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Sample records for frequency noise lfn

  1. Annoyance of low frequency noise (LFN) in the laboratory assessed by LFN-sufferers and non-sufferers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben

    2007-01-01

    , for the first time in one set of covers, over thirty papers on the effects of low frequency noise and vibration on people. The papers are arranged under five headings: • Perception thresholds for low frequency noise • Effect of low frequency noise on people in terms of annoyance and sleep deprivation...

  2. Annoyance of low frequency noise (LFN) in the laboratory assessed by LFN-sufferers and non-sufferers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben

    2007-01-01

    , for the first time in one set of covers, over thirty papers on the effects of low frequency noise and vibration on people. The papers are arranged under five headings: • Perception thresholds for low frequency noise • Effect of low frequency noise on people in terms of annoyance and sleep deprivation...

  3. Annoyance of Low Frequency Noise (LFN) in the laboratory assessed by LFN-sufferers and non-sufferers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben

    2003-01-01

    In a series of listening tests, test subjects listened to eight different environmental low frequency noises to evaluate their loudness and annoyance. The noises were continuous noise with and without tones, intermittent noise, music, traffic noise and low frequency noises with an impulsive...... character. The noises were presented at L-Acq levels of 20, 27.5 and 35 dB. The main group of test subjects (the reference group) comprised eighteen young persons with normal hearing. A special group of four subjects who had reported annoyance due to low frequency noise in their homes was also included....... It was found that the special group generally assessed the annoyance of the noises much higher, especially the annoyance at night....

  4. Chronic exposure to low frequency noise at moderate levels causes impaired balance in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Tamura

    Full Text Available We are routinely exposed to low frequency noise (LFN; below 0.5 kHz at moderate levels of 60-70 dB sound pressure level (SPL generated from various sources in occupational and daily environments. LFN has been reported to affect balance in humans. However, there is limited information about the influence of chronic exposure to LFN at moderate levels for balance. In this study, we investigated whether chronic exposure to LFN at a moderate level of 70 dB SPL affects the vestibule, which is one of the organs responsible for balance in mice. Wild-type ICR mice were exposed for 1 month to LFN (0.1 kHz and high frequency noise (HFN; 16 kHz at 70 dB SPL at a distance of approximately 10-20 cm. Behavior analyses including rotarod, beam-crossing and footprint analyses showed impairments of balance in LFN-exposed mice but not in non-exposed mice or HFN-exposed mice. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a decreased number of vestibular hair cells and increased levels of oxidative stress in LFN-exposed mice compared to those in non-exposed mice. Our results suggest that chronic exposure to LFN at moderate levels causes impaired balance involving morphological impairments of the vestibule with enhanced levels of oxidative stress. Thus, the results of this study indicate the importance of considering the risk of chronic exposure to LFN at a moderate level for imbalance.

  5. Risk Assessment of Neonatal Exposure to Low Frequency Noise Based on Balance in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Nobutaka; Oshino, Reina; Ninomiya, Hiromasa; Li, Xiang; Kato, Masashi; Yajima, Ichiro; Kato, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    General electric devices and ventilation systems are known to generate low frequency noise (LFN) with frequencies of risk to be exposed to LFN in the NICU. However, the risk of neonatal exposure to LFN remains unclear in humans and mice. In this study, male ICR mice were exposed to LFN at 100 Hz for 4 weeks after birth and then subjected to rotarod and beam crossing tests in order to assess LFN-mediated risk of imbalance during the neonatal period. Exposure to LFN at 70 dB, but not exposure to LFN up to 60 dB, during the neonatal period significantly decreased performance scores for rotarod and beam crossing tests compared to the scores of the control group. The number of calbindin-positive hair cells in the saccule and utricle was decreased in mice exposed to LFN at 70 dB for 4 weeks in the neonatal phase. Cessation of exposure for 10 weeks did not result in recovery of the decreased performance in rotarod and beam crossing tests. Thus, our results suggest that 70 dB is a possible threshold for exposure to LFN for 4 weeks during the neonatal period causing unrecoverable imbalance in mice. PMID:28275341

  6. Fractal EEG analysis with Higuchi's algorithm of low-frequency noise exposition on humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panuszka, Ryszard; Damijan, Zbigniew; Kasprzak, Cezary

    2004-05-01

    Authors used methods based on fractal analysis of EEG signal to assess the influence of low-frequency sound field on the human brain electro-potentials. The relations between LFN (low-frequency noise) and change in fractal dimension EEG signal were measured with stimulations tones. Three types of LFN stimuli were presented; each specified dominant frequency and sound-pressure levels (7 Hz at 120 dB, 18 Hz at 120 dB, and 40 Hz at 110 dB). Standard EEG signal was recorded before, during, and after subject's exposure for 35 min. LFN. Applied to the analysis fractal dimension of EEG-signal Higuchis algorithm. Experiments show LFN influence on complexity of EEG-signal with calculated Higuchi's algorithm. Observed increase of mean value of Higuchi's fractal dimension during exposition to LFN.

  7. Evaluation of annoyance from low frequency noise under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Pawlaczyk-Luszczynska

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the annoyance of low frequency noise (LFN at levels normally prevailing at workplaces in control rooms and office-like areas. Two different laboratory experiments were carried out. The first experiment included 55 young volunteers and the second one comprised 70 older volunteers, categorized in terms of sensitivity to noise. The subjects listened to noise samples with different spectra, including LFNs at sound pressure level (SPL of 45-67 dBA, and evaluated annoyance using a 100-score graphical rating scale. The subjective ratings of annoyance were compared to different noise metrics. In both the experiments, there were no differences in annoyance assessments between females and males. A significant influence of individual sensitivity to noise on annoyance rating was observed for some LFNs. Annoyance of LFN was not rated higher than annoyance from broadband noises without or with less prominent low frequencies at similar A-weighted SPLs. In both the experiments, median annoyance rating of LFN highly correlated with A-weighted SPL (L Aeq,T , low frequency A-weighted SPL (L LFAeq,T and C-weighted SPL (L Ceq,T . However, it is only the two latter noise metrics (i.e. L LFAeq,T and L Ceq,T which seem to be reliable predictors of annoyance exclusively from LFN. The young and older participants assessed similar annoyance from LFN at similar L LFAeq,T or L Ceq,T levels. Generally, over half of the subjects were predicted to be highly annoyed by LFN at the low frequency A-weighted SPL or C-weighted SPL above 62 and 83 dB, respectively.

  8. Health-based audible noise guidelines account for infrasound and low-frequency noise produced by wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Robert G; Ashtiani, Payam; Ollson, Christopher A; Whitfield Aslund, Melissa; McCallum, Lindsay C; Leventhall, Geoff; Knopper, Loren D

    2015-01-01

    Setbacks for wind turbines have been established in many jurisdictions to address potential health concerns associated with audible noise. However, in recent years, it has been suggested that infrasound (IS) and low-frequency noise (LFN) could be responsible for the onset of adverse health effects self-reported by some individuals living in proximity to wind turbines, even when audible noise limits are met. The purpose of this paper was to investigate whether current audible noise-based guidelines for wind turbines account for the protection of human health, given the levels of IS and LFN typically produced by wind turbines. New field measurements of indoor IS and outdoor LFN at locations between 400 and 900 m from the nearest turbine, which were previously underrepresented in the scientific literature, are reported and put into context with existing published works. Our analysis showed that indoor IS levels were below auditory threshold levels while LFN levels at distances >500 m were similar to background LFN levels. A clear contribution to LFN due to wind turbine operation (i.e., measured with turbines on in comparison to with turbines off) was noted at a distance of 480 m. However, this corresponded to an increase in overall audible sound measures as reported in dB(A), supporting the hypothesis that controlling audible sound produced by normally operating wind turbines will also control for LFN. Overall, the available data from this and other studies suggest that health-based audible noise wind turbine siting guidelines provide an effective means to evaluate, monitor, and protect potential receptors from audible noise as well as IS and LFN.

  9. Health-based Audible Noise Guidelines Account for Infrasound and Low Frequency Noise Produced by Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G Berger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Setbacks for wind turbines have been established in many jurisdictions to address potential health concerns associated with audible noise. However, in recent years it has been suggested that infrasound (IS and low frequency noise (LFN could be responsible for the onset of adverse health effects self-reported by some individuals living in proximity to wind turbines, even when audible noise limits are met. The purpose of this paper was to investigate whether current audible noise-based guidelines for wind turbines account for the protection of human health, given the levels of IS and LFN typically produced by wind turbines. New field measurements of indoor IS and outdoor LFN at locations between 400 m and 900 m from the nearest turbine, which were previously underrepresented in the scientific literature, are reported and put into context with existing published works. Our analysis showed that indoor IS levels were below auditory threshold levels while LFN levels at distances >500 m were similar to background LFN levels. A clear contribution to LFN due to wind turbine operation (i.e., measured with turbines on in comparison to with turbines off was noted at a distance of 480 m. However, this corresponded to an increase in overall audible sound measures as reported in dB(A, supporting the hypothesis that controlling audible sound produced by normally operating wind turbines will also control for LFN. Overall, the available data from this and other studies suggest that health-based audible noise wind turbine siting guidelines provide an effective means to evaluate, monitor, and protect potential receptors from audible noise as well as IS and LFN.

  10. Potential health effects of standing waves generated by low frequency noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaran, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    The main aim is to present the available updated knowledge regarding the potential health effects of standing waves generated by low frequency noise (LFN) from an open window in a moving car where the negative effects of LFN induced by heating components and/or heating, ventilation and air-conditioning are assessed. Furthermore, the assessment of noise in chosen enclosed spaces, such as rooms, offices, and classrooms, or other LFN sources and their effect on the human being were investigated. These types of noise are responsible for disturbance during relaxation, sleep, mental work, education, and concentration, which may reflect negatively on the comfort and health of the population and on the mental state of people such as scientific staff and students. The assessment points out the most exposed areas, and analyzes the conditions of standing wave generation in these rooms caused by outdoor and/or indoor sources. Measurements were made for three different enclosed spaces (office, flat, and passenger car) and sources (traffic specific noise at intersections, noise induced by pipe vibration, and aerodynamic noise) and their operating conditions. For the detection of LFN, the A-weighted sound pressure level and vibration were measured and a fast Fourier transform analysis was used. The LFN sources are specified and the direct effects on the human are reported. Finally, this paper suggests the possibilities for the assessment of LFN and some possible measures that can be taken to prevent or reduce them.

  11. The effects of low frequency noise on mental performance and annoyance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohammadi, Iraj; Sandrock, Stephan; Gohari, Mahmoud Reza

    2013-08-01

    Low frequency noise (LFN) as background noise in urban and work environments is emitted from many artificial sources such as road vehicles, aircraft, and air movement machinery including wind turbines, compressors, and ventilation or air conditioning units. In addition to objective effects, LFN could also cause noise annoyance and influence mental performance; however, there are no homogenous findings regarding this issue. The purpose of this research was to study the effects of LFN on mental performance and annoyance, as well as to consider the role of extraversion and neuroticism on the issue. This study was conducted on 90 students of Iran University of Medical Sciences (54 males and 36 females). The mean age of the students was 23.46 years (SD = 1.97). Personality traits and noise annoyance were measured by using Eysenck Personality Inventory and a 12-scale self-reported questionnaire, respectively. Stroop and Cognitrone computerized tests measured mental performance of participants each exposed to 50 and 70 dBA of LFN and silence. LFNs were produced by Cool Edit Pro 2.1 software. There was no significant difference between mental performance parameters under 50 and 70 dBA of LFN, whereas there were significant differences between most mental performance parameters in quiet and under LFN (50 and 70 dBA). This research showed that LFN, compared to silence, increased the accuracy and the test performance speed (p  0.01). Introverts conducted the tests faster than extraverts (p < 0.05). This research showed that neuroticism does not influence mental performance. It seems that LFN has increased arousal level of participants, and extraversion has a considerable impact on mental performance.

  12. Generation Mechanism and Prediction Model for Low Frequency Noise Induced by Energy Dissipating Submerged Jets during Flood Discharge from a High Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijian Lian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As flood water is discharged from a high dam, low frequency (i.e., lower than 10 Hz noise (LFN associated with air pulsation is generated and propagated in the surrounding areas, causing environmental problems such as vibrations of windows and doors and discomfort of residents and construction workers. To study the generation mechanisms and key influencing factors of LFN induced by energy dissipation through submerged jets at a high dam, detailed prototype observations and analyses of LFN are conducted. The discharge flow field is simulated using a gas-liquid turbulent flow model, and the vorticity fluctuation characteristics are then analyzed. The mathematical model for the LFN intensity is developed based on vortex sound theory and a turbulent flow model, verified by prototype observations. The model results reveal that the vorticity fluctuation in strong shear layers around the high-velocity submerged jets is highly correlated with the on-site LFN, and the strong shear layers are the main regions of acoustic source for the LFN. In addition, the predicted and observed magnitudes of LFN intensity agree quite well. This is the first time that the LFN intensity has been shown to be able to be predicted quantitatively.

  13. Low-frequency noise in bare SOI wafers: Experiments and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirro, L.; Ionica, I.; Cristoloveanu, S.; Ghibaudo, G.

    2016-11-01

    Low-frequency noise (LFN) measurements are largely used for interface quality characterization in MOSFETs. In this work, a detailed investigation of LFN technique applied to pseudo-MOSFETs in bare silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates is provided. A physical model capable to describe the experimental results is proposed and validated using different die areas and inter-probe distances. The effective silicon area contributing to the noise signal, the impact of defects induced by probes and the possibility to extract interface trap density are addressed.

  14. Low-frequency noise in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors with an inverse staggered structure and an SiO2 gate insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Chul; Lee, Ho-Nyeon

    2014-05-01

    We report the low-frequency noise (LFN) behavior of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors with an inverse staggered structure and an SiO2 gate insulator. The normalized noise power spectral density depended on channel length, L, with the form 1/L2, and on the gate bias voltage, VG, and threshold voltage, VTH, with the form 1/(VG - VTH)β where 1.5 < β < 2.1. In addition, the scattering constant α was less than 105 Ω. These results suggest that the contact resistance has a significant role in the LFN behavior and the charge-carrier density fluctuation is the dominant origin of LFN.

  15. Summary of low frequency noise research and policy development conducted by the Energy and Utilities Board

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGagne, D.C. [Alberta Energy and Utilities Board, Calgary, AB (Canada); Lapka, S.D. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) regulates environmental noise from energy facilities in Alberta. The Noise Control Directive contains precise environmental standards to which the facilities must adhere regarding industrial noise. It was designed to ensure minimal annoyance within communities and the environment. In the early 1990s, the EUB became aware of Low Frequency Noise (LFN) as a potential problem. At that time there seemed to be a growing disconnect between the level of annoyance being expressed by some residents, and the measured night-time sound levels taken at residences in A-weighted energy equivalent sound levels (LAeq). The fifth edition of the Noise Control Directive is comprised of a comprehensive policy and guide that has adopted LAeq to measure sound levels from an energy facility. The sound level readings are compared to the Permissible Sound Level (PSL) established for a residence and can determine if the facility noise level is in compliance with the EUB guidelines. A major part of the Noise Control Directive's success is the use of a Noise Impact Assessment (NIA) at the design stage of an application. Industry must complete an NIA prior to application submission for any new permanent facilities having a continuous noise source or for modifications to existing permanent facilities. Facilities are urged to design 5 dB LAeq below the PSL to account for worst-case situations, possible low frequency noise and inability of noise mitigation measures to meet performance levels. Although A-weighting best approximates human hearing, it tends to discount the presence of LFN, typically below the 250 Hz range, especially when an industrial source is a significant distance from nearby residents. In some cases, the A-weighted sound pressure level from industrial facilities measured at a residence did not correlate with expected annoyance levels. This paper examines the work undertaken by the EUB to understand the issue of LFN and the various

  16. Correlation of Low-Frequency Noise to the Dynamic Properties of the Sensing Surface in Electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Da; Solomon, Paul; Zhang, Shi-Li; Zhang, Zhen

    2017-08-25

    Low-frequency noise (LFN) is of significant implications in ion sensing. As a primary component of LFN for ion sensing in electrolytes, the solid/liquid interfacial noise remains poorly explored especially regarding its relation to the surface binding/debinding dynamic properties. Here, we employ impedance spectroscopy to systematically characterize this specific noise component for its correlation to the dynamic properties of surface protonation (i.e., hydrogen binding) and deprotonation (i.e., hydrogen debinding) processes. This correlation is facilitated by applying our recently developed interfacial impedance model to ultrathin TiO2 layers grown by means of atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a TiN metallic electrode. With an excellent fitting of the measured noise power density spectra by the model for the studied TiO2 layers, we are able to extract several characteristic dynamic parameters for the TiO2 sensing surface. The observed increase of noise with TiO2 ALD cycles can be well accounted for with an increased average binding site density. This study provides insights into how detailed surface properties may affect the noise performance of an ion sensor operating in electrolytes.

  17. Low-frequency noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    In Denmark and in other industrialized countries there are cases where people complain about annoying low-frequency or infrasonic noise in their homes. Besides noise annoyance people often report other adverse effects such as insomnia, headache, lack of concentration etc. In many cases the noise...

  18. Noise rich in low frequency components, a new comorbidity for periodontal disease? An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Joao Baltazar Mendes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Exposure to noise rich in low frequency components induces abnormal proliferation of extracellular matrix and collagens. The previous studies have shown alterations in the periodontium of both humans and animals. Our objective was the evaluation of collagens I, IV and V of the periodontium of Wistar rats exposed to noise rich in low frequency components. Materials and Methods: 5 groups (each with 10 animals were exposed to continuous low frequency noise (LFN. The LFN, from previously recorded white noise, frequency filtered and amplified, was applied in growing periods of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 13 weeks, in order to characterize the alterations with exposure time. A control group of ten animals was kept in silence. These animals were used in groups of 2 as aged-matched controls. After exposure, sections were obtained including teeth, alveolar bone and periodontium and observed after immunollabeling for collagens I, IV and V. Results: A significant increase in collagen I was observed in exposed groups (P < 0.001 (Kruskal-Wallis test. Post-hoc comparisons (Mann-Whitney test with Bonferroni correction showed an increase in collagen I in animals exposed for 3 weeks or more (P < 0.001. The same test was applied to collagen V where significant differences were found when comparing control and exposed groups (P ≤ 0.004. The t-test for independent samples was applied to collagen type IV where no significant differences were found (P = 0.410, when comparing to the control group. Discussion: As in other organs, we can observe fibrosis and the newly formed collagen is likely to be "nonfunctional," which could have clinical impact. Conclusion: Noise may constitute a new comorbidity for periodontal disease.

  19. Frequency noise in frequency swept fiber laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    This Letter presents a measurement of the spectral content of frequency shifted pulses generated by a lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper. We found that each pulse is shifted in frequency with very high accuracy. We also discovered that noise originating from light leaking through the acousto...

  20. Frequency noise in frequency swept fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    This Letter presents a measurement of the spectral content of frequency shifted pulses generated by a lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper. We found that each pulse is shifted in frequency with very high accuracy. We also discovered that noise originating from light leaking through the acousto- optical modulators and forward propagating Brillouin scattering appear in the spectrum.

  1. Study on interface characteristics in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors by using low-frequency noise and temperature dependent mobility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chenfei; Huang, Xiaoming; Lu, Hai; Yu, Guang; Ren, Fangfang; Chen, Dunjun; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2015-07-01

    In this work, the interface properties of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin film transistors annealed at different temperatures ranging from 150 to 250 °C are studied by temperature dependent mobility and low-frequency noise (LFN) characterizations. The dominant scattering mechanism for carrier transport is found to be Coulomb scattering based on gate bias and temperature dependent mobility measurement. Meanwhile, as the annealing temperature increases, the dominant mechanism of LFN within the device channel varies from carrier number fluctuation to carrier mobility fluctuation. The border trap density as well as the distribution properties of charged border traps is deduced. The present results suggest that annealing at higher temperature has a more remarkable effect on removing deeper border traps than traps closer to the channel/dielectric interface.

  2. Low Frequency Noise: A Major Risk Factor in Military Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-02-01

    X-rays are a perfect analogy: merely at a different frequency of electromagnetic radiation (or light), x-rays are not seen or perceived by the...associated with cognitive deterioration. Brainmapping showed wave displacement that changed the potentials topography into frontal, often asymmetric, with...pericardium from a 51-year-old male (Orig. year-old VAD patient (Orig. mag. Xl100). mag. xl0. 1 (SYA) INV3-6 The genotoxic component of LFN has already

  3. LFN, QPO and fractal dimension of X-ray light curves from black hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosvetov, Art; Grebenev, Sergey

    The origin of the low frequency noise (LFN) and quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) observed in X-ray flux of Galactic black hole binaries is still not recognized in spite of multiple studies and attempts to model this phenomenon. There are known correlations between the QPO frequency, X-ray power density, X-ray flux and spectral state of the system, but there is no model that can do these dependences understandable. For the low frequency (~1 Hz) QPO we still have no even an idea capable to explain their production and don't know even what part of an accretion disc is responsible for them. Here we attempted to measure the fractal dimension of X-ray light curves of several black hole X-ray binaries and to study its correlation with the frequency of quasi periodic oscillations observed in their X-ray light-curves. The fractal dimension is a measure of the space-filling capacity of the light curves' profile. To measure the fractal dimension we used R/S method, which is fast enough and has good reputation in financial analytic and materials sciences. We found that if no QPO were observed in X-ray flux from the particular source, the fractal dimension is equal to the unique value which is independent on the source, its luminosity or its spectral state. On the other hand if QPO were detected in the flux, the fractal dimension deviated from its usual value. Also, we found a clear correlation between the QPO frequency and the fractal dimension of the emission. The relationship between these two parameters is solid but nonlinear. We believe that the analysis of X-ray light curves of black hole binaries using the fractal dimension has a good scientific potential and may provide an addition information on the geometry of accretion flow and fundamental physical parameters of the system.

  4. Low-frequency-noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    From 203 cases of low-frequency complaints a random selection of twenty-one cases were investigated. The main aim of the investigation was to answer the question whether the annoyance is caused by an external physical sound or by a physically non-existing sound, i.e. low-frequency tinnitus. Noise...... of the complainants are annoyed by a physical sound (20-180 Hz), while others suffer from low-frequency tinnitus (perceived frequency 40-100 Hz). Physical sound at frequencies below 20 Hz (infrasound) is not responsible for the annoyance - or at all audible - in any of the investigated cases, and none...... of the complainants has extraordinary hearing sensitivity at low frequencies. For comparable cases of low-frequency noise complaints in general, it is anticipated that physical sound is responsible in a substantial part of the cases, while low-frequency tinnitus is responsible in another substantial part of the cases....

  5. Calibration of an audio frequency noise generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, Joseph M.

    1966-01-01

    A noise generator of known output is very convenient in noise measurement. At low audio frequencies, however, all devices, including noise sources, may be affected by excess noise (1/f noise). It is therefore very desirable to be able to check the spectral density of a noise source before it is u...

  6. Annoyance of low frequency noise and traffic noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, F.R.; Poulsen, Torben

    2001-01-01

    The annoyance of different low frequency noise sources was determined and compared to the annoyance from traffic noise. Twenty-two subjects participated in laboratory listening tests. The sounds were presented by loudspeakers in a listening room and the spectra of the low frequency noises were...

  7. Study on Test Method for Low Frequency Noise of Optoelectronic Coupled Device in DC/DC Converter%DC/DC电源用光电耦合器低频噪声测试方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包军林; 孙明; 庄奕琪; 于鹏; 任泽亮

    2012-01-01

    Optoelectronic coupled device (OCD) is a key element of DC/DC converter. The random increase of low frequency noise (LFN) is one of the main failure modes of DC/DC converter. Effective test method and standard for LFN of photoelectric coupler are absent in China. In this paper, characteristics of low frequency noise in OCD and its generation mechanism were investigated in detail. Bias circuit, equipment and method for LFN measurement were proposed. Experimental results from OCD 4N47 in DC/DC converter demonstrated that the proposed method could be used for accurate measurement of low frequency noise of OCDs, providing an effective approach to evaluating typical faults and system suitability of optoelectronic coupler for DC/DC converter.%光电耦合器是DC/DC电源的关键器件,光电耦合器低频噪声的随机增大是该类电源主要失效模式之一.目前,国内尚未形成光电耦合器低频噪声的有效测试方法,更未建立相关标准.文章详细分析了光电耦合器低频噪声特性及产生机理,提出了其低频噪声测试的偏置电路、测试设备和测试方法.针对用于DC/DC电源的典型光电耦合器(4N47)的实测结果表明,该方法能够准确测试光电耦合器的低频噪声,为DC/DC电源用光电耦合器的系统适用性和典型故障提供了一种有效的评估方法.

  8. Phase noise and frequency stability in oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Rubiola, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Presenting a comprehensive account of oscillator phase noise and frequency stability, this practical text is both mathematically rigorous and accessible. An in-depth treatment of the noise mechanism is given, describing the oscillator as a physical system, and showing that simple general laws govern the stability of a large variety of oscillators differing in technology and frequency range. Inevitably, special attention is given to amplifiers, resonators, delay lines, feedback, and flicker (1/f) noise. The reverse engineering of oscillators based on phase-noise spectra is also covered, and end-of-chapter exercises are given. Uniquely, numerous practical examples are presented, including case studies taken from laboratory prototypes and commercial oscillators, which allow the oscillator internal design to be understood by analyzing its phase-noise spectrum. Based on tutorials given by the author at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, international IEEE meetings, and in industry, this is a useful reference for acade...

  9. Low-frequency noise in AlTiO/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor heterojunction field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Son Phuong; Ui, Toshimasa; Nguyen, Tuan Quy; Shih, Hong-An; Suzuki, Toshi-kazu

    2016-05-01

    Using aluminum titanium oxide (AlTiO, an alloy of Al2O3 and TiO2) as a high-k gate insulator, we fabricated and investigated AlTiO/AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor heterojunction field-effect transistors. From current low-frequency noise (LFN) characterization, we find Lorentzian spectra near the threshold voltage, in addition to 1/f spectra for the well-above-threshold regime. The Lorentzian spectra are attributed to electron trapping/detrapping with two specific time constants, ˜25 ms and ˜3 ms, which are independent of the gate length and the gate voltage, corresponding to two trap level depths of 0.5-0.7 eV with a 0.06 eV difference in the AlTiO insulator. In addition, gate leakage currents are analyzed and attributed to the Poole-Frenkel mechanism due to traps in the AlTiO insulator, where the extracted trap level depth is consistent with the Lorentzian LFN.

  10. Noise Suppression of a single Frequency Fiber Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Kui; CUI Shu-Zhen; ZHANG Hai-Long; ZHANG Jun-Xiang; GAO Jiang-Rui

    2011-01-01

    We present an experimental demonstration of fiber laser noise suppression by the mode cleaner.The intensity noise of a single frequency fiber laser is suppressed near the shot noise limit after a sideband frequency of 3 MHz.Two series mode cleaners are used to improve the noise suppression.The noise reduction is over 27 dB at 3 MHz.

  11. Noise in Advanced Electronic Devices and Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, M. Jamal; Marinov, O.

    2005-08-01

    State-of-the-art low-frequency and high-frequency noise performance and modeling in modern semiconductor devices and circuits are discussed. The increase of noise-to-DC current ratio may compromise the circuit applications in near future. The low-frequency noise (LFN) tends to a log-normal distribution. Since the random-telegraph-signal (RTS) noise is pronounced in submicron devices, then new techniques being used to characterize of multilevel RTS are discussed. High-frequency noise modeling and sample experimental results are presented, including the important effect of gate-tunneling current for future devices. For the RF circuits, we discuss the phase noise in voltage-controlled oscillators (VCO) based on ring oscillators and LC-tank VCOs with and without automatic amplitude control. Finally, the effects of hot-carrier stress on the performance of a VCO is presented and discussed.

  12. Measuring low-frequency noise indoors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    that is exceeded in 10% of the volume of a room (L10) is proposed as a rational and objective target for a measurement method. In Sweden and Denmark rules exist for measuring low-frequency noise indoors. The performance of these procedures was investigated in three rooms. The results from the Swedish method were...... close to the L10 target, but, due to a doubtful use of C-weighting in the scanning, it may give too low results in case of complex sounds. The Danish method was found to have a high risk of giving results substantially below the target, unless complainants can precisely appoint measurement positions...

  13. The influences of low frequency noise on mental performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hatami

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Purpose: Although the evolution of industrial systems toward digital technologies decreased the exposure to high levels of noise, it has created some problems encountered with low level and provoking noise (low frequency noise. In the present work, the mental performance of students exposed to low frequency and reference noises at low and high levels (45 & 65 dB were studied. Additionally, other factors such as annoyance, sensitivity to low frequency noise and hearing status of participants were considered.Materials and Methods: After generating low frequency and reference noises required for the study, a pilot study was conducted. Then, 54 students participated in the main study after preliminary tests. Their mental performances were evaluated with standard psychological tests while they were exposed to low frequency and reference noises at 45 and 65 dBA.Results: The results showed that noise annoyance and low frequency noise sensitivity do not have a significant correlation with age and sex. The results also revealed that, low frequency noise at 65 dB can decrease concentration (P=0.003 and increase response time (P=0.039 of performance in comparison with low frequency noise at 45 dB. On the other hand, reference noise at 65 dB can increase speed (P<0.001 of performance in comparison with reference noise at 45 dB.Conclusion: Low frequency noise can reduce the mental performance and increase its response time.Key words: Low Frequency Noise, Reference Noise, Noise Annoyance, Mental PerformanceJ Mazand Univ Med Sci 2008; 18(63: 55-65(Persian

  14. Low-frequency noise in planar Hall effect bridge sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Anders; Bejhedb, R.S.; Bejhed, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    The low-frequency characteristics of planar Hall effect bridge sensors are investigated as function of the sensor bias current and the applied magnetic field. The noise spectra reveal a Johnson-like spectrum at high frequencies, and a 1/f-like excess noise spectrum at lower frequencies, with a knee...

  15. Challenges and limitations in retrofitting facilities for low frequency noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wierzba, P. [ATCO Noise Management, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    The trend to revise and increase environmental regulations regarding low frequency noise emissions from oil and gas facilities was discussed. Noise related complaints can often be traced to low frequency noise, which is the unwanted sound with a frequency range falling within 31.5-Hz, 63-Hz, and 125-Hz octave bands. This paper also discussed the challenges and limitations of field retrofits of the facilities aimed at reducing low frequency noise. The main sources of low frequency noise associated with a compression facility are the radiator cooler, engine exhaust and the building envelope. Regulators are paying close attention not only to the overall noise exposure as measured by the A-weighted levels, but also to the quality of noise emitted by the particular frequency spectrum. The Alberta Energy and Utilities Board recently issued Noise Control Directive 38 and made it a requirement to perform low frequency noise impact assessment for permitting of all new energy facilities. Under Directive 38, the low frequency noise assessment is to be performed using the C-weighted scale as a measure in addition to the previously used A-weighted scale. Directive 38 recommends that in order to avoid low frequency noise problems the difference between the C-weighted and A-weighted levels at the residential locations should be lower than 20 dB. This implies that noise should be limited to 60 dBC for Category 1 residences of low dwelling density. Small upgrades and changes can be made to lower low frequency noise emissions. These may include upgrading building wall insulation, providing wall-to-skid isolation system, upgrading the fan blades, or reducing the rpm of the fans. It was concluded that these upgrades should be considered for facilities in close proximity to residential areas. 3 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  16. Twenty-two cases of low-frequency noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    In Denmark and in other industrialized countries there are cases where people complain about annoying low-frequency or infrasonic noise in their homes. Besides noise annoyance people often report other adverse effects such as insomnia, headache, lack of concentration etc. In many cases the noise...

  17. Noise performance of frequency modulation Kelvin force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesinger, Heinrich; Deresmes, Dominique; Mélin, Thierry

    2014-01-02

    Noise performance of a phase-locked loop (PLL) based frequency modulation Kelvin force microscope (FM-KFM) is assessed. Noise propagation is modeled step by step throughout the setup using both exact closed loop noise gains and an approximation known as "noise gain" from operational amplifier (OpAmp) design that offers the advantage of decoupling the noise performance study from considerations of stability and ideal loop response. The bandwidth can be chosen depending on how much noise is acceptable and it is shown that stability is not an issue up to a limit that will be discussed. With thermal and detector noise as the only sources, both approaches yield PLL frequency noise expressions equal to the theoretical value for self-oscillating circuits and in agreement with measurement, demonstrating that the PLL components neither modify nor contribute noise. Kelvin output noise is then investigated by modeling the surrounding bias feedback loop. A design rule is proposed that allows choosing the AC modulation frequency for optimized sharing of the PLL bandwidth between Kelvin and topography loops. A crossover criterion determines as a function of bandwidth, temperature and probe parameters whether thermal or detector noise is the dominating noise source. Probe merit factors for both cases are then established, suggesting how to tackle noise performance by probe design. Typical merit factors of common probe types are compared. This comprehensive study is an encouraging step toward a more integral performance assessment and a remedy against focusing on single aspects and optimizing around randomly chosen key values.

  18. Frequency domain analysis of noise in autoregulated gene circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Michael L.; Cox, Chris D.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a frequency domain technique for the analysis of intrinsic noise within negatively autoregulated gene circuits. This approach is based on the transfer function around the feedback loop (loop transmission) and the equivalent noise bandwidth of the system. The loop transmission, T, is shown to be a determining factor of the dynamics and the noise behavior of autoregulated gene circuits, and this T-based technique provides a simple and flexible method for the analysis of noise arisin...

  19. Low-frequency noise in single electron tunneling transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavkhelidze, A.N.; Mygind, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    The noise in current biased aluminium single electron tunneling (SET) transistors has been investigated in the frequency range of 5 mHz electromagnetic radiation and especially high energy...... of order seconds. In some cases, the positive and negative slopes of the V(Vg) curve have different overlaid noise patterns. For fixed bias on both slopes, we measure the same noise spectrum, and believe that the asymmetric noise is due to dynamic charge trapping near or inside one of the junctions induced...

  20. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stiffness variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by a plurality of force transmitting mechanisms which contact the noise radiating element. Each one of the force transmitting mechanisms includes an expandable element and a spring in contact with the noise radiating element so that excitation of the element varies the spring force applied to the noise radiating element. The elements are actuated by a controller which receives input of a signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the elements and causes the spring force applied to the noise radiating element to be varied. The force transmitting mechanisms can be arranged to either produce bending or linear stiffness variations in the noise radiating element.

  1. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through stress variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of a noise radiating element is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating element is tuned by an expandable ring embedded in the noise radiating element. Excitation of the ring causes expansion or contraction of the ring, thereby varying the stress in the noise radiating element. The ring is actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the ring, causing the ring to expand or contract. Instead of a single ring embedded in the noise radiating panel, a first expandable ring can be bonded to one side of the noise radiating element, and a second expandable ring can be bonded to the other side.

  2. Towards noise engineering: Recent insights in low-frequency excess flux noise of superconducting quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Sebastian; Ferring, Anna; Enss, Christian

    2016-10-01

    The comprehensive analysis of low-frequency excess flux noise both in terms of magnetic flux noise S Φ , 1 / f and energy sensitivity ɛ1/f of 84 superconducting quantum devices studied at temperatures below 1 K reveals a universal behavior. When analyzing data in terms of ɛ1/f, we find that noise spectra of independent devices cross each other all at certain crossing frequencies fc. Besides this main result of our paper, we further show that superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) arrays systematically feature higher noise exponents than single SQUIDs and give evidence for a material and device type dependence of low-frequency excess flux noise. The latter results facilitate to engineer the shape of magnetic flux noise spectra and thus to experimentally modify key properties such as coherence or measurement times of superconducting quantum devices.

  3. Noise performance of frequency modulation Kelvin force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Diesinger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise performance of a phase-locked loop (PLL based frequency modulation Kelvin force microscope (FM-KFM is assessed. Noise propagation is modeled step by step throughout the setup using both exact closed loop noise gains and an approximation known as “noise gain” from operational amplifier (OpAmp design that offers the advantage of decoupling the noise performance study from considerations of stability and ideal loop response. The bandwidth can be chosen depending on how much noise is acceptable and it is shown that stability is not an issue up to a limit that will be discussed. With thermal and detector noise as the only sources, both approaches yield PLL frequency noise expressions equal to the theoretical value for self-oscillating circuits and in agreement with measurement, demonstrating that the PLL components neither modify nor contribute noise. Kelvin output noise is then investigated by modeling the surrounding bias feedback loop. A design rule is proposed that allows choosing the AC modulation frequency for optimized sharing of the PLL bandwidth between Kelvin and topography loops. A crossover criterion determines as a function of bandwidth, temperature and probe parameters whether thermal or detector noise is the dominating noise source. Probe merit factors for both cases are then established, suggesting how to tackle noise performance by probe design. Typical merit factors of common probe types are compared. This comprehensive study is an encouraging step toward a more integral performance assessment and a remedy against focusing on single aspects and optimizing around randomly chosen key values.

  4. Low-frequency 1/f noise in graphene devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandin, Alexander A.

    2013-08-01

    Low-frequency noise with a spectral density that depends inversely on frequency has been observed in a wide variety of systems including current fluctuations in resistors, intensity fluctuations in music and signals in human cognition. In electronics, the phenomenon, which is known as 1/f noise, flicker noise or excess noise, hampers the operation of numerous devices and circuits, and can be a significant impediment to the development of practical applications from new materials. Graphene offers unique opportunities for studying 1/f noise because of its two-dimensional structure and widely tunable two-dimensional carrier concentration. The creation of practical graphene-based devices will also depend on our ability to understand and control the low-frequency noise in this material system. Here, the characteristic features of 1/f noise in graphene and few-layer graphene are reviewed, and the implications of such noise for the development of graphene-based electronics including high-frequency devices and sensors are examined.

  5. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through variable ring loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of noise radiating structure is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating structure is tuned by a plurality of drivers arranged to contact the noise radiating structure. Excitation of the drivers causes expansion or contraction of the drivers, thereby varying the edge loading applied to the noise radiating structure. The drivers are actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the drivers, causing them to expand or contract. The noise radiating structure may be either the outer shroud of the engine or a ring mounted flush with an inner wall of the shroud or disposed in the interior of the shroud.

  6. Low-frequency noise from large wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Henrik; Pedersen, Christian Sejer

    2011-06-01

    As wind turbines get larger, worries have emerged that the turbine noise would move down in frequency and that the low-frequency noise would cause annoyance for the neighbors. The noise emission from 48 wind turbines with nominal electric power up to 3.6 MW is analyzed and discussed. The relative amount of low-frequency noise is higher for large turbines (2.3-3.6 MW) than for small turbines (≤ 2 MW), and the difference is statistically significant. The difference can also be expressed as a downward shift of the spectrum of approximately one-third of an octave. A further shift of similar size is suggested for future turbines in the 10-MW range. Due to the air absorption, the higher low-frequency content becomes even more pronounced, when sound pressure levels in relevant neighbor distances are considered. Even when A-weighted levels are considered, a substantial part of the noise is at low frequencies, and for several of the investigated large turbines, the one-third-octave band with the highest level is at or below 250 Hz. It is thus beyond any doubt that the low-frequency part of the spectrum plays an important role in the noise at the neighbors.

  7. Noise and frequency response of silicon photodiode operational amplifier combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamstra, R H; Wendland, P

    1972-07-01

    The noise in dark and illuminated Schottky barrier and diffused PIN non-guard-ring photodiodes has been measured between 0.1 Hz and 10 kHz and compared to theory with an excellent fit. It is shown that diodes used photovoltaically are free of 1/f noise in the dark. It is also demonstrated that there is an optimum bias (ca. 100 mV) for minimum noise equivalent power. When only a resistive load is used with a detector, it often determines the frequency response and noise of the detector circuit. We develop and demonstrate equations for the major improvements in both noise and frequency response that can be obtained using a current mode (inverting) operational amplifier.

  8. Nature of low-frequency noise in homogeneous semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palenskis, Vilius; Maknys, Kęstutis

    2015-12-01

    This report deals with a 1/f noise in homogeneous classical semiconductor samples on the base of silicon. We perform detail calculations of resistance fluctuations of the silicon sample due to both a) the charge carrier number changes due to their capture-emission processes, and b) due to screening effect of those negative charged centers, and show that proportionality of noise level to square mobility appears as a presentation parameter, but not due to mobility fluctuations. The obtained calculation results explain well the observed experimental results of 1/f noise in Si, Ge, GaAs and exclude the mobility fluctuations as the nature of 1/f noise in these materials and their devices. It is also shown how from the experimental 1/f noise results to find the effective number of defects responsible for this noise in the measured frequency range.

  9. Low-frequency noise reduction of lightweight airframe structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getline, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to determine the noise attenuation characteristics of aircraft type fuselage structural panels were presented. Of particular interest was noise attenuation at low frequencies, below the fundamental resonances of the panels. All panels were flightweight structures for transport type aircraft in the 34,050 to 45,400 kg (75,000 to 100,000 pounds) gross weight range. Test data include the results of vibration and acoustic transmission loss tests on seven types of isotropic and orthotropically stiffened, flat and curved panels. The results show that stiffness controlled acoustically integrated structures can provide very high noise reductions at low frequencies without significantly affecting their high frequency noise reduction capabilities.

  10. Quantum noise frequency correlations of multiply scattered light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Frequency correlations in multiply scattered light that are present in quantum fluctuations are investigated. The speckle correlations for quantum and classical noise are compared and are found to depend markedly differently on optical frequency, which was confirmed in a recent experiment....... Furthermore, novel mesoscopic correlations are predicted that depend on the photon statistics of the incoming light....

  11. An analysis of low frequency noise from large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    between 75 kW and 3.6 MW was analyzed. The apparent sound power, LWA, increases with electric power at a rate close to 3 dB per doubling of electric power. The low-frequency proportion (10-160 Hz) increases more rapidly, and the difference in slope is statistically significant. A comparison of one-third-octave......As wind turbines get larger, worries have emerged, that the noise emitted by the turbines would move down in frequency, and that the contents of low-frequency noise would be enough to cause significant annoyance for the neighbors. The sound emission from 48 wind turbines with nominal electric power...

  12. Low-frequency Flux Noise in SQUIDs and Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendelbach, Steven; Hover, David; Kittel, Achim; Mueck, Michael; McDermott, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Superconducting qubits are a leading candidate for scalable quantum information processing. In order to realize the full potential of these qubits, it is necessary to develop a more complete understanding of the microscopic physics that governs dissipation and dephasing of the quantum state. In the case of the Josephson phase and flux qubits, the dominant dephasing mechanism is an apparent low-frequency magnetic flux noise with a 1/f spectrum. The origin of this excess noise is not understood. We report the results of SQUID measurements that explore the dependence of the excess low-frequency flux noise on SQUID inductance, geometry, materials, and temperature. We discuss contributions to the measured noise from temperature fluctuations, trapped vortices in the superconducting films, and surface magnetic states in the native oxides of the superconductors. We discuss implications of our measurements for qubit dephasing.

  13. Effects of low-frequency noise in driven coherent nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falci, G.; Berritta, M.; Russo, A.; D'Arrigo, A.; Paladino, E.

    2012-11-01

    We study the effect of low-frequency noise in ac-driven two- or many-level coherent nanodevices. Fluctuations in the properties of the device are translated into equivalent fluctuations of the driving fields. The impact on Rabi oscillations can be modulated with the detuning and minimized at resonance. In three-level atoms slow noise produces qualitative changes for protocols as coherent population transfer. We propose a strategy allowing us to operate at parity symmetry points, where the device is well protected against noise, despite selection rules preventing direct couplings to external fields of involved transitions.

  14. A frequency-domain derivation of shot-noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Frank

    2016-01-01

    A formula for shot-noise is derived in the frequency-domain. The derivation is complete and reasonably rigorous while being appropriate for undergraduate students; it models a sequence of random pulses using Fourier sine and cosine series, and requires some basic statistical concepts. The text here may serve as a pedagogic introduction to the spectral analysis of random processes and may prove useful to introduce students to the logic behind stochastic problems. The concepts of noise power spectral density and equivalent noise bandwidth are introduced.

  15. Frequency domain analysis of noise in autoregulated gene circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Michael L.; Cox, Chris D.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a frequency domain technique for the analysis of intrinsic noise within negatively autoregulated gene circuits. This approach is based on the transfer function around the feedback loop (loop transmission) and the equivalent noise bandwidth of the system. The loop transmission, T, is shown to be a determining factor of the dynamics and the noise behavior of autoregulated gene circuits, and this T-based technique provides a simple and flexible method for the analysis of noise arising from any source within the gene circuit. We show that negative feedback not only reduces the variance of the noise in the protein concentration, but also shifts this noise to higher frequencies where it may have a negligible effect on the noise behavior of following gene circuits within a cascade. This predicted effect is demonstrated through the exact stochastic simulation of a two-gene cascade. The analysis elucidates important aspects of gene circuit structure that control functionality, and may provide some insights into selective pressures leading to this structure. The resulting analytical relationships have a simple form, making them especially useful as synthetic gene circuit design equations. With the exception of the linearization of Hill kinetics, this technique is general and may be applied to the analysis or design of networks of higher complexity. This utility is demonstrated through the exact stochastic simulation of an autoregulated two-gene cascade operating near instability. PMID:12671069

  16. Noise Measurement and Frequency Analysis of Commercially Available Noisy Toys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohreh Jalaie

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Noise measurement and frequency analysis of commercially available noisy toys were the main purposes of the study. Materials and Methods: 181 noisy toys commonly found in toy stores in different zones of Tehran were selected and categorized into 10 groups. Noise measurement were done at 2, 25, and 50 cm from toys in dBA. The noisiest toy of each group was frequency analyzed in octave bands. Results: The highest and the lowest intensity levels belonged to the gun (mean=112 dBA and range of 100-127 dBA and to the rattle-box (mean=84 dBA and range of 74-95 dBA, respectively. Noise intensity levels significantly decreased with increasing distance except for two toys. Noise frequency analysis indicated energy in effective hearing frequencies. Most of the toys energies were in the middle and high frequency region. Conclusion: As intensity level of the toys is considerable, mostly more than 90 dBA, and also their energy exist in the middle and high frequency region, toys should be considered as a cause of the hearing impairment.

  17. Low-frequency noise from large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henrik; Pedersen, Christian Sejer

    2011-01-01

    As wind turbines get larger, worries have emerged that the turbine noise would move down in frequency and that the low-frequency noise would cause annoyance for the neighbors. The noise emission from 48 wind turbines with nominal electric power up to 3.6 MW is analyzed and discussed. The relative...... amount of low-frequency noise is higher for large turbines (2.3–3.6 MW) than for small turbines (≤ 2 MW), and the difference is statistically significant. The difference can also be expressed as a downward shift of the spectrum of approximately one-third of an octave. A further shift of similar size...... is suggested for future turbines in the 10-MW range. Due to the air absorption, the higher low-frequency content becomes even more pronounced, when sound pressure levels in relevant neighbor distances are considered. Even when A-weighted levels are considered, a substantial part of the noise is at low...

  18. Low frequency noise from wind turbines mechanisms of generation and its modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2010-01-01

    model which computes the sound pressure level (SPL) at a specified distance from the turbine. The influences on LFN on a number of turbine design parameters are investigated and the position of the rotor relative to the tower (upwind or downwind rotor) is found to be the most important design parameter....... For an upwind rotor the LFN levels are so low that it should not cause annoyance of neighbouring people. Important turbine design parameters with strong influence on LFN are the blade tip speed and the distance between rotor and tower....

  19. High frequency microseismic noise as possible earthquake precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Sović

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Before an earthquake occurs, microseismic noise in high frequency (HF range, i.e. 2-25 Hz, is being generated during preparation process. These signals change the microseismic noise and, consequently, the spectrum of microseismic noise. Time variation of spectra recorded at the same seismological station could imply the change of the state of noise source. We propose the image moment analysis approach to objectively compare microseismic noise spectra. The result could be used for earthquake precursor identification. Expected spectra change is in HF range, so the analysis has been limited to the shallow tectonic earthquakes with epicenters close, up to 15 km, the seismological stations. The method has been tested post festum using four earthquakes in Dinarides which satisfied condition for epicentral distance. The spectra were calculated for noise recorded in time intervals of 10 days before and 6 to 10 days after the earthquakes. Affine moment invariants were calculated for noise spectra which were treated as the input objects. Spectra of the first five days in the series were referent spectra. The classification parameters were Euclidean distances between referent spectra and the spectra for all days in the series, including referent ones. The results have shown that the spectra of the microseismic noise become noticeably different than the other spectra in time intervals one or two days before an earthquake.

  20. Road traffic noise frequency and prevalent hypertension in Taichung, Taiwan : a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Ta Yuan; Beelen, Rob; Li, Su Fei; Chen, Tzu I.; Lin, Yen Ju; Bao, Bo Ying; Liu, Chiu Shong

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported the association between hypertension and exposure to road traffic noise, but the association between noise frequency characteristics is not clear. This study investigated the association between exposure to different frequency components of road traffic noise an

  1. Low frequency noise reduction using stiff light composite panels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Yongchang; LIN Weizheng

    2003-01-01

    The experiment presented in this paper is to investigate and analyze the noise reduction at low frequency using stiff light composite panels. Since these composite panels are made of lightweight and stiff materials, this actuation strategy will enable the creation of composite panels for duct noise control without using traditional heavy structural mass. The results suggest that the mass-spring resonance absorption in the case of a comparatively stiff thick panel with a thin flexible plate is more efficient with minimum weight, when subjected to low-frequency (<500 Hz). The efficiency of the panel absorber depends on the mass of the thin flexible plate and the stiffness of the panel.

  2. Design & Implementation of High Switching & Low Phase Noise Frequency Synthesizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M. N. Hassan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This research describes the design & implementation of frequency synthesizer using single loop Phase lock loop with the following specifications: Frequency range (1.5 – 2.75 GHz,Step size (1 MHz, Switching time 36.4 µs, & phase noise @10 kHz = -92dBc & spurious -100 dBc The development in I.C. technology provide the simplicity in the design of frequency synthesizer because it implements the phase frequency detector(PFD , prescalar & reference divider in single chip. Therefore our system consists of a single chip contains (low phase noise PFD, charge pump, prescalar & reference divider, voltage controlled oscillator , loop filter & reference oscillator. The single chip is used to provide the following properties :•Low power consumptionSmall size, light weight.Flexibility in selecting crystal oscillator frequencies to fit into the system frequency planning.•High reliability.The application of this synthesizer in frequency hopping systems, satellite communications & radar because it has high switching speed ,low phase noise & low spurious level.

  3. Noise-free quantum optical frequency shifting driven by mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Linran; Poot, Menno; Cheng, Risheng; Guo, Xiang; Han, Xu; Tang, Hong X

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate single photons is of critical importance for fundamental quantum optics studies and practical implementations of quantum communications. While extraordinary progresses have been made in controlling spatial, temporal, spin and orbit angular momentum degrees of freedom, frequency-domain control of single photons so far relies on nonlinear optical effects, which have faced obstacles such as noise photons, narrow bandwidth and demanding optical filtering. Here we demonstrate the first integrated near-unity efficiency frequency manipulation of single photons, by stretching and compressing a waveguide at 8.3 billion cycles per second. Frequency shift up to 150 GHz at telecom wavelength is realized without measurable added noise and the preservation of quantum coherence is verified through quantum interference between twin photons of different colors. This single photon frequency control approach will be invaluable for increasing the channel capacity of quantum communications and compensati...

  4. Measurement of low-frequency noise in rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    to the highest level present in a room, rather than a room average level. In order to ensure representative noise measurements, different positions were investigated based on theoretical considerations and observations from numerical room simulations. In addition measurements were performed in three different......Measurement of low-frequency noise in rooms is problematic due to standing wave patterns. The spatial variation in the sound pressure level can typically be as much as 20-30 dB. For assessment of annoyance from low-frequency noise in dwellings, it is important to measure a level close...... rooms. The sound pressure level was measured 1) in three-dimensional corners and 2) according to current Swedish and Danish measurement methods. Furthermore, the entire sound pressure distributions were measured by scanning. The Swedish and Danish measurement methods include a corner measurement...

  5. Low Frequency Noise Measurement and Analysis of Capacitive Micro-Accelerometers: Temperature Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Yasin, Faisal; Nagel, David J.; Ong, D. S.; Korman, Can E.; Chuah, H. T.

    2008-06-01

    A noise measurements of micro-accelerometers were performed using a special measurement system. A common spectral behavior of noise is found, with 1/ f noise dominating at low frequencies and white thermal noise being the limiting factor at higher frequencies. A temperature dependent and an acceleration dependant of the noise are found in the accelerometers, in agreement and contract of the theories, respectively.

  6. Influence of lasers with non-white frequency noise on the design of coherent optical links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kakkar, Aditya; Navarro, Jaime Rodrigo; Schatz, Richard

    2017-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate for a 28 Gbaud 64-QAM metro link that the LO frequency noise causes timing impairment. Results show the existence of LO frequency noise spectrum regimes where different design criteria apply....

  7. The Influence of High-Frequency Envelope Information on Low-Frequency Vowel Identification in Noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Schubotz

    Full Text Available Vowel identification in noise using consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC logatomes was used to investigate a possible interplay of speech information from different frequency regions. It was hypothesized that the periodicity conveyed by the temporal envelope of a high frequency stimulus can enhance the use of the information carried by auditory channels in the low-frequency region that share the same periodicity. It was further hypothesized that this acts as a strobe-like mechanism and would increase the signal-to-noise ratio for the voiced parts of the CVCs. In a first experiment, different high-frequency cues were provided to test this hypothesis, whereas a second experiment examined more closely the role of amplitude modulations and intact phase information within the high-frequency region (4-8 kHz. CVCs were either natural or vocoded speech (both limited to a low-pass cutoff-frequency of 2.5 kHz and were presented in stationary 3-kHz low-pass filtered masking noise. The experimental results did not support the hypothesized use of periodicity information for aiding low-frequency perception.

  8. Dual-frequency Brillouin fiber laser for optical generation of tunable low-noise radio frequency/microwave frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jihong; Staines, Sean; Jiang, Shibin

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a new approach, i.e., a cw dual-frequency Brillouin fiber laser pumped by two independent single-frequency Er-doped fiber lasers, for the generation of tunable low-noise rf/microwave optical signals. Its inherent features of both linewidth narrowing effect in a Brillouin fiber cavity and common mode noise cancellation between two laser modes sharing a common cavity allow us to achieve high frequency stability without using a supercavity. Beat frequency of the dual-frequency Brillouin fiber laser can be tuned from tens of megahertz up to 100 GHz by thermally tuning the wavelengths of the two pump lasers with tuning sensitivity of approximately 1.4 GHz/ degrees C. Allan variance measurements show the beat signals have the hertz-level frequency stability.

  9. Interferometric SAR imaging by transmitting stepped frequency chaotic noise signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunhua; Gu, Xiang; Zhai, Wenshuai; Dong, Xiao; Shi, Xiaojin; Kang, Xueyan

    2015-10-01

    Noise radar has been applied in many fields since it was proposed more than 50 years ago. However, it has not been applied to interferometric SAR imaging yet as far as we know. This paper introduces our recent work on interferometric noise radar. An interferometric SAR system was developed which can transmit both chirp signal and chaotic noise signal (CNS) at multiple carrier frequencies. An airborne experiment with this system by transmitting both signals was carried out, and the data were processed to show the capability of interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The results shows that although the interferometric phase quality of CNS is degraded due to the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is lower compared with that of chirp signal, we still can get satisfied DEM after multi-looking processing. Another work of this paper is to apply compressed sensing (CS) theory to the interferometric SAR imaging with CNS. The CS theory states that if a signal is sparse, then it can be accurately reconstructed with much less sampled data than that regularly required according to Nyquist Sampling Theory. To form a structured random matrix, if the transmitted signal is of fixed waveform, then random subsampling is needed. However, if the transmitted signal is of random waveform, then only uniform subsampling is needed. This is another advantage of noise signal. Both the interferometric phase images and the DEMs by regular method and by CS method are processed with results compared. It is shown that the degradation of interferometric phases due to subsampling is larger than that of amplitude image.

  10. Passive ultrasonics using sub-Nyquist sampling of high-frequency thermal-mechanical noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabra, Karim G; Romberg, Justin; Lani, Shane; Degertekin, F Levent

    2014-06-01

    Monolithic integration of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer arrays with low noise complementary metal oxide semiconductor electronics minimizes interconnect parasitics thus allowing the measurement of thermal-mechanical (TM) noise. This enables passive ultrasonics based on cross-correlations of diffuse TM noise to extract coherent ultrasonic waves propagating between receivers. However, synchronous recording of high-frequency TM noise puts stringent requirements on the analog to digital converter's sampling rate. To alleviate this restriction, high-frequency TM noise cross-correlations (12-25 MHz) were estimated instead using compressed measurements of TM noise which could be digitized at a sampling frequency lower than the Nyquist frequency.

  11. Large refinery and petrochemical plant furnaces and heaters : low frequency noise measurement and noise source order-ranking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie Frank, HFP Acoustical Consultants Corp. Calgary AB

    2007-07-01

    Large furnaces and process heaters at refineries, gas plants, and petrochemical plants produce a low-frequency tonal noise from combustion roar. They can also produce mid-frequency broadband noise from induced draft fans. The common noise generating mechanisms are turbulence, flow instability, pressure drop, mechanical friction, and component vibration. Some of these energy facilities have multiple furnaces and heaters. As such, a noise source order-ranking assessment is typically performed to determine which plant equipment is responsible for the highest sound level contributions at nearby residence locations. The order-ranking is useful in determining which noise sources may require acoustical treatment to reduce the overall sound level at each residence. These results would form the basis for evaluating the effect of noise mitigating strategies for each source, and for estimating the associated costs for each noise control scenario. The noise model results can also be used to order-rank the equipment noise sources in terms of their frequency-dependant octave band. Experience has shown that large furnaces and heaters usually rank very high in terms of predominant contributors. The combustion roar noise generating mechanism is largely responsible for the predominant amount of acoustical energy. Although some degree of noise reduction can be achieved through burner design, it was shown that noise control engineering largely occurs at the furnace and heater manufacturing or plant retrofit level. This paper presented the results of one refinery with 19 older style furnaces and heaters. 1 tab., 7 figs.

  12. Suppression of thermal frequency noise in erbium-doped fiber random lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Bhavaye; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Liang

    2014-02-15

    Frequency and intensity noise are characterized for erbium-doped fiber (EDF) random lasers based on Rayleigh distributed feedback mechanism. We propose a theoretical model for the frequency noise of such random lasers using the property of random phase modulations from multiple scattering points in ultralong fibers. We find that the Rayleigh feedback suppresses the noise at higher frequencies by introducing a Lorentzian envelope over the thermal frequency noise of a long fiber cavity. The theoretical model and measured frequency noise agree quantitatively with two fitting parameters. The random laser exhibits a noise level of 6  Hz²/Hz at 2 kHz, which is lower than what is found in conventional narrow-linewidth EDF fiber lasers and nonplanar ring laser oscillators (NPROs) by a factor of 166 and 2, respectively. The frequency noise has a minimum value for an optimum length of the Rayleigh scattering fiber.

