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Sample records for freeze substitution fixation-based

  1. Freeze substitution in 3 hours or less.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, K L; Webb, R I

    2011-09-01

    Freeze substitution is a process for low temperature dehydration and fixation of rapidly frozen cells that usually takes days to complete. New methods for freeze substitution have been developed that require only basic laboratory tools: a platform shaker, liquid nitrogen, a metal block with holes for cryotubes and an insulated container such as an ice bucket. With this equipment, excellent freeze substitution results can be obtained in as little as 90 min for cells of small volume such as bacteria and tissue culture cells. For cells of greater volume or that have significant diffusion barriers such as cuticles or thick cell walls, one can extend the time to 3 h or more with dry ice. The 3-h method works well for all manner of specimens, including plants and Caenorhabditis elegans as well as smaller samples. Here, we present the basics of the techniques and some results from Nicotiana leaves, C. elegans adult worms, Escherichia coli and baby hamster kidney tissue culture cells.

  2. High pressure freezing/freeze substitution fixation improves the ultrastructural assessment of Wolbachia endosymbiont-filarial nematode host interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Fischer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wolbachia α-proteobacteria are essential for growth, reproduction and survival for many filarial nematode parasites of medical and veterinary importance. Endobacteria were discovered in filarial parasites by transmission electron microscopy in the 1970's using chemically fixed specimens. Despite improvements of fixation and electron microscopy techniques during the last decades, methods to study the Wolbachia/filaria interaction on the ultrastructural level remained unchanged and the mechanisms for exchange of materials and for motility of endobacteria are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We used high pressure freezing/freeze substitution to improve fixation of Brugia malayi and its endosymbiont, and this led to improved visualization of different morphological forms of Wolbachia. The three concentric, bilayer membranes that surround the endobacterial cytoplasm were well preserved. Vesicles with identical membrane structures were identified close to the endobacteria, and multiple bacteria were sometimes enclosed within a single outer membrane. Immunogold electron microscopy using a monoclonal antibody directed against Wolbachia surface protein-1 labeled the membranes that enclose Wolbachia and Wolbachia-associated vesicles. High densities of Wolbachia were observed in the lateral chords of L4 larvae, immature, and mature adult worms. Extracellular Wolbachia were sometimes present in the pseudocoelomic cavity near the developing female reproductive organs. Wolbachia-associated actin tails were not observed. Wolbachia motility may be explained by their residence within vacuoles, as they may co-opt the host cell's secretory pathway to move within and between cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: High pressure freezing/freeze substitution significantly improved the preservation of filarial tissues for electron microscopy to reveal membranes and sub cellular structures that could be crucial for exchange of materials between Wolbachia

  3. Of plants and other pets: practical aspects of freeze-substitution and resin embedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, M W

    2003-10-01

    Representative tissues from higher plants (e.g. developing pollen, somatic anther tissues from the monocotyledonous angiosperm Ledebouria) and mammalian cell cultures were successfully cryoimmobilized by means of high-pressure freezing. Various substitution and embedding protocols were then evaluated considering the preservation of ultrastructural details, membrane staining, immunolabelling properties, as well as reproducibility and ease of use. Two types of recipe proved to be highly suitable for most applications, regardless of type, developmental stage or physiological conditions of the cells: (i) the best choice for morphology is still osmium in acetone (optionally supplemented with uranyl acetate) followed by embedding in Epon and/or Araldite; (ii) feasible approaches for immunocytochemistry are freeze-substitution with ethanol containing uranyl acetate and formaldehyde, or with pure acetone (in the case of fixation-sensitive antigens), followed by embedding with LR-white acrylic resin; though being far from optimal, these combinations represent, in my opinion, an acceptable compromise between labelling intensity, section stability, structural preservation and health hazards. Notably, the patterns observed in Ledebouria were consistent with data obtained from a broad range of other specimens from all kingdoms (e.g. leaves and callus cultures from angiosperms, gymnosperm roots with their ectomycorrhizal fungi, mammalian cell cultures and eubacteria). Finally, a warning is given as to the extractive potentials of embedding resins (Spurr's mixture, LR-white, but also Epon) being sometimes the cause of unacceptable artefacts, both in plant and in mammalian cells prepared by cryoimmobilization and freeze-substitution.

  4. Influence of waxy rice flour substitution for wheat flour on characteristics of batter and freeze-thawed cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongsutjarittam, Nisachon; Charoenrein, Sanguansri

    2013-09-12

    This study aimed to improve the freeze-thawed cake properties by10-20% waxy rice flour (WRF) substitution for wheat flour (WF). Viscosity of WRF-substituted batters was lower; consequently, trapped air was less uniformly distributed than WF batter. After five freeze-thaw cycles, firmness and enthalpy of melting retrograded amylopectin of WF- and WRF-substituted cakes increased and the matrix surrounding the air pores from SEM images was denser than in fresh-baked cakes. Sensory evaluation showed an increase in firmness and a decrease in firmness acceptability of freeze-thawed cakes. However, freeze-thawed cake with WRF substitution had significantly less firmness, less dense matrix and more acceptability than WF cake. This could have been due to a low amylose content of WRF and the spread of ruptured waxy rice starch granules around swollen wheat starch granules as observed by CLSM. Thus, WRF could be used for WF substitution to improve the firmness in freeze-thawed cake. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigations of the effect of nonmagnetic Ca substitution for magnetic Dy on spin-freezing in Dy₂Ti₂O₇.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, V K; Tennant, D A; Lake, B

    2015-11-01

    Physical properties of partially Ca substituted hole-doped Dy2Ti2O7 have been investigated by ac magnetic susceptibility χ(ac)(T), dc magnetic susceptibility χ(T), isothermal magnetization M(H) and heat capacity C(p)(T) measurements on Dy1.8Ca0.2Ti2O7. The spin-ice system Dy2Ti2O7 exhibits a spin-glass type freezing behavior near 16 K. Our frequency dependent χ(ac)(T) data of Dy1.8Ca0.2Ti2O7 show that the spin-freezing behavior is significantly influenced by Ca substitution. The effect of partial nonmagnetic Ca(2+) substitution for magnetic Dy(3+) is similar to the previous study on nonmagnetic isovalent Y(3+) substituted Dy(2-x)Y(x) Ti2O7 (for low levels of dilution), however the suppression of spin-freezing behavior is substantially stronger for Ca than Y. The Cole-Cole plot analysis reveals semicircular character and a single relaxation mode in Dy1.8Ca0.2Ti2O7 as for Dy2Ti2O7. No noticeable change in the insulating behavior of Dy2Ti2O7 results from the holes produced by 10% Ca(2+) substitution for Dy(3+) ions.

  6. The Combination of Chemical Fixation Procedures with High Pressure Freezing and Freeze Substitution Preserves Highly Labile Tissue Ultrastructure for Electron Tomography Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosinsky, Gina E.; Crum, John; Jones, Ying Z.; Lanman, Jason; Smarr, Benjamin; Terada, Masako; Martone, Maryann E.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Johnson, John E.; Ellisman, Mark H.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of electron tomography as a tool for three dimensional structure determination of cells and tissues has brought its own challenges for the preparation of thick sections. High pressure freezing in combination with freeze substitution provides the best method for obtaining the largest volume of well-preserved tissue. However, for deeply embedded, heterogeneous, labile tissues needing careful dissection, such as brain, the damage due to anoxia and excision before cryofixation is significant. We previously demonstrated that chemical fixation prior to high pressure freezing preserves fragile tissues and produces superior tomographic reconstructions compared to equivalent tissue preserved by chemical fixation alone. Here, we provide further characterization of the technique, comparing the ultrastructure of Flock House Virus infected DL1 insect cells that were 1) high pressure frozen without fixation, 2) high pressure frozen following fixation, and 3) conventionally prepared with aldehyde fixatives. Aldehyde fixation prior to freezing produces ultrastructural preservation superior to that obtained through chemical fixation alone that is close to that obtained when cells are fast frozen without fixation. We demonstrate using a variety of nervous system tissues, including neurons that were injected with a fluorescent dye and then photooxidized, that this technique provides excellent preservation compared to chemical fixation alone and can be extended to selectively stained material where cryofixation is impractical. PMID:17962040

  7. Correlative 3D imaging: CLSM and FIB-SEM tomography using high-pressure frozen, freeze-substituted biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Miriam S; Guenthert, Maja; Gasser, Philippe; Lucas, Falk; Wepf, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy aims at combining data from different imaging modalities, ideally from the same area of the one sample, in order to achieve a more holistic view of the hierarchical structural organization of cells and tissues. Modern 3D imaging techniques opened up new possibilities to expand morphological studies into the third dimension at the nanometer scale. Here we present an approach to correlate 3D light microscopy data with volume data from focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy. An adapted sample preparation method based on high-pressure freezing for structure preservation, followed by freeze-substitution for multimodal en bloc imaging, is described. It is based on including fluorescent labeling during freeze-substitution, which enables histological context description of the structure of interest by confocal laser scanning microscopy prior to high-resolution electron microscopy. This information can be employed to relocate the respective structure in the electron microscope. This approach is most suitable for targeted small 3D volume correlation and has the potential to extract statistically relevant data of structural details for systems biology.

  8. Preparation of cultured cells using high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution for subsequent 2D or 3D visualization in the transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Philippa C

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is an invaluable technique used for imaging the ultrastructure of samples and it is particularly useful when determining virus-host interactions at a cellular level. The environment inside a TEM is not favorable for biological material (high vacuum and high energy electrons). Also biological samples have little or no intrinsic electron contrast, and rarely do they naturally exist in very thin sheets, as is required for optimum resolution in the TEM. To prepare these samples for imaging in the TEM therefore requires extensive processing which can alter the ultrastructure of the material. Here we describe a method which aims to minimize preparation artifacts by freezing the samples at high pressure to instantaneously preserve ultrastructural detail, then rapidly substituting the ice and infiltrating with resin to provide a firm matrix which can be cut into thin sections for imaging. Thicker sections of this material can also be imaged and reconstructed into 3D volumes using electron tomography.

  9. Investigations of the effect of nonmagnetic Ca substitution for magnetic Dy on spin-freezing in Dy2Ti2O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, V. K.; Tennant, D. A.; Lake, B.

    2015-11-01

    Physical properties of partially Ca substituted hole-doped Dy2Ti2O7 have been investigated by ac magnetic susceptibility {χ\\text{ac}}(T) , dc magnetic susceptibility χ (T) , isothermal magnetization M(H) and heat capacity {{C}\\text{p}}(T) measurements on Dy1.8Ca0.2Ti2O7. The spin-ice system Dy2Ti2O7 exhibits a spin-glass type freezing behavior near 16 K. Our frequency dependent {χ\\text{ac}}(T) data of Dy1.8Ca0.2Ti2O7 show that the spin-freezing behavior is significantly influenced by Ca substitution. The effect of partial nonmagnetic Ca2+ substitution for magnetic Dy3+ is similar to the previous study on nonmagnetic isovalent Y3+ substituted Dy2-x Y x Ti2O7 (for low levels of dilution), however the suppression of spin-freezing behavior is substantially stronger for Ca than Y. The Cole-Cole plot analysis reveals semicircular character and a single relaxation mode in Dy1.8Ca0.2Ti2O7 as for Dy2Ti2O7. No noticeable change in the insulating behavior of Dy2Ti2O7 results from the holes produced by 10% Ca2+ substitution for Dy3+ ions.

  10. Substitution of egg yolk by a cyclodextrin-cholesterol complex allows a reduction of the glycerol concentration into the freezing medium of equine sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blommaert, Didier; Franck, Thierry; Donnay, Isabelle; Lejeune, Jean-Philippe; Detilleux, Johann; Serteyn, Didier

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to completely replace the egg yolk a classical diluent for freezing equine semen by a cyclodextrin-cholesterol complex. At the same time, the reduction in the glycerol content used for cryopreservation and the incubation time between sperm and the freezing media were evaluated. Horse ejaculates were frozen with four different freezing extenders: a frozen reference medium (IF) containing egg yolk and 2.5% glycerol and media without egg yolk but supplemented with 1.5 mg 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin cholesterol (HPβCD-C) complex and containing either 1% (G1), 2% (G2) or 3% glycerol (G3). Three incubation times (90, 120 and 180 min) at 4 °C between the fresh semen and the different media were tested before freezing. Viability and motility analyses were performed with computer assisted semen analysis (CASA). Results showed that the freezing media containing the HPβCD-C complex with 1%, 2% and 3% glycerol significantly improve the 3 in vitro parameters of post thawing semen quality (viability, progressive and total mobilities) compared to IF. The best improvement of the parameters was obtained with G1 medium and the longest contact time. The substitution of egg yolk by HPβCD-C complex allows the decrease of protein charge of the medium while favouring the cholesterol supply to membrane spermatozoa offering it a better resistance to osmotic imbalance and a better tolerance to the glycerol toxicity. Our results highlight that the egg yolk of an extender for the freezing of horse semen can be completely substituted by HPβCD-C complex.

  11. Ultrastructure of the endocytotic pathway in glutaraldehyde-fixed and high-pressure frozen/freeze-substituted protoplasts of white spruce (Picea glauca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galway, M E; Rennie, P J; Fowke, L C

    1993-11-01

    An ultrastructural study of endocytosis has been made for the first time in protoplasts of a gymnosperm, white spruce (Picea glauca), fixed by high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution. Protoplasts derived from the WS1 line of suspension-cultured embryogenic white spruce were labelled with cationized ferritin, a non-specific marker of the plasma membrane. The timing of cationized ferritin uptake and its subcellular distribution were determined by fixing protoplasts at various intervals after labelling. To address concerns about using chemical fixation to study the membrane-bound transport of cationized ferritin, protoplasts were fixed both by conventional glutaraldehyde fixation and by rapid freezing in a Balzers high-pressure freezing apparatus (followed by freeze substitution). Cationized ferritin appeared rapidly in coated pits and coated vesicles after labelling. Later it was present in uncoated vesicles, and in Golgi bodies, trans-Golgi membranes and partially coated reticula, then subsequently in multivesicular bodies, which may ultimately fuse with and deliver their contents to lytic vacuoles. The results show that the time course and pathway of cationized ferritin uptake in the gymnosperm white spruce is very similar to the time course and pathway elucidated for cationized ferritin uptake in the angiosperm soybean. High-pressure freezing yielded much better preservation of intracellular membranes and organelles, although plasma membranes appeared ruffled. Protoplasts fixed by both methods possessed numerous smooth vesicles in the cortex and smooth invaginations of the plasma membrane. These became labelled with cationized ferritin, but apparently did not contribute directly to the internalization of cationized ferritin, except via the formation of coated pits and vesicles from their surfaces.

  12. The 'catch' mechanism in molluscan muscle: an electron microscopy study of freeze-substituted anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, P M; Elliott, A

    1989-08-01

    A method for quick-freezing muscles while observing their mechanical properties until the moment of freezing is described. This method was used to freeze the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis. Intact muscle in the presence of sucrose as a cryoprotectant was freeze-substituted in acetone, fixed and embedded for electron microscopy. ABRM was frozen in a number of mechanical states including 'catch', the state of high passive tension particularly associated with some molluscan muscles. Transverse sections were examined to determine the distribution of filaments in the muscle cells. In the relaxed muscle thick and thin filaments are fairly randomly distributed. Groups of thin filaments and of thick filaments are often seen, and there is no obvious association between the two types of filaments. In contrast, in rigor muscles, both glycerol-extracted and intact, most of the thin filaments were found to lie in rings or rosettes around the thick filaments. In some places bridges between thick and thin filaments could be distinguished. In actively contracting muscle (phasic contraction) the appearance is intermediate between that of the relaxed and rigor muscles. Many thick filaments are surrounded by rosettes of thin filaments but many of the thin filaments are grouped and have no connections with thick filaments. The 'catch' state, left after a period of tonic contraction, is similar in its distribution of thick and thin filaments to the active state, many of the thin filaments lying between the thick. Frequently thick and thin filaments seem to be closer together than in other states of the muscle where a pronounced exclusion zone is present around the thick filaments. There is no evidence for association between the thick filaments. The different distribution of thin filaments in the different states is consistent with the previously described X-ray diffraction data if it is assumed that most of the contribution to the equatorial reflection at 12

  13. Macromolecular differentiation of Golgi stacks in root tips of Arabidopsis and Nicotiana seedlings as visualized in high pressure frozen and freeze-substituted samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehelin, L. A.; Giddings, T. H. Jr; Kiss, J. Z.; Sack, F. D.

    1990-01-01

    The plant root tip represents a fascinating model system for studying changes in Golgi stack architecture associated with the developmental progression of meristematic cells to gravity sensing columella cells, and finally to "young" and "old", polysaccharide-slime secreting peripheral cells. To this end we have used high pressure freezing in conjunction with freeze-substitution techniques to follow developmental changes in the macromolecular organization of Golgi stacks in root tips of Arabidopsis and Nicotiana. Due to the much improved structural preservation of all cells under investigation, our electron micrographs reveal both several novel structural features common to all Golgi stacks, as well as characteristic differences in morphology between Golgi stacks of different cell types. Common to all Golgi stacks are clear and discrete differences in staining patterns and width of cis, medial and trans cisternae. Cis cisternae have the widest lumina (approximately 30 nm) and are the least stained. Medial cisternae are narrower (approximately 20 nm) and filled with more darkly staining products. Most trans cisternae possess a completely collapsed lumen in their central domain, giving rise to a 4-6 nm wide dark line in cross-sectional views. Numerous vesicles associated with the cisternal margins carry a non-clathrin type of coat. A trans Golgi network with clathrin coated vesicles is associated with all Golgi stacks except those of old peripheral cells. It is easily distinguished from trans cisternae by its blebbing morphology and staining pattern. The zone of ribosome exclusion includes both the Golgi stack and the trans Golgi network. Intercisternal elements are located exclusively between trans cisternae of columella and peripheral cells, but not meristematic cells. In older peripheral cells only trans cisternae exhibit slime-related staining. Golgi stacks possessing intercisternal elements also contain parallel rows of freeze-fracture particles in their trans

  14. Functional compartmentation of the Golgi apparatus of plant cells : immunocytochemical analysis of high-pressure frozen- and freeze-substituted sycamore maple suspension culture cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G F; Staehelin, L A

    1992-07-01

    The Golgi apparatus of plant cells is engaged in both the processing of glycoproteins and the synthesis of complex polysaccharides. To investigate the compartmentalization of these functions within individual Golgi stacks, we have analyzed the ultrastructure and the immunolabeling patterns of high-pressure frozen and freeze-substituted suspension-cultured sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cells. As a result of the improved structural preservation, three morphological types of Golgi cisternae, designated cis, medial, and trans, as well as the trans Golgi network, could be identified. The number of cis cisternae per Golgi stack was found to be fairly constant at approximately 1, whereas the number of medial and trans cisternae per stack was variable and accounted for the varying number of cisternae (3-10) among the many Golgi stacks examined. By using a battery of seven antibodies whose specific sugar epitopes on secreted polysaccharides and glycoproteins are known, we have been able to determine in which types of cisternae specific sugars are added to N-linked glycans, and to xyloglucan and polygalacturonic acid/rhamnogalacturonan-I, two complex polysaccharides. The findings are as follows. The beta-1,4-linked d-glucosyl backbone of xyloglucan is synthesized in trans cisternae, and the terminal fucosyl residues on the trisaccharide side chains of xyloglucan are partly added in the trans cisternae, and partly in the trans Golgi network. In contrast, the polygalacturonic/rhamnogalacturonan-I backbone is assembled in cis and medial cisternae, methylesterification of the carboxyl groups of the galacturonic acid residues in the polygalacturonic acid domains occurs mostly in medial cisternae, and arabinose-containing side chains of the polygalacturonic acid domains are added to the nascent polygalacturonic acid/rhamnogalacturonan-I molecules in the trans cisternae. Double labeling experiments demonstrate that xyloglucan and polygalacturonic acid

  15. Biomaterials by freeze casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegst, Ulrike G K; Schecter, Matthew; Donius, Amalie E; Hunger, Philipp M

    2010-04-28

    The functional requirements for synthetic tissue substitutes appear deceptively simple: they should provide a porous matrix with interconnecting porosity and surface properties that promote rapid tissue ingrowth; at the same time, they should possess sufficient stiffness, strength and toughness to prevent crushing under physiological loads until full integration and healing are reached. Despite extensive efforts and first encouraging results, current biomaterials for tissue regeneration tend to suffer common limitations: insufficient tissue-material interaction and an inherent lack of strength and toughness associated with porosity. The challenge persists to synthesize materials that mimic both structure and mechanical performance of the natural tissue and permit strong tissue-implant interfaces to be formed. In the case of bone substitute materials, for example, the goal is to engineer high-performance composites with effective properties that, similar to natural mineralized tissue, exceed by orders of magnitude the properties of its constituents. It is still difficult with current technology to emulate in synthetic biomaterials multi-level hierarchical composite structures that are thought to be the origin of the observed mechanical property amplification in biological materials. Freeze casting permits to manufacture such complex, hybrid materials through excellent control of structural and mechanical properties. As a processing technique for the manufacture of biomaterials, freeze casting therefore has great promise.

  16. Freeze fracture and freeze etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Douglas E; Sharp, William P

    2014-01-01

    Freeze fracture depends on the property of frozen tissues or cells, when cracked open, to split along the hydrophobic interior of membranes, thus revealing broad panoramas of membrane interior. These large panoramas reveal the three-dimensional contours of membranes making the methods well suited to studying changes in membrane architecture. Freshly split membrane faces are visualized by platinum or tungsten shadowing and carbon backing to form a replica that is then cleaned of tissue and imaged by TEM. Etching, i.e., removal of ice from the frozen fractured specimen by sublimation prior to shadowing, can also reveal the true surfaces of the membrane as well as the extracellular matrix and cytoskeletal networks that contact the membranes. Since the resolution of detail in the metal replicas formed is 1-2 nm, these methods can also be used to visualize macromolecules or macromolecular assemblies either in situ or displayed on a mica surface. These methods are available for either specimens that have been chemically fixed or specimens that have been rapidly frozen without chemical intervention.

  17. Freezing and Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Food Safety What Can You Freeze? Is Frozen Food Safe? Does Freezing Destroy Bacteria & Parasites? Freshness & Quality ... Temperatures Freezer Storage Time Safe Thawing Refreezing Cooking Frozen Foods Power Outage in Freezer Frozen Cans Frozen Eggs ...

  18. Ultrasound-Assisted Freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, A. E.; Sun, Da-Wen

    Freezing is a well-known preservation method widely used in the food industry. The advantages of freezing are to a certain degree counterbalanced by the risk of damage caused by the formation and size of ice crystals. Over recent years new approaches have been developed to improve and control the crystallization process, and among these approaches sonocrystallization has proved to be very useful, since it can enhance both the nucleation rate and the crystal growth rate. Although ultrasound has been successfully used for many years in the evaluation of various aspects of foods and in medical applications, the use of power ultrasound to directly improve processes and products is less popular in food manufacturing. Foodstuffs are very complex materials, and research is needed in order to define the specific sound parameters that aid the freezing process and that can later be used for the scale-up and production of commercial frozen food products.

  19. Bjorken model with Freeze Out

    CERN Document Server

    Magas, V K

    2007-01-01

    The freeze out of the expanding systems, created in relativistic heavy ion collisions, is discussed. We combine Bjorken scenario with earlier developed freeze out equations into a unified model. The important feature of the proposed model is that physical freeze out is completely finished in a finite time, which can be varied from 0 (freeze out hypersurface) to infinity. The dependence of the post freeze out distribution function on this freeze out time will be studied. As an example model is completely solved and analyzed for the gas of pions.

  20. Oxime Catalysis by Freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agten, Stijn M; Suylen, Dennis P L; Hackeng, Tilman M

    2016-01-20

    Chemical reaction rates are generally decreased at lower temperatures. Here, we report that an oxime ligation reaction in water at neutral pH is accelerated by freezing. The freezing method and its rate effect on oxime ligation are systematically studied on a peptide model system, and applied to a larger chemokine protein, containing a single acetyl butyrate group, which is conjugated to an aminooxy-labeled ligand. Our improved ligation protocol now makes it possible to efficiently introduce oxime-bond coupled ligands into proteins under aqueous conditions at low concentrations and neutral pH.

  1. Stiffness Analysis of the Sarafix External Fixator based on Stainless Steel and Composite Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedim Pervan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a structural analysis of the CAD model three versions fixators Sarafix which is to explore the possibility of introducing composite materials in the construction of the connecting rod fixators comparing values of displacement and stiffness at characteristic structure points. Namely, we have investigated the constructional performance of fixators Sarafix with a connecting rod formed from three different composite materials, the same matrix (epoxy resin with three different types of fibers (E glass, kevlar 49 and carbonM55J. The results of the structural analysis fixators Sarafix with a connecting rod made of composite materials are compared with the results of tubular connecting rod fixators made of stainless steel. After comparing the results, from the aspect of stiffness, we gave the final considerations about composite material which provides an adequate substitution for the existing material.

  2. Freezing increment in keratophakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinger, C A; Wisnicki, H J

    In homoplastic keratomileusis, keratophakia, and epikeratophakia, the corneal tissue that provides the final refractive lenticule undergoes a conformational change when frozen. Because corneal tissue is composed primarily of water, an assumed value of 9.08% (approximate volumic percentage expansion of water when frozen) is frequently used for the increase in thickness, or freezing increment, rather than measuring it directly. We evaluated 32 cases of clinical keratophakia and found the increase in thickness to average 37 +/- 21%. In this series of 32 cases, the percentage of patients with a greater than 4 D residual refractive error was 16%. If an assumed freezing increment of 9.08% had been used, the percentage would have been 28%, with two-thirds of these 28% manifesting a marked undercorrection. Because of a lack of studies documenting the behavior of corneal tissue following cryoprotection and freezing, it is suggested that measurements be taken during homoplastic surgery to minimize the potential for significant inaccuracy in obtaining the desired optic result.

  3. Magnetic freezing of confined water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangyu; Zhang, Weiwei; Dong, Huijuan

    2010-10-07

    We report results from molecular dynamic simulations of the freezing transition of liquid water in the nanoscale hydrophobic confinement under the influence of a homogeneous external magnetic field of 10 T along the direction perpendicular to the parallel plates. A new phase of bilayer crystalline ice is obtained at an anomalously high freezing temperature of 340 K. The water-to-ice translation is found to be first order. The bilayer ice is built from alternating rows of hexagonal rings and rhombic rings parallel to the confining plates, with a large distortion of the hydrogen bonds. We also investigate the temperature shifts of the freezing transition due to the magnetic field. The freezing temperature, below which the freezing of confined water occurs, shifts to a higher value as the magnetic field enhances. Furthermore, the temperature of the freezing transition of confined water is proportional to the denary logarithm of the external magnetic field.

  4. High-freezing-point fuels used for aviation turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, R.

    1979-01-01

    Broadened-specification aviation fuels could be produced from a greater fraction of crude source material with improvements in fuel supply and price. These fuels, particularly those with increased final boiling temperatures, would have higher freezing temperatures than current aviation turbine fuels. The higher-freezing-point fuels can be substituted in the majority of present commercial flights, since temperature data indicate that in-flight fuel temperatures are relatively mild. For the small but significant fraction of commercial flights where low fuel temperatures make higher freezing-point fuel use unacceptable, adaptations to the fuel or fuel system may be made to accommodate this fuel. Several techniques are discussed. Fuel heating is the most promising concept. One simple system design uses existing heat rejection from the fuel-lubricating oil cooler, another uses an engine-driven generator for electrical heating. Both systems offer advantages that outweigh the obvious penalties.

  5. Substitutional analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherford, Daniel Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Classic monograph, suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Topics include calculus of permutations and tableaux, semi-normal representation, orthogonal and natural representations, group characters, and substitutional equations. 1968 edition.

  6. Sugar Substitutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drinks. You may also have heard them called "artificial sweeteners" or "non-caloric sweeteners." They can be used ... of nutrition for your body.What sugar substitutes/artificial sweeteners are approved by the FDA?The following sugar ...

  7. Freeze for action: Neurobiological mechanisms in animal and human freezing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, K.

    2017-01-01

    Upon increasing levels of threat, animals activate qualitatively different defensive modes, including freezing and active fight-or-flight reactions. Whereas freezing is a form of behavioural inhibition accompanied by parasympathetically dominated heart rate deceleration, fight-or-flight reactions ar

  8. Performance Characteristics of an Isothermal Freeze Valve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hailey, A.E.

    2001-08-22

    This document discusses performance characteristics of an isothermal freeze valve. A freeze valve has been specified for draining the DWPF melter at the end of its lifetime. Two freeze valve designs have been evaluated on the Small Cylindrical Melter-2 (SCM-2). In order to size the DWPF freeze valve, the basic principles governing freeze valve behavior need to be identified and understood.

  9. Freeze Protection in Gas Holders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Duursma, Gail

    In cold weather, the water seals of gasholders need protection from freez- ing to avoid compromising the seal. These holders have a large reservoir of “tank water” at the base which is below ground. At present freeze- protection is achieved by external heating of the seal water which is in a slot...

  10. Understanding Slag Freeze Linings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah-Mehrjardi, Ata; Hayes, Peter C.; Jak, Evgueni

    2014-09-01

    Slag freeze linings, the formation of protective deposit layers on the inner walls of furnaces and reactors, are increasingly used in industrial pyrometallurgical processes to ensure that furnace integrity is maintained in these aggressive, high-temperature environments. Most previous studies of freeze-linings have analyzed the formation of slag deposits based solely on heat transfer considerations. These thermal models have assumed that the interface between the stationary frozen layer and the agitated molten bath at steady-state deposit thickness consists of the primary phase, which stays in contact with the bulk liquid at the liquidus temperature. Recent experimental studies, however, have clearly demonstrated that the temperature of the deposit/liquid bath interface can be lower than the liquidus temperature of the bulk liquid. A conceptual framework has been proposed to explain the observations and the factors influencing the microstructure and the temperature of the interface at steady-state conditions. The observations are consistent with a dynamic steady state that is a balance between (I) the rate of nucleation and growth of solids on detached crystals in a subliquidus layer as this fluid material moves toward the stagnant deposit interface and (II) the dissolution of these detached crystals as they are transported away from the interface by turbulent eddies. It is argued that the assumption that the interface temperature is the liquidus of the bulk material represents only a limiting condition, and that the interface temperature can be between T liquidus and T solidus depending on the process conditions and bath chemistry. These findings have implications for the modeling approach and boundary conditions required to accurately describe these systems. They also indicate the opportunity to integrate considerations of heat and mass flows with the selection of melt chemistries in the design of future high temperature industrial reactors.

  11. Solvent substitution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  12. Sensory Substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrillo, Ronald T.

    The idea that the cutaneous surface may be employed as a substitute for the eyes and ears is by no means a modern notion. Although the sense of touch has long been considered as a surrogate for both the visual and auditory modalities, the focus of this chapter will be on the efforts to develop a tactile substitute for hearing, especially that of human speech. The visual system is our primary means of processing information about environmental space such as orientation, distance, direction and size. It is much less effective in making temporal discriminations. The auditory system is unparalleled in processing information that involves rapid sequences of temporal events, such as speech and music. The tactile sense is capable of processing both spatial and temporal information although not as effective in either domain as the eye or the ear.

  13. Substituting complements

    OpenAIRE

    Dari-Mattiacci, G.; Parisi, F.; Heller, M.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of multiple sellers in the provision of (nonsubstitutable) complementary goods leads to outcomes that are worse than those generated by a monopoly (with a vertically integrated production of complements), a problem known in the economic literature as complementary oligopoly and recently popularized in the legal literature as the tragedy of the anticommons. We ask the following question: how many substitutes for each complement are necessary to render the presence of multiple sell...

  14. 9 CFR 590.534 - Freezing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing facilities. 590.534 Section..., and Facility Requirements § 590.534 Freezing facilities. (a) Freezing rooms, either on or off the... as set forth in § 590.536. Use of off-premise freezing facilities is permitted only when prior...

  15. Fundamentals of freeze-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nail, Steven L; Jiang, Shan; Chongprasert, Suchart; Knopp, Shawn A

    2002-01-01

    Given the increasing importance of reducing development time for new pharmaceutical products, formulation and process development scientists must continually look for ways to "work smarter, not harder." Within the product development arena, this means reducing the amount of trial and error empiricism in arriving at a formulation and identification of processing conditions which will result in a quality final dosage form. Characterization of the freezing behavior of the intended formulation is necessary for developing processing conditions which will result in the shortest drying time while maintaining all critical quality attributes of the freeze-dried product. Analysis of frozen systems was discussed in detail, particularly with respect to the glass transition as the physical event underlying collapse during freeze-drying, eutectic mixture formation, and crystallization events upon warming of frozen systems. Experiments to determine how freezing and freeze-drying behavior is affected by changes in the composition of the formulation are often useful in establishing the "robustness" of a formulation. It is not uncommon for seemingly subtle changes in composition of the formulation, such as a change in formulation pH, buffer salt, drug concentration, or an additional excipient, to result in striking differences in freezing and freeze-drying behavior. With regard to selecting a formulation, it is wise to keep the formulation as simple as possible. If a buffer is needed, a minimum concentration should be used. The same principle applies to added salts: If used at all, the concentration should be kept to a minimum. For many proteins a combination of an amorphous excipient, such as a disaccharide, and a crystallizing excipient, such as glycine, will result in a suitable combination of chemical stability and physical stability of the freeze-dried solid. Concepts of heat and mass transfer are valuable in rational design of processing conditions. Heat transfer by conduction

  16. Freezing in a vertical tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparrow, E.M.; Broadbent, J.A.

    1983-05-01

    Fundamental heat transfer experiments were performed for freezing of an initially superheated or nonsuperheated liquid in a cooled vertical tube. Measurements were made which yielded information about the freezing front and the frozen mass, about the various energy components extracted from the tube, and about the decay of the initial liquid superheat. Four component energies were identified and evaluated from the experimental data, including the latent energy released by the phase change and sensibly energies released from the subcooled frozen solid and the superheated liquid. Initial superheating of the liquid tended to moderately diminish the frozen mass and latent energy extraction at short freezing times but had little effect on these quantitites at longer times. The extracted sensible energies associated with the superheating more than compensated for the aforementioned decrease in the latent energy. Although the latent energy is the largest contributor to the total extracted energy, the aggregate sensible energies can make a significant contribution, especially at large tube wall subcooling, large initial liquid superheating, and short freezing time. Natural convection effects in the superheated liquid were modest and were confined to short freezing times.

  17. Basic concepts in freezing cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, P.

    1985-01-01

    Freezing involves the lowering of temperature and the formation of ice. Most cells have not been found to be sensitive to the former; rather injury is a consequence of the removal of water from the system in the form of ice. Some cells such as boar sperm and those of many tropical crops are susceptible to even short-term lowering of temperature to near O/sup 0/C. This susceptiblity, which is independent of the rate of temperature drop, is defined as chilling injury. Other cells are injured by chilling only if the rate of cooling is high, a phenomenon referred to as thermal shock. This paper discusses the physical-chemical events during freezing and on freezing injury will assume that lowered temperature per se is not injurious.

  18. Freeze-in through portals

    CERN Document Server

    Blennow, Mattias; Zaldivar, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The popular freeze-out paradigm for Dark Matter (DM) production, relies on DM-baryon couplings of the order of the weak interactions. However, different search strategies for DM have failed to provide a conclusive evidence of such (non-gravitational) interactions, while greatly reducing the parameter space of many representative models. This motivates the study of alternative mechanisms for DM genesis. In the freeze-in framework, the DM is slowly populated from the thermal bath while never reaching equilibrium. In this work, we analyse in detail the possibility of producing a frozen-in DM via a mediator particle which acts as a portal. We give analytical estimates of different freeze-in regimes and support them with full numerical analyses, taking into account the proper distribution functions of bath particles. Finally, we constrain the parameter space of generic models by requiring agreement with DM relic abundance observations.

  19. Freeze Protection in Gas Holders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Duursma, Gail

    In cold weather, the water seals of gasholders need protection from freez- ing to avoid compromising the seal. These holders have a large reservoir of “tank water” at the base which is below ground. At present freeze- protection is achieved by external heating of the seal water which...... is in a slotted channel called a cup. Electrical heating or circulation of heated tank water to the cup are examples of systems presently used. The tank water has a large thermal capacity and National Grid wishes to inves- tigate whether circulation of the tank water without external heating could provide...... sufficient energy input to avoid freezing. Only tanks in which the tank water is below ground are investigated in the report. The soil temperature under the reservoir at depth of 10m and lower is almost constant....

  20. Meat Freezing Theories and Novel Freezing Technologies%肉类冷冻理论与冷冻新技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金文刚

    2008-01-01

    Main meat freezing theories,including transition theory,glass transformation theory and ice crystallization theory,were introduced.Some novel freezing technologies such as high pressure freezing,ultrasonic freezing,ice nucleus bacteria freezing protein,cell alive system freezing and decompression freezing were also generally reviewed.

  1. Development of freeze dried vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, R. W.

    1970-01-01

    The development of freeze dried vegetables to be used in the Apollo food system is discussed. After the initial selection and screening of vegetables, several types of freeze dried vegetables were prepared in small batches. From these small batches, two vegetables were judged satisfactory for further testing and evaluation. These vegetables, mashed potatoes and asparagus, were subjected to storage at 100 deg plus or minus 5 F. for two weeks and then taste tested. The vegetables were also tested to determine if they complied with the microbiological requirements for Apollo food. The space food prototype production guide for the vegetables is submitted.

  2. Facing Freeze: Social Threat Induces Bodily Freeze in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, K.; Hagenaars, M.A.; Stins, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Freezing is a common defensive response in animals threatened by predators. It is characterized by reduced body motion and decreased heart rate (bradycardia). However, despite the relevance of animal defense models in human stress research, studies have not shown whether social threat cues elicit si

  3. Medical and social egg freezing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lallemant, Camille; Vassard, Ditte; Andersen, Anders Nyboe

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Until recently, limited options for preserving fertility in order to delay childbearing were available. Although egg freezing and successful thawing is now possible, it remains unclear to what extent women are aware of the availability of this technique, their attitudes towards its ...

  4. Time dependence of immersion freezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Welti

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The time dependence of immersion freezing was studied for temperatures between 236 K and 243 K. Droplets with single immersed, size-selected 400 nm and 800 nm kaolinite particles were produced at 300 K, cooled down to supercooled temperatures typical for mixed-phase cloud conditions, and the fraction of frozen droplets with increasing residence time was detected. To simulate the conditions of immersion freezing in mixed-phase clouds we used the Zurich Ice Nucleation Chamber (ZINC and its vertical extension, the Immersion Mode Cooling chAmber (IMCA. We observed that the frozen fraction of droplets increased with increasing residence time in the chamber. This suggests that there is a time dependence of immersion freezing and supports the importance of a stochastic component in the ice nucleation process. The rate at which droplets freeze was observed to decrease towards higher temperatures and smaller particle sizes. Comparison of the laboratory data with four different ice nucleation models, three based on classical nucleation theory with different representations of the particle surface properties and one singular, suggest that the classical, stochastic approach combined with a distribution of contact angles is able to reproduce the ice nucleation observed in these experiments most accurately. Using the models to calculate the increase in frozen fraction at typical mixed-phase cloud temperatures over an extended period of time, yields an equivalent effect of −1 K temperature shift and an increase in time scale by a factor of ~10.

  5. Anhydrobiosis and Freezing-Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGill, Lorraine; Shannon, Adam; Pisani, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Anhydrobiotic animals can survive the loss of both free and bound water from their cells. While in this state they are also resistant to freezing. This physiology adapts anhydrobiotes to harsh environments and it aids their dispersal. Panagrolaimus davidi, a bacterial feeding anhydrobiotic nemato...

  6. 9 CFR 590.536 - Freezing operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing operations. 590.536 Section 590.536 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG..., and Facility Requirements § 590.536 Freezing operations. (a) Freezing rooms shall be kept clean...

  7. A Mathematical Model for Freeze-Drying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the experiments on freeze-drying carrot and potato slabs, the effects of some parameters, such as heating temperature and pressure on the freeze-drying process are examined. A simple model of freeze-drying is established to predict drying time and the mass variations of materials during the drying. The experimental results agree well with those calculated by the model.

  8. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart ...

  9. Freeze Technology for Nuclear Applications - 13590

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostmark, Susanne C.; Knutsson, Sven [Lulea University of Technology (Sweden); Lindberg, Maria [Studsvik Nuclear AB, 611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2013-07-01

    Freezing of soil materials is a complicated process of a number of physical processes: - freezing of pore water in a thermal gradient, - cryogenic suction causing water migration and - ice formation expanding pores inducing frost heave. Structural changes due to increase of effective stress during freezing also take place. The over consolidation gives a powerful dewatering/drying effect and the freeze process causes separation of contaminates. Artificial ground freezing (AGF is a well established technique first practiced in south Wales, as early as 1862. AGF is mostly used to stabilize tunnels and excavations. During the last ten years underwater applications of freeze technologies based on the AGF have been explored in Sweden. The technology can, and has been, used in many different steps in a remediation action. Freeze Sampling where undisturbed samples are removed in both soft and hard sediment/sludge, Freeze Dredging; retrieval of sediment with good precision and minimal redistribution, and Freeze Drying; volume reduction of contaminated sludge/sediment. The application of these technologies in a nuclear or radioactive environment provides several advantages. Sampling by freezing gives for example an advantage of an undisturbed sample taken at a specified depth, salvaging objects by freezing or removal of sludges is other applications of this, for the nuclear industry, novel technology. (authors)

  10. Impregnation of leather during "freeze-drying"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storch, Mikkel; Vestergaard Poulsen Sommer, Dorte; Hovmand, Ida

    2016-01-01

    Freeze-drying is a recognized method for the preservation of waterlogged objects. Naturally, freeze-drying has also been used for waterlogged archaeological leather often after treatment with Na2.EDTA and impregnation with PEG; but the treated leather sometimes suffers from “excessive drying......” becoming too stiff and brittle. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a conventional freeze-drying method against an alternative freeze-drying method that preserves the natural moisture content of the leather. Both new and archaeological waterlogged leather were included in the study...... suggest that the process which takes place within the leather during the freeze-drying in not actual freeze-drying, but rather a sophisticated way of distributing the impregnating agent. The pure ice phase freezes out, but the impregnating agent remains liquid as the temperature does not become low enough...

  11. Modelling Seasonally Freezing Ground Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    snowfall occurs, the snow will tend to freeze, especially if at the start of winter the temperatures oscillate around zero, or there is an early winter...1320 TO 11300 GO TO 1300 1320 CONTINUE FEB (2) - FENE IF(FEB(1)*FEB(2).LT.0.0) GO TO 1330 IF(ABS(FEB(2)) .GT.ABS(FEB(1)))DELTMP--5. IF(NDEX.LT.100)GO

  12. Freeze-casting: Fabrication of highly porous and hierarchical ceramic supports for energy applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Gaudillere

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the freeze-casting ceramic shaping method and to show how its implementation could be useful for several energy applications where key components comprise a porous scaffold. A detailed presentation of the freeze-casting process and of the characteristics of the resulting porous parts is firstly given. The characteristic of freeze-cast parts and the drawbacks of conventional porous scaffolds existing in energy applications are drawn in order to highlight the expected beneficial effect of this new shaping technique as possible substitute to the conventional ones. Finally, a review of the state of the art freeze-cast based energy applications developed up to now and expected to be promising is given to illustrate the large perspectives opened by the implementation of the freeze-casting of ceramics for energy fields. Here we suggest discussing about the feasibility of incorporate freeze-cast porous support in high temperature ceramic-based energy applications.

  13. Characteristics of sugar surfactants in stabilizing proteins during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Koreyoshi; Murai, Katsuyuki; Korehisa, Tamayo; Shimizu, Noriyuki; Yamahira, Ryo; Matsuura, Tsutashi; Tada, Hiroko; Imanaka, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Naoyuki; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro

    2014-06-01

    Sugar surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths and sugar head groups were compared for their protein-stabilizing effect during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying. Six enzymes, different in terms of tolerance against inactivation because of freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, were used as model proteins. The enzyme activities that remained after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying in the presence of a sugar surfactant were measured for different types and concentrations of sugar surfactants. Sugar surfactants stabilized all of the tested enzymes both during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, and a one or two order higher amount of added sugar surfactant was required for achieving protein stabilization during freeze-drying than for the cryoprotection. The comprehensive comparison showed that the C10-C12 esters of sucrose or trehalose were the most effective through the freeze-drying process: the remaining enzyme activities after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying increased at the sugar ester concentrations of 1-10 and 10-100 μM, respectively, and increased to a greater extent than for the other surfactants at higher concentrations. Results also indicate that, when a decent amount of sugar was also added, the protein-stabilizing effect of a small amount of sugar ester through the freeze-drying process could be enhanced. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  14. Fundamental Technical Elements of Freeze-fracture/Freeze-etch in Biological Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeze-fracture/freeze-etch describes a process whereby specimens, typically biological or nanomaterial in nature, are frozen, fractured, and replicated to generate a carbon/platinum "cast" intended for examination by transmission electron microscopy. Specimens are subjected to u...

  15. Fundamental Technical Elements of Freeze-fracture/Freeze-etch in Biological Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeze-fracture/freeze-etch describes a process whereby specimens, typically biological or nanomaterial in nature, are frozen, fractured, and replicated to generate a carbon/platinum "cast" intended for examination by transmission electron microscopy. Specimens are subjected to u...

  16. Freezing and thawing or freezing, thawing, and aging effects on beef tenderness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grayson, A L; King, D A; Shackelford, S D; Koohmaraie, M; Wheeler, T L

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of freezing and thawing or freezing and thawing with an additional aging period after frozen storage on the tenderness of longissimus lumborum (LL...

  17. Freezing and thawing or freezing, thawing, and aging effects on beef tenderness1,2,3

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A L Grayson; D A King; S D Shackelford; M Koohmaraie; T L Wheeler

    2014-01-01

      The objective of this study was to determine the effect of freezing and thawing or freezing and thawing with an additional aging period after frozen storage on the tenderness of longissimus lumborum (LL...

  18. When hot water freezes before cold

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    2006-01-01

    I suggest that the origin of the Mpemba effect (the freezing of hot water before cold) is freezing-point depression by solutes, either gaseous or solid, whose solubility decreases with increasing temperature so that they are removed when water is heated. They are concentrated ahead of the freezing front by zone refining in water that has not been heated, reduce the temperature of the freezing front, and thereby reduce the temperature gradient and heat flux, slowing the progress of the front. I present a simple calculation of this effect, and suggest experiments to test this hypothesis.

  19. Freezing and thawing of processed meat in an industrial freezing tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucio Antonio Marini

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Freezing is a commonly used preservation method in the meat industry. The understanding of the product behavior during the freezing process can assist in a better process management and quality control. This work reports the study of freezing and thawing of three types of processed meat in order to determine process parameters in an industrial forced‑air freezing tunnel at ‑30oC. Chicken sausages (frankfurter type, mortadela (bologna type and mechanically deboned chicken meat (MDCM were studied. Products were placed in several layers in corrugated cardboard boxes (CCB for sausages and mortadela. MDCM was placed in a nylon box. Temperature sensors were inserted in the products and the freezing and thawing curves were obtained. Freezing curves were used to determine the freezing time (tf, initial freezing point (Tf and final freezing point (T’m. Products placed in different layers in the CCB had significantly different freezing times, being the higher rates for products placed in more external layers than internal ones. The external layers of product were subjected to heat transfer by convection showing its importance to decrease freezing time. The results strongly suggest that products placed in different layers could have distinct quality properties and also play a key role in the freezing process efficiency.

  20. Improvement of parameters of freezing medium and freezing protocol for bull sperm using two osmotic supports.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaveiro, A.; Machado, A.L.; Frijters, A.; Engel, B.; Woelders, H.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the freezing protocol of bull sperm, by investigating the influence on sperm viability after freeze/thawing of different freezing medium components, as well as the effect of cooling rates in the different stages of the cooling protocol, in single factor experimen

  1. Mechanisms of deterioration of nutrients. [of freeze dried foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karel, M.; Flink, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Methods which produce freeze dried foods of improved quality were examined with emphasis on storage stability. Specific topics discussed include: microstructure of freeze dried systems, investigation of structural changes in freeze dried systems, artificial food matrices, osmotic preconcentration to yield improved quality freeze dried fruits, and storage stability of osmotically preconcentrated freeze dried fruits.

  2. Updating freeze: Aligning animal and human research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, M.A.; Oitzl, M.S.; Roelofs, K.

    2014-01-01

    Freezing is widely used as the main outcome measure for fear in animal studies. Freezing is also getting attention more frequently in human stress research, as it is considered to play an important role in the development of psychopathology. Human models on defense behavior are largely based on anim

  3. Freeze conditioning agents ease winter railcar unloading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, G.E.

    1982-02-01

    A US midwest utility's freeze control programme is described. All coal is treated with a glycol-based freeze control agent. Some rail wagons were treated with a side release agent which stops coal sticking to the metal wagon. The use of calcium chloride or heat to thaw frozen coal is also discussed.

  4. Repeatability and randomness in heterogeneous freezing nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vali

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at clarifying the relative importance of the specific character of the nuclei and of the duration of supercooling in heterogeneous freezing nucleation by immersed impurities. Laboratory experiments were carried out in which sets of water drops underwent multiple cycles of freezing and melting. The drops contained suspended particles of mixtures of materials; the resulting freezing temperatures ranged from −6°C to −24°C. Rank correlation coefficients between observed freezing temperatures of the drops in successive runs were >0.9 with very high statistical significance, and thus provide strong support for the modified singular model of heterogeneous immersion freezing nucleation. For given drops, changes in freezing temperatures between cycles were relatively small (<1°C for the majority of the events. These frequent small fluctuations in freezing temperatures are interpreted as reflections of the random nature of embryo growth and are associated with a nucleation rate that is a function of a temperature difference from the characteristic temperatures of nuclei. About a sixth of the changes were larger, up to ±5°C, and exhibited some systematic patterns. These are thought to arise from alterations of the nuclei, some being permanent and some transitory. The results are used to suggest ways of describing ice initiation in cloud models that account for both the temperature and the time dependence of freezing nucleation.

  5. Repeatability and randomness in heterogeneous freezing nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vali

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at clarifying the relative importance of the specific character of the nuclei and of the duration of supercooling in heterogeneous freezing nucleation by immersed impurities. Laboratory experiments were carried out in which sets of water drops underwent multiple cycles of freezing and melting. The drops contained suspended particles of mixtures of materials; the resulting freezing temperatures ranged from −6°C to −24°C. Rank correlation coefficients between observed freezing temperatures of the drops in successive runs were >0.9 with very high statistical significance, and thus provide strong support for the modified singular model of heterogeneous immersion freezing nucleation. For given drops, changes in freezing temperatures between cycles were relatively small (<1°C for the majority of the events. These frequent small fluctuations in freezing temperatures are interpreted as reflections of the random nature of embryo growth and are associated with a nucleation rate that is a function of a temperature difference from the characteristic temperatures of nuclei. About a sixth of the changes were larger, up to ±5°C, and exhibited some systematic patterns. These are thought to arise from alterations of the nuclei, some being permanent and some transitory. The results are used to suggest ways of describing ice initiation in cloud models that account for both the temperature and the time dependence of freezing nucleation.

  6. Monitoring the freezing point of buffalo milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Pesce

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the basic freezing point of buffalo milk. Bulk milk samples were collected from buffalo and cattle farms in Caserta area from 2008 to 2014. The analysis involved a total of 1886 buffalo milk samples and 1711 bovine milk samples. These were also tested for fat, protein and lactose contents by means of infrared spectrometry. The freezing point was determined by means of a thermistor cryoscope. Data underwent statistical analysis. Our research showed an average freezing point of -0.528°C for buffalo milk and - 0.522°C for bovine milk. Given the lack of data on the freezing point of buffalo milk, our study provides the first indication of a basic freezing point of the milk of this species in Italy.

  7. Freeze concentration of lime juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ampawan Tansakul

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research was to study the effects of processing conditions, i.e. cooling medium temperature (-6, -12 and -18C and scraper blade rotational speed (50, 100 and 150 rpm on the freeze concentration of lime juice. The initial soluble solid content of lime juice was 7.6 Brix. Results showed that soluble solid content of lime juice increased as cooling medium temperature decreased while scraper blade rotational speed increased. It was also found that the processing condition with -18˚C cooling medium temperature and 150 rpm rotational speed of the scraper blade was the best among all studied conditions, although the loss of the soluble solids with ice crystals during ice separation was relatively high at 35%.

  8. Food freezing with simultaneous surface dehydration: approximate prediction of freezing time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanone, Laura A.; Salvadori, Viviana O.; Mascheroni, Rodolfo H. [Centro de Investigacion Desarollo en Criotecnologia de Alimentos (CIDCA), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, La Plata (Argentina); MODIAL, Facultad de Ingenieria, La Plata (Argentina)

    2005-03-01

    Freezing of unpackaged foods induces mass transfer in the form of surface ice sublimation, which in turn modifies heat transfer conditions. At present there are no simplified methods for predicting freezing times when surface dehydration occurs. This paper uses a previously developed model for the simulation of simultaneous heat and mass transfer during food freezing and storage to generate a complete set of predicted freezing times when dehydration occurs. Based on these data a simplified analytical method for the prediction of freezing time during freezing of unpackaged frozen foods was developed. The method accounts for product characteristics (shape, size and composition) and operating conditions (initial and refrigerant temperature, heat transfer coefficient, relative humidity). The prediction equation is very simple and results of its use - simulating usual freezing conditions for different products - shows very good accuracy when tested against the previously cited numerical model and all the available experimental data. (Author)

  9. 40 CFR 721.8780 - Substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted pyridine azo substituted... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8780 Substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl. (a) Chemical substance... substituted pyridine azo substituted phenyl (PMNs P-96-767 and P-96-773) are subject to reporting under...

