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Sample records for francisella tularensis lipopolysaccharide

  1. Francisella tularensis Bacteremia

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    Haristoy, X.; Lozniewski, A.; Tram, C.; Simeon, D.; Bevanger, L.; Lion, C.

    2003-01-01

    Bacteremia caused by Francisella tularensis is rare and has been reported mainly in the United States and infrequently in Europe. We report herein the first case of bacteremic F. tularensis pneumonia in an immunocompetent individual in southern Europe. PMID:12791928

  2. Regulation of Francisella tularensis Virulence

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    Shipan eDai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is one of the most virulent bacteria known and a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Category A select agent. It is able to infect a variety of animals and insects and can persist in the environment, thus Francisella spp. must be able to survive in diverse environmental niches. However, F. tularensis has a surprising dearth of sensory and regulatory factors. Recent advancements in the field have identified new functions of encoded transcription factors and greatly expanded our understanding of virulence gene regulation. Here we review the current knowledge of environmental adaptation by F. tularensis, its transcriptional regulators and their relationship to animal virulence.

  3. Genetic manipulation of Francisella tularensis

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    Xhavit eZogaj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes the disease tularemia. F. tularensis subsp. tularensis causes the most severe disease in humans and has been classified as a select A agent and potential bioweapon. There is currently no vaccine approved for human use, making genetic manipulation of this organism critical to unraveling the genetic basis of pathogenesis and developing countermeasures against tularemia. The development of genetic techniques applicable to F. tularensis have lagged behind those routinely used for other bacteria, primarily due to lack of research and the restricted nature of the biocontainment required for studying this pathogen. However, in recent years, genetic techniques, such as transposon mutagenesis and targeted gene disruption, have been developed, that have had a dramatic impact on our understanding of the genetic basis of F. tularensis virulence. In this review, we describe some of the methods developed for genetic manipulation of F. tularensis.

  4. Mechanisms of heme utilization by Francisella tularensis.

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    Helena Lindgren

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent facultative intracellular pathogen causing the severe disease tularemia in mammals. As for other bacteria, iron is essential for its growth but very few mechanisms for iron acquisition have been identified. Here, we analyzed if and how F. tularensis can utilize heme, a major source of iron in vivo. This is by no means obvious since the bacterium lacks components of traditional heme-uptake systems. We show that SCHU S4, the prototypic strain of subspecies tularensis, grew in vitro with heme as the sole iron source. By screening a SCHU S4 transposon insertion library, 16 genes were identified as important to efficiently utilize heme, two of which were required to avoid heme toxicity. None of the identified genes appeared to encode components of a potential heme-uptake apparatus. Analysis of SCHU S4 deletion mutants revealed that each of the components FeoB, the siderophore system, and FupA, contributed to the heme-dependent growth. In the case of the former two systems, iron acquisition was impaired, whereas the absence of FupA did not affect iron uptake but led to abnormally high binding of iron to macromolecules. Overall, the present study demonstrates that heme supports growth of F. tularensis and that the requirements for the utilization are highly complex and to some extent novel.

  5. A 52 Kilodalton Protein Vaccine Candidate for Francisella tularensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    du vaccin vivant F. tularensis (LVS). Soixante pourcent (60%) des souris vaccindes ont survdcu la dose ltale multiple alors que toutes les souris non...le lysat des cellules de cultures vivantes du vaccin vivant F. tularensis. Plusieurs composants de Francisella tularensis ont dt6 identifids par cet...antiserum. Le s6rum de souris provenant de souris vaccin6es avec F. tularensis non- vivant n’a pas identifid ces composants. A partir de ces prot6ines

  6. Molecular Method for Discrimination between Francisella tularensis and Francisella-Like Endosymbionts▿

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    Escudero, Raquel; Toledo, A.; Gil, Horacio; Kovácsová, Katarina; Rodríguez-Vargas, Manuela; Jado, Isabel; García-Amil, Cristina; Lobo, Bruno; Bhide, Mangesh; Anda, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    Environmental studies on the distribution of Francisella spp. are hampered by the frequency of Francisella-like endosymbionts that can produce a misleading positive result. A new, efficient molecular method for detection of Francisella tularensis and its discrimination from Francisella-like endosymbionts, as well as two variants associated with human disease (unusual F. tularensis strain FnSp1 and F. tularensis subsp. novicida-like strain 3523), is described. The method is highly specific and sensitive, detecting up to one plasmid copy or 10 genome equivalents. PMID:18650358

  7. Virulence differences among Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis clades in mice.

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    Claudia R Molins

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis (type A and holarctica (type B are of clinical importance in causing tularemia. Molecular typing methods have further separated type A strains into three genetically distinct clades, A1a, A1b and A2. Epidemiological analyses of human infections in the United States suggest that A1b infections are associated with a significantly higher mortality rate as compared to infections caused by A1a, A2 and type B. To determine if genetic differences as defined by molecular typing directly correlate with differences in virulence, A1a, A1b, A2 and type B strains were compared in C57BL/6 mice. Here we demonstrate significant differences between survival curves for infections caused by A1b versus A1a, A2 and type B, with A1b infected mice dying earlier than mice infected with A1a, A2 or type B; these results were conserved among multiple strains. Differences were also detected among type A clades as well as between type A clades and type B with respect to bacterial burdens, and gross anatomy in infected mice. Our results indicate that clades defined within F. tularensis subsp. tularensis by molecular typing methods correlate with virulence differences, with A1b strains more virulent than A1a, A2 and type B strains. These findings indicate type A strains are not equivalent with respect to virulence and have important implications for public health as well as basic research programs.

  8. Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida isolated from a human in Arizona

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    Birdsell Dawn N

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Francisella tularensis is the etiologic agent of tularemia and is classified as a select agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Currently four known subspecies of F. tularensis that differ in virulence and geographical distribution are recognized:tularensis (type A, holarctica (type B, mediasiatica, and novicida. Because of the Select Agent status and differences in virulence and geographical location, the molecular analysis of any clinical case of tularemia is of particular interest. We analyzed an unusual Francisella clinical isolate from a human infection in Arizona using multiple DNA-based approaches. Findings We report that the isolate is F. tularensis subsp. novicida, a subspecies that is rarely isolated. Conclusion The rarity of this novicida subspecies in clinical settings makes each case study important for our understanding of its role in disease and its genetic relationship with other F. tularensis subspecies.

  9. Francisella tularensis detection using magnetic labels and a magnetic biosensor based on frequency mixing

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    Meyer, Martin H.F. [Institute for Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany); Krause, Hans-Joachim [Institute of Bio-and Nanosystems (IBN-2), Research Center Juelich (Germany); Hartmann, Markus [Institute for Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany); Miethe, Peter [SENOVA GmbH, Jena (Germany); Oster, Juergen [chemagen GmbH, Baesweiler (Germany); Keusgen, Michael [Institute for Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany)]. E-mail: Keusgen@staff.uni-marburg.de

    2007-04-15

    A biosensor that uses resonant coils with a special frequency-mixing technique and magnetic beads as detectable labels has been established for the detection of Francisella tularensis, the causative agent for tularemia. The detection principle is based on a sandwich immunoassay using an anti-Ft antibody for immunofiltration immobilized to ABICAP[reg] polyethylene filters, and biotinylated with streptavidin-coated magnetic beads as labels. The linear detection range of this biosensor was found to be 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} cfu F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) per ml. Tested sample matrices were physiological PBS buffer and rabbit serum.

  10. Modelling early events in Francisella tularensis pathogenesis

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    Grant eLythe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Computational models can provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of infection and be used as investigative tools to support development of medical treatments. We develop a stochastic, within-host, computational model of the infection process in the BALB/c mouse, following inhalational exposure to Francisella tularensis SCHU S4. The model is mechanistic and governed by a small number of experimentally verifiable parameters. Given an initial dose, the model generates bacterial load profiles corresponding to those produced experimentally, with a doubling time of approximately 5 hours during the first 48 hours of infection. Analytical approximations for the mean number of bacteria in phagosomes and cytosols for the first twenty-four hours post-infection are derived and used to verify the stochastic model. In our description of the dynamics of macrophage infection, the number of bacteria released per rupturing macrophage is a geometrically-distributed random variable. When combined with doubling time, this provides a distribution for the time taken for infected macrophages to rupture and release their intracellular bacteria. The mean and variance of these distributions are determined by model parameters with a precise biological interpretation, providing new mechanistic insights into the determinants of immune and bacterial kinetics. Insights into the dynamics of macrophage suppression and activation gained by the model can be used to explore the potential benefits of interventions that stimulate macrophage activation.

  11. Geographic Differentiation of Francisella Tularensis using Molecular Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    Medicina Veterinaria , 1998. 15: p. 418-423. 32. de la Puente-Redondo, V.A., et al., Comparison of different PCR approaches for typing of Francisella...Department of Animal Health, Facultad de Veterinaria , Leon, Spain, 4 for contribution of his entire F. tularensis strain DNA collection. I thank Dr

  12. Francisella tularensis endocarditis: two case reports and a literature review.

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    Gaci, Rostane; Alauzet, Corentine; Selton-Suty, Christine; Lozniewski, Alain; Pulcini, Céline; May, Thierry; Goehringer, François

    2017-02-01

    We report the first two cases of infective endocarditis caused by Francisella tularensis in Europe (two cases have previously been reported outside Europe). We suggest clinicians should consider tularemia as a possible diagnosis in endemic regions in cases of culture-negative endocarditis.

  13. Water as Source of Francisella tularensis Infection in Humans, Turkey.

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    Kilic, Selcuk; Birdsell, Dawn N; Karagöz, Alper; Çelebi, Bekir; Bakkaloglu, Zekiye; Arikan, Muzaffer; Sahl, Jason W; Mitchell, Cedar; Rivera, Andrew; Maltinsky, Sara; Keim, Paul; Üstek, Duran; Durmaz, Rıza; Wagner, David M

    2015-12-01

    Francisella tularensis DNA extractions and isolates from the environment and humans were genetically characterized to elucidate environmental sources that cause human tularemia in Turkey. Extensive genetic diversity consistent with genotypes from human outbreaks was identified in environmental samples and confirmed water as a source of human tularemia in Turkey.

  14. Preservation of viable Francisella tularensis for forensic analysis

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    Valentine, Nancy B.; Wunschel, Sharon C.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Straub, Tim M.; Wahl, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    As a preservation solution, (1%) ammonium chloride may be preferred over other conventionally used storage solutions because of its compatibility with analytical techniques such as Mass Spectrometry. In this study, ammonium chloride performed as well or better than phosphate buffered saline with Tween or Butterfields/Tween for preserving Francisella tularensis novicida.

  15. The Role and Mechanism of Erythrocyte Invasion by Francisella tularensis

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    Deanna M. Schmitt

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is an extremely virulent bacterium that can be transmitted naturally by blood sucking arthropods. During mammalian infection, F. tularensis infects numerous types of host cells, including erythrocytes. As erythrocytes do not undergo phagocytosis or endocytosis, it remains unknown how F. tularensis invades these cells. Furthermore, the consequence of inhabiting the intracellular space of red blood cells (RBCs has not been determined. Here, we provide evidence indicating that residing within an erythrocyte enhances the ability of F. tularensis to colonize ticks following a blood meal. Erythrocyte residence protected F. tularensis from a low pH environment similar to that of gut cells of a feeding tick. Mechanistic studies revealed that the F. tularensis type VI secretion system (T6SS was required for erythrocyte invasion as mutation of mglA (a transcriptional regulator of T6SS genes, dotU, or iglC (two genes encoding T6SS machinery severely diminished bacterial entry into RBCs. Invasion was also inhibited upon treatment of erythrocytes with venom from the Blue-bellied black snake (Pseudechis guttatus, which aggregates spectrin in the cytoskeleton, but not inhibitors of actin polymerization and depolymerization. These data suggest that erythrocyte invasion by F. tularensis is dependent on spectrin utilization which is likely mediated by effectors delivered through the T6SS. Our results begin to elucidate the mechanism of a unique biological process facilitated by F. tularensis to invade erythrocytes, allowing for enhanced colonization of ticks.

  16. Francisella tularensis as a potential agent of bioterrorism?

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    Maurin, Max

    2015-02-01

    Francisella tularensis is a category A bioterrorism agent. It is the etiological agent of tularemia, a zoonotic disease found throughout the northern hemisphere. The intentional spread of F. tularensis aerosols would probably lead to severe and often fatal pneumonia cases, but also secondary cases from contaminated animals and environments. We are not ready to face such a situation. No vaccine is currently available. A few antibiotics are active against F. tularensis, but strains resistant to these antibiotics could be used in the context of bioterrorism. We need new therapeutic strategies to fight against category A bioterrorism agents, including development of new drugs inhibiting F. tularensis growth and/or virulence, or enhancing the host response to infection by this pathogen.

  17. A novel nanoprobe for the sensitive detection of Francisella tularensis

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    Kim, Ji-eun; Seo, Youngmin; Jeong, Yoon [Department of Bionano Technology, Graduate School, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Mintai P. [Center for Biomaterials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jangsun [Department of Bionano Technology, Graduate School, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choo, Jaebum; Hong, Jong Wook [Department of Bionano Technology, Graduate School, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bionano Engineering, Hanyang University ERICA, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Jun Ho; Rhie, Gi-eun [Division of High-risk Pathogen Research, Center for Infectious Disease, Korea National Institute of Health, Cheongju 363-951 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jonghoon, E-mail: jonghchoi@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Bionano Technology, Graduate School, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bionano Engineering, Hanyang University ERICA, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • We prepare apoferritin nanoprobes decorated with antibodies and nanoparticles. • We examine nanoprobes for the sensitive detection of Francisella tularensis. • 10-fold decrease of minimum concentration of pathogen was achieved. • Simultaneous detection of multiple high-risk pathogens was obtained. - Abstract: Francisella tularensis is a human zoonotic pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia, a severe infectious disease. Given the extreme infectivity of F. tularensis and its potential to be used as a biological warfare agent, a fast and sensitive detection method is highly desirable. Herein, we construct a novel detection platform composed of two units: (1) Magnetic beads conjugated with multiple capturing antibodies against F. tularensis for its simple and rapid separation and (2) Genetically-engineered apoferritin protein constructs conjugated with multiple quantum dots and a detection antibody against F. tularensis for the amplification of signal. We demonstrate a 10-fold increase in the sensitivity relative to traditional lateral flow devices that utilize enzyme-based detection methods. We ultimately envision the use of our novel nanoprobe detection platform in future applications that require the highly-sensitive on-site detection of high-risk pathogens.

  18. Francisella tularensis metabolism and its relation to virulence

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    Karin Lederballe Meibom

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative bacterium capable of causing the zoonotic disease tularaemia in a large number of mammalian species and in arthropods. F. tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that infects and replicates in vivo mainly inside macrophages. During its systemic dissemination, F. tularensis must cope with very different life conditions (such as survival in different target organs or tissues and/or survival in the blood stream… and may thus encounter a broad variety of carbon substrates, nitrogen, phosphor and sulfur sources, as well as very low concentrations of essential ions. The development of recent genome-wide genetic screens have led to the identification of hundreds of genes participating to variable extents to Francisella virulence. Remarkably, an important proportion of the genes identified are related to metabolic and nutritional functions. However, the relationship between nutrition and the in vivo life cycle of F. tularensis is yet poorly understood. In this review, we will address the importance of metabolism and nutrition for F. tularensis pathogenesis, focusing specifically on amino acid and carbohydrate requirements.

  19. The subversion of the immune system by Francisella tularensis

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    Catharine eBosio

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent bacterial pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. Perhaps the most impressive feature of this bacterium is its ability to cause lethal disease following inoculation of as few as 15 organisms. This remarkable virulence is, in part, attributed to the ability of this microorganism to evade, disrupt and modulate host immune responses. The objective of this review is to discuss the mechanisms utilized by F. tularensis to evade and inhibit innate and adaptive immune responses. The capability of F. tularensis to interfere with developing immunity in the host was appreciated decades ago. Early studies in humans were the first to demonstrate the ability of F. tularensis to suppress innate immunity. This work noted that humans suffering from tularemia failed to respond to a secondary challenge of endotoxin isolated from unrelated bacteria. Further, anecdotal observations of individuals becoming repeatedly infected with virulent strains of F. tularensis suggests that this bacterium also interferes with the generation of adequate adaptive immunity. Recent advances utilizing the mouse model for in vivo studies and human cells for in vitro work have identified specific bacterial and host compounds that play a role in mediating ubiquitous suppression of the host immune response. Compilation of this work will undoubtedly aid in enhancing our understanding of the myriad of mechanisms utilized by virulent F. tularensis for successful infection, colonization and pathogenesis in the mammalian host.

  20. ELISA Detection of Francisella tularensis using Polyclonaland Monoclonal Antibodies

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    Miroslav Pohanka

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The mouse monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were produced for the detection of intracellular pathogenand potential warfare agent Francisella tularensis. Antibody titers obtained were 1:640 for polyclonal antibodiesand 1:320 for monoclonal antibodies. Both antibodies were used in the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbentassay (ELISA found to detect F. tularensis whole cells. The limit of detection was 5.4×106 CFU/ml for polyclonalantibodies and 6.9×106 CFU/ml for monoclonal antibodies. The value sample could  be distinguished from anyconcentration of another gram-negative bacterium: Escherichia coli.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(5, pp.698-702, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1693

  1. Differential Substrate Usage and Metabolic Fluxes in Francisella tularensis Subspecies holarctica and Francisella novicida

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    Fan Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is an intracellular pathogen for many animals causing the infectious disease, tularemia. Whereas F. tularensis subsp. holarctica is highly pathogenic for humans, F. novicida is almost avirulent for humans, but virulent for mice. In order to compare metabolic fluxes between these strains, we performed 13C-labeling experiments with F. tularensis subsp. holarctica wild type (beaver isolate, F. tularensis subsp. holarctica strain LVS, or F. novicida strain U112 in complex media containing either [U-13C6]glucose, [1,2-13C2]glucose, [U-13C3]serine, or [U-13C3]glycerol. GC/MS-based isotopolog profiling of amino acids, polysaccharide-derived glucose, free fructose, amino sugars derived from the cell wall, fatty acids, 3-hydroxybutyrate, lactate, succinate and malate revealed uptake and metabolic usage of all tracers under the experimental conditions with glucose being the major carbon source for all strains under study. The labeling patterns of the F. tularensis subsp. holarctica wild type were highly similar to those of the LVS strain, but showed remarkable differences to the labeling profiles of the metabolites from the F. novicida strain. Glucose was directly used for polysaccharide and cell wall biosynthesis with higher rates in F. tularensis subsp. holarctica or metabolized, with higher rates in F. novicida, via glycolysis and the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP. Catabolic turnover of glucose via gluconeogenesis was also observed. In all strains, Ala was mainly synthesized from pyruvate, although no pathway from pyruvate to Ala is annotated in the genomes of F. tularensis and F. novicida. Glycerol efficiently served as a gluconeogenetic substrate in F. novicida, but only less in the F. tularensis subsp. holarctica strains. In any of the studied strains, serine did not serve as a major substrate and was not significantly used for gluconeogenesis under the experimental conditions. Rather, it was only utilized, at

  2. Indigenous Infection with Francisella tularensis holarctica in The Netherlands

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    Boulos Maraha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here the first case of indigenous tularemia detected in The Netherlands, a nonendemic country, since 1953. Whole genome DNA sequence analysis assigned the isolate BD11-00177 to the genomic group B.FTNF002-00, which previously has been exclusively reported from Spain, France, Italy, Switzerland, and Germany. The patient had not been abroad for years, which implies that this is an indigenous infection. The current case might predict an upcoming distribution of Francisella tularensis holarctica genomic group B.FTNF002-00 in Europe.

  3. The Francisella tularensis proteome and its recognition by antibodies

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    Sara L.N. Kilmury

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of a spectrum of diseases collectively known as tularemia. The extreme virulence of the pathogen in humans, combined with the low infectious dose and the ease of dissemination by aerosol have led to concerns about its abuse as a bioweapon. Until recently, nothing was known about the virulence mechanisms and even now, there is still a relatively poor understanding of pathogen virulence. Completion of increasing numbers of Francisella genome sequences, combined with comparative genomics and proteomics studies, are contributing to the knowledge in this area. Tularemia may be treated with antibiotics, but there is currently no licensed vaccine. An attenuated strain, the Live Vaccine Strain (LVS has been used to vaccinate military and at risk laboratory personnel, but safety concerns mean that it is unlikely to be licensed by the FDA for general use. Little is known about the protective immunity induced by vaccination with LVS, in humans or animals models. Immunoproteomics studies with sera from infected humans or vaccinated mouse strains, are being used in gel based or proteome microarray approaches to give insight into the humoral immune response. In addition, these data have the potential to be exploited in the identification of new diagnostic or protective antigens, the design of next generation live vaccine strains, and the development of subunit vaccines. Herein, we briefly review the current knowledge from Francisella comparative proteomics studies and then focus upon the findings from immunoproteomics approaches.

  4. CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotides protect mice from Burholderia pseudomallei but not Francisella tularensis Schu 54 aersols

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    2010-01-01

    CpG ODN 10103 performs comparably in mice to CpG ODN 7909 (5’-TCGTCGTTTTGTCGTTTTGTCGTT-3’), which was previously reported to protect the BALB/c mice...SHORT REPORT Open Access CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotides protect mice from Burkholderia pseudomallei but not Francisella tularensis Schu S4 aerosols...that CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODN) protect mice from various bacterial pathogens, including Burkholderia pseudomallei and Francisella tularensis

  5. Host–pathogen interactions and immune evasion strategies in Francisella tularensis pathogenicity

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    Steiner DJ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Don J Steiner, Yoichi Furuya, Dennis W Metzger Center for Immunology and Microbial Disease, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY, USA Abstract: Francisella tularensis is an intracellular Gram-negative bacterium that causes life-threatening tularemia. Although the prevalence of natural infection is low, F. tularensis remains a tier I priority pathogen due to its extreme virulence and ease of aerosol dissemination. F. tularensis can infect a host through multiple routes, including the intradermal and respiratory routes. Respiratory infection can result from a very small inoculum (ten organisms or fewer and is the most lethal form of infection. Following infection, F. tularensis employs strategies for immune evasion that delay the immune response, permitting systemic distribution and induction of sepsis. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of F. tularensis in an immunological context, with emphasis on the host response and bacterial evasion of that response. Keywords: LVS, Schu S4, tularemia, host immunity, Francisella tularensis

  6. Draft genome sequence of Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica BD11-00177

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    Coolen, J.P.M.; Sjödin, A.; Maraha, B.; Hajer, G.F.; Forsman, M.; Verspui, E.; Frenay, H.M.E.; Notermans, D.W.; Vries, M.C. de; Reubsaet, F.A.G.; Paauw, A.; Roeselers, G.

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium in the class Gammaproteobacteria. This strain is of interest because it is the etiologic agent of tularemia and a highly virulent category A biothreat agent. Here we describe the draft genome sequence and annotation of Francisella tular

  7. Genome-wide DNA microarray analysis of Francisella tularensis strains demonstrates extensive genetic conservation within the species but identifies regions that are unique to the highly virulent F. tularensis subsp. tularensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuijsen, M.P.; Larsson, P.; Johansson, A.; Byström, M.; Eriksson, U.; Larsson, E.; Prior, R.G.; Sjöstedt, A.; Titball, R.W.; Forsman, M.

    2003-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a potent pathogen and a possible bioterrorism agent. Little is known, however, to explain the molecular basis for its virulence and the distinct differences in virulence found between the four recognized subspecies, F. tularensis subsp. tularensis, F. tularensis subsp. medi

  8. Detection of Francisella tularensis-specific antibodies in patients with tularemia by a novel competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

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    Sharma, Neekun; Hotta, Akitoyo; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Fujita, Osamu; Uda, Akihiko; Morikawa, Shigeru; Yamada, Akio; Tanabayashi, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    A novel competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) was developed and evaluated for detection of antibodies against Francisella tularensis in humans. The assay is based on the ability of serum antibodies to inhibit the binding of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide antigens. The assay was evaluated using serum samples of tularemia patients, inactivated F. tularensis-immunized rabbits, and F. tularensis-infected mice. Antibodies against F. tularensis were successfully detected in serum samples of tularemia patients as well as the immunized and infected animals. The cELISA method was compared to indirect ELISA (iELISA) and the commonly used microagglutination test (MA) using serum samples of 19 tularemia patients and 50 healthy individuals. The sensitivity and specificity of cELISA were 93.9 and 96.1%, respectively, in comparison to the iELISA. MA was less sensitive than cELISA with a sensitivity and specificity of only 81.8 and 98.0%, respectively. A high degree of correlation (R(2) = 0.8226) was observed between cELISA and iELISA results. The novel cELISA developed in this study appears to be highly sensitive and specific for serodiagnosis of human tularemia. The potential of the MAb-based cELISA to be used in both human and animal samples emphasizes its usefulness for serological survey of tularemia among multiple animal species.

  9. Environmental and intracellular regulation of Francisella tularensis ripA

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    Taft-Benz Sharon

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent, facultative intracellular pathogen and the etiologic agent of the zoonotic disease Tularemia. RipA is a cytoplasmic membrane protein that is conserved among Francisella species and is required for intracellular growth. F. tularensis ripA deletion mutants escape the phagosome of infected cells, but unlike wild type organisms fail to replicate in the host cell cytoplasm. Results Further analysis of ripA with respect to environmental effects on the growth of mutant strains and expression levels revealed that RipA is required for optimal growth at pH 7.5 but not pH 6.5. Using a combination of RT-PCR, ripA-lacZ transcriptional and translational fusions, and a RipA-tetracysteine tag fusion protein we found that both ripA transcription and RipA protein levels were elevated in organisms grown at pH 7.5 as compared to organisms grown at pH 5.5. A number of genes, including iglA, that are required for intracellular growth are regulated by the transcriptional regulators MglA and SspA, and are induced upon infection of host cells. We quantified ripA and iglA expression at different stages of intracellular growth and found that the expression of each increased between 1 and 6 hours post infection. Given the similar intracellular expression patterns of ripA and iglA and that MglA and SspA are positive regulators of iglA we tested the impact of mglA and sspA deletions on ripA and iglA expression. In the deletion mutant strains iglA expression was reduced dramatically as expected, however ripA expression was increased over 2-fold. Conclusion Expression of ripA is required for growth at neutral pH, is pH sensitive, and is responsive to the intracellular environment. The intracellular expression pattern of ripA coincided with iglA, which is positively regulated by MglA and SspA. However, in contrast to their positive impact on iglA expression, MglA and SspA negatively impacted ripA expression in

  10. Small molecule control of virulence gene expression in Francisella tularensis.

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    James C Charity

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In Francisella tularensis, the SspA protein family members MglA and SspA form a complex that associates with RNA polymerase (RNAP to positively control the expression of virulence genes critical for the intramacrophage growth and survival of the organism. Although the association of the MglA-SspA complex with RNAP is evidently central to its role in controlling gene expression, the molecular details of how MglA and SspA exert their effects are not known. Here we show that in the live vaccine strain of F. tularensis (LVS, the MglA-SspA complex works in concert with a putative DNA-binding protein we have called PigR, together with the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp, to regulate the expression of target genes. In particular, we present evidence that MglA, SspA, PigR and ppGpp regulate expression of the same set of genes, and show that mglA, sspA, pigR and ppGpp null mutants exhibit similar intramacrophage growth defects and are strongly attenuated for virulence in mice. We show further that PigR interacts directly with the MglA-SspA complex, suggesting that the central role of the MglA and SspA proteins in the control of virulence gene expression is to serve as a target for a transcription activator. Finally, we present evidence that ppGpp exerts its effects by promoting the interaction between PigR and the RNAP-associated MglA-SspA complex. Through its responsiveness to ppGpp, the contact between PigR and the MglA-SspA complex allows the integration of nutritional cues into the regulatory network governing virulence gene expression.

  11. Virulent Type A Francisella tularensis actively suppresses cytokine responses in human monocytes

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    Devyn D Gilette

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative bacterium that can cause the disease tularemia, even upon exposure to low numbers of bacteria. One critical characteristic of Francisella is its ability to dampen or subvert the host immune response. Previous work has shown that monocytes infected with highly virulent F. tularensis subsp. tularensis strain Schu S4 responded with a general pattern of quantitatively reduced pro-inflammatory signaling pathway genes and cytokine production in comparison to those infected with the less virulent related F. novicida. However, it has been unclear whether the virulent Schu S4 was merely evading or actively suppressing monocyte responses. By using mixed infection assays with F. tularensis and F. novicida, we show that F. tularensis actively suppresses monocyte pro-inflammatory responses. Additional experiments show that this suppression occurs in a dose-dependent manner and is dependent upon the viability of F. tularensis. Importantly, F. tularensis was able to suppress pro-inflammatory responses to earlier infections with F. novicida. These results lend support that F. tularensis actively dampens human monocyte responses and this likely contributes to its enhanced pathogenicity.

  12. Molecular Investigation of Francisella-Like Endosymbiont in Ticks and Francisella tularensis in Ixodid Ticks and Mosquitoes in Turkey.

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    Duzlu, Onder; Yildirim, Alparslan; Inci, Abdullah; Gumussoy, Kadir Semih; Ciloglu, Arif; Onder, Zuhal

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the molecular prevalence of Francisella-like endosymbionts (FLEs) and Francisella tularensis in ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) and mosquitoes in Turkey. Genomic DNA pools were constructed from a total of 1477 adult hard ticks of Rhipicephalus (Rh.) annulatus, Rh. turanicus, Rh. sanguineus, Rh. bursa, Haemaphysalis (Hae.) parva, Hae. sulcata, Hyalomma marginatum marginatum, H. anatolicum anatolicum, H. anatolicum excavatum, H. detritum detritum, H. dromedarii, Dermacentor marginatus, and Ixodes ricinus species, which were collected from several barns, cattle, and people. Genomic DNA was also extracted from pools consisting of 6203 adult female mosquito species belonging to Aedes vexans, Culex (Cx.) pipiens, Cx. hortensis, Cx. theileri, Culiseta annulata, and Anopheles maculipennis species. Conventional PCR and TaqMan probe-based real- time PCR targeting the 16S rRNA gene for FLEs and the lpnA gene for F. tularensis, respectively, were performed on the DNA isolates obtained. FLEs and F. tularensis were not found in any genomic DNA pools constructed from ixodid ticks and mosquitos. This study represents the first investigation of F. tularensis and FLEs in potential vector ticks and mosquitoes by molecular methods in Turkey. The present study provides useful insights into the molecular epidemiology of F. tularensis and FLEs. One of the major conclusions of the study is that tularemia outbreaks may be essentially due to direct transmission from the environment (especially from water) in Turkey and not to vector-borne transmission.

  13. Innate immune recognition of Francisella tularensis: activation of type-I interferons and the inflammasome

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    Jonathan Wiley Jones

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is an intracellular pathogen that can cause severe disease in a wide range of mammalian hosts. Primarily residing in host macrophages, F. tularensis escapes phagosomal degradation, and replicates in the macrophage cytosol. The macrophage uses a series of pattern recognition receptors to detect conserved microbial molecules from invading pathogens, and initiates an appropriate host response. In the cytosol, F. tularensis is recognized by the inflammasome, a multiprotein complex responsible for the activation of the cysteine protease caspase-1. Caspase-1 activation leads to processing and release of proinflammatory cytokines and host cell death. Here we review recent work on the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation by F. tularensis, and its consequences both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we discuss the coordination between the inflammasome and other cytosolic host responses, and the evidence for F. tularensis virulence factors that suppress inflammasome activation.

  14. A combined enrichment and aptamer pulldown assay for francisella tularensis detection in food and environmental matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamont, Elise A.; Wang, Ping; Enomoto, Shinichiro; Borewicz, Klaudyna; Abdallah, Ahmed; Isaacson, Richard E.; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Kourentzi, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative bacterium and causative agent of tularemia, is categorized as a Class A select agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention due to its ease of dissemination and ability to cause disease. Oropharyngeal and gastrointestinal tularemia may occur due

  15. Comparative genomic characterization of Francisella tularensis strains belonging to low and high virulence subspecies.

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    Mia D Champion

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Tularemia is a geographically widespread, severely debilitating, and occasionally lethal disease in humans. It is caused by infection by a gram-negative bacterium, Francisella tularensis. In order to better understand its potency as an etiological agent as well as its potential as a biological weapon, we have completed draft assemblies and report the first complete genomic characterization of five strains belonging to the following different Francisella subspecies (subsp.: the F. tularensis subsp. tularensis FSC033, F. tularensis subsp. holarctica FSC257 and FSC022, and F. tularensis subsp. novicida GA99-3548 and GA99-3549 strains. Here, we report the sequencing of these strains and comparative genomic analysis with recently available public Francisella sequences, including the rare F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica FSC147 strain isolate from the Central Asian Region. We report evidence for the occurrence of large-scale rearrangement events in strains of the holarctica subspecies, supporting previous proposals that further phylogenetic subdivisions of the Type B clade are likely. We also find a significant enrichment of disrupted or absent ORFs proximal to predicted breakpoints in the FSC022 strain, including a genetic component of the Type I restriction-modification defense system. Many of the pseudogenes identified are also disrupted in the closely related rarely human pathogenic F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica FSC147 strain, including modulator of drug activity B (mdaB (FTT0961, which encodes a known NADPH quinone reductase involved in oxidative stress resistance. We have also identified genes exhibiting sequence similarity to effectors of the Type III (T3SS and components of the Type IV secretion systems (T4SS. One of the genes, msrA2 (FTT1797c, is disrupted in F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica and has recently been shown to mediate bacterial pathogen survival in host organisms. Our findings suggest that in addition to the duplication of

  16. A combined enrichment and aptamer pulldown assay for Francisella tularensis detection in food and environmental matrices.

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    Elise A Lamont

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative bacterium and causative agent of tularemia, is categorized as a Class A select agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention due to its ease of dissemination and ability to cause disease. Oropharyngeal and gastrointestinal tularemia may occur due to ingestion of contaminated food and water. Despite the concern to public health, little research is focused on F. tularensis detection in food and environmental matrices. Current diagnostics rely on host responses and amplification of F. tularensis genetic elements via Polymerase Chain Reaction; however, both tools are limited by development of an antibody response and limit of detection, respectively. During our investigation to develop an improved culture medium to aid F. tularensis diagnostics, we found enhanced F. tularensis growth using the spent culture filtrate. Addition of the spent culture filtrate allowed for increased detection of F. tularensis in mixed cultures of food and environmental matrices. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC/MS analysis identified several unique chemicals within the spent culture supernatant of which carnosine had a matching m/z ratio. Addition of 0.625 mg/mL of carnosine to conventional F. tularensis medium increased the growth of F. tularensis at low inoculums. In order to further enrich F. tularensis cells, we developed a DNA aptamer cocktail to physically separate F. tularensis from other bacteria present in food and environmental matrices. The combined enrichment steps resulted in a detection range of 1-106 CFU/mL (starting inoculums in both soil and lettuce backgrounds. We propose that the two-step enrichment process may be utilized for easy field diagnostics and subtyping of suspected F. tularensis contamination as well as a tool to aid in basic research of F. tularensis ecology.

  17. The use of resazurin as a novel antimicrobial agent against Francisella tularensis

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    Deanna Marie Schmitt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The highly infectious and deadly pathogen, Francisella tularensis, is classified by the CDC as a Category A bioterrorism agent. Inhalation of a single bacterium results in an acute pneumonia with a 30-60% mortality rate without treatment. Due to the prevalence of antibiotic resistance, there is a strong need for new types of antibacterial drugs. Resazurin is commonly used to measure bacterial and eukaryotic cell viability through its reduction to the fluorescent product resorufin. When tested on various bacterial taxa at the recommended concentration of 44 µM, a potent bactericidal effect was observed against various Francisella and Neisseria species, including the human pathogens type A F. tularensis (Schu S4 and N. gonorrhoeae. As low as 4.4 µM resazurin was sufficient for a 10-fold reduction in F. tularensis growth. In broth culture, resazurin was reduced to resorufin by F. tularensis. However, resorufin also suppressed the growth of F. tularensis suggesting that the process of reducing resazurin was not responsible for the observed antimicrobial effect. Replication of F. tularensis in primary human macrophages and non-phagocytic cells was abolished following treatment with 44 μM resazurin indicating this compound could be an effective therapy for tularemia in vivo.

  18. Evidence Suggesting That Francisella tularensis O-Antigen Capsule Contains a Lipid A-Like Molecule That Is Structurally Distinct from the More Abundant Free Lipid A.

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    Jason H Barker

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis, the Gram-negative bacterium that causes tularemia, produces a high molecular weight capsule that is immunologically distinct from Francisella lipopolysaccharide but contains the same O-antigen tetrasaccharide. To pursue the possibility that the capsule of Francisella live vaccine strain (LVS has a structurally unique lipid anchor, we have metabolically labeled Francisella with [14C]acetate to facilitate highly sensitive compositional analysis of capsule-associated lipids. Capsule was purified by two independent methods and yielded similar results. Autoradiographic and immunologic analysis confirmed that this purified material was largely devoid of low molecular weight LPS and of the copious amounts of free lipid A that the Francisellae accumulate. Chemical hydrolysis yielded [14C]-labeled free fatty acids characteristic of Francisella lipid A but with a different molar ratio of 3-OH C18:0 to 3-OH C16:0 and different composition of non-hydroxylated fatty acids (mainly C14:0 rather than C16:0 than that of free Francisella lipid A. Mild acid hydrolysis to induce selective cleavage of KDO-lipid A linkage yielded a [14C]-labeled product that partitioned during Bligh/Dyer extraction and migrated during thin-layer chromatography like lipid A. These findings suggest that the O-antigen capsule of Francisella contains a covalently linked and structurally distinct lipid A species. The presence of a discrete lipid A-like molecule associated with capsule raises the possibility that Francisella selectively exploits lipid A structural heterogeneity to regulate synthesis, transport, and stable bacterial surface association of the O-antigen capsular layer.

  19. Francisella tularensis harvests nutrients derived via ATG5-independent autophagy to support intracellular growth.

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    Shaun Steele

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular pathogen that invades and replicates within numerous host cell types including macrophages, hepatocytes and pneumocytes. By 24 hours post invasion, F. tularensis replicates up to 1000-fold in the cytoplasm of infected cells. To achieve such rapid intracellular proliferation, F. tularensis must scavenge large quantities of essential carbon and energy sources from the host cell while evading anti-microbial immune responses. We found that macroautophagy, a eukaryotic cell process that primarily degrades host cell proteins and organelles as well as intracellular pathogens, was induced in F. tularensis infected cells. F. tularensis not only survived macroautophagy, but optimal intracellular bacterial growth was found to require macroautophagy. Intracellular growth upon macroautophagy inhibition was rescued by supplying excess nonessential amino acids or pyruvate, demonstrating that autophagy derived nutrients provide carbon and energy sources that support F. tularensis proliferation. Furthermore, F. tularensis did not require canonical, ATG5-dependent autophagy pathway induction but instead induced an ATG5-independent autophagy pathway. ATG5-independent autophagy induction caused the degradation of cellular constituents resulting in the release of nutrients that the bacteria harvested to support bacterial replication. Canonical macroautophagy limits the growth of several different bacterial species. However, our data demonstrate that ATG5-independent macroautophagy may be beneficial to some cytoplasmic bacteria by supplying nutrients to support bacterial growth.

  20. Proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins from mice infected with Francisella tularensis ssp novicida

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    Varnum, Susan M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Frevert, Charles; Skerret, Shawn J.; Wunschel, David S.

    2012-07-06

    Francisella tularensis causes the zoonosis tularemia in humans and is one of the most virulent bacterial pathogens. We utilized a global proteomic approach to characterize protein changes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice exposed to one of three organisms, F. tularensis ssp. novicida, an avirulent mutant of F. tularensis ssp. novicida (F.t. novicida-ΔmglA); and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The composition of BALF proteins was altered following infection, including proteins involved in neutrophil activation, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Components of the innate immune response were induced including the acute phase response and the complement system, however the timing of their induction varied. Francisella tularensis ssp. novicida infected mice do not appear to have an effective innate immune response in the first hours of infection, however within 24 hours they show an upregulation of innate immune response proteins. This delayed response is in contrast to P. aeruginosa infected animals which show an early innate immune response. Likewise, F.t. novicida-ΔmglA infection initiates an early innate immune response, however this response is dimished by 24 hours. Finally, this study identifies several candidate biomarkers, including Chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1 or YKL-40) and peroxiredoxin 1, that are associated with F. tularensis ssp. novicida but not P. aeruginosa infection.

  1. Live attenuated Francisella novicida vaccine protects against Francisella tularensis pulmonary challenge in rats and non-human primates.

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    Ping Chu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis causes the disease tularemia. Human pulmonary exposure to the most virulent form, F. tularensis subsp. tularensis (Ftt, leads to high morbidity and mortality, resulting in this bacterium being classified as a potential biothreat agent. However, a closely-related species, F. novicida, is avirulent in healthy humans. No tularemia vaccine is currently approved for human use. We demonstrate that a single dose vaccine of a live attenuated F. novicida strain (Fn iglD protects against subsequent pulmonary challenge with Ftt using two different animal models, Fischer 344 rats and cynomolgus macaques (NHP. The Fn iglD vaccine showed protective efficacy in rats, as did a Ftt iglD vaccine, suggesting no disadvantage to utilizing the low human virulent Francisella species to induce protective immunity. Comparison of specific antibody profiles in vaccinated rat and NHP sera by proteome array identified a core set of immunodominant antigens in vaccinated animals. This is the first report of a defined live attenuated vaccine that demonstrates efficacy against pulmonary tularemia in a NHP, and indicates that the low human virulence F. novicida functions as an effective tularemia vaccine platform.

  2. Interactions of Francisella tularensis with Alveolar Type II Epithelial Cells and the Murine Respiratory Epithelium.

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    Matthew Faron

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is classified as a Tier 1 select agent by the CDC due to its low infectious dose and the possibility that the organism can be used as a bioweapon. The low dose of infection suggests that Francisella is unusually efficient at evading host defenses. Although ~50 cfu are necessary to cause human respiratory infection, the early interactions of virulent Francisella with the lung environment are not well understood. To provide additional insights into these interactions during early Francisella infection of mice, we performed TEM analysis on mouse lungs infected with F. tularensis strains Schu S4, LVS and the O-antigen mutant Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn. For all three strains, the majority of the bacteria that we could detect were observed within alveolar type II epithelial cells at 16 hours post infection. Although there were no detectable differences in the amount of bacteria within an infected cell between the three strains, there was a significant increase in the amount of cellular debris observed in the air spaces of the lungs in the Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn mutant compared to either the Schu S4 or LVS strain. We also studied the interactions of Francisella strains with human AT-II cells in vitro by characterizing the ability of these three strains to invade and replicate within these cells. Gentamicin assay and confocal microscopy both confirmed that F. tularensis Schu S4 replicated robustly within these cells while F. tularensis LVS displayed significantly lower levels of growth over 24 hours, although the strain was able to enter these cells at about the same level as Schu S4 (1 organism per cell, as determined by confocal imaging. The Schu S4 waaY::TrgTn mutant that we have previously described as attenuated for growth in macrophages and mouse virulence displayed interesting properties as well. This mutant induced significant airway inflammation (cell debris and had an attenuated growth phenotype in the human AT-II cells. These

  3. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response: role of bacterial gene expression in temporal regulation of host defense responses.

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    Kathie-Anne Walters

    Full Text Available Pulmonary exposure to Francisella tularensis is associated with severe lung pathology and a high mortality rate. The lack of induction of classical inflammatory mediators, including IL1-β and TNF-α, during early infection has led to the suggestion that F. tularensis evades detection by host innate immune surveillance and/or actively suppresses inflammation. To gain more insight into the host response to Francisella infection during the acute stage, transcriptomic analysis was performed on lung tissue from mice exposed to virulent (Francisella tularensis ssp tularensis SchuS4. Despite an extensive transcriptional response in the lungs of animals as early as 4 hrs post-exposure, Francisella tularensis was associated with an almost complete lack of induction of immune-related genes during the initial 24 hrs post-exposure. This broad subversion of innate immune responses was particularly evident when compared to the pulmonary inflammatory response induced by other lethal (Yersinia pestis and non-lethal (Legionella pneumophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infections. However, the unique induction of a subset of inflammation-related genes suggests a role for dysregulation of lymphocyte function and anti-inflammatory pathways in the extreme virulence of Francisella. Subsequent activation of a classical inflammatory response 48 hrs post-exposure was associated with altered abundance of Francisella-specific transcripts, including those associated with bacterial surface components. In summary, virulent Francisella induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response characterized by temporal regulation of innate immune pathways correlating with altered bacterial gene expression patterns. This study represents the first simultaneous measurement of both host and Francisella transcriptome changes that occur during in vivo infection and identifies potential bacterial virulence factors responsible for regulation of host inflammatory pathways.

  4. Amblyomma americanum as a Bridging Vector for Human Infection with Francisella tularensis.

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    Rinosh J Mani

    Full Text Available The γ-proteobacterium Francisella tularensis causes seasonal tick-transmitted tularemia outbreaks in natural rabbit hosts and incidental infections in humans in the south-central United States. Although Dermacentor variabilis is considered a primary vector for F. tularensis, Amblyomma americanum is the most abundant tick species in this endemic region. A systematic study of F. tularensis colonization of A. americanum was undertaken to better understand its potential to serve as an overwintering reservoir for F. tularensis and as a bridging vector for human infections. Colony-reared A. americanum were artificially fed F. tularensis subspecies holarctica strain LVS via glass capillaries and colonization levels determined. Capillary-fed larva and nymph were initially infected with 10(4 CFU/tick which declined prior to molting for both stages, but rebounded post-molting in nymphs and persisted in 53% at 10(3 to 10(8 CFU/nymph at 168 days post-capillary feeding (longest sampling time in the study. In contrast, only 18% of adults molted from colonized nymphs maintained LVS colonization at 10(1 to 10(5 CFU/adult at 168 days post-capillary feeding (longest sampling time. For adults, LVS initially colonized the gut and disseminated to salivary glands by 24 h and had an ID50 of <5CFU in mice. Francisella tularensis infected the ovaries of gravid females, but transmission to eggs was infrequent and transovarial transmission to hatched larvae was not observed. The prolonged persistence of F. tularensis in A. americanum nymphs supports A. americanum as an overwintering reservoir for F. tularensis from which seasonal epizootics may originate; however, although the rapid dissemination of F. tularensis from gut to salivary glands in adults A. americanum is compatible with intermittent feeding adult males acting as bridging vectors for incidental F. tularensis infections of humans, acquisition of F. tularensis by adults may be unlikely based on adult feeding

  5. Francisella tularensis bacteria associated with feline tularemia in the United States.

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    Larson, Marilynn A; Fey, Paul D; Hinrichs, Steven H; Iwen, Peter C

    2014-12-01

    Tularemia in the United States was examined by reviewing 106 Francisella tularensis isolates, mostly from Nebraska, collected during 1998-2012: 48% of Nebraska cases were cat-associated; 7/8 human cases were caused by subtype A.I. A vaccine is needed to reduce feline-associated tularemia, and cat owners should protect against bites/scratches and limit their pet's outdoor access.

  6. [Maldi-tof ms analysis for yersinia pestis, vibrio cholera, and francisella tularensis identification].

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    Afanas'ev, M V; Mironova, L V; Balakhonov, S V

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies showed that a new technology for the clinical microbiology laboratories, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization--Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-ToF MS), allows fast, accurate, and effective identification of most clinically relevant microorganisms to be implemented. In the present review, we discuss applications of this approach for identification and typing of extremely dangerous pathogens--Yersinia pestis, Vibrio cholera, and Francisella tularensis, including the advantages and disadvantages of the method, sample preparation and biosafety problems.

  7. From the Outside-In: the Francisella tularensis Envelope and Virulence

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    Hannah M. Rowe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly-infectious bacterium that causes the rapid, and often lethal disease, tularemia. Many studies have been performed to identify and characterize the virulence factors that F. tularensis uses to infect a wide variety of hosts and host cell types, evade immune defenses, and induce severe disease and death. This review focuses on the virulence factors that are present in the F. tularensis envelope, including capsule, LPS, outer membrane, periplasm, inner membrane, secretion systems, and various molecules in each of aforementioned sub-compartments. Whereas no single bacterial molecule or molecular complex single-handedly controls F. tularensis virulence, we review here how diverse bacterial systems work in conjunction to subvert the immune system, attach to and invade host cells, alter phagosome/lysosome maturation pathways, replicate in host cells without being detected, inhibit apoptosis, and induce host cell death for bacterial release and infection of adjacent cells. Given that the F. tularensis envelope is the outermost layer of the bacterium, we highlight herein how many of these molecules directly interact with the host to promote infection and disease. These and future envelope studies are important to advance our collective understanding of F. tularensis virulence mechanisms and offer targets for future vaccine development efforts.

  8. Molecular Detection of Persistent Francisella tularensis Subspecies holarctica in Natural Waters

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    T. Broman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tularemia, caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis, where F. tularensis subspecies holarctica has long been the cause of endemic disease in parts of northern Sweden. Despite this, our understanding of the natural life-cycle of the organism is still limited. During three years, we collected surface water samples (n=341 and sediment samples (n=245 in two areas in Sweden with endemic tularemia. Real-time PCR screening demonstrated the presence of F. tularenis lpnA sequences in 108 (32% and 48 (20% of the samples, respectively. The 16S rRNA sequences from those samples all grouped to the species F. tularensis. Analysis of the FtM19InDel region of lpnA-positive samples from selected sampling points confirmed the presence of F. tularensis subspecies holarctica-specific sequences. These sequences were detected in water sampled during both outbreak and nonoutbreak years. Our results indicate that diverse F. tularensis-like organisms, including F. tularensis subsp. holarctica, persist in natural waters and sediments in the investigated areas with endemic tularemia.

  9. Temperature-dependent gentamicin resistance of Francisella tularensis is mediated by uptake modulation

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    Kathleen eLoughman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gentamicin (Gm is an aminoglycoside commonly used to treat bacterial infections such as tularemia – the disease caused by Francisella tularensis. In addition to being pathogenic, F. tularensis is found in environmental niches such as soil where this bacterium likely encounters Gm producers (Micromonospora sp.. Here we show that F. tularensis exhibits increased resistance to Gm at ambient temperature (26°C compared to mammalian body temperature (37°C. To evaluate whether F. tularensis was less permeable to Gm at 26°C, a fluorescent marker [Texas Red (Tr] was conjugated with Gm, yielding Tr-Gm. Bacteria incubated at 26°C showed reduced fluorescence compared to those at 37°C when exposed to Tr-Gm suggesting that uptake of Gm was reduced at 26°C. Unconjugated Gm competitively inhibited uptake of Tr-Gm, demonstrating that this fluorescent compound was taken up similarly to unconjugated Gm. Lysates of F. tularensis bacteria incubated with Gm at 37°C inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli significantly more than lysates from bacteria incubated at 26°C, further indicating reduced uptake at this lower temperature. Other facultative pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes and Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibited increased resistance to Gm at 26°C suggesting that the results generated using F. tularensis may be generalizable to diverse bacteria. Regulation of the uptake of antibiotics provides a mechanism by which facultative pathogens survive alongside antibiotic-producing microbes in nature.

  10. Structure and function of REP34 implicates carboxypeptidase activity in Francisella tularensis host cell invasion.

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    Feld, Geoffrey K; El-Etr, Sahar; Corzett, Michele H; Hunter, Mark S; Belhocine, Kamila; Monack, Denise M; Frank, Matthias; Segelke, Brent W; Rasley, Amy

    2014-10-31

    Francisella tularensis is the etiological agent of tularemia, or rabbit fever. Although F. tularensis is a recognized biothreat agent with broad and expanding geographical range, its mechanism of infection and environmental persistence remain poorly understood. Previously, we identified seven F. tularensis proteins that induce a rapid encystment phenotype (REP) in the free-living amoeba, Acanthamoeba castellanii. Encystment is essential to the pathogen's long term intracellular survival in the amoeba. Here, we characterize the cellular and molecular function of REP34, a REP protein with a mass of 34 kDa. A REP34 knock-out strain of F. tularensis has a reduced ability to both induce encystment in A. castellanii and invade human macrophages. We determined the crystal structure of REP34 to 2.05-Å resolution and demonstrate robust carboxypeptidase B-like activity for the enzyme. REP34 is a zinc-containing monomeric protein with close structural homology to the metallocarboxypeptidase family of peptidases. REP34 possesses a novel topology and substrate binding pocket that deviates from the canonical funnelin structure of carboxypeptidases, putatively resulting in a catalytic role for a conserved tyrosine and distinct S1' recognition site. Taken together, these results identify REP34 as an active carboxypeptidase, implicate the enzyme as a potential key F. tularensis effector protein, and may help elucidate a mechanistic understanding of F. tularensis infection of phagocytic cells.

  11. TLR-dependent control of Francisella tularensis infection and host inflammatory responses.

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    Allison L Abplanalp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia and is classified as a Category A select agent. Recent studies have implicated TLR2 as a critical element in the host protective response to F. tularensis infection, but questions remain about whether TLR2 signaling dominates the response in all circumstances and with all species of Francisella and whether F. tularensis PAMPs are predominantly recognized by TLR2/TLR1 or TLR2/TLR6. To address these questions, we have explored the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs in the host response to infections with F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS and F. tularensis subspecies (subsp. novicida in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: C57BL/6 (B6 control mice and TLR- or MyD88-deficient mice were infected intranasally (i.n. or intradermally (i.d. with F. tularensis LVS or with F. tularensis subsp. novicida. B6 mice survived >21 days following infection with LVS by both routes and survival of TLR1(-/-, TLR4(-/-, and TLR6(-/- mice infected i.n. with LVS was equivalent to controls. Survival of TLR2(-/- and MyD88(-/- mice, however, was significantly reduced compared to B6 mice, regardless of the route of infection or the subspecies of F. tularensis. TLR2(-/- and MyD88(-/- mice also showed increased bacterial burdens in lungs, liver, and spleen compared to controls following i.n. infection. Primary macrophages from MyD88(-/- and TLR2(-/- mice were significantly impaired in the ability to secrete TNF and other pro-inflammatory cytokines upon ex vivo infection with LVS. TNF expression was also impaired in vivo as demonstrated by analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and by in situ immunofluorescent staining. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude from these studies that TLR2 and MyD88, but not TLR4, play critical roles in the innate immune response to F. tularensis infection regardless of the route of infection or the subspecies. Moreover, signaling through TLR2 does not depend exclusively

  12. Experimental Infection of voles with Francisella tularensis indicates their amplification role in tularemia outbreaks.

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    Heidi Rossow

    Full Text Available Tularemia outbreaks in humans have been linked to fluctuations in rodent population density, but the mode of bacterial maintenance in nature is unclear. Here we report on an experiment to investigate the pathogenesis of Francisella tularensis infection in wild rodents, and thereby assess their potential to spread the bacterium. We infected 20 field voles (Microtus agrestis and 12 bank voles (Myodes glareolus with a strain of F. tularensis ssp. holarctica isolated from a human patient. Upon euthanasia or death, voles were necropsied and specimens collected for histological assessment and identification of bacteria by immunohistology and PCR. Bacterial excretion and a rapid lethal clinical course with pathological changes consistent with bacteremia and tissue necrosis were observed in infected animals. The results support a role for voles as an amplification host of F. tularensis, as excreta and, in particular, carcasses with high bacterial burden could serve as a source for environmental contamination.

  13. Identification of two substrates of FTS_1067 protein - An essential virulence factor of Francisella tularensis.

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    Spidlova, Petra; Senitkova, Iva; Link, Marek; Stulik, Jiri

    2016-11-15

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular pathogen with the capacity to infect a variety of hosts including humans. One of the most important proteins involved in F. tularensis virulence and pathogenesis is the protein DsbA. This protein is annotated as a lipoprotein with disulfide oxidoreductase/isomerase activity. Therefore, its interactions with different substrates, including probable virulence factors, to assist in their proper folding are anticipated. We aimed to use the immunopurification approach to find DsbA (gene locus FTS_1067) interacting partners in F. tularensis subsp. holarctica strain FSC200 and compare the identified substrates with proteins which were found in our previous comparative proteome analysis. As a result of our work two FTS_1067 substrates, D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase family protein and HlyD family secretion protein, were identified. Bacterial two-hybrid systems were further used to test their relevance in confirming FTS_1067 protein interactions.

  14. In Vitro Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Francisella tularensis Determined by Broth Microdilution following CLSI Methods.

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    Heine, Henry S; Miller, Lynda; Halasohoris, Stephanie; Purcell, Bret K

    2017-09-01

    In vitro susceptibilities for 47 antibiotics were determined in 30 genetic diverse strains of Francisella tularensis by the broth microdilution method following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods. The F. tularensis strains demonstrated susceptibility to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. There was a distinct difference in macrolide susceptibilities between A and B type strains, as has been noted previously. The establishment and comparison of antibiotic susceptibilities of a diverse but specific set of F. tularensis strains by standardized methods and the establishment of population ranges and MIC50/90 values provide reference information for assessing new antibiotic agents and a baseline to monitor any future emergence of resistance, whether natural or intentional. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Rapid high resolution genotyping of Francisella tularensis by whole genome sequence comparison of annotated genes ("MLST+".

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    Markus H Antwerpen

    Full Text Available The zoonotic disease tularemia is caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis. This pathogen is considered as a category A select agent with potential to be misused in bioterrorism. Molecular typing based on DNA-sequence like canSNP-typing or MLVA has become the accepted standard for this organism. Due to the organism's highly clonal nature, the current typing methods have reached their limit of discrimination for classifying closely related subpopulations within the subspecies F. tularensis ssp. holarctica. We introduce a new gene-by-gene approach, MLST+, based on whole genome data of 15 sequenced F. tularensis ssp. holarctica strains and apply this approach to investigate an epidemic of lethal tularemia among non-human primates in two animal facilities in Germany. Due to the high resolution of MLST+ we are able to demonstrate that three independent clones of this highly infectious pathogen were responsible for these spatially and temporally restricted outbreaks.

  16. Role of pathogenicity determinant protein C (PdpC in determining the virulence of the Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis SCHU.