  13. Subjective annoyance caused by indoor low-level and low frequency noise and control method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DI Guo-qing; ZHANG Bang-jun; SHANG Qi

    2005-01-01

    The influence of low-level noise has not been widely noticed. This paper discovered that low-level and low frequency noise(Aweighted equivalent level Leq < 45 dB) causes higher probability of subjective annoyance. The fuzzy mathematic principle was applied to deal with the threshold level of subjective annoyance from noise in this study; there is preferable relationship between the indoor noise and noise annoyance at low frequency noise level. Study indicated at the same centered noise level, the change of annoyance probability is mainly caused by the change of the frequency spectrum characteristic of the indoor noise. Under low noise level environment, without change of the medium-low frequency noise, the slight increase of medium-high frequency noise level with the help of noise sheltering effect can significantly reduce the noise annoyance. This discovery brings a new resolution on how to improve the environmental quality of working or living places. A noise control model is given in this study according to the acoustic analysis.

  14. Noise reduction combining time-frequency epsilon-filter and M-transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tomomi; Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2008-08-01

    This paper introduces noise reduction combining time-frequency epsilon-filter (TF epsilon-filter) and time-frequency M-transform (TF M-transform). Musical noise is an offensive noise generated due to noise reduction in the time-frequency domain such as spectral subtraction and TF epsilon-filter. It has a deleterious effect on speech recognition. To solve the problem, M-transform is introduced. M-transform is a linear transform based on M-sequence. The method combining the time-domain epsilon-filter (TD epsilon-filter) and time-domain M-transform (TD M-transform) can reduce not only white noise but also impulse noise. Musical noise is isolated in the time-frequency domain, which is similar to impulse noise in the time domain. On these prospects, this paper aims to reduce musical noise by improving M-transform for the time-frequency domain. Noise reduction by using TD M-transform and the TD epsilon-filter is first explained to clarify its features. Then, an improved method applying M-transform to the time-frequency domain, namely TF M-transform, is described. Noise reduction combining the TF epsilon-filter and TF M-transform is also proposed. The proposed method can reduce not only high-level nonstationary noise but also musical noise. Experimental results are also given to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method.

  15. Frequency Effect of Harmonic Noise on the FitzHugh-Nagumo Neuron Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋艳丽

    2011-01-01

    Using harmonic noise,the frequency effect of noise on the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model is investigated.The results show that the neuron has a resonance characteristic and responds strongly to the noise with a certain frequency at fixed power.Driven by the noise with this frequency,the train is most regular and the coefficient of variation R has a minimum.The imperfect synchronization takes place,which,however,is optimal only for noise with an appropriate frequency.It is shown that there exists coherence resonance related to frequency.%Using harmonic noise, the frequency effect of noise on the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model is investigated. The results show that the neuron has a resonance characteristic and responds strongly to the noise with a certain frequency at fixed power. Driven by the noise with this frequency, the train is most regular and the coefficient of variation R has a minimum. The imperfect synchronization takes place, which, however, is optimal only for noise with an appropriate frequency. It is shown that there exists coherence resonance related to frequency.

  16. Observation of Fundamental Thermal Noise in Optical Fibers down to Infrasonic Frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Jing; Li, Tang; Liu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic thermal noise in optical fibers is the ultimate limit of fiber-based systems. However, at infrasonic frequencies, the spectral behavior of the intrinsic thermal noise remains unclear so far. We present the measurements of the fundamental thermal noise in optical fibers obtained using a balanced fiber Michelson interferometer. When an ultra-stable laser is used as the laser source and other noise sources are carefully controlled, the 1/f spectral density of thermal noise is observed down to infrasonic frequencies and the measured magnitude is consistent with the theoretical predictions at the frequencies from 0.2 Hz to 20 kHz. Moreover, as observed in the experiment, the level of 1/f thermal noise is reduced by changing the coating of optical fibers. Therefore, a possible way to reduce the thermal noise in optical fibers at low Fourier frequencies is indicated. Finally, the inconsistency between the experimental data on thermomechanical noise and existing theory is discussed.

  17. Effect of noise on Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fittinghoff, D.N.; DeLong, K.W.; Ladera, C.L.; Trebino, R.

    1995-02-01

    We study the effects of noise in Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating measurements of ultrashort pulses. We quantify the measurement accuracy in the presence of additive, muliplicative, and quantization noise, and discuss filtering and pre-processing of the data.

  18. Frequency-resolved noise figure measurements of phase (in)sensitive fiber optical parametric amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, R; Kumpera, A; Lorences-Riesgo, A; Andrekson, P A; Karlsson, M

    2014-11-17

    We measure the frequency-resolved noise figure of fiber optical parametric amplifiers both in phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive modes in the frequency range from 0.03 to 3 GHz. We also measure the variation in noise figure due to the degradation in pump optical signal to noise ratio and also as a function of the input signal powers. Noise figure degradation due to stimulated Brillouin scattering is observed.

  19. The possible influence of noise frequency components on the health of exposed industrial workers - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K V Mahendra Prashanth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise is a common occupational health hazard in most industrial settings. An assessment of noise and its adverse health effects based on noise intensity is inadequate. For an efficient evaluation of noise effects, frequency spectrum analysis should also be included. This paper aims to substantiate the importance of studying the contribution of noise frequencies in evaluating health effects and their association with physiological behavior within human body. Additionally, a review of studies published between 1988 and 2009 that investigate the impact of industrial/occupational noise on auditory and non-auditory effects and the probable association and contribution of noise frequency components to these effects is presented. The relevant studies in English were identified in Medknow, Medline, Wiley, Elsevier, and Springer publications. Data were extracted from the studies that fulfilled the following criteria: title and/or abstract of the given study that involved industrial/occupational noise exposure in relation to auditory and non-auditory effects or health effects. Significant data on the study characteristics, including noise frequency characteristics, for assessment were considered in the study. It is demonstrated that only a few studies have considered the frequency contributions in their investigations to study auditory effects and not non-auditory effects. The data suggest that significant adverse health effects due to industrial noise include auditory and heart-related problems. The study provides a strong evidence for the claims that noise with a major frequency characteristic of around 4 kHz has auditory effects and being deficient in data fails to show any influence of noise frequency components on non-auditory effects. Furthermore, specific noise levels and frequencies predicting the corresponding health impacts have not yet been validated. There is a need for advance research to clarify the importance of the dominant noise frequency

  20. Broadband phase noise suppression in a Yb-fiber frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingöz, A; Yost, D C; Allison, T K; Ruehl, A; Fermann, M E; Hartl, I; Ye, J

    2011-03-01

    We report a simple technique to suppress high-frequency phase noise of a Yb-based fiber optical frequency comb using an active intensity noise servo. Out-of-loop measurements of the phase noise using an optical heterodyne beat with a cw laser show suppression of phase noise by ≥7 dB out to Fourier frequencies of 100 kHz with a unity-gain crossing of ∼700 kHz. These results are enabled by the strong correlation between the intensity and phase noise of the laser. Detailed measurements of intensity and phase noise spectra, as well as transfer functions, reveal that the dominant phase and intensity noise contribution above ∼100 kHz is due to amplified spontaneous emission or other quantum noise sources.

  1. On-line adaptive line frequency noise cancellation from a nuclear power measuring channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qadir Javed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available On-line software for adaptively canceling 50 Hz line frequency noise has been designed and tested at Pakistan Research Reactor 1. Line frequency noise causes much problem in weak signals acquisition. Sometimes this noise is so dominant that original signal is totally corrupted. Although notch filter can be used for eliminating this noise, but if signal of interest is in close vicinity of 50 Hz, then original signal is also attenuated and hence overall performance is degraded. Adaptive noise removal is a technique which could be employed for removing line frequency without degrading the desired signal. In this paper line frequency noise has been eliminated on-line from a nuclear power measuring channel. The adaptive LMS algorithm has been used to cancel 50 Hz noise. The algorithm has been implemented in labVIEW with NI 6024 data acquisition card. The quality of the acquired signal has been improved much as can be seen in experimental results.

  2. Enhancement of VCO Linearity and Phase Noise by Implementing Frequency Locked Loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayranci, E; Christensen, K; Andreani, Pietro

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the on-chip implementation of a frequency locked loop (FLL) over a VCO that decreases the phase noise and linearizes the transfer function. Implementation of the FLL inside a PLL is also investigated and a possible application is highlighted. Design of a special kind of low...... noise frequency detector without a reference frequency (frequency-to-voltage converter), which is the most critical component of the FLL, is also presented in a 0.25 mum BiCMOS process. Linearization and approximately 15 dBc/Hz phase noise suppression is demonstrated over a moderate phase noise LC VCO...

  3. The influence of low frequencies on the assessment of noise from neighbours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Rasmussen, Birgit; Nielsen, Jesper Rye

    1996-01-01

    Lightweight building constructions often suffer from insufficient sound insulation at low frequencies. In order to investigate the degree of the problems, a laboratory experiment has been carried out. Twenty test persons have been asked to evaluate series of typical noise from neighbours, ie, two...... kinds of airborne noise and two kinds of impact noise. The noise examples were presented with two different shapings of the frequency spectrum in order to stimulate either a heavy building construction or a typical lightweight construction. The noise examples were presented at four different levels...... and combined with two levels of background noise. The two frequency shapings were different in the frequency range 25-200 Hz, but identical at higher frequencies. Dose-response curves have been derived for annoyance, disturbance of concentration and subjective loudness. It has not been possible to analyze...

  4. Methodology for 1/f noise parameter extraction for high-voltage MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavredakis, Nikolaos; Pflanzl, Walter; Seebacher, Ehrenfried; Bucher, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a detailed low frequency noise (LFN) parameter extraction method for high-voltage (HV) MOSFETs at low (50 mV) and medium (3 V) drain biases. In Vd = 3 V region, noise coming from the channel is dominant while in linear region there is an extra contribution of noise from the drift region part especially for long-channel devices in strong inversion region. Flicker noise of 50 V and 20 V N- and P-channel HV-MOSFETs was measured over a large current range from weak to strong inversion, making possible the extraction of the noise parameters related to the different noise contributions, such as mobility fluctuations in low current regime, carrier number fluctuations and Coulomb scattering in medium and high current regime. In some cases, series resistance noise contribution especially at high current is apparent as well. The parameter extraction procedure is devised for a recently established charge-based flicker noise model for HV-MOSFETs. Noise parameters related to the carrier number fluctuation effect in the gate oxide extension in drift region are also extracted in high current regime of long-channel devices under low drain bias condition. The frequency exponent AF related to the slope of the measured noise spectra is also extracted. Measurements and analysis include both long as well as short N- and P-channel HV-MOSFETs.

  5. A barrier for low frequency noise from starting aircraft: comparison between numerical and scale model results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosschaart, C.; Eisses, A.R.; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2010-01-01

    Amsterdam Airport Schiphol has organized a competition to design a noise mitigating measure along the 'Polderbaan' runway. Its main goal is to reduce the low frequency (LF) ground noise from starting aircraft. The winning concept is a flexible parabolic shaped noise barrier positioned relatively clo

  6. Refraction of high frequency noise in an arbitrary jet flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Krejsa, Eugene A.

    1994-01-01

    Refraction of high frequency noise by mean flow gradients in a jet is studied using the ray-tracing methods of geometrical acoustics. Both the two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) formulations are considered. In the former case, the mean flow is assumed parallel and the governing propagation equations are described by a system of four first order ordinary differential equations. The 3D formulation, on the other hand, accounts for the jet spreading as well as the axial flow development. In this case, a system of six first order differential equations are solved to trace a ray from its source location to an observer in the far field. For subsonic jets with a small spreading angle both methods lead to similar results outside the zone of silence. However, with increasing jet speed the two prediction models diverge to the point where the parallel flow assumption is no longer justified. The Doppler factor of supersonic jets as influenced by the refraction effects is discussed and compared with the conventional modified Doppler factor.

  7. Stochastic resonance in a single-mode laser driven by frequency modulated signal and coloured noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Guo-Xiang; Zhang Liang-Ying; Cao Li

    2009-01-01

    By adding frequency modulated signals to the intensity equation of gain-noise model of the single-mode laser driven by two coloured noises which are correlated, this paper uses the linear approximation method to calculate the power spectrum and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the laser intensity. The results show that the SNR appears typical stochastic resonance with the variation of intensity of the pump noise and quantum noise. As the amplitude of a modulated signal has effects on the SNR, it shows suppression, monotone increasing, stochastic resonance, and multiple stochastic resonance with the variation of the frequency of a carrier signal and modulated signal.

  8. Speech Enhancement with Geometric Advent of Spectral Subtraction using Connected Time-Frequency Regions Noise Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Saleem

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech enhancement with Geometric Advent of Spectral subtraction using connected time-frequency regions noise estimation aims to de-noise or reduce background noise from the noisy speech for better quality, pleasantness and improved intelligibility. Numerous enhancement methods are proposed including spectral subtraction, subspace, statistical with different noise estimations. The traditional spectral subtraction techniques are reasonably simple to implement and suffer from musical noise. This study addresses the new approach for speech enhancement which has minimized the insufficiencies in traditional spectral subtraction algorithms using MCRA. This approach with noise estimation has been evolved with PESQ, the ITU-T standard; Frequency weighted segmental SNR and weighted spectral slope. The analysis shows that Geometric approach with time-frequency connected regions has improved results than old-fashioned spectral subtraction algorithms. The normal hearing tests has suggested that new approach has lower audible musical noise.

  9. Uncorrelated Phase Noise Analysis for Millimeter-Wave Radiometer Imager Frequency Synthesizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a nontrivial uncorrelated phase noise analysis is proposed for frequency synthesizer of a passive millimeter-wave Synthetic Aperture Interferometric Radiometer (SAIR imager named BHU-2D-U designed for concealed weapon detections on human bodies with high imaging rates. This synthesizer provides local oscillators both for millimeter-wave front-ends and intermediate frequency IQ demodulators for the receivers. The influence of synthesizer uncorrelated phase noise in different offset frequency ranges on the visibility phase errors have been systematically investigated with phase noise mismatch requirements drawn. Integrated RMS phase error has been applied to establish uncorrelated phase noise requirements for visibility error control. Measurement results have proved that uncorrelated phase noise does exist among synthesizer output pairs, and the previously defined requirements are achieved with imaging results proposed. In conclusion, the uncorrelated phase noise effects on SAIR visibility errors have been concretized to phase noise design requirements, which have been realized by synthesizer design.

  10. Low-frequency noise characterization of a magnetic field monitoring system using an anisotropic magnetoresistance

    CERN Document Server

    Mateos, I; Lobo, A

    2016-01-01

    A detailed study about magnetic sensing techniques based on anisotropic magnetoresistive sensors shows that the technology is suitable for low-frequency space applications like the eLISA mission. Low noise magnetic measurements at the sub-millihertz frequencies were taken by using different electronic noise reduction techniques in the signal conditioning circuit. We found that conventional modulation techniques reversing the sensor bridge excitation do not reduce the potential $1/f$ noise of the magnetoresistors, so alternative methods such as flipping and electro-magnetic feedback are necessary. In addition, a low-frequency noise analysis of the signal conditioning circuits has been performed in order to identify and minimize the different main contributions from the overall noise. The results for chip-scale magnetoresistances exhibit similar noise along the eLISA bandwidth ($0.1\\,{\\rm mHz}-1\\,{\\rm Hz}$) to the noise measured by means of the voluminous fluxgate magnetometers used in its precursor mission, kn...

  11. A noise level prediction method based on electro-mechanical frequency response function for capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingyu; Ji, Shengchang; Shen, Qi; Liu, Yuan; Li, Jinyu; Liu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The capacitors in high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) converter stations radiate a lot of audible noise which can reach higher than 100 dB. The existing noise level prediction methods are not satisfying enough. In this paper, a new noise level prediction method is proposed based on a frequency response function considering both electrical and mechanical characteristics of capacitors. The electro-mechanical frequency response function (EMFRF) is defined as the frequency domain quotient of the vibration response and the squared capacitor voltage, and it is obtained from impulse current experiment. Under given excitations, the vibration response of the capacitor tank is the product of EMFRF and the square of the given capacitor voltage in frequency domain, and the radiated audible noise is calculated by structure acoustic coupling formulas. The noise level under the same excitations is also measured in laboratory, and the results are compared with the prediction. The comparison proves that the noise prediction method is effective.

  12. Noise characterization of an Optical Frequency Comb using Offline Cross-Correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Khayatzadeh, Ramin; Guyomarc'h, Didier; Ferrand, Didier; Hagel, Gaëtan; Houssin, Marie; Morizot, Olivier; Champenois, Caroline; Knoop, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Using an offline cross-correlation technique, we have analyzed the noise behavior of a new type of optical frequency comb (OFC), which is carrier envelope offset (CEO) free by configuration, due to difference frequency generation. In order to evaluate the instrument's ultimate noise floor, the phase and amplitude noise of a stabilized OFC are measured simultaneously using two analog-to-digital converters. Carrier recovery and phase detection are done by post-processing, eliminating the need for external phase-locked loops and complex calibration techniques. In order to adapt the measurement noise floor and the number of averages used in cross correlation, an adaptive frequency resolution for noise measurement is applied. Phase noise results are in excellent agreement with measurements of the fluctuations of the repetition frequency of the OFC obtained from optical signal.

  13. An investigation of twenty-one cases of low-frequency noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-one cases of low-frequency noise complaints were thoroughly investigated with the aim of answering the question whether it is real physical sound or low-frequency tinnitus that causes the annoyance. Noise recordings were made in the homes of the complainants taking the spatial variation...

  14. Development of a rating procedure for low frequency noise : Results of measurements near runways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buikema, E.; Vercammen, M.; Ploeg, F. van der; Granneman, J.; Vos, J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent issues concerning low frequency aircraft noise around airports (groundnoise) and a legal verdict about the application of low frequency noise criteria in the Netherlands have been the motivation to start a research commissioned by the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Enviro

  15. Carrier recovery techniques for semiconductor laser frequency noise for 28 Gbd DP-16QAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias Olmedo, Miguel; Pang, Xiaodan; Piels, Molly

    2015-01-01

    We report on the first experimental comparison of DD-PLL, two-stage feed forward, and two variations of extended Kalman filtering for tracking semiconductor laser frequency noise. We identify which carrier phase recovery technique works best depending on the carrier induced frequency noise profile....

  16. An acoustic vector based approach to locate low frequency noise sources in 3D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bree, H.-E. de; Ostendorf, C.; Basten, T.

    2009-01-01

    Although low frequency noise is an issue of huge societal importance, traditional acoustic testing methods have limitations in finding the low frequency source. It is hard to determine the direction of the noise using traditional microphones. Three dimensional sound probes capturing the particle vel

  17. Subjective evaluation of noise from neighbours with focus on low frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Frank Rysgaard

    1999-01-01

    There is a growing tendency to use lightweight constructions in the building industry. One unwanted side effect of this tendency is poor sound insulation at low frequencies. The purpose of this investigation has been to examine the subjective effects of the resulting increase of low frequency noise...... from neighbours in dwellings using listening tests. The results of the experiments confirm that noise from neighbours transmitted through light constructions is indeed rated more annoying than noise transmitted through heavier constructions....

  18. The Lombard effect in male ultrasonic frogs: Regulating antiphonal signal frequency and amplitude in noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jun-Xian; Xu, Zhi-Min

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic communication in noisy environments presents a significant challenge for vocal animals because noise can interfere with animal acoustic signals by decreasing signal-to-noise ratios and masking signals. Birds and mammals increase call intensity or frequency as noise levels increase, but it is unclear to what extend this behavior is shared by frogs. Concave-eared torrent frogs (Odorrana tormota) have evolved the capacity to produce various calls containing ultrasonic harmonics and to communicate beside noisy streams. However, it is largely unclear how frogs regulate vocalization in response to increasing noise levels. We exposed male frogs to various levels of noise with playback of conspecific female courtship calls and recorded antiphonal signals and spontaneous short calls. Males were capable of rapidly adjusting fundamental frequency and amplitude of antiphonal signals as noise levels increased. The increment in fundamental frequency and amplitude was approximately 0.5 kHz and 3 dB with every 10 dB increase in noise level, indicating the presence of noise-dependent signal characteristics. Males showed the noise-tolerant adaption in response to female calls in noise level from 40 to 90 dB SPL. The results suggest that the noise-dependent signal characteristics in O. tormota have evolved as a strategy to cope with varying torrent noise. PMID:27345957

  19. Low frequency noise in resonant Josephson soliton oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørn Bindslev; Holst, T.; Wellstood, Frederick C.;

    1991-01-01

    to the Nyquist voltage noise in a resistance equal to the dynamic resistance RD of the current-voltage characteristic of the bias point. In contrast, measurements of the linewidth of the microwave radiation from the same JTL showed that the spectral density of the underlying noise voltage scaled as R D2/RS where...

  20. Low frequency noise from large wind turbines - updated 2011; Lavfrekvent stoej fra store vindmoeller - opdateret 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, H.; Sejer Pedersen, C.; Pedersen, Steffen

    2011-07-01

    The study analyzed measurements of noise from 65 wind turbines, 25 large turbines (2.3 to 3.6 MW) and 40 small ones (up to 2 MW). The large mills (2.3 to 3.6 MW) emit relatively more low frequency noise than the small ones (up to 2 MW). The difference is statistically significant for the frequency range 63-250 Hz, regardless of whether calculations are performed on all the large mills or only on new wind turbines. There are no significant differences between prototype turbines and the new mills. Because of wind noise in the measurements of the small mills, it is not possible to determine whether the difference between small and large turbines continues further down in frequency. Looking at the A-weighted sound pressure in relevant neighbor distances, the lower frequencies constitute an essential part of the noise from the large mills, and there is no doubt that the low frequency noise is both audible and annoying. When the total A-weighted sound pressure level is the same, there will on average be about 3 dB more low frequency noise from large turbines than from small ones. At large distances the noise character becomes yet more low frequency because atmospheric absorption reduces the high frequencies more than the low frequencies. Depending on the sound insulation the low frequency noise can also be annoying indoors. If the total A-weighted sound pressure level outdoors is 44 dB, the low frequency noise can be heard indoors in all the houses and for all the large turbines. The sound pressure level will in many cases exceed the indoor limit for evening night at 20 dB. (ln)

  1. Impact of source/drain and bulk engineering on LFN performance of n- and p-MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, E. G.; Rohracher, K.; Roger, F.; Pflanzl, W. C.; Leisenberger, F. P.; Wachmann, E.; Seebacher, E.; Vescoli, V.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed investigation of the impact of different Lightly Doped Drain (LDD) implants and different well doping on the low frequency noise performance of n- and p-MOS devices from a CMOS technology node. We investigate the impact of three different devices. Two with the same LDD implant but different well doping and one with different LDD implant cocktail. The results demonstrate that the different bulk doping does not affect the low frequency noise performance of the devices. On the other hand there is a serious impact on the noise level of the device with the different LDD implant. In order to further support our results we investigated devices with different lengths in the linear and saturation region of operation.

  2. Perceptual effects of noise reduction by time-frequency masking of noisy speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brons, Inge; Houben, Rolph; Dreschler, Wouter A

    2012-10-01

    Time-frequency masking is a method for noise reduction that is based on the time-frequency representation of a speech in noise signal. Depending on the estimated signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), each time-frequency unit is either attenuated or not. A special type of a time-frequency mask is the ideal binary mask (IBM), which has access to the real SNR (ideal). The IBM either retains or removes each time-frequency unit (binary mask). The IBM provides large improvements in speech intelligibility and is a valuable tool for investigating how different factors influence intelligibility. This study extends the standard outcome measure (speech intelligibility) with additional perceptual measures relevant for noise reduction: listening effort, noise annoyance, speech naturalness, and overall preference. Four types of time-frequency masking were evaluated: the original IBM, a tempered version of the IBM (called ITM) which applies limited and non-binary attenuation, and non-ideal masking (also tempered) with two different types of noise-estimation algorithms. The results from ideal masking imply that there is a trade-off between intelligibility and sound quality, which depends on the attenuation strength. Additionally, the results for non-ideal masking suggest that subjective measures can show effects of noise reduction even if noise reduction does not lead to differences in intelligibility.

  3. High-frequency audiometry: A means for early diagnosis of noise-induced hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Amir H Mehrparvar; Seyyed J Mirmohammadi; Abbas Ghoreyshi; Abolfazl Mollasadeghi; Ziba Loukzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), an irreversible disorder, is a common problem in industrial settings. Early diagnosis of NIHL can help prevent the progression of hearing loss, especially in speech frequencies. For early diagnosis of NIHL, audiometry is performed routinely in conventional frequencies. We designed this study to compare the effect of noise on high-frequency audiometry (HFA) and conventional audiometry. In a historical cohort study, we compared hearing threshold and prevalence...

  4. Noise-Induced Phase Locking and Frequency Mixing in an Optical Bistable System with Delayed Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misono, Masatoshi; Miyakawa, Kenji

    2011-11-01

    The interplay between stochastic resonance (SR) and coherence resonance (CR) is experimentally studied in an optical bistable system with a time-delayed feedback loop. We demonstrate that the phase of the noise-induced motion is locked to that of the periodic input when the ratio of their frequencies is a simple rational number. We also demonstrate that the interplay between SR and CR generates frequency-mixed modes, and that the efficiency of frequency mixing is enhanced by the optimum noise.

  5. Suppression of frequency noise of single mode laser with unbalanced fiber interferometer for subnanometer interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmíd, Radek; Čížek, Martin; Mikel, Břetislav; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondrej

    2014-05-01

    We present a method of noise suppression of laser diodes by unbalanced Michelson fiber interferometer. The unstabilized laser source is represented by compact planar waveguide external cavity laser module ORION (Redfern Integrated Optics, Inc.) working at 1040.57 nm with Michelson interferometer with 1 km long arm based on SMF-28 fiber spool to suppress the frequency noise by fast PI servo-loop up to 33 kHz of laser injection current modulation. We were able to decrease the noise level by -60 dBc/Hz up to 1.5 kHz noise frequency of the laser.

  6. Noise helped manifestation of intrinsic frequency: A case study in the mesoscopic hormone signaling system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Ji; Yuanyuan Zhang; Xiufeng Lang; Wenxiang Hu; Qianshu Li

    2009-01-01

    The selective sustainment of nonlinear systems to signals is of great significance to signal transduction in living systems. We take hormone signaling as an example, and investigate the sustainment of internal and external signals. Simulation results prove that signals with "intrinsic frequency", no matter if it is noise induced or external injected, can be selectively sustained by exploiting internal and/or external noise. Both the internal and external noise can optimize the noise-induced signals, and the optimization is rather robust to the disturbance of external signals with other frequencies. These results are of significance for weak signal detection and trausduction in the presence of external signals.

  7. Low frequency noise elimination technique for 24-bit Σ-Δ data acquisition systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shao-Bo; Robert, Olivier; Lognonné, Philippe; Zhou, Ze-Bing; Yang, Shan-Qing

    2015-03-01

    Low frequency 1/f noise is one of the key limiting factors of high precision measurement instruments. In this paper, digital correlated double sampling is implemented to reduce the offset and low frequency 1/f noise of a data acquisition system with 24-bit sigma delta (Σ-Δ) analog to digital converter (ADC). The input voltage is modulated by cross-coupled switches, which are synchronized to the sampling clock, and converted into digital signal by ADC. By using a proper switch frequency, the unwanted parasitic signal frequencies generated by the switches are avoided. The noise elimination processing is made through the principle of digital correlated double sampling, which is equivalent to a time shifted subtraction for the sampled voltage. The low frequency 1/f noise spectrum density of the data acquisition system is reduced to be flat down to the measurement frequency lower limit, which is about 0.0001 Hz in this paper. The noise spectrum density is eliminated by more than 60 dB at 0.0001 Hz, with a residual noise floor of (9 ± 2) nV/Hz1/2 which is limited by the intrinsic white noise floor of the ADC above its corner frequency.

  8. [Impact of low-frequencies noise on the ability of thinking and judgment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi-ting; Di, Guo-qing; Gao, Ting-ting; Hong, You-peng; Huang, Yi-fan; Lu, Xiang-ming; Zhang, Bang-jun

    2008-04-01

    Three typical low frequency noise samples which were collected from some associated facilities in urban residential areas and white noise which was produced by acoustic apparatus were selected to compare the competence of brainwork index (AYP) and error rate in noisy environment with those in quiet environment, using dosage exercise method. The result indicates that AYP is lower in noisy environment and the error rate is higher than that in quiet environment, and there are significant differences between them. The changes of most testees in groups that use three different low frequency noise samples respectively are more obvious than the group that uses white noise, and the AYP difference attains significant level. It indicates that low frequency components are the main frequency elements to affect the ability of thinking and judgment. By paired samples t-test and frequency spectrums analysis, the results show that the impact degree of air condition outdoor unit noise is highest, and noise samples which have a peak frequency between 50-300 Hz have a more negative impact on the ability of thinking and judgment than other environmental noise.

  9. A LOW-PHASE NOISE FREQUENCY MULTIPLIER CHAIN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Consequently, the driving crystal oscillators and the first multiplier .... the upper cut off frequency of the system and its asymptotic slope. ..... (SMHz}, the order of multipliction of the. "difference" ... upto 300GHz. To go higher in frequency it is.

  10. Considering the influence of artificial environmental noise to study cough time-frequency features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hirtum, A.; Berckmans, D.

    2003-09-01

    In general the study of the cough mechanism and sound in both animal and human is performed by eliciting coughing in a reproducible way by nebulization of an irritating substance. Due to ventilation the controlled evaporation-protocol causes artificial noises from a mechanical origin. The resulting environmental low-frequency noises complicate cough time-frequency features. In order to optimize the study of the cough-sound the research described in this paper attempts on the one hand to characterize and model the environmental noises and on the other hand to evaluate the influence of the noise on the time-frequency representation for the intended cough sounds by comparing different de-noising approaches. Free field acoustic sound is continuously registered during 30 min citric acid cough-challenges on individual Belgian Landrace piglets and during respiratory infection experiments, with a duration of about 10 days, where room-ventilation was present.

  11. The influence of low frequencies on the assessment of noise from neighbours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindel, Jens Holger; Rasmussen, Birgit; Nielsen, Jesper Rye

    1996-01-01

    and combined with two levels of background noise. The two frequency shapings were different in the frequency range 25-200 Hz, but identical at higher frequencies. Dose-response curves have been derived for annoyance, disturbance of concentration and subjective loudness. It has not been possible to analyze...

  12. Frequency Estimation of Single-Tone Sinusoids Under Additive and Phase Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Asmaa Nazar Almoosawy; Zahir M. Hussain; Fadel A. Murad

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the performance of main frequency estimation methods for a single-component complex sinusoid under complex additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) as well as phase noise (PN). Two methods are under test: Maximum Likelihood (ML) method using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), and the autocorrelation method (Corr). Simulation results showed that FFT-method has superior performance as compared to the Corr-method in the presence of additive white Gaussian noise (affecting the amplitude) an...

  13. The Protective Effect of Conditioning on Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Is Frequency-Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Pourbakht

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We compared the extent of temporary threshold shift (TTS and hair cell loss following high level 4 kHz noise exposure with those preconditioned with moderate level 1 and 4 kHz octave band noise. Fifteen Male albino guinea pigs (300- 350 g in weight were randomly allocated into three groups: those exposed to 4 kHz octave band noise at 102 dB SPL (group 1, n=5; those conditioned with 1 kHz octave band noise at 85 dB SPL, 6 hours per day for 5 days, then exposed to noise (group 2, n=5; those conditioned with 4 kHz octave band noise at 85 dB SPL, then exposed to noise (group 3, n=5. An hour and one week after noise exposure, threshold shifts were evaluated by auditory-evoked brainstem response (ABR and then animals were euthanized for histological evaluation. We found that TTS and cochlear damage caused by noise exposure were significantly reduced by 1 kHz and 4 kHz conditioning (P<0.001. We also showed that 4 kHz protocol attenuates noise- induced TTS but no significant TTS reduction occurred by 1 kHz conditioning. Both protocol protected noise-induced cochlear damage. We concluded that lower tone conditioning could not protect against higher tone temporary noise-induced hearing loss, thus conditioning is a local acting and frequency-dependent phenomenon.

  14. Noise in a coupling electromagnetic detecting system for high frequency gravitational waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jin; Li Fang-Yu; Zhong Yuan-Hong

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the basic categories of noise in detecting high frequency gravitational waves in the microwave band (~0.1-10 GHz), which contain shot noise from the laser and the thermal radiation photons, thermal noise from statistical fluctuation of the thermal photons and fluctuation of the temperature, radiation press noise on the fractal membrane, the noise caused by the scattering of the Gaussian Beam (GB) in the detecting tube and noise in the microwave radiometers. The analysis shows that a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio may be achieved for a detecting device with the fixed power of GB (105 W), only when the temperature of the environment is no more than T=l K, and the optimal length of the microwave radiometers is about 0.3 m.

  15. Indoor measurements of low-frequency noise for annoyance assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    was found to have a high risk of significantly underestimating the noise present in a room, unless complainants can precisely appoint the measurement positions. It was found that a very good estimate of the L10 target level can be obtained by measuring only in four three-dimensional corners....

  16. Techniques for the reduction of low frequency noise in buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuada Coelho, B.A.; Koopman, A.

    2012-01-01

    Vibration isolation of buildings is often achieved by introducing spring systems at the foundation level. This can be an effective measure, especially against vibrations induced by noise, but it is also very costly. Due to the current usage of the cities space, where buildings and infrastructures sh

  17. Low frequency dove coos vary across noise gradients in an urbanized environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fengyi; Bonebrake, Timothy C; Dingle, Caroline

    2016-08-01

    Urbanization poses a challenge to bird communication due to signal masking by ambient noise and reflective surfaces that lead to signal degradation. Bird species (especially oscines) have been shown to alter their singing behaviour to increase signal efficiency in highly urbanized environments. However, few studies on the effects of noise on song structure have included birds with low frequency vocal signals which may be especially vulnerable to noise pollution due to significant frequency overlap of their signals with traffic noise. We compared the perch coos of spotted doves (Streptopelia chinensis), a species with very low frequency vocalizations, in different background noise levels across urban and peri-urban areas in Hong Kong. We documented a 10% upward shift in the minimum frequency of coos of spotted doves across the noise gradient (a relatively small but significant shift), and a reduced maximum frequency in urban habitats with a higher density of built up area. Hong Kong doves had significantly higher minimum and maximum frequencies than doves from throughout their range (from mostly rural sites). Our results indicate that urban species with extremely low sound frequencies such as doves can alter their vocalizations in response to variable urban acoustic environments.

  18. Intensity and phase noise correlations in a dual-frequency VECSEL operating at telecom wavelength

    CERN Document Server

    De, Syamsundar; Bouchoule, Sophie; Alouini, Mehdi; Bretenaker, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    The amplitude and phase noises of a dual-frequency vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (DF-VECSEL) operating at telecom wavelength are theoretically and experimentally investigated in detail. In particular, the spectral behavior of the correlation between the intensity noises of the two modes of the DF-VECSEL is measured. Moreover, the correlation between the phase noise of the radio-frequency (RF) beatnote generated by optical mixing of the two laser modes with the intensity noises of the two modes is investigated. All these spectral behaviors of noise correlations are analyzed for two different values of the nonlinear coupling between the laser modes. We find that to describe the spectral behavior of noise correlations between the laser modes, it is of utmost importance to have a precise knowledge about the spectral behavior of the pump noise, which is the dominant source of noise in the frequency range of our interest (10 kHz to 35 MHz). Moreover, it is found that the noise correlation also dep...

  19. Low frequency noise peak near magnon emission energy in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on the low frequency (LF noise measurements in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs below 4 K and at low bias, where the transport is strongly affected by scattering with magnons emitted by hot tunnelling electrons, as thermal activation of magnons from the environment is suppressed. For both CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB and CoFeB/AlOx/CoFeB MTJs, enhanced LF noise is observed at bias voltage around magnon emission energy, forming a peak in the bias dependence of noise power spectra density, independent of magnetic configurations. The noise peak is much higher and broader for unannealed AlOx-based MTJ, and besides Lorentzian shape noise spectra in the frequency domain, random telegraph noise (RTN is visible in the time traces. During repeated measurements the noise peak reduces and the RTN becomes difficult to resolve, suggesting defects being annealed. The Lorentzian shape noise spectra can be fitted with bias-dependent activation of RTN, with the attempt frequency in the MHz range, consistent with magnon dynamics. These findings suggest magnon-assisted activation of defects as the origin of the enhanced LF noise.

  20. Low frequency noise peak near magnon emission energy in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Liang; Xiang, Li; Guo, Huiqiang; Wei, Jian, E-mail: weijian6791@pku.edu.cn [International Center for Quantum Materials, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China and Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China); Li, D. L.; Yuan, Z. H.; Feng, J. F., E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Han, X. F. [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Coey, J. M. D. [CRANN and School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-12-15

    We report on the low frequency (LF) noise measurements in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) below 4 K and at low bias, where the transport is strongly affected by scattering with magnons emitted by hot tunnelling electrons, as thermal activation of magnons from the environment is suppressed. For both CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB and CoFeB/AlO{sub x}/CoFeB MTJs, enhanced LF noise is observed at bias voltage around magnon emission energy, forming a peak in the bias dependence of noise power spectra density, independent of magnetic configurations. The noise peak is much higher and broader for unannealed AlO{sub x}-based MTJ, and besides Lorentzian shape noise spectra in the frequency domain, random telegraph noise (RTN) is visible in the time traces. During repeated measurements the noise peak reduces and the RTN becomes difficult to resolve, suggesting defects being annealed. The Lorentzian shape noise spectra can be fitted with bias-dependent activation of RTN, with the attempt frequency in the MHz range, consistent with magnon dynamics. These findings suggest magnon-assisted activation of defects as the origin of the enhanced LF noise.

  1. Simulation of Low frequency Noise from a Downwind Wind Turbine Rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Helge Aa.; Johansen, Jeppe; Sørensen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    One of the major drawbacks of a wind turbine with a downwind rotor is the generation of considerable low frequency noise (so-called thumping noise) which can cause annoyance of people at a considerable distance. This was experienced on a number of full-scale turbines in e.g. US and Sweden in the ...

  2. Linear, Low Noise Microwave Photonic Systems using Phase and Frequency Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    a monolithically integrated widely-tunable laser- phase modulator ,” in Proc. Optical Fiber Communication Conf. OFC 2004, vol. 2, 2004. [92] M. N... modulation efficiency experimental setup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 5.5 DBR FM modulation efficiency versus frequency. . . . . . . . . . . . 71 v 5.6...Phase-noise limited noise figure for FM DBR lasers from measured modulation efficiency and linewidth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 5.7

  3. Comparison of objective methods for assessment of annoyance of low frequency noise with the results of a laboratory listening test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben

    2007-01-01

    , for the first time in one set of covers, over thirty papers on the effects of low frequency noise and vibration on people. The papers are arranged under five headings: • Perception thresholds for low frequency noise • Effect of low frequency noise on people in terms of annoyance and sleep deprivation...

  4. Low frequency voltage noise in current biased HTCS thin films. [BiSrCaCuO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gierlowski, P. (Inst. Fizyki PAN, Warszawa (Poland)); Jung, G. (Inst. Fizyki PAN, Warszawa (Poland) Physics Dept., Ben Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel) Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. di Salerno (Italy)); Kula, W. (Inst. Fizyki PAN, Warszawa (Poland) Electrical Engineering Dept., Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)); Lewandowski, S.J. (Inst. Fizyki PAN, Warszawa (Poland)); Savo, B. (Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. di Salerno (Italy)); Sobolewski, R. (Inst. Fizyki PAN, Warszawa (Poland) Electrical Engineering Dept., Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)); Tebano, A. (Dipt. di Ingegneria Meccanica, Univ. di Roma Tor-Vergata (Italy)); Vecchione, A. (Physics Dept., Ben Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel) Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. di Salerno (Italy))

    1994-02-01

    Pronounced changes in low-frequency noise power spectra have been observed, close to the transition temperature, in current biased high-T[sub c] superconducting thin films. Generally, the spectra scale as 1/f[sup [alpha

  5. Small foamed polystyrene shield protects low-frequency microphones from wind noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedrick, R. N.

    1964-01-01

    A foamed polystyrene noise shield for microphones has been designed in teardrop shape to minimize air turbulence. The shield slips on and off the microphone head easily and is very effective in low-frequency sound intensity measurements.

  6. Subjective evaluation of noise from neighbours with focus on low frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Frank Rysgaard

    1999-01-01

    There is a growing tendency to use lightweight constructions in the building industry. One unwanted side effect of this tendency is poor sound insulation at low frequencies. The purpose of this investigation has been to examine the subjective effects of the resulting increase of low frequency noi...... from neighbours in dwellings using listening tests. The results of the experiments confirm that noise from neighbours transmitted through light constructions is indeed rated more annoying than noise transmitted through heavier constructions....

  7. Reducing Raman noise in parametric frequency conversion by varying the input pump power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Andersen, Lasse Mejling; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    The phase-matching condition of parametric frequency conversion and the impact of Raman scattering depend on the power of two separate pumps. We show that Raman noise is reduced by asymmetrically varying the pump powers.......The phase-matching condition of parametric frequency conversion and the impact of Raman scattering depend on the power of two separate pumps. We show that Raman noise is reduced by asymmetrically varying the pump powers....

  8. Low Phase Noise SiGe Push-Push Oscillators for Millimeter Wave Frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis low phase noise SiGe HBT monolithically integrated push-push oscillators for millimeter wave frequency generation are investigated. Nonlinear simulation methods for oscillator signal and noise analysis and device physics at high currents and high voltages are discussed. Push-push oscillators with output frequencies from 63 GHz up to 280 GHz were designed and after fabrication in an external foundry investigated experimentally. For automotive radar applications a VCO with a cent...

  9. Application of Wavelet Packet De-noising in Time-Frequency Analysis of the Local Wave Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-kun; MA Xiao-jiang; WANG Zhen; ZHU Hong

    2003-01-01

    The local wave method is a very good time-frequency method for nonstationary vibration signal analysis. But the interfering noise has a big influence on the accuracy of time-frequency analysis. The wavelet packet de-noising method can eliminate the interference of noise and improve the signal-noise-ratio. This paper uses the local wave method to decompose the de-noising signal and perform a time-frequency analysis. We can get better characteristics. Finally, an example of wavelet packet de-noising and a local wave time-frequency spectrum application of diesel engine surface vibration signal is put forward.

  10. Noise-cancelled, cavity-enhanced saturation laser spectroscopy for laser frequency stabilisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, Glenn de; McClelland, David E; Gray, Malcolm B [Centre for Gravitational Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2006-03-02

    We employ a relatively simple experimental technique enabling mechanical-noise free, cavityenhanced spectroscopic measurements of an atomic transition and its hyperfine structure. We demonstrate this technique with the 532 nm frequency doubled output from a Nd:YAG laser and an iodine vapour cell. The resulting cavity-enhanced, noise-cancelled, iodine hyperfine error signal is used as a frequency reference with which we stabilise the frequency of the 1064nm Nd:YAG laser. Preliminary frequency stabilisation results are then presented.

  11. Clutter noise reduction for phased array imaging using frequency-spatial polarity coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongzhang, Rui; Gachagan, Anthony; Xiao, Bo

    2015-03-01

    A number of materials used in industry exhibit highly-scattering properties which can reduce the performance of conventional ultrasonic NDE approaches. Moving Bandwidth Polarity Thresholding (MBPT) is a robust frequency diversity based algorithm for scatter noise reduction in single A-scan waveforms, using sign coherence across a range of frequency bands to reduce grain noise and improve Signal to Noise Ratio. Importantly, for this approach to be extended to array applications, spatial variation of noise characteristics must also be considered. This paper presents a new spatial-frequency diversity based algorithm for array imaging, extended from MBPT. Each A-scan in the full matrix capture array dataset is partitioned into a serial of overlapped frequency bands and then undergoes polarity thresholding to generate sign-only coefficients indicating possible flaw locations within each selected band. These coefficients are synthesized to form a coefficient matrix using a delay and sum approach in each frequency band. Matrices produced across the frequency bands are then summed to generate a weighting matrix, which can be applied on any conventional image. A 5MHz linear array has been used to acquire data from both austenitic steel and high nickel alloy (HNA) samples to validate the proposed algorithm. Background noise is significantly suppressed for both samples after applying this approach. Importantly, three side drilled holes and the back wall of the HNA sample are clearly enhanced in the processed image, with a mean 133% Contrast to Noise Ratio improvement when compared to a conventional TFM image.

  12. SPECTRON, a neutron noise measurement system in frequency domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, G; Jammes, C; Geslot, B; Di Salvo, J; Destouches, C

    2015-11-01

    This paper is dedicated to the presentation and validation of SPECTRON, a novel neutron noise measurement system developed at CEA Cadarache. The device is designed for the measurement of the β(eff) parameter (effective fraction of delayed neutrons) of experimental nuclear reactors using the Cohn-α method. An integrated electronic system is used to record the current from fission chambers. Spectra computed from measurement data are processed by a dedicated software in order to estimate the reactor transfer function and then the effective fraction of delayed neutrons as well as the prompt neutron generation time. After a review of the pile noise measurement method in current mode, the SPECTRON architecture is presented. Then, the validation procedure is described and experimental results are shown, supporting the proper functioning of this new measurement system. It is shown that every technical requirement needed for correct measurement of neutron noise is fulfilled. Measurements performed at MINERVE and EOLE, two experimental nuclear reactors at CEA Cadarache, in real conditions allowed us to validate SPECTRON.

  13. Intelligibility of speech in noise at high presentation levels: effects of hearing loss and frequency region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Van; Cord, Mary T

    2007-08-01

    These experiments examined how high presentation levels influence speech recognition for high- and low-frequency stimuli in noise. Normally hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners were tested. In Experiment 1, high- and low-frequency bandwidths yielding 70%-correct word recognition in quiet were determined at levels associated with broadband speech at 75 dB SPL. In Experiment 2, broadband and band-limited sentences (based on passbands measured in Experiment 1) were presented at this level in speech-shaped noise filtered to the same frequency bandwidths as targets. Noise levels were adjusted to produce approximately 30%-correct word recognition. Frequency bandwidths and signal-to-noise ratios supporting criterion performance in Experiment 2 were tested at 75, 87.5, and 100 dB SPL in Experiment 3. Performance tended to decrease as levels increased. For NH listeners, this "rollover" effect was greater for high-frequency and broadband materials than for low-frequency stimuli. For HI listeners, the 75- to 87.5-dB increase improved signal audibility for high-frequency stimuli and rollover was not observed. However, the 87.5- to 100-dB increase produced qualitatively similar results for both groups: scores decreased most for high-frequency stimuli and least for low-frequency materials. Predictions of speech intelligibility by quantitative methods such as the Speech Intelligibility Index may be improved if rollover effects are modeled as frequency dependent.

  14. Low Noise Frequency Comb Sources Based on Synchronously Pumped Doubly Resonant Optical Parametric Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chenchen

    Optical frequency combs are coherent light sources consist of thousands of equally spaced frequency lines. Frequency combs have achieved success in applications of metrology, spectroscopy and precise pulse manipulation and control. The most common way to generate frequency combs is based on mode-locked lasers which has the output spectrum of comb structures. To generate stable frequency combs, the output from mode-locked lasers need to be phase stabilized. The whole comb lines will be stabilized if the pulse train repetition rate corresponding to comb spacing and the pulse carrier envelope offset (CEO) frequency are both stabilized. The output from a laser always has fluctuations in parameters known as noise. In laser applications, noise is an important factor to limit the performance and often need to be well controlled. For example in precision measurement such as frequency metrology and precise spectroscopy, low laser intensity and phase noise is required. In mode-locked lasers there are different types of noise like intensity noise, pulse temporal position noise also known as timing jitter, optical phase noise. In term for frequency combs, these noise dynamics is more complex and often related. Understanding the noise behavior is not only of great interest in practical applications but also help understand fundamental laser physics. In this dissertation, the noise of frequency combs and mode-locked lasers will be studied in two projects. First, the CEO frequency phase noise of a synchronously pumped doubly resonant optical parametric oscillators (OPO) will be explored. This is very important for applications of the OPO as a coherent frequency comb source. Another project will focus on the intensity noise coupling in a soliton fiber oscillator, the finding of different noise coupling in soliton pulses and the dispersive waves generated from soliton perturbation can provide very practical guidance for low noise soliton laser design. OPOs are used to generate

  15. Orthogonal frequency division multiplexed quantum key distribution in the presence of Raman noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Sima; Razavi, Mohsen; Salehi, Jawad A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of orthogonal frequency division multiplexed quantum key distribution (OFDM-QKD) in an integrated quantum-classical wavelength-division-multiplexing system. The presence of an intense classical signal alongside the quantum one generates Raman background noise. Noise reduction techniques should, then, be carried out at the receiver to suppress this crosstalk noise. In this work, we show that OFDM-QKD enables efficient filtering, in time and frequency domains, making it an attractive solution for the high-rate links at the core of quantum-classical networks.

  16. Reassigned time-frequency peak filtering for seismic random noise attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H.; Li, Y.; Ma, H.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic noise attenuation for the aim of improving signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) plays an important role in seismic data processing for detailed description of oil and gas reservoirs. In particular, strong seismic random noise, which is unpredictable and incoherent in space and time, always degrades the qualities of seismic exploration and much more difficult to be suppressed than coherent noise, since only its statistical properties can be used. It is a common problem in random noise attenuation to keep the signal with minimized distortion. Multi-direction, multi-scale and time-varying methods can be considered as appropriate for tracking the signal characteristics varying in time. In particular, time-frequency based methods might better recover the local characteristics of the non-stationary seismic signal, which is important to produce a satisfactory random noise attenuation result. Time-frequency peak filtering(TFPF), which has already proved to be a powerful tool for Gaussian random noise attenuation in linear signal, can be alternative tool for seismic random noise attenuation. Indeed, seismic noise sometimes may have an asymmetric Wigner-Ville spectrum(WVS) and the seismic signal is nonlinear in time, which might induce amplitude attenuation and residual random noise in the results. This work reports the preliminary results from an improved TFPF method planned to obtain more accurate estimation of the seismic signal by increasing the signal concentration of the time-frequency distribution(TFD) during TFPF. At the beginning the improved reassignment TFPF(RTFPF) encoded the seismic trace as an instantaneous frequency (IF) of the analytic signal generated by frequency modulation. After that the smooth pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution(SPWVD) of the coded analytic signal was computed. The separate frequency window of the SPWVD helps to smooth away the random oscillations introduced by the WVS of seismic noise and nonlinear signal component in the pseudo Wigner

  17. Effects of noise on the frequency response of the monostable Duffing oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Edmon

    2017-03-01

    The influence of noise on the frequency response of the monostable, hardening Duffing oscillator is studied. These changes are studied via the averaged dynamics (using Euler-Maruyama simulations) as well as experiments. It is found that for intermediate noise amplitudes, the qualitative shape of the frequency response curve is changed. For large noise amplitudes, the upper and lower branches of the hysteresis curve collapse into one curve. These results could be of practical significance, if an oscillator is desired to be placed on the upper or lower branch of the hysteresis curve.

  18. Occupational Noise Frequencies and the Incidence of Hypertension in a Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chiu-Shong; Young, Li-Hao; Yu, Tzu-Yi; Bao, Bo-Ying; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2016-07-15

    Occupational noise exposure is associated with cardiovascular disease, but little is known about the contributions of noise frequency components. This retrospective study investigated the relationship between exposure to different noise frequencies and the incidence of hypertension. A cohort of 1,002 volunteers from 4 machinery and equipment manufacturing companies in Taichung, Taiwan, was followed from 1973 to 2012. Personal noise measurements and environmental octave-band analyses were performed to divide subjects into different exposure groups. Cox regression models were used to estimate the relative risk of hypertension. Participants exposed to ≥80 A-weighted decibels (dBA) over 8 years had a higher relative risk of hypertension (relative risk = 1.38, 95% confidence interval: 1.02, 1.85) compared with those exposed to <75 dBA. Significant exposure-response patterns were observed between incident hypertension and stratum of noise exposure at frequencies of 250 Hz, 1 kHz, 2 kHz, 4 kHz, and 8 kHz. The strongest effect was found at 4 kHz; a 20-dBA increase in noise exposure at 4 kHz was associated with a 34% higher risk of hypertension (relative risk = 1.34, 95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.77). Occupational noise exposure may be associated with an increased risk of hypertension, and the 4 kHz component of occupational noise exposure may have the strongest relationship with hypertension.

  19. Portable Low-Frequency Noise Reduction Device for Both Small Open and Closed Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise pollution has been given more attention due to its negative impacts on human health and disease. The portable low-frequency noise reduction device we developed in this research can provide an effective way for solving low-frequency noise pollution problem in the small space. This work describes the design principle and the prototype structures for two versions of V1.5 and V2.0 and builds the noise test systems for small spaces, respectively. These devices, installed on the outer surface of the small spaces, can automatically identify the noise spectrum and implement noise reduction by means of the active noise control (ANC technology. The testing results indicate that the noise can be reduced 12 dB in the range of 250 Hz~400 Hz for the small closed space while, for the small open space, the best effect of 5.88 dB occurs in the optimal frequency of 450 Hz. These effects will be weakened with the increasing distance away from the source and show the obvious axisymmetric distribution in the inverted cone space.

  20. Suppression of low-frequency charge noise in gates-defined GaAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Jie; Li, Hai-Ou, E-mail: haiouli@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: gpguo@ustc.edu.cn; Wang, Ke; Cao, Gang; Song, Xiang-Xiang; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guo-Ping, E-mail: haiouli@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: gpguo@ustc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, Chinese Academy of Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-12-07

    To reduce the charge noise of a modulation-doped GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dot, we have fabricated shallow-etched GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots using the wet-etching method to study the effects of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) underneath the metallic gates. The low-frequency 1/f noise in the Coulomb blockade region of the shallow-etched quantum dot is compared with a non-etched quantum dot on the same wafer. The average values of the gate noise are approximately 0.5 μeV in the shallow-etched quantum dot and 3 μeV in the regular quantum dot. Our results show the quantum dot low-frequency charge noise can be suppressed by the removal of the 2DEG underneath the metallic gates, which provides an architecture for noise reduction.

  1. Low Complexity Direction and Doppler Frequency Estimation for Bistatic MIMO Radar in Spatial Colored Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyun Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the algorithm of direction and Doppler frequency estimation for bistatic multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO radar in spatial colored noise. A novel method of joint estimation of direction and Doppler frequency in spatial colored noise based on propagator method (PM for bistatic MIMO radar is discussed. Utilizing the cross-correlation matrix which is formed by the adjacent outputs of match filter in the time domain, the special matrix is constructed to eliminate the influence of spatial colored noise. The proposed algorithm provides lower computational complexity and has very close parameters estimation compared to estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT algorithm in high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. It is applicable even if the transmitted waveforms are not orthogonal. The estimated parameters can be paired automatically and the Cramér-Rao Bound (CRB is given in spatial colored noise. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Nonlinear modification of the laser noise power spectrum induced by a frequency-shifted optical feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Lacot, Eric; Girardeau, Vadim; Hugon, Olivier; Jacquin, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we study the non-linear coupling between the stationary (i.e. the beating modulation signal) and transient (i.e. the laser quantum noise) dynamics of a laser subjected to frequency shifted optical feedback. We show how the noise power spectrum and more specifically the relaxation oscillation frequency of the laser are modified under different optical feedback condition. Specifically we study the influence of (i) the amount of light returning to the laser cavity and (ii) the initial detuning between the frequency shift and intrinsic relaxation frequency. The present work shows how the relaxation frequency is related to the strength of the beating signal and the shape of the noise power spectrum gives an image of the Transfer Modulation Function (i.e. of the amplification gain) of the nonlinear-laser dynamics.The theoretical predictions, confirmed by numerical resolutions, are in good agreements with the experimental data.

  3. Dolphins adjust species-specific frequency parameters to compensate for increasing background noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papale, Elena; Gamba, Marco; Perez-Gil, Monica; Martin, Vidal Martel; Giacoma, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    An increase in ocean noise levels could interfere with acoustic communication of marine mammals. In this study we explored the effects of anthropogenic and natural noise on the acoustic properties of a dolphin communication signal, the whistle. A towed array with four elements was used to record environmental background noise and whistles of short-beaked common-, Atlantic spotted- and striped-dolphins in the Canaries archipelago. Four frequency parameters were measured from each whistle, while Sound Pressure Levels (SPL) of the background noise were measured at the central frequencies of seven one-third octave bands, from 5 to 20 kHz. Results show that dolphins increase the whistles' frequency parameters with lower variability in the presence of anthropogenic noise, and increase the end frequency of their whistles when confronted with increasing natural noise. This study provides the first evidence that the synergy among SPLs has a role in shaping the whistles' structure of these three species, with respect to both natural and anthropogenic noise.

  4. Measurements of Low Frequency Noise of Infrared Photo-Detectors with Transimpedance Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciura Łukasz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the method and results of low-frequency noise measurements of modern mid-wavelength infrared photodetectors. A type-II InAs/GaSb superlattice based detector with nBn barrier architecture is compared with a high operating temperature (HOT heterojunction HgCdTe detector. All experiments were made in the range 1 Hz - 10 kHz at various temperatures by using a transimpedance detection system, which is examined in detail. The power spectral density of the nBn’s dark current noise includes Lorentzians with different time constants while the HgCdTe photodiode has more uniform 1/f - shaped spectra. For small bias, the low-frequency noise power spectra of both devices were found to scale linearly with bias voltage squared and were connected with the fluctuations of the leakage resistance. Leakage resistance noise defines the lower noise limit of a photodetector. Other dark current components give raise to the increase of low-frequency noise above this limit. For the same voltage biasing devices, the absolute noise power densities at 1 Hz in nBn are 1 to 2 orders of magnitude lower than in a MCT HgCdTe detector. In spite of this, low-frequency performance of the HgCdTe detector at ~ 230K is still better than that of InAs/GaSb superlattice nBn detector.