  10. Platelets self-assemble into porous nacre during freeze casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Philipp M; Donius, Amalie E; Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2013-03-01

    Nacre possesses a remarkable combination of mechanical properties. Its high stiffness, strength and toughness are attributed to a highly aligned structure of aragonite platelets "glued" together by a small fraction (∼5vol%) of polymer; theoretically it can be described by a shear-lag model of staggered tensile elements between which loads are transferred via shear. Despite extensive research, it has not been possible yet to manufacture this aligned structure as a bulk material of considerable volume with a fast and easy production process. Particularly porous materials would benefit from enhanced wall material properties to compensate for performance loss due to their high porosity. An important application for such porous materials are tissue scaffolds for bone substitution. Bone, like nacre, exhibits excellent mechanical properties, particularly an exceptionally high toughness, because of its composite structure of hydroxyapatite platelets aligned in a ∼35vol% polymer matrix. Through the freeze casting process, which results in a fast and straightforward self-assembly of platelet-shaped particles during directional solidification, highly porous bulk materials with nacre-like cell walls can now be created. This porous nacre outperforms by a factor of 1.5-4 in terms of stiffness, strength and toughness materials that have the same amount of porosity but do not exhibit the nacre-like microarchitecture. The self-assembly process presented in this study thus has tremendous potential for the creation of highly porous, yet mechanically strong tissue scaffolds for low or medium load bearing bone substitute materials. Due to the versatility of the freeze casting process, materials with a self-assembled cell wall structure can be created from high-aspect ratio particles of all material classes. This enables material optimization for a great variety of applications such as impact protection, filtration, catalysis, energy generation and storage, in addition to those with

  11. Protein freeze concentration and micro-segregation analysed in a temperature-controlled freeze container

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Roessl

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To examine effects of varied freezing conditions on the development of spatial heterogeneity in the frozen protein solution, macroscopic freeze concentration and micro-segregation of bovine serum albumin (BSA were investigated in a temperature-controlled 200-ml freeze container. Freezing to −40 °C promoted formation of protein concentration gradients (69–114 μg ml−1 in frozen samples taken from 12 different freezer positions, whereby slow freezing in 4 h or longer facilitated the evolution of strong spatial heterogeneities and caused local concentration increases by 1.15-fold relative to the initial protein concentration (100 μg ml−1. To visualize protein micro-segregation during phase separation, BSA was conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate and confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy was used to localize and size the freeze-concentrated protein regions. Slow freezing resulted in distinctly fewer and larger protein domains in the frozen bulk than fast freezing. Surface stress on the protein during freezing would therefore be minimized at low cooling rates; microscopic freeze concentration would however be highest under these conditions, potentially favoring protein aggregation.

  12. Exploring the Nature of Contact Freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, A. A.; Hoffmann, N.; Duft, D.; Leisner, T.

    2012-12-01

    The freezing of supercooled water droplets upon contact with aerosol particles (contact nucleation of ice) is the least understood mechanism of ice formation in atmospheric clouds. Although experimental evidences suggest that some aerosols can be better IN in the contact than in the immersion mode (that is, triggering ice nucleation at higher temperature), no final explanation of this phenomena currently exists. On the other hand, the contact freezing is believed to be responsible for the enhanced rate of secondary ice formation occasionally observed in LIDAR measurements in the cold mixed phase clouds. Recently we have been able to show that the freezing of supercooled droplets electrodynamically levitated in the laminar flow containing mineral dust particles (kaolinite) is a process solely governed by a rate of collisions between the supercooled droplet and the aerosol particles. We have shown that the probability of droplet freezing on a single contact with aerosol particle may differ over an order of magnitude for kaolinite particles having different genesis and morphology. In this presentation we extend the study of contact nucleation of ice and compare the IN efficiency measured for DMA-selected kaolinite, illite and hematite particles. We show that the freezing probability increases towards unity as the temperature decreases and discuss the functional form of this temperature dependence. We explore the size dependence of the contact freezing probability and show that it scales with the surface area of the particles, thus resembling the immersion freezing behavior. However, for all minerals investigated so far, the contact freezing has been shown to dominate over immersion freezing on the short experimental time scales. Finally, based on the combined ESEM and electron microprobe analysis, we discuss the significance of particle morphology and variability of chemical composition on its IN efficiency in contact mode.

  13. A micromechanical comparison of human and porcine skin before and after preservation by freezing for medical device development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranamukhaarachchi, S. A.; Lehnert, S.; Ranamukhaarachchi, S. L.; Sprenger, L.; Schneider, T.; Mansoor, I.; Rai, K.; Häfeli, U. O.; Stoeber, B.

    2016-08-01

    Collecting human skin samples for medical research, including developing microneedle-based medical devices, is challenging and time-consuming. Researchers rely on human skin substitutes and skin preservation techniques, such as freezing, to overcome the lack of skin availability. Porcine skin is considered the best substitute to human skin, but their mechanical resemblance has not been fully validated. We provide a direct mechanical comparison between human and porcine skin samples using a conventional mechano-analytical technique (microindentation) and a medical application (microneedle insertion), at 35% and 100% relative humidity. Human and porcine skin samples were tested immediately after surgical excision from subjects, and after one freeze-thaw cycle at ‑80 °C to assess the impact of freezing on their mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of fresh human and porcine skin (especially of the stratum corneum) were found to be different for bulk measurements using microindentation; and both types of skin were mechanically affected by freezing. Localized in-plane mechanical properties of skin during microneedle insertion appeared to be more comparable between human and porcine skin samples than their bulk out-of-plane mechanical properties. The results from this study serve as a reference for future mechanical tests conducted with frozen human skin and/or porcine skin as a human skin substitute.

  14. Evaluation of spin freezing versus conventional freezing as part of a continuous pharmaceutical freeze-drying concept for unit doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meyer, L; Van Bockstal, P-J; Corver, J; Vervaet, C; Remon, J P; De Beer, T

    2015-12-30

    Spin-freezing as alternative freezing approach was evaluated as part of an innovative continuous pharmaceutical freeze-drying concept for unit doses. The aim of this paper was to compare the sublimation rate of spin-frozen vials versus traditionally frozen vials in a batch freeze-dryer, and its impact on total drying time. Five different formulations, each having a different dry cake resistance, were tested. After freezing, the traditionally frozen vials were placed on the shelves while the spin-frozen vials were placed in aluminum vial holders providing radial energy supply during drying. Different primary drying conditions and chamber pressures were evaluated. After 2h of primary drying, the amount of sublimed ice was determined in each vial. Each formulation was monitored in-line using NIR spectroscopy during drying to determine the sublimation endpoint and the influence of drying conditions upon total drying time. For all tested formulations and applied freeze-drying conditions, there was a significant higher sublimation rate in the spin-frozen vials. This can be explained by the larger product surface and the lower importance of product resistance because of the much thinner product layers in the spin frozen vials. The in-line NIR measurements allowed evaluating the influence of applied drying conditions on the drying trajectories.

  15. Harnessing the energy accompanying freezing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akyurt, M., E-mail: makyurt@kau.edu.s [Departments of Mechanical Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Tuerkmen, N. [Departments of Mechanical Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Ice pressurization allows the burst and leak testing of practically all tubular materials. {yields} The assembly can be made fully portable for maintenance operations without the use of liquid CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}. {yields} Ice pressurization can work where conventional interference fitting, axial pressing and heat treatment fail. {yields} Uniform pressures can be developed in ice pressurization as opposed to Herzian distributions under plungers. -- Abstract: The progression of freezing of water inside a pipe is reviewed, with special emphasis on bursting. The process of pressure rise in confined bodies of water is discussed. The development of a method utilizing liquid carbon dioxide and liquid nitrogen, for the development of pressures inside closed containers is summarized. Then a novel method, utilizing mechanical refrigeration, is explained for the generation of high pressures. An experimental setup for the latter technique is described and results of experiments are summarized. A number of ways of utilizing the ice-pressurization technique are presented. Certain characteristics and advantages of ice-pressurization are enumerated as regards to burst and leak testing. It is noted that a number of other techniques such as shrink fitting, embossing and compaction of powders also seem to be particularly suitable. It is concluded that, with the advent of the portable and novel chilling apparatus, new vistas are approachable for undertaking maintenance operations in hospitals, power plants, nuclear facilities, and other systems that require uninterrupted operation.

  16. The Influence of Freezing Drizzle on Wire Icing during Freezing Fog Events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yue; NIU Shengjie; L(U) Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    Both direct and indirect effects of freezing drizzle on ice accretion were analyzed for ten freezing drizzle events during a comprehensive ice thickness,fog,and precipitation observation campaign carried out during the winter of 2008 and 2009 at Enshi Radar Station (30°17′N,109°16′E),Hubei Province,China.The growth rate of ice thickness was 0.85 mm h-1 during the freezing drizzle period,while the rate was only 0.4 mm h-1 without sleet and freezing drizzle.The rain intensity,liquid water content (LWC),and diameter of freezing drizzle stayed at low values.The development of microphysical properties of fog was suppressed in the freezing drizzle period.A threshold diameter (Dc) was proposed to estimate the influence of freezing drizzle on different size ranges of fog droplets.Fog droplets with a diameter less than Dc would be affected slightly by freezing drizzle,while larger fog droplets would be affected significantly.Dc had a correlation with the average rain intensity,with a correlation coefficient of 0.78.The relationships among the microphysical properties of fog droplets were all positive when the effect of freezing drizzle was weak,while they became poor positive correlations,or even negative correlations during freezing drizzle period.The direct contribution of freezing drizzle to ice thickness was about 14.5%.Considering both the direct and indirect effects,we suggest that freezing drizzle could act as a “catalyst” causing serious icing conditions.

  17. Snow Melting and Freezing on Older Townhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anker; Claesson, Johan

    2011-01-01

    The snowy winter of 2009/2010 in Scandinavia prompted many newspaper articles on icicles falling from buildings and the risk this presented for people walking below. The problem starts with snow melting on the roof due to heat loss from the building. Melt water runs down the roof and some...... of it will freeze on the overhang. The rest of the water will either run off or freeze in gutters and downpipes or turn into icicles. This paper describes use of a model for the melting and freezing of snow on roofs. Important parameters are roof length, overhang length, heat resistance of roof and overhang......, outdoor and indoor temperature, snow thickness and thermal conductivity. If the snow thickness is above a specific limit value – the snow melting limit- some of the snow will melt. Another interesting limit value is the dripping limit. All the melt water will freeze on the overhang, if the snow thickness...

  18. Well-plate freeze-drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trnka, Hjalte; Rantanen, Jukka; Grohganz, Holger

    2015-01-01

    due to increasing amount of amorphous matter in the samples was observed in both vials and well plates. Cake collapse was found to be representative in well plates and could be effectively quantified using image analysis. Reconstitution time was also found to be equal in all three platforms. Finally......Abstract Context: Freeze-drying in presence of excipients is a common practice to stabilize biomacromolecular formulations. The composition of this formulation is known to affect the quality of the final product. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate freeze-drying in well-plates...... as a high throughput platform for formulation screening of freeze-dried products. Methods: Model formulations consisting of mannitol, sucrose and bovine serum albumin were freeze-dried in brass well plates, plastic well plates and vials. Physical properties investigated were solid form, residual moisture...

  19. Freezing phenomena in ice-water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akyurt, M.; Zaki, G.; Habeebullah, B. [Fakieh Center for Applied Research, Makkah Al-Mukarramah (Saudi Arabia); King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2002-09-01

    The characteristics of solidification and melting are reviewed. The properties of water and ice and the phase diagram of water are discussed with special emphasis on ice density. A concise account of the freezing process and the Stefan problem is presented. To this end, the four stages of freezing are identified, supercooling, nucleation and the formation of dendritic ice, the growth of concentric rings of solid ice at 0{sup o}C and the final cooling of the solid ice are treated in some detail. The subject of bursting of pipes is given particular emphasis. Attention is drawn to a common misconception on pipe bursting and to misleading relationships for the computation of freezing time for ice blockage. Several current applications of melting and freezing systems are outlined. (author)

  20. Medicineringsfejl ved generisk substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rölfing, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Generic substitution is a major cause of medical mistakes in the general population. Danish legislation obligates pharmacies to substitute prescribed medicine with the cheapest equivalent formulation, despite variations in product name, packaging, shape and colour. Consequently, medical mistakes ...... occur. Scientific evidence on the consequences of generic substitution is sparse. Call upon fellow health workers to report medical mistakes to the national entities and scientific peers, in order to increase awareness and scientific evidence about the problem....

  1. Cyclotomic Aperiodic Substitution Tilings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Pautze

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The class of Cyclotomic Aperiodic Substitution Tilings (CASTs is introduced. Its vertices are supported on the 2 n -th cyclotomic field. It covers a wide range of known aperiodic substitution tilings of the plane with finite rotations. Substitution matrices and minimal inflation multipliers of CASTs are discussed as well as practical use cases to identify specimen with individual dihedral symmetry D n or D 2 n , i.e., the tiling contains an infinite number of patches of any size with dihedral symmetry D n or D 2 n only by iteration of substitution rules on a single tile.

  2. Freezing of water droplets colliding with kaolinite particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Erik Anders; Delval, Christophe Eric Ludovic; Freiherr von Und zu Hessberg, P J H;

    2009-01-01

    Contact freezing of single supercooled water droplets colliding with kaolinite dust particles has been investigated. The experiments were performed with droplets levitated in an electrodynamic balance at temperatures from 240 to 268 K. Under dry conditions freezing 5 was observed to occur below 2...... studies to describe freezing rates are appropriate for kaolinite aerosol particles. Mechanisms for contact freezing are briefly discussed....

  3. Isochoric and isobaric freezing of fish muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Năstase, Gabriel; Lyu, Chenang; Ukpai, Gideon; Șerban, Alexandru; Rubinsky, Boris

    2017-02-19

    We have recently shown that, a living organism, which succumbs to freezing to -4 °C in an isobaric thermodynamic system (constant atmospheric pressure), can survive freezing to -4 °C in an isochoric thermodynamic system (constant volume). It is known that the mechanism of cell damage in an isobaric system is the freezing caused increase in extracellular osmolality, and, the consequent cell dehydration. An explanation for the observed survival during isochoric freezing is the thermodynamic modeling supported hypothesis that, in the isochoric frozen solution the extracellular osmolality is comparable to the cell intracellular osmolality. Therefore, cells in the isochoric frozen organism do not dehydrate, and the tissue maintains its morphological integrity. Comparing the histology of: a) fresh fish white muscle, b) fresh muscle frozen to -5 °C in an isobaric system and c) fresh muscle frozen to -5 °C I in an isochoric system, we find convincing evidence of the mechanism of cell dehydration during isobaric freezing. In contrast, the muscle tissue frozen to -5 °C in an isochoric system appears morphologically identical to fresh tissue, with no evidence of dehydration. This is the first experimental evidence in support of the hypothesis that in isochoric freezing there is no cellular dehydration and therefore the morphology of the frozen tissue remains intact.

  4. Composite bone substitutes prepared by two methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoe Y.

    A variety of ceramics and polymers exists that can be used as bone substitute materials with desirable properties such as biocompatibility and osteoconductivity. A key feature missing in these bone substitutes, or scaffolds, is the ability to bear loads. This work explored two methods for solving this problem. The first used cancellous bone taken from bovine femoral bone to create a natural scaffold through a heat treating process that eliminated the organic components and sintered the bone minerals, known as hydroxyapatite, together. The strength and Young's modulus of the natural scaffold were greatly improved after polymer infiltration with polymethylmethacrylate. Unfortunately, compression testing revealed that there was not a good interfacial bond between the mineral and polymer phases. The second method employed a freeze-casting technique to create synthetic hydroxyapatite scaffolds that have an aligned lamellar microstructure. By varying the amount of hydroxyapatite in the initial slurry mixture and the cooling rate, synthetic scaffolds with a range of porosities and strengths was produced. The highest solid loading and fastest cooling rate produced a scaffold with a strength and modulus approaching that of cortical bone. Further study is required to produce a two phase composite that is chemically bonded together for optimal performance. The synthetic scaffolds, with their tunable mechanical properties and ease of fabrication, make them a promising material for a load-bearing bone substitute.

  5. The role of antioxidant system in freezing acclimation-induced freezing resistance of Populus suaveolens cuttings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Lei; Lin Shan-zhi; Zheng Hui-quan; Lei Yang; Zhang Qian; Zhang Zhi-yi

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the changes in the contents of H2O2, malonaldehyde (MDA) and endogenous antioxidants, the activities of protective enzymes and some critical enzymes involved in the ascorbate-glutathione (ASA-GSH) cycle as well as freezing resistance(expressed as LT50) and correlations mentioned above, in detail using Populus suaveolens cuttings. The purpose was to explore the physiological mechanism of the enhancement of freezing resistance induced by freezing acclimation at -20℃, and to elucidate the physiological mechanisms by which trees adapt to freezing. The results showed that freezing acclimation enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR), ascorbate peroxidase(APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and glutathione reductase (GR). And it increased the contents of reduced ascorbate(ASA), reduced glutathione (GSH), dehydroascorbate (DHA) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG). However, H2O2 and MDA contents and LT50 of cuttings were decreased. LT50 in cuttings was found to be closely correlated to the levels of SOD, POD, CAT, APX,DHAR, MDAR, GR, H2O2, MDA, ASA, GSH, DHA and GSSG during freezing acclimation. This suggested that the enhancement of freezing resistance of cuttings induced by freezing acclimation may relate to the distinct increase for the levels of SOD, POD, CAT,APX, DHAR, MDAR,GR,ASA, GSH, DHA, and GSSG. In addition, the observed levels of APX, DHAR, MDAR, GR, ASA, DHA,GSH and GSSG were higher than those of SOD, POD and CAT during freezing acclimation. It indicated that a higher capacity of the ASA-GSH cycle is required for H2O2 detoxification, and growth and development of cuttings. Based on the obtained results, it can be concluded that the ASA-GSH cycle plays an important role in enhancement of freezing resistance of P. suaveolens cuttings during freezing acclimation.

  6. A new freeze casting technique for ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kiyoshi

    A new freeze casting technique for ceramics capable of manufacturing near room temperature with a sublimable vehicle has been developed in order to eliminate expensive processes under extremely cold temperatures in the conventional freeze casting. Fluid concentrated slurries of Al2O 3 powder in molten camphene (C10H16) were successfully prepared at 55°C with a small amount of a dispersant. These slurries were quickly solidified (frozen) at room temperature to yield a rigid solid green body, where the frozen camphene was easily removed by sublimation (freeze-drying) with negligible shrinkage. Sintering was successfully conducted without any special binder burnout process to yield dense sintered bodies (over 98% T.D). An organic alloy with a eutectic composition in the naphthalene (C 10H8)-camphor (C10H16O) binary system with a eutectic temperature of 31°C was also found to be a successful vehicle for the new ceramic freeze casting. The fabrication processes are almost the same as those with camphene. It was found that vehicles with off-eutectic compositions resulted in large voids in the sintered body due to the ceramic particle rejection by pro-eutectic crystals during freezing. At the eutectic composition, fine lamellar microstructure in the solidified vehicle inhibits the particle rejection. The proposed advantages of the new freeze casting technique with a sublimable vehicle include; (1) elimination of extremely cold temperatures used in conventional freeze casting; (2) elimination of troublesome binder burnout process; and (3) fast manufacturing cycle due to quick solidification. Porous ceramic bodies with unique interconnected pore channels were fabricated by the new freeze casting with lower solid content. The unique channels surrounded by fully dense walls have nearly circular cross-sections unlike conventional aqueous freeze casting. The porosity and the channel diameters are controllable by the solid content in the slurry. The unique channels are

  7. An Investigation of Freezing of Supercooled Water on Anti-Freeze Protein Modified Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thibaut V J Charpentier; Anne Neville; Paul Millner; Rob Hewson; Ardian Morina

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates how functionalization ofaluminium surfaces with natural type Ⅲ Anti-Freeze Protein (AFP) affects the mechanism of heterogeneous ice nucleation.First the bulk ice nucleation properties of distilled water and aqueous solution of AFP were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry.Then the modified surface was characterized by Secondary Ions Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS),Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy and contact angle measurement.Freezing experiments were then conducted in which water droplets underwent a slow controlled cooling.This study shows that compared to uncoated aluminium,the anti-freeze proteins functionalized surfaces exhibit a higher and narrower range of freezing temperature.It was found that these proteins that keep living organisms from freezing in cold environment act in the opposite way once immobilized on surfaces by promoting ice nucleation.Some suggestions regarding the mechanism of action of the observed phenomena were proposed based on the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT).

  8. Freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are of great importance for the food and biotechnology industry. They are widely used as starters for manufacturing food (e.g., yogurt, cheese, fermented meats, and vegetables) and probiotic products, as well as for green chemistry applications. Freeze-drying or lyophilization is a convenient method for preservation of bacteria. By reducing water activity to values below 0.2, it allows long-term storage and low-cost distribution at suprazero temperatures, while minimizing losses in viability and functionality. Stabilization of bacteria via freeze-drying starts with the addition of a protectant solution to the bacterial suspension. Freeze-drying includes three steps, namely, (1) freezing of the concentrated and protected cell suspension, (2) primary drying to remove ice by sublimation, and (3) secondary drying to remove unfrozen water by desorption. In this chapter we describe a method for freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria at a pilot scale, thus allowing control of the process parameters for maximal survival and functionality recovery.

  9. Female Fertility: Is it Safe to "Freeze?"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the safety and risk of cryopreservation in female fertility preservation. Data sources: The data analyzed in this review were the English articles from 1980 to 2013 from journal databases, primarily PubMed and Google scholar. The criteria used in the literature search show as following: (1 human; embryo; cryopreservation/freezing/vitrification, (2 human; oocyte/immature oocyte; cryopreservation/ freezing/vitrification, (3 human; ovarian tissue transplantation; cryopreservation/freezing/vitrification, (4 human; aneuploidy/DNA damage/epigenetic; cryopreservation/freezing/vitrification, and (5 human; fertility preservation; maternal age. Study selection: The risk ratios based on survival rate, maturation rate, fertilization rate, cleavage rate, implantation rate, pregnancy rate, and clinical risk rate were acquired from relevant meta-analysis studies. These studies included randomized controlled trials or studies with one of the primary outcome measures covering cryopreservation of human mature oocytes, embryos, and ovarian tissues within the last 7 years (from 2006 to 2013, since the pregnancy rates of oocyte vitrification were significantly increased due to the improved techniques. The data involving immature oocyte cryopreservation obtained from individual studies was also reviewed by the authors. Results: Vitrifications of mature oocytes and embryos obtained better clinical outcomes and did not increase the risks of DNA damage, spindle configuration, embryonic aneuploidy, and genomic imprinting as compared with fresh and slow-freezing procedures, respectively. Conclusions: Both embryo and oocyte vitrifications are safe applications in female fertility preservation.

  10. Freeze tolerance of soil chytrids from temperate climates in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Frank H; Letcher, Peter M; McGee, Peter A

    2008-08-01

    Very little is known about the capacity of soil chytrids to withstand freezing in the field. Tolerance to freezing was tested in 21 chytrids isolated from cropping and undisturbed soils in temperate Australia. Samples of thalli grown on peptone-yeast-glucose (PYG) agar were incubated for seven days at -15 degrees C. Recovery of growth after thawing and transferring to fresh medium at 20 degrees C indicated survival. All isolates in the Blastocladiales and Spizellomycetales survived freezing in all tests. All isolates in the Chytridiales also survived freezing in some tests. None of the isolates in the Rhizophydiales survived freezing in any of the tests. However, some isolates in the Rhizophydiales recovered growth after freezing if they were grown on PYG agar supplemented with either 1% sodium chloride or 1% glycerol prior to freezing. After freezing, the morphology of the thalli of all isolates was observed under LM. In those isolates that recovered growth after transfer to fresh media, mature zoosporangia were observed in the monocentric isolates and resistant sporangia or resting spores in the polycentric isolates. Encysted zoospores in some monocentric isolates also survived freezing. In some of the experiments the freezing and thawing process caused visible structural damage to the thalli. The production of zoospores after freezing and thawing was also used as an indicator of freeze tolerance. The chytrids in this study responded differently to freezing. These data add significantly to our limited knowledge of freeze tolerance in chytrids but leave many questions unanswered.

  11. Heat transfer coefficient of cryotop during freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W J; Zhou, X L; Wang, H S; Liu, B L; Dai, J J

    2013-01-01

    Cryotop is an efficient vitrification method for cryopreservation of oocytes. It has been widely used owing to its simple operation and high freezing rate. Recently, the heat transfer performance of cryotop was studied by numerical simulation in several studies. However, the range of heat transfer coefficient in the simulation is uncertain. In this study, the heat transfer coefficient for cryotop during freezing process was analyzed. The cooling rates of 40 percent ethylene glycol (EG) droplet in cryotop during freezing were measured by ultra-fast measurement system and calculated by numerical simulation at different value of heat transfer coefficient. Compared with the results obtained by two methods, the range of the heat transfer coefficient necessary for the numerical simulation of cryotop was determined, which is between 9000 W/(m(2)·K) and 10000 W/(m (2)·K).

  12. Freezing precipitation in Russia and the Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Zavyalova

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Conditions for freezing precipitation (FP, including freezing rain (FR and freezing drizzle (FZ for 8 airports in Russia and 4 in the Ukraine are studied on the basis of 10 to 20-year series of surface observations, radiosonde and objective analysis data. Statistical characteristics are presented of the FP episode durations and of occurrence frequency dependences on surface air temperature, wind direction and speed and cloud base height. From the radiosonde data, it is found that the "classical mechanism" of FP generation (for which, stratification of "warm nose" type in the cloud layer is necessary is not frequent: most of FP cases are associated with "all cold" conditions in the lower 3-km layer, that is, with negative temperatures in and below the clouds.

  13. Synthesis of substituted pyrazines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagoria, Philip F.; Zhang, Mao Xi

    2016-10-04

    A method for synthesizing a pyrazine-containing material according to one embodiment includes contacting an iminodiacetonitrile derivative with a base and a reagent selected from a group consisting of hydroxylamine, a hydroxylamine salt, an aliphatic primary amine, a secondary amine, an aryl-substituted alkylamine a heteroaryl-substituted alkyl amine, an alcohol, an alkanolamine and an aryl alcoholamine. Additional methods and several reaction products are presented. ##STR00001##

  14. Regulation of SMAD transcription factors during freezing in the freeze tolerant wood frog, Rana sylvatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Oscar A; Hadj-Moussa, Hanane; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-11-01

    The wood frog, Rana sylvatica, survives sub-zero winter temperatures by undergoing full body freezing for weeks at a time, during which it displays no measurable brain activity, no breathing, and a flat-lined heart. Freezing is a hypometabolic state characterized by a global suppression of gene expression that is elicited in part by transcription factors that coordinate the activation of vital pro-survival pathways. Smad transcription factors respond to TGF-β signalling and are involved in numerous cellular functions from development to stress. Given the identity of genes they regulate, we hypothesized that they may be involved in coordinating gene expression during freezing. Protein expression of Smad1/2/3/4/5 in response to freezing was examined in 24h frozen and 8h thawed wood frog tissues using western immunoblotting, with the determination of subcellular localization in muscle and liver tissues. Transcript levels of smad2, smad4 and downstream genes (serpine1, myostatin, and tsc22d3) were measured by RT-PCR. Tissue-specific responses were observed during freezing where brain, heart, and liver had elevated levels of pSmad3, and skeletal muscle and kidneys had increased levels of pSmad1/5 and pSmad2 during freeze/thaw cycle, while protein and transcript levels remained constant. There were increases in nuclear levels of pSmad2 in muscle and pSmad3 in liver. Transcript levels of serpine1 were induced in heart, muscle, and liver, myostatin in muscle, and tsc22d3 in heart, and liver during freezing. These results suggest a novel freeze-responsive activation of Smad proteins that may play an important role in coordinating pro-survival gene networks necessary for freeze tolerance.

  15. Empirical codon substitution matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonnet Gaston H

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Codon substitution probabilities are used in many types of molecular evolution studies such as determining Ka/Ks ratios, creating ancestral DNA sequences or aligning coding DNA. Until the recent dramatic increase in genomic data enabled construction of empirical matrices, researchers relied on parameterized models of codon evolution. Here we present the first empirical codon substitution matrix entirely built from alignments of coding sequences from vertebrate DNA and thus provide an alternative to parameterized models of codon evolution. Results A set of 17,502 alignments of orthologous sequences from five vertebrate genomes yielded 8.3 million aligned codons from which the number of substitutions between codons were counted. From this data, both a probability matrix and a matrix of similarity scores were computed. They are 64 × 64 matrices describing the substitutions between all codons. Substitutions from sense codons to stop codons are not considered, resulting in block diagonal matrices consisting of 61 × 61 entries for the sense codons and 3 × 3 entries for the stop codons. Conclusion The amount of genomic data currently available allowed for the construction of an empirical codon substitution matrix. However, more sequence data is still needed to construct matrices from different subsets of DNA, specific to kingdoms, evolutionary distance or different amount of synonymous change. Codon mutation matrices have advantages for alignments up to medium evolutionary distances and for usages that require DNA such as ancestral reconstruction of DNA sequences and the calculation of Ka/Ks ratios.

  16. Building the Method to Determine the Rate of Freezing Water in Penaeus monodon of the Freezing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Tan Dzung

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The method of determination the rate of freezing water in Penaeus monodon of freezing process was established on base the equation of energy balance in warming up process Penaeus monodon after freezing to determine specific heat of Penaeus monodon. The result obtained was built the mathematical model (19 to determine the rate of freezing water according to the freezing temperature of Penaeus monodon. The results indicated that when water was completely frozen (ω = 1 or 100%, the optimal freezing temperature of Penaeus monodon was-22.00°C.

  17. Scaling-Up Eutectic Freeze Crystallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genceli, F.E.

    2008-01-01

    A novel crystallization technology, Eutectic Freeze Crystallization (EFC) has been investigated and further developed in this thesis work. EFC operates around the eutectic temperature and composition of aqueous solutions and can be used for recovery of (valuable) dissolved salts (and/or or acids) an

  18. Anomalous freezing behavior of nanoscale liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangler, E. J.; Kumar, P. B. S.; Laradji, M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the finite size of one-component liposomes on their phase behavior is investigated via simulations of an implicit-solvent model of self-assembled lipid bilayers. We found that the high curvature of nanoscale liposomes has a significant effect on their freezing behavior. While...

  19. Liquid carbon: structure near the freezing line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghiringhelli, L.M.; Los, J.H.; Meijer, E.J.; Fasolino, A.; Frenkel, D.

    2005-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the structure of liquid carbon near the freezing line. The results are obtained by molecular simulation using a recently developed state-of-the-art bond order potential. We find that along the melting line the liquid is predominantly threefold coordinated up to pres

  20. Freeze-thaw induced gelation of alginates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Shen, Wei; Chen, Zhigang; Wu, Tao

    2016-09-01

    Adding divalent ions or lowering pH below the pKa values of alginate monomers are common ways in preparing alginate gels. Herein a new way of preparing alginate gels using freeze-thaw technique is described. Solvent crystallization during freezing drove the polymers to associate into certain structures that became the junction zones of hydrogels after thawing. It enabled the preparation of alginate gels at pH 4.0 and 3.5, two pH at which the gel could not be formed previously. At pH 3.0 where alginate gel could be formed initially, applying freeze-thaw treatment increased the gel storage modulus almost 100 times. The formation of hydrogels and the resulting gel properties, such as dynamic moduli and gel syneresis were influenced by the pH values, number of freeze-thaw cycles, alginate concentrations, and ionic strengths. The obtained hydrogels were soft and demonstrated a melting behavior upon storage, which may find novel applications in the biomedical industry.

  1. Asset Freezing: Smart Sanction or Criminal Charge?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, Melissa van den; Hazelhorst, Monique; Zanger, Wouter de

    2011-01-01

    In this article the question is asked whether asset freezing can be qualified as a criminal charge within the meaning of Article6 ECHR and if yes, what effects this qualification may have on the legislative framework on so called smart sanctions. Byanalysing Community and EU law and case law of the

  2. Nucleation Pathways For Freezing Of Two Grades Of Zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Rulison, Aaron; Bayuzick, Robert; Hofmeister, William; Morton, Craig

    1996-01-01

    Report discusses classical nucleation theory of freezing and describes experimental study of nucleation mechanisms that predominate during freezing of spherical specimens of initially molten zirconium levitated electrostatically in vacuum.

  3. Influence of secondary packing on the freezing time of chiken meat in air blast freezing tunnels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santos, Clarice de Ávila; Laurindo, João Borges; Silveira Júnior, Vivaldo; Hense, Haiko

    2008-01-01

    ...) in order to remove the packaging thermal resistance. The assays, performed in a industrial plant, demonstrated that CCB used commercially for meat freezing have a high heat transfer resistance...

  4. Freezing characteristics and texture variation after freezing and thawing of four fruit types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpassorn Sirijariyawat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available One major problem with frozen fruits is a loss of texture. Therefore this study investigated the effects of the freezingprocess on the freezing profiles, texture, and drip loss of apple, mango, cantaloupe, and pineapple fruit samples. All frozenthawedfruits varied in these three properties because of diversity in the fresh fruits. Mango had the highest total solublesolids content and the lowest freezing point, whereas pineapple showed the highest freezing rate. The highest firmness andcrunchy texture were found in fresh apple, and these properties were absent in the other fresh fruits. The firmness of allfrozen fruits significantly decreased by different percentages as compared to those of the fresh fruits. The drip loss of eachfruit type was also significantly different with apple samples having the highest firmness decrease and drip loss. This studyshows that freezing characteristics and frozen fruit properties depend on type of fruit.

  5. Female Fertility: Is it Safe to "Freeze?"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Zhang; Li-Ying Yan; Xu Zhi; Jie Yan; Jie Qiao

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the safety and risk of cryopreservation in female fertility preservation.Data sources:The data analyzed in this review were the English articles from 1980 to 2013 from journal databases,primarily PubMed and Google scholar.The criteria used in the literature search show as following:(1) human; embryo; cryopreservation/freezing/vitrification,(2) human; oocyte/immature oocyte; cryopreservation/freezing/vitrification,(3) human; ovarian tissue transplantation; cryopreservation/ freezing/vitrification,(4) human; aneuploidy/DNA damage/epigenetic; cryopreservation/freezing/vitrification,and (5) human; fertility preservation; maternal age.Study selection:The risk ratios based on survival rate,maturation rate,fertilization rate,cleavage rate,implantation rate,pregnancy rate,and clinical risk rate were acquired from relevant meta-analysis studies.These studies included randomized controlled trials or studies with one of the primary outcome measures covering cryopreservation of human mature oocytes,embryos,and ovarian tissues within the last 7 years (from 2006 to 2013,since the pregnancy rates of oocyte vitrification were significantly increased due to the improved techniques).The data involving immature oocyte cryopreservation obtained from individual studies was also reviewed by the authors.Results:Vitrifications of mature oocytes and embryos obtained better clinical outcomes and did not increase the risks of DNA damage,spindle configuration,embryonic aneuploidy,and genomic imprinting as compared with fresh and slow-freezing procedures,respectively.Conclusions:Both embryo and oocyte vitrifications are safe applications in female fertility preservation.

  6. COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN METHOD OF FREEZE WALL AND ITS APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENXiangsheng

    1995-01-01

    Artificially ground freezing (AGF) is one of the main methods to establish temporary support for shaft sinking in unstable water bearing strata. Domke(1915) formula based on frozen soil strength has widely been used for designing freeze wall thickness. However, it can not ensure the stability of freeze wall, nor guarantee the safety of shaft construction as frozen depth increase in unstable water bearing strata. F.A.Auld (1985, 1988) presented a design method of freeze wall, which is on the basis of strength and stability, together with deformation of freeze wall.He combined deformation of freeze wall, lining and deformation of freeze tube to set up a comprehensive design method for freeze wall. This paper, according to the practice in China, describes a comprehensive design method for deep freeze wall, considering influence of excavation rate of advance, unsupported length of freeze wall and the sump state on inward deformation of freeze wall, and the allowable pipe deformation caused by inward deformation of freeze wall. Finally, successful application of this method to the large scale coal mine-Jining No.2 Mine in Shandong Province of China, is presented.It saved much investment compared with F.A.Auld's design for the same mine on behalf of Shell Coal International.

  7. 7 CFR 58.620 - Freezing and packaging rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing and packaging rooms. 58.620 Section 58.620 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....620 Freezing and packaging rooms. The rooms used for freezing and packaging frozen desserts shall...

  8. Objective video quality assessment method for freeze distortion based on freeze aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Keishiro; Okamoto, Jun; Kurita, Takaaki

    2006-01-01

    With the development of the broadband network, video communications such as videophone, video distribution, and IPTV services are beginning to become common. In order to provide these services appropriately, we must manage them based on subjective video quality, in addition to designing a network system based on it. Currently, subjective quality assessment is the main method used to quantify video quality. However, it is time-consuming and expensive. Therefore, we need an objective quality assessment technology that can estimate video quality from video characteristics effectively. Video degradation can be categorized into two types: spatial and temporal. Objective quality assessment methods for spatial degradation have been studied extensively, but methods for temporal degradation have hardly been examined even though it occurs frequently due to network degradation and has a large impact on subjective quality. In this paper, we propose an objective quality assessment method for temporal degradation. Our approach is to aggregate multiple freeze distortions into an equivalent freeze distortion and then derive the objective video quality from the equivalent freeze distortion. Specifically, our method considers the total length of all freeze distortions in a video sequence as the length of the equivalent single freeze distortion. In addition, we propose a method using the perceptual characteristics of short freeze distortions. We verified that our method can estimate the objective video quality well within the deviation of subjective video quality.

  9. Aryl substitution of pentacenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas R. Waterloo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of 11 new pentacene derivatives has been synthesized, with unsymmetrical substitution based on a trialkylsilylethynyl group at the 6-position and various aryl groups appended to the 13-position. The electronic and physical properties of the new pentacene chromophores have been analyzed by UV–vis spectroscopy (solution and thin films, thermoanalytical methods (DSC and TGA, cyclic voltammetry, as well as X-ray crystallography (for 8 derivatives. X-ray crystallography has been specifically used to study the influence of unsymmetrical substitution on the solid-state packing of the pentacene derivatives. The obtained results add to our ability to better predict substitution patterns that might be helpful for designing new semiconductors for use in solid-state devices.

  10. Bone substitute biomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, K

    2014-01-01

    Bone substitute biomaterials are fundamental to the biomedical sector, and have recently benefitted from extensive research and technological advances aimed at minimizing failure rates and reducing the need for further surgery. This book reviews these developments, with a particular focus on the desirable properties for bone substitute materials and their potential to encourage bone repair and regeneration. Part I covers the principles of bone substitute biomaterials for medical applications. One chapter reviews the quantification of bone mechanics at the whole-bone, micro-scale, and non-scale levels, while others discuss biomineralization, osteoductivization, materials to fill bone defects, and bioresorbable materials. Part II focuses on biomaterials as scaffolds and implants, including multi-functional scaffolds, bioceramics, and titanium-based foams. Finally, Part III reviews further materials with the potential to encourage bone repair and regeneration, including cartilage grafts, chitosan, inorganic poly...

  11. Currency Substitution in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail H. Genc

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether the recent depreciations in the Turkish currency (Lira resulted in the currency substitution away from Lira by using quarterly data over the period from 1987:1 to 2000: 2 with M1 and M2 monetary aggregates and income, interest rate and exchange rate. Other than the variety of monetary aggregates, we tried different ways of including the interest rate into the models to ensure the robustness of our results. Our analysis shows that the currency substitution in fact happened with Lira.

  12. Freezing tolerance of winter wheat as influenced by extended growth at low temperature and exposure to freeze-thaw cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the seasons progress, autumn-planted winter wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L.) first gain, then progressively lose freezing tolerance. Exposing the plants to freeze-thaw cycles of -3/3°C results in increased ability to tolerate subsequent freezing to potentially damaging temperatures. This stu...

  13. The freezing and supercooling of garlic (Allium sativum L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Christian; Seignemartin, Violaine; James, Stephen J. [Food Refrigeration and Process Engineering Research Centre (FRPERC), University of Bristol, Churchill Building, Langford, Bristol BS40 5DU (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    This work shows that peeled garlic cloves demonstrate significant supercooling during freezing under standard conditions and can be stored at temperatures well below their freezing point (-2.7 C) without freezing. The nucleation point or 'metastable limit temperature' (the point at which ice crystal nucleation is initiated) of peeled garlic cloves was found to be between -7.7 and -14.6 C. Peeled garlic cloves were stored under static air conditions at temperatures between -6 and -9 C for up to 69 h without freezing, and unpeeled whole garlic bulbs and cloves were stored for 1 week at -6 C without freezing. (author)

  14. Saving Outweighs Substituting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sophia

    2007-01-01

    @@ Energy crisis has become great challenge to the whole world.As the vehicle population keeps soaring in China,effectie countermeasures should be taken timely to deal with global energy crisis.There are two ways out:one is to substitute and one is to save.

  15. Simulating currency substitution bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Boon (Martin); C.J.M. Kool (Clemens); C.G. de Vries (Casper)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractThe sign and size of estimates of the elasticity of currency substitution critically depend on the definition of the oppurtunity costs of holding money. We investigate possible biases by means of Monte Carlo experiments, as sufficient real data are not available.

  16. Fish antifreeze protein and the freezing and recrystallization of ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, C A; DeVries, A L; Oolman, L D

    Antifreeze glycopeptide and peptides from the blood of polar fishes prevent the growth of ice crystals in water at temperatures down to approximately 1 degree C below freezing point, but do not appreciably influence the equilibrium freezing point. This freezing point hysteresis must be a disequilibrium effect, or it would violate Gibbs' phase rule, but the separate freezing and melting points are experimentally very definite: ice neither melts nor freezes perceptibly within the 'hysteresis gap', for periods of hours or days. We report here unusual crystal faces on ice crystals grown from solutions of very low concentrations of the anti-freeze glycopeptides and peptides. This is a clue to the mechanism of freezing inhibition, and it may be the basis of a simple, very sensitive test for antifreeze material. Very low concentrations of the antifreeze protein are also remarkably effective in preventing the recrystallization of ice.

  17. Volume versus surface nucleation in freezing aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurbjörnsson, Ómar F.; Signorell, Ruth

    2008-05-01

    The present study puts an end to the ongoing controversy regarding volume versus surface nucleation in freezing aerosols: Our study on nanosized aerosol particles demonstrates that current state of the art measurements of droplet ensembles cannot distinguish between the two mechanisms. The reasons are inherent experimental uncertainties as well as approximations used to analyze the kinetics. The combination of both can lead to uncertainties in the rate constants of two orders of magnitude, with important consequences for the modeling of atmospheric processes.

  18. [Equipment for spray-freezing in ophthalmology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, M; Matthes, R

    1991-05-01

    The authors discuss the theoretical background of the method of spray/freezing for destructive processes and their advantages. They demonstrate a cryo-apparatus IKG 3 for liquid nitrogen which is part of the Dresden equipment and was elaborated by the department for cryomedicine of the "Carl Gustav Carus" Academy in cooperation with the Technical University in Dresden. The apparatus produces a fine dispensable spray of the cooling mixture and permits treatment even of small tissue areas.

  19. Freezing of charged colloids in slit pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandner, Stefan; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2008-12-28

    Using Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical and isobaric ensembles we investigate freezing phenomena in a charged colloidal suspension confined to narrow slit pores. Our model involves only the macroions which interact via a Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) potential supplemented by a soft-sphere potential. We focus on DLVO parameters typical for moderately charged silica particles (with charges Z approximately 35) in solvents of low ionic strengths. The corresponding DLVO interactions are too weak to drive a (bulk) freezing transition. Nevertheless, for sufficiently small surface separations L(z) the confined systems display not only layering but also significant in-plane crystalline order at chemical potentials where the bulk system is a globally stable fluid (capillary freezing). At confinement conditions related to two-layer systems the observed in-plane structures are consistent with those detected in ground state calculations for perfect Yukawa bilayers [R. Messina and H. Lowen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 146101 (2003)]. Here we additionally observe (at fixed L(z)) a compression-induced first-order phase transition from a two-layer to a three-layer system with different in-plane structure, in agreement with previous findings for pure hard spheres.

  20. Sperm Preservation using Freeze-Drying Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAKDIR SAILI

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of cryopreservation method for bull semen, cryopreservation become an alternative method for maintaining gamet resources of certain animal which is threatened or near extinction. This technology was then applied to the preservation of embryo, oocyte, ovary and testis. The application of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI for which sperm motility is unnecessary had supported the effort to create simplified method such as freeze-drying for sperm preservation. Due to the benefit of ICSI over the conventional in vitro fertilization (IVF the spermatozoon could be mechanically driven to pass through the zona pellucida and entering the cytoplasm of oocytes prior to fertilization. The freeze-drying method is an alternative method in sperm preservation which ignored the motility of sperm. The sperm resulted from this technique is in drying state, therefore, it might be stored in room temperature or in refrigerator. Many reports have claimed that freeze-dried sperm which is not motile but has an intact DNA was able to fertilize oocytes, even produced offspring in mouse.

  1. Spin-freezing perspective on cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Philipp; Hoshino, Shintaro; Shinaoka, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The high-temperature superconducting state in cuprates appears if charge carriers are doped into a Mott-insulating parent compound. An unresolved puzzle is the unconventional nature of the normal state above the superconducting dome and its connection to the superconducting instability. At weak hole doping, a "pseudogap" metal state with signatures of time-reversal symmetry breaking is observed, which near-optimal doping changes into a "strange metal" with non-Fermi-liquid properties. Qualitatively similar phase diagrams are found in multiorbital systems, such as pnictides, where the unconventional metal states arise from a Hund-coupling-induced spin freezing. Here, we show that the relevant model for cuprates, the single-orbital Hubbard model on the square lattice, can be mapped onto an effective multiorbital problem with strong ferromagnetic Hund coupling. The spin-freezing physics of this multiorbital system explains the phenomenology of cuprates, including the pseudogap, the strange metal, and the d -wave superconducting instability. Our analysis suggests that spin/orbital freezing is the universal mechanism which controls the properties of unconventional superconductors.

  2. Disaggregating meteorites by automated freeze thaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Christopher R J

    2011-06-01

    An automated freeze-thaw (AFT) instrument for disaggregating meteorites is described. Meteorite samples are immersed in 18.2 MΩ water and hermetically sealed in a clean 30 ml Teflon vial. This vial and its contents are dipped between baths of liquid nitrogen and hot water over a number of cycles by a dual-stepper motor system controlled by LabView. Uniform and periodic intervals of freezing and thawing induce multiple expansions and contractions, such that cracks propagate along natural flaws in the meteorite for a sufficient number of AFT cycles. For the CR2 chondrite NWA801, the boundaries between different phases (i.e., silicates, metal, matrix) became progressively weaker and allowed for an efficient recovery of 500 individual chondrules and chondrule fragments spanning 0.2-4.7 mm diameters after 243 AFT cycles over 103.3 h. Further FT experiments on a basalt analog showed that the time required for freezing and thawing the same number of cycles can be reduced by a factor of ∼4. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  3. The influence of freezing rates on bovine pericardium tissue Freeze-drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Figueiredo Borgognoni

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The bovine pericardium has been used as biomaterial in developing bioprostheses. Freeze-drying is a drying process that could be used for heart valve's preservation. The maintenance of the characteristics of the biomaterial is important for a good heart valve performance. This paper describes the initial step in the development of a bovine pericardium tissue freeze-drying to be used in heart valves. Freeze-drying involves three steps: freezing, primary drying and secondary drying. The freezing step influences the ice crystal size and, consequently, the primary and secondary drying stages. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of freezing rates on the bovine pericardium tissue freeze-drying parameters. The glass transition temperature and the structural behaviour of the lyophilized tissues were determined as also primary and secondary drying time. The slow freezing with thermal treatment presented better results than the other freeze-drying protocols.O pericárdio bovino é um material utilizado na fabricação de biopróteses. A liofilização é um método de secagem que vem sendo estudado para a conservação de válvulas cardíacas. A preservação das características do biomaterial é de fundamental importância no bom funcionamento das válvulas. Este artigo é a primeira etapa do desenvolvimento do ciclo de liofilização do pericárdio bovino. Liofilização é o processo de secagem no qual a água é removida do material congelado por sublimação e desorção da água incongelável, sob pressão reduzida. O congelamento influencia o tamanho do cristal de gelo e, consequentemente, a secagem primária e secundária. O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a influência das taxas de congelamento nos parâmetros de liofilização do pericárdio bovino. Determinou-se a temperatura de transição vítrea e o comportamento estrutural do pericárdio bovino liofilizado. Determinou-se o tempo da secagem primária e secundária. O

  4. Freeze-cast alumina pore networks: Effects of freezing conditions and dispersion medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, S. M.; Xiao, X.; Faber, K. T.

    2015-11-01

    Alumina ceramics were freeze-cast from water- and camphene-based slurries under varying freezing conditions and examined using X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Pore network characteristics, i.e., porosity, pore size, geometric surface area, and tortuosity, were measured from XCT reconstructions and the data were used to develop a model to predict feature size from processing conditions. Classical solidification theory was used to examine relationships between pore size, temperature gradients, and freezing front velocity. Freezing front velocity was subsequently predicted from casting conditions via the two-phase Stefan problem. Resulting models for water-based samples agreed with solidification-based theories predicting lamellar spacing of binary eutectic alloys, and models for camphene-based samples concurred with those for dendritic growth. Relationships between freezing conditions and geometric surface area were also modeled by considering the inverse relationship between pore size and surface area. Tortuosity was determined to be dependent primarily on the type of dispersion medium. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Food freezing with simultaneous surface dehydration: approximate prediction of weight loss during freezing and storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanone, Laura A.; Salvadori, Viviana O.; Mascheroni, Rodolfo H. [Centro de Investigacion Desarollo en Criotecnologia de Alimentos (CIDCA), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, La Plata (Argentina); MODIAL, Facultad de Ingenieria, La Plata (Argentina)

    2005-03-01

    Weight loss of unpackaged foods during freezing and later storage is an important quality and economic issue. It is originated on surface ice sublimation due to differences in water activity between food surface and the refrigerating air. Weight loss rate is determined by refrigerating conditions and product characteristics. The modelling of this phenomenon has merited very little attention; at present there are no simplified methods to predict weight losses during the freezing and the storage of unpackaged foods. In previous studies we developed a detailed model for the simultaneous heat and mass transfer during food freezing and storage with ice sublimation. Based on the information of this numerical model, simplified analytical methods for the prediction of weight loss during the freezing and the storage of unpackaged frozen foods were developed. The methods account for product characteristics and storage conditions. The prediction equations are very simple and results of their use - simulating usual freezing and storage conditions for different products - give very good accuracy when tested against the previously cited numerical model and experimental data. (Author)

  6. Response of New zealand mudsnails Potamopyrgus antipodarum to freezing and near freezing fluctuating water temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Christine M.; James, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    We explored the resilience of the invasive New Zealand mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum to fluctuating winter freezing and near-freezing temperature cycles in laboratory tests. Our goal was to provide data to confirm field observations of mortality and presumed mortality in stream habitats with fluctuating freezing to near-freezing temperatures. We tested individuals from 2 locations with distinctly different thermal regimes and population densities. One location had low snail densities and water temperatures with strong diel and seasonal water variation. The other location had high snail densities and nearly constant water temperatures. Groups of individuals from both locations were tested in each of 3 laboratory-created diel thermal cycles around nominal temperatures of 0, 2, or 4°C. Mortality occurred in cycles around 0°C in both populations, and little to no mortality occurred at temperatures >0°C. Individuals from both sources held in diel 0°C cycles for 72 h showed 100% mortality. Our findings support observations from published field studies that survival was limited in infested habitats subject to freezing temperatures.

  7. Smart Substitutions for Healthy Cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recognition & Awards Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Smart Substitutions Updated:Dec 16,2016 Healthy eating doesn’ ... mean giving up all the foods you love! Smart substitutions can help you maintain an overall healthy ...

  8. Recent Developments in Smart Freezing Technology Applied to Fresh Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ji-Cheng; Zhang, Min; Mujumdar, Arun S; Adhikari, Benu

    2015-10-13

    Due to the increased awareness of consumers in sensorial and nutritional quality of frozen foods, the freezing technology has to seek new and innovative technologies for better retaining the fresh-like quality. In this article, we reviewed the recent developments in smart freezing technology applied to fresh foods. The application of these intelligent technologies and the associated underpinning concepts has greatly improved the quality of frozen foods and the freezing efficiency. These technologies are able to automatically collect the information in-line during freezing and help control the freezing process better. Smart freezing technology includes new and intelligent technologies and concepts applied to the pretreatment of the frozen product, freezing processes, cold chain logistics as well as warehouse management. These technologies enable real-time monitoring of quality during freezing process and help improve product quality and freezing efficiency. We also provided a brief overview of several sensing technologies used to achieve automatic control of individual steps of freezing process. These sensing technologies included computer vision, electronic nose, electronic tongue, digital simulation, confocal laser, near infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance technology and ultrasound. Understanding of the mechanism of these new technologies will be helpful for applying them to improve the quality of frozen foods.

  9. Freeze-drying of live virus vaccines: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, L J J; Daoussi, R; Vervaet, C; Remon, J-P; De Beer, T R M

    2015-10-13

    Freeze-drying is the preferred method for stabilizing live, attenuated virus vaccines. After decades of research on several aspects of the process like the stabilization and destabilization mechanisms of the live, attenuated viruses during freeze-drying, the optimal formulation components and process settings are still matter of research. The molecular complexity of live, attenuated viruses, the multiple destabilization pathways and the lack of analytical techniques allowing the measurement of physicochemical changes in the antigen's structure during and after freeze-drying mean that they form a particular lyophilization challenge. The purpose of this review is to overview the available information on the development of the freeze-drying process of live, attenuated virus vaccines, herewith focusing on the freezing and drying stresses the viruses can undergo during processing as well as on the mechanisms and strategies (formulation and process) that are used to stabilize them during freeze-drying.

  10. Freezing of water saturated in aluminum wool mats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugawara, M.; Onodera, T.; Komatsu, Y.; Tago, M. [Akita University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita (Japan); Beer, H. [Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Institut fur Technische Thermodynamik, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    This paper is concerned with the freezing of water saturated in aluminum wool mats (AWM) around a cooling pipe. Two arrangements of AWM around the pipe are considered, i.e. a disk-type and a roll-type. Freezing mass M(kg/m{sup 2}) in the disk type for a porosity {epsilon} = 0.95, indicates to be two times larger compared with that without AWM (i.e. {epsilon} = 1) at the freezing time t = 180 min. Even a small AWM volume fraction enhances considerably freezing of water in the disk type. However, freezing enhancement in the roll type is small compared with that of the disk type. Numerical calculation predicts well freezing at the disk type arrangement by using an anisotropy model for the effective thermal conductivity of ice/water saturated AWM, however, poor predictions for the roll type arrangement. (orig.)

  11. Freezing of water saturated in aluminum wool mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, M.; Onodera, T.; Komatsu, Y.; Tago, M.; Beer, H.

    2008-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the freezing of water saturated in aluminum wool mats (AWM) around a cooling pipe. Two arrangements of AWM around the pipe are considered, i.e. a disk-type and a roll-type. Freezing mass M(kg/m2) in the disk type for a porosity ɛ = 0.95, indicates to be two times larger compared with that without AWM (i.e. ɛ = 1) at the freezing time t = 180 min. Even a small AWM volume fraction enhances considerably freezing of water in the disk type. However, freezing enhancement in the roll type is small compared with that of the disk type. Numerical calculation predicts well freezing at the disk type arrangement by using an anisotropy model for the effective thermal conductivity of ice/water saturated AWM, however, poor predictions for the roll type arrangement.