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    Akihiko Uda

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, is highly pathogenic to humans and animals. However, the SCHU strain of F. tularensis SCHU P0 maintained by passaging in artificial media has been found to be attenuated. To better understand the molecular mechanisms behind the pathogenicity of F. tularensis SCHU, we attempted to isolate virulent bacteria by serial passages in mice. SCHU P5 obtained after 5th passages in mice remained avirulent, while SCHU P9 obtained after 9th passages was completely virulent in mice. Moreover, SCHU P9 grew more efficiently in J774.1 murine macrophages compared with that in the less pathogenic SCHU P0 and P5. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of the whole genomes of SCHU P0, P5, and P9 revealed only 1 nucleotide difference among P0, P5 and P9 in 1 of the 2 copies of pathogenicity determinant protein C (pdpC gene. An adenine residue deletion was observed in the pdpC1 gene of SCHU P0, P5, and P9 and in the pdpC2 gene of SCHU P0, and P5, while P9 was characterized by the wild type pdpC2 gene. Thus, SCHU P0 and P5 expressed only truncated forms of PdpC protein, while SCHU P9 expressed both wild type and truncated versions. To validate the pathogenicity of PdpC, both copies of the pdpC gene in SCHU P9 have been inactivated by Targetron mutagenesis. SCHU P9 mutants with inactivated pdpC gene showed low intracellular growth in J774.1 cells and did not induce severe disease in experimentally infected mice, while virulence of the mutants was restored by complementation with expression of the intact PdpC. These results demonstrate that PdpC is crucial in determining the virulence of F. tularensis SCHU.

  17. Detection of Francisella tularensis in Alaskan Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) and Assessment of a Laboratory Model for Transmission

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    TRIEBENBACH, ALISON N.; VOGL, SIGRID J.; LOTSPEICH-COLE, LEDA; SIKES, DEREK S.; HAPP, GEORGE M.; HUEFFER, KARSTEN

    2013-01-01

    Tularemia is a zoonotic disease caused by the Category A bioterrorism agent Francisella tularensis. In Scandinavia, tularemia transmission by mosquitoes has been widely cited in the literature. We tested >2,500 mosquitoes captured in Alaska and found Francisella DNA in 30% of pooled samples. To examine the potential for transmission of Francisella by mosquitoes, we developed a mosquito model of Francisella infection. Larvae of Anopheles gambiae Giles and Aedes aegypti (L.) readily ingest F. tularensis but do not efficiently transfer infective doses of the bacterium to the pupal or adult stage. After a bloodmeal containing Francisella, adult female An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti retained detectable levels of Francisella DNA for 3 d, but when they took a second bloodmeal, the mammalian host was not infected. This study suggests that although Francisella DNA can be detected in a significant portion of wild-caught mosquitoes, transmission of Francisella is either very inefficient or is species dependent for the Francisella strain or the arthropod vector. PMID:20695280

  18. Identification, characterization and immunogenicity of an O-antigen capsular polysaccharide of Francisella tularensis.

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    Michael A Apicella

    Full Text Available Capsular polysaccharides are important factors in bacterial pathogenesis and have been the target of a number of successful vaccines. Francisella tularensis has been considered to express a capsular antigen but none has been isolated or characterized. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, 11B7, which recognizes the capsular polysaccharide of F. tularensis migrating on Western blot as a diffuse band between 100 kDa and 250 kDa. The capsule stains poorly on SDS-PAGE with silver stain but can be visualized using ProQ Emerald glycoprotein stain. The capsule appears to be highly conserved among strains of F. tularensis as antibody 11B7 bound to the capsule of 14 of 14 F. tularensis type A and B strains on Western blot. The capsular material can be isolated essentially free of LPS, is phenol and proteinase K resistant, ethanol precipitable and does not dissociate in sodium dodecyl sulfate. Immunoelectron microscopy with colloidal gold demonstrates 11B7 circumferentially staining the surface of F. tularensis which is typical of a polysaccharide capsule. Mass spectrometry, compositional analysis and NMR indicate that the capsule is composed of a polymer of the tetrasaccharide repeat, 4-alpha-D-GalNAcAN-(1->4-alpha-D-GalNAcAN-(1->3-beta-D-QuiNAc-(1->2-beta-D-Qui4NFm-(1-, which is identical to the previously described F. tularensis O-antigen subunit. This indicates that the F. tularensis capsule can be classified as an O-antigen capsular polysaccharide. Our studies indicate that F. tularensis O-antigen glycosyltransferase mutants do not make a capsule. An F. tularensis acyltransferase and an O-antigen polymerase mutant had no evidence of an O-antigen but expressed a capsular antigen. Passive immunization of BALB/c mice with 75 microg of 11B7 protected against a 150 fold lethal challenge of F. tularensis LVS. Active immunization of BALB/c mice with 10 microg of capsule showed a similar level of protection. These studies demonstrate that F. tularensis

  19. Pericardial effusion as the only manifestation of infection with Francisella tularensis: a case report

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    Landais Cécile

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Francisella tularensis, a facultative intracellular Gram-negative bacterium, has rarely been reported as an agent of pericarditis, generally described as a complication of tularemia sepsis. F. tularensis is a fastidious organism that grows poorly on standard culture media and diagnosis is usually based on serological tests. However, cross-reactions may occur. Western blotting allows the correct diagnosis. Case presentation A non-smoking 53-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with a large posterior pericardial effusion. Serological tests showed a seroconversion in antibody titers to F. tularensis (IgG titer = 400 and Legionella pneumophila (IgG titer = 512. F. tularensis was identified by Western immunoblotting following cross-adsorption. The patient reported close contact with rabbits 2 weeks prior to the beginning of symptoms of pericarditis. Conclusion We report a rare case of pericardial effusion as the only manifestation of infection by F. tularensis. The etiological diagnosis is based on serology. Western blotting and cross-adsorption allow differential diagnosis.

  20. Case Report of Low Virulence Francisella tularensis Presented as Severe Bacteremic Pneumonia

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    Su, Ting-Yi; Shie, Shian-Sen; Chia, Ju-Hsin; Huang, Ching-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tularemia is a zoonotic infection seen primarily in the Northern Hemisphere. It is caused by the bacteria Francisella tularensis. Although the ulceroglandular form of the disease is the more common manifestation of infection, F tularensis is known to cause pneumonia. F tularensis has two predominant subspecies, namely subsp. tularensis (type A) and subsp. holarctica (type B). Type B tularemia is considered to be much less virulent than type A and barely caused lethal disease and pneumonia. We reported a case with a 68-year-old man immune-compromised patient diagnosed with bacteremic pneumonia engendered by type B tularemia with initial presentation of high fever, pneumonia with pleural effusion; the diagnosis was performed using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The patient's fever, pneumonia, and pleural effusion were resolved with appropriate antibiotics for tularemia. This case involving severe bacteremic pneumonia in an immune-compromised patient is rare. This case suggests that low virulence F tularensis should be included in the differential diagnoses of bacteremic pneumonia for endemic tularemia. PMID:27175638

  1. A new dye uptake assay to test the activity of antibioticsagainst intracellular Francisella tularensis

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    Vivien eSutera

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the aetiological agent of tularaemia. Antibiotic treatment of this zoonosis is based on the administration of a fluoroquinolone or a tetracycline for cases with mild to moderate severity, whereas an aminoglycoside (streptomycin or gentamicin is advocated for severe cases. However, treatment failures and relapses remain frequent, especially in patients suffering from chronic lymph node suppuration. Therefore, new treatment alternatives are needed. We have developed a dye uptake assay for determination of minimal inhibitory extracellular concentrations (MIECs of antibiotics against intracellular F. tularensis, and validated the method by comparing the results obtained using a CFU-enumerating method. We also compared MIECs with MICs of the same compounds determined using a CLSI broth microdilution method. We tested the activity of 11 antibiotics against two clinical strains of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica isolated in France. Both strains displayed low MICs (= 8 µg/mL were found for carbapenems (imipenem and meropenem, daptomycin and linezolid. Erythromycin MICs were 4.0 and 16.0 µg/mL, respectively, for the two clinical strains. MIECs were almost the same with the two methods used. They were concordant with MICs, except for erythromycin and linezolid (respectively, four and eight times more active against intracellular F. tularensis and gentamicin (four to eight times less active against intracellular F. tularensis. This study validated the dye uptake assay as a new tool for determination of the activity of a large panel of antibiotics against intracellular F. tularensis. This test confirmed the intracellular activity of first-line antibiotics used for tularaemia treatment, but also revealed significant activity of linezolid against intracellular F. tularensis.

  2. Biochemical studies on Francisella tularensis RelA in (p)ppGpp biosynthesis.

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    Wilkinson, Rachael C; Batten, Laura E; Wells, Neil J; Oyston, Petra C F; Roach, Peter L

    2015-10-08

    The bacterial stringent response is induced by nutrient deprivation and is mediated by enzymes of the RSH (RelA/SpoT homologue; RelA, (p)ppGpp synthetase I; SpoT, (p)ppGpp synthetase II) superfamily that control concentrations of the 'alarmones' (p)ppGpp (guanosine penta- or tetra-phosphate). This regulatory pathway is present in the vast majority of pathogens and has been proposed as a potential anti-bacterial target. Current understanding of RelA-mediated responses is based on biochemical studies using Escherichia coli as a model. In comparison, the Francisella tularensis RelA sequence contains a truncated regulatory C-terminal region and an unusual synthetase motif (EXSD). Biochemical analysis of F. tularensis RelA showed the similarities and differences of this enzyme compared with the model RelA from Escherichia coli. Purification of the enzyme yielded a stable dimer capable of reaching concentrations of 10 mg/ml. In contrast with other enzymes from the RelA/SpoT homologue superfamily, activity assays with F. tularensis RelA demonstrate a high degree of specificity for GTP as a pyrophosphate acceptor, with no measurable turnover for GDP. Steady state kinetic analysis of F. tularensis RelA gave saturation activity curves that best fitted a sigmoidal function. This kinetic profile can result from allosteric regulation and further measurements with potential allosteric regulators demonstrated activation by ppGpp (5',3'-dibisphosphate guanosine) with an EC50 of 60±1.9 μM. Activation of F. tularensis RelA by stalled ribosomal complexes formed with ribosomes purified from E. coli MRE600 was observed, but interestingly, significantly weaker activation with ribosomes isolated from Francisella philomiragia.

  3. Decontamination of a hospital room using gaseous chlorine dioxide: Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis.

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    Lowe, John J; Gibbs, Shawn G; Iwen, Peter C; Smith, Philip W; Hewlett, Angela L

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of gaseous chlorine dioxide for inactivation of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis in a hospital patient care suite. Spore and vegetative cells of Bacillus anthracis Sterne 34F2, spores of Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372 and vegetative cells of both Francisella tularensis ATCC 6223 and Yersinia pestis A1122 were exposed to gaseous chlorine dioxide in a patient care suite. Organism inactivation was then assessed by log reduction in viable organisms postexposure to chlorine dioxide gas compared to non-exposed control organism. Hospital room decontamination protocols utilizing chlorine dioxide gas concentrations of 377 to 385 ppm maintained to exposures of 767 ppm-hours with 65% relative humidity consistently achieved complete inactivation of B. anthracis and B. atrophaeus spores, as well as vegetative cells of B. anthracis, F. tularensis, and Y. pestis. Decrease in exposure (ppm-hours) and relative humidity (8 log reductions in organisms. Up to 10-log reductions were achieved in a hospital room with limited impact on adjacent areas, indicating chlorine dioxide concentrations needed for decontamination of highly concentrated (>6 logs) organisms can be achieved throughout a hospital room. This study translates laboratory chlorine dioxide fumigation studies applied in a complex clinical environment.

  4. Microarray analysis of human monocytes infected with Francisella tularensis identifies new targets of host response subversion.

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    Jonathan P Butchar

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative facultative bacterium that causes the disease tularemia, even upon exposure to low numbers of bacteria. One critical characteristic of Francisella is its ability to dampen or subvert the host immune response. In order to help understand the mechanisms by which this occurs, we performed Affymetrix microarray analysis on transcripts from blood monocytes infected with the virulent Type A Schu S4 strain. Results showed that expression of several host response genes were reduced such as those associated with interferon signaling, Toll-like receptor signaling, autophagy and phagocytosis. When compared to microarrays from monocytes infected with the less virulent F. tularensis subsp. novicida, we found qualitative differences and also a general pattern of quantitatively reduced pro-inflammatory signaling pathway genes in the Schu S4 strain. Notably, the PI3K/Akt1 pathway appeared specifically down-regulated following Schu S4 infection and a concomitantly lower cytokine response was observed. This study identifies several new factors potentially important in host cell subversion by the virulent Type A F. tularensis that may serve as novel targets for drug discovery.

  5. Global transcriptional response to mammalian temperature provides new insight into Francisella tularensis pathogenesis

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    Shanks Robert MQ

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After infecting a mammalian host, the facultative intracellular bacterium, Francisella tularensis, encounters an elevated environmental temperature. We hypothesized that this temperature change may regulate genes essential for infection. Results Microarray analysis of F. tularensis LVS shifted from 26°C (environmental to 37°C (mammalian showed ~11% of this bacterium's genes were differentially-regulated. Importantly, 40% of the protein-coding genes that were induced at 37°C have been previously implicated in virulence or intracellular growth of Francisella in other studies, associating the bacterial response to this temperature shift with pathogenesis. Forty-four percent of the genes induced at 37°C encode proteins of unknown function, suggesting novel Francisella virulence traits are regulated by mammalian temperature. To explore this possibility, we generated two mutants of loci induced at 37°C [FTL_1581 and FTL_1664 (deoB]. The FTL_1581 mutant was attenuated in a chicken embryo infection model, which was likely attributable to a defect in survival within macrophages. FTL_1581 encodes a novel hypothetical protein that we suggest naming temperature-induced, virulence-associated locus A, tivA. Interestingly, the deoB mutant showed diminished entry into mammalian cells compared to wild-type LVS, including primary human macrophages and dendritic cells, the macrophage-like RAW 264.7 line, and non-phagocytic HEK-293 cells. This is the first study identifying a Francisella gene that contributes to uptake into both phagocytic and non-phagocytic host cells. Conclusion Our results provide new insight into mechanisms of Francisella virulence regulation and pathogenesis. F. tularensis LVS undergoes considerable gene expression changes in response to mammalian body temperature. This temperature shift is important for the regulation of genes that are critical for the pathogenesis of Francisella. Importantly, the compilation of

  6. Francisella tularensis: No Evidence for Transovarial Transmission in the Tularemia Tick Vectors Dermacentor reticulatus and Ixodes ricinus.

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    Marco Genchi

    Full Text Available Tularemia is a zoonosis caused by the Francisella tularensis, a highly infectious Gram-negative coccobacillus. Due to easy dissemination, multiple routes of infection, high environmental contamination and morbidity and mortality rates, Francisella is considered a potential bioterrorism threat and classified as a category A select agent by the CDC. Tick bites are among the most prevalent modes of transmission, and ticks have been indicated as a possible reservoir, although their reservoir competence has yet to be defined. Tick-borne transmission of F. tularensis was recognized in 1923, and transstadial transmission has been demonstrated in several tick species. Studies on transovarial transmission, however, have reported conflicting results.The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of ticks as reservoirs for Francisella, assessing the transovarial transmission of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica in ticks, using experimentally-infected females of Dermacentor reticulatus and Ixodes ricinus.Transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization showed F. tularensis within oocytes. However, cultures and bioassays of eggs and larvae were negative; in addition, microscopy techniques revealed bacterial degeneration/death in the oocytes.These results suggest that bacterial death might occur in oocytes, preventing the transovarial transmission of Francisella. We can speculate that Francisella does not have a defined reservoir, but that rather various biological niches (e.g. ticks, rodents, that allow the bacterium to persist in the environment. Our results, suggesting that ticks are not competent for the bacterium vertical transmission, are congruent with this view.

  7. Unique substrates secreted by the type VI secretion system of Francisella tularensis during intramacrophage infection.

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    Jeanette E Bröms

    Full Text Available Gram-negative bacteria have evolved sophisticated secretion machineries specialized for the secretion of macromolecules important for their life cycles. The Type VI secretion system (T6SS is the most widely spread bacterial secretion machinery and is encoded by large, variable gene clusters, often found to be essential for virulence. The latter is true for the atypical T6SS encoded by the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI of the highly pathogenic, intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis. We here undertook a comprehensive analysis of the intramacrophage secretion of the 17 FPI proteins of the live vaccine strain, LVS, of F. tularensis. All were expressed as fusions to the TEM β-lactamase and cleavage of the fluorescent substrate CCF2-AM, a direct consequence of the delivery of the proteins into the macrophage cytosol, was followed over time. The FPI proteins IglE, IglC, VgrG, IglI, PdpE, PdpA, IglJ and IglF were all secreted, which was dependent on the core components DotU, VgrG, and IglC, as well as IglG. In contrast, the method was not directly applicable on F. novicida U112, since it showed very intense native β-lactamase secretion due to FTN_1072. Its role was proven by ectopic expression in trans in LVS. We did not observe secretion of any of the LVS substrates VgrG, IglJ, IglF or IglI, when tested in a FTN_1072 deficient strain of F. novicida, whereas IglE, IglC, PdpA and even more so PdpE were all secreted. This suggests that there may be fundamental differences in the T6S mechanism among the Francisella subspecies. The findings further corroborate the unusual nature of the T6SS of F. tularensis since almost all of the identified substrates are unique to the species.

  8. Signatures of T cells as correlates of immunity to Francisella tularensis.

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    Kjell Eneslätt

    Full Text Available Tularemia or vaccination with the live vaccine strain (LVS of Francisella tularensis confers long-lived cell-mediated immunity. We hypothesized that this immunity depends on polyfunctional memory T cells, i.e., CD4(+ and/or CD8(+ T cells with the capability to simultaneously express several functional markers. Multiparametric flow cytometry, measurement of secreted cytokines, and analysis of lymphocyte proliferation were used to characterize in vitro recall responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC to killed F. tularensis antigens from the LVS or Schu S4 strains. PBMC responses were compared between individuals who had contracted tularemia, had been vaccinated, or had not been exposed to F. tularensis (naïve. Significant differences were detected between either of the immune donor groups and naïve individuals for secreted levels of IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and MIP-1β. Expression of IFN-γ, MIP-1β, and CD107a by CD4(+CD45RO(+ or CD8(+CD45RO(+ T cells correlated to antigen concentrations. In particular, IFN-γ and MIP-1β strongly discriminated between immune and naïve individuals. Only one cytokine, IL-6, discriminated between the two groups of immune individuals. Notably, IL-2- or TNF-α-secretion was low. Our results identify functional signatures of T cells that may serve as correlates of immunity and protection against F. tularensis.

  9. Glutathione provides a source of cysteine essential for intracellular multiplication of Francisella tularensis.

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    Khaled Alkhuder

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterium causing the zoonotic disease tularemia. Its ability to multiply and survive in macrophages is critical for its virulence. By screening a bank of HimarFT transposon mutants of the F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS to isolate intracellular growth-deficient mutants, we selected one mutant in a gene encoding a putative gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT. This gene (FTL_0766 was hence designated ggt. The mutant strain showed impaired intracellular multiplication and was strongly attenuated for virulence in mice. Here we present evidence that the GGT activity of F. tularensis allows utilization of glutathione (GSH, gamma-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine and gamma-glutamyl-cysteine dipeptide as cysteine sources to ensure intracellular growth. This is the first demonstration of the essential role of a nutrient acquisition system in the intracellular multiplication of F. tularensis. GSH is the most abundant source of cysteine in the host cytosol. Thus, the capacity this intracellular bacterial pathogen has evolved to utilize the available GSH, as a source of cysteine in the host cytosol, constitutes a paradigm of bacteria-host adaptation.

  10. Evaluation of a safranin-O-stained antigen microagglutination test for francisella tularensis antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    A microagglutination test for Francisella tularensis, with 0.025-ml amounts of diluted sera and 0.025-ml amounts of safranin-O-stained antigen in U-bottom microtitration plates, was compared with a tube agglutination test by using 137 sera. There was 86.3% agreement (+/- 1 dilution variation) between the microagglutination results and the tube agglutination results for sera with tube agglutination titers of greater than or equal to 20. There was 100% agreement (+/- 1 dilution variation) for s...

  11. A method for functional trans-complementation of intracellular Francisella tularensis.

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    Shaun Steele

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterial pathogen that invades and replicates within numerous host cell types. After uptake, F. tularensis bacteria escape the phagosome, replicate within the cytosol, and suppress cytokine responses. However, the mechanisms employed by F. tularensis to thrive within host cells are mostly unknown. Potential F. tularensis mutants involved in host-pathogen interactions are typically discovered by negative selection screens for intracellular replication or virulence. Mutants that fulfill these criteria fall into two categories: mutants with intrinsic intracellular growth defects and mutants that fail to modify detrimental host cell processes. It is often difficult and time consuming to discriminate between these two possibilities. We devised a method to functionally trans-complement and thus identify mutants that fail to modify the host response. In this assay, host cells are consistently and reproducibly infected with two different F. tularensis strains by physically tethering the bacteria to antibody-coated beads. To examine the efficacy of this protocol, we tested phagosomal escape, cytokine suppression, and intracellular replication for F. tularensis ΔripA and ΔpdpC. ΔripA has an intracellular growth defect that is likely due to an intrinsic defect and fails to suppress IL-1β secretion. In the co-infection model, ΔripA was unable to replicate in the host cell when wild-type bacteria infected the same cell, but cytokine suppression was rescued. Therefore, ΔripA intracellular growth is due to an intrinsic bacterial defect while cytokine secretion results from a failed host-pathogen interaction. Likewise, ΔpdpC is deficient for phagosomal escape, intracellular survival and suppression of IL-1β secretion. Wild-type bacteria that entered through the same phagosome as ΔpdpC rescued all of these phenotypes, indicating that ΔpdpC failed to properly manipulate the host. In summary, functional

  12. Sensitivity of Francisella tularensis to ultrapure water and deoxycholate: implications for bacterial intracellular growth assay in macrophages

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    Chalabaev, Sabina; Anderson, Christine A.; Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Francisella tularensis to replicate in macrophages is critical for its pathogenesis, therefore intracellular growth assays are important tools for assessing virulence. We show that two lysis solutions commonly used in these assays, deionized water and deoxycholate in PBS, lead to highly inaccurate measurements of intracellular bacterial survival. PMID:21420447

  13. Towards Development of Improved Serodiagnostics for Tularemia by Use of Francisella tularensis Proteome Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Rie; Escudero, Raquel; Molina, Douglas M; Rodríguez-Vargas, Manuela; Randall, Arlo; Jasinskas, Algis; Pablo, Jozelyn; Felgner, Philip L; AuCoin, David P; Anda, Pedro; Davies, D Huw

    2016-07-01

    Tularemia in humans is caused mainly by two subspecies of the Gram-negative facultative anaerobe Francisella tularensis: F. tularensis subsp. tularensis (type A) and F. tularensis subsp. holarctica (type B). The current serological test for tularemia is based on agglutination of whole organisms, and the reactive antigens are not well understood. Previously, we profiled the antibody responses in type A and B tularemia cases in the United States using a proteome microarray of 1,741 different proteins derived from the type A strain Schu S4. Fifteen dominant antigens able to detect antibodies to both types of infection were identified, although these were not validated in a different immunoassay format. Since type A and B subspecies are closely related, we hypothesized that Schu S4 antigens would also have utility for diagnosing type B tularemia caused by strains from other geographic locations. To test this, we probed the Schu S4 array with sera from 241 type B tularemia cases in Spain. Despite there being no type A strains in Spain, we confirmed the responses against some of the same potential serodiagnostic antigens reported previously, as well as determined the responses against additional potential serodiagnostic antigens. Five potential serodiagnostic antigens were evaluated on immunostrips, and two of these (FTT1696/GroEL and FTT0975/conserved hypothetical protein) discriminated between the Spanish tularemia cases and healthy controls. We conclude that antigens from the type A strain Schu S4 are suitable for detection of antibodies from patients with type B F. tularensis infections and that these can be used for the diagnosis of tularemia in a deployable format, such as the immunostrip.

  14. Expression, purification and crystallization of class C acid phosphatases from Francisella tularensis and Pasteurella multocida

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    Singh, Harkewal; Felts, Richard L.; Ma, Li; Malinski, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Tanner, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Class C nonspecific acid phosphatases are bacterial enzymes that are secreted across the cytoplasmic membrane and hydrolyze a variety of phosphomono­esters at acidic pH. These enzymes are of interest for the development of improved vaccines and clinical diagnostic methods. In one case, the category A pathogen Francisella tularensis, the class C phosphatase plays a role in bacterial fitness. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization methods for the class C acid phosphatases from F. tularensis and Pasteurella multocida are reported. Crystals of the F. tularensis enzyme diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2221, with one enzyme molecule in the asymmetric unit. Crystals of the P. multocida enzyme diffracted to 1.85 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with three molecules in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction patterns from crystals of the P. multocida enzyme exhibited multiple interpenetrating reciprocal-space lattices, indicating epitaxial twinning. Despite this aberrance, autoindexing was robust and the data could be satisfactorily processed to 1.85 Å resolution using MOSFLM and SCALA. PMID:19255471

  15. Crystallization of a newly discovered histidine acid phosphatase from Francisella tularensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felts, Richard L.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterial pathogen that is considered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to be a potential bioterrorism weapon. Here, the crystallization of a 37.2 kDa phosphatase encoded by the genome of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica live vaccine strain is reported. This enzyme shares 41% amino-acid sequence identity with Legionella pneumophila major acid phosphatase and contains the RHGXRXP motif that is characteristic of the histidine acid phosphatase family. Large diffraction-quality crystals were grown in the presence of Tacsimate, HEPES and PEG 3350. The crystals belong to space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.96, c = 210.78 Å. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain one protein molecule, with a solvent content of 53%. A 1.75 Å resolution native data set was recorded at beamline 4.2.2 of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source. Molecular-replacement trials using the human prostatic acid phosphatase structure as the search model (28% amino-acid sequence identity) did not produce a satisfactory solution. Therefore, the structure of F. tularensis histidine acid phosphatase will be determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative. PMID:16511256

  16. Eradication of intracellular Francisella tularensis in THP-1 human macrophages with a novel autophagy inducing agent

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    Gunn John S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autophagy has been shown recently to play an important role in the intracellular survival of several pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we investigated the effect of a novel small-molecule autophagy-inducing agent, AR-12, on the survival of Francisella tularensis, the causative bacterium of tularemia in humans and a potential bioterrorism agent, in macrophages. Methods and results Our results show that AR-12 induces autophagy in THP-1 macrophages, as indicated by increased autophagosome formation, and potently inhibits the intracellular survival of F. tularensis (type A strain, Schu S4 and F. novicida in macrophages in association with increased bacterial co-localization with autophagosomes. The effect of AR-12 on intracellular F. novicida was fully reversed in the presence of the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyl adenine or the lysosome inhibitor, chloroquine. Intracellular F. novicida were not susceptible to the inhibitory activity of AR-12 added at 12 h post-infection in THP-1 macrophages, and this lack of susceptibility was independent of the intracellular location of bacteria. Conclusion Together, AR-12 represents a proof-of-principle that intracellular F. tularensis can be eradicated by small-molecule agents that target innate immunity.

  17. Nonrandom distribution of vector ticks (Dermacentor variabilis infected by Francisella tularensis.

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    Heidi K Goethert

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The island of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, is the site of a sustained outbreak of tularemia due to Francisella tularensis tularensis. Dog ticks, Dermacentor variabilis, appear to be critical in the perpetuation of the agent there. Tularemia has long been characterized as an agent of natural focality, stably persisting in characteristic sites of transmission, but this suggestion has never been rigorously tested. Accordingly, we sought to identify a natural focus of transmission of the agent of tularemia by mapping the distribution of PCR-positive ticks. From 2004 to 2007, questing D. variabilis were collected from 85 individual waypoints along a 1.5 km transect in a field site on Martha's Vineyard. The positions of PCR-positive ticks were then mapped using ArcGIS. Cluster analysis identified an area approximately 290 meters in diameter, 9 waypoints, that was significantly more likely to yield PCR-positive ticks (relative risk 3.3, P = 0.001 than the rest of the field site. Genotyping of F. tularensis using variable number tandem repeat (VNTR analysis on PCR-positive ticks yielded 13 different haplotypes, the vast majority of which was one dominant haplotype. Positive ticks collected in the cluster were 3.4 times (relative risk = 3.4, P<0.0001 more likely to have an uncommon haplotype than those collected elsewhere from the transect. We conclude that we have identified a microfocus where the agent of tularemia stably perpetuates and that this area is where genetic diversity is generated.

  18. The human-bacterial pathogen protein interaction networks of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis.

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    Matthew D Dyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis are bacterial pathogens that can cause anthrax, lethal acute pneumonic disease, and bubonic plague, respectively, and are listed as NIAID Category A priority pathogens for possible use as biological weapons. However, the interactions between human proteins and proteins in these bacteria remain poorly characterized leading to an incomplete understanding of their pathogenesis and mechanisms of immune evasion. METHODOLOGY: In this study, we used a high-throughput yeast two-hybrid assay to identify physical interactions between human proteins and proteins from each of these three pathogens. From more than 250,000 screens performed, we identified 3,073 human-B. anthracis, 1,383 human-F. tularensis, and 4,059 human-Y. pestis protein-protein interactions including interactions involving 304 B. anthracis, 52 F. tularensis, and 330 Y. pestis proteins that are uncharacterized. Computational analysis revealed that pathogen proteins preferentially interact with human proteins that are hubs and bottlenecks in the human PPI network. In addition, we computed modules of human-pathogen PPIs that are conserved amongst the three networks. Functionally, such conserved modules reveal commonalities between how the different pathogens interact with crucial host pathways involved in inflammation and immunity. SIGNIFICANCE: These data constitute the first extensive protein interaction networks constructed for bacterial pathogens and their human hosts. This study provides novel insights into host-pathogen interactions.

  19. Entry of Francisella tularensis into Murine B Cells: The Role of B Cell Receptors and Complement Receptors.

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    Lenka Plzakova

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, is an intracellular pathogen that dominantly infects and proliferates inside phagocytic cells but can be seen also in non-phagocytic cells, including B cells. Although protective immunity is known to be almost exclusively associated with the type 1 pathway of cellular immunity, a significant role of B cells in immune responses already has been demonstrated. Whether their role is associated with antibody-dependent or antibody-independent B cell functions is not yet fully understood. The character of early events during B cell-pathogen interaction may determine the type of B cell response regulating the induction of adaptive immunity. We used fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to identify the basic requirements for the entry of F. tularensis into B cells within in vivo and in vitro infection models. Here, we present data showing that Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica strain LVS significantly infects individual subsets of murine peritoneal B cells early after infection. Depending on a given B cell subset, uptake of Francisella into B cells is mediated by B cell receptors (BCRs with or without complement receptor CR1/2. However, F. tularensis strain FSC200 ΔiglC and ΔftdsbA deletion mutants are defective in the ability to enter B cells. Once internalized into B cells, F. tularensis LVS intracellular trafficking occurs along the endosomal pathway, albeit without significant multiplication. The results strongly suggest that BCRs alone within the B-1a subset can ensure the internalization process while the BCRs on B-1b and B-2 cells need co-signaling from the co receptor containing CR1/2 to initiate F. tularensis engulfment. In this case, fluidity of the surface cell membrane is a prerequisite for the bacteria's internalization. The results substantially underline the functional heterogeneity of B cell subsets in relation to F. tularensis.

  20. Crystallization of a newly discovered histidine acid phosphatase from Francisella tularensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felts, Richard L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Reilly, Thomas J. [Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65212 (United States); Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65212 (United States); Calcutt, Michael J. [Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65212 (United States); Tanner, John J., E-mail: tannerjj@missouri.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States)

    2006-01-01

    A histidine acid phosphatase from the CDC Category A pathogen F. tularensis has been crystallized in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.96, c = 210.78 Å. A 1.75 Å resolution data set was collected at Advanced Light Source beamline 4.2.2. Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterial pathogen that is considered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to be a potential bioterrorism weapon. Here, the crystallization of a 37.2 kDa phosphatase encoded by the genome of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica live vaccine strain is reported. This enzyme shares 41% amino-acid sequence identity with Legionella pneumophila major acid phosphatase and contains the RHGXRXP motif that is characteristic of the histidine acid phosphatase family. Large diffraction-quality crystals were grown in the presence of Tacsimate, HEPES and PEG 3350. The crystals belong to space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.96, c = 210.78 Å. The asymmetric unit is predicted to contain one protein molecule, with a solvent content of 53%. A 1.75 Å resolution native data set was recorded at beamline 4.2.2 of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source. Molecular-replacement trials using the human prostatic acid phosphatase structure as the search model (28% amino-acid sequence identity) did not produce a satisfactory solution. Therefore, the structure of F. tularensis histidine acid phosphatase will be determined by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  1. Francisella tularensis Catalase Restricts Immune Function by Impairing TRPM2 Channel Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerley, Nicole L; Chandrasekaran, Akshaya; Trebak, Mohamed; Miller, Barbara A; Melendez, J Andrés

    2016-02-19

    As an innate defense mechanism, macrophages produce reactive oxygen species that weaken pathogens and serve as secondary messengers involved in immune function. The Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis utilizes its antioxidant armature to limit the host immune response, but the mechanism behind this suppression is not defined. Here we establish that F. tularensis limits Ca(2+) entry in macrophages, thereby limiting actin reorganization and IL-6 production in a redox-dependent fashion. Wild type (live vaccine strain) or catalase-deficient F. tularensis (ΔkatG) show distinct profiles in their H2O2 scavenging rates, 1 and 0.015 pm/s, respectively. Murine alveolar macrophages infected with ΔkatG display abnormally high basal intracellular Ca(2+) concentration that did not increase further in response to H2O2. Additionally, ΔkatG-infected macrophages displayed limited Ca(2+) influx in response to ionomycin, as a result of ionophore H2O2 sensitivity. Exogenously added H2O2 or H2O2 generated by ΔkatG likely oxidizes ionomycin and alters its ability to transport Ca(2+). Basal increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) and insensitivity to H2O2-mediated Ca(2+) entry in ΔkatG-infected cells are reversed by the Ca(2+) channel inhibitors 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate and SKF-96365. 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate but not SKF-96365 abrogated ΔkatG-dependent increases in macrophage actin remodeling and IL-6 secretion, suggesting a role for H2O2-mediated Ca(2+) entry through the transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) channel in macrophages. Indeed, increases in basal Ca(2+), actin polymerization, and IL-6 production are reversed in TRPM2-null macrophages infected with ΔkatG. Together, our findings provide compelling evidence that F. tularensis catalase restricts reactive oxygen species to temper macrophage TRPM2-mediated Ca(2+) signaling and limit host immune function.

  2. Serological evidence of Francisella tularensis in febrile patients seeking treatment at remote hospitals, northeastern Kenya, 2014–2015

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    J. Njeru

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Tularaemia is a highly contagious infectious zoonosis caused by the bacterial agent Francisella tularensis. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of antibodies to F. tularensis in febrile patients in northeastern Kenya. During 2014–2015, 730 patients were screened for anti-F. tularensis antibodies using a combination of ELISA and Western blot. Twenty-seven (3.7% individuals were positive for F. tularensis. Tularaemia was not suspected by the treating clinicians in any of them. Our results suggest that tularaemia may be present in Kenya but remain unreported, and emphasizes the need for local clinicians to broaden their diagnostic repertoire when evaluating patients with undifferentiated febrile illness.

  3. Photonic Biosensor Assays to Detect and Distinguish Subspecies of Francisella tularensis

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    Thomas J. Inzana

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of photonic biosensor assays to diagnose the category-A select agent Francisella tularensis was investigated. Both interferometric and long period fiber grating sensing structures were successfully demonstrated; both these sensors are capable of detecting the optical changes induced by either immunological binding or DNA hybridization. Detection was made possible by the attachment of DNA probes or immunoglobulins (IgG directly to the fiber surface via layer-by-layer electrostatic self-assembly. An optical fiber biosensor was tested using a standard transmission mode long period fiber grating of length 15 mm and period 260 µm, and coated with the IgG fraction of antiserum to F. tularensis. The IgG was deposited onto the optical fiber surface in a nanostructured film, and the resulting refractive index change was measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The presence of F. tularensis was detected from the decrease of peak wavelength caused by binding of specific antigen. Detection and differentiation of F. tularensis subspecies tularensis (type A strain TI0902 and subspecies holarctica (type B strain LVS was further accomplished using a single-mode multi-cavity fiber Fabry-Perot interferometric sensor. These sensors were prepared by depositing seven polymer bilayers onto the fiber tip followed by attaching one of two DNA probes: (a a 101-bp probe from the yhhW gene unique to type-A strains, or (b a 117-bp probe of the lpnA gene, common to both type-A and type-B strains. The yhhW probe was reactive with the type-A, but not the type-B strain. Probe lpnA was reactive with both type-A and type-B strains. Nanogram quantities of the target DNA could be detected, highlighting the sensitivity of this method for DNA detection without the use of PCR. The DNA probe reacted with 100% homologous target DNA, but did not react with sequences containing 2-bp mismatches, indicating the high specificity of the assay. These assays will fill an

  4. Adaptation of Francisella tularensis to the Mammalian Environment Is Governed by Cues Which Can Be Mimicked In Vitro▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlett, Karsten R. O.; Caldon, Seth D.; McArthur, Debbie G.; Cirillo, Kerry A.; Kirimanjeswara, Girish S.; Magguilli, Micheal L.; Malik, Meenakshi; Shah, Aaloki; Broderick, Scott; Golovliov, Igor; Metzger, Dennis W.; Rajan, Krishna; Sellati, Timothy J.; Loegering, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    The intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis survives in mammals, arthropods, and freshwater amoeba. It was previously established that the conventional media used for in vitro propagation of this microbe do not yield bacteria that mimic those harvested from infected mammals; whether these in vitro-cultivated bacteria resemble arthropod- or amoeba-adapted Francisella is unknown. As a foundation for our goal of identifying F. tularensis outer membrane proteins which are expressed during mammalian infection, we first sought to identify in vitro cultivation conditions that induce the bacterium's infection-derived phenotype. We compared Francisella LVS grown in brain heart infusion broth (BHI; a standard microbiological medium rarely used in Francisella research) to that grown in Mueller-Hinton broth (MHB; the most widely used F. tularensis medium, used here as a negative control) and macrophages (a natural host cell, used here as a positive control). BHI- and macrophage-grown F. tularensis cells showed similar expression of MglA-dependent and MglA-independent proteins; expression of the MglA-dependent proteins was repressed by the supraphysiological levels of free amino acids present in MHB. We observed that during macrophage infection, protein expression by intracellular bacteria differed from that by extracellular bacteria; BHI-grown bacteria mirrored the latter, while MHB-grown bacteria resembled neither. Naïve macrophages responding to BHI- and macrophage-grown bacteria produced markedly lower levels of proinflammatory mediators than those in cells exposed to MHB-grown bacteria. In contrast to MHB-grown bacteria, BHI-grown bacteria showed minimal delay during intracellular replication. Cumulatively, our findings provide compelling evidence that growth in BHI yields bacteria which recapitulate the phenotype of Francisella organisms that have emerged from macrophages. PMID:18644878

  5. The type IV pilin, PilA, is required for full virulence of Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis

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    Forslund Anna-Lena

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All four Francisella tularensis subspecies possess gene clusters with potential to express type IV pili (Tfp. These clusters include putative pilin genes, as well as pilB, pilC and pilQ, required for secretion and assembly of Tfp. A hallmark of Tfp is the ability to retract the pilus upon surface contact, a property mediated by the ATPase PilT. Interestingly, out of the two major human pathogenic subspecies only the highly virulent type A strains have a functional pilT gene. Results In a previous study, we were able to show that one pilin gene, pilA, was essential for virulence of a type B strain in a mouse infection model. In this work we have examined the role of several Tfp genes in the virulence of the pathogenic type A strain SCHU S4. pilA, pilC, pilQ, and pilT were mutated by in-frame deletion mutagenesis. Interestingly, when mice were infected with a mixture of each mutant strain and the wild-type strain, the pilA, pilC and pilQ mutants were out-competed, while the pilT mutant was equally competitive as the wild-type. Conclusions This suggests that expression and surface localisation of PilA contribute to virulence in the highly virulent type A strain, while PilT was dispensable for virulence in the mouse infection model.

  6. TaqMan real-time PCR assays for single-nucleotide polymorphisms which identify Francisella tularensis and its subspecies and subpopulations.

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    Dawn N Birdsell

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis, the etiologic agent of tularemia and a Class A Select Agent, is divided into three subspecies and multiple subpopulations that differ in virulence and geographic distribution. Given these differences, there is a need to rapidly and accurately determine if a strain is F. tularensis and, if it is, assign it to subspecies and subpopulation. We designed TaqMan real-time PCR genotyping assays using eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that were potentially specific to closely related groups within the genus Francisella, including numerous subpopulations within F. tularensis species. We performed extensive validation studies to test the specificity of these SNPs to particular populations by screening the assays across a set of 565 genetically and geographically diverse F. tularensis isolates and an additional 21 genetic near-neighbor (outgroup isolates. All eleven assays correctly determined the genetic groups of all 565 F. tularensis isolates. One assay differentiates F. tularensis, F. novicida, and F. hispaniensis from the more genetically distant F. philomiragia and Francisella-like endosymbionts. Another assay differentiates F. tularensis isolates from near neighbors. The remaining nine assays classify F. tularensis-confirmed isolates into F. tularensis subspecies and subpopulations. The genotyping accuracy of these nine assays diminished when tested on outgroup isolates (i.e. non F. tularensis, therefore a hierarchical approach of assay usage is recommended wherein the F. tularensis-specific assay is used before the nine downstream assays. Among F. tularensis isolates, all eleven assays were highly sensitive, consistently amplifying very low concentrations of DNA. Altogether, these eleven TaqMan real-time PCR assays represent a highly accurate, rapid, and sensitive means of identifying the species, subspecies, and subpopulation of any F. tularensis isolate if used in a step-wise hierarchical scheme. These assays

  7. Optimal swab processing recovery method for detection of bioterrorism-related Francisella tularensis by real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Roblena E; Petersen, Jeannine M; Stephens, Kenyatta W; Dauphin, Leslie A

    2010-10-01

    Francisella tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, is regarded as a potential bioterrorism agent. The advent of bioterrorism has heightened awareness of the need for validated methods for processing environmental samples. In this study we determined the optimal method for processing environmental swabs for the recovery and subsequent detection of F. tularensis by the use of real-time PCR assays. Four swab processing recovery methods were compared: heat, sonication, vortexing, and the Swab Extraction Tube System (SETS). These methods were evaluated using cotton, foam, polyester and rayon swabs spiked with six pathogenic strains of F. tularensis. Real-time PCR analysis using a multi-target 5'nuclease assay for F. tularensis showed that the use of the SETS method resulted in the best limit of detection when evaluated using multiple strains of F. tularensis. We demonstrated also that the efficiency of F. tularensis recovery from swab specimens was not equivalent for all swab processing methodologies and, thus, that this variable can affect real-time PCR assay sensitivity. The effectiveness of the SETS method was independent of the automated DNA extraction method and real-time PCR platforms used. In conclusion, diagnostic laboratories can now potentially incorporate the SETS method into specimen processing protocols for the rapid and efficient detection of F. tularensis by real-time PCR during laboratory bioterrorism-related investigations.

  8. Border Patrol Gone Awry: Lung NKT Cell Activation by Francisella tularensis Exacerbates Tularemia-Like Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Timothy M; Gilchuk, Pavlo; Cicek, Basak B; Osina, Maria A; Boyd, Kelli L; Durrant, Douglas M; Metzger, Dennis W; Khanna, Kamal M; Joyce, Sebastian

    2015-06-01

    The respiratory mucosa is a major site for pathogen invasion and, hence, a site requiring constant immune surveillance. The type I, semi-invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells are enriched within the lung vasculature. Despite optimal positioning, the role of NKT cells in respiratory infectious diseases remains poorly understood. Hence, we assessed their function in a murine model of pulmonary tularemia--because tularemia is a sepsis-like proinflammatory disease and NKT cells are known to control the cellular and humoral responses underlying sepsis. Here we show for the first time that respiratory infection with Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain resulted in rapid accumulation of NKT cells within the lung interstitium. Activated NKT cells produced interferon-γ and promoted both local and systemic proinflammatory responses. Consistent with these results, NKT cell-deficient mice showed reduced inflammatory cytokine and chemokine response yet they survived the infection better than their wild type counterparts. Strikingly, NKT cell-deficient mice had increased lymphocytic infiltration in the lungs that organized into tertiary lymphoid structures resembling induced bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT) at the peak of infection. Thus, NKT cell activation by F. tularensis infection hampers iBALT formation and promotes a systemic proinflammatory response, which exacerbates severe pulmonary tularemia-like disease in mice.

  9. A mathematical model of CR3/TLR2 crosstalk in the context of Francisella tularensis infection.

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    Rachel Leander

    Full Text Available Complement Receptor 3 (CR3 and Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2 are pattern recognition receptors expressed on the surface of human macrophages. Although these receptors are essential components for recognition by the innate immune system, pathogen coordinated crosstalk between them can suppress the production of protective cytokines and promote infection. Recognition of the virulent Schu S4 strain of the intracellular pathogen Francisella tularensis by host macrophages involves CR3/TLR2 crosstalk. Although experimental data provide evidence that Lyn kinase and PI3K are essential components of the CR3 pathway that influences TLR2 activity, additional responsible upstream signaling components remain unknown. In this paper we construct a mathematical model of CR3 and TLR2 signaling in response to F. tularensis. After demonstrating that the model is consistent with experimental results we perform numerical simulations to evaluate the contributions that Akt and Ras-GAP make to ERK inhibition. The model confirms that phagocytosis-associated changes in the composition of the cell membrane can inhibit ERK activity and predicts that Akt and Ras-GAP synergize to inhibit ERK.

  10. Mouse models of aerosol-acquired tularemia caused by Francisella tularensis types A and B.

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    Fritz, David L; England, Marilyn J; Miller, Lynda; Waag, David M

    2014-10-01

    After preliminary assessment of virulence in AKR/J, DBA/1, BALB/c, and C57BL/6 mice, we investigated histopathologic changes in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice infected with type A (strain SCHU S4) or type B (strain 425) Francisella tularensis by aerosol exposure. In mice exposed to type A infection, changes in histologic presentation were not apparent until day 3 after infection, when pyogranulomatous inflammation was detected in spleens and livers of BALB/c mice, and in lungs and spleens of C57BL/6 mice. Histopathologic changes were most severe and widespread in both mouse strains on day 5 after infection and seemed to completely resolve within 22 d of challenge. BALB/c mice were more resistant than C57BL/6 mice in lethal-dose calculations, but C57BL/6 mice cleared the infection more rapidly. Mice similarly challenged with type B F. tularensis also developed histopathologic signs of infection beginning on day 3. The most severe changes were noted on day 8 and were characterized by granulomatous or pyogranulomatous infiltrations of the lungs. Unlike type A infection, lesions due to type B did not resolve over time and remained 3 wk after infection. In type B, but not type A, infection we noted extensive inflammation of the heart muscle. Although no microorganisms were found in tissues of type A survivors beyond 9 d after infection, mice surviving strain 425 infection had a low level of residual infection at 3 wk after challenge. The histopathologic presentation of tularemia caused by F. tularensis types A and B in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice bears distinct similarities to tularemia in humans.

  11. Francisella tularensis 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate cytidylyltransferase: kinetic characterization and phosphoregulation.

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    Arthur Tsang

    Full Text Available Deliberate and natural outbreaks of infectious disease, the prevalence of antibiotic resistant strains, and the ease by which antibiotic resistant bacteria can be intentionally engineered all underscore the necessity of effective vaccines and continued development of novel antimicrobial/antiviral therapeutics. Isoprenes, a group of molecules fundamentally involved in a variety of crucial biological functions, are derived from either the mevalonic acid (MVA or methylerythritol phosphate (MEP pathway. While mammals utilize the MVA pathway, many bacteria utilize the MEP pathway, highlighting the latter as an attractive target for antibiotic development. In this report we describe the cloning and characterization of Francisella tularensis MEP cytidylyltransferase, a MEP pathway enzyme and potential target for antibiotic development. Size exclusion chromatography indicates the protein exists as a dimer in solution. Enzyme assays produced an apparentK(MEP(M = 178 μM, K(CTP(M = 73 μM , k(MEP(cat = 1(s-1, k(CTP(cat = 0.8( s-1, and a k(MEP(cat/ K(MEP(M = 3.4 x 10(5 M(-1 min(-1. The enzyme exhibits a strict preference for Mg(+2 as a divalent cation and CTP as the nucleotide. Titanium dioxide chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identified Thr141 as a site of phosphorylation. T141D and T141E site-directed mutants are catalytically inactive, suggesting a mechanism for post-translational control of metabolic flux through the F. tularensis MEP pathway. Overall, our study suggests that MEP cytidylyltransferase is an excellent target for the development of novel antibiotics against F. tularensis.

  12. Rapid countermeasure discovery against Francisella tularensis based on a metabolic network reconstruction.

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    Sidhartha Chaudhury

    Full Text Available In the future, we may be faced with the need to provide treatment for an emergent biological threat against which existing vaccines and drugs have limited efficacy or availability. To prepare for this eventuality, our objective was to use a metabolic network-based approach to rapidly identify potential drug targets and prospectively screen and validate novel small-molecule antimicrobials. Our target organism was the fully virulent Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis Schu S4 strain, a highly infectious intracellular pathogen that is the causative agent of tularemia and is classified as a category A biological agent by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We proceeded with a staggered computational and experimental workflow that used a strain-specific metabolic network model, homology modeling and X-ray crystallography of protein targets, and ligand- and structure-based drug design. Selected compounds were subsequently filtered based on physiological-based pharmacokinetic modeling, and we selected a final set of 40 compounds for experimental validation of antimicrobial activity. We began screening these compounds in whole bacterial cell-based assays in biosafety level 3 facilities in the 20th week of the study and completed the screens within 12 weeks. Six compounds showed significant growth inhibition of F. tularensis, and we determined their respective minimum inhibitory concentrations and mammalian cell cytotoxicities. The most promising compound had a low molecular weight, was non-toxic, and abolished bacterial growth at 13 µM, with putative activity against pantetheine-phosphate adenylyltransferase, an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of coenzyme A, encoded by gene coaD. The novel antimicrobial compounds identified in this study serve as starting points for lead optimization, animal testing, and drug development against tularemia. Our integrated in silico/in vitro approach had an overall 15% success rate in terms of

  13. Insights to genetic characterization tools for epidemiological tracking of Francisella tularensis in Sweden.

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    Tara Wahab

    Full Text Available Tularaemia, caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis, is endemic in Sweden and is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of three different genetic typing systems to link a genetic type to the source and place of tularemia infection in Sweden. Canonical single nucleotide polymorphisms (canSNPs, MLVA including five variable number of tandem repeat loci and PmeI-PFGE were tested on 127 F. tularensis positive specimens collected from Swedish case-patients. All three typing methods identified two major genetic groups with near-perfect agreement. Higher genetic resolution was obtained with canSNP and MLVA compared to PFGE; F. tularensis samples were first assigned into ten phylogroups based on canSNPs followed by 33 unique MLVA types. Phylogroups were geographically analysed to reveal complex phylogeographic patterns in Sweden. The extensive phylogenetic diversity found within individual counties posed a challenge to linking specific genetic types with specific geographic locations. Despite this, a single phylogroup (B.22, defined by a SNP marker specific to a lone Swedish sequenced strain, did link genetic type with a likely geographic place. This result suggests that SNP markers, highly specific to a particular reference genome, may be found most frequently among samples recovered from the same location where the reference genome originated. This insight compels us to consider whole-genome sequencing (WGS as the appropriate tool for effectively linking specific genetic type to geography. Comparing the WGS of an unknown sample to WGS databases of archived Swedish strains maximizes the likelihood of revealing those rare geographically informative SNPs.

  14. Francisella tularensis LVS surface and membrane proteins as targets of effective post-exposure immunization for tularemia.

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    Chandler, Jeffrey C; Sutherland, Marjorie D; Harton, Marisa R; Molins, Claudia R; Anderson, Rebecca V; Heaslip, Darragh G; Bosio, Catharine M; Belisle, John T

    2015-02-01

    Francisella tularensis causes disease (tularemia) in a large number of mammals, including man. We previously demonstrated enhanced efficacy of conventional antibiotic therapy for tularemia by postexposure passive transfer of immune sera developed against a F. tularensis LVS membrane protein fraction (MPF). However, the protein composition of this immunogenic fraction was not defined. Proteomic approaches were applied to define the protein composition and identify the immunogens of MPF. MPF consisted of at least 299 proteins and 2-D Western blot analyses using sera from MPF-immunized and F. tularensis LVS-vaccinated mice coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identified 24 immunoreactive protein spots containing 45 proteins. A reverse vaccinology approach that applied labeling of F. tularensis LVS surface proteins and bioinformatics was used to reduce the complexity of potential target immunogens. Bioinformatics analyses of the immunoreactive proteins reduced the number of immunogen targets to 32. Direct surface labeling of F. tularensis LVS resulted in the identification of 31 surface proteins. However, only 13 of these were reactive with MPF and/or F. tularensis LVS immune sera. Collectively, this use of orthogonal proteomic approaches reduced the complexity of potential immunogens in MPF by 96% and allowed for prioritization of target immunogens for antibody-based immunotherapies against tularemia.

  15. Re-emergence of tularemia in Germany: Presence of Francisella tularensis in different rodent species in endemic areas

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    Pfeffer Martin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tularemia re-emerged in Germany starting in 2004 (with 39 human cases from 2004 to 2007 after over 40 years of only sporadic human infections. The reasons for this rise in case numbers are unknown as is the possible reservoir of the etiologic agent Francisella (F. tularensis. No systematic study on the reservoir situation of F. tularensis has been published for Germany so far. Methods We investigated three areas six to ten months after the initial tularemia outbreaks for the presence of F. tularensis among small mammals, ticks/fleas and water. The investigations consisted of animal live-trapping, serologic testing, screening by real-time-PCR and cultivation. Results A total of 386 small mammals were trapped. F. tularensis was detected in five different rodent species with carrier rates of 2.04, 6.94 and 10.87% per trapping area. None of the ticks or fleas (n = 432 tested positive for F. tularensis. We were able to demonstrate F. tularensis-specific DNA in one of 28 water samples taken in one of the outbreak areas. Conclusion The findings of our study stress the need for long-term surveillance of natural foci in order to get a better understanding of the reasons for the temporal and spatial patterns of tularemia in Germany.

  16. Purification and biophysical characterization of the CapA membrane protein FTT0807 from Francisella tularensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Garcia, Jose M; Hansen, Debra T; Zook, James; Loskutov, Andrey V; Robida, Mark D; Craciunescu, Felicia M; Sykes, Kathryn F; Wachter, Rebekka M; Fromme, Petra; Allen, James P

    2014-04-01

    The capA gene (FTT0807) from Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis SCHU S4 encodes a 44.4 kDa integral membrane protein composed of 403 amino acid residues that is part of an apparent operon that encodes at least two other membrane proteins, CapB, and CapC, which together play a critical role in the virulence and pathogenesis of this bacterium. The capA gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli as a C-terminal His6-tagged fusion with a folding reporter green fluorescent protein (frGFP). Purification procedures using several detergents were developed for the fluorescing and membrane-bound product, yielding approximately 30 mg of pure protein per liter of bacterial culture. Dynamic light scattering indicated that CapA-frGFP was highly monodisperse, with a size that was dependent upon both the concentration and choice of detergent. Circular dichroism showed that CapA-frGFP was stable over the range of 3-9 for the pH, with approximately half of the protein having well-defined α-helical and β-sheet secondary structure. The addition of either sodium chloride or calcium chloride at concentrations producing ionic strengths above 0.1 M resulted in a small increase of the α-helical content and a corresponding decrease in the random-coil content. Secondary-structure predictions on the basis of the analysis of the sequence indicate that the CapA membrane protein has two transmembrane helices with a substantial hydrophilic domain. The hydrophilic domain is predicted to contain a long disordered region of 50-60 residues, suggesting that the increase of α-helical content at high ionic strength could arise because of electrostatic interactions involving the disordered region. CapA is shown to be an inner-membrane protein and is predicted to play a key cellular role in the assembly of polysaccharides.

  17. Growth conditions and environmental factors impact aerosolization but not virulence of Francisella tularensis infection in mice.

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    Seth eFaith

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In refining methodology to develop a mouse model for inhalation of Francisella tularensis, it was noted that both relative humidity and growth media impacted the aerosol concentration of the live vaccine strain (LVS of F. tularensis. A relative humidity of less than 55% had a negative impact on the spray factor, the ratio between the concentration of LVS in the aerosol and the nebulizer. The spray factor was significantly higher for LVS grown in brain heart infusion (BHI broth than LVS grown in Mueller-Hinton broth (MHb or Chamberlain’s Chemically Defined Medium (CCDM. The variability between aerosol exposures was also considerably less with BHI. LVS grown in BHI survived desiccation far longer than MHb-grown or CCDM-grown LVS (~70% at 20 minutes for BHI compared to <50% for MHb and CCDM. Removal of the capsule by hypertonic treatment impacted the spray factor for CCDM-grown LVS or MHb-grown LVS but not BHI-grown LVS, suggesting the choice of culture media altered the adherence of the capsule to the cell membrane. The choice of growth media did not impact the LD50 of LVS but the LD99 of BHI-grown LVS was 1 log lower than that for MHb-grown LVS or CCDM-grown LVS. Splenomegaly was prominent in mice that succumbed to MHb- and BHI-grown LVS but not CCDM-grown LVS. Environmental factors and growth conditions should be evaluated when developing new animal models for aerosol infection, particularly for vegetative bacterial pathogens.

  18. Francisella tularensis LVS evades killing by human neutrophils via inhibition of the respiratory burst and phagosome escape.

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    McCaffrey, Ramona L; Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2006-12-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of tularemia. Recent data indicate that F. tularensis replicates inside macrophages, but its fate in other cell types, including human neutrophils, is unclear. We now show that F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS), opsonized with normal human serum, was rapidly ingested by neutrophils but was not eliminated. Moreover, evasion of intracellular killing can be explained, in part, by disruption of the respiratory burst. As judged by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence and nitroblue tetrazolium staining, neutrophils infected with live F. tularensis did not generate reactive oxygen species. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that NADPH oxidase assembly was disrupted, and LVS phagosomes did not acquire gp91/p22(phox) or p47/p67(phox). At the same time, F. tularensis also impaired neutrophil activation by heterologous stimuli such as phorbol esters and opsonized zymosan particles. Later in infection, LVS escaped the phagosome, and live organisms persisted in the neutrophil cytosol for at least 12 h. To our knowledge, our data are the first demonstration of a facultative intracellular pathogen, which disrupts the oxidative burst and escapes the phagosome to evade elimination inside neutrophils, and as such, our data define a novel mechanism of virulence.