  5. Frequency domain analysis of errors in cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Ben-Zion, Yehuda; Zigone, Dimitri

    2016-12-01

    We analyse random errors (variances) in cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise in the frequency domain, which differ from previous time domain methods. Extending previous theoretical results on ensemble averaged cross-spectrum, we estimate confidence interval of stacked cross-spectrum of finite amount of data at each frequency using non-overlapping windows with fixed length. The extended theory also connects amplitude and phase variances with the variance of each complex spectrum value. Analysis of synthetic stationary ambient noise is used to estimate the confidence interval of stacked cross-spectrum obtained with different length of noise data corresponding to different number of evenly spaced windows of the same duration. This method allows estimating Signal/Noise Ratio (SNR) of noise cross-correlation in the frequency domain, without specifying filter bandwidth or signal/noise windows that are needed for time domain SNR estimations. Based on synthetic ambient noise data, we also compare the probability distributions, causal part amplitude and SNR of stacked cross-spectrum function using one-bit normalization or pre-whitening with those obtained without these pre-processing steps. Natural continuous noise records contain both ambient noise and small earthquakes that are inseparable from the noise with the existing pre-processing steps. Using probability distributions of random cross-spectrum values based on the theoretical results provides an effective way to exclude such small earthquakes, and additional data segments (outliers) contaminated by signals of different statistics (e.g. rain, cultural noise), from continuous noise waveforms. This technique is applied to constrain values and uncertainties of amplitude and phase velocity of stacked noise cross-spectrum at different frequencies, using data from southern California at both regional scale (˜35 km) and dense linear array (˜20 m) across the plate-boundary faults. A block bootstrap resampling method

  6. High-frequency hearing thresholds: effects of age, occupational ultrasound and noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccà, Isabella; Scapellato, Maria Luisa; Carrieri, Mariella; Maso, Stefano; Trevisan, Andrea; Bartolucci, Giovanni Battista

    2015-02-01

    It has been suggested that high-frequency audiometry (HFA) could represent a useful preventive measure in exposed workers. The aim was to investigate the effects of age, ultrasound and noise on high-frequency hearing thresholds. We tested 24 industrial ultrasound-exposed subjects, 113 industrial noise-exposed subjects and 148 non-exposed subjects. Each subject was tested with both conventional-frequency (0.125-8 kHz) and high-frequency (9-18 kHz) audiometry. The hearing threshold at high frequency deteriorated as a function of age, especially in subjects more than 30 years old. The ultrasound-exposed subjects had significantly higher hearing thresholds than the non-exposed ones at the high frequencies, being greatest from 10 to 14 kHz. This hearing loss was already significantly evident in subjects with exposure frequencies 4 and 6 kHz and at the high frequency of 14 kHz. After stratification for age, there was a significant difference between the two groups at 9-10 and 14-15 kHz only for those under 30 years of age. Multivariate analysis indicated that age was the primary predictor, and noise and ultrasound exposure the secondary predictors of hearing thresholds in the high-frequency range. The results suggest that HFA could be useful in the early diagnosis of noise-induced hearing loss in younger groups of workers (under 30 years of age).

  7. A Simple Approach to Determine Noise Frequency of Boiler Drum Level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposed a simple approach to determine noise frequency of boiler drum level in order to improve control performance. Based on analysis of uncertainty of drum level, the redundant oscillation component of signal, noise is ascribed to the surface wave of drum water. According to the characteristic of surface wave, a new method was proposed to determine noise's frequency band. By gradually removing the lowest frequency component of signal, the variance of remained component is calculated and observed. An apparent turning point was found and the corresponding critical frequcncy was determined. With this result a low-pass filter was designed to separate noise component. Finally validation is conducted by comparing the proposed method and conventional ones. Results show the accuracy and simpleness of the proposed method.

  8. Suppression of random noise by the separation of frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Tibabishev, V N

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that a well-known theory of random stationary processes contain contradictions. Integral representations of correlation functions and random stationary processes are investigated further. The new method of struggle with handicaps is received on the basis of the carried out researches. Method of dealing with noise leads to a new method of identification of dynamic characteristics of control objects in a class of multidimensional linear stationary models. As an example, describe an algorithm for obtaining the differential equation-wire feed control aircraft pitch, taking into account the elastic deformation of the structure of class IL -96 aircraft.

  9. A study of twenty-one cases of low-frequency noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    -frequency tinnitus. Noise recordings were made in the homes of the complainants, and the complainants were exposed to these in blind test listening experiments. Furthermore, the low-frequency hearing function of the complainants was investigated, and characteristics of the annoying sound was matched. The results...... showed that some of the complainants are annoyed by a physical sound (20-180 Hz), while others suffer from low-frequency tinnitus (perceived frequency 40-100 Hz). Physical sound at frequencies below 20 Hz (infrasound) is not responsible for the annoyance - or at all audible - in any of the investigated...... cases, and none of the complainants has extraordinary hearing sensitivity at low frequencies. For comparable cases of low-frequency noise complaints in general, it is anticipated that physical sound is responsible in a substantial part of the cases, while lowfrequency tinnitus is responsible in another...

  10. Residual Phase Noise and Time Jitters of Single-Chip Digital Frequency Dividers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu-Lu Yan; Sen Meng; Wen-Yu Zhao; Wen-Ge Guo; Hai-Feng Jiang; Shou-Gang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract-In this paper, we demonstrate the residual phase noise of a few microwave frequency dividers which usually limit the performance of frequency synthesizers. In order to compare these dividers under different operation frequencies, we calculate additional time jitters of these dividers by using the measured phase noise. The time jitters are various from ~0.1fs to 43fs in a bandwidth from 1Hz to 100Hz in dependent of models and operation frequencies. The HMC series frequency dividers exhibit outstanding performance for high operation frequencies, and the time jitters can be sub-fs. The time jitters of SP8401, MC10EP139, and MC100LVEL34 are comparable or even below that of HMC series for low operation frequencies.

  11. Frequency Content of Ambient Seismic Noise in North-Central Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuera-Diaz, I. C.; Carpenter, P. J.

    2004-12-01

    High and low-frequency ground motion vibration measurements were made in DeKalb and Kane Counties, Illinois, to characterize different sources of seismic noise and determine directions and magnitude of motion produced by each source. The Seismic Analysis Code 2000 (SAC2000) was used to process seismic noise data recorded with a low-frequency digital system,, earthquake records downloaded from the WILBER Web site, and noise data recorded by an engineering seismograph with high-frequency geophones. Power-spectral density estimates were computed from an autocorrelation series in most cases. Using the power density spectra routine of SAC2000, selecting autocorrelation windows of 20 s for the low-frequency data and 2 s for the high-frequency data, we have found distinctive seismic noise peaks among the different sites, regardless of the background noise level. The earthquake low-frequency data showed a microseism peak at a frequency of 0.2 Hz for stations located in the Midwestern U.S. Microseism peak frequency did not decrease with increasing distance from Lake Michigan, suggesting the lake is not the primary source of the microseisms, which may be generated in ocean basins. Ambient ground motion recorded by the Northern Illinois University seismic station with a 2 Hz natural period seismometer exhibited peaks around 0.8 and 2.2 Hz. Ground motion from trains, traffic, air-conditioning units and water pumping equipment was recorded with an engineering seismograph. Vertical geophones of natural frequency 2, 8, and 50 Hz were used, as well as a 4.5 Hz horizontal geophone. Train noise exhibits strong peaks in the 5-10 Hz range, both for the vertical and horizontal geophones. Noise peaks at 25, 60, 90 and 115 Hz are probably related to traffic, electrical transformers, and air-conditioning units. Measurements made near a sewage treatment plant in DeKalb showed peaks at 10, 30, 93, and 109 Hz, probably related to pumping and mechanical equipment. Seismic noise collected

  12. Narrow sidebranch arrays for low frequency duct noise control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S K

    2012-11-01

    The present study investigates the sound transmission loss across a section of an infinitely long duct where one or more narrow sidebranch tubes are installed flushed with the duct wall. The finite-element method is used to compute the wave propagation characteristics, and a simplified theoretical analysis is carried out at the same time to explain the wave mechanism at frequencies of high sound reduction. Results show that the high sound transmission loss at a particular frequency is due to the concerted actions of three consecutive sidebranch tubes with the most upstream one in the resonant state. The expansion chamber effect of the setup also plays a role in enhancing sound attenuation at non-resonance frequencies. Broadband performance of the device can be greatly enhanced by appropriate arrangements of tube lengths and/or by coupling arrays on the two sides of the duct.

  13. Individual differences in low-frequency noise perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Marquardt, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    in the FMETF where the slope changes approx. 6 dB/octave (around 40-65 Hz depending on person). The change in slope is attributed to the shunting effect of the helicotrema. A preliminary study has been carried out in order to see if this resonance feature measured objectively is also found in perceptual data...... frequency range where they are more sensitive and a narrow range where they are less sensitive compared to the standards. Since the frequency range is subject dependent this could explain why some people are annoyed by a lowfrequency sound that is not audible to other people....

  14. Frequency noise suppression of a single mode laser with an unbalanced fiber interferometer for subnanometer interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmíd, Radek; Čížek, Martin; Mikel, Břetislav; Číp, Ondřej

    2015-01-12

    We present a method of noise suppression of laser diodes by an unbalanced Michelson fiber interferometer. The unstabilized laser source is represented by compact planar waveguide external cavity laser module, ORIONTM (Redfern Integrated Optics, Inc.), working at 1540.57 nm with a 1.5-kHz linewidth. We built up the unbalanced Michelson interferometer with a 2.09 km-long arm based on the standard telecommunication single-mode fiber (SMF-28) spool to suppress the frequency noise by the servo-loop control by 20 dB to 40 dB within the Fourier frequency range, remaining the tuning range of the laser frequency.

  15. A Verilog-A Based Fractional Frequency Synthesizer Model for Fast and Accurate Noise Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Gonzalez-Diaz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new strategy to simulate fractional frequency synthesizer behavioral models with better performance and reduced simulation time. The models are described in Verilog-A with accurate phase noise predictions and they are based on a time jitter to power spectral density transformation of the principal noise sources in a synthesizer. The results of a fractional frequency synthesizer simulation is compared with state of the art Verilog-A descriptions showing a reduction of nearly 20 times. In addition, experimental results of a fractional frequency synthesizer are compared to the simulation results to validate the proposed model.

  16. Symmetry based frequency domain processing to remove harmonic noise from surface nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Annette; Larsen, Jakob Juul; Parsekian, Andrew D.

    2017-02-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a unique geophysical method due to its direct sensitivity to water. A key limitation to overcome is the difficulty of making surface NMR measurements in environments with anthropogenic electromagnetic noise, particularly constant frequency sources such as powerlines. Here we present a method of removing harmonic noise by utilizing frequency domain symmetry of surface NMR signals to reconstruct portions of the spectrum corrupted by frequency-domain noise peaks. This method supplements the existing NMR processing workflow and is applicable after despiking, coherent noise cancellation, and stacking. The symmetry based correction is simple, grounded in mathematical theory describing NMR signals, does not introduce errors into the data set, and requires no prior knowledge about the harmonics. Modelling and field examples show that symmetry based noise removal reduces the effects of harmonics. In one modelling example, symmetry based noise removal improved signal-to-noise ratio in the data by 10 per cent. This improvement had noticeable effects on inversion parameters including water content and the decay constant T2*. Within water content profiles, aquifer boundaries and water content are more accurate after harmonics are removed. Fewer spurious water content spikes appear within aquifers, which is especially useful for resolving multilayered structures. Within T2* profiles, estimates are more accurate after harmonics are removed, especially in the lower half of profiles.

  17. Effect of low frequency noise on the evolution of the emittance and halo population

    CERN Document Server

    Fitterer, Miriam; Antoniou, Fanouria; Bravin, Enrico; Bruce, Roderik; Fartoukh, Stephane; Fuchsberger, Kajetan; Hofle, Wolfgang; Gasior, Marek; Jaussi, Michael; Jacquet, Delphine; Kotzian, Gerd; Olexa, Jakub; Papadopoulou, Parthena Stefania; Papotti, Giulia; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Stancari, Giulio; Trad, Georges; Valuch, Daniel; Valentino, Gianluca; Wagner, Joschka; Wenninger, Jorg; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    For the High Luminosity upgrade the β* in IR1 and IR5 will be further reduced compared to the current LHC. As the β* decreases the β-functions in the inner triplet (IT) increase resulting in a higher sensitivity of the HL-LHC to ground motion in the IT region or to increases of the low frequency noise. Noise can in general lead to emittance growth and higher halo population and diffusion rate. However, it is usually assumed in the literature that only frequencies close to the betatron frequencies and sidebands have an effect on the emittance and tail population. To test this theory, an MD was carried out to observe if also low frequency noise can lead to emittance growth and stronger halo population and diffusion.

  18. Low-frequency suppression of random-telegraph-noise spectra in high-temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashkenazy, V.D. (Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, 52100, Ramat Gan (Israel)); Jung, G. (Department of Physics, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, 84105 Beer-Sheva (Israel) Instytut Fizuki, Polish Academy of Sciences, 02668 Warszawa (Poland)); Khalfin, I.B. (Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, 52100, Ramat Gan (Israel)); Shapiro, B.Y. (Jack and Pearl Resnik Institute of Advanced Technology, Bar-Ilan University, 52100, Ramat Gan (Israel) Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, 52100, Ramat Gan (Israel))

    1995-01-01

    Interaction of the random-telegraph-noise signals with pinned Abrikosov vortices in granular high-temperature superconductors is investigated. It is shown that the low-frequency part of random-noise spectra is suppressed due to interaction of Abrikosov vortices with pinning centers at low magnetic fields and/or due to mutual interactions of vortices in an Abrikosov lattice at high magnetic fields. Values of characteristic frequencies below which spectra are suppressed are evaluated for various experimental configurations including a typical experimental thin-film strip geometry. It is shown that characteristic frequencies and the functional dependence of the low-frequency part of the noise spectra strongly depend on the external magnetic field.

  19. Recognition of speech in noise after application of time-frequency masks: dependence on frequency and threshold parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinex, Donal G

    2013-04-01

    Binary time-frequency (TF) masks can be applied to separate speech from noise. Previous studies have shown that with appropriate parameters, ideal TF masks can extract highly intelligible speech even at very low speech-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Two psychophysical experiments provided additional information about the dependence of intelligibility on the frequency resolution and threshold criteria that define the ideal TF mask. Listeners identified AzBio Sentences in noise, before and after application of TF masks. Masks generated with 8 or 16 frequency bands per octave supported nearly-perfect identification. Word recognition accuracy was slightly lower and more variable with 4 bands per octave. When TF masks were generated with a local threshold criterion of 0 dB SNR, the mean speech reception threshold was -9.5 dB SNR, compared to -5.7 dB for unprocessed sentences in noise. Speech reception thresholds decreased by about 1 dB per dB of additional decrease in the local threshold criterion. Information reported here about the dependence of speech intelligibility on frequency and level parameters has relevance for the development of non-ideal TF masks for clinical applications such as speech processing for hearing aids.

  20. A noise level prediction method based on electro-mechanical frequency response function for capacitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyu Zhu

    Full Text Available The capacitors in high-voltage direct-current (HVDC converter stations radiate a lot of audible noise which can reach higher than 100 dB. The existing noise level prediction methods are not satisfying enough. In this paper, a new noise level prediction method is proposed based on a frequency response function considering both electrical and mechanical characteristics of capacitors. The electro-mechanical frequency response function (EMFRF is defined as the frequency domain quotient of the vibration response and the squared capacitor voltage, and it is obtained from impulse current experiment. Under given excitations, the vibration response of the capacitor tank is the product of EMFRF and the square of the given capacitor voltage in frequency domain, and the radiated audible noise is calculated by structure acoustic coupling formulas. The noise level under the same excitations is also measured in laboratory, and the results are compared with the prediction. The comparison proves that the noise prediction method is effective.

  1. Comparison of objective methods for assessment of annoyance of low frequency noise with the results of a laboratory listening test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Torben

    2003-01-01

    of the noises. The noises were stationary noise with and without tones, intermittent noise, music, traffic noise and impulsive low frequency noise. The noises were presented twice in a random order at L-Aeq levels of 20 dB, 27.5 dB and 35 dB. The assessment methods were those used in Sweden, Germany......, The Netherlands, Poland and Denmark. It was found that the Danish assessment method gave the best relation to the subjective assessments made by the test persons. An important property of this method is that it includes a 5 dB penalty for noises having an impulsive character....

  2. Noise characterization of an atomic magnetometer at sub-millihertz frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Mateos, I; Zhivun, E; Budker, D; Wurm, D; Ramos-Castro, J

    2015-01-01

    Noise measurements have been carried out in the LISA bandwidth (0.1 mHz to 100 mHz) to characterize an all-optical atomic magnetometer based on nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. This was done in order to assess if the technology can be used for space missions with demanding low-frequency requirements like the LISA concept. Magnetometry for low-frequency applications is usually limited by $1/f$ noise and thermal drifts, which become the dominant contributions at sub-millihertz frequencies. Magnetic field measurements with atomic magnetometers are not immune to low-frequency fluctuations and significant excess noise may arise due to external elements, such as temperature fluctuations or intrinsic noise in the electronics. In addition, low-frequency drifts in the applied magnetic field have been identified in order to distinguish their noise contribution from that of the sensor. We have found the technology suitable for LISA in terms of sensitivity, although further work must be done to characterize the low-fr...

  3. Consideration of some factors affecting low-frequency fuselage noise transmission for propeller aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixson, J. S.; Roussos, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    Possible reasons for disagreement between measured and predicted trends of sidewall noise transmission at low frequency are investigated using simplified analysis methods. An analytical model combining incident plane acoustic waves with an infinite flat panel is used to study the effects of sound incidence angle, plate structural properties, frequency, absorption, and the difference between noise reduction and transmission loss. Analysis shows that these factors have significant effects on noise transmission but they do not account for the differences between measured and predicted trends at low frequencies. An analytical model combining an infinite flat plate with a normally incident acoustic wave having exponentially decaying magnitude along one coordinate is used to study the effect of a localized source distribution such as is associated with propeller noise. Results show that the localization brings the predicted low-frequency trend of noise transmission into better agreement with measured propeller results. This effect is independent of low-frequency stiffness effects that have been previously reported to be associated with boundary conditions.

  4. Subtraction of temperature induced phase noise in the LISA frequency band

    CERN Document Server

    Nofrarias, M; Karnesis, N; Garcia, A F; Hewitson, M; Heinzel, G; Danzmann, K

    2013-01-01

    Temperature fluctuations are expected to be one of the limiting factors for gravitational wave detectors in the very low frequency range. Here we report the characterisation of this noise source in the LISA Pathfinder optical bench and propose a method to remove its contribution from the data. Our results show that temperature fluctuations are indeed limiting our measurement below one millihertz, and that their subtraction leads to a factor 5.6 (15 dB) reduction in the noise level at the lower end of the LISA measurement band 10^{-4} Hz, which increases to 20.2 (26 dB) at even lower frequencies, i.e., 1.5x10^{-5} Hz. The method presented here can be applied to the subtraction of other noise sources in gravitational wave detectors in the general situation where multiple sensors are used to characterise the noise source.

  5. Speech Enhancement with Natural Sounding Residual Noise Based on Connected Time-Frequency Speech Presence Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørensen Karsten Vandborg

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose time-frequency domain methods for noise estimation and speech enhancement. A speech presence detection method is used to find connected time-frequency regions of speech presence. These regions are used by a noise estimation method and both the speech presence decisions and the noise estimate are used in the speech enhancement method. Different attenuation rules are applied to regions with and without speech presence to achieve enhanced speech with natural sounding attenuated background noise. The proposed speech enhancement method has a computational complexity, which makes it feasible for application in hearing aids. An informal listening test shows that the proposed speech enhancement method has significantly higher mean opinion scores than minimum mean-square error log-spectral amplitude (MMSE-LSA and decision-directed MMSE-LSA.

  6. Adaptive Feed-Forward Control of Low Frequency Interior Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Kletschkowski, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This book presents a mechatronic approach to Active Noise Control (ANC). It describes the required elements of system theory, engineering acoustics, electroacoustics and adaptive signal processing in a comprehensive, consistent and systematic manner using a unified notation. Furthermore, it includes a design methodology for ANC-systems, explains its application and describes tools to be used for ANC-system design. From the research point of view, the book presents new approaches to sound source localization in weakly damped interiors. One is based on the inverse finite element method, the other is based on a sound intensity probe with an active free field. Furthermore, a prototype of an ANC-system able to reach the physical limits of local (feed-forward) ANC is described. This is one example for applied research in ANC-system design. Other examples are given for (i) local ANC in a semi-enclosed subspace of an aircraft cargo hold and (ii) for the combination of audio entertainment with ANC.

  7. Snapping shrimp noise mitigation based on statistical detection in underwater acoustic orthogonal frequency division multiplexing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeonsu; Seo, Jongpil; Ahn, Jongmin; Chung, Jaehak

    2017-07-01

    We propose a mitigation scheme for snapping shrimp noise when it corrupts an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal in underwater acoustic communication systems. The OFDM signal distorted by the snapping shrimp noise is filtered by a band-stop filter. The snapping shrimp noises in the filtered signal are detected by a detector with a constant false alarm rate whose threshold is derived theoretically from the statistics of the background noise. The detected signals are reconstructed by a simple reconstruction method. The proposed scheme has a higher detection capability and a lower mean square error of the channel estimation for simulated data and a lower bit error rate for practical ocean OFDM data collected in northern East China Sea than the conventional noise-mitigating methods.

  8. Microwave noise temperature and attenuation of clouds at frequencies below 50 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobin, S. D.

    1981-01-01

    The microwave attenuation and noise temperature effects of clouds can result in serious degradation of telecommunications link performance, especially for low-noise systems presently used in deep-space communications. Although cloud effects are generally less than rain effects, the frequent presence of clouds will cause some amount of link degradation a large portion of the time. Cloud types, water particle densities, radiative transfer, attenuation and noise temperature calculations are reviewed and examples of basic link signal to noise ratio calculations are given. Calculations for twelve different cloud models are presented for frequencies of from 1 to 50 GHz and elevation angles of 30 degrees and 90 degrees. These case results may be used as a handbook to predict noise temperature and attenuation values for known or forecast cloud conditions.

  9. Temporal and spatial variations in road traffic noise for different frequency components in metropolitan Taichung, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ven-Shing; Lo, Ei-Wen; Liang, Chih-Hsiang; Chao, Keh-Ping; Bao, Bo-Ying; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    Road traffic noise exposure has been associated with auditory and non-auditory health effects, but few studies report noise characteristics. This study determines 24-h noise levels and analyzes their frequency components to investigate associations between seasons, meteorology, land-use types, and traffic. We set up 50 monitoring stations covering ten different land-use types and conducted measurements at three times of the year to obtain 24-h-average A-weighted equivalent noise levels (LAeq,24h) and frequency analyses from 2013 to 2014 in Taichung, Taiwan. Information on land-use types, road parameters, traffic flow rates, and meteorological variables was also collected for analysis with the annual averages of road traffic noise and its frequency components. The annual average LAeq,24h in Taichung was 66.4 ± 4.7 A-weighed decibels (dBA). Significant differences in LAeq,24h and frequency components were observed between land-use types (all p-values traffic flow rates, and land-use types were significantly associated with annual average LAeq,24h (all p-values traffic (Spearman's coefficient = 0.795) and the highest prediction in the multiple linear regression (R(2) = 0.803; adjusted R(2) = 0.765). These findings reveal the spatial variation in road traffic noise exposure in Taichung. The highest correlation and predictive capacity was observed between this variation and noise levels at 125 Hz. We recommend that governmental agencies should take actions to reduce noise levels from traffic vehicles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Frequency and Phase Noise in Non-Linear Microwave Oscillator Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Tannous, C.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a new methodology and a time-domain software package for the estimation of the oscillation frequency and the phase noise spectrum of non-linear noisy microwave circuits based on the direct integration of the system of stochastic differential equations representing the circuit. Our theoretical evaluations can be used in order to make detailed comparisons with the experimental measurements of phase noise spectra in selected oscillating circuits.

  11. Detection of low frequency impulsive noise from large wind turbine generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, K. P.

    1985-01-01

    The thresholds of detection of low frequency, impulsive wind turbine sounds in the presence of background noise were examined. Seven wind turbine sounds, six of which were synthesized, were used in conjunction with three background noise conditions; quiet, 35, and 45 dB(A). The results indicate that thresholds of detection are predictable based on assumed characteristics of the auditory system. The synthesized wind turbine sounds were found to adequately represent a real recording.

  12. High-frequency audiometry: a means for early diagnosis of noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrparvar, Amir H; Mirmohammadi, Seyyed J; Ghoreyshi, Abbas; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Loukzadeh, Ziba

    2011-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), an irreversible disorder, is a common problem in industrial settings. Early diagnosis of NIHL can help prevent the progression of hearing loss, especially in speech frequencies. For early diagnosis of NIHL, audiometry is performed routinely in conventional frequencies. We designed this study to compare the effect of noise on high-frequency audiometry (HFA) and conventional audiometry. In a historical cohort study, we compared hearing threshold and prevalence of hearing loss in conventional and high frequencies of audiometry among textile workers divided into two groups: With and without exposure to noise more than 85 dB. The highest hearing threshold was observed at 4000 Hz, 6000 Hz and 16000 Hz in conventional right ear audiometry, conventional left ear audiometry and HFA in each ear, respectively. The hearing threshold was significantly higher at 16000 Hz compared to 4000. Hearing loss was more common in HFA than conventional audiometry. HFA is more sensitive to detect NIHL than conventional audiometry. It can be useful for early diagnosis of hearing sensitivity to noise, and thus preventing hearing loss in lower frequencies especially speech frequencies.

  13. Experimental demonstration of a dual-frequency laser free from anti-phase noise

    CERN Document Server

    Amili, Abdelkrim El; De, Syamsundar; Schwartz, Sylvain; Feugnet, Gilles; Pocholle, Jean-Paul; Bretenaker, Fabien; Alouini, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    A reduction of more than 20 dB of the intensity noise at the anti-phase relaxation oscillation frequency is experimentally demonstrated in a two-polarization dual-frequency solid-state laser without any optical or electronic feedback loop. Such a behavior is inherently obtained by aligning the two orthogonally polarized oscillating modes with the crystallographic axes of a (100)-cut neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet active medium. The anti-phase noise level is shown to increase as soon as one departs from this peculiar configuration, evidencing the predominant role of the nonlinear coupling constant. This experimental demonstration opens new perspectives on the design and realization of extremely low noise dual-frequency solid-state lasers.

  14. Intensity noise in diode-pumped single-frequency Nd:YAG lasers and its control by electronic feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    The power spectrum of the relative intensity noise (RIN) of single-frequency diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers is observed to be shot-noise limited at frequencies above 20 MHz for a photocurrent of up to 4.4 mA. Relaxation oscillations result in noise 60-70 dB above shot noise at a few hundred kHz. These relaxation oscillations have been suppressed using electronic feedback.

  15. High Resolution Flicker-Noise-Free Frequency Measurements of Weak Microwave Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Creedon, Daniel L; Ivanov, Eugene N; Hartnett, John G

    2011-01-01

    Amplification is usually necessary when measuring the frequency instability of microwave signals. In this work, we develop a flicker noise free frequency measurement system based on a common or shared amplifier. First, we show that correlated flicker phase noise can be cancelled in such a system. Then we compare the new system with the conventional by simultaneously measuring the beat frequency from two cryogenic sapphire oscillators with parts in 10^15 fractional frequency instability. We determine for low power, below -80 dBm, the measurements were not limited by correlated noise processes but by thermal noise of the readout amplifier. In this regime, we show that the new readout system performs as expected and at the same level as the standard system but with only half the number of amplifiers. We also show that, using a standard readout system, the next generation of cryogenic sapphire oscillators could be flicker phase noise limited when instability reaches parts in 10^16 or better

  16. A low-phase-noise 18 GHz Kerr frequency microcomb phase-locked over 65 THz

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, S -W; Zhou, H; Yu, M; Kwong, D -L; Wong, C W

    2015-01-01

    Laser frequency combs are coherent light sources that simultaneously provide pristine frequency spacings for precision metrology and the fundamental basis for ultrafast and attosecond sciences. Recently, nonlinear parametric conversion in high-Q microresonators has been suggested as an alternative platform for optical frequency combs, though almost all in 100 GHz frequencies or more. Here we report a low-phase-noise on-chip Kerr frequency comb with mode spacing compatible with high-speed silicon optoelectronics. The waveguide cross-section of the silicon nitride spiral resonator is designed to possess small and flattened group velocity dispersion, so that the Kerr frequency comb contains a record-high number of 3,600 phase-locked comb lines. We study the single-sideband phase noise as well as the long-term frequency stability and report the lowest phase noise floor achieved to date with -130 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset for the 18 GHz Kerr comb oscillator, along with feedback stabilization to achieve frequency Alla...

  17. Low-frequency noise in Josephson junctions for superconducting qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroms, J.; van Schaarenburg, L. C.; Driessen, E. F. C.; Plantenberg, J. H.; Huizinga, C. M.; Schouten, R. N.; Verbruggen, A. H.; Harmans, C. J. P. M.; Mooij, J. E.

    2006-09-01

    The authors have studied low-frequency resistance fluctuations in shadow-evaporated Al /AlOx/Al tunnel junctions. Between 300 and 5K the spectral density follows a 1/f law. Below 5K, individual defects distort the 1/f shape of the spectrum. The spectral density decreases linearly with temperature between 150 and 1K and saturates below 0.8K. At 4.2K, it is about two orders of magnitude lower than expected from a recent survey [D. J. Van Harlingen et al., Phys. Rev. B 70, 064510 (2004)]. Due to saturation below 0.8K the estimated qubit dephasing times at 100mK are only about two times longer than calculated by Van Harlingen et al.

  18. Effect of noise correlation on noise-induced oscillation frequency in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in a continuous stirred tank reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, David S A; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2013-12-27

    We report on the experimental study of noise-induced oscillations in the photosensitive Ru(bpy)3(2+)-catalyzed Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). In the absence of deterministic oscillations and any external periodic forcing, oscillations appear when the system is perturbed by stochastic fluctuations in light irradiation with sufficiently high amplitude in the vicinity of the bifurcation point. The frequency distribution of the noise-induced oscillations is strongly affected by noise correlation. There is a shift of the noise-induced oscillation frequency toward higher frequencies for an intermediate range of the noise correlation exponent, indicating the occurrence of coherence resonance. Our findings indicate that, in principle, noise correlation can be used to direct chemical reactions toward certain behavior.

  19. Required changes in emission standards for high-frequency noise in power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundmark, C.M.; Larsson, E.O.A. [Lulea Univ. of Technology, Skelleftea (Sweden); Bollen, M.H.J. [STRI AB, Ludvika (Sweden)

    2006-07-01

    This paper discusses some recent developments that make the existing standards on the emission of high-frequency noise in power systems due for reconsideration. It is shown that it is possible for an equipment to remain below the emission limits while at the same time the disturbance level increases beyond what was intended by the standard document. Further, the change from analog to digital communication and the use of communication via the power system, make that the permitted disturbance levels need to be reconsidered. This paper also contains an example of measured high-frequency noise and proposes a framework for re-coordination of emission and immunity levels. (Author)

  20. Laser phase and frequency noise measurement by Michelson interferometer composed of a 3 × 3 optical fiber coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dan; Yang, Fei; Chen, Dijun; Wei, Fang; Cai, Haiwen; Fang, Zujie; Qu, Ronghui

    2015-08-24

    A laser phase and frequency noise measurement method by an unbalanced Michelson interferometer composed of a 3 × 3 optical fiber coupler is proposed. The relations and differences of the power spectral density (PSD) of differential phase and frequency fluctuation, PSD of instantaneous phase and frequency fluctuation, phase noise and linewidth are derived strictly and discussed carefully. The method obtains the noise features of a narrow linewidth laser conveniently without any specific assumptions or noise models. The technique is also used to characterize the noise features of a narrow linewidth external-cavity semiconductor laser, which confirms the correction and robustness of the method.

  1. Perception of force and stiffness in the presence of low-frequency haptic noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurari, Netta; Okamura, Allison M; Kuchenbecker, Katherine J

    2017-01-01

    This work lays the foundation for future research on quantitative modeling of human stiffness perception. Our goal was to develop a method by which a human's ability to perceive suprathreshold haptic force stimuli and haptic stiffness stimuli can be affected by adding haptic noise. Five human participants performed a same-different task with a one-degree-of-freedom force-feedback device. Participants used the right index finger to actively interact with variations of force (∼5 and ∼8 N) and stiffness (∼290 N/m) stimuli that included one of four scaled amounts of haptically rendered noise (None, Low, Medium, High). The haptic noise was zero-mean Gaussian white noise that was low-pass filtered with a 2 Hz cut-off frequency; the resulting low-frequency signal was added to the force rendered while the participant interacted with the force and stiffness stimuli. We found that the precision with which participants could identify the magnitude of both the force and stiffness stimuli was affected by the magnitude of the low-frequency haptically rendered noise added to the haptic stimulus, as well as the magnitude of the haptic stimulus itself. The Weber fraction strongly correlated with the standard deviation of the low-frequency haptic noise with a Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient of ρ > 0.83. The mean standard deviation of the low-frequency haptic noise in the haptic stimuli ranged from 0.184 N to 1.111 N across the four haptically rendered noise levels, and the corresponding mean Weber fractions spanned between 0.042 and 0.101. The human ability to perceive both suprathreshold haptic force and stiffness stimuli degrades in the presence of added low-frequency haptic noise. Future work can use the reported methods to investigate how force perception and stiffness perception may relate, with possible applications in haptic watermarking and in the assessment of the functionality of peripheral pathways in individuals with haptic impairments.

  2. The possible influence of noise frequency components on the health of exposed industrial workers--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendra Prashanth, K V; Venugopalachar, Sridhar

    2011-01-01

    Noise is a common occupational health hazard in most industrial settings. An assessment of noise and its adverse health effects based on noise intensity is inadequate. For an efficient evaluation of noise effects, frequency spectrum analysis should also be included. This paper aims to substantiate the importance of studying the contribution of noise frequencies in evaluating health effects and their association with physiological behavior within human body. Additionally, a review of studies published between 1988 and 2009 that investigate the impact of industrial/occupational noise on auditory and non-auditory effects and the probable association and contribution of noise frequency components to these effects is presented. The relevant studies in English were identified in Medknow, Medline, Wiley, Elsevier, and Springer publications. Data were extracted from the studies that fulfilled the following criteria: title and/or abstract of the given study that involved industrial/occupational noise exposure in relation to auditory and non-auditory effects or health effects. Significant data on the study characteristics, including noise frequency characteristics, for assessment were considered in the study. It is demonstrated that only a few studies have considered the frequency contributions in their investigations to study auditory effects and not non-auditory effects. The data suggest that significant adverse health effects due to industrial noise include auditory and heart-related problems. The study provides a strong evidence for the claims that noise with a major frequency characteristic of around 4 kHz has auditory effects and being deficient in data fails to show any influence of noise frequency components on non-auditory effects. Furthermore, specific noise levels and frequencies predicting the corresponding health impacts have not yet been validated. There is a need for advance research to clarify the importance of the dominant noise frequency contribution in

  3. Automotive Interior Noise Reduction in High Frequency Using Statistical Energy Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xin; WANG Deng-feng; ZHU Lei; MA Zheng-dong

    2009-01-01

    Statistical energy analysis (SEA) is an effective method for predicting high frequency vibro-acoustic performance of automobiles. A full vehicle SEA model is presented for interior noise reduction. It is composed of a number of subsystems based on a 3D model with all parameters for each subsystem. The excitation inputs are measured through road tests in different conditions, including inputs from the engine vibration and the sound pressure of the engine bay. The accuracy in high frequency of SEA model is validated, by comparing the analysis results with the testing pressure level data at driver's right ear. Noise contribution and sensitivity of key subsystems are analyzed. Finally, the effectiveness of noise reduction is verified. Based on the SEA model, an approach combining test and simulation is proposed for the noise vibration and harshness (NVH) design in vehicle development. It contains building the SEA model, testing for subsystem parameter identification, validating the simulation model, identifying subsystem power inputs, analyzing the design sensitivity. An example is given to demonstrate the interior noise reduction in high frequency.

  4. Design optimizations of phase noise, power consumption and frequency tuning for VCO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Chen; Shengxi, Diao; Lu, Huang; Xuefei, Bai; Fujiang, Lin

    2013-09-01

    To meet the requirements of the low power Zigbee system, VCO design optimizations of phase noise, power consumption and frequency tuning are discussed in this paper. Both flicker noise of tail bias transistors and up-conversion of flicker noise from cross-coupled pair are reduced by improved self-switched biasing technology, leading to low close-in phase noise. Low power is achieved by low supply voltage and triode region biasing. To linearly tune the frequency and get constant gain, distributed varactor structure is adopted. The proposed VCO is fabricated in SMIC 0.18-μm CMOS process. The measured linear tuning range is from 2.38 to 2.61 GHz. The oscillator exhibits low phase noise of -77.5 dBc/Hz and -122.8 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz and 1 MHz offset, respectively, at 2.55 GHz oscillation frequency while dissipating 2.7 mA from 1.2 V supply voltage, which well meet design specifications.

  5. Phase noise measurement of wideband microwave sources based on a microwave photonic frequency down-converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dengjian; Zhang, Fangzheng; Zhou, Pei; Pan, Shilong

    2015-04-01

    An approach for phase noise measurement of microwave signal sources based on a microwave photonic frequency down-converter is proposed. Using the same optical carrier, the microwave signal under test is applied to generate two +1st-order optical sidebands by two stages of electro-optical modulations. A time delay is introduced between the two sidebands through a span of fiber. By beating the two +1st-order sidebands at a photodetector, frequency down-conversion is implemented, and phase noise of the signal under test can be calculated thereafter. The system has a very large operation bandwidth thanks to the frequency conversion in the optical domain, and good phase noise measurement sensitivity can be achieved since the signal degradation caused by electrical amplifiers is avoided. An experiment is carried out. The phase noise measured by the proposed system agrees well with that measured by a commercial spectrum analyzer or provided by the datasheet. A large operation bandwidth of 5-40 GHz is demonstrated using the proposed system. Moreover, good phase noise floor is achieved (-123  dBc/Hz at 1 kHz and -137  dBc/Hz at 10 kHz at 10 GHz), which is nearly constant over the full measurement range.

  6. Effects of Noise and Absorption on High Frequency Measurements of Acoustic-Backscatter from Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Furusawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative echosounders operating at multiple frequencies (e.g., 18, 38, 70, 120, 200, 333, and 710 kHz are often used to observe fish and zooplankton and identify their species. At frequencies above 100 kHz, the absorption attenuation increases rapidly and decreases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Also, incomplete compensation for the attenuation may result in measurement error. This paper addresses the effects of the attenuation and noise on high frequency measurements of acoustic backscatter from fish. It is shown that measurements of a fish with target strength of −40 dB at 200 m depth are limited by SNR to frequencies up to about 100 kHz. Above 100 kHz, absorption coefficients must be matched to local environmental conditions.

  7. Noise Depression of Parasitic Capacitance for Frequency Detection of Micromechanical Bulk Disk Resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Meng; Cagliani, Alberto; Escouflaire, Marie

    2010-01-01

    A bulk disk resonator working in dynamic mode is used for mass detection. In the capacitive transduction scheme, the parasitic capacitance between the electrodes produces an anti resonance in the transmission curve, which distorts the phase shift at the resonant frequency and increases the freque......A bulk disk resonator working in dynamic mode is used for mass detection. In the capacitive transduction scheme, the parasitic capacitance between the electrodes produces an anti resonance in the transmission curve, which distorts the phase shift at the resonant frequency and increases...... the frequency noise of the system. A capacitor cancellation circuit is used to subtract the parasitic capacitor. Measurements are conducted before and after the cancellation, and results show that after cancellation, the anti resonance is suppressed and the frequency noise is decreased, thus decreasing...

  8. Flicker noise and magnetic resolution of graphene hall sensors at low frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huilong; Huang, Le; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Bingyan; Zhong, Hua; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2013-09-01

    Hall elements fabricated on chemical vapor deposited graphene exhibited high current- and voltage-related sensitivities due to its low intrinsic carrier density and high mobility about 5000 cm2/V s. Electric noise of the Hall elements was measured at room temperature and found to be largely Flicker noise at low frequency which can be well described by Hooge's empirical relation with a low noise parameter of about 1.8 × 10-4. The combination of high sensitivity and low noise in graphene Hall elements leads to a high room temperature magnetic resolution of about 5 × 10-3 G/Hz0.5 at 3 kHz.

  9. High accuracy measurement of low-frequency noise in front-end p-channel FETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Re, V. [Pavia Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Elettronica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy); Svelto, F. [Pavia Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Elettronica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy)

    1995-11-01

    The paper describes the instrumentation that was developed to allow series noise spectral analysis on field effect transistors. Analog interfaces between the device under test and commercial available analysers, working in the frequency range 100mHz-100kHz, have been designed and realised. The intrinsic noise contribution of the interface is estimated to be 1nV/{radical}(Hz) at 100mHz and 50pV/{radical}(Hz) beyond 1kHz. The basic idea is to amplify the noise of the device under test through a capacitive feedback loop, which is theoretically noiseless. The paper is focused on the design and the performances of the interface for the noise characterisation of p-channel FETs. (orig.).

  10. Resistivity and low-frequency noise characteristics of epoxy-carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    PralgauskaitÄ--, Sandra; Matukas, Jonas; Tretjak, Marina; Macutkevic, Jan; Banys, Juras; Selskis, Algirdas; Cataldo, Antonino; Micciulla, Federico; Bellucci, Stefano; Fierro, Vanessa; Celzard, Alain

    2017-03-01

    Noise and electrical transport properties of composites based on epoxy resin filled with various carbon inclusions (single-walled carbon nanotubes, high surface area carbon black, and exfoliated graphite) were investigated in depth. The temperature dependence of resistivity shows that Mott's hopping and tunneling between conductive carbon particles dominate the charge carrier transport at low temperature, whereas a positive temperature coefficient effect occurs at higher temperature. Low-frequency noise spectra of the investigated materials comprise 1/fα type components. The noise level is the highest for composites close to the percolation threshold. The percolation threshold value of the system also strongly impacts both the temperature dependence of the noise level and the resistivity. Close to the percolation threshold, the noise level increases due to the carrier tunneling throughout the polymer matrix and decreases due to the rapid expansion of the polymer matrix. In contrast, the latter has almost no influence on the noise level far above the percolation threshold, and the small kink in the temperature dependence of the noise level indicates a crossover between tunneling and thermally activated electron transport mechanisms.

  11. Effects of speech noise on vocal fundamental frequency using power spectral analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guo-She; Hsiao, Tzu-Yu; Yang, Cheryl C H; Kuo, Terry B J

    2007-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between auditory function and vocal fundamental frequency (F0) using binaural masking with speech noise during sustained vowel vocalization. Eight healthy subjects were instructed to vocalize the sustained vowel /a/ at the intensities of 65 to 75 dBA and 90 to 100 dBA as steadily as possible. The phonations without noise masking were compared with the phonations under masking with 85-dBA speech noise presented to both ears through headphones. The F0s were obtained by using autocorrelation of the voice signals and were converted to cents to form a F0 sequence. The power spectrum of the F0 sequence was then acquired using fast Fourier transformation. A significant increase in the power spectrum in the frequency range of production by decreasing F0 modulation at production and auditory feedback.

  12. Wind Turbine Acoustic Investigation: Infrasound and Low-Frequency Noise--A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Stephen E.; Rand, Robert W.; Krogh, Carmen M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Wind turbines produce sound that is capable of disturbing local residents and is reported to cause annoyance, sleep disturbance, and other health-related impacts. An acoustical study was conducted to investigate the presence of infrasonic and low-frequency noise emissions from wind turbines located in Falmouth, Massachusetts, USA. During the…

  13. Wind Turbine Acoustic Investigation: Infrasound and Low-Frequency Noise--A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Stephen E.; Rand, Robert W.; Krogh, Carmen M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Wind turbines produce sound that is capable of disturbing local residents and is reported to cause annoyance, sleep disturbance, and other health-related impacts. An acoustical study was conducted to investigate the presence of infrasonic and low-frequency noise emissions from wind turbines located in Falmouth, Massachusetts, USA. During the…

  14. Effect of modulation depth, frequency, and intermittence on wind turbine noise annoyance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ioannidou, Christina; Santurette, Sébastien; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) may be an important factor for the perceived annoyance of wind turbine noise (WTN). Two AM types, typically referred to as “normal AM” (NAM) and “other AM” (OAM), characterize WTN AM, OAM corresponding to having intermittent periods with larger AM depth in lower frequency...

  15. Novel time–frequency characterization of electrochemical noise data in corrosion studies using Hilbert spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homborg, A.M.; Westing, E.P.M.; Tinga, Tiedo; Zhang, X; Oonincx, P.J.; Ferrari, G.M.; de Wit, J.H.W.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Hilbert spectra, calculated with the Hilbert–Huang transform, are presented here as an analysis technique for the characterization of electrochemical noise data in corrosion studies. A highly detailed decomposition of the original current and potential data is provided in time and frequency

  16. Low noise optical multi-carrier generation using optical-FIR filter for ASE noise suppression in re-circulating frequency shifter loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiachuan; Xi, Lixia; Li, Jianrui; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xia; Niazi, Shahab Ahmad

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, an improved multi-carrier generation scheme based on single-side-band recirculating frequency shifter with optical finite impulse response (FIR) filter for amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise suppression is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The carrier-to-noise-ratio (CNR) instead of tone-to-noise-ratio (TNR) is introduced to more reasonably and exactly evaluate the signal-to-noise-ratio of a multi-carrier source with non-flat noise floor. We have experimentally attain the worst case CNR of 22.5dB and 19.1dB for generated 50 and 69 flat low noise carriers, which has shown significant improvement than the previous cited works based on recirculating frequency shifter.

  17. Frequency domain phase noise analysis of dual injection-locked optoelectronic oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbakht, Sajad

    2016-10-01

    Dual injection-locked optoelectronic oscillators (DIL-OEOs) have been introduced as a means to achieve very low-noise microwave oscillations while avoiding the large spurious peaks that occur in the phase noise of the conventional single-loop OEOs. In these systems, two OEOs are inter-injection locked to each other. The OEO with the longer optical fiber delay line is called the master OEO, and the other is called the slave OEO. Here, a frequency domain approach for simulating the phase noise spectrum of each of the OEOs in a DIL-OEO system and based on the conversion matrix approach is presented. The validity of the new approach is verified by comparing its results with previously published data in the literature. In the new approach, first, in each of the master or slave OEOs, the power spectral densities (PSDs) of two white and 1/f noise sources are optimized such that the resulting simulated phase noise of any of the master or slave OEOs in the free-running state matches the measured phase noise of that OEO. After that, the proposed approach is able to simulate the phase noise PSD of both OEOs at the injection-locked state. Because of the short run-time requirements, especially compared to previously proposed time domain approaches, the new approach is suitable for optimizing the power injection ratios (PIRs), and potentially other circuit parameters, in order to achieve good performance regarding the phase noise in each of the OEOs. Through various numerical simulations, the optimum PIRs for achieving good phase noise performance are presented and discussed; they are in agreement with the previously published results. This further verifies the applicability of the new approach. Moreover, some other interesting results regarding the spur levels are also presented.

  18. High-frequency Audiometry Hearing on Monitoring of Individuals Exposed to Occupational Noise: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonioli, Cleonice Aparecida Silva; Momensohn-Santos, Teresa Maria; Benaglia, Tatiana Aparecida Silva

    2016-07-01

    The literature reports on high-frequency audiometry as one of the exams used on hearing monitoring of individuals exposed to high sound pressure in their work environment, due to the method́s greater sensitivity in early identification of hearing loss caused by noise. The frequencies that compose the exam are generally between 9 KHz and 20KHz, depending on the equipment. This study aims to perform a retrospective and secondary systematic revision of publications on high-frequency audiometry on hearing monitoring of individuals exposed to occupational noise. This systematic revision followed the methodology proposed in the Cochrane Handbook, focusing on the question: "Is High-frequency Audiometry more sensitive than Conventional Audiometry in the screening of early hearing loss individuals exposed to occupational noise?" The search was based on PubMed data, Base, Web of Science (Capes), Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (BVS), and in the references cited in identified and selected articles. The search resulted in 6059 articles in total. Of these, only six studies were compatible with the criteria proposed in this study. The performed meta-analysis does not definitively answer the study's proposed question. It indicates that the 16 KHz high frequency audiometry (HFA) frequency is sensitive in early identification of hearing loss in the control group (medium difference (MD = 8.33)), as well as the 4 KHz frequency (CA), this one being a little less expressive (MD = 5.72). Thus, others studies are necessary to confirm the HFA importance for the early screening of hearing loss on individuals exposed to noise at the workplace.

  19. Research Plans for Improving Understanding of Effects of Very Low-Frequency Noise of Heavy Lift Rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidell, Sanford; Horonieff, Richard D.; Schmitz, Fredric H.

    2010-01-01

    This report reviews the English-language technical literature on infrasonic and low-frequency noise effects; identifies the most salient effects of noise produced by a future large civil tiltrotor aircraft on crew, passengers, and communities near landing areas; and recommends research needed to improve understanding of the effects of such noise on passengers, crew, and residents of areas near landing pads.

  20. Time-frequency, bi-frequency detector analysis of noise technology radar

    OpenAIRE

    Heuschel, Eugene R.

    2006-01-01

    Enemy integrated air defense systems (IADS) using low probability of intercept (LPI) emitters can cause significant problems for suppression of enemy air defense (SEAD) techniques. New threat emitter configurations using low-power random noise modulation have a significant processing gain unavailable to non-cooperative intercept receivers. Consequently, the detection of these emitters can not be accomplished with conventional intercept receiver detection methods. This thesis examines the...

  1. Passive coherent discriminator using phase diversity for the simultaneous measurement of frequency noise and intensity noise of a continuous-wave laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud-Belleau, V.; Bergeron, H.; Light, P. S.; Hébert, N. B.; Deschênes, J. D.; Luiten, A. N.; Genest, J.

    2016-10-01

    The frequency noise and intensity noise of a laser set the performance limits in many modern photonics applications and, consequently, must often be characterized. As lasers continue to improve, the measurement of these noises however becomes increasingly challenging. Current approaches for the characterization of very high-performance lasers often call for a second laser with equal or higher performance to the one that is to be measured, an incoherent interferometer having an extremely long delay-arm, or an interferometer that relies on an active device. These instrumental features can be impractical or problematic under certain experimental conditions. As an alternative, this paper presents an entirely passive coherent interferometer that employs an optical 90° hybrid coupler to perform in-phase and quadrature detection. We demonstrate the technique by measuring the frequency noise power spectral density of a highly-stable 192 THz (1560 nm) fiber laser over five frequency decades. Simultaneously, we are able to measure its relative intensity noise power spectral density and characterize the correlation between its amplitude noise and phase noise. We correct some common misconceptions through a detailed theoretical analysis and demonstrate the necessity to account for normal imperfections of the optical 90° hybrid coupler. We finally conclude that this passive coherent discriminator is suitable for reliable and simple noise characterization of highly-stable lasers, with bandwidth and dynamic range benefits but susceptibility to additive noise contamination.

  2. A low phase noise and low spur PLL frequency synthesizer for GNSS receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Li; Jinguang, Jiang; Xifeng, Zhou; Jianghua, Liu

    2014-01-01

    A low phase noise and low spur phase locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer for use in global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers is proposed. To get a low spur, the symmetrical structure of the phase frequency detector (PFD) produces four control signals, which can reach the charge pump (CP) simultaneously, and an improved CP is realized to minimize the charge sharing and the charge injection and make the current matched. Additionally, the delay is controllable owing to the programmable PFD, so the dead zone of the CP can be eliminated. The output frequency of the VCO can be adjusted continuously and precisely by using a programmable LC-TANK. The phase noise of the VCO is lowered by using appropriate MOS sizes. The proposed PLL frequency synthesizer is fabricated in a 0.18 μm mixed-signal CMOS process. The measured phase noise at 1 MHz offset from the center frequency is -127.65 dBc/Hz and the reference spur is -73.58 dBc.

  3. Frequency Noise Suppression of a Single Mode Laser with an Unbalanced Fiber Interferometer for Subnanometer Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Šmíd

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a method of noise suppression of laser diodes by an unbalanced Michelson fiber interferometer. The unstabilized laser source is represented by compact planar waveguide external cavity laser module, ORIONTM (Redfern Integrated Optics, Inc., working at 1540.57 nm with a 1.5-kHz linewidth. We built up the unbalanced Michelson interferometer with a 2.09 km-long arm based on the standard telecommunication single-mode fiber (SMF-28 spool to suppress the frequency noise by the servo-loop control by 20 dB to 40 dB within the Fourier frequency range, remaining the tuning range of the laser frequency.

  4. Efficient and low-noise single-photon-level frequency conversion interfaces using silicon nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Qing; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    Optical frequency conversion has applications ranging from tunable light sources to telecommunications-band interfaces for quantum information science. Here, we demonstrate efficient, low-noise frequency conversion on a nanophotonic chip through four-wave-mixing Bragg scattering in compact (footprint 60 % for the last two processes, a signal conversion bandwidth > 1 GHz, < 60 mW of continuous-wave pump power needed, and background noise levels between a few fW and a few pW, these devices are suitable for quantum frequency conversion of single photon states from InAs quantum dots. Simulations based on coupled mode equations and the Lugiato-Lefever equation are used to model device performance, and show quantitative agreement with measurements.

  5. A Phase Noise Analysis Method for Millimeter-Wave Passive Imager BHU-2D-U Frequency Synthesizer

    OpenAIRE

    Jin Zhang; Cheng Zheng; Xianxun Yao; Baohua Yang

    2013-01-01

    A nontrivial phase noise analysis method is proposed for frequency synthesizer of a passive millimeter-wave synthetic aperture interferometric radiometer (SAIR) imager for concealed weapon detections on human bodies with high imaging rates. The frequency synthesizer provides local oscillator signals for both millimeter-wave front ends and intermediate frequency IQ demodulators for the SAIR system. The influence of synthesizer phase noise in different offset frequency ranges on the visibility ...

  6. High finesse external cavity VCSELs: from very low noise lasers to dual frequency lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baili, Ghaya; Alouini, Medhi; Morvan, Loic; Bretenaker, Fabien; Sagnes, Isabelle; Garnache, Arnaud; Dolfi, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Low noise-level optical sources are required for numerous applications such as microwave photonics, fiber-optic sensing and time/frequency references distribution. In this paper, we demonstrate how inserting a SC active medium into a centimetric high-Q external cavity is a simple way to obtain a shot-noise-limited laser source over a very wide frequency bandwidth. This approach ensures, with a compact design, a sufficiently long photon lifetime to reach the oscillation-relaxation- free class-A regime. This concept has been illustrated by inserting a 1/2-VCSEL in an external cavity including an etalon filter. A -156dB/Hz relative intensity noise level is obtained over the 100 MHz to 18 GHz bandwidth of interest. This is several orders of magnitude better than the noise, previously observed in VCSELs, belonging to the class-B regime. The optimization, in terms of noise, is shown to be a trade-off between the cavity length and the laser mode filtering. The transition between the class-B and class-A dynamical behaviors is directly observed by continuously controlling the photon lifetime is a sub-millimetric to a centimetric cavity length. It's proven that the transition occurs progressively, without any discontinuity. Based on the same laser architecture, tunable dual-frequency oscillation is demonstrated by reducing the polarized eigenstates overlap in the gain medium. The class-A dynamics of such a laser, free of relaxation oscillations, enables to suppress the electrical phase noise in excess, usually observed in the vicinity of the beat note. An original technique for jitter reduction in mode-locked VECSELs is also investigated. Such lasers are needed for photonic analog to digital converters.

  7. An OFDM Receiver with Frequency Domain Diversity Combined Impulsive Noise Canceller for Underwater Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saotome, Rie; Hai, Tran Minh; Matsuda, Yasuto; Suzuki, Taisaku; Wada, Tomohisa

    2015-01-01

    In order to explore marine natural resources using remote robotic sensor or to enable rapid information exchange between ROV (remotely operated vehicles), AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle), divers, and ships, ultrasonic underwater communication systems are used. However, if the communication system is applied to rich living creature marine environment such as shallow sea, it suffers from generated Impulsive Noise so-called Shrimp Noise, which is randomly generated in time domain and seriously degrades communication performance in underwater acoustic network. With the purpose of supporting high performance underwater communication, a robust digital communication method for Impulsive Noise environments is necessary. In this paper, we propose OFDM ultrasonic communication system with diversity receiver. The main feature of the receiver is a newly proposed Frequency Domain Diversity Combined Impulsive Noise Canceller. The OFDM receiver utilizes 20–28 KHz ultrasonic channel and subcarrier spacing of 46.875 Hz (MODE3) and 93.750 Hz (MODE2) OFDM modulations. In addition, the paper shows Impulsive Noise distribution data measured at a fishing port in Okinawa and at a barge in Shizuoka prefectures and then proposed diversity OFDM transceivers architecture and experimental results are described. By the proposed Impulsive Noise Canceller, frame bit error rate has been decreased by 20–30%. PMID:26351656

  8. An OFDM Receiver with Frequency Domain Diversity Combined Impulsive Noise Canceller for Underwater Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saotome, Rie; Hai, Tran Minh; Matsuda, Yasuto; Suzuki, Taisaku; Wada, Tomohisa

    2015-01-01

    In order to explore marine natural resources using remote robotic sensor or to enable rapid information exchange between ROV (remotely operated vehicles), AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle), divers, and ships, ultrasonic underwater communication systems are used. However, if the communication system is applied to rich living creature marine environment such as shallow sea, it suffers from generated Impulsive Noise so-called Shrimp Noise, which is randomly generated in time domain and seriously degrades communication performance in underwater acoustic network. With the purpose of supporting high performance underwater communication, a robust digital communication method for Impulsive Noise environments is necessary. In this paper, we propose OFDM ultrasonic communication system with diversity receiver. The main feature of the receiver is a newly proposed Frequency Domain Diversity Combined Impulsive Noise Canceller. The OFDM receiver utilizes 20-28 KHz ultrasonic channel and subcarrier spacing of 46.875 Hz (MODE3) and 93.750 Hz (MODE2) OFDM modulations. In addition, the paper shows Impulsive Noise distribution data measured at a fishing port in Okinawa and at a barge in Shizuoka prefectures and then proposed diversity OFDM transceivers architecture and experimental results are described. By the proposed Impulsive Noise Canceller, frame bit error rate has been decreased by 20-30%.

  9. An OFDM Receiver with Frequency Domain Diversity Combined Impulsive Noise Canceller for Underwater Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Saotome

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore marine natural resources using remote robotic sensor or to enable rapid information exchange between ROV (remotely operated vehicles, AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle, divers, and ships, ultrasonic underwater communication systems are used. However, if the communication system is applied to rich living creature marine environment such as shallow sea, it suffers from generated Impulsive Noise so-called Shrimp Noise, which is randomly generated in time domain and seriously degrades communication performance in underwater acoustic network. With the purpose of supporting high performance underwater communication, a robust digital communication method for Impulsive Noise environments is necessary. In this paper, we propose OFDM ultrasonic communication system with diversity receiver. The main feature of the receiver is a newly proposed Frequency Domain Diversity Combined Impulsive Noise Canceller. The OFDM receiver utilizes 20–28 KHz ultrasonic channel and subcarrier spacing of 46.875 Hz (MODE3 and 93.750 Hz (MODE2 OFDM modulations. In addition, the paper shows Impulsive Noise distribution data measured at a fishing port in Okinawa and at a barge in Shizuoka prefectures and then proposed diversity OFDM transceivers architecture and experimental results are described. By the proposed Impulsive Noise Canceller, frame bit error rate has been decreased by 20–30%.