  12. Dynamical freeze-out in event-by-event hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Holopainen, Hannu

    2012-01-01

    In hydrodynamical modeling of the ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions the freeze-out is typically performed at a constant temperature or density. In this work we apply a dynamical freeze-out criterion, which compares the hydrodynamical expansion rate with the pion scattering rate. Recently many calculations have been done using event-by-event hydrodynamics where the initial density profile fluctuates from event to event. In these event-by-event calculations the expansion rate fluctuates strongly as well, and thus it is interesting to check how the dynamical freeze-out changes hadron distributions with respect to the constant temperature freeze-out. We present hadron spectra and elliptic flow calculated using (2+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamics, and show the differences between constant temperature and dynamical freeze-out criteria. We find that the differences caused by different freeze-out criteria are small in all studied cases.

  13. Freeze Casting for Assembling Bioinspired Structural Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qunfeng; Huang, Chuanjin; Tomsia, Antoni P

    2017-08-23

    Nature is very successful in designing strong and tough, lightweight materials. Examples include seashells, bone, teeth, fish scales, wood, bamboo, silk, and many others. A distinctive feature of all these materials is that their properties are far superior to those of their constituent phases. Many of these natural materials are lamellar or layered in nature. With its "brick and mortar" structure, nacre is an example of a layered material that exhibits extraordinary physical properties. Finding inspiration in living organisms to create bioinspired materials is the subject of intensive research. Several processing techniques have been proposed to design materials mimicking natural materials, such as layer-by-layer deposition, self-assembly, electrophoretic deposition, hydrogel casting, doctor blading, and many others. Freeze casting, also known as ice-templating, is a technique that has received considerable attention in recent years to produce bioinspired bulk materials. Here, recent advances in the freeze-casting technique are reviewed for fabricating lamellar scaffolds by assembling different dimensional building blocks, including nanoparticles, polymer chains, nanofibers, and nanosheets. These lamellar scaffolds are often infiltrated by a second phase, typically a soft polymer matrix, a hard ceramic matrix, or a metal matrix. The unique architecture of the resultant bioinspired structural materials displays excellent mechanical properties. The challenges of the current research in using the freeze-casting technique to create materials large enough to be useful are also discussed, and the technique's promise for fabricating high-performance nacre-inspired structural materials in the future is reviewed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Mechano-freezing of the ambient water

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xi; Zou, Bo; Sun, Chang Q

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy examination of the 25 deg-C water freezing under compression revealed transition from 1.35 GPa to 0.86 GPa upon ice being formed at continued volume change. The transition is associated with a slight blue shift of the high-frequency phonon (omiga_H ~ 3120 cm-1) and creation of the low-frequency phonons (Omiga_L ~ 200 cm-1). In the liquid and in the solid phase, the increased pressure softens the Omiga_H and stiffens the Omida_L, which indicates the presence of the inter-electron-pair repulsion in both liquid and solid water.

  15. How to freeze drop oscillations with powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Jeremy; Zhu, Ying; Vakarelski, Ivan; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2012-11-01

    We present experiments that show when a water drop impacts onto a bed of fine, hydrophobic powder, the final form of the drop can be very different from the spherical form with which it impacts. For all drop impact speeds, the drop rebounds due to the hydrophobic nature of the powder. However, we observe that above a critical impact speed, the drop undergoes a permanent deformation to a highly non-spherical shape with a complete coverage of powder, thus creating a deformed liquid marble. This powder coating acts to freeze the drop oscillations during rebound.

  16. Freeze-fracture study of Trichomonas vaginalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Benchimol

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available The freeze-fracture technique was used to analyse the organization of the plasma membrane, as well as membranes of cytoplasmic organelles, of the pathogenic protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis. Rosettes formed by 4 to 14 intramembranous particles were seen on the fracture faces of the membrane lining the anterior flagella as well as in fracture faces of the plasma membrane enclosing the anterior region of the protozoan and in cytoplasmic organelles. Special organization of the membrane particles were also seen in the region of association of the recurrent flagellum to the cell body.

  17. Gradient porous hydroxyapatite ceramics fabricated by freeze casting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Kai-hui; zhang, Yuan; Jiang, Dongliang; Zeng, Yu-Ping

    2011-04-01

    By controlling the cooling rates and the composition of slurries, the gradient porous hydroxyapatite ceramics are fabricated by the freeze casting method. According to the different cooling rate, the pores of HAP ceramics fabricated by gradient freeze casting are divided into three parts: one is lamellar pores, another is column pore and the last one is fine round pores. The laminated freeze casting is in favour of obtaining the gradient porous ceramics composed of different materials and the ceramics have unclear interfaces.

  18. Experimental quantification of contact freezing in an electrodynamic balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hoffmann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous nucleation of ice in a supercooled water droplet induced by an external contact with a dry aerosol particle has long been known to be more effective than freezing induced by the same nucleus immersed in the droplet. However, the experimental quantification of contact freezing is challenging. Here we report an experimental method allowing to determine the temperature dependent ice nucleation probability of size selected aerosol particles. The method uses supercooled charged water droplets suspended in a laminar flow of air containing aerosol particles as contact freezing nuclei. The rate of droplet–particle collisions is calculated numerically with account for Coulomb attraction, drag force and induced dipole interaction between charged droplet and aerosol particles. The calculation is verified by direct counting of aerosol particles collected by a levitated droplet. By repeating the experiment on individual droplets for a sufficient number of times, we are able to reproduce the statistical freezing behavior of a large ensemble of supercooled droplets and measure the average rate of freezing events. The freezing rate is equal to the product of the droplet–particle collision rate and the probability of freezing on a single contact, the latter being a function of temperature, size and composition of the contact ice nuclei. Based on these observations, we show that for the types of particles investigated so far, contact freezing is the dominating freezing mechanism on the time scale of our experiment.

  19. Experimental quantification of contact freezing in an electrodynamic balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hoffmann

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous nucleation of ice in a supercooled water droplet induced by external contact with a dry aerosol particle has long been known to be more effective than freezing induced by the same nucleus immersed in the droplet. However, the experimental quantification of contact freezing is challenging. Here we report an experimental method to determine the temperature-dependent ice nucleation probability of size-selected aerosol particles. The method is based on the suspension of supercooled charged water droplets in a laminar flow of air containing aerosol particles as contact freezing nuclei. The rate of droplet–particle collisions is calculated numerically with account for Coulomb attraction, drag force and induced dipole interaction between charged droplet and aerosol particles. The calculation is verified by direct counting of aerosol particles collected by a levitated droplet. By repeating the experiment on individual droplets for a sufficient number of times, we are able to reproduce the statistical freezing behavior of a large ensemble of supercooled droplets and measure the average rate of freezing events. The freezing rate is equal to the product of the droplet–particle collision rate and the probability of freezing on a single contact, the latter being a function of temperature, size and composition of the contact ice nuclei. Based on these observations, we show that for the types of particles investigated so far, contact freezing is the dominating freezing mechanism on the timescale of our experiment.

  20. A“TIME-SPACE” RELATED DESIGNMETHOD OF FREEZING WALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈湘生

    1996-01-01

    Artificially ground freezing (AGF) is one of the main methods to establish temporarysupport for shaft sinking in unstable water bearing strata. Domde (1915) formula based on frozensoil strength has widely been used for designing freezing wall thickness. However, it can not en-sure the stability of freezing wall, nor guarantee the safety of shaft construction as frozen depth in-creases in unstable water bearing strata. F. A. Auld (1985, 1988)[1'2] presented a designmethod of freezing wall, which is on the basis of strength and stability, together with deformationof freezing wall. This paper, according to the practice in China, describes a "time -space" relat-ed design method for deep freezing wall. The method is based on "time-space" concept, whichincludes influence of excavation rate of advance, unsupported length of freezing wall and the sumpstate on inward deformation of freezing wall, and the allowable pipe deformation caused by in-ward deformation of freezing wall. Finally, successful application of this method to the large scalecoal mine-Jining No. 2 Mine[3] in Shandong Province of China is presented. It saved much invest-ment compared with F. A. Auld's design for the same mine.

  1. A molecular dynamics study of freezing in a confined geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wen-Jong; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls is studied by computer simulation. The time development of ordering is quantified and a novel freezing mechanism is observed. The liquid forms layers and subsequent in-plane ordering within a layer is accompanied by a sharpening of the layer in the transverse direction. The effects of channel size, the methods of quench, the liquid-wall interaction and the roughness of walls on the freezing mechanism are elucidated. Comparison with recent experiments on freezing in confined geometries is presented.

  2. Parameter Sensitivity of the Microdroplet Vacuum Freezing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The vacuum freezing process of microdroplets (1 mm. Pressure and droplet diameter have an effect on cooling and freezing stages, but initial temperature only affects the cooling stage. The thermal conductivity coefficient kl affected the cooling stage, whereas ki affected the freezing stage. Heat capacity Cl affected the cooling stage, but Ci has virtually no effect on all stages. The actual latent heat of freezing ΔH was also affected. Higher density corresponds to lower cooling rate in the cooling stage.

  3. Reversible Photoinhibition in Antarctic Moss during Freezing and Thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, C. E.; Jackson, A. E.; Melick, D. R.; Seppelt, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    Tolerance of antarctic moss to freezing and thawing stress was investigated using chlorophyll a fluorescence. Freezing in darkness caused reductions in Fv/Fm (ratio of variable to maximum fluorescence) and Fo (initial fluorescence) that were reversible upon thawing. Reductions in Fv/Fm and Fo during freezing in darkness indicate a reduction in the potential efficiency of photosystem II that may be due to conformational changes in pigment-protein complexes due to desiccation associated with freezing. The absorption of light during freezing further reduced Fv/Fm and Fo but was also reversible. Using dithiothreitol (DTT), which inhibits the formation of the carotenoid zeaxanthin, we found reduced flurorescence quenching during freezing and reduced concentrations of zeaxanthin and antheraxanthin after freezing in DTT-treated moss. Reduced concentrations of zeaxanthin and antheraxanthin in DTT-treated moss were partially associated with reductions in nonphotochemical fluorescence quenching. The reversible photoinhibition observed in antarctic moss during freezing indicates the existence of processes that protect from photoinhibitory damage in environments where freezing temperatures occur in conjunction with high solar radiation levels. These processes may limit the need for repair cycles that require temperatures favorable for enzyme activity. PMID:12228644

  4. A molecular dynamics study of freezing in a confined geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wen-Jong; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls is studied by computer simulation. The time development of ordering is quantified and a novel freezing mechanism is observed. The liquid forms layers and subsequent in-plane ordering within a layer is accompanied by a sharpening of the layer in the transverse direction. The effects of channel size, the methods of quench, the liquid-wall interaction and the roughness of walls on the freezing mechanism are elucidated. Comparison with recent experiments on freezing in confined geometries is presented.

  5. 40 CFR 721.10034 - Substituted pyridine coupled with diazotized substituted nitrobenzonitrile, diazotized...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted pyridine coupled with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10034 Substituted pyridine coupled with diazotized substituted... as substituted pyridine coupled with diazotized substituted nitrobenzonitrile, diazotized...

  6. Automated assessment of Pavlovian conditioned freezing and shock reactivity in mice using the VideoFreeze system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan G Anagnostaras

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Pavlovian conditioned freezing paradigm has become a prominent mouse and rat model of learning and memory, as well as of pathological fear. Due to its efficiency, reproducibility, and well-defined neurobiology, the paradigm has become widely adopted in large-scale genetic and pharmacological screens. However, one major shortcoming of the use of freezing behavior has been that it has required the use of tedious hand scoring, or a variety of proprietary automated methods that are often poorly validated or difficult to obtain and implement. Here we report an extensive validation of the Video Freeze system in mice, a turn-key all-inclusive system for fear conditioning in small animals. Using digital video and near-infrared lighting, the system achieved outstanding performance in scoring both freezing and movement. Given the large-scale adoption of the conditioned freezing paradigm, we encourage similar validation of other automated systems for scoring freezing, or other behaviors.

  7. Spray freeze drying of YSZ nanopowder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghupathy, Bala P. C.; Binner, J. G. P.

    2012-07-01

    Spray freeze drying of yttria stabilised zirconia nanopowders with a primary particle size of 16 nm has been undertaken using different solids content starting suspensions, with the effect of the latter on the flowability and crushability of the granules being investigated. The flowability and fill density of the granules increased with an increase in the solid content of the starting suspension, whilst the crushability decreased. The powder flowability, measured using a Hall flowmeter and model shoe-die filling tests, showed that the flowability of otherwise poorly flowable nanopowders can be improved to match that of the commercial spray dried submicron powder. The 5.5 vol.% solid content based suspension yielded soft agglomerates whilst a 28 vol.% solid content suspension formed hard agglomerates on spray freeze drying; the granule relics were visible in the fracture surface of the die pressed green compact in the latter case. The increase in granule strength is explained by the reduction in inter-particle distance based on the theories developed by Rumpf and Kendall. The flaw sizes computed using the Kendall model are comparable with those seen in the micrographs of the granule. With an optimum solid content, it is possible to have a granulated nanopowder with reasonable flowability and compactability resulting in homogeneous green bodies with 54 % of theoretical density.

  8. Asset Freezing: Smart Sanction or Criminal Charge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter de Zanger

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article the question is asked whether asset freezing can be qualified as a criminal charge within the meaning of Article6 ECHR and if yes, what effects this qualification may have on the legislative framework on so called smart sanctions. Byanalysing Community and EU law and case law of the European Court of Human Rights, General Court of Instance andCourt of Justice of the European Communities the authors give an overview of the notion and possible qualification of assetfreezing as a criminal charge. The article further focusses on the consequenses of qualifying asset freezing as a criminal chargeunder ECHR and EC/EU law and concludes by answering the aforementioned question.This article is a rewrite of a research paper written under supervision of prof. dr. J.A.E. Vervaele and prof. dr. C.H. Brants(Willem Pompe Institute for Criminal Law and Criminology, Utrecht University School of Law, whom the authors wouldlike to thank for their useful comments and supervision.

  9. Effect of freezing on rabbit cultured chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R Filgueiras

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the effect of freezing on chondrocytes maintained in culture, aiming the establishment of a cell bank for future application as heterologous implant. Chondrocytes extracted from joint cartilage of nine healthy New Zealand White rabbits were cultivated and frozen with the cryoprotector 5% dimethylsulfoxide for six months. Phenotypic and scanning electron microscopy analyses were carried out to identify morphological and functional differences between fresh and thawed cells. After enzymatic digestion, a total of 4.8x10(5cells per rabbit were obtained. Fresh chondrocytes showed a high mitotic rate and abundant matrix was present up to 60 days of culture. Loss of phenotypic stability was notable in the thawed chondrocytes, with a low labeling of proteoglycans and weak immunostaining of type II collagen. The present study showed important loss of chondrocyte viability under the freezing conditions. For future in vivo studies of heterologous implant, these results suggests that a high number of cells should be implanted in the host site in order to achieve an adequate number of viable cells. Furthermore, the chondrocytes should be implanted after two weeks of culture, when the highest viability rate is found

  10. Estimating the impact of single and multiple freezes on video quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kester, S.; Xiao, T.; Kooij, R.E.; Brunnstrom, K.; Ahmed, O.K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the impact of freezing of video on quality as experienced by users. Two types of freezes are investigated. First a freeze where the image pauses, so no frames were lost (frame halt). In the second type of freeze, the image freezes and skips that part of the video (frame drop). Mea

  11. Amino acid-assisted synthesis of strontium hydroxyapatite bone cement by a soft solution freezing method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Gopi; S Nithiya; L Kavitha; J M F Ferreira

    2012-12-01

    Among many cations that can substitute for calcium in the structure of hydroxyapatite, strontium provokes an increasing interest because of its beneficial effect on bone formation and prevention of bone resorption. Strontium-incorporated calcium phosphates show potential in biomedical application, particularly the doped strontium may help in new bone formation. We have synthesized strontium hydroxyapatite powders at 2 °C by a soft solution freezing method using glycine as the template. The structural and morphological characterizations were carried out on the as obtained powders using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Strontium was quantitatively incorporated into hydroxyapatite where its substitution for calcium provoked a linear shift of the infrared absorption bands of the hydroxyl and phosphate groups. The strontium substituted bone cement has potential for use in orthopaedic surgeries. The present study shows that the addition of glycine plays an important role in reducing the particle size of strontium hydroxyapatite which could be used for biomedical applications.

  12. DOES GLUTATHIONE PLAY A ROLE IN FREEZING TOLERANCE OF PLANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, C.E.E.; De Kok, Luit J.; Kuiper, P.J.C.

    1992-01-01

    During low temperature hardening enhanced levels of glutathione (GSH) are generally observed in plant shoots and are often related to the development of freezing tolerance. The present communication shows that there is no direct relation between an increased GSH content and freezing tolerance of lea

  13. Determination of Freeze-out Conditions from Lattice QCD Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Karsch, Frithjof

    2012-01-01

    Freeze-out conditions in Heavy Ion Collisions are generally determined by comparing experimental results for ratios of particle yields with theoretical predictions based on applications of the Hadron Resonance Gas model. We discuss here how this model dependent determination of freeze-out parameters may eventually be replaced by theoretical predictions based on equilibrium QCD thermodynamics.

  14. DOES GLUTATHIONE PLAY A ROLE IN FREEZING TOLERANCE OF PLANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, C.E.E.; De Kok, Luit J.; Kuiper, P.J.C.

    1992-01-01

    During low temperature hardening enhanced levels of glutathione (GSH) are generally observed in plant shoots and are often related to the development of freezing tolerance. The present communication shows that there is no direct relation between an increased GSH content and freezing tolerance of

  15. Understanding freeze stress in biological tissues: Thermodynamics of interfacial water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olien, C. Robert [USDA-ARS (retired), Crop and Soil Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1325 (United States); Livingston, David P. [USDA and North Carolina State University, Crop Science, 840 Method Road, Unit 3, Raleigh, NC 27502 (United States)]. E-mail: dpl@unity.ncsu.edu

    2006-12-01

    A thermodynamic approach to distinguish forms of freeze energy that injure plants as the temperature decreases is developed. The pattern resulting from this analysis dictated the sequence of thermal requirements for water to exist as an independent state. Improvement of freezing tolerance in biological systems depends on identification of a specific form of stress, just as control of a disease depends on identification of the pathogen causing the disease. The forms of energy that stress hydrated systems as temperature decreases begin with disruption of biological function from chill injury that occurs above freezing. Initiation of non-equilibrium freezing with sufficient free energy to drive disruptive effects can occur in a supercooled system. As the temperature continues to decrease and freezing occurs in an equilibrium manner, adhesion at hydrated interfaces contributes to disruptive effects as protoplasts contract by freeze-dehydration. If protective systems are able to prevent injury from direct interactions with ice, passive effects of freeze-dehydration may cause injury at lower temperatures. The temperature range in which an injury occurs is an indicator of the form of energy causing stress. The form of energy is thus a primary guide for selection of a protective mechanism. An interatomic force model whose response to temperature change corresponds with the enthalpy pattern might help define freeze stress from a unique perspective.

  16. Prospective Primary School Teachers' Perceptions on Boiling and Freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senocak, Erdal

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of prospective primary school teachers on the physical state of water during the processes of boiling and freezing. There were three stages in the investigation: First, open-ended questions concerning the boiling and freezing of water were given to two groups of prospective primary school…

  17. Thermogram No Substitute for Mammogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Thermogram No Substitute for Mammogram Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  18. Substitute Valuations: Generation and Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Hajek, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    Substitute valuations (in some contexts called gross substitute valuations) are prominent in combinatorial auction theory. An algorithm is given in this paper for generating a substitute valuation through Monte Carlo simulation. In addition, the geometry of the set of all substitute valuations for a fixed number of goods K is investigated. The set consists of a union of polyhedrons, and the maximal polyhedrons are identified for K=4. It is shown that the maximum dimension of the maximal polyhedrons increases with K nearly as fast as two to the power K.

  19. Structure and Substitutions in Fluorapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leroy N.

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluorapatite, Ca10(PO46F2. is a widely spread form of calcium phosphate present particularly in biological material. Human hard tissues contain crystals structurally related to apatite. Fluoride can be found in various natural sources and is also used for its beneficial action in caries prevention. Fluorapatite belongs to the spatial group P63/m (C6h2 and consists of 3 ions: F-, Ca2+, PO43-. In the present paper, we have carried out a crystallographic study of the fluorapatite structure and of the changes induced by the substitutions. The fluorapatite structure and the presence of a large number of ionic bonds make fluorapatite a very suitable host for many substitutents, some of them harmless for the human organism, some not. According to the substitution site, we can describe four types of substitution. The F- substitution, also called Type A substitution, is the main one, and the best known. Only the Ca2+ substitution implies changes in the crystal structure. However, some questions remain, in particular for the PO43- substitution, which is the main substitution present in the biological calcium phosphates.

  20. Cooling system with automated seasonal freeze protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth, Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Simons, Robert E.; Singh, Prabjit; Zhang, Jing

    2016-05-24

    An automated multi-fluid cooling system and method are provided for cooling an electronic component(s). The cooling system includes a coolant loop, a coolant tank, multiple valves, and a controller. The coolant loop is at least partially exposed to outdoor ambient air temperature(s) during normal operation, and the coolant tank includes first and second reservoirs containing first and second fluids, respectively. The first fluid freezes at a lower temperature than the second, the second fluid has superior cooling properties compared with the first, and the two fluids are soluble. The multiple valves are controllable to selectively couple the first or second fluid into the coolant in the coolant loop, wherein the coolant includes at least the second fluid. The controller automatically controls the valves to vary first fluid concentration level in the coolant loop based on historical, current, or anticipated outdoor air ambient temperature(s) for a time of year.

  1. Cooling method with automated seasonal freeze protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cambell, Levi; Chu, Richard; David, Milnes; Ellsworth, Jr, Michael; Iyengar, Madhusudan; Simons, Robert; Singh, Prabjit; Zhang, Jing

    2016-05-31

    An automated multi-fluid cooling method is provided for cooling an electronic component(s). The method includes obtaining a coolant loop, and providing a coolant tank, multiple valves, and a controller. The coolant loop is at least partially exposed to outdoor ambient air temperature(s) during normal operation, and the coolant tank includes first and second reservoirs containing first and second fluids, respectively. The first fluid freezes at a lower temperature than the second, the second fluid has superior cooling properties compared with the first, and the two fluids are soluble. The multiple valves are controllable to selectively couple the first or second fluid into the coolant in the coolant loop, wherein the coolant includes at least the second fluid. The controller automatically controls the valves to vary first fluid concentration level in the coolant loop based on historical, current, or anticipated outdoor air ambient temperature(s) for a time of year.

  2. Freezing resistance of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. X.; Lu, L. C.; Wang, S. D.; Zhao, P. Q.; Gong, C. C.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of freeze-thaw cycle on the mechanical properties of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement was investigated in the present study. The visual examination was conducted to evaluate the surface damage. The deterioration considering the weight loss, modulus loss of relative dynamic elastic and strength loss of mortar were also investigated. The morphology of hydration products were analysed by SEM. Compared with ordinary Portland cement and sulphoaluminate cement, the frost resistance of high iron phosphoraluminate cement is better. Hydration products of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement contain sheet crystals, and a lot of gel form a dense three-dimensional network structure, which results in a lower porosity. Different from ordinary Portland cement, the hydration product of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement does not contain Ca(OH)2, and low alkalinity reduces its osmotic pressure. The lower porosity and osmotic pressure are the two main reasons which causes in the higher frost resistance of high iron phoasphoaluminate cement.

  3. STEFINS: a steel freezing integral simulation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, M.V.

    1980-09-01

    STEFINS (STEel Freezing INtegral Simulation) is a computer program for the calculation of the rate of solidification of molten steel on solid steel. Such computations arize when investigating core melt accidents in fast reactors. In principle this problem involves a coupled two-dimensional thermal and hydraulic approach. However, by physically reasonable assumptions a decoupled approach has been developed. The transient solidification of molten steel on a cold wall is solved in the direction normal to the molten steel flow and independent from the solution for the molten steel temperature and Nusselt number along the direction of flow. The solutions to the applicable energy equations have been programmed in cylindrical and slab geometries. Internal gamma heating of steel is included.

  4. Universality in freezing of an asymmetric drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Md Farhad; Waghmare, Prashant R.

    2016-12-01

    We present the evidence of universality in conical tip formation during the freezing of arbitrary-shaped sessile droplets. The focus is to demonstrate the relationship between this universality and the liquid drop shape. We observe that, in the case of asymmetric drops, this universal shape is achieved when the tip reconfigures by changing its location, which subsequently alters the frozen drop shape. The proposed "two-triangle" model quantifies the change in the tip configuration as a function of the asymmetry of the drop that shows a good agreement with the experimental evidence. Finally, based on the experimental and theoretical exercise, we propose the scaling dependence between the variations in the tip configuration and the asymmetry of the drop.

  5. Hot water can freeze faster than cold?!?

    CERN Document Server

    Jeng, M

    2005-01-01

    We review the Mpemba effect, where intially hot water freezes faster than initially cold water. While the effect appears impossible at first sight, it has been seen in numerous experiments, was reported on by Aristotle, Francis Bacon, and Descartes, and has been well-known as folklore around the world. It has a rich and fascinating history, which culminates in the dramatic story of the secondary school student, Erasto Mpemba, who reintroduced the effect to the twentieth century scientific community. The phenomenon, while simple to describe, is deceptively complex, and illustrates numerous important issues about the scientific method: the role of skepticism in scientific inquiry, the influence of theory on experiment and observation, the need for precision in the statement of a scientific hypothesis, and the nature of falsifiability. We survey proposed theoretical mechanisms for the Mpemba effect, and the results of modern experiments on the phenomenon. Studies of the observation that hot water pipes are more ...

  6. Versatile Aerogel Fabrication by Freezing and Subsequent Freeze-Drying of Colloidal Nanoparticle Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freytag, Axel; Sánchez-Paradinas, Sara; Naskar, Suraj; Wendt, Natalja; Colombo, Massimo; Pugliese, Giammarino; Poppe, Jan; Demirci, Cansunur; Kretschmer, Imme; Bahnemann, Detlef W; Behrens, Peter; Bigall, Nadja C

    2016-01-18

    A versatile method to fabricate self-supported aerogels of nanoparticle (NP) building blocks is presented. This approach is based on freezing colloidal NPs and subsequent freeze drying. This means that the colloidal NPs are directly transferred into dry aerogel-like monolithic superstructures without previous lyogelation as would be the case for conventional aerogel and cryogel fabrication methods. The assembly process, based on a physical concept, is highly versatile: cryogelation is applicable for noble metal, metal oxide, and semiconductor NPs, and no impact of the surface chemistry or NP shape on the resulting morphology is observed. Under optimized conditions the shape and volume of the liquid equal those of the resulting aerogels. Also, we show that thin and homogeneous films of the material can be obtained. Furthermore, the physical properties of the aerogels are discussed.

  7. Multiple Glass Transitions and Freezing Events of Aqueous Citric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Calorimetric and optical cryo-microscope measurements of 10–64 wt % citric acid (CA) solutions subjected to moderate (3 K/min) and slow (0.5 and 0.1 K/min) cooling/warming rates and also to quenching/moderate warming between 320 and 133 K are presented. Depending on solution concentration and cooling rate, the obtained thermograms show one freezing event and from one to three liquid–glass transitions upon cooling and from one to six liquid–glass and reverse glass–liquid transitions, one or two freezing events, and one melting event upon warming of frozen/glassy CA/H2O. The multiple freezing events and glass transitions pertain to the mother CA/H2O solution itself and two freeze-concentrated solution regions, FCS1 and FCS2, of different concentrations. The FCS1 and FCS2 (or FCS22) are formed during the freezing of CA/H2O upon cooling and/or during the freezing upon warming of partly glassy or entirely glassy mother CA/H2O. The formation of two FCS1 and FCS22 regions during the freezing upon warming to our best knowledge has never been reported before. Using an optical cryo-microscope, we are able to observe the formation of a continuous ice framework (IF) and its morphology and reciprocal distribution of IF/(FCS1 + FCS2). Our results provide a new look at the freezing and glass transition behavior of aqueous solutions and can be used for the optimization of lyophilization and freezing of foods and biopharmaceutical formulations, among many other applications where freezing plays a crucial role. PMID:25482069

  8. Effects of freezing rates and cryoprotectant on thermal expansion of articular cartilage during freezing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y; Sun, H J; Lv, Y; Zou, J C; Lin, B L; Hua, T C

    2013-01-01

    The intact articular cartilage has not yet been successfully preserved at low temperature most likely due to the volume expansion from water to ice during freezing. The objective of this current study focuses on examining thermal expansion behavior of articular cartilage (AC) during freezing from 0 degree C to -100 degree C. Thermo Mechanical Analysis (TMA) was used to investigate the effects of different concentrations of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) (0%, 10%, 30% and 60% v/v) and different freezing rates (1 C/min, 3 C/min and 5 C/min). The results showed that: (1) the inhomogeneous thermal expansion (or contraction) presents due to inhomogeneous water distributions in articular cartilage during freezing, which also may be the most likely reason that the matrix has been damaged in cryopreserved intact articular cartilage; (2) at the phase transition temperature range, the maximum thermal strain change value for 5C/min is approximately 1.45 times than that for 1 C/min, but the maximum thermal expansion coefficient of the later is about six times than that of the former; (3) the thermal expansion coefficient decreases with increasing cooling rate at the unfrozen temperature region, but some opposite results are obtained at the frozen temperature region; (4) the higher the DMSO concentration is, at the phase change temperature region, the smaller the thermal strain change as well as the maximum thermal expansion coefficient are, but DMSO concentration exhibits little effect on the thermal expansion coefficient at both unfrozen and frozen region. Once the DMSO concentration increasing enough, e.g. 60% v/v, the thermal strain decreases linearly and smoothly without any abrupt change due to little or no ice crystal forms (i.e. vitrification) in frozen articular cartilage. This study may improve our understanding of the thermal expansion (or contraction) behavior of cryopreserved articular cartilage and it may be useful for the future study on cryopreservation of intact

  9. Freezing Precipitation and Freezing Events over Northern Eurasia and North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groisman, Pavel; Yin, Xungang; Bulygina, Olga; Partasenok, Irina; Zolina, Olga; Hanssen-Bauer, Inger

    2016-04-01

    With global climate change in the extratropics, the 0°C isotherm will not disappear and associated precipitation events will continue to occur. The near-0°C temperatures should generally move poleward and arrive at many locations earlier in spring or later in autumn. This could potentially affect the seasonal cycle of near-0°C precipitation. The overall warming, together with a larger influx of the water vapor in the winter atmosphere from the oceans (including ice-free portions of the Arctic Ocean) can also affect the amount of near-0°C precipitation. The issue of near 0°C precipitation is linked with several hazardous phenomena including heavy snowfall/rainfall transition around °C; strong blizzards; rain-on-snow events causing floods; freezing rain and freezing drizzle; and ice load on infrastructure. In our presentation using more than 1,500 long-term time series of synoptic observations for the past four decades, we present climatology and the empirical evidence about changes in occurrence, timing, and intensity of freezing rains and freezing drizzles over several countries of Northern Eurasia and North America. In the former Soviet Union, instrumental monitoring of ice load has been performed by ice accretion indicator that in addition to the type, intensity and duration of ice deposits reports also their weight and size. Estimates of climatology and changes in ice load based on this monitoring at 958 Russian stations will be also presented. The work was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation (grant 14.B25.31.0026) and NASA LCLUC Program (grant "How Environmental Change in Central Asian Highlands Impacts High Elevation Communities").

  10. Investigation of the stabilizing effects of hydroxyethyl cellulose on LDH during freeze drying and freeze thawing cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hussein, Anas; Gieseler, Henning

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate both the cryoprotective and lyoprotective effects of the polymer hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) on the model protein lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) during freeze thawing and freeze drying cycles. The effect of annealing on both protein stability and the physical state of HEC was evaluated. HEC was used as a sole excipient in the protein formulations, and its stabilizing was compared to that of other excipients which are commonly used in freeze dried protein formulations. Furthermore, other quality aspects of the freeze dried samples containing solely HEC were investigated, such as, reconstitution time and product elegance. Protein stability was evaluated functionally by measuring the activity recovery of the model protein LDH. The physical state of HEC after freeze drying was investigated and compared to this of other studied solutes using differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffractometry. HEC showed superior cryoprotective effects on LDH during freeze thawing, and considerable lyoprotective effects during the freeze drying process. Annealing had limited influence on the stabilizing effect of HEC. The extensive reconstitution times of the HEC lyophilisates could be greatly improved by incorporation of the surfactant Tween 80 into the formulations prior to freeze drying.

  11. Effect of wettability on sessile drop freezing: when superhydrophobicity stimulates an extreme freezing delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boinovich, Ludmila; Emelyanenko, Alexandre M; Korolev, Vadim V; Pashinin, Andrei S

    2014-02-18

    An increasing number of studies directed at supercooling water droplets on surfaces with different wettabilities have appeared in recent years. This activity has been stimulated by the recognition that water supercooling phenomena can be effectively used to develop methods for protecting outdoor equipment and infrastructure elements against icing and snow accretion. In this article, we discuss the nucleation kinetics of supercooled sessile water droplets on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces under isothermal conditions at temperatures of -8, -10, and -15 °C and a saturated water vapor atmosphere. The statistics of nucleation events for the ensembles of freezing sessile droplets is completed by the detailed analysis of the contact angle temperature dependence and freezing of individual droplets in a saturated vapor atmosphere. We have demonstrated that the most essential freezing delay is characteristic of the superhydrophobic coating on aluminum, with the texture resistant to contact with ice and water. This delay can reach many hours at T = -8 °C and a few minutes at -23 °C. The observed behavior is analyzed on the basis of different nucleation mechanisms. The dissimilarity in the total nucleation rate, detected for two superhydrophobic substrates having the same apparent contact angle of the water drop but different resistivities of surface texture to the contact with water/ice, is associated with the contribution of heterogeneous nucleation on external centers located at the water droplet/air interface.

  12. Effects of industrial pre-freezing processing and freezing handling on glucosinolates and antioxidant attributes in broccoli florets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Congxi; Miao, Huiying; Qian, Hongmei; Yao, Leishuan; Wang, Bingliang; Wang, Qiaomei

    2016-11-01

    The effects of industrial pre-freezing processing and freezing handling on the contents of glucosinolates and antioxidants (vitamin C, polyphenols, carotenoid and chlorophyll), as well as the antioxidant capacity in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) florets were investigated in the present study. Our results showed that the glucosinolate accumulations were significantly decreased after pre-freezing processing, whereas elevated levels of phenols, carotenoids, chlorophyll, and also antioxidant capacity were observed in frozen broccoli florets. The contents of vitamin C remained constant during above mentioned processing. In conclusion, the current industrial freezing processing method is a good practice for the preservation of main antioxidant nutrients in broccoli florets, although some improvements in pre-freezing processing, such as steam blanching and ice-water cooling, are needed to attenuate the decrease in glucosinolate content.

  13. Currency substitution in Eastern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aarle, B.; Budina, N.

    1995-01-01

    Monetary instability during the transition process from a command economy to a market economy has induced a considerable increase in currency substitution in Eastern Europe. Currency substitution itself affects monetary stability since it reduces the stability of velocity. This paper investigates cu

  14. Displacement, Substitution, Sublimation: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Sigmund Freund worked with the mechanisms of displacement, substitution, and sublimation. These mechanisms have many similarities and have been studied diagnostically and therapeutically. Displacement and substitution seem to fit in well with phobias, hysterias, somatiyations, prejudices, and scapegoating. Phobias, prejudices, and scapegoating…

  15. Substitute Teachers: The Professional Contradiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreeve, William C.; And Others

    The substitute teacher's public image was investigated by means of an informal survey of part-time and full-time teachers in Washington. Survey results revealed that working conditions appeared to be the largest factor in damaging the self-image of most substitute teachers. The majority of full-time teachers and administrators surveyed were…

  16. Review. Freeze-casting: Fabrication of highly porous and hierarchical ceramic supports for energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudillere, C.; Serra, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    The manufacture of structured ceramic porous support knows an important boom since more than a decade with the development of new shaping techniques. Among the most promising ones, the freeze-casting also called Ice-Tem plating allows the fabrication of ceramic parts exhibiting high porosity (>50%) and vertically aligned and hierarchically organized pores. Such structures were firstly conceived for biomedical applications like bone substitute and tissue engineering, but the distinctive features of freeze-cast structures have attracted the attention of diverse scientific fields, especially in high temperature ceramic-based energy production systems. Indeed, technologies like (a) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and Electrolyser Cell (SOEC), (b) gas separation (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}) by asymmetric supported membranes based on mixed ionic and electronic conductors (MIEC) or hydrogen-permeable metals, and (c) Catalytic Membrane Reactor (CMR) systems present a porous component in their physical structure. This latest, presenting a tortuous pathway for gas access and as a consequence, a high transport limitation, is known to be a limiting component for the operation at high flow streams that would enable to reach industrial target. (Author)

  17. Use of Aloe vera-based extender for chilling and freezing collared peccary (Pecari tajacu) semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, A L P; Lima, G L; Peixoto, G C X; Silva, A M; Oliveira, M F; Silva, A R

    2016-05-01

    As an alternative for the conservation of collared peccary semen, this research aims at evaluating the use of Aloe vera (AV) extract as a cryoprotectant for semen chilling and freezing. Five ejaculates were divided in two aliquots that were diluted in Tris plus egg yolk (EY; 20%) or AV extract (20%) and chilled at 5 °C. In both treatments, an adequate semen conservation was achieved and values closer to 40% motile sperm with viability and osmotic response ranging from 20% to 40%, and normal morphology of 80% were found after 36 hours of storage. Moreover, 12 other ejaculates were diluted in Tris plus EY (20%) or AV extract (5, 10, or 20%) and glycerol (3%). Samples were frozen in liquid nitrogen and thawed after 1 week. After thawing, all the treatments containing EY or AV provided similar values for sperm morphology, viability, osmotic response, membrane integrity, sperm motility, amplitude of lateral head, beat cross frequency, and rapid, low, and static subpopulations, but the highest values for straightness and the lowest values for curvilinear velocity were found using 20% AV (P < 0.05). In conclusion, we found that AV extract at a 20% concentration could be used as an alternative substitute to EY in the formulation of Tris extenders for collared peccaries' semen chilling or freezing.

  18. Heterogeneous freezing of super cooled water droplets in micrometre range- freezing on a chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, Thomas; Witek, Lorenz; Felgitsch, Laura; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2017-04-01

    A new setup to analyse the freezing behaviour of ice nucleation particles (INPs) dispersed in aqueous droplets has been developed with the aim to analyse ensembles of droplets with sizes in the micrometre range, in which INPs are immersed. Major disadvantages of conventional drop-freezing experiments like varying drop sizes or interactions between the water- oil mixture and the INP, were solved by introducing a unique freezing- chip consisting of an etched and sputtered 15x15x1 mm gold-plated silicon or pure gold film (Pummer et al., 2012; Zolles et al., 2015). Using this chip, isolated micrometre-sized droplets can be generated with sizes similar to droplets in real world clouds. The experimental set-up for drop-freezing experiments was revised and improved by establishing automated process control and image evaluation. We were able to show the efficiency and accuracy of our setup by comparing measured freezing temperatures of different INPs (Snomax®, K- feldspar, birch pollen (Betula pendula) washing water, juniper pollen suspension (Juniperus communis) and ultrapure water) with already published results (Atkinson et al., 2013; Augustin et al., 2013; Pruppacher and Klett, 1997; Pummer et al., 2012; Wex et al., 2015; Zolles et al., 2015). Comparison of our measurements with literature data show the important impact of droplet size, INP concentration and number of active sites on the T50 values. Here, the new set-up exhibits its strength in reproducibility and accuracy which is due to the defined and isolated droplets. Finally, it opens a temperature window down to -37˚ C for freezing experiments which was not accessible with former traditional approaches .Atkinson, J. D., Murray, B. J., Woodhouse, M. T., Whale, T. F., Baustian, K. J., Carslaw, K. S., Dobbie, S., O'Sullivan, D., and Malkin, T. L.: The importance of feldspar for ice nucleation by mineral dust in mixed-phase clouds (vol 498, pg 355, 2013), Nature, 500, 491-491, 2013. Augustin, S., Wex, H

  19. Bilateral maxillary sinus floor augmentation with tissue-engineered autologous osteoblasts and demineralized freeze-dried bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aashish Deshmukh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pneumatization of the maxillary sinus often results in a lack of sufficient alveolar bone for implant placement. In the last decades, maxillary sinus lift has become a very popular procedure with predictable results. Sinus floor augmentation procedures are generally carried out using autologous bone grafts, bone substitutes, or composites of bone and bone substitutes. However, the inherent limitations associated with each of these, have directed the attention of investigators to new technologies like bone tissue engineering. Bone marrow stromal cells have been regarded as multi-potent cells residing in bone marrow. These cells can be harvested from a person, multiplied outside his body using bioengineering principles and technologies and later introduced into a tissue defect. We present a case where tissue-engineered autologous osteoblasts were used along with demineralized freeze-dried bone for sinus floor augmentation.

  20. Metabolic changes in Avena sativa crowns recovering from freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Cynthia A; Duke, Stanley H; Livingston, David P

    2014-01-01

    Extensive research has been conducted on cold acclimation and freezing tolerance of fall-sown cereal plants due to their economic importance; however, little has been reported on the biochemical changes occurring over time after the freezing conditions are replaced by conditions favorable for recovery and growth such as would occur during spring. In this study, GC-MS was used to detect metabolic changes in the overwintering crown tissue of oat (Avena sativa L.) during a fourteen day time-course after freezing. Metabolomic analysis revealed increases in most amino acids, particularly proline, 5-oxoproline and arginine, which increased greatly in crowns that were frozen compared to controls and correlated very significantly with days after freezing. In contrast, sugar and sugar related metabolites were little changed by freezing, except sucrose and fructose which decreased dramatically. In frozen tissue all TCA cycle metabolites, especially citrate and malate, decreased in relation to unfrozen tissue. Alterations in some amino acid pools after freezing were similar to those observed in cold acclimation whereas most changes in sugar pools after freezing were not. These similarities and differences suggest that there are common as well as unique genetic mechanisms between these two environmental conditions that are crucial to the winter survival of plants.

  1. Metabolic changes in Avena sativa crowns recovering from freezing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia A Henson

    Full Text Available Extensive research has been conducted on cold acclimation and freezing tolerance of fall-sown cereal plants due to their economic importance; however, little has been reported on the biochemical changes occurring over time after the freezing conditions are replaced by conditions favorable for recovery and growth such as would occur during spring. In this study, GC-MS was used to detect metabolic changes in the overwintering crown tissue of oat (Avena sativa L. during a fourteen day time-course after freezing. Metabolomic analysis revealed increases in most amino acids, particularly proline, 5-oxoproline and arginine, which increased greatly in crowns that were frozen compared to controls and correlated very significantly with days after freezing. In contrast, sugar and sugar related metabolites were little changed by freezing, except sucrose and fructose which decreased dramatically. In frozen tissue all TCA cycle metabolites, especially citrate and malate, decreased in relation to unfrozen tissue. Alterations in some amino acid pools after freezing were similar to those observed in cold acclimation whereas most changes in sugar pools after freezing were not. These similarities and differences suggest that there are common as well as unique genetic mechanisms between these two environmental conditions that are crucial to the winter survival of plants.

  2. Physical Chemistry of the Freezing Process of Atmospheric Aqueous Drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Anatoli; Molina, Mario J

    2017-04-27

    In supercooled aqueous solutions, ice nucleation is the initial stage of the freezing process. In this paper, we present experimental results that indicate that during the freezing of aqueous solutions, freeze-induced phase separation (FIPS) into pure ice and a freeze-concentrated solution (FCS) takes place. Our observations involve the use of an optical cryo-microscope (OC-M) to record images and movies. The results visually indicate for the first time that there are two freezing processes for (NH4)3H(SO4)2/H2O solutions: (i) contact freezing, as is the case for pure water drops, and (ii) the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process, which is the growth of frozen drops (ice) at the expense of liquid ones. We also present OC-M images of frozen micrometer-scaled H2SO4/H2O drops that support our previous finding that freezing of these solutions generates mixed-phase particles, namely an ice core coated with a FCS. These results are relevant for atmospheric as well as for pharmaceutical sciences.

  3. Sucrose Diffusion in Decellularized Heart Valves for Freeze-Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shangping; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Goecke, Tobias; Ramm, Robert; Harder, Michael; Haverich, Axel; Hilfiker, Andres; Wolkers, Willem Frederik

    2015-09-01

    Decellularized heart valves can be used as starter matrix implants for heart valve replacement therapies in terms of guided tissue regeneration. Decellularized matrices ideally need to be long-term storable to assure off-the-shelf availability. Freeze-drying is an attractive preservation method, allowing storage at room temperature in a dried state. However, the two inherent processing steps, freezing and drying, can cause severe damage to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and the overall tissue histoarchitecture and thus impair biomechanical characteristics of resulting matrices. Freeze-drying therefore requires a lyoprotective agent that stabilizes endogenous structural proteins during both substeps and that forms a protective glassy state at room temperature. To estimate incubation times needed to infiltrate decellularized heart valves with the lyoprotectant sucrose, temperature-dependent diffusion studies were done using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Glycerol, a cryoprotective agent, was studied for comparison. Diffusion of both protectants was found to exhibit Arrhenius behavior. The activation energies of sucrose and glycerol diffusion were found to be 15.9 and 37.7 kJ·mol(-1), respectively. It was estimated that 4 h of incubation at 37°C is sufficient to infiltrate heart valves with sucrose before freeze-drying. Application of a 5% sucrose solution was shown to stabilize acellular valve scaffolds during freeze-drying. Such freeze-dried tissues, however, displayed pores, which were attributed to ice crystal damage, whereas vacuum-dried scaffolds in comparison revealed no pores after drying and rehydration. Exposure to a hygroscopic sucrose solution (80%) before freeze-drying was shown to be an effective method to diminish pore formation in freeze-dried ECMs: matrix structures closely resembled those of control samples that were not freeze-dried. Heart valve matrices were shown to be in a glassy state after drying, suggesting that they can

  4. Trifluoromethyl-substituted tetrathiafulvalenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Jeannin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of tetrathiafulvalenes functionalized with one or two trifluoromethyl electron-withdrawing groups (EWG is obtained by phosphite coupling involving CF3-substituted 1,3-dithiole-2-one derivatives. The relative effects of the EWG such as CF3, CO2Me and CN on the TTF core were investigated from a combination of structural, electrochemical, spectrochemical and theoretical investigations. Electrochemical data confirm the good correlations between the first oxidation potential of the TTF derivatives and the σmeta Hammet parameter, thus in the order CO2Me 3 3, where, as in TTF itself, the low energy absorption band is essentially attributable to a HOMO→LUMO + 1 transition. Despite relatively high oxidation potentials, these donor molecules with CF3 EWG can be involved in charge transfer complexes or cation radical salts, as reported here for the CF3-subsituted EDT-TTF donor molecule. A neutral charge transfer complex with TCNQ, (EDT-TTF-CF32(TCNQ was isolated and characterized through alternated stacks of EDT-TTF-CF3 dimers and TCNQ in the solid state. A radical cation salt of EDT-TTF-CF3 is also obtained upon electrocrystallisation in the presence of the FeCl4− anion. In this salt, formulated as (EDT-TTF-CF3(FeCl4, the (EDT-TTF-CF3+• radical cations are associated two-by-two into centrosymmetric dyads with a strong pairing of the radical species in a singlet state.

  5. Air-Cooled Stack Freeze Tolerance Freeze Failure Modes and Freeze Tolerance Strategies for GenDriveTM Material Handling Application Systems and Stacks Final Scientific Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, David, W.

    2012-02-14

    Air-cooled stack technology offers the potential for a simpler system architecture (versus liquid-cooled) for applications below 4 kilowatts. The combined cooling and cathode air allows for a reduction in part count and hence a lower cost solution. However, efficient heat rejection challenges escalate as power and ambient temperature increase. For applications in ambient temperatures below freezing, the air-cooled approach has additional challenges associated with not overcooling the fuel cell stack. The focus of this project was freeze tolerance while maintaining all other stack and system requirements. Through this project, Plug Power advanced the state of the art in technology for air-cooled PEM fuel cell stacks and related GenDrive material handling application fuel cell systems. This was accomplished through a collaborative work plan to improve freeze tolerance and mitigate freeze-thaw effect failure modes within innovative material handling equipment fuel cell systems designed for use in freezer forklift applications. Freeze tolerance remains an area where additional research and understanding can help fuel cells to become commercially viable. This project evaluated both stack level and system level solutions to improve fuel cell stack freeze tolerance. At this time, the most cost effective solutions are at the system level. The freeze mitigation strategies developed over the course of this project could be used to drive fuel cell commercialization. The fuel cell system studied in this project was Plug Power's commercially available GenDrive platform providing battery replacement for equipment in the material handling industry. The fuel cell stacks were Ballard's commercially available FCvelocity 9SSL (9SSL) liquid-cooled PEM fuel cell stack and FCvelocity 1020ACS (Mk1020) air-cooled PEM fuel cell stack.

  6. On the time required to freeze water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, J. R.; Navarro, C.; Sanz, E.; Valeriani, C.; Vega, C.

    2016-12-01

    By using the seeding technique the nucleation rate for the formation of ice at room pressure will be estimated for the TIP4P/ICE model using longer runs and a smaller grid of temperatures than in the previous work. The growth rate of ice will be determined for TIP4P/ICE and for the mW model of water. Although TIP4P/ICE and mW have a similar melting point and melting enthalpy, they differ significantly in the dynamics of freezing. The nucleation rate of mW is lower than that of TIP4P/ICE due to its higher interfacial free energy. Experimental results for the nucleation rate of ice are between the predictions of these two models when obtained from the seeding technique, although closer to the predictions of TIP4P/ICE. The growth rate of ice for the mW model is four orders of magnitude larger than for TIP4P/ICE. Avrami's expression is used to estimate the crystallization time from the values of the nucleation and growth rates. For mW the minimum in the crystallization time is found at approximately 85 K below the melting point and its value is of about a few ns, in agreement with the results obtained from brute force simulations by Moore and Molinero. For the TIP4P/ICE the minimum is found at about 55 K below the melting point, but its value is about ten microseconds. This value is compatible with the minimum cooling rate required to avoid the formation of ice and obtaining a glass phase. The crossover from the nucleation controlled crystallization to the growth controlled crystallization will be discussed for systems of finite size. This crossover could explain the apparent discrepancy between the values of J obtained by different experimental groups for temperatures below 230 K and should be considered as an alternative hypothesis to the two previously suggested: internal pressure and/or surface freezing effects. A maximum in the compressibility was found for the TIP4P/ICE model in supercooled water. The relaxation time is much smaller than the crystallization time

  7. Freezing-induced deformation of biomaterials in cryomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcelikkale, Altug

    Cryomedicine utilizes low temperature treatments of biological proteins, cells and tissues for cryopreservation, materials processing and cryotherapy. Lack of proper understanding of cryodamage that occurs during these applications remains to be the primary bottleneck for development of successful tissue cryopreservation and cryosurgery procedures. An engineering approach based on a view of biological systems as functional biomaterials can help identify, predict and control the primary cryodamage mechanisms by developing an understanding of underlying freezing-induced biophysical processes. In particular, freezing constitutes the main structural/mechanical origin of cryodamage and results in significant deformation of biomaterials at multiple length scales. Understanding of these freezing-induced deformation processes and their effects on post-thaw biomaterial functionality is currently lacking but will be critical to engineer improved cryomedicine procedures. This dissertation addresses this problem by presenting three separate but related studies of freezing-induced deformation at multiple length scales including nanometer-scale protein fibrils, single cells and whole tissues. A combination of rigorous experimentation and computational modeling is used to characterize post-thaw biomaterial structure and properties, predict biomaterial behavior and assess its post-thaw biological functionality. Firstly, freezing-induced damage on hierarchical extracellular matrix structure of collagen is investigated at molecular, fibril and matrix levels. Results indicate to a specific kind of fibril damage due to freezing-induced expansion of intrafibrillar fluid. This is followed by a study of freezing-induced cell and tissue deformation coupled to osmotically driven cellular water transport. Computational and semi empirical modeling of these processes indicate that intracellular deformation of the cell during freezing is heterogeneous and can interfere with cellular water

  8. Prototype device for converting freezing energy into mechanical work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habeebullah, B.; Zaki, G.M.; Akyurt, M. [Fakieh Center for Applied Research, Makkah Al-Mukarramah (Saudi Arabia)

    2003-01-01

    Certain properties of ice are reviewed. The phenomenon of freezing of water is discussed, with special emphasis on the blockage and bursting of water pipes. Several concepts are discussed that are related to achieving the freezing of water, the design of the container where freezing occurs and the conversion into mechanical energy. A conceptual design is presented for one type of ice energy converter. Certain design details for this machine are provided. Initial test results are furnished for this device, which was manufactured and tested. Conclusions are drawn and recommendations are made. (author)

  9. Freeze-thaw bond properties of new-old concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using composite cubic specimens of new-old concrete, the bond splitting tensile strength and failure mechanism for the interface of new-old concrete in saturating state were explored when exposed to freeze-thaw cycling. Specimens were experienced for 0,25,50,75,100 and 125 freezing cycles. The roughness and ad hesion agent including cement paste, cement mortar and cement paste with 10 percent of UEA expanding agent were also investigated. The test results indicate that the bond splitting tensile strength decreases with increased numbers of freezing-and-thawing cycles. The roughness and adhesion agent have different effects on the bond strength.