  19. Molecular immune responses to aerosol challenge with Francisella tularensis in mice inoculated with live vaccine candidates of varying efficacy.

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    Hua Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen and the etiological agent of tularemia. The subspecies F. tularensis tularensis is especially virulent for humans when inhaled and respiratory tularemia is associated with high mortality if not promptly treated. A live vaccine strain (LVS derived from the less virulent holarctica subspecies confers incomplete protection against aerosol challenge with subsp. tularensis. Moreover, correlates of protection have not been established for LVS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study we compare molecular immune responses elicited by LVS and two defined deletion mutants of clinical subsp. tularensis strain, SCHU S4, that confer enhanced protection in a mouse model. BALB/c mice were immunized intradermally then challenged with an aerosol of SCHU S4 six weeks later. Changes in the levels of a selected panel of cytokines and chemokines were examined in the lungs, spleens, and sera of vaccinated and challenged mice. Mostly, increased cytokine and chemokine levels correlated with increased bacterial burden. However, after adjusting for this variable, immunization with either of the two Schu S4 mutants resulted in higher levels of several pulmonary cytokines, versus those resulting after LVS immunization, including IL-17. Moreover, treatment of mice immunized with ΔclpB with anti-IL-17 antibodies post-challenge enhanced lung infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report characterizing local and systemic cytokine and chemokine responses in mice immunized with vaccines with different efficacies against aerosol challenge with virulent F. tularensis subsp. tularensis. It shows that increases in the levels of most of these immunomodulators, including those known to be critical for protective immunity, do not superficially correlate with protection unless adjusted for the effects of bacterial burden. Additionally, several cytokines were selectively

  20. Isolation of Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis from Blood Cultures by Plasma Purification and Immunomagnetic Separation Accelerates Antibiotic Susceptibility Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloni-Grinstein, Ronit; Schuster, Ofir; Yitzhaki, Shmuel; Aftalion, Moshe; Maoz, Sharon; Steinberger-Levy, Ida; Ber, Raphael

    2017-01-01

    The early symptoms of tularemia and plague, which are caused by Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis infection, respectively, are common to other illnesses, resulting in a low index of suspicion among clinicians. Moreover, because these diseases can be treated only with antibiotics, rapid isolation of the bacteria and antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) are preferable. Blood cultures of patients may serve as a source for bacteria isolation. However, due to the slow growth rates of F. tularensis and Y. pestis on solid media, isolation by plating blood culture samples on proper agar plates may require several days. Thus, improving the isolation procedure prior to antibiotic susceptibility determination is a major clinically relevant need. In this study, we developed a rapid, selective procedure for the isolation of F. tularensis and Y. pestis from blood cultures. We examined drop-plating and plasma purification followed by immunomagnetic separation (IMS) as alternative isolation methods. We determined that replacing the classical isolation method with drop-plating is advantageous with respect to time at the expense of specificity. Hence, we also examined isolation by IMS. Sub-localization of F. tularensis within blood cultures of infected mice has revealed that the majority of the bacteria are located within the extracellular fraction, in the plasma. Y. pestis also resides within the plasma. Therefore, the plasma fraction was isolated from blood cultures and subjected to an IMS procedure using polyclonal anti-F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) or anti-Y. pestis antibodies conjugated to 50-nm nano-beads. The time required to reach an inoculum of sufficient bacteria for AST was shortest when using the plasma and IMSs for both bacteria, saving up to 2 days of incubation for F. tularensis and 1 day for Y. pestis. Our isolation procedure provides a proof of concept for the clinical relevance of rapid isolation for AST from F. tularensis- and Y. pestis

  1. Complete genome sequence of Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica FTNF002-00.

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    Ravi D Barabote

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica FTNF002-00 strain was originally obtained from the first known clinical case of bacteremic F. tularensis pneumonia in Southern Europe isolated from an immunocompetent individual. The FTNF002-00 complete genome contains the RD(23 deletion and represents a type strain for a clonal population from the first epidemic tularemia outbreak in Spain between 1997-1998. Here, we present the complete sequence analysis of the FTNF002-00 genome. The complete genome sequence of FTNF002-00 revealed several large as well as small genomic differences with respect to two other published complete genome sequences of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica strains, LVS and OSU18. The FTNF002-00 genome shares >99.9% sequence similarity with LVS and OSU18, and is also approximately 5 MB smaller by comparison. The overall organization of the FTNF002-00 genome is remarkably identical to those of LVS and OSU18, except for a single 3.9 kb inversion in FTNF002-00. Twelve regions of difference ranging from 0.1-1.5 kb and forty-two small insertions and deletions were identified in a comparative analysis of FTNF002-00, LVS, and OSU18 genomes. Two small deletions appear to inactivate two genes in FTNF002-00 causing them to become pseudogenes; the intact genes encode a protein of unknown function and a drug:H(+ antiporter. In addition, we identified ninety-nine proteins in FTNF002-00 containing amino acid mutations compared to LVS and OSU18. Several non-conserved amino acid replacements were identified, one of which occurs in the virulence-associated intracellular growth locus subunit D protein. Many of these changes in FTNF002-00 are likely the consequence of direct selection that increases the fitness of this subsp. holarctica clone within its endemic population. Our complete genome sequence analyses lay the foundation for experimental testing of these possibilities.

  2. Antibodies to both terminal and internal B-cell epitopes of Francisella tularensis O-polysaccharide produced by patients with tularemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhaohua; Perkins, Hillary M; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2014-02-01

    Francisella tularensis, the Gram-negative bacterium that causes tularemia, is considered a potential bioterrorism threat due to its low infectivity dose and the high morbidity and mortality from respiratory disease. We previously characterized two mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the O-polysaccharide (O antigen [OAg]) of F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS): Ab63, which targets a terminal epitope at the nonreducing end of OAg, and Ab52, which targets a repeating internal OAg epitope. These two MAbs were protective in a mouse model of respiratory tularemia. To determine whether these epitope types are also targeted by humans, we tested the ability of each of 18 blood serum samples from 11 tularemia patients to inhibit the binding of Ab63 or Ab52 to F. tularensis LPS in a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Although all serum samples had Ab63- and Ab52-inhibitory activities, the ratios of Ab63 to Ab52 inhibitory potencies varied 75-fold. However, the variation was only 2.3-fold for sequential serum samples from the same patient, indicating different distributions of terminal- versus internal-binding antibodies in different individuals. Western blot analysis using class-specific anti-human Ig secondary antibodies showed that both terminal- and internal-binding OAg antibodies were of the IgG, IgM, and IgA isotypes. These results support the use of a mouse model to discover protective B-cell epitopes for tularemia vaccines or prophylactic/therapeutic antibodies, and they present a general strategy for interrogating the antibody responses of patients and vaccinees to microbial carbohydrate epitopes that have been characterized in experimental animals.

  3. Bioavailability and efficacy of levofloxacin against Francisella tularensis in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

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    Nelson, Michelle; Lever, Mark S; Dean, Rachel E; Pearce, Peter C; Stevens, Daniel J; Simpson, Andrew J H

    2010-09-01

    Pharmacokinetic and efficacy studies with levofloxacin were performed in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) model of inhalational tularemia. Plasma levofloxacin pharmacokinetics were determined in six animals in separate single-dose and multidose studies. Plasma drug concentrations were analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-electrospray ionization. On day 7 of a twice-daily dosing regimen of 40 mg/kg, the levofloxacin half-life, maximum concentration, and area under the curve in marmoset plasma were 2.3 h, 20.9 microg/ml, and 81.4 microg/liter/h, respectively. An efficacy study was undertaken using eight treated and two untreated control animals. Marmosets were challenged with a mean of 1.5 x 10(2) CFU of Francisella tularensis by the airborne route. Treated animals were administered 16.5 mg/kg levofloxacin by mouth twice daily, based on the pharmacokinetic parameters, beginning 24 h after challenge. Control animals had a raised core body temperature by 57 h postchallenge and died from infection by day 5. All of the other animals survived, remained afebrile, and lacked overt clinical signs. No bacteria were recovered from the organs of these animals at postmortem after culling at day 24 postchallenge. In conclusion, postexposure prophylaxis with orally administered levofloxacin was efficacious against acute inhalational tularemia in the common marmoset. The marmoset appears to be an appropriate animal model for the evaluation of postexposure therapies.

  4. Binding and activation of host plasminogen on the surface of Francisella tularensis

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    Whitt Michael A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Francisella tularensis (FT is a gram-negative facultative intracellular coccobacillus and is the causal agent of a life-threatening zoonotic disease known as tularemia. Although FT preferentially infects phagocytic cells of the host, recent evidence suggests that a significant number of bacteria can be found extracellularly in the plasma fraction of the blood during active infection. This observation suggests that the interaction between FT and host plasma components may play an important role in survival and dissemination of the bacterium during the course of infection. Plasminogen (PLG is a protein zymogen that is found in abundance in the blood of mammalian hosts. A number of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial pathogens have the ability to bind to PLG, giving them a survival advantage by increasing their ability to penetrate extracellular matrices and cross tissue barriers. Results We show that PLG binds to the surface of FT and that surface-bound PLG can be activated to plasmin in the presence of tissue PLG activator in vitro. In addition, using Far-Western blotting assays coupled with proteomic analyses of FT outer membrane preparations, we have identified several putative PLG-binding proteins of FT. Conclusions The ability of FT to acquire surface bound PLG that can be activated on its surface may be an important virulence mechanism that results in an increase in initial infectivity, survival, and/or dissemination of this bacterium in vivo.

  5. Outer membrane vesicle-associated lipase FtlA enhances cellular invasion and virulence in Francisella tularensis LVS.

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    Chen, Fei; Cui, Guolin; Wang, Shuxia; Nair, Manoj Kumar Mohan; He, Lihong; Qi, Xinyi; Han, Xiangmin; Zhang, Hanqi; Zhang, Jing-Ren; Su, Jingliang

    2017-07-26

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious intracellular pathogen that infects a wide range of host species and causes fatal pneumonic tularemia in humans. ftlA was identified as a potential virulence determinant of the F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) in our previous transposon screen, but its function remained undefined. Here, we show that an unmarked deletion mutant of ftlA was avirulent in a pneumonia mouse model with a severely impaired capacity to infect host cells. Consistent with its sequence homology with GDSL lipase/esterase family proteins, the FtlA protein displayed lipolytic activity in both E. coli and F. tularensis with a preference for relatively short carbon-chain substrates. FtlA thus represents the first F. tularensis lipase to promote bacterial infection of host cells and in vivo fitness. As a cytoplasmic protein, we found that FtlA was secreted into the extracellular environment as a component of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). Further confocal microscopy analysis revealed that the FtlA-containing OMVs isolated from F. tularensis LVS attached to the host cell membrane. Finally, the OMV-associated FtlA protein complemented the genetic deficiency of the ΔftlA mutant in terms of host cell infection when OMVs purified from the parent strain were co-incubated with the mutant bacteria. These lines of evidence strongly suggest that the FtlA lipase promotes F. tularensis adhesion and internalization by modifying bacterial and/or host molecule(s) when it is secreted as a component of OMVs.

  6. About three cases of ulceroglandular tularemia, is this the re-emergence of Francisella tularensis in Belgium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, E; Van Eeckhoudt, S; Thissen, X; Ausselet, N; Fretin, D; Stefanescu, I; Glupczynski, Y; Delaere, B

    2015-10-01

    Tularemia is a zoonosis caused by Francisella tularensis that can be transmitted by several ways to human being and cause different clinical manifestations. We report three clinical cases of tularemia with ulceroglandular presentation in young males acquired during outdoor activities in Southern Belgium. Confirmation of the diagnosis was established by serology. Only three cases of tularemia have been reported in Belgium between 1950 and 2012 by the National Reference Laboratory CODA-CERVA (Ref Lab CODA-CERVA) but re-emergence of tularemia is established in several European countries and F. tularensis is also well known to be present in animal reservoirs and vectors in Belgium. The diagnosis of tularemia has to be considered in case of suggestive clinical presentation associated with epidemiological risk factors.

  7. Recovery of Francisella tularensis from soil samples by filtration and detection by real-time PCR and cELISA.

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    Sellek, Ricela; Jimenez, Oscar; Aizpurua, Carmen; Fernandez-Frutos, Begoña; De Leon, Patricia; Camacho, Maite; Fernandez-Moreira, Daniel; Ybarra, Carmen; Carlos Cabria, Juan

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a specific and highly sensitive method able to detect very low concentrations of Francisella tularensis in soil samples by real-time PCR (qPCR) with SYBR Green I. tul4 gene, which encodes the 17-kDa protein (TUL4) in F. tularensis strains, was amplified using a LightCycler (LC) device. We achieved a detection limit of 0.69 fg of genomic DNA from F. tularensis subp. holarctica live vaccine strain (LVS), corresponding to a value less than 3.4 genome equivalents per reaction. The qPCR was shown to be specific, highly sensitive and reproducible. In addition, we evaluated 2 new methods for recovering bacteria from soil based on 1-step filtration using glass fiber filters and PVDF filters. These filtration methods enabled us to recover F. tularensis efficiently from soil samples. As few as 50 CFU per 0.5 g of soil were detected by qPCR. Capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) allowed us to detect and quantify the amount of bacteria recovered from soil by an immunological method. Although qPCR was more sensitive than cELISA, we did not observe substantial differences in the amount of bacteria quantified by both methods.

  8. Novel engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides display broad-spectrum activity against Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    Abdelbaqi, Suha; Deslouches, Berthony; Steckbeck, Jonathan; Montelaro, Ronald; Reed, Douglas S

    2016-02-01

    Broad-spectrum antimicrobials are needed to effectively treat patients infected in the event of a pandemic or intentional release of a pathogen prior to confirmation of the pathogen's identity. Engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides (eCAPs) display activity against a number of bacterial pathogens including multi-drug-resistant strains. Two lead eCAPs, WLBU2 and WR12, were compared with human cathelicidin (LL-37) against three highly pathogenic bacteria: Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Both WLBU2 and WR12 demonstrated bactericidal activity greater than that of LL-37, particularly against F. tularensis and Y. pestis. Only WLBU2 had bactericidal activity against B. pseudomallei. WLBU2, WR12 and LL-37 were all able to inhibit the growth of the three bacteria in vitro. Because these bacteria can be facultative intracellular pathogens, preferentially infecting macrophages and dendritic cells, we evaluated the activity of WLBU2 against F. tularensis in an ex vivo infection model with J774 cells, a mouse macrophage cell line. In that model WLBU2 was able to achieve greater than 50% killing of F. tularensis at a concentration of 12.5 μM. These data show the therapeutic potential of eCAPs, particularly WLBU2, as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial for treating highly pathogenic bacterial infections.

  9. New protein fold revealed by a 1.65 Å resolution crystal structure of Francisella tularensis pathogenicity island protein IglC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P.; Schubot, Florian D.; Waugh, David S.

    2007-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious Gram-negative intracellular pathogen that causes the fulminating disease tularemia and is considered to be a potential bioweapon. F. tularensis pathogenicity island proteins play a key role in modulating phagosome biogenesis and subsequent bacterial escape into the cytoplasm of macrophages. The 23 kDa pathogenicity island protein IglC is essential for the survival and proliferation of F. tularensis in macrophages. Seeking to gain some insight into its function, we determined the crystal structure of IglC at 1.65 Å resolution. IglC adopts a β-sandwich conformation that exhibits no similarity with any known protein structure. PMID:17905833

  10. Francisella tularensis type A Strains Cause the Rapid Encystment of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Survive in Amoebal Cysts for Three Weeks post Infection

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    El-Etr, S H; Margolis, J; Monack, D; Robison, R; Cohen, M; Moore, E; Rasley, A

    2009-07-28

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of the zoonotic disease tularemia, has recently gained increased attention due to the emergence of tularemia in geographical areas where the disease has been previously unknown, and the organism's potential as a bioterrorism agent. Although F. tularensis has an extremely broad host range, the bacterial reservoir in nature has not been conclusively identified. In this study, the ability of virulent F. tularensis strains to survive and replicate in the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii was explored. We observe that A. castellanii trophozoites rapidly encyst in response to F. tularensis infection and that this rapid encystment phenotype (REP) is caused by factor(s) secreted by amoebae and/or F. tularensis into the co-culture media. Further, our results indicate that in contrast to LVS, virulent strains of F. tularensis can survive in A. castellanii cysts for at least 3 weeks post infection and that induction of rapid amoeba encystment is essential for survival. In addition, our data indicate that pathogenic F. tularensis strains block lysosomal fusion in A. castellanii. Taken together, these data suggest that the interactions between F. tularensis strains and amoeba may play a role in the environmental persistence of F. tularensis.

  11. Diversity of Francisella tularensis Schu4 antigens recognized by T lymphocytes after natural infections in humans: identification of candidate epitopes for inclusion in a rationally designed tularemia vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurry, Julie A; Gregory, Stephen H; Moise, Leonard;

    2007-01-01

    The T lymphocyte antigens, which may have a role in protection against tularemia, were predicted by immunoinformatics analysis of Francisella tularensis Schu4. Twenty-seven class II putative promiscuous epitopes and 125 putative class I supertype epitopes were chosen for synthesis; peptides were...

  12. Utilization of an unstable plasmid and the I-SceI endonuclease to generate routine markerless deletion mutants in Francisella tularensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horzempa, Joseph; Shanks, Robert M.Q.; Brown, Matthew J.; Russo, Brian C.; O’Dee, Dawn M.; Nau, Gerard J.

    2011-01-01

    We engineered an efficient system to make Francisella tularensis deletion mutations using an unstable, poorly maintained plasmid to enhance the likelihood of homologous recombination. For counterselection, we adapted a strategy using I-SceI, which causes a double-stranded break in the integrated suicide vector, forcing a second recombination to mediate allelic replacement. PMID:19879904

  13. Generation of a convalescent model of virulent Francisella tularensis infection for assessment of host requirements for survival of tularemia.

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    Deborah D Crane

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of tularemia. Development of novel vaccines and therapeutics for tularemia has been hampered by the lack of understanding of which immune components are required to survive infection. Defining these requirements for protection against virulent F. tularensis, such as strain SchuS4, has been difficult since experimentally infected animals typically die within 5 days after exposure to as few as 10 bacteria. Such a short mean time to death typically precludes development, and therefore assessment, of immune responses directed against virulent F. tularensis. To enable identification of the components of the immune system that are required for survival of virulent F. tularensis, we developed a convalescent model of tularemia in C57Bl/6 mice using low dose antibiotic therapy in which the host immune response is ultimately responsible for clearance of the bacterium. Using this model we demonstrate αβTCR(+ cells, γδTCR(+ cells, and B cells are necessary to survive primary SchuS4 infection. Analysis of mice deficient in specific soluble mediators shows that IL-12p40 and IL-12p35 are essential for survival of SchuS4 infection. We also show that IFN-γ is required for survival of SchuS4 infection since mice lacking IFN-γR succumb to disease during the course of antibiotic therapy. Finally, we found that both CD4(+ and CD8(+ cells are the primary producers of IFN-γand that γδTCR(+ cells and NK cells make a minimal contribution toward production of this cytokine throughout infection. Together these data provide a novel model that identifies key cells and cytokines required for survival or exacerbation of infection with virulent F. tularensis and provides evidence that this model will be a useful tool for better understanding the dynamics of tularemia infection.

  14. The involvement of IL-17A in the murine response to sub-lethal inhalational infection with Francisella tularensis.

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    Gal Markel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Francisella tularensis is an intercellular bacterium often causing fatal disease when inhaled. Previous reports have underlined the role of cell-mediated immunity and IFNgamma in the host response to Francisella tularensis infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we provide evidence for the involvement of IL-17A in host defense to inhalational tularemia, using a mouse model of intranasal infection with the Live Vaccine Strain (LVS. We demonstrate the kinetics of IL-17A production in lavage fluids of infected lungs and identify the IL-17A-producing lymphocytes as pulmonary gammadelta and Th17 cells. The peak of IL-17A production appears early during sub-lethal infection, it precedes the peak of immune activation and the nadir of the disease, and then subsides subsequently. Exogenous airway administration of IL-17A or of IL-23 had a limited yet consistent effect of delaying the onset of death from a lethal dose of LVS, implying that IL-17A may be involved in restraining the infection. The protective role for IL-17A was directly demonstrated by in vivo neutralization of IL-17A. Administration of anti IL-17A antibodies concomitantly to a sub-lethal airway infection with 0.1xLD(50 resulted in a fatal disease. CONCLUSION: In summary, these data characterize the involvement and underline the protective key role of the IL-17A axis in the lungs from inhalational tularemia.

  15. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Francisella tularensis Pathogenicity Regulator, Macrophage Locus Protein A (MglA.

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    Bonnie J Cuthbert

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is one of the most infectious bacteria known and is the etiologic agent of tularemia. Francisella virulence arises from a 33 kilobase (Kb pathogenicity island (FPI that is regulated by the macrophage locus protein A (MglA and the stringent starvation protein A (SspA. These proteins interact with both RNA polymerase (RNAP and the pathogenicity island gene regulator (PigR to activate FPI transcription. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are not well understood. Indeed, while most bacterial SspA proteins function as homodimers to activate transcription, F. tularensis SspA forms a heterodimer with the MglA protein, which is unique to F. tularensis. To gain insight into MglA function, we performed structural and biochemical studies. The MglA structure revealed that it contains a fold similar to the SspA protein family. Unexpectedly, MglA also formed a homodimer in the crystal. Chemical crosslinking and size exclusion chromatography (SEC studies showed that MglA is able to self-associate in solution to form a dimer but that it preferentially heterodimerizes with SspA. Finally, the MglA structure revealed malate, which was used in crystallization, bound in an open pocket formed by the dimer, suggesting the possibility that this cleft could function in small molecule ligand binding. The location of this binding region relative to recently mapped PigR and RNAP interacting sites suggest possible roles for small molecule binding in MglA and SspA•MglA function.

  16. Identification of a small molecule that modifies MglA/SspA interaction and impairs intramacrophage survival of Francisella tularensis.

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    Algevis P Wrench

    Full Text Available The transcription factors MglA and SspA of Francisella tularensis form a heterodimer complex and interact with the RNA polymerase to regulate the expression of the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI genes. These genes are essential for this pathogen's virulence and survival within host cells. In this study, we used a small molecule screening to identify quinacrine as a thermal stabilizing compound for F. tularensis SCHU S4 MglA and SspA. A bacterial two-hybrid system was used to analyze the in vivo effect of quinacrine on the heterodimer complex. The results show that quinacrine affects the interaction between MglA and SspA, indicated by decreased β-galactosidase activity. Further in vitro analyses, using size exclusion chromatography, indicated that quinacrine does not disrupt the heterodimer formation, however, changes in the alpha helix content were confirmed by circular dichroism. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicated that quinacrine makes contact with amino acid residues Y63 in MglA, and K97 in SspA, both located in the "cleft" of the interacting surfaces. In F. tularensis subsp. novicida, quinacrine decreased the transcription of the FPI genes, iglA, iglD, pdpD and pdpA. As a consequence, the intramacrophage survival capabilities of the bacteria were affected. These results support use of the MglA/SspA interacting surface, and quinacrine's chemical scaffold, for the design of high affinity molecules that will function as therapeutics for the treatment of Tularemia.

  17. Isolation and mutagenesis of a capsule-like complex (CLC from Francisella tularensis, and contribution of the CLC to F. tularensis virulence in mice.

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    Aloka B Bandara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Francisella tularensis is a category-A select agent and is responsible for tularemia in humans and animals. The surface components of F. tularensis that contribute to virulence are not well characterized. An electron-dense capsule has been postulated to be present around F. tularensis based primarily on electron microscopy, but this specific antigen has not been isolated or characterized. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A capsule-like complex (CLC was effectively extracted from the cell surface of an F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS lacking O-antigen with 0.5% phenol after 10 passages in defined medium broth and growth on defined medium agar for 5 days at 32°C in 7% CO₂. The large molecular size CLC was extracted by enzyme digestion, ethanol precipitation, and ultracentrifugation, and consisted of glucose, galactose, mannose, and Proteinase K-resistant protein. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that expression of genes in a putative polysaccharide locus in the LVS genome (FTL_1432 through FTL_1421 was upregulated when CLC expression was enhanced. Open reading frames FTL_1423 and FLT_1422, which have homology to genes encoding for glycosyl transferases, were deleted by allelic exchange, and the resulting mutant after passage in broth (LVSΔ1423/1422_P10 lacked most or all of the CLC, as determined by electron microscopy, and CLC isolation and analysis. Complementation of LVSΔ1423/1422 and subsequent passage in broth restored CLC expression. LVSΔ1423/1422_P10 was attenuated in BALB/c mice inoculated intranasally (IN and intraperitoneally with greater than 80 times and 270 times the LVS LD₅₀, respectively. Following immunization, mice challenged IN with over 700 times the LD₅₀ of LVS remained healthy and asymptomatic. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicated that the CLC may be a glycoprotein, FTL_1422 and -FTL_1423 were involved in CLC biosynthesis, the CLC contributed to the virulence of F. tularensis LVS, and a CLC

  18. Monitoring biothreat agents (Francisella tularensis, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis) with a portable real-time PCR instrument.

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    Mölsä, Markos; Hemmilä, Heidi; Katz, Anna; Niemimaa, Jukka; Forbes, Kristian M; Huitu, Otso; Stuart, Peter; Henttonen, Heikki; Nikkari, Simo

    2015-08-01

    In the event of suspected releases or natural outbreaks of contagious pathogens, rapid identification of the infectious agent is essential for appropriate medical intervention and disease containment. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of a novel portable real-time PCR thermocycler, PikoReal™, to the standard real-time PCR thermocycler, Applied Biosystems® 7300 (ABI 7300), for the detection of three high-risk biothreat bacterial pathogens: Francisella tularensis, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis. In addition, a novel confirmatory real-time PCR assay for the detection of F. tularensis is presented and validated. The results show that sensitivity of the assays, based on a dilution series, for the three infectious agents ranged from 1 to 100 fg of target DNA with both instruments. No cross-reactivity was revealed in specificity testing. Duration of the assays with the PikoReal and ABI 7300 systems were 50 and 100 min, respectively. In field testing for F. tularensis, results were obtained with the PikoReal system in 95 min, as the pre-PCR preparation, including DNA extraction, required an additional 45 min. We conclude that the PikoReal system enables highly sensitive and rapid on-site detection of biothreat agents under field conditions, and may be a more efficient alternative to conventional diagnostic methods.

  19. Specific recognition of the major capsid protein of Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus by sera of patients infected by Francisella tularensis.

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    Pelletier, Nicolas; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2009-08-01

    Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative cocobacillus responsible for tularemia, especially severe pneumonia, is a facultative intracellular bacterium classified as a biological agent of category A. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APM) is a recently discovered giant virus suspected to be an agent of both community- and hospital-acquired pneumonia. During specificity testing of antibody to APM detection, it was observed that nearly all patients infected by F. tularensis had elevated antibody titers to APM. In the present study, we investigated this cross-reactivity by immunoproteomics. Apart from the detection of antibodies reactive to new immunoreactive proteins in patients infected by F. tularensis, we showed that the sera of those patients recognize specifically two proteins of APM: the capsid protein and another protein of unknown function. No common protein motif can be detected in silico based on genome analysis of the involved protein. Furthermore, this cross-reactivity was confirmed with the recombinant capsid protein expressed in Escherichia coli. This emphasizes the pitfalls of a serological diagnosis of pneumonia.

  20. Prior Inoculation with Type B Strains of Francisella tularensis Provides Partial Protection against Virulent Type A Strains in Cottontail Rabbits.

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    Vienna R Brown

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent bacterium that is capable of causing severe disease (tularemia in a wide range of species. This organism is characterized into two distinct subspecies: tularensis (type A and holarctica (type B which vary in several crucial ways, with some type A strains having been found to be considerably more virulent in humans and laboratory animals. Cottontail rabbits have been widely implicated as a reservoir species for this subspecies; however, experimental inoculation in our laboratory revealed type A organisms to be highly virulent, resulting in 100% mortality following challenge with 50-100 organisms. Inoculation of cottontail rabbits with the same number of organisms from type B strains of bacteria was found to be rarely lethal and to result in a robust humoral immune response. The objective of this study was to characterize the protection afforded by a prior challenge with type B strains against a later inoculation with a type A strain in North American cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus spp. Previous infection with a type B strain of organism was found to lengthen survival time and in some cases prevent death following inoculation with a type A2 strain of F. tularensis. In contrast, inoculation of a type A1b strain was uniformly lethal in cottontail rabbits irrespective of a prior type B inoculation. These findings provide important insight about the role cottontail rabbits may play in environmental maintenance and transmission of this organism.

  1. Detection of Francisella tularensis in ticks and identification of their genotypes using multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis

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    Yang Hong

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tularemia was reported in China over 50 years ago, however, many epidemical characteristics remain unclear. In the present study, the prevalence of Francisella tularensis in ticks was investigated during an epidemiological surveillance in China and then we measured their genetic diversity by conducting multiple-locus variable- number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA. Results 1670 ticks from 2 endemic areas (Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region and Heilongjiang Province and 2 non-endemic areas (Jilin and Fujian Provinces were collected and tested for evidence of tularemia by nested PCR. The prevalence of Francisella tularensis in ticks averaged 1.98%. The positive rates were significantly different among tick species, with Dermacentor silvarum and Ixodes persulatus responsible for all positive numbers. All F. tularensis that were detected in ticks belonged to F. tularensis subsp. holarctica and MLVA disclosed genetic diversity. One subtype was identified in 17 of 33 positive tick samples in three different study areas. Another subtype belonging to F. tularensis subsp. holarctica genotype was described for the first time in the current study. Conclusion The study showed two tick species, D. silvarum and I. persulatus harboring the pathogen of tularemia in natural environment, indicating these two tick species might have a role in tularemia existence in China. MLVA results disclosed the genetic diversity F. tularensis and identified one genotype as the most prevalent among the investigated ticks in China.

  2. Immunoproteomics analysis of the murine antibody response to vaccination with an improved Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS.

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    Susan M Twine

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis is the causative agent of a spectrum of diseases collectively known as tularemia. An attenuated live vaccine strain (LVS has been shown to be efficacious in humans, but safety concerns have prevented its licensure by the FDA. Recently, F. tularensis LVS has been produced under Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP guidelines. Little is known about the immunogenicity of this new vaccine preparation in comparison with extensive studies conducted with laboratory passaged strains of LVS. Thus, the aim of the current work was to evaluate the repertoire of antibodies produced in mouse strains vaccinated with the new LVS vaccine preparation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the current study, we used an immunoproteomics approach to examine the repertoire of antibodies induced following successful immunization of BALB/c versus unsuccessful vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with the new preparation of F. tularensis LVS. Successful vaccination of BALB/c mice elicited antibodies to nine identified proteins that were not recognized by antisera from vaccinated but unprotected C57BL/6 mice. In addition, the CGMP formulation of LVS stimulated a greater repertoire of antibodies following vaccination compared to vaccination with laboratory passaged ATCC LVS strain. A total of 15 immunoreactive proteins were identified in both studies, however, 16 immunoreactive proteins were uniquely reactive with sera from the new formulation of LVS. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report characterising the antibody based immune response of the new formulation of LVS in the widely used murine model of tularemia. Using two mouse strains, we show that successfully vaccinated mice can be distinguished from unsuccessfully vaccinated mice based upon the repertoire of antibodies generated. This opens the door towards downselection of antigens for incorporation into tularemia subunit vaccines. In addition, this work

  3. Fine tuning inflammation at the front door: macrophage complement receptor 3-mediates phagocytosis and immune suppression for Francisella tularensis.

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    Shipan Dai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD11b/CD18 is a major macrophage phagocytic receptor. The biochemical pathways through which CR3 regulates immunologic responses have not been fully characterized. Francisella tularensis is a remarkably infectious, facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages that causes tularemia. Early evasion of the host immune response contributes to the virulence of F. tularensis and CR3 is an important receptor for its phagocytosis. Here we confirm that efficient attachment and uptake of the highly virulent Type A F. tularensis spp. tularensis strain Schu S4 by human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs requires complement C3 opsonization and CR3. However, despite a>40-fold increase in uptake following C3 opsonization, Schu S4 induces limited pro-inflammatory cytokine production compared with non-opsonized Schu S4 and the low virulent F. novicida. This suggests that engagement of CR3 by opsonized Schu S4 contributes specifically to the immune suppression during and shortly following phagocytosis which we demonstrate by CD11b siRNA knockdown in hMDMs. This immune suppression is concomitant with early inhibition of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK and NF-κB activation. Furthermore, TLR2 siRNA knockdown shows that pro-inflammatory cytokine production and MAPK activation in response to non-opsonized Schu S4 depends on TLR2 signaling providing evidence that CR3-TLR2 crosstalk mediates immune suppression for opsonized Schu S4. Deletion of the CD11b cytoplasmic tail reverses the CR3-mediated decrease in ERK and p38 activation during opsonized Schu-S4 infection. The CR3-mediated signaling pathway involved in this immune suppression includes Lyn kinase and Akt activation, and increased MKP-1, which limits TLR2-mediated pro-inflammatory responses. These data indicate that while the highly virulent F. tularensis uses CR3 for efficient uptake, optimal engagement of this receptor down-regulates TLR2-dependent pro-inflammatory responses by inhibiting

  4. [Investigation of the presence of Francisella tularensis by culture, serology and molecular methods in mice of Thrace Region, Turkey].

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    Unal Yilmaz, Gülizar; Gurcan, Saban; Ozkan, Beytullah; Karadenizli, Aynur

    2014-04-01

    Tularemia is a disease that has been reported in Turkey since 1936. Although mice are considered to have a role in the transmission of Francisella tularensis to man, this has not been exactly confirmed yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of F. tularensis in mice by using culture, serology and molecular methods. For this purpose, four villages (Edirne-Demirkoy, Kirklareli-Kaynarca, Tekirdag-Muzruplu, Tekirdag-Sinanli) were selected in Thrace Region of Turkey where tularemia cases had been reported previously. A total of 126 live-catch mouse traps were established in warehouses, barns, areas near wells, water tanks and creeks in the villages in December 2012. Traps were kept overnight and the next day the animals collected were identified at species-level. The live-captured mice were anesthetized and their heart blood samples were obtained. Subsequently, liver and spleen tissues were removed from every mouse under aseptic conditions in the class-2 safety cabinet. These tissues were cultivated in Francis medium containing 5% sheep blood, 0.1% cystein, 1% glucose and incubated for seven days in both normal atmosphere and 5% carbondioxide incubator at 37°C. Tularemia microagglutination test was performed by using the sera which were obtained from live-captured mice. Finally, DNAs were isolated from both liver and spleen tissues of mice, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (Tularemia RT-PCR; Public Health Agency of Turkey, Ankara) were performed. In our study, a total of 19 mice were captured and of these 11 were alive. Ten mice were identified as Apodemus flavicollis, seven were Mus macedonicus and two were Mus musculus. There were no Francisella tularensis isolation in the cultures of mice liver and spleen tissues. Serological tests yielded negative results for 10 mice whose serum samples could be obtained. In RT-PCR, positivity were detected in spleen tissues of two mice which were captured from Kaynarca where first tularemia cases in

  5. The use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry in the identification of Francisella tularensis

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    Karatuna, Onur; Çelebi, Bekir; Can, Simge; Akyar, Işın; Kiliç, Selçuk

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the cause of the zoonotic disease tularemia and is classified among highly pathogenic bacteria (HPB) due to its low infection dose and potential for airborne transmission. In the case of HBP, there is a pressing need for rapid, accurate and reliable identification. Phenotypic identification of Francisella species is inappropriate for clinical microbiology laboratories because it is time-consuming, hazardous and subject to variable interpretation. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was recently evaluated as a useful tool for the rapid identification of a variety of microorganisms. In this study, we evaluated the use of MALDI-TOF MS for the rapid identification of Francisella tularensis and differentiation of its subspecies. Using national collection of Francisella isolates from the National Tularemia Reference Laboratory (Public Health Institution of Turkey, Ankara), a total of 75 clinical isolates were investigated by species and subspecies-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and MALDI-TOF MS. All isolates were originally identified as F. tularensis subsp. holarctica according to region of difference 1 (RD1) subspecies-specific PCR results. For all isolates MALDI-TOF MS provided results in concordance with subspecies-specific PCR analysis. Although PCR-based methods are effective in identifying Francisella species, they are labor-intensive and take longer periods of time to obtain the results when compared with MALDI-TOF MS. MALDI-TOF MS appeared to be a rapid, reliable and cost-effective identification technique for Francisella spp. Shorter analysis time and low cost make this an appealing new option in microbiology laboratories. PMID:26773181

  6. Evaluation of the FilmArray® system for detection of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis

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    Seiner, Derrick R.; Colburn, Heather A.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Straub, Tim M.; Victry, Kristin D.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2013-04-29

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the Idaho Technologies FilmArray® Biothreat Panel for the detection of Bacillus anthracis (Ba), Francisella tularensis (Ft), and Yersinia pestis (Yp) DNA, and demonstrate the detection of Ba spores. Methods and Results: DNA samples from Ba, Ft and Yp strains and near-neighbors, and live Ba spores were analyzed using the Biothreat Panel, a multiplexed PCR-based assay for 17 pathogens and toxins. Sensitivity studies with DNA suggest a limit of detection of 250 genome equivalents (GEs) per sample. Furthermore, the correct call of Ft, Yp or Bacillus species was made in 63 of 72 samples tested at 25 GE or less. With samples containing 25 Ba Sterne spores, at least one of the two possible Ba markers were identified in all samples tested. We observed no cross-reactivity with near-neighbor DNAs.

  7. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of macrophage growth locus A (MglA) protein from Francisella tularensis

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    Subburaman, P.; Austin, B.P.; Shaw, G.X.; Waugh, D.S.; Ji, X. (NCI)

    2010-11-03

    Francisella tularensis, a potential bioweapon, causes a rare infectious disease called tularemia in humans and animals. The macrophage growth locus A (MglA) protein from F. tularensis associates with RNA polymerase to positively regulate the expression of multiple virulence factors that are required for its survival and replication within macrophages. The MglA protein was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 7.5 {angstrom} resolution at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory and belonged to the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 125, c = 54 {angstrom}.

  8. Rapid focused sequencing: a multiplexed assay for simultaneous detection and strain typing of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis.

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    Rosemary S Turingan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intentional release of Bacillus anthracis in the United States in 2001 has heightened concern about the use of pathogenic microorganisms in bioterrorism attacks. Many of the deadliest bacteria, including the Class A Select Agents Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis, are highly infectious via the pulmonary route when released in aerosolized form. Hence, rapid, sensitive, and reliable methods for detection of these biothreats and characterization of their potential impact on the exposed population are of critical importance to initiate and support rapid military, public health, and clinical responses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed microfluidic multiplexed PCR and sequencing assays based on the simultaneous interrogation of three pathogens per assay and ten loci per pathogen. Microfluidic separation of amplified fluorescently labeled fragments generated characteristic electrophoretic signatures for identification of each agent. The three sets of primers allowed significant strain typing and discrimination from non-pathogenic closely-related species and environmental background strains based on amplicon sizes alone. Furthermore, sequencing of the 10 amplicons per pathogen, termed "Rapid Focused Sequencing," allowed an even greater degree of strain discrimination and, in some cases, can be used to determine virulence. Both amplification and sequencing assays were performed in microfluidic biochips developed for fast thermal cycling and requiring 7 µL per reaction. The 30-plex sequencing assay resulted in genotypic resolution of 84 representative strains belonging to each of the three biothreat species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The microfluidic multiplexed assays allowed identification and strain differentiation of the biothreat agents Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis and clear discrimination from closely-related species and several environmental

  9. Differential MicroRNA Analyses of Burkholderia pseudomallei- and Francisella tularensis-Exposed hPBMCs Reveal Potential Biomarkers

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    Herrera-Galeano, J. Enrique; Frey, Kenneth G.; Schully, Kevin L.; Luu, Truong V.; Pesce, John; Mokashi, Vishwesh P.; Keane-Myers, Andrea M.; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence that microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the immune response against infectious agents suggests that miRNA might be exploitable as signatures of exposure to specific infectious agents. In order to identify potential early miRNA biomarkers of bacterial infections, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) were exposed to two select agents, Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243 and Francisella tularensis SHU S4, as well as to the nonpathogenic control Escherichia coli DH5α. RNA samples were harvested at three early time points, 30, 60, and 120 minutes postexposure, then sequenced. RNAseq analyses identified 87 miRNAs to be differentially expressed (DE) in a linear fashion. Of these, 31 miRNAs were tested using the miScript miRNA qPCR assay. Through RNAseq identification and qPCR validation, we identified differentially expressed miRNA species that may be involved in the early response to bacterial infections. Based upon its upregulation at early time points postexposure in two different individuals, hsa-mir-30c-5p is a miRNA species that could be studied further as a potential biomarker for exposure to these gram-negative intracellular pathogens. Gene ontology functional analyses demonstrated that programmed cell death is the first ranking biological process associated with miRNAs that are upregulated in F. tularensis-exposed hPBMCs. PMID:28791299

  10. Visualization of murine intranasal dosing efficiency using luminescent Francisella tularensis: effect of instillation volume and form of anesthesia.

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    Mark A Miller

    Full Text Available Intranasal instillation is a widely used procedure for pneumonic delivery of drugs, vaccine candidates, or infectious agents into the respiratory tract of research mice. However, there is a paucity of published literature describing the efficiency of this delivery technique. In this report we have used the murine model of tularemia, with Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (FTLVS infection, to evaluate the efficiency of pneumonic delivery via intranasal dosing performed either with differing instillation volumes or different types of anesthesia. FTLVS was rendered luminescent via transformation with a reporter plasmid that constitutively expressed the Photorhabdus luminescens lux operon from a Francisella promoter. We then used an IVIS Spectrum whole animal imaging system to visualize FT dissemination at various time points following intranasal instillation. We found that instillation of FT in a dose volume of 10 µl routinely resulted in infection of the upper airways but failed to initiate infection of the pulmonary compartment. Efficient delivery of FT into the lungs via intranasal instillation required a dose volume of 50 µl or more. These studies also demonstrated that intranasal instillation was significantly more efficient for pneumonic delivery of FTLVS in mice that had been anesthetized with inhaled (isoflurane vs. parenteral (ketamine/xylazine anesthesia. The collective results underscore the need for researchers to consider both the dose volume and the anesthesia type when either performing pneumonic delivery via intranasal instillation, or when comparing studies that employed this technique.

  11. A Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain that improves stimulation of antigen-presenting cells does not enhance vaccine efficacy.

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    Deanna M Schmitt

    Full Text Available Vaccination is a proven strategy to mitigate morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases. The methodology of identifying and testing new vaccine candidates could be improved with rational design and in vitro testing prior to animal experimentation. The tularemia vaccine, Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS, does not elicit complete protection against lethal challenge with a virulent type A Francisella strain. One factor that may contribute to this poor performance is limited stimulation of antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we examined whether the interaction of genetically modified LVS strains with human antigen-presenting cells correlated with effectiveness as tularemia vaccine candidates. Human dendritic cells infected with wild-type LVS secrete low levels of proinflammatory cytokines, fail to upregulate costimulatory molecules, and activate human T cells poorly in vitro. One LVS mutant, strain 13B47, stimulated higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines from dendritic cells and macrophages and increased costimulatory molecule expression on dendritic cells compared to wild type. Additionally, 13B47-infected dendritic cells activated T cells more efficiently than LVS-infected cells. A deletion allele of the same gene in LVS displayed similar in vitro characteristics, but vaccination with this strain did not improve survival after challenge with a virulent Francisella strain. In vivo, this mutant was attenuated for growth and did not stimulate T cell responses in the lung comparable to wild type. Therefore, stimulation of antigen-presenting cells in vitro was improved by genetic modification of LVS, but did not correlate with efficacy against challenge in vivo within this model system.

  12. Seroprevalence for Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis in Austrian adults: a cross-sectional survey among military personnel and civilians.

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    Tobudic, Selma; Nedomansky, Klara; Poeppl, Wolfgang; Müller, Maria; Faas, Angelus; Mooseder, Gerhard; Allerberger, Franz; Stanek, Gerold; Burgmann, Heinz

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella melitensis infections in Austria and the exposure risk of military personnel were assessed in an exploratory nationwide cross-sectional seroprevalence survey in 526 healthy adult individuals, 222 of which were soldiers and 304 were civilians. Screening for IgA/IgG antibodies to C. burnetii (Phase I) and IgG/IgM antibodies to C. burnetii (Phase II), and to F. tularensis was done with commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. To detect antibodies against B. abortus and B. melitensis, an in-house complement fixation test was used. Overall, 11 individuals (2.0%) showed antibodies to C. burnetii, 3 individuals (0.5%) were seropositive for F. tularensis, and one (0.3%) individual was borderline positive. All individuals positive or borderline for F. tularensis tested negative for antibodies against C. burnetii. All individuals tested negative for antibodies against B. melitensis/B. abortus. There were no significant differences between the seroprevalence of C. burnetii and F. tularensis among military personnel and civilians. Our data demonstrate serological evidence of a low rate of exposure to C. burnetii and F. tularensis among the Austrian adult population and military personnel.

  13. Use of a capture-based pathogen transcript enrichment strategy for RNA-Seq analysis of the Francisella tularensis LVS transcriptome during infection of murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Zachary W; Brazel, David M; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary B; Hamblin, Rachelle Y; VanderNoot, Victoria A; Branda, Steven S

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a zoonotic intracellular pathogen that is capable of causing potentially fatal human infections. Like all successful bacterial pathogens, F. tularensis rapidly responds to changes in its environment during infection of host cells, and upon encountering different microenvironments within those cells. This ability to appropriately respond to the challenges of infection requires rapid and global shifts in gene expression patterns. In this study, we use a novel pathogen transcript enrichment strategy and whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to perform a detailed characterization of the rapid and global shifts in F. tularensis LVS gene expression during infection of murine macrophages. We performed differential gene expression analysis on all bacterial genes at two key stages of infection: phagosomal escape, and cytosolic replication. By comparing the F. tularensis transcriptome at these two stages of infection to that of the bacteria grown in culture, we were able to identify sets of genes that are differentially expressed over the course of infection. This analysis revealed the temporally dynamic expression of a number of known and putative transcriptional regulators and virulence factors, providing insight into their role during infection. In addition, we identified several F. tularensis genes that are significantly up-regulated during infection but had not been previously identified as virulence factors. These unknown genes may make attractive therapeutic or vaccine targets.

  14. Use of a capture-based pathogen transcript enrichment strategy for RNA-Seq analysis of the Francisella tularensis LVS transcriptome during infection of murine macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary W Bent

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a zoonotic intracellular pathogen that is capable of causing potentially fatal human infections. Like all successful bacterial pathogens, F. tularensis rapidly responds to changes in its environment during infection of host cells, and upon encountering different microenvironments within those cells. This ability to appropriately respond to the challenges of infection requires rapid and global shifts in gene expression patterns. In this study, we use a novel pathogen transcript enrichment strategy and whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq to perform a detailed characterization of the rapid and global shifts in F. tularensis LVS gene expression during infection of murine macrophages. We performed differential gene expression analysis on all bacterial genes at two key stages of infection: phagosomal escape, and cytosolic replication. By comparing the F. tularensis transcriptome at these two stages of infection to that of the bacteria grown in culture, we were able to identify sets of genes that are differentially expressed over the course of infection. This analysis revealed the temporally dynamic expression of a number of known and putative transcriptional regulators and virulence factors, providing insight into their role during infection. In addition, we identified several F. tularensis genes that are significantly up-regulated during infection but had not been previously identified as virulence factors. These unknown genes may make attractive therapeutic or vaccine targets.

  15. Slow-Onset Inhibition of the FabI Enoyl Reductase from Francisella tularensis: Residence Time and in Vivo Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, H.; England, K; Ende, C; Truglio, J; Luckner, S; Reddy, B; Marlenee, N; Knudson, S; Knudson, D; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent and contagious Gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes the disease tularemia in mammals. The high infectivity and the ability of the bacterium to survive for weeks in a cool, moist environment have raised the possibility that this organism could be exploited deliberately as a potential biological weapon. Fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS-II) is essential for bacterial viability and has been validated as a target for the discovery of novel antibacterials. The FAS-II enoyl reductase ftuFabI has been cloned and expressed, and a series of diphenyl ethers have been identified that are subnanomolar inhibitors of the enzyme with MIC90 values as low as 0.00018 ?g mL-1. The existence of a linear correlation between the Ki and MIC values strongly suggests that the antibacterial activity of the diphenyl ethers results from direct inhibition of ftuFabI within the cell. The compounds are slow-onset inhibitors of ftuFabI, and the residence time of the inhibitors on the enzyme correlates with their in vivo activity in a mouse model of tularemia infection. Significantly, the rate of breakdown of the enzyme-inhibitor complex is a better predictor of in vivo activity than the overall thermodynamic stability of the complex, a concept that has important implications for the discovery of novel chemotherapeutics that normally rely on equilibrium measurements of potency.

  16. IL-23 p19 knockout mice exhibit minimal defects in responses to primary and secondary infection with Francisella tularensis LVS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry L Kurtz

    Full Text Available Our laboratory's investigations into mechanisms of protective immunity against Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS have uncovered mediators important in host defense against primary infection, as well as those correlated with successful vaccination. One such potential correlate was IL-12p40, a pleiotropic cytokine that promotes Th1 T cell function as part of IL-12p70. LVS-infected IL-12p40 deficient knockout (KO mice maintain a chronic infection, but IL-12p35 KO mice clear LVS infection; thus the role that IL-12p40 plays in immunity to LVS is independent of the IL-12p70 heterodimer. IL-12p40 can also partner with IL-23p19 to create the heterodimeric cytokine IL-23. Here, we directly tested the role of IL-23 in LVS resistance, and found IL-23 to be largely dispensable for immunity to LVS following intradermal or intranasal infection. IL-23p19 KO splenocytes were fully competent in controlling intramacrophage LVS replication in an in vitro overlay assay. Further, antibody responses in IL-23p19 KO mice were similar to those of normal wild type mice after LVS infection. IL-23p19 KO mice or normal wild type mice that survived primary LVS infection survived maximal doses of LVS secondary challenge. Thus p40 has a novel role in clearance of LVS infection that is unrelated to either IL-12 or IL-23.

  17. Lymphotoxin-α Plays Only a Minor Role in Host Resistance to Respiratory Infection with Virulent Type A Francisella tularensis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the role of lymphotoxin (LT-α in host defense against airborne infection with Francisella tularensis, a gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of tularemia. Following a low-dose aerosol infection with the highly virulent type A strain of F. tularensis, mice deficient in LT α (LTα−/− consistently harbored approximately 10-fold fewer bacteria in their spleens at day 2 and 10-fold more bacteria in their lungs at day 4 than LTα+/+ mice. However, the mortality and median time to death were indistinguishable between the two mouse strains. In addition, the inflammatory responses to the infection, as reflected by the cytokine levels and leukocyte influx in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and histopathological analysis, were generally similar between LTα−/− and LTα+/+ mice. These data suggest that although LTα does not contribute significantly to the resistance and host responses of mice to airborne type A F. tularensis infection, it does play a subtle role in the multiplication/dissemination of F. tularensis.

  18. Research Progress on Francisella Tularensis Detection%土拉弗朗西斯菌检测研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王振东; 景滢滢; 王静

    2009-01-01

    土拉弗朗西斯菌(Francisella tularensis)是土拉菌病(Tularemia)的致病菌,是最具传染性的致病菌之一,在自然界中已发现一百种以上的动物感染此菌.因其传播途径多样,易扩散、毒性强而被美国疾病控制预防中心列入A类生物恐怖制剂.土拉菌病是一种人畜共患病,致死率高,及时、准确的检测土拉菌对于土拉菌病患者及时治疗和防止扩散具有重要的意义.土拉菌检测方法很多.如菌培养,微凝集实验、酶联免疫吸附、快速检测试纸条、生物传感器、PCR、核酸杂交检测、质谱分析、基因芯片等.但到目前为止还没有一种成熟的用于土拉菌检测方法,其主要原因在于土拉菌致病性强,且不易分离培养.本文综述了土拉菌细菌学、免疫学、分子生物学方法检测的最新研究进展.

  19. Lipids Derived from Virulent Francisella tularensis Broadly Inhibit Pulmonary Inflammation via Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Deborah D.; Ireland, Robin; Alinger, Joshua B.; Small, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that causes an acute lethal respiratory disease in humans. The heightened virulence of the pathogen is linked to its unique ability to inhibit Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated inflammatory responses. The bacterial component and mechanism of this inhibition are unknown. Here we show that lipids isolated from virulent but not attenuated strains of F. tularensis are not detected by host cells, inhibit production of proinflammatory cytokines by primary macrophages in response to known TLR ligands, and suppress neutrophil recruitment in vivo. We further show that lipid-mediated inhibition of inflammation is dependent on TLR2, MyD88, and the nuclear hormone and fatty acid receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Pathogen lipid-mediated interference with inflammatory responses through the engagement of TLR2 and PPARα represents a novel manipulation of host signaling pathways consistent with the ability of highly virulent F. tularensis to efficiently evade host immune responses. PMID:23925884

  20. The Francisella tularensis migR, trmE, and cphA genes contribute to F. tularensis pathogenicity island gene regulation and intracellular growth by modulation of the stress alarmone ppGpp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faron, Matthew; Fletcher, Joshua R; Rasmussen, Jed A; Long, Matthew E; Allen, Lee-Ann H; Jones, Bradley D

    2013-08-01

    The Francisella tularensis pathogenicity island (FPI) encodes many proteins that are required for virulence. Expression of these genes depends upon the FevR (PigR) regulator and its interactions with the MglA/SspA and RNA polymerase transcriptional complex. Experiments to identify how transcription of the FPI genes is activated have led to identification of mutations within the migR, trmE, and cphA genes that decrease FPI expression. Recent data demonstrated that the small alarmone ppGpp, produced by RelA and SpoT, is important for stabilizing MglA/SspA and FevR (PigR) interactions in Francisella. Production of ppGpp is commonly known to be activated by cellular and nutritional stress in bacteria, which indicates that cellular and nutritional stresses act as important signals for FPI activation. In this work, we demonstrate that mutations in migR, trmE, or cphA significantly reduce ppGpp accumulation. The reduction in ppGpp levels was similar for each of the mutants and correlated with a corresponding reduction in iglA reporter expression. In addition, we observed that there were differences in the ability of each of these mutants to replicate within various mammalian cells, indicating that the migR, trmE, and cphA genes are likely parts of different cellular stress response pathways in Francisella. These results also indicate that different nutritional and cellular stresses exist in different mammalian cells. This work provides new information to help understand how Francisella regulates its virulence genes in response to host cell environments, and it contributes to our growing knowledge of this highly successful bacterial pathogen.

  1. A galU mutant of francisella tularensis is attenuated for virulence in a murine pulmonary model of tularemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Re Fabio

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of studies have revealed that Francisella tularensis (FT suppresses innate immune responses such as chemokine/cytokine production and neutrophil recruitment in the lungs following pulmonary infection via an unidentified mechanism. The ability of FT to evade early innate immune responses could be a very important virulence mechanism for this highly infectious bacterial pathogen. Results Here we describe the characterization of a galU mutant strain of FT live vaccine strain (LVS. We show that the galU mutant was highly attenuated in a murine model of tularemia and elicited more robust innate immune responses than the wild-type (WT strain. These studies document that the kinetics of chemokine expression and neutrophil recruitment into the lungs of mice challenged with the galU mutant strain are significantly more rapid than observed with WT FT, despite the fact that there were no observed differences in TLR2 or TLR4 signaling or replication/dissemination kinetics during the early stages of infection. We also show that the galU mutant had a hypercytotoxic phenotype and more rapidly induced the production of IL-1β following infection either in vitro or in vivo, indicating that attenuation of the galU mutant strain may be due (in part to more rapid activation of the inflammasome and/or earlier death of FT infected cells. Furthermore, we show that infection of mice with the galU mutant strain elicits protective immunity to subsequent challenge with WT FT. Conclusions Disruption of the galU gene of FTLVS has little (if any effect on in vivo infectivity, replication, or dissemination characteristics, but is highly attenuating for virulence. The attenuated phenotype of this mutant strain of FT appears to be related to its increased ability to induce innate inflammatory responsiveness, resulting in more rapid recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs following pneumonic infection, and/or to its ability to kill infected cells in

  2. Francisella tularensis elicits IL-10 via a PGE₂-inducible factor, to drive macrophage MARCH1 expression and class II down-regulation.

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    Danielle Hunt

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a bacterial pathogen that uses host-derived PGE₂ to subvert the host's adaptive immune responses in multiple ways. Francisella-induced PGE₂ acts directly on CD4 T cells to blunt production of IFN-γ. Francisella-induced PGE₂ can also elicit production of a >10 kDa soluble host factor termed FTMØSN (F. tularensismacrophage supernatant, which acts on IFN-γ pre-activated MØ to down-regulate MHC class II expression via a ubiquitin-dependent mechanism, blocking antigen presentation to CD4 T cells. Here, we report that FTMØSN-induced down-regulation of MØ class II is the result of the induction of MARCH1, and that MØ expressing MARCH1 "resistant" class II molecules are resistant to FTMØSN-induced class II down-regulation. Since PGE₂ can induce IL-10 production and IL-10 is the only reported cytokine able to induce MARCH1 expression in monocytes and dendritic cells, these findings suggested that IL-10 is the active factor in FTMØSN. However, use of IL-10 knockout MØ established that IL-10 is not the active factor in FTMØSN, but rather that Francisella-elicited PGE₂ drives production of a >10 kDa host factor distinct from IL-10. This factor then drives MØ IL-10 production to induce MARCH1 expression and the resultant class II down-regulation. Since many human pathogens such as Salmonella typhi, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Legionella pneumophila also induce production of host PGE₂, these results suggest that a yet-to-be-identified PGE₂-inducible host factor capable of inducing IL-10 is central to the immune evasion mechanisms of multiple important human pathogens.

  3. Monitoring of Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in Danish hares (Lepus europaeus) by fluorescent in-situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette Sif; Chriél, Mariann; Larsen, Gitte;

    . pseudotuberculosis has a wide host range and causes high mortality in hares. When it comes to zoonotic potential F. tularensis poses the major risk for humans, where it causes tularemia - a potentially deadly disease. FISH is an easy, cheap and not at least safe method for monitoring F. tularensis and Y...