  10. A bulk-controlled ring-VCO with 1/f-noise reduction for frequency ΔΣ modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuan Vu, CAO; Wisland, Dag T.; Lande, Tor Sverre

    The paper introduces a bulk-controlled ring-VCO with a tail transistor utilizing flicker-noise (1/f-noise) reduction techniques for a frequency-based DeltaSigma modulator (FDSM). This VCO converts an analog input voltage to phase information under various bias conditions ranging from sub......-threshold to saturation. By using the 1/f-noise reduction circuit which is based on the switched bias technique, the simulations indicate that less noise is transferred to the output when the 1/f-noise reduction circuit is used. The phase noise of the proposed VCO is improved by 7.6% while maintaining tuning...

  11. Simulation of Low frequency Noise from a Downwind Wind Turbine Rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Helge Aa.; Johansen, Jeppe; Sørensen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    One of the major drawbacks of a wind turbine with a downwind rotor is the generation of considerable low frequency noise (so-called thumping noise) which can cause annoyance of people at a considerable distance. This was experienced on a number of full-scale turbines in e.g. US and Sweden...... in the period from around 1980 to 1990. One of the common characteristics of this low frequency noise, emerging from analysis of the phenomenon, was that the sound pressure level is strongly varying in time. We have investigated this phenomenon using a model package by which the low frequency noise...... to the aero acoustic model. The results for a 5 MW two-bladed turbine with a downwind rotor showed an increase in the sound pressure level of 5-20 dB due to the unsteadiness in the wake caused mainly by vortex shedding. However, in some periods the sound pressure level can increase additionally 0-10 dB when...

  12. Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  13. Effects of high-frequency emphasis and compression time constants on speech intelligibility in noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Toor, Thijs; Verschuure, Hans

    2002-10-01

    The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effect of different settings with regard to speech intelligibility in noise both objectively and subjectively and thus determine a favoured setting of compression time parameters, pre-set program (high-frequency emphasis) or combination for each individual user in a prospective study. Another objective was to evaluate the relationship between patient characteristics (e.g. slope of hearing loss) and favoured settings. In total, 38 subjects divided over five audiological centres were fitted with the Philips Spaceline D71-40 BTE digital hearing aid. Subjects were asked to compare three predefined compression algorithms with different time constants, slow (indicated by the manufacturer as AVC), intermediate (NORMAL) and fast (SYLLABIC) over two 4-week periods using the intermediate setting in both comparisons and randomizing over the fast and slow conditions. A randomization determined whether a subject started with the comfort-oriented pre-set program (AUTO) or the speech intelligibility-oriented setting with high-frequency emphasis (SPIN). In a third 4-week period, the pre-sets AUTO and SPIN were compared using the setting of the compression time constants that gave the best results during the first two periods. Comparisons were made using a standard speech-in-noise test with three types of noise: continuous speaker noise, modulated ICRA-4 noise, and car noise. The patients were also asked to fill in a Dutch translation and adaptation of the APHAB questionnaire to indicate their impression of performance. The results indicate that no compression algorithm, pre-set or combination is favoured overall. The largest improvement in speech-in-noise scores was found with syllabic compression. The advantageous effect of high-frequency emphasis after optimization of compression timing is small. The APHAB showed that users tend to prefer the SPIN setting. We found no relationship between favoured compression or pre-set and the

  14. An Application of Reassigned Time-Frequency Representations for Seismic Noise/Signal Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, S. M.; Langston, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic data recorded by surface arrays are often strongly contaminated by unwanted noise. This background noise makes the detection of small magnitude events difficult. An automatic method for seismic noise/signal decomposition is presented based upon an enhanced time-frequency representation. Synchrosqueezing is a time-frequency reassignment method aimed at sharpening a time-frequency picture. Noise can be distinguished from the signal and suppressed more easily in this reassigned domain. The threshold level is estimated using a general cross validation approach that does not rely on any prior knowledge about the noise level. Efficiency of thresholding has been improved by adding a pre-processing step based on higher order statistics and a post-processing step based on adaptive hard-thresholding. In doing so, both accuracy and speed of the denoising have been improved compared to our previous algorithms (Mousavi and Langston, 2016a, 2016b; Mousavi et al., 2016). The proposed algorithm can either kill the noise (either white or colored) and keep the signal or kill the signal and keep the noise. Hence, It can be used in either normal denoising applications or in ambient noise studies. Application of the proposed method on synthetic and real seismic data shows the effectiveness of the method for denoising/designaling of local microseismic, and ocean bottom seismic data. References: Mousavi, S.M., C. A. Langston., and S. P. Horton (2016), Automatic Microseismic Denoising and Onset Detection Using the Synchrosqueezed-Continuous Wavelet Transform. Geophysics. 81, V341-V355, doi: 10.1190/GEO2015-0598.1. Mousavi, S.M., and C. A. Langston (2016a), Hybrid Seismic Denoising Using Higher-Order Statistics and Improved Wavelet Block Thresholding. Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am., 106, doi: 10.1785/0120150345. Mousavi, S.M., and C.A. Langston (2016b), Adaptive noise estimation and suppression for improving microseismic event detection, Journal of Applied Geophysics., doi: http

  15. Frequency Noise Suppression of a Single Mode Laser with an Unbalanced Fiber Interferometer for Subnanometer Interferometry

    OpenAIRE

    Radek Šmíd; Martin Čížek; Břetislav Mikel; Ondřej Číp

    2015-01-01

    We present a method of noise suppression of laser diodes by an unbalanced Michelson fiber interferometer. The unstabilized laser source is represented by compact planar waveguide external cavity laser module, ORIONTM (Redfern Integrated Optics, Inc.), working at 1540.57 nm with a 1.5-kHz linewidth. We built up the unbalanced Michelson interferometer with a 2.09 km-long arm based on the standard telecommunication single-mode fiber (SMF-28) spool to suppress the frequency noise by the servo-loo...

  16. Low noise buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators for precise time and frequency measurement and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichinger, R. A.; Dachel, P.; Miller, W. H.; Ingold, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    Extremely low noise, high performance, wideband buffer amplifiers and buffered phase comparators were developed. These buffer amplifiers are designed to distribute reference frequencies from 30 KHz to 45 MHz from a hydrogen maser without degrading the hydrogen maser's performance. The buffered phase comparators are designed to intercompare the phase of state of the art hydrogen masers without adding any significant measurement system noise. These devices have a 27 femtosecond phase stability floor and are stable to better than one picosecond for long periods of time. Their temperature coefficient is less than one picosecond per degree C, and they have shown virtually no voltage coefficients.

  17. An efficient low-noise single-frequency 1033 nm Yb3+-doped MOPA phosphate fiber laser system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Huaqiu; Chen, Dan; Zhao, Qilai; Yang, Changsheng; Zhang, Yuanfei; Zhang, Yuning; Feng, Zhouming; Yang, Zhongmin; Xu, Shanhui

    2017-06-01

    An efficient low-noise, single-frequency 1033 nm master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) Yb3+-doped phosphate fiber (YPF) laser system is demonstrated. A maximal output power of 612 mW with a laser linewidth of 65 dB and relative intensity noise (RIN) of laser system has applications in the fields of optical frequency standards and beam combining.

  18. An Ultrahigh Frequency Partial Discharge Signal De-Noising Method Based on a Generalized S-Transform and Module Time-Frequency Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yushun Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to electromagnetic interference in power substations, the partial discharge (PD signals detected by ultrahigh frequency (UHF antenna sensors often contain various background noises, which may hamper high voltage apparatus fault diagnosis and localization. This paper proposes a novel de-noising method based on the generalized S-transform and module time-frequency matrix to suppress noise in UHF PD signals. The sub-matrix maximum module value method is employed to calculate the frequencies and amplitudes of periodic narrowband noise, and suppress noise through the reverse phase cancellation technique. In addition, a singular value decomposition de-noising method is employed to suppress Gaussian white noise in UHF PD signals. Effective singular values are selected by employing the fuzzy c-means clustering method to recover the PD signals. De-noising results of simulated and field detected UHF PD signals prove the feasibility of the proposed method. Compared with four conventional de-noising methods, the results show that the proposed method can suppress background noise in the UHF PD signal effectively, with higher signal-to-noise ratio and less waveform distortion.

  19. Band-gap tunable dielectric elastomer filter for low frequency noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun; Wang, Mian; Lu, Tongqing; Zhang, Jinhua; Wang, Tiejun

    2016-05-01

    In the last decades, diverse materials and technologies for sound insulation have been widely applied in engineering. However, suppressing the noise radiation at low frequency still remains a challenge. In this work, a novel membrane-type smart filter, consisting of a pre-stretched dielectric elastomer membrane with two compliant electrodes coated on the both sides, is presented to control the low frequency noise. Since the stiffness of membrane dominates its acoustic properties, sound transmission band-gap of the membrane filter can be tuned by adjusting the voltage applied to the membrane. The impedance tube experiments have been carried out to measure the sound transmission loss (STL) of the filters with different electrodes, membrane thickness and pre-stretch conditions. The experimental results show that the center frequency of sound transmission band-gap mainly depends on the stress in the dielectric elastomer, and a large band-gap shift (more than 60 Hz) can be achieved by tuning the voltage applied to the 85 mm diameter VHB4910 specimen with pre-stretch {λ }0=3. Based on the experimental results and the assumption that applied electric field is independent of the membrane behavior, 3D finite element analysis has also been conducted to calculate the membrane stress variation. The sound filter proposed herein may provide a promising facility to control low frequency noise source with tonal characteristics.

  20. A low-noise widely tunable Gm-C filter with frequency calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wang; Jing, Liu; Na, Yan; Hao, Min

    2016-09-01

    A fourth-order Gm-C Chebyshev low-pass filter is presented as channel selection filter for reconfigurable multi-mode wireless receivers. Low-noise technologies are proposed in optimizing the noise characteristics of both the Gm cells and the filter topology. A frequency tuning strategy is used by tuning both the transconductance of the Gm cells and the capacitance of the capacitor banks. To achieve accurate cut-off frequencies, an on-chip calibration circuit is presented to compensate for the frequency inaccuracy introduced by process variation. The filter is fabricated in a 0.13 μm CMOS process. It exhibits a wide programmable bandwidth from 322.5 kHz to 20 MHz. Measured results show that the filter has low input referred noise of 5.9 \\text{nV}/\\sqrt {\\text{Hz}} and high out-of-band IIP3 of 16.2 dBm. It consumes 4.2 and 9.5 mW from a 1 V power supply at its lowest and highest cut-off frequencies respectively. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61574045).

  1. Schottky barrier parameters and low frequency noise characteristics of graphene-germanium Schottky barrier diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurelbaatar, Zagarzusem; Kil, Yeon-Ho; Shim, Kyu-Hwan; Cho, Hyunjin; Kim, Myung-Jong; Lee, Sung-Nam; Jeong, Jae-chan; Hong, Hyobong; Choi, Chel-Jong

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the electrical properties of chemical vapor deposition-grown monolayer graphene/n-type germanium (Ge) Schottky barrier diodes (SBD) using current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and low frequency noise measurements. The Schottky barrier parameters of graphene/n-type Ge SBDs, such as Schottky barrier height (VB), ideality factor (n), and series resistance (Rs), were extracted using the forward I-V and Cheung's methods. The VB and n extracted from the forward ln(I)-V plot were found to be 0.63 eV and 1.78, respectively. In contrast, from Cheung method, the VB and n were calculated to be 0.53 eV and 1.76, respectively. Such a discrepancy between the values of VB calculated from the forward I-V and Cheung's methods indicated a deviation from the ideal thermionic emission of graphene/n-type Ge SBD associated with the voltage drop across graphene. The low frequency noise measurements performed at the frequencies in the range of 10 Hz-1 kHz showed that the graphene/n-type Ge SBD had 1/f γ frequency dependence, with γ ranging from 1.09 to 1.12, regardless of applied forward biases. Similar to forward-biased SBDs operating in the thermionic emission mode, the current noise power spectral density of graphene/n-type Ge SBD was linearly proportional to the forward current.

  2. Microscopic origin of low frequency noise in MoS2 field-effect transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhamoy Ghatak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report measurement of low frequency 1/f noise in molybdenum di-sulphide (MoS2 field-effect transistors in multiple device configurations including MoS2 on silicon dioxide as well as MoS2-hexagonal boron nitride (hBN heterostructures. All as-fabricated devices show similar magnitude of noise with number fluctuation as the dominant mechanism at high temperatures and density, although the calculated density of traps is two orders of magnitude higher than that at the SiO2 interface. Measurements on the heterostructure devices with vacuum annealing and dual gated configuration reveals that along with the channel, metal-MoS2 contacts also play a significant role in determining noise magnitude in these devices.

  3. Impact of hydrogen anneal on low frequency noise of n- and p-MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, E. G.; Pflanzl, W. C.; Stueckler, E.; Vescoli, V.; Carniello, S.; Seebacher, E.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed investigation of the impact of hydrogen anneal on the low frequency noise spectra of n- and p-MOS devices from an advanced CMOS technology node. We investigate the impact of hydrogen anneal in three different wafers, one with one time hydrogen anneal step (1×H2), one with two times (2×H2) and one without hydrogen anneal (w/o H2). The results demonstrate that the carrier number with correlated mobility fluctuations model can explain accurately the 1/f noise results. A significant reduction of the 1/f noise level was observed for the device treated with two times hydrogen anneal.

  4. Notched-noise embedded frequency specific chirps for objective audiometry using auditory brainstem responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah I. Corona-Strauss

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown recently that chirp-evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs show better performance than click stimulations, especially at low intensity levels. In this paper we present the development, test, and evaluation of a series of notched-noise embedded frequency specific chirps. ABRs were collected in healthy young control subjects using the developed stimuli. Results of the analysis of the corresponding ABRs using a time-scale phase synchronization stability (PSS measure are also reported. The resultant wave V amplitude and latency measures showed a similar behavior as for values reported in literature. The PSS of frequency specific chirp-evoked ABRs reflected the presence of the wave V for all stimulation intensities. The scales that resulted in higher PSS are in line with previous findings, where ABRs evoked by broadband chirps were analyzed, and which stated that low frequency channels are better for the recognition and analysis of chirp-evoked ABRs. We conclude that the development and test of the series of notched-noise embedded frequency specific chirps allowed the assessment of frequency specific ABRs, showing an identifiable wave V for different intensity levels. Future work may include the development of a faster automatic recognition scheme for these frequency specific ABRs.

  5. Dual-frequency laser Doppler velocimeter for speckle noise reduction and coherence enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chih-Hao; Lee, Chia-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Wei; Lin, Fan-Yi

    2012-08-27

    We study the characteristics of a dual-frequency laser Doppler velocimeter (DF-LDV) based on an optically injected semiconductor laser. The laser operated in a period-one (P1) dynamical state with two optical frequencies separated by 11.25 GHz is used as the dual-frequency light source. With a microwave beat signal carried by the light, the DF-LDV possesses both the advantages of good directionality, high intensity, and high spatial resolution from the light and low speckle noise and good coherence from the microwave, respectively. By phase-locking the two frequency components with a microwave signal, the coherence of the dual-frequency light source can be further improved and the detection range can be much extended. In this paper, velocity resolutions of the DF-LDV with different amounts of speckle noise and at different detection ranges are experimentally measured and analyzed. Compared with the conventional single-frequency LDV (SF-LDV), the velocity resolution of the DF-LDV is improved by 8 × 10(3) times from 2.5 m/s to 0.31 mm/s for a target with a longitudinal velocity vz = 4 cm/s, a transverse velocity vt = 5 m/s, and at a detection range of 108 m.

  6. Noise Corruption of Empirical Mode Decomposition and Its Effect on Instantaneous Frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Kaslovsky, Daniel N; 10.1142/S1793536910000537

    2010-01-01

    Huang's Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) is an algorithm for analyzing nonstationary data that provides a localized time-frequency representation by decomposing the data into adaptively defined modes. EMD can be used to estimate a signal's instantaneous frequency (IF) but suffers from poor performance in the presence of noise. To produce a meaningful IF, each mode of the decomposition must be nearly monochromatic, a condition that is not guaranteed by the algorithm and fails to be met when the signal is corrupted by noise. In this work, the extraction of modes containing both signal and noise is identified as the cause of poor IF estimation. The specific mechanism by which such "transition" modes are extracted is detailed and builds on the observation of Flandrin and Goncalves that EMD acts in a filter bank manner when analyzing pure noise. The mechanism is shown to be dependent on spectral leak between modes and the phase of the underlying signal. These ideas are developed through the use of simple signals...

  7. Perceptual learning for speech in noise after application of binary time-frequency masks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mahnaz; Gross, Vauna L.; Sinex, Donal G.

    2013-01-01

    Ideal time-frequency (TF) masks can reject noise and improve the recognition of speech-noise mixtures. An ideal TF mask is constructed with prior knowledge of the target speech signal. The intelligibility of a processed speech-noise mixture depends upon the threshold criterion used to define the TF mask. The study reported here assessed the effect of training on the recognition of speech in noise after processing by ideal TF masks that did not restore perfect speech intelligibility. Two groups of listeners with normal hearing listened to speech-noise mixtures processed by TF masks calculated with different threshold criteria. For each group, a threshold criterion that initially produced word recognition scores between 0.56–0.69 was chosen for training. Listeners practiced with one set of TF-masked sentences until their word recognition performance approached asymptote. Perceptual learning was quantified by comparing word-recognition scores in the first and last training sessions. Word recognition scores improved with practice for all listeners with the greatest improvement observed for the same materials used in training. PMID:23464038

  8. Nonlinear modeling of low-to-high-frequency noise up-conversion in microwave electron devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filicori, Fabio; Traverso, Pier A.; Florian, Corrado

    2003-05-01

    Measurement-based, circuit-oriented non-linear noise modeling of microwave electron devices is still an open field of research, since existing approaches are not always suitable for the accurate prediction of low-frequency noise up-conversion to RF, which represents an essential information for the non-linear circuit analyses performed in the CAD of low phase-noise oscillators. In this paper a technology-independent, empirical approach to the modeling of noise contributions at the ports of electron devices, operating under strongly non-linear conditions, is proposed. Details concerning the analytical formulation of the model, which is derived by considering randomly time-varying perturbations in the basic equations of an otherwise conventional charge-controlled non-linear model, are presented, along with a discussion about the measurement techniques devoted to its experimental characterization. An example of application of the proposed Charge-Controlled Non-linear Noise (CCNN) model is considered in the case of a HBT transistor. Techniques devoted to the implementation of the obtained model in the framework of commercial CAD tools for circuit analysis and design are provided as well.

  9. Radio-frequency Electrometry Using Rydberg Atoms in Vapor Cells: Towards the Shot Noise Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Fan, Haoquan; Jahangiri, Akbar; Kuebler, Harald; Shaffer, James P.; 5. Physikalisches Institut, Universitat Stuttgart, Germany Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Rydberg atoms are a promising candidate for radio frequency (RF) electric field sensing. Our method uses electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms in vapor cells to read out the effect that the RF electric field has on the Rydberg atoms. The method has the potential for high sensitivity (pV cm-1 Hz- 1 / 2) and can be self-calibrated. Some of the main factors limiting the sensitivity of RF electric field sensing from reaching the shot noise limit are the residual Doppler effect and the sensitivity of the optical read-out using the probe laser. We present progress on overcoming the residual Doppler effect by using a new multi-photon scheme and reaching the shot noise detection limit using frequency modulated spectroscopy. Our experiments also show promise for studying quantum optical effects such as superradiance in vapor cells using Rydberg atoms. This work is supported by DARPA, ARO, and NRO.

  10. Influences of low-frequency and other noises produced by wind turbines: An epidemiological literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Hasunuma, Hideki; Morimatsu, Yoshitaka; Fujino, Yoshihisa; Hara, Kunio; Ishitake, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Due to its' environment-friendly and clean energy characteristics, wind power has been increasingly used globally, particularly in advanced countries. However, concerns about health hazards, especially due to low-frequency and other noises generated from wind turbines, have been reported repeatedly. In order to manage adverse health effects appropriately, regulatory standards or guidelines that consider the health of residents need to be developed. To provide a scientific basis for the development of such regulatory standards and guidelines, this paper conducted a literature review to analyze epidemiological studies involving residents living in the vicinity of wind farms.Methods Using the PubMED database, epidemiological papers that examined the health effects of noises produced by wind turbines were searched and collected. Additional papers were collected from the abstracts presented at relevant international academic conferences such as the Inter-Noise 2013 and Wind Turbine Noise 2015. An evidence table comprising the study design, subjects, exposure assessment, outcomes, confounders, and research results of each selected study was created.Results A total of 11 papers were collected (2 of which were abstracts from the international academic conferences). These studies reported outcomes such as perception of noises, annoyance caused by the noises, and the association of the noises with stress and sleeplessness. Significant associations between the noises or annoyance produced by wind turbines and subjective adverse health effects were reported repeatedly. Two studies reported an odds ratio of 1.1 for an increase of 1 dB in the A-weighted sound pressure level as a factor representing the influence level. For other factors, it was not possible to compare the magnitude of the impact among the collected studies. Individual attitudes toward wind power and landscapes, economic benefits of wind farms, visibility of wind turbines, sensitivity to sounds

  11. Light emission and finite-frequency shot noise in molecular junctions: from tunneling to contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Christensen, Rasmus Bjerregaard; Brandbyge, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope induced light emission from an atomic or molecular junction has been probed from the tunneling to contact regime in recent experiments. There, the measured light emission yields suggest a strong correlation with the high-frequency current/charge fluctuations. We show...... that this is consistent with the established theory in the tunneling regime, by writing the finite-frequency shot noise as a sum of inelastic transitions between different electronic states. Based on this, we develop a practical scheme to perform calculations on realistic structures using nonequilibrium Green's functions...

  12. Efficient and low-noise single-photon-level frequency conversion interfaces using silicon nanophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Davanço, Marcelo; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2016-06-01

    Optical frequency conversion has applications ranging from tunable light sources to telecommunications-band interfaces for quantum information science. Here, we demonstrate efficient, low-noise frequency conversion on a nanophotonic chip through four-wave-mixing Bragg scattering in compact (footprint 60% for the last two processes, a signal conversion bandwidth of >1 GHz, a required continuous-wave pump power of equations and the Lugiato-Lefever equation are used to model device performance, and show quantitative agreement with measurements.

  13. Strong Coulomb scattering effects on low frequency noise in monolayer WS2 field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Min-Kyu; Yun, Yoojoo; Yun, Seokjoon; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Dongseok

    2016-10-01

    When atomically thin semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides are used as a channel material, they are inevitably exposed to supporting substrates. This situation can lead to masking of intrinsic properties by undesired extrinsic doping and/or additional conductance fluctuations from the largely distributed Coulomb impurities at the interface between the channel and the substrate. Here, we report low-frequency noise characteristics in monolayer WS2 field-effect transistors on silicon/silicon-oxide substrate. To mitigate the effect of extrinsic low-frequency noise sources, a nitrogen annealing was carried out to provide better interface quality and to suppress the channel access resistance. The carrier number fluctuation and the correlated mobility fluctuation (CNF-CMF) model was better than the sole CNF one to explain our low-frequency noise data, because of the strong Coulomb scattering effect on the effective mobility caused by carrier trapping/detrapping at oxide traps. The temperature-dependent field-effect mobility in the four-probe configuration and the Coulomb scattering parameters are presented to support this strong Coulomb scattering effect on carrier transport in monolayer WS2 field-effect transistor.

  14. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: A dual-band frequency synthesizer for CMMB application with low phase noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yu; Jun, Yan; Yin, Shi; Foster, Dai Fa

    2010-09-01

    A wide-band frequency synthesizer with low phase noise is presented. The frequency tuning range is from 474 to 858 MHz which is compatible with U-band CMMB application while the S-band frequency is also included. Three VCOs with selectable sub-band are integrated on chip to cover the target frequency range. This PLL is fabricated with 0.35 μm SiGe BiCMOS technology. The measured result shows that the RMS phase error is less than 1° and the reference spur is less than -60 dBc. The proposed PLL consumes 20 mA current from a 2.8 V supply. The silicon area occupied without PADs is 1.17 mm2.

  15. Low-frequency noise in high-{Tc} superconductor Josephson junctions, SQUIDs, and magnetometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklich, A.H.

    1994-05-01

    Design and performance of high-T{sub c} dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUEDs), junctions that comprise them, and magnetometers made from them are described, with attention to sources of 1/f noise. Biepitaxial junctions are found to have large levels of critical current fluctuations which make them unsuitable for low-noise SQUIDS; this suggests a poorly connected interface at the grain boundary junction. SQUIDs from bicrystal junctions have levels of critical current noise controllable using bias current reversal techniques which leave the noise white down to frequencies of a few Hz. A SQUID with an energy resolution of 1.5{times}10{sup {minus}30} J Hz{sup {minus}1} at 1 Hz is reported. Magnetometers in which a (9 mm){sup 2} pickup loop is directly coupled to a SQUID body have achieved field resolutions of 93 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} down to frequencies below I Hz, improving to 39 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz with the addition of a 50mm-diameter single-turn flux transformer. Poor coupling to pickup loop makes it difficult to satisfy competing goals of high field resolution and small detector size necessary for multichannel biomagnetic imaging. Improved coupling is demonstrated by the use of multiturn-input-coil flux transformers, and a resolution of 35 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2} in the white noise region is reported with a (10 mm){sup 2} pickup loop. However, additional 1/f noise from processed multilayer structures in the transformer limits the resolution at 1 Hz to 114 fT Hz{sup {minus}1/2}. High-T{sub c} SQUIDs exhibit additional 1/f noise when cooled in a nonzero static magnetic field because of additional flux vortices trapped in the film, with the noise power at 1 Hz typically increasing by a factor of 10--20 in a field of 0.05mT (0.5 G). Finally, a SQUID-based voltmeter with a resolution of 9.2 pV.Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 10 Hz (24 pV Hz{sup {minus}1/2} at 1 Hz) is described.

  16. Tunable mechanical monolithic sensor with interferometric readout for low frequency seismic noise measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acernese, F.; De Rosa, R.; Giordano, G.; Romano, R.; Barone, F.

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes a mechanical monolithic sensor for geophysical applications developed at the University of Salerno. The instrument is basically a monolithic tunable folded pendulum, shaped with precision machining and electric-discharge-machining, that can be used both as seismometer and, in a force-feedback configuration, as accelerometer. The monolithic mechanical design and the introduction of laser interferometric techniques for the readout implementation make it a very compact instrument, very sensitive in the low-frequency seismic noise band, with a very good immunity to environmental noises. Many changes have been produced since last version (2007), mainly aimed to the improvement of the mechanics and of the optical readout of the instrument. In fact, we have developed and tested a prototype with elliptical hinges and mechanical tuning of the resonance frequency together with a laser optical lever and a new laser interferometer readout system. The theoretical sensitivity curve both for both laser optical lever and laser interferometric readouts, evaluated on the basis of suitable theoretical models, shows a very good agreement with the experimental measurements. Very interesting scientific result, for example, is that the measured natural resonance frequency of the instrument is 70 mHz with a Q = 140 in air without thermal stabilization, demonstrating the feasibility of a monolithic FP sensor with a natural resonance frequency of the order of mHz with a more refined mechanical tuning. Results on the readout system based on polarimetric homodyne Michelson interferometer is discussed.

  17. Effect of high energy electron irradiation on low frequency noise in 4H-SiC Schottky diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovski, V. V.; Lebedev, A. A.; Levinshtein, M. E.; Rumyantsev, S. L.; Palmour, J. W.

    2017-03-01

    The low-frequency noise in high voltage Ni/4H-SiC Schottky diodes irradiated with high energy (0.9 MeV) electrons was studied in the frequency range from 1 Hz to 50 kHz, temperature interval 295-410 K, and irradiation dose Φ from 0.2 × 1016 cm-2 to 7 × 1016 cm-2. The noise amplitude was found monotonically increasing with the irradiation dose. With the irradiation dose increase, the noise spectra on the linear part of the current voltage characteristic transform from the 1/f noise to the generation recombination noise of at least two trap levels. One of these levels can be classified as Z1/2 with the capture cross section determined from the noise measurements to be ˜10-15 cm2.

  18. A mathematical model of extremely low frequency ocean induced electromagnetic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautta, Manik; Faruque, Rumana Binte; Islam, Rakibul

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic Anomaly Detection (MAD) system uses the principle that ferromagnetic objects disturb the magnetic lines of force of the earth. These lines of force are able to pass through both water and air in similar manners. A MAD system, usually mounted on an aerial vehicle, is thus often employed to confirm the detection and accomplish localization of large ferromagnetic objects submerged in a sea-water environment. However, the total magnetic signal encountered by a MAD system includes contributions from a myriad of low to Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) sources. The goal of the MAD system is to detect small anomaly signals in the midst of these low-frequency interfering signals. Both the Range of Detection (Rd) and the Probability of Detection (Pd) are limited by the ratio of anomaly signal strength to the interfering magnetic noise. In this paper, we report a generic mathematical model to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio or SNR. Since time-variant electro-magnetic signals are affected by conduction losses due to sea-water conductivity and the presence of air-water interface, we employ the general formulation of dipole induced electromagnetic field propagation in stratified media [1]. As a first step we employ a volumetric distribution of isolated elementary magnetic dipoles, each having its own dipole strength and orientation, to estimate the magnetic noise observed by a MAD system. Numerical results are presented for a few realizations out of an ensemble of possible realizations of elementary dipole source distributions.

  19. Suppression method of low-frequency noise for two-dimensional integrated magnetic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Takayuki; Sakairi, Yusuke; Mori, Akihiro; Masuzawa, Toru

    2017-04-01

    A new correlated double sampling method for two-dimensional magnetic sensors was proposed. In this method, output from a magnetic sensor is controlled by adjusting the drain bias of a MOSFET used as a Hall element. The two-dimensional integrated magnetic sensor used for the demonstration of correlated double sampling was composed of a 64 × 64 array of Hall sensors and fabricated by a 0.18 µm CMOS standard process. The size of a Hall element was 2.7 × 2.7 µm2. The dimensions of one pixel in which a Hall element was embedded were 7 × 7 µm2. The magnitude of residual noise after correlated double sampling with drain bias control was 0.81 mVp–p. This value is 16% of the original low-frequency noise. From the experimental results, the proposed correlated double sampling method is found to be suitable for low-frequency noise suppression in the two-dimensional magnetic sensors.

  20. Low frequency critical current noise and two level system defects in Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugroho, Christopher Daniel

    The critical current in a Josephson junction is known to exhibit a 1/falpha low frequency noise. Implemented as a superconducting qubit, this low frequency noise can lead to decoherence. While the 1/f noise has been known to arise from an ensemble of two level systems connected to the tunnel barrier, the precise microscopic nature of these TLSs remain a mystery. In this thesis we will present measurements of the 1/f alpha low frequency noise in the critical current and tunneling resistance of Al-AlOx-Al Josephson junctions. Measurements in a wide range of resistively shunted and unshunted junctions confirm the equality of critical current and tunneling resistance noise. That is the critical current fluctuation corresponds to fluctuations of the tunneling resistance. In not too small Al-AlOx-Al junctions we have found that the fractional power spectral density scales linearly with temperature. We confirmed that the 1/falpha power spectrum is the result of a large number of two level systems modulating the tunneling resistance. At small junction areas and low temperatures, the number of thermally active TLSs is insufficient to integrate out a featureless 1/ f spectral shape. By analyzing the spectral variance in small junction areas, we have been able to deduce the TLS defect density, n ≈ 2.53 per micrometer squared per Kelvin spread in the TLS energy per factor e in the TLS lifetimes. This density is consistent with the density of tunneling TLSs found in glassy insulators, as well as the density deduced from coherent TLSs interacting at qubit frequencies. The deduced TLS density combined with the magnitude of the 1/f power spectral density in large area junctions, gives an average TLS effective area, A ˜ 0.3 nanometer squared. In ultra small tunnel junctions, we have studied the time-domain dynamics of isolated TLSs. We have found a TLS whose dynamics is described by the quantum tunneling between the two localized wells, and a one-phonon absorption

  1. Ship noise extends to frequencies used for echolocation by endangered killer whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veirs, Scott; Veirs, Val; Wood, Jason D

    2016-01-01

    Combining calibrated hydrophone measurements with vessel location data from the Automatic Identification System, we estimate underwater sound pressure levels for 1,582 unique ships that transited the core critical habitat of the endangered Southern Resident killer whales during 28 months between March, 2011, and October, 2013. Median received spectrum levels of noise from 2,809 isolated transits are elevated relative to median background levels not only at low frequencies (20-30 dB re 1 µPa(2)/Hz from 100 to 1,000 Hz), but also at high frequencies (5-13 dB from 10,000 to 96,000 Hz). Thus, noise received from ships at ranges less than 3 km extends to frequencies used by odontocetes. Broadband received levels (11.5-40,000 Hz) near the shoreline in Haro Strait (WA, USA) for the entire ship population were 110 ± 7 dB re 1 µPa on average. Assuming near-spherical spreading based on a transmission loss experiment we compute mean broadband source levels for the ship population of 173 ± 7 dB re 1 µPa 1 m without accounting for frequency-dependent absorption. Mean ship speed was 7.3 ± 2.0 m/s (14.1 ± 3.9 knots). Most ship classes show a linear relationship between source level and speed with a slope near +2 dB per m/s (+1 dB/knot). Spectrum, 1/12-octave, and 1/3-octave source levels for the whole population have median values that are comparable to previous measurements and models at most frequencies, but for select studies may be relatively low below 200 Hz and high above 20,000 Hz. Median source spectrum levels peak near 50 Hz for all 12 ship classes, have a maximum of 159 dB re 1 µPa(2)/Hz @ 1 m for container ships, and vary between classes. Below 200 Hz, the class-specific median spectrum levels bifurcate with large commercial ships grouping as higher power noise sources. Within all ship classes spectrum levels vary more at low frequencies than at high frequencies, and the degree of variability is almost halved for classes that have smaller speed standard

  2. Ship noise extends to frequencies used for echolocation by endangered killer whales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Veirs

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Combining calibrated hydrophone measurements with vessel location data from the Automatic Identification System, we estimate underwater sound pressure levels for 1,582 unique ships that transited the core critical habitat of the endangered Southern Resident killer whales during 28 months between March, 2011, and October, 2013. Median received spectrum levels of noise from 2,809 isolated transits are elevated relative to median background levels not only at low frequencies (20–30 dB re 1 µPa2/Hz from 100 to 1,000 Hz, but also at high frequencies (5–13 dB from 10,000 to 96,000 Hz. Thus, noise received from ships at ranges less than 3 km extends to frequencies used by odontocetes. Broadband received levels (11.5–40,000 Hz near the shoreline in Haro Strait (WA, USA for the entire ship population were 110 ± 7 dB re 1 µPa on average. Assuming near-spherical spreading based on a transmission loss experiment we compute mean broadband source levels for the ship population of 173 ± 7 dB re 1 µPa 1 m without accounting for frequency-dependent absorption. Mean ship speed was 7.3 ± 2.0 m/s (14.1 ± 3.9 knots. Most ship classes show a linear relationship between source level and speed with a slope near +2 dB per m/s (+1 dB/knot. Spectrum, 1/12-octave, and 1/3-octave source levels for the whole population have median values that are comparable to previous measurements and models at most frequencies, but for select studies may be relatively low below 200 Hz and high above 20,000 Hz. Median source spectrum levels peak near 50 Hz for all 12 ship classes, have a maximum of 159 dB re 1 µPa2/Hz @ 1 m for container ships, and vary between classes. Below 200 Hz, the class-specific median spectrum levels bifurcate with large commercial ships grouping as higher power noise sources. Within all ship classes spectrum levels vary more at low frequencies than at high frequencies, and the degree of variability is almost halved for classes that have smaller speed

  3. Spots of Seismic Danger Extracted by Properties of Low-Frequency Seismic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubushin, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    A new method of seismic danger estimate is presented which is based on using properties of low-frequency seismic noise from broadband networks. Two statistics of noise waveforms are considered: multi-fractal singularity spectrum support width D and minimum normalized entropy En of squared orthogonal wavelet coefficients. The maps of D and En are plotted in the moving time window. Let us call the regions extracted by low values of D and high values of En as "spots of seismic danger" - SSD. Mean values of D and En are strongly anti-correlated - that is why statistics D and En extract the same SSD. Nevertheless their mutual considering is expedient because these parameters are based on different approaches. The physical mechanism which underlies the method is consolidation of small blocks of the Earth's crust into the large one before the strong earthquake. This effect has a consequence that seismic noise does not include spikes which are connected with mutual movements of small blocks. The absence of irregular spikes in the noise follows the decreasing of D and increasing of entropy En. The stability in space and size of the SSD provides estimates of the place and energy of the probable future earthquake. The increasing or decreasing of SSD size and minimum or maximum values of D and En within SSD allows estimate the trend of seismic danger. The method is illustrating by the analysis of seismic noise from broadband seismic network F-net in Japan [1-5]. Statistically significant decreasing of D allowed a hypothesis about approaching Japan to a future seismic catastrophe to be formulated at the middle of 2008. The peculiarities of correlation coefficient estimate within 1 year time window between median values of D and generalized Hurst exponent allowed to make a decision that starting from July of 2010 Japan come to the state of waiting strong earthquake [3]. The method extracted a huge SSD near Japan which includes the region of future Tohoku mega-earthquake and the

  4. Novel Algorithm for Active Noise Control Systems Based on Frequency Selective Filters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-liang ZHAO

    2010-01-01

    A novel algorithm for active noise control systems based on frequency selective filters (FSFANC)is presented in the paper.The FSFANC aims at the m lti-tonal noise attenuation problem.One FSFANC system copes with one of the tonal components,and several FSFANC systems can nun independently in parallel to cancel the selected multiple tones.The proposed algorithm adopts a simple structrue with only two coefficients that can be explained as the real and imaginary parts of the structure to modelthesecondary path,and estimates the secondary path by injecting sinusoidal identification signals.Theoretical analysis and laboratory experiments show that the proposed algorithm possesses some advantages,such as simpler stricture,less computational burden,greater stability,and fast canverging speed.

  5. A bulk-controlled ring-VCO with 1/f-noise reduction for frequency ΔΣ modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuan Vu, CAO; Wisland, Dag T.; Lande, Tor Sverre

    The paper introduces a bulk-controlled ring-VCO with a tail transistor utilizing flicker-noise (1/f-noise) reduction techniques for a frequency-based DeltaSigma modulator (FDSM). This VCO converts an analog input voltage to phase information under various bias conditions ranging from sub...

  6. Anomalous low-frequency noise in synthetic antiferromagnets: possible evidence of current-induced domain-wall motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herranz, D.; Guerrero, R.; Villar, R.; Aliev, F.G.; Swaving, A.C.; Duine, R.A.; Van Haesendonck, C.; Vavra, I.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate current-driven magnetization dynamics in synthetic [Fe/Cr]10 multilayer antiferromagnets by using low-frequency voltage noise measurements. We observe suppression of the noise above a critical current density of about 2×105 A/cm2. Theoretical estimates suggest that this effect may be

  7. Noise control of a flow around a cylinder using high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopiev, V. F.; Belyaev, I. V.; Zaytsev, M. Yu.; Kazansky, P. N.; Kopiev, V. A.; Moralev, I. A.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators on the noise of a flow around a circular cylinder is experimentally studied. It is shown that the plasma actuators are able to reduce the vortex noise of a cylinder within the range of velocities typical for aeroacoustic applications.

  8. Double-gated Si NW FET sensors: Low-frequency noise and photoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, F.; Khondkaryan, H.; Arakelyan, A.; Zadorozhnyi, I.; Pud, S.; Vitusevich, S.

    2016-08-01

    The transport, noise, and photosensitivity properties of an array of silicon nanowire (NW) p+-p-p+ field-effect transistors (FETs) are investigated. The peculiarities of photosensitivity and detectivity are analyzed over a wide spectrum range. The absorbance of p-Si NW shifts to the short wavelength region compared with bulk Si. The photocurrent and photosensitivity reach increased values in the UV range of the spectrum at 300 K. It is shown that sensitivity values can be tuned by the drain-source voltage and may reach record values of up to 2-4 A/W at a wavelength of 300 nm at room temperature. Low-frequency noise studies allow calculating the photodetectivity values, which increase with decreasing wavelength down to 300 nm. We show that the drain current of Si NW biochemical sensors substantially depends on pH value and the signal-to-noise ratio reaches the high value of 105. Increasing pH sensitivity with gate voltage is revealed for certain source-drain currents of pH-sensors based on Si NW FETs. The noise characteristic index decreases from 1.1 to 0.7 with the growth of the liquid gate voltage. Noise behavior is successfully explained in the framework of the correlated number-mobility unified fluctuation model. pH sensitivity increases as a result of the increase in liquid gate voltage, thus giving the opportunity to measure very low proton concentrations in the electrolyte medium at certain values of the liquid gate voltage.

  9. High-frequency noise in FDSOI MOSFETs: a Monte Carlo investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengel, Raul; Mateos, Javier; Pardo, Daniel; Gonzalez, Tomas; Martin, Maria Jesus; Dambrine, Gilles; Danneville, Francois; Raskin, Jean-Pierre

    2003-05-01

    Due to the enormous industrial interest of the SOI MOSFET technology, a proper understanding of the physics underlying the behavior of these devices is necessary in order to optimize their high frequency performance. In this work, we study the static, dynamic and noise characteristics of FDSOI MOSFET"s by means of numerical simulations validated by comparison with experimental data. For this purpose, we use a 2D Ensemble Monte Carlo simulator, taking into account, in an appropriate manner, the physical topology of a fabricated 0.25 μm gate-length FDSOI transistor. Important effects appearing in real transistors, such as surface charges, contact resistances, impact ionization phenomena and extrinsic parasitics are included in the simulation. This allows to accurately reproduce the experimental behavior of static and dynamic parameters (output and transference characteristics, gm/ID ratio, capacitances, etc.). Moreover, results are explained by means of internal quantities such as concentration, velocity or energy of carriers. The results of the Monte Carlo simulations for the typical four noise parameters (NFmin, Gass, Rn, Gamma opt) of the 0.25 μm FDSOI MOSFET also show an exceptional agreement with experimental data. Once the reliability of the simulator has been confirmed, a full study of the noise characteristics of the device (noise sources, drain spectral densities, α, β and C parameters, etc.) is performed. Taking advantage of the possibilities of the Monte Carlo method as a pseudo-experimental approach, the influence on these noise characteristics of the variation of some geometry parameters (i.e., downscaling the gate length, thickness of the active layer or inclusion of HALO regions) is evaluated an interpreted in terms of microscopic transport processes.

  10. Anti-noise sound recognition based on energy-frequency feature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiaomin; LI Ying

    2015-01-01

    In the natural environment, non-stationary background noise affects the animal sound recognition directly. Given this problem, a new technology of animal sound recognition based on energy-frequency ( E-F) feature is proposed in this paper. The animal sound is turned into spectrogram to show the energy, time and frequency characteristics. The sub-band frequency division and sub-band energy division are carried out on the spectrogram for extracting the statistical characteristic of energy and frequency, so as to achieve sub-band power distribution ( SPD) and sub-band division. Radon transform ( RT) and discrete wavelet transform ( DWT) are employed to obtain the important projection coefficients, and the energy values of sub-band frequencies are calculated to extract the sub-band frequency feature. The E-F feature is formed by com-bining the SPD feature and sub-band energy value feature. The classification is achieved by support vector machine ( SVM) classifier. The experimental results show that the method can achieve better recognition effect even when the SNR is below 10 dB.

  11. High-Frequency Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation Enhances Perception of Facial Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanska, Aleksandra; Rezlescu, Constantin; Susilo, Tirta; Duchaine, Bradley; Banissy, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Recently, a number of studies have demonstrated the utility of transcranial current stimulation as a tool to facilitate a variety of cognitive and perceptual abilities. Few studies, though, have examined the utility of this approach for the processing of social information. Here, we conducted 2 experiments to explore whether a single session of high-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) targeted at lateral occipitotemporal cortices would enhance facial identity perception. In Experiment 1, participants received 20 min of active high-frequency tRNS or sham stimulation prior to completing the tasks examining facial identity perception or trustworthiness perception. Active high-frequency tRNS facilitated facial identity perception, but not trustworthiness perception. Experiment 2 assessed the spatial specificity of this effect by delivering 20 min of active high-frequency tRNS to lateral occipitotemporal cortices or sensorimotor cortices prior to participants completing the same facial identity perception task used in Experiment 1. High-frequency tRNS targeted at lateral occipitotemporal cortices enhanced performance relative to motor cortex stimulation. These findings show that high-frequency tRNS to lateral occipitotemporal cortices produces task-specific and site-specific enhancements in face perception.

  12. Electro-optic comb based real time ultra-high sensitivity phase noise measurement system for high frequency microwaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuse, N; Fermann, M E

    2017-06-06

    Recent progress in ultra low phase noise microwave generation indispensably depends on ultra low phase noise characterization systems. However, achieving high sensitivity currently relies on time consuming averaging via cross correlation, which sometimes even underestimates phase noise because of residual correlations. Moreover, extending high sensitivity phase noise measurements to microwaves beyond 10 GHz is very difficult because of the lack of suitable high frequency microwave components. In this work, we introduce a delayed self-heterodyne method in conjunction with sensitivity enhancement via the use of higher order comb modes from an electro-optic comb for ultra-high sensitivity phase noise measurements. The method obviates the need for any high frequency RF components and has a frequency measurement range limited only by the bandwidth (100 GHz) of current electro-optic modulators. The estimated noise floor is as low as -133 dBc/Hz, -155 dBc/Hz, -170 dBc/Hz and -171 dBc/Hz without cross correlation at 1 kHz, 10 kHz, 100 kHz and 1 MHz Fourier offset frequency for a 10 GHz carrier, respectively. Moreover, since no cross correlation is necessary, RF oscillator phase noise can be directly suppressed via feedback up to 100 kHz frequency offset.

  13. A 3 to 5 GHz low-phase-noise fractional-N frequency synthesizer with adaptive frequency calibration for GSM/PCS/DCS/WCDMA transceivers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Yaohua; Mei Niansong; Chen Hu; Huang Yumei; Hong Zhiliang

    2012-01-01

    A low-phase-noise ∑-△ fractional-N frequency synthesizer for GSM/PCS/DCS/WCDMA transceivers is presented.The voltage controlled oscillator is designed with a modified digital controlled capacitor array to extend the tuning range and minimize phase noise.A high-resolution adaptive frequency calibration technique is introduced to automatically choose frequency bands and increase phase-noise immunity.A prototype is implemented in 0.13 μm CMOS technology.The experimental results show that the designed 1.2 V wideband frequency synthesizer is locked from 3.05 to 5.17 GHz within 30μs,which covers all five required frequency bands.The measured in-band phase noise are -89,-95.5 and -101 dBc/Hz for 3.8 GHz,2 GHz and 948 MHz carriers,respectively,and accordingly the out-of-band phase noise are -121,-123 and -132 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset,which meet the phase-noise-mask requirements of the above-mentioned standards.

  14. An experimental investigation of low-frequency noise in 8-mm-band Gunn-diode oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, I. A.; Malyshev, V. M.; Meshcheriakov, A. V.

    1989-07-01

    The noise characteristics of Ka-band Gunn oscillators are studied. The dependences of the frequency fluctuations on the SWR and load phases are analyzed. A comparison of the noise characteristics of Ka- and X-band Gunn oscillators shows that their fluctuation levels are about the same if they are calculated at the same oscillation frequency. The amplitude fluctuation is 10 dB lower in Ka-band oscillators.

  15. Adaptive Threshold Clipper Combining Receiver for Fast Frequency Hopping Systems during Partial-Band Noise Jamming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖立民; 许希斌; 姚彦

    2001-01-01

    Diversity combining technologies are analyzed for fastfrequency-hopping spread spectrum systems during partial-band noise jamming to develop a novel combining receiver called an Adaptive Threshold Clipper Combining Receiver (ATCCR). The optimal clipping level for an ATCCR is analyzed, computed, and compared with several other diversity combining technologies. Since the ATCCR can estimate the power of the jamming and the number of jammed frequency cells to adaptively adjust the clipper's threshold, the system performance using the adaptive threshold clipper combining technique can be greatly improved.

  16. Effect of modulation depth, frequency, and intermittence on wind turbine noise annoyance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ioannidou, Christina; Santurette, Sébastien; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) may be an important factor for the perceived annoyance of wind turbine noise (WTN). Two AM types, typically referred to as “normal AM” (NAM) and “other AM” (OAM), characterize WTN AM, OAM corresponding to having intermittent periods with larger AM depth in lower frequency......, while determined from real on-site recordings, could be varied systematically. Listening tests with both original and synthesized stimuli showed that a reduction in mean AM depth across the spectrum led to a significant decrease in annoyance. When the spectrotemporal characteristics of the original far...

  17. Investigation of noise in Lightwave Synthesized Frequency Sweeper seeded LIDAR anemometers from leakage through the Acousto Optic Modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Lindelöw, Per Jonas Petter

    2009-01-01

    Lightwave Synthesized Frequency Sweepers (LSFS) have potential use as lightsources in lidar anemometers. In this paper noise due to leakage in the acousto optic modulators in an LSFS is investigated. Theoretical expressions describing the build-up of noise in the LSFS due to leakage are derived...... Train (FSPT) modulated lidars the leakage will give rise to rapidly growing noise in the bins which corresponds to the signal from low radial wind velocities. It is likely that noise canceling techniques similar to those used for RIN removal has to be deployed for measurements of low wind velocities....

  18. Computationally efficient algorithm for high sampling-frequency operation of active noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Nirmal Kumar; Das, Debi Prasad; Panda, Ganapati

    2015-05-01

    In high sampling-frequency operation of active noise control (ANC) system the length of the secondary path estimate and the ANC filter are very long. This increases the computational complexity of the conventional filtered-x least mean square (FXLMS) algorithm. To reduce the computational complexity of long order ANC system using FXLMS algorithm, frequency domain block ANC algorithms have been proposed in past. These full block frequency domain ANC algorithms are associated with some disadvantages such as large block delay, quantization error due to computation of large size transforms and implementation difficulties in existing low-end DSP hardware. To overcome these shortcomings, the partitioned block ANC algorithm is newly proposed where the long length filters in ANC are divided into a number of equal partitions and suitably assembled to perform the FXLMS algorithm in the frequency domain. The complexity of this proposed frequency domain partitioned block FXLMS (FPBFXLMS) algorithm is quite reduced compared to the conventional FXLMS algorithm. It is further reduced by merging one fast Fourier transform (FFT)-inverse fast Fourier transform (IFFT) combination to derive the reduced structure FPBFXLMS (RFPBFXLMS) algorithm. Computational complexity analysis for different orders of filter and partition size are presented. Systematic computer simulations are carried out for both the proposed partitioned block ANC algorithms to show its accuracy compared to the time domain FXLMS algorithm.

  19. Evidence of Cnidarians sensitivity to sound after exposure to low frequency noise underwater sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, Marta; Lenoir, Marc; Fontuño, José Manuel; Durfort, Mercè; van der Schaar, Mike; André, Michel

    2016-12-01

    Jellyfishes represent a group of species that play an important role in oceans, particularly as a food source for different taxa and as a predator of fish larvae and planktonic prey. The massive introduction of artificial sound sources in the oceans has become a concern to science and society. While we are only beginning to understand that non-hearing specialists like cephalopods can be affected by anthropogenic noises and regulation is underway to measure European water noise levels, we still don’t know yet if the impact of sound may be extended to other lower level taxa of the food web. Here we exposed two species of Mediterranean Scyphozoan medusa, Cotylorhiza tuberculata and Rhizostoma pulmo to a sweep of low frequency sounds. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed injuries in the statocyst sensory epithelium of both species after exposure to sound, that are consistent with the manifestation of a massive acoustic trauma observed in other species. The presence of acoustic trauma in marine species that are not hearing specialists, like medusa, shows the magnitude of the problem of noise pollution and the complexity of the task to determine threshold values that would help building up regulation to prevent permanent damage of the ecosystems.

  20. Ultralow-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal generator assisted with an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizawa, A; Nishikawa, T; Goto, T; Hitachi, K; Sogawa, T; Gotoh, H

    2016-05-17

    Low-noise millimetre-wave signals are valuable for digital sampling systems, arbitrary waveform generation for ultra-wideband communications, and coherent radar systems. However, the phase noise of widely used conventional signal generators (SGs) will increase as the millimetre-wave frequency increases. Our goal has been to improve commercially available SGs so that they provide a low-phase-noise millimetre-wave signal with assistance from an electro-optics-modulator-based optical frequency comb (EOM-OFC). Here, we show that the phase noise can be greatly reduced by bridging the vast frequency difference between the gigahertz and terahertz ranges with an EOM-OFC. The EOM-OFC serves as a liaison that magnifies the phase noise of the SG. With the EOM-OFC used as a phase noise "booster" for a millimetre-wave signal, the phase noise of widely used SGs can be reduced at an arbitrary frequency f (6 ≦ f ≦ 72 GHz).

  1. Prediction and reduction of internal blade-passing frequency noise of the centrifugal fan in a refrigerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seungyub; Heo, Seung; Cheong, Cheolung [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, 30, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Pusan 609-735 (Korea)

    2010-09-15

    The internal blade-passing frequency (BPF) noise of a centrifugal fan in a household refrigerator is computed using a hybrid method. The unsteady flow field of the centrifugal fan in a duct is predicted by solving the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with conventional computational fluid dynamics techniques. The principal sources of noise are then extracted from the predicted flow field through the acoustic analogy. Finally, the internal BPF noise is predicted using the modeled sources in combination with the boundary element method. A parametric study using this hybrid technique shows that the BPF noise levels predicted for various non-dimensional cutoff distances closely follow the experimental data. Based on this result, a low-noise design for the centrifugal fan is proposed. A BPF noise reduction of approximately 3 dB is achieved in comparison with the original model, which is in good agreement with the prediction using the hybrid techniques. (author)

  2. Post-Processing Enhancement of Reverberation-Noise Suppression in Dual-Frequency SURF Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Nasholm, Sven Peter; Angelsen, Bjørn A J; 10.1109/TUFFC.2011.1811

    2013-01-01

    A post-processing adjustment technique which aims for enhancement of dual-frequency SURF (Second order UltRasound Field) reverberation-noise suppression imaging in medical ultrasound is analyzed. Two variant methods are investigated through numerical simulations. They both solely involve post-processing of the propagated high-frequency (HF) imaging wave fields, which in real-time imaging corresponds to post-processing of the beamformed receive radio-frequency signals. Hence the transmit pulse complexes are the same as for the previously published SURF reverberation-suppression imaging method. The adjustment technique is tested on simulated data from propagation of SURF pulse complexes consisting of a 3.5 MHz HF imaging pulse added to a 0.5 low-frequency sound-speed manipulation pulse. Imaging transmit beams are constructed with and without adjustment. The post-processing involves filtering, e.g., by a time-shift, in order to equalize the two SURF HF pulses at a chosen depth. This depth is typically chosen to ...

  3. Effect of modulation depth, frequency, and intermittence on wind turbine noise annoyance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Christina; Santurette, Sébastien; Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) may be an important factor for the perceived annoyance of wind turbine noise (WTN). Two AM types, typically referred to as "normal AM" (NAM) and "other AM" (OAM), characterize WTN AM, OAM corresponding to having intermittent periods with larger AM depth in lower frequency regions than NAM. The extent to which AM depth, frequency, and type affect WTN annoyance remains uncertain. Moreover, the temporal variations of WTN AM have often not been considered. Here, realistic stimuli accounting for such temporal variations were synthesized such that AM depth, frequency, and type, while determined from real on-site recordings, could be varied systematically. Listening tests with both original and synthesized stimuli showed that a reduction in mean AM depth across the spectrum led to a significant decrease in annoyance. When the spectrotemporal characteristics of the original far-field stimuli and the temporal AM variations were taken into account, the effect of AM frequency remained limited and the presence of intermittent OAM periods did not affect annoyance. These findings suggest that, at a given overall level, the AM depth of NAM periods is the most crucial AM parameter for WTN annoyance.

  4. Concrete bridge-borne low-frequency noise simulation based on train-track-bridge dynamic interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Xu, Y. L.; Wu, D. J.

    2012-05-01

    Both the vibration of a railway bridge under a moving train and the associated bridge-borne noise are time-varying in nature. The former is commonly predicted in the time domain to take its time-varying and nonlinear properties into account, whereas acoustic computation is generally conducted in the frequency domain to obtain steady responses. This paper presents a general procedure for obtaining various characteristics of concrete bridge-borne low-frequency noise by bridging the gap between time-domain bridge vibration computation and frequency-domain bridge-borne noise simulation. The finite element method (FEM) is first used to solve the transient train-track-bridge dynamic interaction problem, with an emphasis on the local vibration of the bridge. The boundary element method (BEM) is then applied to find the frequency-dependent modal acoustic transfer vectors (MATVs). The time-domain sound pressure is finally obtained with the help of time-frequency transforms. The proposed procedure is applied to a real urban rail transit U-shaped concrete bridge to compute the bridge acceleration and bridge-borne noise, and these results are compared with the field measurement results. Both sets of results show the proposed procedure to be feasible and accurate and the dominant frequencies of concrete bridge-borne noise to range from 32 Hz to 100 Hz.

  5. Analysis of frequency noise properties of 729nm extended cavity diode laser with unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tuan M.; Čížek, Martin; Hucl, Václav; Lazar, Josef; Hrabina, Jan; Řeřucha, Šimon; Lešundák, Adam; Obšil, Petr; Filip, Radim; Slodička, Lukáš; Číp, Ondřej

    2016-12-01

    We report on the frequency noise investigation of a linewidth-suppressed Extended Cavity Diode Laser (ECDL), working at 729 nm. Since the ECDL is intended as an excitation laser for the forbidden transition in a trapped and laser cooled 40Ca+ ion, an Hz-level linewidth is required. We present the experimental design that comprises a two-stage linewidth narrowing and a facility for frequency and noise analysis. The linewidth is first narrowed with a phase lock loop of the ECDL onto a selected component of an optical frequency comb where the frequency noise was suppressed with a fast electronic servo-loop controller that drives the laser injection current with a high bandwidth. The second stage comprises locking the laser onto a selected mode of a high-finesse passive optical cavity. The frequency analysis used an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a fiber spool inserted in the reference arm in order to give a general insight into the signal properties by mixing two separated beams, one of them delayed by the spool, and processing it with a spectral analyzer. Such a frequency noise analysis reveals what are the most significant noises contributions to the laser linewidth, which is a crucial information in field of ion trapping and cooling. The presented experimental results show the effect of the linewidth narrowing with the first stage, where the linewidth of ECDL was narrowed down to a kHz level.

  6. High-Resolution Dual-Comb Spectroscopy with Ultra-Low Noise Frequency Combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänsel, Wolfgang; Giunta, Michele; Beha, Katja; Perry, Adam J.; Holzwarth, R.