  10. Characterization of a laboratory-scale container for freezing protein solutions with detailed evaluation of a freezing process simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessl, Ulrich; Jajcevic, Dalibor; Leitgeb, Stefan; Khinast, Johannes G; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2014-02-01

    A 300-mL stainless steel freeze container was constructed to enable QbD (Quality by Design)-compliant investigations and the optimization of freezing and thawing (F/T) processes of protein pharmaceuticals at moderate volumes. A characterization of the freezing performance was conducted with respect to freezing kinetics, temperature profiling, cryoconcentration, and stability of the frozen protein. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of temperature and phase transition were established to facilitate process scaling and process analytics as well as customization of future freeze containers. Protein cryoconcentration was determined from ice-core samples using bovine serum albumin. Activity, aggregation, and structural perturbation were studied in frozen rabbit muscle l-lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) solution. CFD simulations provided good qualitative and quantitative agreement with highly resolved experimental measurements of temperature and phase transition, allowing also the estimation of spatial cryoconcentration patterns. LDH exhibited stability against freezing in the laboratory-scale system, suggesting a protective effect of cryoconcentration at certain conditions. The combination of the laboratory-scale freeze container with accurate CFD modeling will allow deeper investigations of F/T processes at advanced scale and thus represents an important step towards a better process understanding. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  11. Comparison of the depth of tissue necrosis between double-freeze and single-freeze nitrous oxide-based cryotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinfolarin Clement Adepiti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cryotherapy is one the methods of treating cervical premalignant lesions. It is particularly suitable for low-resource countries because of it is relative cheaper, has low cost of maintenance, ease of use and that does not require electricity which is in short supply in many rural areas of developing countries where the incidence and mortality from cervical cancer is very high. In this study we compared single and double freezing on the cervices of women admitted for hysterectomy for benign conditions using Nitrous-based cryotherapy. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted for elective hysterectomy for benign gynaecological conditions were randomized into two arms. The first group had single freeze cryotherapy while the second arm received double freeze cryotherapy. The cervices were examined 24 hours later to determine the depth of tissue necrosis. Results: In this comparative study, the depth of tissue necrosis was deeper with double freeze compared with single freeze. Also in both arms, the depth of necrosis was deeper on anterior lips than on posterior lips of the cervix. Conclusion: Double freeze technique achieve more depth of tissue necrosis than single-freeze on both anterior and posterior lips of the cervix.

  12. Inner ear tissue preservation by rapid freezing: improving fixation by high-pressure freezing and hybrid methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, A; Taylor, R R; Kachar, B; Moores, C; Fleck, R A; Forge, A

    2014-09-01

    In the preservation of tissues in as 'close to life' state as possible, rapid freeze fixation has many benefits over conventional chemical fixation. One technique by which rapid freeze-fixation can be achieved, high pressure freezing (HPF), has been shown to enable ice crystal artefact-free freezing and tissue preservation to greater depths (more than 40 μm) than other quick-freezing methods. Despite increasingly becoming routine in electron microscopy, the use of HPF for the fixation of inner ear tissue has been limited. Assessment of the quality of preservation showed routine HPF techniques were suitable for preparation of inner ear tissues in a variety of species. Good preservation throughout the depth of sensory epithelia was achievable. Comparison to chemically fixed tissue indicated that fresh frozen preparations exhibited overall superior structural preservation of cells. However, HPF fixation caused characteristic artefacts in stereocilia that suggested poor quality freezing of the actin bundles. The hybrid technique of pre-fixation and high pressure freezing was shown to produce cellular preservation throughout the tissue, similar to that seen in HPF alone. Pre-fixation HPF produced consistent high quality preservation of stereociliary actin bundles. Optimising the preparation of samples with minimal artefact formation allows analysis of the links between ultrastructure and function in inner ear tissues. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Drying a tuberculosis vaccine without freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yun-Ling; Sampson, Samantha; Germishuizen, Willem Andreas; Goonesekera, Sunali; Caponetti, Giovanni; Sadoff, Jerry; Bloom, Barry R; Edwards, David

    2007-02-20

    With the increasing incidence of tuberculosis and drug resistant disease in developing countries due to HIV/AIDS, there is a need for vaccines that are more effective than the present bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. We demonstrate that BCG vaccine can be dried without traditional freezing and maintained with remarkable refrigerated and room-temperature stability for months through spray drying. Studies with a model Mycobacterium (Mycobacterium smegmatis) revealed that by removing salts and cryoprotectant (e.g., glycerol) from bacterial suspensions, the significant osmotic pressures that are normally produced on bacterial membranes through droplet drying can be reduced sufficiently to minimize loss of viability on drying by up to 2 orders of magnitude. By placing the bacteria in a matrix of leucine, high-yield, free-flowing, "vial-fillable" powders of bacteria (including M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG) can be produced. These powders show relatively minor losses of activity after maintenance at 4 degrees C and 25 degrees C up to and beyond 4 months. Comparisons with lyophilized material prepared both with the same formulation and with a commercial formulation reveal that the spray-dried BCG has better overall viability on drying.

  14. Adaptation to seasonality and the winter freeze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Christine Preston

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Flowering plants initially diversified during the Mesozoic era at least 140 million years ago in regions of the world where temperate seasonal environments were not encountered. Since then several cooling events resulted in the contraction of warm and wet environments and the establishment of novel temperate zones in both hemispheres. In response, less than half of modern angiosperm families have members that evolved specific adaptations to cold seasonal climates, including cold acclimation, freezing tolerance, endodormancy, and vernalization responsiveness. Despite compelling evidence for multiple independent origins, the level of genetic constraint on the evolution of adaptations to seasonal cold is not well understood. However, the recent increase in molecular genetic studies examining the response of model and crop species to seasonal cold offers new insight into the evolutionary lability of these traits. This insight has major implications for our understanding of complex trait evolution, and the potential role of local adaptation in response to past and future climate change. In this review, we discuss the biochemical, morphological, and developmental basis of adaptations to seasonal cold, and synthesize recent literature on the genetic basis of these traits in a phylogenomic context. We find evidence for multiple genetic links between distinct physiological responses to cold, possibly reinforcing the coordinated expression of these traits. Furthermore, repeated recruitment of the same or similar ancestral pathways suggests that land plants might be somewhat pre-adapted to dealing with temperature stress, perhaps making inducible cold traits relatively easy to evolve.

  15. Stochastic flux freezing and magnetic dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic flux conservation in turbulent plasmas at high magnetic Reynolds numbers is argued neither to hold in the conventional sense nor to be entirely broken, but instead to be valid in a statistical sense associated to the "spontaneous stochasticity" of Lagrangian particle trajectories. The latter phenomenon is due to the explosive separation of particles undergoing turbulent Richardson diffusion, which leads to a breakdown of Laplacian determinism for classical dynamics. Empirical evidence is presented for spontaneous stochasticity, including numerical results. A Lagrangian path-integral approach is then exploited to establish stochastic flux freezing for resistive hydromagnetic equations and to argue, based on the properties of Richardson diffusion, that flux conservation must remain stochastic at infinite magnetic Reynolds number. An important application of these results is the kinematic, fluctuation dynamo in nonhelical, incompressible turbulence at magnetic Prandtl number (Pr(m)) equal to unity. Numerical results on the Lagrangian dynamo mechanisms by a stochastic particle method demonstrate a strong similarity between the Pr(m)=1 and 0 dynamos. Stochasticity of field-line motion is an essential ingredient of both. Finally, some consequences for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, dynamo, and reconnection are briefly considered.

  16. Vitreous substitutes: challenges and directions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian-Ying; Gao; Yue; Fu; Yan-Nian; Hui

    2015-01-01

    The natural vitreous body has a fine structure and complex functions. The imitation of the natural vitreous body by vitreous substitutes is a challenging work for both researchers and ophthalmologists. Gases, silicone oil, heavy silicone oil and hydrogels, particularly the former two vitreous substitutes are clinically widely used with certain complications. Those, however, are not real artificial vitreous due to lack of structure and function like the natural vitreous body. This article reviews the situations, challenges, and future directions in the development of vitreous substitutes, particularly the experimental and clinical use of a new artificial foldable capsular vitreous body.

  17. Influence of Stress Treatments on the Resistance of Lactococcus lactis to Freezing and Freeze-Drying

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chan

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of cold, heat, or osmotic shock treatment on the resistance of L. lactis subsp. cremoris MM160 and MM310 and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MM210 and FG2 cheese starter bacteria to freezing and freeze-drying. The ability to withstand freezing at -60°C for 24 h was variable among lactococci, but resistance to this treatment was significantly improved (P < 0.05) in most strains by a 2-h cold shock at l0°C or a 25-min heat shock at 39°C (L. lactis subsp. crem...

  18. ARCTIC FOUNDATIONS, INC. FREEZE BARRIER TECHNOLOGY; INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arctic Foundations, Inc. (AFI), of Anchorage, Alaska has developed a freeze barrier technology designed to prevent the migration of contaminants in groundwater by completely isolating contaminant source areas until appropriate remediation techniques can be applied. With this tech...

  19. ARCTIC FOUNDATIONS, INC. FREEZE BARRIER SYSTEM - SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arctic Foundations, Inc. (AFI), of Anchorage, Alaska has developed a freeze barrier technology designed to prevent the migration of contaminants in groundwater by completely isolating contaminant source areas until appropriate remediation techniques can be applied. With this tec...

  20. CURRENT TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATIONS IN FREEZE SHAFT SINKING IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张铭; 翁家杰; 夏正明

    1991-01-01

    This paper gives a brief review of the development of shaft sinking by artificial ground freezing since 1949 when new China was founded. Several shaft freezing schemes which have been successfully applied from the economic and safe viewpoints are presented. Current technology and some innovative techniques,especially the shah lining which have experienced major improvements over the last four decades,are briefly reviewed. The technique of the in-situ pour concrete incorporating ailica fume with higher early strength under low temperature curing conditions is described. The temperature field in shah freezing and its finite difference solution are given in this paper. A recently developed method combining freeze wall model test with back analysis technique based on numerical simulation is also described.

  1. Freezing Resistance of HPC with Nano-SiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Baomin; WANG Lijiu; F C Lai

    2008-01-01

    The test of fast-freezing method is employed to research the freezing resistance of C60and C80 high-performance concrete with nanometer-SiO2,and XRD and SEM are employed to analyze the mechanism of its influence.The experimental results show that the freezing resistance of high-performance concrete has been effectively improved.The compressive strength of C60,C70 and C80 high-performance concrete added with nano-SiO2 can be improved by 8%,6% and 5% respectively,the weight loss can be reduced by 1%,0.6% and 0.3% respectively and the relative dynamic elastic modulus can be improved by 7%,4% and 6%respectively after the 300 times freeze-thaw cycle.

  2. Universality of Tip Singularity Formation in Freezing Water Drops

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, Alvaro G; Brunet, Philipe; Colinet, Pierre; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2014-01-01

    A drop of water deposited on a cold plate freezes into an ice drop with a pointy tip. While this phenomenon clearly finds its origin in the expansion of water upon freezing, a quantitative description of the tip singularity has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate how the geometry of the freezing front, determined by heat transfer considerations, is crucial for the tip formation. We perform systematic measurements of the angles of the conical tip, and reveal the dynamics of the solidification front in a Hele-Shaw geometry. It is found that the cone angle is independent of substrate temperature and wetting angle, suggesting a universal, self-similar mechanism that does not depend on the rate of solidification. We propose a model for the freezing front and derive resulting tip angles analytically, in good agreement with observations.

  3. REDOX ASPECTS REGARDING PRESERVATION OF VEGETAL FOOD PRODUCTS BY FREEZING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristinel Zanoaga

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Freezing, at least of the vegetable products, no matter of the anatomic part involved – root, stalk, leaf, flower, fruit or seed – induces a biochemical changes manifested, implicitly, by modification of the tissular rH. More precisely, the more distant the native rH of the product under consideration is from a certain value – apparently the optimum/compatible to the animal, consuming organism – (rH ~ 26, the deeper are the transformations it suffers as a result of freezing, namely: if the native rH takes values below 26, the product gets oxidized by freezing while, in the opposite case, it is reduced, as if the whole group of vegetal products would tend to attain – by means of freezing – a (redox homeostasis

  4. Multiphoton imaging of biological samples during freezing and heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2014-02-01

    We applied multiphoton microscopic imaging to observe freezing and heating effects in plant- and animal cell samples. The experimental setups consisted of a multiphoton imaging system and a heating and cooling stage which allows for precise temperature control from liquid nitrogen temperature (-196°C 77 K) up to +600°C (873 K) with heating/freezing rates between 0.01 K/min and 150 K/min. Two multiphoton imaging systems were used: a system based on a modified optical microscope and a flexible mobile system. To illustrate the imaging capabilities, plant leafs as well as animal cells were microscopically imaged in vivo during freezing based on autofluorescence lifetime and intensity of intrinsic molecules. The measurements illustrate the usefulness of multiphoton imaging to investigate freezing effects on animal and plant cells.

  5. Evaluating Freeze-Thaw Deterioration with Tensile Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, A. J. K.; Boyd, A. J.

    2017-06-01

    Freeze-thaw damage is one of the leading contributors to infrastructure deterioration in temperate northern climates. Deterioration caused by freeze-thaw cycling is primarily induced by hydraulic pressures within the hydrated cement paste matrix that cause tensile cracking. Such damage should, therefore, be more effectively detected with tensile testing. This work presents the detection and evaluation of ongoing freeze-thaw (F/T) damage in plain concrete cylinders using the pressure tensile strength test, as it compares to compressive strength evaluation. Pressure tension test results exhibited significantly higher levels of deterioration compared to compression testing, with the samples losing up to 90% of their undamaged tensile capacity. Moreover, it was shown that tensile strength testing is far more sensitive to freeze-thaw deterioration, evidenced by a significant drop in the tensile to compressive strength ratio to below 5%.

  6. Freezing Point Depressions of Phase Change CO2 Solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arshad, Muhammad Waseem; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; von Solms, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Freezing point depressions (FPD) in phase change solvents containing 2-(diethylamino)ethanol (DEEA) and 3-(methylamino)propylamine (MAPA) were measured using a modified Beckmann apparatus. The measurements were performed for the binary aqueous DEEA and MAPA solutions, respectively......, in the concentration ranges of (0 to 55) mass percent and (0 to 32.5) mass percent of amine. For the ternary aqueous DEEA–MAPA solutions, freezing points were measured for 5:1, 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, and 1:5 molar ratios of DEEA/MAPA. The FPD method was extended for easy and accurate measurement of freezing points in the CO2......, 20, and 27) mass percent MAPA solutions at different CO2 loadings. The apparatus and the experimental method used showed good repeatability and accuracy. The measured freezing point data were compared with monoethanolamine (MEA) and methyl diethanolamine (MDEA) found in the literature...

  7. Microwave Enhanced Freeze Drying of Solid Waste Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of advanced methods for Microwave Enhanced Freeze Drying of Solid Waste (MEFDSW) is proposed. Methods for the recovery of relatively pure water as a...

  8. Microwave Enhanced Freeze Drying of Solid Waste Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of technology for Microwave Enhanced Freeze Drying of Solid Waste (MEFDSW) is proposed. The present state of the art for solid waste stabilization using...

  9. Freeze concentration of dairy products Phase 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, D.E.; Vasavada, K.C.

    1993-09-01

    An efficient, electrically driven freeze concentration system offers potential for substantially increasing electricity demand while providing the mature dairy industry with new products for domestic and export markets together with enhanced production efficiencies. Consumer tests indicate that dairy products manufactured from freeze-concentrated ingredients are either preferred or considered equivalent in quality to fresh milk-based products. Economic analyses indicate that this technology should be competitive with thermal evaporation processes on a commercial basis.

  10. In cryptozoospermia or severe oligozoospermia is sperm freezing useful?

    OpenAIRE

    Bessonnat, Julien; Brouillet, Sophie; Sintzel, Sarah; Gillois, Pierre; Bergues, Ulrike; Boutte-Busquet, Caroline; Thomas-Cadi, Claire; Hennebicq, Sylviane

    2014-01-01

    Background Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) is an Assisted Reproduction Technique (ART) which offers the chance to conceive to patients presenting very low sperm counts (cryptozoospermia/severe oligozoospermia). Sperm freezing before the oocyte pick-up, can prevent from a lack of spermatozoa on the day of the ICSI. It can avoid the cancellation of the ICSI or the use of TESE (Testicular sperm extraction). The objective of this study was to analyse the practice of sperm freezing for the...

  11. RESEARCH OF MOISTURE MIGRATION DURING PARTIAL FREEZING OF GROUND BEEF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Stefanovskiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of «ideal product» is proposed for the study of mass transfer during partial freezing of food products by freezing plate. The ideal product is a product, in which number of factors affecting the «real product» (meat are excluded. These factors include chemical composition of meat, quality grade of raw material (NOR, DFD, PSE, cryoscopic temperature that determines the degree of water transformation into ice, the phenomenon of osmosis, rate of freezing, etc. By using the concept of «ideal product» and its implementation in a physical experiment, it is proved that the “piston effect” causing the migration of moisture is due to frozen crust formation during partial freezing of the body. During partial freezing of the product by freezing plate, «ideal» and «real» food environment is transformed from closed system into open one with inflow of moisture to unfrozen part of the body. In the «ideal product», there is an expulsion of unfrozen moisture from freezing front, so the water appears on the body surface. Thus, the displacement of moisture increases by the same law, according to which the thickness (weight of frozen layer increases. During partial freezing of ground meat, moisture does not appear on the surface of the product, but hydrates the unfrozen part of meat. The reason of this phenomenon is the expulsion of water during formation of frozen crust and water-binding capacity of meat.

  12. Liquidty Freezes and Market Runs; Evidencefrom the Panic of 1907

    OpenAIRE

    Gehrig, Thomas Paul; Fohlin, Caroline; Haas, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Using a new daily dataset for all stocks traded on the New York Stock Exchange, we study the evolution of information asymmetry during runs on financial institutions and the subsequent liquidity freeze of October 1907 - one of the severest financial crises of the 20\\textsuperscript{th} century. We find that increased informational risk and resulting runs on financial institutions led to a freeze in short-term money markets, which forced liquidation of stock positions, and drained liquidity fr...

  13. Study on the Efficiency of the Vegetables Freezing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Paulikienė

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes taking place during the storage of the products of vegetable origin are inevitable. Products can deteriorate and change their shelf appearance, nutritional value, texture, taste and aroma. Freezing is one of the most appropriate technological operations for the product storage. By freezing products of vegetable origin, cleaner production technology can be used to consume less energy and to preserve quality of the product as well as valuable nutritional/ biologically active substances.The study of vegetable freezing process was carried out by freezing red beets. Beetroot was frozen in a chamber with controlled climatic environment - the Feutron.A portion of moisture content always evaporates from products of vegetable origin at freezing. Air flow velocity has a great influence on freezing rate of vegetables. Intensity of moisture evaporation also increases up to the moment of freezing-up of the surface layers.Intensity of retardation of the evaporation process depends on a peel and on stomata on it. Moisture evaporation’s retardation rate of the red beet peel εevp.ap = 0,50 ± 0,02. When air velocity was 0,15 m/s - εevp varied from 0,47 to 0,53, whilst at the air flow velocity 0,65 m/s - εevp = 0,37 – 0,45.Purpose of the study - to analyse the freezing process of vegetables (by the red beetroot example under the influence of different environment factors.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.69.3.6064

  14. Winter railcar unloading: heat thawing vs FCA. [Freeze conditioning agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, R.J.

    1983-11-01

    The use of freeze conditioning agents and thawing by radiant heat are compared as methods for freezing coal for unloading from railcars in severe weather. The costs of the methods are evaluated and it is shown that, although heating systems require capital expenditure, if a sufficient volume of coal is to be treated, the cost per ton compares very favourably with the use of chemical agents.

  15. Three keys to the radiation of angiosperms into freezing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanne, Amy E; Tank, David C; Cornwell, William K; Eastman, Jonathan M; Smith, Stephen A; FitzJohn, Richard G; McGlinn, Daniel J; O'Meara, Brian C; Moles, Angela T; Reich, Peter B; Royer, Dana L; Soltis, Douglas E; Stevens, Peter F; Westoby, Mark; Wright, Ian J; Aarssen, Lonnie; Bertin, Robert I; Calaminus, Andre; Govaerts, Rafaël; Hemmings, Frank; Leishman, Michelle R; Oleksyn, Jacek; Soltis, Pamela S; Swenson, Nathan G; Warman, Laura; Beaulieu, Jeremy M

    2014-02-06

    Early flowering plants are thought to have been woody species restricted to warm habitats. This lineage has since radiated into almost every climate, with manifold growth forms. As angiosperms spread and climate changed, they evolved mechanisms to cope with episodic freezing. To explore the evolution of traits underpinning the ability to persist in freezing conditions, we assembled a large species-level database of growth habit (woody or herbaceous; 49,064 species), as well as leaf phenology (evergreen or deciduous), diameter of hydraulic conduits (that is, xylem vessels and tracheids) and climate occupancies (exposure to freezing). To model the evolution of species' traits and climate occupancies, we combined these data with an unparalleled dated molecular phylogeny (32,223 species) for land plants. Here we show that woody clades successfully moved into freezing-prone environments by either possessing transport networks of small safe conduits and/or shutting down hydraulic function by dropping leaves during freezing. Herbaceous species largely avoided freezing periods by senescing cheaply constructed aboveground tissue. Growth habit has long been considered labile, but we find that growth habit was less labile than climate occupancy. Additionally, freezing environments were largely filled by lineages that had already become herbs or, when remaining woody, already had small conduits (that is, the trait evolved before the climate occupancy). By contrast, most deciduous woody lineages had an evolutionary shift to seasonally shedding their leaves only after exposure to freezing (that is, the climate occupancy evolved before the trait). For angiosperms to inhabit novel cold environments they had to gain new structural and functional trait solutions; our results suggest that many of these solutions were probably acquired before their foray into the cold.

  16. Improving the Quality of Freeze Dried Rice: Initial Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    CRP. Improvement themes are product texture following rehydration, alternatives to plain FD rice, and fortification with vitamins and minerals. Phase...cm, placed in a –20 °C blast freezer and held overnight, then transferred to the production scale freeze dryer (Pilot Freeze Drying Plant , Budge... vitamins ) upon washing3 and cooking in excess water which is then discarded4, with these losses increasing when the rice was cooked with a greater

  17. Freezing drillings at the shaft deepening at Lyukobanya in 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csiszar, L.

    1988-01-01

    The preliminaries of freezing drilling in Hungary are summarized and the deepening of the Lyukobanya shaft by means of this method is discussed. The drilling equipment and the drilling parameters are listed and the incorporation of freezing tubes is dealt with in detail. The problems and measurement of vertical drilling with this technology are presented on the basis of experiments carried out on the Lyukobanya shaft.

  18. Influence of dough freezing on Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Pejin Dušanka J.; Došanović Irena S.; Popov Stevan D.; Suturović Zvonimir J.; Ranković Jovana A.; Dodić Siniša N.; Dodić Jelena M.; Vučurović Vesna M.

    2007-01-01

    The need to freeze dough is increasing in bakery production. Frozen dough can be stored for a long time without quality change. The capacity of bakery production can be increased in this way, and in the same time, the night shifts can be decreased. Yeast cells can be damaged by freezing process resulting in poor technological quality of dough after defrostation (longer fermentation of dough). The influence of frozen storage time of dough on survival percentage of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was ...

  19. Freezing and Thawing Durability of Very High Strength Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Hamoush

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The newly developed Very High Strength Concrete (VHSC, having compressive strengths of 29 ksi and flexural strengths of 6 ksi, represents a breakthrough in concrete technology. Study to further enhance the properties of this new concrete is continuing. Approach: The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of exposing Very High Strength Concrete (VHSC specimens to rapid freeze/thaw cycles. Twenty one specimens were tested according to the Standards of the American Society for Testing and Materials ASTM C215, ASTM C666 and ASTM C78. Results: One hundred freeze/thaw cycles were performed on the VHSC specimens. Change in specimen’s dimensions and material’s properties were recorded at zero, forty, seventy and one hundred cycles. Dimensions and properties considered were: dimension of cross section, length, weight, Dynamic Moduli, Poisson’s Ratio, durability factor and Modulus of Rupture. Conclusion/Recommendations: The test results indicated that VHSC is good freeze-thaw resistance (durability factor > 85% and can avoid freeze/thaw damage. Freeze- thaw cycling did not significantly affect VHSC specimens’ cross sectional dimensions, length, or Poisson’s Ratio. However, there was a decrease in the specimens’ weight with the increase in number of freeze/thaw cycles, but the decrease was very slim indicating little or no deterioration has occur. Moreover, the fine voids exist in VHSC greatly lower the freezing point of any trapped water, making the material less susceptible to Freeze- Thaw damage.

  20. Evaluation and Comparison of Freeze-Thaw Tests and Air Void Analysis of Pervious Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Kevern, John T.;

    2016-01-01

    to eval-uate the freeze-thaw resistance of fresh or hardened pervious concrete and correspondingly what constitutes acceptable freeze-thaw durability. A greater understanding of the correlation between the freeze-thaw performance and the air void structure of pervious concrete is needed. In the present...... effectively relieve the pressure when water freezes....

  1. Factor substitution in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, John; Grabowski, David C; Hirth, Richard A

    2006-03-01

    This paper studies factor substitution in one important sector: the nursing home industry. Specifically, we measure the extent to which nursing homes substitute materials for labor when labor becomes relatively more expensive. From a policy perspective, factor substitution in this market is important because materials-intensive methods of care are associated with greater risks of morbidity and mortality among nursing home residents. Studying longitudinal data from 1991 to 2000 on nearly every nursing home in the United States, we use the method of instrumental variables (IV) to address measurement error in nursing home wages. The results from the IV models yield evidence of factor substitution: higher nursing home wages are associated with greater use of psychoactive drugs and lower quality.

  2. Nucleophilic Substitution by Benzodithioate Anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnans-Plaisance, Chantal; Gressier, Jean-Claude

    1988-01-01

    Describes a two-session experiment designed to provide a good illustration of, and to improve student knowledge of, the Grignard reaction and nucleophilic substitution. Discusses the procedure, experimental considerations, and conclusion of this experiment. (CW)

  3. THE USE OF MODERN FACILITIES FOR FREEZING WAX SUBSTANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Iashchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The basic directions of use, frozen vegetable oil, an analysis of markets. Analyzed trends in the development of cryogenic freezing. The urgency of developing energy efficient cryogenic devices. Integrated approach to the development of competitive domestic technologies and equipment for cryogenic freezing of vegetable oils is to use effective and innovative cooling techniques, process intensification, reduction of specific energy consumption and, consequently, reducing the cost of production in achieving high quality performance. The advantages of using an inert gas vapor as an alternative direction for existing equipment freezing wax-like substances using brine or water cooling. The investigations of cryogenic freezing using nitrogen vapor. Scientifically confirmed that oil bubbling nitrogen vapor layer, helps to increase the cooling capacity due to the thermal capacity and significantly reduces the processing time. Variants of using cryogenic coolant in the chiller plant. The optimal thermal, geometric and hydrodynamic modes. The ways to improve energy efficiency cryogenic apparatus using cryogenic coolant. The results will produce engineering calculations and design of freezing progressive installations with different technological modes. The conditions for cooling food liquids by bubbling with possibility of integration of physical and chemical characteristics of the cooled product. Cryogenic unit designed for continuous freezing of vegetable oils increased efficiency to the process of automatic control. Confirmed the economic efficiency of cleaning oils from impurities in continuous cryogenic apparatus by reducing the amount of equipment on similar processes in the preparation of the final product with a high degree of purification.

  4. Effect of Freezing Conditions on Fecal Bacterial Composition in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara U. Metzler-Zebeli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sample preservation and recovery of intact DNA from gut samples may affect the inferred gut microbiota composition in pigs. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the freezing process and storage temperature prior to DNA extraction on DNA recovery and bacterial community composition in pig feces using quantitative PCR. Fresh fecal samples from six growing pigs were collected and five aliquots of each prepared: (1 total DNA extracted immediately; (2 stored at −20 °C; (3 snap frozen and stored at −20 °C; (4 stored at −80 °C; and (5 snap frozen and stored at −80 °C. Results showed that DNA yields from fresh fecal samples were, on average, 25 to 30 ng higher than those from the various stored samples. The DNA extracted from fresh samples had more gene copies of total bacteria and all targeted bacterial groups per gram feces compared to DNA extraction from frozen samples. Data presentation also modified the observed effect of freeze storage; as results for Lactobacillus group, Enterococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Clostridium cluster IV, Bacteroides-Prevotella-Porphyromonas and Enterobacteriaceae showed the opposite effect when expressed as relative abundance, by being greater in freeze stored feces than in fresh feces. Snap freezing increased the relative proportion of Clostridium cluster IV by 24%. In conclusion, the freezing process affected DNA yield and bacterial abundances, whereas snap freezing and storage temperature had only little influence on abundances of bacterial populations in pig feces.

  5. Freeze tolerance differs between two ecotypes of Paspalum vaginatum (Poaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Teresa Fabbri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Morphological and physiological responses to freezing were evaluated in two ecotypes of the perennial turfgrass Paspalum vaginatum. Leaf extension rate, number of active meristems, leaf water potential and net photosynthesis were measured on plants of both a commercial cultivar, 'Sea Isle 2000', and a wild ecotype from the Flooding Pampa grasslands of Argentina. Plants were propagated by cloning, cultivated in pots, and examined during 18 consecutive days under two treatments: a non-frozen control treatment (15.5±7 ºC and a frozen treatment with two stages: Stage 1 with four hours of freezing stress for 10 nights (-5ºC, and Stage 2 with 12 hours of freezing stress for eight nights (five nights at -5ºC and three nights at -8ºC. After these treatments, plants were returned to the outside environment to evaluate shoot injury and post-freezing recovery. Leaf water potential, net photosynthesis and leaf extension rate were significantly higher in the wild ecotype than in the commercial cultivar. Meristem density was reduced after freezing in both ecotypes, but was more pronounced in the commercial cultivar (98.5% than in the wild ecotype (80%. Thus, the two ecotypes coming from different environments, exhibited different morphological and physiological responses to exposure to freezing temperatures.

  6. Studies on Freezing RAM Semen in Absence of Glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnaby, Abdelhady Abdelhakeam

    1988-12-01

    Glycerol is widely used as a major cryoprotective agent for freezing spermatozoa of almost all species. However, it reduces fertility of sheep inseminated cervically compared with intrauterine insemination. Studies were conducted to develop a method and procedure for freezing ram semen in the absence of glycerol. Post -thaw survival of ram spermatozoa frozen in the absence of glycerol was affected by time and temperature after collection and before dilution and time after dilution and before freezing. Increase in time at 5^ circC before or after dilution and before freezing increased both post-thaw motility and number of cells passing through Sephadex filter. A cold dilution method was developed. Slow cooling of fresh ram semen and diluting at 5^circ C 2-3 hr. after collection, then freezing 1 hr. after dilution improved both post-thaw motility and number of cells passing through Sephadex filter compared with immediate dilution at 30-37^circC after collection and freezing 3-4 hr. later (P synchronization during breeding season resulted in higher heat response and lambing rate than two injections given 10 days apart.

  7. Effects of freezing, freeze drying and convective drying on in vitro gastric digestion of apples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmau, Maria Esperanza; Bornhorst, Gail M; Eim, Valeria; Rosselló, Carmen; Simal, Susana

    2017-01-15

    The influence of processing (freezing at -196°C in liquid N2, FN sample; freeze-drying at -50°C and 30Pa, FD sample; and convective drying at 60°C and 2m/s, CD sample) on apple (var. Granny Smith) behavior during in vitro gastric digestion was investigated. Dried apples (FD and CD samples) were rehydrated prior to digestion. Changes in carbohydrate composition, moisture, soluble solids, acidity, total polyphenol content (TPC), and antioxidant activity (AA) of apple samples were measured at different times during digestion. Processing resulted in disruption of the cellular structure during digestion, as observed by scanning electron microscopy, light microscopy, and changes in carbohydrate composition. Moisture content increased (6-11% dmo), while soluble solids (55-78% dmo), acidity (44-72% dmo), total polyphenol content (30-61% dmo), and antioxidant activity (41-87%) decreased in all samples after digestion. Mathematical models (Weibull and exponential models) were used to better evaluate the influence of processing on apple behavior during gastric digestion.

  8. Immersion freezing of biological particles at LACIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, T.; Hartmann, S.; Temkiv, T. S.; Augustin, S.; Gosewinkel Karlson, U.; Sahyoun, M. M.; Niedermeier, D.; Wex, H.; Voigtländer, J.; Raddatz, M.; Stratmann, F.

    2012-04-01

    Biological particles, especially bacteria being ubiquitous in the atmosphere, belong to the most efficient ice nuclei (IN) (Möhler, 2008) and hence might have a large impact on weather and climate. In this study, the immersion freezing behavior of different size segregated biological particles is investigated at the laminar flow tube LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, Hartmann et al., 2011). For these experiments, SNOMAX and outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are used as IN. SNOMAX industrially produced from Pseudomonas-syringae bacteria, which are very ice nucleation active, can be seen as a proxy for ice nucleating bacteria in general. On the surface of these bacteria, ice nucleating proteins that initiate the freezing are situated (Maki et al., 1974). Additionally, it has been found that some ice nucleating bacteria strains have the ability to produce OMV, i.e., strangulated parts of the bacterial cell consisting of the same membrane material (Phelps et al., 1986). These OMV might contain the same ice nucleating proteins on their surface and thus might be able to nucleate ice as well. The OMV used in our experiments were extracted from bacteria cultivated from rain samples collected in Denmark from 30 m height. In our experiments, the biological particles are suspended in air via atomization, size selected by means of a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer, and then fed into LACIS. In LACIS, well defined droplets are produced by activating the biological particles to cloud droplets, so that each droplet contains only one biological particle. By decreasing the temperature in LACIS, these droplets are frozen. To determine the ice fraction, i.e., the fraction of frozen droplets to all particles, the liquid and frozen droplets are distinguished by means of a newly self-built optical device, which is positioned under LACIS, using the depolarization of light scattered by a single particle. The ice fractions are measured as a function of temperature and

  9. Preparation and Characterization ofβ-TCP/CS Scaffolds by Freeze-extraction and Freeze-gelation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Ruiran; WANG Deping; YAO Aihua; HUANG Wenhai

    2011-01-01

    The freeze-extraction and freeze-gelation methods were used to prepare highly porous β-TCP/CS scaffolds with different β-TCP/CS ratio. In these methods, the suspending mixture of β-TCP and chitosan was frozen, the frozen mixture was immersed in a non-solvent(0.05 mol/L NaOH/ehanol aqueous) bath to allow the exchange between solvent(acetic-acid aqueous) and non-solvent at a temperature lower than the freezing point of the acetic-acid. Then, the β-TCP/CS scaffolds were formed and dried at room temperature. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), gas chromatography (GC) and omnipotence material testing machine were employed to characterize theβ-TCP/CS scaffolds. The results of GC show that the freeze extraction of the β-TCP/chitosan scaffolds was completed when the extraction time is above 24 h. The SEM results show that the β-TCP/CS scaffolds are composed of interconnected pore network. The porosity of the β-TCP/CS scaffolds decrease with the increase of the content of the β-TCP. The β-TCP/CS scaffolds have a highest compressive strength when the chitosan/β-TCP ratio is 30:70. The present work displays that the β-TCP/CS composite scaffolds with appropriate mechanical properties and high porosity can be successfully prepared by the freeze-extraction and freeze-gelation methods.

  10. Repeated vitrification/warming of human sperm gives better results than repeated slow programmable freezing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teraporn Vutyavanich; Worashorn Lattiwongsakorn; Waraporn Piromlertamorn; Sudarat Samchimchom

    2012-01-01

    In this study,we compared the effects of repeated freezing/thawing of human sperm by our in-house method of rapid freezing with slow programmable freezing.Sperm samples from 11 normozoospermic subjects were processed through density gradients and divided into three aliquots:non-frozen,rapid freezing and slow programmable freezing.Sperm in the rapid freezing group had better motility and viability than those in the slow freezing group (P<O.01) after the first,second and third cycles of freezing/thawing,but there was no difference in morphology.In the second experiment,rapid freezing was repeated three times in 20 subjects.The samples from each thawing cycle were evaluated for DNA fragmentation using the alkaline comet assay.DNA fragmentation began to increase considerably after the second cycle of freezing/thawing,but to a level that was not clinically important.In the third experiment,rapid freezing was done repeatedly in 10 subjects,until no motile sperm were observed after thawing.The median number of repeated freezing/thawing that yielded no motile sperm was seven (range:5-8,mean:6.8).In conclusion,we demonstrated that repeated freezing/thawing of processed semen using our rapid freezing method gave better results than standard slow programmable freezing.This method can help maximize the usage of precious cryopreserved sperm samples in assisted reproduction technology.

  11. Does anxiety cause freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaylena A Ehgoetz Martens

    Full Text Available Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD commonly experience freezing of gait under time constraints, in narrow spaces, and in the dark. One commonality between these different situations is that they may all provoke anxiety, yet anxiety has never been directly examined as a cause of FOG. In this study, virtual reality was used to induce anxiety and evaluate whether it directly causes FOG. Fourteen patients with PD and freezing of gait (Freezers and 17 PD without freezing of gait (Non-Freezers were instructed to walk in two virtual environments: (i across a plank that was located on the ground (LOW, (ii across a plank above a deep pit (HIGH. Multiple synchronized motion capture cameras updated participants' movement through the virtual environment in real-time, while their gait was recorded. Anxiety levels were evaluated after each trial using self-assessment manikins. Freezers performed the experiment on two separate occasions (in their ON and OFF state. Freezers reported higher levels of anxiety compared to Non-Freezers (p < 0.001 and all patients reported greater levels of anxiety when walking across the HIGH plank compared to the LOW (p < 0.001. Freezers experienced significantly more freezing of gait episodes (p = 0.013 and spent a significantly greater percentage of each trial frozen (p = 0.005 when crossing the HIGH plank. This finding was even more pronounced when comparing Freezers in their OFF state. Freezers also had greater step length variability in the HIGH compared to the LOW condition, while the step length variability in Non-Freezers did not change. In conclusion, this was the first study to directly compare freezing of gait in anxious and non-anxious situations. These results present strong evidence that anxiety is an important mechanism underlying freezing of gait and supports the notion that the limbic system may have a profound contribution to freezing in PD.

  12. Microaspiration for high-pressure freezing: a new method for ultrastructural preservation of fragile and sparse tissues for TEM and electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auer, Manfred; Triffo, W.J.; Palsdottir, H.; McDonald, K.L.; Inman, J.L.; Bissell, M.J.; Raphael, R.M.; Auer, M.; Lee, J.K.

    2008-02-13

    High-pressure freezing is the preferred method to prepare thick biological specimens for ultrastructural studies. However, the advantages obtained by this method often prove unattainable for samples that are difficult to handle during the freezing and substitution protocols. Delicate and sparse samples are difficult to manipulate and maintain intact throughout the sequence of freezing, infiltration, embedding, and final orientation for sectioning and subsequent TEM imaging. An established approach to surmount these difficulties is the use of cellulose microdialysis tubing to transport the sample. With an inner diameter of 200 micrometers, the tubing protects small and fragile samples within the thickness constraints of high-pressure freezing, and the tube ends can be sealed to avoid loss of sample. Importantly, the transparency of the tubing allows optical study of the specimen at different steps in the process. Here, we describe the use of a micromanipulator and microinjection apparatus to handle and position delicate specimens within the tubing. We report two biologically significant examples that benefit from this approach, 3D cultures of mammary epithelial cells and cochlear outer hair cells. We illustrate the potential for correlative light and electron microscopy as well as electron tomography.

  13. Rational design of an influenza subunit vaccine powder with sugar glass technology : preventing conformational changes of haemagglutinin during freezing and freeze-drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amorij, J-P; Meulenaar, J; Hinrichs, W L J; Stegmann, T; Huckriede, A; Coenen, F; Frijlink, H W

    2007-01-01

    The development of a stable influenza subunit vaccine in the dry state was investigated. The influence of various carbohydrates, buffer types and freezing rates on the integrity of haemagglutinin after freeze-thawing or freeze-drying was investigated with a range of analytical and immunological meth

  14. Rational design of an influenza subunit vaccine powder with sugar glass technology : preventing conformational changes of haemagglutinin during freezing and freeze-drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amorij, J-P; Meulenaar, J; Hinrichs, W L J; Stegmann, T; Huckriede, A; Coenen, F; Frijlink, H W

    2007-01-01

    The development of a stable influenza subunit vaccine in the dry state was investigated. The influence of various carbohydrates, buffer types and freezing rates on the integrity of haemagglutinin after freeze-thawing or freeze-drying was investigated with a range of analytical and immunological

  15. Preparation of Chitosan Nanocompositeswith a Macroporous Structure by Unidirectional Freezing and Subsequent Freeze-Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Aranaz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is the N-deacetylated derivative of chitin, a naturally abundant mucopolysaccharide that consists of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-d-glucose through a β (1→4 linkage and is found in nature as the supporting material of crustaceans, insects, etc. Chitosan has been strongly recommended as a suitable functional material because of its excellent biocompatibility, biodegradability, non-toxicity, and adsorption properties. Boosting all these excellent properties to obtain unprecedented performances requires the core competences of materials chemists to design and develop novel processing strategies that ultimately allow tailoring the structure and/or the composition of the resulting chitosan-based materials. For instance, the preparation of macroporous materials is challenging in catalysis, biocatalysis and biomedicine, because the resulting materials will offer a desirable combination of high internal reactive surface area and straightforward molecular transport through broad “highways” leading to such a surface. Moreover, chitosan-based composites made of two or more distinct components will produce structural or functional properties not present in materials composed of one single component. Our group has been working lately on cryogenic processes based on the unidirectional freezing of water slurries and/or hydrogels, the subsequent freeze-drying of which produce macroporous materials with a well-patterned structure. We have applied this process to different gels and colloidal suspensions of inorganic, organic, and hybrid materials. In this review, we will describe the application of the process to chitosan solutions and gels typically containing a second component (e.g., metal and ceramic nanoparticles, or carbon nanotubes for the formation of chitosan nanocomposites with a macroporous structure. We will also discuss the role played by this tailored composition and structure in the ultimate performance of these materials.

  16. Enhanced enzymatic conversion with freeze pretreatment of rice straw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ken-Lin; Thitikorn-amorn, Jitladda; Ou, Bay-Ming; Chen, Shan-He; Huang, Po-Jung [Institute of Biological Chemistry and Genomics Research Center Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 115 (China); Hsieh, Jung-Feng [Department of Food Science, Fu Jen Catholic University, Xin Zhuang, Taipei 242 (China); Ratanakhanokchai, Khanok [School of Bioresources and Technology, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Chen, Shui-Tein [Institute of Biological Chemistry and Genomics Research Center Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 115 (China); Institute of Biochemical Sciences, College of Life Science, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106 (China)

    2011-01-15

    Production of bioethanol by the conversion of lignocellulosic waste has attracted much interest in recent years, because of its low cost and great potential availability. The pretreatment process is important for increasing the enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulosic materials. Enzymatic conversion with freeze pretreatment of rice straw was evaluated in this study. The freeze pretreatment was found to significantly increase the enzyme digestibility of rice straw from 48% to 84%. According to the results, enzymatic hydrolysis of unpretreated rice straw with 150 U cellulase and 100 U xylanase for 48 h yielded 226.77 g kg{sup -1} and 93.84 g kg{sup -1} substrate-reducing sugars respectively. However, the reducing sugar yields from freeze pretreatment under the same conditions were 417.27 g kg{sup -1} and 138.77 g kg{sup -1} substrate, respectively. In addition, hydrolyzates analysis showed that the highest glucose yield obtained during the enzymatic hydrolysis step in the present study was 371.91 g kg{sup -1} of dry rice straw, following pretreatment. Therefore, the enhanced enzymatic conversion with freeze pretreatment of rice straw was observed in this study. This indicated that freeze pretreatment was highly effective for enzymatic hydrolysis and low environmental impact. (author)

  17. Prediction of frozen food properties during freezing using product composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonsupthip, W; Heldman, D R

    2007-06-01

    Frozen water fraction (FWF), as a function of temperature, is an important parameter for use in the design of food freezing processes. An FWF-prediction model, based on concentrations and molecular weights of specific product components, has been developed. Published food composition data were used to determine the identity and composition of key components. The model proposed in this investigation had been verified using published experimental FWF data and initial freezing temperature data, and by comparison to outputs from previously published models. It was found that specific food components with significant influence on freezing temperature depression of food products included low molecular weight water-soluble compounds with molality of 50 micromol per 100 g food or higher. Based on an analysis of 200 high-moisture food products, nearly 45% of the experimental initial freezing temperature data were within an absolute difference (AD) of +/- 0.15 degrees C and standard error (SE) of +/- 0.65 degrees C when compared to values predicted by the proposed model. The predicted relationship between temperature and FWF for all analyzed food products provided close agreements with experimental data (+/- 0.06 SE). The proposed model provided similar prediction capability for high- and intermediate-moisture food products. In addition, the proposed model provided statistically better prediction of initial freezing temperature and FWF than previous published models.

  18. Factors influencing the outcome of embryo freezing and Ihawing program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶英辉; 金帆; 徐晨明; 邢兰凤

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors that might influence the sucess of an ernbryo freezing and thawing program.Method: The relationship between the pregnancy rate in 73 cycles of embryo freezing and thewing program and the following factors was analyzed;matermal age,E2 level at the time of HCG trigger,embryo storage time,number of thawed embryos transferred,presence of sponsoring embryos and intact embryos.And the suvival rate of thawed embryos with different morphology,cell stage and storage time was evaluated.Result:Transfer with three of more than three thawed embryos resulted in pragnancy rates of 38.5% and 35.7%,respectively.compared with 5.3% for transfer of fewer than three embryos.The presence of sponsoring embryos and intact embryos significantly incresses pregnancy rate in embryo freezing and thawing program .No other factor examined had any effect on pregnancy outcome.The survival rate of good morphology embryos was higher than poor ones,but was not influenced by cell stage and storage time.Conclusion:Embryo morphology before freezing , number of thawed embryos transferred and the presence of intact embryos are important to the outcome of embryo freezing and thawing program.

  19. Factors influencing the outcome of embryo freezing and thawing program

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶英辉; 金帆; 徐晨明; 邢兰凤

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors that might influence the succ ess of an embryo freezing and thawing program. Method: The relationship betwee n the pregnancy rate in 73 cycles of embryo freezing and thawing program and the following factors was analyzed: maternal age, E2 level at the time of HCG trigg er, embryo storage time, number of thawed embryos transferred, presence of spons oring embryos and intact embryos. And the survival rate of thawed embryos with d ifferent morphology, cell stage and storage time was evaluated. Result: Tra nsfer with three or more than three thawed embryos resulted in pregnancy rates o f 38.5% and 35.7%, respectively, compared with 5.3% for transfer of fewer th an t hree embryos. The presence of sponsoring embryos and intact embryos significantl y increases pregnancy rate in embryo freezing and thawing program. No other fact or examined had any effect on pregnancy outcome. The survival rate of good morph ology embryos was higher than poor ones, but was not influenced by cell stage an d storage time. Conclusion: Embryo morphology before freezing, number of thaw ed embryos transferred and the presence of intact embryos are important to the o utcome of embryo freezing and thawing program.

  20. Cryoprotectant-free freezing of the goat epididymal sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katanbafzadeh, H; Barati, F; Tabandeh, M

    2014-01-01

    Cryoprotectant free approach successfully removed the impact of physical and chemical damages in preserving human sperm in a vitrification protocol. There is no any report on this technology in farm animal sperm freezing. The aim of the present study was to find the efficacy of cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrin (CLC; 1 mg per 60 million) and sucrose (0.1 and 0.2 M) on freezing of the goat epididymal sperm. Caudal epididymides (n=5 pairs) were dissected, incised and incubated in the Tris-BSA solution for 15 min, followed by swim-up at room temperature. Sperm was loaded in 0.25 mL French straws and cooled on nitrogen vapor for 3 min then immersed in liquid nitrogen and remained for 48 h. Then the straws thawed by immersing in 37 degree C waterbath for 30 sec and analyzed. The results showed the impact of freezing on the goat epididymal sperm motility, viability and DNA fragmentation that were improved by incorporation of CLC and sucrose (0.2 M). In conclusion, the goat epididymal sperm was frozen in a cryoprotectant-free freezing model. CLC and 0.4 M sucrose protected the goat epididymal sperm against freezing-induced damages.

  1. Freeze-In Dark Matter with Displaced Signatures at Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Co, Raymond T; Hall, Lawrence J; Pappadopulo, Duccio

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter, $X$, may be generated by new physics at the TeV scale during an early matter-dominated (MD) era that ends at temperature $T_R \\ll {\\rm TeV}$. Compared to the conventional radiation-dominated (RD) results, yields from both Freeze-Out and Freeze-In processes are greatly suppressed by dilution from entropy production, making Freeze-Out less plausible while allowing successful Freeze-In with a much larger coupling strength. Freeze-In is typically dominated by the decay of a particle $B$ of the thermal bath, $B \\rightarrow X$. For a large fraction of the relevant cosmological parameter space, the decay rate required to produce the observed dark matter abundance leads to displaced signals at LHC and future colliders, for any $m_X$ in the range ${\\rm keV} < m_X < m_B$ and for values of $m_B$ accessible to these colliders. This result applies whether the early MD era arises after conventional inflation, when $T_R$ is the usual reheat temperature, or is a generic MD era with an alternative origin. I...

  2. Magnesium substitution in brushite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Cabrejos-Azama, Jatsue; Rodríguez, Carmen Rueda; Jerez, Luis Blanco; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnesium-doped ceramics has been described to modify brushite cements and improve their biological behavior. However, few studies have analyzed the efficiency of this approach to induce magnesium substitution in brushite crystals. Mg-doped ceramics composed of Mg-substituted β-TCP, stanfieldite and/or farringtonite were reacted with primary monocalcium phosphate (MCP) in the presence of water. The cement setting reaction has resulted in the formation of brushite and newberyite within the cement matrix. Interestingly, the combination of SAED and EDX analyses of single crystal has indicated the occurrence of magnesium substitution within brushite crystals. Moreover, the effect of magnesium ions on the structure, and mechanical and setting properties of the new cements was characterized as well as the release of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions. Further research would enhance the efficiency of the system to incorporate larger amounts of magnesium ions within brushite crystals.

  3. On Regular Power-Substitution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huanyin CHEN

    2009-01-01

    The necessary and sufficient conditions under which a ring satisfies regular power-substitution are investigated. It is shown that a ring R satisfies regular power-substitution if and only if a(-~)b in R implies that there exist n ∈ N and a U ∈ GLn(R) such that aU =Ub if and only if for any regular x ∈ R there exist m,n ∈ N and U ∈ GLn(R) such that xmIn = xmUxm, where a(-~)b means that there exists x, y, z ∈ R such that a = ybx, b = xaz and x = xyx = xzx. It is proved that every directly finite simple ring satisfies regular power-substitution. Some applications for stably free R-modules are also obtained.

  4. 40 CFR 721.10040 - Substituted acridine naphtha substituted benzamide (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted acridine naphtha... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10040 Substituted acridine naphtha substituted... substance identified generically as a substituted acridine naphtha substituted benzamide (PMN P-02-522) is...

  5. 40 CFR 721.2577 - Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Copper complex of (substituted... Copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted phenyl) disulfonaphthyl azo, amine salt... substances identified generically as copper complex of (substituted sulfonaphthyl azo substituted...

  6. Substituted decision making: elder guardianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatherman, Martha E; Goethe, Katherine E

    2009-11-01

    The goal of this column is to help experienced clinicians navigate the judicial system when they are confronted with requests for capacity evaluations that involve guardianship (conservatorship). The interface between the growing elderly medical population and increasing requests for substituted decision making is becoming more complex. This column will help practicing psychiatrists understand the medical, legal, and societal factors involved in adult guardianship. Such understanding is necessary in order to effectively perform guardianship evaluations and adequately inform courts, patients, and families about the psychiatric diagnoses central to substituted decision making.

  7. Hypoxic radiosensitizers: substituted styryl derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudelman, A; Falb, E; Odesa, Y; Shmueli-Broide, N

    1994-10-01

    A number of novel styryl epoxides, N-substituted-styryl-ethanolamines, N-mono and N,N'-bis-(2-hydroxyethyl)-cinnamamides--analogues to the known radiosensitizers RSU-1069, pimonidazole and etanidazole--display selective hypoxic radiosensitizing activity. The styryl group, especially when substituted by electron withdrawing groups, was found to be bioisosteric to the nitroimidazolyl functionality. The most active derivative 2-(2'-nitrophenyl)ethen-1-yl-oxirane 8a displayed a sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) of 5 relative to misonidazole.

  8. Freezing point depression in model Lennard-Jones solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschke, Konstantin; Jörg Limbach, Hans; Kremer, Kurt; Donadio, Davide

    2015-09-01

    Crystallisation of liquid solutions is of uttermost importance in a wide variety of processes in materials, atmospheric and food science. Depending on the type and concentration of solutes the freezing point shifts, thus allowing control on the thermodynamics of complex fluids. Here we investigate the basic principles of solute-induced freezing point depression by computing the melting temperature of a Lennard-Jones fluid with low concentrations of solutes, by means of equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The effect of solvophilic and weakly solvophobic solutes at low concentrations is analysed, scanning systematically the size and the concentration. We identify the range of parameters that produce deviations from the linear dependence of the freezing point on the molal concentration of solutes, expected for ideal solutions. Our simulations allow us also to link the shifts in coexistence temperature to the microscopic structure of the solutions.

  9. Deconfinement of strangeness and freeze-out from charge fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Swagato

    2013-01-01

    We use Lattice QCD calculations of fluctuations and correlations of various conserved charges to show that the deconfinement of strangeness takes place in the chiral crossover region of QCD; however, inside the quark-gluon plasma strange quarks remain strongly interacting at least up to temperatures twice the QCD crossover temperature. Further, we discuss how the freeze-out parameters of heavy-ion collisions can be determined in a model-independent way through direct comparisons between experimentally measured higher order cumulants of conserved charges and corresponding Lattice QCD calculations. Utilizing the preliminary data from the STAR and PHENIX experiments we illustrate this method. Although, the Lattice QCD based determinations of the freeze-out parameters utilizing data sets of different experiments and different observables are currently not consistent with each other, it is tantalizing to see that all the observed freeze-out parameters lie very close to the chiral/deconfinement crossover region of ...

  10. Freeze-drying applied to radioactive source preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sanoit, J; Leprince, B; Bobin, Ch; Bouchard, J

    2004-12-01

    In the framework of R&D studies for the improvement of radioactive source efficiencies prepared on thin films for 4pibeta-gamma coincidence counting, a comparative study on two drying methods has been undertaken in our laboratory (BNM-Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, France). The standard method of evaporation at atmospheric pressure and a method based on freeze-drying using commercial equipment are compared. The preliminary results of this study obtained with 65Zn sources are presented and a significant improvement of the detection efficiencies to the electron emission for freeze-dried sources is shown. In the course of validation of this method, other radionuclides were studied and, up to now, the results confirm the better crystallization homogeneity achieved for freeze-dried sources.

  11. Freezing of gait: a practical approach to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonnekes, Jorik; Snijders, Anke H; Nutt, John G; Deuschl, Günter; Giladi, Nir; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2015-07-01

    Freezing of gait is a common and disabling symptom in patients with parkinsonism, characterised by sudden and brief episodes of inability to produce effective forward stepping. These episodes typically occur during gait initiation or turning. Treatment is important because freezing of gait is a major risk factor for falls in parkinsonism, and a source of disability to patients. Various treatment approaches exist, including pharmacological and surgical options, as well as physiotherapy and occupational therapy, but evidence is inconclusive for many approaches, and clear treatment protocols are not available. To address this gap, we review medical and non-medical treatment strategies for freezing of gait and present a practical algorithm for the management of this disorder, based on a combination of evidence, when available, and clinical experience of the authors. Further research is needed to formally establish the merits of our proposed treatment protocol.