  4. Structure of the Francisella tularensis enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) in complex with NAD[superscript +] and triclosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehboob, Shahila; Truong, Kent; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Johnson, Michael E. (UIC)

    2010-11-19

    Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (FabI) catalyzes the last rate-limiting step in the elongation cycle of the fatty-acid biosynthesis pathway and has been validated as a potential antimicrobial drug target in Francisella tularensis. The development of new antibiotic therapies is important both to combat potential drug-resistant bioweapons and to address the broader societal problem of increasing antibiotic resistance among many pathogenic bacteria. The crystal structure of FabI from F. tularensis (FtuFabI) in complex with the inhibitor triclosan and the cofactor NAD{sup +} has been solved to a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. Triclosan is known to effectively inhibit FabI from different organisms. Precise characterization of the mode of triclosan binding is required to develop highly specific inhibitors. Comparison of our structure with the previously determined FtuFabI structure (PDB code 2jjy) which is bound to only NAD{sup +} reveals the conformation of the substrate-binding loop, electron density for which was missing in the earlier structure, and demonstrates a shift in the conformation of the NAD{sup +} cofactor. This shift in the position of the phosphate groups allows more room in the active site for substrate or inhibitor to bind and be better accommodated. This information will be crucial for virtual screening studies to identify novel scaffolds for development into new active inhibitors.

  5. Low dose vaccination with attenuated Francisella tularensis strain SchuS4 mutants protects against tularemia independent of the route of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockx-Brouwer, Dedeke; Chong, Audrey; Wehrly, Tara D; Child, Robert; Crane, Deborah D; Celli, Jean; Bosio, Catharine M

    2012-01-01

    Tularemia, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis, is a severe, sometimes fatal disease. Interest in tularemia has increased over the last decade due to its history as a biological weapon. In particular, development of novel vaccines directed at protecting against pneumonic tularemia has been an important goal. Previous work has demonstrated that, when delivered at very high inoculums, administration of live, highly attenuated strains of virulent F. tularensis can protect against tularemia. However, lower vaccinating inoculums did not offer similar immunity. One concern of using live vaccines is that the host may develop mild tularemia in response to infection and use of high inoculums may contribute to this issue. Thus, generation of a live vaccine that can efficiently protect against tularemia when delivered in low numbers, e.g. tularemia when delivered at concentrations of approximately 50 or fewer bacteria. Attenuated strains for use as vaccines were selected by their inability to efficiently replicate in macrophages in vitro and impaired replication and dissemination in vivo. Although all strains were defective for replication in vitro within macrophages, protective efficacy of each attenuated mutant was correlated with their ability to modestly replicate and disseminate in the host. Finally, we demonstrate the parenteral vaccination with these strains offered superior protection against pneumonic tularemia than intranasal vaccination. Together our data provides proof of principle that low dose attenuated vaccines may be a viable goal in development of novel vaccines directed against tularemia.

  6. Successful protection against tularemia in C57BL/6 mice is correlated with expansion of Francisella tularensis-specific effector T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Amanda J; Crane, Deborah D; Wehrly, Tara D; Bosio, Catharine M

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is an intracellular, Gram-negative bacterium that causes the fatal disease tularemia. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines for tularemia and the requirements for protection against infection are poorly defined. To identify correlates of vaccine-induced immunity against tularemia, we compared different strains of the live vaccine strain (LVS) for their relative levels of virulence and ability to protect C57BL/6 mice against challenge with virulent F. tularensis strain SchuS4. Successful vaccination, as defined by survival of C57BL/6 mice, was correlated with significantly greater numbers of effector T cells in the spleen and lung. Further, lung cells and splenocytes from fully protected animals were more effective than lung cells and splenocytes from vaccinated but nonimmune animals in limiting intracellular replication of SchuS4 in vitro. Together, our data provide a unique model to compare efficacious vaccines to nonefficacious vaccines, which will enable comprehensive identification of host and bacterial components required for immunization against tularemia.

  7. Inhibition of expression in Escherichia coli of a virulence regulator MglB of Francisella tularensis using external guide sequence technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaoping Xiao

    Full Text Available External guide sequences (EGSs have successfully been used to inhibit expression of target genes at the post-transcriptional level in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We previously reported that EGS accessible and cleavable sites in the target RNAs can rapidly be identified by screening random EGS (rEGS libraries. Here the method of screening rEGS libraries and a partial RNase T1 digestion assay were used to identify sites accessible to EGSs in the mRNA of a global virulence regulator MglB from Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium. Specific EGSs were subsequently designed and their activities in terms of the cleavage of mglB mRNA by RNase P were tested in vitro and in vivo. EGS73, EGS148, and EGS155 in both stem and M1 EGS constructs induced mglB mRNA cleavage in vitro. Expression of stem EGS73 and EGS155 in Escherichia coli resulted in significant reduction of the mglB mRNA level coded for the F. tularensis mglB gene inserted in those cells.

  8. Low dose vaccination with attenuated Francisella tularensis strain SchuS4 mutants protects against tularemia independent of the route of vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedeke Rockx-Brouwer

    Full Text Available Tularemia, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis, is a severe, sometimes fatal disease. Interest in tularemia has increased over the last decade due to its history as a biological weapon. In particular, development of novel vaccines directed at protecting against pneumonic tularemia has been an important goal. Previous work has demonstrated that, when delivered at very high inoculums, administration of live, highly attenuated strains of virulent F. tularensis can protect against tularemia. However, lower vaccinating inoculums did not offer similar immunity. One concern of using live vaccines is that the host may develop mild tularemia in response to infection and use of high inoculums may contribute to this issue. Thus, generation of a live vaccine that can efficiently protect against tularemia when delivered in low numbers, e.g. <100 organisms, may address this concern. Herein we describe the ability of three defined, attenuated mutants of F. tularensis SchuS4, deleted for FTT0369c, FTT1676, or FTT0369c and FTT1676, respectively, to engender protective immunity against tularemia when delivered at concentrations of approximately 50 or fewer bacteria. Attenuated strains for use as vaccines were selected by their inability to efficiently replicate in macrophages in vitro and impaired replication and dissemination in vivo. Although all strains were defective for replication in vitro within macrophages, protective efficacy of each attenuated mutant was correlated with their ability to modestly replicate and disseminate in the host. Finally, we demonstrate the parenteral vaccination with these strains offered superior protection against pneumonic tularemia than intranasal vaccination. Together our data provides proof of principle that low dose attenuated vaccines may be a viable goal in development of novel vaccines directed against tularemia.

  9. Comparison of Five Commercial DNA Extraction Kits for the Recovery of Francisella Tularensis DNA from Spiked Soil Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    to survive long periods in infected ticks. An alternative suggestion is that the bacterium is able to persist free - living in the environment or in...Asia, and tends to cause a less virulent form of disease than subspecies tularensis. The live vaccine strain (LVS), used as a live -attenuated vaccine...protozoa. The fact that F. tularensis has been shown to survive in amoebae in the laboratory [8], and has been isolated from natural water sources [9,10

  10. Francisella tularensis SchuS4 and SchuS4 lipids inhibit IL-12p40 in primary human dendritic cells by inhibition of IRF1 and IRF8*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Robin; Wang, Rong; Alinger, Joshua B.; Small, Pamela; Bosio, Catharine M.

    2013-01-01

    Induction of innate immunity is essential for host survival of infection. Evasion and inhibition of innate immunity is a strategy used by pathogens, such as the highly virulent bacterium Francisella tularensis, to ensure their replication and transmission. The mechanism and bacterial components responsible for this suppression of innate immunity by F. tularensis are not defined. Here, we demonstrate that lipids enriched from virulent F. tularensis strain SchuS4, but not attenuated Live Vaccine Strain (LVS), inhibit inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo. Suppression of inflammatory responses is associated with IκBα independent inhibition of NF-κBp65 activation and selective inhibition of activation of Interferon Regulatory Factors (IRFs). Interference with NF-κBp65 and IRFs is also observed following infection with viable SchuS4. Together these data provide novel insight as to how highly virulent bacteria selectively modulate the host to interfere innate immune responses required for survival of infection. PMID:23817430

  11. The FupA/B protein uniquely facilitates transport of ferrous iron and siderophore-associated ferric iron across the outer membrane of Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Bhaswati

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious Gram-negative pathogen that replicates intracellularly within the mammalian host. One of the factors associated with virulence of F. tularensis is the protein FupA that mediates high-affinity transport of ferrous iron across the outer membrane. Together with its paralogue FslE, a siderophore–ferric iron transporter, FupA supports survival of the pathogen in the host by providing access to the essential nutrient iron. The FupA orthologue in the attenuated live vaccine strain (LVS) is encoded by the hybrid gene fupA/B, the product of an intergenic recombination event that significantly contributes to attenuation of the strain. We used 55Fe transport assays with mutant strains complemented with the different paralogues to show that the FupA/B protein of LVS retains the capacity for high-affinity transport of ferrous iron, albeit less efficiently than FupA of virulent strain Schu S4. 55Fe transport assays using purified siderophore and siderophore-dependent growth assays on iron-limiting agar confirmed previous findings that FupA/B also contributes to siderophore-mediated ferric iron uptake. These assays further demonstrated that the LVS FslE protein is a weaker siderophore–ferric iron transporter than the orthologue from Schu S4, and may be a result of the sequence variation between the two proteins. Our results indicate that iron-uptake mechanisms in LVS differ from those in Schu S4 and that functional differences in the outer membrane iron transporters have distinct effects on growth under iron limitation. PMID:24307666

  12. Mucosal immunization with live attenuated Francisella novicida U112ΔiglB protects against pulmonary F. tularensis SCHU S4 in the Fischer 344 rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee L Signarovitz

    Full Text Available The need for an efficacious vaccine against Francisella tularensis is a consequence of its low infectious dose and high mortality rate if left untreated. This study sought to characterize a live attenuated subspecies novicida-based vaccine strain (U112ΔiglB in an established second rodent model of pulmonary tularemia, namely the Fischer 344 rat using two distinct routes of vaccination (intratracheal [i.t.] and oral. Attenuation was verified by comparing replication of U112ΔiglB with wild type parental strain U112 in F344 primary alveolar macrophages. U112ΔiglB exhibited an LD(50>10(7 CFU compared to the wild type (LD(50 = 5 × 10(6 CFU i.t.. Immunization with 10(7 CFU U112ΔiglB by i.t. and oral routes induced antigen-specific IFN-γ and potent humoral responses both systemically (IgG2a>IgG1 in serum and at the site of mucosal vaccination (respiratory/intestinal compartment. Importantly, vaccination with U112ΔiglB by either i.t. or oral routes provided equivalent levels of protection (50% survival in F344 rats against a subsequent pulmonary challenge with ~25 LD(50 (1.25 × 10(4 CFU of the highly human virulent strain SCHU S4. Collectively, these results provide further evidence on the utility of a mucosal vaccination platform with a defined subsp. novicida U112ΔiglB vaccine strain in conferring protective immunity against pulmonary tularemia.

  13. Downmodulation of Vaccine-Induced Immunity and Protection against the Intracellular Bacterium Francisella tularensis by the Inhibitory Receptor FcγRIIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Franz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fc gamma receptor IIB (FcγRIIB is the only Fc gamma receptor (FcγR which negatively regulates the immune response, when engaged by antigen- (Ag- antibody (Ab complexes. Thus, the generation of Ag-specific IgG in response to infection or immunization has the potential to downmodulate immune protection against infection. Therefore, we sought to determine the impact of FcγRIIB on immune protection against Francisella tularensis (Ft, a Category A biothreat agent. We utilized inactivated Ft (iFt as an immunogen. Naïve and iFt-immunized FcγRIIB knockout (KO or wildtype (WT mice were challenged with Ft-live vaccine strain (LVS. While no significant difference in survival between naïve FcγRIIB KO versus WT mice was observed, iFt-immunized FcγRIIB KO mice were significantly better protected than iFt-immunized WT mice. Ft-specific IgA in serum and bronchial alveolar lavage, as well as IFN-γ, IL-10, and TNF-α production by splenocytes harvested from iFt-immunized FcγRIIB KO, were also significantly elevated. In addition, iFt-immunized FcγRIIB KO mice exhibited a reduction in proinflammatory cytokine levels in vivo at 5 days after challenge, which correlates with increased survival following Ft-LVS challenge in published studies. Thus, these studies demonstrate for the first time the ability of FcγRIIB to regulate vaccine-induced IgA production and downmodulate immunity and protection. The immune mechanisms behind the above observations and their potential impact on vaccine development are discussed.

  14. Targeting of a Fixed Bacterial Immunogen to Fc Receptors Reverses the Anti-Inflammatory Properties of the Gram-Negative Bacterium, Francisella tularensis, during the Early Stages of Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfia Babadjanova

    Full Text Available Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells at the early stages of bacterial infection is important for host protection against the pathogen. Many intracellular bacteria, including Francisella tularensis, the agent of tularemia, utilize the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, to evade the host immune response. It is well established that IL-10 has the ability to inhibit robust antigen presentation by dendritic cells and macrophages, thus suppressing the generation of protective immunity. The pathogenesis of F. tularensis is not fully understood, and research has failed to develop an effective vaccine to this date. In the current study, we hypothesized that F. tularensis polarizes antigen presenting cells during the early stages of infection towards an anti-inflammatory status characterized by increased synthesis of IL-10 and decreased production of IL-12p70 and TNF-α in an IFN-ɣ-dependent fashion. In addition, F. tularensis drives an alternative activation of alveolar macrophages within the first 48 hours post-infection, thus allowing the bacterium to avoid protective immunity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that targeting inactivated F. tularensis (iFt to Fcγ receptors (FcɣRs via intranasal immunization with mAb-iFt complexes, a proven vaccine strategy in our laboratories, reverses the anti-inflammatory effects of the bacterium on macrophages by down-regulating production of IL-10. More specifically, we observed that targeting of iFt to FcγRs enhances the classical activation of macrophages not only within the respiratory mucosa, but also systemically, at the early stages of infection. These results provide important insight for further understanding the protective immune mechanisms generated when targeting immunogens to Fc receptors.

  15. Influence of membrane microdomin on infection process of mouse macrophages by Francisella tularensis LVS%质膜微区对土拉弗朗西斯菌LVS感染鼠巨噬细胞的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘欣; 祁建城; 李广渡; 贾文凯; 瞿曼; 赵子夜

    2009-01-01

    目的 评估士拉弗朗西斯菌LNS入侵鼠巨噬细胞过程巾质膜微区的作用.方法 用电穿孔法将穿梭质粒pFNLTP6gro-gfp导人土拉弗朗西斯菌LVS.细胞膜用FM4-64染色,结合单抗的微囊蛋白-1用键合了Alexa 594荧光素的羊抗鼠二抗显色.用Z轴电动聚焦的荧光显微镜分析土拉弗朗西斯菌LNS感染.用甲基-β-环式糊精干扰富含脂质的胞膜损耗胆固醇,以评估质膜微区的损伤埘弗朗西斯菌入侵的影响.菲律平Ⅲ用以榆测胆固醇损耗的效果.结果 土拉弗朗西斯菌疫苗株可以诱导膜结构域伸出伪足将细菌吸收进入巨噬细胞.质膜微区相关成分微囊蛋白-1与含有弗朗西斯菌的囊泡一同进入宿主.弗朗西斯菌入侵巨噬细胞需要胆崮醇丰富的膜结构域.结论 胆固醇丰富的质膜微区和微囊蛋白-1在弗朗西斯菌早期进入巨噬细胞期间发挥重要作用.%Objective To evaluate the role of membrane microdomain on the entry process of Francisella tularensis LVS infecting mouse macrophages.Methods A shuttle plasmid pFNLTP6 gro-gfp was introduced to E tularensis LVS by dectroporation method.Membrane was stained with FM4-64,and cavcolin-1 was detected with mono-antihody and visualized with Alexa Fluor 594 conjugated goat-antkmouse antibodies.F.tularensis INS infection was analyzed by a fluorescence microscope equipped with a motorized Z-focus.In order to evaluate the depletion of membrane microdomain induced by Francisella entering macrophages,interference with lipid-rich plasma membrane through the depletion of cholesterol was pedormed by treatment with methyl beta cyclodextrin.The cholesterol-binding agent Filipin Ⅲ was used to detect the effect of cholesterol deplction.Results It was shown that the live vaccine strain of E tularensis induced membrane domains ruffling for sucoessful entry into maerophages.Menlbrane microdomain-assodated components such as caveolin1 were incorporated into Francisella containing

  16. An in vitro co-culture mouse model demonstrates efficient vaccine-mediated control of Francisella tularensis SCHU S4 and identifies nitric oxide as a predictor of efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Golovlev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular bacterium and cell-mediated immunity is critical for protection, but mechanisms of protection against highly virulent variants, such as the prototypic strain F. tularensis strain SCHU S4, are poorly understood. To this end, we established a co-culture system, based on splenocytes from naïve or immunized mice and in vitro infected bone marrow-derived macrophages, that allowed assessment of mechanisms controlling infection with F. tularensis. We utilized the system to understand why the clpB gene deletion mutant, ΔclpB, of SCHU S4 shows superior efficacy as a vaccine in the mouse model as compared to the existing human vaccine, the live vaccine strain (LVS. Compared to naïve splenocytes, ΔclpB- or LVS-immune splenocytes conferred very significant control of a SCHU S4 infection and the ΔclpB-immune splenocytes were superior to the other splenocytes. Cultures with the latter splenocytes also contained higher levels of IFN-gamma and nitric oxide, and T cells expressing combinations of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-17 than did cultures with LVS-immune splenocytes. There was strong inverse correlation between bacterial replication and levels of nitrite, an end product of nitric oxide, and essentially no control was observed when BMDM from iNOS-/- mice were infected. Collectively, the mouse co-culture model identified a critical role of nitric oxide for protection against a highly virulent strain of F. tularensis.

  17. β-Hydroxyacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Dehydratase (FabZ) from Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis : Structure Determination, Enzymatic Characterization, and Cross-Inhibition Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGillick, Brian E.; Kumaran, Desigan; Vieni, Casey; Swaminathan, Subramanyam

    2016-02-23

    The bacterial system for fatty acid biosynthesis (FAS) contains several enzymes whose sequence and structure are highly conserved across a vast array of pathogens. This, coupled with their low homology and difference in organization compared to the equivalent system in humans, makes the FAS pathway an excellent target for antimicrobial drug development. To this end, we have cloned, expressed, and purified the β-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein dehydratase (FabZ) from both Francisella tularensis (FtFabZ) and Yersinia pestis (YpFabZ). We also solved the crystal structures and performed an enzymatic characterization of both enzymes and several mutant forms of YpFabZ. Additionally, we have discovered two novel inhibitors of FabZ, mangostin and stictic acid, which show similar potencies against both YpFabZ and FtFabZ. Lastly, we selected several compounds from the literature that have been shown to be active against single homologues of FabZ and tested them against both YpFabZ and FtFabZ. These results have revealed clues as to which scaffolds are likely to lead to broad-spectrum antimicrobials targeted against FabZ as well as modifications to existing FabZ inhibitors that may improve potency.

  18. Azithromycin effectiveness against intracellular infections of Francisella

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    Mann Barbara J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrolide antibiotics are commonly administered for bacterial respiratory illnesses. Azithromycin (Az is especially noted for extremely high intracellular concentrations achieved within macrophages which is far greater than the serum concentration. Clinical strains of Type B Francisella (F. tularensis have been reported to be resistant to Az, however our laboratory Francisella strains were found to be sensitive. We hypothesized that different strains/species of Francisella (including Type A may have different susceptibilities to Az, a widely used and well-tolerated antibiotic. Results In vitro susceptibility testing of Az confirmed that F. tularensis subsp. holarctica Live Vaccine Strain (LVS (Type B was not sensitive while F. philomiragia, F. novicida, and Type A F. tularensis (NIH B38 and Schu S4 strain were susceptible. In J774A.1 mouse macrophage cells infected with F. philomiragia, F. novicida, and F. tularensis LVS, 5 μg/ml Az applied extracellularly eliminated intracellular Francisella infections. A concentration of 25 μg/ml Az was required for Francisella-infected A549 human lung epithelial cells, suggesting that macrophages are more effective at concentrating Az than epithelial cells. Mutants of RND efflux components (tolC and ftlC in F. novicida demonstrated less sensitivity to Az by MIC than the parental strain, but the tolC disc-inhibition assay demonstrated increased sensitivity, indicating a complex role for the outer-membrane transporter. Mutants of acrA and acrB mutants were less sensitive to Az than the parental strain, suggesting that AcrAB is not critical for the efflux of Az in F. novicida. In contrast, F. tularensis Schu S4 mutants ΔacrB and ΔacrA were more sensitive than the parental strain, indicating that the AcrAB may be important for Az efflux in F. tularensis Schu S4. F. novicida LPS O-antigen mutants (wbtN, wbtE, wbtQ and wbtA were found to be less sensitive in vitro to Az compared to the wild

  19. Identification of Francisella novicida mutants that fail to induce prostaglandin E2 synthesis by infected macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Woolard, Matthew D.; Barrigan, Lydia M.; Fuller, James R.; Buntzman, Adam S.; Bryan, Joshua; Manoil, Colin; Kawula, Thomas H.; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. We have previously shown that infection with F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) induces macrophages to synthesize prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Synthesis of PGE2 by F. tularensis infected macrophages results in decreased T cell proliferation in vitro and increased bacterial survival in vivo. Although we understand some of the biological consequences of F. tularensis induced PGE2 synthesis by macrophages, we do not understand the cell...

  20. Identification of Francisella novicida mutants that fail to induce prostaglandin E2 synthesis by infected macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Dale Woolard; Barrigan, Lydia M.; Fuller, James R.; Buntzman, Adam S.; Joshua eBryan; Colin eManoil; Tom eKawula; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. We have previously shown that infection with F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) induces macrophages to synthesize prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Synthesis of PGE2 by F. tularensis infected macrophages results in decreased T cell proliferation in vitro and increased bacterial survival in vivo. Although we understand some of the biological consequences of F. tularensis induced PGE2 synthesis by macrophages, we do not understand the ce...

  1. A 14.7 kDa protein from Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida (named FTN_1133), involved in the response to oxidative stress induced by organic peroxides, is not endowed with thiol-dependent peroxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meireles, Diogo de Abreu; Alegria, Thiago Geronimo Pires; Alves, Simone Vidigal; Arantes, Carla Rani Rocha; Netto, Luis Eduardo Soares

    2014-01-01

    Francisella genus comprises Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacteria that are among the most infectious human pathogens. A protein of 14.7 KDa named as FTN_1133 was previously described as a novel hydroperoxide resistance protein in F. tularensis subsp. novicida, implicated in organic peroxide detoxification and virulence. Here, we describe a structural and biochemical characterization of FTN_1133. Contrary to previous assumptions, multiple amino acid sequence alignment analyses revealed that FTN_1133 does not share significant similarity with proteins of the Ohr/OsmC family or any other Cys-based, thiol dependent peroxidase, including conserved motifs around reactive cysteine residues. Circular dichroism analyses were consistent with the in silico prediction of an all-α-helix secondary structure. The pKa of its single cysteine residue, determined by a monobromobimane alkylation method, was shown to be 8.0±0.1, value that is elevated when compared with other Cys-based peroxidases, such as peroxiredoxins and Ohr/OsmC proteins. Attempts to determine a thiol peroxidase activity for FTN_1133 failed, using both dithiols (DTT, thioredoxin and lipoamide) and monothiols (glutathione or 2-mercaptoethanol) as reducing agents. Heterologous expression of FTN_1133 gene in ahpC and oxyR mutants of E. coli showed no complementation. Furthermore, analysis of FTN_1133 protein by non-reducing SDS-PAGE showed that an inter-molecular disulfide bond (not detected in Ohr proteins) can be generated under hydroperoxide treatment, but the observed rates were not comparable to those observed for other thiol-dependent peroxidases. All the biochemical and structural data taken together indicated that FTN_1133 displayed distinct characteristics from other thiol dependent peroxidases and, therefore, suggested that FTN_1133 is not directly involved in hydroperoxide detoxification.

  2. Comparative review of F. tularensis and F. novicida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke C. Kingry

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of the acute disease tularemia. Due to its extreme infectivity and ability to cause disease upon inhalation, F. tularensis has been classified as a biothreat agent. Two subspecies of F. tularensis, tularensis and holarctica, are responsible for tularemia in humans. In comparison, the closely related species F. novicida very rarely causes human illness and cases that do occur are associated with patients who are immune compromised or have other underlying health problems. Virulence between F. tularensis and F. novicida also differs in laboratory animals. Despite this varying capacity to cause disease, the two species share ~97% nucleotide identity, with F. novicida commonly used as a laboratory surrogate for F. tularensis. As the F. novicida U112 strain is exempt from U.S. select agent regulations research studies can be carried out in non-registered laboratories lacking specialized containment facilities required for work with virulent F. tularensis strains. This review is designed to highlight phenotypic (clinical, ecological, virulence and pathogenic and genomic differences between F. tularensis and F. novicida that warrant maintaining F. novicida and F. tularensis as separate species. Standardized nomenclature for F. novicida is critical for accurate interpretation of experimental results, limiting clinical confusion between F. novicida and F. tularensis and ensuring treatment efficacy studies utilize virulent F. tularensis strains.

  3. Discovery and tracking source of the new subgroup of Chinese Francisella tularensis type B%中国土拉弗朗西斯菌B型亚种新亚型的发现与溯源分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳华; 乔富宇; 曹菊; 彭遥; 夏连续

    2015-01-01

    目的 对于北京市1例疑似土拉热病例,进行实验室诊断和溯源分析.方法 2012年7月19日北京市报告1例疑似土拉热病例.从病例血液样本中提取基因组DNA后,采用土拉弗朗西斯菌(土拉菌)3种特异基因(fopA,tul4和16S rRNA)和两种基因分型引物(C1C4和RD1),进行PCR检测并对扩增子测序.另外两个实验室分别平行进行了fopA的PCR扩增和测序.同时采用4个靶位点(fopA、ISFtul2、23kDa和tul4)进行荧光定量PCR检测,并采用11个规范的SNP和4个插入/缺失进行系统进化分析.结果 3种特异基因均得到阳性扩增,测序后得到的片段大小分别为409、407和1 053 bp,经序列比对,显示病例感染的是土拉菌.两种基因分型引物扩增后分别得到了151和924 bp的序列,根据片段长度可判定病例感染的土拉菌为B型亚种.另外两个实验室对于opA的PCR扩增和测序,均得到了阳性结果.4个靶位点的荧光定量PCR检测也均得到了阳性结果,fopA、ISFtul2、23kDa和tul4位点的Ct值分别为30、25、28和30.系统进化分析显示,本研究中土拉菌和俄罗斯来源的土拉菌聚在一个分支上,为B3亚型.结论 该病例确定为土拉热病例,本研究在中国发现了土拉菌B型亚种的一个新亚型.%Objective To perform laboratory diagnosis and tracking source of a suspected tularemia patient in Beijing.Methods A suspected tularemia patient was reported in Beijing city on July 19, 2012.Genomic DNA was extracted from the blood sample of the patient, then general PCR and sequencing of amplicons were conducted using 3 specific genes (fopA, tul4 and 16S rRNA)Francisella tutarensis(F.tularensis), and 2 genotyping primers (C1C4 and RD1).Two other laboratories repeated the PCR and sequencing of the fopA in parallel.At the same time, real-time PCR fluorescent ration was performed using 4 targets (fopA, ISFtul2, 23kDa, and tul4), and phylogenetic analysis was carried out using 11 canonical single

  4. [CITRULLINUREIDASE GENE DIVERSITY IN THE GENUS FRANCISELLA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, V S; Bakhteeva, I V; Pavlov, V M; Mokrievich, A N

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the results, of the in silico analysis of the genetic diversity of the citrullinureidase gene (ctu) in two species of bacteria of the genus Francisella: tularensis (ssp. tularensis, holarctica, mediasiatica, novicida) and philomiragia. The strains of the Central Asiatic subspecies possessing the citrullinureidase activity differ in the gene ctu from the ssp tularensis Schu by three nucleotide substitutions leading to two insignificant amino acid substitutions in the encoded polypeptide. In the strain F. tularensis of the ssp. holarctica the gene ctu encodes inactive enzyme, which is probably due to amino acid substitutions: 151 Gly --> Asp, 183 Pro --> Leu, 222 Asp --> Asn. Except for the Japan biovar bacteria, in all strains of the Holarctic subspecies there are two stop codons in the gene ctu. The bacteria of the subspecies novicida contain the ctu gene only in the strain 3523, whereas the other strains contain the gene FTN_0827 encoding the C-N hydrolase, which probably provides the citrullinureidase activity.

  5. Medical Countermeasure Models. Volume 4. Francisella tularensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    Fong I. "Tularemia from a cat bite: case report and review of feline -associated tularemia." Clinical Infectious Diseases. 16(4). 1993. 213 CDC...Epidemiologic, and Ecological Characteristics." Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 1105(1). 2007. 228 Penn RL and Kinasewitz GT. "Factors

  6. A Spontaneous Mutation in kdsD, a Biosynthesis Gene for 3-Deoxy-D-manno-Octulosonic Acid, Occurred in a Ciprofloxacin Resistant Strain of Francisella tularensis and Causes a High Level of Attenuation in Murine Models of Tularemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-30

    outer membrane surface antigen (81). Likewise, Ftt0_676 encodes for an ion transporter which 506 has been shown to be downregulated when F. tularensis...genome assembly (Genbank: CP013853) was annotated using NCBI’s 618 Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline v3.0 (95). 619 To identify genomic...NuPage Novex 4-686 12% Bis-Tris gels. For Western analysis, fractionated proteins were transferred onto a 687 nitrocellulouse membrane using an

  7. Francisella-Arthropod vector interaction and its role in patho-adaptation to infect mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef eAbu Kwaik

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative, intracellular, zoonotic bacterium, and is the causative agent of tularemia in a broad host range. Arthropods such as ticks, mosquitoes, and flies maintain F. tularensis in nature by transmitting the bacteria among small mammals. While the tick is largely believed to be a biological vector of F. tularensis, transmission by mosquitoes and flies is largely believed to be mechanical on the mouthpart through interrupted feedings. However, the mechanism of infection of the vectors by F. tularensis is not well understood. Since F. tularensis has not been localized in the salivary gland of the primary human biting ticks, it is thought that bacterial transmission by ticks is through mechanical inoculation of tick feces containing F. tularensis into the skin wound. D. melanogaster is an established arthropod-vector model of tularemia, where F. tularensis infects hemocytes, and is found in hemolymph, as seen in ticks. In addition, phagosome biogenesis and robust intracellular proliferation of F. tularensis in arthropod-derived cells are similar to that in mammalian macrophages. Furthermore, bacterial factors required for infectivity of mammals are often required for infectivity of the fly by F. tularensis. Several host factors that contribute to F. tularensis intracellular pathogenesis in D. melanogaster have been identified, and F. tularensis targets some of the evolutionarily conserved eukaryotic processes to enable intracellular survival and proliferation in evolutionarily distant hosts

  8. Comparative phosphoproteomics reveals components of host cell invasion and post-transcriptional regulation during Francisella infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Tempel, Rebecca; Cambronne, Xiaolu A.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Jones, Marcus B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-09-22

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes the deadly disease tularemia. Most evidence suggests that Francisella is not well recognized by the innate immune system that normally leads to cytokine expression and cell death. In previous work, we identified new bacterial factors that were hyper-cytotoxic to macrophages. Four of the identified hyper-cytotoxic strains (lpcC, manB, manC and kdtA) had an impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and produced an exposed lipid A lacking the O-antigen. These mutants were not only hyper-cytotoxic but also were phagocytosed at much higher rates compared to the wild type parent strain. To elucidate the cellular signaling underlying this enhanced phagocytosis and cell death, we performed a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of cells infected with wild-type and delta-lpcC F. novicida. Our data suggest that not only actin but also intermediate filaments and microtubules are important for F. novicida entry into the host cells. In addition, we observed differential phosphorylation of tristetraprolin (TTP), a key component of the mRNA-degrading machinery that controls the expression of a variety of genes including many cytokines. Infection with the delta-lpcC mutant induced the hyper-phosphorylation and inhibition of TTP, leading to the production of cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha which may kill the host cells by triggering apoptosis. Together, our data provide new insights for Francisella invasion and a post-transcriptional mechanism that prevents the expression of host immune response factors that controls infection by this pathogen.

  9. Comparative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Components of Host Cell Invasion and Post-transcriptional Regulation During Francisella Infection*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Tempel, Rebecca; Cambronne, Xiaolu A.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Jones, Marcus B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes the deadly disease tularemia. Most evidence suggests that Francisella is not well recognized by the innate immune system that normally leads to cytokine expression and cell death. In previous work, we identified new bacterial factors that were hyper-cytotoxic to macrophages. Four of the identified hyper-cytotoxic strains (lpcC, manB, manC, and kdtA) had an impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and produced an exposed lipid A lacking the O-antigen. These mutants were not only hyper-cytotoxic but also were phagocytosed at much higher rates compared with the wild type parent strain. To elucidate the cellular signaling underlying this enhanced phagocytosis and cell death, we performed a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of cells infected with wild-type and delta-lpcC F. novicida. Our data suggest that not only actin but also intermediate filaments and microtubules are important for F. novicida entry into the host cells. In addition, we observed differential phosphorylation of tristetraprolin, a key component of the mRNA-degrading machinery that controls the expression of a variety of genes including many cytokines. Infection with the delta-lpcC mutant induced the hyper-phosphorylation and inhibition of tristetraprolin, leading to the production of cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha that may kill the host cells by triggering apoptosis. Together, our data provide new insights for Francisella invasion and a post-transcriptional mechanism that prevents the expression of host immune response factors that control infection by this pathogen. PMID:23970565

  10. Comparative phosphoproteomics reveals components of host cell invasion and post-transcriptional regulation during Francisella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Tempel, Rebecca; Cambronne, Xiaolu A; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Jones, Marcus B; Gritsenko, Marina A; Monroe, Matthew E; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D; Adkins, Joshua N; Heffron, Fred

    2013-11-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes the deadly disease tularemia. Most evidence suggests that Francisella is not well recognized by the innate immune system that normally leads to cytokine expression and cell death. In previous work, we identified new bacterial factors that were hyper-cytotoxic to macrophages. Four of the identified hyper-cytotoxic strains (lpcC, manB, manC, and kdtA) had an impaired lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and produced an exposed lipid A lacking the O-antigen. These mutants were not only hyper-cytotoxic but also were phagocytosed at much higher rates compared with the wild type parent strain. To elucidate the cellular signaling underlying this enhanced phagocytosis and cell death, we performed a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of cells infected with wild-type and delta-lpcC F. novicida. Our data suggest that not only actin but also intermediate filaments and microtubules are important for F. novicida entry into the host cells. In addition, we observed differential phosphorylation of tristetraprolin, a key component of the mRNA-degrading machinery that controls the expression of a variety of genes including many cytokines. Infection with the delta-lpcC mutant induced the hyper-phosphorylation and inhibition of tristetraprolin, leading to the production of cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha that may kill the host cells by triggering apoptosis. Together, our data provide new insights for Francisella invasion and a post-transcriptional mechanism that prevents the expression of host immune response factors that control infection by this pathogen.

  11. FEASIBILITY OF THE AEROSOL-TO-LIQUID PARTICLE EXTRACTION SYSTEM (ALPES) FOR COLLECTION OF VIABLE FRANCISELLA SP.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitkamp, M

    2006-08-07

    Several Biowatch monitoring sites in the Houston area have tested positive for Francisella tularensis and there is a need to determine whether natural occurring Francisella-related microorganism(s) may be responsible for these observed positive reactions. The collection, culturing and characterization of Francisella-related natural microorganisms will provide the knowledge base to improve the future selectivity of Biowatch monitoring for Francisella. The aerosol-to-liquid particle extraction system (ALPES) is a high-efficiency, dual mechanism collection system that utilizes a liquid collection medium for capture of airborne microorganisms. Since the viability of microorganisms is preserved better in liquid medium than on air filters, this project was undertaken to determine whether Francisella philomiragia and Francisella tularensis LVS maintain acceptable viability in the continuous liquid recirculation, high direct current voltage and residual ozone concentrations which occur during ALPES operation. Throughout a series of preliminary trial runs with representative gram-negative and gram-positive microorganisms, several design modifications and improvements to the ALPES optimized liquid handling, electrical stability, sampling and overall performance for biological sampling. Initial testing with Francisella philomiragia showed viability was preserved better in PBS buffer than HBSS buffer. Trial runs at starting cell concentrations of 1.8 x 10{sup 6} and 2.5 x 10{sup 4} CFU/L showed less than a 1-log decrease in viability for F. philomiragia after 24 h in the ALPES. Francisella tularensis LVS (live vaccine strain) was used as a surrogate for virulent F. tularensis in ALPES trial runs conducted at starting cell concentrations of 10{sup 4}, 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6} CFU/L. F. tularensis LVS was slow-growing and required highly selective growth media to prevent overgrowth by collected airborne microorganisms. In addition, one ALPES unit intake was HEPA filtered during

  12. Enhanced survival but not amplification of Francisella spp. in the presence of free-living amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Helen Y; Schaefer, Frank W; Rice, Eugene W

    2016-12-08

    Transmission of Francisella tularensis, the etiologic agent of tularemia, has been associated with various water sources. Survival of many waterborne pathogens within free-living amoeba (FLA) is well documented; however, the role of amoebae in the environmental persistence of F. tularensis is unclear. In this study, axenic FLA cultures of Acanthamoeba castellanii, Acanthamoeba polyphaga, and Vermamoeba vermiformis were each inoculated with virulent strains of F. tularensis (Types A and B), the attenuated live vaccine strain, and Francisella novicida. Experimental parameters included low and high multiplicity of infection and incubation temperatures of 25 and 30 °C for 0-10 days. Francisella spp. survival was enhanced by the presence of FLA; however, bacterial growth and protozoa infectivity were not observed. In contrast, co-infections of A. polyphaga and Legionella pneumophila, used as an amoeba pathogen control, resulted in bacterial proliferation, cytopathic effects, and amoebal lysis. Collectively, even though short-term incubation with FLA was beneficial, the long-term effects on Francisella survival are unknown, especially given the expenditure of available amoebal derived nutrients and the fastidious nature of Francisella spp. These factors have clear implications for the role of FLA in Francisella environmental persistence.

  13. The Francisella intracellular life cycle: towards molecular mechanisms of intracellular survival and proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey eChong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The tularemia-causing bacterium Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular organism with a complex intracellular lifecycle that ensures its survival and proliferation in a variety of mammalian cell types, including professional phagocytes. Because this cycle is essential to Francisella pathogenesis and virulence, much research has focused on deciphering the mechanisms of its intracellular survival and replication and characterizing both bacterial and host determinants of the bacterium’s intracellular cycle. Studies of various strains and host cell models have led to the consensual paradigm of Francisella as a cytosolic pathogen, but also to some controversy about its intracellular cycle. In this review, we will detail major findings that have advanced our knowledge of Francisella intracellular survival strategies and also attempt to reconcile discrepancies that exist in our molecular understanding of the Francisella-phagocyte interaction.

  14. Review of Processing and Analytical Methods for Francisella ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal Article The etiological agent of tularemia, Francisella tularensis, is a resilient organism within the environment and can be acquired many ways (infectious aerosols and dust, contaminated food and water, infected carcasses, and arthropod bites). However, isolating F. tularensis from environmental samples can be challenging due to its nutritionally fastidious and slow-growing nature. In order to determine the current state of the science regarding available processing and analytical methods for detection and recovery of F. tularensis from water and soil matrices, a review of the literature was conducted. During the review, analysis via culture, immunoassays, and genomic identification were the most commonly found methods for F. tularensis detection within environmental samples. Other methods included combined culture and genomic analysis for rapid quantification of viable microorganisms and use of one assay to identify multiple pathogens from a single sample. Gaps in the literature that were identified during this review suggest that further work to integrate culture and genomic identification would advance our ability to detect and to assess the viability of Francisella spp. The optimization of DNA extraction, whole genome amplification with inhibition-resistant polymerases, and multiagent microarray detection would also advance biothreat detection.

  15. Francisella species in ticks and animals, Iberian Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes de Carvalho, I; Toledo, A; Carvalho, C L; Barandika, J F; Respicio-Kingry, L B; Garcia-Amil, C; García-Pérez, A L; Olmeda, A S; Zé-Zé, L; Petersen, J M; Anda, P; Núncio, M S; Escudero, R

    2016-02-01

    The presence of Francisella species in 2134 ticks, 93 lagomorphs and 280 small mammals from the Iberian Peninsula was studied. Overall, 19 ticks and 6 lagomorphs were positive for Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica, suggesting, as described for other regions, that lagomorphs may have an important role in the maintenance of F. tularensis in nature. Of the 6 positive lagomorphs, 4 were identified as the European rabbit, Oryctogalus cuniculus. Additionally, 353 ticks and 3 small mammals were PCR positive for Francisella-like endosymbionts (FLEs) and one small mammal was also positive for Francisella hispaniensis-like DNA sequences. Among FLE positive specimens, a variety of sequence types were detected: ticks were associated with 5 lpnA sequence types, with only one type identified per tick, in contrast to 2 lpnA sequence types detected in a single wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus). To our knowledge, this is the first report of FLEs in free-living small mammals as well as the first detection of F. hispaniensis-like sequences in a natural setting.

  16. 肌动蛋白结合脂筏促进巨噬细胞摄入土拉弗朗西斯菌%Advancement of Actin Binding with Lipid Rafts in the Uptake Francisella tularensis by Mouse Macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘欣; 曾思良; 蔡家麟; 吴鉴今; 杨光; 黄通来

    2011-01-01

    观察土拉弗朗西斯菌LVS借助脂筏以肌动蛋白为动力被鼠巨噬细胞摄入的过程.细胞胆固醇用菲律平Ⅲ染色,结合神经节苷酯GM1的霍乱毒素B亚基用键合了Alexa 594的免抗霍乱毒素B亚基二抗显色:肌动蛋白用键合了Alexa 594的鬼笔环肽显色.免疫荧光显微镜观察到脂筏成分中的胆固醇、神经节苷酯GM1均可与细菌共定位;胆固醇可与肌动蛋白共定位.随着感染时同的延长,细菌可离开脂筏.离开脂筏的细菌囊泡可与肌动蛋白共定位.这些发现提示肌动蛋白与脂筏结合,在弗朗西新菌早期进入巨噬细胞期间发辉重要作用.%The process of the uptake Franciselia tularensis LVS by mouse macrophages with the aid of lipid rafts powered by actin was observed. Cell cholesterol was stained with filipin H and combined with cholera toxin sub-radical B of gangliosides CM1 were detected and visualized with Alexa Fluor 594 conjugated rabbit-anti-cholera toxin sub-radical B antibodies. Actins were visualized with phalloidin conjugated to Alexa 594. The results indicated thai under fluorescence microscope cholesterol, gangliosides GM1 of the component of lipid rafts could be colocalized with the bacterium, and cholesterol could be colocalized with actin. As ihe prolongation of the infection, bacterium could leave the lipid rafts. Bacterial saccule thai left the lipid rafts could be colocalized with actin. These findings suggested that actin combined with lipid rafts played an important role in Franciselia early entering into macrophages.

  17. Increased knowledge of Francisella genus diversity highlights the benefits of optimised DNA-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlinder, Jon; Öhrman, Caroline; Svensson, Kerstin; Lindgren, Petter; Johansson, Anders; Forsman, Mats; Larsson, Pär; Sjödin, Andreas

    2012-09-25

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies offer promising tools for generating large numbers of genomes, larger typing databases and improved mapping of environmental bacterial diversity. However, DNA-based methods for the detection of Francisella were developed with limited knowledge about genetic diversity. This, together with the high sequence identity between several Francisella species, means there is a high risk of false identification and detection of the highly virulent pathogen Francisella tularensis. Moreover, phylogenetic reconstructions using single or limited numbers of marker sequences often result in incorrect tree topologies and inferred evolutionary distances. The recent growth in publicly accessible whole-genome sequences now allows evaluation of published genetic markers to determine optimal combinations of markers that minimise both time and laboratory costs. In the present study, we evaluated 38 previously published DNA markers and the corresponding PCR primers against 42 genomes representing the currently known diversity of the genus Francisella. The results highlight that PCR assays for Francisella tularensis are often complicated by low specificity, resulting in a high probability of false positives. A method to select a set of one to seven markers for obtaining optimal phylogenetic resolution or diagnostic accuracy is presented. Current multiple-locus sequence-typing systems and detection assays of Francisella, could be improved by redesigning some of the primers and reselecting typing markers. The use of only a few optimally selected sequence-typing markers allows construction of phylogenetic topologies with almost the same accuracy as topologies based on whole-genome sequences.

  18. Alternative activation of macrophages and induction of arginase are not components of pathogenesis mediated by Francisella species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Griffin

    Full Text Available Virulent Francisella tularensis ssp tularensis is an intracellular, Gram negative bacterium that causes acute lethal disease following inhalation of fewer than 15 organisms. Pathogenicity of Francisella infections is tied to its unique ability to evade and suppress inflammatory responses in host cells. It has been proposed that induction of alternative activation of infected macrophages is a mechanism by which attenuated Francisella species modulate host responses. In this report we reveal that neither attenuated F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS nor virulent F. tularensis strain SchuS4 induce alternative activation of macrophages in vitro or in vivo. LVS, but not SchuS4, provoked production of arginase1 independent of alternative activation in vitro and in vivo. However, absence of arginase1 did not significantly impact intracellular replication of LVS or SchuS4. Together our data establish that neither induction of alternative activation nor expression of arginase1 are critical features of disease mediated by attenuated or virulent Francisella species.

  19. Identification of Francisella novicida mutants that fail to induce prostaglandin E2 synthesis by infected macrophages.

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    Matthew Dale Woolard

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. We have previously shown that infection with F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS induces macrophages to synthesize prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. Synthesis of PGE2 by F. tularensis infected macrophages results in decreased T cell proliferation in vitro and increased bacterial survival in vivo. Although we understand some of the biological consequences of F. tularensis induced PGE2 synthesis by macrophages, we do not understand the cellular pathways (neither host nor bacterial that result in up-regulation of the PGE2 biosynthetic pathway in F. tularensis infected macrophages. We took a genetic approach to begin to understand the molecular mechanisms of bacterial induction of PGE2 synthesis from infected macrophages. To identify F. tularensis genes necessary for the induction of PGE2 in primary macrophages, we infected cells with individual mutants from the closely related strain Francisella tularensis subspecies novicida U112 (U112 two allele mutant library. Twenty genes were identified that when disrupted resulted in U112 mutant strains unable to induce the synthesis of PGE2 by infected macrophages. Fourteen of the genes identified are located within the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI. Genes in the FPI are required for F. tularensis to escape from the phagosome and replicate in the cytosol, which might account for the failure of U112 with transposon insertions within the FPI to induce PGE2. This implies that U112 mutant strains that do not grow intracellularly would also not induce PGE2. We found that U112 clpB::Tn grows within macrophages yet fails to induce PGE2, while U112 pdpA::Tn does not grow yet does induce PGE2. We also found that U112 iglC::Tn neither grows nor induces PGE2. These findings indicate that there is dissociation between intracellular growth and the ability of F. tularensis to induce PGE2 synthesis. These mutants provide a critical entrée into the pathways used

  20. Francisella tularensis Molecular Typing Using Differential Insertion Sequence Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    were homogenized in cold phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) within containment by using a Mini Beadbeater-8 instrument (Bio Spec Products, Inc...from the University of Nehrao;ka Medical Center stock collection. ’ 1 Previously known at Bacillus sul>tilis var. niger . • Abbreviations: LVS. live

  1. Purification and Partial Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies of Francisella tularensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    incubated for 2 h at 37*C. Plates were washed with 0.05% Tween 20-PBS three times. Fifty pl of a 1:2500 dilution of goat anti-mouse IgG and IgM...Cherwonogrodzky, J.W., Dubray, G., Moreno, E. and Nmyer, H. 1990. Antigens of Brucella, p. 19-63 In K. Nielsen and J.R. Duncan (ed.) Animal Brucellosis , CRC

  2. Indigenous infection with Francisella tularensis holarctica in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maraha, B.; Hajer, G.F.; Sjödin, A.; Forsman, M.; Paauw, A.; Roeselers, G.; Verspui, E.; Frenay, H.M.E.; Notermans, D.W.; Vries, M.C. de; Reubsaet, F.A.G.

    2013-01-01

    We report here the first case of indigenous tularemia detected inTheNetherlands, a nonendemic country, since 1953.Whole genome DNAsequence analysis assigned the isolate BD11-00177 to the genomic group B.FTNF002-00,which previously has been exclusively reported from Spain, France, Italy, Switzerland,

  3. Clinical Characterization of Aerosolized Francisella tularensis Infection in Cynomolgus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-21

    seed stock. After 23 hours of incubation at 37°C and shaking at 200 rpm, the optical density (OD660 nm) was measured and the bacteria were diluted...count), up to 4 mm in diameter, tannish-white, flattened to slightly raised foci randomly dispersed throughout the parenchyma and capsular surface

  4. Rapid Identification of Francisella tularensis by a Fluorogenic Enzyme Immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    Benjamin, D.C. and Wagner, R.R., "Monoclonal antibodies to the glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus: comparative neutralizing activity", J. Virol... feline leukemia virus and its neutralization", J. Immunol. Methods, 114 (1988) pp. 253-260. UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 22 29. Palfree, R.G.E. and

  5. Francisella infections in farmed and wild aquatic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colquhoun Duncan J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the last 10 years or so, infections caused by bacteria belonging to a particular branch of the genus Francisella have become increasingly recognised in farmed fish and molluscs worldwide. While the increasing incidence of diagnoses may in part be due to the development and widespread availability of molecular detection techniques, the domestication of new organisms has undoubtedly instigated emergence of clinical disease in some species. Francisellosis in fish develops in a similar fashion independent of host species and is commonly characterised by the presence of multi-organ granuloma and high morbidity, with varying associated mortality levels. A number of fish species are affected including Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua; tilapia, Oreochromis sp.; Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar; hybrid striped bass, Morone chrysops × M. saxatilis and three-lined grunt, Parapristipoma trilinineatum. The disease is highly infectious and often prevalent in affected stocks. Most, if not all strains isolated from teleost fish belong to either F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis in warm water fish species or Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis in coldwater fish species. The disease is quite readily diagnosed following histological examination and identification of the aetiological bacterium by culture on cysteine rich media or PCR. The available evidence may indicate a degree of host specificity for the various Francisella strains, although this area requires further study. No effective vaccine is currently available. Investigation of the virulence mechanisms and host response shows similarity to those known from Francisella tularensis infection in mammals. However, no evidence exists for zoonotic potential amongst the fish pathogenic Francisella.

  6. Increased knowledge of Francisella genus diversity highlights the benefits of optimised DNA-based assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahlinder Jon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in sequencing technologies offer promising tools for generating large numbers of genomes, larger typing databases and improved mapping of environmental bacterial diversity. However, DNA-based methods for the detection of Francisella were developed with limited knowledge about genetic diversity. This, together with the high sequence identity between several Francisella species, means there is a high risk of false identification and detection of the highly virulent pathogen Francisella tularensis. Moreover, phylogenetic reconstructions using single or limited numbers of marker sequences often result in incorrect tree topologies and inferred evolutionary distances. The recent growth in publicly accessible whole-genome sequences now allows evaluation of published genetic markers to determine optimal combinations of markers that minimise both time and laboratory costs. Results In the present study, we evaluated 38 previously published DNA markers and the corresponding PCR primers against 42 genomes representing the currently known diversity of the genus Francisella. The results highlight that PCR assays for Francisella tularensis are often complicated by low specificity, resulting in a high probability of false positives. A method to select a set of one to seven markers for obtaining optimal phylogenetic resolution or diagnostic accuracy is presented. Conclusions Current multiple-locus sequence-typing systems and detection assays of Francisella, could be improved by redesigning some of the primers and reselecting typing markers. The use of only a few optimally selected sequence-typing markers allows construction of phylogenetic topologies with almost the same accuracy as topologies based on whole-genome sequences.

  7. Rapid differentiation of Francisella species and subspecies by fluorescent in situ hybridization targeting the 23S rRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trebesius Karlheinz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Francisella (F. tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. Due to its low infectious dose, ease of dissemination and high case fatality rate, F. tularensis was the subject in diverse biological weapons programs and is among the top six agents with high potential if misused in bioterrorism. Microbiological diagnosis is cumbersome and time-consuming. Methods for the direct detection of the pathogen (immunofluorescence, PCR have been developed but are restricted to reference laboratories. Results The complete 23S rRNA genes of representative strains of F. philomiragia and all subspecies of F. tularensis were sequenced. Single nucleotide polymorphisms on species and subspecies level were confirmed by partial amplification and sequencing of 24 additional strains. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH assays were established using species- and subspecies-specific probes. Different FISH protocols allowed the positive identification of all 4 F. philomiragia strains, and more than 40 F. tularensis strains tested. By combination of different probes, it was possible to differentiate the F. tularensis subspecies holarctica, tularensis, mediasiatica and novicida. No cross reactivity with strains of 71 clinically relevant bacterial species was observed. FISH was also successfully applied to detect different F. tularensis strains in infected cells or tissue samples. In blood culture systems spiked with F. tularensis, bacterial cells of different subspecies could be separated within single samples. Conclusion We could show that FISH targeting the 23S rRNA gene is a rapid and versatile method for the identification and differentiation of F. tularensis isolates from both laboratory cultures and clinical samples.

  8. Inflammasome priming is similar for francisella species that differentially induce inflammasome activation.

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    Mohammed G Ghonime

    Full Text Available Inflammasome activation is a two-step process where step one, priming, prepares the inflammasome for its subsequent activation, by step two. Classically step one can be induced by LPS priming followed by step two, high dose ATP. Furthermore, when IL-18 processing is used as the inflammasome readout, priming occurs before new protein synthesis. In this context, how intracellular pathogens such as Francisella activate the inflammasome is incompletely understood, particularly regarding the relative importance of priming versus activation steps. To better understand these events we compared Francisella strains that differ in virulence and ability to induce inflammasome activation for their relative effects on step one vs. step two. When using the rapid priming model, i.e., 30 min priming by live or heat killed Francisella strains (step 1, followed by ATP (step 2, we found no difference in IL-18 release, p20 caspase-1 release and ASC oligomerization between Francisella strains (F. novicida, F. holarctica -LVS and F. tularensis Schu S4. This priming is fast, independent of bacteria viability, internalization and phagosome escape, but requires TLR2-mediated ERK phosphorylation. In contrast to their efficient priming capacity, Francisella strains LVS and Schu S4 were impaired in inflammasome triggering compared to F. novicida. Thus, observed differences in inflammasome activation by F. novicida, LVS and Schu S4 depend not on differences in priming but rather on their propensity to trigger the primed inflammasome.

  9. Monocyte / macrophage inflammatory response pathways to combat Francisella infection: possible therapeutic targets?

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    Devyn D Gillette

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis can bypass and suppress host immune responses, even to the point of manipulating immune cell phenotypes and intercellular inflammatory networks. Strengthening these responses such that immune cells more readily identify and destroy the bacteria is likely to become a viable (and perhaps necessary strategy for combating infections with Francisella, especially given the likelihood of antibiotic resistance in the foreseeable future. Monocytes and macrophages offer a niche wherein Francisella can invade and replicate, resulting in substantially higher bacterial load that can overcome the host. As such, understanding their responses to Francisella may uncover potential avenues of therapy that could promote a lowering of bacterial burden and clearance of infection. These response pathways include Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2, the caspase-1 inflammasome, Interferons, NADPH oxidase, Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K and the Ras pathway. In this review we summarize the literature pertaining to the roles of these pathways during Francisella infection, with an emphasis on monocyte / macrophage responses. The therapeutic targeting of one or more such pathways may ultimately become a valuable tool for the treatment of tularemia, and several possibilities are discussed.

  10. Mouse Model of Oral Infection with Virulent Type A Francisella tularensis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    KuoLee, R.; Zhao, X.; Austin, J.; Harris, G.; Conlan, J. W.; Chen, W.