    2017-06-01

    Dual-comb spectroscopy is a powerful tool for fast broad-band spectroscopy due to the parallel interrogation of thousands of spectral lines. Here we report on the spectroscopic analysis of acetylene vapor in a pressurized gas cell using two ultra-low noise frequency combs with a repetition rate around 250 MHz. Optical referencing to a high-finesse cavity yields a sub-Hertz stability of all individual comb lines (including the virtual comb lines between 0 Hz and the carrier) and permits one to pick a small difference of repetition rate for the two frequency combs on the order of 300 Hz, thus representing an optical spectrum of 100 THz (˜3300 \\wn) within half the free spectral range (125 MHz). The transmission signal is derived straight from a photodetector and recorded with a high-resolution spectrum analyzer or digitized with a computer-controlled AD converter. The figure to the right shows a schematic of the experimental setup which is all fiber-coupled with polarization-maintaining fiber except for the spectroscopic cell. The graph on the lower right reveals a portion of the recorded radio-frequency spectrum which has been scaled to the optical domain. The location of the measured absorption coincides well with data taken from the HITRAN data base. Due to the intrinsic linewidth of all contributing comb lines, each sampling point in the transmission graph corresponds to the probing at an optical frequency with sub-Hertz resolution. This resolution is maintained in coherent wavelength conversion processes such as difference-frequency generation (DFG), sum-frequency generation (SFG) or non-linear broadening (self-phase modulation), and is therefore easily transferred to a wide spectral range from the mid infrared up to the visible spectrum.

  7. Low-frequency noise from large wind turbines – additional data and assessment of new Danish regulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Pedersen, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    ) than for small turbines (≤ 2 MW) is confirmed. Due to the air absorption, the higher low-frequency content becomes even more pronounced, when sound pressure levels in relevant neighbor distances are considered. Even when A weighted levels are considered, a substantial part of the noise is at low...... frequencies, and for several of the investigated large turbines, the one-third-octave band with the highest level is at or below 250 Hz. It is thus beyond any doubt that the low-frequency part of the spectrum plays an important role in the noise at the neighbors. The new Danish regulation is based...

  8. Assessment of DC and low-frequency noise performances of triple-gate FinFETs at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretu, B.; Boudier, D.; Simoen, E.; Veloso, A.; Collaert, N.

    2016-12-01

    In this work an in-depth investigation in terms of short-channel effects, analog operation and low-frequency noise performances at very low temperature operation is given. The most important electrical parameters are investigated and it is highlighted that for our devices the downscaling to sub-10 nm technologies leads to improved drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) and intrinsic voltage gain. As expected, cryogenic operation leads to an amelioration of the subthreshold slope and charge sharing effect. A reduction of the threshold voltage and of the effective mobility is also observed. Discontinuities in the subthreshold slope in the drain current-gate voltage characteristics can be linked to potential non-uniformities in the channel width. It was observed that noise spectra contain 1/f and generation-recombination contributions. Low-frequency noise measurements as a function of the applied gate voltage at cryogenic operation show that the carrier number fluctuations dominate the flicker noise in weak inversion. Access resistance noise contributions were evidenced in strong inversion. The fact that devices suffer from generation-recombination noise even at 10 K operation shows that there are some active traps even at this cryogenic temperature operation. The low-frequency noise measurements as a function of temperature (10 K-70 K) are used as a non-destructive device characterization tool in order to identify traps induced during the device processing and to make a correlation between the observed traps and some technological steps.

  9. Fundamental x-ray interaction limits in diagnostic imaging detectors: frequency-dependent Swank noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdok, G; Battista, J J; Cunningham, I A

    2008-07-01

    A frequency-dependent x-ray Swank factor based on the "x-ray interaction" modulation transfer function and normalized noise power spectrum is determined from a Monte Carlo analysis. This factor was calculated in four converter materials: amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium (a-Se), cesium iodide (CsI), and lead iodide (PbI2) for incident photon energies between 10 and 150 keV and various converter thicknesses. When scaled by the quantum efficiency, the x-ray Swank factor describes the best possible detective quantum efficiency (DQE) a detector can have. As such, this x-ray interaction DQE provides a target performance benchmark. It is expressed as a function of (Fourier-based) spatial frequency and takes into consideration signal and noise correlations introduced by reabsorption of Compton scatter and photoelectric characteristic emissions. It is shown that the x-ray Swank factor is largely insensitive to converter thickness for quantum efficiency values greater than 0.5. Thus, while most of the tabulated values correspond to thick converters with a quantum efficiency of 0.99, they are appropriate to use for many detectors in current use. A simple expression for the x-ray interaction DQE of digital detectors (including noise aliasing) is derived in terms of the quantum efficiency, x-ray Swank factor, detector element size, and fill factor. Good agreement is shown with DQE curves published by other investigators for each converter material, and the conditions required to achieve this ideal performance are discussed. For high-resolution imaging applications, the x-ray Swank factor indicates: (i) a-Si should only be used at low-energy (e.g., mammography); (ii) a-Se has the most promise for any application below 100 keV; and (iii) while quantum efficiency may be increased at energies just above the K edge in CsI and PbI2, this benefit is offset by a substantial drop in the x-ray Swank factor, particularly at high spatial frequencies.

  10. A low phase noise microwave frequency synthesis for a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, B; Calosso, C E; Danet, J M; Boudot, R

    2014-09-01

    We report the development, absolute phase noise, and residual phase noise characterization of a 9.192 GHz microwave frequency synthesis chain devoted to be used as a local oscillator in a high-performance cesium vapor cell atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT). It is based on frequency multiplication of an ultra-low phase noise 100 MHz oven-controlled quartz crystal oscillator using a nonlinear transmission line-based chain. Absolute phase noise performances of the 9.192 GHz output signal are measured to be -42, -100, -117 dB rad(2)/Hz and -129 dB rad(2)/Hz at 1 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. Compared to current results obtained in a state-of-the-art CPT-based frequency standard developed at LNE-SYRTE, this represents an improvement of 8 dB and 10 dB at f = 166 Hz and f = 10 kHz, respectively. With such performances, the expected Dick effect contribution to the atomic clock short term frequency stability is reported at a level of 6.2 × 10(-14) at 1 s integration time, that is a factor 3 higher than the atomic clock shot noise limit. Main limitations are pointed out.

  11. Calculation of shear stiffness in noise dominated magnetic resonance elastography data based on principal frequency estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, K P; Lake, D; Mariappan, Y; Manduca, A; Ehman, R L [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 First Street, SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Hubmayr, R D [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 First Street, SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Ansell, K, E-mail: mcgee.kiaran@mayo.edu [Schaeffer Academy, 2700 Schaeffer Lane NE, Rochester, MN 55906 (United States)

    2011-07-21

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a non-invasive phase-contrast-based method for quantifying the shear stiffness of biological tissues. Synchronous application of a shear wave source and motion encoding gradient waveforms within the MRE pulse sequence enable visualization of the propagating shear wave throughout the medium under investigation. Encoded shear wave-induced displacements are then processed to calculate the local shear stiffness of each voxel. An important consideration in local shear stiffness estimates is that the algorithms employed typically calculate shear stiffness using relatively high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) MRE images and have difficulties at an extremely low SNR. A new method of estimating shear stiffness based on the principal spatial frequency of the shear wave displacement map is presented. Finite element simulations were performed to assess the relative insensitivity of this approach to decreases in SNR. Additionally, ex vivo experiments were conducted on normal rat lungs to assess the robustness of this approach in low SNR biological tissue. Simulation and experimental results indicate that calculation of shear stiffness by the principal frequency method is less sensitive to extremely low SNR than previously reported MRE inversion methods but at the expense of loss of spatial information within the region of interest from which the principal frequency estimate is derived.

  12. Empirical frequency domain model for fixed-pattern noise in infrared focal plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Francisco; Pezoa, Jorge E.; Figueroa, Miguel; Torres, Sergio N.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a new empirical model for the spatial structure of the fixed-pattern noise (FPN) observed in infrared (IR) focal-plane arrays (FPA) is presented. The model was conceived after analyzing, in the spatial frequency domain, FPN calibration data from different IR cameras and technologies. The analysis showed that the spatial patterns of the FPN are retained in the phase spectrum, while the noise intensity is determined by the magnitude spectrum. Thus, unlike traditional representations, the proposed model abstracts the FPN structure using one matrix for its magnitude spectrum and another matrix for its phase spectrum. Three applications of the model are addressed here. First, an algorithm is provided for generating random samples of the FPN with the same spatial pattern of the actual FPN. Second, the model is used to assess the performance of non-uniformity correction (NUC) algorithms in the presence of spatially correlated and uncorrelated FPN. Third, the model is used to improve the NUC capability of a method that requires, as a reference, a proper FPN sample.

  13. A joint recovery scheme for carrier frequency offset and carrier phase noise using extended Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linqian; Feng, Yiqiao; Zhang, Wenbo; Cui, Nan; Xu, Hengying; Tang, Xianfeng; Xi, Lixia; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2017-07-01

    A joint carrier recovery scheme for polarization division multiplexing (PDM) coherent optical transmission system is proposed and demonstrated, in which the extended Kalman filter (EKF) is exploited to estimate and equalize the carrier frequency offset (CFO) and carrier phase noise (CPN) simultaneously. The proposed method is implemented and verified in the PDM-QPSK system and the PDM-16QAM system with the comparisons to conventional improved Mth-power (IMP) algorithm for CFO estimation, blind phase search (BPS) algorithm or Viterbi-Viterbi (V-V) algorithm for CPN recovery. It is demonstrated that the proposed scheme shows high CFO estimation accuracy, with absolute mean estimation error below 1.5 MHz. Meanwhile, the proposed method has the CFO tolerance of [±3 GHz] for PDM-QPSK system and [±0.9 GHz] for PDM-16QAM system. Compare with IMP/BPS and IMP/V-V, the proposed scheme can enhance the linewidth symbol duration product from 3 × 10-4 (IMP/BPS) and 2 × 10-4 (IMP/V-V) to 1 × 10-3 for PDM-QPSK, and from 1 × 10-4 (IMP/BPS) to 3 × 10-4 for PDM-16QAM, respectively, at the 1 dB optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) penalty. The proposed Kalman filter also shows a fast convergence with only 100 symbols and much lower computational complexity.

  14. Real-time simulation of finite-frequency noise from a single-electron emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, T.; Stoll, T.; Rech, J.; Martin, T.

    2012-01-01

    We study the real-time emission of single electrons from a quantum dot coupled to a one dimensional conductor, using exact diagonalization on a discrete tight-binding chain. We show that, from the calculation of the time evolution of the one-electron states, we have simple access to all the relevant physical quantities in the system. In particular, we are able to compute accurately the finite-frequency current autocorrelation noise. The method that we use is general and versatile, allowing us to study the impact of many different parameters, such as the dot transparency or level position. Our results can be directly compared with existing experiments, and can also serve as a basis for future calculations including electronic interactions using the time-dependent density-matrix renormalization group and other techniques based on tight-binding models.

  15. Note: Suppression of kHz-frequency switching noise in digital micro-mirror devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueck, Klaus; Mazurenko, Anton; Luick, Niclas; Lompe, Thomas; Moritz, Henning

    2017-01-01

    High resolution digital micro-mirror devices (DMDs) make it possible to produce nearly arbitrary light fields with high accuracy, reproducibility, and low optical aberrations. However, using these devices to trap and manipulate ultracold atomic systems for, e.g., quantum simulation is often complicated by the presence of kHz-frequency switching noise. Here we demonstrate a simple hardware extension that solves this problem and makes it possible to produce truly static light fields. This modification leads to a 47 fold increase in the time that we can hold ultracold (6)Li atoms in a dipole potential created with the DMD. Finally, we provide reliable and user friendly APIs written in Matlab and Python to control the DMD.

  16. Modeling of low- and high-frequency noise by slow and fast fluctuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov, Alexander I.; Berman, Gennady P.

    2012-05-01

    We study the dynamics of dephasing in a quantum two-level system by modeling both 1/f and high-frequency noise by random telegraph processes. Our approach is based on a so-called spin-fluctuator model in which a noisy environment is modeled by a large number of fluctuators. In the continuous limit we obtain an effective random process (ERP) that is described by a distribution function of the fluctuators. In a simplified model, we reduce the ERP to the two (slow and fast) ensembles of fluctuators. Using this model, we study decoherence in a superconducting flux qubit and we compare our theoretical results with the available experimental data. We demonstrate good agreement of our theoretical predictions with the experiments. Our approach can be applied to many quantum systems, such as biological complexes, semiconductors, superconducting, and spin qubits, where the effects of interaction with the environment are essential.

  17. Note: Suppression of kHz-frequency switching noise in digital micro-mirror devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueck, Klaus; Mazurenko, Anton; Luick, Niclas; Lompe, Thomas; Moritz, Henning

    2017-01-01

    High resolution digital micro-mirror devices (DMDs) make it possible to produce nearly arbitrary light fields with high accuracy, reproducibility, and low optical aberrations. However, using these devices to trap and manipulate ultracold atomic systems for, e.g., quantum simulation is often complicated by the presence of kHz-frequency switching noise. Here we demonstrate a simple hardware extension that solves this problem and makes it possible to produce truly static light fields. This modification leads to a 47 fold increase in the time that we can hold ultracold 6Li atoms in a dipole potential created with the DMD. Finally, we provide reliable and user friendly APIs written in Matlab and Python to control the DMD.

  18. Suppression of kHz-Frequency Switching Noise in Digital Micro-Mirror Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hueck, Klaus; Luick, Niclas; Lompe, Thomas; Moritz, Henning

    2016-01-01

    High resolution digital micro-mirror devices (DMD) make it possible to produce nearly arbitrary light fields with high accuracy, reproducibility and low optical aberrations. However, using these devices to trap and manipulate ultracold atomic systems for e.g. quantum simulation is often complicated by the presence of kHz-frequency switching noise. Here we demonstrate a simple hardware extension that solves this problem and makes it possible to produce truly static light fields. This modification leads to a 47 fold increase in the time that we can hold ultracold $^6$Li atoms in a dipole potential created with the DMD. Finally, we provide reliable and user friendly APIs written in Matlab and Python to control the DMD.

  19. Modeling of Low and High Frequency Noise by Slow and Fast Fluctuators

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterov, Alexander I

    2012-01-01

    We study the dynamics of dephasing in a quantum two-level system by modeling both $1/f$ and high-frequency noise by random telegraph processes. Our approach is based on a so-called spin-fluctuator model in which a noisy environment is modelled by a large number of fluctuators. In the continuous limit we obtain an effective random process (ERP) that is described by a distribution function of the fluctuators. In a simplified model, we reduce the ERP to the two (slow and fast) effective fluctuators. Using this model, we study decoherence in a superconducting flux qubit and we compare our theoretical results with the available experimental data. We demonstrate good agreement of our theoretical predictions with the experiments. Our approach can be applied to many quantum systems, such as photosynthetic complexes, semiconductors, and superconducting and spin qubits, where the effects of interaction with the environment are essential.

  20. Correction of phase velocity bias caused by strong directional noise sources in high-frequency ambient noise tomography: a case study in Karamay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Luo, Y.; Yang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    with results from geology surveys than those based on uncorrected ones. As ambient noise in high frequency band (>1Hz) is mostly related to human activities or climate events, both of which have strong directivity, the iterative approach demonstrated here helps improve the accuracy and resolution of ANT in imaging shallow earth structures.

  1. Correction of phase velocity bias caused by strong directional noise sources in high-frequency ambient noise tomography: a case study in Karamay, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Luo, Yinhe; Yang, Yingjie

    2016-05-01

    corrected interstation dispersion measurements are more consistent with results from geology surveys than those based on uncorrected data. As ambient noise in high-frequency band (>1 Hz) is mostly related to human activities or climate events, both of which have strong directivity, the iterative approach demonstrated here helps improve the accuracy and resolution of ANT in imaging shallow earth structures.

  2. Radio-frequency shot-noise measurement in a magnetic tunnel junction with a MgO barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Mushtaq; Park, Junghwan; Song, Woon; Chong, Yonuk [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yeonsub; Min, Byoungchul; Shin, Kyungho [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Sangwan [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Khim, Zheong [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    We measured the noise power of a magnetic tunnel junction in the frequency range of 710 {approx} 1200 MHz. A low-noise cryogenic HEMT amplifier was used to measure the small noise signal at a high frequency with wide bandwidth. The MgO-barrier tunnel junction showed large tunnel magnetoresistance ratio of 215% at low temperature, which indicates electronic transport through the tunnel barrier without any significant spin-flip scattering. In the bias-dependent noise measurement, however, the zero-bias shot noise was enhanced compared to the value expected from a perfect tunnel barrier or the value observed from a good Al-AlO{sub x}-Al tunnel junction. We assume that this enhanced noise comes from inelastic tunneling processes through the barrier, which may be related to the observed zero-bias anomaly in the differential resistance of the tunnel junctions. We present a simple phenomenological model for how the inelastic scattering process can enhance the zero-bias noise in a tunnel junction.

  3. Broadband suppression of phase-noise with cascaded phase-locked-loops for the generation of frequency ramps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Musch

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of analogue frequency ramps with non-fractional phase-locked-loops (PLL is a cost effective way of linearising varactor controlled oscillators (VCO. In case that the VCO shows a high phase-noise level, a single non-fractional PLL is not able to suppress the phase-noise of the VCO sufficiently. The reason for this is the limited loopbandwidth of the PLL. In the field of precise measurements a high phase-noise level is mostly not tolerable. Examples of VCO-types with an extremely high phase noise level are integrated millimetre wave oscillators based on GaAs-HEMT technology. Both, a low quality factor of the resonator and a high flicker-noise corner frequency of the transistors are the main reason for the poor phase-noise behaviour. On the other hand this oscillator type allows a cost effective implementation of a millimetre-wave VCO. Therefore, a cascaded two-loop structure is presented that is able to linearise a VCO and additionally to reduce its phase-noise significantly.

  4. 噪声性聋与频率相关性研究%The relationship between noise deafness and noise frequency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶辉; 李刚; 庄标; 李文志

    2016-01-01

    Objective To collect the data of those workers hearing chart, the intensity and frequency of noise was recorded in their workshop, and Spectral analysis was done according to the taping of noise. The relevance was analysed between hearing loss and noise frequency. It will provide one theoretical base for diagnosis and safeguard of the noise deafness.Methods 260 records of worker were collected in two factories including four workshops. The intensity and frequency of noise was surveyed in the four workshops, and the record was analyzed by praat software.Results Hearing of 99 workers among 260 workers was decreased. There were 63 workers in workshop one, the frequency of noise was 1400~17000Hz in the workshop,the intensity of noise was 62~81dB, there were 17 workers(26.98%) with hearing loss,13 workers of them had more than five years (76.47%). There were 97 workers in workshop two, the frequency of noise was 2500~14000Hz in the workshop,the intensity of noise was 55~71dB,there were 24 workers(24.74%) had hearing loss,19 workers of them had more than five years(79.17%). There were 52 workers in workshop three, the frequency of noise was 3500~15000Hz in the workshop,the intensity of noise was 84~98dB,there were 28 workers(53.85%) suffering hearing loss,25 workers of them had more than five years(89.29%). There were 48 workers in workshop four, the frequency of noise was 3000~17000Hz in the workshop,the intensity of noise was 85~101dB,there were 30 workers(62.5%)had hearing loss,27 workers of them had more than five years( 90%) . The worker's hearing loss was obvious in high frequency about 4000Hz.Conclusions The frequency of noise is wide in the workshop, from hundreds to ten thousands Hertz. The worker's hearing loss was obvious in high frequency, it is first start at 4000Hz, and will expand to other frequency gradually. The worker's hearing loss was infrequent in language frequency. The hearing loss of workers in the workshop showed time-dose-effect relations.%目

  5. Effect of dipole-quadrupole Robinson mode coupling upon the beam response to radio-frequency phase noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Bosch

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In an electron storage ring, coupling between dipole and quadrupole Robinson oscillations modifies the spectrum of longitudinal beam oscillations driven by radio-frequency (rf generator phase noise. In addition to the main peak at the resonant frequency of the coupled dipole Robinson mode, another peak occurs at the resonant frequency of the coupled quadrupole mode. To describe these peaks analytically for a quadratic synchrotron potential, we include the dipole and quadrupole modes when calculating the beam response to generator noise. We thereby obtain the transfer function from generator-noise phase modulation to beam phase modulation with and without phase feedback. For Robinson-stable bunches confined in a synchrotron potential with a single minimum, the calculated transfer function agrees with measurements at the Aladdin 800-MeV electron storage ring. The transfer function is useful in evaluating phase feedback that suppresses Robinson oscillations in order to obtain quiet operation of an infrared beam line.

  6. Audio-vocal responses of vocal fundamental frequency and formant during sustained vowel vocalizations in different noises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shao-Hsuan; Hsiao, Tzu-Yu; Lee, Guo-She

    2015-06-01

    Sustained vocalizations of vowels [a], [i], and syllable [mə] were collected in twenty normal-hearing individuals. On vocalizations, five conditions of different audio-vocal feedback were introduced separately to the speakers including no masking, wearing supra-aural headphones only, speech-noise masking, high-pass noise masking, and broad-band-noise masking. Power spectral analysis of vocal fundamental frequency (F0) was used to evaluate the modulations of F0 and linear-predictive-coding was used to acquire first two formants. The results showed that while the formant frequencies were not significantly shifted, low-frequency modulations (production, the motor speech controls on F0 may depend on a feedback mechanism while articulation should rely more on a feedforward mechanism. Power spectral analysis of F0 might be applied to evaluate audio-vocal control for various hearing and neurological disorders in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Analytical bit error rate performance evaluation of an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing power line communication system impaired by impulsive and Gaussian channel noise

    OpenAIRE

    Munshi Mahbubur Rahman; Satya Prasad Majumder

    2015-01-01

    An analytical approach is presented to evaluate the bit error rate (BER) performance of a power line (PL) communication system considering the combined influence of impulsive noise and background PL Gaussian noise. Middleton class-A noise model is considered to evaluate the effect of impulsive noise. The analysis is carried out to find the expression of the signal-to-noise ratio and BER considering orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) with binary phase shift keying modulation wit...

  8. Millisecond and Binary Pulsars as Nature's Frequency Standards; 2, Effects of Low-Frequency Timing Noise on Residuals and Measured Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeikin, S M

    1998-01-01

    Pulsars are the most stable natural frequency standards. They can be applied to a number of principal problems of modern astronomy and time-keeping metrology. The full exploration of pulsar properties requires obtaining unbiased estimates of the spin and orbital parameters. These estimates depend essentially on the random noise component being revealed in the residuals of time of arrivals (TOA). In the present paper, the influence of low-frequency ("red") timing noise with spectral indices from 1 to 6 on TOA residuals, variances, and covariances of estimates of measured parameters of single and binary pulsars are studied. In order to determine their functional dependence on time, an analytic technique of processing of observational data in time domain is developed which takes into account both stationary and non-stationary components of noise. Our analysis includes a simplified timing model of a binary pulsar in a circular orbit and procedure of estimation of pulsar parameters and residuals under the influenc...

  9. Evaluation of closure strategies for a periodically-forced Duffing oscillator with slowly modulated frequency subject to Gaussian white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalim, Jason; Welfert, Bruno D.; Lopez, Juan M.

    2017-03-01

    The response of a Duffing oscillator subject to a periodic forcing with slowly and stochastically modulated frequency is analyzed numerically. The results of both moment and cumulant-based stochastic reductions are compared to Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown how the explicit characterization of higher-order central moments of the (Gaussian) noise source and the periodic nature of the forcing enable a reliable reduction strategy providing a faithful description of the mean behavior of stochastic solutions. The reduced model is then used to illustrate how a large noise level and fast frequency drift may combine to sustain a strong response that is normally associated to resonance in the noiseless static case.

  10. Design and Characterization of a 5.2 GHz/2.4 GHz Fractional- Frequency Synthesizer for Low-Phase Noise Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Foster F

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a complete noise analysis of a -based fractional- phase-locked loop (PLL based frequency synthesizer. Rigorous analytical and empirical formulas have been given to model various phase noise sources and spurious components and to predict their impact on the overall synthesizer noise performance. These formulas have been applied to an integrated multiband WLAN frequency synthesizer RFIC to demonstrate noise minimization through judicious choice of loop parameters. Finally, predicted and measured phase jitter showed good agreement. For an LO frequency of 4.3 GHz, predicted and measured phase noise was rms and rms, respectively.

  11. Design and Characterization of a 5.2 GHz/2.4 GHz ΣΔ Fractional- N Frequency Synthesizer for Low-Phase Noise Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a complete noise analysis of a ΣΔ -based fractional- N phase-locked loop (PLL based frequency synthesizer. Rigorous analytical and empirical formulas have been given to model various phase noise sources and spurious components and to predict their impact on the overall synthesizer noise performance. These formulas have been applied to an integrated multiband WLAN frequency synthesizer RFIC to demonstrate noise minimization through judicious choice of loop parameters. Finally, predicted and measured phase jitter showed good agreement. For an LO frequency of 4.3 GHz, predicted and measured phase noise was 0.50 ° rms and 0.535 ° rms, respectively.

  12. Noise performance of phase-insensitive frequency multicasting in parametric mixer with finite dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Zhi; Wiberg, Andreas O J; Myslivets, Evgeny; Huynh, Chris K; Kuo, Bill P P; Alic, Nikola; Radic, Stojan

    2013-07-29

    Noise performance of dual-pump, multi-sideband parametric mixer operated in phase-insensitive mode is investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that, in case when a large number of multicasting idlers are generated, the noise performance is strictly dictated by the dispersion characteristics of the mixer. We find that the sideband noise performance is significantly degraded in anomalous dispersion region permitting nonlinear noise amplification. In contrast, in normal dispersion region, the noise performance converges to the level of four-sideband parametric process, rather than deteriorates with increased sideband creation. Low noise generation mandates precise dispersion-induced phase mismatch among pump and sideband waves in order to control the noise coupling. We measure the noise performance improvement for a many-sideband, multi-stage mixer by incorporating new design technique.

  13. Testing Time and Frequency Fiber-Optic Link Transfer by Hardware Emulation of Acoustic-Band Optical Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipiński Marcin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The low-frequency optical-signal phase noise induced by mechanical vibration of the base occurs in field-deployed fibers. Typical telecommunication data transfer is insensitive to this type of noise but the phenomenon may influence links dedicated to precise Time and Frequency (T&F fiber-optic transfer that exploit the idea of stabilization of phase or propagation delay of the link. To measure effectiveness of suppression of acoustic noise in such a link, a dedicated measurement setup is necessary. The setup should enable to introduce a low-frequency phase corruption to the optical signal in a controllable way. In the paper, a concept of a setup in which the mechanically induced acoustic-band optical signal phase corruption is described and its own features and measured parameters are presented. Next, the experimental measurement results of the T&F transfer TFTS-2 system’s immunity as a function of the fibre-optic length vs. the acoustic-band noise are presented. Then, the dependency of the system immunity on the location of a noise source along the link is also pointed out.

  14. Ultralow-frequency-noise stabilization of a laser by locking to an optical fiber-delay line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kéfélian, Fabien; Jiang, Haifeng; Lemonde, Pierre; Santarelli, Giorgio

    2009-04-01

    We report the frequency stabilization of an erbium-doped fiber distributed-feedback laser using an all-fiber-based Michelson interferometer of large arm imbalance. The interferometer uses a 1 km SMF-28 optical fiber spool and an acousto-optic modulator allowing heterodyne detection. The frequency-noise power spectral density is reduced by more than 40 dB for Fourier frequencies ranging from 1 Hz to 10 kHz, corresponding to a level well below 1 Hz2/Hz over the entire range; it reaches 10(-2) Hz2/Hz at 1 kHz. Between 40 Hz and 30 kHz, the frequency noise is shown to be comparable to the one obtained by Pound-Drever-Hall locking to a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity. Locking to a fiber delay line could consequently represent a reliable, simple, and compact alternative to cavity stabilization for short-term linewidth reduction.

  15. An experimental study of low-frequency amplitude noise in a fibre Bragg grating laser diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zholnerov, V S [Russian Institute of Radionavigation and Time, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ivanov, A V; Kurnosov, V D; Kurnosov, K V; Romantsevich, V I; Chernov, R V [Open Joint-Stock Company M.F. Stel' makh Polyus Research Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-30

    We have studied the amplitude noise in a fibre Bragg grating laser diode. It has been shown that discontinuities in noise characteristics correlate with those in the power – current and spectral characteristics of the laser diode, whereas the noise characteristics of the pump source have no such discontinuities. The highest noise level has been observed at pump currents corresponding to concurrent generation of two longitudinal modes. (lasers)

  16. A low noise all-fiber interferometer for high resolution frequency modulated atomic force microscopy imaging in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Haider I; Wilkinson, Paul R; Stieg, Adam Z; Gimzewski, James K

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a low noise all-fiber interferometer for use as the deflection sensor in liquid environment frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM). A detailed description and rationale for the choice of the critical components are provided along with the design of a simple alignment assembly. The optimization of the deflection sensor toward achieving the highest possible sensitivity and lowest deflection noise density is discussed in the context of an ideal interference cavity. Based on the provided analysis we have achieved deflection noise densities of 2 fm/square root(Hz) on commercially available cantilevers in both ambient and liquid environments. The low noise interferometer works without the need for differential detection, special focusing lenses, or polarization sensitive optics, dramatically simplifying measurements. True atomic resolution imaging of muscovite mica by FM-AFM in water is demonstrated using the developed deflection sensor.

  17. Unified analytical expressions for calculating resonant frequencies, transimpedances, and equivalent input noise current densities of tuned receiver front ends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qing Zhong

    1992-01-01

    Unified analytical expressions have been derived for calculating the resonant frequencies, transimpedance and equivalent input noise current densities of the four most widely used tuned optical receiver front ends built with FETs and p-i-n diodes. A more accurate FET model has been used to improve...

  18. Comparison of Two Dose-response Relationship of Noise Exposure Evaluation Results with High Frequency Hearing Loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Zhang; Nan Li; Qiu-Ling Yang; Wei Qiu; Liang-Liang Zhu; Li-Yuan Tao; Robert I Davis

    2015-01-01

    Background:Complex noise and its relation to hearing loss are difficult to measure and evaluate.In complex noise measurement,individual exposure results may not accurately represent lifetime noise exposure.Thus,the mean LAeq,8 h values of individuals in the same workgroup were also used to represent LAeq,8h in our study.Our study aimed to explore whether the mean exposure levels of workers in the same workgroup represented real noise exposure better than individual exposure levels did.Methods:A cross-sectional study was conducted to establish a model for cumulative noise exposure (CNE) and hearing loss in 205 occupational noise-exposed workers who were recruited from two large automobile manufacturers in China.We used a personal noise dosimeter and a questionnaire to determine the workers' occupational noise exposure levels and exposure times,respectively.A qualified audiologist used standardized audiometric procedures to assess hearing acuity after at least 16 h of noise avoidance.Results:We observed that 88.3% of workers were exposed to more than 85 dB(A) of occupational noise (mean:89.3 ± 4.2 dB(A)).The personal CNE (CNEp) and workgroup CNE (CNEg) were 100.5 ± 4.7 dB(A) and 100.5 ± 2.9 dB(A),respectively.In the binary logistic regression analysis,we established a regression model with high-frequency hearing loss as the dependent variable and CNE as the independent variable.The Wald value was 5.014 with CNEp as the independent variable and 8.653 with CNEg as the independent variable.Furthermore,we found that the figure for CNEg was more similar to the stationary noise reference than CNEp was.The CNEg model was better than the CNEp model.In this circumstance,we can measure some subjects instead of the whole workgroup and save manpower.Conclusions:In a complex noise environment,the measurements of average noise exposure level of the workgroup can improve the accuracy and save manpower.

  19. Comparison of Two Dose-response Relationship of Noise Exposure Evaluation Results with High Frequency Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Complex noise and its relation to hearing loss are difficult to measure and evaluate. In complex noise measurement, individual exposure results may not accurately represent lifetime noise exposure. Thus, the mean L Aeq,8 h values of individuals in the same workgroup were also used to represent L Aeq,8 h in our study. Our study aimed to explore whether the mean exposure levels of workers in the same workgroup represented real noise exposure better than individual exposure levels did. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted to establish a model for cumulative noise exposure (CNE and hearing loss in 205 occupational noise-exposed workers who were recruited from two large automobile manufacturers in China. We used a personal noise dosimeter and a questionnaire to determine the workers′ occupational noise exposure levels and exposure times, respectively. A qualified audiologist used standardized audiometric procedures to assess hearing acuity after at least 16 h of noise avoidance. Results: We observed that 88.3% of workers were exposed to more than 85 dB(A of occupational noise (mean: 89.3 ± 4.2 dB(A. The personal CNE (CNEp and workgroup CNE (CNEg were 100.5 ± 4.7 dB(A and 100.5 ± 2.9 dB(A, respectively. In the binary logistic regression analysis, we established a regression model with high-frequency hearing loss as the dependent variable and CNE as the independent variable. The Wald value was 5.014 with CNEp as the independent variable and 8.653 with CNEg as the independent variable. Furthermore, we found that the figure for CNEg was more similar to the stationary noise reference than CNEp was. The CNEg model was better than the CNEp model. In this circumstance, we can measure some subjects instead of the whole workgroup and save manpower. Conclusions: In a complex noise environment, the measurements of average noise exposure level of the workgroup can improve the accuracy and save manpower.

  20. Sources of high frequency seismic noise: insights from a dense network of ~250 stations in northern Alsace (France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergne, Jerome; Blachet, Antoine; Lehujeur, Maximilien

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring local or regional seismic activity requires stations having a low level of background seismic noise at frequencies higher than few tenths of Hertz. Network operators are well aware that the seismic quality of a site depends on several aspects, among them its geological setting and the proximity of roads, railways, industries or trees. Often, the impact of each noise source is only qualitatively known which precludes estimating the quality of potential future sites before they are tested or installed. Here, we want to take advantage of a very dense temporary network deployed in Northern Alsace (France) to assess the effect of various kinds of potential sources on the level of seismic noise observed in the frequency range 0.2-50 Hz. In September 2014, more than 250 seismic stations (FairfieldNodal@ Zland nodes with 10Hz vertical geophone) have been installed every 1.5 km over a ~25km diameter disc centred on the deep geothermal sites of Soultz-sous-Forêts and Rittershoffen. This region exhibits variable degrees of human imprints from quite remote areas to sectors with high traffic roads and big villages. It also encompasses both the deep sedimentary basin of the Rhine graben and the piedmont of the Vosges massif with exposed bedrock. For each site we processed the continuous data to estimate probability density functions of the power spectral densities. At frequencies higher than 1 Hz most sites show a clear temporal modulation of seismic noise related to human activity with the well-known variations between day and night and between weekdays and weekends. Moreover we observe a clear evolution of the spatial distribution of seismic noise levels with frequency. Basically, between 0.5 and 4 Hz the geological setting modulates the level of seismic noise. At higher frequencies, the amplitude of seismic noise appears mostly related to the distance to nearby roads. Based on road maps and traffic estimation, a forward approach is performed to model the induced

  1. Low Noise Quantum Frequency Conversion from Rb Wavelengths to Telecom O-band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Solmeyer, Neal; Stack, Daniel; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2015-05-01

    Ideal quantum repeaters would be composed of long-lived quantum memories entangled with flying qubits. They are becoming essential elements to achieve quantum communication over long distances in a quantum network. However, quantum memories based on neutral atoms operate at wavelengths in the near infrared, unsuitable for long distance communication. The ability to coherently convert photons entangled with quantum memories into telecom wavelengths reduces the transmission loss in optical fibers and therefore dramatically improves the range of a quantum repeater. Furthermore, quantum frequency conversion (QFC) can enable entanglement and communication between different types of quantum memories, thus creating a versatile hybrid quantum network. A recent experiment has shown the conversion of heralded photons from Rb-based memories to the telecom C-band. We implement a setup using a nonlinear PPLN waveguide for the QFC into a wavelength region where the noise-floor would be limited by dark counts rather than pump photons. Our approach uses a pump laser at a much longer wavelength. It has the advantage that the strong pump itself and the broad background in the PPLN can be nearly completely filtered from the converted signal. Such low background level allows for the conversion to be done on the heralding photon, which enables the generated entanglement to be used in a scalable way to multiple nodes remotely situated and to subsequent protocols.

  2. Effects of inflow conditions on discrete frequency noise generated by small, axial flow fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, K. B.; Lauchle, G. C.

    1985-09-01

    Discrete frequency acoustic radiation is generated by subsonic axial flow fans through both steady and unsteady blade loading. Steady loading is a function of pumping requirement, and unsteady loading is generated by spatially periodic inflow distortions. The latter effect is the dominant generation mechanism when small fans are used to cool electronic equipment. Fans mounted to exhaust out of a device ingest distortions created by all objects within the unit. This work represents an empirical survey of noise generated by small axial flow cooling fans in the presence of upstream obstructions and various inlet configurations. The obstructions include a cylinder, a thin rectangle, a thick rectangle, and an electronic card gate model. Each of these represents obstructions found in a typical installation. Simple and modified inlet baffles, finger guards, and honeycomb flow straighteners are investigated. Design recommendations are offered to minimize discrete tone generation. These include aerodynamic shaping of unaviodable obstructions, a minimum axial distance of 0.3 fan radii for obstructions in the inlet, the avoidance of blockage in lateral inflow and the use of an inlet baffle to smooth inlet distortions. Account is taken of the spatial restictions of typical installations.

  3. The Autonomous Cryocooled Sapphire Oscillator: A Reference for Frequency Stability and Phase Noise Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, V.; Grop, S.; Fluhr, C.; Dubois, B.; Kersalé, Y.; Rubiola, E.

    2016-06-01

    The Cryogenic Sapphire Oscillator (CSO) is the microwave oscillator which feature the highest short-term stability. Our best units exhibit Allan deviation σy (τ) of 4.5x10-16 at 1s, ≈ 1.5x10-16 at 100 s ≤ t ≤ 5,000 s (floor), and ≤ 5x10-15 at one day. The use of a Pulse-Tube cryocooler enables full two year operation with virtually no maintenance. Starting with a short history of the CSO in our lab, we go through the architecture and we provide more details about the resonator, the cryostat, the oscillator loop, and the servo electronics. We implemented three similar oscillators, which enable the evaluation of each with the three- cornered hat method, and provide the potential for Allan deviation measurements at parts of 10-17 level. One of our CSOs (ULISS) is transportable, and goes with a small customized truck. The unique feature of ULISS is that its σy (τ) can be validated at destination by measuring before and after the roundtrip. To this extent, ULISS can be regarded as a traveling standard of frequency stability. The CSOs are a part of the Oscillator IMP project, a platform dedicated to the measurement of noise and short-term stability of oscillators and devices in the whole radio spectrum (from MHz to THz), including microwave photonics. The scope spans from routine measurements to the research on new oscillators, components, and measurement methods.

  4. Eavesdropping time and frequency: phase noise cancellation along a time-varying path, such as an optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Grosche, Gesine

    2013-01-01

    Single-mode optical fiber is a highly efficient connecting medium, used not only for optical telecommunications but also for the dissemination of ultra-stable frequencies or timing signals. In 1994, Ma, Jungner, Ye and Hall described a measurement and control system to deliver the same optical frequency at two places, namely the two ends of a fiber, by eliminating the "fiber-induced phase-noise modulation, which corrupts high-precision frequency-based applications". We present a simple detection and control scheme to deliver the same optical frequency at many places anywhere along a transmission path, or in its vicinity, with a relative instability of 1 part in $10^{19}$. The same idea applies to radio frequency and timing signals. This considerably simplifies future efforts to make precise timing/frequency signals available to many users, as required in some large scale science experiments.

  5. The Effect of Doppler Frequency Shift, Frequency Offset of the Local Oscillators, and Phase Noise on the Performance of Coherent OFDM Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fuqin; Andro, Monty

    2001-01-01

    This paper first shows that the Doppler frequency shift affects the frequencies of the RF carrier, subcarriers, envelope, and symbol timing by the same percentage in an Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) signal or any other modulated signals. Then the SNR degradation of an OFDM system due to Doppler frequency shift, frequency offset of the local oscillators and phase noise is analyzed. Expressions are given and values for 4-, 16-, 64-, and 256-QAM OFDM systems are calculated and plotted. The calculations show that the Doppler shift of the D3 project is about 305 kHz, and the degradation due to it is about 0.01 to 0.04 dB, which is negligible. The degradation due to frequency offset and phase noise of local oscillators will be the main source of degradation. To keep the SNR degradation under 0.1 dB, the relative frequency offset due to local oscillators must be below 0.01 for the 16 QAM-OFDM. This translates to an offset of 1.55 MHz (0.01 x 155 MHz) or a stability of 77.5 ppm (0.01 x 155 MHz/20 GHz) for the DI project. To keep the SNR degradation under 0.1 dB, the relative linewidth (0) due to phase noise of the local oscillators must be below 0.0004 for the 16 QAM-OFDM. This translates to a linewidth of 0.062 MHz (0.0004 x 155 MHz) of the 20 GHz RIF carrier. For a degradation of 1 dB, beta = 0.04, and the linewidth can be relaxed to 6.2 MHz.

  6. Analysis and simulations of a frequency synthesizer with internal and external noise sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Sangha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel technique to analyse the noise behaviour of a second-order-PLL based synthesizer is demonstrated. Its non-linear behaviour is analyzed with independent noise-sources introduced at different points of the circuit. Phase plane trajectories will be used to demonstrate that noise sources at different locations in the loop produce qualitatively different contributions to the output signal of the synthesizer.

  7. Construction and Testing of Compact Low-Noise Hydrophones with Extended Frequency Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    solution is the utilization of differential amplifiers that frequently form the foundations of modern opamp circuits. In the latter schemes, it is...noise performance. Thus, the preamp corresponds to a better noise level of roughly 8 to 15 dB than modern low noise opamps . However, in spite of the...significant differences, the preamplifier of Fig.13 does resemble an opamp with a negative feedback and with its input terminal behaving as the non

  8. Effect of gamma irradiation on the low-frequency (1/f) noise of linear ICs: reliability physics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khobare, S.K. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Reliability Evaluation Lab.)

    1982-01-01

    Linear integrated circuits IC709 and 741 were irradiated by gamma rays using cobalt-60 source. Low-frequency noise was measured for these ICs before and after irradiation dose levels 10/sup 4/, 10/sup 5/, 10/sup 6/ and 5x10/sup 6/R. In general IC741s appeared to be more noisy than IC709s. The noise levels increase substantially in the case of IC741 after gamma irradiation of 10/sup 6/R. Comparative measurement results are presented in this article. These results may be useful to correlate radiation as a defect producing stress, mode and type of failures and reliability of linear ICs.

  9. Theoretical study of low-frequency noise and amplitude – frequency characteristics of a semiconductor laser with a fiber Bragg grating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnosov, V D; Kurnosov, K V [Open Joint-Stock Company M.F. Stel' makh Polyus Research Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-30

    Using the rate equations for the density of photons and charge carriers, we have studied the amplitude low-frequency noise of a fibre Bragg grating semiconductor laser. The calculations rely on two versions of the rate equation for the carriers, characterised by the presence of the optical confinement coefficient for the term, which takes into account the rate of stimulated recombination. It is shown that the relative noise intensity, which is calculated by using the rate equation for the carriers without optical confinement, agrees better with the experimental results. The calculation of the amplitude – frequency characteristics (AFCs) has shown that it is impossible to give preference to any one of these systems, since the AFCs for the two versions of the rate equations for the carriers coincide. (lasers)

  10. Millisecond and Binary Pulsars as Nature's Frequency Standards; 3, Fourier Analysis and Spectral Sensitivity of Timing Observations to Low-Frequency Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeikin, S M; Kopeikin, Sergei M.; Potapov, Vladimir A.

    1998-01-01

    Millisecond and binary pulsars are the most stable natural frequency standards which admits to introduce modified versions of universal and ephemeris time scales based correspondingly on the intrinsic rotation of pulsar and on its orbital motion around barycenter of a binary system. Measured stability of these time scales depends on numerous physical phenomena which affect rotational and orbital motion of the pulsar and observer on the Earth, perturb propagation of electromagnetic pulses from pulsar to the observer and bring about random fluctuations in the rate of atomic clock used as a primary time reference in timing observations. On the long time intervals the main reason for the instability of the pulsar time scales is the presence of correlated, low-frequency timing noise in residuals of times of arrivals (TOA) of pulses from the pulsar which has both astrophysical and geophysical origin. Hence, the timing noise can carry out the important physical information about interstellar medium, interior structu...

  11. Low noise Nb-SIS mixers at far above the gap frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, [No Value; vandeStadt, H; Jegers, JBM; Kovtonyuk, S; Hulshoff, W; Whyborn, ND; Klapwijk, TM; deGraauw, T; Liao, FJ; Liu, JY

    1996-01-01

    There are great interests in developing Nb SIS mixers because of the extremely low noise temperatures and because of the need of low local oscillator (LO) power. Several groups have demonstrated experimentally that Nb SIS mixers with integrated tuning elements can perform near the quantum noise limi

  12. High-frequency noise modeling of Si(Ge) bipolar transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitale, F.

    2014-01-01

    The design and the optimization of electronic systems often requires a detailed knowledge of the inherent noise generated within semiconductor active devices, constituting the core of such systems. Examples of applications in which noise is a key issue include receiver front-ends in radiofrequency (

  13. Integrated covariance estimation using high-frequency data in the presence of noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voev, Valeri; Lunde, Asger

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the effects of nonsynchronicity and market microstructure noise on realized covariance type estimators. Hayashi and Yoshida (2005) propose a simple estimator that resolves the problem of nonsynchronicity and is unbiased and consistent for the integrated covariance in the absence of noise...

  14. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF ORTHOGONAL FREQUENCY DIVISION MULTIPLEXING BASED BIDIRECTIONAL RELAY NETWORK IN THE PRESENCE OF PHASE NOISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Senthil Kumaran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the performance of OFDM based bidirectional relay network which employs Physical Layer Network Coding (PLNC is analyzed in the presence of phase noise. The bidirectional relay network is assumed to consist of two sources and a relay, where each node has a single antenna and operates in half duplex mode. The PLNC based OFDM system transmits high data streams over numerous sub channels in frequency domain. Each sub channel is a narrow band flat fading channel, thereby achieving high spectral efficiency over wide band channels. In practice, phase noise is introduced with the information symbols transmitted on all subcarriers in OFDM transceiver. The influence of phase noise on the received signals are analyzed at both the Multiple Access Channel (MAC and at the Broadcast Channel (BC environments.

  15. Aerodynamic noise characterization of a full-scale wind turbine through high-frequency surface pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertagnolio, Franck; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Bak, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate and characterize the high-frequency surface pressure fluctuations on a full-scale wind turbine blade and in particular the influence of the atmospheric turbulence. As these fluctuations are highly correlated to the sources of both turbulent inflow noise...... wind turbine with a 80 m diameter rotor as well as measurements of an airfoil section tested in a wind tunnel. The turbine was extensively equipped in order to monitor the local inflow onto the rotating blades. Further a section of the 38 m long blade was instrumented with 50 microphones flush......-mounted relative to the blade surface. The measurements of surface pressure spectra are compared with the results of two engineering models for trailing edge noise and for turbulent inflow noise. The measured pressure fluctuations are related to the local inflow angle and are also compared to measurements...

  16. Low-noise quantum frequency down-conversion of indistinguishable photons (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambs, Benjamin; Kettler, Jan; Bock, Matthias; Becker, Jonas; Arend, Carsten; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter; Becher, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    telecom regime as a result of the small conversion bandwidth and using a high-performance fiber-Bragg-grating solely left the detector dark counts as the only noise source in our setup. Therefore, we could achieve conversion efficiencies of more than 20 %. In order to test the indistinguishability, sequentially emitted photons were fed into a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and spatially as well as temporally overlapped at the output beam splitter. Cross-correlation measurements between both output-ports of the beam splitter exhibit two-photon interference contrasts of more than 40 % prior to and after the down-conversion step. Accordingly, we demonstrate that the process of quantum frequency conversion preserves photon indistinguishability and can be used to establish a versatile source of indistinguishable single photons at the telecom C-Band. Furthermore our scheme allows for converting photons in a wavelength band from 900 nm to 910 nm to the same telecom target wavelength. This enables us to test indistinguishability of frequency-converted photons, originally stemming from different sources with dinstinguishable wavelengths.

  17. Effects of the intensity of masking noise on ear canal recorded low-frequency cochlear microphonic waveforms in normal hearing subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming

    2014-07-01

    Compared to auditory brainstem responses (ABRs), cochlear microphonics (CMs) may be more appropriate to serve as a supplement to the test of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Researchers have shown that low-frequency CMs from the apical cochlea are measurable at the tympanic membrane using high-pass masking noise. Our objective is to study the effect of such noise at different intensities on low-frequency CMs recorded at the ear canal, which is not completely known. Six components were involved in this CM measurement including an ear canal electrode (1), a relatively long and low-frequency toneburst (2), and high-pass masking noise at different intensities (3). The rest components include statistical analysis based on multiple human subjects (4), curve modeling based on amplitudes of CM waveforms (CMWs) and noise intensity (5), and a technique based on electrocochleography (ECochG or ECoG) (6). Results show that low-frequency CMWs appeared clearly. The CMW amplitude decreased with an increase in noise level. It decreased first slowly, then faster, and finally slowly again. In conclusion, when masked with high-pass noise, the low-frequency CMs are measurable at the human ear canal. Such noise reduces the low-frequency CM amplitude. The reduction is noise-intensity dependent but not completely linear. The reduction may be caused by the excited basal cochlea which the low-frequency has to travel and pass through. Although not completely clear, six mechanisms related to such reduction are discussed.

  18. Design of digital filters for frequency weightings (A and C) required for risk assessments of workers exposed to noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimell, Andrew N; Mansfield, Neil J; Paddan, Gurmail S

    2015-01-01

    Many workers are exposed to noise in their industrial environment. Excessive noise exposure can cause health problems and therefore it is important that the worker's noise exposure is assessed. This may require measurement by an equipment manufacturer or the employer. Human exposure to noise may be measured using microphones; however, weighting filters are required to correlate the physical noise sound pressure level measurements to the human's response to an auditory stimulus. IEC 61672-1 and ANSI S1.43 describe suitable weighting filters, but do not explain how to implement them for digitally recorded sound pressure level data. By using the bilinear transform, it is possible to transform the analogue equations given in the standards into digital filters. This paper describes the implementation of the weighting filters as digital IIR (Infinite Impulse Response) filters and provides all the necessary formulae to directly calculate the filter coefficients for any sampling frequency. Thus, the filters in the standards can be implemented in any numerical processing software (such as a spreadsheet or programming language running on a PC, mobile device or embedded system).

  19. The effect of signal-temporal uncertainty on detection in bursts of noise or a random-frequency complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, Angela Yarnell; Leibold, Lori J.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effect of signal-temporal uncertainty on detection of a 120-ms, 1-kHz tone in the presence of a continuous sequence of 120-ms bursts of either a broadband noise or a random-frequency, two-tone complex. Using the method of constant stimuli, signal-temporal uncertainty was defined as the difference in threshold across temporally uncertain and temporally defined listening conditions. Results indicted an average effect of signal-temporal uncertainty of 2 dB for the noise masker compared to 9 dB for the random-frequency, two-tone masker. These results suggest that signal-temporal uncertainty may be more detrimental for conditions in which informational masking dominates performance. PMID:19045685

  20. Integrated covariance estimation using high-frequency data in the presence of noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voev, Valeri; Lunde, Asger

    2007-01-01

    . When noise is present, however, we find that this estimator is biased, and show how the bias can be corrected for. Ultimately, we propose a subsampling version of the bias-corrected estimator which improves its efficiency. Empirically, we find that the usual assumption of a martingale price process...... plus an independently and identically distributed (i.i.d.) noise does not describe the dynamics of the observed price process across stocks, which confirms the practical relevance of our general noise specification and the estimation techniques we propose.Finally, a simulation experiment is carried out...

  1. Low-Frequency Noise and Microplasma Analysis for c-Si Solar Cell Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Vanek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper brings the comparison of solar cell conversion efficiency and results from a noise spectroscopy and microplasma presence to evaluate the solar cell technology. Three sets of monocrystalline silicon solar cells (c-Si varying in front side phosphorus doped emitters were produced by standard screen-printing technique. From the measurements it follows that the noise spectral density related to defects is of 1/f type and its magnitude. It has been established that samples showing low noise feature high-conversion efficiency. The best results were reached for a group solar cells with selective emitter structure prepared by double-phosphorus diffusion process.

  2. Unified analytical expressions for calculating resonant frequencies, transimpedances, and equivalent input noise current densities of tuned receiver front ends

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Unified analytical expressions have been derived for calculating the resonant frequencies, transimpedance and equivalent input noise current densities of the four most widely used tuned optical receiver front ends built with FETs and p-i-n diodes. A more accurate FET model has been used to improve the accuracy of the analysis. The Miller capacitance has been taken into account, and its impact on the performances of the tuned front ends has been demonstrated. The accuracy of the expressions ha...

  3. Effects of Noises on Fujisaki’s Model of Fundamental Frequency Contours for Thai Dialects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suphattharachai Chomphan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Modeling of fundamental frequency (F0 contour plays an important role on the natural speech processing, since F0 is an important speech feature defining the human speech prosody. In Thai, there are four main dialects spoken by Thai people residing in four core region including central, north, northeast and south regions. Environmental noises are also plays an important role in corrupting the speech quality. The study of effects of noises on modeling of F0 contour for Thai dialects will evaluate robustness of the modeling techniques. Approach: The Fujisaki’s model has been selected in this study because of its achievement in modeling of various Thai speech units. Four types of environmental noises are simulated with different levels of power. The differences among the model parameters of four Thai dialects have been summarized. This study proposes an analysis of model parameters for Thai speech prosody with four regional dialects and two genders and four types of noises. Seven derived parameters from the Fujisaki’s model are as follows. The first parameter is baseline frequency which is the lowest level of F0 contour. The second and third parameters are the numbers of phrase commands and tone commands which reflect the frequencies of surges of the utterance in global and local levels, respectively. The fourth and fifth parameters are phrase command and tone command durations which reflect the speed of speaking and the length of a syllable, respectively. The sixth and seventh parameters are amplitudes of phrase command and tone command which reflect the energy of the global speech and the energy of local syllable. Results: In the experiments, each regional dialect includes 10 samples of 10 sentences with male and female speech. Four types of noises include train, factory, car and air conditioner. Moreover, five levels of each type of noise are varied from 0-20 dB. The results show that most of the proposed parameters

  4. Discrimination and Identification of Modulation-Frequency Using Noise, Tone, and Tonal-Complex Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-23

    frequency. For these frequencies, identification performance was almost as good as discrimination performance. This " edge effect " is commonly...if the edge effect acts over a fixed frequency range, then the better relative performance at the lower frequencies may be due to the edge effect rather

  5. Intensity- and phase-noise correlations in a dual-frequency vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser operating at telecom wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Syamsundar; Baili, Ghaya; Bouchoule, Sophie; Alouini, Mehdi; Bretenaker, Fabien

    2015-05-01

    The amplitude and phase noises of a dual-frequency vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (DF-VECSEL) operating at telecom wavelength are theoretically and experimentally investigated in detail. In particular, the spectral behavior of the correlation between the intensity noises of the two modes of the DF-VECSEL is measured. Moreover, the correlation between the phase noise of the radio-frequency beat note generated by optical mixing of the two laser modes with the intensity noises of the two modes is investigated. All these spectral behaviors of noise correlations are analyzed for two different values of the nonlinear coupling between the laser modes. We find that to describe the spectral behavior of noise correlations between the laser modes, it is of utmost importance to have precise knowledge about the spectral behavior of the pump noise, which is the dominant source of noise in the frequency range of interest (10 kHz to 35 MHz). Moreover, it is found that the noise correlation also depends on how the spatially separated laser modes of the DF-VECSEL intercept the noise from a multimode fiber-coupled laser diode used for pumping both the laser modes. To this aim, a specific experiment is reported which aims at measuring the correlations between different spatial regions of the pump beam. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with a theoretical model based on modified rate equations.

  6. Structure-borne low-frequency noise from multi-span bridges: A prediction method and spatial distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X. D.; Wu, D. J.; Li, Q.; Botteldooren, D.

    2016-04-01

    Structure-borne noise from railway bridges at far-field points is an important indicator in environmental noise assessment. However, studies that predict structure-borne noise tend to model only single-span bridges, thus ignoring the sound pressure radiating from adjacent spans. To simulate the noise radiating from multi-span bridges induced by moving vehicles, the vibrations of a multi-span bridge are first obtained from a three-dimensional (3D) vehicle-track-bridge dynamic interaction simulation using the mode superposition method. A procedure based on the 2.5-dimensional (2.5D) boundary element method (BEM) is then presented to promote the efficiency of acoustical computation compared with the 3D BEM. The simulated results obtained from both the single-span and multi-span bridge models are compared with the measured results. The sound predictions calculated from the single-span model are accurate only for a minority of near-field points. In contrast, the sound pressures calculated from the multi-span bridge model match the measured results in both the time and frequency domains for all of the near-field and far-field points. The number of bridge spans required in the noise simulation is then recommended related to the distance between the track center and the field points of interest. The spatial distribution of multi-span structure-borne noise is also studied. The variation in sound pressure levels is insignificant along the length of the bridge, which validates the finding that the sound test section can be selected at an arbitrary plane perpendicular to the multi-span bridge.

  7. Low-frequency noise behavior at reverse bias region in InAs/GaSb superlattice photodiodes on mid-wave infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansel, T.; Kutluer, K.; Muti, A.; Salihoglu, Ö.; Aydinli, A.; Turan, R.

    2013-06-01

    We describe a relationship between the noise characterization and activation energy of InAs/GaSb superlattice Mid-Wavelength-Infrared photodiodes for different passivation materials applied to the device. The noise measurements exhibited a frequency dependent plateau (i.e. 1/f-noise characteristic) for unpassivated as well as Si3N4 passivated samples whereas 1/f-type low noise suppression (i.e. frequency independent plateau) with a noise current reduction of more than one order of magnitude was observed for SiO2 passivation. For reverse bias values below -0.15V, the classical Schottky-noise calculation alone did not appear to describe the noise mechanism in a SL noise behavior, which shows a divergence between theoretically and experimentally determined noise values. We identify that, the additional noise appears, with and without passivation, at the surface activation energy of < 60 meV and is inversely proportional to the reverse bias. This is believed to be caused by the surface dangling-bonds (as well as surface states) whose response is controlled by the applied reverse bias. The calculated noise characteristics showed a good agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy: A sensitive technique for high-resolution broadband molecular detection

    CERN Document Server

    Khodabakhsh, Amir; Foltynowicz, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy (NICE-OFCS) is a recently developed technique that utilizes phase modulation to obtain immunity to frequency-to-amplitude noise conversion by the cavity modes and yields high absorption sensitivity over a broad spectral range. We describe the principles of the technique and discuss possible comb-cavity matching solutions. We present a theoretical description of NICE-OFCS signals detected with a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), and validate the model by comparing it to experimental CO2 spectra around 1575 nm. Our system is based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser locked to a cavity and phase-modulated at a frequency equal to a multiple of the cavity free spectral range (FSR). The NICE-OFCS signal is detected by a fast-scanning FTS equipped with a high-bandwidth commercial detector. We demonstrate a simple method of passive locking of the modulation frequency to the cavity FSR that significantly improves the long term stability of the system, a...