  12. Surviving freezing in plant tissues by oomycetous snow molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Ryo; Yajima, Yuka; Kida, Ken-ichi; Tokura, Katsuyuki; Tojo, Motoaki; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2015-04-01

    Oomyceteous snow molds, Pythium species, were reported to be less tolerant to chilling and freezing temperatures than other snow mold taxa. However, Pythium species are often found to be pathogenic on mosses in Polar Regions. We investigated the frost resistance of Pythium species from Temperate (Hokkaido, Japan) and Subantarctic Regions. Free mycelia and hyphal swellings, structures for survival, of Pythium iwayamai and Pythium paddicum lost viability within freeze-thaw 3 cycles; however, mycelia in host plants survived the treatment. It was reported that fungi in permafrost are characterized both by the presence of natural cryoprotectants in these ecotopes and by the ability to utilize their inherent mechanisms of protection. It is conceivable that plant substrates or derivatives thereof are natural cryoprotectants, enabling them to provide advantageous conditions to microorganisms under freezing conditions. Our results are the first to experimentally support this hypothesis.

  13. The freezing step in lyophilization: physico-chemical fundamentals, freezing methods and consequences on process performance and quality attributes of biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Julia Christina; Friess, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    Lyophilization is a common, but cost-intensive, drying process to achieve protein formulations with long-term stability. In the past, typical process optimization has focused on the drying steps and the freezing step was rather ignored. However, the freezing step is an equally important step in lyophilization, as it impacts both process performance and product quality. While simple in concept, the freezing step is presumably the most complex step in lyophilization. Therefore, in order to get a more comprehensive understanding of the processes that occur during freezing, the physico-chemical fundamentals of freezing are first summarized. The available techniques that can be used to manipulate or directly control the freezing process in lyophilization are also reviewed. In addition, the consequences of the freezing step on quality attributes, such as sample morphology, physical state of the product, residual moisture content, reconstitution time, and performance of the primary and secondary drying phase, are discussed. A special focus is given to the impact of the freezing process on protein stability. This review aims to provide the reader with an awareness of not only the importance but also the complexity of the freezing step in lyophilization and its impact on quality attributes of biopharmaceuticals and process performance. With a deeper understanding of freezing and the possibility to directly control or at least manipulate the freezing behavior, more efficient lyophilization cycles can be developed, and the quality and stability of lyophilized biopharmaceuticals can be improved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrasonic emissions from conifer xylem exposed to repeated freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Stefan; Zublasing, Verena

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonic emission measurements enable the analysis of xylem cavitation induced by drought and freeze-thaw events. Several studies have indicated that ultrasonic acoustic emissions (UAE) in conifers occur upon freezing and not upon thawing, although classical theory has postulated gas bubble formation during freezing and cavitation during thawing. We analyzed the pattern and quality of freeze-thaw-induced UAE in seven conifers (Abies alba, Larix decidua, Juniperus communis, Picea abies, Pinus cembra, Pinus mugo, Pinus sylvestris). Axes samples dehydrated to different water potentials were exposed to repeated frost cycles. The number, amplitude and energy of UAE signals were registered and related to water potential, temperature course and wood characteristics (wood density, tracheid diameter). For P. abies, ultrasonic emission analysis was also performed on bark samples, xylem samples without bark, as well as on stems of young potted trees. In all conifers, UAE were registered in water-stressed samples but not in saturated or dehydrated samples. No signals were emitted by the bark of P. abies. Ultrasonic activity occurred only upon freezing, and identical patterns were observed in axes samples and stems of potted P. abies trees. A weak positive relationship between tracheid diameter and UAE energy was observed, indicating wide tracheids to emit signals with higher energy. The classical bubble formation hypothesis cannot sufficiently explain the occurrence of UAE during freezing and upon repeated temperature cycles, as demonstrated in this study. We suggest that the low water potential of ice induces air-seeding near the ice-water interface, and consequently, causes UAE.

  15. The effect of dryer load on freeze drying process design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sajal M; Jameel, Feroz; Pikal, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    Freeze-drying using a partial load is a common occurrence during the early manufacturing stages when insufficient amounts of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) are available. In such cases, the immediate production needs are met by performing lyophilization with less than a full freeze dryer load. However, it is not obvious at what fractional load significant deviations from full load behavior begin. The objective of this research was to systematically study the effects of variation in product load on freeze drying behavior in laboratory, pilot and clinical scale freeze-dryers. Experiments were conducted with 5% mannitol (high heat and mass flux) and 5% sucrose (low heat and mass flux) at different product loads (100%, 50%, 10%, and 2%). Product temperature was measured in edge as well as center vials with thermocouples. Specific surface area (SSA) was measured by BET gas adsorption analysis and residual moisture was measured by Karl Fischer. In the lab scale freeze-dryer, the molar flux of inert gas was determined by direct flow measurement using a flowmeter and the molar flux of water vapor was determined by manometric temperature measurement (MTM) and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) techniques. Comparative pressure measurement (capacitance manometer vs. Pirani) was used to determine primary drying time. For both 5% mannitol and 5% sucrose, primary drying time decreases and product temperature increases as the load on the shelves decreases. No systematic variation was observed in residual moisture and vapor composition as load decreased. Further, SSA data suggests that there are no significant freezing differences under different load conditions. Independent of dryer scale, among all the effects, variation in radiation heat transfer from the chamber walls to the product seems to be the dominant effect resulting in shorter primary drying time as the load on the shelf decreases (i.e., the fraction of edge vials increases).

  16. Dynamics and Sizes of the Fireball at Freeze-out

    CERN Document Server

    Tomasik, Boris; Heinz, Ulrich W; Tomasik, Boris; Wiedemann, Urs Achim; Heinz, Ulrich

    2000-01-01

    Analyzing the m_t-spectrum and two-particle correlations of negative hadrons from 158 AGeV/c Pb+Pb collisions at slightly forward rapidities we find a (thermal) freeze-out temperature of about 100 MeV and transverse flow with approximately 0.55c. The M_t-dependence of the correlation radii prefers a box-like transverse density profile over a Gaussian. From an analysis of the pion phase-space density we find pion chemical potential of approximately 60 MeV at thermal freeze-out.

  17. Field application of freezing technology for social infrastructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EunChul Shin; YuRa Gong; CheolGyu Jeong

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous methods to prevent seepage flow and ground improvement methodologies such as cement grouting, sheet piling, and the membrane method. In this paper, we present case histories of freezing technology applications in the construction of a deep tunnel sewerage system, undersea highway tunnel, and liquefied natural gas tank. Heaving pressure measurements for various soil types around a liquefied natural tank are compared with existing data. In this paper, we present temperature variations at the bottom and side of a liquefied natural gas tank. Our findings show that ground-freezing technology is very effective in controlling ground water infiltration into underground structures as well providing soil reinforcement in the soft ground.

  18. Random spin freezing in uranium intermetallic compound UCuSi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Dexin [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nimori, Shigeki [Tsukuba Magnet Laboratory, National Institute for Materials Science, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Shiokawa, Yoshinobu [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)

    2006-03-29

    The results of low-temperature ac susceptibility, dc magnetization, magnetic relaxation, specific heat, and electrical resistivity measurements on the uranium intermetallic compound UCuSi, a hexagonal CeCd{sub 2}-type non-magnetic atom disorder system, are reported. The results establish that a spin-glass state is formed in this compound at low temperature. Some dynamical parameters characterizing the spin freezing state of this system, such as static spin freezing temperature T{sub s}, critical exponent z{nu}, and activation energy E{sub a}, are determined from dynamical analysis of the ac susceptibility data. The observed properties are discussed based on a magnetic cluster model.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Thermal Conductivity of Meat During Freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinbayeva, A.; Arkharov, I.; Aldiyarov, A.; Drobyshev, A.; Zhubaniyazova, M.; Kurnosov, V.

    2017-04-01

    The cryogenic technologies of processing and storage of agricultural products are becoming increasingly indispensable in the food industry as an important factor of ensuring food safety. One of such technologies is the shock freezing of meat, which provides a higher degree of preservation of the quality of frozen products in comparison with traditional technologies. The thermal conductivity of meat is an important parameter influencing the energy consumption in the freezing process. This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of beef. The measurements were taken by using a specially designed measurement cell, which allows covering the temperature range from 80 to 300 K.

  20. High freezing point fuels used for aviation turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, R.

    1979-01-01

    Broadened-specification aviation fuels could be produced from a greater fraction of crude source material with improvements in fuel supply and price. These fuels, particularly those with increased final boiling temperatures, would have higher freezing temperatures than current aviation turbine fuels. For the small but significant fraction of commercial flights where low fuel temperatures make higher freezing-point fuel use unacceptable, adaptations to the fuel or fuel system may be made to accommodate this fuel. Several techniques are discussed. Fuel heating is the most promising concept. One simple design uses existing heat rejection from the fuel-lubricating oil cooler, another uses an engine-driven generator for electrical heating.

  1. Accelerated redox reaction between chromate and phenolic pollutants during freezing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Jinjung; Kim, Jaesung [Department of Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 24252 (Korea, Republic of); Vetráková, Ľubica [Department of Chemistry and Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Seo, Jiwon [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Heger, Dominik [Department of Chemistry and Research Centre for Toxic Compounds in the Environment (RECETOX), Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Lee, Changha [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ho-Il [Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI), Incheon 21990 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kitae, E-mail: ktkim@kopri.re.kr [Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI), Incheon 21990 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jungwon, E-mail: jwk@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwon-do 24252 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-05

    Highlights: • Redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) was significantly accelerated during freezing. • Accelerated redox conversion in ice is ascribed to the freeze concentration effect. • 4-CP, Cr(VI), and protons are concentrated in the liquid brine by freezing. • Redox conversions of various phenolic pollutants/Cr(VI) were significant in ice. • Freezing-accelerated redox conversion was observed in real polluted water. - Abstract: The redox reaction between 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) and chromate (Cr(VI)) (i.e., the simultaneous oxidation of 4-CP by Cr(VI) and reduction of Cr(VI) by 4-CP) in ice (i.e., at −20 °C) was compared with the corresponding reaction in water (i.e., at 25 °C). The redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI), which was negligible in water, was significantly accelerated in ice. This accelerated redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) in ice is ascribed to the freeze concentration effect occurring during freezing, which excludes solutes (i.e., 4-CP and Cr(VI)) and protons from the ice crystals and subsequently concentrates them in the liquid brine. The concentrations of Cr(VI) and protons in the liquid brine were confirmed by measuring the optical image and the UV–vis absorption spectra of cresol red (CR) as a pH indicator of frozen solution. The redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) was observed in water when the concentrations of 4-CP/protons or Cr(VI)/protons increased by 100/1000-fold. These results corroborate the freeze concentration effect as the reason for the accelerated redox conversion of 4-CP/Cr(VI) in ice. The redox conversion of various phenolic pollutants/Cr(VI) and 4-CP/Cr(VI) in real wastewater was successfully achieved in ice, which verifies the environmental relevance and importance of freezing-accelerated redox conversion of phenolic pollutants/Cr(VI) in cold regions.

  2. On freeze-out problem in relativistic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Yu B

    2008-01-01

    A finite unbound system which is equilibrium in one reference frame is in general nonequilibrium in another frame. This is a consequence of the relative character of the time synchronization in the relativistic physics. This puzzle was a prime motivation of the Cooper--Frye approach to the freeze-out in relativistic hydrodynamics. Solution of the puzzle reveals that the Cooper--Frye recipe is far not a unique phenomenological method that meets requirements of energy-momentum conservation. Alternative freeze-out recipes are considered and discussed.

  3. Empirical formula for the refractive index of freezing brine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    2009-01-01

    The refractive index of freezing brine is important for example in order to estimate oceanic scattering as sea ice develops. Previously, no simple continuous expression was available for estimating the refractive index of brine at subzero temperatures. I show that extrapolation of the empirical...... formula for the refractive index of seawater by Quan and Fry [Appl. Opt. 34(18), 3477-3480 (1995)] provides a good fit to the refractive index of freezing brine for temperatures above -24 degrees celsius and salinities below 180 parts per thousand....

  4. Tax Rates as Strategic Substitutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. de Mooij (Ruud); H. Vrijburg (Hendrik)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis paper analytically derives the conditions under which the slope of the tax reaction function is negative in a classical tax competition model. If countries maximize welfare, we show that a negative slope (reflecting strategic substitutability) occurs under relatively mild conditions

  5. Tax rates as strategic substitutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Vrijburg (Hendrik); R.A. de Mooij (Ruud)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper analytically derives conditions under which the slope of the tax-reaction function is negative in a classical tax competition model. If countries maximize welfare, a negative slope (reflecting strategic substitutability) occurs under relatively mild conditions. The strategic t

  6. Tax rates as strategic substitutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Vrijburg (Hendrik); R.A. de Mooij (Ruud)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper analytically derives conditions under which the slope of the tax-reaction function is negative in a classical tax competition model. If countries maximize welfare, a negative slope (reflecting strategic substitutability) occurs under relatively mild conditions. The strategic t

  7. No Substitute Teacher Left behind

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Schools and districts routinely recruit, retain, and support highly qualified teachers to ensure that students receive the best learning opportunities. However, even if one's school employs highly qualified full-time teachers, it is important to acknowledge that substitute teachers also have a significant impact on the education of students. One…

  8. A novel approach to sterile pharmaceutical freeze-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Christopher Lee Albert; Millward, Huw; Cooper, Rose; Landon, John

    2014-02-01

    A novel approach has been developed that enables sterile pharmaceutical products to be freeze-dried in the open laboratory without specialist facilities. The product is filled into vials, semi-stoppered and sealed inside one, followed by a second, sterilization pouch under class 100 conditions. The product is then freeze-dried in the laboratory where the vials are shelf-stoppered before being returned to class 100, unwrapped and crimped. The sterilization pouches increased the resistance to water vapor movement during sublimation, thereby increasing the sublimation time and product temperature. Ovine immunoglobulins were double wrapped and lyophilized (as above) adjusting the primary drying time and shelf temperature for increased product temperature and, therefore, prevention of collapse. Ovine immunoglobulin G formulations freeze-dried to ≤ 1.1% residual moisture with no effect on protein aggregation or biological activity. The process was simulated with tryptone soya broth and no growth of contaminating microbial cells was observed after incubation at 35 °C for 2 weeks. Although increasing lyophilization time, this approach offers significant plant and validation cost savings when sterile freeze-drying small numbers of vials thereby making the manufacture of treatments for neglected and orphan diseases more viable economically.

  9. 40 CFR 52.1135 - Regulation for parking freeze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... from acts of God, strikes, litigation, or other matters beyond the control of the owner shall be... of any such existing facility in the freeze area unless and until he has obtained from the Governor... conform to the requirements of 40 CFR 51.4(b); and the agency rules or procedures may provide that if...

  10. Brain imaging in patients with freezing of gait

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Anna L.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2008-01-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) is a disabling gait disturbance with unknown cerebral pathophysiology. In this review, we discuss the functional brain imaging Studies that address gait physiology and pathophysiology of FOG. Radiotracer metabolic studies show basal ganglia-cortical circuitry involvement in di

  11. Freeze granulation for the processing of silicon nitride ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyckfeldt, O. [Swedish Ceramic Inst., Goeteborg (Sweden); Rundgren, K. [Permascand AB, Ljungaverk (Sweden); Sjoestedt, M. [PowderPro HB, Hisings Backa (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    Freeze granulation (LS-2, PowderPro HB, Sweden) has been demonstrated as a favourable alternative to conventional granulation methods (spray drying, sieve granulation etc) in the production of granules for the pressing of high-performance ceramic powders. Freeze granulation/freeze drying prevents the migration of pressing aids or particle fines to the granule surface, as is the case in spray drying. This ensures granule homogeneity and an easy breakdown of granules during pressing. This, in turn, results in defect minimisation and optimal conditions for the sintering and the development of the desired material properties. In this study silicon nitride materials have been produced using freeze granulation, pressing and sintering to validate the performance. Materials with competitive properties were manufactured based on medium-cost, direct-nitrided powders (SicoNide P95, Permascand AB, Sweden), various pressing and sintering aid compositions as well as various pressing and sintering schedules. MgO vs Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} as sintering aid, PEG vs PVA as binder and higher pressure at the initial uniaxial pressing were found to promote the sintering performance. (orig.)

  12. Freeze desalination of seawater using LNG cold energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jian; Zuo, Jian; Lu, Kang-Jia; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2016-10-01

    With the aid of cold energy from regasification of liquefied natural gas (LNG), freeze desalination (FD) is an emerging technology for seawater desalination because of its low energy characteristics and insensitivities to fouling problems. This work aims to investigate the major operating parameters of FD such as coolant temperature, freezing duration, supercooling, seeding, agitation, crystallizer material and subsequent washing procedure on ice production and water quality. It was found that the optimal freezing duration per batch was 1 h for an iron crystallizer and 1.5 h for a glass crystallizer. The optimal coolant temperature should be around -8 °C. The optimal amount of washing water to clean the raw ice was about 50 wt% of the raw ice. Over 50 wt% of the feed could be recovered as raw ice within 1 h, which means an overall ice recovery rate of higher than 25% (of the original seawater), considering the consumption of washing water. Both artificial and real seawater were tested under the optimized conditions. The total dissolved solid in the product ice was around 300 ppm, which met the World Health Organization (WHO) potable water salinity standard of 500 ppm. Therefore, the process parameters optimized in this study can be directly used for the freeze desalination of seawater.

  13. 7 CFR 58.638 - Freezing the mix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Freezing the mix. 58.638 Section 58.638 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE...

  14. Measurement of Freezing Point Depression of Selected Food Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Satoshi; Tanaka, Fumihiko; Matsuoka, Takahisa

    Freezing point depression of selected food solutions were measured at various concentrations in order to reveal the characteristics of solid-liquid phase equilibrium. The measurement were carried out on a hand made apparatus that was calibrated before the measurement by some of selected reagents (acid and sugar) with known thermal properties. The results revealed that the freezing point depression of selected food solutions deviated from the behavior of the ideal solution with increasing solute concentration, so the water activity for non-ideal solution were introduced to the freezing point depression equation. Further, assuming that the heat of fusion was a equation of temperature, thus the following new equation was led, ln {(1-Xs)/(l-Xs+α·Xs + β·Xs2)} = A(1/To - 1/Tf) - Bln(To/Tf) The goodness of fit of the equation showed the best results. Futhermore, by using the parameters a formula of freezing ratio and the relative water activities, which showed deviation from the ideal solution, were derived.

  15. Molecular and genetic basis of freezing tolerance in crucifer species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, J.

    2014-01-01

      Understanding genetic variation for freezing tolerance is important for unraveling an adaptative strategy of species and for finding out an effective way to improve crop productivity to unfavorable winter environments. The aim of this thesis was to examine natural variation for components of

  16. A heat equation for freezing processes with phase change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backi, Christoph Josef; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Leth, John-Josef

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the stability properties as well as possible applications of a partial differential equation (PDE) with state-dependent parameters are investigated. Among other things, the PDE describes freezing of foodstuff, and is closely related to the (potential) Burgers’ equation. We show...

  17. Freeze desalination of seawater using LNG cold energy

    KAUST Repository

    Chang, Jian

    2016-06-23

    With the aid of cold energy from regasification of liquefied natural gas (LNG), freeze desalination (FD) is an emerging technology for seawater desalination because of its low energy characteristics and insensitivities to fouling problems. This work aims to investigate the major operating parameters of FD such as coolant temperature, freezing duration, supercooling, seeding, agitation, crystallizer material and subsequent washing procedure on ice production and water quality. It was found that the optimal freezing duration per batch was 1 h for an iron crystallizer and 1.5 h for a glass crystallizer. The optimal coolant temperature should be around −8 °C. The optimal amount of washing water to clean the raw ice was about 50 wt% of the raw ice. Over 50 wt% of the feed could be recovered as raw ice within 1 h, which means an overall ice recovery rate of higher than 25% (of the original seawater), considering the consumption of washing water. Both artificial and real seawater were tested under the optimized conditions. The total dissolved solid in the product ice was around 300 ppm, which met the World Health Organization (WHO) potable water salinity standard of 500 ppm. Therefore, the process parameters optimized in this study can be directly used for the freeze desalination of seawater.

  18. Freeze-dried bone in pulpotomy procedures in monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadavi, S; Anderson, A W; Punwani, I C

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of freeze-dried bone on amputated pulps. Fifteen primary and one permanent monkey teeth were treated with freeze-dried bone. As the control group, another fifteen primary teeth were treated with calcium hydroxide and fifteen primary and one permanent teeth with formocresol. Four other primary teeth pulps were amputated and sealed with tin foil and IRM as controls. Twelve mandibular incisors were left intact. Histologically all but three teeth treated with human freeze-dried bone after three months showed a complete or partial calcific barrier directly below the amputation site. Normal appearing odontoblastic cells were noted below the calcific barrier. The apical third was vital with an occasional chronic inflammatory cell visible. The histological findings of teeth treated with calcium-hydroxide were very similar to freeze-dried bone. All but four teeth showed a complete calcific barrier at the amputation site. The odontoblastic cells were normal in appearance and the inflammatory cell reactions decreased from the middle portion toward the apical region. The histological evaluation of the formocresol-treated teeth was comparable with previously published studies.

  19. Dynamic Melting of Freezing Droplets on Ultraslippery Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Fuqiang; Wu, Xiaomin; Wang, Lingli

    2017-03-08

    Condensed droplet freezing and freezing droplet melting phenomena on the prepared ultraslippery superhydrophobic surface were observed and discussed in this study. Although the freezing delay performance of the surface is common, the melting of the freezing droplets on the surface is quite interesting. Three self-propelled movements of the melting droplets (ice- water mixture) were found including the droplet rotating, the droplet jumping, and the droplet sliding. The melting droplet rotating, which means that the melting droplet rotates spontaneously on the superhydrophobic surface like a spinning top, is first reported in this study and may have some potential applications in various engineering fields. The melting droplet jumping and sliding are similar to those occurring during condensation but have larger size scale and motion scale, as the melting droplets have extra-large specific surface area with much more surface energy available. These self-propelled movements make all the melting droplets on the superhydrophobic surface dynamic, easily removed, which may be promising for the anti-icing/frosting applications.

  20. Cash Freeze for E-Rate Hits Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2004-01-01

    A freeze on $3.28 billion in requests for aid under the federal E-rate program has left hundreds of school districts scrambling to pay for their technology needs--and, in some cases, crippled classroom instruction. The E-rate program, which has disbursed more than $8 billion since its inception in 1997, helps link public and private schools as…

  1. Computational analysis of fluid dynamics in pharmaceutical freeze-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeenko, Alina A; Ganguly, Arnab; Nail, Steven L

    2009-09-01

    Analysis of water vapor flows encountered in pharmaceutical freeze-drying systems, laboratory-scale and industrial, is presented based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The flows under continuum gas conditions are analyzed using the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations whereas the rarefied flow solutions are obtained by the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for the Boltzmann equation. Examples of application of CFD techniques to laboratory-scale and industrial scale freeze-drying processes are discussed with an emphasis on the utility of CFD for improvement of design and experimental characterization of pharmaceutical freeze-drying hardware and processes. The current article presents a two-dimensional simulation of a laboratory scale dryer with an emphasis on the importance of drying conditions and hardware design on process control and a three-dimensional simulation of an industrial dryer containing a comparison of the obtained results with analytical viscous flow solutions. It was found that the presence of clean in place (CIP)/sterilize in place (SIP) piping in the duct lead to significant changes in the flow field characteristics. The simulation results for vapor flow rates in an industrial freeze-dryer have been compared to tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and gravimetric measurements.

  2. Growing bubbles and freezing drops: depletion effects and tip singularities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enríquez Paz y Puente, Oscar Raúl

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the author investigates the growth of gas bubbles in a supersaturated solution and the freezing of water drops when placed on a cold plate. Supersaturated solutions are common in nature and industry; perhaps the best know examples are carbonated drinks, such as beer or soda. These ar

  3. IMPACT OF FREEZING OF FCAS: THE CASE OF PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Abdur Rashi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Foreign investment and foreign exchange reserves have ample importance for developing countries. So, there is a needed to encourage the foreign and domestic investors whose confidence was suffer by the unexpected decision of freezing of FCAs. The purpose of this study was to identify the areas that were affected after the decision of freezing of FCAs. Moreover, the impact of freezing decision on economy of Pakistan also indicated. More sophisticated impact on banking sector, balance of payment, foreign exchange reserves, foreign debt, and foreign investment. Study found the negative impact of freezing decision of FCAs on foreign banking and positive impact on domestic banking but Pakistan banking sector was disconnected from the international banking; insatiability in balance of payment was increased; the foreign investment and exports was reduced.Resultantly, foreign exchange reserves were reduced and foreign exchange rates was increased. Therefore, it is suggested to increase the confidence of foreign investors in order to increase the foreign investment and foreign exchange reserves. Discussion of conclusions and recommendations were also provided.

  4. Seeing fearful body language rapidly freezes the observer's motor cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgomaneri, Sara; Vitale, Francesca; Gazzola, V.; Avenanti, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Fearful body language is a salient signal alerting the observer to the presence of a potential threat in the surrounding environment. Although detecting potential threats may trigger an immediate reduction of motor output in animals (i.e., freezing behavior), it is unclear at what point in time simi

  5. Capital stock management during a recession that freezes credit markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caulkins, J.P.; Feichtinger, G.; Grass, D.; Hartl, R.F.; Kort, Peter; Seidl, A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of how to price a conspicuous product while maintaining liquidity during a recession which both reduces demand and freezes credit markets. Reducing price would help maintain cash flow, but low prices can erode brand image and, hence, long-term sales. The paper extend

  6. Destabilization of mayonnaise induced by lipid crystallization upon freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Yayoi; Ogawa, Takenobu; Nakagawa, Kyuya; Adachi, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    The thermal and rheological history of mayonnaise during freezing and its dispersion stability after the freeze-thaw process were investigated. Mayonnaise was cooled to freeze and stored at -20 to -40 °C while monitoring the temperature; penetration tests were conducted on the mayonnaise, which was sampled at selected times during isothermal storage at -20 °C. Significant increases in the temperature and stress values due to water-phase crystallization and subsequent oil-phase crystallization were observed. The water phase crystallized during the cooling step in all the tested mayonnaise samples. The oil phases of the prepared mayonnaise (with rapeseed oil) and commercial mayonnaise crystallized during isothermal storage after 6 and 4 h, respectively, at -20 °C. The dispersion stability was evaluated from the separation ratio, which was defined as the weight ratio of separated oil after centrifuging to the total amount of oil in the commercial mayonnaise. The separation ratio rapidly increased after 4 h of freezing. This result suggests that crystallization of the oil phase is strongly related to the dispersion stability of mayonnaise.

  7. Properties of subvisible cirrus clouds formed by homogeneous freezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kärcher

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Number concentrations and mean sizes of ice crystals and derived microphysical and optical properties of subvisible cirrus clouds (SVCs formed by homogeneous freezing of supercooled aerosols are investigated as a function of temperature and updraft speed of adiabatically ascending air parcels. The properties of such clouds are insensitive to variations of the aerosol number and size distribution. Based on criteria constraining the optical extinction, sedimentation time, and existence time of SVCs, longer-lived (>10 min clouds, capable of exerting a measurable radiative or chemical impact, are generated within a narrow range of updraft speeds below 1 - 2 cm s -1 at temperatures below about 215K, with concentrations of ice crystals not exceeding 0.1 cm-3. The clouds do not reach an equilibrium state because the ice crystals sediment out of the formation layer typically before the supersaturation is removed. Given these results, it seems likely that a limited number (<0.1 cm-3 of effective heterogeneous freezing nuclei that nucleate ice below the homogeneous freezing threshold can control the formation and properties of SVCs, although homogeneous freezing nuclei are far more abundant.

  8. Physiological and environmental causes of freezing injury in red spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul G. Schaberg; Donald H. DeHayes

    2000-01-01

    For many, concerns about the implications of "environmental change" conjure up scenarios of forest responses to global warming, enrichment of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide and methane, and the northward migration of maladapted forests. From that perspective, the primary focus of this chapter, that is, causes of freezing injury to red spruce (

  9. Ultrafast microfluidic mixer and freeze-quenching device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu; Gerfen, Gary J; Rousseau, Denis L; Yeh, Syun-Ru

    2003-10-15

    The freeze-quenching technique is extremely useful for trapping meta-stable intermediates populated during fast chemical or biochemical reactions. The application of this technique, however, is limited by the long mixing time of conventional solution mixers and the slow freezing time of cryogenic fluids. To overcome these problems, we have designed and tested a novel microfluidic silicon mixer equipped with a new freeze-quenching device, with which reactions can be followed down to 50 micros. In the microfluidic silicon mixer, seven 10-microm-diameter vertical pillars are arranged perpendicular to the flow direction and in a staggered fashion in the 450-pL mixing chamber to enhance turbulent mixing. The mixed-solution jet, with a cross section of 10 microm x 100 microm, exits from the microfluidic silicon mixer with a linear flow velocity of 20 m/s. It instantaneously freezes on one of two rotating copper wheels maintained at 77 K and is subsequently ground into an ultrafine powder. The ultrafine frozen powder exhibits excellent spectral quality and high packing factor and can be readily transferred between spectroscopic observation cells. The microfluidic mixer was tested by the reaction between azide and myoglobin at pH 5.0. It was found that complete mixing was achieved within the mixing dead time of the mixer (20 micros), and the first observable point for this coupled device was determined to be 50 micros, which is approximately 2 orders of magnitude faster than commercially available instruments.

  10. Cash Freeze for E-Rate Hits Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2004-01-01

    A freeze on $3.28 billion in requests for aid under the federal E-rate program has left hundreds of school districts scrambling to pay for their technology needs--and, in some cases, crippled classroom instruction. The E-rate program, which has disbursed more than $8 billion since its inception in 1997, helps link public and private schools as…

  11. A Study on the Coupled Model of Hydrothermal-Salt for Saturated Freezing Salinized Soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xudong Zhang; Qing Wang; Gang Wang; Wenhua Wang; Huie Chen; Zhongqiong Zhang

    2017-01-01

      Water and heat interact in the process of freezing for the saturated soil. And for the salinized soil, water, heat, and salt interact in the freezing process, because salinized soil has soluble salt...

  12. Experimental research of "microcable in a microconduct" system stability to effect of freezing water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Vladimir A.; Burdin, Vladimir A.; Nikulina, Tatiana G.; Alekhin, Ivan N.; Gavryushin, Sergey A.; Nikulin, Aleksey G.; Praporshchikov, Denis E.

    2011-12-01

    Results of experimental researches of "optical microcable in a microduct" system stability to effect of freezing water are presented. It is shown this system is steadier to water freezing in comparison to lighten optical cable in protective polymer tube.

  13. 5 CFR 1690.15 - Freezing an account-administrative holds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SAVINGS PLAN Miscellaneous § 1690.15 Freezing an account—administrative holds. (a) The TSP may freeze (e.g...) Pursuant to a request from the Department of Justice under the Mandatory Victims Restitution Act; (3) Upon...

  14. Freezing of water in a vertical closed tube partially embedded in the ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, M.; Tago, M.; Beer, H.

    2017-09-01

    Freezing of water accumulated on the bottom in a vertical closed tube partially embedded in the ground is considered by means of numerical calculations. The wind temperature below the freezing temperature changes periodically with 1 day cycles. Freezing is considered with changing the wind-temperature and -velocity, the tube length and the heat conduction in the soil around the tube. Natural convection in the tube plays a key role for the freezing of the water.

  15. Effect of freezing and thawing rates on denaturation of proteins in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Enhong; Chen, Yahuei; Cui, Zhanfeng; Foster, Peter R

    2003-06-20

    The freeze denaturation of model proteins, LDH, ADH, and catalase, was investigated in absence of cryoprotectants using a microcryostage under well-controlled freezing and thawing rates. Most of the experimental data were obtained from a study using a dilute solution with an enzyme concentration of 0.025 g/l. The dependence of activity recovery of proteins on the freezing and thawing rates showed a reciprocal and independent effect, that is, slow freezing (at a freezing rate about 1 degrees C/min) and fast thawing (at a thawing rate >10 degrees C/min) produced higher activity recovery, whereas fast freezing with slow thawing resulted in more severe damage to proteins. With minimizing the freezing concentration and pH change of buffer solution by using a potassium phosphate buffer, this phenomenon could be ascribed to surface-induced denaturation during freezing and thawing process. Upon the fast freezing (e.g., when the freezing rate >20 degrees C/min), small ice crystals and a relatively large surface area of ice-liquid interface are formed, which increases the exposure of protein molecules to the ice-liquid interface and hence increases the damage to the proteins. During thawing, additional damage to proteins is caused by recrystallization process. Recrystallization exerts additional interfacial tension or shear on the entrapped proteins and hence causes additional damage to the latter. When buffer solutes participated during freezing, the activity recovery of proteins after freezing and thawing decreased due to the change of buffer solution pH during freezing. However, the patterns of the dependence on freezing and thawing rates of activity recovery did not change except for that at extreme low freezing rates (solutions could be reduced by changing the buffer type and composition and by optimizing the freezing-thawing protocol.

  16. Freezing-Thawing Characteristics of Botanical Tissues and Influence of Water Morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hai-Ling; MA Yuan; PENG Xiao-Feng

    2004-01-01

    @@ A series of visualization experiments were conducted to investigate the transport phenomena and interface behaviour during the freezing-thawing process of typical botanical tissues. Attention was paid to the growth of ice crystals and the advance of the phase-change interface. A comparison was made to identify the freezing/thawing behaviour for different tissues under various freezing conditions. Based on the experimental observation, analyses were conducted to explore the influence of water morphology on the freezing/thawing characteristics.

  17. Response of seasonal soil freeze depth to climate change across China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Tingjun; Frauenfeld, Oliver W.; Wang, Kang; Cao, Bin; Zhong, Xinyue; Su, Hang; Mu, Cuicui

    2017-05-01

    The response of seasonal soil freeze depth to climate change has repercussions for the surface energy and water balance, ecosystems, the carbon cycle, and soil nutrient exchange. Despite its importance, the response of soil freeze depth to climate change is largely unknown. This study employs the Stefan solution and observations from 845 meteorological stations to investigate the response of variations in soil freeze depth to climate change across China. Observations include daily air temperatures, daily soil temperatures at various depths, mean monthly gridded air temperatures, and the normalized difference vegetation index. Results show that soil freeze depth decreased significantly at a rate of -0.18 ± 0.03 cm yr-1, resulting in a net decrease of 8.05 ± 1.5 cm over 1967-2012 across China. On the regional scale, soil freeze depth decreases varied between 0.0 and 0.4 cm yr-1 in most parts of China during 1950-2009. By investigating potential climatic and environmental driving factors of soil freeze depth variability, we find that mean annual air temperature and ground surface temperature, air thawing index, ground surface thawing index, and vegetation growth are all negatively associated with soil freeze depth. Changes in snow depth are not correlated with soil freeze depth. Air and ground surface freezing indices are positively correlated with soil freeze depth. Comparing these potential driving factors of soil freeze depth, we find that freezing index and vegetation growth are more strongly correlated with soil freeze depth, while snow depth is not significant. We conclude that air temperature increases are responsible for the decrease in seasonal freeze depth. These results are important for understanding the soil freeze-thaw dynamics and the impacts of soil freeze depth on ecosystem and hydrological process.

  18. Freezing shortens the lifetime of DNA molecules under tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wei-Ju; Cui, Yujia; Chen, Chi-Shuo; Wei, Wesley H; Chang, Rong-Shing; Shu, Wun-Yi; Hsu, Ian C

    2017-09-08

    DNA samples are commonly frozen for storage. However, freezing can compromise the integrity of DNA molecules. Considering the wide applications of DNA molecules in nanotechnology, changes to DNA integrity at the molecular level may cause undesirable outcomes. However, the effects of freezing on DNA integrity have not been fully explored. To investigate the impact of freezing on DNA integrity, samples of frozen and non-frozen bacteriophage lambda DNA were studied using optical tweezers. Tension (5-35 pN) was applied to DNA molecules to mimic mechanical interactions between DNA and other biomolecules. The integrity of the DNA molecules was evaluated by measuring the time taken for single DNA molecules to break under tension. Mean lifetimes were determined by maximum likelihood estimates and variances were obtained through bootstrapping simulations. Under 5 pN of force, the mean lifetime of frozen samples is 44.3 min with 95% confidence interval (CI) between 36.7 min and 53.6 min while the mean lifetime of non-frozen samples is 133.2 min (95% CI: 97.8-190.1 min). Under 15 pN of force, the mean lifetimes are 10.8 min (95% CI: 7.6-12.6 min) and 78.5 min (95% CI: 58.1-108.9 min). The lifetimes of frozen DNA molecules are significantly reduced, implying that freezing compromises DNA integrity. Moreover, we found that the reduced DNA structural integrity cannot be restored using regular ligation process. These results indicate that freezing can alter the structural integrity of the DNA molecules.

  19. Approaches in Substitution of Organic Solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    In substitution of harmful chemicals or products with less harmful or harmless ones, there are different approaches according to the different situations, the technical requirements to the substitutes, and the goals for the substitution. Three different cases are presented. The substitution process...... may be characterized by two phases, the invention phase and the implementation phase. Different qualifications are needed in the two phases, but a thorough knowledge of the production process in question is necessary in both....

  20. Smart Phones and their Substitutes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Gimpel, Gregory; Hedman, Jonas

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on data from a longitudinal field study, this paper investigates the influence of existing, better and stand-alone technology substitutes on the use of smart phones. By applying prospect theory, media richness theory, and business model literature, the purpose of this paper is to improve...... our understanding of the role of substitutes, device content fit issues, and implications for business models by asking the question: What is an effective business model to address the relationship between user preference and the fit of the smart phone and everyday task? The field study data suggest...... the need for business models to recognize that adoption decisions are reference-dependent and strongly influenced by the fit between task and smart phone....

  1. 40 CFR 721.323 - Substituted acrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted acrylamide. 721.323... Substances § 721.323 Substituted acrylamide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted acrylamide (PMN P-90-1687) is...

  2. 24 CFR 220.253 - Substitute mortgagors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Contract Rights and Obligations-Homes § 220.253 Substitute mortgagors. (a) Selling mortgagor. The mortgagee... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Substitute mortgagors. 220.253... the Commissioner's approval of a substitute mortgagor, as provided by this section. (b)...

  3. 24 CFR 221.252 - Substitute mortgagors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Cost Homes § 221.252 Substitute mortgagors. (a) Selling mortgagor. The mortgagee may effect the release... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Substitute mortgagors. 221.252... approval of a substitute mortgagor, as provided by this section. (b) Purchasing mortgagor. The...

  4. 40 CFR 721.5867 - Substituted phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted phenol. 721.5867 Section... Substances § 721.5867 Substituted phenol. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as substituted phenol (PMNs P-89-1125,...

  5. Substituted Indoleacetic Acids Tested in Tissue Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1978-01-01

    Monochloro substituted IAA inhibited shoot induction in tobacco tissue cultures about as much as IAA. Dichloro substituted IAA inhibited shoot formation less. Other substituted IAA except 5-fluoro- and 5-bromoindole-3-acetic acid were less active than IAA. Callus growth was quite variable...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9820 - Substituted triazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted triazole. 721.9820 Section... Substances § 721.9820 Substituted triazole. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as a substituted triazole (PMN P-90-1731)...

  7. Substitution reactions at boron atoms in metallacarboranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bregadze, Vladimir I; Timofeev, Sergei V; Sivaev, Igor B; Lobanova, Irina A [A.N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-05-31

    Data on substitution reactions at boron atoms in 10-12-vertex metallacarboranes, which are of fundamental and applied significance, are generalised. The possible mechanisms of substitution reactions and the influence of the metal fragment on substitution positions in the polyhedron are discussed.

  8. 40 CFR 721.8775 - Substituted pyridines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted pyridines. 721.8775... Substances § 721.8775 Substituted pyridines. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted pyridine (PMN P-84-1219)...

  9. Iridium-Catalyzed Allylic Substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, John F.; Pouy, Mark J.

    Iridium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic substitution has become a valuable method to prepare products from the addition of nucleophiles at the more substituted carbon of an allyl unit. The most active and selective catalysts contain a phosphoramidite ligand possessing at least one arylethyl substituent on the nitrogen atom of the ligand. In these systems, the active catalyst is generated by a base-induced cyclometalation at the methyl group of this substituent to generate an iridium metalacycle bound by the COD ligand of the [Ir(COD)Cl]2 precursor and one additional labile dative ligand. Such complexes catalyze the reactions of linear allylic esters with alkylamines, arylamines, phenols, alcohols, imides, carbamates, ammonia, enolates and enolate equivalents, as well as typical stabilized carbon nucleophiles generated from malonates and cyanoesters. Iridium catalysts for enantioselective allylic substitution have also been generated from phosphorus ligands with substituents bound by heteroatoms, and an account of the studies of such systems, along with a description of the development of iridium catalysts is included.

  10. Gelatin-Filtered Consomme: A Practical Demonstration of the Freezing and Thawing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahne, Jacob B.; Schmidt, Shelly J.

    2010-01-01

    Freezing is a key food processing and preservation technique widely used in the food industry. Application of best freezing and storage practices extends the shelf-life of foods for several months, while retaining much of the original quality of the fresh food. During freezing, as well as its counterpart process, thawing, a number of critical…

  11. Microstructure and Dynamic Failure Properties of Freeze-Cast Materials for Thermobaric Warhead Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Freeze cast process: slurry preparation, solidification, sublimation and sintering (From Ref 6...the process can be divided into four steps, illustrated in Figure 1. 6 Figure 1. Freeze cast process: slurry preparation, solidification...DYNAMIC FAILURE PROPERTIES OF FREEZE- CAST MATERIALS FOR THERMOBARIC WARHEAD CASES by Yi Ming Tan December 2012 Thesis Advisor: Joseph

  12. Impact of the industrial freezing process on selected vegetables -Part II. Colour and bioactive compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzeo, Teresa; Paciulli, Maria; Chiavaro, Emma; Visconti, Attilio; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Ganino, Tommaso; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the impact of the different steps (i.e. blanching, freezing, storage following the industrial freezing process and the final cooking prior to consumption) of the industrial freezing process was evaluated on colour, chlorophylls, lutein, polyphenols and ascorbic acid content

  13. The impact of freeze-drying on microstructure and rehydration properties of carrot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voda, A.; Homan, N.; Witek, M.; Duijster, A.; Dalen, van G.; Sman, van der R.G.M.; Nijsse, J.; Vliet, van L.J.; As, van H.; Duynhoven, van J.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    The impact of freeze-drying, blanching and freezing rate pre-treatments on the microstructure and on the rehydration properties of winter carrots were studied by µCT, SEM, MRI and NMR techniques. The freezing rate determines the size of ice crystals being formed that leave pores upon drying. Their a

  14. Impact of the industrial freezing process on selected vegetables -Part II. Colour and bioactive compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzeo, Teresa; Paciulli, Maria; Chiavaro, Emma; Visconti, Attilio; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Ganino, Tommaso; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the impact of the different steps (i.e. blanching, freezing, storage following the industrial freezing process and the final cooking prior to consumption) of the industrial freezing process was evaluated on colour, chlorophylls, lutein, polyphenols and ascorbic acid content

  15. 21 CFR 864.9225 - Cell-freezing apparatus and reagents for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cell-freezing apparatus and reagents for in vitro... vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. Cell-freezing apparatus and reagents for in vitro diagnostic use are devices used to freeze human red blood cells for in vitro diagnostic use. (b)...

  16. Sensory and physico-chemical characteristics of desserts prepared with egg products processed by freeze and spray drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Nunes de Jesús

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, three freeze-dried (FD egg products (whole egg (WE, egg yolk (EY and egg white (EW were obtained and the acceptability of confections prepared with each was evaluated. Sensory analyses for confections were performed by hedonic testing with fifty panelists in each evaluation. The studied confections were: Condensed Milk Pudding (P, Quindim (Q and Meringue (M. The results obtained for confections made with FD egg products were compared with the achieved through other formulations of the same desserts made with fresh (F or spray-dried (SD egg products. The sensory analysis results for confections made with FD egg products showed good acceptance by panelists. A principal component analysis of the sensory evaluation data was carried out to identify similarities between the different egg products. The PCA supported the conclusion that FD egg products can substitute their fresh and SD counterparts in dessert formulations with good acceptability while keeping the advantages conferred by the freeze-drying method.

  17. Freeze drying of red blood cells: the use of directional freezing and a new radio frequency lyophilization device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arav, Amir; Natan, Dity

    2012-08-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) units are administered routinely into patients expressing a wide range of acute and chronic conditions (e.g., anemia, traumatic bleeding, chronic diseases, and surgery). The modern blood banking system has been designed to answer this need and assure a continuous, high quality blood supply to patients. However, RBCs units can be stored under hypothermic conditions for only up to 42 days, which leads to periodic shortages. Cryopreservation can solve these shortages, but current freezing methods employ high glycerol concentrations, which need to be removed and the cells washed prior to transfusion, resulting in a long (more than 1 hour) and cumbersome washing step. Thus, frozen RBCs have limited use in acute and trauma situations. In addition, transportation of frozen samples is complicated and costly. Freeze drying (lyophilization) of RBCs has been suggested as a solution for these problems, since it will allow for a low weight sample to be stored at room temperature, but reaching this goal is not a simple task. We studied the effect of different solutions (IMT2 and IMT3) containing trehalose and antioxidants or trehalose and human serum albumin, respectively, on freezing/thawing and freeze drying of RBCs. In addition, we evaluated the effect of cells concentrations and cooling rates on the post thaw and post rehydration recoveries of the RBCs. Finally, we developed a new radio frequency (RF) lyophilization device for a more rapid and homogeneous sublimation process of the frozen RBCs samples. Recovery and free Hb were measured as well as oxygen association/dissociation and cell's deformability. We found that IMT3 (0.3 M trehalose and 10% HSA) solution that was directionally frozen at a rapid interface velocity of 1 mm/sec (resulting in a cooling rate of 150°C/min) yielded the best results (better than IMT2 solution and slow interface velocity). Freeze thawing gave 100% survival, while freeze drying followed by rehydration with 20% dextran-40k

  18. Automatic segmentation of high pressure frozen and freeze-substituted mouse retina nuclei from FIB-SEM tomograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thai V; Kizilyaprak, Caroline; Spehner, Danièle; Humbel, Bruno M; Schultz, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    Focused Ion Beam milling combined with Scanning Electron Microscopy is a powerful tool to determine the 3-D organization of whole cells and tissue at an isotropic resolution of 3-5nm. This opens the possibility to quantify several cellular parameters and to provide detailed phenotypic information in normal or disease states. Here we describe Biocomputing methods to extract in an automated way characteristic features of mouse rod photoreceptor nuclei such as the shape and the volume of the nucleus; the proportion of heterochromatin; the number, density and distribution of nuclear pore complexes (NPC). Values obtained on five nuclei show that the number of NPC (348±8) is the most conserved feature. Nuclei in higher eukaryotes show large variations in size and rod nuclei are amongst the smallest reported (32±3μm(3)). Despite large species- and cell-type-specific variations in size, the density of NPC (about 15/μm(2)) is highly conserved.

  19. 40 CFR 721.1555 - Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... benzenediazonium salt. 721.1555 Section 721.1555 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.1555 Substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt. (a... generically as a substituted phenyl azo substituted benzenediazonium salt (PMN P-92-652) is subject to...

  20. New particle dependant parameterizations of heterogeneous freezing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Karoline; Mitra, Subir K.

    2014-05-01

    For detailed investigations of cloud microphysical processes an adiabatic air parcel model with entrainment is used. It represents a spectral bin model which explicitly solves the microphysical equations. The initiation of the ice phase is parameterized and describes the effects of different types of ice nuclei (mineral dust, soot, biological particles) in immersion, contact, and deposition modes. As part of the research group INUIT (Ice Nuclei research UnIT), existing parameterizations have been modified for the present studies and new parameterizations have been developed mainly on the basis of the outcome of INUIT experiments. Deposition freezing in the model is dependant on the presence of dry particles and on ice supersaturation. The description of contact freezing combines the collision kernel of dry particles with the fraction of frozen drops as function of temperature and particle size. A new parameterization of immersion freezing has been coupled to the mass of insoluble particles contained in the drops using measured numbers of ice active sites per unit mass. Sensitivity studies have been performed with a convective temperature and dew point profile and with two dry aerosol particle number size distributions. Single and coupled freezing processes are studied with different types of ice nuclei (e.g., bacteria, illite, kaolinite, feldspar). The strength of convection is varied so that the simulated cloud reaches different levels of temperature. As a parameter to evaluate the results the ice water fraction is selected which is defined as the relation of the ice water content to the total water content. Ice water fractions between 0.1 and 0.9 represent mixed-phase clouds, larger than 0.9 ice clouds. The results indicate the sensitive parameters for the formation of mixed-phase and ice clouds are: 1. broad particle number size distribution with high number of small particles, 2. temperatures below -25°C, 3. specific mineral dust particles as ice nuclei such

  1. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity of cell free dermal substitutes using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NING Fang-gang; ZHANG Guo-an

    2010-01-01

    Background The cytotoxicity of dermal substitutes may be increased by the very processes used to deplete the cells. The present research aimed to investigate the method for monitoring the cytotoxicity of cell-free dermal substitutes using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) method.Methods The cytotoxicity of four dermal substitutes was evaluated using the MTT method according to the standards set by the Chinese State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA). Swine acellular dermal matrix (SADM) and goat acellular dermal matrix (GADM) were produced using a repeated freeze-thaw method. Human dermal matrix glutaraldehyde composite (HADM-G) and SADM cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (SADM-G) were produced using conventional methods. Results The cytotoxicity of all dermal substitutes ranged from Grade 0 to Grade 1, meeting the standards of the Chinese FDA. The OD_(490) of both SADM and GADM was higher than that of either HADM-G or SADM-G (P<0.05). Conclusion Dermal substitutes produced by the freeze-thaw method are less cytotoxic than those produced using conventional methods.

  2. Summer freezing resistance: a critical filter for plant community assemblies in Mediterranean high mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sánchez Pescador

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Assessing freezing community response and whether freezing resistance is related to other functional traits is essential for understanding alpine community assemblages, particularly in Mediterranean environments where plants are exposed to freezing temperatures and summer droughts. Thus, we characterized the leaf freezing resistance of 42 plant species in 38 plots at Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain by measuring their ice nucleation temperature, freezing point (FP, and low-temperature damage (LT50, as well as determining their freezing resistance mechanisms (i.e., tolerance or avoidance. The community response to freezing was estimated for each plot as community weighted means (CWMs and functional diversity, and we assessed their relative importance with altitude. We established the relationships between freezing resistance, growth forms, and four key plant functional traits (i.e., plant height, specific leaf area, leaf dry matter content, and seed mass. There was a wide range of freezing resistance responses and more than in other alpine habitats. At the community level, the CWMs of FP and LT50 responded negatively to altitude, whereas the functional diversity of both traits increased with altitude. The proportion of freezing-tolerant species also increased with altitude. The ranges of FP and LT50 varied among growth forms, and only the leaf dry matter content correlated negatively with freezing-resistance traits. Summer freezing events represent important abiotic filters for assemblies of Mediterranean high mountain communities, as suggested by the CWMs. However, a concomitant summer drought constraint may also explain the high freezing resistance of species that thrive in these areas and the lower functional diversity of freezing resistance traits at lower altitudes. Leaves with high dry matter contents may maintain turgor at lower water potential and enhance drought tolerance in parallel to freezing resistance. This adaptation to drought seems to

  3. Summer Freezing Resistance: A Critical Filter for Plant Community Assemblies in Mediterranean High Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescador, David S; Sierra-Almeida, Ángela; Torres, Pablo J; Escudero, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    Assessing freezing community response and whether freezing resistance is related to other functional traits is essential for understanding alpine community assemblages, particularly in Mediterranean environments where plants are exposed to freezing temperatures and summer droughts. Thus, we characterized the leaf freezing resistance of 42 plant species in 38 plots at Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain) by measuring their ice nucleation temperature, freezing point (FP), and low-temperature damage (LT50), as well as determining their freezing resistance mechanisms (i.e., tolerance or avoidance). The community response to freezing was estimated for each plot as community weighted means (CWMs) and functional diversity (FD), and we assessed their relative importance with altitude. We established the relationships between freezing resistance, growth forms, and four key plant functional traits (i.e., plant height, specific leaf area, leaf dry matter content (LDMC), and seed mass). There was a wide range of freezing resistance responses and more than in other alpine habitats. At the community level, the CWMs of FP and LT50 responded negatively to altitude, whereas the FD of both traits increased with altitude. The proportion of freezing-tolerant species also increased with altitude. The ranges of FP and LT50 varied among growth forms, and only leaf dry matter content was negatively correlated with freezing-resistance traits. Summer freezing events represent important abiotic filters for assemblies of Mediterranean high mountain communities, as suggested by the CWMs. However, a concomitant summer drought constraint may also explain the high freezing resistance of species that thrive in these areas and the lower FD of freezing resistance traits at lower altitudes. Leaves with high dry matter contents may maintain turgor at lower water potential and enhance drought tolerance in parallel to freezing resistance. This adaptation to drought seems to be a general prerequisite for plants

  4. Technology Advances and Mechanistic Modelling in Freeze-drying and Dehydration of Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanren Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study is to introduce some advanced freeze-drying technology and mechanistic modelling in freeze-drying and dehydration of food, freeze-drying is based on the dehydration by sublimation of a frozen product, due to very low temperature, all the deterioration activity and microbiological activity are stopped and provide better quality to the final product. Meanwhile the main problems of the freeze-dried food were proposed and its prospect and outlook was also analyzed, expecting to obtain technical and theoretical support for the production of freeze-drying food.

  5. Experimental investigations of freezing soils at ground conditions of Astana, Kazakhstan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhussupbekov Askar; Shakhmov Zhanbolat

    2015-01-01

    Kazakhstan regions is seasonal climatic with transient freezing of soil ground during the winter. Roadbed integrity is important to resist the sustained load transmitted by traffic on the road surface. Freezing of soil ground could significantly influence roadbed integrity in the seasonal freezing climate of Kazakhstan. The proper determination magnitude of frost heave and heaving pressure by the influence of freezing temperatures during the winter season are necessary for design and construction of highways. Thus, experimental tests were conducted on specimens obtained from Astana (Kazakhstan) to determine the freezing pressure and magnitude of frost heaving.