    2007-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. Little is known about the immunopathogenesis of oral infection with this pathogen. Here, for the first time, we examined the susceptibility of mice to intragastric inoculation with virulent type A F. tularensis and characterized the course of infection and the associated host responses. Both immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice were relatively susceptible to intragastric inoculation of type A F. tularensis with a 50% lethal dose (LD50) of 106 organisms, which was 100,000-fold higher than the LD100 for intradermal or respiratory routes of infection. Mice deficient in gamma interferon or tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 were more susceptible than wild-type controls to oral infection with a high dose of the pathogen. After oral inoculation, F. tularensis appeared first in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and then rapidly spread to the livers and spleens, where the organism multiplied to high numbers and induced marked neutrophilic infiltration and severe tissue necrosis. Infected mice showed rapid increases in tissue cytokine mRNA expression, which peaked in the MLN at 2 days postinfection (dpi) and in the liver and spleen at 3 dpi. The levels of gamma interferon, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, KC, interferon-inducible protein 10, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 were elevated from day 2 postinoculation onward. Moreover, mice intradermally immunized with the live vaccine strain of F. tularensis showed little survival advantage over naive mice after oral challenge with type A F. tularensis. These results suggest that type A F. tularensis is an effective oral pathogen that can cause fatal systemic infection and could pose a public health concern, particularly to immunocompromised individuals, if ingested in contaminated water and food. PMID:17242058

  11. Mutations of Francisella novicida that alter the mechanism of its phagocytosis by murine macrophages.

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    Xin-He Lai

    Full Text Available Infection with the bacterial pathogen Francisella tularensis tularensis (F. tularensis causes tularemia, a serious and debilitating disease. Francisella tularensis novicida strain U112 (abbreviated F. novicida, which is closely related to F. tularensis, is pathogenic for mice but not for man, making it an ideal model system for tularemia. Intracellular pathogens like Francisella inhibit the innate immune response, thereby avoiding immune recognition and death of the infected cell. Because activation of inflammatory pathways may lead to cell death, we reasoned that we could identify bacterial genes involved in inhibiting inflammation by isolating mutants that killed infected cells faster than the wild-type parent. We screened a comprehensive transposon library of F. novicida for mutant strains that increased the rate of cell death following infection in J774 macrophage-like cells, as compared to wild-type F. novicida. Mutations in 28 genes were identified as being hypercytotoxic to both J774 and primary macrophages of which 12 were less virulent in a mouse infection model. Surprisingly, we found that F. novicida with mutations in four genes (lpcC, manB, manC and kdtA were taken up by and killed macrophages at a much higher rate than the parent strain, even upon treatment with cytochalasin D (cytD, a classic inhibitor of macrophage phagocytosis. At least 10-fold more mutant bacteria were internalized by macrophages as compared to the parent strain if the bacteria were first fixed with formaldehyde, suggesting a surface structure is required for the high phagocytosis rate. However, bacteria were required to be viable for macrophage toxicity. The four mutant strains do not make a complete LPS but instead have an exposed lipid A. Interestingly, other mutations that result in an exposed LPS core were not taken up at increased frequency nor did they kill host cells more than the parent. These results suggest an alternative, more efficient macrophage

  12. Genetic diversity within the genus Francisella as revealed by comparative analyses of the genomes of two North American isolates from environmental sources

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    Siddaramappa Shivakumara

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Francisella tularensis is an intracellular pathogen that causes tularemia in humans and the public health importance of this bacterium has been well documented in recent history. Francisella philomiragia, a distant relative of F. tularensis, is thought to constitute an environmental lineage along with Francisella novicida. Nevertheless, both F. philomiragia and F. novicida have been associated with human disease, primarily in immune-compromised individuals. To understand the genetic relationships and evolutionary contexts among different lineages within the genus Francisella, the genome of Francisella spp. strain TX07-7308 was sequenced and compared to the genomes of F. philomiragia strains ATCC 25017 and 25015, F. novicida strain U112, and F. tularensis strain Schu S4. Results The size of strain ATCC 25017 chromosome was 2,045,775 bp and contained 1,983 protein-coding genes. The size of strain TX07-7308 chromosome was 2,035,931 bp and contained 1,980 protein-coding genes. Pairwise BLAST comparisons indicated that strains TX07-7308 and ATCC 25017 contained 1,700 protein coding genes in common. NUCmer analyses revealed that the chromosomes of strains TX07-7308 and ATCC 25017 were mostly collinear except for a few gaps, translocations, and/or inversions. Using the genome sequence data and comparative analyses with other members of the genus Francisella (e.g., F. novicida strain U112 and F. tularensis strain Schu S4, several strain-specific genes were identified. Strains TX07-7308 and ATCC 25017 contained an operon with six open reading frames encoding proteins related to enzymes involved in thiamine biosynthesis that was absent in F. novicida strain U112 and F. tularensis strain Schu S4. Strain ATCC 25017 contained an operon putatively involved in lactose metabolism that was absent in strain TX07-7308, F. novicida strain U112, and F. tularensis strain Schu S4. In contrast, strain TX07-7308 contained an operon putatively

  13. Resistance of Francisella novicida to Fosmidomycin Associated with Mutations in the Glycerol-3-Phosphate Transporter

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    Ryan S Mackie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The methylerythritol phosphate (MEP pathway is essential in most prokaryotes and some lower eukaryotes but absent from human cells, and is a validated target for antimicrobial drug development. The formation of MEP is catalyzed by 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR. MEP pathway genes have been identified in many Category A and B biothreat agents, including Francisella tularensis, which causes the zoonosis tularemia. Fosmidomycin inhibits purified Francisella DXR. This compound also inhibits the growth of F. tularensis NIH B38, F. novicida and F. tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS bacteria. Related compounds such as FR900098 and lipophilic prodrugs of FR900098 have been developed to improve the bioavailability of these DXR inhibitors. In disc-inhibition assays with these compounds, we observed breakthrough colonies of F. novicida in the presence of fosmidomycin, suggesting spontaneous development of fosmidomycin resistance (FosR. FosR bacteria had decreased sensitivity to both fosmidomycin and FR900098. The two most likely targets for the development of mutants would be the DXR enzyme or the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT that allows entry of fosmidomycin into the bacteria. Sensitivity of FosR F. novicida bacteria to compound 1 was not abated suggesting that spontaneous resistance is not due to mutation of DXR. We thus predicted that the glpT transporter may be mutated leading to this resistant phenotype. Supporting this, transposon insertion mutants at the glpT locus were also found to be resistant to fosmidomycin. DNA sequencing of four different spontaneous FosR colonies demonstrated a variety of deletions in the glpT coding region. The overall frequency of FosR mutations in F. novicida was determined to be 6.3 x 10-8. Thus we conclude that one mechanism of resistance of F. novicida to fosmidomycin is caused by mutations in GlpT. This is the first description of mutations in Francisella leading to fosmidomycin

  14. Comparison of bacterial culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica in wild animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sting, Reinhard; Runge, Martin; Eisenberg, Tobias; Braune, Silke; Müller, Wolfgang; Otto, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Detection of the zoonotic pathogen Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica (EF tularensis) in wild animals with culture techniques as well as polymerase chain reaction were compared and discussed on the basis of the investigation of 60 animals. The samples originated from 55 European brown hares (Lepus europaeus), two red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and one each from a wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a European beaver (Castor fiber), and a lemur (Lemur catta). When comparing the growth of 28 F. tularensis isolates on the cysteine blood agar and the modified Martin-Lewis-agar used in this study, cultivation was successful for 26 isolates on both media, but for two isolates only on the cysteine blood agar. Out of 43 carcasses 19 tested positive in bacteriological culture and PCR. Two culture positive samples of tonsils originating from foxes could not be confirmed by PCR, although PCR was positive in 22 samples that missed growth of F. tularensis. Comparative studies on cultural detection of E. tularensis were performed on samples of 16 hares from lung, spleen, liver and gut and in one case with a peritoneal swab. In at least one of these localizations cultivation of the pathogen was successful. Detection rate was reduced to 94% (15 of 16 hares) considering only the results of the cultures of the lungs and spleens. For a sensitive and rapid detection of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica, the PCR is a suitable method thereby avoiding hazardous multiplying of the pathogen. However, cultivation of F. tularensis is often a prerequisite for further studies on antibiotic resistance patterns of the pathogen, molecular epidemiological and pathological analyses of tularaemia.

  15. Francisella subverts innate immune signaling: Focus on PI3K/Akt

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    Thomas John Cremer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular bacterial pathogens exploit host cells as a part of their lifecycle, and they do so by manipulating host cell signaling events. Many such bacteria are known to produce effector proteins that promote cell invasion, alter membrane trafficking and disrupt signaling cascades. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of signaling pathways involved in host cell responses to Francisella tularensis, a facultative Gram-negative intracellular pathogen that causes tularemia. We highlight several key pathways that are targeted by Francisella, with a focus on the PI3K/Akt pathway. Lastly, we discuss the emerging role of microRNAs, specifically miR-155, as a key regulator of host signaling and defense.

  16. Macrophage replication screen identifies a novel Francisella hydroperoxide resistance protein involved in virulence.

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    Anna C Llewellyn

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. Recently, genome-wide screens have identified Francisella genes required for virulence in mice. However, the mechanisms by which most of the corresponding proteins contribute to pathogenesis are still largely unknown. To further elucidate the roles of these virulence determinants in Francisella pathogenesis, we tested whether each gene was required for replication of the model pathogen F. novicida within macrophages, an important virulence trait. Fifty-three of the 224 genes tested were involved in intracellular replication, including many of those within the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI, validating our results. Interestingly, over one third of the genes identified are annotated as hypothetical, indicating that F. novicida likely utilizes novel virulence factors for intracellular replication. To further characterize these virulence determinants, we selected two hypothetical genes to study in more detail. As predicted by our screen, deletion mutants of FTN_0096 and FTN_1133 were attenuated for replication in macrophages. The mutants displayed differing levels of attenuation in vivo, with the FTN_1133 mutant being the most attenuated. FTN_1133 has sequence similarity to the organic hydroperoxide resistance protein Ohr, an enzyme involved in the bacterial response to oxidative stress. We show that FTN_1133 is required for F. novicida resistance to, and degradation of, organic hydroperoxides as well as resistance to the action of the NADPH oxidase both in macrophages and mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that F. holarctica LVS, a strain derived from a highly virulent human pathogenic species of Francisella, also requires this protein for organic hydroperoxide resistance as well as replication in macrophages and mice. This study expands our knowledge of Francisella's largely uncharacterized intracellular lifecycle and

  17. MiR-155 induction by F. novicida but not the virulent F. tularensis results in SHIP down-regulation and enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine response.

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    Thomas J Cremer

    Full Text Available The intracellular gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis causes the disease tularemia and is known for its ability to subvert host immune responses. Previous work from our laboratory identified the PI3K/Akt pathway and SHIP as critical modulators of host resistance to Francisella. Here, we show that SHIP expression is strongly down-regulated in monocytes and macrophages following infection with F. tularensis novicida (F.n.. To account for this negative regulation we explored the possibility that microRNAs (miRs that target SHIP may be induced during infection. There is one miR that is predicted to target SHIP, miR-155. We tested for induction and found that F.n. induced miR-155 both in primary monocytes/macrophages and in vivo. Using luciferase reporter assays we confirmed that miR-155 led to down-regulation of SHIP, showing that it specifically targets the SHIP 3'UTR. Further experiments showed that miR-155 and BIC, the gene that encodes miR-155, were induced as early as four hours post-infection in primary human monocytes. This expression was dependent on TLR2/MyD88 and did not require inflammasome activation. Importantly, miR-155 positively regulated pro-inflammatory cytokine release in human monocytes infected with Francisella. In sharp contrast, we found that the highly virulent type A SCHU S4 strain of Francisella tularensis (F.t. led to a significantly lower miR-155 response than the less virulent F.n. Hence, F.n. induces miR-155 expression and leads to down-regulation of SHIP, resulting in enhanced pro-inflammatory responses. However, impaired miR-155 induction by SCHU S4 may help explain the lack of both SHIP down-regulation and pro-inflammatory response and may account for the virulence of Type A Francisella.

  18. Screening for bacterial DNA in the hard tick Hyalomma marginatum (Ixodidae from Socotra Island (Yemen: detection of Francisella-like endosymbiont

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    M. Montagna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-four adult ticks collected from livestock on Socotra Island (Yemen were identified as Hyalomma marginatum using traditional morphological characteristics. Morphological identification was confirmed for all the collected specimens using a molecular approach targeting a fragment of the mitochondrial gene 12S rRNA. All the specimens were examined for the presence of tick-borne pathogens and the tick endosymbiont Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii using polymerase chain reaction. Three specimens out of the 34 analyzed tested positive to the presence of Francisella spp. leading to the first detection of these bacteria in H. marginatum on Socotra Island. The phylogenetic analyses conducted on a 660 bp fragment of the ribosomal gene 16S rRNA of Francisella spp. (including F. philomiragia as outgroup, the four subspecies of F. tularensis and the Francisella-like endosymbiont of ticks confirm that the newly detected Francisella strains cluster into the Francisella-like endosymbionts of ticks. Interestingly, the detected Francisella-like endosymbiont, shows a different genotype to that previously isolated from H. marginatum collected in Bulgaria. No specimen was positive for the presence of Rickettsia spp., Coxiella burnetii, Borrelia burgdorferi or M. mitochondrii.

  19. Evasion of IFN-γ signaling by Francisella novicida is dependent upon Francisella outer membrane protein C.

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    Kalyan C Nallaparaju

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of the lethal disease tularemia. An outer membrane protein (FTT0918 of F. tularensis subsp. tularensis has been identified as a virulence factor. We generated a F. novicida (F. tularensis subsp. novicida FTN_0444 (homolog of FTT0918 fopC mutant to study the virulence-associated mechanism(s of FTT0918.The ΔfopC strain phenotype was characterized using immunological and biochemical assays. Attenuated virulence via the pulmonary route in wildtype C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, as well as in knockout (KO mice, including MHC I, MHC II, and µmT (B cell deficient, but not in IFN-γ or IFN-γR KO mice was observed. Primary bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM prepared from C57BL/6 mice treated with rIFN-γ exhibited greater inhibition of intracellular ΔfopC than wildtype U112 strain replication; whereas, IFN-γR KO macrophages showed no IFN-γ-dependent inhibition of ΔfopC replication. Moreover, phosphorylation of STAT1 was downregulated by the wildtype strain, but not the fopC mutant, in rIFN-γ treated macrophages. Addition of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, an NOS inhibitor, led to an increase of ΔfopC replication to that seen in the BMDM unstimulated with rIFN-γ. Enzymatic screening of ΔfopC revealed aberrant acid phosphatase activity and localization. Furthermore, a greater abundance of different proteins in the culture supernatants of ΔfopC than that in the wildtype U112 strain was observed.F. novicida FopC protein facilitates evasion of IFN-γ-mediated immune defense(s by down-regulation of STAT1 phosphorylation and nitric oxide production, thereby promoting virulence. Additionally, the FopC protein also may play a role in maintaining outer membrane stability (integrity facilitating the activity and localization of acid phosphatases and other F. novicida cell components.

  20. Akt and SHIP modulate Francisella escape from the phagosome and induction of the Fas-mediated death pathway.

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    Murugesan V S Rajaram

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis infects macrophages and escapes phago-lysosomal fusion to replicate within the host cytosol, resulting in host cell apoptosis. Here we show that the Fas-mediated death pathway is activated in infected cells and correlates with escape of the bacterium from the phagosome and the bacterial burden. Our studies also demonstrate that constitutive activation of Akt, or deletion of SHIP, promotes phago-lysosomal fusion and limits bacterial burden in the host cytosol, and the subsequent induction of Fas expression and cell death. Finally, we show that phagosomal escape/intracellular bacterial burden regulate activation of the transcription factors sp1/sp3, leading to Fas expression and cell death. These data identify for the first time host cell signaling pathways that regulate the phagosomal escape of Francisella, leading to the induction of Fas and subsequent host cell death.

  1. Identification of genes required for secretion of the Francisella oxidative burst-inhibiting acid phosphatase AcpA

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    John S Gunn

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a Tier 1 bioterror threat and the intracellular pathogen responsible for tularemia in humans and animals. Upon entry into the host, Francisella uses multiple mechanisms to evade killing. Our previous studies have shown that after entering its primary cellular host, the macrophage, Francisella immediately suppresses the oxidative burst by secreting a series of acid phosphatases including AcpA-B-C and HapA, thereby evading the innate immune response of the macrophage and enhancing survival and further infection. However, the mechanism of acid phosphatase secretion by Francisella is still unknown. In this study, we screened for genes required for AcpA secretion in Francisella. We initially demonstrated that the known secretion systems, the putative Francisella-pathogenicity island (FPI-encoded Type VI secretion system and the Type IV pili, do not secrete AcpA. Using random transposon mutagenesis in conjunction with ELISA, Western blotting and acid phosphatase enzymatic assays, a transposon library of 5450 mutants was screened for strains with a minimum 1.5-fold decrease in secreted (culture supernatant AcpA, but no defect in cytosolic AcpA. Three mutants with decreased supernatant AcpA were identified. The transposon insertion sites of these mutants were revealed by direct genomic sequencing or inverse-PCR and sequencing. One of these mutants has a severe defect in AcpA secretion (at least 85% decrease and is a predicted hypothetical inner membrane protein. Interestingly, this mutant also affected the secretion of the FPI-encoded protein, VgrG. Thus, this screen identified novel protein secretion factors involved in the subversion of host defenses.

  2. Mass spectrometry analysis of intact Francisella bacteria identifies lipid A structure remodeling in response to acidic pH stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Camille B; Thomson, Michael; Vercellone, Alain; Gardner, Francesca; Ernst, Robert K; Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Nigou, Jérôme

    2017-08-12

    Structural modification of lipid A, the lipid anchor of LPS, is one of the strategies used by Gram-negative bacteria to evade host innate immunity. Francisella tularensis is a human pathogen that infects and replicates within phagocytic cells. It produces an atypical lipid A, whose structure precludes an efficient recognition by both innate immune players, TLR4 and cationic antimicrobial peptides. Interestingly, a recent report indicates that the lipid A of Francisella (LVS vaccinal strain) undergoes polar modifications when bacteria are grown in human macrophages as compared to in broth. To characterize the structural modifications of lipid A that may be induced intracellularly, Francisella novicida, a surrogate strain for the highly virulent F. tularensis, was submitted to different stress conditions mimicking the harsh environment encountered in the macrophages. To analyze lipid A directly from intact bacteria without any chemical treatment or purification steps, we used a rapid and sensitive MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry approach. Among the many conditions tested, only bacteria exposure to acidic pHs (from 6 to 5) induced a change in lipid A structure. These changes were characterized by an increase in the relative abundance of molecular species bearing an additional hexose unit on the diglucosamine backbone, similar to species present when bacteria are grown under reduced environmental temperature. This lipid A glyco-form, which is observed in trace amounts in normal in vitro growth conditions at 37 °C, may contribute to the intracellular parasitism of macrophages by Francisella. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  3. Structural modifications of bacterial lipopolysaccharide that facilitate Gram-negative bacteria evasion of host innate immunity

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    Motohiro eMatsuura

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a cell wall component characteristic of Gram-negative bacteria, is a representative pathogen-associated molecular pattern that allows mammalian cells to recognize bacterial invasion and trigger innate immune responses. The polysaccharide moiety of LPS primary plays protective roles for bacteria such as prevention from complement attacks or camouflage with common host carbohydrate residues. The lipid moiety, termed lipid A, is recognized by the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4/MD-2 complex, which transduces signals for activation of host innate immunity. The basic structure of lipid A is a glucosamine disaccharide substituted by phosphate groups and acyl groups. Lipid A with 6 acyl groups (hexa-acylated form has been indicated to be a strong stimulator of the TLR4/MD-2 complex. This type of lipid A is conserved among a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria, and those bacteria are easily recognized by host cells for activation of defensive innate immune responses. Modifications of the lipid A structure to less-acylated forms have been observed in some bacterial species, and those forms are poor stimulators of the TLR4/MD-2 complex. Such modifications are thought to facilitate bacterial evasion of host innate immunity, thereby enhancing pathogenicity. This hypothesis is supported by studies of Yersinia pestis LPS, which contains hexa-acylated lipid A when the bacterium grows at 27ºC (the temperature of the vector flea, and shifts to contain less-acylated forms when grown at the human body temperature of 37ºC. This alteration of lipid A forms following transmission of Y. pestis from fleas to humans contributes predominantly to the virulence of this bacterium over other virulence factors. A similar role for less-acylated lipid A forms has been indicated in some other bacterial species, such as Francisella tularensis, Helicobacter pylori, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, and further studies to explore this concept are

  4. Type IV pili in Francisella – A virulence trait in an intracellular pathogen

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    Emelie eNäslund Salomonsson

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular human pathogen that is capable of rapid proliferation in the infected host. Mutants affected in intracellular survival and growth are highly attenuated which highlights the importance of the intracellular phase of the infection. Genomic analysis has revealed that Francisella encodes all genes required for expression of functional type IV pili (Tfp, and in this focused review we summarise recent findings regarding this system in the pathogenesis of tularemia. Tfp are dynamic adhesive structures that have been identified as major virulence determinants in several human pathogens, but it is not obvious what role these structures could have in an intracellular pathogen like Francisella. In the human pathogenic strains, genes required for secretion and assembly of Tfp and one pilin, PilA, have shown to be required for full virulence. Importantly, specific genetic differences have been identified between the different Francisella subspecies where in the most pathogenic type A variants all genes are intact while several Tfp genes are pseudogenes in the less pathogenic type B strains. This suggests that there has been a selection for expression of Tfp with different properties in the different subspecies. There is also a possibility that the genetic differences reflect adaption to different environmental niches of the subspecies and plays a role in transmission of tularemia. This is also in line with recent findings where Tfp pilins are found to be glycosylated which could reflect a role for Tfp in the environment to promote survival and transmission. We are still far from understanding the role of Tfp in virulence and transmission of tularemia, but with the genomic information and genetic tools available we are in a good position to address these issues in the future.

  5. Analyzing time-dependent microarray data using independent component analysis derived expression modes from human macrophages infected with F. tularensis holartica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, D; Langmann, Th; Ugocsai, P; Moehle, C; Seibold, E; Splettstoesser, W D; Gruber, P; Lang, E W; Schmitz, G

    2009-08-01

    The analysis of large-scale gene expression profiles is still a demanding and extensive task. Modern machine learning and data mining techniques developed in linear algebra, like Independent Component Analysis (ICA), become increasingly popular as appropriate tools for analyzing microarray data. We applied ICA to analyze kinetic gene expression profiles of human monocyte derived macrophages (MDM) from three different donors infected with Francisella tularensis holartica and compared them to more classical methods like hierarchical clustering. Results were compared using a pathway analysis tool, based on the Gene Ontology and the MeSH database. We could show that both methods lead to time-dependent gene regulatory patterns which fit well to known TNFalpha induced immune responses. In comparison, the nonexclusive attribute of ICA results in a more detailed view and a higher resolution in time dependent behavior of the immune response genes. Additionally, we identified NFkappaB as one of the main regulatory genes during response to F. tularensis infection.

  6. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Technical Report

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    Fischer, N. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-13

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that colocalization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. In the third quarter of the third year, F344 rats vaccinated with adjuvanted NLP formulations were challenged with F. tularensis SCHU S4 at Battelle. Preliminary data indicate that up to 65% of females vaccinated intranasally with an NLP-based formulation survived this challenge, compared to only 20% survival of naïve animals. In addition, NLPs were successfully formulated with Burkholderia protein antigens. IACUC approval for immunological assessments in BALB/c mice was received and we anticipate that these assessments will begin by March 2015, pending ACURO approval.

  7. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, N. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-06

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that colocalization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. In the second quarter of the third year, LLNL finalized all immunological assessments of NLP vaccine formulations in the F344 model. Battelle has immunized rats with three unique NLP formulations by either intramuscular or intranasal administration. All inoculations have been completed, and protective efficacy against an aerosolized challenge will begin at the end of October, 2014.

  8. Development of a bead-based Luminex assay using lipopolysaccharide specific monoclonal antibodies to detect biological threats from Brucella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbereisen, Angelika; Tamborrini, Marco; Wittwer, Matthias; Schürch, Nadia; Pluschke, Gerd

    2015-10-05

    Brucella, a Gram-negative bacterium, is classified as a potential bioterrorism agent mainly due to the low dose needed to cause infection and the ability to transmit the bacteria via aerosols. Goats/sheep, cattle, pigs, dogs, sheep and rodents are infected by B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis, B. canis, B. ovis and B. neotomae, respectively, the six classical Brucella species. Most human cases are caused by B. melitensis and B. abortus. Our aim was to specifically detect Brucellae with 'smooth' lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using a highly sensitive monoclonal antibody (mAb) based immunological assay. To complement molecular detection systems for potential bioterror agents, as required by international biodefense regulations, sets of mAbs were generated by B cell hybridoma technology and used to develop immunological assays. The combination of mAbs most suitable for an antigen capture assay format was identified and an immunoassay using the Luminex xMAP technology was developed. MAbs specific for the LPS O-antigen of Brucella spp. were generated by immunising mice with inactivated B. melitensis or B. abortus cells. Most mAbs recognised both B. melitensis and B. abortus and antigen binding was not impeded by inactivation of the bacterial cells by γ irradiation, formalin or heat treatment, a step required to analyse the samples immunologically under biosafety level two conditions. The Luminex assay recognised all tested Brucella species with 'smooth' LPS with detection limits of 2×10(2) to 8×10(4) cells per mL, depending on the species tested. Milk samples spiked with Brucella spp. cells were identified successfully using the Luminex assay. In addition, the bead-based immunoassay was integrated into a multiplex format, allowing for simultaneous, rapid and specific detection of Brucella spp., Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis within a single sample. Overall, the robust Luminex assay should allow detection of Brucella spp. in both natural

  9. DotU and VgrG, core components of type VI secretion systems, are essential for Francisella LVS pathogenicity.

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    Jeanette E Bröms

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis causes tularemia, a disease which requires bacterial escape from phagosomes of infected macrophages. Once in the cytosol, the bacterium rapidly multiplies, inhibits activation of the inflammasome and ultimately causes death of the host cell. Of importance for these processes is a 33-kb gene cluster, the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI, which is believed to encode a type VI secretion system (T6SS. In this study, we analyzed the role of the FPI-encoded proteins VgrG and DotU, which are conserved components of type VI secretion (T6S clusters. We demonstrate that in F. tularensis LVS, VgrG was shown to form multimers, consistent with its suggested role as a trimeric membrane puncturing device in T6SSs, while the inner membrane protein DotU was shown to stabilize PdpB/IcmF, another T6SS core component. Upon infection of J774 cells, both ΔvgrG and ΔdotU mutants did not escape from phagosomes, and subsequently, did not multiply or cause cytopathogenicity. They also showed impaired activation of the inflammasome and marked attenuation in the mouse model. Moreover, all of the DotU-dependent functions investigated here required the presence of three residues that are essentially conserved among all DotU homologues. Thus, in agreement with a core function in T6S clusters, VgrG and DotU play key roles for modulation of the intracellular host response as well as for the virulence of F. tularensis.

  10. Understanding Virulence in the Brucellae and Francisellae: Towards Efficacious Treatments for Two Potential Biothreat Agents

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    Rasley, A; Parsons, D A; El-Etr, S; Roux, C; Tsolis, R

    2009-12-30

    Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Brucellae species are highly infectious pathogens classified as select agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with the potential for use in bioterrorism attacks. These organisms are known to be facultative intracellular pathogens that preferentially infect human monocytes. As such, understanding how the host responds to infection with these organisms is paramount in detecting and combating human disease. We have compared the ability of fully virulent strains of each pathogen and their non-pathogenic near neighbors to enter and survive inside the human monocytic cell line THP-1 and have quantified the cellular response to infection with the goal of identifying both unique and common host response patterns. We expanded the scope of these studies to include experiments with pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of Y. pestis, the causative agent of plague. Nonpathogenic strains of each organism were impaired in their ability to survive intracellularly compared with their pathogenic counterparts. Furthermore, infection of THP-1 cells with pathogenic strains of Y. pestis and F. tularensis resulted in marked increases in the secretion of the inflammatory chemokines IL-8, RANTES, and MIP-1{beta}. In contrast, B. melitensis infection failed to elicit any significant increases in a panel of cytokines tested. These differences may underscore distinct strategies in pathogenic mechanisms employed by these pathogens.

  11. Macrophage pro-inflammatory response to Francisella novicida infection is regulated by SHIP.

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    Kishore V L Parsa

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen infecting principally macrophages and monocytes, is the etiological agent of tularemia. Macrophage responses to F. tularensis infection include the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL-12, which is critical for immunity against infection. Molecular mechanisms regulating production of these inflammatory mediators are poorly understood. Herein we report that the SH2 domain-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP is phosphorylated upon infection of primary murine macrophages with the genetically related F. novicida, and negatively regulates F. novicida-induced cytokine production. Analyses of the molecular details revealed that in addition to activating the MAP kinases, F. novicida infection also activated the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway in these cells. Interestingly, SHIP-deficient macrophages displayed enhanced Akt activation upon F. novicida infection, suggesting elevated PI3K-dependent activation pathways in absence of SHIP. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt resulted in suppression of F. novicida-induced cytokine production through the inhibition of NFkappaB. Consistently, macrophages lacking SHIP displayed enhanced NFkappaB-driven gene transcription, whereas overexpression of SHIP led to decreased NFkappaB activation. Thus, we propose that SHIP negatively regulates F. novicida-induced inflammatory cytokine response by antagonizing the PI3K/Akt pathway and suppressing NFkappaB-mediated gene transcription. A detailed analysis of phosphoinositide signaling may provide valuable clues for better understanding the pathogenesis of tularemia.

  12. Francisella philomiragia Adenitis and Pulmonary Nodules in a Child with Chronic Granulomatous Disease

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    Timothy Mailman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Francisella philomiragia is a rare and opportunistic pathogen capable of producing invasive infection in patients with compromised neutrophil function and in patients that have survived a near-drowning. A case of F philomiragia adenitis and lung nodules, refractory to cephalosporin therapy, is reported in a 10-year-old boy with chronic granulomatous disease following a facial abrasion from a saltwater crab. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first Canadian clinical isolate to be reported. Genus and species identification was confirmed via 16S ribosomal RNA sequence analysis. A literature review revealed three groups at risk of F philomiragia infection: young patients with chronic granulomatous disease; adults with hematogenous malignancy; and near-drowning patients. Pneumonia, fever without an apparent source and sepsis are the main clinical presentations. Invasive procedures may be required to isolate this organism and ensure appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Limited awareness of F philomiragia has led to delayed identification, patient death and misidentification as Francisella tularensis - a biosafety level three pathogen and potential bioterrorism agent.

  13. Clusters versus affinity-based approaches in F. tularensis whole genome search of CTL epitopes.

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    Anat Zvi

    Full Text Available Deciphering the cellular immunome of a bacterial pathogen is challenging due to the enormous number of putative peptidic determinants. State-of-the-art prediction methods developed in recent years enable to significantly reduce the number of peptides to be screened, yet the number of remaining candidates for experimental evaluation is still in the range of ten-thousands, even for a limited coverage of MHC alleles. We have recently established a resource-efficient approach for down selection of candidates and enrichment of true positives, based on selection of predicted MHC binders located in high density "hotspots" of putative epitopes. This cluster-based approach was applied to an unbiased, whole genome search of Francisella tularensis CTL epitopes and was shown to yield a 17-25 fold higher level of responders as compared to randomly selected predicted epitopes tested in Kb/Db C57BL/6 mice. In the present study, we further evaluate the cluster-based approach (down to a lower density range and compare this approach to the classical affinity-based approach by testing putative CTL epitopes with predicted IC(50 values of <10 nM. We demonstrate that while the percent of responders achieved by both approaches is similar, the profile of responders is different, and the predicted binding affinity of most responders in the cluster-based approach is relatively low (geometric mean of 170 nM, rendering the two approaches complimentary. The cluster-based approach is further validated in BALB/c F. tularensis immunized mice belonging to another allelic restriction (Kd/Dd group. To date, the cluster-based approach yielded over 200 novel F. tularensis peptides eliciting a cellular response, all were verified as MHC class I binders, thereby substantially increasing the F. tularensis dataset of known CTL epitopes. The generality and power of the high density cluster-based approach suggest that it can be a valuable tool for identification of novel CTLs in

  14. Rapid Countermeasure Discovery against Francisella tularensis Based on a Metabolic Network Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    Streptococcus pneumonia chorismate synthase inhibitor [40]. Although the computed PK parameters were in the good to moderate ranges and the compound was non...DMEM; Gibco Invitrogen) containing 10% fetal calf serum (FBS), penicillin (100 U/ml), and streptomycin (100 mg/ml) were added, and cells were incubated

  15. Transcriptional Profiling of Francisella tularensis Infected Peripheral Blood Monomuclear Cells: A Predictive Tool for Tularemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    0.03 1.04 0.04 1.08 0.04 1.15 0.03 1.19 0.03 1.10 0.70 0.39 CCR7 1.01 0.01 1.02 0.02 1.03 0.02 1.04 0.02 1.06 0.02 1.24 0.66 0.83 CD3E...addition, four lymphocyte genes downregulated in tularemia (CD3 epsilon chain, CD79A, CCR7 and TRGV9) (Andersson et al., 2006) did not change in vitro...regulated in the tularemia patients. CCR7 , IL2RB, and CD8A, which showed increased expression (although not significant), are also T-cell-associated

  16. Protein, Lipid, Chemical and Structural Signatures of Differentially-Cultivated Francisella tularensis and Acinetobactor baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-05

    Resistant Strains of Acinetobacter baumannii , Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, (07 2013): 0. doi: 10.1128/AAC.00865-13 Bibiana V Iglesias...Q. Shanks, Y. Doi. Activities of Vancomycin-Containing Regimens against Colistin-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Strains, Antimicrobial... Acinetobacter baumannii , Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (04 2013) TOTAL: 1 Received Paper TOTAL: PERCENT_SUPPORTEDNAME FTE Equivalent: Total

  17. Discrimination of Pathogenic vs. Nonpathogenic Francisella tularensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei Using Proteomics Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    assignments. Validated peptide sequences, differentially present or absent in various strains (STB matrices), were visualized as assignment bitmaps...PERL, MATLAB, and Microsoft Visual Basic. 3. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION The current project characterized and identified pathogenic and nonpathogenic...ECa_O157H7EDt9|ECOt.UTie ABC«.51!2| AEt «.MlHEllBA(41_AP5|BAPH_BP|6V»PH_5G|r»O_RBS0|ECEN_AU1054|BaC_rK;|BMAl. SO.O_MOR5ITAN5 ECCl.536|ECOt_536|ECOl._CFT073

  18. Transcriptome Analysis of Human Immune Responses Following Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) Francisella Tularensis Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-08

    CSF2RB Colony-stimulating factor 2 receptor, beta, low-affinity (granulocyte-macrophage) – IL3/ IL5 receptor low-affinity Antimicrobial humoral...STAT6, IFN gamma, IL5 , IL7, IL13, IL19 3597 SCAP2 src family-associated phosphoprotein 2 Protein complex assembly, signal transduction, associated with

  19. Dominance of Human Innate Immune Responses in Primary Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-31

    Diseases, Bacteriology Division, 425 Porter St, Frederick , MD 21702-5011. Dr Brittingham is the recipient of the National Research Council Fellowship...tularemia vaccine strain) infection by the sera of human recipients of the live tula- remia vaccine. Am J Med Sci 1994;308:83-7. 10. Herzberg VL

  20. Identification of Genome-Wide Mutations in Ciprofloxacin-Resistant F. tularensis LVS Using Whole Genome Tiling Arrays and Next Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaing, Crystal J.; McLoughlin, Kevin S.; Thissen, James B.; Zemla, Adam; Vergez, Lisa M.; Bourguet, Feliza; Mabery, Shalini; Fofanov, Viacheslav Y.; Koshinsky, Heather; Jackson, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is classified as a Class A bioterrorism agent by the U.S. government due to its high virulence and the ease with which it can be spread as an aerosol. It is a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of tularemia. Ciprofloxacin (Cipro) is a broad spectrum antibiotic effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Increased Cipro resistance in pathogenic microbes is of serious concern when considering options for medical treatment of bacterial infections. Identification of genes and loci that are associated with Ciprofloxacin resistance will help advance the understanding of resistance mechanisms and may, in the future, provide better treatment options for patients. It may also provide information for development of assays that can rapidly identify Cipro-resistant isolates of this pathogen. In this study, we selected a large number of F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) isolates that survived in progressively higher Ciprofloxacin concentrations, screened the isolates using a whole genome F. tularensis LVS tiling microarray and Illumina sequencing, and identified both known and novel mutations associated with resistance. Genes containing mutations encode DNA gyrase subunit A, a hypothetical protein, an asparagine synthase, a sugar transamine/perosamine synthetase and others. Structural modeling performed on these proteins provides insights into the potential function of these proteins and how they might contribute to Cipro resistance mechanisms. PMID:27668749

  1. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Annual Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, N. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-04-16

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that co-localization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of recombinant subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. NLPs are are biocompatible, high-density lipoprotein mimetics that are amenable to the incorporation of multiple, chemically-disparate adjuvant and antigen molecules. We hypothesize that the ability to co-localize optimized adjuvant formulations with subunit antigens within a single particle will enhance the stimulation and activation of key immune effector cells, increasing the protective efficacy of subunit antigen-based vaccines. While Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis subunit antigens are the focus of this proposal, we anticipate that this approach is applicable to a wide range of DOD-relevant biothreat agents. The F344 rat aerosol challenge model for F. tularensis has been successfully established at Battelle under this contract, and Year 3 efficacy studies performed at Battelle demonstrated that an NLP vaccine formulation was able to enhance survival of female F344 rats relative to naïve animals. In addition, Year 3 focused on the incorporation of multiple Burkholderia antigens (both polysaccharides and proteins) onto adjuvanted NLPs, with immunological analysis poised to begin in the next quarter.

  2. New species in the genus Francisella (Gammaproteobacteria; Francisellaceae); Francisella piscicida sp. nov. isolated from cod (Gadus morhua)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottem, Karl F; Nylund, Are; Karlsbakk, Egil

    2007-01-01

    A Francisella strain, GM2212, previously isolated from moribund farmed Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in Norway, is closely related to Francisella philomiragia among Francisella spp. according to its complete 16S rDNA, 16S-23S intergenic spacer, 23S rDNA, 23S-5S intergenic spacer, 5S rDNA, Fop...

  3. First case of Francisella bacteraemia in Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Aravena-Román

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Francisella species are Gram-negative, nonmotile, pleomorphic coccobacilli, facultative intracellular fastidious bacteria. We report the isolation of a Francisella-like species from a blood culture collected from a 44-year-old bacteraemic patient in Perth, Western Australia. The organism was identified to species level by 16S rRNA sequencing and by fatty acid methyl esters analysis. The strain genotypically resembled Francisella hispaniensis, a species previously isolated from human blood in Spain.

  4. New species in the genus Francisella (Gammaproteobacteria; Francisellaceae); Francisella piscicida sp. nov. isolated from cod (Gadus morhua)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottem, Karl F; Nylund, Are; Karlsbakk, Egil;

    2007-01-01

    A Francisella strain, GM2212, previously isolated from moribund farmed Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in Norway, is closely related to Francisella philomiragia among Francisella spp. according to its complete 16S rDNA, 16S-23S intergenic spacer, 23S rDNA, 23S-5S intergenic spacer, 5S rDNA, FopA, lip...... the establishment of GM2212 as a novel species, for which the name Francisella piscicida sp. nov. is proposed (=CNCM I-3511(T) = DSM 18777(T) = LMG registration number not yet available)....

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0103 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0103 ref|YP_169727.1| serine transporter [Francisella tularensis subsp.... tularensis SCHU S4] ref|YP_666859.1| serine transporter [Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis FSC198] ...ref|ZP_03665376.1| serine transporter [Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis MA00-2987] ref|ZP_04986333.1...5247354.1| serine transporter [Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis MA00-2987] emb|CAG45345.1| serine transporter [Francis...ella tularensis subsp. tularensis SCHU S4] emb|CAL08728.1| serine transporter [Francisella

  6. Large Direct Repeats Flank Genomic Rearrangements between a New Clinical Isolate of Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis A1 and Schu S4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    Author Contributions Conceived and designed the experiments: UN KS SHH PDF. Performed the experiments: UN KS RDB GX TSB PDF. Analyzed the data: UN KS RDB...GX TSB SHH PDF. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: UN MPD PCI SCF RDB GX TSB SHH PDF. Wrote the paper: UN KS SHH PDF. References 1. Farlow

  7. Exploitation of complement regulatory proteins by Borrelia and Francisella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madar, Marian; Bencurova, Elena; Mlynarcik, Patrik; Almeida, André M; Soares, Renata; Bhide, Katarina; Pulzova, Lucia; Kovac, Andrej; Coelho, Ana V; Bhide, Mangesh

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens have developed sophisticated mechanisms of complement evasion such as binding to the host complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) on their surface or expression of CRP mimicking molecules. The ability of pathogens to evade the complement system has been correlated with pathogenesis and host selectivity. Hitherto, little work has been undertaken to determine whether Borrelia and Francisella exploit various CRPs to block complement attack. Seventeen Borrelia (twelve species) and six Francisella (three subspecies) strains were used to assess their ability to bind human, sheep and cattle CRPs or mimic membrane associated complement regulators. A series of experiments including affinity ligand binding experiments, pull-down assays and mass spectrometry based protein identification, revealed an array of CRP binding proteins of Borrelia and Francisella. Unlike Francisella, Borrelia strains were able to bind multiple human CRPs. Three strains of Borrelia (SKT-4, SKT-2 and HO14) showed the presence of a human CD46-homologous motif, indicating their ability to possess putative human CD46 mimicking molecules. Similarly, five strains of Borrelia and two strains of Francisella may have surface proteins with human CD59-homologous motifs. Among ovine and bovine CRPs, the only CRP bound by Francisella (LVS, Tul4 strain) was vitronectin, while ovine C4BP, ovine factor H and bovine factor H were bound to Borrelia strains SKT-2, DN127 and Co53. This study presents an array of proteins of Borrelia and Francisella that bind CRPs or may mimic membrane-CRPs, thus enabling multiphasic complement evasion strategies of these pathogens.

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0084 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0084 ref|ZP_03665674.1| amino acid permease [Francisella tularensis su...bsp. tularensis MA00-2987] ref|ZP_04986598.1| amino acid permease [Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis ...FSC033] ref|ZP_05247618.1| amino acid permease [Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis MA00-2987] gb|EDN34...490.1| amino acid permease [Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis FSC033] gb|E...ET19343.1| amino acid permease [Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis MA00-2987] ZP_03665674.1 0.22 27% ...

  9. 3-Substituted Indole Inhibitors Against Francisella tularensis FabI Identified by Structure-Based Virtual Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    FabI, but share low sequence identity and are poorly inhibited by triclosan.25,26 S. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa contain FabK,24 and Vibrio cholerae ,27...Massengo-Tiasse, R. P.; Cronan, J. E. Vibrio cholerae FabV defines a new class of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase. J. Biol. Chem. 2008, 283, 1308...of enoyl- (acyl-carrier protein) reductase, FabV, from Vibrio fischeri. Acta Crystallogr., Sect. F: Struct. Biol. Cryst. Commun. 2012, 68, 78−80. (27

  10. Anti-Francisella tularensis DNA Aptamers Detect Tularemia Antigen from Different Subspecies by Aptamer-Linked Immobilized Sorbent Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Biobehavior, Bioassessment & Biosurveillance Branch 711 Human Performance Wing 2486 Gillingham Dr Human Effectiveness Directorate Brooks City-Base, TX... Biosurveillance Branch Brooks City-Base, TX 78235 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 711 HPW/RHPF; 711 HPW/RHPFB 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT... portal of infection. The clinical appearance varies from skin lesions to multi-organ involvement. Furthermore, the severity depends on the dose and the

  11. DESTRUCTION OF FRANCISELLA TULARENSIS AND YERSINIA PESTIS PERSISTENCE OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS SPORES AND CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM IN MUNICIPAL SOLID LANDFILL LEACHATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Research and Development National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) in collaboration with the Department of Defense Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) are evaluating the permanence of biological and chemi...

  12. Biofilm formation of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Esteban; Halliday-Wimmonds, Iona; Francis , Stewart; Kearney, Michael T; Hansen, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is an emergent fish pathogen in both marine and fresh water environments. The bacterium is suspected to persist in the environment even without the presence of a suitable fish host. In the present study, the influence of different abiotic factors such as salinity and temperature were used to study the biofilm formation of different isolates of Fno including intracellular growth loci C (iglC)and pathogenicity determinant protein A (pdpA) knockout strains. Finally, we compared the susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm to three disinfectants used in the aquaculture and ornamental fish industry, namely Virkon®, bleach and hydrogen peroxide. The data indicates that Fno is capable of producing biofilms within 24 h where both salinity as well as temperature plays a role in the growth and biofilm formation of Fno. Mutations in theiglC or pdpA, both known virulence factors, do not appear to affect the capacity of Fno to produce biofilms, and the minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum biocidal concentration for the three disinfectants were lower than the minimum biofilm eradication concentration values. This information needs to be taken into account if trying to eradicate the pathogen from aquaculture facilities or aquariums.

  13. Francisella guangzhouensis sp. nov., isolated from air-conditioning systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ping-Hua; Chen, Shou-Yi; Scholz, Holger C; Busse, Hans-Jürgen; Gu, Quan; Kämpfer, Peter; Foster, Jeffrey T; Glaeser, Stefanie P; Chen, Cha; Yang, Zhi-Chong

    2013-10-01

    Four strains (08HL01032(T), 09HG994, 10HP82-6 and 10HL1960) were isolated from water of air-conditioning systems of various cooling towers in Guangzhou city, China. Cells were Gram-stain-negative coccobacilli without flagella, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative, showing no reduction of nitrate, no hydrolysis of urea and no production of H2S. Growth was characteristically enhanced in the presence of l-cysteine, which was consistent with the properties of members of the genus Francisella. The quinone system was composed of ubiquinone Q-8 with minor amounts of Q-9. The polar lipid profile consisted of the predominant lipids phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, two unidentified phospholipids (PL2, PL3), an unidentified aminophospholipid and an unidentified glycolipid (GL2). The polyamine pattern consisted of the major compounds spermidine, cadaverine and spermine. The major cellular fatty acids were C10 : 0, C14 : 0, C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω9c and C18 : 1 3-OH. A draft whole-genome sequence of the proposed type strain 08HL01032(T) was generated. Comparative sequence analysis of the complete 16S and 23S rRNA genes confirmed affiliation to the genus Francisella, with 95 % sequence identity to the closest relatives in the database, the type strains of Francisella philomiragia and Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis. Full-length deduced amino acid sequences of various housekeeping genes, recA, gyrB, groEL, dnaK, rpoA, rpoB, rpoD, rpoH, fopA and sdhA, exhibited similarities of 67-92 % to strains of other species of the genus Francisella. Strains 08HL01032(T), 09HG994, 10HP82-6 and 10HL1960 exhibited highly similar pan-genome PCR profiles. Both the phenotypic and molecular data support the conclusion that the four strains belong to the genus Francisella but exhibit considerable divergence from all recognized Francisella species. Therefore, we propose the name Francisella guangzhouensis sp

  14. Lipophilic prodrugs of FR900098 are antimicrobial against Francisella novicida in vivo and in vitro and show GlpT independent efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth S McKenney

    Full Text Available Bacteria, plants, and algae produce isoprenoids through the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP pathway, an attractive pathway for antimicrobial drug development as it is present in prokaryotes and some lower eukaryotes but absent from human cells. The first committed step of the MEP pathway is catalyzed by 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR/MEP synthase. MEP pathway genes have been identified in many biothreat agents, including Francisella, Brucella, Bacillus, Burkholderia, and Yersinia. The importance of the MEP pathway to Francisella is demonstrated by the fact that MEP pathway mutations are lethal. We have previously established that fosmidomycin inhibits purified MEP synthase (DXR from F. tularensis LVS. FR900098, the acetyl derivative of fosmidomycin, was found to inhibit the activity of purified DXR from F. tularensis LVS (IC(50=230 nM. Fosmidomycin and FR900098 are effective against purified DXR from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as well, but have no effect on whole cells because the compounds are too polar to penetrate the thick cell wall. Fosmidomycin requires the GlpT transporter to enter cells, and this is absent in some pathogens, including M. tuberculosis. In this study, we have identified the GlpT homologs in F. novicida and tested transposon insertion mutants of glpT. We showed that FR900098 also requires GlpT for full activity against F. novicida. Thus, we synthesized several FR900098 prodrugs that have lipophilic groups to facilitate their passage through the bacterial cell wall and bypass the requirement for the GlpT transporter. One compound, that we termed "compound 1," was found to have GlpT-independent antimicrobial activity. We tested the ability of this best performing prodrug to inhibit F. novicida intracellular infection of eukaryotic cell lines and the caterpillar Galleria mellonella as an in vivo infection model. As a lipophilic GlpT-independent DXR inhibitor, compound 1 has the potential to be a broad

  15. Characterization of Francisella sp., GM2212, the first Francisella isolate from marine fish, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottem, Karl F; Nylund, Are; Karlsbakk, Egil

    2007-01-01

    from F. tularensis and F. philomiragia. GM2212(T) is catalase-positive, indole positive, oxidase-negative, do not produce H(2)S in Triple Sugar Iron agar, and does not hydrolyze gelatin, is resistant to erythromycin and susceptible to ceftazidime, the latter five characteristics separating it from F...

  16. Characterization of Francisella sp., GM2212, the first Francisella isolate from marine fish, Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottem, Karl F; Nylund, Are; Karlsbakk, Egil;

    2007-01-01

    A Francisella sp., isolate GM2212(T), previously isolated from diseased farmed Atlantic cod Gadus morhua in Norway is characterized. The complete 16S rDNA, 16S-23S intergenic spacer, 23S rDNA, 23S-5S intergenic spacer, 5S rDNA, FopA, lipoprotein TUL4 (LpnA), malate dehydrogenase and a hypothetical...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CBRI-05-0288 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-05-0288 ref|YP_512974.1| Acyltransferase [Francisella tularensis subsp. h...olarctica] ref|YP_762841.1| acyltransferase [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica OSU18] ref|YP_001427626.1| acyltransferase [Fra...ncisella tularensis subsp. holarctica FTA] emb|CAJ78620.1| Acyltransferase [Francis...ella tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS] gb|ABI82204.1| acyltransferase [Francisell...a tularensis subsp. holarctica OSU18] gb|EBA51928.1| acyltransferase [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarcti

  18. Characterization of Francisella species isolated from the cooling water of an air conditioning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Quan; Li, Xunde; Qu, Pinghua; Hou, Shuiping; Li, Juntao; Atwill, Edward R; Chen, Shouyi

    2015-01-01

    Strains of Francisella spp. were isolated from cooling water from an air conditioning system in Guangzhou, China. These strains are Gram negative, coccobacilli, non-motile, oxidase negative, catalase negative, esterase and lipid esterase positive. In addition, these bacteria grow on cysteine-supplemented media at 20 °C to 40 °C with an optimal growth temperature of 30 °C. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that these strains belong to the genus Francisella. Biochemical tests and phylogenetic and BLAST analyses of 16S rRNA, rpoB and sdhA genes indicated that one strain was very similar to Francisella philomiragia and that the other strains were identical or highly similar to the Francisella guangzhouensis sp. nov. strain 08HL01032 we previously described. Biochemical and molecular characteristics of these strains demonstrated that multiple Francisella species exist in air conditioning systems.

  19. Characterization of Francisella species isolated from the cooling water of an air conditioning system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Gu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Strains of Francisella spp. were isolated from cooling water from an air conditioning system in Guangzhou, China. These strains are Gram negative, coccobacilli, non-motile, oxidase negative, catalase negative, esterase and lipid esterase positive. In addition, these bacteria grow on cysteine-supplemented media at 20 °C to 40 °C with an optimal growth temperature of 30 °C. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that these strains belong to the genus Francisella. Biochemical tests and phylogenetic and BLAST analyses of 16S rRNA, rpoB and sdhA genes indicated that one strain was very similar to Francisella philomiragia and that the other strains were identical or highly similar to the Francisella guangzhouensis sp. nov. strain 08HL01032 we previously described. Biochemical and molecular characteristics of these strains demonstrated that multiple Francisella species exist in air conditioning systems.

  20. 42 CFR 73.3 - HHS select agents and toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... posadasii/Coccidioides immitis Conotoxins Coxiella burnetii Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus Diacetoxyscirpenol Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus Ebola viruses Francisella tularensis Lassa fever virus Marburg.... (i) The seizure of Botulinum neurotoxins, Ebola viruses, Francisella tularensis, Lassa fever...

  1. Serology for tularemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tularemia test; Serology for Francisella tularensis ... This blood test is done when tularemia is suspected. ... Saunders; 2011:chap 44. Penn RL. Francisella tularensis (Tularemia). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0900 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0900 ref|YP_001122232.1| CDP-alcohol phosphatidyltransferase [Francise...lla tularensis subsp. tularensis WY96-3418] ref|YP_001427783.1| CDP-alcohol phosphatidyltransferase [Francis...ella tularensis subsp. holarctica FTA] gb|ABO47111.1| CDP-alcohol phosphatidyltransferase [Francisella tular...ensis subsp. tularensis WY96-3418] gb|EDN35713.1| phosphatidylserine synthase [Francis...ella tularensis subsp. novicida GA99-3549] gb|EDN37179.1| hypothetical protein FTDG_01588 [Francisella

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2994 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2994 ref|YP_899042.1| O antigen flippase [Francisella tularensis subsp.... novicida U112] gb|ABK81668.1| Wzx [Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida] gb|ABK90288.1| O antigen flippase [Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida U112] YP_899042.1 0.16 22% ...

  4. 集中空调系统中弗朗西斯菌的分离与鉴定%Isolation and identification of Francisella-like strains from central air conditioning system in Guang-zhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李营; 屈平华; 张颖; 李工厂; 叶大柠; 陈守义; 陈茶; 吴尚为

    2015-01-01

    Objective To isolate the Francisella-like strains from central air conditioning system in Guangzhou and to identify their species .Methods Three hundred and twenty-four samples of cooling wa-ter and 36 samples of condensed water were collected from the air conditioning system in Guangzhou from year 2008 to 2014.The samples were cultured in BCYE supplemented with glycine (3 g/L), polymyxin B sulfate (80 000 U/L), vancomycin (1 mg/L) and cycloheximide (80 mg/L) (BCYEα-GVPC) medium af-ter concentrated by membrane filtration and pretreated by KCl-HCl buffer of pH2.2 for 10 minutes.The Francisella-like isolates were identified according to their cultural characteristics , biochemical test , PCR identification, 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis and genomic DNA-DNA hybridization.Results Fifteen stains were isolated from 14 samples of cooling water and were identified as Francisella by PCR identification and phenotype analysis .The Francisella strains were detected in 4.3%of cooling water samples , but not in the condensed water samples .The phylogenetic tree constructed based on the sequence of 16S rRNA showed that the 15 strains formed four clusters including one cluster of nine Francisella guangzhouensis isolates, one cluster of one Francisella philomiragia isolate and two clusters of five isolates closest to the Francisella guan-gzhouensis strain.The five isolates represented two novel genospecies sharing a genomic homology of less than 70%with the Francisella guangzhouensis strain as indicated by the DNA-DNA hybridization analysis . Conclusion Water samples collected from the air conditioning system in Guangzhou city showed a lower positive rate for Francisella strain and no Francisella tularensis strain with strong pathogenicity was found in those samples .%目的 对集中空调系统中的弗朗西斯菌进行分离鉴定. 方法 收集2008—2014年广州市集中空调系统的324份冷却水和36份冷凝水水样,经负压膜过滤集菌、酸处理后接种

  5. Host immune response and acute disease in a zebrafish model of francisella pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtech, L.N.; Sanders, G.E.; Conway, C.; Ostland, V.; Hansen, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the bacterial genus Francisella are highly virulent and infectious pathogens. New models to study Francisella pathogenesis in evolutionarily distinct species are needed to provide comparative insight, as the mechanisms of host resistance and pathogen virulence are not well understood. We took advantage of the recent discovery of a novel species of Francisella to establish a zebrafish/Francisella comparative model of pathogenesis and host immune response. Adult zebraflsh were susceptible to acute Francisella-induced disease and suffered mortality in a dose-dependent manner. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we localized bacterial antigens primarily to lymphoid tissues and livers of zebraflsh following infection by intraperitoneal injection, which corresponded to regions of local cellular necrosis. Francisella sp. bacteria replicated rapidly in these tissues beginning 12 h postinfection, and bacterial titers rose steadily, leveled off, and then decreased by 7 days postinfection. Zebraflsh mounted a significant tissue-specific proinflammatory response to infection as measured by the upregulation of interleukin-l?? (IL-1??), gamma interferon, and tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA beginning by 6 h postinfection and persisting for up to 7 days postinfection. In addition, exposure of zebraflsh to heat-killed bacteria demonstrated that the significant induction of IL-?? was highly specific to live bacteria. Taken together, the pathology and immune response to acute Francisella infection in zebraflsh share many features with those in mammals, highlighting the usefulness of this new model system for addressing both general and specific questions about Francisella host-pathogen interactions via an evolutionary approach. Copyright ?? 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Identification of Ciprofloxacin Resistance by SimpleProbe (trademark), High Resolution Melt and Pyrosequencing (trademark) Nucleic Acid Analysis in Biothreat Agents: Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis and Francisella tularensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV and gyrase are clustered at the DNA breakage site. J Biol Chem 2005;280:14252e63. [6] Wolfson JS, Hooper DC...Ambler J, Mehtar S, Fisher LM. Involvement of topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase as ciprofloxacin targets in Streptococcus pneumoniae . Antimicrob Agents...agents addressed here and further research into this possibility would provide valuable insight into fluoroquinolone resistance in these important

  7. Performance of a Handheld PCR Instrument in the Detection of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis: Sensitivity, Specificity, and Effect of Interferents on Assay Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    A Bordetella pertussis 105 0/3 N/A Campylobacter jejuni 105 0/3 N/A Clostridium perfringens 105 1/5 50 Clostridium tetani ...ATCC 9797 105 0/3 N/A Campylobacter jejuni ATCC 33560 105 0/3 N/A Clostridium perfringens 105 0/3 N/A Escherichia coli ATCC

  8. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vassoler Serrato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biological nitrogen fixation is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2 is transformed into ammonia (NH3 by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS, anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  9. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Rodrigo V

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans, and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO) produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0103 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0103 ref|YP_514171.1| serine transporter [Francisella tularensis subsp.... holarctica] ref|YP_001429039.1| hypothetical protein FTA_1608 [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica FT...NF002-00] ref|ZP_02274778.1| serine permease [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica FSC200] ref|ZP_049841...11.1| serine transporter [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica 257] emb|CAJ79...963.1| serine transporter [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS] gb|EBA52995.1| serine transporter [Francis

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-01-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-01-0028 ref|YP_514229.1| hypothetical membrane protein [Francisella tular...ensis subsp. holarctica] ref|YP_763969.1| hypothetical protein FTH_1536 [Francisella tularensis subsp. holar...ctica OSU18] ref|YP_001429107.1| hypothetical membrane protein [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica FTA...] emb|CAJ80029.1| hypothetical membrane protein [Francisella tularensis subsp. ho...larctica LVS] gb|ABI83332.1| conserved hypothetical protein [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica OSU18

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Francisella endociliophora Strain FSC1006, Isolated from a Laboratory Culture of the Marine Ciliate Euplotes raikovi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjödin, Andreas; Öhrman, Caroline; Bäckman, Stina; Lärkeryd, Adrian; Granberg, Malin; Lundmark, Eva; Karlsson, Edvin; Nilsson, Elin; Vallesi, Adriana; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Stenberg, Per

    2014-01-01

    A strain of Francisella endociliophora was isolated from a laboratory culture of the marine ciliate Euplotes raikovi. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the bacterial strain FSC1006 (Francisella Strain Collection, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden). PMID:25428973

  13. A Real-Time PCR Array for Hierarchical Identification of Francisella Isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svensson, Kerstin; Granberg, Malin; Karlsson, Linda; Neubauerova, Vera; Forsman, Mats; Johansson, Anders

    2009-01-01

    A robust, rapid and flexible real-time PCR assay for hierarchical genetic typing of clinical and environmental isolates of Francisella is presented. Typing markers were found by multiple genome and gene comparisons, from which 23 canonical single nucleotide polymorphisms (canSNPs) and 11 canonical i

  14. Francisella Infection in Cultured Tilapia in Thailand and the Inflammatory Cytokine Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantrakajorn, Sasibha; Wongtavatchai, Janenuj

    2016-06-01

    Francisella infections developed in freshwater Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus and red tilapia Oreochromis spp. farms in Thailand during 2012-2014. The diseased fish were lethargic and pale in color and showed numerous white nodules in their enlarged spleens. Histopathological examination and electron microscopy suggested that the white nodules were multifocal granulomas consisting of coccobacilli within vacuolated cells. Isolation of Francisella-like bacteria was achieved from 42 of 100 samples, while polymerase chain reaction confirmed Francisella infections in all samples. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene from samples obtained from three different geographical culture areas revealed more than 99% similarity with F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis. The influence of Francisella infection on inflammatory cytokines was determined on splenic cells of fish intraperitoneally injected with the bacteria (0.8 × 10(5) colony-forming units per fish). Infected tilapia showed significantly greater expression of the pro-inflammatory genes interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrotic factor-α (TNF-α) within 24 h postinjection (hpi) and for up to 96 hpi. However, down-regulation of an anti-inflammatory gene, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was observed as early as 24 hpi. This investigation demonstrates that an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in response to the infection may account for the substantial number of granulomas in fish hematopoietic tissues that was found in the later stage of the disease. Received September 9, 2015; accepted December 13, 2015.