  9. Predicting speech intelligibility based on the signal-to-noise envelope power ratio after modulation-frequency selective processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Søren; Dau, Torsten

    2011-09-01

    A model for predicting the intelligibility of processed noisy speech is proposed. The speech-based envelope power spectrum model has a similar structure as the model of Ewert and Dau [(2000). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1181-1196], developed to account for modulation detection and masking data. The model estimates the speech-to-noise envelope power ratio, SNR(env), at the output of a modulation filterbank and relates this metric to speech intelligibility using the concept of an ideal observer. Predictions were compared to data on the intelligibility of speech presented in stationary speech-shaped noise. The model was further tested in conditions with noisy speech subjected to reverberation and spectral subtraction. Good agreement between predictions and data was found in all cases. For spectral subtraction, an analysis of the model's internal representation of the stimuli revealed that the predicted decrease of intelligibility was caused by the estimated noise envelope power exceeding that of the speech. The classical concept of the speech transmission index fails in this condition. The results strongly suggest that the signal-to-noise ratio at the output of a modulation frequency selective process provides a key measure of speech intelligibility.

  10. Noise and Spurious Tones Management Techniques for Multi-GHz RF-CMOS Frequency Synthesizers Operating in Large Mixed Analog-Digital SOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents circuit techniques and power supply partitioning, filtering, and regulation methods aimed at reducing the phase noise and spurious tones in frequency synthesizers operating in large mixed analog-digital system-on-chip (SOC. The different noise and spur coupling mechanisms are presented together with solutions to minimize their impact on the overall PLL phase noise performance. Challenges specific to deep-submicron CMOS integration of multi-GHz PLLs are revealed, while new architectures that address these issues are presented. Layout techniques that help reducing the parasitic noise and spur coupling between digital and analog blocks are described. Combining system-level and circuit-level low noise design methods, low phase noise frequency synthesizers were achieved which are compatible with the demanding nowadays wireless communication standards.

  11. Tunable Narrow Linewidth, Low Noise 2.05 Micron Single Frequency Seeder Laser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose an all-fiber based 2.05-micron single frequency, narrow linewidth seeder laser with 10 nm tuning range and 5GHz frequency modulation for next generation...

  12. Tunable Narrow Linewidth, Low Noise 2.05 Micron Single Frequency Seeder Laser Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose an all-fiber based 2.05-micron single frequency, narrow linewidth seeder laser with 10 nm tuning range and 5GHz frequency modulation for next generation...

  13. Adaptive Noise Cancellation System for Low Frequency Transmission of Sound in Open Fan Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Griffin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of a structural/acoustic model of a section of a large aircraft to help define the sensor/actuator architecture that was used in a hardware demonstration of adaptive noise cancellation. Disturbances considered were representative of propeller-induced disturbances from an open fan aircraft. Controller on and controller off results from a hardware demonstration on a portion of a large aircraft are also included. The use of the model has facilitated the development of a new testing technique, closely related to modal testing, that can be used to find good structural actuator locations for adaptive noise cancellation.

  14. Dichotic multiple-frequency auditory steady-state responses in evaluating the hearing thresholds of occupational noise-exposed workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruey-Fen Hsu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available An objective, fast, and reasonably accurate assessment test that allows for easy interpretation of the responses of the hearing thresholds at all frequencies of a conventional audiogram is needed to resolve the medicolegal aspects of an occupational hearing injury. This study evaluated the use of dichotic multiple-frequency auditory steady-state responses (Mf-ASSR to predict the hearing thresholds in workers exposed to high levels of noise. The study sample included 34 workers with noise-induced hearing impairment. Thresholds of pure-tone audiometry (PTA and Mf-ASSRs at four frequencies were assessed. The differences and correlations between the thresholds of Mf-ASSRs and PTA were determined. The results showed that, on average, Mf-ASSR curves corresponded well with the thresholds of the PTA contours averaged across subjects. The Mf-ASSRs were 20±8 dB, 16±9 dB, 12±9 dB, and 11±12 dB above the thresholds of the PTA for 500 Hz, 1,000 Hz, 2,000 Hz, and 4,000 Hz, respectively. The thresholds of the PTA and the Mf-ASSRs were significantly correlated (r=0.77–0.89. We found that the measurement of Mf-ASSRs is easy and potentially time saving, provides a response at all dichotic multiple frequencies of the conventional audiogram, reduces variability in the interpretation of the responses, and correlates well with the behavioral hearing thresholds in subjects with occupational noise-induced hearing impairment. Mf-ASSR can be a valuable aid in the adjustment of compensation cases.

  15. Prediction and analysis of infra and low-frequency noise of upwind horizontal axis wind turbine using statistical wind speed model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gwang-Se; Cheong, Cheolung

    2014-12-01

    Despite increasing concern about low-frequency noise of modern large horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs), few studies have focused on its origin or its prediction methods. In this paper, infra- and low-frequency (the ILF) wind turbine noise are closely examined and an efficient method is developed for its prediction. Although most previous studies have assumed that the ILF noise consists primarily of blade passing frequency (BPF) noise components, these tonal noise components are seldom identified in the measured noise spectrum, except for the case of downwind wind turbines. In reality, since modern HAWTs are very large, during rotation, a single blade of the turbine experiences inflow with variation in wind speed in time as well as in space, breaking periodic perturbations of the BPF. Consequently, this transforms acoustic contributions at the BPF harmonics into broadband noise components. In this study, the ILF noise of wind turbines is predicted by combining Lowson's acoustic analogy with the stochastic wind model, which is employed to reproduce realistic wind speed conditions. In order to predict the effects of these wind conditions on pressure variation on the blade surface, unsteadiness in the incident wind speed is incorporated into the XFOIL code by varying incident flow velocities on each blade section, which depend on the azimuthal locations of the rotating blade. The calculated surface pressure distribution is subsequently used to predict acoustic pressure at an observing location by using Lowson's analogy. These predictions are compared with measured data, which ensures that the present method can reproduce the broadband characteristics of the measured low-frequency noise spectrum. Further investigations are carried out to characterize the IFL noise in terms of pressure loading on blade surface, narrow-band noise spectrum and noise maps around the turbine.

  16. Prediction and analysis of infra and low-frequency noise of upwind horizontal axis wind turbine using statistical wind speed model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwang-Se Lee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasing concern about low-frequency noise of modern large horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs, few studies have focused on its origin or its prediction methods. In this paper, infra- and low-frequency (the ILF wind turbine noise are closely examined and an efficient method is developed for its prediction. Although most previous studies have assumed that the ILF noise consists primarily of blade passing frequency (BPF noise components, these tonal noise components are seldom identified in the measured noise spectrum, except for the case of downwind wind turbines. In reality, since modern HAWTs are very large, during rotation, a single blade of the turbine experiences inflow with variation in wind speed in time as well as in space, breaking periodic perturbations of the BPF. Consequently, this transforms acoustic contributions at the BPF harmonics into broadband noise components. In this study, the ILF noise of wind turbines is predicted by combining Lowson’s acoustic analogy with the stochastic wind model, which is employed to reproduce realistic wind speed conditions. In order to predict the effects of these wind conditions on pressure variation on the blade surface, unsteadiness in the incident wind speed is incorporated into the XFOIL code by varying incident flow velocities on each blade section, which depend on the azimuthal locations of the rotating blade. The calculated surface pressure distribution is subsequently used to predict acoustic pressure at an observing location by using Lowson’s analogy. These predictions are compared with measured data, which ensures that the present method can reproduce the broadband characteristics of the measured low-frequency noise spectrum. Further investigations are carried out to characterize the IFL noise in terms of pressure loading on blade surface, narrow-band noise spectrum and noise maps around the turbine.

  17. Beyond noise: using temporal ICA to extract meaningful information from high-frequency fMRI signal fluctuations during rest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Norbert Boubela

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of resting-state networks using fMRI usually ignores high-frequencyfluctuations in the BOLD signal – be it because of low TR prohibiting the analysis offluctuations with frequencies higher than 0.25 Hz (for a typical TR of 2 s, or becauseof the application of a bandpass filter (commonly restricting the signal to frequencieslower than 0.1 Hz. While the standard model of convolving neuronal activity with ahemodynamic response function suggests that the signal of interest in fMRI is characterized by slow fluctuation, it is in fact unclear whether the high-frequency dynamics of the signal consists of noise only. In this study, 10 subjects were scanned at 3 T during 6 minutes of rest using a multiband EPI sequence with a TR of 354 ms to critically sample fluctuations of up to 1.4 Hz. Preprocessed data were high-pass filtered to include only frequencies above 0.25 Hz, and voxelwise whole-brain temporal ICA (tICA was used to identify consistent high-frequency signals. The resulting components include physiological background signal sources, most notably pulsation and heartbeat components, that can be specifically identified and localized with the method presented here. Perhaps more surprisingly, common resting-state networks like the default-mode network also emerge as separate tICA components. This means that high frequency oscillations sampled with a rather T1-weighted contrast still contain specific information on these resting-state networks to consistently identify them, not consistent with the commonly held view that these networks operate on low-frequency fluctuations alone. Consequently, the use of bandpass filters in resting-state data analysis should be reconsidered, since this step eliminates potentially relevant information. Instead, more specific methods for the elimination of physiological background signals, for example by regression of physiological noise components, might prove to be viable alternatives.

  18. Time-frequency methods for trend removal in electrochemical noise data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homborg, A.M.; Tinga, T.; Zhang, X.; Westing, E.P.M. van; Oonincx, P.J.; Wit, J.H.W. de; Mol, J.M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical current and potential noise signals in many cases exhibit a DC drift that should be removed prior to further data analysis. The theoretical ability of wavelet analysis and empirical mode decomposition to effectively remove only the DC drift component is evaluated based on their mutua

  19. An Analytical Model for Spectral Peak Frequency Prediction of Substrate Noise in CMOS Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Ming; Mikkelsen, Jan H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes an analytical model describing the generation of switching current noise in CMOS substrates. The model eliminates the need for SPICE simulations in existing methods by conducting a transient analysis on a generic CMOS inverter and approximating the switching current waveform us...

  20. A Standard Definition for Wind-Generated, Low-Frequency Ambient Noise Source Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-09

    FUNDING NUMBERS PROGR.AM PROJECT ITASK IWORK UNIT ELEMENT 14O. NO. NO. IACCESSION NO. I I ritLE (include Security Caiafaon) I7Ol A STANDARD DEFINITION...use of a specific propagation code (PE, RAYTRACE, ASTRAL , NORMAL MODE, etc). The specification of noise intensity per unit area with respect to/ /P

  1. Multiple testing issues in discriminating compound-related peaks and chromatograms from high frequency noise, spikes and solvent-based nois in LC-MS data sets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyangoma, S.O.; Van Kampen, A.A.; Reijmers, T.H.; Govorukhina, N.I; van der Zee, A.G.; Billingham, I.J; Bischoff, Rainer; Jansen, R.C.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple testing issues in discriminating compound-related peaks and chromatograms from high frequency noise, spikes and solvent-based noise in LC-MS data sets.Nyangoma SO, van Kampen AA, Reijmers TH, Govorukhina NI, van der Zee AG, Billingham LJ, Bischoff R, Jansen RC. University of Birmingham. Liq

  2. Robust frequency diversity based algorithm for clutter noise reduction of ultrasonic signals using multiple sub-spectrum phase coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gongzhang, R.; Xiao, B.; Lardner, T.; Gachagan, A. [Centre for Ultrasonic Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom); Li, M. [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18

    This paper presents a robust frequency diversity based algorithm for clutter reduction in ultrasonic A-scan waveforms. The performance of conventional spectral-temporal techniques like Split Spectrum Processing (SSP) is highly dependent on the parameter selection, especially when the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is low. Although spatial beamforming offers noise reduction with less sensitivity to parameter variation, phased array techniques are not always available. The proposed algorithm first selects an ascending series of frequency bands. A signal is reconstructed for each selected band in which a defect is present when all frequency components are in uniform sign. Combining all reconstructed signals through averaging gives a probability profile of potential defect position. To facilitate data collection and validate the proposed algorithm, Full Matrix Capture is applied on the austenitic steel and high nickel alloy (HNA) samples with 5MHz transducer arrays. When processing A-scan signals with unrefined parameters, the proposed algorithm enhances SNR by 20dB for both samples and consequently, defects are more visible in B-scan images created from the large amount of A-scan traces. Importantly, the proposed algorithm is considered robust, while SSP is shown to fail on the austenitic steel data and achieves less SNR enhancement on the HNA data.

  3. The Impact of ENSO on Extratropical Low Frequency Noise in Seasonal Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Siegfried D.; Suarez, Max J.; Chang, Yehui; Branstator, Grant

    2000-01-01

    This study examines the uncertainty in forecasts of the January-February-March (JFM) mean extratropical circulation, and how that uncertainty is modulated by the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The analysis is based on ensembles of hindcasts made with an Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) forced with sea surface temperatures observed during; the 1983 El Nino and 1989 La Nina events. The AGCM produces pronounced interannual differences in the magnitude of the extratropical seasonal mean noise (intra-ensemble variability). The North Pacific, in particular, shows extensive regions where the 1989 seasonal mean noise kinetic energy (SKE), which is dominated by a "PNA-like" spatial structure, is more than twice that of the 1983 forecasts. The larger SKE in 1989 is associated with a larger than normal barotropic conversion of kinetic energy from the mean Pacific jet to the seasonal mean noise. The generation of SKE due to sub-monthly transients also shows substantial interannual differences, though these are much smaller than the differences in the mean flow conversions. An analysis of the Generation of monthly mean noise kinetic energy (NIKE) and its variability suggests that the seasonal mean noise is predominantly a statistical residue of variability resulting from dynamical processes operating on monthly and shorter times scales. A stochastically-forced barotropic model (linearized about the AGCM's 1983 and 1989 base states) is used to further assess the role of the basic state, submonthly transients, and tropical forcing, in modulating the uncertainties in the seasonal AGCM forecasts. When forced globally with spatially-white noise, the linear model generates much larger variance for the 1989 base state, consistent with the AGCM results. The extratropical variability for the 1989 base state is dominanted by a single eigenmode, and is strongly coupled with forcing over tropical western Pacific and the Indian Ocean, again consistent with the AGCM results

  4. The Bilingual Disadvantage in Speech Understanding in Noise Is Likely a Frequency Effect Related to Reduced Language Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, Jens

    2016-01-01

    The present study sought to explain why bilingual speakers are disadvantaged relative to monolingual speakers when it comes to speech understanding in noise. Exemplar models of the mental lexicon hold that each encounter with a word leaves a memory trace in long-term memory. Words that we encounter frequently will be associated with richer phonetic representations in memory and therefore recognized faster and more accurately than less frequently encountered words. Because bilinguals are exposed to each of their languages less often than monolinguals by virtue of speaking two languages, they encounter all words less frequently and may therefore have poorer phonetic representations of all words compared to monolinguals. In the present study, vocabulary size was taken as an estimate for language exposure and the prediction was made that both vocabulary size and word frequency would be associated with recognition accuracy for words presented in noise. Forty-eight early Spanish–English bilingual and 53 monolingual English young adults were tested on speech understanding in noise (SUN) ability, English oral verbal ability, verbal working memory (WM), and auditory attention. Results showed that, as a group, monolinguals recognized significantly more words than bilinguals. However, this effect was attenuated by language proficiency; higher proficiency was associated with higher accuracy on the SUN test in both groups. This suggests that greater language exposure is associated with better SUN. Word frequency modulated recognition accuracy and the difference between groups was largest for low frequency words, suggesting that the bilinguals’ insufficient exposure to these words hampered recognition. The effect of WM was not significant, likely because of its large shared variance with language proficiency. The effect of auditory attention was small but significant. These results are discussed within the Ease of Language Understanding model (Rönnberg et al., 2013), which

  5. Speckle noise reduction of a dual-frequency laser Doppler velocimeter based on an optically injected semiconductor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chih-Hao; Lee, Jia-Wei; Lin, Tze-Wei; Lin, Fan-Yi

    2012-02-01

    We develop and investigate a dual-frequency Laser Doppler Velocimeter (DF-LDV) based on an optically injected semiconductor laser. By operating the laser in a period-one oscillation (P1) state, the laser can emit light with two coherent frequency components separated by about 11.25 GHz. Through optical heterodyning, the velocity of the target can be determined from the Doppler shift of the beat signal of the dual-frequency light. While the DF-LDV has the same advantages of good directionality and high intensity as in the conventional singlefrequency LDV (SF-LDV), having an effective wavelength in the range of microwave in the beat signal greatly reduces the speckle noise caused by the random phase modulation from the rough surface of the moving target. To demonstrate the speckle noise reduction, the Doppler shifted signals from a moving target covered by the plain paper are measured both from the SF-LDV and the DF-LDV. The target is rotated to provide a transverse velocity, where the speckle noise increases as the transverse velocity increases. The bandwidth of the Doppler signal obtained from the SF-LDV is increased from 4.7 kHz to 9.4 kHz as the transverse velocity increases from 0 m/s to 5 m/s. In contrast, the bandwidth obtained from the DF-LDV maintains at 0.09 Hz with or without the rotation limited by the linewidth of the P1 state used. By phase-locking the laser with a RF current modulation, the linewidth of the P1 state can be much reduced to further improve the velocity resolution and extend the detection range.

  6. Low-noise on-chip frequency conversion by four-wave-mixing Bragg scattering in SiNx waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Agha, Imad; Thurston, Bryce; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2012-01-01

    Low-noise, tunable wavelength-conversion through non-degenerate four-wave mixing Bragg scattering in SiNx waveguides is experimentally demonstrated. Finite element method simulations of waveguide dispersion are used with the split-step Fourier method to predict device performance, and indicate a strong dependence of the conversion efficiency on phase matching, which is controlled by the waveguide geometry. Two 1550 nm wavelength band pulsed pumps are used to achieve tunable conversion of a 980 nm signal over a range of 5 nm with a peak conversion efficiency of \\approx 5 %. The demonstrated Bragg scattering process is suitable for frequency conversion of quantum states of light.

  7. Proposed Criteria for Assessing Low Frequency Noise Annoyance in Occupational Settings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pawlaczyk-Łuszczyńska, Maĺgorzata; Szymczak, Wiesłaaw; Dudarewicz, Adam; Śliwińska-Kowalska, Mariola

    2006-01-01

    ...: (i) method I - frequency analysis in 1/3-octave bands within the range of 10-250 Hz, (ii) method II - consisting in 1/3-octave band measurements and determination of low frequency equivalentcontinuous A-weighted sound pressure level (SPL...

  8. Differentially coherent detection of QASK for frequency-hopping systems. I - Performance in the presence of a Gaussian noise environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M. K.; Huth, G. K.; Polydoros, A.

    1982-01-01

    Bandwidth-conserving modulation techniques, which trade average power for bandwidth in a favorable exchange, have recently found widespread application in digital radio and satellite communication systems. Quadrature amplitude-shift-keying (QASK) is a particular type of the considered techniques. QASK makes use of multilevel signals to amplitude modulate the in-phase and quadrature components of a carrier. Frequency hopping (FH) is used to protect a conventional communication system from radio frequency interference (RFI) or jamming. Differentially coherent detection provides a possible solution to the effect of phase discontinuities introduced by FH. The application of such a detection technique to QASK signals is discussed. A receiver structure is proposed and its symbol error probability performance for an additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) background is investigated.

  9. A Noise Reduction Method for Dual-Mass Micro-Electromechanical Gyroscopes Based on Sample Entropy Empirical Mode Decomposition and Time-Frequency Peak Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chong; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Shi, Yunbo; Tang, Jun; Cao, Huiliang; Liu, Jun

    2016-05-31

    The different noise components in a dual-mass micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscope structure is analyzed in this paper, including mechanical-thermal noise (MTN), electronic-thermal noise (ETN), flicker noise (FN) and Coriolis signal in-phase noise (IPN). The structure equivalent electronic model is established, and an improved white Gaussian noise reduction method for dual-mass MEMS gyroscopes is proposed which is based on sample entropy empirical mode decomposition (SEEMD) and time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF). There is a contradiction in TFPS, i.e., selecting a short window length may lead to good preservation of signal amplitude but bad random noise reduction, whereas selecting a long window length may lead to serious attenuation of the signal amplitude but effective random noise reduction. In order to achieve a good tradeoff between valid signal amplitude preservation and random noise reduction, SEEMD is adopted to improve TFPF. Firstly, the original signal is decomposed into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by EMD, and the SE of each IMF is calculated in order to classify the numerous IMFs into three different components; then short window TFPF is employed for low frequency component of IMFs, and long window TFPF is employed for high frequency component of IMFs, and the noise component of IMFs is wiped off directly; at last the final signal is obtained after reconstruction. Rotation experimental and temperature experimental are carried out to verify the proposed SEEMD-TFPF algorithm, the verification and comparison results show that the de-noising performance of SEEMD-TFPF is better than that achievable with the traditional wavelet, Kalman filter and fixed window length TFPF methods.

  10. A Noise Reduction Method for Dual-Mass Micro-Electromechanical Gyroscopes Based on Sample Entropy Empirical Mode Decomposition and Time-Frequency Peak Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Shen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The different noise components in a dual-mass micro-electromechanical system (MEMS gyroscope structure is analyzed in this paper, including mechanical-thermal noise (MTN, electronic-thermal noise (ETN, flicker noise (FN and Coriolis signal in-phase noise (IPN. The structure equivalent electronic model is established, and an improved white Gaussian noise reduction method for dual-mass MEMS gyroscopes is proposed which is based on sample entropy empirical mode decomposition (SEEMD and time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF. There is a contradiction in TFPS, i.e., selecting a short window length may lead to good preservation of signal amplitude but bad random noise reduction, whereas selecting a long window length may lead to serious attenuation of the signal amplitude but effective random noise reduction. In order to achieve a good tradeoff between valid signal amplitude preservation and random noise reduction, SEEMD is adopted to improve TFPF. Firstly, the original signal is decomposed into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs by EMD, and the SE of each IMF is calculated in order to classify the numerous IMFs into three different components; then short window TFPF is employed for low frequency component of IMFs, and long window TFPF is employed for high frequency component of IMFs, and the noise component of IMFs is wiped off directly; at last the final signal is obtained after reconstruction. Rotation experimental and temperature experimental are carried out to verify the proposed SEEMD-TFPF algorithm, the verification and comparison results show that the de-noising performance of SEEMD-TFPF is better than that achievable with the traditional wavelet, Kalman filter and fixed window length TFPF methods.

  11. Low frequency noise assessment in n- and p-channel sub-10 nm triple-gate FinFETs: Part I: Theory and methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudier, D.; Cretu, B.; Simoen, E.; Carin, R.; Veloso, A.; Collaert, N.; Thean, A.

    2017-02-01

    The transfer characteristic at room temperature of FinFETs processed for sub-10 nm technologies could always be explained by solving Poisson equation throughout the channel - dielectric interface. Various methods for the MOSFET parameters estimation are proposed in the literature. In this paper, the electrical parameters extraction technique based on the Y-function methodology is reminded. Low frequency noise is presented considering three major noise sources: 1/f noise associated to carrier trapping-detrapping in the gate oxide, channel carrier mobility fluctuations and generation-recombination noise related to traps located in the depletion zone of the device. Theory and methodology in order to identify the 1/f noise mechanism and to have information of the process induced traps in the silicon film using the noise spectroscopy technique are revisited.

  12. Liquid-phase exfoliated graphene self-assembled films: Low-frequency noise and thermal-electric characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tubon Usca, G., E-mail: gabriela.tubon@fis.unical.it [Surface Nanoscience Group, Department of Physics, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci cubo 33C, 87036, Rende, Cosenza (Italy); DIMES - University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci cubo 42C, 87036, Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Hernandez-Ambato, J., E-mail: jhernandez@dimes.unical.it [DIMES - University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci cubo 42C, 87036, Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Pace, C., E-mail: calogero.pace@unical.it [DIMES - University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci cubo 42C, 87036, Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Caputi, L.S., E-mail: lorenzo.caputi@fis.unical.it [Surface Nanoscience Group, Department of Physics, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci cubo 33C, 87036, Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Tavolaro, A., E-mail: a.tavolaro@itm.cnr.it [Research Institute on Membrane Technology (ITM-CNR), cubo 17C, 87036 University of Calabria, 87036 Rende, Cosenza (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    Highlights: • Graphene was exfoliated in liquid phase also in the presence of zeolite 4A. • Films were obtained by drop-casting. • SEM, Raman, low-frequency noise and thermal electric measurements show that the presence of zeolite improves the quality of the FLG films. - Abstract: In few years, graphene has become a revolutionary material, leading not only to applications in various fields such as electronics, medicine and environment, but also to the production of new types of 2D materials. In this work, Liquid Phase Exfoliation (LPE) was applied to natural graphite by brief sonication or mixer treatment in suitable solvents, in order to produce Few Layers Graphene (FLG) suspensions. Additionally, zeolite 4A (Z4A) was added during the production of FLG flakes-based inks, with the aim of aiding the exfoliation process. Conductive films were obtained by drop casting three types of suspensions over Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates with interdigitated electrodes, with total channel surface of 1.39 mm{sup 2}. The morphology characterization resulted in the verification of the presence of thin self-assembled flakes. Raman studies gave evidence of 4 to 10 layers graphene flakes. Electrical measurements were performed to state the Low-Frequency Noise and Thermal-Electric characteristics of the samples. We observe interesting relations between sample preparation procedures and electrical properties.

  13. Control of low-frequency noise for piping systems via the design of coupled band gap of acoustic metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yanfei [College of Power Engineering, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan, 430033 (China); Shen, Huijie, E-mail: shj588@163.com [College of Power Engineering, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan, 430033 (China); Zhang, Linke [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, 430063 (China); Su, Yongsheng, E-mail: suyongsheng1981@163.com [College of Power Engineering, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan, 430033 (China); Yu, Dianlong [Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Integrated Logistics Support, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic wave propagation and sound transmission in a metamaterial-based piping system with Helmholtz resonator (HR) attached periodically are studied. A transfer matrix method is developed to conduct the investigation. Calculational results show that the introduction of periodic HRs in the piping system could generate a band gap (BG) near the resonant frequency of the HR, such that the bandwidth and the attenuation effect of HR improved notably. Bragg type gaps are also exist in the system due to the systematic periodicity. By plotting the BG as functions of HR parameters, the effect of resonator parameters on the BG behavior, including bandwidth, location and attenuation performance, etc., is examined. It is found that Bragg-type gap would interplay with the resonant-type gap under some special situations, thereby giving rise to a super-wide coupled gap. Further, explicit formulation for BG exact coupling is extracted and some key parameters on modulating the width and the attenuation coefficient of coupled gaps are investigated. The coupled gap can be located to any frequency range as one concerned, thus rendering the low-frequency noise control feasible in a broad band range. - Highlights: • A metamaterial-type pipe system with Bragg and resonant acoustic gaps. • A low-frequency acoustic coupled gap. • Exact coupling condition for Bragg and resonant gaps. • Effects of resonant parameters on coupled gaps.

  14. Drift-compensated Low-noise Frequency Synthesis Based on a cryoCSO for the KRISS-F1

    CERN Document Server

    Heo, Myoung-Sun; Lee, Won-Kyu; Lee, Sang-Bum; Hong, Hyun-Gue; Kwon, Taeg Yong; Park, Chang Yong; Yu, Dai-Hyuk; Santarelli, G; Hilton, Ashby; Luiten, Andre N; Hartnett, John G

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report on the implementation and stability analysis of a drift-compensated frequency synthesizer from a cryogenic sapphire oscillator (CSO) designed for a Cs/Rb atomic fountain clock. The synthesizer has two microwave outputs of 7 GHz and 9 GHz for Rb and Cs atom interrogation, respectively. The short-term stability of these microwave signals, measured using an optical frequency comb locked to an ultra-stable laser, is better than $5\\times10^{-15}$ at an averaging time of 1 s. We demonstrate that the short-term stability of the synthesizer is lower than the quantum projection noise limit of the Cs fountain clock, KRISS-F1(Cs) by measuring the short-term stability of the fountain with varying trapped atom number. The stability of the fountain at 1-s averaging time reaches $2.5\\times10^{-14}$ at the highest atom number in the experiment when the synthesizer is used as an interrogation oscillator of the fountain. In order to compensate the frequency drift of the CSO, the output frequency of a wa...

  15. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    François, B. [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, 26 chemin de l’Epitaphe, 25030 Besançon (France); INRIM, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Calosso, C. E.; Micalizio, S. [INRIM, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Abdel Hafiz, M.; Boudot, R. [FEMTO-ST, CNRS, Université de Franche-Comté, 26 chemin de l’Epitaphe, 25030 Besançon (France)

    2015-09-15

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be −109 and −141 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is −105 and −138 dB rad{sup 2}/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10{sup −14} for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10{sup −14} for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10{sup −15} level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  16. Simple-design ultra-low phase noise microwave frequency synthesizers for high-performing Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, B; Calosso, C E; Abdel Hafiz, M; Micalizio, S; Boudot, R

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development and characterization of novel 4.596 GHz and 6.834 GHz microwave frequency synthesizers devoted to be used as local oscillators in high-performance Cs and Rb vapor-cell atomic clocks. The key element of the synthesizers is a custom module that integrates a high spectral purity 100 MHz oven controlled quartz crystal oscillator frequency-multiplied to 1.6 GHz with minor excess noise. Frequency multiplication, division, and mixing stages are then implemented to generate the exact output atomic resonance frequencies. Absolute phase noise performances of the output 4.596 GHz signal are measured to be -109 and -141 dB rad(2)/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz Fourier frequencies, respectively. The phase noise of the 6.834 GHz signal is -105 and -138 dB rad(2)/Hz at 100 Hz and 10 kHz offset frequencies, respectively. The performances of the synthesis chains contribute to the atomic clock short term fractional frequency stability at a level of 3.1 × 10(-14) for the Cs cell clock and 2 × 10(-14) for the Rb clock at 1 s averaging time. This value is comparable with the clock shot noise limit. We describe the residual phase noise measurements of key components and stages to identify the main limitations of the synthesis chains. The residual frequency stability of synthesis chains is measured to be at the 10(-15) level for 1 s integration time. Relevant advantages of the synthesis design, using only commercially available components, are to combine excellent phase noise performances, simple-architecture, low-cost, and to be easily customized for signal output generation at 4.596 GHz or 6.834 GHz for applications to Cs or Rb vapor-cell frequency standards.

  17. Low frequency noise case study : identification and mitigation of a severe infrasonic tone from a mine shaft ventilation fan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, R.D. [HGC Engineering, Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    This paper presented a solution for a severe low frequency infrasound problem experienced at a home near a large mine shaft ventilation fan in Dallas, West Virginia. Strong low frequency acoustic pulsations were detected as far as 200 metres from the fan. HGC Engineering was retained by the coal mine company to investigate the source of the problem and to find solutions. Controlling low frequency sound is a challenge because the wavelengths of sound are long at low frequencies. The relatively high level of acoustic energy of a low frequency sound or infrasound that is loud enough to be heard also presents a problem for noise control. In order to be effective, low frequency noise control measures must usually be large, bulky and expensive. In this study, HGC Engineering readily identified acoustic pulsations in the order of 75 dB at 15 Hz outside the residences. At 15 Hz, the infrasound was not audible at the residence, but was causing rattling of lightweight furnishings inside the home. The measured sound pressure level at 15 Hz was approximately 10 dB greater than the onset of risk for rattling and perceptible vibration. The vibration was also perceptible on the walls and windows of the dwellings. The vibration of the dwelling structure had a high measured coherence with the air-borne pulsations at 15 Hz, suggesting that the vibration was induced by the air-borne infrasonic pulsations. HGC Engineering determined that 15 Hz corresponded to the rotational speed of the fan. A reduction of 15 dB at 15 Hz was targeted, in order to reduce the perceptibility and risk of rattling at the residence. A tuned acoustic plenum was considered to be a viable method to silence the fan. In order to investigate the effectiveness of this approach, HGC Engineering conducted a preliminary analytical design and parametric study of an acoustic plenum tuned to 15 Hz. An analytical model was developed to determine the acoustic behaviour of the plenum. In addition, a numerical boundary

  18. Low-frequency rotational noise in closed-test-section wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Marianne

    The effects of closed-section wind-tunnel walls on the sound field radiated from a helicopter rotor are investigated by means of numerical simulations, summarizing the findings reported by Mosher (1986). The techniques used to model the rotor and the test section (including geometry, wall absorption, and measurement location) are outlined, and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs. It is found that first-harmonic acoustic measurements obtained in a hard-walled wind tunnel twice as wide as the rotor diameter do not accurately represent the free-field rotational noise, that the relationship between the sound-pressure levels in the wind tunnel and in the free field is complex, that multiple near-field measurements are needed to characterize the direct acoustic field of the rotor, and that absorptive linings are of little value in enlarging the accurate-measurement zone.

  19. Ultra-low phase-noise microwave generation using a diode-pumped solid-state laser based frequency comb and a polarization-maintaining pulse interleaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portuondo-Campa, Erwin; Buchs, Gilles; Kundermann, Stefan; Balet, Laurent; Lecomte, Steve

    2015-12-14

    We report ultra-low phase-noise microwave generation at a 9.6 GHz carrier frequency from optical frequency combs based on diode-pumped solid-state lasers emitting at telecom wavelength and referenced to a common cavity-stabilized continuous-wave laser. Using a novel fibered polarization-maintaining pulse interleaver, a single-oscillator phase-noise floor of -171 dBc/Hz at 10 MHz offset frequency has been measured with commercial PIN InGaAs photodiodes, constituting a record for this type of detector. Also, a direct optical measurement of the stabilized frequency combs' timing jitter was performed using a balanced optical cross correlator, allowing for an identification of the origin of the phase-noise limitations in the system.

  20. Temporal step fluctuations on a conductor surface: electromigration force, surface resistivity and low-frequency noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E. D.; Bondarchuk, O.; Tao, C. G.; Yan, W.; Cullen, W. G.; Rous, P. J.; Bole, T.

    2007-10-01

    Scattering of charge carriers from surface structures will become an increasing factor in the resistivity as the structure decreases in size to the nanoscale. The effects of scattering at the most basic surface defect, a kink in a step edge, are here analyzed using the continuum step model. Using a Langevin analysis, it has been shown that the electromigration force on the atoms at the step edge causes changes in the temporal evolution of the step-edge. For an electromigration force acting perpendicular to the average step edge and mass-transport dominated by step-edge diffusion, significant deviations from the usual t1/4 scaling of the displacement correlation function occur dependent on a critical time τ and the direction of the force relative to the step edge (i.e. uphill or downhill). Experimental observations of step fluctuations on Ag(111) show the predicted changes among step fluctuations without current, and with current in the up- and down-hill directions for a current density of order 105 A cm-2. The results yield the magnitude of the electromigration force acting on kinked sites at the step-edge. This in turn yields the contribution of the fluctuating steps to the surface resistivity, which exceeds 1% of the bulk resistivity as wire diameters decrease below 10s of nanometres. The temporal fluctuations of kink density can thus also be related to resistivity noise. Relating the known fluctuation spectrum of the step displacements to fluctuations in their lengths, the corresponding resistivity noise is predicted to show spectral signatures of ~f-1/2 for step fluctuations governed by random attachment/detachment, and ~f-3/4 for step fluctuations governed by step-edge diffusion.

  1. Discrete Frequency Noise and Its Reduction in Small Axial-Flow Fans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-02

    Rotor blade modifications .. .......... ... 71 4.4 Evaluation of Modifications .... ............ . 76 4.4.1 Tarzan ....... .................. . 76... Tarzan TN 3A3 ..................... 123 A.2 Rotron Patriot PT 77 B3 ... ........... ... 123 A.3 Rotron Muffin XL MX 2A1 ... ........... ... 126 A.4...the Discrete Tones Radiated by the Tarzan ....... .................. .. 84 V. Discrete Frequency Power Levels - Tarzan .. ......... .. 85 VI. Effects of

  2. Influence of laser frequency noise on scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer based laser Doppler velocimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    n this work, we study the performance of a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer based laser Doppler velocimeter (sFPILDV) and compare two candidate 1.5 um single-frequency laser sources for the system – a fiber laser (FL) and a semiconductor laser (SL). We describe a straightforward calibration pr...

  3. Low phase noise oscillator design and simulation using large signal analysis and low frequency feedback networks

    OpenAIRE

    Güngör, Çağatay Ertürk

    2013-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering and the Graduate School of Engineering and Science of Bilkent University, 2013. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2013. Includes bibliographical references leaves 72-76. Spectral purity of oscillators is of great importance in both commercial and military systems. Implementing communication, radar, and Electronic Warfare systems with increasingly higher frequencies, wider bandwidths, greater data rates...

  4. Analytical bit error rate performance evaluation of an orthogonal frequency division multiplexing power line communication system impaired by impulsive and Gaussian channel noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munshi Mahbubur Rahman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An analytical approach is presented to evaluate the bit error rate (BER performance of a power line (PL communication system considering the combined influence of impulsive noise and background PL Gaussian noise. Middleton class-A noise model is considered to evaluate the effect of impulsive noise. The analysis is carried out to find the expression of the signal-to-noise ratio and BER considering orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM with binary phase shift keying modulation with coherent demodulation of OFDM sub-channels. The results are evaluated numerically considering the multipath transfer function model of PL with non-flat power spectral density of PL background noise over a bandwidth of 0.3–100 MHz. The results are plotted for several system and noise parameters and penalty because of impulsive noise is determined at a BER of 10^−6. The computed results show that the system suffers significant power penalty because of impulsive noise which is higher at higher channel bandwidth and can be reduced by increasing the number of OFDM subcarriers to some extent. The analytical results conform well with the simulation results reported earlier.

  5. Low-Frequency-Noise Reduction Technique for Linear Analog CMOS IC's

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Jeongwook

    2007-01-01

    For AMS (analog-mixed signal) and RF (radio frequency) implementations CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor) technology platforms are the mainstream today. These platforms provide great density and power savings on digital parts on the same chip and, in addition, a good mix of components for analog design. The analog performance of CMOS technology is worse compared to other technology options (e.g. bipolar technology), and its major advantage is the lower total cost of system. Severa...

  6. Control of low-frequency noise for piping systems via the design of coupled band gap of acoustic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanfei; Shen, Huijie; Zhang, Linke; Su, Yongsheng; Yu, Dianlong

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic wave propagation and sound transmission in a metamaterial-based piping system with Helmholtz resonator (HR) attached periodically are studied. A transfer matrix method is developed to conduct the investigation. Calculational results show that the introduction of periodic HRs in the piping system could generate a band gap (BG) near the resonant frequency of the HR, such that the bandwidth and the attenuation effect of HR improved notably. Bragg type gaps are also exist in the system due to the systematic periodicity. By plotting the BG as functions of HR parameters, the effect of resonator parameters on the BG behavior, including bandwidth, location and attenuation performance, etc., is examined. It is found that Bragg-type gap would interplay with the resonant-type gap under some special situations, thereby giving rise to a super-wide coupled gap. Further, explicit formulation for BG exact coupling is extracted and some key parameters on modulating the width and the attenuation coefficient of coupled gaps are investigated. The coupled gap can be located to any frequency range as one concerned, thus rendering the low-frequency noise control feasible in a broad band range.

  7. Wavelet-based method for time-domain noise analysis and reduction in a frequency-scan ion trap mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Szu-Wei; Shiu, Guo-Rung; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2012-11-01

    We adopt an orthogonal wavelet packet decomposition (OWPD) filtering approach to cancel harmonic interference noises arising from an AC power source in time domain and remove the resulting rf voltage interference noise from the mass spectra acquired by using a charge detection frequency-scan quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. With the use of a phase lock resampling technique, the transform coefficients of the rf interference in signals become a constant, exhibiting a shift of the baseline in different rf phases. The rf interference is therefore removable by shifting the baselines back to zero in OWPD coefficients. The approach successfully reduces the time-domain background noise from 1367 electrons (rms) to 408 electrons (rms) (an improvement of 70 %) and removes the high frequency noise components in the charge detection ion trap mass spectrometry. Unlike other smoothing or averaging methods commonly used in the mass-to-charge (m/Ze) domain, our approach does not cause any distortion of original signals.

  8. Suppression of optical beat interference-noise in orthogonal frequency division multiple access-passive optical network link using self-homodyne balanced detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Yong-Yuk; Jung, Sang-Min; Han, Sang-Kook

    2014-08-01

    A new technique, which reduces optical beat interference (OBI) noise in orthogonal frequency division multiple access-passive optical network (OFDMA-PON) links, is proposed. A self-homodyne balanced detection, which uses a single laser for the optical line terminal (OLT) as well as for the optical network unit (ONU), reduces OBI noise and also improves the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the discrete multi-tone (DMT) signal. The proposed scheme is verified by transmitting quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK)-modulated DMT signal over a 20-km single mode fiber. The optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR), that is required for BER of 10-5, is reduced by 2 dB in the balanced detection compared with a single channel due to the cancellation of OBI noise in conjunction with the local laser.

  9. On the treatment of noise and conspiring bias in dual-frequency differential Global Navigation Satellite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, Dean C.

    Four primary contributions are made to the treatment of noise and conspiring bias for dual frequency differential Global Satellite Navigation Systems (GNSSs). These contributions enhance accuracy and protection levels for aircraft precision approach and landing operations and similar applications. A statistical characterization is presented of Global Positioning System (GPS) user range error as an uncorrelated, normally distributed random variable with non-zero mean over the length of the aircraft precision approach operation. This leads directly to modeling GPS error in the position domain as multivariate normal with non-zero mean. Based on this model, a vertical composite protection level VPLc and a horizontal composite protection level HPLc are each implemented as univariate normal distributions with non-zero means. A method is presented by which exact values---that is, values accurate to a user-defined error tolerance and consistent with statistical assumptions---of VPL c and HPLc are obtained, and by which computationally efficient approximations may be evaluated. A statistical quadratic form under the multivariate normal distribution is then used to derive a new class of protection levels based on the probability enclosed within a radius defined in two or more dimensions. A central chi-square representation of this quadratic form is also presented, and is incorporated into a six-step computational procedure for the two-dimensional composite radial protection level RPLc. This procedure is extended to the composite spherical protection level (SPLc) and the ellipsoidal protection level (EPLc). Two additional algorithms are presented for dual-frequency differential Global Positioning System (GPS) use. Performance improvements are achieved first through the exchange of pseudorange noise and multipath for reducible biases using a modified Code Noise and Multipath (CNMP) algorithm applied both to reference station and aircraft ranging measurements. In this algorithm

  10. The quasi-periodic oscillations and very low frequency noise of Scorpius X-1 as transient chaos - A dripping handrail?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D.; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas; Young, Karl; Donoho, David L.; Crutchfield, James P.; Imamura, James

    1993-01-01

    We present evidence that the quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) and very low frequency noise (VLFN) characteristic of many accretion sources are different aspects of the same physical process. We analyzed a long, high time resolution EXOSAT observation of the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) Sco X-1. The X-ray luminosity varies stochastically on time scales from milliseconds to hours. The nature of this variability - as quantified with both power spectrum analysis and a new wavelet technique, the scalegram - agrees well with the dripping handrail accretion model, a simple dynamical system which exhibits transient chaos. In this model both the QPO and VLFN are produced by radiation from blobs with a wide size distribution, resulting from accretion and subsequent diffusion of hot gas, the density of which is limited by an unspecified instability to lie below a threshold.

  11. Performance analysis for time-frequency MUSIC algorithm in presence of both additive noise and array calibration errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodja, Mohamed; Belouchrani, Adel; Abed-Meraim, Karim

    2012-12-01

    This article deals with the application of Spatial Time-Frequency Distribution (STFD) to the direction finding problem using the Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC)algorithm. A comparative performance analysis is performed for the method under consideration with respect to that using data covariance matrix when the received array signals are subject to calibration errors in a non-stationary environment. An unified analytical expression of the Direction Of Arrival (DOA) error estimation is derived for both methods. Numerical results show the effect of the parameters intervening in the derived expression on the algorithm performance. It is particularly observed that for low Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and high Signal to sensor Perturbation Ratio (SPR) the STFD method gives better performance, while for high SNR and for the same SPR both methods give similar performance.

  12. Low-frequency footfall noise in multi-storey timber frame buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hveem, S.; Homb, A.; Hagberg, K.

    1997-01-01

    . 17 examples of current timber floor constructions are described and measuring results are given as well as subjective judgements of the acoustic quality.The relation between annoyance and impact sound level is analysed on the basis of a number of field investigations found in the literature....... It is concluded that the frequency range for measurements should be extended below 100 Hz, at least down to 50 Hz and preferably down to 20 Hz. It is found that deflection and vibration of the floor are often evaluated as a problem in timber floor constructions....

  13. Quantum phase noise and field correlation in single frequency semiconductor laser systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallion, P.; Debarge, G.

    1984-04-01

    The influence of quantum phase fluctuations which affect single frequency semiconductor lasers in various coherent detection systems is discussed in terms of photocurrent autocorrelation and spectral density functions. The general treatment given in this paper can be applied in diverse practical cases and points out the problems of phase correlation and phase matching between the two mixed optical beams. In the more general case the photocurrent spectrum is found to be composed of discrete and quasi-Lorentzian parts whose energies and spectral spreads are discussed as a function of the laser line width, the phase matching and the phase correlation between the two coherently combined fields.

  14. High-Frequency EMI Noise Suppression by Polymer-Based Composite Magnetic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Dosoudil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex permeability and EM-wave absorption properties of hybrid polymer-based composite magneticmaterials (with MnZn and LiZn ferrite fillers and PVC matrix prepared with constant total filler content (65 vol% andparticle size (0-250 mm have been investigated in the 1-1000 MHz frequency range. Within this filler concentrationthe permeability of composites changed continuously with the change of ferrite filler content ratio between two types offerrite fillers. The observed relaxation type of permeability dispersion was due to the domain wall and natural ferromagneticresonance phenomena and was also attributed to the high damping of spin motion. Measured values of permeability wereused to determine the EM-wave absorption properties (return loss RL, matching frequency fm, matching thickness dm andbandwidth Df for RL £ -20 dB. The calculation of these properties was based on a model of single-layered absorber backedby a perfect conductor using transmission-line and EM-field theory. The composite with the volume fraction ratio of hybridMnZn:LiZn ferrite filler set to 0.5:0.5 has shown a return loss of -57 dB (> 99 % power absorption at fm = 714 MHz with the-20 dB bandwidth of Df = 232 MHz for an absorber thickness of 7.79 mm.

  15. Ultra-low phase-noise microwave generation using a diode-pumped solid-state laser based frequency comb and a polarization-maintaining pulse interleaver

    CERN Document Server

    Portuondo-Campa, Erwin; Kundermann, Stefan; Balet, Laurent; Lecomte, Steve

    2015-01-01

    We report ultra-low phase-noise microwave generation at a 9.6 GHz carrier frequency from optical frequency combs based on diode-pumped solid-state lasers emitting at telecom wavelength and referenced to a common cavity-stabilized continuous-wave laser. Using a novel fibered polarization-maintaining pulse interleaver, a single-oscillator phase-noise floor of -171 dBc/Hz has been measured with commercial PIN InGaAs photodiodes, constituting a record for this type of detector. Also, a direct optical measurement of the stabilized frequency combs timing jitter was performed using a balanced optical cross correlator, allowing for an identification of the origin of the current phase-noise limitations in the system.

  16. Phase-noise characteristics of a 25-GHz-spaced optical frequency comb based on a phase- and intensity-modulated laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizawa, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Mizutori, Akira; Takara, Hidehiko; Takada, Atsushi; Sogawa, Tetsuomi; Koga, Masafumi

    2013-12-02

    We investigated phase-noise characteristics of both a phase/intensity-modulated laser with 25-GHz mode spacing and a mode-locked fiber laser with carrier-envelope-offset (CEO) locking. As the separation from the frequency of the continuous wave (CW) laser diode (LD) for a seed light source increases, the integrated phase noise of each comb mode of both the phase/intensity-modulated laser and supercontinuum light originating from it increases with the same slope as a function of mode number. The dependence of the integrated phase noise on mode number with the phase/intensity-modulated laser is much larger than with the mode-locked fiber laser of the CEO locking. However, the phase noise of the phase/intensity-modulated laser is extremely lower than that of the mode-locked fiber laser with CEO locking in the frequency region around the CW LD. The phase noise of the phase/intensity-modulated laser with 25-GHz mode spacing and that of the mode-locked fiber laser with the CEO locking could be estimated and were found to be almost the same at the wavelengths required in an f-to-2f self-referencing interferometer. Our experimental results indicate the possibility of achieving an offset-frequency-locked frequency comb with the phase/intensity-modulated laser.

  17. Prediction and measurement of low-frequency harmonic noise of a hovering model helicopter rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarawal, H. R.; Schmitz, F. H.; Boxwell, D. A.

    Far-field acoustic data for a model helicopter rotor have been gathered in a large open-jet, acoustically treated wind tunnel with the rotor operating in hover and out of ground-effect. The four-bladed Boeing 360 model rotor with advanced airfoils, planform, and tip shape was run over a range of conditions typical of today's modern helicopter main rotor. Near in-plane acoustic measurements were compared with two independent implementations of classical linear theory. Measured steady thrust and torque were used together with a free-wake analysis (to predict the thrust and drag distributions along the rotor radius) as input to this first-principles theoretical approach. Good agreement between theory and experiment was shown for both amplitude and phase for measurements made in those positions that minimized distortion of the radiated acoustic signature at low-frequencies.

  18. Low-frequency footfall noise in multi-storey timber frame buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hveem, S.; Homb, A.; Hagberg, K.

    1997-01-01

    The report presents an overview of the acoustic problems related to light-weight timber floors as they are typically found in modern buildings in the Nordic countries. After a review of recently published literature on the topic, a number of current projects in the Nordic countries are presented........ It is concluded that the frequency range for measurements should be extended below 100 Hz, at least down to 50 Hz and preferably down to 20 Hz. It is found that deflection and vibration of the floor are often evaluated as a problem in timber floor constructions........ 17 examples of current timber floor constructions are described and measuring results are given as well as subjective judgements of the acoustic quality.The relation between annoyance and impact sound level is analysed on the basis of a number of field investigations found in the literature...

  19. Asymptotic structure of low frequency supersonic heated jet noise using LES data to re-construct a turbulence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, Mohammed; Sescu, Adrian; Sassanis, Vasileios; Bres, Guillaume; Towne, Aaron; Lele, Sanjiva

    2016-11-01

    The Goldstein-Sescu-Afsar asymptotic theory postulated that the appropriate distinguished limit in which non-parallel mean flow effects introduces a leading order change in the 'propagator' (which is related adjoint linearized Euler Green's function) within Goldstein's acoustic analogy must be when the jet spread rate is the same order as Strouhal number. We analyze the low frequency structure of the acoustic spectrum using Large-eddy simulations of two axi-symmetric jets (heated & unheated) at constant supersonic jet Mach number to obtain the mean flow for the asymptotic theory. This approach provides excellent quantitative agreement for the peak jet noise when the coefficients of the turbulence model are tuned for good agreement with the far-field acoustic data. Our aim in this talk, however, is to show the predictive capability of the asymptotics when the turbulence model in the acoustic analogy is 'exactly' re-constructed by numerically matching the length scale coefficients of an algebraic-exponential model for the 1212-component of the Reynolds stress auto-covariance tensor (1 is streamwise & 2 is radial direction) with LES data at any spatial location and temporal frequency. In this way, all information is obtained from local unsteady flow. We thank Professor Parviz Moin for supporting this work as part of the Center for Turbulence Research Summer Program 2016.

  20. A study on the contribution of body vibrations to the vibratory sensation induced by high-level, complex low-frequency noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukio Takahashi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the contribution of body vibrations to the vibratory sensation induced by high-level, complex low-frequency noise, we conducted two experiments. In Experiment 1, eight male subjects were exposed to seven types of low-frequency noise stimuli: two pure tones [a 31.5-Hz, 100-dB(SPL tone and a 50-Hz, 100-dB(SPL tone] and five complex noises composed of the pure tones. For the complex noise stimuli, the sound pressure level of one tonal component was 100 dB(SPL and that of another one was either 90, 95, or 100 dB(SPL. Vibration induced on the body surface was measured at five locations, and the correlation with the subjective rating of the vibratory sensation at each site of measurement was examined. In Experiment 2, the correlation between the body surface vibration and the vibratory sensation was similarly examined using seven types of noise stimuli composed of a 25-Hz tone and a 50-Hz tone. In both the experiments, we found that at the chest and the abdomen, the rating of the vibratory sensation was in close correlation with the vibration acceleration level (VAL of the body surface vibration measured at each corresponding location. This was consistent with our previous results and suggested that at the trunk of the body (the chest and the abdomen, the mechanoreception of body vibrations plays an important role in the experience of the vibratory sensation in persons exposed to high-level low-frequency noise. At the head, however, no close correlation was found between the rating of the vibratory sensation and the VAL of body surface vibration. This suggested that at the head, the perceptual mechanisms of vibration induced by high-level low-frequency noise were different from those in the trunk of the body.

  1. Application of ray theory to propagation of low frequency noise from wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, James A.

    1987-01-01

    Ray theory is used to explain data from two experiments (1985 and 1985) on the propagation of low frequency sound generated by the WTS-4 wind turbine. Emphasis is on downwind data, but some upwind measurements taken during the 1985 experiment are also considered. General ray theory for a moving medium is reviewed and ray equations obtained. Restrictions are introduced simplifying the equations and permitting the use of a ray theory program MEDUSA, the computed propagation loss curve of which is compared to the measurements. Good qualitative agreement is obtained with 1984 downwind data. The results indicate that the downwind sound field is that of a near-ground sound channel. Although more scatter is seen in the 1985 data, agreement between theory and data is also good. In particular, the position and magnitude of the jump in the sound levels associated with the beginning of the sound channel is correctly predicted. The theoretical explanation of the upwind data is less successful. Ray theory calculations indicate the formation of a shadow zone that, in fact, does not occur. While no sharp shadow zone is apparent in the data, the general expectation (based on ray theory) that sound levels should be much reduced upwind is confirmed by the data.

  2. Analysis of the dominant vibration frequencies of rail bridges for structure-borne noise using a power flow method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Wu, D. J.

    2013-09-01

    The use of concrete bridges in urban rail transit systems has raised many concerns regarding low-frequency (20-200 Hz) structure-borne noise due to the vibration of bridges when subjected to moving trains. Understanding the mechanism that determines the dominant frequencies of bridge vibrations is essential for both vibration and noise reduction. This paper presents a general procedure based on the force method to obtain the power flows within a coupled vehicle-track-bridge system, the point mobility of the system and the dynamic interaction forces connecting various components. The general coupling system consists of multi-rigid-bodies for the vehicles, infinite Euler beams representing the rails, two-dimensional or three-dimensional elements of the concrete bridges, and spring-dashpot pairs to model the wheel-rail contacts, the vehicle suspensions, the rail pads and the bridge bearings. The dynamic interaction of the coupled system is solved in the frequency domain by assuming the combined wheel-rail roughness moves forward relative to the stationary vehicles. The proposed procedure is first applied to a rail on discrete supports and then to a real urban rail transit U-shaped concrete bridge. The computed results show that the wheel-rail contact forces, the power flows to the rail/bridge subsystem and the accelerations of the bridge are primarily dominated by the contents around the natural frequency of a single wheel adhered to the elastically supported rail. If the ath node of the mth spring-dashpot pair and the bth node of the nth spring-dashpot pair are connected to the same rigid body, then δmnab(ω) can be expressed as δmnab(ω)=-{(}/{Mlω}, where Ml is the mass of the lth rigid body. If the ath node of the mth spring-dashpot pair and the bth node of the nth spring-dashpot pair are connected to the same infinite rail, δmnab(ω) can be expressed as [8] δmnab(ω)=-j{((e-je)}/{4EIk}, where xm and xn are the x-coordinates of the mth and nth spring

  3. A case study of interior low-frequency noise from box-shaped bridge girders induced by running trains: Its mechanism, prediction and countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xun; Li, Xiaozhen; Hao, Hong; Wang, Dangxiong; Li, Yadong

    2016-04-01

    A side effect of high-speed railway and urban rail transit systems is the associated vibration and noise. Since the use of concrete viaducts is predominant in railway construction due to scarce land resources, low-frequency (20-200 Hz) structure-radiated noise from concrete bridges is a principal concern. Although it is the most commonly used bridge type, the mechanism of noise emission from box-shaped bridge girders when subjected to impact forces from moving trains, which sounds like beating a drum, has not been well studied. In this study, a field measurement was first made on a simply-supported box-shaped bridge to record the acceleration of the slabs and the associated sound pressures induced by running trains. These data indicated that a significant beat-wave noise occurred in the box-shaped cavity when the train speed was around 340 km/h, which arose from the interference between two sound waves of 75.0 Hz and 78.8 Hz. The noise leakage from the bridge expansion joint was serious and resulted in obvious noise pollution near the bridge once the beat-wave noise was generated in the cavity. The dominant frequency of the interior noise at 75.0 Hz was confirmed from the spectrum of the data and the modal analysis results, and originated from the peak vibration of the top slab due to resonance and the first-order vertical acoustic mode, which led to cavity resonance, amplifying the corresponding noise. The three-dimensional acoustic modes and local vibration modes of the slab were calculated by using the finite element method. A simplified vehicle-track-bridge coupling vibration model was then developed to calculate the wheel-rail interaction force in a frequency range of 20-200 Hz. Numerical simulations using the boundary element method confirmed the cavity resonance effect and the numerical results agreed well with the data. Based on the calibrated numerical model, three noise reduction measures, i.e., adding a horizontal baffle in the interior cavity, narrowing

  4. Sea level estimate from multi-frequency signal-to-noise ratio data collected by a single geodetic receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Nicolas; Frappart, Frédéric; Ramillien, Guillaume; Darrozes, José; Cornu, Gwendolyne; Koummarasy, Khanithalath

    2016-04-01

    GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) altimetry has demonstrated a strong potential for sea level monitoring. Interference Pattern Technique (IPT) based on the analysis of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) estimated by a GNSS receiver, presents the main advantage of being applicable everywhere by using a single geodetic antenna and receiver, transforming them to real tide gauges. Such a technique has already been tested in various configurations of acquisition of surface-reflected GNSS signals with an accuracy of a few centimeters. Nevertheless, the classical SNR analysis method for estimating the reflecting surface-antenna height is limited by an approximation: the vertical velocity of the reflecting surface must be negligible. Authors present a significant improvement of the SNR technique to solve this problem and broaden the scope of SNR-based tide monitoring. The performances achieved on the different GNSS frequency band (L1, L2 and L5) are analyzed. The method is based on a Least-Mean Square Resolution Method (LSM), combining simultaneous measurements from different GNSS constellations (GPS, GLONASS), which permits to take the dynamic of the surface into account. It was validated in situ [1], with an antenna placed at 60 meters above the Atlantic Ocean surface with variations reaching ±3 meters, and amplitude rate of the semi-diurnal tide up to 0.5 mm/s. Over the three months of SNR records on L1 frequency band for sea level determination, we found linear correlations of 0.94 by comparing with a classical tide gauge record. Our SNR-based time series was also compared to a tide theoretical model and amplitudes and phases of the main astronomical periods (6-, 12- and 24-h) were perfectly well detected. Waves and swell are also likely to be detected. If the validity of our method is already well-established with L1 band [1], the aim of our current study is to analyze the results obtained with the other GNSS frequency band: L2 and L5. L1 band seems to provide the best sea

  5. The impact of human perception of simultaneous exposure to thermal load, low-frequency ventilation noise and indoor air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alm, Ole; Witterseh, Thomas; Clausen, Geo

    1999-01-01

    Human perception of simultaneous exposure to combinations of three different levels of operative temperature, low-frequency ventilation noise and indoor air pollution (27 combinations) was studied in climate chambers. The operative temperatures studied were: 26.0 deg.C, 27.6 deg.C and 29.6 deg.......C, and the sound pressure levels were: 45 dB(A), 48 dB(A) and 51 dB(A). The air pollution corresponding to these three levels of perceived air quality (at 26 deg.C) was: 1.1 decipol (dp), 2.4 dp and 4.5 dp. A 1 deg.C change in operative temperature had the same impact on the human perception of the overall...... conditions as a change of 3.8 dB(A) in sound pressure level or a change of 7 dp in air pollution (at 26 deg.C). The percentage of dissatisfied with the perceived air quality increased with increasing temperature. An elevated temperature had a dominant impact on the human perception of the indoor environment...