  6. Effects of Artificial Supercooling Followed by Slow Freezing on the Microstructure and Qualities of Pork Loin

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yiseul; Hong, Geun-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of artificial supercooling followed by still air freezing (SSF) on the qualities of pork loin. The qualities of pork frozen by SSF were compared with the fresh control (CT, stored at 4℃ for 24 h), slow freezing (SAF, still air freezing) and rapid freezing (EIF, ethanol immersion freezing) treatments. Compared with no supercooling phenomena of SAF and EIF, the extent of supercooling obtained by SSF treatment was 1.4℃. Despite that SSF was conducted with the ...

  7. Modeling freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease with a virtual reality paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shine, J M; Matar, E; Bolitho, S J; Dilda, V; Morris, T R; Naismith, S L; Moore, S T; Lewis, S J G

    2013-05-01

    Freezing of gait is a paroxysmal and disabling symptom that commonly affects patients in the latter stages of Parkinson's disease, however the intermittent nature of this symptom makes it difficult to study in the clinical setting. Our research group has previously reported a correlation between self-reported freezing of gait symptoms and performance on a seated virtual reality gait task. In this study, we sought to determine whether behavioral measures recorded on this task were correlated with actual clinical measures of freezing of gait recorded in a cohort of 38 Parkinson's disease patients whilst in their clinically defined 'off' state. Firstly, patients with freezing of gait had a significantly larger frequency of spontaneous motor arrests recorded on the virtual reality gait task than 'non-freezers'. In addition, in those 24 patients with clinically proven freezing of gait, the number and percentage of time spent with freezing on the virtual reality task were both moderately correlated with the duration of freezing of gait recorded on the timed up-and-go tasks. These findings suggest that the freezing behavior observed during a virtual reality gait task may share similar neural substrates to freezing of gait. Such a relationship could offer a potential avenue for modeling the phenomenon of freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease, allowing for the exploration of the neural correlates of freezing. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Importance of freeze-thaw events in low temperature ecotoxicology of cold tolerant enchytraeids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana L Patrício; Enggrob, Kirsten; Slotsbo, Stine; Amorim, Mónica J B; Holmstrup, Martin

    2014-08-19

    Due to global warming it is predicted that freeze-thaw cycles will increase in Arctic and cold temperate regions. The effects of this variation becomes of particular ecological importance to freeze-tolerant species when it is combined with chemical pollutants. We compared the effect of control temperature (2 °C), daily freeze-thaw cycles (2 to -4 °C) and constant freezing (-2 °C) temperatures on the cold-tolerance of oligochaete worms (Enchytraeus albidus) and tested how survival was influenced by pre-exposure to 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), a common nonionic detergent found in sewage sludge amended soils. Results showed that combined effect of 4-NP and daily freeze-thaw cycles can cause higher mortality to worms as compared with sustained freezing or control temperature. Exposure to 4-NP caused a substantial depletion of glycogen reserves which is catabolized during freezing to produce cryoprotective concentrations of free glucose. Further, exposure to freeze-thaw cycles resulted in higher concentrations of 4-NP in worm tissues as compared to constant freezing or control temperature (2 °C). Thus, worms exposed to combined effect of freeze-thaw cycles and 4-NP suffer higher consequences, with the toxic effect of the chemical potentiating the deleterious effects of freezing and thawing.

  9. Chemical Freeze-Out and Higher Order Multiplicity Moments

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A

    2013-01-01

    We calculate the non-normalized moments of the particle multiplicity within the framework of the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. At finite chemical potential $\\mu$, a non-monotonic behavior is observed in the thermal evolution of third order moment (skewness $S$) and the higher order ones as well. Among others, this observation likely reflects dynamical fluctuations and strong correlations. The signatures of non-monotonicity in the normalized fourth order moment (kurtosis $\\kappa$) and its products get very clear. Based on these findings, we introduce a novel condition characterizing the universal freeze-out curve. The chemical freeze-out parameters $T$ and $\\mu$ are described by vanishing $\\kappa\\, \\sigma^2$ or equivalently $m_4=3\\,\\chi^2$, where $\\sigma$, $\\chi$ and $m_4$ are the standard deviation, susceptibility and fourth order moment, respectively. The fact that the HRG model is not able to release information about criticality related to the confinement and chiral dynamics should not veil the observa...

  10. Large tundra methane burst during onset of freezing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastepanov, Mikhail; Sigsgaard, Charlotte; Dlugokencky, Edward J.;

    2008-01-01

    Terrestrial wetland emissions are the largest single source of the greenhouse gas methane1. Northern high-latitude wetlands contribute significantly to the overall methane emissions from wetlands, but the relative source distribution between tropical and high-latitude wetlands remains uncertain2...... after the growing season but then increase significantly during the freeze-in period. The integral of emissions during the freeze-in period is approximately equal to the amount of methane emitted during the entire summer season. Three-dimensional atmospheric chemistry and transport model simulations......,3. As a result, not all the observed spatial and seasonal patterns of atmospheric methane concentrations can be satisfactorily explained, particularly for high northern latitudes. For example, a late-autumn shoulder is consistently observed in the seasonal cycles of atmospheric methane at high-latitude sites4...

  11. Characterization of freeze dried egg melange long stored after irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalivanov, Stefan; Tsvetkova, Eli; Bakalivanova, Todorka; Tsvetkov, Tsvetan; Kaloyanov, Nikolay; Grigorova, Stoyanka; Alexieva, Vanja

    2008-01-01

    During the 4-year period of storage at room temperature of the freeze-dried (control group) and the freeze-dried and gamma-irradiated (2.0 and 3.5 kGy) whole hen's egg mélange, no significant changes were found into the sensory and functional characteristics till the 28th month. The change in the number of SH groups was not unidirectional up to the 28th month and then it started to decrease in all investigated samples. During the entire period of investigation the amount of malondialdehyde in all three groups of egg mélange was considerably below the allowed limit for foodstuffs. The most significant fractions of the protein spectra showed a general tendency of decrease during the storage.

  12. Freeze/thaw phenomena in concrete at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn

    2007-01-01

    Freeze/thaw damage in concrete is by general practice concluded to be a problem that can be avoided by using air-entraining agents to develop an air bubble structure in the hardened concrete together with the use of a relatively low water to cement ratio in mix. This fact is true for inner damages......, however, the so-called salt-frost damage, occurring mainly at the surfaces of concrete constructions, can not totally be avoided by the above mentioned method. The performance and the mechanisms occurring in concrete, with a substantial amount of water in its micro-structure, at very low temperature are......, however, in most part unknown. In this work samples of concrete at different water to cement ratios and air bubble contents subjected to freeze/thaw cycles with the lowest temperature at about -80 oC are investigated. By adopting a novel technique a scanning calorimeter is used to obtain data from which...

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF FREEZING ON THE BIOLOGICAL VALUE OF BERRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MÁRIA NÉMETH- BALOGH

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our research was to observe the influence of freezing on the biological value of selected berry samples according to their antiradical activity, content of anthocyans and vitamin C. The content of vitamin C (method by Lásztity and Törley, 1987, anthocyans (method by Fuleki and Francis, 1968 and antiradical activity (method by Brand- Williams et al., 1995 and Sanchéz- Moreno et al., 1998 were analysed both in frozen and fresh berry samples. In general, the avarage contents of vitamin C, anthocyans and values of antiradical activity in the fresh and frozen berry samples are not significantly different. Freezing of fresh plant materials to –18 °C is suitable for preservation of their basic biological properties (content of anthocyans, vitamin C and antiradical activity. These plant materials can be used for direct consumption and also to rise the biological value of human nutrition.

  14. Cod and rainbow trout as freeze-chilled meal elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Nielsen, Jette; Jørgensen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Meal elements' are elements of a meal, e.g. portions of pre-fried meat, sauces, frozen fish or pre-processed vegetables typically prepared industrially. The meal elements are distributed to professional satellite kitchens, where the staff can combine them into complete meals. Freeze-chilling is a......Meal elements' are elements of a meal, e.g. portions of pre-fried meat, sauces, frozen fish or pre-processed vegetables typically prepared industrially. The meal elements are distributed to professional satellite kitchens, where the staff can combine them into complete meals. Freeze...... days of chilled storage, and the corresponding time for rainbow trout was 10 days. After this period the sensory quality decreased and chemical indicators of spoilage were seen to increase. CONCLUSION: The consistent quality during storage and the high-quality shelf life are practically applicable...

  15. Chemical freeze-out in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Ko, Che Ming

    2017-09-01

    One surprising result in relativistic heavy-ion collisions is that the abundance of various particles measured in experiments is consistent with the picture that they reach chemical equilibrium at a temperature much higher than the temperature they freeze out kinetically. Using a multiphase transport model to study particle production in these collisions, we find, as an example, that the effective pion to nucleon ratio, which includes those from resonance decays, indeed changes very little during the evolution of the hadronic matter from the chemical to the kinetic freeze-out, and it is also accompanied by an almost constant specific entropy. We further use a hadron resonance gas model to illustrate the results from the transport model study.

  16. Barium titanate-polymer composites produced via directional freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzkowski, Edward P; Pan, Ming-Jen

    2009-08-01

    In this study, we use a freeze casting technique to construct ceramic-polymer composites in which the 2 phases are arranged in an electrically parallel configuration. By doing so, the composites exhibit dielectric constant (K) up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than that of composites with ceramic particles randomly dispersed in a polymer matrix. In this technique, an aqueous ceramic slurry was frozen unidirectionally to form ice platelets and ceramic aggregates that were aligned in the temperature gradient direction. Upon freeze-drying, the ice platelets sublimed and left the lamellar ceramic structure intact. The green ceramic body was fired to retain the microstructure, and then the space between ceramic lamellae was infiltrated with a polymer material. The finished composites exhibit the high dielectric constant (1000) of ferroelectric ceramics while maintaining the unique properties of polymer materials such as graceful failure, low dielectric loss, and high dielectric breakdown.

  17. INFLUENCE OF CYCLIC FREEZING AND THAWING UPON SPRUCE WOOD PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bernadett SZMUTKU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results concerning the change of some physical and mechanical properties of spruce wood (Picea abies L., after repeated freezing and thawing, respectively after being subjected to temperature variation from positive valuea (+100C to negative values (-250C. Through this approach, the authors aimed at simulating normal temperature variations that occur in winter between night and daytime and which fresh cut timber has to stand if being stored in an open yard for one week before being kilndried. By comparing these results with the ones obtained after continuous freezing at -250C for one week, it was established that the temperature variation and the repeated changing phase of water inside wood increase dimensional instability and reduce the mechanical strengths much more than the simple exposure to theconstant negative temperature.

  18. Study on Semen Freezing Preservation of German Shepherd Dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang He; Tian Ya-guang; Zheng Peng; Zhang Gui-xue

    2012-01-01

    In order to prolong semen preservation and improve pregnancy rate, semen freezing was studied with German shepherd dogs for experimental animals. The semen of four dogs was collected 40 times in four dilution frozen into two formulations, according to the sperm motility to compare the advantages and disadvantages. The result indicated that the sperm motility of the pellet frozen semen in dilute 2 was significantly higher than that in dilution 1, 3, and 4 (P0.01). The sperm motility of dogs semen with fried smoked method was notablely higher than that of frozen semen of program method (P0.01). The dilution which contained yolk-Tris mainly was the best; the pellet semen frozen with fried smoked method was superior to tuble semen frozen with program freezing method; sperm motility of pellet semen was higher than that of tuble semen in the same dilution. The conception rate and litter size of the natural matting were higher than AI.

  19. Encapsulation of black carrot juice using spray and freeze drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, S; Kar, Abhijit; Mohapatra, Debabandya; Kalia, Pritam

    2015-12-01

    Black carrot juice extracted using pectinase enzyme was encapsulated in three different carrier materials (maltodextrin 20DE, gum arabic and tapioca starch) using spray drying at four inlet temperatures (150, 175, 200 and 225 ℃) and freeze drying at a constant temperature of - 53 ℃ and vacuum of 0.22-0.11 mbar with the constant feed mixture. The products were analyzed for total anthocyanin content, antioxidant activity, water solubility index, encapsulation efficiency and total colour change. For both the drying methods followed in this study, maltodextrin 20DE as the carrier material has proven to be better in retaining maximum anthocyanin and antioxidant activity compared to gum arabic and tapioca starch. The best spray dried product, was obtained at 150 ℃. The most acceptable was the freeze dried product with maximum anthocyanin content, antioxidant activity, water solubility index, encapsulation efficiency and colour change.

  20. Freezing in the presence of disorder: a lattice study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Matthias; Lafuente, Luis; Cuesta, José A.

    2003-07-01

    We investigate the freezing transition in a two-dimensional lattice model of annealed hard squares that are subject to the influence of randomly placed quenched particles of the same size. The latter model is a porous medium. By combining two recent density functional approaches we arrive at a theory for quenched-annealed lattice fluids that treats the quenched particles on the level of their one-body density distribution. We show that this approach yields thermodynamics that compare well with results from treating matrix realizations explicitly and performing subsequent averaging over the disorder. The freezing transition from a fluid to a columnar phase is found to be continuous. On increasing matrix density it shifts towards close packing and vanishes beyond a threshold matrix density.

  1. Freezing in the presence of disorder: a lattice study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Matthias [Soft Condensed Matter, Debye Institut, Utrecht University, Princetonpln 5, 3584 CC Utrecht (Netherlands); Lafuente, Luis [Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC), Departamento de Matematicas, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Cuesta, Jose A [Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC), Departamento de Matematicas, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain)

    2003-07-16

    We investigate the freezing transition in a two-dimensional lattice model of annealed hard squares that are subject to the influence of randomly placed quenched particles of the same size. The latter model is a porous medium. By combining two recent density functional approaches we arrive at a theory for quenched-annealed lattice fluids that treats the quenched particles on the level of their one-body density distribution. We show that this approach yields thermodynamics that compare well with results from treating matrix realizations explicitly and performing subsequent averaging over the disorder. The freezing transition from a fluid to a columnar phase is found to be continuous. On increasing matrix density it shifts towards close packing and vanishes beyond a threshold matrix density.

  2. Preventing freezing of condensate inside tubes of air cooled condenser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Jeong A; Hwang, In Hwan; Lee, Dong Hwan [Chonbuk Nat' l Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Young Il [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia (United States)

    2012-08-15

    An air cooled condenser is a device that is used for converting steam into condensate by using ambient air. The air cooled condenser is prone to suffer from a serious explosion when the condensate inside the tubes of a heat exchanger is frozen; in particular, tubes can break during winter. This is primarily due to the structural problem of the tube outlet of an existing conventional air cooled condenser system, which causes the backflow of residual steam and noncondensable gases. To solve the backflow problem in such condensers, such a system was simulated and a new system was designed and evaluated in this study. The experimental results using the simulated condenser showed the occurrence of freezing because of the backflow inside the tube. On the other hand, no backflow and freezing occurred in the advanced new condenser, and efficient heat exchange occurred.

  3. Heterogeneous ice nucleation: bridging stochastic and singular freezing behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Niedermeier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous ice nucleation, a primary pathway for ice formation in the atmosphere, has been described alternately as being stochastic, in direct analogy with homogeneous nucleation, or singular, with ice nuclei initiating freezing at deterministic temperatures. We present an idealized model that bridges these stochastic and singular descriptions of heterogeneous ice nucleation. This "soccer ball" model treats statistically similar particles as being covered with surface sites (patches of finite area characterized by different nucleation barriers, but with each surface site following the stochastic nature of ice embryo formation. The model provides a phenomenological explanation for seemingly contradictory experimental results obtained in our research groups. We suggest that ice nucleation is fundamentally a stochastic process but that for realistic atmospheric particle populations this process can be masked by the heterogeneity of surface properties. Full evaluation of the model will require experiments with well characterized ice nucleating particles and the ability to vary both temperature and waiting time for freezing.

  4. Chitosan nanofibers fabricated by combined ultrasonic atomization and freeze casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yihan; Wakisaka, Minato

    2015-05-20

    Aligned chitosan nanofibers exhibiting diameters smaller than 100 nm were easily prepared by combining ultrasonic atomization with freeze casting. A major advantage of this approach is the use of distilled water as main solvent. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that fiber diameter and morphology mainly depended on the atomizing tools, freezing temperature, and chitosan solution viscosity. Minimum diameter and uniform orientation were achieved using an electric flosser as an atomizing tool, liquid nitrogen as a coolant, 0.4 wt% aqueous chitosan solution (molecular weight = 22 kDa), and a small amount of lactic acid as solvent at 0 °C. The resulting chitosan nanofibers may find application in biomedical and food engineering. Moreover, this new technology may be applicable to other natural and synthetic water-soluble polymers.

  5. Deformation mechanism of nanoporous materials upon water freezing and melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erko, Maxim; Wallacher, Dirk; Paris, Oskar

    2012-10-01

    Temperature-induced non-monotonous reversible deformation of water-filled nanoporous silica materials is investigated experimentally using in-situ small-angle x-ray scattering. The influence of freezing and melting in the nanopores on this deformation is treated quantitatively by introducing a simple model based on the Gibbs-Thomson equation and a generalized Laplace-pressure. The physical origin of the melting/freezing induced pore lattice deformation is found to be exactly the same as for capillary condensation/evaporation, namely the curved phase boundary due to the preferred wetting of the pore walls by the liquid phase. As a practical implication, elastic properties of the nanoporous framework can be determined from the temperature-deformation curves.

  6. Heat and Mass Transfer Model in Freeze-Dried Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfat, Sayahdin; Purqon, Acep

    2017-07-01

    There are big problems in agriculture sector every year. One of the major problems is abundance of agricultural product during the peak of harvest season that is not matched by an increase in demand of agricultural product by consumers, this causes a wasted agricultural products. Alternative way was food preservation by freeze dried method. This method was already using heat transfer through conduction and convection to reduce water quality in the food. The main objective of this research was to design a model heat and mass transfer in freeze-dried medium. We had two steps in this research, the first step was design of medium as the heat injection site and the second was simulate heat and mass transfer of the product. During simulation process, we use physical property of some agriculture product. The result will show how temperature and moisture distribution every second. The method of research use finite element method (FEM) and will be illustrated in three dimensional.

  7. CFD modelling of condensers for freeze-drying processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Miriam Petitti; Antonello A Barresi; Daniele L Marchisio

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present research is the development of a computational tool for investigating condensation processes and equipment with particular attention to freeze-dryers. These condensers in fact are usually operated at very low pressures, making it difficult to experimentally acquire quantitative knowledge of all the variables involved. Mathematical modelling and CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulations are used here to achieve a better comprehension of the flow dynamics and of the process of ice condensation and deposition in the condenser, in order to evaluate condenser efficiency and gain deeper insights of the process to be used for the improvement of its design. Both a complete laboratory-scale freeze-drying apparatus and an industrial-scale condenser have been investigated in this work, modelling the process of water vapour deposition. Different operating conditions have been considered and the influence exerted by the inert gas as well as other parameters has been investigated.

  8. Classification and Assessment of Freeze-Thaw Erosion in Tibet, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-guo; YANG Yong-hong; LIU Shu-zhen

    2005-01-01

    Based on the analysis of existing relevant research result, a theoretical basis for the defining freeze-thaw erosion zones of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau was been put forward, and a equation for calculating the altitude of the lower bound of the freeze-thaw erosion zones of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau was been established in this paper. Moreover, the freeze-thaw erosion zones in Tibet was been identified by using Geographical Information System (GIS) software. Next, based on the comprehensive analysis of impact factors of freeze-thaw erosion, this paper chooses annul temperature range, slop and vegetation as three indexes, works out the criteria for relative classification of freeze-thaw erosion, and realizes the relative classification of the freeze-thaw erosion in Tibet under the support of GIS software. Then, a synthetic assessment of freeze-thaw erosion in Tibet was been done according to the relative classification result.

  9. In vivo experiments and numerical investigations on nanocryosurgical freezing of target tissues with large blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zi-Qiao; Yang, Yang; Liu, Jing

    2012-02-01

    This study presented the first in vivo animal experiments of using nano-cryosurgical modality to completely freezing tumor tissues embedded with large blood vessels, which is a tough issue to tackle otherwise. Three-dimensional theoretical simulations were also performed on the complex freezing problems by considering flow and heat transfer of blood flow in large vessels. According to the experimental measurements and numerical predictions, injecting the nanoparticles with high thermal conductivity into the freezing target can significantly reduce the heating effect of blood vessel, shorten the freezing time, and enlarge the freezing range. Most importantly, the introduction of nanoparticles successfully overcomes the classical challenges in completely ablating the tumor region with large blood vessel and enhancing the freezing efficacy of cryosurgery. This investigation consolidates the practical and theoretical foundation for nano-cryosurgery which suggests a highly efficient freezing strategy for treating late stage tumor.

  10. Cold tolerance and freeze-induced glucose accumulation in three terrestrial slugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slotsbo, Stine; Hansen, Lars Monrad; Jordaens, Kurt;

    2012-01-01

    in their habitat. Slugs spontaneously froze at about -4 °C when cooled under dry conditions, but freezing of body fluids was readily induced at -1 °C when in contact with external ice crystals. All three species survived freezing for 2 days at -1 °C, and some A. rufus and A. lusitanicus also survived freezing......Cold tolerance and metabolic responses to freezing of three slug species common in Scandinavia (Arion ater, Arion rufus and Arion lusitanicus) are reported. Autumn collected slugs were cold acclimated in the laboratory and subjected to freezing conditions simulating likely winter temperatures....... Glucose increased from about 6 to 22 µg/mg dry tissue upon freezing in A. rufus, but less so in A. ater and A. lusitanicus. Glucose may thus act as a cryoprotectant in these slugs, although the concentrations are not as high as reported for other freeze tolerant invertebrates....

  11. Promising freeze protection alternatives in solar domestic hot water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    Since the gains associated with solar thermal energy technologies are comparatively small in relation to the required capital investment, it is vital to maximize conversion efficiency. While providing the necessary function of freeze protection, the heat exchanger commonly included in solar domestic water heating systems represents a system inefficiency. This thesis explores two alternate methods of providing freeze protection without resorting to a heat exchanger. Commonly, collectors are made of rigid copper tubes separated by copper or aluminum fins. Cracking damage can occur when water is allowed to freeze and expand inside the non compliant tubes. The possibility of making collectors out of an elastic material was investigated and shown to be effective. Since unlike copper, elastomers typically have low thermal conductivities, the standard collector performance prediction equations do not apply. Modified thermal performance prediction equations were developed which can be used for both low and high thermal conductivity materials to provide accurate predictions within a limited range of plate geometries. An elastomeric collector plate was then designed and shown to have comparable performance to a copper plate collector whose aperture area is approximately 33% smaller. Another options for providing freeze protection to an SDHW system is to turn it off during the winter. Choosing a three-season operating period means two things. First, the system will have different optimums such as slope and collector area. Second, the wintertime solar energy incident on the collector is unavailable for meeting a heating load. However, the system`s heat exchanger becomes unnecessary and removing it increases the amount of energy that arrives at the storage tank during those periods in which the system is operating.

  12. Synthesis and structural evaluation of freeze-cast porous alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Douglas F., E-mail: souzadf@outlook.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais — UFMG, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP: 31270-901, Escola de Engenharia, bloco 2, sala 2230 (Brazil); Nunes, Eduardo H.M., E-mail: eduardohmn@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais — UFMG, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP: 31270-901, Escola de Engenharia, bloco 2, sala 2230 (Brazil); Pimenta, Daiana S.; Vasconcelos, Daniela C.L. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais — UFMG, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP: 31270-901, Escola de Engenharia, bloco 2, sala 2230 (Brazil); Nascimento, Jailton F.; Grava, Wilson [Petrobras/CENPES, Avenida Horácio Macedo 950, Cidade Universitária, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ CEP:21941-915 (Brazil); Houmard, Manuel [Department of Materials Engineering and Civil Construction, Federal University of Minas Gerais — UFMG, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP: 31270-901, Escola de Engenharia, bloco 1, sala 3304 (Brazil); Vasconcelos, Wander L., E-mail: wlv@demet.ufmg.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal University of Minas Gerais — UFMG, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Campus UFMG, Belo Horizonte, MG CEP: 31270-901, Escola de Engenharia, bloco 2, sala 2230 (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    In this work we fabricated alumina samples by the freeze-casting technique using tert-butanol as the solvent. The prepared materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microtomography. Next, they were coated with sol–gel silica films by dip-coating. Permeability tests were carried out in order to assess the permeation behavior of the materials processed in this study. We observed that the sintering time and alumina loading showed a remarkable effect on both the structural properties and flexural strength of the freeze-cast samples. Nitrogen adsorption tests revealed that the silica prepared in this study exhibited a microporous structure. It was observed that the presence of silica coatings on the alumina surface decreased the CO{sub 2} permeance by about one order of magnitude. Because of the similar kinetic diameters of nitrogen and carbon dioxide, the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} system showed a separation efficiency that was lower than that observed for the He/CO{sub 2} and He/N{sub 2} systems. We noticed that increasing the feed pressure improved the separation capacity of the obtained materials. - Highlights: • Porous alumina samples obtained by the freeze-casting technique • Microporous silica coating prepared by a simple sol–gel dip-coating methodology • Samples examined by SEM, μ-CT, and nitrogen sorption tests • Mechanical tests were carried out in the freeze-cast samples. • The presence of silica coatings on the alumina surface decreased the CO{sub 2} permeance.

  13. Robustness Analysis for Value-Freezing Signal Temporal Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Brim

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In our previous work we have introduced the logic STL*, an extension of Signal Temporal Logic (STL that allows value freezing. In this paper, we define robustness measures for STL* by adapting the robustness measures previously introduced for Metric Temporal Logic (MTL. Furthermore, we present an algorithm for STL* robustness computation, which is implemented in the tool Parasim. Application of STL* robustness analysis is demonstrated on case studies.

  14. Market run-ups, market freezes, and leverage

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Bond; Yaron Leitner

    2010-01-01

    The authors study trade between a buyer and a seller when both may have existing inventories of assets similar to those being traded. They analyze how these inventories affect trade, information dissemination, and price formation. The authors show that when the buyer's and seller's initial leverage is moderate, inventories increase price and trade volume, but when leverage is high, trade may become impossible (a "market freeze"). Their analysis predicts a pattern of trade in which prices and ...

  15. Lipids differentially degraded during tissue freezing and thawing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Plants cope with freezing and thawing by altering the lipid composition of their cell membranes. Such cellular responses go through three phases Successful test flight of an airship Researchers with the Balloon Aircraft Research Center (BARC) of the Academy of Opto-electronics, CAS, succeeded in their first test flight of an aeroboat with a flight altitude up to 1,000 meters and an effective payload of 20 kilograms in Shandong on 25 December, 2007.

  16. Freeze-Spray Processing of Layered Ceramic Composites (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    remove the ice by sublimation . In order to study the effect of green density on the sintered microstructure, a set of samples were isostatically...Ceram. Forum Int., 79 ( 9 , E35-E38, (2002). ’K. Araki and J. W. Halloran, "Room-Temperature Freeze Casting for Ceramics with Nonaqueous Sublimable ...Vehicles in the Naphtalene- Camphor Eutectic System," J. Am. Cerum Soc. 87 (1 1) 2014-2019 (2004). 9 ~ . Reed, Introduction to the Principles of

  17. Promising freeze protection alternatives in solar domestic hot water systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Since the gains associated with solar thermal energy technologies are comparatively small in relation to the required capital investment, it is vital to maximize conversion efficiency. While providing the necessary function of freeze protection, the heat exchanger commonly included in solar domestic water heating systems represents a system inefficiency. This thesis explores two alternate methods of providing freeze protection without resorting to a heat exchanger. Commonly, collectors are made of rigid copper tubes separated by copper or aluminum fins. Cracking damage can occur when water is allowed to freeze and expand inside the non compliant tubes. The possibility of making collectors out of an elastic material was investigated and shown to be effective. Since unlike copper, elastomers typically have low thermal conductivities, the standard collector performance prediction equations do not apply. Modified thermal performance prediction equations were developed which can be used for both low and high thermal conductivity materials to provide accurate predictions within a limited range of plate geometries. An elastomeric collector plate was then designed and shown to have comparable performance to a copper plate collector whose aperture area is approximately 33% smaller. Another options for providing freeze protection to an SDHW system is to turn it off during the winter. Choosing a three-season operating period means two things. First, the system will have different optimums such as slope and collector area. Second, the wintertime solar energy incident on the collector is unavailable for meeting a heating load. However, the system`s heat exchanger becomes unnecessary and removing it increases the amount of energy that arrives at the storage tank during those periods in which the system is operating.

  18. Monitoring Winter Wheat Freeze Injury Using Multi-Temporal MODIS Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Mei-chen; YANG Wu-de; CAO Liang-liang; DING Guang-wei

    2009-01-01

    Freeze injury is an usual disaster for winter wheat in Shanxi Province,China,and monitoring freeze injury is of important economic significance.The aim of this article is to monitor and analyze the winter wheat freeze injury using remote sensmg data,to monitor the occurrence and spatial distribution of winter wheat freeze in time.as well as the severity of the damage.The winter wheat freeze injury was monitored using multi-temporal moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data,combined with ground meteorological data and field survey data,the change of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) before and after freeze injury was analyzed,as well as the effect of winter wheat growth recovery rate on yield.The results showed that the NDVI of winter wheat decreased dramatically after the suffering from freeze injury,which was the prominent feature for the winter wheat freeze injury monitoring.The degrees of winter wheat freeze injury were different in the three regions,of which,Yuncheng was the worst severity and the largest freeze injury area,the severity of freeze injury correlates with the breeding stage of the winter wheat.The yield of winter wheat showed positive correlation with its growth recovery rate (r=0.659**) which can be utilized to monitor the severity of winter wheat freeze injury as well as its impact on yield.It can effectively monitor the occurrence and severity of winter wheat freeze injury using horizontal and vertical profile distribution and growth recovery rate,and provide a basis for monitoring the winter wheat freeze injury in Shanxi Province.

  19. Recent changes in the frequency of freezing precipitation in North America and Northern Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groisman, Pavel Ya; Bulygina, Olga N.; Yin, Xungang; Vose, Russell S.; Gulev, Sergey K.; Hanssen-Bauer, Inger; Førland, Eirik

    2016-04-01

    Freezing rain and freezing drizzle events represent a critical feature of many regions of the world. Even at low intensities, these events often result in natural hazards that cause damage to housing, communication lines, and other man-made infrastructure. These events usually occur near the 0 °C isotherm. In a changing climate, this isotherm will not disappear, but its position in space and time will likely change as will the geography of freezing precipitation. A larger influx of water vapor into the continents from the oceans may also increase the amount and frequency of freezing precipitation events. This paper assesses our current understanding of recent changes in freezing precipitation for the United States, Canada, Norway, and Russia. The research is part of a larger GEWEX Cross-Cut Project addressing ‘cold/shoulder season precipitation near 0 °C’. Using an archive of 874 long-term time series (40 years of data) of synoptic observations for these four countries, we document the climatology of daily freezing rain and freezing drizzle occurrences as well as trends therein. The regions with the highest frequency of freezing rains (from 3 to 8 days per year) reside in the northeastern quadrant of the conterminous United States and adjacent areas of southeastern Canada south of 50 °N and over the south and southwest parts of the Great East European Plain. The frequency of freezing drizzle exceeds the frequency of freezing rain occurrence in all areas. During the past decade, the frequency of freezing rain events somewhat decreased over the southeastern US. In North America north of the Arctic Circle, it increased by about 1 day yr-1. Over Norway, freezing rain occurrences increased substantially, especially in the Norwegian Arctic. In European Russia and western Siberia, the frequency of freezing rain somewhat increased (except the southernmost steppe regions and the Arctic regions) while freezing drizzle frequency decreased over entire Russia.

  20. Chemical freeze-out and higher order multiplicity moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawfik, A., E-mail: a.tawfik@eng.mti.edu.eg

    2014-02-15

    We calculate the non-normalized moments of the particle multiplicity within the framework of the hadron resonance gas (HRG) model. At finite chemical potential μ, a non-monotonic behavior is observed in the thermal evolution of third order moment (skewness S) and the higher order ones as well. The signatures of non-monotonicity in the normalized fourth order moment (kurtosis κ) and its products get very clear. Among others, this observation likely reflects dynamical fluctuations and strong correlations. Based on these findings, we introduce the physics of the universal freeze-out curve. It is found that the chemical freeze-out parameters T and μ are described by vanishing κσ{sup 2} or equivalently m{sub 4}=3χ{sup 2}, where σ, χ and m{sub 4} are the standard deviation, susceptibility and fourth order moment, respectively. The fact that the HRG model is not able to release information about criticality related to the confinement and chiral dynamics should not veil the observations related to the chemical freeze-out. Recent lattice QCD studies strongly advocate the main conclusion of the present paper.

  1. Antifreeze proteins enable plants to survive in freezing conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravi Gupta; Renu Deswal

    2014-12-01

    Overwintering plants secrete antifreeze proteins (AFPs) to provide freezing tolerance. These proteins bind to and inhibit the growth of ice crystals that are formed in the apoplast during subzero temperatures. Antifreeze activity has been detected in more than 60 plants and AFPs have been purified from 15 of these, including gymnosperms, dicots and monocots. Biochemical characterization of plant antifreeze activity, as determined by the high ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) activities and low thermal hysteresis (TH) of AFPs, showed that their main function is inhibition of ice crystal growth rather than the lowering of freezing temperatures. However, recent studies showed that antifreeze activity with higher TH also exists in plants. Calcium and hormones like ethylene and jasmonic acid have been shown to regulate plant antifreeze activity. Recent studies have shown that plant AFPs bind to both prism planes and basal planes of ice crystals by means of two flat ice binding sites. Plant AFPs have been postulated to evolve from the OsLRR-PSR gene nearly 36 million years ago. In this review, we present the current scenario of plant AFP research in order to understand the possible potential of plant AFPs in generation of freezing-tolerant crops.

  2. On the transition between heterogeneous and homogeneous freezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gierens

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Box model simulations of an uplifting and adiabatically cooling cloud of aerosol have been performed in order to study the transition between cirrus formation dominated by homogeneous nucleation of ice to that dominated by heterogeneous nucleation. The aerosol was assumed to consist of an internal mixture of sulfuric acid solution droplets with inclusions of soot. The simulations show that the transition from heterogeneous to homogeneous nucleation occurs over a narrow range of soot concentration. Thus it seems to be possible to fix critical concentrations of heterogeneous ice nuclei which must be exceeded if heterogeneous freezing dominates cirrus formation. A formula has been derived that allows to compute the critical concentrations of heterogeneous ice nuclei as a function of temperature, updraft speed, ambient pressure, and supersaturation at which heterogeneous freezing occurs. Generally, homogeneous nucleation dominates in regions with updrafts stronger than 20 cmps, with the exception of heavily polluted areas which could be common in the northern hemisphere due to air traffic, where updrafts of the order 1 mps may be necessary to render heterogeneous nucleation unimportant. According to the present results it cannot be excluded that heterogeneous nucleation plays a more important role for cirrus formation in the northern midlatitudes than anywhere else. A possible consequence of these results is that air pollution may lead to a higher coverage of cirrus clouds, but then these clouds will be optically thinner than clouds formed by homogeneous freezing, with the exception of regions where condensation trails are frequent.

  3. Preparation and Characterization of Directionally Freeze-cast Copper Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelia I. Cuba Ramos

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Because of their excellent thermal and electric conductivities, copper foams are ideally suited for applications such as heat exchangers, catalyst supports and EMI-shields. Here, we demonstrate the preparation of copper with ~80% aligned, elongated, interconnected pores via directional freeze casting, a well established processing technique for porous ceramics. First, an aqueous slurry of 40−80 nm cupric oxide powders was directionally solidified, resulting in a preform consisting of elongated, aligned dendrites of pure ice separated by interdendritic ice walls with high oxide powder content. Oxide rather than metallic nanometric particles are used, as the latter would oxidize rapidly and uncontrollably when suspended in the aqueous solution used during directional casting. The preforms were then freeze-dried to sublimate the ice and sintered in a hydrogen-bearing atmosphere to reduce the copper oxide to metallic copper particles and densify these copper particles. Microstructural analysis of the copper foams shows that three types of porosities are present: (i aligned, elongated pores replicating the ice dendrites created during the freeze-casting process; (ii micro-porosity in the partially sintered copper walls separating the elongated pores; and (iii cracks in these copper walls, probably created because of shrinkage associated with the reduction of the oxide powders.

  4. A Comparison of Thawing and Freezing Dark Energy Parametrizations

    CERN Document Server

    Pantazis, G; Perivolaropoulos, L

    2016-01-01

    Dark energy equation of state $w(z)$ parametrizations with two parameters and given monotonicity are generically either convex or concave functions. This makes them suitable for fitting either freezing or thawing quintessence models but not both simultaneously. Fitting a dataset based on a freezing model with an unsuitable (concave when increasing) $w(z)$ parametrization (like CPL) can lead to significant misleading features like crossing of the phantom divide line, incorrect $w(z=0)$, incorrect slope \\etc that are not present in the underlying cosmological model. To demonstrate this fact we generate scattered cosmological data both at the level of $w(z)$ and the luminosity distance $D_L(z)$ based on either thawing or freezing quintessence models and fit them using parametrizations of convex and of concave type. We then compare statistically significant features of the best fit $w(z)$ with actual features of the underlying model. We thus verify that the use of unsuitable parametrizations can lead to misleadin...

  5. Warm and cold fermionic dark matter via freeze-in

    CERN Document Server

    Klasen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The freeze-in mechanism of dark matter production provides a simple and intriguing alternative to the WIMP paradigm. In this paper, we analyze whether freeze-in can be used to account for the dark matter in the so-called singlet fermionic model. In it, the SM is extended with only two additional fields, a singlet scalar that mixes with the Higgs boson, and the dark matter particle, a fermion assumed to be odd under a Z_2 symmetry. After numerically studying the generation of dark matter, we analyze the dependence of the relic density with respect to all the free parameters of the model. These results are then used to obtain the regions of the parameter space that are compatible with the dark matter constraint. We demonstrate that the observed dark matter abundance can be explained via freeze-in over a wide range of masses extending down to the keV range. As a result, warm and cold dark matter can be obtained in this model. It is also possible to have dark matter masses well above the unitarity bound for WIMPs...

  6. Warm and cold fermionic dark matter via freeze-in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Michael; Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2013-11-01

    The freeze-in mechanism of dark matter production provides a simple and intriguing alternative to the WIMP paradigm. In this paper, we analyze whether freeze-in can be used to account for the dark matter in the so-called singlet fermionic model. In it, the SM is extended with only two additional fields, a singlet scalar that mixes with the Higgs boson, and the dark matter particle, a fermion assumed to be odd under a Z2 symmetry. After numerically studying the generation of dark matter, we analyze the dependence of the relic density with respect to all the free parameters of the model. These results are then used to obtain the regions of the parameter space that are compatible with the dark matter constraint. We demonstrate that the observed dark matter abundance can be explained via freeze-in over a wide range of masses extending down to the keV range. As a result, warm and cold dark matter can be obtained in this model. It is also possible to have dark matter masses well above the unitarity bound for WIMPs.

  7. Warm and cold fermionic dark matter via freeze-in

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, Michael; Yaguna, Carlos E., E-mail: michael.klasen@uni-muenster.de, E-mail: carlos.yaguna@uni-muenster.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Straße 9, D-48149 Münster (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    The freeze-in mechanism of dark matter production provides a simple and intriguing alternative to the WIMP paradigm. In this paper, we analyze whether freeze-in can be used to account for the dark matter in the so-called singlet fermionic model. In it, the SM is extended with only two additional fields, a singlet scalar that mixes with the Higgs boson, and the dark matter particle, a fermion assumed to be odd under a Z{sub 2} symmetry. After numerically studying the generation of dark matter, we analyze the dependence of the relic density with respect to all the free parameters of the model. These results are then used to obtain the regions of the parameter space that are compatible with the dark matter constraint. We demonstrate that the observed dark matter abundance can be explained via freeze-in over a wide range of masses extending down to the keV range. As a result, warm and cold dark matter can be obtained in this model. It is also possible to have dark matter masses well above the unitarity bound for WIMPs.

  8. Fluid Line Evacuation and Freezing Experiments for Digital Radiator Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berisford, Daniel F.; Birur, Gajanana C.; Miller, Jennifer R.; Sunada, Eric T.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Stephan, Ryan; Johnson, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The digital radiator technology is one of three variable heat rejection technologies being investigated for future human-rated NASA missions. The digital radiator concept is based on a mechanically pumped fluid loop with parallel tubes carrying coolant to reject heat from the radiator surface. A series of valves actuate to start and stop fluid flow to di erent combinations of tubes, in order to vary the heat rejection capability of the radiator by a factor of 10 or more. When the flow in a particular leg is stopped, the fluid temperature drops and the fluid can freeze, causing damage or preventing flow from restarting. For this reason, the liquid in a stopped leg must be partially or fully evacuated upon shutdown. One of the challenges facing fluid evacuation from closed tubes arises from the vapor generated during pumping to low pressure, which can cause pump cavitation and incomplete evacuation. Here we present a series of laboratory experiments demonstrating fluid evacuation techniques to overcome these challenges by applying heat and pumping to partial vacuum. Also presented are results from qualitative testing of the freezing characteristics of several different candidate fluids, which demonstrate significant di erences in freezing properties, and give insight to the evacuation process.

  9. Tuning towards dynamic freezing using a two-rate protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Satyaki; Mukherjee, Bhaskar; Sengupta, K.

    2016-08-01

    We study periodically driven closed quantum systems where two parameters of the system Hamiltonian are varied periodically in time with frequencies ω1 and ω2=r ω1 . We show that such drives may be used to tune towards dynamics-induced freezing where the wave function of the state of the system after a drive cycle at time T =2 π /ω1 has almost perfect overlap with the initial state. We locate regions in the (ω1,r ) plane where the freezing is near exact for a class of integrable models and a specific nonintegrable model. The integrable models that we study encompass Ising and XY models in d =1 , Kitaev model in d =2 , and Dirac fermions in graphene and atop a topological insulator surface, whereas the nonintegrable model studied involves the experimentally realized one-dimensional tilted Bose-Hubbard model in an optical lattice. In addition, we compute the relevant correlation functions of such driven systems and describe their characteristics in the region of the (ω1,r ) plane where the freezing is near exact. We supplement our numerical analysis with semianalytic results for integrable driven systems within adiabatic-impulse approximation and discuss experiments which may test our theory.

  10. Moisture sorption characteristics of freeze-dried human platelets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng-jie XU; Guang-ming CHEN; Ju-li FAN; Jin-hui LIU; Xian-guo XU; Shao-zhi ZHANG

    2011-01-01

    Freeze-drying is a promising method for a long-term storage of human platelets. The moisture sorption characteristics of freeze-dried human platelets (FDHPs) were studied in this paper. The moisture sorption isotherms of FDHPs and freeze-dried lyophilization buffer (FDLB) were measured at 4, 25, and 37 ℃. The experimental data were fitted to Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB) equations. There were no significant statistical differences (P>0.05) between the sorption characteristics of FDHPs and FDLB at 4 and 25 ℃, while FDHPs absorbed more water at 37 ℃. The net isosteric heat of sorption was derived. The heat for FDHPs showed an abnormal negative value at low moisture contents when 25 and 37 ℃ data were used. Dynamic sorption experiments were carried out at 25 ℃ with environmental water activity controlled at 0.75, 0.85, and 0.90. The moisture diffusion coefficient was fitted to be 8.24x 10-12 m2/s when experimental data at initial time were used. These results would be helpful in choosing prehydration and storage condition for FDHPs.

  11. Biologic and synthetic skin substitutes: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Ahmad

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The current trend of burn wound care has shifted to more holistic approach of improvement in the long-term form and function of the healed burn wounds and quality of life. This has demanded the emergence of various skin substitutes in the management of acute burn injury as well as post burn reconstructions. Skin substitutes have important roles in the treatment of deep dermal and full thickness wounds of various aetiologies. At present, there is no ideal substitute in the market. Skin substitutes can be divided into two main classes, namely, biological and synthetic substitutes. The biological skin substitutes have a more intact extracellular matrix structure, while the synthetic skin substitutes can be synthesised on demand and can be modulated for specific purposes. Each class has its advantages and disadvantages. The biological skin substitutes may allow the construction of a more natural new dermis and allow excellent re-epithelialisation characteristics due to the presence of a basement membrane. Synthetic skin substitutes demonstrate the advantages of increase control over scaffold composition. The ultimate goal is to achieve an ideal skin substitute that provides an effective and scar-free wound healing.

  12. Some quality attributes of low fat ice cream substituted with hulless barley flour and barley ß-glucan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Haleem, Amal M H; Awad, R A

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate some quality attributes of low fat ice cream (LFIC) substituted with hulless barley flour (HBF) and barley ß-glucan (BBG). The methodology included in this paper is based on adding HBF (1, 2, 3 and 4 %) as a partial substitution of skim milk powder (SMP) and BBG (0.40 %) as a complete substitution of carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC). All mixes and resultant ice cream samples were evaluated for their physicochemical properties as well as the sensory quality attributes.The results indicated that substitution of SMP with HBF significantly increased total solids (TS), fat and crude fiber, while crude protein and ash significantly decreased in ice cream mixes. BBG exhibited the same manner of control. Specific gravity was gradually increased with adding HBFand BBG in the mixes and therefore the overrun percent was significantly changed in the resultant ice cream. Adding HBF in ice cream formula led to significant decrease in acidity with higher freezing point and the product showed higher ability to meltdown. BBG treatment showed the same trend of control. Values of flow time and viscosity significantly increased with increasing HBF in the ice cream mixes, but these values significantly decreased in BBG mix. The time required to freeze ice cream mixes was decreased with increasing the ratio of HBF but, increased in BBG treatment. The substitution of SMP with 1 and 2 % HBF significantly (P ≤ 0.05) enhanced sensory attributes of ice cream samples. While, BBG treatment achieved mild score and acceptability.

  13. Cement from magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, K J; Gbureck, U; Knowles, J C; Farrar, D F; Barralet, J E

    2005-05-01

    Brushite cement may be used as a bone graft material and is more soluble than apatite in physiological conditions. Consequently it is considerably more resorbable in vivo than apatite forming cements. Brushite cement formation has previously been reported by our group following the mixture of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and phosphoric acid. In this study, brushite cement was formed from the reaction of nanocrystalline magnesium-substituted hydroxyapatite with phosphoric acid in an attempt to produce a magnesium substituted brushite cement. The presence of magnesium was shown to have a strong effect on cement composition and strength. Additionally the presence of magnesium in brushite cement was found to reduce the extent of brushite hydrolysis resulting in the formation of HA. By incorporating magnesium ions in the apatite reactant structure the concentration of magnesium ions in the liquid phase of the cement was controlled by the dissolution rate of the apatite. This approach may be used to supply other ions to cement systems during setting as a means to manipulate the clinical performance and characteristics of brushite cements.

  14. Suitability of a Freeze Dried Product as a Vehicle for Vitamin Fortification of Military Ration Packs: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    loaded into the freeze dryer and dried over an eight hour period. The freeze dried product was removed from the freeze dryer and transferred to...plastic bags (one bag per treatment). While in the bag the pieces of freeze dried product were manually broken and tumbled to mix. The bags were placed

  15. Development of Spalangia cameroni and Muscidifurax raptor (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) on Live and Freeze-killed House Fly (Diptera: Muscidae) Pupae

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to determine if the reduced suitability of freeze-killed pupae for Pteromalidae, particularly Spalangia cameroni Perkins, is due to freezing, freezing duration or the type of freezer utilized. Processing pupae through freezing had a considerably greater negative effect on ...

  16. Freeze-In dark matter with displaced signatures at colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Co, Raymond T.; D’Eramo, Francesco; Hall, Lawrence J.; Pappadopulo, Duccio [Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics,and Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-12-11

    Dark matter, X, may be generated by new physics at the TeV scale during an early matter-dominated (MD) era that ends at temperature T{sub R}≪ TeV. Compared to the conventional radiation-dominated (RD) results, yields from both Freeze-Out and Freeze-In processes are greatly suppressed by dilution from entropy production, making Freeze-Out less plausible while allowing successful Freeze-In with a much larger coupling strength. Freeze-In is typically dominated by the decay of a particle B of the thermal bath, B→X. For a large fraction of the relevant cosmological parameter space, the decay rate required to produce the observed dark matter abundance leads to displaced signals at LHC and future colliders, for any m{sub X} in the range keV

  17. Studies of heterogeneous freezing by three different desert dust samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Connolly

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We present results of experiments at the aerosol interactions and dynamics in the atmosphere (AIDA chamber facility looking at the freezing of water by three different types of mineral particles at temperatures between −12°C and −33°C. The three different dusts are Asia Dust-1 (AD1, Sahara Dust-2 (SD2 and Arizona test Dust (ATD. The dust samples used had particle concentrations of sizes that were log-normally distributed with mode diameters between 0.3 and 0.5 μm and standard deviations, σg, of 1.6–1.9. The results from the freezing experiments are consistent with the singular hypothesis of ice nucleation. The dusts showed different nucleation abilities, with ATD showing a rather sharp increase in ice-active surface site density at temperatures less than −24°C. AD1 was the next most efficient freezing nuclei and showed a more gradual increase in activity than the ATD sample. SD2 was the least active freezing nuclei.

    We used data taken with particle counting probes to derive the ice-active surface site density forming on the dust as a function of temperature for each of the three samples and polynomial curves are fitted to this data. The curve fits are then used independently within a bin microphysical model to simulate the ice formation rates from the experiments in order to test the validity of parameterising the data with smooth curves. Good agreement is found between the measurements and the model for AD1 and SD2; however, the curve for ATD does not yield results that agree well with the observations. The reason for this is that more experiments between −20 and −24°C are needed to quantify the rather sharp increase in ice-active surface site density on ATD in this temperature regime. The curves presented can be used as parameterisations in atmospheric cloud models where cooling rates of approximately 1°C min−1 or more are present to predict the concentration of ice crystals forming by the

  18. Studies of heterogeneous freezing by three different desert dust samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Connolly

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present results of experiments at the aerosol interactions and dynamics in the atmosphere (AIDA chamber facility looking at the freezing of water by three different types of mineral particles at temperatures between −12°C and −33°C. The three different dusts are Asia Dust-1 (AD1, Sahara Dust-2 (SD2 and Arizona test Dust (ATD. The dust samples used had particle concentrations of sizes that were log-normally distributed with mode diameters between 0.3 and 0.5 μm and standard deviations, σg, of 1.6–1.9. The results from the freezing experiments are consistent with the singular hypothesis of ice nucleation. The dusts showed different nucleation abilities, with ATD showing a rather sharp increase in ice-active surface site density at temperatures less than −24°C. AD1 was the next most efficient freezing nuclei and showed a more gradual increase in activity than the ATD sample. SD2 was the least active freezing nuclei.

    We used data taken with particle counting probes to derive the ice-active surface site density forming on the dust as a function of temperature for each of the three samples and polynomial curves are fitted to this data. The curve fits are then used independently within a bin microphysical model to simulate the ice formation rates from the experiments in order to test the validity of parameterising the data with smooth curves. Good agreement is found between the measurements and the model for AD1 and SD2; however, the curve for ATD does not yield results that agree well with the observations. The reason for this is that more experiments between −20 and −24°C are needed to quantify the rather sharp increase in ice-active surface site density on ATD in this temperature regime. The curves presented can be used as parameterisations in atmospheric cloud models where cooling rates of approximately 1°C min−1 or more are present to predict the concentration of ice crystals forming by

  19. Freezing of bentonite. Experimental studies and theoretical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Martin; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2010-01-15

    During its lifetime, a KBS-3 repository will be subject to various ambient temperatures. Backfilled tunnels, shafts and investigation bore holes closest to ground level will experience periods of temperature below 0 deg C. From a safety assessment perspective, it is therefore essential to understand the behavior of compacted bentonite below 0 deg C. A theoretical framework for predicting the pressure response in compacted water saturated bentonite due to temperature changes has been developed based on thermodynamics and a single pore-type. This model predicts an approximately linear temperature dependence of swelling pressure P{sub s}(w,DELTAT) = P{sub s}(w,0 deg C) + DELTAs(w)DELTAT/nu{sub clay}(w) where DELTAT denotes a temperature difference from 0 deg C, DELTAs(w) is the difference in partial molar entropy between clay water and bulk water, nu{sub clay} (w) is the partial molar volume of the clay water and w denotes the water/solid mass ratio of the clay. As bulk water changes phase at 0 deg C, DELTAs(w) has a different value dependent on whether DELTAT is negative or positive. Above 0 deg C DELTAs(w) is a small value for all relevant densities which means that the pressure response due to temperature changes is small. A further consequence of this fact is that DELTAs(w) is a large positive number below 0 deg C when the external water phase is transformed to ice. Consequently, the model predicts a large drop of swelling pressure with temperature below 0 deg C, in the order of 1.2 MPa/deg C. Specifically, the swelling pressure is zero at a certain (negative) temperature T{sub C}. T{sub C} also quantifies the freezing point of the bentonite sample under consideration, as ice formation in the bentonite does not occur until swelling pressure is lost. A large set of laboratory tests have been performed where fully water saturated samples of bentonites have been exposed to temperatures in the range -10 deg C to +25 deg C. The swelling pressure response has been

  20. Freezing of bentonite. Experimental studies and theoretical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Martin; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2010-01-15

    During its lifetime, a KBS-3 repository will be subject to various ambient temperatures. Backfilled tunnels, shafts and investigation bore holes closest to ground level will experience periods of temperature below 0 deg C. From a safety assessment perspective, it is therefore essential to understand the behavior of compacted bentonite below 0 deg C. A theoretical framework for predicting the pressure response in compacted water saturated bentonite due to temperature changes has been developed based on thermodynamics and a single pore-type. This model predicts an approximately linear temperature dependence of swelling pressure P{sub s}(w,DELTAT) = P{sub s}(w,0 deg C) + DELTAs(w)DELTAT/nu{sub clay}(w) where DELTAT denotes a temperature difference from 0 deg C, DELTAs(w) is the difference in partial molar entropy between clay water and bulk water, nu{sub clay} (w) is the partial molar volume of the clay water and w denotes the water/solid mass ratio of the clay. As bulk water changes phase at 0 deg C, DELTAs(w) has a different value dependent on whether DELTAT is negative or positive. Above 0 deg C DELTAs(w) is a small value for all relevant densities which means that the pressure response due to temperature changes is small. A further consequence of this fact is that DELTAs(w) is a large positive number below 0 deg C when the external water phase is transformed to ice. Consequently, the model predicts a large drop of swelling pressure with temperature below 0 deg C, in the order of 1.2 MPa/deg C. Specifically, the swelling pressure is zero at a certain (negative) temperature T{sub C}. T{sub C} also quantifies the freezing point of the bentonite sample under consideration, as ice formation in the bentonite does not occur until swelling pressure is lost. A large set of laboratory tests have been performed where fully water saturated samples of bentonites have been exposed to temperatures in the range -10 deg C to +25 deg C. The swelling pressure response has been

  1. Flash-and-freeze: coordinating optogenetic stimulation with rapid freezing to visualize membrane dynamics at synapses with millisecond resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Watanabe

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Electron microscopy depicts subcellular structures at synapses exquisitely but only captures static images. To visualize membrane dynamics, we have developed a novel technique, called flash-and-freeze, which induces neuronal activity with a flash of light and captures the membrane dynamics by rapid freezing. For characterizing membrane movements during synaptic transmission, a light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin, is heterologously expressed in mouse hippocampal neurons or in Caenorhabditis elegans motor neurons. A brief pulse of blue light activates channelrhodopsin and induces an action potential, leading to synaptic transmission. Following the light stimulation, neurons are frozen at different time intervals ranging from 10 ms to 20 s. Electron micrographs are then acquired from each time point to visualize the morphological changes. Using this approach, we have characterized a novel form of endocytosis, ultrafast endocytosis, which rapidly removes excess membrane added to the surface during neurotransmission. The flash-and-freeze approach can be adapted to study other cellular phenomena that can be induced by light-sensitive genetic or pharmacological tools.