  15. Molecular detection of Rickettsia, Anaplasma, Coxiella and Francisella bacteria in ticks collected from Artiodactyla in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumrandee, Chalao; Baimai, Visut; Trinachartvanit, Wachareeporn; Ahantarig, Arunee

    2016-07-01

    A total of 79 ticks collected from Sambar deer (Cervus unicolor), Barking deer (Muntiacus muntjak) and Wild boar (Sus scrofa) were examined by PCR for the presence of Rickettsia, Anaplasma, Coxiella, and Francisella bacteria. Of the 79 ticks, 13% tested positive for Rickettsia, 15% tested positive for Anaplasma, 4% tested positive for Coxiella, and 3% tested positive for Francisella. Interestingly, triple infection with Anaplasma, Rickettsia and Francisella was determined in a Dermacentor auratus tick. Moreover, another triple infection with Rickettsia, Anaplasma, and Coxiella was found in a Haemaphysalis lagrangei tick. Double infection of Rickettsia with Coxiella was also detected in another H. lagrangei tick. From the phylogenetic analyses, we found a Rickettsia sp. with a close evolutionary relationship to Rickettsia bellii in the H. lagrangei tick. We also found the first evidence of a Rickettsia sp. that is closely related to Rickettsia tamurae in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus ticks from Thailand. H. lagrangei and Haemaphysalis obesa ticks collected from Sambar deer tested positive for Anaplasma species form the same clade with Anaplasma bovis. In contrast, other H. lagrangei ticks collected from Sambar deer and D. auratus ticks collected from Wild boar were also reported for the first time to be infected with an Anaplasma species that is closely related to Anaplasma platys. The phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of Coxiella bacteria revealed that Coxiella symbionts from H. lagrangei formed a distinctly different lineage from Coxiella burnetii (a human pathogen). Additionally, Francisella bacteria identified in D. auratus ticks were found to be distantly related to a group of pathogenic Francisella species. The identification of these bacteria in several feeding ticks suggests the risk of various emerging tick-borne diseases and endosymbionts in humans, wildlife, and domestic animals in Thailand. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights

  16. Chlamydial hemagglutinin identified as lipopolysaccharide.

    OpenAIRE

    Watkins, N G; Caldwell, H D; Hackstadt, T

    1987-01-01

    Chlamydial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) agglutinated mouse and rabbit erythrocytes but not human, guinea pig, or pronghorn antelope erythrocytes. Hemagglutination was not specific for Chlamydia spp., as rough LPSs from Coxiella burnetii and Escherichia coli also agglutinated erythrocytes from the same animal species. Nonagglutinated and agglutinated erythrocytes bound equivalent amounts of LPS, indicating that hemagglutination was not due to a specific interaction of chlamydial LPS with erythrocy...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0103 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0103 ref|YP_898271.1| serine permease [Francisella tularensis subsp. n...ovicida U112] ref|ZP_03057299.1| membrane protein, putative [Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida FTE] ref...|ZP_04985702.1| hypothetical protein FTAG_01017 [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica FSC022] gb|ABK89517.1| serine permease [Fra... hypothetical protein FTAG_01017 [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica FSC022] gb|EDX19858.1| membrane protein, putative [Francis...ncisella tularensis subsp. novicida U112] gb|EDO66780.1|

  18. Production of outer membrane vesicles and outer membrane tubes by Francisella novicida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaig, William D; Koller, Antonius; Thanassi, David G

    2013-03-01

    Francisella spp. are highly infectious and virulent bacteria that cause the zoonotic disease tularemia. Knowledge is lacking for the virulence factors expressed by Francisella and how these factors are secreted and delivered to host cells. Gram-negative bacteria constitutively release outer membrane vesicles (OMV), which may function in the delivery of virulence factors to host cells. We identified growth conditions under which Francisella novicida produces abundant OMV. Purification of the vesicles revealed the presence of tube-shaped vesicles in addition to typical spherical OMV, and examination of whole bacteria revealed the presence of tubes extending out from the bacterial surface. Recently, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells have been shown to produce membrane-enclosed projections, termed nanotubes, which appear to function in cell-cell communication and the exchange of molecules. In contrast to these previously characterized structures, the F. novicida tubes are produced in liquid as well as on solid medium and are derived from the OM rather than the cytoplasmic membrane. The production of the OMV and tubes (OMV/T) by F. novicida was coordinately regulated and responsive to both growth medium and growth phase. Proteomic analysis of purified OMV/T identified known Francisella virulence factors among the constituent proteins, suggesting roles for the vesicles in pathogenesis. In support of this, production of OM tubes by F. novicida was stimulated during infection of macrophages and addition of purified OMV/T to macrophages elicited increased release of proinflammatory cytokines. Finally, vaccination with purified OMV/T protected mice from subsequent challenge with highly lethal doses of F. novicida.

  19. Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus Linn) inhibits lipopolysaccharide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    extract on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide ... suppressed LPS-induced NO as well as ROS compared to untreated cells. ... the human diet, supplying many nutrients. Okra.

  20. Immunoelectron microscopy of lipopolysaccharide in Chlamydia trachomatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkelund, Svend; Lundemose, AG; Christiansen, Gunna

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) specific for Chlamydia trachomatis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and major outer membrane protein (MOMP) were used for immunoelectron microscopy analysis. MAb specific for MOMP showed strong reaction with the chlamydial surface, whereas MAb specific for LPS showed strong...

  1. 42 CFR 73.5 - Exemptions for HHS select agents and toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Ebola viruses, Francisella tularensis, Lassa fever virus, Marburg virus, South American Haemorrhagic Fever viruses (Junin, Machupo, Sabia, Flexal, Guanarito), Variola major virus (Smallpox virus),...

  2. 42 CFR 73.9 - Responsible Official.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... neurotoxins, Brucella melitensis, Francisella tularensis, Ebola viruses, Hendra virus, Marburg virus, Lassa fever virus, Nipah virus, Rift Valley fever virus, South American Haemorrhagic Fever viruses...

  3. Integrated Semiconductor-based Diagnostics System for Multiplexed Genomic Amplification and Electrochemical Detection of Biothreat Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    contains all of the reagents and a microarray to test for Bacillus anthracis, Clostridium botulinum, Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Brucella suis, Vibrio cholera, and Yersinia enterocolitica .

  4. Problems in identification of Francisella philomiragia associated with fatal bacteremia in a patient with chronic granulomatous disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Møller, Alice; Lemming, L E; Valerius, Niels Henrik

    2004-01-01

    Francisella philomiragia is a rare gram-negative, halophilic coccobacillus with bizarre spherical forms on primary isolation. A case of F. philomiragia bacteremia in a 24-year-old patient with chronic granulomatous disease is reported. Identification of F. philomiragia was problematic with conven......Francisella philomiragia is a rare gram-negative, halophilic coccobacillus with bizarre spherical forms on primary isolation. A case of F. philomiragia bacteremia in a 24-year-old patient with chronic granulomatous disease is reported. Identification of F. philomiragia was problematic...

  5. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is markedly decreased following pulmonary F. tularensis challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Patrick Chambers

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-1 antitrypsin, a small glycoprotein clade A serpine serine protease inhibitor of neutrophil elastase has been shown to increase in humans following bacterial and viral infection. However, we report here significant reduction of this major inhibitor of elastase in plasma of F. tularensis LVS and SCHU S4 (Type A strain following pulmonary challenge. Consistent with an imbalance of protease-antiprotease function at the alveolar level in lungs of infected animals, increased elastase activity was observed in lung lavage fluids accompanied by decrease lung function, i.e., loss of lung elastance with concomitant increase of pulmonary hysteresistivity. These data are suggestive of targeted tissue destruction via unchecked neutrophhil elastase activity in infected animals.

  6. Efficacy of florfenicol for control of mortality with Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis in Nile tilapia, oreochromis niloticus (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) (syn. F. asiatica) is an emergent Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacterium. Although it is considered one of the most pathogenic bacteria in fish, there are no commercially available treatments of vaccines. The objective of this project was ...

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Francisella guangzhouensis Strain 08HL01032T, Isolated from Air-Conditioning Systems in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Daniel; Öhrman, Caroline; Bäckman, Stina; Karlsson, Edvin; Nilsson, Elin; Byström, Mona; Lärkeryd, Adrian; Myrtennäs, Kerstin; Stenberg, Per; Qu, Ping-Hua; Trygg, Johan; Scholz, Holger C; Forsman, Mats; Sjödin, Andreas

    2015-03-19

    We present the complete genome sequence of Francisella guangzhouensis strain 08HL01032(T), which consists of one chromosome (1,658,482 bp) and one plasmid (3,045 bp) with G+C contents of 32.0% and 28.7%, respectively.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Francisella guangzhouensis Strain 08HL01032T, Isolated from Air-Conditioning Systems in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Daniel; Öhrman, Caroline; Bäckman, Stina; Karlsson, Edvin; Nilsson, Elin; Byström, Mona; Lärkeryd, Adrian; Myrtennäs, Kerstin; Stenberg, Per; Qu, Ping-hua; Trygg, Johan; Scholz, Holger C.; Forsman, Mats

    2015-01-01

    We present the complete genome sequence of Francisella guangzhouensis strain 08HL01032T, which consists of one chromosome (1,658,482 bp) and one plasmid (3,045 bp) with G+C contents of 32.0% and 28.7%, respectively. PMID:25792039

  9. Francisella philomiragia Bacteremia in a Patient with Acute Respiratory Insufficiency and Acute-on-Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relich, Ryan F; Humphries, Romney M; Mattison, H Reid; Miles, Jessica E; Simpson, Edward R; Corbett, Ian J; Schmitt, Bryan H; May, M

    2015-12-01

    Francisella philomiragia is a very uncommon pathogen of humans. Diseases caused by it are protean and have been reported largely in near-drowning victims and those with chronic granulomatous disease. We present a case of F. philomiragia pneumonia with peripheral edema and bacteremia in a renal transplant patient and review the diverse reports of F. philomiragia infections.

  10. Efficient targeted mutagenesis of rice and tobacco genomes using Cpf1 from Francisella novicida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Akira; Masafumi, Mikami; Kaya, Hidetaka; Toki, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 systems are nowadays applied extensively to effect genome editing in various organisms including plants. CRISPR from Prevotella and Francisella 1 (Cpf1) is a newly characterized RNA-guided endonuclease that has two distinct features as compared to Cas9. First, Cpf1 utilizes a thymidine-rich protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) while Cas9 prefers a guanidine-rich PAM. Cpf1 could be used as a sequence-specific nuclease to target AT-rich regions of a genome that Cas9 had difficulty accessing. Second, Cpf1 generates DNA ends with a 5′ overhang, whereas Cas9 creates blunt DNA ends after cleavage. “Sticky” DNA ends should increase the efficiency of insertion of a desired DNA fragment into the Cpf1-cleaved site using complementary DNA ends. Therefore, Cpf1 could be a potent tool for precise genome engineering. To evaluate whether Cpf1 can be applied to plant genome editing, we selected Cpf1 from Francisella novicida (FnCpf1), which recognizes a shorter PAM (TTN) within known Cpf1 proteins, and applied it to targeted mutagenesis in tobacco and rice. Our results show that targeted mutagenesis had occurred in transgenic plants expressing FnCpf1 with crRNA. Deletions of the targeted region were the most frequently observed mutations. Our results demonstrate that FnCpf1 can be applied successfully to genome engineering in plants. PMID:27905529

  11. Transformation of Human Erythrocyte Shape by Endotoxic Lipopolysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were observed to undergo a discocyte to echinocyte to spheroechinocyte shape transformation during brief incubation with endotoxic lipopolysaccharide. It was concluded that lipopolysaccharide-membrane interactions alter the curvature of erythrocyte membranes.

  12. Transformation of human erythrocyte shape by endotoxic lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, J R; Harris, A S; Wallas, C H

    1983-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were observed to undergo a discocyte to echinocyte to spheroechinocyte shape transformation during brief incubation with endotoxic lipopolysaccharide. It was concluded that lipopolysaccharide-membrane interactions alter the curvature of erythrocyte membranes.

  13. Cathepsin B modulates lysosomal biogenesis and host defense against Francisella novicida infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaopeng; Man, Si Ming; Malireddi, R K Subbarao; Karki, Rajendra; Lupfer, Christopher; Gurung, Prajwal; Neale, Geoffrey; Guy, Clifford S; Lamkanfi, Mohamed; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2016-09-19

    Lysosomal cathepsins regulate an exquisite range of biological functions, and their deregulation is associated with inflammatory, metabolic, and degenerative diseases in humans. In this study, we identified a key cell-intrinsic role for cathepsin B as a negative feedback regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy. Mice and macrophages lacking cathepsin B activity had increased resistance to the cytosolic bacterial pathogen Francisella novicida Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of cathepsin B down-regulated mechanistic target of rapamycin activity and prevented cleavage of the lysosomal calcium channel TRPML1. These events drove transcription of lysosomal and autophagy genes via transcription factor EB, which increased lysosomal biogenesis and activation of autophagy initiation kinase ULK1 for clearance of the bacteria. Our results identified a fundamental biological function of cathepsin B in providing a checkpoint for homeostatic maintenance of lysosome populations and basic recycling functions in the cell.

  14. Restriction of Francisella novicida genetic diversity during infection of the vector midgut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn E Reif

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of pathogens, and interactions between genotypes, can strongly influence pathogen phenotypes such as transmissibility and virulence. For vector-borne pathogens, both mammalian hosts and arthropod vectors may limit pathogen genotypic diversity (number of unique genotypes circulating in an area by preventing infection or transmission of particular genotypes. Mammalian hosts often act as "ecological filters" for pathogen diversity, where novel variants are frequently eliminated because of stochastic events or fitness costs. However, whether vectors can serve a similar role in limiting pathogen diversity is less clear. Here we show using Francisella novicida and a natural tick vector of Francisella spp. (Dermacentor andersoni, that the tick vector acted as a stronger ecological filter for pathogen diversity compared to the mammalian host. When both mice and ticks were exposed to mixtures of F. novicida genotypes, significantly fewer genotypes co-colonized ticks compared to mice. In both ticks and mice, increased genotypic diversity negatively affected the recovery of available genotypes. Competition among genotypes contributed to the reduction of diversity during infection of the tick midgut, as genotypes not recovered from tick midguts during mixed genotype infections were recovered from tick midguts during individual genotype infection. Mediated by stochastic and selective forces, pathogen genotype diversity was markedly reduced in the tick. We incorporated our experimental results into a model to demonstrate how vector population dynamics, especially vector-to-host ratio, strongly affected pathogen genotypic diversity in a population over time. Understanding pathogen genotypic population dynamics will aid in identification of the variables that most strongly affect pathogen transmission and disease ecology.

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2378 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2378 ref|YP_898144.1| hypothetical membrane protein [Francisella tular...ensis subsp. novicida U112] gb|ABK89390.1| hypothetical membrane protein [Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida U112] YP_898144.1 0.15 25% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0900 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0900 ref|YP_898010.1| phosphatidylserine synthase [Francisella tularen...sis subsp. novicida U112] gb|ABK89256.1| phosphatidylserine synthase [Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida U112] YP_898010.1 3.0 27% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2378 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2378 ref|YP_897819.1| competence protein [Francisella tularensis subsp.... novicida U112] gb|ABK89065.1| competence protein [Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida U112] YP_897819.1 0.12 24% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-0856 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-0856 ref|YP_899172.1| hypothetical membrane protein [Francisella tular...ensis subsp. novicida U112] gb|ABK90418.1| hypothetical membrane protein [Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida U112] YP_899172.1 0.006 29% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2151 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2151 ref|YP_897819.1| competence protein [Francisella tularensis subsp.... novicida U112] gb|ABK89065.1| competence protein [Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida U112] YP_897819.1 0.005 24% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ETEL-01-1508 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ETEL-01-1508 ref|YP_899172.1| hypothetical membrane protein [Francisella tular...ensis subsp. novicida U112] gb|ABK90418.1| hypothetical membrane protein [Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida U112] YP_899172.1 1.2 29% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0103 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0103 ref|ZP_04988076.1| serine transporter [Francisella tularensis sub...sp. novicida GA99-3549] gb|EDN35968.1| serine transporter [Francisella tularensis subsp. novicida GA99-3549] ZP_04988076.1 0.059 25% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0103 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0103 ref|YP_763917.1| HAAAP family serine permease [Francisella tulare...nsis subsp. holarctica OSU18] gb|ABI83280.1| HAAAP family serine permease [Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica OSU18] YP_763917.1 0.077 25% ...

  3. Lipopolysaccharides from Yersinia pestis. Studies on lipid A of lipopolysaccharides I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Venezia, N; Minka, S; Bruneteau, M; Mayer, H; Michel, G

    1985-09-01

    The chemical structure of the lipid A of lipopolysaccharide I and II from Yersinia pestis, strain EV 40, was studied. It consists of a (1 ---- 6), beta-linked D-glucosamine disaccharide which carries two phosphate groups; one phosphate is linked glycosidically with a glucosamine unit, the other one is linked to the non-reducing glucosamine. Various degradation methods combined with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed that the ester-bound phosphate group is linked to a 4-aminoarabinosyl residue and the glycosidically linked phosphate group is linked to a D-arabinofuranosyl residue in lipopolysaccharide II and to the phosphorylethanolamine in lipopolysaccharide I. The hydroxyl groups of the disaccharide are acylated by dodecanoic, hexadecenoic, 3-hydroxytetradecanoic and 3-dodecanoyloxytetradecanoic acids. The amino groups of the disaccharide carry 3-hydroxytetradecanoic and 3-dodecanoyloxytetradecanoic acids. In addition smaller amounts of 3-tetradecanoyloxyltetradecanoic and 3-hexadecanoyloxytetradecanoic acids are present in ester linkage.

  4. Genus Francisella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-15

    observed. Methyl red test negative; acetylmethylcarbinol and indole not produced. Nitrate not reduced to nitrite. Methylene blue reduced. 18 Produces...Carbohydrate fermentation : + - + + Sucrose - - + D b Catalase + + + + Oxidase - D + - Nil 3 - + +b + Sodium ricinoleate solubility + - + + Penicillin

  5. DMPD: Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12106784 Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Carof...html) (.csml) Show Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. PubmedID 12106784 Ti...tle Structural and functional analyses of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Authors

  6. First identification of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis causing mortality in Mexican tilapia Oreochromis spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Cesar; Mancera, Gerardo; Enríquez, Ricardo; Vargas, Augusto; Martínez, Simón; Fajardo, Raúl; Avendaño-Herrera, Ruben; Navarrete, María José; Romero, Alex

    2016-08-01

    Francisellosis, an emerging disease in tilapia Oreochromis spp., is caused by the facultative, intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis, which is present in various countries where tilapia farming is commercially important. We confirmed the presence of francisellosis in Mexican tilapia cultures in association with an outbreak during the second semester of 2012. Broodstock fish presented a mortality rate of approximately 40%, and disease was characterized by histologically classified granulomas, or whitish nodules, in different organs, mainly the spleen and kidney. Through DNA obtained from infected tissue and pure cultures in a cysteine heart medium supplemented with hemoglobin, F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis was initially confirmed through the amplification and analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and the internal transcribed spacer region. Phylogenetic analysis of these genes demonstrated close similarity with previously reported F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis sequences obtained from infected tilapia from various countries. The identification of this subspecies as the causative agent of the outbreak was confirmed using the iglC gene as a target sequence, which showed 99.5% identity to 2 F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis strains (Ethime-1 and Toba04). These findings represent the first documented occurrence of francisellosis in Mexican tilapia cultures, which highlights the importance of establishing preventative measures to minimize the spread of this disease within the Mexican aquaculture industry.

  7. A Francisella virulence factor catalyses an essential reaction of biotin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Youjun; Napier, Brooke A; Manandhar, Miglena; Henke, Sarah K; Weiss, David S; Cronan, John E

    2014-01-01

    We recently identified a gene (FTN_0818) required for Francisella virulence that seemed likely involved in biotin metabolism. However, the molecular function of this virulence determinant was unclear. Here we show that this protein named BioJ is the enzyme of the biotin biosynthesis pathway that determines the chain length of the biotin valeryl side-chain. Expression of bioJ allows growth of an Escherichia coli bioH strain on biotin-free medium, indicating functional equivalence of BioJ to the paradigm pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester carboxyl-esterase, BioH. BioJ was purified to homogeneity, shown to be monomeric and capable of hydrolysis of its physiological substrate methyl pimeloyl-ACP to pimeloyl-ACP, the precursor required to begin formation of the fused heterocyclic rings of biotin. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed that distinct from BioH, BioJ represents a novel subclade of the α/β-hydrolase family. Structure-guided mapping combined with site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the BioJ catalytic triad consists of Ser151, Asp248 and His278, all of which are essential for activity and virulence. The biotin synthesis pathway was reconstituted reaction in vitro and the physiological role of BioJ directly assayed. To the best of our knowledge, these data represent further evidence linking biotin synthesis to bacterial virulence.

  8. Roles of inflammatory caspases during processing of zebrafish interleukin-1β in Francisella noatunensis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtech, Lucia N.; Scharping, Nichole; Woodson, James C.; Hansen, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The interleukin-1 family of cytokines are essential for the control of pathogenic microbes but are also responsible for devastating autoimmune pathologies. Consequently, tight regulation of inflammatory processes is essential for maintaining homeostasis. In mammals, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is primarily regulated at two levels, transcription and processing. The main pathway for processing IL-1β is the inflammasome, a multiprotein complex that forms in the cytosol and which results in the activation of inflammatory caspase (caspase 1) and the subsequent cleavage and secretion of active IL-1β. Although zebrafish encode orthologs of IL-1β and inflammatory caspases, the processing of IL-1β by activated caspase(s) has never been examined. Here, we demonstrate that in response to infection with the fish-specific bacterial pathogen Francisella noatunensis, primary leukocytes from adult zebrafish display caspase-1-like activity that results in IL-1β processing. Addition of caspase 1 or pancaspase inhibitors considerably abrogates IL-1β processing. As in mammals, this processing event is concurrent with the secretion of cleaved IL-1β into the culture medium. Furthermore, two putative zebrafish inflammatory caspase orthologs, caspase A and caspase B, are both able to cleave IL-1β, but with different specificities. These results represent the first demonstration of processing and secretion of zebrafish IL-1β in response to a pathogen, contributing to our understanding of the evolutionary processes governing the regulation of inflammation.                   

  9. Lipopolysaccharide potentiates hyperthermia-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Baik-Lin; Abraham, Jayne; Mlsna, Lauren; Kim, Min Jung; Koh, Sookyong

    2015-08-01

    Prolonged febrile seizures (FS) have both acute and long-lasting effects on the developing brain. Because FS are often associated with peripheral infection, we aimed to develop a preclinical model of FS that simulates fever and immune activation in order to facilitate the implementation of targeted therapy after prolonged FS in young children. The innate immune activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to postnatal day 14 rat (200 μg/kg) and mouse (100 μg/kg) pups 2-2.5 h prior to hyperthermic seizures (HT) induced by hair dryer or heat lamp. To determine whether simulation of infection enhances neuronal excitability, latency to seizure onset, threshold temperature and total number of seizures were quantified. Behavioral seizures were correlated with electroencephalographic changes in rat pups. Seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production was assessed in blood samples at various time points after HT. Seizure-induced microglia activation in the hippocampus was quantified using Cx3cr1(GFP/+) mice. Lipopolysaccharide priming increased susceptibility of rats and mice to hyperthemic seizures and enhanced seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production and microglial activation. Peripheral inflammation appears to work synergistically with hyperthermia to potentiate seizures and to exacerbate seizure-induced immune responses. By simulating fever, a regulated increase in body temperature from an immune challenge, we developed a more clinically relevant animal model of prolonged FS.

  10. Multiple-locus, variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA of the fish-pathogen Francisella noatunensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottem Karl F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since Francisella noatunensis was first isolated from cultured Atlantic cod in 2004, it has emerged as a global fish pathogen causing disease in both warm and cold water species. Outbreaks of francisellosis occur in several important cultured fish species making a correct management of this disease a matter of major importance. Currently there are no vaccines or treatments available. A strain typing system for use in studies of F. noatunensis epizootics would be an important tool for disease management. However, the high genetic similarity within the Francisella spp. makes strain typing difficult, but such typing of the related human pathogen Francisella tullarensis has been performed successfully by targeting loci with higher genetic variation than the traditional signature sequences. These loci are known as Variable Numbers of Tandem Repeat (VNTR. The aim of this study is to identify possible useful VNTRs in the genome of F. noatunensis. Results Seven polymorphic VNTR loci were identified in the preliminary genome sequence of F. noatunensis ssp. noatunensis GM2212 isolate. These VNTR-loci were sequenced in F. noatunensis isolates collected from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua from Norway (n = 21, Three-line grunt (Parapristipoma trilineatum from Japan (n = 1, Tilapia (Oreochromis spp. from Indonesia (n = 3 and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar from Chile (n = 1. The Norwegian isolates presented in this study show both nine allelic profiles and clades, and that the majority of the farmed isolates belong in two clades only, while the allelic profiles from wild cod are unique. Conclusions VNTRs can be used to separate isolates belonging to both subspecies of F. noatunensis. Low allelic diversity in F. noatunensis isolates from outbreaks in cod culture compared to isolates wild cod, indicate that transmission of these isolates may be a result of human activity. The sequence based MLVA system presented in this study should provide a good

  11. Bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT and survival in a vaccine mouse model of tularemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiana Chiavolini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Francisella tularensis causes severe pulmonary disease, and nasal vaccination could be the ideal measure to effectively prevent it. Nevertheless, the efficacy of this type of vaccine is influenced by the lack of an effective mucosal adjuvant. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were immunized via the nasal route with lipopolysaccharide isolated from F. tularensis and neisserial recombinant PorB as an adjuvant candidate. Then, mice were challenged via the same route with the F. tularensis attenuated live vaccine strain (LVS. Mouse survival and analysis of a number of immune parameters were conducted following intranasal challenge. Vaccination induced a systemic antibody response and 70% of mice were protected from challenge as showed by their improved survival and weight regain. Lungs from mice recovering from infection presented prominent lymphoid aggregates in peribronchial and perivascular areas, consistent with the location of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT. BALT areas contained proliferating B and T cells, germinal centers, T cell infiltrates, dendritic cells (DCs. We also observed local production of antibody generating cells and homeostatic chemokines in BALT areas. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that PorB might be an optimal adjuvant candidate for improving the protective effect of F. tularensis antigens. The presence of BALT induced after intranasal challenge in vaccinated mice might play a role in regulation of local immunity and long-term protection, but more work is needed to elucidate mechanisms that lead to its formation.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis STIR-GUS-F2f7, a Highly Virulent Strain Recovered from Diseased Red Nile Tilapia Farmed in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Pär; Wehner, Stefanie; Bekaert, Michaël; Öhrman, Caroline; Metselaar, Matthijs; Thompson, Kimberly Dawn; Richards, Randolph Harvey; Penman, David James; Adams, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A highly virulent strain of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis, STIR-GUS-F2f7, was isolated from moribund red Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) farmed in Europe. In this communication, the complete genome sequencing of this bacterium is reported. PMID:28302784

  13. Prevalence of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis in cultured tilapia on the island of Oahu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Esteban; McGovern-Hopkins, Kathleen; Klinger-Bowen, Ruth; Fox, Bradley K; Brock, James; Antonio, Nathene; Waal, Zelda van der; Rushton, Stephen; Mill, Aileen; Tamaru, Clyde S

    2013-06-01

    Francisellosis is an emergent disease in cultured and wild aquatic animals. The causative agent, Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno), is a gram-negative bacterium recognized as one of the most virulent pathogens of warmwater fish. The main objective of this project was to investigate the prevalence of Fno in cultured tilapia (specifically, Mozambique Tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus, Koilapia [also known as Wami Tilapia] O. hornorum, Blue Tilapia O. aureus, and Nile Tilapia O. niloticus hybrids) on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, using conventional and real-time PCR assays followed by statistical modeling to compare the different diagnostic methods and identify potential risk factors. During 2010 and 2012, 827 fish were collected from different geographical locations throughout the island of Oahu. Upon collection of fish, the water temperature in the rearing system and the length of individual fish were measured. Extraction of DNA from different tissues collected aseptically during necropsy served as a template for molecular diagnosis. High correlation between both molecular methods was observed. Moreover, the bacterium was isolated from infected tilapia on selective media and confirmed to be Fno utilizing a species-specific Taqman-based real-time PCR assay. Although a direct comparison of the prevalence of Fno between the different geographical areas was not possible, the results indicate a high prevalence of Fno DNA in cultured tilapia throughout the farm sites located on Oahu. Of the different tilapia species and hybrids currently cultured in Hawaii, Mozambique Tilapia were more susceptible to infection than Koilapia. Water temperature in the rearing systems and fish size also had a strong effect on the predicted level of infection, with fish held at lower temperatures and smaller fish being more susceptible to piscine francisellosis.

  14. Efficacy of Resistance to Francisella Imparted by ITY/NRAMP/SLC11A1 Depends on Route of Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Daniel A.; Frelinger, Jeffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Natural resistance-associated macrophage protein (NRAMP) encoded by the Slc11a1 gene is a membrane-associated transporter of divalent metal ions. Murine Slc11a1 has two known alleles, a functional Slc11a1Gly169, which is found in DBA2/J, NOD/LtJ, and 129p3/J and related mouse strains, and a non-functional Slc11a1Asp169, that is found in C56Bl/6J (B6) and BALB/cJ mice. B6 mice congenic for Slc11a1Gly169 (B6-Slc11a1G169) are markedly resistant to the intracellular pathogens Salmonella, Leishmania, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We examined the host cell response and replication of Francisella in B6-Slc11a1G169 mice. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from either B6-Slc11a1G169 or B6 mice were both effectively invaded by Francisella live vaccine strain (LVS). However, at 16 hours post-infection (hpi), the number of LVS bacteria recovered from B6 macrophages had increased roughly 100-fold, while in B6-Slc11a1G169 mice the number decreased 10-fold. When the mice were challenged intranasally (i.n.) B6 mice lost significant amounts (~15%) of weight, where as B6-Slc11a1G169 mice lost no weight. Three days after infection in B6-Slc11a1G169 mice, we failed to recover viable Francisella from the lungs, livers, or spleens. By contrast, B6 mice had bacterial burdens approaching 1 × 106 CFU/organ in all three organs. To further examine the degree of resistance imparted by Slc11a1Gly169 expression, we challenged mice deficient in TLR2, TLR4, and TLR9, but expressing the functional Slc11a1 (B6-Slc11a1G169Tlr2/4/9−/−). Surprisingly, B6-Slc11a1G169Tlr2/4/9−/− mice had no notable weight loss. Eighty percent of B6-Slc11a1G169Tlr2/4/9−/− mice yielded no detectable Francisella in any organ tested. Additionally, Slc11a1G169 produced little detectable cytokine either in the lung or serum compared to B6 mice. Mice expressing Slc11a1Gly169 survived even high doses (~80 LD50) of LVS inoculation. These data taken together serve to highlight that functional Slc11a1Gly169 can

  15. ANTIVIRAL ACTIVITY OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES OF Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L .D. Varbanets

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the ability of lipopolysaccharides of two strains of Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens to inhibit in vitro the reproduction of human viruses: influenza A/FM/1/47 (H1N1, herpes simplex type 2 and bovine diarrhea, which is used as a model of hepatitis C virus, as well as to suppress hepatitis C virus production in model system of cells transfected with cDNA of this virus. It has been established that for both lipopolysaccharides in three types of cultures (MDCK, Vero and MDBK the toxicity is not manifested even in a concentration of 100.0 μg/ml, and decreasing in infectious virus titer more than by 2.0 lg TCD50 (ED99 was already achieved at concentrations of 1.55 mg/ml. Selectivity indexes determination of lipopolysaccharides preparations against the influenza A/FM/1/47 (H1N1 virus, herpes simplex virus type 2 and bovine diarrhea virus shows that lipopolysaccharides of P. chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens UCM B-306 and UCM B-111 are effective inhibitors of investigated viruses reproduction: selectivity index is at least 64. In the model of Jurkat cells transfected with human hepatitis C virus cDNA, viral RNA loading was determined in cells treated with lipopolysaccharides of P. chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens. The results of the studies indicate that when lipopolysaccharides of both strains are administered, the production of the hepatitis C virus is completely inhibited.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide Structure and Biosynthesis in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Tang, Hong; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2016-12-01

    This review covers the current knowledge and gaps in Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure and biosynthesis. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which colonizes the luminal surface of the human gastric epithelium. Both a constitutive alteration of the lipid A preventing TLR4 elicitation and host mimicry of the Lewis antigen decorated O-antigen of H. pylori LPS promote immune escape and chronic infection. To date, the complete structure of H. pylori LPS is not available, and the proposed model is a linear arrangement composed of the inner core defined as the hexa-saccharide (Kdo-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-DD-Hep-Gal-Glc), the outer core composed of a conserved trisaccharide (-GlcNAc-Fuc-DD-Hep-) linked to the third heptose of the inner core, the glucan, the heptan and a variable O-antigen, generally consisting of a poly-LacNAc decorated with Lewis antigens. Although the glycosyltransferases (GTs) responsible for the biosynthesis of the H. pylori O-antigen chains have been identified and characterized, there are many gaps in regard to the biosynthesis of the core LPS. These limitations warrant additional mutagenesis and structural studies to obtain the complete LPS structure and corresponding biosynthetic pathway of this important gastric bacterium.

  17. Review: Lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jerry D; Kocíncová, Dana; Westman, Erin L; Lam, Joseph S

    2009-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes serious nosocomial infections, and an important virulence factor produced by this organism is lipopolysaccharide (LPS). This review summarizes knowledge about biosynthesis of all three structural domains of LPS - lipid A, core oligosaccharide, and O polysaccharides. In addition, based on similarities with other bacterial species, this review proposes new hypothetical pathways for unstudied steps in the biosynthesis of P. aeruginosa LPS. Lipid A biosynthesis is discussed in relation to Escherichia coli and Salmonella, and the biosyntheses of core sugar precursors and core oligosaccharide are summarised. Pseudomonas aeruginosa attaches a Common Polysaccharide Antigen and O-Specific Antigen polysaccharides to lipid A-core. Both forms of O polysaccharide are discussed with respect to their independent synthesis mechanisms. Recent advances in understanding O-polysaccharide biosynthesis since the last major review on this subject, published nearly a decade ago, are highlighted. Since P. aeruginosa O polysaccharides contain unusual sugars, sugar-nucleotide biosynthesis pathways are reviewed in detail. Knowledge derived from detailed studies in the O5, O6 and O11 serotypes is applied to predict biosynthesis pathways of sugars in poorly-studied serotypes, especially O1, O4, and O13/O14. Although further work is required, a full understanding of LPS biosynthesis in P. aeruginosa is almost within reach.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein in preterm infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, D; Dembinski, J; Heep, A; Bartmann, P

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess serum concentrations of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) in preterm infants with neonatal bacterial infection (NBI). Methods: Blood samples were analysed of 57 preterm (28+1 to 36+6, median 33+2 weeks gestation) and 17 term infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit within the first 72 hours of life with suspicion of NBI. Samples were obtained at first suspicion of sepsis and after 12 and 24 hours. Diagnosis of NBI was confirmed by raised concentrations of C reactive protein and/or interleukin 6. The influence of gestational age and labour was analysed. Results: Maximum LBP concentrations in infants with NBI were greatly increased compared with infants without NBI (13.0–46.0 µg/ml (median 20.0 µg/ml) v 0.6–17.4 µg/ml (median 4.2 µg/ml)). LBP concentrations in infected infants were not yet significantly raised when NBI was first suspected. The LBP concentrations of preterm infants were comparable to those of term infants. Regression analysis revealed no significant effect of labour or gestational age on LBP. Conclusions: Raised LBP concentrations indicate NBI in preterm and term infants. Preterm infants of > 28 weeks gestation seem to be capable of producing LBP as efficiently as term infants. Neonatal LBP concentrations are not influenced by labour. LBP may be a useful diagnostic marker of NBI in preterm infants. PMID:15499153

  19. Francisella philomiragia, bacteria asociada con altas mortalidades en salmones del Atlántico (Salmo salar cultivados en balsas-jaulas en el lago Llanquihue Francisella philomiragia, a bacteria associated with high mortalities in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar cage-farmed in Llanquihue lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Bohle

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Francisella philomiragia fue aislada de salmón del Atlántico cultivado en balsas-jaulas en el lago Llanquihue con brotes de una enfermedad granulomatosa con altas tasas de morbilidad y mortalidad acumuladas entre 5% a 20%. Los aislados bacterianos tienen 100% similitud con F. philomiragia ssp noatunensis o F. piscicida aislado de bacalao en Noruega, 99% de similitud con Francisella sp. detectado en tilapia en Asia y Centroamérica y 99% de similitud con la especie tipo F. philomiragia por análisis filogenético del gen 16s rDNA.Francisella philomiragia was isolated from Atlantic salmon cage-farmed in the Llanquihue lake with outbreaks of a granulomatous disease, with high rates of morbidity and an accumulated mortalities between 5% to 20%. The isolates had 100% similarity with F. philomiragia ssp noatunensis or F. piscicida isolated in Atlantic cod, 99% similarity with Francisella sp. detected in tilapia from Asia and Central America and 99% of similarity with the reference strain F. philomiragia through 16s rDNA phylogenetic analysis.

  20. Horizontally acquired glycosyltransferase operons drive salmonellae lipopolysaccharide diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Mark R; Broadbent, Sarah E; Harris, Simon R; Thomson, Nicholas R; van der Woude, Marjan W

    2013-06-01

    The immunodominant lipopolysaccharide is a key antigenic factor for Gram-negative pathogens such as salmonellae where it plays key roles in host adaptation, virulence, immune evasion, and persistence. Variation in the lipopolysaccharide is also the major differentiating factor that is used to classify Salmonella into over 2600 serovars as part of the Kaufmann-White scheme. While lipopolysaccharide diversity is generally associated with sequence variation in the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis operon, extraneous genetic factors such as those encoded by the glucosyltransferase (gtr) operons provide further structural heterogeneity by adding additional sugars onto the O-antigen component of the lipopolysaccharide. Here we identify and examine the O-antigen modifying glucosyltransferase genes from the genomes of Salmonella enterica and Salmonella bongori serovars. We show that Salmonella generally carries between 1 and 4 gtr operons that we have classified into 10 families on the basis of gtrC sequence with apparent O-antigen modification detected for five of these families. The gtr operons localize to bacteriophage-associated genomic regions and exhibit a dynamic evolutionary history driven by recombination and gene shuffling events leading to new gene combinations. Furthermore, evidence of Dam- and OxyR-dependent phase variation of gtr gene expression was identified within eight gtr families. Thus, as O-antigen modification generates significant intra- and inter-strain phenotypic diversity, gtr-mediated modification is fundamental in assessing Salmonella strain variability. This will inform appropriate vaccine and diagnostic approaches, in addition to contributing to our understanding of host-pathogen interactions.

  1. Whole-genome immunoinformatic analysis of F. tularensis: predicted CTL epitopes clustered in hotspots are prone to elicit a T-cell response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Zvi

    Full Text Available The cellular arm of the immune response plays a central role in the defense against intracellular pathogens, such as F. tularensis. To date, whole genome immunoinformatic analyses were limited either to relatively small genomes (e.g. viral or to preselected subsets of proteins in complex pathogens. Here we present, for the first time, an unbiased bacterial global immunoinformatic screen of the 1740 proteins of F. tularensis subs. holarctica (LVS, aiming at identification of immunogenic peptides eliciting a CTL response. The very large number of predicted MHC class I binders (about 100,000, IC(50 of 1000 nM or less required the design of a strategy for further down selection of CTL candidates. The approach developed focused on mapping clusters rich in overlapping predicted epitopes, and ranking these "hotspot" regions according to the density of putative binding epitopes. Limited by the experimental load, we selected to screen a library of 1240 putative MHC binders derived from 104 top-ranking highly dense clusters. Peptides were tested for their ability to stimulate IFNγ secretion from splenocytes isolated from LVS vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. The majority of the clusters contained one or more CTL responder peptides and altogether 127 novel epitopes were identified, of which 82 are non-redundant. Accordingly, the level of success in identification of positive CTL responders was 17-25 fold higher than that found for a randomly selected library of 500 predicted MHC binders (IC(50 of 500 nM or less. Most proteins (ca. 2/3 harboring the highly dense hotspots are membrane-associated. The approach for enrichment of true positive CTL epitopes described in this study, which allowed for over 50% increase in the dataset of known T-cell epitopes of F. tularensis, could be applied in immunoinformatic analyses of many other complex pathogen genomes.

  2. DMPD: Lipopolysaccharide-binding molecules: transporters, blockers and sensors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15241548 Lipopolysaccharide-binding molecules: transporters, blockers and sensors. ...orters, blockers and sensors. PubmedID 15241548 Title Lipopolysaccharide-binding molecules: transport...Chaby R. Cell Mol Life Sci. 2004 Jul;61(14):1697-713. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Lipopolysaccharide-binding molecules: transp

  3. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF CATEGORY "A" BIO-TERRORISM AGENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster presents information on the inactivation of select bioterrorist agents. Information will be presented on chlorine disinfection of vegetative cells of Brucella suis, Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis and endos...

  4. Detection of Multiple Waterborne Pathogens Using Microsequencing Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: A microarray was developed to simultaneously detect Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium hominis, Enterococcus faecium, Bacillus anthracis and Francisella tularensis in water. Methods and Results: A DNA microarray was designed to contain probes that specifically dete...

  5. 78 FR 33692 - Implementation of the Understandings Reached at the 2012 Australia Group (AG) Plenary Meeting and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-05

    ...; Rickettsia prowazekii; and Salmonella typhi) and 1C351.c.18 through .c 20 (Shigella dysenteriae; Vibrio....14. Francisella tularensis; c.15. Rickettsia prowazekii; c.16. Salmonella typhi; c.17. Shiga...

  6. Sarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g., Salmonella species, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shigella ) Francisella tularensis (tularemia) Key Facts About Tularemia Frequently ... salmonellosis) Salmonella Typhi (typhoid fever) Salmonellosis ( Salmonella species) Shigella (shigellosis) Shigellosis ( Shigella ) Smallpox (variola major) Smallpox Basics ...

  7. VX

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g., Salmonella species, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shigella ) Francisella tularensis (tularemia) Key Facts About Tularemia Frequently ... salmonellosis) Salmonella Typhi (typhoid fever) Salmonellosis ( Salmonella species) Shigella (shigellosis) Shigellosis ( Shigella ) Smallpox (variola major) Smallpox Basics ...

  8. Tabun

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g., Salmonella species, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shigella ) Francisella tularensis (tularemia) Key Facts About Tularemia Frequently ... salmonellosis) Salmonella Typhi (typhoid fever) Salmonellosis ( Salmonella species) Shigella (shigellosis) Shigellosis ( Shigella ) Smallpox (variola major) Smallpox Basics ...

  9. Soman

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g., Salmonella species, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shigella ) Francisella tularensis (tularemia) Key Facts About Tularemia Frequently ... salmonellosis) Salmonella Typhi (typhoid fever) Salmonellosis ( Salmonella species) Shigella (shigellosis) Shigellosis ( Shigella ) Smallpox (variola major) Smallpox Basics ...

  10. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF CATEGORY "A" BIO-TERRORISM AGENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster presents information on the inactivation of select bioterrorist agents. Information will be presented on chlorine disinfection of vegetative cells of Brucella suis, Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis and endos...

  11. Flåtbårne infektioner i Danmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bo Bødker; Ocias, Lukas Frans; Andersen, Nanna Skaarup

    2017-01-01

    The castor bean tick, Ixodes ricinus, is common in woodlands in most of Denmark. Besides Borrelia burgdorferi, it can harbour a number of pathogenic microorganisms such as tick-borne encephalitis virus, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Rickettsia helvetica, Francisella tularensis, Candidatus Neoehrlichia...

  12. Lipopolysaccharide contamination in intradermal DNA vaccination : toxic impurity or adjuvant?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, J.H. van den; Quaak, S.G.L.; Beijnen, J.H.; Hennink, W.E.; Storm, G.; Schumacher, T.N.; Haanen, J.B.A.G.; Nuijen, B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are known both as potential adjuvants for vaccines and as toxic impurity in pharmaceutical preparations. The aim of this study was to assess the role of LPS in intradermal DNA vaccination administered by DNA tattooing. Method: Micewere vaccinated with a model DNA v

  13. ACTIVATION OF HUMAN BLOOD MONONUCLEARS BY LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE OF DIFFERENT COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Zubova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS composition upon activation of human blood mononuclears was investigated, by measuring levels of pro-inflammatory TNFα and IL-6 cytokines released by the cells. It is shown that LPS from Rhodobacter capsulatus PG, in contrast to E. coli LPS, did not activate the target cells for synthesis of the cytokines.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide contamination in intradermal DNA vaccination : toxic impurity or adjuvant?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, J.H. van den; Quaak, S.G.L.; Beijnen, J.H.; Hennink, W.E.; Storm, G.; Schumacher, T.N.; Haanen, J.B.A.G.; Nuijen, B.

    Purpose: Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are known both as potential adjuvants for vaccines and as toxic impurity in pharmaceutical preparations. The aim of this study was to assess the role of LPS in intradermal DNA vaccination administered by DNA tattooing. Method: Micewere vaccinated with a model DNA

  15. Inhibition of gastric secretion by bacterial lipopolysaccharide in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenen, F.H.H.; Miert, A.S.J.P.A.M. van

    1969-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) provoked an inhibition of gastric secretion in the rat. Reserpine and the catecholamine-synthesis inhibitors α-methyldopa and diethyl dithiocarbamate blocked this action of LPS, although adrenergic blocking agents or adrenalectomy were without effect. Direct stimul

  16. Lipid lateral organization on giant unilamellar vesicles containing lipopolysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubiak, Jakub; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Hansen, Søren

    2011-01-01

    We developed a new (to our knowledge) protocol to generate giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) composed of mixtures of single lipopolysaccharide (LPS) species and Escherichia coli polar lipid extracts. Four different LPSs that differed in the size of the polar headgroup (i.e., LPS smooth > LPS...

  17. Horizontally acquired glycosyltransferase operons drive salmonellae lipopolysaccharide diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Davies

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The immunodominant lipopolysaccharide is a key antigenic factor for Gram-negative pathogens such as salmonellae where it plays key roles in host adaptation, virulence, immune evasion, and persistence. Variation in the lipopolysaccharide is also the major differentiating factor that is used to classify Salmonella into over 2600 serovars as part of the Kaufmann-White scheme. While lipopolysaccharide diversity is generally associated with sequence variation in the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis operon, extraneous genetic factors such as those encoded by the glucosyltransferase (gtr operons provide further structural heterogeneity by adding additional sugars onto the O-antigen component of the lipopolysaccharide. Here we identify and examine the O-antigen modifying glucosyltransferase genes from the genomes of Salmonella enterica and Salmonella bongori serovars. We show that Salmonella generally carries between 1 and 4 gtr operons that we have classified into 10 families on the basis of gtrC sequence with apparent O-antigen modification detected for five of these families. The gtr operons localize to bacteriophage-associated genomic regions and exhibit a dynamic evolutionary history driven by recombination and gene shuffling events leading to new gene combinations. Furthermore, evidence of Dam- and OxyR-dependent phase variation of gtr gene expression was identified within eight gtr families. Thus, as O-antigen modification generates significant intra- and inter-strain phenotypic diversity, gtr-mediated modification is fundamental in assessing Salmonella strain variability. This will inform appropriate vaccine and diagnostic approaches, in addition to contributing to our understanding of host-pathogen interactions.

  18. Horizontally Acquired Glycosyltransferase Operons Drive Salmonellae Lipopolysaccharide Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Mark R.; Broadbent, Sarah E.; Harris, Simon R.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; van der Woude, Marjan W.

    2013-01-01

    The immunodominant lipopolysaccharide is a key antigenic factor for Gram-negative pathogens such as salmonellae where it plays key roles in host adaptation, virulence, immune evasion, and persistence. Variation in the lipopolysaccharide is also the major differentiating factor that is used to classify Salmonella into over 2600 serovars as part of the Kaufmann-White scheme. While lipopolysaccharide diversity is generally associated with sequence variation in the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis operon, extraneous genetic factors such as those encoded by the glucosyltransferase (gtr) operons provide further structural heterogeneity by adding additional sugars onto the O-antigen component of the lipopolysaccharide. Here we identify and examine the O-antigen modifying glucosyltransferase genes from the genomes of Salmonella enterica and Salmonella bongori serovars. We show that Salmonella generally carries between 1 and 4 gtr operons that we have classified into 10 families on the basis of gtrC sequence with apparent O-antigen modification detected for five of these families. The gtr operons localize to bacteriophage-associated genomic regions and exhibit a dynamic evolutionary history driven by recombination and gene shuffling events leading to new gene combinations. Furthermore, evidence of Dam- and OxyR-dependent phase variation of gtr gene expression was identified within eight gtr families. Thus, as O-antigen modification generates significant intra- and inter-strain phenotypic diversity, gtr-mediated modification is fundamental in assessing Salmonella strain variability. This will inform appropriate vaccine and diagnostic approaches, in addition to contributing to our understanding of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:23818865

  19. Detection of an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 lipopolysaccharide (LPS) variant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbaek, E.I.; HovindHaugen, K.

    1996-01-01

    Until now 12 serotypes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae have been recognized. The specificity of the serotypes reside in the carbohydrate composition of the capsular polysaccharides and lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The LPS of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 is a smooth type LPS with O-chains of li......Until now 12 serotypes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae have been recognized. The specificity of the serotypes reside in the carbohydrate composition of the capsular polysaccharides and lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The LPS of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 is a smooth type LPS with O......-chains of linear repeating pentasaccharide units with an O-acetyl group linked to a glucose unit. A monoclonal antibody (MAb 102-G02) directed against A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 was characterized in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and in sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS...

  20. Roscovitine protects murine Leydig cells from lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Tiancheng; Hu, Guanghui; Dong, Binbin; YAN, YANGYE; Liu, Min; YAO, XUDONG; Zheng, Junhua; Xu, Yunfei

    2017-01-01

    Roscovitine is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, which has been previously investigated for its anticancer effects. It has also been confirmed that roscovitine can downregulate the expression of myeloid cell leukemia-1 protein to inhibit inflammation. In the present study, roscovitine was used to treat inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced model mice. At the cellular level, Leydig cells isolated from mouse testis were assessed for inflammatory factors. It was revealed that rosco...

  1. Innate immunity probed by lipopolysaccharides affinity strategy and proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangrande, Chiara; Colarusso, Lucia; Lanzetta, Rosa; Molinaro, Antonio; Pucci, Piero; Amoresano, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are ubiquitous and vital components of the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria that have been shown to play a relevant role in the induction of the immune-system response. In animal and plant cells, innate immune defenses toward microorganisms are triggered by the perception of pathogen associated molecular patterns. These are conserved and generally indispensable microbial structures such as LPSs that are fundamental in the Gram-negative immunity recognition. This paper reports the development of an integrated strategy based on lipopolysaccharide affinity methodology that represents a new starting point to elucidate the molecular mechanisms elicited by bacterial LPS and involved in the different steps of innate immunity response. Biotin-tagged LPS was immobilized on streptavidin column and used as a bait in an affinity capture procedure to identify protein partners from human serum specifically interacting with this effector. The complex proteins/lipopolysaccharide was isolated and the protein partners were fractionated by gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. This procedure proved to be very effective in specifically binding proteins functionally correlated with the biological role of LPS. Proteins specifically bound to LPS essentially gathered within two functional groups, regulation of the complement system (factor H, C4b, C4BP, and alpha 2 macroglobulin) and inhibition of LPS-induced inflammation (HRG and Apolipoproteins). The reported strategy might have important applications in the elucidation of biological mechanisms involved in the LPSs-mediated molecular recognition and anti-infection responses.

  2. Early life peripheral lipopolysaccharide challenge reprograms catecholaminergic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Lin Kooi; Fuller, Erin A.; Sominsky, Luba; Hodgson, Deborah M.; Dunkley, Peter R.; Dickson, Phillip W.

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal immune challenge with the bacterial mimetic lipopolysaccharide has the capacity to generate long-term changes in the brain. Neonatal rats were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (0.05 mg/kg) on postnatal day (PND) 3 and again on PND 5. The activation state of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was measured in the locus coeruleus, ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra on PND 85. In the locus coeruleus there was an approximately four-fold increase in TH activity. This was accompanied by a significant increase in TH protein together with increased phosphorylation of all three serine residues in the N-terminal region of TH. In the ventral tegmental area, a significant increase in TH activity and increased phosphorylation of the serine 40 residue was seen. Neonatal lipopolysaccharide had no effect on TH activation in the substantia nigra. These results indicate the capacity of a neonatal immune challenge to generate long-term changes in the activation state of TH, in particular in the locus coeruleus. Overall, the current results demonstrate the enduring outcomes of a neonatal immune challenge on specific brain catecholaminergic regions associated with catecholamine synthesis. This highlights a novel mechanism for long-term physiological and behavioural alterations induced by this model. PMID:28071709

  3. Comparación de técnicas de Diagnóstico de Francisella sp. en muestras de tilapia (Oreochomis sp.)

    OpenAIRE

    Mancera Cuadros, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    La francisellosis en tilapias (Oreochromis spp) es una enfermedad emergente causada por el cocobacilo, Gram negativo, intracelular facultativo Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (FNO), que afecta a varios países donde el cultivo de peces de género tilapia es importante. Esta enfermedad de manifestación crónica se caracteriza por la ausencia de signos clínicos y baja mortalidad, lo que asociado al difícil aislamiento de la bacteria en medios de cultivo bacteriológicos convencionales, di...

  4. SIRT2 ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ae Sin; Jung, Yu Jin; Kim, Dal; Nguyen-Thanh, Tung [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Kyung Pyo [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sik [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Kwang [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Won, E-mail: kwon@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine of Chonbuk National University, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Knockout of SIRT2 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced iNOS expression. • Lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production is decreased in SIRT2 KO macrophage. • SIRT2 deficiency suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced ROS production in macrophage. • M1-macrophage related factors are decreased in SIRT2 deficient cells. • SIRT2 deficiency decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NFκB. - Abstract: Introduction: SIRT2 is a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases and associated with numerous processes such as infection, carcinogenesis, DNA damage and cell cycle regulation. However, the role of SIRT2 in inflammatory process in macrophage remains unclear. Materials and methods: In the present study, we have evaluated the regulatory effects of SIRT2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages isolated from SIRT2 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice or Raw264.7 macrophage cells. As inflammatory parameters, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the productions of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and M1-macrophage-related factors were evaluated. We also examined the effects of SIRT2 on activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) signaling. Results: SIRT2 deficiency inhibits LPS-induced iNOS mRNA and protein expression in bone marrow derived macrophages. SIRT2-siRNA transfection also suppressed LPS-induced iNOS expression in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. Bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from SIRT2 KO mice produced lower nitric oxide and expressed lower levels of M1-macrophage related markers including iNOS and CD86 in response to LPS than WT mice. Decrease of SIRT2 reduced the LPS-induced reactive oxygen species production. Deficiency of SIRT2 resulted in inhibition of NFκB activation through reducing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. The phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of p65 was significantly decreased in SIRT2-deficient macrophages after LPS stimulation. Discussion: Our data suggested that

  5. Lipopolysaccharide-induced acute renal failure in conscious rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonassen, Thomas E N; Graebe, Martin; Promeneur, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    In conscious, chronically instrumented rats we examined 1) renal tubular functional changes involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute renal failure; 2) the effects of LPS on the expression of selected renal tubular water and sodium transporters; and 3) effects of milrinone, a phosphodies......In conscious, chronically instrumented rats we examined 1) renal tubular functional changes involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute renal failure; 2) the effects of LPS on the expression of selected renal tubular water and sodium transporters; and 3) effects of milrinone......). LPS-induced fall in GFR and proximal tubular outflow were sustained on day 2. Furthermore, LPS-treated rats showed a marked increase in fractional distal water excretion, despite significantly elevated levels of plasma vasopressin (AVP). Semiquantitative immunoblotting showed that LPS increased......-alpha and lactate, inhibited the LPS-induced tachycardia, and exacerbated the acute LPS-induced fall in GFR. Furthermore, Ro-20-1724-treated rats were unable to maintain MAP. We conclude 1) PDE3 or PDE4 inhibition exacerbates LPS-induced renal failure in conscious rats; and 2) LPS treated rats develop an escape...