  6. The impact of human perception of simultaneous exposure to thermal load, low-frequency ventilation noise and indoor air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alm, Ole; Witterseh, Thomas; Clausen, Geo

    1999-01-01

    Human perception of simultaneous exposure to combinations of three different levels of operative temperature, low-frequency ventilation noise and indoor air pollution (27 combinations) was studied in climate chambers. The operative temperatures studied were: 26.0 deg.C, 27.6 deg.C and 29.6 deg.......C, and the sound pressure levels were: 45 dB(A), 48 dB(A) and 51 dB(A). The air pollution corresponding to these three levels of perceived air quality (at 26 deg.C) was: 1.1 decipol (dp), 2.4 dp and 4.5 dp. A 1 deg.C change in operative temperature had the same impact on the human perception of the overall...... conditions as a change of 3.8 dB(A) in sound pressure level or a change of 7 dp in air pollution (at 26 deg.C). The percentage of dissatisfied with the perceived air quality increased with increasing temperature. An elevated temperature had a dominant impact on the human perception of the indoor environment...

  7. Non-Pilot-Aided Sequential Monte Carlo Method to Joint Signal, Phase Noise, and Frequency Offset Estimation in Multicarrier Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Garnier

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We address the problem of phase noise (PHN and carrier frequency offset (CFO mitigation in multicarrier receivers. In multicarrier systems, phase distortions cause two effects: the common phase error (CPE and the intercarrier interference (ICI which severely degrade the accuracy of the symbol detection stage. Here, we propose a non-pilot-aided scheme to jointly estimate PHN, CFO, and multicarrier signal in time domain. Unlike existing methods, non-pilot-based estimation is performed without any decision-directed scheme. Our approach to the problem is based on Bayesian estimation using sequential Monte Carlo filtering commonly referred to as particle filtering. The particle filter is efficiently implemented by combining the principles of the Rao-Blackwellization technique and an approximate optimal importance function for phase distortion sampling. Moreover, in order to fully benefit from time-domain processing, we propose a multicarrier signal model which includes the redundancy information induced by the cyclic prefix, thus leading to a significant performance improvement. Simulation results are provided in terms of bit error rate (BER and mean square error (MSE to illustrate the efficiency and the robustness of the proposed algorithm.

  8. Liquid-phase exfoliated graphene self-assembled films: Low-frequency noise and thermal-electric characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubon Usca, G.; Hernandez-Ambato, J.; Pace, C.; Caputi, L. S.; Tavolaro, A.

    2016-09-01

    In few years, graphene has become a revolutionary material, leading not only to applications in various fields such as electronics, medicine and environment, but also to the production of new types of 2D materials. In this work, Liquid Phase Exfoliation (LPE) was applied to natural graphite by brief sonication or mixer treatment in suitable solvents, in order to produce Few Layers Graphene (FLG) suspensions. Additionally, zeolite 4A (Z4A) was added during the production of FLG flakes-based inks, with the aim of aiding the exfoliation process. Conductive films were obtained by drop casting three types of suspensions over Al2O3 substrates with interdigitated electrodes, with total channel surface of 1.39 mm2. The morphology characterization resulted in the verification of the presence of thin self-assembled flakes. Raman studies gave evidence of 4 to 10 layers graphene flakes. Electrical measurements were performed to state the Low-Frequency Noise and Thermal-Electric characteristics of the samples. We observe interesting relations between sample preparation procedures and electrical properties.

  9. A 9.8-mW 1.2-GHz CMOS frequency synthesizer with a low phase-noise LC-VCO and an I/Q frequency divider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhenrong; Zhuang Yiqi; Li Bing; Jin Gang, E-mail: allen_lzr@126.com [Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education for Wide Band-Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2011-07-15

    A 1.2 GHz frequency synthesizer integrated in a RF receiver for Beidou navigation is implemented in standard 0.18 {mu}m CMOS technology. A distributed biased varactor LC voltage-controlled oscillator is employed to achieve low tuning sensitivity and optimized phase noise performance. A high-speed and low-switching-noise divider-by-2 circuit based on a source-coupled logic structure is adopted to generate a quadrature (I/Q) local oscillating signal. A high-speed 8/9 dual-modulus prescaler (DMP), a programmable-delay phase frequency detector without dead-zone problem, and a programmable-current charge pump are also integrated into the frequency synthesizer. The frequency synthesizer demonstrates an output frequency from 1.05 to 1.30 GHz, and the phase noise is -98.53 dBc/Hz at 100-kHz offset and -121.92 dBc/Hz at 1-MHz offset from the carrier frequency of 1.21 GHz. The power dissipation of the core circuits without the output buffer is 9.8 mW from a 1.8 V power supply. The total area of the receiver is 2.4 x 1.6 mm{sup 2}. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  10. Experimental assessment of anomalous low-frequency noise increase at the onset of Gunn oscillations in InGaAs planar diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, Ó.; Alimi, Y.; Song, A.; Íñiguez-de-la-Torre, I.; Pérez, S.; Mateos, J.; González, T.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the presence of anomalous low-frequency fluctuations during the initiation of higher frequency oscillations in InGaAs-based Gunn planar diodes has been evidenced and investigated. Accurate measurements showing the evolution of the power spectral density of the device with respect to the applied voltage have been carried out. Such spectra have been obtained in the wide frequency range between 10 MHz and 43.5 GHz, simultaneously covering both the low-frequency noise and the fundamental oscillation peak at some tens of GHz. This provides valuable information to better understand how these fluctuations appear and how these are distributed in frequency. For much higher frequency operation, such understanding can be utilized as a simple tool to predict the presence of Gunn oscillations without requiring a direct detection.

  11. Test and Research on Frequency Features and Equivalent Frequencies of Noise in Operation of Train%列车运行噪声频率特性及等效频率试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田新浩

    2001-01-01

    The test and research are made on the frequency features of thestable radiation noise in operation of passenger and freight trains.Through analysis of the train operation test data,the distribution features of the radiation noise frequency and the equivalent frequency values under different speeds in operation of the train are obtained.%对客货列车运行稳态辐射噪声的频率特性进行了试验研究,通过分析列车运行试验数据,得出列车运行辐射噪声频率分布特性及不同速度下的等效频率值。

  12. Energy dependence of r.m.s amplitude of low frequency broadband noise and kHz quasi periodic oscillations in 4U 1608-52

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Soma

    2016-07-01

    The neutron star low mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52 is known to show kHz QPOs as well as low frequency broad band noise. The energy dependence of the fractional r.m.s of these variations reflect the underlying radiative mechanism responsible for the phenomena. In this work we compute the energy depedence for 26 instances of kHz QPO observed by RXTE. We typically find as reported before, that the r.m.s increases with energy with slope of ˜0.5. This indicates that the variation is in the hot thermal compotonization component and in particular the QPO is likely to be driven by variation in the thermal heating rate of the hot plasma. For the same data, we compute the energy dependent r.m.s variability of the low frequency broad band noise component by considering the light curves. In contrast to the behaviour seen for the kHz QPO, the energy dependence is nearly flat i.e. the r.m.s. is energy independent. This indicates that the driver here may be the soft photon source. Thus the radiative mechanism driving the low frequency broad band noise and the high frequency QPO are different in nature.

  13. A 220-1100 MHz low phase-noise frequency synthesizer with wide-band VCO and selectable I/Q divider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Chen; Renjie, Gong; Xu, Cheng; Yulin, Zhang; Zhong, Gao; Guiliang, Guo; Yuepeng, Yan

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a low phase-noise fractional-N frequency synthesizer which provides an in-phase/quadrature-phase (I/Q) signal over a frequency range of 220-1100 MHz for wireless networks of industrial automation (WIA) applications. Two techniques are proposed to achieve the wide range. First, a 1.4-2.2 GHz ultralow gain voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) is adopted by using 128 tuning curves. Second, a selectable I/Q divider is employed to divide the VCO frequency by 2 or 3 or 4 or 6. Besides, a phase-switching prescaler is proposed to lower PLL phase noise, a self-calibrated charge pump is used to suppress spur, and a detect-boosting phase frequency detector is adopted to shorten settling time. With a 200 kHz loop bandwidth, lowest measured phase noise is -106 dBc/Hz at a 10 kHz offset and -131 dBc/Hz at a 1 MHz offset. Fabricated in the TSMC 0.18 μm CMOS process, the synthesizer occupies a chip area of 1.2 mm2, consumes only 15 mW from the 1.8 V power supply, and settles within 13.2 μs. The synthesizer is optimized for the WIA applications, but can also be used for other short-range wireless communications, such as 433, 868, 916 MHz ISM band applications.

  14. Non-auditory Effect of Noise Pollution and Its Risk on Human Brain Activity in Different Audio Frequency Using Electroencephalogram Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdy, Armin; Jafari, Amir Homayoun

    2016-10-01

    Noise pollution is one of the most harmful ambiance disturbances. It may cause many deficits in ability and activity of persons in the urban and industrial areas. It also may cause many kinds of psychopathies. Therefore, it is very important to measure the risk of this pollution in different area. This study was conducted in the Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences from June to September of 2015, in which, different frequencies of noise pollution were played for volunteers. 16-channel EEG signal was recorded synchronously, then by using fractal dimension and relative power of Beta sub-band of EEG, the complexity of EEG signals was measured. As the results, it is observed that the average complexity of brain activity is increased in the middle of audio frequency range and the complexity map of brain activity changes in different frequencies, which can show the effects of frequency changes on human brain activity. The complexity of EEG is a good measure for ranking the annoyance and non-auditory risk of noise pollution on human brain activity.

  15. Identification and Removal of High Frequency Temporal Noise in a Nd:YAG Macro-Pulse Laser Assisted with a Diagnostic Streak Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent Marlett, Bechtel Nevada; Ke-Xun Sun Bechtel Nevada

    2004-09-23

    This paper discusses the use of a reference streak camera (SC) to diagnose laser performance and guide modifications to remove high frequency noise from Bechtel Nevada's long-pulse laser. The upgraded laser exhibits less than 0.1% high frequency noise in cumulative spectra, exceeding National Ignition Facility (NIF) calibration specifications. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments require full characterization of streak cameras over a wide range of sweep speeds (10 ns to 480 ns). This paradigm of metrology poses stringent spectral requirements on the laser source for streak camera calibration. Recently, Bechtel Nevada worked with a laser vendor to develop a high performance, multi-wavelength Nd:YAG laser to meet NIF calibration requirements. For a typical NIF streak camera with a 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD, the flat field calibration at 30 ns requires a smooth laser spectrum over 33 MHz to 68 GHz. Streak cameras are the appropriate instrumentation for measuring laser amplitude noise at these very high frequencies since the upper end spectral content is beyond the frequency response of typical optoelectronic detectors for a single shot pulse. The SC was used to measure a similar laser at its second harmonic wavelength (532 nm), to establish baseline spectra for testing signal analysis algorithms. The SC was then used to measure the new custom calibration laser. In both spatial-temporal measurements and cumulative spectra, 6-8 GHz oscillations were identified. The oscillations were found to be caused by inter-surface reflections between amplifiers. Additional variations in the SC spectral data were found to result from temperature instabilities in the seeding laser. Based on these findings, laser upgrades were made to remove the high frequency noise from the laser output.

  16. Noise measurements of the lowest frequency longitudinal mode of an aluminum cylinder at liquid nitrogen temperatures. Annual report 1 Nov 75--31 Dec 76

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.S.; Gretz, D.; Richard, J.P.; Rydbeck, G.; Weber, J.

    1976-08-01

    The lowest frequency longitudinal mode of an aluminum cylinder has been studied over the temperature range 60 K -- 78 K. Lead zirconate titanate crystals were bonded to the cylinder for observation of the thermal fluctuations and relaxation phenomena. Large amounts of excess noise were observed whenever the cylinder was not in thermal equilibrium. The cylinder appeared to have attained thermal equilibrium after its temperature had been maintained near liquid nitrogen temperatures for several weeks. Noise temperatures within a factor 2 of the temperature measured by a platinum resistance thermometer were observed when the mean temperature of the cylinder was drifting less than 0.01 Kelvin per day. The very large fluctuations in noise temperature are not understood and warrant further investigation. (auth)

  17. Low Frequency Noise Degradation in 45 nm High-k nMOSFETs due to Hot Carrier and Constant Voltage Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. Shahriar; ćelik-Butler, Zeynep; Quevedo-Lopez, M. A.; Shanware, Ajit; Colombo, Luigi

    2009-04-01

    Hafnium based materials are the leading candidates to replace conventional SiON as the gate dielectric in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. Hot carrier and constant voltage stress induced 1/f noise behavior is presented for HfSiON nMOSFETs. The additional low-frequency noise introduced through stressing was evaluated on nMOSFETs with TiN metal gate and HfSiON gate dielectric. Nitridation of HfSiO was achieved either by high temperature thermal nitridation or by relatively lower temperature plasma nitridation. The difference in stress induced noise behavior is attributed to the nitrogen profile across high-k/Si interface and bulk of high-k gate oxide caused by different nitridation techniques.

  18. A joint resonance frequency estimation and in-band noise reduction method for enhancing the detectability of bearing fault signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozchalooi, I. Soltani; Liang, Ming

    2008-05-01

    The vibration signal measured from a bearing contains vital information for the prognostic and health assessment purposes. However, when bearings are installed as part of a complex mechanical system, the measured signal is often heavily clouded by various noises due to the compounded effect of interferences of other machine elements and background noises present in the measuring device. As such, reliable condition monitoring would not be possible without proper de-noising. This is particularly true for incipient bearing faults with very weak signature signals. A new de-noising scheme is proposed in this paper to enhance the vibration signals acquired from faulty bearings. This de-noising scheme features a spectral subtraction to trim down the in-band noise prior to wavelet filtering. The Gabor wavelet is used in the wavelet transform and its parameters, i.e., scale and shape factor are selected in separate steps. The proper scale is found based on a novel resonance estimation algorithm. This algorithm makes use of the information derived from the variable shaft rotational speed though such variation is highly undesirable in fault detection since it complicates the process substantially. The shape factor value is then selected by minimizing a smoothness index. This index is defined as the ratio of the geometric mean to the arithmetic mean of the wavelet coefficient moduli. De-noising results are presented for simulated signals and experimental data acquired from both normal and faulty bearings with defective outer race, inner race, and rolling element.

  19. Ultra-low-phase-noise cryocooled microwave dielectric-sapphire-resonator oscillators with frequency instability below 1 x 10^-16

    CERN Document Server

    Hartnett, John G; Lu, Chuan

    2012-01-01

    Two nominally identical ultra-stable cryogenic microwave oscillators are compared. Each incorporates a dielectric-sapphire resonator cooled to near 6 K in an ultra-low vibration cryostat using a low-vibration pulse-tube cryocooler. The phase noise for a single oscillator is measured at -105 dBc/Hz at 1 Hz offset on the 11.2 GHz carrier. The oscillator fractional frequency stability is characterized in terms of Allan deviation by 5.3 x 10^-16 tau^-1/2 + 9 x 10^-17 for integration times 0.1 s < tau < 100 s and is limited by a flicker frequency noise floor below 1 x 10^-16.

  20. A novel low-noise linear-in-dB intermediate frequency variable-gain amplifier for DRM/DAB tuners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Keping; Wang Zhigong; Zhou Jianzheng; Lei Xuemei; Zhou Mingzhu, E-mail: zgwang@seu.edu.c [Institute of RF- and OE-ICs, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2009-03-15

    A broadband CMOS intermediate frequency (IF) variable-gain amplifier (VGA) for DRM/DAB tuners is presented. The VGA comprises two cascaded stages: one is for noise-canceling and another is for signal-summing. The chip is fabricated in a standard 0.18 mum 1P6M RF CMOS process of SMIC. Measured results show a good linear-in-dB gain characteristic in 28 dB dynamic gain range of -10 to 18 dB. It can operate in the frequency range of 30-700 MHz and consumes 27 mW at 1.8 V supply with the on-chip test buffer. The minimum noise figure is only 3.1 dB at maximum gain and the input-referred 1 dB gain compression point at the minimum gain is -3.9 dBm.

  1. Influence of temporal noise on the skin blood flow measurements performed by cooled thermal imaging camera: limit possibilities within each physiological frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaidachnyi, A. A.; Volkov, I. U.; Fomin, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes limit possibilities of modern cooled thermal imaging cameras as a tool for estimation of blood flow oscillations at the surface of living body. Skin temperature oscillations, as we assumed, are a consequence of the blood flow oscillations. We considered the temperature sensitivity 0.01-0.02 °C as a typical for the most of modern cooled long wave thermal imaging cameras. Fourier filter used to investigate the temperature signal separately within endothelial, neurogenic, myogenic, respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges. The level of temporal noise has been estimated during measurements of no living body with stabilized temperature ~ 24°C. The level of temperature oscillations has been calculated for the group of healthy subjects within each frequency range. Thus, we were able to determine signal-to-noise ratio within frequency band [0.001, 1] Hz. As a result, we determine that skin temperature oscillations measured by thermal imaging camera with sensitivity 0.02°C have the upper frequency limit ~ 0.2 Hz. In other words, within the respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges of blood flow oscillations the noise level exceeds signal one, and temperature measurements at the skin surface are practically useless. The endothelial, neurogenic and myogenic components of the temperature oscillations contain ~98% of the total spectral power of the signal. We have plot the empirical extrapolated curve of sensitivity of thermal imaging camera vs. frequency of the temperature oscillations. The data analysis shows that measurements of skin temperature oscillations within respiratory and cardiac ranges require the temperature sensitivity at least ~ 0.01°C and 0.001°C, respectively.

  2. Estudo do espectro sonoro nos limiares de altas frequências em trabalhadores expostos ao ruído Study of the noise spectrum on high frequency thresholds in workers exposed to noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurea Oliveira Canha Ottoni

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available O grau de nocividade do ruído pode ser quantificado e qualificado com base em algumas características do som como sua intensidade, o tipo de espectro, duração e a distribuição da exposição ao ruído durante a jornada de trabalho. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o espectro de ruído e a configuração audiométrica em trabalhadores. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Estudo de coorte contemporânea com corte transversal, realizado no Distrito Federal. Realizou-se avaliação ambiental (análise espectral do ruído em empresas de diferentes ramos de atividade econômica e avaliação audiológica em 347 trabalhadores. RESULTADOS: A análise espectral revelou picos em diferentes frequências em cada ramo de atividade (8 kHz-metalúrgico, 4 kHz-marmoraria e 2 kHz-madeireira. Verificou-se que as frequências de 14 kHz e 16 kHz apresentaram diferenças significativas entre os ramos de atividade, com maior prevalência no metalúrgico. CONCLUSÃO: A utilização de medidor de nível de pressão sonora, acoplado a analisador de frequência e a avaliação audiométrica de altas frequências possibilitam a detecção precoce de danos auditivos que, por sua vez, viabiliza melhor direcionamento das ações preventivas.Noise level can be quantified and qualified based on sound characteristics such as intensity, type of spectrum, duration and distribution of the noise exposure during one's working hours. OBJECTIVE: To assess noise spectrum and the audiometric configuration of workers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Contemporary cross-sectional cohort carried out in the Federal District - Brazil. We did an environmental analysis (spectral analysis of the noise in companies from different industries, with audiological assessment of 347 workers. RESULTS: The spectral analysis revealed peaks at different frequencies for each industry investigated (8 kHz-metallurgical, 4 kHz-stone Works and 2 kHz-wood works. We noticed that the frequencies of 14 kHz and 16 kHz had significant differences

  3. High frequency cut-off in 1/f conductivity noise of hole-doped La1-x Ca x MnO3 manganite single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybytek, Jacek; Fink-Finowicki, Jan; Puźniak, Roman; Jung, Grzegorz

    2016-05-01

    High frequency bias and temperature-dependent Lorentzian cut-off has been observed in the 1/f spectra of the conductivity fluctuations in low hole-doped ferromagnetic insulating La1-x Ca x MnO3 manganite at low temperatures. The cut-off frequency depends on dc current bias and temperature. The high frequency cut-off has been tentatively associated with intrinsic limits of the appearance of 1/f noise in the hopping regime of the Coulomb glass state. The assumption is validated by the fact that the Efros-Shklovskii temperature {{T}\\text{ES}} , estimated from the fit of the model to the experimentally measured temperature dependence of the cut-off frequency, has the same value as the temperature {{T}\\text{ES}} evaluated independently from the temperature dependence of the resistivity in the corresponding temperature range.

  4. I. Low frequency noise in metal films at the superconducting transition. II. Resistance of superconductor - normal metal- superconductor sandwiches and the quasiparticle relaxation time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiang, T.Y.

    1977-07-01

    Measurements of the noise power spectra of tin and lead films at the superconducting transition in the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 5k Hz are reported. Two types of samples were made. Type A were evaporated directly onto glass substrate, while Type B were evaporated onto glass or sapphire substrate with a 50A aluminum underlay. The results were consistent with a thermal diffusion model which attributes the noise to the intrinsic temperature fluctuation in the metal film driven with a random energy flux source. In both types of metal films, the noise power was found to be proportional to (V-bar)/sup 2/ ..beta../sup 2//..cap omega.., where V-bar was the mean voltage across the sample, ..beta.. was the temperature coefficient of resistance and ..cap omega.. was the volume of the sample. Correlation of noises in two regions of the metal film a distance d apart was detected at frequencies less than or = D/..pi..d/sup 2/. A possible explanation of the noises using quantitative boundary conditions and implications of this work for device applications are discussed. Theoretical and experimental investigation are reported on the resistance of superconductor-normal metal-superconductor sandwiches near T/sub c/. The increase in SNS resistance is attributed to the penetration of normal electric current in the superconductor. It is proved from first principles that an electric field can exist inside the superconductor when quasiparticles are not equally populated on the two branches of the excitation spectrum, and such is the case in a current biased SNS junction. The electric field inside S decays according to a diffusion law. The diffusion length is determined by the quasiparticle ''branch-crossing'' relaxation time. The branch-crossing relaxation times were measured. Impurity-doping of tin was found to decrease this relaxation time.

  5. Spatial noise in coupling strength and natural frequency within a pacemaker network; consequences for development of intestinal motor patterns according to a weakly coupled phase oscillator model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Parsons

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Pacemaker activities generated by networks of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC, in conjunction with the enteric nervous system, orchestrate most motor patterns in the gastrointestinal tract. It was our objective to understand the role of network features of ICC associated with the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP in the shaping of motor patterns of the small intestine. To that end, a model of weakly coupled oscillators (oscillators influence each other's phase but not amplitude was created with most parameters derived from experimental data. The ICC network is a uniform two dimensional network coupled by gap junctions. All ICC generate pacemaker (slow wave activity with a frequency gradient in mice from 50/min at the proximal end of the intestine to 40/min at the distal end. Key features of motor patterns, directly related to the underlying pacemaker activity, are frequency steps and dislocations. These were accurately mimicked by reduction of coupling strength at a point in the chain of oscillators. When coupling strength was expressed as a product of gap junction density and conductance, and gap junction density was varied randomly along the chain (i.e. spatial noise with a long-tailed distribution, plateau steps occurred at points of low density. As gap junction conductance was decreased, the number of plateaus increased, mimicking the effect of the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone. When spatial noise was added to the natural interval gradient, as gap junction conductance decreased, the number of plateaus increased as before but in addition the phase waves frequently changed direction of apparent propagation, again mimicking the effect of carbenoxolone. In summary, key features of the motor patterns that are governed by pacemaker activity may be a direct consequence of biological noise, specifically spatial noise in gap junction coupling and pacemaker frequency.

  6. Spatial Noise in Coupling Strength and Natural Frequency within a Pacemaker Network; Consequences for Development of Intestinal Motor Patterns According to a Weakly Coupled Phase Oscillator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Sean P.; Huizinga, Jan D.

    2016-01-01

    Pacemaker activities generated by networks of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), in conjunction with the enteric nervous system, orchestrate most motor patterns in the gastrointestinal tract. It was our objective to understand the role of network features of ICC associated with the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) in the shaping of motor patterns of the small intestine. To that end, a model of weakly coupled oscillators (oscillators influence each other's phase but not amplitude) was created with most parameters derived from experimental data. The ICC network is a uniform two dimensional network coupled by gap junctions. All ICC generate pacemaker (slow wave) activity with a frequency gradient in mice from 50/min at the proximal end of the intestine to 40/min at the distal end. Key features of motor patterns, directly related to the underlying pacemaker activity, are frequency steps and dislocations. These were accurately mimicked by reduction of coupling strength at a point in the chain of oscillators. When coupling strength was expressed as a product of gap junction density and conductance, and gap junction density was varied randomly along the chain (i.e., spatial noise) with a long-tailed distribution, plateau steps occurred at pointsof low density. As gap junction conductance was decreased, the number of plateaus increased, mimicking the effect of the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone. When spatial noise was added to the natural interval gradient, as gap junction conductance decreased, the number of plateaus increased as before but in addition the phase waves frequently changed direction of apparent propagation, again mimicking the effect of carbenoxolone. In summary, key features of the motor patterns that are governed by pacemaker activity may be a direct consequence of biological noise, specifically spatial noise in gap junction coupling and pacemaker frequency. PMID:26869875

  7. Spatial Noise in Coupling Strength and Natural Frequency within a Pacemaker Network; Consequences for Development of Intestinal Motor Patterns According to a Weakly Coupled Phase Oscillator Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Sean P; Huizinga, Jan D

    2016-01-01

    Pacemaker activities generated by networks of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), in conjunction with the enteric nervous system, orchestrate most motor patterns in the gastrointestinal tract. It was our objective to understand the role of network features of ICC associated with the myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) in the shaping of motor patterns of the small intestine. To that end, a model of weakly coupled oscillators (oscillators influence each other's phase but not amplitude) was created with most parameters derived from experimental data. The ICC network is a uniform two dimensional network coupled by gap junctions. All ICC generate pacemaker (slow wave) activity with a frequency gradient in mice from 50/min at the proximal end of the intestine to 40/min at the distal end. Key features of motor patterns, directly related to the underlying pacemaker activity, are frequency steps and dislocations. These were accurately mimicked by reduction of coupling strength at a point in the chain of oscillators. When coupling strength was expressed as a product of gap junction density and conductance, and gap junction density was varied randomly along the chain (i.e., spatial noise) with a long-tailed distribution, plateau steps occurred at pointsof low density. As gap junction conductance was decreased, the number of plateaus increased, mimicking the effect of the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone. When spatial noise was added to the natural interval gradient, as gap junction conductance decreased, the number of plateaus increased as before but in addition the phase waves frequently changed direction of apparent propagation, again mimicking the effect of carbenoxolone. In summary, key features of the motor patterns that are governed by pacemaker activity may be a direct consequence of biological noise, specifically spatial noise in gap junction coupling and pacemaker frequency.

  8. 管道低频噪声的自适应有源控制%Adaptive Active Control of Low-Frequency Noise in a Duct

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李传光; 李悟; 韩秀苓

    1999-01-01

    目的针对实际的具有行波的管道模型,研究一种降噪方案.方法通过建立数学模型和用来导出降噪的自适应系统的传递函数,对RLS、LMS和LSL算法的效果进行分析和比较.结果不存在声反馈时,对0-500Hz的宽带噪声可达到平均降噪量(MNRV)27.5dB.若存在声反馈并使用气流扬声器时,MNRV只有近似4.9dB.当该扬声器具有平坦特性时,MNRV可提高10.2dB.结论这项抵消技术可用于对排气管降噪.原则上,它亦可用于三维封闭空间的降噪问题.%Aim To study a method realizing noise control for a physical model of progressive wave in a duct. Methods A mathematical model was constructed and a transfer function of the adaptive system for noise control was also worked out; moreover, the effects of some algorithms such as RLS,LMS and LSL on noise control were analyzed and compared. Results Without the feedback of sound, the mean noise reduce value(MNRV) of 27.5 dB for broadband noise from 0 to 500Hz in frequency were achieved. When acoustic feedback took place and an air-stream loudspeaker was used, the MNRV was only about 4.9dB. But if the loudspeaker had a plain frequency feature, MNRV was improved by 10.2dB. Conclusion The technique is applied to ruducing the noise from engines' exhausted gas pipes. It is, in principle, used for noise-cancelling in a closed three dimensional space.

  9. A frequency-selective feedback model of auditory efferent suppression and its implications for the recognition of speech in noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Nicholas R; Brown, Guy J; Jürgens, Tim; Meddis, Ray

    2012-09-01

    The potential contribution of the peripheral auditory efferent system to our understanding of speech in a background of competing noise was studied using a computer model of the auditory periphery and assessed using an automatic speech recognition system. A previous study had shown that a fixed efferent attenuation applied to all channels of a multi-channel model could improve the recognition of connected digit triplets in noise [G. J. Brown, R. T. Ferry, and R. Meddis, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 127, 943-954 (2010)]. In the current study an anatomically justified feedback loop was used to automatically regulate separate attenuation values for each auditory channel. This arrangement resulted in a further enhancement of speech recognition over fixed-attenuation conditions. Comparisons between multi-talker babble and pink noise interference conditions suggest that the benefit originates from the model's ability to modify the amount of suppression in each channel separately according to the spectral shape of the interfering sounds.

  10. Impact of interface manipulation of oxide on electrical transport properties and low-frequency noise in MgO/NiFe/MgO heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian-wei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhao, Chong-jun; Feng, Chun; Yu, Guang-hua [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhou, Zhongfu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Low-frequency noise and magnetoresistance in sputtered-deposited Ta(5 nm)/MgO (3 nm)/NiFe(10 nm)/MgO(3 nm)/Ta(3 nm) films have been measured as a function of different annealing times at 400°C. These measurements did not change synchronously with annealing time. A significant increase in magnetoresistance is observed for short annealing times (of the order of minutes) and is correlated with a relatively small reduction in 1/f noise. In contrast, a significant reduction in 1/f noise is observed for long annealing times (of the order of hours) accompanied by a small change in magnetoresistance. After annealing for 2 hours, the 1/f noise decreases by three orders of magnitude. Transmission electron microscopy and slow positron annihilation results implicate the cause being micro-structural changes in the MgO layers and interfaces following different annealing times. The internal vacancies in the MgO layers gather into vacancy clusters to reduce the defect density after short annealing times, whereas the MgO/NiFe and the NiFe/MgO interfaces improve significantly after long annealing times with the amorphous MgO layers gradually crystallizing following the release of interfacial stress.

  11. Analytical determination of the uncertainty and the optimum sampling frequency for one-dimensional images with noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Siegmann, Philip

    2008-12-01

    Kriging is an estimation technique that has been proved useful in image processing since it behaves, under regular sampling, as a convolution. The uncertainty obtained with kriging has also been shown to behave as a convolution for the case of regular sampling. The convolution kernel for the uncertainty exclusively depends on the spatial correlation properties of the image. In this work we obtain, first, analytical expressions for the uncertainty of 1D images with noise using this convolution procedure. Then, we use this uncertainty to propose a new criterion for determining whether a 1D image with noise is correctly sampled.

  12. Joint phase noise and frequency offset estimation and mitigation for optically coherent QAM based on adaptive multi-symbol delay detection (MSDD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselniker, Igor; Sigron, Netta; Nazarathy, Moshe

    2012-05-07

    This paper extends our prior coherent MSDD Carrier Recovery system from QPSK to QAM operation and also characterizes for the first time the Carrier Frequency Offset (CFO) mitigation capabilities of the novel MSDD for QAM systems. We introduce and numerically investigate the performance of an improved MSDD carrier recovery system (differing from the one disclosed in our MSDD for QPSK prior paper), automatically adapting to the channel statistics for optimal phase-noise mitigation. Remarkably, we do not require a separate structure to estimate and mitigate CFO, but the same adaptive structure originally intended for phase noise mitigation is shown to also automatically provide frequency offset estimation and recovery functionality. The CFO capture range of our system is in principle infinite, whereas prior CFO mitigation systems have CFO capture ranges limited to a small a fraction of the baud-rate. When used for 16-QAM with coherent-grade lasers of 100 KHz linewidth, our MSDD system attains the best tradeoffs between performance and complexity, relative to other carrier recovery systems combining blind-phase-search with maximum likelihood detection. We also present additional MSDD phase-noise recovery system variants whereby substantially reduced complexity is traded off for slightly degraded performance. Our MSDD system is able to switch "on-the-fly" to various m-QAM constellation sizes, e.g. seamlessly transition between 16-QAM and QPSK, which may be useful for dynamically adaptive optical networks.

  13. Joint Doppler frequency, 2D-DOD and 2D-DOA estimation for bistatic MIMO radar in spatial coloured noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingyun; Zhang, Xiaofei; Xu, Zongze; Zeng, Xianwei; Yao, Fuqiang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of four-dimensional angle and Doppler frequency estimation for L-shaped bistatic multiple input multiple output radar in spatial coloured noise. A novel method of joint estimation of Doppler frequency, two-dimensional direction of departure and two-dimensional direction of arrival based on the propagator method is discussed. Utilising the cross-correlation matrix which is formed by the adjacent outputs of matched filter in the time domain, the special matrix is constructed to eliminate the influence of spatial coloured noise. The proposed algorithm provides lower computational complexity and has very close parameter estimation to the estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance techniques algorithm and DOA-matrix algorithm in high signal-to-noise ratio and Cramér-Rao bound is given. Furthermore, multidimensional parameters can be automatically paired by this algorithm to avoid the performance degradation resulting from wrong pairing. Numerical simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Comparative analysis of frequency and noise characteristics of Fabry – Perot and distributed feedback laser diodes with external optical injection locking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonenko, A A; Dorogush, E S [Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus); Malyshev, S A; Chizh, A L [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

    2015-11-30

    Using a system of coupled travelling wave equations, in the small-signal regime we analyse frequency and noise characteristics of index- or absorption-coupled distributed feedback laser diodes, as well as of Fabry – Perot (FP) laser diodes. It is shown that the weakest dependence of the direct modulation efficiency on the locking frequency in the regime of strong external optical injection locking is exhibited by a FP laser diode formed by highly reflective and antireflective coatings on the end faces of a laser structure. A reduction in the dependence of output characteristics of the laser diode on the locking frequency can be attained by decreasing the reflection coefficient of the antireflective FP mirror. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  15. Low-Frequency Noise Properties of GaN Schottky Barriers Deposited on Intermediate Temperature Buffer Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.; H.; Leung; W.; K.; Fong; C.; Surya; L.; W.; Lu; W.; K.; Ge

    2003-01-01

    Flicker noise and deep level transient spectroscopy were used to characterize defect properties of GaN films with different buffer structures. Results indicate improved properties with the use of intermediate temperature buffer layers due to the relaxation of residue strain in the films.

  16. Energetic distribution of interface states in GaN metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector structure obtained from low-frequency noise measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungil; Oh, S. K.; Kim, Seonhee

    2011-12-01

    We show that the low-frequency noise characteristics in Gallium nitride metal-semiconductor-metal photodiode structures where the structure can be treated as two Shottky diodes connected head-to-head, can be used to give useful information about the energetic distribution of interface states. By considering different models for noise generation, we concluded the density of interface states increases towards the conduction band edge in the forbidden energy gap. The experimental results reported in the literature showed quadratic current dependence at low current regions and became super-quadratic at higher current region which can be explained by the random walk of electrons involving interface states at the metal-semiconductor interface which gives quadratic current dependence and linear dependence on the interface states density at the Fermi level. Thus the non-quadratic dependence can be analyzed to give energetic distribution of the interface states.

  17. Variations in voice level and fundamental frequency with changing background noise level and talker-to-listener distance while wearing hearing protectors: A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouserhal, Rachel E.; MacDonald, Ewen; Falk, Tiago H.;

    2016-01-01

    concern for people wearing hearing protection devices (HPD). Although practical, radio communication is cumbersome, as it does not distinguish designated receivers. A smarter radio communication protocol must be developed to alleviate this problem. Thus, it is necessary to model speech production in noise...... while wearing HPDs. Such a model opens the door to radio communication systems that distinguish receivers and offer more efficient communication between persons wearing HPDs. Design: This paper presents the results of a pilot study aimed to investigate the effects of occluding the ear on changes...... in voice level and fundamental frequency in noise and with varying talker-to-listener distance. Study sample: Twelve participants with a mean age of 28 participated in this study. Results: Compared to existing data, results show a trend similar to the open ear condition with the exception of the occluded...

  18. Prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure among people working with sound systems and general population in Brazil: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevisani Virgínia FM

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Music is ever present in our daily lives, establishing a link between humans and the arts through the senses and pleasure. Sound technicians are the link between musicians and audiences or consumers. Recently, general concern has arisen regarding occurrences of hearing loss induced by noise from excessively amplified sound-producing activities within leisure and professional environments. Sound technicians' activities expose them to the risk of hearing loss, and consequently put at risk their quality of life, the quality of the musical product and consumers' hearing. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure among sound technicians in Brazil and compare this with a control group without occupational noise exposure. Methods This was a cross-sectional study comparing 177 participants in two groups: 82 sound technicians and 95 controls (non-sound technicians. A questionnaire on music listening habits and associated complaints was applied, and data were gathered regarding the professionals' numbers of working hours per day and both groups' hearing complaint and presence of tinnitus. The participants' ear canals were visually inspected using an otoscope. Hearing assessments were performed (tonal and speech audiometry using a portable digital AD 229 E audiometer funded by FAPESP. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the sound technicians and controls regarding age and gender. Thus, the study sample was homogenous and would be unlikely to lead to bias in the results. A statistically significant difference in hearing loss was observed between the groups: 50% among the sound technicians and 10.5% among the controls. The difference could be addressed to high sound levels. Conclusion The sound technicians presented a higher prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure than did the general population, although

  19. Prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure among people working with sound systems and general population in Brazil: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Dib, Regina P; Silva, Edina M K; Morais, José F; Trevisani, Virgínia F M

    2008-05-07

    Music is ever present in our daily lives, establishing a link between humans and the arts through the senses and pleasure. Sound technicians are the link between musicians and audiences or consumers. Recently, general concern has arisen regarding occurrences of hearing loss induced by noise from excessively amplified sound-producing activities within leisure and professional environments. Sound technicians' activities expose them to the risk of hearing loss, and consequently put at risk their quality of life, the quality of the musical product and consumers' hearing. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure among sound technicians in Brazil and compare this with a control group without occupational noise exposure. This was a cross-sectional study comparing 177 participants in two groups: 82 sound technicians and 95 controls (non-sound technicians). A questionnaire on music listening habits and associated complaints was applied, and data were gathered regarding the professionals' numbers of working hours per day and both groups' hearing complaint and presence of tinnitus. The participants' ear canals were visually inspected using an otoscope. Hearing assessments were performed (tonal and speech audiometry) using a portable digital AD 229 E audiometer funded by FAPESP. There was no statistically significant difference between the sound technicians and controls regarding age and gender. Thus, the study sample was homogenous and would be unlikely to lead to bias in the results. A statistically significant difference in hearing loss was observed between the groups: 50% among the sound technicians and 10.5% among the controls. The difference could be addressed to high sound levels. The sound technicians presented a higher prevalence of high frequency hearing loss consistent with noise exposure than did the general population, although the possibility of residual confounding due to unmeasured factors

  20. 发动机声激励下的车内高频噪声分析%Vehicle Interior High Frequency Noise under Engine Acoustic Excitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜爱民; 邵长慧; 邵建旺; 魏娜

    2016-01-01

    In order to research the vehicle interior high frequency noise and the performance of sound package under the engine acoustic excitation ,the statistical energy analysis and sound package models were built with VA One software .Both the power-based noise reduction test and the engine noise measurement were conducted to verify the accuracy of vehicle model .The cowl panel and floor were identified to be the main noise transfer paths according to the energy contribution of driver head and leg a-coustic cavity ,which laid the foundation for the optimization of sound package and the control of vehicle interior noise in the fu-ture .%为研究发动机声激励下中高频噪声和整车声学包隔声性能,在VA One软件中建立整车统计能量分析模型和声学包模型,并进行基于能量的整车隔声量测试和发动机噪声采集试验,验证了整车模型的准确性.通过对驾驶员头部声腔和腿部声腔的输入能量贡献量分析,发现前围和地板是车内噪声的主要传播路径,为后续汽车声学包的优化设计和车内噪声控制提供了帮助.

  1. Separation and quantification of frequency coupled noise sources of submarine cabin%舱段模型频率耦合噪声源的分离量化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李思纯; 宫元彬; 时胜国; 于树华; 韩闯

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods do not effectively handle separation and quantification of coupled vibration noise sources in submarines. So a new multivariate statistical analysis method, partial least square regression ( PLS) , is presented, which can be used to separate and quantify frequency coupled noise sources. PLS has the characteristic of simultaneously extracting principal input/output components, including maximum information, correlation of in⁃put with output, and regression modeling with multiple correlations among variables. Simulation and cabin model experiments show that, when there is frequency coupling between multiple excitation sources, PLS is capable of sorting among the energy contributions of internal noise sources to submarine hull, submarine hull to underwater a⁃coustic field, and noise sources to underwater acoustic field. The feasibility of PLS for frequency coupled source separation and quantification is proven. The method provides a basis for the control of the main noise sources.%由于潜艇振动噪声源存在频率相互耦合现象,常规方法难以有效地解决耦合噪声源分离与贡献量化问题。采用一种新型多元统计分析方法-偏最小二乘回归分析方法来实现频率耦合噪声源的分离量化,该方法可同时提取反映输入/输出中最大信息且相关性最大的主成分,并能够在变量间存在多重相关性的条件下进行回归建模。仿真与舱段模型试验表明:当多激励源之间存在频率耦合时,能对噪声源进行分离和贡献量化,从而实现了噪声源对耐压壳体观测点贡献以及噪声源对辐射声场观测点贡献的排序,验证了偏最小二乘回归用于频率耦合源分离量化的可行性,为主要噪声源的控制提供了依据。

  2. Predicting speech intelligibility based on the signal-to-noise envelope power ratio after modulation-frequency selective processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Søren; Dau, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    A model for predicting the intelligibility of processed noisy speech is proposed. The speech-based envelope power spectrum model has a similar structure as the model of Ewert and Dau [(2000). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1181-1196], developed to account for modulation detection and masking data....... The model estimates the speech-to-noise envelope power ratio, SNR env, at the output of a modulation filterbank and relates this metric to speech intelligibility using the concept of an ideal observer. Predictions were compared to data on the intelligibility of speech presented in stationary speech......-shaped noise. The model was further tested in conditions with noisy speech subjected to reverberation and spectral subtraction. Good agreement between predictions and data was found in all cases. For spectral subtraction, an analysis of the model's internal representation of the stimuli revealed...

  3. An Analysis of Linear and Non-Linear Coherent Detection in Atmospheric Noise at Very Low Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-01

    Bestimmte Integrale (Integral Table, Second Part , Definite Integrals), Fourth Edition, Springer-Verlag, Vienna (Austria), 1966. 20. Hall, Harry M., "A New...close agreement with the computational results of the analyses. The first part of the analysis is a survey of atmospheric noise representations. This...derived error rate perfomance data is presented which shows close agreement with the computational results of the analyses. The first part of the

  4. Impact of turbulent phase noise on frequency transfer with asymmetric two-way ground-satellite coherent optical links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Clélia; Conan, Jean-Marc; Wolf, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Bidirectional ground-satellite laser links suffer from turbulence-induced scintillation and phase distortion. We study how turbulence impacts on coherent detection capacity and on the associated phase noise that restricts clock transfer precision. We evaluate the capacity to obtain a two-way cancellation of atmospheric effects despite the asymmetry between up and down link that limits the link reciprocity. For ground-satellite links, the asymmetry is induced by point-ahead angle and possibly the use, for the ground terminal, of different transceiver diameters, in reception and emission. The quantitative analysis is obtained thanks to refined end- to-end simulations under realistic turbulence and wind conditions as well as satellite cinematic. These temporally resolved simulations allow characterizing the coherent detection in terms of time series of heterodyne efficiency for different system parameters. We show that Tip/Tilt correction on ground is mandatory at reception for the down link and as a pre-compensation of the up link. Good correlation between up and down phase noise is obtained even with asymmetric apertures of the ground transceiver and in spite of pointing ahead angle. The reduction to less than 1 rad2 of the two-way differential phase noise is very promising for clock comparisons.

  5. Noise suppression by noise

    OpenAIRE

    Vilar, J. M. G.; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between an externally added noise and the intrinsic noise of systems that relax fast towards a stationary state, and found that increasing the intensity of the external noise can reduce the total noise of the system. We have established a general criterion for the appearance of this phenomenon and discussed two examples in detail.

  6. Variations in voice level and fundamental frequency with changing background noise level and talker-to-listener distance while wearing hearing protectors: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouserhal, Rachel E; Macdonald, Ewen N; Falk, Tiago H; Voix, Jérémie

    2016-01-01

    Speech production in noise with varying talker-to-listener distance has been well studied for the open ear condition. However, occluding the ear canal can affect the auditory feedback and cause deviations from the models presented for the open-ear condition. Communication is a main concern for people wearing hearing protection devices (HPD). Although practical, radio communication is cumbersome, as it does not distinguish designated receivers. A smarter radio communication protocol must be developed to alleviate this problem. Thus, it is necessary to model speech production in noise while wearing HPDs. Such a model opens the door to radio communication systems that distinguish receivers and offer more efficient communication between persons wearing HPDs. This paper presents the results of a pilot study aimed to investigate the effects of occluding the ear on changes in voice level and fundamental frequency in noise and with varying talker-to-listener distance. Twelve participants with a mean age of 28 participated in this study. Compared to existing data, results show a trend similar to the open ear condition with the exception of the occluded quiet condition. This implies that a model can be developed to better understand speech production for the occluded ear.

  7. AC bias characterization of low noise bolometers for SAFARI using an Open-Loop Frequency Domain SQUID-based multiplexer operating between 1 and 5 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Gottardi, Luciano; Gao, Jan-R; Hartog, Roland den; Hijmering, Richard; Hoevers, Henk; Khosropanah, Pourya; de Korte, Piet; van der Kuur, Jan; Lindeman, Mark; Ridder, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    SRON is developing the Frequency Domain Multiplexing (FDM) readout and the ultra low NEP TES bolometers array for the infrared spectrometer SAFARI on board of the Japanese space mission SPICA. The FDM prototype of the instrument requires critical and complex optimizations. For single pixel characterization under AC bias we are developing a simple FDM system working in the frequency range from 1 to 5 MHz, based on the open loop read-out of a linearized two-stage SQUID amplifier and high Q lithographic LC resonators. We describe the details of the experimental set-up required to achieve low power loading (< 1 fW) and low noise (NEP $\\sim 10^{-19} W/Hz^{1/2}$) in the TES bolometers. We conclude the paper by comparing the performance of a $4 \\cdot 10^{-19} W/Hz^{1/2}$ TES bolometer measured under DC and AC bias.

  8. Interferometric coherence measurement and radio frequency noise characterization of the 1.3 μm femtosecond intense Stokes continuum from a TZDW source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuhong; Knox, Wayne H.

    2015-02-01

    Photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with two closely spaced zero dispersion wavelengths (TZDW) offers a unique route to efficient energy transfer to two spectrally localized continua beyond either side of the ZDWs, which we have employed in previous work for mid-IR difference frequency generation and speckle-free red-green-blue generation. In this manuscript, we report the interferometric coherence characterization and radio frequency (RF) noise measurements of the Stokes side TZDW component. With a custom-built 1.3 W, 1035 nm, 40 MHz, 240 fs Yb:fiber chirped pulse amplifier as the pump source, we use 12 cm of commercially available TZDW PCF to excite the dual narrow-band continua from which the Stokes pulse is filtered out with a 1180 nm long wave pass filter. We achieve 0.8 to 3 nJ of narrow-band pulses within the spectral range of 1200 - 1315 nm at an average power conversion efficiency of 33%. Employing an un-balanced Michelson interferometer, measured mutual spectral coherence of the Stokes pulse is in excess of 0.76 with pump Soliton order as high as N ~70. Its measured RF noise spectrum at the first harmonic of the laser repetition rate shows less than 8 dBc/Hz increase in relative intensity noise (RIN) compared to that of the power amplifier, which is consistent with reported studies employing sub-100 fs pulses from relatively low noise oscillators. In contrast to the broadband continuum from a single ZDW PCF wherein severe de-coherence is found with pumping at high soliton order and longer pump pulse width, the reported TZDW fiber source shows preservation of intensity stability and phase coherence against variation in pump pulse parameters, which not only attests to the stability of our reported method for mid-IR generation, but also shows promising potential towards an all-fiber, efficient and low noise ultrafast source that can be helpful for applications such as biomedical deep-tissue imaging.

  9. Electrical Transport and Low-Frequency Noise in Chemical Vapor Deposited Single-Layer MoS2 Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-18

    noise in graphene devices [18–20], and lately on MoS2 FETs [21]. Particularly for MoS2 devices, there exists a lack of understanding of the dominant...methods Monolayer MoS2 films were grown directly on a SiO2 -coated (285 nm) Si substrate using the procedure described in detail by Najmaei et al [24...passivated and etched devices, respectively. In the case of graphene devices, several groups have reported SID/IDS2 in the range of 10−9 Hz−1 to 10−7 Hz−1 at

  10. Advanced bridge instrument for the measurement of the phase noise and of the short-term frequency stability of ultra-stable quartz resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Sthal, Fabrice; Salzenstein, Patrice; Galliou, Serge; Cibiel, Gilles; Rubiola, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    High-stability quartz oscillators are needed in a number of space applications. A short-term stability of parts in 10^{-14} [Allan deviation \\sigma y(\\tau) ] is sometimes required, for integration time \\tau of approximately 1-10 s. The Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and the FEMTO-ST Institute (formerly LPMO and LCEP), have been collaborating for many years in this domain, aiming at measuring and at understanding the oscillator noise. The highest stability has been observed on 5 MHz and 10 MHz bulk acoustic-wave resonators. Yet this stability is still not sufficient, or the the manufacturing method is not reproducible. Recently, the analysis of a few premium-stability oscillators has demonstrated that the oscillator frequency instability is due to the fluctuation of the resonator natural frequency, rather than to the noise of the sustaining amplifier via the Leeson effect. It is therefore natural to give attention to the measurement of the resonator fluctuations.

  11. Analysis and Control of Low Frequency Road Noise inside a Car%车内低频路面噪声分析与控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘先锋; 权循宇; 陈建中; 吴春军; 王学军; 俞伟杰

    2015-01-01

    There is a serious booming noise in rear seats of a sedan car when the car is running on an old and rough asphalt pavement. The simulations of the interior acoustic modal of the car’s cavity and the structural modal of the trim’s body show that the low-frequency noise in the rear seats is due to the strong coupling of the second-order modal of the acoustic cavity with the sixth-order local structural modal of the trim’s body. In order to avoid the coupling resonance, the beam structure of the rear roof was modified. This modification can effectively solve the problem of low frequency road noise inside the car.%某三厢轿车在粗糙的老旧沥青路面上行驶时,车内后座存在严重的低频轰鸣声。通过车内空腔声学模态和装饰车身结构模态仿真计算,发现车内后座低频噪声产生的原因为车内空腔的第二阶声学模态与装饰车身车顶后部第六阶局部结构模态强烈耦合。为避免耦合共振,改进了后车顶横梁结构设计。实车验证改进措施有效。

  12. Electro-Static Discharge Protection Design for V-Band Low-Noise Amplifier Using Radio Frequency Junction Varactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Huang, Sing-Kai; Hsu, Shawn S. H.

    2013-04-01

    The RF junction varactors are employed as electro-static discharge (ESD) protection devices and co-designed with 60 GHz low-noise amplifier (LNA) fabricated in a 65-nm CMOS technology. The junction varactor acts as an ESD diode to bypass ESD current during ESD zapping, and also utilized as a capacitor to be a part of input matching network of the LNA in normal RF operation. By transmission line pulse (TLP) measurement, the ESD protection capabilities of RF junction varactors are characterized with different device parameters. The experimental results demonstrate excellent second breakdown currents (It2) and high ratios of the ESD levels to parasitic capacitances (VESD/CESD). With ESD/matching co-design methodology, the ESD-protected LNA demonstrates a second breakdown current It2 of 1.4 A, corresponding to a 2-kV human-body-model (HBM) ESD protection level with a noise figure (NF) of 6.6 dB and a peak gain of 16.5 dB at 60 GHz under a power consumption of only 28 mW.

  13. Beamspace time-frequency analysis for identification of underwater tone noise sources%水下线谱噪声源识别的波束域时频分析方法研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The noise emitted by an underwater vehicle consists of several strong tones superimposed on a broad-band radiated noise component. Among them, the stable low-frequency tone noise induced by the reciprocating movements of the auxiliary machines in the underwater vehicle, carries characteristic information of the vehicle and is necessary for long-distance detection. Therefore, identification of the tone noise sources of an underwater vehicle is significant for noise reduction. On the basis of the joint information of space-time-frequency, beamspace time-frequency analysis (TFA) scheme is proposed for identification of low-frequency tone noise sources of underwater moving vehicle. First, the Doppler signals formed when the tone noise sources pass through the closest point of approach (CPA) are separated in time domain, by using superdirectivity beamforming of a small aperture circular array. The output signals can be approximated in linear form, i. e. , LFM signal. After the LFM signals from the narrow beam are processed by two TFA methods of pseudo Wigner−Ville distribution and chirplet transform (CT), the time-frequency images of the noise signals are obtained. Then, the CPA time of each tone noise sources can be estimated by using peak search of the time-frequency images. At last, by converting the time coordinate to space coordinate and comparing with a reference source whose CPA time and position are known in advance, the positions of the low-frequency tone noise sources on the underwater vehicle are identified. The proposed scheme is different from the focused beamforming method, which scans the beam angle after eliminating the Doppler effect. Besides, due to no need of decorrelation usually used in the focused beamforming method, beamspace TFA scheme resolves the problem that array aperture is limited for identification of coherent noise sources of an underwater vehicle. The aperture of the used array can be reduced to meter-scale even when the frequencies of

  14. Neuropathic pain: transcranial electric motor cortex stimulation using high frequency random noise. Case report of a novel treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alm PA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Per A Alm, Karolina DreimanisDepartment of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, SwedenObjectives: Electric motor cortex stimulation has been reported to be effective for many cases of neuropathic pain, in the form of epidural stimulation or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS. A novel technique is transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS, which increases the cortical excitability irrespective of the orientation of the current. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of tRNS on neuropathic pain in a small number of subjects, and in a case study explore the effects of different stimulation parameters and the long-term stability of treatment effects.Methods: The study was divided into three phases: (1 a double-blind 100–600 Hz, varying from 0.5 to 10 minutes and from 50 to 1500 µA, at intervals ranging from daily to fortnightly.crossover study, with four subjects; (2 a double-blind extended case study with one responder; and (3 open continued treatment. The motor cortex stimulation consisted of alternating current random noise (100–600 Hz, varying from 0.5 to 10 minutes and from 50 to 1500 μA, at intervals ranging from daily to fortnightly.Results: One out of four participants showed a strong positive effect (also compared with direct-current-sham, P = 0.006. Unexpectedly, this effect was shown to occur also for very weak (100 µA, P = 0.048 and brief (0.5 minutes, P = 0.028 stimulation. The effect was largest during the first month, but remained at a highly motivating level for the patient after 6 months.Discussion: The study suggests that tRNS may be an effective treatment for some cases of neuropathic pain. An important result was the indication that even low levels of stimulation may have substantial effects.Keywords: neuropathic pain, central pain, transcranial direct current stimulation, motor cortex stimulation, random noise stimulation

  15. Suppression and spectral splitting of the amplitude noise due to mode beatings in a single-frequency injection laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogatov, A.P.; Eliseev, P.G.; Kobildzhanov, O.A.; Madgazin, V.R.

    1987-06-01

    Investigations of intensity fluctuations in a single-frequency injection laser showed that they are due to beatings between coherent field and superluminescent spontaneous emission. It has been experimentally found that in the region of developed laser emission, the level of fluctuations is decreased with an increase of the output power, and so the relative spectral shift of external cavity superluminescent mode frequencies is dependent on the laser output power. The explanation of this phenomenon was made on the basis of the mechanism of a nonlinear interaction of a field in the active region of a laser diode.

  16. Analytical calculation of the frequency shift in phase oscillators driven by colored noise: implications for electrical engineering and neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Roberto F

    2009-09-01

    We provide an analytical expression for the mean frequency shift in phase oscillators as a function of the standard deviation, sigma and the autocorrelation time, tau of small random perturbations. We show that the frequency shift is negative and proportional to sigma;{2} . Its absolute value increases monotonically with tau , approaching an asymptote determined by the L2 -norm of the phase-response curve. We validate our theoretical predictions with computer simulations and discuss their implications for the design of electronic oscillators and for the encoding of information in biological neural networks.

  17. Solar noise storms

    CERN Document Server

    Elgaroy, E O

    2013-01-01

    Solar Noise Storms examines the properties and features of solar noise storm phenomenon. The book also presents some theories that can be used to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon. The coverage of the text includes topics that cover the features and behavior of noise storms, such as the observable features of noise storms; the relationship between noise storms and the observable features on the sun; and ordered behavior of storm bursts in the time-frequency plane. The book also covers the spectrum, polarization, and directivity of noise storms. The text will be of great use to astr

  18. Interior High Frequency Noise Analysis of Heavy Vehicle Cab and Multi-Objective Optimization with Statistical Energy Analysis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuming; Wang, Lianhui; Song, Jiqang; Wang, Dengfeng; Chen, Jing

    The interior sound pressure levels of a commercial vehicle cab at the driver’s right ear position and head rest position are determined as evaluation indices of vehicle acoustic performances. A statistical energy analysis model of the commercial vehicle cab was created by using statistical energy analysis method. The simulated interior acoustic performance of the cab has a significant coincidence with the experimental results. A response surface model was presented to determine the relationship between sound package parameters and evaluation indices of the interior acoustic performance for the vehicle cab. A multi-objective optimization was performed by using NSGA II algorithm with weighting coefficient method. The presented method provides a new idea for the multi-objective optimization design of the acoustic performances in vehicle noise analysis and control field.