  2. Flash-and-Freeze: Coordinating Optogenetic Stimulation with Rapid Freezing to Visualize Membrane Dynamics at Synapses with Millisecond Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy depicts subcellular structures at synapses exquisitely but only captures static images. To visualize membrane dynamics, we have developed a novel technique, called flash-and-freeze, which induces neuronal activity with a flash of light and captures the membrane dynamics by rapid freezing. For characterizing membrane movements during synaptic transmission, a light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin, is heterologously expressed in mouse hippocampal neurons or in Caenorhabditis elegans motor neurons. A brief pulse of blue light activates channelrhodopsin and induces an action potential, leading to synaptic transmission. Following the light stimulation, neurons are frozen at different time intervals ranging from 10 ms to 20 s. Electron micrographs are then acquired from each time point to visualize the morphological changes. Using this approach, we have characterized a novel form of endocytosis, ultrafast endocytosis, which rapidly removes excess membrane added to the surface during neurotransmission. The flash-and-freeze approach can be adapted to study other cellular phenomena that can be induced by light-sensitive genetic or pharmacological tools. PMID:27594835

  3. Immersion freezing of ice nucleation active protein complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hartmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Utilising the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS, the immersion freezing behaviour of droplet ensembles containing monodisperse particles, generated from a Snomax™ solution/suspension, was investigated. Thereto ice fractions were measured in the temperature range between −5 °C to −38 °C. Snomax™ is an industrial product applied for artificial snow production and contains Pseudomonas syringae} bacteria which have long been used as model organism for atmospheric relevant ice nucleation active (INA bacteria. The ice nucleation activity of such bacteria is controlled by INA protein complexes in their outer membrane. In our experiments, ice fractions increased steeply in the temperature range from about −6 °C to about −10 °C and then levelled off at ice fractions smaller than one. The plateau implies that not all examined droplets contained an INA protein complex. Assuming the INA protein complexes to be Poisson distributed over the investigated droplet populations, we developed the CHESS model (stoCHastic modEl of similar and poiSSon distributed ice nuclei which allows for the calculation of ice fractions as function of temperature and time for a given nucleation rate. Matching calculated and measured ice fractions, we determined and parameterised the nucleation rate of INA protein complexes exhibiting class III ice nucleation behaviour. Utilising the CHESS model, together with the determined nucleation rate, we compared predictions from the model to experimental data from the literature and found good agreement. We found that (a the heterogeneous ice nucleation rate expression quantifying the ice nucleation behaviour of the INA protein complex is capable of describing the ice nucleation behaviour observed in various experiments for both, Snomax™ and P. syringae bacteria, (b the ice nucleation rate, and its temperature dependence, seem to be very similar regardless of whether the INA protein complexes inducing ice

  4. Formation of substituted oxa- and azarhodacyclobutanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauth, Alexander; Rigling, Carla; Tsoung, Jennifer; Love, Jennifer A

    2013-12-01

    The preparation of substituted oxa- and azarhodacyclobutanes is reported. After exchange of ethylene with a variety of unsymmetrically and symmetrically substituted alkenes, the corresponding rhodium-olefin complexes were oxidized with H2O2 and PhINTs (Ts=p-toluenesulfonyl) to yield the substituted oxa- and azarhodacyclobutanes, respectively. Oxarhodacyclobutanes could be prepared with excellent selectivity for incorporation of the oxygen atom on the more substituted carbon atom of the alkene. At the same time, azarhodacyclobutanes showed good-to-excellent selectivity for heteroatom incorporation on the less substituted carbon. Furthermore, it was shown that steric modifications of the ancillary ligand have a significant influence on the selectivity of Rh-olefin complex formation as well as formation of the substituted azametallacycles.

  5. Trends in Substitution Models of Molecular Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eArenas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Substitution models of evolution describe the process of genetic variation through fixed mutations and constitute the basis of the evolutionary analysis at the molecular level. Almost forty years after the development of first substitution models, highly sophisticated and data-specific substitution models continue emerging with the aim of better mimicking real evolutionary processes. Here I describe current trends in substitution models of DNA, codon and amino acid sequence evolution, including advantages and pitfalls of the most popular models. The perspective concludes that despite the large number of currently available substitution models, further research is required for more realistic modeling, especially for DNA coding and amino acid data. Additionally, the development of more accurate complex models should be coupled with new implementations and improvements of methods and frameworks for substitution model selection and downstream evolutionary analysis.

  6. Currency substitution, portfolio diversification, and money demand

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, Miguel Lebre de; Veiga, Francisco José

    2006-01-01

    We extend the Thomas (1985) dynamic optimising model of money demand and currency substitution to the case in which the individual has restricted or no access to foreign currency denominated bonds. In this case Currency Substitution decisions and Asset Substitution decisions are not separable. The results obtained suggest that the significance of an expected exchange rate depreciation term in the demand for domestic money provides a valid test for the presence of currency subst...

  7. Effect of conventional and controlled freezing method on the post thaw characteristics of boar spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baishya, S K; Biswas, R K; Kadirvel, G; Deka, B C; Kumar, Suresh; Sinha, S; Dutta, D J; Saikia, G K

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of conventional, and controlled freezing method adopting three freezing rates 20°C, 40°C and 60°C/min for cryopreservation of boar semen. Sixty sperm-rich fractions of ejaculates from six boars were utilized for freezing of semen with different freezing methods in lactose-egg yolk glycerol extender using 0.5 ml straws. Semen samples were evaluated for sperm motility, live sperm, acrosome integrity, plasma membrane integrity (PMI) by carboxyfluorescein diacetate plus propidium iodide (PI) staining, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) by combined JC-1 plus PI staining and lipid peroxidation (LPO) by BODIPY (581/591)-C11 probe after equilibration and after freezing. The results revealed that the post thaw sperm motility, live sperm, live intact acrosome and plasma membrane integrity were significantly (p0.05) mean values of live sperm with high MMP as compared to conventional freezing. However, the post thaw sperm LPO did not influence by difference in freezing methods. No significant difference on the post thaw sperm qualities was recorded among the three controlled freezing rates. All the sperm parameters assessed declined significantly (pboar semen with controlled freezing methods conferred better post thaw sperm quality as compared to conventional method, and the freezing rates of either 20, 40 or 60°C/min could provide better freezability of boar semen.

  8. Novel Real-Time Diagnosis of the Freezing Process Using an Ultrasonic Transducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Hsiang Tseng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The freezing stage governs several critical parameters of the freeze drying process and the quality of the resulting lyophilized products. This paper presents an integrated ultrasonic transducer (UT in a stainless steel bottle and its application to real-time diagnostics of the water freezing process. The sensor was directly deposited onto the stainless steel bottle using a sol-gel spray technique. It could operate at temperature range from −100 to 400 °C and uses an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. The progression of the freezing process, including water-in, freezing point and final phase change of water, were all clearly observed using ultrasound. The ultrasonic signals could indicate the three stages of the freezing process and evaluate the cooling and freezing periods under various processing conditions. The temperature was also adopted for evaluating the cooling and freezing periods. These periods increased with water volume and decreased with shelf temperature (i.e., speed of freezing. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of the ultrasonic sensor and technology for diagnosing and optimizing the process of water freezing to save energy.

  9. Dehalogenation of aromatics by nucleophilic aromatic substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowsky, Daniel; McNeill, Kristopher; Cramer, Christopher J

    2014-09-16

    Nucleophilic aromatic substitution has been implicated as a mechanism for both the biotic and abiotic hydrodehalogenation of aromatics. Two mechanisms for the aqueous dehalogenation of aromatics involving nucleophilic aromatic substitution with hydride as a nucleophile are investigated using a validated density functional and continuum solvation protocol. For chlorinated and brominated aromatics, nucleophilic addition ortho to carbon-halogen bonds via an anionic intermediate is predicted to be the preferred mechanism in the majority of cases, while concerted substitution is predicted to be preferred for most fluorinated aromatics. Nucleophilic aromatic substitution reactions with the hydroxide and hydrosulfide anions as nucleophiles are also investigated and compared.

  10. Impact of the freeze-drying process on product appearance, residual moisture content, viability, and batch uniformity of freeze-dried bacterial cultures safeguarded at culture collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiren, Jindrich; Hellemans, Ann; De Vos, Paul

    2016-07-01

    In this study, causes of collapsed bacterial cultures in glass ampoules observed after freeze-drying were investigated as well as the influence of collapse on residual moisture content (RMC) and viability. Also, the effect of heat radiation and post freeze-drying treatments on the RMC was studied. Cake morphologies of 21 bacterial strains obtained after freeze-drying with one standard protocol could be classified visually into four major types: no collapse, porous, partial collapse, and collapse. The more pronounced the collapse, the higher residual moisture content of the freeze-dried product, ranging from 1.53 % for non-collapsed products to 3.62 % for collapsed products. The most important cause of collapse was the mass of the inserted cotton plug in the ampoule. Default cotton plugs with a mass between 21 and 30 mg inside the ampoule did not affect the viability of freeze-dried Aliivibrio fischeri LMG 4414(T) compared to ampoules without cotton plugs. Cotton plugs with a mass higher than 65 mg inside the ampoule induced a full collapsed product with rubbery look (melt-back) and decreasing viability during storage. Heat radiation effects in the freeze-drying chamber and post freeze-drying treatments such as exposure time to air after freeze-drying and manifold drying time prior to heat sealing of ampoules influenced the RMC of freeze-dried products. To produce uniform batches of freeze-dried bacterial strains with intact cake structures and highest viabilities, inserted cotton plugs should not exceed 21 mg per ampoule. Furthermore, heat radiation effects should be calculated in the design of the primary drying phase and manifold drying time before heat sealing should be determined as a function of exposure time to air.

  11. Controversial issues of maternity substitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Pușcă

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Substitute maternity consists in a woman carrying a pregnancy (the implant of an embryo, at therequest of a sterile couple, most of the times in exchange of a sum of money, with her commitment tounconditionally give away the newborn after birth to the couple she concluded the agreement with. Manycontroversies emerged in what concerns the contract between the sterile couple and the carrying mother,especially when this contract is by onerous title, which happens in most of the cases. In that a civil contract? Is ita sales contract for the child? Is it a contract to provide services? Is it body marketing? Between total prohibitionand excessive liberalism, the middle way, which is the regulation according to ethical religious, cultural andsocial norms of each community, represents a realistic solution.

  12. Monodromy Substitutions and Rational Blowdowns

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, Hisaaki; van Horn-Morris, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    We introduce several new families of relations in the mapping class groups of planar surfaces, each equating two products of right-handed Dehn twists. The interest of these relations lies in their geometric interpretation in terms of rational blowdowns of 4-manifolds, specifically via monodromy substitution in Lefschetz fibrations. The simplest example is the lantern relation, already shown by the first author and Gurtas to correspond to rational blowdown along a -4 sphere; here we give relations that extend that result to realize the "generalized" rational blowdowns of Fintushel-Stern and Park by monodromy subsitution, as well as several of the families of rational blowdowns discovered by Stipsicz-Szab\\'o-Wahl.

  13. Substitution dynamical systems spectral analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Queffélec, Martine

    2010-01-01

    This volume mainly deals with the dynamics of finitely valued sequences, and more specifically, of sequences generated by substitutions and automata. Those sequences demonstrate fairly simple combinatorical and arithmetical properties and naturally appear in various domains. As the title suggests, the aim of the initial version of this book was the spectral study of the associated dynamical systems: the first chapters consisted in a detailed introduction to the mathematical notions involved, and the description of the spectral invariants followed in the closing chapters. This approach, combined with new material added to the new edition, results in a nearly self-contained book on the subject. New tools - which have also proven helpful in other contexts - had to be developed for this study. Moreover, its findings can be concretely applied, the method providing an algorithm to exhibit the spectral measures and the spectral multiplicity, as is demonstrated in several examples. Beyond this advanced analysis, many...

  14. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Substituted Phenylnitrenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeratne, Neloni R.; Fonte, Maria Da; Wenthold, Paul G.

    2009-06-01

    Nitrenes are unusual molecular structures with unfilled electronic valences that are isoelectronic with carbenes. Although, both can be generated by either thermal or photochemical decomposition of appropriate precursors they usually exhibit different reactivities. In this work, we carry out spectroscopic studies of substituted phenylnitrene to determine how the introduction of substituents will affect the reactivity and its thermochemical properties. All studies were carried out by using the newly constructed time-of-flight negative ion photoelectron spectrometer (NIPES) at Purdue University. The 355 nm photoelectron spectra of the o-, m-, and p-chlorophenyl nitrene anions are fairly similar to that measured for phenylnitrene anion. All spectra show low energy triplet state and a high energy singlet state. The singlet state for the meta isomer is well-resolved, with a well defined origin and observable vibrational structure. Whereas the singlet states for the ortho and para isomers have lower energy onsets and no resolved structure. The isomeric dependence suggests that the geometry differences result from the resonance interaction between the nitrogen and the substituent. Quinoidal resonance structures are possible for the open-shell singlet states of the o- and p-chlorinated phenyl nitrenes. The advantages of this type of electronic structures for the open-shell singlet states is that the unpaired electrons can be more localized on separate atoms in the molecules, minimizing the repulsion between. Because the meta position is not in resonance with the nitrenes, substitution at that position should not affect the structure of the open-shell singlet state. The measured electron affinities (EA) of the triplet phenylnitrenes are in excellent agreement with the values predicted by electronic structure calculations. The largest EA, 1.82 eV is found for the meta isomer, with para being the smallest, 1.70 eV.

  15. Diurnal freeze/thaw cycles of the ground surface on the Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG MeiXue; YAO TanDong; GOU XiaoHua; HIROSE Nozomu; FUJII Hide Yuki; HAO LiSheng; D.F.LEVIA

    2007-01-01

    The exchange of energy and water between the lithosphere and atmosphere mainly takes place at the ground surface. Therefore, freeze/thaw condition at the ground surface is an important factor in examining the interactions between the land surface and atmosphere. Based on the observation data obtained by CEOP/CAMP-Tibet, the diurnal freeze/thaw cycles of the ground surface near Naqu, central Tibetan Plateau was preliminarily analyzed. The results show that the surface layer was completely frozen for approximately one month. However, the time that the ground surface experienced diurnal freeze/thaw cycles was about 6 months. The high frequency of freeze/thaw cycles at the ground surface significantly influences water and energy exchanges between ground and atmosphere over half a year. The interaction processes between the ground and atmosphere under different soil conditions (such as complete thaw, complete freeze and diurnal freeze/thaw cycles) are issues worthy of further examination.

  16. Damage Evaluation on Freeze-Thawing Process of Food by Using NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andou, Hiroko; Fukuoka, Mika; Miyawaki, Osato; Suzuki, Toru

    Freeze-thawing process gives significant damages for food structure. Several new techniques have been attempted for quantitative evaluation of the damages. In this study, using NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) with a stimulated echo method, restricted diffusion phenomena of water molecules was measured for damaged food (onion and tuna) tissues that were subjected to the repeat of freeze-thawing, Through experiments, water permeability of tissue membrane was calculated. The water permeability of fresh tissues for onion showed clearly restricted diffusion, but after freeze-thawing, it disappeared. On the other hand, the water permeability of fresh tuna tissue was small significantly, even though it was a little higher after freeze-thawing. After all, the damage level after freeze-thawing showed a significant difference between onion and tuna. These results support the view that plant tissue is very sensitive to freeze-thawing and that the water permeability of plant is much lower than that of animal.

  17. Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function after repeated freezing and thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Moreno, J; Esteso, M C; Pradiee, J; Castaño, C; Toledano-Díaz, A; O'Brien, E; Lopez-Sebastián, A; Martínez-Nevado, E; Delclaux, M; Fernández-Morán, J; Zhihe, Z

    2016-05-01

    This work examines the effects of subsequent cycles of freezing-thawing on giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) sperm morphometry and function, and assesses whether density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) can increase the number of freezing-thawing cycles this sperm can withstand. A sperm sample was collected by electroejaculation from a mature giant panda and subjected to five freezing-thawing cycles. Although repeated freezing-thawing negatively affected (P 60% of the sperm cells in both treatments showed acrosome integrity even after the fifth freezing cycle. In fresh semen, the sperm head length was 4.7 μm, the head width 3.6 μm, area 14.3 μm(2) and perimeter length 14.1 μm. The present results suggest that giant panda sperm trends to be resistant to repeated freezing-thawing, even without DGC selection. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. On the transition between heterogeneous and homogeneous freezing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Gierens

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Box model simulations of an uplifting and adiabatically cooling cloud of aerosol have been performed in order to study the transition between cirrus formation dominated by homogeneous nucleation of ice to that dominated by heterogeneous nucleation. The aerosol was assumed to consist of an internal mixture of sulfuric acid solution droplets with inclusions of soot. The parametrisation of De Mott et al. (1997 was used to simulate the heterogeneous nucleation of ice in such droplets with soot inclusions. The simulations show that the transition from heterogeneous to homogeneous nucleation occurs over a narrow range of soot concentration. Thus it seems to be possible to fix critical concentrations of heterogeneous ice nuclei which must be exceeded if heterogeneous freezing dominates cirrus formation. A formula has been derived that allows to compute the critical concentrations of heterogeneous ice nuclei as a function of temperature, updraft speed, ambient pressure, and supersaturation at which heterogeneous freezing occurs. Generally, homogeneous nucleation dominates in regions with updrafts stronger than 20 cm s -1, with the exception of heavily polluted areas which could be common in the northern hemisphere due to air traffic, where updrafts of the order 1 m s-1 may be necessary to render heterogeneous nucleation unimportant. According to the present results it cannot be excluded that heterogeneous nucleation plays a more important role for cirrus formation in the northern midlatitudes than anywhere else. A possible consequence of these results is that air pollution may lead to a higher coverage of cirrus clouds, but then these clouds will be optically thinner than clouds formed by homogeneous freezing, with the exception of regions where condensation trails are frequent.

  19. Dynamics of a model colloidal suspension from dilute to freezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannam, S. D. W.; Daivis, P. J.; Bryant, G.

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was used to study a model colloidal suspension at a range of packing fractions from the dilute limit up to the freezing point. This study builds on previous work by the authors which modeled the colloidal particles with a hard core surrounded by a Weeks-Chandler-Anderson potential with modified interaction parameters, and included an explicit solvent. In this work, we study dynamical properties of the model by first calculating the velocity autocorrelation function, the self-diffusion coefficient, and the mutual diffusion coefficient. We also perform detailed calculations of the colloidal particle intermediate scattering function to study the change in dynamics leading up to the freezing point, and to determine whether the current model can be used to interpret light scattering experiments. We then perform a multiexponential analysis on the intermediate scattering function results and find that the data are fitted well by the sum of two exponentials, which is in line with previous analysis of experimental colloidal suspensions. The amplitudes and decay coefficients of the two modes are determined over a large range of wave vectors at packing fractions leading up to the freezing point. We found that the maximum wave vector at which macroscopic diffusive behavior was observed decreased as the packing fraction increased, and a simple extrapolation shows the maximum wave vector going to zero at the melting point. Lastly, the ratio of the two decay coefficients is compared to the scaling law proposed by Segrè and Pusey [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 771 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.77.771]. It was found that the ratio was not constant, but instead was wave vector dependent.

  20. Influence of dough freezing on Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejin Dušanka J.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The need to freeze dough is increasing in bakery production. Frozen dough can be stored for a long time without quality change. The capacity of bakery production can be increased in this way, and in the same time, the night shifts can be decreased. Yeast cells can be damaged by freezing process resulting in poor technological quality of dough after defrostation (longer fermentation of dough. The influence of frozen storage time of dough on survival percentage of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. Dough samples were taken after 1, 7, 14 and 28 days of frozen storage at -20°C. After defrosting, at room temperature, samples were taken from the surface and the middle part of dough (under aseptic conditions, and the percentage of living S. cerevisiae cells was determined. During frozen storage of dough, the number of living S. cerevisiae decreased. After 28 days of frozen storage, the percentage of live cells on the surface and inside the dough was 53,1% and 54,95%, respectively. The addition of k-carragenan to dough increased the percentage of living cells in the middle part of dough up to 64,63%. Pure cultures, isolated from survived S. cerevisia cells in frozen dough by agar plates method (Koch's method, were multiplied in optimal liquid medium for yeasts. The content of cytochromes in S. cerevisiae cells was determined by spectrophotometric method. The obtained results showed that the content of cytochromes in survived S. cerevisiae cells was not affected by dough freezing process. Growth rate and fermentative activity (Einchor's method were determined in multiplied cells.

  1. Nasal dorsal augmentation with freeze-dried allograft bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Richard P; Wong, Granger; Johnson, Loche M; Hagge, Rosalie J; Ciminello, Frank; Lee, John; Stone, Kiki I; Clark, Isabel A

    2009-10-01

    Properly prepared freeze-dried bone has been used with impunity by orthopedic surgeons since 1992 without a single report of disease transmission. The aim of this study was to evaluate freeze-dried cortical allograft bone for nasal dorsal augmentation. Freeze-dried human cortical bone was obtained from DCI Donor Services, Nashville, Tennessee. Standards recommended by the American Association of Tissue Banks, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were followed. Objective evaluation of the persistence of graft volume was obtained by cephalometric radiography. Vascularization and incorporation of new bone elements within the grafts were demonstrated by using fluorine-18 sodium fluoride positron emission tomographic/computed tomographic scanning. The average persistence of projection in 18 patients was 87 percent at 6 months. Thereafter, 10 patients showed 100 percent maintenance of projection at 12 to 36 months. Vascularization and incorporation of new bone elements within the grafts were demonstrated by using fluorine-18 sodium fluoride positron emission tomographic/computed tomographic scanning in four patients. The initial loss of 13 percent of projection is most likely attributable to resolution of early surgical edema. The authors postulate that there are two pathways based on whether the recipient bed allows vascular access to the graft. The revascularization or inductive pathway involves stem cell conversion to eventual osteoblasts. The scar bed barrier or noninductive pathway involves the preservation of the graft as an unchanged alloimplant. This report is the first of a series that will include a 5-year and a 10-year follow-up.

  2. 40 CFR 721.5340 - Substituted benzothiazole-azo-substituted benzoquinoline nickel complex (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted benzothiazole-azo... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5340 Substituted benzothiazole-azo... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted...

  3. Numerical Simulation on Freezing Process of Saturated Granlar Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The relation between ice pressure and load as a criterion of segregated ice initiation is introduced into the rigid ice model to simulate frost heave in saturated and granular soil. The calculated results show that unfrozen water content, thermal conductivity and hydraulic conductivity change greatly in frozen fringe. In numerical simulations, the influence of load, hydraulic conductivity and property of soil containing water on the process of soil freezing are analyzed, and the simulation curves such as cumulative heave,the change of depth of frozen and the distributions of water content are similar to the observations reported elsewhere.

  4. Random symmetry breaking and freezing in chaotic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Y; Kinzel, W; Kanter, I

    2012-09-01

    Parameter space of a driven damped oscillator in a double well potential presents either a chaotic trajectory with sign oscillating amplitude or a nonchaotic trajectory with a fixed sign amplitude. A network of such delay coupled damped oscillators is shown to present chaotic dynamics while the sign amplitude of each damped oscillator is randomly frozen. This phenomenon of random broken global symmetry of the network simultaneous with random freezing of each degree of freedom is accompanied by the existence of exponentially many randomly frozen chaotic attractors with the size of the network. Results are exemplified by a network of modified Duffing oscillators with infinite range pseudoinverse delayed interactions.

  5. Immersion freezing by plant nanocelloluse and plant phytolith particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudich, Yinon; Reicher, Naama

    2017-04-01

    Using a new microfluidics setup (WISDOM), we examined the immersion freezing abilities of two types of airborne particles from biogenic sources: Plant nano crystalline cellulose particles and plant phytoliths. Plant opal phytoliths (POP) form in tissues of living plants during their growth, and can be found in soils following plants decay and in biomass burning plumes. Several measurements have identified these micro-sized particles in the atmosphere, but their ice nucleation properties have not yet been studied. We will present the new WISDOM device and first results on the efficiency of these biogenic particles to act as ice nuclei in the atmosphere under mixed clouds conditions.

  6. Static critical fluctuations on the freeze-out surface

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Lijia; Song, Huichao

    2016-01-01

    In this proceeding, we summarize the main results of our recent paper, which introduces a freeze-out scheme to the dynamical models near the QCD critical point. Within such framework of static critical fluctuations, the Beam Energy Scan (BES) data of $C_4$ and $\\kappa \\sigma^2$ for net protons within different $p_T$ ranges can be roughly described. Besides, the momentum acceptance dependence of higher cumulants at lower collision energies can also be qualitatively described. However, $C_2$ and $C_3$ are always over-predicted due to the positive static critical fluctuations.

  7. Physical Stability of Freeze-Dried Isomalt Diastereomer Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koskinen, Anna-Kaisa; Fraser-Miller, Sara J.; Bøtker, Johan P.

    2016-01-01

    of the diastereomer compositions showed signs of physical instability when stored in the highest relative humidity condition. The four different crystalline diastereomer mixtures showed specific identifiable solid state properties. Conclusions Isomalt was shown to be a suitable excipient for freeze-drying. Preferably...... a mixture of the diastereomers should be used, as the mixture containing only one of the isomers showed physical instability. A mixture containing a 1:1 ratio of the two diastereomers showed the best physical stability in the amorphous form....

  8. Numerical modeling of seasonally freezing ground and permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolsky, Dmitry J.

    2007-12-01

    This thesis represents a collection of papers on numerical modeling of permafrost and seasonally freezing ground dynamics. An important problem in numerical modeling of temperature dynamics in permafrost and seasonally freezing ground is related to parametrization of already existing models. In this thesis, a variation data assimilation technique is presented to find soil properties by minimizing the discrepancy between in-situ measured temperatures and those computed by the models. The iterative minimization starts from an initial approximation of the soil properties that are found by solving a sequence of simple subproblems. In order to compute the discrepancy, the temperature dynamics is simulated by a new implementation of the finite element method applied to the heat equation with phase change. Despite simplifications in soil physics, the presented technique was successfully applied to recover soil properties, such as thermal conductivity, soil porosity, and the unfrozen water content, at several sites in Alaska. The recovered properties are used in discussion on soil freezing/thawing and permafrost dynamics in other parts of this thesis. Another part of this thesis concerns development of a numerical thermo-mechanical model of seasonal soil freezing on the lateral scale of several meters. The presented model explains observed differential frost heave occurring in non-sorted circle ecosystems north of the Brooks Range in the Alaskan tundra. The model takes into account conservation principles for energy, linear momentum and mass of three constituents: liquid water, ice and solid particles. The conservation principles are reduced to a computationally convenient system of coupled equations for temperature, liquid water pressure, porosity, and the velocity of soil particles in a three-dimensional domain with cylindrical symmetry. Despite a simplified rheology, the model simulates the ground surface motion, temperature, and water dynamics in soil and explains

  9. Electrochemical properties of carbon aerogels with freeze - drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuelong; Yan, Meifang; Liua, Zhenfa

    2017-09-01

    Carbon aerogels (CAs) were prepared via a sol–gel process by polymerization of phloroglucinol, resorcinol and formaldehyde using 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid as catalyst with freeze-drying. The electrochemical properties were characterized using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge–discharge measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The specific capacitance of corresponding CAs was up to 131 F g‑1 and 105 F g‑1 at the density of 0.5 A g‑1 and 1.0 A g‑1, respectively.

  10. Calorimetric analysis of cryopreservation and freeze-drying formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wendell Q

    2015-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a commonly used thermal analysis technique in cryopreservation and freeze-drying research. It has been used to investigate crystallization, eutectic formation, glass transition, devitrification, recrystallization, melting, polymorphism, molecular relaxation, phase separation, water transport, thermochemistry, and kinetics of complex reactions (e.g., protein denaturation). Such information can be used for the optimization of protective formulations and process protocols. This chapter gives an introduction to beginners who are less familiar with this technique. It covers the instrument and its basic principles, followed by a discussion of the methods as well as examples of specific applications.

  11. Do freeze events create a demographic bottleneck for Colophospermum mopane?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Whitecross, MA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available . Frost forms as a layer of ice on the surface of the earth when the air temperature drops below 0 ?C and the dew point is situated close to the surface of the earth (Pearce, 2001). Water outside of the plant turns solid at these low temperatures... and this not only causes the plant to experience water stress, but also can lead to severe damage or death of plant tissues (Pearce, 2001; Snyder and Paulo de Melo-Abreu, 2005). Freeze-damage caused through the formation of ice crystals inside the cell...

  12. THE BEHAVIOR OF DIFFERENT FIBERS AT BREAD DOUGH FREEZING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Filipović

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Three different types of commercial fibers (inulin originated from artichoke with long and short molecule chains and Fibrex - originated from sugar beet were incorporated into the dough formula as flour supplements at the level of 5 %. The influence of fiber characteristics on yeast dough (proving time and stability and bread quality (volume and crumb quality during 60 days freezing is presented. Data show that the addition of fibers in frozen yeast dough is positively contributing to preserving the quality of the final product and their influence depends on the characteristics of fibers.

  13. Deformed liquid marbles: Freezing drop oscillations with powders

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy

    2012-09-01

    In this work we show that when a liquid drop impacts onto a fine-grained hydrophobic powder, the final form of the drop can be very different from the spherical form with which it impacts. In all cases, the drop rebounds due to the hydrophobic nature of the powder. However, we find that above a critical impact speed, the drop undergoes a permanent deformation to a highly non-spherical shape with a near-complete coverage of powder, which then freezes the drop oscillations during rebound. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles do not alter the biomechanical properties of fibular allograft bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Joshua M; Hunter, Shawn A; Gayton, J Christopher; Boivin, Gregory P; Prayson, Michael J

    2012-03-01

    Allograft tissues can undergo several freeze-thaw cycles between donor tissue recovery and final use by surgeons. However, there are currently no standards indicating the number of reasonable freeze-thaw cycles for allograft bone and it is unclear how much a graft may be degraded with multiple cycles. We therefore asked whether (1) the mechanical properties of fibular allograft bone would remain unchanged with increasing numbers of freeze-thaw cycles and (2) histologic alterations from increased numbers of freeze-thaw cycles would correspond to any mechanical changes. Fibular allograft segments were subjected to two, four, and eight freeze-thaw cycles and compared biomechanically and histologically with a control group (one freeze-thaw cycle). Two freeze-dried treatments, one after being subjected to one freeze-thaw cycle and the other after being subjected to three freeze-thaw cycles, also were compared with the control group. For all segments, the average ultimate stress was 174 MPa, average modulus was 289 MPa, average energy was 2.00 J, and the average stiffness was 1320 N/mm. The material properties of the freeze-thaw treatment groups were similar to those of the control group: ultimate stress and modulus were a maximum of 16% and 70% different, respectively. Both freeze-dried treatments showed increased stiffness (maximum 53% ± 71%) and energy to failure (maximum 117% ± 137%) but did not exhibit morphologic differences. There were no alterations in the histologic appearance of the bone sections in any group. Fibular allograft segments can be refrozen safely up to eight times without affecting the biomechanical or morphologic properties. Freeze-dried treatments require further study to determine whether the detected differences are caused by the processing. Cryopreserved cortical allografts are thawed by surgeons in preparation for procedures and then occasionally discarded when not used. Refreezing allograft tissues can result in a cost savings because of a

  15. On the ethics of social egg freezing and fertility preservation for nonmedical reasons

    OpenAIRE

    Harwood, Karey

    2015-01-01

    Karey A Harwood Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA Abstract: The practice of egg freezing reached a new milestone in 2012, when the American Society for Reproductive Medicine removed its designation as “experimental”. Studies of the safety and efficacy of egg freezing led the ASRM to recommend egg freezing for patients facing infertility due to gonadotoxic therapies, but prompted continued caution against egg ...

  16. Classical nucleation theory of immersion freezing: sensitivity of contact angle schemes to thermodynamic and kinetic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickes, Luisa; Welti, André; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2017-02-01

    Heterogeneous ice formation by immersion freezing in mixed-phase clouds can be parameterized in general circulation models (GCMs) by classical nucleation theory (CNT). CNT parameterization schemes describe immersion freezing as a stochastic process, including the properties of insoluble aerosol particles in the droplets. There are different ways to parameterize the properties of aerosol particles (i.e., contact angle schemes), which are compiled and tested in this paper. The goal of this study is to find a parameterization scheme for GCMs to describe immersion freezing with the ability to shift and adjust the slope of the freezing curve compared to homogeneous freezing to match experimental data. We showed in a previous publication that the resulting freezing curves from CNT are very sensitive to unconstrained kinetic and thermodynamic parameters in the case of homogeneous freezing. Here we investigate how sensitive the outcome of a parameter estimation for contact angle schemes from experimental data is to unconstrained kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. We demonstrate that the parameters describing the contact angle schemes can mask the uncertainty in thermodynamic and kinetic parameters. Different CNT formulations are fitted to an extensive immersion freezing dataset consisting of size-selected measurements as a function of temperature and time for different mineral dust types, namely kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, microcline (K-feldspar), and Arizona test dust. We investigated how accurate different CNT formulations (with estimated fit parameters for different contact angle schemes) reproduce the measured freezing data, especially the time and particle size dependence of the freezing process. The results are compared to a simplified deterministic freezing scheme. In this context, we evaluated which CNT-based parameterization scheme able to represent particle properties is the best choice to describe immersion freezing in a GCM.

  17. Effect of cooling rate on the microstructure and porosity of alumina produced by freeze casting

    OpenAIRE

    Nieto Isabel María; Rodríguez-Parra Jesús M.; Moreno Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    Freeze casting is a well-known shaping technique to produce materials with directional porosity. One of the major problems is the difficulty to control the cooling rate thus leading to gradients in pore size and homogeneity. This work deals with the manufacture of alumina ceramics with directional porosity by freeze casting of aqueous suspensions. An experimental set-up was prepared in order to apply different cooling rates. Freeze casting tests were done with an aqueous alumina suspens...

  18. STUDY ON THE DAMAGE MECHANISM OF PORE STRUCTURE IN CONCRETE SUBJECTED TO FREEZE-THAW CYCLES

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Li; Kaiyuan Wang; Jize Mao; Qingyong Guo

    2015-01-01

    It is well know that freeze-thaw cycles play the most significant role in the durability evolution in concrete structures, freeze-thaw cycles have been accounted as one of the major factors on the damage and demolition of concrete. Microscopic parameters have been used for describing the characterizations of damage in concrete under freeze-thaw actions by researchers. However, their models could not provide specific damage factors or parameters. In this paper, a new damage model and equation ...

  19. PERFORMANCE OF PULVERIZED SLAG-SUBSTITUTED CEMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The Portland cement is equivalently substituted by slag micropowders with various specific areas. The workability,activity and acid-corrosion resistance of the slag-substituted cements are investigated,the activation of gypsum is discussed,also the porosity and pore distribution of mortars of the slag micropowders cement are determined by mercury intrusion porosimetry.

  20. Multisensory integration, sensory substitution and visual rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proulx, Michael J; Ptito, Maurice; Amedi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Sensory substitution has advanced remarkably over the past 35 years since first introduced to the scientific literature by Paul Bach-y-Rita. In this issue dedicated to his memory, we describe a collection of reviews that assess the current state of neuroscience research on sensory substitution...

  1. 24 CFR 235.206 - Substitute mortgagors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... MORTGAGE INSURANCE AND ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS FOR HOME OWNERSHIP AND PROJECT REHABILITATION Contract Rights and Obligations-Homes for Lower Income Families § 235.206 Substitute mortgagors. (a) Selling mortgagor... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Substitute mortgagors....

  2. Type Substitution for Object-Oriented Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff; Palsberg, Jens

    1990-01-01

    Genericity allows the substitution of types in a class. This is usually obtained through parameterized classes, although they are inflexible since any class can be inherited but is not in itself parameterized. We suggest a new genericity mechanism, type substitution, which is a subclassing concep...

  3. Biomechanical properties of four dermal substitutes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guo-an; NING Fang-gang; ZHAO Nan-ming

    2007-01-01

    @@ Many kinds of cell-free dermal substitutes have been developed during the past several years, however,their biomechanical properties, including hysteresis,stress relaxation, creep, and non-linear stress-strain, are still unknown. In this study, we tested these biomechanical characteristics of four dermal substitutes,and compared them with those of fresh human skin (FHS).

  4. Aluminum substitution in goethite in lake ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlson, L.

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The extent of substitution of Fe by Al in goethite in 32 lake ore samples collected from 11 lakes in Finland varied between 0 and 23 mol-%. The data indicated a negative relationship between Al-substitution and the particle size of lake ore. Differences in the Al-substitution were apparent between sampling sites, suggesting that kinetic and environmental variation in lake ore formation influences the substitution. Non-substituted goethite is formed in coarse-grained sediments with locally high concentrations of Fe due to iron-rich springs. Unit cell edge lengths and volumes of goethite varied as function of Al-subsitution but deviated from the Vegard relationship towards higher values.

  5. Advances in studies on concrete durability and countermeasures against freezing-thawing effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuJian Yan; FuJun Niu; XianJun Zhang; Jing Luo; GuoAn Yin

    2014-01-01

    This-paper-is-a-meta-analysis-of-recent-domestic-and-foreign-research-on-freezing-thawing-effects-on-concrete-durability.-The-main-theories-on-the-mechanisms-of-freeze-thaw-damage-to-concrete-are-introduced:-the-hydrostatic-pressure-theory,-the-osmotic-pressure-theory,-the-critical-water-saturation-degree-theory,-the-dual-mechanism-theory,-and-the-mi-cro-ice-crystal-lens-model-theory.-The-influence-laws-of-freezing-thawing-on-the-mechanical-properties-of-concrete-are-summarized,-and-countermeasures-to-improve-concrete-durability-in-freezing-thawing-circumstances-are-presented.-This-work-provides-valuable-references-for-future-engineering-constructions-in-cold-regions.

  6. Effect of Anti-freezing Admixtures on Alkali-silica Reaction in Mortars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Junzhe; LI Yushun; LV Lihua

    2005-01-01

    The influence of anti-freezing admixture on the alkali aggregate reaction in mortar was analyzed with accelerated methods. It is confirmed that the addition of sodium salt ingredients of anti-freezing admixture accelerates the alkali silica reaction to some extent, whereas calcium salt ingredient of anti-freezing admixture reduces the expansion of alkali silica reaction caused by high alkali cement. It is found that the addition of the fly ash considerably suppresses the expansion of alkali silica reaction induced by the anti-freezing admixtures.

  7. Behavior of High Water-cement Ratio Concrete under Biaxial Compression after Freeze-thaw Cycles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Huaishuai; SONG Yupu; OU Jinping

    2008-01-01

    The high water-cement ratio concrete specimens under biaxial compression that completed in a triaxial testing machine were experimentally studied.Strength and deformations of plain concrete specimens after 0,25,50 cycles of freeze-thaw.Influences of freeze-thaw cycles and stress ratio on the peak stress and deformation of this point were analyzed aecording to the experimental results.Based on the test data,the failure criterion expressed in terms of principal stress after difierent cycles of freeze-thaw,and the failure criterion with consideration of the influence of freeze-thaw cycle and sffess ratio were proposed respectively.

  8. Degradation of ATP and glycogen in cod ( Gadus morhua ) muscle during freezing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappeln, Gertrud; Jessen, Flemming

    2001-01-01

    Changes in ATP, IMP, lactate and glycogen contents in the muscle of cod were followed during freezing at temperatures of -20C and -45C. ATP degradation was accompanied by a corresponding increase in IMP content. Simultaneous measurement of temperature showed that at both freezing rates......, the greatest decrease in ATP content was observed when the temperature reached -0.8C. Glycolysis occurred during freezing of cod as indicated by an increase in lactate content. The changes found in all measured metabolites were more pronounced when freezing was performed at a slow rate compared to a fast rate...

  9. Degradation of ATP and glycogen in cod ( Gadus morhua ) muscle during freezing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappeln, Gertrud; Jessen, Flemming

    2001-01-01

    Changes in ATP, IMP, lactate and glycogen contents in the muscle of cod were followed during freezing at temperatures of -20C and -45C. ATP degradation was accompanied by a corresponding increase in IMP content. Simultaneous measurement of temperature showed that at both freezing rates......, the greatest decrease in ATP content was observed when the temperature reached -0.8C. Glycolysis occurred during freezing of cod as indicated by an increase in lactate content. The changes found in all measured metabolites were more pronounced when freezing was performed at a slow rate compared to a fast rate...

  10. Effect of Freeze-thaw Cycles on Bond Strength between Steel Bars and Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Xiaodong; SONG Yupu; LIU Yuan

    2008-01-01

    The effect of freezing and thawing cycles on mechanical properties of concrete(compressive,splitting tensile strength)was experimentally investigated.According to the pullout test data of three kinds of deformed steel bars,the bond stress-slip curves after freezing and thawing were obtained.The empirical equations of peak bond strength were proposed that the damage accounted for effects of freezing and thawing cycle.Meanwhile,the mechanism of bond deterioration between steel bars and concrete after freezing and thawing cycles was discussed.All these conclusions will be useful to the durability design and reliability calculation of RC structures in cold region.

  11. Model of Mass and Heat Transfer during Vacuum Freeze-Drying for Cornea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Huifen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cornea is the important apparatus of organism, which has complex cell structure. Heat and mass transfer and thermal parameters during vacuum freeze-drying of keeping corneal activity are studied. The freeze-drying cornea experiments were operated in the homemade vacuum freeze dryer. Pressure of the freeze-drying box was about 50 Pa and temperature was about −10°C by controlled, and operating like this could guarantee survival ratio of the corneal endothelium over the grafting normal. Theory analyzing of corneal freeze-drying, mathematical model of describing heat and mass transfer during vacuum freeze-drying of cornea was established. The analogy computation for the freeze-drying of cornea was made by using finite-element computational software. When pressure of the freeze-drying box was about 50 Pa and temperature was about −10°C, time of double-side drying was 170 min. In this paper, a moving-grid finite-element method was used. The sublimation interface was tracked continuously. The finite-element mesh is moved continuously such that the interface position always coincides with an element node. Computational precision was guaranteed. The computational results were agreed with the experimental results. It proved that the mathematical model was reasonable. The finite-element software is adapted for calculating the heat and mass transfer of corneal freeze-drying.

  12. Numerical simulation of the effect of groundwater salinity on artificial freezing wall in coastal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rui; Liu, Quan

    2017-04-01

    During the engineering projects with artificial ground freezing (AFG) techniques in coastal area, the freezing effect is affected by groundwater salinity. Based on the theories of artificially frozen soil and heat transfer in porous material, and with the assumption that only the variations of total dissolved solids (TDS) impact on freezing point and thermal conductivity, a numerical model of an AFG project in a saline aquifer was established and validated by comparing the simulated temperature field with the calculated temperature based on the analytic solution of rupak (reference) for single-pipe freezing temperature field T. The formation and development of freezing wall were simulated with various TDS. The results showed that the variety of TDS caused the larger temperature difference near the frozen front. With increasing TDS in the saline aquifer (1 35g/L), the average thickness of freezing wall decreased linearly and the total formation time of the freezing wall increased linearly. Compared with of the scenario of fresh-water (Journal of Geophysical Research, 2007, 112: 1-13. Lukas U.Arenson, Dave C.Sego. The effect of salinity on the freezing of coarse- grained sand[J]. Canadian Geotechnical Journal, 2006, 43: 325-337. Hui Bing, Wei Ma. Laboratory investigation of the freezing point of saline soil[J]. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 2011, 67: 79-88.

  13. Optimization of freeze drying conditions for purified pectinase from mango (Mangifera indica cv. Chokanan) peel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mehrnoush, Amid; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Yazid, Abdul Manap Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) along with central composite design (CCD) was applied to optimize the freeze drying conditions for purified pectinase from mango (Mangifera indica cv. Chokanan) peel...

  14. NMR Pore Structure and Dynamic Characteristics of Sandstone Caused by Ambient Freeze-Thaw Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For a deeper understanding of the freeze-thaw weathering effects on the microstructure evolution and deterioration of dynamic mechanical properties of rock, the present paper conducted the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR tests and impact loading experiments on sandstone under different freeze-thaw cycles. The results of NMR test show that, with the increase of freeze-thaw cycles, the pores expand and pores size tends to be uniform. The experimental results show that the stress-strain curves all go through four stages, namely, densification, elasticity, yielding, and failure. The densification curve is shorter, and the slope of elasticity curve decreases as the freeze-thaw cycles increase. With increasing freeze-thaw cycles, the dynamic peak stress decreases and energy absorption of sandstone increases. The dynamic failure form is an axial splitting failure, and the fragments increase and the size diminishes with increasing freeze-thaw cycles. The higher the porosity is, the more severe the degradation of dynamic characteristics is. An increase model for the relationships between the porosity or energy absorption and freeze-thaw cycles number was built to reveal the increasing trend with the freeze-thaw cycles increase; meanwhile, a decay model was built to predict the dynamic compressive strength degradation of rock after repeated freeze-thaw cycles.

  15. The Adsorption and Desorption of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) in Freeze-Thaw Treated Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linhui; Ma, Jincai; Xu, Meng; Li, Xu; Tao, Jiahui; Wang, Guanzhu; Yu, Jitong; Guo, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption and desorption are important processes that influence the potential toxicity and bioavailability of heavy metals in soils. However, information regarding adsorption and desorption behavior of heavy metals in soils subjected to freeze-thaw cycles is poorly understood. In the current study, the effect of freeze-thaw cycles with different freezing temperature (-15, -25, -35°C) on soil properties was investigated. Then the adsorption and desorption behavior of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) in freeze-thaw treated soils was studied. The adsorption amounts of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) in freeze-thaw treated soils were smaller than those in unfrozen soils (p adsorption amounts of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) in soils treated with lower freezing temperatures were higher than those in soils treated with higher freezing temperatures. Desorption percentages of Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) in unfrozen soils were smaller than those in freeze-thaw treated soils (p adsorption and desorption behavior of typical heavy metals in freeze-thaw treated soils located in seasonal frozen soils zone in northeast China.

  16. Alcohol Brine Freezing of Japanese Horse Mackerel (Trachurus japonicus) for Raw Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Toshimichi; Yuki, Atsuhiko; Sakurai, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Koichiro; Itoh, Nobuo; Inui, Etsuro; Seike, Kazunori; Mizukami, Yoichi; Fukuda, Yutaka; Harada, Kazuki

    In order to test the possible application of alcohol brine freezing to Japanese horse mackerel (Trachurus japonicus) for raw consumption, the quality and taste of fish frozen by direct immersion in 60% ethanol brine at -20, -25 and -30°C was compared with those by air freezing and fresh fish without freezing. Cracks were not found during the freezing. Smell of ethanol did not remain. K value, an indicator of freshness, of fish frozen in alcohol brine was less than 8.3%, which was at the same level as those by air freezing and fresh fish. Oxidation of lipid was at the same level as air freezing does, and lower than that of fresh fish. The pH of fish frozen in alcohol brine at -25 and -30°C was 6.5 and 6.6, respectively, which were higher than that by air freezing and that of fresh fish. Fish frozen in alcohol brine was better than that by air and at the same level as fresh fish in total evaluation of sensory tests. These results show that the alcohol brine freezing is superior to air freezing, and fish frozen in alcohol brine can be a material for raw consumption. The methods of thawing in tap water, cold water, refrigerator, and at room temperature were compared. Thawing in tap water is considered to be convenient due to the short thaw time and the quality of thawed fish that was best among the methods.

  17. Folic acid content in thermostabilized and freeze-dried space shuttle foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, H. W.; Nillen, J. L.; Kloeris, V. L.

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether freeze-dried and thermostabilized foods on a space shuttle contain adequate folate and to investigate any effects of freeze-drying on folacin. Frozen vegetables were analyzed after three states of processing: thawed; cooked; and rehydrated. Thermostabilized items were analyzed as supplied with no further processing. Measurable folate decreased in some freeze-dried vegetables and increased in others. Folacin content of thermostabilized food items was comparable with published values. We concluded that although the folacin content of some freeze-dried foods was low, adequate folate is available from the shuttle menu to meet RDA guidelines.

  18. Supplementation freeze-thawed media with selenium protect adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells from freeze-thawed induced injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadbeygi, Arash; Naji, Tahere; Pirnia, Afshin; Gholami, Mohammadreza

    2016-10-01

    Successful freezed-thaw of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) could be a major step in regenerative medicine as well as in the cloning of animal breeds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of selenium on the optimizing of freezed-thaw media in the ADMSCs. ADMSCs were extracted from NMRI mice and purified with positive selection Monoclonal CD105 Antibody (PE) and negative selection Monoclonal CD31 and CD45 Antibody using MACS method as well as differentiation to adipose and bone tissue. ADMSCs were divided into four groups. ADMSCs were freezed-thaw under standard condition with or without the addition of 5 ng/ml selenium to both the cryopreservation and thawing solutions. Frozen cells were thawed after four months and viability and cytotoxicity of the cells were analyzed by the Trypan blue test and MTT assay respectively. RNA was extracted and cDNA was synthesized and the expression of apoptotic genes (P53, Fas, Bax, Caspase3, and Bcl2) was examined using Real time-PCR Rotor gene 2009. This study compares slow and rapid methods of cryopreservation. After thawing, viability of the cells treated with selenium was higher than the control group in rapid and slow cryopreserved ADMSCs. Also, the percentage of living cells in the slow cooling method was considerably more than with the rapid cooling method. After analysis of the results using Real time-PCR, the Bcl2 gene was shown to be expressed in both the rapid and slow cooling methods. In the rapid cooling group in addition to the BCL-2 gene, p53 was also expressed. It appears that selenium prevented the apoptotic genes from expression due to its anti-apoptotic effects. The slow cooling method is better and more optimized for ADMSCs protecting them from oxidative damage to a greater extent compared to the rapid cooling method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Substituted hydroxyapatites with antibacterial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmas, Joanna; Groszyk, Ewa; Kwiatkowska-Różycka, Dagmara

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructive surgery is presently struggling with the problem of infections located within implantation biomaterials. Of course, the best antibacterial protection is antibiotic therapy. However, oral antibiotic therapy is sometimes ineffective, while administering an antibiotic at the location of infection is often associated with an unfavourable ratio of dosage efficiency and toxic effect. Thus, the present study aims to find a new factor which may improve antibacterial activity while also presenting low toxicity to the human cells. Such factors are usually implemented along with the implant itself and may be an integral part of it. Many recent studies have focused on inorganic factors, such as metal nanoparticles, salts, and metal oxides. The advantages of inorganic factors include the ease with which they can be combined with ceramic and polymeric biomaterials. The following review focuses on hydroxyapatites substituted with ions with antibacterial properties. It considers materials that have already been applied in regenerative medicine (e.g., hydroxyapatites with silver ions) and those that are only at the preliminary stage of research and which could potentially be used in implantology or dentistry. We present methods for the synthesis of modified apatites and the antibacterial mechanisms of various ions as well as their antibacterial efficiency.

  20. Substituted Hydroxyapatites with Antibacterial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kolmas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructive surgery is presently struggling with the problem of infections located within implantation biomaterials. Of course, the best antibacterial protection is antibiotic therapy. However, oral antibiotic therapy is sometimes ineffective, while administering an antibiotic at the location of infection is often associated with an unfavourable ratio of dosage efficiency and toxic effect. Thus, the present study aims to find a new factor which may improve antibacterial activity while also presenting low toxicity to the human cells. Such factors are usually implemented along with the implant itself and may be an integral part of it. Many recent studies have focused on inorganic factors, such as metal nanoparticles, salts, and metal oxides. The advantages of inorganic factors include the ease with which they can be combined with ceramic and polymeric biomaterials. The following review focuses on hydroxyapatites substituted with ions with antibacterial properties. It considers materials that have already been applied in regenerative medicine (e.g., hydroxyapatites with silver ions and those that are only at the preliminary stage of research and which could potentially be used in implantology or dentistry. We present methods for the synthesis of modified apatites and the antibacterial mechanisms of various ions as well as their antibacterial efficiency.

  1. Uproar over Milk Substitutes Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-15

    Health policy activists lobbied 7 years for the Infant Milk Substitutes, Feeding Bottles and Infant Food Bill. Proponents of the bill say that it basically curtails unethical marketing practices, not the sales of baby foods, and argue that it was conceived to reduce the trend of mothers over-diluting commercial milk in order to reduce household expenses as well as stem the potential erosion of knowledge on locally available weaning foods. Even though the bill will become an Act only after its rules and regulations have been finalized, the government has already banned baby food advertisements on television and in other electronic media under its control. Women's groups now argue that the bill tends to focus almost exclusively upon the welfare of children and compromises the position of women who can not lactate adequately. Moreover, they hold that the bill may be used to compel wives to stay out of the formal workforce so that they may feed their babies. The intention of the bill may be meaningless without complementary legislation addressing the problems of working mothers. Specifically, amendments to the Maternity Benefits Act of 1961 would extend maternity leave to 4 months after delivery and lengthen the duration of nursing breaks. It is, however, feared that these changes may reduce employment prospects for women.

  2. Substituted androstanes as aromatase inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levina, Inna S [N.D.Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-11-30

    The synthesis and structure-activity relationships of inhibitors of steroid aromatase which catalyses the last stage of a multistep biotransformation of cholesterol into estrogens, viz., aromatisation of C{sub 19}-steroids into C{sub 18}-phenolic steroids, are discussed. Compounds of the androstane series which are structurally related to the natural substrate, viz., androst-4-ene-3,17-dione, are the subjects of consideration. The review encompasses problems of synthesis of various substituted androstanes and their aromatase-inhibiting activities and structural requirements for selective specific aromatase inhibitors based on in vitro and in vivo structure-activity studies of compounds synthesised, their biological properties and the results of clinical trials. Special attention is paid to practical applications of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of hormone-dependent mammary and ovarian tumours as well as benign prostatic tumours. In writing this report, the author has used all the information currently available in the chemical, biochemical, endocrinological and medicinal literature as well as in patents. The bibliography includes 173 references.