  6. Prolonged sleep fragmentation of mice exacerbates febrile responses to lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringgold, Kristyn M.; Barf, R. Paulien; George, Amrita; Sutton, Blair C.; Opp, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sleep disruption is a frequent occurrence in modern society. Whereas many studies have focused on the consequences of total sleep deprivation, few have investigated the condition of sleep disruption. New Method We disrupted sleep of mice during the light period for 9 consecutive days using an intermittently-rotating disc. Results Electroencephalogram (EEG) data demonstrated that non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep was severely fragmented and REM sleep was essentially abolished during the 12 h light period. During the dark period, when sleep was not disrupted, neither NREM sleep nor REM sleep times differed from control values. Analysis of the EEG revealed a trend for increased power in the peak frequency of the NREM EEG spectra during the dark period. The fragmentation protocol was not overly stressful as body weights and water consumption remained unchanged, and plasma corticosterone did not differ between mice subjected to 3 or 9 days of sleep disruption and home cage controls. However, mice subjected to 9 days of sleep disruption by this method responded to lipopolysaccharide with an exacerbated febrile response. Comparison with existing methods Existing methods to disrupt sleep of laboratory rodents often subject the animal to excessive locomotion, vibration, or sudden movements. This method does not suffer from any of these confounds. Conclusions This study demonstrates that prolonged sleep disruption of mice exacerbates febrile responses to lipopolysaccharide. This device provides a method to determine mechanisms by which chronic insufficient sleep contributes to the etiology of many pathologies, particularly those with an inflammatory component. PMID:23872243

  7. Dexmedetomidine Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide Induced MCP-1 Expression in Primary Astrocyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Faez Abdelgawad, Amro

    2017-01-01

    Background. Neuroinflammation which presents as a possible mechanism of delirium is associated with MCP-1, an important proinflammatory factor which is expressed on astrocytes. It is known that dexmedetomidine (DEX) possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to investigate the potential effects of DEX on the production of MCP-1 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated astrocytes. Materials and Methods. Astrocytes were treated with LPS (10 ng/ml, 50 ng/ml, 100 ng/ml, and 1000 ng/ml), DEX (500 ng/mL), LPS (100 ng/ml), and DEX (10, 100, and 500 ng/mL) for a duration of three hours; expression levels of MCP-1 were measured by real-time PCR. The double immunofluorescence staining protocol was utilized to determine the expression of α2-adrenoceptors (α2AR) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) on astrocytes. Results. Expressions of MCP-1 mRNA in astrocytes were induced dose-dependently by LPS. Administration of DEX significantly inhibited the expression of MCP-1 mRNA (P < 0.001). Double immunofluorescence assay showed that α2AR colocalize with GFAP, which indicates the expression of α2-adrenoceptors in astrocytes. Conclusions. DEX is a potent suppressor of MCP-1 in astrocytes induced with lipopolysaccharide through α2A-adrenergic receptors, which potentially explains its beneficial effects in the treatment of delirium by attenuating neuroinflammation. PMID:28286770

  8. Deciphering the dual effect of lipopolysaccharides from plant pathogenic Pectobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Kettani-Halabi; Daniel, Tran; Aurélien, Dauphin; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Rafik, Errakhi; Arbelet-Bonnin, Delphine; Biligui, Bernadette; Florence, Val; Mustapha, Ennaji Moulay; François, Bouteau

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are a component of the outer cell surface of almost all Gram-negative bacteria and play an essential role for bacterial growth and survival. Lipopolysaccharides represent typical microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules and have been reported to induce defense-related responses, including the expression of defense genes and the suppression of the hypersensitive response in plants. However, depending on their origin and the challenged plant, LPS were shown to have complex and different roles. In this study we showed that LPS from plant pathogens Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum induce common and different responses in A. thaliana cells when compared to those induced by LPS from non-phytopathogens Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Among common responses to both types of LPS are the transcription of defense genes and their ability to limit of cell death induced by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp carotovorum. However, the differential kinetics and amplitude in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation seemed to regulate defense gene transcription and be determinant to induce programmed cell death in response to LPS from the plant pathogenic Pectobacterium. These data suggest that different signaling pathways could be activated by LPS in A. thaliana cells.

  9. Structural basis for lipopolysaccharide insertion in the bacterial outer membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Shuai; Luo, Qingshan; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xuejun Cai; Huang, Yihua

    2014-07-03

    One of the fundamental properties of biological membranes is the asymmetric distribution of membrane lipids. In Gram-negative bacteria, the outer leaflet of the outer membrane is composed predominantly of lipopolysaccharides (LPS). The export of LPS requires seven essential lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) proteins to move LPS from the inner membrane, through the periplasm to the surface. Of the seven Lpt proteins, the LptD-LptE complex is responsible for inserting LPS into the external leaflet of the outer membrane. Here we report the crystal structure of the ∼110-kilodalton membrane protein complex LptD-LptE from Shigella flexneri at 2.4 Å resolution. The structure reveals an unprecedented two-protein plug-and-barrel architecture with LptE embedded into a 26-stranded β-barrel formed by LptD. Importantly, the secondary structures of the first two β-strands are distorted by two proline residues, weakening their interactions with neighbouring β-strands and creating a potential portal on the barrel wall that could allow lateral diffusion of LPS into the outer membrane. The crystal structure of the LptD-LptE complex opens the door to new antibiotic strategies targeting the bacterial outer membrane.

  10. An outbreak of granulomatous inflammation associated with Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis in farmed tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus × O. aureus) in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiang; Li, Ningqiu; Fu, Xiaozhe; Hu, Qiandong; Chang, Ouqin; Liu, Lihui; Zhang, Defeng; Wang, Guangjun; San, Guibao; Wu, Shuqin

    2016-05-01

    In 2013, a novel disease was detected in tilapia ( Oreochromis niloticus × O. aureus) in Guangzhou, South China. To identify the causative pathogen, we conducted histological examination, bacteria isolation, and purification, and sequenced the 16S rRNA gene of isolates. Infected fish had a large number of white granulomas in the kidney, liver, heart, and spleen. The head kidney and spleen were markedly swollen. A bacterium strain designated as gz201301 was recovered from the spleen of infected tilapia. The 16S rRNA sequence of gz201301 revealed that it was highly similar to F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis. This is the first report of a Francisella-like infection in farmed tilapia in China.

  11. Uptake and modification of 125I-lipopolysaccharide by isolated rat Kupffer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, E S; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A

    1988-01-01

    While it is generally believed that hepatic clearance of lipopolysaccharide involves Kupffer cells, the mechanism involved has not been fully elucidated. This study assesses this phenomenon in terms of in vitro uptake and post-uptake modification experiments with an 125I-labeled Salmonella minnesota lipopolysaccharide. 125I-Lipopolysaccharide was added to Kupffer cells in suspension cultures under a variety of conditions. In vitro uptake of 125I-Lipopolysaccharide was not saturable up to concentrations of 33.33 micrograms per ml. Kinetics experiments performed at 16.67 micrograms per ml demonstrated that Kupffer cells were unsaturable after 60 min of incubation. The kinetics of uptake could be inhibited, however, by incubation in the presence of a 10-fold excess of unlabeled lipopolysaccharide, indicating that a component of the uptake process may be limited. Energy dependence in this process was demonstrated by incubation in the presence of 1 mM 2-deoxyglucose which inhibited 125I-lipopolysaccharide uptake by approximately 30%. Pretreatment with 7.5 x 10(-5) M colchicine had no effect on kinetics, implying no role for the cell cytoskeleton in lipopolysaccharide uptake. These results are inconsistent with a receptor-mediated process as previously suggested. Modification of internalized label has been demonstrated by changes in buoyant density in CsCl isopyknic density gradients following overnight incubation with Kupffer cells. These results indicate that Kupffer cells clear bacterial endotoxin in vitro and post-uptake degradation occurs within 20 hr of incubation.

  12. Interactions of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides with Gold Nanorod Surfaces Investigated by Refractometric Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadeer, Nardine S; Fülöp, Gergő; Chen, Si; Käll, Mikael; Murphy, Catherine J

    2015-11-11

    The interface between nanoparticles and bacterial surfaces is of great interest for applications in nanomedicine and food safety. Here, we demonstrate that interactions between gold nanorods and bacterial surface molecules are governed by the nanoparticle surface coating. Polymer-coated gold nanorod substrates are exposed to lipopolysaccharides extracted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli, and attachment is monitored using localized surface plasmon resonance refractometric sensing. The number of lipopolysaccharide molecules attached per nanorod is calculated from the shift in the plasmon maximum, which results from the change in refractive index after analyte binding. Colloidal gold nanorods in water are also incubated with lipopolysaccharides to demonstrate the effect of lipopolysaccharide concentration on plasmon shift, ζ-potential, and association constant. Both gold nanorod surface charge and surface chemistry affect gold nanorod-lipopolysaccharide interactions. In general, anionic lipopolysaccharides was found to attach more effectively to cationic gold nanorods than to neutral or anionic gold nanorods. Some variation in lipopolysaccharide attachment is also observed between the three strains studied, demonstrating the potential complexity of bacteria-nanoparticle interactions.

  13. Structural Characterization of Core Region in Erwinia amylovora Lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Casillo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Erwinia amylovora (E. amylovora is the first bacterial plant pathogen described and demonstrated to cause fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting a wide range of species including a wide variety of Rosaceae. In this study, we reported the lipopolysaccharide (LPS core structure from E. amylovora strain CFBP1430, the first one for an E. amylovora highly pathogenic strain. The chemical characterization was performed on the mutants waaL (lacking only the O-antigen LPS with a complete LPS-core, wabH and wabG (outer-LPS core mutants. The LPSs were isolated from dry cells and analyzed by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. In particular, they were subjected to a mild acid hydrolysis and/or a hydrazinolysis and investigated in detail by one and two dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR spectroscopy and ElectroSpray Ionization Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ESI FT-ICR mass spectrometry.

  14. Structural Characterization of Core Region in Erwinia amylovora Lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillo, Angela; Ziaco, Marcello; Lindner, Buko; Merino, Susana; Mendoza-Barberá, Elena; Tomás, Juan M.; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2017-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora (E. amylovora) is the first bacterial plant pathogen described and demonstrated to cause fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting a wide range of species including a wide variety of Rosaceae. In this study, we reported the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core structure from E. amylovora strain CFBP1430, the first one for an E. amylovora highly pathogenic strain. The chemical characterization was performed on the mutants waaL (lacking only the O-antigen LPS with a complete LPS-core), wabH and wabG (outer-LPS core mutants). The LPSs were isolated from dry cells and analyzed by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. In particular, they were subjected to a mild acid hydrolysis and/or a hydrazinolysis and investigated in detail by one and two dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ElectroSpray Ionization Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ESI FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. PMID:28273861

  15. Roscovitine protects murine Leydig cells from lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tiancheng; Hu, Guanghui; Dong, Binbin; Yan, Yangye; Liu, Min; Yao, Xudong; Zheng, Junhua; Xu, Yunfei

    2017-05-01

    Roscovitine is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, which has been previously investigated for its anticancer effects. It has also been confirmed that roscovitine can downregulate the expression of myeloid cell leukemia-1 protein to inhibit inflammation. In the present study, roscovitine was used to treat inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced model mice. At the cellular level, Leydig cells isolated from mouse testis were assessed for inflammatory factors. It was revealed that roscovitine successfully reduced inflammation-associated injury induced by LPS pretreatment. At the molecular level, roscovitine was found to exert this effect through promotion of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to suggest that roscovitine has a protective role in Leydig cells through its anti-inflammatory action.

  16. Structural Characterization of Core Region in Erwinia amylovora Lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casillo, Angela; Ziaco, Marcello; Lindner, Buko; Merino, Susana; Mendoza-Barberá, Elena; Tomás, Juan M; Corsaro, Maria Michela

    2017-03-04

    Erwinia amylovora (E. amylovora) is the first bacterial plant pathogen described and demonstrated to cause fire blight, a devastating plant disease affecting a wide range of species including a wide variety of Rosaceae. In this study, we reported the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core structure from E. amylovora strain CFBP1430, the first one for an E. amylovora highly pathogenic strain. The chemical characterization was performed on the mutants waaL (lacking only the O-antigen LPS with a complete LPS-core), wabH and wabG (outer-LPS core mutants). The LPSs were isolated from dry cells and analyzed by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. In particular, they were subjected to a mild acid hydrolysis and/or a hydrazinolysis and investigated in detail by one and two dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ElectroSpray Ionization Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (ESI FT-ICR) mass spectrometry.

  17. Kinetic analysis of interaction between lipopolysaccharide and biomolecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan YANG; Xiurong YANG

    2008-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major compo-nent of the outer membrane of all gram-negative bacteria. It interacts with some biomolecules and triggers a toxic reaction. In this paper, we studied the interaction between LPS from Salmonella Minnesota and some biomolecules using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. Biomolecules were immobilized on a CM5 sensor chip using the amino coupling method and LPS was injected over the immobilized surfaces. The affinity constant KA of LPS with serum albumin, hemoglobin, chitosan and lysozyme was 2.36 × 107, 2.03 × 108,7.58×106, 2.82 × 104 L·mol-1, respectively. However, LPS could not interact with ferritin.

  18. Galangin dampens mice lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yu-Sheng; Tao, Wei; Miao, Qian-Bing; Lu, Shi-Chun; Zhu, Ya-Bing

    2014-10-01

    Galangin, an active ingredient of Alpinia galangal, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Inflammation and oxidative stress are known to play vital effect in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). In this study, we determined whether galangin exerts lung protection in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Male BALB/c mice were randomized to receive galangin or vehicle intraperitoneal injection 3 h after LPS challenge. Samples were harvested 24 h post LPS administration. Galangin administration decreased biochemical parameters of oxidative stress and inflammation, and improved oxygenation and lung edema in a dose-dependent manner. These protective effects of galangin were associated with inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and upregulation of heme oxygenase (HO)-1. Galangin reduces LPS-induced ALI by inhibition of inflammation and oxidative stress.

  19. LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE INDUCES EXPOSURE OF FIBRINOGEN RECEPTORS ON HUMAN PLATELETS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于希春; 吴其夏

    1995-01-01

    The effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the exposure of platelet fibrinogen receptors was investigated.The results showed that:1)LPS increased the binding of fibrinogen-gold complexes to platelets and the labels were primarily limited to shape-changed platelets;2)LPS caused a dose-dependent rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in platelets;3)LPS induced the activation of platelet protein kinase C(PKC) and the phosphorylation of glycoprotein llla (GP llla) which was inhibited by H-7.All these results suggest that stimulation of platelets with LPS causes a conformational change in glycoprotein llb/Illa (GPllb/llla) through platelet shape change and/or phosphorylation of GPllla via PKC,which serves to expose the fibrinogen binding sites of GPllb/llla on human platelets.

  20. Neuroprotective Activity of (--Epigallocatechin Gallate against Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Biao Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- mediated systemic inflammation plays a critical role in neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, the major component in green tea, on LPS-mediated inflammation and neurotoxicity. LPS treatment of macrophages induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. However, EGCG pretreatment of macrophages significantly inhibited LPS-mediated induction of these cytokines. In addition, EGCG significantly diminished LPS-induced inflammatory cytokines in the peripheral mononuclear blood cells (PBMCs. Supernatant from EGCG-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures was found to be less cytotoxic to neurons than that from non-EGCG-pretreated and LPS-activated macrophage cultures. Furthermore, EGCG treatment of neurons could inhibit LPS-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Thus EGCG represents a potent and useful neuroprotective agent for inflammation-mediated neurological disorders.

  1. Pleurotus eryngii Ameliorates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Lung Inflammation in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junya Kawai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleurotus eryngii (P. eryngii is consumed as a fresh cultivated mushroom worldwide and demonstrated to have multiple beneficial effects. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of P. eryngii in mice with acute lung injury (ALI. Intranasal instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS (10 μg/site/mouse induced marked lung inflammation (increase in the number of inflammatory cells, protein leakage, and production of nitric oxide in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as well as histopathological damage in the lung, 6 h after treatment. Mice administered heat-treated P. eryngii (0.3–1 g/kg, p.o. (HTPE 1 h before LPS challenge showed decreased pulmonary inflammation and ameliorated histopathological damage. These results suggest that HTPE has anti-inflammatory effects against ALI. Thus, P. eryngii itself may also have anti-inflammatory effects and could be a beneficial food for the prevention of ALI induced by bacterial infection.

  2. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide affects human gingival fibroblast cytoskeletal organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Marmolejo, Luis Arturo; Román-Alvárez, Patricia; Barajas-Torres, Carolina

    2008-04-01

    The cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure that plays a key role in maintaining cell morphology and function. This study investigates the effect of bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a strong inflammatory agent, on the dynamics and organization of actin, tubulin, vimentin, and vinculin proteins in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). A time-dependent study showed a noticeable change in actin architecture after 1.5 h of incubation with LPS (1 microg/ml) with the formation of orthogonal fibers and further accumulation of actin filament at the cell periphery by 24 h. When 0.01-10 microg/ml of LPS was added to human gingival fibroblast cultures, cells acquired a round, flat shape and gradually developed cytoplasmic ruffling. Lipopolysaccharides extracted from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans periodontopathogenic bacteria promoted alterations in F-actin stress fibres of human gingival cells. Normally, human gingival cells have F-actin fibres that are organized in linear distribution throughout the cells, extending along the cell's length. LPS-treated cells exhibited changes in cytoskeletal protein organization, and F-actin was reorganized by the formation of bundles underneath and parallel to the cell membrane. We also found the reorganization of the vimentin network into vimentin bundling after 1.5 h of treatment. HGF cells exhibited diffuse and granular gamma-tubulin stain. There was no change in LPS-treated HGF. However, vinculin plaques distributed in the cell body diminished after LPS treatment. We conclude that the dynamic and structured organization of cytoskeletal filaments and actin assembly in human gingival fibroblasts is altered by LPS treatment and is accompanied by a decrease in F-actin pools.

  3. Purification of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein from bovine serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochsler, P N; Yang, Z; Murphy, C L; Carroll, R C

    1996-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) plays a central role in presentation of bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS; endotoxin) to leukocytes such as macrophages and neutrophils. Interaction of LBP with LPS is significant because LBP-LPS complexes promote activation of leukocytes and the immune system, which results in enhanced secretion of a spectrum of proinflammatory cytokines. An improved, simplified method was used to purify bovine LBP from serum. Methodology consisted of ion-exchange chromatography using Bio-Rex 70 resin, followed by gel-filtration chromatography (Sephacryl S-200 resin) of a selected ion-exchange fraction (0.22-0.50 M NaCl). Densitometric scans on silver-stained polyacrylamide gels of chromatographically-derived proteins indicated up to 88.7% purity of the resultant 64kD protein (bovine LBP) in the cleanest fractions. The isoelectric point of bovine LBP was determined to be 6.8. Identity of the protein was substantiated by western-blot analysis, and by N-terminus amino acid sequence analysis with favorable comparison to published sequence data from rabbit, human, and murine LBP Identity was corroborated by use of purified bovine LBP in bioassays which demonstrated enhanced tissue factor expression of LPS (1 ng ml(-1)-stimulated bovine alveolar macrophages. Tissue factor expression was inhibitable in these assays using anti-CD14 monoclonal antibodies, which is also consistent with LBP-mediated activation of cells. When bovine LBP was heated at 56 degrees C for 30 min, the biological activity was reduced by 50% in the macrophage-based bioassays. Biological activity of bovine LBP was completely destroyed by heating at 62 degrees C for 30 min, which compared favorably with data resulting from use of fetal bovine serum.

  4. Intestinal barrier damage caused by trauma and lipopolysaccharide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-An Ding; Jie-Shou Li; You-Sheng Li; Nian-Ting Zhu; Fang-Nan Liu; Li Tan

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the intestinal barrier function damage induced by trauma and infection in rats.METHODS: Experimental models of surgical trauma and infection were established in rats. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: control group (n = 8), EN group (n = 10), PN group (n = 9) and Sep group (n = 8).The rats in PN and Sep groups were made into PN models that received isonitrogenous, isocaloric and isovolumic TPN solution during the 7-d period. Rats in EN and Sep groups received laparotomy and cervical catheterization on day 1 and received lipopolysaccharide injection intraperitoneally on d 7. On the 7th day all the animals were gavaged with lactulose and mannitol to test the intestinal permeability.Twenty-four hours later samples were collected and examined.RESULTS: The inflammatory responses became gradually aggravated from EN group to Sep group. The mucosal structure of small intestine was markedly impaired in PN and Sep groups. There was a low response in IgA level in Sep group when compared with that of EN group.Lipopolysaccharide injection also increased the nitric oxide levels in the plasma of the rats. The intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation increased significantly in Sep group compared with that of control group.CONCLUSION: One wk of parenteral nutrition causes an atrophy of the intestinal mucosa and results in a moderate inflammatory reaction in the rats. Endotoxemia aggravats the inflammatory responses that caused by laparotomy plus TPN, increases the production of nitric oxide in the body, and damages the intestinal barrier function.

  5. The effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide on pregnancy in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, A; van Pampus, M G; Aarnoudse, J G; van der Schans, C P; Abbas, F; Faas, M M

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Periodontitis, mostly associated with Porphyromonas gingivalis, has frequently been related to adverse pregnancy outcomes. We therefore investigated whether lipopolysaccharides of P. gingivalis (Pg-LPS) induced pregnancy complications in the rat. METHODS: Experiment 1: pregnant rats (day

  6. Lipopolysaccharide-induced hyperalgesia of intracranial capsaicin sensitive afferents in conscious rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, RHA; Spoelstra, MB; Meijler, WJ; Ter Horst, GJ

    1998-01-01

    Migraineous and non-migraineous headache is reported to be at highest intensity after an infection. This study investigated whether activation of the immune system can induce hyperalgesia in intracranial capsaicin sensitive afferents. The effects of intraperitoneal injected lipopolysaccharides (LPS)

  7. Lipopolysaccharide induces apoptosis of cytotrophoblasts by activating an innate immune reaction in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Si-yang; SHANG Tao; LI Shu-juan; RUI Guang-hai; LI Qiu-ling

    2007-01-01

    Background Enhanced apoptosis of cytotrophoblasts in early pregnancy is associated with high risk of intrauterine growth retardation and preeclampsia, which are two common pregnant complications. Its etiological factors remain unclear. Cytotrophoblasts share some traits with innate immune cells and may show response to lipopolysaccharide. This study was conducted to demonstrate whether lipopolysaccharide has apoptosis-inducing effects on cytotrophoblast and the role of innate immune reaction in this process.Methods Cytotrophoblasts were isolated from early pregnant villous tissues and cultured with serum-free medium.Subsequently, cytotrophoblasts were treated with lipopolysaccharide at the concentrations of 0 (control), 25, 50, 100 and 200 ng/ml for 24 hours. Apoptosis of cytotrophoblasts was determined by light microscopy, Hoechst 33258 DNA staining with a fluorescent microscope, transmission electron microscope and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated /propidium iodide (PI) staining with flow cytometry. Then expression of caspase-3 was detected by Western blot. Confocal immunofluorescence technique was used to detect tumor necrosis factor α expression in cytotrophoblasts. The levels of tumor necrosis factor α in the culture medium were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results Under light, fluorescence microscope and transmission electron microscope, characteristic alternations of apoptosis in cytotrophoblasts were observed after lipopolysaccharide treatment. Flow cytometry results showed that lipopolysaccharide significantly increased apoptosis indexes of cytotrophoblasts. Significant statistical differences were found in the above groups (P≤0.01). The mean relative densities of bands corresponding to caspase-3 were significantly increased in groups treated with lipopolysaccharide, as compared with the normal control (P<0.001). Tumor necrosis factor α expression was found to increase in cytotrophoblasts by confocal

  8. Isoforskolin pretreatment attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weimin; Qiang, Dongjin; Zhang, Min; Ma, Limei; Zhang, Yonghui; Qing, Chen; Xu, Yunlong; Zhen, Chunlan; Liu, Jikai; Chen, Yan-Hua

    2011-06-01

    Isoforskolin was isolated from Coleus forskohlii native to Yunnan in China. We hypothesize that isoforskolin pretreatment attenuates acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin). Three acute lung injury models were used: situ perfused rat lung, rat and mouse models of endotoxic shock. Additionally, lipopolysaccharide stimulated proinflammatory cytokine production was evaluated in human mononuclear leukocyte. In situ perfused rat lungs, pre-perfusion with isoforskolin (100, and 200 μM) and dexamethasone (65 μM, positive control) inhibited lipopolysaccharide (10 mg/L) induced increases in lung neutrophil adhesion rate, myeloperoxidase activity, lung weight Wet/Dry ratio, permeability-surface area product value, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels. In rats, pretreatments with isoforskolin (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) and dexamethasone (5mg/kg, i.p.) markedly reduced lipopolysaccharide (6 mg/kg i.v.) induced increases of karyocyte, neutrophil counts and protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and plasma myeloperoxidase activity. Lung histopathology showed that morphologic changes induced by lipopolysaccharide were less pronounced in the isoforskolin and dexamethasone pretreated rats. In mice, 5 mg/kg isoforskolin and dexamethasone caused 100% and 80% survival, respectively, after administration of lipopolysaccharide (62.5mg/kg, i.v., 40% survival if untreated). In human mononuclear leukocyte, isoforskolin (50, 100, and 200 μM) and dexamethasone (10 μM) pre-incubation lowered lipopolysaccharide (2 μg/mL) induced secretion of the cytokine TNF-α, and interleukins (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-8. In conclusion, pretreatment with isoforskolin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in several models, and it is involved in down-regulation of inflammatory responses and proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8.

  9. Influence of feeding status on neuronal activity in the hypothalamus during lipopolysaccharide-induced anorexia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautron, L; Mingam, R; Moranis, A; Combe, C; Layé, S

    2005-01-01

    Fasting attenuates disease-associated anorexia, but the mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the extent to which a 48 h fast alters hypothalamic neuronal activity in response to the anorectic effects of lipopolysaccharide in rats. Male rats were fed ad libitum or fasted, and were injected with i.p. saline or lipopolysaccharide (250 microg/kg). Immunohistochemistry for Fos protein was used to visualize neuronal activity in response to lipopolysaccharide within selected hypothalamic feeding regulatory nuclei. Additionally, food intake, body weight, plasma interleukin-1 and leptin levels, and the expression of mRNA for appetite-related neuropeptides (neuropeptide Y, proopiomelanocortin and cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript) were measured in a time-related manner. Our data show that the pattern of lipopolysaccharide-induced Fos expression was similar in most hypothalamic nuclei whatever the feeding status. However, we observed that fasting significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced Fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus, in association with an attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced anorexia and body weight loss. Moreover, lipopolysaccharide reduced fasting-induced Fos expression in the perifornical area of the lateral hypothalamus. Lipopolysaccharide-induced circulating levels of interleukin-1 were similar across feeding status. Finally, fasting, but not lipopolysaccharide, affected circulating level of leptin and appetite-related neuropeptides expression in the arcuate nucleus. Together, our data show that fasting modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced anorexia and body weight loss in association with neural changes in specific hypothalamic nuclei.

  10. Surveillance of tularaemia in Kosovo, 2001 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunow, R; Kalaveshi, A; Kühn, A; Mulliqi-Osmani, G; Ramadani, N

    2012-07-12

    Tularaemia, caused by Francisella tularensis, had not been registered in Kosovo before an outbreak in 1999 and 2000. A national surveillance system has been implemented in Kosovo since 2000 to monitor a number of diseases, including tularaemia. Antibody detection in human sera was used for laboratory diagnosis of tularaemia and F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide antigen was used as a marker of infection. The purpose of this study is to describe the incidence of tularaemia in Kosovo after the 1999-00 outbreak. In 2001 and 2002, a second outbreak occurred, with 327 serologically confirmed cases. From 2001 to 2010, 25-327 cases were registered per year, giving a mean annual incidence of 5.2 per 100,000 population. The most likely sources of infection were contaminated drinking water and food. The dominant clinical manifestations were the glandular (79%) and ulcero-glandular (21%) forms. By 2010, the disease had spread throughout Kosovo. Presumably as a result of war and subsequent environmental disruption, mass population displacement and breakdown of sanitation and hygiene, the two major outbreaks of tularaemia resulted in the establishment of an active endemic area of tularaemia in Kosovo.

  11. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces apoptosis in the trout ovary

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    Krasnov Aleksei

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mammals it is well known that infections can lead to alterations in reproductive function. As part of the innate immune response, a number of cytokines and other immune factors is produced during bacterial infection or after treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and acts on the reproductive system. In fish, LPS can also induce an innate immune response but little is known about the activation of the immune system by LPS on reproduction in fish. Therefore, we conducted studies to examine the in vivo and in vitro effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS on the reproductive function of sexually mature female trout. Methods In saline- and LPS -injected brook trout, we measured the concentration of plasma steroids as well as the in vitro steroidogenic response (testosterone and 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone of ovarian follicles to luteinizing hormone (LH, the ability of 17alpha,20beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one to induce germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD in vitro, and that of epinephrine to stimulate follicular contraction in vitro. We also examined the direct effects of LPS in vitro on steroid production, GVBD and contraction in brook trout ovarian follicles. The incidence of apoptosis was evaluated by TUNEL analysis. Furthermore, we examined the gene expression pattern in the ovary of saline- and LPS-injected rainbow trout by microarray analysis. Results LPS treatment in vivo did not affect plasma testosterone concentration or the basal in vitro production of steroids, although a small but significant potentiation of the effects of LH on testosterone production in vitro was observed in ovarian follicles from LPS-treated fish. In addition, LPS increased the plasma concentration of cortisol. LPS treatment in vitro did not affect the basal or LH-stimulated steroid production in brook trout ovarian follicles. In addition, we did not observe any effects of LPS in vivo or in vitro on GVBD or follicular contraction. Therefore, LPS did not

  12. [Isolation and chemical characterization of type R lipopolysaccharides of a hypovirulent strain of Yersinia pestis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minka, S; Bruneteau, M

    1998-05-01

    The lipopolysaccharides LPS I and LPS II, isolated from the hypovirulent EV40 strain of Yersinia pestis, are composed only of type R lipopolysaccharides. This type consists of two forms a and b, depending on their solubility pattern in a solvent mixture containing varying proportions of chloroform, methanol, hexane, and hydrochloric acid. LPS I consists of one subtype, RIb, while LPS II consists of two subtypes, RIIa and RIIb. Analysis by gel electrophoresis shows that the mass of these lipopolysaccharide forms are in the vicinity of 2000-3000 Da. The RIb and RIIb subtypes, which are found in the majority of lipopolysaccharide I and II fractions, are composed of ketoses and amines that are similar to those occurring in LPS I and LPS II. In contrast, the two subtypes RIIa and RIIb are different both in terms of the composition of lipid A and the extent of its substitution. Certain fractions of RIIa contain only lipid A and 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (KDO), while other fractions of RIIb possess a lipid A, which is not substituted by arabinose. The whole set of these R-type lipopolysaccharide forms are excellent models for the study of the role of the primary structure of the polysaccharide region, and for the effect of lipid A substitution on the biological activity of bacterial lipopolysaccharides.

  13. Correlation of salivary immunoglobulin A against lipopolysaccharide of Porphyromonas gingivalis with clinical periodontal parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpa S Pudakalkatti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A major challenge in clinical periodontics is to find a reliable molecular marker of periodontal tissue destruction. Aim: The aim of the present study was to assess, whether any correlation exists between salivary immunoglobulin A (IgA level against lipopolysaccharide of Porphyromonas gingivalis and clinical periodontal parameters (probing depth and clinical attachment loss. Materials and Methods: Totally, 30 patients with chronic periodontitis were included for the study based on clinical examination. Unstimulated saliva was collected from each study subject. Probing depth and clinical attachment loss were recorded in all selected subjects using University of North Carolina-15 periodontal probe. Extraction and purification of lipopolysaccharide were done from the standard strain of P. gingivalis (ATCC 33277. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to detect the level of IgA antibodies against lipopolysaccharide of P. gingivalis in the saliva of each subject by coating wells of ELISA kit with extracted lipopolysaccharide antigen. Statistical Analysis: The correlation between salivary IgA and clinical periodontal parameters was checked using Karl Pearson′s correlation coefficient method and regression analysis. Results: The significant correlation was observed between salivary IgA level and clinical periodontal parameters in chronic periodontitis patients. Conclusion: A significant strong correlation was observed between salivary IgA against lipopolysaccharide of P. gingivalis and clinical periodontal parameters which suggest that salivary IgA level against lipopolysaccharide of P. gingivalis can be used to predict the severity of periodontal destruction in chronic periodontitis patients.

  14. Temporal dynamic changes of connexin 43 expression in C6 cells following lipopolysaccharide stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Liu; Haiyan Liu; Zhenping Gao; Linbo Zhang; Lue Su; Guojun Dong; Haiyang Yu; Jiayi Tian; Hang Zhao; Yanyan Xu

    2012-01-01

    Connexin 43, a gap junction protein, is expressed mainly in glia in the central nervous system.Neuroinflammation plays an important role in central nervous system injury. Changes to glial connexin 43 levels and neuroinflammation may trigger brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases.To illustrate the relationship between connexin 43 and neuroinflammation, this study investigated how connexin 43 expression levels change in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated rat C6 glioma cells. C6 cells were treated with 0.05, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5 and 5 μg/mL lipopolysaccharide for 24 hours. The nitrite estimation-detected nitric oxide release level was elevated substantially after lipopolysaccharide stimulation. To test the transcriptional level changes of inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor-α and connexin 43 mRNA, C6 cells were treated with 5 μg/mL lipopolysaccharide for 3-48 hours. Reverse transcription-PCR showed that the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA increased over time, but connexin 43 mRNA levels increased in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated C6 cells at 3 and 6 hours, and then decreased from 12 to 48 hours. Connexin 43 protein expression was detected by immunofluorescence staining, and the protein levels matched the mRNA expression levels. These results suggest that connexin 43 expression is biphasic in lipopolysaccharide-inducedneuroinflammation in C6 cells, which may be correlated with the connexin 43 compensatorymechanism.

  15. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide induced acute inflammation in lung by chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinshan; Xue, Jinling; Xu, Bi; Xie, Jiani [Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control State Key Joint Laboratory, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Qiao, Juan, E-mail: qjuan@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lu, Yun, E-mail: luyun@tsinghua.edu.cn [Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control State Key Joint Laboratory, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-02-13

    Highlights: • Chlorination is effective to reduce the inflammation inducing capacity of LPS in lung. • LAL-detected endotoxin activity is not correlated to the potency of inflammation induction. • Alkyl chain of LPS was chlorinated in chlorination process. • LPS aggregate size decreases after chlorination. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, also called endotoxin) is a pro-inflammatory constituent of gram negative bacteria and cyanobacteria, which causes a potential health risk in the process of routine urban application of reclaimed water, such as car wash, irrigation, scenic water refilling, etc. Previous studies indicated that the common disinfection treatment, chlorination, has little effect on endotoxin activity removal measured by Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. However, in this study, significant decrease of acute inflammatory effects was observed in mouse lung, while LAL assay still presented a moderate increase of endotoxin activity. To explore the possible mechanisms, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results showed the chlorination happened in alkyl chain of LPS molecules, which could affect the interaction between LPS and LPS-binding protein. Also the size of LPS aggregates was found to drop significantly after treatment, which could be another results of chlorination caused polarity change. In conclusion, our observation demonstrated that chlorination is effective to reduce the LPS induced inflammation in lung, and it is recommended to use health effect-based methods to assess risk removal of water treatment technologies.

  16. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide induced inflammation in the perivascular space in lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pabst Reinhard

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipopolysaccharide (LPS contained in tobacco smoke and a variety of environmental and occupational dusts is a toxic agent causing lung inflammation characterized by migration of neutrophils and monocytes into alveoli. Although migration of inflammatory cells into alveoli of LPS-treated rats is well characterized, the dynamics of their accumulation in the perivascular space (PVS leading to a perivascular inflammation (PVI of pulmonary arteries is not well described. Methods Therefore, we investigated migration of neutrophils and monocytes into PVS in lungs of male Sprague-Dawley rats treated intratracheally with E. coli LPS and euthanized after 1, 6, 12, 24 and 36 hours. Control rats were treated with endotoxin-free saline. H&E stained slides were made and immunohistochemistry was performed using a monocyte marker and the chemokine Monocyte-Chemoattractant-Protein-1 (MCP-1. Computer-assisted microscopy was performed to count infiltrating cells. Results Surprisingly, the periarterial infiltration was not a constant finding in each animal although LPS-induced alveolitis was present. A clear tendency was observed that neutrophils were appearing in the PVS first within 6 hours after LPS application and were decreasing at later time points. In contrast, mononuclear cell infiltration was observed after 24 hours. In addition, MCP-1 expression was present in perivascular capillaries, arteries and the epithelium. Conclusion PVI might be a certain lung reaction pattern in the defense to infectious attacks.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide contamination in intradermal DNA vaccination: toxic impurity or adjuvant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Joost H; Quaak, Susanne G L; Beijnen, Jos H; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert; Schumacher, Ton N; Haanen, John B A G; Nuijen, Bastiaan

    2010-05-05

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are known both as potential adjuvants for vaccines and as toxic impurity in pharmaceutical preparations. The aim of this study was to assess the role of LPS in intradermal DNA vaccination administered by DNA tattooing. Mice were vaccinated with a model DNA vaccine (Luc-NP) with an increasing content of residual LPS. The effect of LPS on systemic toxicity, antigen expression and cellular immunity was studied. The presence of LPS in the DNA vaccine neither induced systemic toxicity (as reflected by IL-6 concentration in serum), nor influenced antigen expression (measured by intravital imaging). Higher LPS contents however, appeared to be associated with an elevated cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response but without reaching statistical significance. Interestingly, the DNA tattoo procedure by itself was shown to induce a serum cytokine response that was at least as potent as that induced by parenteral LPS administration. LPS does not show toxicity in mice vaccinated by DNA tattooing at dose levels well above those encountered in GMP-grade DNA preparations. Thus, residual LPS levels in the pharmaceutical range are not expected to adversely affect clinical outcome of vaccination trials and may in fact have some beneficial adjuvant effect. The observed pro-inflammatory effects of DNA tattoo may help explain the high immunogenicity of this procedure. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Exemplification of serological cross-reactivity of Neisseria lipopolysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeland, J A; Smeland, S

    1986-08-01

    Antibodies against the Gc2 serotype determinant of gonococcal lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and antisera against strains of meningococci were tested by ELISA against the Gc2 LPS, and the antibodies examined for inhibition by bacteria of prototype strains of gonococci and meningococci. From one of the anti-meningococcal sera and anti-lactose (anti-lac) type of antibody was isolated. The results showed that antigenic sites belonging to the serotype, variable, and common sets of determinants as defined for gonococcal LPSs, may cross-react with meningococci. The anti-lac antibody combined with all of 34 strains of gonococci, with 41 out of 44 strains of meningococci tested, and with a Neisseria cinerea strain. The anti-lac showed no reactivity with any of a number of other Gram-negative cocci or bacilli examined. The results indicate that LPS from most strains of the pathogenic Neisseria species share a lactosyl moiety, presumably an inner core structure, of similar or identical configuration.

  20. Emodin ameliorates lipopolysaccharides-induced corneal inflammation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Ling; Chen; Jing-Jing; Zhang; Xin; Kao; Lu-Wan; Wei; Zhi-Yu; Liu

    2015-01-01

    · AIM: To investigate the effect of emodin on pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharides(LPS)-induced corneal inflammation in rats.· METHODS: Corneal infection was induced by pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS in Wistar rats. The inflammation induced by LPS were examined by slit lamp microscope and cytological checkup of aqueous humor.Corneal tissue structure was observed by hematoxylin and eosin(HE) staining. The activation of nuclear factor kappa B(NF-κB) was determined by Western blot.Messenger ribonucleic acid(m RNA) of tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1(ICAM-1) in LPS-challenged rat corneas were measured with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR).· RESULTS: Typical manifestations of acute corneal inflammation were observed in LPS-induce rat model,and the corneal inflammatory response and structure were improved in rats pretreated with emodin. Treatment with emodin could improve corneal structure, reduce corneal injure by reducing corneal inflammatory response. Emodin could inhibit the decreasing lever of inhibitor of kappa B alpha(IкBα) express, and the m RNA expression of TNF-α and ICAM-1 in corneal tissues was also inhibited by emodin. The differences were statistically significant between groups treated with emodin and those without treatment(P <0.01).·CONCLUSION: Emodin could ameliorate LPS-induced corneal inflammation, which might via inhibiting the activation of NF-κB.

  1. IL-12 Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide Stimulated Osteoclastogenesis in Mice

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    Masako Yoshimatsu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is related to osteoclastogenesis in osteolytic diseases. Interleukin- (IL- 12 is an inflammatory cytokine that plays a critical role in host defense. In this study, we investigated the effects of IL-12 on LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. LPS was administered with or without IL-12 into the supracalvariae of mice, and alterations in the calvarial suture were evaluated histochemically. The number of osteoclasts in the calvarial suture and the mRNA level of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, an osteoclast marker, were lower in mice administered LPS with IL-12 than in mice administered LPS alone. The serum level of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP 5b, a bone resorption marker, was also lower in mice administered LPS with IL-12 than in mice administered LPS alone. These results revealed that IL-12 might inhibit LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. In TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL assays, apoptotic changes in cells were recognized in the calvarial suture in mice administered LPS with IL-12. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of both Fas and FasL were increased in mice administered LPS with IL-12. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis is inhibited by IL-12 and that this might arise through apoptotic changes in osteoclastogenesis-related cells induced by Fas/FasL interactions.

  2. The lipopolysaccharide of a chloridazon-degrading bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisshaar, R; Lingens, F

    1983-12-01

    Lipopolysaccharide of a chloridazon-degrading bacterium was obtained by a two-stage extraction procedure with phenol/EDTA in a yield of 0.3% of dried bacteria. The carbohydrate moiety consisted of heptose, 3-deoxyoctulosonic acid and D-glucose in a molar ratio of 1:2:2 X 3. Lipid A was composed of 1 mol 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucose, 2 mol amide-bound and 2.6 mol ester-bound fatty acids/mol. Amide-bound fatty acids were 3-hydroxydodecanoic acid and 3-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid; dodecanoic acid and R-(-)-3-hydroxydodec-5-cis-enoic acid were found to be present in ester linkage. Under conditions of acidic hydrolysis, the latter was converted into the cis and trans isomers of 5-hexyltetrahydrofuran-2-acetic acid. Dodecanoic acid was demonstrated to be linked with the hydroxy groups of the amide-bound fatty acids. The taxonomic significance of these results, especially the demonstration of 2,3-diamino-2, 3-dideoxy-D-glucose, is discussed.

  3. Interleukin-1 in Lipopolysaccharide Induced Chorioamnionitis in the Fetal Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Clare A.; Nitsos, Ilias; Hillman, Noah H.; Pillow, J. Jane; Polglase, Graeme R.; Kramer, Boris W.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Newnham, John P.; Jobe, Alan H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that interleukin 1 (IL-1) mediates intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced chorioamnionitis in preterm fetal sheep. Time-mated Merino ewes with singleton fetuses received IL-1α, LPS, or saline (control) by intra-amniotic injection 1 to 2 days before operative delivery at 124 ± 1 days gestational age (N = 5-9/group; term = 150 days). Recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1ra) was given into the amniotic fluid 3 hours before intra-amniotic LPS or saline to block IL-1 signaling. Inflammation in the chorioamnion was determined by histology, cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA), protein expression, and by quantitation of activated inflammatory cells. Intra-amniotic IL-1 and LPS both induced chorioamnionitis. However, IL-1 blockade with IL-1ra did not decrease intra-amniotic LPS-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNAs, numbers of inflammatory cells, myeloperoxidase, or monocyte chemotactic protein-1-expressing cells in the chorioamnion. We conclude that IL-1 and LPS both can cause chorioamnionitis, but IL-1 is not an important mediator of LPS-induced chorioamnionitis in fetal sheep. PMID:21493953

  4. Redefining the requisite lipopolysaccharide structure in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Timothy C; Aggarwal, Parag; Mamat, Uwe; Lindner, Buko; Woodard, Ronald W

    2006-02-17

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an asymmetric lipid bilayer surrounding the cell wall, the outer membrane (OM). The OM inner leaflet is primarily composed of various glycerophospholipids, whereas the outer leaflet predominantly contains the unique amphiphilic macromolecule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS or endotoxin). The majority of all gram-negative bacteria elaborate LPS containing at least one 2-keto 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate (Kdo) molecule. The minimal LPS structure required for growth of Escherichia coli has long been recognized as two Kdo residues attached to lipid A, inextricably linking viability to toxicity. Here we report the construction and characterization of the nonconditional E. coli K-12 suppressor strain KPM22 that lacks Kdo and is viable despite predominantly elaborating the endotoxically inactive LPS precursor lipid IV(A). Our results challenge the established E. coli Kdo2-lipid A dogma, indicating that the previously observed and well-documented dependence of cell viability on the synthesis of Kdo stems from a lethal pleiotropy precipitated after the depletion of the carbohydrate, rather than an inherent need for the Kdo molecule itself as an indispensable structural component of the OM LPS layer. Inclusion of the inner membrane LPS transporter MsbA on a multicopy plasmid partially suppresses the lethal deltaKdo phenotype directly in the auxotrophic parent strain, suggesting increased rates of nonglycosylated lipid A transport can, in part, compensate for Kdo depletion. The unprecedented nature of a lipid IV(A) OM redefines the requisite LPS structure for viability in E. coli.

  5. Visualization and analysis of lipopolysaccharide distribution in binary phospholipid bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henning, Maria Florencia [Instituto de Investigaciones Bioquimicas La Plata (INIBIOLP), CCT-La Plata, CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Medicas, UNLP, Calles 60 y 120, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Sanchez, Susana [Laboratory for Fluorescence Dynamics, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States); Bakas, Laura, E-mail: lbakas@biol.unlp.edu.ar [Instituto de Investigaciones Bioquimicas La Plata (INIBIOLP), CCT-La Plata, CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Medicas, UNLP, Calles 60 y 120, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Departamento de Ciencias Biologicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, UNLP, Calles 47 y 115, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2009-05-22

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an endotoxin released from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria during infections. It have been reported that LPS may play a role in the outer membrane of bacteria similar to that of cholesterol in eukaryotic plasma membranes. In this article we compare the effect of introducing LPS or cholesterol in liposomes made of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine on the solubilization process by Triton X-100. The results show that liposomes containing LPS or cholesterol are more resistant to solubilization by Triton X-100 than the binary phospholipid mixtures at 4 {sup o}C. The LPS distribution was analyzed on GUVs of DPPC:DOPC using FITC-LPS. Solid and liquid-crystalline domains were visualized labeling the GUVs with LAURDAN and GP images were acquired using a two-photon microscope. The images show a selective distribution of LPS in gel domains. Our results support the hypothesis that LPS could aggregate and concentrate selectively in biological membranes providing a mechanism to bring together several components of the LPS-sensing machinery.

  6. [SEROLOGICAL PROPERTIES AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF PANTOEA AGGLOMERANS LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulygina, T V; Yakovleva, L M; Brovarska, O S; Varbanets, L D

    2015-01-01

    The serological and phytotoxic properties of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of plant pathogens--Pantoea agglomerans were studied. It is known that the thin variations in the structure of the O-specific polysaccharides determining serological specificity of gram- negative bacteria and used as a molecular basis of serological classification schemes. For P. agglomerans still does not exist a classification scheme based on serology specificity of their LPS. The results of cross serological tests demonstrate immunochemical heterogeneity of species P agglomerans. Only three strains of the 8488, 8490 and 7969 according to the agglutination of O-antigens and direct hemagglutination and inhibition direct hemagglutination can be attributed to a single serogroup. Other strains--each separate group, although some have a relationship. Compared with control plants under the influence of seed treatment of LPS in plants may be reduced, and in some cases increased root length, height and weight sprout, depending on the strain from which the selected LPS. Dive seedlings of tomatoes in the solutions of the studied preparations FSC caused the loss, and after some time, restore turgor.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide Neutralization by Cationic-Amphiphilic Polymers through Pseudoaggregate Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-03-14

    Synthetic polymers incorporating the cationic charge and hydrophobicity to mimic the function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been developed. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind to bacterial membranes that generally contain negatively charged phospholipids and cause membrane disintegration resulting in cell death; however, cationic-amphiphilic antibacterial polymers with endotoxin neutralization properties, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported. Bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause sepsis that is responsible for a great amount of mortality worldwide. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers can also bind to negatively charged and hydrophobic LPS and cause detoxification. Hence, we envisaged that cationic-amphiphilic polymers can have both antibacterial as well as LPS binding properties. Here we report synthetic amphiphilic polymers with both antibacterial as well as endotoxin neutralizing properties. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes caused by LPS stimulation were inhibited by >80% when coincubated with these polymers. These reductions were found to be dependent on concentration and, more importantly, on the side-chain chemical structure due to variations in the hydrophobicity profiles of these polymers. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind and cause LPS neutralization and detoxification. Investigations of polymer interaction with LPS using fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that these polymers bind but neither dissociate nor promote LPS aggregation. We show that polymer binding to LPS leads to sort of a pseudoaggregate formation resulting in LPS neutralization/detoxification. These findings provide an unusual mechanism of LPS neutralization using novel synthetic cationic-amphiphilic polymers.

  8. Survey of innate immune responses to Burkholderia pseudomallei in human blood identifies a central role for lipopolysaccharide.

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    Narisara Chantratita

    Full Text Available B. pseudomallei is a gram-negative bacterium that causes the tropical infection melioidosis. In northeast Thailand, mortality from melioidosis approaches 40%. As exemplified by the lipopolysaccharide-Toll-like receptor 4 interaction, innate immune responses to invading bacteria are precipitated by activation of host pathogen recognition receptors by pathogen associated molecular patterns. Human melioidosis is characterized by up-regulation of pathogen recognition receptors and pro-inflammatory cytokine release. In contrast to many gram-negative pathogens, however, the lipopolysaccharide of B. pseudomallei is considered only weakly inflammatory. We conducted a study in 300 healthy Thai subjects to investigate the ex vivo human blood response to various bacterial pathogen associated molecular patterns, including lipopolysaccharide from several bacteria, and to two heat-killed B. pseudomallei isolates. We measured cytokine levels after stimulation of fresh whole blood with a panel of stimuli. We found that age, sex, and white blood cell count modulate the innate immune response to B. pseudomallei. We further observed that, in comparison to other stimuli, the innate immune response to B. pseudomallei is most highly correlated with the response to lipopolysaccharide. The magnitude of cytokine responses induced by B. pseudomallei lipopolysaccharide was significantly greater than those induced by lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli and comparable to many responses induced by lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella minnesota despite lower amounts of lipid A in the B. pseudomallei lipopolysaccharide preparation. In human monocytes stimulated with B. pseudomallei, addition of polymyxin B or a TLR4/MD-2 neutralizing antibody inhibited the majority of TNF-α production. Challenging existing views, our data indicate that the innate immune response to B. pseudomallei in human blood is largely driven by lipopolysaccharide, and that the response to B

  9. Phosphorylation of the Lipid A Region of Meningococcal Lipopolysaccharide: Identification of a Family of Transferases That Add Phosphoethanolamine to Lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Andrew D.; Wright, J. Claire; Li, Jianjun; Hood, Derek W.; Moxon, E. Richard; Richards, James C.

    2003-01-01

    A gene, NMB1638, with homology to the recently characterized gene encoding a phosphoethanolamine transferase, lpt-3, has been identified from the Neisseria meningitidis genome sequence and was found to be present in all meningococcal strains examined. Homology comparison with other database sequences would suggest that NMB1638 and lpt-3 represent genes coding for members of a family of proteins of related function identified in a wide range of gram-negative species of bacteria. When grown and isolated under appropriate conditions, N. meningitidis elaborated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) containing a lipid A that was characteristically phosphorylated with multiple phosphate and phosphoethanolamine residues. In all meningococcal strains examined, each lipid A species contained the basal diphosphorylated species, wherein a phosphate group is attached to each glucosamine residue. Also elaborated within the population of LPS molecules are a variety of “phosphoforms” that contain either an additional phosphate residue, an additional phosphoethanolamine residue, additional phosphate and phosphoethanolamine residues, or an additional phosphate and two phosphoethanolamine residues in the lipid A. Mass spectroscopic analyses of LPS from three strains in which NMB1638 had been inactivated by a specific mutation indicated that there were no phosphoethanolamine residues included in the lipid A region of the LPS and that there was no further phosphorylation of lipid A beyond one additional phosphate species. We propose that NMB1638 encodes a phosphoethanolamine transferase specific for lipid A and propose naming the gene “lptA,” for “LPS phosphoethenolamine transferase for lipid A.” PMID:12754224

  10. Methylprednisolone stiffens aortas in lipopolysaccharide-induced chronic inflammation in rats.

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    Ya-Hui Ko

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Glucocorticoids are commonly used as therapeutic agents in many acute and chronic inflammatory and auto-immune diseases. The current study investigated the effects of methylprednisolone (a synthetic glucocorticoid on aortic distensibility and vascular resistance in lipopolysaccharide-induced chronic inflammation in male Wistar rats. METHODS: Chronic inflammation was induced by implanting a subcutaneous slow-release ALZET osmotic pump (1 mg kg(-1 day(-1 lipopolysaccharide for either 2 or 4 weeks. Arterial wave transit time (τ was derived to describe the elastic properties of aortas using the impulse response function of the filtered aortic input impedance spectra. RESULTS: Long-term lipopolysaccharide challenge enhanced the expression of advanced glycation end products (AGEs in the aortas. Lipopolysaccharide also upregulated the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase to produce high levels of nitric oxide (NO, which resulted in vasodilation, as evidenced by the fall in total peripheral resistance (Rp . However, lipopolysaccharide challenge did not influence the elastic properties of aortas, as shown by the unaltered τ. The NO-mediated vascular relaxation may counterbalance the AGEs-induced arterial stiffening so that the aortic distensibility remained unaltered. Treating lipopolysaccharide-challenged rats with methylprednisolone prevented peripheral vasodilation because of its ability to increase Rp . However, methylprednisolone produced an increase in aorta stiffness, as manifested by the significant decline in τ. The diminished aortic distensibility by methylprednisolone paralleled a significant reduction in NO plasma levels, in the absence of any significant changes in AGEs content. CONCLUSION: Methylprednisolone stiffens aortas and elastic arteries in lipopolysaccharide-induced chronic inflammation in rats, for NO activity may be dominant as a counteraction of AGEs.

  11. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide promotes profibrotic activation of intestinal fibroblasts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, J P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Fibroblasts play a critical role in intestinal wound healing. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a cell wall component of commensal gut bacteria. The effects of LPS on intestinal fibroblast activation were characterized. METHODS: Expression of the LPS receptor, toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, was assessed in cultured primary human intestinal fibroblasts using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Fibroblasts were treated with LPS and\\/or transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1. Nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) pathway activation was assessed by inhibitory kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) degradation and NFkappaB promoter activity. Fibroblast contractility was measured using a fibroblast-populated collagen lattice. Smad-7, a negative regulator of TGF-beta1 signalling, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression were assessed using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The NFkappaB pathway was inhibited by IkappaBalpha transfection. RESULTS: TLR-4 was present on the surface of intestinal fibroblasts. LPS treatment of fibroblasts induced IkappaBalpha degradation, enhanced NFkappaB promoter activity and increased collagen contraction. Pretreatment with LPS (before TGF-beta1) significantly increased CTGF production relative to treatment with TGF-beta1 alone. LPS reduced whereas TGF-beta1 increased smad-7 expression. Transfection with an IkappaBalpha plasmid enhanced basal smad-7 expression. CONCLUSION: Intestinal fibroblasts express TLR-4 and respond to LPS by activating NFkappaB and inducing collagen contraction. LPS acts in concert with TGF-beta1 to induce CTGF. LPS reduces the expression of the TGF-beta1 inhibitor, smad-7.

  12. Lipopolysaccharide-deficient Brucella variants arise spontaneously during infection

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    Joshua E. Turse

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide-deficient mutants of smooth Brucella species (rough mutants have been shown to arise spontaneously in culture. However, in situ analysis of Brucella infected macrophages using antibody directed against O-polysaccharide suggested a loss of reactivity of Brucella consistent with the appearance of rough organisms, and a potential contribution to infection. The experiments reported describe the direct recovery of Brucella from macrophages infected in vitro and from the spleens of infected mice at a frequency similar to that described in vitro, suggesting that Brucella dissociation is not simply an in vitro artifact. The frequency of appearance of spontaneous rough organisms deficient in O-polysaccharide expression measured in vitro is approximately 2-3 logs higher than the appearance of mutation to antibiotic resistance, purine auxotrophy or reversion of erythritol sensitive ∆eryC mutants to tolerance. Genetic trans-complementation using a plasmid-based expression of Brucella manBA successfully restored O-polysaccharide expression in only one third of O-polysaccharide deficient spontaneous mutants. Suggesting that the appearance of rough mutants is caused by mutation at more than one locus. In addition, Sanger sequencing of the manBA structural genes detected multiple sequence changes that may explain the observed phenotypic differences. The presence of O-polysaccharide resulted in macrophage and neutrophil infiltration into the peritoneal cavity and systemic distribution of the organism. In contrast, rough organisms are controlled by resident macrophages or by extracellular killing mechanisms and rapidly cleared from this compartment consistent with the inability to cause disease. Loss of O-polysaccharide expression appears to be stochastic giving rise to organisms with biological properties distinct from the parental smooth organism during the course of infection.

  13. Frankincense improves memory retrieval in rats treated with Lipopolysaccharide

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    Beheshti Siamak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Frankincense has been shown to possess anti-inf lammatory activity. In this studythe effect of pretreatment with the hydro-alcoholic extract of frankincense on memory retrievalwas assessed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS treated rats.Methods: Forty-two adult male Wistar rats were distributed into 7 groups of 6 each. One groupreceived LPS (1 mg/kg; i.p pre-test. The control group received saline (1 ml/kg; i.p. 2 groups ofanimals received frankincense (50 mg/kg; P.O or DMSO 5% (1 ml/kg; P.O and 30 minutes laterLPS (1 mg/kg; i.p. Two other groups of animals received frankincense (50 mg/kg; P.O or DMSO5% (1 ml/kg; P.O and 30 minutes later saline (1 ml/kg; i.p. Another group of rats received LPS(1 mg/kg; i.p and 30 minutes later Ibuprofen (100 mg/kg; P.O. In all the experimental groups,memory retrieval was assessed 4 hours following the last injection, using a passive avoidancetask (PAT. Hippocampal TNF-α levels were measured by ELISA as an index of LPS-inducedneuroinf lammation.Results: LPS impaired memory retrieval by decreasing step-through latency (STL, significantly.LPS also increased levels of TNF-α in the hippocampus as compared to the control group.Administration of frankincense (50 mg/kg; P.O before LPS (1 mg/kg; i.p improved memoryretrieval as compared to the control group. Frankincense reduced hippocampal TNF-α level in theLPS treated rats, significantly, compared to the control group.Conclusion: The results indicate that the hydro-alcoholic extract of frankincense has the potentialto improve memory retrieval in LPS treated rats, possibly via an anti-neuroinf lammatory activity.