  19. Effects of laser frequency chirp on modal noise in short-range radio over multimode fiber links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visani, Davide; Tartarini, Giovanni; Petersen, Martin Nordal;

    2010-01-01

    An important effect of the frequency chirp of the optical transmitter in radio over multimode fiber links is put into evidence experimentally and modeled theoretically for the first time, to our knowledge. This effect can have an important impact in short-range connections, where, although...

  20. A Novel Approach of Low-Light Image Denoising for Face Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimei Kang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Illumination variation makes automatic face recognition a challenging task, especially in low light environments. A very simple and efficient novel low-light image denoising of low frequency noise (DeLFN is proposed. The noise frequency distribution of low-light images is presented based on massive experimental results. The low and very low frequency noise are dominant in low light conditions. DeLFN is a three-level image denoising method. The first level denoises mixed noises by histogram equalization (HE to improve overall contrast. The second level denoises low frequency noise by logarithmic transformation (LOG to enhance the image detail. The third level denoises residual very low frequency noise by high-pass filtering to recover more features of the true images. The PCA (Principal Component Analysis recognition method is applied to test recognition rate of the preprocessed face images with DeLFN. DeLFN are compared with several representative illumination preprocessing methods on the Yale Face Database B, the Extended Yale face database B, and the CMU PIE face database, respectively. DeLFN not only outperformed other algorithms in improving visual quality and face recognition rate, but also is simpler and computationally efficient for real time applications.

  1. Analysis of electrochemical noise (ECN) data in time and frequency domain for comparison corrosion inhibition of some azole compounds on Cu in 1.0 M H2SO4 solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezanzadeh, B.; Arman, S. Y.; Mehdipour, M.; Markhali, B. P.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the corrosion inhibition properties of two similar heterocyclic compounds namely benzotriazole (BTA) and benzothiazole (BNS) inhibitors on copper in 1.0 M H2SO4 solution were studied by electrochemical techniques as well as surface analysis. The results showed that corrosion inhibition of copper largely depends on the molecular structure and concentration of the inhibitors. The effect of DC trend on the interpretation of electrochemical noise (ECN) results in time domain was evaluated by moving average removal (MAR) method. Accordingly, the impact of square and Hanning window functions as drift removal methods in frequency domain was studied. After DC trend removal, a good trend was observed between electrochemical noise (ECN) data and the results obtained from EIS and potentiodynamic polarization. Furthermore, the shot noise theory in frequency domain was applied to approach the charge of each electrochemical event (q) from the potential and current noise signals.

  2. Synthesis of multi-wavelength temporal phase-shifting algorithms optimized for high signal-to-noise ratio and high detuning robustness using the frequency transfer function

    CERN Document Server

    Servin, Manuel; Garnica, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis of single-wavelength temporal phase-shifting algorithms (PSA) for interferometry is well-known and firmly based on the frequency transfer function (FTF) paradigm. Here we extend the single-wavelength FTF-theory to dual and multi-wavelength PSA-synthesis when several simultaneous laser-colors are present. The FTF-based synthesis for dual-wavelength PSA (DW-PSA) is optimized for high signal-to-noise ratio and minimum number of temporal phase-shifted interferograms. The DW-PSA synthesis herein presented may be used for interferometric contouring of discontinuous industrial objects. Also DW-PSA may be useful for DW shop-testing of deep free-form aspheres. As shown here, using the FTF-based synthesis one may easily find explicit DW-PSA formulae optimized for high signal-to-noise and high detuning robustness. To this date, no general synthesis and analysis for temporal DW-PSAs has been given; only had-hoc DW-PSAs formulas have been reported. Consequently, no explicit formulae for their spectra, their sign...

  3. Effect of Nitrogen Concentration on Low-Frequency Noise and Negative Bias Temperature Instability of p-Channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors with Nitrided Gate Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, In-Shik; Kwon, Hyuk-Min; Bok, Jung-Deuk; Kwon, Sung-Kyu; Jung, Yi-Jung; Choi, Woon-il; Choi, Deuk-Sung; Lim, Min-Gyu; Chung, Yi-Sun; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Ga-Won; Lee, Hi-Deok

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, the dependence of negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) and low-frequency noise characteristics on the various nitrided gate oxides is reported. The threshold voltage shift (ΔVT) under NBTI stress for thermally nitrided oxide (TNO) was greater than that of plasma nitrided oxide (PNO), whereas the slopes of ΔVT versus stress time for PNO were similar to those for TNO. The flicker noise (1/f noise) characteristic of PNO was better than that of TNO by about 1 order of magnitude, although the 1/f noise of PNO showed almost the same dependence on the frequency as that of TNO. The carrier number fluctuation model due to the trapping and detrapping of electrons in oxide traps was found to be a dominant mechanism of flicker noise. The probability of the generation of drain current random telegraph signal (ID-RTS) noise shows similar values (70-78%) for all nitrided oxides, which shows that the generation of RTS noise is not greatly affected by the nitridation method or nitrogen concentration.

  4. On the predictability of volcano-tectonic events by low frequency seismic noise analysis at Teide-Pico Viejo volcanic complex, Canary Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tárraga

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The island of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain, is showing possible signs of reawakening after its last basaltic strombolian eruption, dated 1909 at Chinyero. The main concern relates to the central active volcanic complex Teide - Pico Viejo, which poses serious hazards to the properties and population of the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain, and which has erupted several times during the last 5000 years, including a subplinian phonolitic eruption (Montaña Blanca about 2000 years ago. In this paper we show the presence of low frequency seismic noise which possibly includes tremor of volcanic origin and we investigate the feasibility of using it to forecast, via the material failure forecast method, the time of occurrence of discrete events that could be called Volcano-Tectonic or simply Tectonic (i.e. non volcanic on the basis of their relationship to volcanic activity. In order to avoid subjectivity in the forecast procedure, an automatic program has been developed to generate forecasts, validated by Bayes theorem. A parameter called 'forecast gain' measures (and for the first time quantitatively what is gained in probabilistic terms by applying the (automatic failure forecast method. The clear correlation between the obtained forecasts and the occurrence of (Volcano-Tectonic seismic events - a clear indication of a relationship between the continuous seismic noise and the discrete seismic events - is the explanation for the high value of this 'forecast gain' in both 2004 and 2005 and an indication that the events are Volcano-Tectonic rather than purely Tectonic.

  5. Electron density window for best frequency performance, lowest phase noise and slowest degradation of GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matulionis, Arvydas

    2013-07-01

    The problems in the realm of nitride heterostructure field-effect transistors (HFETs) are discussed in terms of a novel fluctuation-dissipation-based approach impelled by a recent demonstration of strong correlation of hot-electron fluctuations with frequency performance and degradation of the devices. The correlation has its genesis in the dissipation of the LO-mode heat accumulated by the non-equilibrium longitudinal optical phonons (hot phonons) confined in the channel that hosts the high-density hot-electron gas subjected to a high electric field. The LO-mode heat causes additional scattering of hot electrons and facilitates defect formation in a different manner than the conventional heat contained mainly in the acoustic phonon mode. We treat the heat dissipation problem in terms of the hot-phonon lifetime responsible for the conversion of the non-migrant hot phonons into migrant acoustic modes and other vibrations. The lifetime is measured over a wide range of electron density and supplied electric power. The optimal conditions for the dissipation of the LO-mode heat are associated with the plasmon-assisted disintegration of hot phonons. Signatures of plasmons are experimentally resolved in fluctuations, dissipation, hot-electron transport, transistor frequency performance, transistor phase noise and transistor reliability. In particular, a slower degradation and a faster operation of GaN-based HFETs take place inside the electron density window where the resonant plasmon-assisted ultrafast dissipation of the LO-mode heat comes into play. A novel heterostructure design for the possible improvement of HFET performance is proposed, implemented and tested.

  6. Noise Gating Solar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, Craig; Seaton, Daniel B.; Darnell, John A.

    2017-08-01

    I present and demonstrate a new, general purpose post-processing technique, "3D noise gating", that can reduce image noise by an order of magnitude or more without effective loss of spatial or temporal resolution in typical solar applications.Nearly all scientific images are, ultimately, limited by noise. Noise can be direct Poisson "shot noise" from photon counting effects, or introduced by other means such as detector read noise. Noise is typically represented as a random variable (perhaps with location- or image-dependent characteristics) that is sampled once per pixel or once per resolution element of an image sequence. Noise limits many aspects of image analysis, including photometry, spatiotemporal resolution, feature identification, morphology extraction, and background modeling and separation.Identifying and separating noise from image signal is difficult. The common practice of blurring in space and/or time works because most image "signal" is concentrated in the low Fourier components of an image, while noise is evenly distributed. Blurring in space and/or time attenuates the high spatial and temporal frequencies, reducing noise at the expense of also attenuating image detail. Noise-gating exploits the same property -- "coherence" -- that we use to identify features in images, to separate image features from noise.Processing image sequences through 3-D noise gating results in spectacular (more than 10x) improvements in signal-to-noise ratio, while not blurring bright, resolved features in either space or time. This improves most types of image analysis, including feature identification, time sequence extraction, absolute and relative photometry (including differential emission measure analysis), feature tracking, computer vision, correlation tracking, background modeling, cross-scale analysis, visual display/presentation, and image compression.I will introduce noise gating, describe the method, and show examples from several instruments (including SDO

  7. Study of low-frequency excess noise transport in Ga-face and N-face GaN thin films grown on intermediate-temperature buffer layer by RF-MBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, W.K.; Leung, B.H.; Xie, J.Q.; Surya, C. [Department of Electronic and Information Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2002-08-16

    We report detailed investigations of low-frequency excess noise in both Ga-faced and N-faced GaN thin films grown by RF-plasma molecular beam epitaxy. The GaN epilayers were grown on double buffer layers, and consisted of a thick intermediate-temperature buffer layer (ITBL) deposited at 690 C and a conventional thin buffer layer. Deposition of the thin buffer layer is used to control the polarity of the GaN epilayer. Low-frequency excess noise was studied in detail to examine the effects on the ITBL on the noise. The low-frequency noise is attributed to the correlated fluctuations in number and mobility of carriers, arising from the capture and emission by localized states. Our experimental results show that the polarity of the GaN epilayer and the utilization of ITBL have strong influence on the defect density of the GaN material. (Abstract Copyright[2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Slap fingerprint noise detection and removal algorithm based on frequency domain statistics%基于频域统计量的联指图噪声检测和去除

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鹏; 张永良; 李焱淼; 李骏康

    2011-01-01

    针对联指图中存在的各种噪声,提出了一种基于频域统计量的联指图噪声检测和去除算法.首先对联指图进行规格化处理,然后利用三个频域统计量来检测和去除噪声,最后对图像进行后处理.该算法根据指纹和各种噪声在频域上的不同特性,给出了相应的噪声判定条件.实验结果表明该算法是一种行之有效的联指图噪声检测和去除算法.%To detect and remove the noise in slap fingerprint images, an efficient algorithm was presented based on frequency domain statistics. Firstly, the slap was normalized; then, three frequency domain statistics were used for noise detection and removal; finally, post-processing was applied to optimize the result. Based on the different frequency domain characteristics between fingerprint and noise, the corresponding criterion was proposed to detect and remove the noise. The experimental results show that the presented algorithm is effective.

  9. Low Phase Noise Design Technology of Frequency Synthesizer at 1 Hz for Deep Space TT & C System%深空测控系统1 Hz低相噪频率合成技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜丹

    2015-01-01

    针对深空测控系统高精度测量对于信道附加相噪的要求,采用直接数字频率合成( DDS )正交调制方法设计频率综合器。通过巧妙的试验和外推方法,择优选取电压型鉴相器,在锁相环相噪模型的基础上,全面分析各部分相噪的贡献,综合设计环路带宽,有效控制附加相噪,实现低相噪频综器最理想的目标,即环路带内的相噪完全由参考决定,带外的相噪由压控振荡器( VCO)决定,并采用两源互比的方法完成1 Hz极低相位噪声的测试,测试结果为-73 dBc/Hz,与设计结果完全一致。该方法对于测控站极低相噪的设计具有一定参考价值。%For the additional phase noise requirements on channels in deep space TT&C system with high ac-curacy measurement,a frequency synthesizer is designed using direct digital synthesizing(DDS) quadrature modulation. A voltage-type phase discriminator is selected by smart test and extrapolation method. Based on phase noise model of phase locked loop,contributions from all parts of phase noise are analyzed. So the idea-lest performance of frequency synthesizer with low phase noise,i. e. loop in-band phase noise is depended on reference frequency,and out-band phase noise is determined by voltage-controlled oscillator(VCO),is implemented by loop bandwidth integrated design and efficient additional phase noise control. The 1 Hz low phase noise is tested through comparing two sources and it is-73 dBc/Hz,which is consistent with design re-sult. This method is valuable to low phase noise design in deep space TT&C ground station.

  10. 低相噪硅雷达射频频率源的研究与设计%Research and Design of the Low Phase Noise Frequency Synthesizer with Integrated VCO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李旺; 唐俊

    2012-01-01

    分析了频率源中各个模块的噪声传递函数,确定影响近端噪声的模块分别是鉴频鉴相器_电荷泵(PFD_CP)、分频器;在默认分频器相位噪声为-158 dBc/Hz,通过matlab建模推断,需要PFD-CP模块在10 kHz频偏处的输入噪声达到-143 dBc/Hz,才能实现频率源输出信号在10 kHz频偏处相位噪声-107 dBc/Hz.采用0.18μmSiGe BiCMOS工艺,设计了整块芯片,着重优化了PFD-CP模块的输入噪声,经过spectre仿真,PFD_CP模块的输入噪声为-146 dBc/Hz,经过实测,输出信号在10 kHz频偏处相位噪声为-108 dBc/Hz,达到设计预期.%Based on analysis of the phase noise model of the frequency synthesizer, it is known that the PFD-CP (phase frequency detector and charge pump) noise and the divider noise are the main contributer of the phase noise. By using matlab model if the divider phase noise of - 158 dBc/Hz, is default value PFD_CP must attain -143 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset in order to realize the designed synthesizer phase noise of -107 dBc/Hz. The frequency synthesizer chip has been designed in 0. 18μm SiGe BiCMOS technology, simulated results by spectre show that charge pump noise is -146 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz. Measured phase noise of the frequency synthesizer is -108 dBc/Hz@10 kHz at 3 GHz.

  11. Model of flicker noise effects on phase noise in oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centurelli, Francesco; Ercolani, Alessandro; Tommasino, Pasquale; Trifiletti, Alessandro

    2003-05-01

    Phase noise models that describe the near-carrier spectrum in an accurate but insightful way are needed, to better optimize the oscillator design. In this paper we present a model to describe the effect of flicker noise sources on the phase noise of an oscillator, that can be applied both to linear oscillators and to nonlinear structures like relaxation and ring oscillators, so extending previous works that considered only the effect of the flicker noise superimposed to the control voltage of a VCO. In the phase noise of an oscillator we can separate the effect of high frequency noise sources, that can be described by a short-time-constant system, and the effect of low frequency noises (mostly flicker sources), described by a system with time constants much slower than the oscillation period. Flicker noise has been considered to cause a change in the circuit bias point; this bias point change can be mapped in a shift of the oscillation frequency by exploiting Barkhausen conditions (for linear oscillators) or obtaining this link by simulations. The power spectral density of the oscillator can then be obtained as the probability distribution of the oscillation frequency, starting from the flicker noise probability distribution. If the effect of high frequency noise sources is also taken into account, the overall oscillator spectrum can be obtained as a convolution of the spectrum due to flicker sources with the Lorentzian-shaped spectrum due to white noise sources, in analogy with the description of inhomogeneous broadening of laser linewidth.

  12. Seismometer Self-Noise and Measuring Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringler, Adam; R. Sleeman,; Hutt, Charles R.; Gee, Lind S.

    2014-01-01

    Seismometer self-noise is usually not considered when selecting and using seismic waveform data in scientific research as it is typically assumed that the self-noise is negligibly small compared to seismic signals. However, instrumental noise is part of the noise in any seismic record, and in particular, at frequencies below a few mHz, the instrumental noise has a frequency-dependent character and may dominate the noise. When seismic noise itself is considered as a carrier of information, as in seismic interferometry (e.g., Chaput et al. 2012), it becomes extremely important to estimate the contribution of instrumental noise to the recordings.

  13. Comparison between pulsed laser and frequency-domain photoacoustic modalities: Signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, resolution, and maximum depth detectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkari, Bahman; Mandelis, Andreas

    2011-09-01

    In this work, a detailed theoretical and experimental comparison between various key parameters of the pulsed and frequency-domain (FD) photoacoustic (PA) imaging modalities is developed. The signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of these methods are theoretically calculated in terms of transducer bandwidth, PA signal generation physics, and laser pulse or chirp parameters. Large differences between maximum (peak) SNRs were predicted. However, it is shown that in practice the SNR differences are much smaller. Typical experimental SNRs were 23.2 dB and 26.1 dB for FD-PA and time-domain (TD)-PA peak responses, respectively, from a subsurface black absorber. The SNR of the pulsed PA can be significantly improved with proper high-pass filtering of the signal, which minimizes but does not eliminate baseline oscillations. On the other hand, the SNR of the FD method can be enhanced substantially by increasing laser power and decreasing chirp duration (exposure) correspondingly, so as to remain within the maximum permissible exposure guidelines. The SNR crossover chirp duration is calculated as a function of transducer bandwidth and the conditions yielding higher SNR for the FD mode are established. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the FD axial resolution is affected by both signal amplitude and limited chirp bandwidth. The axial resolution of the pulse is, in principle, superior due to its larger bandwidth; however, the bipolar shape of the signal is a drawback in this regard. Along with the absence of baseline oscillation in cross-correlation FD-PA, the FD phase signal can be combined with the amplitude signal to yield better axial resolution than pulsed PA, and without artifacts. The contrast of both methods is compared both in depth-wise (delay-time) and fixed delay time images. It was shown that the FD method possesses higher contrast, even after contrast enhancement of the pulsed response through filtering.

  14. Effect of de-correlating turbulence on the low frequency decay of jet-surface interaction noise in sub-sonic unheated air jets using a CFD-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, M. Z.; Leib, S. J.; Bozak, R. F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we extend the Rapid-distortion theory (RDT)-based model derived by Goldstein, Afsar & Leib (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 736, pp. 532-569, 2013) for the sound generated by the interaction of a large-aspect-ratio rectangular jet with the trailing edge of a flat plate to include a more realistic upstream turbulence spectrum that possess a de-correlation (i.e. negative dip) in its space-time structure and use results from three-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solutions to determine the mean flow, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence length & time scales. Since the interaction noise dominates the low-frequency portion of the spectrum, we use an appropriate asymptotic approximation for the Rayleigh equation Green's function, which enters the analysis, based on a two-dimensional mean flow representation for the jet. We use the model to predict jet-surface interaction noise for a range of subsonic acoustic Mach number jets, nozzle aspect ratios, streamwise and transverse trailing-edge locations and compare them with experimental data. The RANS meanflow computations are also compared with flow data for selected cases to assess their validity. We find that finite de-correlation in the turbulence spectrum increases the low-frequency algebraic decay (the low-frequency "roll-off") of the acoustic spectrum with angular frequency to give a model that has a pure dipole frequency scaling. This gives better agreement with noise data compared to Goldstein et al. (2013) for Strouhal numbers less than the peak jet-surface interaction noise. For example, through sensitivity analysis we find that there is a difference of 10 dB at the lowest frequency for which data exists (relative to a model without de-correlation effects included) for the highest acoustic Mach number case. Secondly, our results for the planar flow theory provide a first estimate of the low-frequency amplification due to the jet-surface interaction for moderate aspect ratio nozzles when RANS

  15. Equivalent magnetic noise reduction at high frequency range due to polarized direction optimization in Terfenol-D/Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 magnetoelectric laminate sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cong; Ma, Jiashuai; Yao, Meng; Di, Wenning; Lin, Di; Xu, Haiqing; Wang, Wei; Luo, Haosu

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the responsivities and output voltage noise power spectral densities of magnetoelectric (ME) laminate sensors, consisting of length magnetized Terfenol-D alloys and transverse/width poled Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMNT) crystals (i.e. L-T mode and L-W mode respectively), which are directly integrated with custom-build low noise charge amplifier circuits. Both the theoretical analyses and experimental results prove that the L-W mode sensor with the optimized polarized direction of the PMNT plate possesses lower magnetic detection limit at the interested high frequency range of 10 kHz≤f≤50 kHz. The equivalent magnetic noise (EMN) of the L-W mode sensor is 0.78 pT/Hz1/2 at 30 kHz, which is about 1.7 times lower than the 1.35 pT/Hz1/2 for conventional L-T mode sensor. Furthermore, an effective method of using operational amplifiers with low equivalent input noise voltage and employing ME laminate composites with high voltage coefficient to reduce the EMNs of the ME laminate sensors at high frequency range has been established.

  16. ECG De-noising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kevin; Jensen, Søren Hjøllund; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2015-01-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) is a widely used noninvasive method to study the rhythmic activity of the heart and thereby to detect the abnormalities. However, these signals are often obscured by artifacts from various sources and minimization of these artifacts are of paramount important. This paper...... proposes two adaptive techniques, namely the EEMD-BLMS (Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition in conjunction with the Block Least Mean Square algorithm) and DWT-NN (Discrete Wavelet Transform followed by Neural Network) methods in minimizing the artifacts from recorded ECG signals, and compares...... their performance. These methods were first compared on two types of simulated noise corrupted ECG signals: Type-I (desired ECG+noise frequencies outside the ECG frequency band) and Type-II (ECG+noise frequencies both inside and outside the ECG frequency band). Subsequently, they were tested on real ECG recordings...

  17. Formation of the peak amplitude of blood flow oscillations at a frequency of 0.1 Hz in the human cardiovascular system by the noise effect on the heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinevich, Andrey A.; Tankanag, Arina V.; Chemeris, Nikolay K.

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of our previous hypothesis about the participation of structural and hydrodynamic properties of the vascular bed in the formation of the 0.1-Hz component of blood flow oscillations in the human cardiovascular system and on the basis of the reduced hydrodynamic model, the role of additive stochastic perturbations of the operation of the single-chamber pump that simulates the heart was investigated. It was shown that aperiodic noise modulation of the rigidity of the walls of the pump or its valves generates low-frequency oscillations of pressure of arterial vascular bed with the spectral components at a frequency close to 0.1 Hz.

  18. Oscillator With Low Phase Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1987-01-01

    Phase errors cancelled for high frequency stability. Radio-frequency oscillator achieves high stability of frequency through parallel, two-amplifier configuration in which effects cause phase noise tend to cancel each other. Circuit includes two amplifiers with resonating elements, each constitutes part of feedback loop of other. Generate same frequency because each circuit provides other with conditions necessary for oscillation.

  19. Psychoacoustic study on contribution of fan noise to engine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhong; Liu, Hai; Bi, Fengrong; Ni, Guangjian; Zhang, Guichang; Lin, Jiewei; Yu, Hanzhengnan

    2012-07-01

    There are more researches on engine fan noise control focusing on reducing fan noise level through optimizing fan structure, and a lot of research achievements have been obtained. However, researches on the effect of fan noise to engine noise quality are lacking. The influences of the effects of fan structure optimization on the engine noise quality are unclear. Thus, there will be a decline in fan noise level, but the deterioration of engine noise quality. Aiming at the above problems, in consideration of fan structure design and engine noise quality, an innovative method to analyze the contribution of fan noise to engine noise quality using psychoacoustic theory is proposed. The noises of diesel engine installing different cooling fans are measured by using the acoustic pressure method. The experiment results are regarded as analysis samples. The model of sensory pleasantness is used to analyze the sound quality of a diesel engine with different cooling fans. Results show that after installing 10-blade fan in medium diameter the sensory pleasantness at each test point is increased, and the increase is 13.53% on average, which indicate the improvement of the engine noise quality. In order to verify the psychoacoustical analysis, the subjective assessment is carried out. The test result shows the noise quality of engine installed 10-blade fan in medium diameter is most superior. 1/3 octave frequency spectrum analysis is used to study the reason of the improvement of engine noise quality. It is found that after installing proper cooling fan the sound pressure level below 400 Hz are obviously increased, the frequency assignment and spectral envelope are more reasonable and a proper cooling fan can optimize the spectrum structure of the engine noise. The psychoacoustic study is applied in the contribution of fan noise to engine noise, and the idea of engine sound quality improvement through the structure optimization is proposed.

  20. Noise upon the Sinusoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2005-01-01

    Sinusoids are used for making harmonic and other sounds. In order to having life in the sounds and adding a wide variety of noises, irregularities are inserted in the frequency and amplitudes. A simple and intuitive noise model is presented, consisting of a low-pass filtered noise, and having...... control for strength and bandwidth. The noise is added on the frequency and amplitudes of the sinusoids, and the resulting irregularity’s (jitter and shimmer) bandwidth is derived. This, together with an overview of investigation methods of the jitter and shimmer results in an analysis of the necessary...... samplerate of the shimmer and jitter. A harmonic model introduces individual and common irregularity, and adds a correlation control. The model has been implemented in max/msp and used in contemporary music compositions....

  1. Noise upon the sinusoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2005-01-01

    Sinusoids are used for making harmonic and other Sounds. In order to having life in the sounds and adding a wide variety of noises, irregularities are inserted in the frequency and amplitudes. A simple and intuitive noise model is presented, consisting of a low-pass filtered noise, and having...... control for strength and bandwidth. The noise is added on the frequency and amplitudes of the sinusoids, and the resulting irregularity's (jitter and shimmer) bandwidth is derived. This, together with an overview of investigation methods of the jitter and shimmer results in an analysis of the necessary...... samplerate of the shimmer and jitter. A harmonic model introduces individual and common irregularity, and adds a correlation control. The model has been implemented in max/msp and used in contemporary Music compositions....

  2. An adaptive algorithm for noise rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, D E; Knoebel, S B

    1978-01-01

    An adaptive algorithm for the rejection of noise artifact in 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiographic recordings is described. The algorithm is based on increased amplitude distortion or increased frequency of fluctuations associated with an episode of noise artifact. The results of application of the noise rejection algorithm on a high noise population of test tapes are discussed.

  3. Shot noise effect on noise source and noise parameter of 10-nm-scale quasi-ballistic n-/p-type MOS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jongwook; Kang, Myounggon

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we investigated the noise source and noise parameters of a quasi-ballistic MOSFET at the high-frequency regime. We presented the shot noise properties in the measured drain current noise and its impact on the induced gate noise and the noise parameters of 10-nm-scale n-/p-type MOS (N/PMOS) devices for the first time. The measured noise sources and noise parameters were carefully analyzed with the shot and thermal noise models in all operation regions. On the basis of the results, new noise parameter models are proposed and the noise performance improvement in the quasi-ballistic regime is shown.

  4. Signal with Flat Phase Noise Using a Carrier and the Power Spectral Density of White Noise for Phase Noise Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Ken-ichi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Ikegami, Takeshi; Iida, Hitoshi; Shimada, Yozo

    2012-01-01

    We have realized a phase noise standard of a signal with a -100 dBc/Hz flat phase noise at 10 MHz for Fourier frequencies of 1 Hz to 100 kHz, which ensures traceability to the International System of Units (SI). The flat phase noise signal is produced using a carrier combined with white noise. To ensure traceability, both the flat phase noise signal power and the power spectral density of white noise are determined with a calibrated power meter and the noise standard, respectively. The flatness of the phase noise standard is within ±0.7 dB.

  5. Development of Active Noise Control System for Quieting Transformer Noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bok Kyu; Song, Seik Young; Choi, Huo Yul [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Dae Hea; Lee, Hyuk Jae [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The passive noise control technique made use of sound-absorbing or soundproofing materials, so it required a large area and high cost for installation and had a drawback of poor performance at low frequency. Compared to this, the Active Noise Control attenuates noise sound pressure by using secondary source which has same performance ay low-frequency. Furthermore, it is able to save space and expenses. - research on adaptive algorithms - evaluation of global attenuation of the control - computer simulation - real-time Active Noise Control System Hardware Implementation - ANC system setting in the noisy area.

  6. Development of Active Noise Control System for Quieting Transformer Noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bok Kyu; Song, Seik Young; Choi, Huo Yul [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Dae Hea; Lee, Hyuk Jae [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The passive noise control technique made use of sound-absorbing or soundproofing materials, so it required a large area and high cost for installation and had a drawback of poor performance at low frequency. Compared to this, the Active Noise Control attenuates noise sound pressure by using secondary source which has same performance ay low-frequency. Furthermore, it is able to save space and expenses. - research on adaptive algorithms - evaluation of global attenuation of the control - computer simulation - real-time Active Noise Control System Hardware Implementation - ANC system setting in the noisy area.

  7. Speech perception of noise with binary gains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, DeLiang; Kjems, Ulrik; Pedersen, Michael Syskind

    2008-01-01

    For a given mixture of speech and noise, an ideal binary time-frequency mask is constructed by comparing speech energy and noise energy within local time-frequency units. It is observed that listeners achieve nearly perfect speech recognition from gated noise with binary gains prescribed...

  8. 一种低相位噪声频标分配放大器的设计实现%Design and Implementation of a Low Phase Noise Frequency Reference Distribution Amplifier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕桂华; 周耀华; 李和战; 周超英

    2012-01-01

    Most frequency reference distribution amplification products in the domestic market don't meet requirements of the space TT& C systems on low phase noise specifications. This paper presents design of a low phase noise frequency reference distribution amplifier based on a two-level amplifier circuit structure using MAX4104 as a low phase noise gain amplifier and using LMH6609 as a strong driver distribution amplifier. In addition, advanced PCB design technology and effective noise suppression measures are used to get low phase noise frequency output from the distribution amplifier. Finally, validation of the design is given. Products of the design have already been successfully used in the frequency and time subsystems of satellite ground control systems and engineering applications show that the design meets the requirements of space TT& C systems and weaponry test systems.%随着测控试验系统对低相位噪声频标指标要求的不断提高,国内市场上的绝大部分相关产品已无法满足要求.本文给出一种低相位噪声频标分配放大器的设计实例,实例采用基于MAX4104增益放大和LMH6609分配放大的2级放大电路结构,充分利用MAX4104的低相位噪声放大特性和LMH6609的大电流驱动分配特性,同时采用先进的PCB(印制电路板)设计技术和有效的电路噪声抑制手段,实现了频标的低相位噪声分配放大输出.最后对实例设计进行了验证分析.本设计相关产品已广泛应用于卫星地面测控系统的时频分系统中,实践证明设计指标满足航天测控和武器试验用户的要求.

  9. Quantum noise in superluminescent diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuvek, A.M.; Taylor, H.F.; Goldberg, L.; Weller, J.F.; Dandridge, A.

    1986-04-01

    Intensity noise in a superluminescent diode (SLD) has been studied over the frequency range from 100 Hz to 2 MHz. The ''1/F'' noise which dominates at low frequencies (<59 kHz) is superceded by a flat ''white noise'' spectrum at higher frequencies (> 500 5Hz). A more extensive investigation has been carried out in this higher frequency regime, where the intensity noise is assumed to result from quantum fluctuation effects. For a given SLD driving current, the excess noise power is found to be a linear function of photodetector current to the maximum observed level of 12 db. These results agree well with the behavior predicted by a quantum amplifier model for the SLD.

  10. A measurement based model of HEMT teking into account the non linear, non uniform transmission line nature of the channel its associated low frequency noise sources

    OpenAIRE

    Laloue, A.; Camiade, M.; Valenza, M; Vildeuil, J.C.; Nallatamby, J. C.; Prigent, M.; Obregon, J.; Quéré, R.

    2000-01-01

    For the first time, a fully measurement based extraction procedure of non linear and non uniform transmission line model of FET devices is proposed. This model describes accurately the distributed nature under the device gate which allows a good distortion prediction (IM3) and promises good perspectives for simulation of noise characteristics in non linear circuits.

  11. Analysis of mode-hopping effect in Fabry–Pérot multiple-quantum well laser diodes via low frequency noise investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pralgauskaitė, Sandra; Palenskis, Vilius; Matukas, Jonas;

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive investigation of noise characteristics and radiation spectrum with special attention to the mode-hopping effect of Fabry–Pérot (FP) multiple quantum well laser diodes (LDs) have been carried out: laser radiation spectra, optical and electrical fluctuations and cross-correlation factor...

  12. 频率域奇异值分解压制随机噪声方法%Seismic Random Noise Suppression by Using Frequency-domain Singular Value Decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍伟; 马继涛

    2013-01-01

    奇异值分解(SVD)是提高信噪比的一种较新的有效手段之一.本文从数学角度阐述了奇异值分解SVD滤波技术增强地震资料信噪比的原理,对比了时间域和频率域SVD技术压制随机噪声的处理效果.结果表明,时间域SVD技术只能对水平或接近水平的同相轴进行信号增强,对倾斜同相轴的处理效果较差;而频率域SVD技术既可以处理水平同相轴,也可以处理倾斜同相轴,对提高地震剖面信噪比具有很好的效果.本文用3个简单的合成地震记录和1个实际地震资料检验了SVD两种方法的应用效果.结果表明,本文方法可以达到随机噪声压制的效果.%Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) is a new and effective method for random noise suppression.The principle of the SVD filtering technique,which enhances the signal to noise ratio of seismic data,is illustrated.Then,by applying time-domain and frequency-domain SVD techniques to suppress random noise generated from a variety of seismic model data,their processing results are compared with each other.The results indicate that the time-domain SVD technique is only able to enhance fiat or near flat events.When encountering dip events,it is less effective.However,the frequency-domain SVD technique is able to enhance both flat and dip events,and improve the signal to noise ratio of seismic profile.Three simple synthetic seismograms and one real seismic data are used,and the practical effects of these two SVD methods are verified.The results show that the frequency-domain SVD is effective for suppressing the random noise.

  13. 非理想NNC-DFH接收机抗部分频带干扰性能分析%Performance analysis of non-ideal noise-normalization combining differential frequency hopping receiver in partial-band jamming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈晓旭; 娄景艺; 高俊

    2012-01-01

    为改善差分跳频系统的抗部分频带干扰性能,提出一种噪声归一化合并差分跳频接收机模型.采用矩生成函数法推导了非理想噪声功率估计条件下系统误符号率的联合上界.将信道建模为瑞利衰落信道,同时考虑了加性背景热噪声的影响.数值和仿真结果验证了理论分析的正确性.研究结果表明:在噪声估计不存在严重偏差时(估计误差因子满足0.1<λ<3.0),噪声归一化合并差分跳频接收机在最坏部分频带干扰下的性能优于乘积合并和线性合并差分跳频接收机,且当噪声估计值略低于理想估计值时(0.2<λ<0.6),系统误符号性能优于理想噪声估计条件下的误符号性能.%A differential frequency hopping (DFH) receiver utilizing noise-normalization combining (NNC) was proposed to improve its performance of rejecting partial-band noise jamming (PBNJ). Symbol error rate (SER) upper bound of this receiver under PBNJ was analyzed using moment generating function method with non-ideal noise power estimation considered. DFH signal was assumed Rayleigh faded and corrupted by additive background thermal noise. The theoretical analysis was validated by the numerical and simulation results. It is shown that when the noise power estimation error is not great ( 0. 1 <λ A < 3. 0 , λis the estimation error factor) , NNC-DFH receiver is superior to the product combining DFH receiver and the linear combing DFH receiver when they are jammed by the worst-case PBNJ. System with noise power a little lower estimated (0. 2 < λ < 0. 6) outperforms that with ideal noise power estimation.

  14. Noise Effects in the Mode-Locked External Cavity Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nuran Dogru; M. Sadettin Ozyazici

    2003-01-01

    Effect of high level of spontaneous and carrier noise on mode-locked hybrid soliton pulse source and relative intensity noise is described. Transform limited pulses are not generated over a wide frequency range because of these noises.

  15. Noise Effects on Synchronized Globally Coupled Oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Moro, Esteban; Sánchez, Angel

    1998-01-01

    The synchronized phase of globally coupled identical nonlinear oscillators subject to noise fluctuations is studied by means of a new analytical approach able to tackle general couplings, nonlinearities, and noise temporal correlations. Our results show that the interplay between coupling and noise modi es the e ective frequency of the system in a nontrivial way. Whereas for linear couplings the e ect of noise is always to increase the e ective frequency, for nonlinear coupling...

  16. Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR Enhancement Comparison of Impulse-, Coding- and Novel Linear-Frequency-Chirp-Based Optical Time Domain Reflectometry (OTDR for Passive Optical Network (PON Monitoring Based on Unique Combinations of Wavelength Selective Mirrors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Bentz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We compare optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR techniques based on conventional single impulse, coding and linear frequency chirps concerning their signal to noise ratio (SNR enhancements by measurements in a passive optical network (PON with a maximum one-way attenuation of 36.6 dB. A total of six subscribers, each represented by a unique mirror pair with narrow reflection bandwidths, are installed within a distance of 14 m. The spatial resolution of the OTDR set-up is 3.0 m.

  17. Ambiguity functions and noise floor suppression in random noise radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Sune R. J.

    2006-09-01

    Noise radar can be used in a great number of applications including SAR. The non-periodic waveform suppresses the range ambiguity and reduces the probability of intercept and interference. Due to the randomness of the waveform, a noise floor limiting the possible side lobe suppression accompanies the correlation integral involved. In strong clutter scenes with dominant reflectors, the induced noise floor can be too high and further suppression is needed. In this paper, the ambiguity function of random noise waveforms is first analyzed, and an improved formulation is introduced to include the noise floor effect. The use of mismatched filtering for improved sidelobe suppression is then discussed. Finally, an iterative subtraction algorithm is analyzed for noise floor cancellation in the presence of dominating reflectors. This method is successfully tested on random step frequency radar data and noise sodar data.

  18. Development of a noise metric for assessment of exposure risk to complex noises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiangdong; Kim, Jay H; Song, Won Joon; Murphy, William J; Song, Seongho

    2009-08-01

    Many noise guidelines currently use A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level L(Aeq) as the noise metric and the equal energy hypothesis to assess the risk of occupational noises. Because of the time-averaging effect involved with the procedure, the current guidelines may significantly underestimate the risk associated with complex noises. This study develops and evaluates several new noise metrics for more accurate assessment of exposure risks to complex and impulsive noises. The analytic wavelet transform was used to obtain time-frequency characteristics of the noise. 6 basic, unique metric forms that reflect the time-frequency characteristics were developed, from which 14 noise metrics were derived. The noise metrics were evaluated utilizing existing animal test data that were obtained by exposing 23 groups of chinchillas to, respectively, different types of noise. Correlations of the metrics with the hearing losses observed in chinchillas were compared and the most promising noise metric was identified.

  19. 小波包消噪在Compass电离层三频二阶改正中的应用%APPLICATION OF WAVELET PACKAGE DE-NOISING IN COMPASS TRIPLE-FREQUENCY OF TWO ORDER IONOSPHERIC CORRECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄令勇; 宋力杰; 王琰; 任雅奇; 刘毅锟; 宁德阳

    2012-01-01

    针对Compass电离层二阶改正存在的问题,提出利用小波包分析算法对观测值进行消噪,再进行三频二阶改正的方法.利用Compass仿真数据的试验表明,小波消噪算法能够大大削弱观测噪声,有利于提高Compass三频二阶改正的精度,增强其可行性和有效性.%For taking the problem in Compass two order ionospheric correction, the algorithm of wavelet package de-noising is used to weaken the noises before ionospheric delay correction. Finally, the experiment is made by Compass emulational data and the results show that wavelet packet de-noising method can decrease the observation errors and enhance the feasibility and validity of triple-frequency of two order correction greatly.

  20. Theory on plate-silencer with low frequency and broadband hydrodynamic noise attenuation characteristics%低频宽带板式水动力噪声消声器理论

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何涛; 李东升; 孙玉东; 俞孟萨

    2014-01-01

    Hydrodynamic noise transmits along the pipeline and radiates to the sea. The design of function-al fluid pipeline silencer is desiderated. In this paper, the model is a rectangular duct with a rectangular cavity which is partitioned by a rectangular plate. Theory on plate-silencer with low frequency and broad-band hydrodynamic noise attenuation characteristics is established by using Green function and mode method. The vibration of plate is solved considering fluid loading of cavity and duct sound medium on both sides. The results indicate that the plate silencer has low frequency and broadband attenuating characteris-tics of hydrodynamic noise. The noise attenuating mechanism is analyzed and the effect of damping on noise attenuating characteristic is investigated. The established theory and parameter research can provide a basis of design.%水动力噪声沿通海管路系统经通海口直接向舰船外辐射噪声,降低舰船隐身性能。如何设计有效的管路消声器以降低舷外辐射噪声成为亟待解决的问题。文章以弹性板间隔的矩形截面通流管路与矩形背腔为几何模型,基于格林函数法和模态理论,求解包含背腔和主管声介质影响的弹性板耦合振动方程,建立了弹性板式水动力噪声消声器理论。计算结果显示,弹性板式水动力噪声消声器具有低频宽带消声性能。计算分析了消声机理以及阻尼对消声性能的影响。该文的工作为低频宽带水动力消声器原理样机的设计提供了理论依据。

  1. Ambient noise near the sea-route

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Ambient noise data measured in an experiment conducted in shallow water near a sea-route were analyzed. It was observed that, at low frequency, the horizontal correlation has an obvious difference from that predicted by the classical ambient noise model. The theoretical analyses show that this phenomenon is caused by wind noise together with the discrete shipping noise nearby. An ambient noise model was proposed to include the effects caused by both the noise sources. Data measured at different times verify that the proposed model can be used to forecast the ambient noise field in shallow water near the sea-route.

  2. Ambient noise near the sea-route

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Li; LI ZhengLin; PENG ZhaoHui

    2009-01-01

    Ambient noise data measured in an experiment conducted in shallow water near a sea-route were analyzed. It was observed that, at low frequency, the horizontal correlation has an obvious difference from that predicted by the classical ambient noise model. The theoretical analyses show that this phenomenon is caused by wind noise together with the discrete shipping noise nearby. An ambient noise model was proposed to include the effects caused by both the noise sources. Data measured at different times verify that the proposed model can be used to forecast the ambient noise field in shal-low water near the sea-route.

  3. Analysis of low-frequency noise in the amorphous indium zinc oxide thin film transistors%非晶铟锌氧化物薄膜晶体管的低频噪声特性与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘远; 吴为敬; 李斌; 恩云飞; 王磊; 刘玉荣

    2014-01-01

    本文针对底栅结构非晶铟锌氧化物薄膜晶体管的低频噪声特性开展实验与理论研究.由实验结果可知:受铟锌氧化物与二氧化硅界面处缺陷态俘获与释放载流子效应的影响,器件沟道电流噪声功率谱密度随频率的变化遵循1/fγ(γ≈0.75)的变化规律;此外,器件沟道电流归一化噪声功率谱密度随沟道长度与沟道宽度的增加而减小,证明器件低频噪声来源于沟道的闪烁噪声,可忽略源漏结接触及寄生电阻对器件低频噪声的影响.最后,基于载流子数涨落及迁移率涨落模型,提取γ因子与平均Hooge因子,为评价材料及器件特性奠定基础.%Properties of low-frequency noise in the amorphous InZnO thin film transistors have been investigated in this paper. Due to the emission and trapping processes of carriers between trapping states located in the interface between the IZO layer and gate insulator, the drain current spectral density shows a 1/fγ(γ = 0.75) low-frequency noise behavior. In addition, the normalized drain current spectral density is decreased linearly with the increase of gate length and width. This property confirms that the low-frequency noise in the IZO TFTs is due to the flicker noise in the channel, the contribution of source/drain contact and parasitic resistances can be ignored. Finally, based on the number fluctuation theory and the mobility fluctuation theory, the γ and average Hooge’s parameters have been extracted to estimate the quality of devices and materials.

  4. Occupational noise in printing companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Grujic, Selena D; Kiurski, Jelena; Krstic, Jelena; Oros, Ivana; Kovacevic, Ilija

    2011-10-01

    The extent of noise in five printing companies in Novi Sad, Serbia, was determined using TES-1358A Sound Analyzer with RS-232 Interface. The data on equivalent A-level (dBA), as well as, maximum and minimum sound pressure levels were collected. It was found that folders and offset printing units are the predominant noise sources, with the average L (eq) levels of 87.66 and 82.7 dBA, respectively. Forty percent of the machines produced noise levels above the limiting threshold level of 85 dBA, allowed by law. The noise in all printing companies was dominated by higher frequency noise, and the maximum level mostly appeared at 4,000 Hz. For offset printing machines and folders, the means of L (eq) levels exceeded the permissible levels given by NR-80 curve at higher frequencies. There are no published studies of occupational noise and hearing impairment of workers exposed to hazardous noise in printing industry in Serbia. More extensive studies are needed to determine the exact impact of noise on the workers. Technical and organizational measures in order to control noise and prevent noise exposure, and general hearing conservation program to protect workers, should be introduced in printing industry.

  5. Frequencies Estimation of Sinusoidal Embedded in Colored Noises via Cross-High-Order Cumulant LS Method%色噪声背景下正弦频率估计的互高阶谱LS方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马彦; 石要武; 戴逸松

    2001-01-01

    Harmonic retrieval problem considered here concerns with the estimation of the sinusoidal frequencies in hybrid col-red noises. It is applied to the cross-spectral theory and high-order self-spectral theory now. In this paper, Yule-Walker equation based on cross-fourth-order cumulant is developed first. And least square(LS) modified Yule-Walker (LS-Yule-Walker) method is also provided. Simulation results show that the method is effective to estimation sinusoid signal frequencies from hybrid colored noises and has good performance.%在互功率谱估计方法和高阶统计量理论相结合的基础上,提出了现代互高阶谱估计理论。首先推导并建立了基于互四阶累积量的Yule-Walker方程,并在此基础上提出了互四阶累积量的最小二乘(LS)修正Yule-Walker方程方法。仿真结果表明,在混合色噪声背景下,在信噪比达到-5dB的情况下,该方法仍能有效地抑制相关的和不相关的色噪声,具有良好的频率估计性能。

  6. 舰船通海管路低频消声技术的研究进展%Research progress of low frequency noise attenuation techniques for sea-connected pipes in naval vessel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴俊; 苏胜利

    2016-01-01

    The application environment of hydrodynamic and low frequency noise attenuation techniques in naval vessel is analyzed at first in this paper, which points out the characteristics of sound propagation and excitation, requirements of safety and size in sea water piping system. Then, hydrodynamic and low frequency noise attenuation techniques, including traditional reactive silencer, gasbag silencer, elastic plate silencer and ANC, are analyzed in detail. The advantage and disadvantage of all kinds of these techniques is presented in this paper, which indicates the work to be carried out in the future.%分析水管路低频消声技术的实船应用环境,指出通海管路在声传播、空间布置等方面存在的特点以及安全性、空间布置等方面的要求。在此基础上,将通海管路低频消声技术分为传统抗性消声技术、气囊式消声技术、水动力弹性板式消声技术以及主动消声技术等4个方面,结合实船环境,详细分析各项技术的优缺点,指出下一步应继续开展的工作。

  7. Analysis of MPN, MHN and Phase Noise of a Two-Mode Semiconductor Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ebrahim Mortazy; Vahid Ahmadi; Mohammad Kazem Moravvej-Farshi; Abbas Zarifkar

    2003-01-01

    Intensity noise including Mode Partition Noise (MPN) and Mode Hopping Noise (MHN), and Phase/Frequency Noise Spectrum (FNS) are calculated for a two-mode semiconductor laser. RIN is derived considering of MPN and MHN effect.

  8. Noise mapping inside a car cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kim; Sjøj, Sidsel Marie Nørholm; Jacobsen, Finn

    The mapping of noise is of considerable interest in the car industry where a good noise mapping can make it much easier to identify the sources that generate the noise and eventually reduce the individual contributions to the noise. The methods used for this purpose include delay-and-sum beamform......The mapping of noise is of considerable interest in the car industry where a good noise mapping can make it much easier to identify the sources that generate the noise and eventually reduce the individual contributions to the noise. The methods used for this purpose include delay......-and-sum beamforming and spherical harmonics beamforming. These methods have a poor spatial esolution at low frequencies, and since much noise generated in cars is dominated by low frequencies the methods are not optimal. In the present paper the mapping is done by solving an inverse problem with a transfer matrix...

  9. On the influence of freight trains on humans: a laboratory investigation of the impact of nocturnal low frequency vibration and noise on sleep and heart rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A substantial increase in transportation of goods on railway may be hindered by public fear of increased vibration and noise leading to annoyance and sleep disturbance. As the majority of freight trains run during night time, the impact upon sleep is expected to be the most serious adverse effect. The impact of nocturnal vibration on sleep is an area currently lacking in knowledge. We experimentally investigated sleep disturbance with the aim to ascertain the impact of increasing vibration amplitude. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The impacts of various amplitudes of horizontal vibrations on sleep disturbance and heart rate were investigated in a laboratory study. Cardiac accelerations were assessed using a combination of polysomnography and ECG recordings. Sleep was assessed subjectively using questionnaires. Twelve young, healthy subjects slept for six nights in the sleep laboratory, with one habituation night, one control night and four nights with a variation of vibration exposures whilst maintaining the same noise exposure. With increasing vibration amplitude, we found a decrease in latency and increase in amplitude of heart rate as well as a reduction in sleep quality and increase in sleep disturbance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We concluded that nocturnal vibration has a negative impact on sleep and that the impact increases with greater vibration amplitude. Sleep disturbance has short- and long-term health consequences. Therefore, it is necessary to define levels that protect residents against sleep disruptive vibrations that may arise from night time railway freight traffic.

  10. Active Noise Control of Radiated Noise from Jets Originating NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Michael J.; Fuller, Christopher R.; Schiller, Noah H.; Turner, Travis L.

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of jet noise using a closed-loop active noise control system with highbandwidth active chevrons was investigated. The high frequency energy introduced by piezoelectrically-driven chevrons was demonstrated to achieve a broadband reduction of jet noise, presumably due to the suppression of large-scale turbulence. For a nozzle with one active chevron, benefits of up to 0.8 dB overall sound pressure level (OASPL) were observed compared to a static chevron nozzle near the maximum noise emission angle, and benefits of up to 1.9 dB OASPL were observed compared to a baseline nozzle with no chevrons. The closed-loop actuation system was able to effectively reduce noise at select frequencies by 1-3 dB. However, integrated OASPL did not indicate further reduction beyond the open-loop benefits, most likely due to the preliminary controller design, which was focused on narrowband performance.

  11. The subjective importance of noise spectral content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Donald; Phillips, Jonathan; Denman, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents secondary Standard Quality Scale (SQS2) rankings in overall quality JNDs for a subjective analysis of the 3 axes of noise, amplitude, spectral content, and noise type, based on the ISO 20462 softcopy ruler protocol. For the initial pilot study, a Python noise simulation model was created to generate the matrix of noise masks for the softcopy ruler base images with different levels of noise, different low pass filter noise bandwidths and different band pass filter center frequencies, and 3 different types of noise: luma only, chroma only, and luma and chroma combined. Based on the lessons learned, the full subjective experiment, involving 27 observers from Google, NVIDIA and STMicroelectronics was modified to incorporate a wider set of base image scenes, and the removal of band pass filtered noise masks to ease observer fatigue. Good correlation was observed with the Aptina subjective noise study. The absence of tone mapping in the noise simulation model visibly reduced the contrast at high levels of noise, due to the clipping of the high levels of noise near black and white. Under the 34-inch viewing distance, no significant difference was found between the luma only noise masks and the combined luma and chroma noise masks. This was not the intuitive expectation. Two of the base images with large uniform areas, `restaurant' and `no parking', were found to be consistently more sensitive to noise than the texture rich scenes. Two key conclusions are (1) there are fundamentally different sensitivities to noise on a flat patch versus noise in real images and (2) magnification of an image accentuates visual noise in a way that is non-representative of typical noise reduction algorithms generating the same output frequency. Analysis of our experimental noise masks applied to a synthetic Macbeth ColorChecker Chart confirmed the color-dependent nature of the visibility of luma and chroma noise.

  12. Audiometria de altas frequências em bombeiros militares com audiometria normal expostos ao ruído High-frequency audiometry in normal hearing military firemen exposed to noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Leniza Oliveira da Rocha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O estudo das altas frequências vem demonstrando sua importância para detecção de danos na orelha interna. Em alguns casos, as frequências convencionais não são sensíveis a alterações da orelha interna em seu estágio inicial. OBJETIVO: Analisar os resultados dos limiares das altas frequências de indivíduos expostos ao ruído com audiometria convencional normal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foi realizado um estudo de coorte transversal retrospectivo com 47 combatentes do Corpo de Bombeiros do Rio de Janeiro alocados no aeroporto Santos Dumont e 33 militares sem exposição ao ruído. Os grupos foram divididos em duas faixas etárias: 30-39 anos e 40-49 anos. Imediatamente após a audiometria tonal e vocal eram testadas as altas frequências. RESULTADOS: Os resultados mais significativos ocorreram na faixa de 40 a 49 anos, onde o grupo experimental apresentou limiar significativamente maior que o grupo controle 14000Hz (p = 0,008 e 16000Hz (p = 0,0001. CONCLUSÕES: Concluiu-se que o ruído interferiu nos limiares das altas frequências, onde todas as médias encontradas no grupo experimental foram maiores do que as do grupo controle. Sugeriu-se que esses dados reforçariam a importância da pesquisa das altas frequências, mesmo com a audiometria convencional normal, no diagnóstico precoce da perda auditiva induzida pela exposição ao ruído.The study of high frequencies has proven its importance for detecting inner ear damage. In some cases, conventional frequencies are not sensitive enough to pick up early changes to the inner ear. AIM: To analyze the results of threshold high frequency analysis of individuals exposed to noise with normal conventional audiometry. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a retrospective cross-sectional cohort study, in which we studied 47 firefighters of the Fire Department of Rio de Janeiro, based on Santos Dumont airport and 33 military men without noise exposure. They were broken down into two age groups: 30

  13. Audiovisual Perception of Noise Vocoded Speech in Dyslexic and Non-Dyslexic Adults: The Role of Low-Frequency Visual Modulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megnin-Viggars, Odette; Goswami, Usha

    2013-01-01

    Visual speech inputs can enhance auditory speech information, particularly in noisy or degraded conditions. The natural statistics of audiovisual speech highlight the temporal correspondence between visual and auditory prosody, with lip, jaw, cheek and head movements conveying information about the speech envelope. Low-frequency spatial and…

  14. Audiovisual Perception of Noise Vocoded Speech in Dyslexic and Non-Dyslexic Adults: The Role of Low-Frequency Visual Modulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megnin-Viggars, Odette; Goswami, Usha

    2013-01-01

    Visual speech inputs can enhance auditory speech information, particularly in noisy or degraded conditions. The natural statistics of audiovisual speech highlight the temporal correspondence between visual and auditory prosody, with lip, jaw, cheek and head movements conveying information about the speech envelope. Low-frequency spatial and…

  15. Phase Noise Influence in Optical OFDM Systems employing RF Pilot Tone for Phase Noise Cancellation

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobsen, Gunnar; Kazovsky, Leonid G.; Xu, TianHua; Popov, Sergei; Li, Jie; Zhang, Yimo; Friberg, Ari T.

    2016-01-01

    For coherent and direct-detection Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexed (OFDM) systems employing radio frequency (RF) pilot tone phase noise cancellation the influence of laser phase noise is evaluated. Novel analytical results for the common phase error and for the (modulation dependent) inter carrier interference are evaluated based upon Gaussian statistics for the laser phase noise. In the evaluation it is accounted for that the laser phase noise is filtered in the correlation signal d...

  16. Radio Astronomy Explorer /RAE/. I - Observations of terrestrial radio noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, J. R.; Caruso, J. A.; Stone, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) I data are analyzed to establish characteristics of HF terrestrial radio noise at an altitude of about 6000 km. Time and frequency variations in amplitude of the observed noise well above cosmic noise background are explained on the basis of temporal and spatial variations in ionospheric critical frequency coupled with those in noise source distributions. It is shown that terrestrial radio noise regularly breaks through the ionosphere and reaches RAE with magnitudes 15 dB and more above cosmic noise background, on frequencies above the F-layer critical frequency.

  17. I-DLTS, Electrical Lag and Low Frequency Noise measurements of Trapping effects in AlGaN/GaN HEMT for reliability studies

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    International audience; GaN technologies have penetrated the microelectronic markets, proving the high potential of this technology for a wide variety of applications (optoLEDs and Laser, power and RF electronics). However, robustness of these widebandgap technologies still needs to be improved: a large number of studies have addressed the main different roots provoking degradation of RF, DC or thermal performances of transistors dedicated to high frequency applications. However, experiencing...

  18. Noise Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Clean Air Act Overview Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Clean Air Act Title IV - ... noises in the community (from your neighbor, boom cars, lawn equipment, etc.) and from commercial businesses (factory, ...

  19. 机场周边环境噪声验收监测频次探究%Investigation on the Acceptance Monitoring Frequency of Environmental Noise in Airport Surrounding Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田志仁; 林峰; 尤洋; 李宁; 齐文启; 李曼; 邱立莉

    2016-01-01

    Based on calculation and analysis of noise measurement results ,this paper compared the average weighted equivalent con -tinuous perceived noise level at noise sensitive sites around three different types of airports during one day and night ,two consecutive days and nights,and seven consecutive days and nights .It was found that the biggest difference of the sound level between one day and night and seven consecutive days and nights was less than 2.2 dB for the same monitoring target,and less than 1.8 dB between two and seven consecutive days and nights .There was no significant difference of the monitoring results among the three monitoring frequencies for the same monitoring target .%通过比较3个不同类型机场周边敏感点噪声连续1昼夜、连续2昼夜与连续7昼夜平均计权等效连续感觉声级值之间的差异发现,对于同一监测目标,连续1昼夜与连续7昼夜声级值差异不超过2.2 dB,连续2昼夜与连续7昼夜声级值差异不超过1.8 dB,连续1昼夜或2昼夜与连续7昼夜的噪声监测结果差别不大。

  20. Comparison of Ising spin glass noise to flux and inductance noise in SQUIDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Yu, Clare C

    2010-06-18

    Recent experiments implicate spins on the surface of metals as the source of flux and inductance noise in SQUIDs. We present Monte Carlo simulations of 2D and 3D Ising spin glasses that produce magnetization noise S(M) consistent with flux noise. At low frequencies S(M) is a maximum at the critical temperature T(C) in three dimensions, implying that flux noise should be a maximum at T(C). The second spectra of the magnetization noise and the noise in the susceptibility are consistent with experimentally measured SQUID inductance noise.