  3. Substituted androstanes as aromatase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levina, Inna S.

    1998-11-01

    The synthesis and structure-activity relationships of inhibitors of steroid aromatase which catalyses the last stage of a multistep biotransformation of cholesterol into estrogens, viz., aromatisation of C19-steroids into C18-phenolic steroids, are discussed. Compounds of the androstane series which are structurally related to the natural substrate, viz., androst-4-ene-3,17-dione, are the subjects of consideration. The review encompasses problems of synthesis of various substituted androstanes and their aromatase-inhibiting activities and structural requirements for selective specific aromatase inhibitors based on in vitro and in vivo structure-activity studies of compounds synthesised, their biological properties and the results of clinical trials. Special attention is paid to practical applications of aromatase inhibitors in the treatment of hormone-dependent mammary and ovarian tumours as well as benign prostatic tumours. In writing this report, the author has used all the information currently available in the chemical, biochemical, endocrinological and medicinal literature as well as in patents. The bibliography includes 173 references.

  4. Ice encapsulation protects rather than disturbs the freezing lichen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerke, J W

    2009-03-01

    Arctic and alpine terricolous lichens are adapted to harsh environments and are tolerant to extremely low temperatures when metabolically inactive. However, there are reports indicating that freezing can be lethal to metabolically active lichens. With a projected warmer and more unstable climate, winter precipitation at high latitudes will fall more frequently as rain, causing snowmelt and encapsulating terricolous lichens in ice or exposing them to large temperature fluctuations. Lichens are a major winter food source for reindeer in most parts of the circumpolar region. A laboratory experiment tested how three hydrated reindeer forage lichen species covered by snow, encapsulated in ice, or uncovered responded to storage at freezing temperatures and subsequent warming. Photosynthetic performance (maximal fluorescence of dark-adapted samples and net photosynthetic rates) was significantly lower in lichens not insulated by snow or ice, whereas there were few differences between the snow and ice treatments. It is suggested that snow and ice provide sufficiently moist environments to improve extracellular and reduce intracellular ice nucleation activity. Ice encapsulation, which is often lethal to vascular plants, did not have any negative effects on the studied lichens. The results indicate that complete snow and ice melt followed by refreezing can be detrimental to terricolous lichen ecosystems. Reduced lichen biomass will have a negative effect both on reindeer winter survival and the indigenous peoples who herd reindeer.

  5. When a water drop freezes before it solidifies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavehpour, Pirouz; Davis, Stephen; Tavakoli, Faryar

    2012-11-01

    When a drop of liquid is placed on a substrate which temperature is below the melting point of the liquid, one would expect the drop to solidify instantaneously. However, many liquids, such as water, must be subcooled to solidify below its melting temperature due to homogeneous nucleation's high activation energy. Most of the drop solidification research, particularly for water, phase change is assumed to occur at equilibrium freezing temperature; however, this is not the case. We found that after a certain degree of supercooling, a kinetic based nucleation begins and latent heat of fusion is suddenly liberated, causing an increase in liquid temperature. At the end of this stage, approximately 20% of the drop is crystallized. This phenomenon is known among metallurgists as recalescence. This is followed by a slow solidification process at the melting point. As a water droplet spreads on a cold substrate, its contact line stops just prior to freezing inception from the liquid-solid interface. In this study, we assert that recalescence prior to solidification may be the cause of water's sudden immobility, which results in a fixed contact angle and droplet diameter. In our experiments, the nucleation front initiates from the trijunction point and propagates to the drop volume.

  6. Flux-freezing breakdown in high-conductivity magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory; Vishniac, Ethan; Lalescu, Cristian; Aluie, Hussein; Kanov, Kalin; Bürger, Kai; Burns, Randal; Meneveau, Charles; Szalay, Alexander

    2013-05-23

    The idea of 'frozen-in' magnetic field lines for ideal plasmas is useful to explain diverse astrophysical phenomena, for example the shedding of excess angular momentum from protostars by twisting of field lines frozen into the interstellar medium. Frozen-in field lines, however, preclude the rapid changes in magnetic topology observed at high conductivities, as in solar flares. Microphysical plasma processes are a proposed explanation of the observed high rates, but it is an open question whether such processes can rapidly reconnect astrophysical flux structures much greater in extent than several thousand ion gyroradii. An alternative explanation is that turbulent Richardson advection brings field lines implosively together from distances far apart to separations of the order of gyroradii. Here we report an analysis of a simulation of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence at high conductivity that exhibits Richardson dispersion. This effect of advection in rough velocity fields, which appear non-differentiable in space, leads to line motions that are completely indeterministic or 'spontaneously stochastic', as predicted in analytical studies. The turbulent breakdown of standard flux freezing at scales greater than the ion gyroradius can explain fast reconnection of very large-scale flux structures, both observed (solar flares and coronal mass ejections) and predicted (the inner heliosheath, accretion disks, γ-ray bursts and so on). For laminar plasma flows with smooth velocity fields or for low turbulence intensity, stochastic flux freezing reduces to the usual frozen-in condition.

  7. A New Mechanism of Canopy Effect in Unsaturated Freezing Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Jidong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Canopy effect refers to the phenomenon where moisture accumulates underneath an impervious cover. Field observation reveals that canopy effect can take place in relatively dry soils where the groundwater table is deep and can lead to full saturation of the soil immediately underneath the impervious cover. On the other hand, numerical analysis based on existing theories of heat and mass transfer in unsaturated soils can only reproduce a minor amount of moisture accumulation due to an impervious cover, particularly when the groundwater table is relatively deep. In attempt to explain the observed canopy effect in field, this paper proposes a new mechanism of moisture accumulation in unsaturated freezing soils: vapour transfer in such a soil is accelerated by the process of vapour-ice desublimation. A new approach for modelling moisture and heat movements is proposed, in which the phase change of evaporation, condensation and de-sublimation of vapor flow are taken into account. The computed results show that the proposed model can indeed reproduce the unusual moisture accumulation observed in relatively dry soils. The results also demonstrate that soil freezing fed by vapour transfer can result in a water content close to full saturation. Since vapour transfer is seldom considered in geotechnical design, the canopy effect deserves more attention during construction and earth works in cold and arid regions.

  8. Inventory Decisions in a Product-Updated System with Component Substitution and Product Substitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yancong Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Substitution behaviors happen frequently when demands are uncertain in a production inventory system, and it has attracted enough attention from firms. Related researches can be clearly classified into firm-driven substitution and customer-driven substitution. However, if production inventory is stock-out when a firm updates its product, the firm may use a new generation product to satisfy the customer’s demand of old generation product or use updated component to substitute old component to satisfy production demand. Obviously, two cases of substitution exist simultaneously in the product-updated system when an emergent shortage happens. In this paper, we consider a component order problem with component substitution and product substitution simultaneously in a product-updated system, where the case of firm-driven substitution or customer-driven substitution can be reached by setting different values for two system parameters. Firstly, we formulate the problem into a two-stage dynamic programming. Secondly, we give the optimal decisions about assembled quantities of different types of products. Next, we prove that the expected profit function is jointly concave in order quantities and decrease the feasible domain by determining some bounds for decision variables. Finally, some management insights about component substitution and product substitution are investigated by theoretical analysis method.

  9. First principles investigation of substituted strontium hexaferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Vivek

    This dissertation investigates how the magnetic properties of strontium hexaferrite change upon the substitution of foreign atoms at the Fe sites. Strontium hexaferrite, SrFe12O19, is a commonly used hard magnetic material and is produced in large quantities (around 500,000 tons per year). For different applications of strontium hexaferrite, its magnetic properties can be tuned by a proper substitution of the foreign atoms. Experimental screening for a proper substitution is a cost-intensive and time-consuming process, whereas computationally it can be done more efficiently. We used the 'density functional theory' a first principles based method to study substituted strontium hexaferrite. The site occupancies of the substituted atoms were estimated by calculating the substitution energies of different configurations. The formation probabilities of configurations were used to calculate the magnetic properties of substituted strontium hexaferrite. In the first study, Al-substituted strontium hexaferrite, SrFe12-x AlxO19 with x=0.5 and x=1.0 were investigated. It was found that at the annealing temperature the non-magnetic Al +3 ions preferentially replace Fe+3 ions from the 12 k and 2a sites. We found that the magnetization decreases and the magnetic anisotropy field increases as the fraction, x of the Al atoms increases. In the second study, SrFe12-xGaxO19 and SrFe12-xInxO19 with x=0.5 and x=1.0 were investigated. In the case of SrFe12-xGaxO19, the sites where Ga+3 ions prefer to enter are: 12 k, 2a, and 4f1. For SrFe12-xInxO19, In+3 ions most likely to occupy the 12k, 4f1 , and 4f2 sites. In both cases the magnetization was found to decrease slightly as the fraction of substituted atom increases. The magnetic anisotropy field increased for SrFe12-xGaxO 19, and decreased for SrFe12-xInxO19 as the concentration of substituted atoms increased. In the third study, 23 elements (M) were screened for their possible substitution in strontium hexaferrite, SrFe12-xMxO 19

  10. Gait-related cerebral alterations in patients with Parkinson's disease with freezing of gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Anke H; Leunissen, Inge; Bakker, Maaike; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Helmich, Rick C; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Toni, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Freezing of gait is a common, debilitating feature of Parkinson's disease. We have studied gait planning in patients with freezing of gait, using motor imagery of walking in combination with functional magnetic resonance imaging. This approach exploits the large neural overlap that exists between planning and imagining a movement. In addition, it avoids confounds introduced by brain responses to altered motor performance and somatosensory feedback during actual freezing episodes. We included 24 patients with Parkinson's disease: 12 patients with freezing of gait, 12 matched patients without freezing of gait and 21 matched healthy controls. Subjects performed two previously validated tasks--motor imagery of gait and a visual imagery control task. During functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning, we quantified imagery performance by measuring the time required to imagine walking on paths of different widths and lengths. In addition, we used voxel-based morphometry to test whether between-group differences in imagery-related activity were related to structural differences. Imagery times indicated that patients with freezing of gait, patients without freezing of gait and controls engaged in motor imagery of gait, with matched task performance. During motor imagery of gait, patients with freezing of gait showed more activity than patients without freezing of gait in the mesencephalic locomotor region. Patients with freezing of gait also tended to have decreased responses in mesial frontal and posterior parietal regions. Furthermore, patients with freezing of gait had grey matter atrophy in a small portion of the mesencephalic locomotor region. The gait-related hyperactivity of the mesencephalic locomotor region correlated with clinical parameters (freezing of gait severity and disease duration), but not with the degree of atrophy. These results indicate that patients with Parkinson's disease with freezing of gait have structural and functional alterations in the

  11. DSC and TMA studies on freezing and thawing gelation of galactomannan polysaccharide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iijima, Mika, E-mail: m-iijima@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Education, Nagasaki University, 1-14, Bunkyo-machi, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Hatakeyama, Tatsuko [Lignocell Research, 73-8 Yatsumata, Fukui 910-3558 (Japan); Hatakeyama, Hyoe [Department of Environment and Biotechnology, Faculty of Engineering, Fukui University of Technology, 3-6-1, Gakuen, Fukui 910-8505 (Japan)

    2012-03-20

    Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Locust bean gum forms hydrogels by freezing and thawing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Syneresis was observed when freezing and thawing cycle (n) increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic Young's modulus increased with increasing n. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-freezing water content restrained by hydrogels decreased with increasing n. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strong gel with densely packed network structure formed with increasing n. - Abstract: Among various kinds of polysaccharides known to form hydrogels, locust bean gum (LBG) consisting of a mannose backbone and galactose side chains has unique characteristics, since LBG forms hydrogels by freezing and thawing. In this study, effect of thermal history on gelation was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermomechanical analysis (TMA). Gel/sol ratio calculated by weighing method was found to be affected by sol concentration, freezing rate and the number of freezing and thawing cycle (n). Once LBG hydrogels are formed, they are thermally stable, although syneresis was observed when n increased. Dynamic Young's modulus (E Prime ) of hydrogels measured by TMA in water increased with increasing n and decreasing freezing rate. Non-freezing water calculated from DSC melting peak of ice in the gel decreased with increasing n and decreasing freezing rate. Morphological observation of freeze-dried gels was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The above results indicate that weak hydrogel having large molecular network structure transformed into strong gel with densely packed network structure by increasing n and decreasing freezing rate.

  12. Effect of freezing and thawing rates on sperm motility in Bocachico Prochilodus magdalenae (Pisces, Characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G. Martínez

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the freezing and thawing rates necessary to maintain sperm viability during cryopreservation of Bocachico semen. Materials and methods. Four interactional treatments were implemented between two freezing (rapid and slow and two thawing (rapid and slow curves, in a 2x2 factorial as follows: rapid freezing-rapid thawing, rapid freezing-slow thawing, slow freezing-rapid thawing, and slow freezing-slow thawing. After thawing by Sperm Class Analyzer (SCA curvilinear velocity (VCL and straight-line (VSL (μm sec-1 were analyzed; total, rapid, medium, and slow motility, were compared among treatments. Results. The rapid freezing-slow thawing treatment was lethal for all variables of velocity and motility, causing a significant (p<0.01 post-thaw inmotility of 100%. The slow freezing-rapid thawing interaction had a significantly higher effect than the other treatments (p<0.05, particularly on variables such as rapid motility (10.1 ± 1.1%, medium motility (30.16 ± 4.1%, and curvilinear velocity (51.5 ± 4.75 μm sec.-1 also decreased the percentage of sperm with slow motility (41.7 ± 4.45%. Independently of the applied thawing rate, the freezing rate generated the main significant effect on total motility. Conclusions. It is possible to conclude that the interaction effect between freezing and thawing rates is nil (except for slow motility during cryopreservation process. However, the independent effects of these factors (main effects on remaining motility variables are positively significant and decisive to the maintenance of these features, especially the freeze factor (when it is slow. This becomes the first successful report of sperm cryopreservation from Bocachico Prochilodus magdalenae in the world and may be used in conservation programs for this endangered species.

  13. Differential freezing resistance and photoprotection in C3 and C4 eudicots and grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-Zhen; Osborne, Colin P

    2013-05-01

    Globally, C4 plants dominate hot, open environments, but this general pattern is underpinned by important differences in the biogeography of C4 lineages. In particular, the species richness of C4 Poaceae (grasses) increases strongly with increasing temperature, whereas that of the major C4 eudicot group Chenopodiaceae correlates positively with aridity. Freezing tolerance is a crucial determinant of biogeographical relationships with temperature and is mediated by photodamage and cellular disruption by desiccation, but little is known about differences between C4 families. This study hypothesized that there is a greater risk of freezing damage via these mechanisms in C4 Poaceae than Chenopodiaceae, that freezing protection differs between the taxonomic groups, and that freezing tolerance of species is linked to arid habitat preference. Chlorophyll fluorescence, water relations, and freezing injury were compared in four C3 and six C4 species of Poaceae and Chenopodiaceae from the same Mongolian flora. Contrary to expectations, freezing-induced leaf mortality and photodamage were lower in Poaceae than Chenopodiaceae species, and unrelated to photosynthetic pathway. The freezing resistance of Poaceae species resulted from constitutive protection and cold acclimation and an ability to protect the photosynthetic apparatus from photodamage. Freezing protection was associated with low osmotic potential and low tissue elasticity, and freezing damage was accompanied by electrolyte leakage, consistent with cell-membrane disruption by ice. Both Chenopodiaceae and Poaceae had the potential to develop cold acclimation and withstand freezing during the growing season, which conflicted with the hypothesis. Instead, freezing tolerance was more closely associated with life history and ecological preference in these Mongolian species.

  14. Freeze/thaw-induced embolism: probability of critical bubble formation depends on speed of ice formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna eSevanto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Bubble formation in the conduits of woody plants sets a challenge for uninterrupted water transportation from the soil up to the canopy. Freezing and thawing of stems has been shown to increase the number of air-filled (embolized conduits, especially in trees with large conduit diameters. Despite numerous experimental studies, the mechanisms leading to bubble formation during freezing have not been addressed theoretically. We used classical nucleation theory and fluid mechanics to show which mechanisms are most likely to be responsible for bubble formation during freezing and what parameters determine the likelihood of the process. Our results confirm the common assumption that bubble formation during freezing is most likely due to gas segregation by ice. If xylem conduit walls are not permeable to the salts expelled by ice during the freezing process, osmotic pressures high enough for air seeding could be created. The build-up rate of segregated solutes in front of the ice-water interface depends equally on conduit diameter and freezing velocity. Therefore, bubble formation probability depends on these variables. The dependence of bubble formation probability on freezing velocity means that the experimental results obtained for cavitation threshold conduit diameters during freeze/thaw cycles depend on the experimental setup; namely sample size and cooling rate. The velocity dependence also suggests that to avoid bubble formation during freezing trees should have narrow conduits where freezing is likely to be fast (e.g. branches or outermost layer of the xylem. Avoidance of bubble formation during freezing could thus be one piece of the explanation why xylem conduit size of temperate and boreal zone trees varies quite systematically.

  15. A spatiotemporal analysis of gait freezing and the impact of pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael H.; Graepel, Cara L.; Hyam, Jonathan A.; Jenkinson, Ned; Brittain, John-Stuart; Coyne, Terry J.; Silburn, Peter A.; Aziz, Tipu Z.; Kerr, Graham; Brown, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gait freezing is an episodic arrest of locomotion due to an inability to take normal steps. Pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation is an emerging therapy proposed to improve gait freezing, even where refractory to medication. However, the efficacy and precise effects of pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation on Parkinsonian gait disturbance are not established. The clinical application of this new therapy is controversial and it is unknown if bilateral stimulation is more effective than unilateral. Here, in a double-blinded study using objective spatiotemporal gait analysis, we assessed the impact of unilateral and bilateral pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation on triggered episodes of gait freezing and on background deficits of unconstrained gait in Parkinson’s disease. Under experimental conditions, while OFF medication, Parkinsonian patients with severe gait freezing implanted with pedunculopontine nucleus stimulators below the pontomesencephalic junction were assessed during three conditions; off stimulation, unilateral stimulation and bilateral stimulation. Results were compared to Parkinsonian patients without gait freezing matched for disease severity and healthy controls. Pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation improved objective measures of gait freezing, with bilateral stimulation more effective than unilateral. During unconstrained walking, Parkinsonian patients who experience gait freezing had reduced step length and increased step length variability compared to patients without gait freezing; however, these deficits were unchanged by pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation. Chronic pedunculopontine nucleus stimulation improved Freezing of Gait Questionnaire scores, reflecting a reduction of the freezing encountered in patients’ usual environments and medication states. This study provides objective, double-blinded evidence that in a specific subgroup of Parkinsonian patients, stimulation of a caudal pedunculopontine nucleus region selectively improves gait

  16. Modeling competitive substitution in a polyelectrolyte complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, B.; Muthukumar, M., E-mail: muthu@polysci.umass.edu [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    We have simulated the invasion of a polyelectrolyte complex made of a polycation chain and a polyanion chain, by another longer polyanion chain, using the coarse-grained united atom model for the chains and the Langevin dynamics methodology. Our simulations reveal many intricate details of the substitution reaction in terms of conformational changes of the chains and competition between the invading chain and the chain being displaced for the common complementary chain. We show that the invading chain is required to be sufficiently longer than the chain being displaced for effecting the substitution. Yet, having the invading chain to be longer than a certain threshold value does not reduce the substitution time much further. While most of the simulations were carried out in salt-free conditions, we show that presence of salt facilitates the substitution reaction and reduces the substitution time. Analysis of our data shows that the dominant driving force for the substitution process involving polyelectrolytes lies in the release of counterions during the substitution.

  17. Determinants of generic drug substitution in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufkin Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since generic drugs have the same therapeutic effect as the original formulation but at generally lower costs, their use should be more heavily promoted. However, a considerable number of barriers to their wider use have been observed in many countries. The present study examines the influence of patients, physicians and certain characteristics of the generics' market on generic substitution in Switzerland. Methods We used reimbursement claims' data submitted to a large health insurer by insured individuals living in one of Switzerland's three linguistic regions during 2003. All dispensed drugs studied here were substitutable. The outcome (use of a generic or not was modelled by logistic regression, adjusted for patients' characteristics (gender, age, treatment complexity, substitution groups and with several variables describing reimbursement incentives (deductible, co-payments and the generics' market (prices, packaging, co-branded original, number of available generics, etc.. Results The overall generics' substitution rate for 173,212 dispensed prescriptions was 31%, though this varied considerably across cantons. Poor health status (older patients, complex treatments was associated with lower generic use. Higher rates were associated with higher out-of-pocket costs, greater price differences between the original and the generic, and with the number of generics on the market, while reformulation and repackaging were associated with lower rates. The substitution rate was 13% lower among hospital physicians. The adoption of the prescribing practices of the canton with the highest substitution rate would increase substitution in other cantons to as much as 26%. Conclusions Patient health status explained a part of the reluctance to substitute an original formulation by a generic. Economic incentives were efficient, but with a moderate global effect. The huge interregional differences indicated that prescribing behaviours and

  18. Substitution between cars within the household

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Borger, Bruno; Mulalic, Ismir; Rouwendal, Jan

    2016-01-01

    .98 and 1.41 for the primary and secondary cars, respectively. Accounting for substitution effects, these figures reduce to, respectively, 0.32 and 0.45. Consistent with substitution behaviour, we find that the fuel price elasticity of fuel demand exceeds the elasticity of kilometre demands with respect...... to the fuel price; the difference strongly increases at the highest deciles of the distribution of kilometre demand. Extending the model to account for driver heterogeneity and the role of car characteristics confirmed the relevance of substitution between cars within the household. We found strong evidence......’ fuel efficiency choices are related to their price sensitivity....

  19. Elasticity of Substitution and Antidumping Measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drud Hansen, Jørgen; Meinen, Philipp; Nielsen, Jørgen Ulff-Møller

    Abstract This paper analyzes the role of the elasticity of substitution for anti-dumping decisions across countries. In monopolistic competition models with cost heterogeneous firms across countries, price differences vary inversely with the elasticity of substitution. Anti-dumping duties should...... therefore also vary inversely with the elasticity of substitution at least for countries which have a strong focus on prices in the determination of their anti-dumping measures. We test this for ten countries from 1990 to 2009 using data on anti-dumping from Chad Bown (2010) and US-data at 8-digit level...

  20. Characterising freeze in the UK: applications for the insurance industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, E. K.; Keef, C.; Busby, K.

    2012-04-01

    The UK winters of 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 were characterised by prolonged and widespread low temperatures. This was challenging for the UK insurance industry and organisations such as the emergency services, the Highways Agency and British Gas who had to manage the extra demands that resulted. In the 6-day period running to Christmas Eve 2010, British Gas reported 100,000 boiler repair call-outs, whilst those 190,000 homes and businesses left with frozen and subsequently burst pipes contributed to the ABI's estimated £ 900 million in insured losses for December 2010 alone; the highest payout by the industry for damages associated with cold weather. Unfortunately, the severity of these winters made the difference between profit and loss for some primary UK insurance companies. To enable better pricing of premiums in the future, insurance companies are looking to understand the potential risk from cold waves at a local, postcode-level, whilst reinsurance firms seek to determine the accumulated loss across the UK associated with spatially coherent events. Other industry sectors also strive to improve their understanding of weather extremes for planning and management. Underpinning this is the need to statistically characterise the physical hazard. Aimed primarily at the re/insurance industry, we have applied an established methodology for developing statistical event sets and applied this to generate a UK freeze event set. An event set provides a stochastic set of several thousand events over 10's of 1000's of years and is typically applied within probabilistic catastrophe models. Our method applies extreme value theory and dependence modelling to explain low-temperature relationships across the UK and over time using historical records. The resulting event set represents the spatial and temporal dependence of cold waves in the UK and is modelled against household factors that increase the vulnerability to freezing conditions, such as property type, age and condition

  1. Freezing Point Depressions of Aqueous MEA, MDEA, and MEA−MDEA Measured with a New Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Pedersen, Mikkel Gielsager; Thomsen, Kaj

    2011-01-01

    Freezing points for aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA), methyl diethanolamine (MDEA), and MEA−MDEA solutions were measured in the concentration range from 0 to 0.4 mass fractions of the alkanolamines. For the aqueous MEA−MDEA system, freezing points for 1:4, 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, and 4:1 molar ratios of MEA...

  2. Application of freeze-drying technology in manufacturing orally disintegrating films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Kai Bin; Odeniyi, Michael Ayodele; Peh, Kok-Khiang

    2016-01-01

    Freeze drying technology has not been maximized and reported in manufacturing orally disintegrating films. The aim of this study was to explore the freeze drying technology in the formulation of sildenafil orally disintegrating films and compare the physical properties with heat-dried orally disintegrating film. Central composite design was used to investigate the effects of three factors, namely concentration of carbopol, wheat starch and polyethylene glycol 400 on the tensile strength and disintegration time of the film. Heat-dried films had higher tensile strength than films prepared using freeze-dried method. For folding endurance, freeze-dried films showed improved endurance than heat-dried films. Moreover, films prepared using freeze-dried methods were thicker and had faster disintegration time. Formulations with higher amount of carbopol and starch showed higher tensile strength and thickness whereas formulations with higher PEG 400 content showed better flexibility. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the freeze-dried films had more porous structure compared to the heat-dried film as a result of the release of water molecule from the frozen structure when it was subjected to freeze drying process. The sildenafil film was palatable. The dissolution profiles of freeze-dried and heat-dried films were similar to Viagra® with f2 of 51.04 and 65.98, respectively.

  3. Reagan and the Nuclear Freeze: "Stars Wars" as a Rhetorical Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjork, Rebecca S.

    1988-01-01

    Analyzes the interaction between nuclear freeze activists and proponents of a Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI). Argues that SDI strengthens Reagan's rhetorical position concerning nuclear weapons policy because it reduces the argumentative ground of the freeze movement by envisioning a defensive weapons system that would nullify nuclear weapons.…

  4. 9 CFR 354.244 - Temperatures and cooling and freezing procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Temperatures and cooling and freezing procedures. 354.244 Section 354.244 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... and cooling and freezing procedures. Temperatures and procedures which are necessary for cooling...

  5. FREEZING TOLERANCE AND BIOCHEMICAL-CHANGES IN WHEAT SHOOTS AS AFFECTED BY H2S FUMIGATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, C.E.E.; De Kok, Luit J.; Kuiper, P.J.C.

    1992-01-01

    Fumigation of winter wheat with H2S during low temperature acclimation substantially reduced the development of freezing tolerance of the leaves. After 6 weeks of low temperature exposure (3-degrees-C), the freezing tolerance was increased by 6 and 2-degrees-C at 0 and 0.25-mu-l l-1 H2S, respectivel

  6. Projecting potential adoption of genetically engineered freeze-tolerant Eucalyptus in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Wear; Ernest Dixon IV; Robert C. Abt; Navinder Singh

    2015-01-01

    Development of commercial Eucalyptus plantations has been limited in the United States because of the species’ sensitivity to freezing temperatures. Recently developed genetically engineered clones of a Eucalyptus hybrid, which confer freeze tolerance, could expand the range of commercial plantations. This study explores how...

  7. the effect of freezing method on the survival of ram spermatozoa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diluted, cooled semen was dropped directly into liquid nitrogen and the pellets allowed to sink in the freezing fluid. ... pre-freezing dilution rate was varied in Experiment I and was 1:4 ... (v/v) egg yolk and either 133,2 mM raffmose - 54,4 mM.

  8. DNA comet assay to identify different freezing temperatures of irradiated liver chicken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Renato C.; Mozeika, Michel A.; Fanaro, Gustavo B.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: renatocduarte@yahoo.com.br; Marchioni, Eric [Universite de Strasbourg, Illkirch (France). Faculte de Pharmacie. Lab. de Chimie Analytique et Sciences de l' Aliment

    2009-07-01

    The cold chain is a succession of steps which maintain the food at low temperature. The thawed food never be frozen again and the best solution being to consume it quickly to avoid the microorganism growth which causes decay and nutrients damage. One of most important point is that freezing process, unlike irradiation, do not destroy microorganisms, only inactive them as long as they remain in a frozen state. The Comet Assay is an original test used to detect irradiated foods that's recognize the DNA damage and can then be used to control the overall degradation of the food and in a certain extend to evaluate the damage caused by irradiation, different forms of freeze and storage time on liver chicken cells. Different freezing temperatures were used, deep freeze -196 deg C and slow freeze -10 deg C. Samples were irradiated in a {sup 60}Co irradiator with 1.5, 3.0 and 4.5 kGy radiation doses. Fast freezing technique induces a low percent of DNA degradation comparing to slow freezing technique. This procedure could be a good choose to chicken freezing processing. (author)

  9. Heat and Mass Transfer of Droplet Vacuum Freezing Process Based on Dynamic Mesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical simulation using dynamic mesh method by COMSOL has been developed to model heat and mass transfer during vacuum freezing by evaporation of a single droplet. The initial droplet diameter, initial droplet temperature, and vacuum chamber pressure effect are studied. The surface and center temperature curve was predicted to show the effect. The mass transfer rate and radius displacement were also calculated. The results show the dynamic mesh shows well the freezing process with the radius reduction of droplet. The initial droplet diameter, initial droplet temperature, and vacuum pressure have obvious effect on freezing process. The total freezing time is about 200 s, 300 s, and 400 s for droplet diameter 7.5 mm, 10.5 mm, and 12.5 mm, respectively. The vacuum pressure less than 200 Pa is enough for the less time to freezing the droplet, that is, the key point in freezing time. The initial droplet temperature has obvious effect on freezing but little effect on freezing temperature.

  10. Freeze-drying in novel container system: Characterization of heat and mass transfer in glass syringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sajal M; Pikal, Michael J

    2010-07-01

    This study is aimed at characterizing and understanding different modes of heat and mass transfer in glass syringes to develop a robust freeze-drying process. Two different holder systems were used to freeze-dry in syringes: an aluminum (Al) block and a plexiglass holder. The syringe heat transfer coefficient was characterized by a sublimation test using pure water. Mannitol and sucrose (5% w/v) were also freeze-dried, as model systems, in both the assemblies. Dry layer resistance was determined from manometric temperature measurement (MTM) and product temperature was measured using thermocouples, and was also determined from MTM. Further, freeze-drying process was also designed using Smart freeze-dryer to assess its application for freeze-drying in novel container systems. Heat and mass transfer in syringes were compared against the traditional container system (i.e., glass tubing vial). In the Al block, the heat transfer was via three modes: contact conduction, gas conduction, and radiation with gas conduction being the dominant mode of heat transfer. In the plexiglass holder, the heat transfer was mostly via radiation; convection was not involved. Also, MTM/Smart freeze-drying did work reasonably well for freeze-drying in syringes. When compared to tubing vials, product temperature decreases and hence drying time increases in syringes. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  11. Study of polluted soil remediation based on freezing and thawing cycles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DaHu Rui; BaiYang Song; Yuzuru Ito; Li Wang

    2014-01-01

    It-is-generally-known-that-soil-pollution-poses-a-terrible-hazard-to-the-environment,-but-the-present-techniques-of-con-taminated-soil-remediation-cannot-control-this-growing-threat.-This-paper-compares-the-pollutant-extraction-efficiency-of-traditional-pumping-and-treating,-which-is-a-typical-washing-technology-for-the-remediation-of-contaminated-soils,-with-methods-that-utilize-freeze-thaw-cycles.-In-the-soil-freezing-process,-water-shifts-from-unfrozen-soils-to-the-freezing-front,-and-the-permeability-of-soil-will-be-enhanced-under-certain-temperature-gradients-and-water-conditions.-Therefore,-this-paper-discusses-the-purification-of-contaminated-soil-through-freeze-thaw-action.-We-conducted-a-cleansing-experiment-on-clay-and-silica-sand-infused-with-NaCl-(simulation-of-heavy-metals)-and-found-that-the-efficiency-of-purification-was-en-hanced-remarkably-in-the-latter-by-the-freeze-thaw-action.-To-assess-the-effective-extraction-of-DNAPLs-in-soil,-we-con-ducted-an-experiment-on-suction-by-freezing,-predicated-on-the-different-freezing-points-of-moisture-and-pollutants.-We-found-that-the-permeability-coefficient-was-significantly-increased-by-the-freezing-thawing-action,-enabling-the-DNAPL-contaminants-to-be-extracted-selectively-and-effectively.

  12. Cueing for freezing of gait: a need for 3-dimensional cues?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, A.H.; Jeene, P.; Nijkrake, M.J.; Abdo, W.F.; Bloem, B.R.

    2012-01-01

    Visual cues can ameliorate freezing of gait, an incapacitating symptom frequently seen in patients with parkinsonism. Here, we describe a patient with severe freezing of gait, who responded well to 3-dimensional cues, but not to 2-dimensional visual cues. We discuss the potential implications of

  13. Control of crystal growth in water purification by directional freeze crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, William M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A Directional Freeze Crystallization system employs an indirect contact heat exchanger to freeze a fraction of liquid to be purified. The unfrozen fraction is drained away and the purified frozen fraction is melted. The heat exchanger must be designed in accordance with a Growth Habit Index to achieve efficient separation of contaminants. If gases are dissolved in the liquid, the system must be pressurized.

  14. Effects of freezing-thawing on sensory descriptive profiles of cooked poultry breast meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freezing is a common method used by consumers to extend meat shelf life and by researchers to allow for subsequent meat quality assessments and processing. However, the effects of freezing on the sensory quality of cooked poultry breast meat are not well documented. The objective of this study was t...

  15. Microstructural changes in white matter associated with freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vercruysse, S.; Leunissen, I.; Vervoort, G.M.; Vandenberghe, W.; Swinnen, S.; Nieuwboer, A.

    2015-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), freezing of gait (FOG) is associated with widespread functional and structural gray matter changes throughout the brain. Previous study of freezing-related white matter changes was restricted to brainstem and cerebellar locomotor tracts. This study was undertaken to dete

  16. Model-based optimization of the primary drying step during freeze-drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortier, Séverine Thérèse F.C.; Van Bockstal, Pieter-Jan; Nopens, Ingmar;

    2015-01-01

    Since large molecules are considered the key driver for growth of the pharmaceutical industry, the focus of the pharmaceutical industry is shifting from small molecules to biopharmaceuticals: around 50% of the approved biopharmaceuticals are freeze-dried products. Therefore, freeze- drying is an ...

  17. Freezing Point of Milk: A Natural Way to Understand Colligative Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, Mercedes; Reija, Belen; Al-Soufi, Wajih

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is presented in which the freezing point depression is analyzed using milk as solution. The nature of milk as a mixture of different solutes makes it a suitable probe to learn about colligative properties. The first part of the experiment illustrates the analytical use of freezing point measurements to control milk quality,…

  18. Effects of very rapid versus vapor phase freezing on human sperm parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvishnia, Hamid; Lakpour, Niknam; Lahijani, Maryam Shams; Heidari-Vala, Hamed; Akhondi, Mohammad A; Zeraati, Hojjat; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of two freezing methods, vapor phase and very rapid freezing, with and without cryoprotectant on semen parameters in men with normal semen criteria. Cryopreservation was done on semen samples from 31 men by two methods of vapor phase freezing and very rapid freezing, with and without Test Yolk buffered glycerol (TYBG) as cryoprotectant. The motility, viability, acrosome and DNA integrity were evaluated on fresh and post-thaw samples. Post-thaw sperm progressive motility was significantly higher in the presence of TYBG in the vapor phase cryopreservation (%6.30 ± 3.74) compared with the very rapid freezing method (%2.2 ± 1.97 and %4.00 ± 2.42 in the presence and absence of TYBG, respectively). There was no significant difference in viability, acrosome status and DNA integrity between two methods in presence or absence of TYBG. The very rapid freezing method in the absence of TYBG showed better sperm motility but viability, acrosome and DNA integrity were similar to the presence of TYBG. The results show that cryopreservation of human spermatozoa together with seminal plasma by using vapor phase method is better than very rapid freezing method to preserve sperm progressive motility; however very rapid freezing method is quick and simple and do not require special cryoprotectant. It can be used for cryopreservation of small number of spermatozoa in IVF centers.

  19. The vulnerability to freezing-induced xylem cavitation of Larrea tridentata (Zygophyllaceae) in the Chihuahuan desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Pockman, William T

    2002-12-01

    The temperature dependence of freezing-induced xylem cavitation was studied in a Chihuahuan desert population of Larrea tridentata (Zygophyllaceae). Field measurements of wood temperature and xylem embolism were combined with anatomical studies and laboratory measurements of embolism in stem and root samples frozen under controlled conditions. Our laboratory experiments corroborated the previously observed relationship between minimum freezing temperature and embolism. The area of the low-temperature exotherms produced during the freezing treatments was correlated with the resulting embolism, suggesting that the freezing of water inside parenchyma cells is associated with the occurrence of xylem embolism. In the laboratory experiments, embolism in stems increased only at temperatures below -14°C. Although this meant that the studied population was more resistant to freezing-induced xylem embolism than a previously studied population from the Sonoran desert, the impact of freezing was nevertheless greater because of much lower environmental temperatures. This result suggests that dieback associated with periodic extreme freezes may contribute to limiting the present distribution of L. tridentata in central New Mexico. Although laboratory experiments showed that root xylem embolism increased after freezing to less negative minimum temperatures than stems (significant effects at T = -7°C), root embolism in the field was lower than shoot embolism in accordance with measured soil temperatures throughout the study.

  20. FREEZING TOLERANCE AND BIOCHEMICAL-CHANGES IN WHEAT SHOOTS AS AFFECTED BY H2S FUMIGATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuiver, C.E.E.; De Kok, Luit J.; Kuiper, P.J.C.

    1992-01-01

    Fumigation of winter wheat with H2S during low temperature acclimation substantially reduced the development of freezing tolerance of the leaves. After 6 weeks of low temperature exposure (3-degrees-C), the freezing tolerance was increased by 6 and 2-degrees-C at 0 and 0.25-mu-l l-1 H2S,

  1. The oatmeal nematode Panagrellus redivivus survives moderately low temperatures by freezing tolerance and cryoprotective dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masakazu; Wharton, David A

    2011-04-01

    The cold tolerance abilities of only a few nematode species have been determined. This study shows that the oatmeal nematode, Panagrellus redivivus, has modest cold tolerance with a 50% survival temperature (S (50)) of -2.5°C after cooling at 0.5°C min(-1) and freezing for 1 h. It can survive low temperatures by freezing tolerance and cryoprotective dehydration; although freezing tolerance appears to be the dominant strategy. Freezing survival is enhanced by low temperature acclimation (7 days at 5°C), with the S (50) being lowered by a small but significant amount (0.42°C). There is no cold shock or rapid cold hardening response under the conditions tested. Cryoprotective dehydration enhances the ability to survive freezing (the S (50) is lowered by 0.55°C, compared to the control, after 4 h freezing at -1°C) and this effect is in addition to that produced by acclimation. Breeding from survivors of a freezing stress did not enhance the ability to survive freezing. The cold tolerance abilities of this nematode are modest, but sufficient to enable it to survive in the cold temperate environments it inhabits.

  2. Effect of particle surface area on ice active site densities retrieved from droplet freezing spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beydoun, Hassan; Polen, Michael; Sullivan, Ryan C.

    2016-10-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation remains one of the outstanding problems in cloud physics and atmospheric science. Experimental challenges in properly simulating particle-induced freezing processes under atmospherically relevant conditions have largely contributed to the absence of a well-established parameterization of immersion freezing properties. Here, we formulate an ice active, surface-site-based stochastic model of heterogeneous freezing with the unique feature of invoking a continuum assumption on the ice nucleating activity (contact angle) of an aerosol particle's surface that requires no assumptions about the size or number of active sites. The result is a particle-specific property g that defines a distribution of local ice nucleation rates. Upon integration, this yields a full freezing probability function for an ice nucleating particle. Current cold plate droplet freezing measurements provide a valuable and inexpensive resource for studying the freezing properties of many atmospheric aerosol systems. We apply our g framework to explain the observed dependence of the freezing temperature of droplets in a cold plate on the concentration of the particle species investigated. Normalizing to the total particle mass or surface area present to derive the commonly used ice nuclei active surface (INAS) density (ns) often cannot account for the effects of particle concentration, yet concentration is typically varied to span a wider measurable freezing temperature range. A method based on determining what is denoted an ice nucleating species' specific critical surface area is presented and explains the concentration dependence as a result of increasing the variability in ice nucleating active sites between droplets. By applying this method to experimental droplet freezing data from four different systems, we demonstrate its ability to interpret immersion freezing temperature spectra of droplets containing variable particle concentrations. It is shown that general

  3. Questioning nuclear waste substitution: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Alan

    2007-03-01

    This article looks at the ethical quandaries, and their social and political context, which emerge as a result of international nuclear waste substitution. In particular it addresses the dilemmas inherent within the proposed return of nuclear waste owned by Japanese nuclear companies and currently stored in the United Kingdom. The UK company responsible for this waste, British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL), wish to substitute this high volume intermediate-level Japanese-owned radioactive waste for a much lower volume of much more highly radioactive waste. Special focus is given to ethical problems that they, and the UK government, have not wished to address as they move forward with waste substitution. The conclusion is that waste substitution can only be considered an ethical practice if a set of moderating conditions are observed by all parties. These conditions are listed and, as of yet, they are not being observed.

  4. Synthesis of substituted 2-cyanoarylboronic esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysén, Morten; Hansen, Henriette M; Begtrup, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis of substituted 2-cyanoarylboronic esters is described via lithiation/in situ trapping of the corresponding methoxy-, trifluoromethyl-, fluoro-, chloro-, and bromobenzonitriles. The crude arylboronic esters were obtained in high yields and purities and with good regioselectivities....

  5. DOES CURRENCY SUBSTITUTION AFFECT EXCHANGE RATE VOLATILITY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisao Kumamoto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the impacts of the degree of currency substitution on nominal exchange rate volatility in seven countries (Indonesia, the Philippines, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Argentina, and Peru. We use the Threshold ARCH model to consider the ratchet effect of currency substitution and sample periods in the 2000s, during which time the economies of the sample countries stabilized, while the U.S. dollar and euro depreciated against other major currencies following the recent global financial crisis. The presented empirical analyses show that the degree of currency substitution has significant positive effects on the conditional variance of the depreciation rate of the nominal exchange rate in most sample countries. Moreover, a shock to the depreciation rate of the nominal exchange rate has asymmetric effects on the conditional variance, depending on the sign. One possible explanation for these differential effects is the existence of the ratchet effect of currency substitution.

  6. Artificial Sweeteners and Other Sugar Substitutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in many processed foods and other products, including chocolate, candy, frozen desserts, chewing gum, toothpaste, mouthwash, baked ... sugar substitutes, generally don't offer the same health benefits as do whole foods, such as fruits and ...

  7. INFLUENCE OF THE SUBSTITUTION ON THE ELECTRONIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Printed in Ethiopia ... light emitting diodes (OLEDs), organic field effect transistors (OFETs), flexible displays, and sensors [1-3]. ... Influence of substitution on electronic properties of perylene-3,4:9,10-bis(dicarboximides). Bull. Chem. Soc.

  8. Development of a diesel substitute fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, Anton; Mair-Zelenka, Philipp [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria). Inst. of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology; Zeymer, Marc [OMV Refining and Marketing GmbH, Vienna (Austria). MRDI-D Product Development and Innovation

    2013-06-01

    Substitute fuels composed of few real chemical compounds are an alternative characterisation approach for conventional fuels as opposed to the traditional pseudo-component method. With the algorithm proposed in this paper the generation of such substitutes will be facilitated and well-established thermodynamic methods can be applied for physical property-data prediction. Based on some quality criteria like true boiling-point curve, liquid density, C/H ratio, or cloud point of a target fuel a surrogate which meets these properties is determined by fitting its composition. The application and capabilities of the algorithm developed are demonstrated by means of an exemplary diesel substitute fuel. The substitute mixture obtained can be generated and used for evaluation of property-prediction methods. Furthermore this approach can help to understand the effects of mixing fossil fuels with biogenic compounds. (orig.)

  9. Fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen preserves bulk dissolved organic matter concentrations, but not its composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieme, Lisa; Graeber, Daniel; Kaupenjohann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    -freezing with liquid nitrogen) on DOM concentrations measured as organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and on spectroscopic properties of DOM from different terrestrial ecosystems (forest and grassland). Fresh and differently frozen throughfall, stemflow, litter leachate and soil solution samples were analyzed for DOC...... concentrations, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence excitation–emission matrices combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen prevented a significant decrease of DOC concentrations observed after freezing at −18 °C. Nonetheless, the share of PARAFAC components 1 (EXmax...... component 4 (EXmax: 280 nm, EXmax: 328 nm) to total fluorescence was not affected by freezing. We recommend fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen for preservation of bulk DOC concentrations of samples from terrestrial sources, whereas immediate measuring is preferable to preserve spectroscopic properties...

  10. Indication of Differential Kinetic Freeze-out at RHIC and LHC Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Thakur, D; Garg, P; and, R Sahoo; Cleymans, J

    2016-01-01

    The transverse momentum spectra at RHIC and LHC for A+A and p+p collisions are studied with Tsallis distributions in different approaches i.e. with and without radial flow. The information on the freeze-out surface in terms of freeze-out volume, temperature, chemical potential and radial flow velocities for different particle species are obtained. These parameters are found to show a systematic behavior with mass dependence. It is observed that the heavier particles freeze-out early as compared to lighter particles and freeze-out surfaces are different for different particles, which is a direct signature of mass dependent differential freeze-out. Further, we observe that the radial flow velocity decreases with increasing mass. This confirms the mass ordering behavior in collectivity observed in heavy-ion collisions. It is also observed that the systems created in peripheral heavy-ion collisions and in proton-proton collisions are of similar thermodynamic nature.

  11. Comparison Study of Three Common Technologies for Freezing-Thawing Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinbao Yu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a comparison study on three different technologies (i.e., thermocouple, electrical resistivity probe and Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR that are commonly used for frost measurement. Specially, the paper developed an analyses procedure to estimate the freezing-thawing status based on the dielectric properties of freezing soil. Experiments were conducted where the data of temperature, electrical resistivity, and dielectric constant were simultaneously monitored during the freezing/thawing process. The comparison uncovered the advantages and limitations of these technologies for frost measurement. The experimental results indicated that TDR measured soil dielectric constant clearly indicates the different stages of the freezing/thawing process. Analyses method was developed to determine not only the onset of freezing or thawing, but also the extent of their development. This is a major advantage of TDR over other technologies.

  12. Freeze-drying as a preserving preparation technique for in vitro testing of human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Lutz; Vidlářová, Lucie; Kostka, Karl-Heinz; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Windbergs, Maike

    2013-01-01

    In vitro testing of drugs with excised human skin is a valuable prerequisite for clinical studies. However, the analysis of excised human skin presents several obstacles. Ongoing drug diffusion, microbial growth and changes in hydration state influence the results of drug penetration studies. In this work, we evaluate freeze-drying as a preserving preparation method for skin samples to overcome these obstacles. We analyse excised human skin before and after freeze-drying and compare these results with human skin in vivo. Based on comprehensive thermal and spectroscopic analysis, we demonstrate comparability to in vivo conditions and exclude significant changes within the skin samples due to freeze-drying. Furthermore, we show that freeze-drying after skin incubation with drugs prevents growth of drug crystals on the skin surface due to drying effects. In conclusion, we introduce freeze-drying as a preserving preparation technique for in vitro testing of human skin.

  13. Fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen preserves bulk dissolved organic matter concentrations, but not its composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieme, Lisa; Graeber, Daniel; Kaupenjohann, Martin;

    2016-01-01

    concentrations, UV-vis absorption and fluorescence excitation–emission matrices combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen prevented a significant decrease of DOC concentrations observed after freezing at −18 °C. Nonetheless, the share of PARAFAC components 1 (EXmax......-freezing with liquid nitrogen) on DOM concentrations measured as organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and on spectroscopic properties of DOM from different terrestrial ecosystems (forest and grassland). Fresh and differently frozen throughfall, stemflow, litter leachate and soil solution samples were analyzed for DOC...... component 4 (EXmax: 280 nm, EXmax: 328 nm) to total fluorescence was not affected by freezing. We recommend fast-freezing with liquid nitrogen for preservation of bulk DOC concentrations of samples from terrestrial sources, whereas immediate measuring is preferable to preserve spectroscopic properties...

  14. Intracellular trehalose improves the survival of human red blood cells by freeze-drying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Hui; LIU Baolin; HUA Zezhao; LI Chuan; WU Zhengzheng

    2007-01-01

    Freeze-drying of human red blood cells has a potential important application for blood transfusion.The aim of this study was to investigate the effects ofintracellular trehalose on the survival of red blood cells after freeze-drying and rehydration.Fresh red blood cells were incubated in trehalose solutions of various concentrations at 37℃ for 7 h following freeze-drying.Polyvinylpyrrolidone,Trehalose,sodium citrate,and human serum albumin were used as extracellular protective agents for the freeze-drying of red blood cells.The results indicated that the intracellular trehalose concentration was increased with increasing concentration of extracellular trehalose solution,and the maximum concen tration of intracellular trehalose reached 35 mmol/L.The viability of freeze-dried red blood cells increased with the increment of intracellular trehalose concentration.

  15. Substantiation of Reference Method For Determining Concrete’s Freeze-Thaw Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolskiy, S.; Pertseva, O.

    2017-01-01

    It has been analytically proved that using concrete’s rate of set ε as a measure of damage, instead of decreasing of tensile strength R, increases freeze-thaw resistance’s accuracy of estimation a lot under otherwise equal conditions by the time of freeze-thaw cycling. Also it has been experimentally shown that ratio of relative decreasing R to ε in direction, perpendicular to compression, is assumed to be independent on values R and ε for a given concrete and on the ways of achieving them during mechanical or freeze-thaw cycling. Taking this into account patented methods for estimation of concrete’s freeze-thaw resistance as per values R and ε received after freezing and thawing cycles of some specimens and their postliminary failure by linear compression was substantiated.

  16. Lattice QCD results on cumulant ratios at freeze-out

    CERN Document Server

    Karsch, Frithjof

    2016-01-01

    Ratios of cumulants of net proton-number fluctuations measured by the STAR Collaboration show strong deviations from a skellam distribution, which should describe thermal properties of cumulant ratios, if proton-number fluctuations are generated in equilibrium and a hadron resonance gas (HRG) model would provide a suitable description of thermodynamics at the freeze-out temperature. We present some results on sixth order cumulants entering the calculation of the QCD equation of state at non-zero values of the baryon chemical potential (mu_B) and discuss limitations on the applicability of HRG thermodynamics deduced from a comparison between QCD and HRG model calculations of cumulants of conserved charge fluctuations. We show that basic features of the $\\mu_B$-dependence of skewness and kurtosis ratios of net proton-number fluctuations measured by the STAR Collaboration resemble those expected from a O(mu_B^2) QCD calculation of the corresponding net baryon-number cumulant ratios.

  17. Freezing of low energy excitations in charge density wave glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staresinic, D; Zaitsev-Zotov, S V; Baklanov, N I; Biljaković, K

    2008-03-07

    Thermally stimulated discharge current measurements were performed to study slow relaxation processes in two canonical charge density wave systems K(0.3)MoO(3) and o-TaS(3). Two relaxation processes were observed and characterized in each system, corroborating the results of dielectric spectroscopy. Our results are consistent with the scenario of the glass transition on the charge density wave superstructure level. In particular, the results directly prove the previously proposed criterion of charge density wave freezing based on the interplay of charge density wave pinning by impurities and screening by free carriers. In addition, we obtained new information on distribution of relaxation parameters, as well as on nonlinear dielectric response both below and above the threshold field for charge density wave sliding.

  18. MICROSTRUCTURE MODIFICATIONS INDUCED IN SPRUCE WOOD BY FREEZING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bernadett SZMUTKU

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM is amodern, non-invasive method for objective andspecialized image analysis of anatomical materialfeatures at microscopic level. Referring to wood, itoffers the possibility to view in 3D a bunch ofneighboring cells, in all three grain directions.This allows the imaging of modifications thatmight appear in the structure of the wood cellmembrane (e.g. micro-fissures caused by differentfactors, including temperature variations. This paperpresents the results of the SEM analysis performedon European spruce (Picea abies samples, cut fromboards which were subjected to freezing and thawingunder different conditions of temperature variationand time of exposure.The main aim of this research was to reveal theconditions which determine the occurrence of microfissuresin the cell wall and consequently lead tostrength losses in wood.

  19. Spin dynamics and spin freezing at ferromagnetic quantum phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmakat, P.; Wagner, M.; Ritz, R.; Bauer, A.; Brando, M.; Deppe, M.; Duncan, W.; Duvinage, C.; Franz, C.; Geibel, C.; Grosche, F. M.; Hirschberger, M.; Hradil, K.; Meven, M.; Neubauer, A.; Schulz, M.; Senyshyn, A.; Süllow, S.; Pedersen, B.; Böni, P.; Pfleiderer, C.

    2015-07-01

    We report selected experimental results on the spin dynamics and spin freezing at ferromagnetic quantum phase transitions to illustrate some of the most prominent escape routes by which ferromagnetic quantum criticality is avoided in real materials. In the transition metal Heusler compound Fe2TiSn we observe evidence for incipient ferromagnetic quantum criticality. High pressure studies in MnSi reveal empirical evidence for a topological non-Fermi liquid state without quantum criticality. Single crystals of the hexagonal Laves phase compound Nb1- y Fe2+ y provide evidence of a ferromagnetic to spin density wave transition as a function of slight compositional changes. Last but not least, neutron depolarisation imaging in CePd1- x Rh x underscore evidence taken from the bulk properties of the formation of a Kondo cluster glass.

  20. Spacecraft Radiator Freeze Protection Using a Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Schunk, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    An active thermal control system architecture has been modified to include a regenerative heat exchanger (regenerator) inboard of the radiator. Rather than using a radiator bypass valve a regenerative heat exchanger is placed inboard of the radiators. A regenerator cold side bypass valve is used to set the return temperature. During operation, the regenerator bypass flow is varied, mixing cold radiator return fluid and warm regenerator outlet fluid to maintain the system setpoint. At the lowest heat load for stable operation, the bypass flow is closed off, sending all of the flow through the regenerator. This lowers the radiator inlet temperature well below the system set-point while maintaining full flow through the radiators. By using a regenerator bypass flow control to maintain system setpoint, the required minimum heat load to avoid radiator freezing can be reduced by more than half compared to a radiator bypass system.