  14. Btk regulates macrophage polarization in response to lipopolysaccharide.

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    Joan Ní Gabhann

    Full Text Available Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a strong inducer of inflammation and does so by inducing polarization of macrophages to the classic inflammatory M1 population. Given the role of Btk as a critical signal transducer downstream of TLR4, we investigated its role in M1/M2 induction. In Btk deficient (Btk (-\\- mice we observed markedly reduced recruitment of M1 macrophages following intraperitoneal administration of LPS. Ex vivo analysis demonstrated an impaired ability of Btk(-/- macrophages to polarize into M1 macrophages, instead showing enhanced induction of immunosuppressive M2-associated markers in response to M1 polarizing stimuli, a finding accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of STAT1 and enhanced STAT6 phosphorylation. In addition to STAT activation, M1 and M2 polarizing signals modulate the expression of inflammatory genes via differential activation of transcription factors and regulatory proteins, including NF-κB and SHIP1. In keeping with a critical role for Btk in macrophage polarization, we observed reduced levels of NF-κB p65 and Akt phosphorylation, as well as reduced induction of the M1 associated marker iNOS in Btk(-/- macrophages in response to M1 polarizing stimuli. Additionally enhanced expression of SHIP1, a key negative regulator of macrophage polarisation, was observed in Btk(-/- macrophages in response to M2 polarizing stimuli. Employing classic models of allergic M2 inflammation, treatment of Btk (-/- mice with either Schistosoma mansoni eggs or chitin resulted in increased recruitment of M2 macrophages and induction of M2-associated genes. This demonstrates an enhanced M2 skew in the absence of Btk, thus promoting the development of allergic inflammation.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of bone sialoprotein gene by Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyue; Kato, Naoko; Mezawa, Masaru; Li, Zhengyang; Wang, Zhitao; Yang, Li; Sasaki, Yoko; Kaneko, Takashi; Takai, Hideki; Yoshimura, Atsutoshi; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2010-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major mediator of inflammatory response. Periodontopathic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis LPS has quite different character from Escherichia coli LPS. E. coli LPS is agonist for Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), whereas P. gingivalis LPS worked as antagonist for TLR4. Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an early marker of osteoblast differentiation. To investigate the effects of P. gingivalis LPS on BSP transcription, we used rat osteoblast-like ROS17/2.8 cells. BSP mRNA levels were decreased by 0.1 microg/ml and increased by 0.01 microg/ml P. gingivalis LPS at 12 h. Results of luciferase assays showed that 0.1 microg/ml decreased and 0.01 microg/ml P. gingivalis LPS increased BSP transcription in -116 to +60 BSP construct. The effects of P. gingivalis LPS were abrogated by double mutations in cAMP response element (CRE) and FGF2 response element (FRE). Tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin A, ERK1/2 inhibitor and antioxidant N-acetylcystein inhibited effects of P. gingivalis LPS. Protein kinase A inhibitor and PI3-kinase/Akt inhibitor only abolished the effect of 0.01 microg/ml P. gingivalis LPS. Furthermore, 0.1 microg/ml LPS decreased the CRE- and FRE-protein complexes formation, whereas 0.01 microg/ml P. gingivalis LPS increased the nuclear protein binding to CRE and FRE. ChIP assays revealed increased binding of CREB1, JunD, Fra2, Runx2, Dlx5, and Smad1 to a chromatin fragment containing the CRE and FRE by 0.01 microg/ml P. gingivalis LPS. These studies therefore indicated that 0.1 microg/ml suppressed, and 0.01 microg/ml P. gingivalis LPS increased BSP gene transcription mediated through CRE and FRE elements in the rat BSP gene promoter.

  16. Toxicity and immunogenicity of Neisseria meningitidis lipopolysaccharide incorporated into liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A B; Semenov, B F; Vartanyan, Y P; Zakirov, M M; Torchilin, V P; Trubetskoy, V S; Koshkina, N V; L'Vov, V L; Verner, I K; Lopyrev, I V

    1992-09-01

    To obtain nontoxic and highly immunogenic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for immunization, we incorporated Neisseria meningitidis LPS into liposomes. Native LPS and its salts were incorporated by the method of dehydration-rehydration of vesicles or prolonged cosonication. The most complete incorporation of LPS into liposomes and a decrease in toxicity were achieved by the method of dehydration-rehydration of vesicles. Three forms of LPS (H+ form, Mg2+ salt, and triethanolamine salt) showed different solubilities in water, the acidic form of LPS, with the most pronounced hydrophobic properties, being capable of practically complete association with liposomal membranes. An evaluation of the activity of liposomal LPS in vitro (by the Limulus amoebocyte test) and in vivo (by monitoring the pyrogenic reaction in rabbits) revealed a decrease in endotoxin activity of up to 1,000-fold. In addition, the pyrogenic activity of liposomal LPS was comparable to that of a meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine. Liposomes had a pronounced adjuvant effect on the immune response to LPS. Thus, the level of anti-LPS plaque-forming cells in the spleens of mice immunized with liposomal LPS was 1 order of magnitude higher and could be observed for a longer time (until day 21, i.e., the term of observation) than in mice immunized with free LPS. The same regularity was revealed in a study done with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This study also established that antibodies induced by immunization belonged to the immunoglobulin M and G classes, which are capable of prolonged circulation. Moreover, liposomal LPS induced a pronounced immune response in CBA/N mice (defective in B lymphocytes of the LyB-5+ subpopulation). The latter results indicate that the immunogenic action of liposomal LPS occurs at an early age.

  17. Reducing the bioactivity of Tannerella forsythia lipopolysaccharide by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Sung-Hoon

    2014-08-01

    Tannerella forsythia is considered a pathogen of periodontitis and forms a biofilm with multi-species bacteria in oral cavity. Lipopolysaccharide is a powerful immunostimulator and induces inflammation and shock. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of T. forsythia LPS in its co-cultivation with Fusobacterium nucleatum or Porphyromonas gingivalis. T. forsythia was co-cultured in the presence and absence of F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis and then T. forsythia LPS was extracted. The extracts were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and NF-κB reporter CHO cell lines. THP-1 cells were treated with the LPS and evaluated induction of cytokine expression by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. For analysis of the bioactivity of T. forsythia LPS, the binding assay on LPS-binding protein (LBP) and CD14 was processed. The extracts did not contaminate other molecules except LPS and showed TLR4 agonists. Co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with P. gingivalis exhibited a lower level of induction of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 expression than single- or co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with F. nucleatum in the conditions of human serum. However, the three T. forsythia LPS did not show difference of cytokine induction in the serum free conditions. Co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with P. gingivalis exhibited a lower affinity to LBP and CD14 as binding site of O-antigen and attached at a lower level to THP-1 cells compared to single- or co-cultured T. forsythia LPS with F. nucleatum. The virulence of T. forsythia LPS was decreased by co-culturing with P. gingivalis and their affinity to LBP and CD14 was reduced, which may due to modification of O-antigen chain by P. gingivalis.

  18. Gram-Negative Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Activin A Secretion from Human Amniotic Epithelial Cells

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    Yumiko Abe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activin A is involved in inflammation. The present study was performed to clarify if lipopolysaccharide, a component of Gram-negative bacteria, stimulates activin A secretion from human amniotic epithelial cells and to determine if activin A plays a role in amnionitis. Fetal membranes were obtained during elective cesarean sections performed in full-term pregnancies of patients without systemic disease, signs of premature delivery, or fetal complications. Amniotic epithelial cells were isolated by trypsinization. The activin A concentrations in the culture media were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and cell proliferation was assessed by 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation. Amniotic epithelial cells secreted activin A in a cell density-dependent manner, and lipopolysaccharide (10 μg/mL enhanced the secretion at each cell density. Lipopolysaccharide (10–50 μg/mL also stimulated activin A secretion in a dose-dependent manner. Contrary to the effect of activin A secretion, lipopolysaccharide inhibited cell proliferation in amniotic epithelial cells. The present study suggests that lipopolysaccharide stimulation of activin A secretion may be a mechanism in the pathogenesis of amnionitis.

  19. Beryllium alters lipopolysaccharide-mediated intracellular phosphorylation and cytokine release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Shannon; Ganguly, Kumkum; Fresquez, Theresa M; Gupta, Goutam; McCleskey, T Mark; Chaudhary, Anu

    2009-12-01

    Beryllium exposure in susceptible individuals leads to the development of chronic beryllium disease, a lung disorder marked by release of inflammatory cytokine and granuloma formation. We have previously reported that beryllium induces an immune response even in blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals. In this study, we investigate the effects of beryllium on lipopolysaccharide-mediated cytokine release in blood mononuclear and dendritic cells from healthy individuals. We found that in vitro treatment of beryllium sulfate inhibits the secretion of lipopolysaccharide-mediated interleukin 10, while the release of interleukin 1beta is enhanced. In addition, not all lipopolysaccharide-mediated responses are altered, as interleukin 6 release in unaffected upon beryllium treatment. Beryllium sulfate-treated cells show altered phosphotyrosine levels upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Significantly, beryllium inhibits the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transducer 3, induced by lipopolysaccharide. Finally, inhibitors of phosphoinositide-3 kinase mimic the effects of beryllium in inhibition of interleukin 10 release, while they have no effect on interleukin 1beta secretion. This study strongly suggests that prior exposures to beryllium could alter host immune responses to bacterial infections in healthy individuals, by altering intracellular signaling.

  20. Increase of histidine decarboxylase activity in mice hypothalamus after intracerebroventricular administration of lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, M; Mochizuki, T; Cacabelos, R; Yamatodani, A

    1993-10-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of lipopolysaccharide on histidine decarboxylase activity and histamine content in the hypothalamus were investigated in male mice of ddY strain in vivo. Two-fold increase in histidine decarboxylase activity (HDC) was observed 4 h after administration of 50 mcg lipopolysaccharide, and HDC activity returned to the basal level within 12 h after injection. Furthermore, histamine contents showed a slight decrease at 1 and 2 h and a mild increase at 12 h after administration. However, changes in histamine content were not statistically significant. These results suggest that the increase of HDC activity in the hypothalamus by lipopolysaccharide may be involved in the central neuroimmune responses.

  1. Chemical composition of lipopolysaccharides isolated from various endophytic nitrogen-fixing bacteria of the genus Herbaspirillum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, R V; Sassaki, G L; Cruz, L M; Carlson, R W; Muszyński, A; Monteiro, R A; Pedrosa, F O; Souza, E M; Iacomini, M

    2010-04-01

    Bacteria from the genus Herbaspirillum are endophytes responsible for nitrogen fixation in gramineous plants of economic importance such as maize, sugarcane, sorghum, rice, and wheat. Some species are known to produce plant growth substances. In contrast, Herbaspirillum rubrisubalbicans strains are known to be mild plant pathogens. The molecular communication between the plant and the microbes might involve lipopolysaccharides present in the outer membrane of these gram-negative bacteria. Phenol-water extraction was used to obtain lipopolysaccharides from 7 strains of Herbaspirillum seropedicae (SmR1, Z67, Z78, ZA95, and M2) and H. rubrisubalbicans (M1 and M4). The electrophoretic profiles and chemical composition of the lipopolysaccharides obtained in the phenol and aqueous extracts were shown herein.

  2. Simvastatin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced airway mucus hypersecretion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Xue-mei; WANG Bai-ding; WEN Fu-qiang; FENG Yu-lin; HUANG Xiang-yang; XIAO Jun

    2008-01-01

    Background Mucus hypersecretion in the respiratory tract and goblet cell metaplasia in the airway epithelium contribute to the morbidity and mortality associated with airway inflammatory diseases.This study aimed to examine the effect and mechanisms of simvastatin on airway mucus hypersecretion in rats treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS).Methods Mucus hypersecretion in rat airways was induced by intra-tracheal instillation of LPS.Rats treated with or without LPS were administered intra-peritoneally simvastatin (5 and 20 mg/kg) for 4 days.Expression of Muc5ac,RhoA and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) p38 in lung were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR),immunohistochemistry or Western blotting.Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a and IL-8 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF)were assayed by an enzyme-linked lectin assay and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Results Simvastatin attenuated LPS-induced goblet cell hyperplasia in bronchial epithelium and Muc5ac hypersecretion at both the gene and protein levels in lung (P<0.05).Moreover,simvastatin inhibited neutrophil accumulation and the increased concentration of TNF-α and IL-8 in BALF follows LPS stimulation (P<0.05).The higher dose of simvastatin was associated with a more significant reduction in Muc5ac mRNA expression,neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory cytokine release.Simultaneously,the increased expression of RhoA and p38 MAPK were observed in LPS-treated lung (P<0.05).Simvastatin inhibited the expression of RhoA and p38 phosphorylation in lung following LPS stimulation (P<0.05).However,the increased expression of p38 protein in LPS-traated lung was not affected by simvastatin administration.Conclusions Simvastatin attenuates airway mucus hypersecretion and pulmonary inflammatory damage induced by LPS.The inhibitory effect of simvastatin on airway mucus hypersecretion may be through,at least in part,the suppression of neutrophil accumulation and inflammatory cytokine

  3. Lipopolysaccharide induces IFN-γ production in human NK cells

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    Leonid M Kanevskiy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells have been shown to play a regulatory role in sepsis. According to the current view, NK cells become activated via macrophages or dendritic cells primed by lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Recently TLR4 gene expression was detected in human NK cells suggesting the possibility of a direct action of LPS on NK cells. In this study, effects of LPS on NK cell cytokine production and cytotoxicity were studied using highly purified human NK cells. LPS induced IFN-γ production in the presence of IL-2 in cell populations containing >98% CD56+ cells. Surprisingly, in the same experiments LPS decreased NK cell degranulation. No significant expression of markers related to blood dendritic cells, monocytes or T or B lymphocytes in the NK cell preparations was observed; the portions of HLA-DRbright, CD14+, CD3+ and CD20+ cells amounted to less than 0.1% within the cell populations. No more than 0.2% of NK cells were shown to be slightly positive for surface TLR4 in our experimental system, although intracellular staining revealed moderate amounts of TLR4 inside the NK cell population. These cells were negative for surface CD14, the receptor participating in LPS recognition by TLR4. Incubation of NK cells with IL-2 or/and LPS did not lead to an increase in TLR4 surface expression. TLR4–CD56+ NK cells isolated by cell sorting secreted IFN-γ in response to LPS. Antibody to TLR4 did not block the LPS-induced increase in IFN-γ production. We have also shown that Re-form of LPS lacking outer core oligosaccharide and O-antigen induces less cytokine production in NK cells than full length LPS. We speculate that the polysaccharide fragments of LPS molecule may take part in LPS-induced IFN-γ production by NK cells. Collectively our data suggest the existence of a mechanism of LPS direct action on NK cells distinct from established TLR4-mediated signaling.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide sensitized male and female juvenile brains to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalm, M; Roughton, K; Blomgren, K

    2013-12-12

    Radiotherapy is an effective tool in the treatment of pediatric malignancies but it is associated with adverse side effects, both short- and long-term. One common long-term side effect after cranial radiotherapy is cognitive impairment and this is, at least partly, thought to be caused by reduced hippocampal neurogenesis. Neuroinflammation and a perturbed microenvironment are thought to be important in the dysregulation of neurogenesis seen after irradiation (IR). We investigated the effects of a pre-existing, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammation at the time of IR in both males and females. A single dose of 8 Gy to the brain of postnatal day 14 mice caused an upregulation of cytokines/chemokines (IL-1β, MIP-1β, IL-12, GM-CSF, MIP-1α, IL-17, CCL2 and KC) 6 h after IR, more so in females. Caspase-3 activity, reflecting apoptosis and possibly microglia activation, was elevated 6 h after IR. Females treated with LPS before IR showed a higher caspase-3 activity compared with males. During the chronic phase (3 months post IR), we found that LPS-induced inflammation at the time of IR aggravated the IR-induced injury in both male and female mice, as judged by reduced bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and neurogenesis (doublecortin-positive cells) in the hippocampus. At this late time point, the microglia density was increased by IR, more so in females, indicating long-term effects on the microenvironment. IR increased anxiety-related behavior in vehicle-, but not LPS-, treated animals. However, exploratory behavior was affected by IR in both vehicle- and LPS-treated mice. In conclusion, we found that LPS administration before IR of the young mouse brain aggravated the injury, as judged by reduced hippocampal neurogenesis. This supports the clinical practice to postpone radiotherapy if the patient shows signs of infection. Systemic inflammation is not always obvious, though, for example because of concurrent corticosteroid treatment, so careful

  5. DMPD: Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15379975 Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor...-4. Palsson-McDermott EM, O'Neill LA. Immunology. 2004 Oct;113(2):153-62. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal... transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. PubmedID 15379975 Title Signal

  6. Immunotherapy for tularemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyberg, Jerod A

    2013-11-15

    Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative bacterium that causes the zoonotic disease tularemia. Francisella is highly infectious via the respiratory route (~10 CFUs) and pulmonary infections due to type A strains of F. tularensis are highly lethal in untreated patients (> 30%). In addition, no vaccines are licensed to prevent tularemia in humans. Due to the high infectivity and mortality of pulmonary tularemia, F. tularensis has been weaponized, including via the introduction of antibiotic resistance, by several countries. Because of the lack of efficacious vaccines, and concerns about F. tularensis acquiring resistance to antibiotics via natural or illicit means, augmentation of host immunity, and humoral immunotherapy have been investigated as countermeasures against tularemia. This manuscript will review advances made and challenges in the field of immunotherapy against tularemia.

  7. Effect of methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus Willd. on lipopolysaccharide induced-oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mohammad Parwez; Hussain, Arshad; Siddiqui, Hefazat Hussain; Wahab, Shadma; Adak, Manoranjan

    2015-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress and impairment of normal physiological function generally categorized by increased anxiety and reduced mobility. Therefore, the present study was to find out the effect Methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus (MEAR ) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress in rats . LPS-induced oxidative stress in rats was measured by locomotor activity by photoactometer test, anxiety with elevated plus maze test and also studied the oxidative stress markers, nitric oxide and cytokines. The obtained data shows that LPS markedly exhausted (pAsparagus racemosus Willd. is a functionally newer type of cerebroprotective agent.

  8. [Chemical composition and immunochemical characteristics of the lipopolysaccharide of nitrogen-fixing rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense CD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konnova, O N; Burygin, G L; Fedonenko, Iu P; Matora, L Iu; Pankin, K E; Konnova, S A; Ignatov, V V

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition of the lipopolysaccharide of the associative diazotrophic rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Cd has been studied. Among the main components of the hydrophobic part of the lipopolysaccharide, we identified 3-hydroxytetradecanoic, hexadecenoic, 3-hydroxyhexadecanoic, hexadecanoic, octadecenoic, and nanodecanoic fatty acids; the carbohydrate part contained rhamnose, galactose, and mannose. Polyclonal antibodies against the preparation under study were raised in rabbits. Serological relations between A. brasilense Cd and other strains of Azospirillum spp. were studied using double radial immunodiffusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

  9. Structural and functional peculiarities of the lipopolysaccharide of Azospirillum brasilense SR55, isolated from the roots of Triticum durum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, Alevtina S; Konnova, Svetlana A; Fedonenko, Yulia P; Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Smol'kina, Olga N; Kachala, Vadim V; Ignatov, Vladimir V

    2011-10-20

    Azospirillum brasilense SR55, isolated from the rhizosphere of Triticum durum, was classified as serogroup II on the basis of serological tests. Such serogroup affiliation is uncharacteristic of wheat-associated Azospirillum species. The lipid A of A. brasilense SR55 lipopolysaccharide contained 3-hydroxytetradecanoic, 3-hydroxyhexadecanoic, hexadecanoic and octadecenoic fatty acids. The structure of the lipopolysaccharide's O polysaccharide was established, with the branched octasaccharide repeating unit being represented by l-rhamnose, l-3-O-Me-rhamnose, d-galactose and d-glucuronic acid. The SR55 lipopolysaccharide induced deformations of wheat root hairs. The lipopolysaccharide was not involved in bacterial cell aggregation, but its use to pretreat wheat roots was conducive to cell adsorption. This study shows that Azospirillum bacteria can utilise their own lipopolysaccharide as a carbon source, which may give them an advantage in competitive natural environments.

  10. Harepest hos jaeger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edfors, Robert; Smith, Birgitte; Lillebaek, Troels

    2010-01-01

    "Rabbit fever" (Francisella Tularensis) is a rare infection in Denmark. It was first described in Denmark in 1987. It is most likely to affect people who come into close contact with infected animals or ticks, such as hunters, butchers and veterinarians. The diagnosis should be suspected in such ......"Rabbit fever" (Francisella Tularensis) is a rare infection in Denmark. It was first described in Denmark in 1987. It is most likely to affect people who come into close contact with infected animals or ticks, such as hunters, butchers and veterinarians. The diagnosis should be suspected...

  11. [A case of tularemia in a Danish hunter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edfors, Robert; Smith, Birgitte; Lillebaek, Troels

    2010-02-01

    "Rabbit fever" (Francisella Tularensis) is a rare infection in Denmark. It was first described in Denmark in 1987. It is most likely to affect people who come into close contact with infected animals or ticks, such as hunters, butchers and veterinarians. The diagnosis should be suspected in such persons presenting with fever, headache, lethargy, lymphadenitis and bite wounds. We present a Danish case describing the diagnosis and treatment of a hunter infected with T. tularensis.

  12. Aptamer Selection Express: A Novel Method for Rapid Single-Step Selection and Sensing of Aptamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    aptamers of Bacillus anthracis (Ba), Shiga toxin , botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), and Francisella tularensis bacteria (all selected by SELEX) have been...This process has been used to select aptamers against different types of targets ( Bacillus anthracis spores, Bacillus thuringiensis spores, MS-2...studied by reselecting aptamers against different targets, Ba spores, Shiga toxin , and F. tularensis bacteria. In contrast to SELEX, the use of

  13. Bartonella quintana lipopolysaccharide is a natural antagonist of Toll-like receptor 4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popa, C.; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, S.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Takahashi, N.; Sprong, T.; Matera, G.; Liberto, M.C.; Foca, A.; Deuren, M. van; Kullberg, B.J.; Berg, W.B. van den; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Netea, M.G.

    2007-01-01

    Bartonella quintana is a gram-negative microorganism that causes trench fever and chronic bacteremia. B. quintana lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was unable to induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes. Interestingly, B. quintana LPS is a potent antagonist of Toll-like receptor

  14. Alpha-lipoic acid protects mitochondrial enzymes and attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Hypothermia is a key symptom of sepsis and the mechanism(s) leading to hypothermia during sepsis is largely unknown. To investigate a potential mechanism and find an effective treatment for hypothermia in sepsis, we induced hypothermia in mice by lipopolysaccharide (LP...

  15. Prenatal transportation alters the metabolic response of Brahman bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the metabolic response to a postnatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day 60, 80,...

  16. Lipopolysaccharides of bacterial pathogens from the genus Yersinia: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneteau, Maud; Minka, Samuel

    2003-01-01

    This review summarizes the state of knowledge on the composition and structure of the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from three species of Yersinia known to produce disease in humans: Y. pseudotuberculosis, Y. enterocolitica and Y. pestis. We also mention recent data on the genome sequence of Yersinia pestis and the role of LPS in relation to the virulence of this bacteria.

  17. Dietary L-arginine supplementation modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammatory response in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to evaluate whether dietary supplementation with L-arginine (Arg) could attenuate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammatory response through LPS/TLR-4 signaling pathway in broilers. The experiment was designed as a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (n = 8 cages/treatm...

  18. In Utero Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide Alters the Postnatal Acute Phase Response in Beef Heifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was designed to determine the potential effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal acute phase response (APR) to an LPS challenge in heifers. Pregnant crossbred cows (n = 50) were separated into prenatal immune stimulation (PIS; n = 25; administered 0.1 microgr...

  19. Modulation of endothelial monolayer permeability induced by plasma obtained from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated whole blood.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooteboom, A.; Bleichrodt, R.P.; Hendriks, T.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the time course of the permeability response of endothelial monolayers after exposure to plasma obtained from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated human whole blood; to investigate the role of apoptosis in monolayer permeability, and to inhibit the permeability inc

  20. Protective effects of paroxetine on the lipopolysaccharide injured hippocampal-derived neural stem cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭正午

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of paroxetine on the cell viability and expression of the phosphorylated ERK1/2 in lipopolysaccharide LPS injured hippocampalderived neural stem cells (NSCs) .Methods The NSCs were derived from hippocampus of fetal rats,after the

  1. Protection against Experimental Melioidosis following Immunisation with a Lipopolysaccharide-Protein Conjugate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Melioidosis is a severe infectious disease caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. It is refractory to antibiotic treatment and there is currently no licensed vaccine. In this report we detail the construction and protective efficacy of a polysaccharide-protein conjugate composed of B. pseudomallei lipopolysaccharide and the Hc fragment of tetanus toxin. Immunisation of mice with the lipopolysaccharide-conjugate led to significantly reduced bacterial burdens in the spleen 48 hours after challenge and afforded significant protection against a lethal challenge with B. pseudomallei. The conjugate generated significantly higher levels of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a than in lipopolysaccharide-immunised mice. Immunisation with the conjugate also demonstrated a bias towards Th1 type responses, evidenced by high levels of IgG2a. In contrast, immunisation with unconjugated lipopolysaccharide evoked almost no IgG2a demonstrating a bias towards Th2 type responses. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of this approach in the development of an efficacious and protective vaccine against melioidosis.

  2. Defects in rhizobial cyclic glucan and lipopolysaccharide synthesis alter legume gene expression during nodule development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Antuono, Alejandra L; Ott, Thomas; Krusell, Lene

    2008-01-01

    cDNA array technology was used to compare transcriptome profiles of Lotus japonicus roots inoculated with a Mesorhizobium loti wild-type and two mutant strains affected in cyclic beta(1-2) glucan synthesis (cgs) and in lipopolysaccharide synthesis (lpsbeta2). Expression of genes associated with t...

  3. Priming, induction and modulation of plant defence responses by bacterial lipopolysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Mari-Anne; Dow, J. Maxwell; Molinaro, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) have multiple roles in plant-microbe interactions. LPS contributes to the low permeability of the outer membrane, which acts as a barrier to protect bacteria from plant-derived antimicrobial substances. Conversely, perception of LPS by plant cells can lead...

  4. Seroreactivity of Salmonella-infected cattle herds against a fimbrial antigen in comparison with lipopolysaccharide antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Lind, Peter; Bell, M.M.

    1996-01-01

    The IgG seroreaction of Salmonella-infected cattle herds against a fimbrial antigen (SEF14) was compared with that against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigens. Sera from 23 dairy herds (n = 205) from an island with no occurrence of salmonellosis, four herds (n = 303) with recent outbreaks of S...

  5. Effects of minimal lipopolysaccharide-instilled lungs on ventilator-induced lung injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ke-zhong; WANG Qiu-jun; SUN Tao; YAO Shang-long

    2007-01-01

    @@ Mechanical ventilation (MV) may aggravate lung injury induced by a variety of injuries, including intratracheal hydrochloric acid instillation,1 intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) instillation with or without concurrent saline lavage,2 intravenous LPS,3 or intravenous oleic acid.4 However, the mechanism for this detrimental effect of MV is unclear.

  6. Protective effect of mangiferin against lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive and anxiety-like behaviour in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangra, Ashok; Lukhi, Manish M; Sulakhiya, Kunjbihari; Baruah, Chandana C; Lahkar, Mangala

    2014-10-05

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that inflammation, oxidative stress and altered level of neurotrophins are involved in the pathogenesis of depressive illness. Mangiferin, a C-glucosylxanthone is abundant in the stem and bark of Mangifera indica L. The compound has been shown to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. The present study was performed to investigate the effect of mangiferin pretreatment on lipopolysaccharide-induced increased proinflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress and neurobehavioural abnormalities. Mice were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (0.83 mg/kg, i.p.) after 14 days of mangiferin (20 and 40 mg/kg, p.o.) pretreatment. Mangiferin pretreatment significantly ameliorated the anxiety-like behaviour as evident from the results of an elevated plus maze, light-dark box and open field test. Mangiferin pretreatment also improved the anhedonic behaviour as revealed by sucrose preference test and increased social interaction time. It also prevented the lipopolysaccharide-evoked depressive-like effect by reducing the immobility time in forced swim and tail suspension test. Lipopolysaccharide-induced elevated oxidative stress was decreased with mangiferin pretreatment due to its potential to increase reduced glutathione concentration, Superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and decrease lipid peroxidation and nitrite level in the hippocampus as well as in the prefrontal cortex. Mangiferin pretreatment also attenuated neuroinflammation by reducing the interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) level in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that mangiferin possessed antidepressant and anti-anxiety properties due to its ability to attenuate IL-1β level and oxidative stress evoked by intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide. Mangiferin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of depressive and anxiety illness.

  7. BRP, a polysaccharide fraction isolated from Boschniakia rossica, protects against galactosamine and lipopolysaccharide induced hepatic failure in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Jishu; Jin, Meihua; Xu, Huixian; Qiu, Delai; Yin, Xuezhe

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of BRP, a polysaccharide fraction isolated from Boschniakia rossica, against galactosamine and lipopolysaccharide induced fulminant hepatic failure. Mice were injected with a single dose of galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide with or without pretreatment of BRP. Results showed marked reduction of hepatic necrosis, serum marker enzymes and levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in BRP pretreated mice when compared with galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-challenged mice. Mice pretreated with BRP decreased the activation of caspases-3 and caspase-8, and showed a reduced level of DNA fragmentation of liver cells. BRP also reduced hepatic lipid peroxidation, increased potential of hepatic antioxidative defense system, and reduced hepatic nitric oxide level which was elevated by galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide injection. Immunoblot analysis showed down-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 proteins of liver tissues in BRP pretreated group when compared with galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-challenged group. Furthermore, treatment with galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide markedly increased toll-like receptor 4, nuclear level of nuclear factor-κB, and phosphorylation of both extracellular signal-regulated kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in liver tissues. However, these increases were attenuated by pretreatment with BRP. The results suggest that BRP alleviates galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury by enhancing antioxidative defense system, suppressing inflammatory responses and reducing apoptotic signaling.

  8. The redefinition of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide O-antigen and core-oligosaccharide domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debowski, Aleksandra W.; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Fulurija, Alma; Dell, Anne; Stubbs, Keith A.; Marshall, Barry J.

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide promotes chronic gastric colonisation through O-antigen host mimicry and resistance to mucosal antimicrobial peptides mediated primarily by modifications of the lipid A. The structural organisation of the core and O-antigen domains of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide remains unclear, as the O-antigen attachment site has still to be identified experimentally. Here, structural investigations of lipopolysaccharides purified from two wild-type strains and the O-antigen ligase mutant revealed that the H. pylori core-oligosaccharide domain is a short conserved hexasaccharide (Glc-Gal-DD-Hep-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-KDO) decorated with the O-antigen domain encompassing a conserved trisaccharide (-DD-Hep-Fuc-GlcNAc-) and variable glucan, heptan and Lewis antigens. Furthermore, the putative heptosyltransferase HP1284 was found to be required for the transfer of the third heptose residue to the core-oligosaccharide. Interestingly, mutation of HP1284 did not affect the ligation of the O-antigen and resulted in the attachment of the O-antigen onto an incomplete core-oligosaccharide missing the third heptose and the adjoining Glc-Gal residues. Mutants deficient in either HP1284 or O-antigen ligase displayed a moderate increase in susceptibility to polymyxin B but were unable to colonise the mouse gastric mucosa. Finally, mapping mutagenesis and colonisation data of previous studies onto the redefined organisation of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide revealed that only the conserved motifs were essential for colonisation. In conclusion, H. pylori lipopolysaccharide is missing the canonical inner and outer core organisation. Instead it displays a short core and a longer O-antigen encompassing residues previously assigned as the outer core domain. The redefinition of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide domains warrants future studies to dissect the role of each domain in host-pathogen interactions. Also enzymes involved in the assembly of the conserved core structure

  9. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide modification, Lewis antigen expression, and gastric colonization are cholesterol-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee David J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori specifically takes up cholesterol and incorporates it into the bacterial membrane, yet little is currently known about cholesterol's physiological roles. We compared phenotypes and in vivo colonization ability of H. pylori grown in a defined, serum-free growth medium, F12 with 1 mg/ml albumin containing 0 to 50 μg/ml cholesterol. Results While doubling times were largely unaffected by cholesterol, other overt phenotypic changes were observed. H. pylori strain SS1 grown in defined medium with cholesterol successfully colonized the stomach of gerbils, whereas SS1 grown without cholesterol failed to colonize. H. pylori lipopolysaccharide often displays Lewis X and/or Y antigens. Expression of these antigens measured by whole-cell ELISA was markedly enhanced in response to growth of strain SS1, 26695, or G27 in cholesterol. In addition, electrophoretic analysis of lipopolysaccharide in wild type G27 and in mutants lacking the O-chain revealed structural changes within the oligosaccharide core/lipid A moieties. These responses in Lewis antigen levels and in lipopolysaccharide profiles to cholesterol availability were highly specific, because no changes took place when cholesterol was substituted by β-sitosterol or bile salts. Disruption of the genes encoding cholesterol α-glucosyltransferase or lipid A phosphoethanolamine transferase had no effect on Lewis expression, nor on lipopolysaccharide profiles, nor on the cholesterol responsiveness of these properties. Disruption of the lipid A 1-phosphatase gene eliminated the effect of cholesterol on lipopolysaccharide profiles but not its effect on Lewis expression. Conclusions Together these results suggest that cholesterol depletion leads to aberrant forms of LPS that are dependent upon dephosphorylation of lipid A at the 1-position. A tentative model for the observed effects of cholesterol is discussed in which sequential steps of lipopolysaccharide biogenesis

  10. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide modification, Lewis antigen expression, and gastric colonization are cholesterol-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Ellen; McGee, David J

    2009-12-14

    Helicobacter pylori specifically takes up cholesterol and incorporates it into the bacterial membrane, yet little is currently known about cholesterol's physiological roles. We compared phenotypes and in vivo colonization ability of H. pylori grown in a defined, serum-free growth medium, F12 with 1 mg/ml albumin containing 0 to 50 mug/ml cholesterol. While doubling times were largely unaffected by cholesterol, other overt phenotypic changes were observed. H. pylori strain SS1 grown in defined medium with cholesterol successfully colonized the stomach of gerbils, whereas SS1 grown without cholesterol failed to colonize. H. pylori lipopolysaccharide often displays Lewis X and/or Y antigens. Expression of these antigens measured by whole-cell ELISA was markedly enhanced in response to growth of strain SS1, 26695, or G27 in cholesterol. In addition, electrophoretic analysis of lipopolysaccharide in wild type G27 and in mutants lacking the O-chain revealed structural changes within the oligosaccharide core/lipid A moieties. These responses in Lewis antigen levels and in lipopolysaccharide profiles to cholesterol availability were highly specific, because no changes took place when cholesterol was substituted by beta-sitosterol or bile salts. Disruption of the genes encoding cholesterol alpha-glucosyltransferase or lipid A phosphoethanolamine transferase had no effect on Lewis expression, nor on lipopolysaccharide profiles, nor on the cholesterol responsiveness of these properties. Disruption of the lipid A 1-phosphatase gene eliminated the effect of cholesterol on lipopolysaccharide profiles but not its effect on Lewis expression. Together these results suggest that cholesterol depletion leads to aberrant forms of LPS that are dependent upon dephosphorylation of lipid A at the 1-position. A tentative model for the observed effects of cholesterol is discussed in which sequential steps of lipopolysaccharide biogenesis and, independently, presentation of Lewis antigen at

  11. The redefinition of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide O-antigen and core-oligosaccharide domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Yang, Tiandi; Liao, Tingting; Debowski, Aleksandra W; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Fulurija, Alma; Haslam, Stuart M; Mulloy, Barbara; Dell, Anne; Stubbs, Keith A; Marshall, Barry J; Benghezal, Mohammed

    2017-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide promotes chronic gastric colonisation through O-antigen host mimicry and resistance to mucosal antimicrobial peptides mediated primarily by modifications of the lipid A. The structural organisation of the core and O-antigen domains of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide remains unclear, as the O-antigen attachment site has still to be identified experimentally. Here, structural investigations of lipopolysaccharides purified from two wild-type strains and the O-antigen ligase mutant revealed that the H. pylori core-oligosaccharide domain is a short conserved hexasaccharide (Glc-Gal-DD-Hep-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-KDO) decorated with the O-antigen domain encompassing a conserved trisaccharide (-DD-Hep-Fuc-GlcNAc-) and variable glucan, heptan and Lewis antigens. Furthermore, the putative heptosyltransferase HP1284 was found to be required for the transfer of the third heptose residue to the core-oligosaccharide. Interestingly, mutation of HP1284 did not affect the ligation of the O-antigen and resulted in the attachment of the O-antigen onto an incomplete core-oligosaccharide missing the third heptose and the adjoining Glc-Gal residues. Mutants deficient in either HP1284 or O-antigen ligase displayed a moderate increase in susceptibility to polymyxin B but were unable to colonise the mouse gastric mucosa. Finally, mapping mutagenesis and colonisation data of previous studies onto the redefined organisation of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide revealed that only the conserved motifs were essential for colonisation. In conclusion, H. pylori lipopolysaccharide is missing the canonical inner and outer core organisation. Instead it displays a short core and a longer O-antigen encompassing residues previously assigned as the outer core domain. The redefinition of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide domains warrants future studies to dissect the role of each domain in host-pathogen interactions. Also enzymes involved in the assembly of the conserved core structure

  12. The effect of lipopolysaccharide-induced obesity and its chronic inflammation on influenza virus-related pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sun-Young; Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Lee, Sang-Yeon; Park, Hye-Lim; Park, Yong-Wook; Kim, Hun; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2015-11-01

    Obese individuals show increased susceptibility to infection, low vaccine efficacy, and worse pathophysiology. However, it is unclear how obesity affects these events. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of obesity-triggered chronic inflammation on immune cells after influenza virus infection. Control and lipopolysaccharide mice, in which an osmotic pump continually released Tween saline or lipopolysaccharide, were prepared and 3 weeks later were infected with pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza A virus. In lipopolysaccharide mice, we found a reduction in macrophage activation markers in the steady state, and reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6, in restimulated peritoneal macrophages. Interestingly, lipopolysaccharide-triggered chronic inflammation exacerbated the severity of pathological symptoms in the lungs after challenge with influenza virus. Taken together, the increased severity of virus-induced symptoms in obese individuals with chronic inflammation may be, at least partially, caused by macrophage dysfunction.

  13. Dose dependency and individual variability in selected clinical, haematological and blood biochemical responses after systemic lipopolysaccharide challenge in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine; Tølbøll, Trine; Andersen, Pia Haubro Fischer

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have notede that susceptibility to systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure seems to differ between individual cows. However, to date inter-individual variation in the existence or extent has never been backed up by statistical analyses.......Previous studies have notede that susceptibility to systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure seems to differ between individual cows. However, to date inter-individual variation in the existence or extent has never been backed up by statistical analyses....

  14. Structural studies of the O-specific polysaccharide(s) from the lipopolysaccharide of Azospirillum brasilense type strain Sp7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigida, Elena N; Fedonenko, Yuliya P; Shashkov, Alexander S; Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Konnova, Svetlana A; Ignatov, Vladimir V; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2013-10-18

    Lipopolysaccharide was obtained by phenol-water extraction from dried bacterial cells of Azospirillum brasilense type strain Sp7. Mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharide followed by GPC on Sephadex G-50 resulted in a polysaccharide mixture, which was studied by composition and methylation analyses, Smith degradation and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The following polysaccharide structures were established, where italics indicate a non-stoichiometric (∼40%) 2-O-methylation of l-rhamnose.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide and Interleukin 1 Augment the Effects of Hypoxia and Inflammation in Human Pulmonary Arterial Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziesche, Rolf; Petkov, Venzeslav; Williams, John; Zakeri, Schaker M.; Mosgoller, Wilhelm; Knofler, Martin; Block, Lutz H.

    1996-10-01

    The combined effects of hypoxia and interleukin 1, lipopolysaccharide, or tumor necrosis factor α on the expression of genes encoding endothelial constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthases, endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were investigated in human primary pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures. Hypoxia decreased the expression of constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS-3) mRNA and NOS-3 protein as compared with normoxic conditions. The inhibition of expression of NOS-3 corresponded with a reduced production of NO. A combination of hypoxia with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, interleukin 1β , or tumor necrosis factor α augmented both effects. In contrast, the combination of hypoxia and the inflammatory mediators superinduced the expression of endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8. Here, we have shown that inflammatory mediators aggravate the effect of hypoxia on the down-regulation of NOS-3 and increase the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in human pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures.

  16. Transcriptional Activation of Mucin by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipopolysaccharide in the Pathogenesis of Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Dong; Dohrman, Austin F.; Gallup, Marianne; Miyata, Susumu; Gum, James R.; Kim, Young S.; Nadel, Jay A.; Prince, Alice; Basbaum, Carol B.

    1997-02-01

    An unresolved question in cystic fibrosis (CF) research is how mutations of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator, a CI ion channel, cause airway mucus obstruction leading to fatal lung disease. Recent evidence has linked the CF transmembrane conductance regulator mutation to the onset and persistence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the airways, and here we provide evidence directly linking P. aeruginosa infection to mucus overproduction. We show that P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide profoundly upregulates transcription of the mucin gene MUC 2 in epithelial cells via inducible enhancer elements and that this effect is blocked by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin AG 126. These findings improve our understanding of CF pathogenesis and suggest that the attenuation of mucin production by lipopolysaccharide antagonists and tyrosine kinase inhibitors could reduce morbidity and mortality in this disease.

  17. The mechanism of lipopolysaccharide infiltration through HUVEC membrane surface in direct endotoxin injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Cai, Shao-Xi; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Luo, Xiang-Dong; Yang, Zong-Cheng

    2005-09-01

    In this study, the HUVEC's cellular biomechanical properties of HUVEC (elastic modulus K1, K2 and viscoefficient mu) were determined with micropipette aspiration system and analyzed after being directly damaged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The phospholipid compositions of HUVEC membrane were analyzed with high-performance capillary electrophoresis and PLA2 activity was determined to research the modification and metabolism of HUVEC membrane phospholipid. Infiltration of LPS on HUVEC membrane was studied by observation with confocal microscopy and fluorescent microscopy. Results showed that LPS direct injuring HUVEC can cause the changes of HUVEC biomechanical properties and membrane lipid contents; HUVEC directly damage by LPS could also activate HUVEC phospholipase A2 (PLA2), influencing membrane lipid metabolism; LPS could directly infiltrate and intercalate HUVEC membrane, causing and membrane contents variation. Based on these experimental results, the mechanism of lipopolysaccharide infiltration VEC membrane surface in direct LPS injury was studied and analyzed in view of the cellular biomechanical mechanism.

  18. SEROLOGICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE FROM Escherichia coli L-19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Varbanets

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia coli L-19 was isolated, chemically identified and its nontoxicity but pyrogenicity were shown. The investigations of lipopolysaccharide influence on T- and B-lymphocytes indicated that it might be used as a mitogen in blasttransformation reactions since it was only in insignificant degree less active in comparison with the commercial one. It was shown that in reactions of Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion in agar LPS from E. coli L-19 exerted an activity of antigen in homological system. There were not established serological cross reactions between antiserum to heated E.coli L-19 cells and LPS from another of E.coli strain М-17 аnd also the representatives of Enterobacteriaceae species such as Budvicia aquatica, Rahnella aquatilis and Pragia fontium. These results indicate the absence of common antigenic determinants between the tested strains.

  19. Baclofen influences lipopolysaccharide-mediated interleukin-6 release from murine pituicytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Tine H; Hansen, Erik W; Christensen, Jens D

    2002-01-01

    -6 release from pituicytes. Cultured murine pituicytes were stimulated for 24 h with lipopolysaccharide (0.5 ng/ml) to give a significant interleukin-6 release compared to control. The interleukin-6 release was significantly potentiated by the GABA(B) receptor agonist (R)-4-amino-3-(4-chlorophenyl......Pituicytes, the glial cells of the neurohypophysis, secrete interleukin-6 upon stimulation with various inflammatory mediators, i.e. lipopolysaccharide. Previous studies have identified several receptors on pituicytes. This study investigates the effect of GABA(B) receptor activation on interleukin......) butanoic acid (R-baclofen; 10, 100 or 500 microM). However, R-baclofen itself (10, 100 or 500 microM) did not stimulate the interleukin-6 secretion. Furthermore, the potent GABA(B) receptor antagonists 3-[[(3,4-Dichlorophenyl)methyl]amino]propyl]diethoxymethyl) phosphinic acid (CGP52432; 30 or 300 micro...

  20. Core Oligosaccharide of Plesiomonas shigelloides PCM 2231 (Serotype O17 Lipopolysaccharide — Structural and Serological Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maciejewska

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The herein presented complete structure of the core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide (LPS P. shigelloides Polish Collection of Microorganisms (PCM 2231 (serotype O17 was investigated by 1H, 13C NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, chemical analyses and serological methods. The core oligosaccharide is composed of an undecasaccharide, which represents the second core type identified for P. shigelloides serotype O17 LPS. This structure is similar to that of the core oligosaccharide of P. shigelloides strains 302-73 (serotype O1 and 7-63 (serotype O17 and differs from these only by one sugar residue. Serological screening of 55 strains of P. shigelloides with the use of serum against identified core oligosaccharide conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA indicated the presence of similar structures in the LPS core region of 28 O-serotypes. This observation suggests that the core oligosaccharide structure present in strain PCM 2231 could be the most common type among P. shigelloides lipopolysaccharides.

  1. Unusual fatty acid substitution in lipids and lipopolysaccharides of Helicobacter pylori.

    OpenAIRE

    Geis, G; Leying, H; Suerbaum, S; Opferkuch, W

    1990-01-01

    Cellular fatty acids, phospholipid fatty acids, and lipopolysaccharide fatty acids of four strains of Helicobacter pylori were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. The presence of myristic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, 19-carbon cyclopropane fatty acid, beta-hydroxypalmitic acid, and beta-hydroxystearic acid was confirmed. In phospholipids, myristic acid and 19-carbon cyclopropane fatty acid were the major fatty acids. Hydroxy fatty acids and unsaturated fatt...

  2. OpsX from Haemophilus influenzae Represents a Novel Type of Heptosyltransferase I in Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Gronow, Sabine; Brabetz, Werner; Lindner, Buko; Brade, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    The inner core region of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Haemophilus influenzae is characterized by the presence of a phosphorylated 3-deoxy-α-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo). In this study, we show that the heptosyltransferase I adding the first l-glycero-d-manno-heptose residue to this acceptor is encoded by the gene opsX, which differs in substrate specificity from the other heptosyltransferase I, known as WaaC.

  3. Neuroprotective role of pseudoginsenoside-F11 on activated microgfia induced by lipopolysaccharide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-liBI; Jing-yuYANG; Ying-xuDONG; LiangYU; Chun-fuWU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: In the present study, the neuroprotective effect and its possible molecular mechanisms of pseudoginsenoside-F11 (PF11),a saponin existed in American ginseng, on activated N9 microglia induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were studied. RESULTS:The results showed that PF11 inhibited the activation of p38 ,p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and the degradation of IkB alpha (IrBα) induced by LPS. However, it

  4. Ethanol extracts of Scutellaria baicalensis protect against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute liver injury in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hai Nguyen Thanh; Hue Pham Thi Minh; Tuan Anh Le; Huong Duong Thi Ly; Tung Nguyen Huu; Loi Vu Duc; Thu Dang Kim; Tung Bui Thanh

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigated the protective potential of ethanol extracts of Scutellaria baicalensis (S. baicalensis) against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury. Methods: Dried roots of S. baicalensis were extracted with ethanol and concentrated to yield a dry residue. Mice were administered 200 mg/kg of the ethanol extracts orally once daily for one week. Animals were subsequently administered a single dose of LPS (5 mg/kg of body weight, intraperitoneal injection). Both protein ...

  5. Comparison of Mouse Urinary Metabolic Profiles after Exposure to the Inflammatory Stressors γ Radiation and Lipopolysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    Laiakis, Evagelia C.; Hyduke, Daniel R; Albert J Fornace

    2011-01-01

    Metabolomics on easily accessible biofluids has the potential to provide rapid identification and distinction between stressors and inflammatory states. In the event of a radiological event, individuals with underlying medical conditions could present with similar symptoms to radiation poisoning, prominently nausea, diarrhea, vomiting and fever. Metabolomics of radiation exposure in mice has provided valuable biomarkers, and in this study we aimed to identify biomarkers of lipopolysaccharide ...

  6. Lipopolysaccharide-Deficient Mutants of Salmonella enterica Have Increased Sensitivity to Catechins

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshii, Miho; OKAMOTO, Akira; Ota, Michio

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity is one of the well-known biological characteristics of catechins, the main extract of green tea leaves. It is thought that catechins intercalate into the bacterial cell membrane and damage the lipid bilayer. However, the association between catechins and lipopolysaccharides, which consist of an O side chain, core oligosaccharide, and lipid A, has not been previously investigated. In this study, we evaluated the catechin sensitivity of Salmonella enterica mutants that la...

  7. Detection of antibodies to Salmonella lipopolysaccharide in muscle fluid from cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Wedderkopp, A.; Lind, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Objective-To compare muscle fluid with serum samples for detection of antibodies to Salmonella lipopolysaccharide. Sample Population-Muscle fluid and serum samples from 2 cattle populations: 1 from the island of Bornholm with no history of salmonellosis (n = 39), and the other from the S dublin......%) and the O:9-blocking ELISA (r(s) = 0.49, P can be used as a practical alternative to serum samples for surveillance of Salmonella infections in cattle....

  8. Transport of lipopolysaccharide across the cell envelope: the long road of discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2009-09-01

    Intracellular lipid transport is poorly understood. Genetic studies to identify lipid-transport factors are complicated by the essentiality of many lipids, whereas biochemical and cell biology approaches aiming to determine localization and mechanisms of lipid transport are often challenged by the lack of adequate technology. Here, we review the epic history of how different approaches, technological advances and ingenuity contributed to the recent discovery of a multi-protein pathway that transports lipopolysaccharide across the envelope of Gram-negative bacteria.

  9. The structure of the Morganella morganii lipopolysaccharide core region and identification of its genomic loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Nash, John H E; Foote, Simon; Young, N Martin

    2015-01-30

    The core region of the lipopolysaccharide of Morganella morganii serotype O:1ab was obtained by hydrolysis of the LPS and studied by 2D NMR, ESI MS, and chemical methods. Its structure was highly homologous to those from the two major members of the same Proteeae tribe, Proteus mirabilis and Providencia alcalifaciens, and analysis of the M. morganii genome disclosed that the loci for its outer core, lipid A and Ara4N moieties are similarly conserved.

  10. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on sickness behaviour in hens kept in cage and free range environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, N G; Payne, S R; Devine, C D; Cook, C J

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether environmental enrichment and environmental conditions can influence the expression of sickness behaviour. The behaviour in response to injection of lipopolysaccharide or saline was examined in a total of 96 62-weeks old hatchmate hens kept in a free range or cage environment. There were eight experimental treatments, each with 12 birds. Half the birds were sourced from a commercial cage layer unit (C/-) and half from a commercial free range unit (FR/-). After intraperitoneal injection with either lipopolysaccharide or saline (as a control), the hens were placed in either a cage (-/C) or free range (-/FR) environment. Lipopolysaccharide caused greater suppression of activity in free range (FR/FR) than in caged hens, including less walking (53% reduction), roosting (-86%) and preening (-60%) (pcaged birds released into free range, nor in free range birds introduced to cages, suggesting that both the presence of and the familiarity with an environment affected sickness behaviour patterns. Increased sleeping was the most consistent response (+147%; pcaged hens, and this may make it more difficult to recognise disease expression in the caged environment.

  11. Sirtuin inhibition attenuates the production of inflammatory cytokines in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Claudia A. [Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI), Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery Research Group, Brussels B-1200 (Belgium); Fievez, Laurence [University of Liege, GIGA-Research, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Liege B-4000 (Belgium); Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Delzenne, Nathalie M. [Universite catholique de Louvain, LDRI, Metabolism and Nutrition Research Group, Brussels B-1200 (Belgium); Bureau, Fabrice [University of Liege, GIGA-Research, Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Liege B-4000 (Belgium); Vanbever, Rita, E-mail: rita.vanbever@uclouvain.be [Universite catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute (LDRI), Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery Research Group, Brussels B-1200 (Belgium)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages were treated with cambinol and sirtinol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cambinol and sirtinol decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cambinol decreased NF-{kappa}B activity but had no impact on p38 MAPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sirtuins are an interesting target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. -- Abstract: In several inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis or sepsis, the regulatory mechanisms of inflammation are inefficient and the excessive inflammatory response leads to damage to the host. Sirtuins are class III histone deacetylases that modulate the activity of several transcription factors that are implicated in immune responses. In this study, we evaluated the impact of sirtuin inhibition on the activation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated J774 macrophages by assessing the production of inflammatory cytokines. The pharmacologic inhibition of sirtuins decreased the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) interleukin 6 (IL-6) and Rantes. The reduction of cytokine production was associated with decreased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity and inhibitor kappa B alpha (I{kappa}B{alpha}) phosphorylation while no impact was observed on the phosphorylation status of p38 mitogen-activated kinase (p38 MAPK). This work shows that sirtuin pharmacologic inhibitors are a promising tool for the treatment of inflammatory conditions.

  12. Effect of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation on structurization properties of bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brill G.E.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to investigate the effects of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation on the process of dehydration self-organization of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Materials and Methods. The method of wedge dehydration has been used to study the structure formation of bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Image-phases analysis included their qualitative characteristics, as well as the calculation of quantitative indicators, followed by statistical analysis. Results. UHF-Radiation (1GHz, 0,1 uW/cm2, 10 min has led to the changes in the suspension system of the LPS-saline reflected in the kinetics of structure formation. Conclusion. 1 GHz corresponds to the natural frequency of oscillation of water clusters and, presumably, the effect of UHF on structure of LPS mediates through the changes in water-salt environment. Under these conditions, properties of water molecules of hydration and possibly the properties of hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions in the molecule of LPS, which can affect the ability of toxin molecules to form aggregates change. Therefore the lipopolysaccharide structure modification may result in the change of its toxic properties.

  13. Biotechnology: Genetically Engineered Pathogens (The Counterproliferation Papers, Future Warfare Series No. 53)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    and hemorrhagic fevers (Ebola, Marburg, Lassa ). 13 Toxins are harmful substances produced by animals, plants and microbes. Though they are non...pestis (plague), Francisella tularensis (tularemia), Brucella sp. (brucellosis), and Coxiella burnetti (Q fever ), are all bacterial agents that...ability to shut down the human body include smallpox, influenza, yellow fever , encephalitis (various), dengue fever , chikungunga, Rift Valley fever

  14. Operational Art and the Incident Command System: Public Health’s Bridge in Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    from botulinum toxins), Francisella tularensis (Tularemia), and Filoviruses and Arenaviruses like Ebola virus and Lassa virus (Viral Hemorrhagic fevers...an extremely fragile virus , but anthrax spores can “shelter in place” indefinitely). Virulence (lethality) refers to the agent’s ability to produce

  15. Raccoons and Skunks as Sentinels for Enzootic Tularemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrada, Zenda L.; Goethert, Heidi K.

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed sera from diverse mammals of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, for evidence of Francisella tularensis exposure. Skunks and raccoons were frequently seroreactive, whereas white-footed mice, cottontail rabbits, deer, rats, and dogs were not. Tularemia surveillance may be facilitated by focusing on skunks and raccoons. PMID:16707067

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides Containing Unnatural Amino Acid Exhibit Potent Bactericidal Activity against ESKAPE Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    bacterial strains as previously reported by Hicks and co-workers45 Bacteria Compound 23 64 61 Yersinia pestis C092 500 62.5 32.2 Brucella melitensis...16M 500 125 125 Brucella abortus 2308 500 62.5 125 Francisella tularensis 250 0.04 125 Burkholderia mallei 500 0.04 500 Burkholderia pseudomallei 500

  17. Tick-borne agents in rodents, China, 2004-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Zhan (Lin); W.C. Cao (Wu Chun); C.Y. Chu (Chen); B.G. Jiang; F. Zhang (Fang); L.J. Liu (Wei); J.S. Dumler (Stephen); X-M. Wu (Xiao-Ming); S-Q. Zuo (Shu-Qing); H.N. Huang; Q.M. Zhao; N. Jia (Na); H. Yang (Hong); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractA total of 705 rodents from 6 provinces and autonomous regions of mainland People's Republic of China were tested by PCRs for tick-borne agents (Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, spotted fever group rickettsiae, and Francisella tularensis). Infection rates were

  18. Tularemia among free-ranging mice without infection of exposed humans, Switzerland, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Origgi, Francesco C; König, Barbara; Lindholm, Anna K; Mayor, Désirée; Pilo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The animals primarily infected by Francisella tularensis are rapidly consumed by scavengers, hindering ecologic investigation of the bacterium. We describe a 2012 natural tularemia epizootic among house mice in Switzerland and the assessment of infection of exposed humans. The humans were not infected, but the epizootic coincided with increased reports of human cases in the area.

  19. Development and evaluation of a latex agglutination test for the rapid serodiagnosis of tularemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastawicki, Waldemar; Rokosz-Chudziak, Natalia; Chróst, Anna; Gierczyński, Rafał

    2015-05-01

    A latex agglutination test (LAT) was developed for a rapid detection of antibodies against Francisella tularensis. The assay is performed by mixing serum with antigen-coated latex beads and read within 5 min. Developed LAT has been proved to be a specific, sensitive, fast, easy-to-perform and cost-efficient tool for the routine diagnosis of tularemia.

  20. Agricultural Bioterrorism What Challenges and Actions Remain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-10

    Midwest annually produces more than 80 million cattle, hogs, sheep, goats and bison and is more economically exposed to the threat of agroterrorism...pestis (plaque), Francisella tularensis (tularemia), Coxiella burnetii (Q fever), Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Brucella suis ( brucellosis ), and

  1. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10905-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available _1266( CP000608 |pid:none) Francisella tularensis subsp. t... 101 9e-20 AY386265_10( AY386265 |pid:none) Bovine papular stomatitis... virus s... 99 3e-19 AY424973_1( AY424973 |pid:none) Bovine papular stomatitis virus m

  2. Serologic survey for viral and bacterial infections in western populations of Canada Lynx (Lynx canadensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman Biek; Randall L. Zarnke; Colin Gillin; Margaret Wild; John R. Squires; Mary Poss

    2002-01-01

    A serologic survey for exposure to pathogens in Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) in western North America was conducted. Samples from 215 lynx from six study areas were tested for antibodies to feline parvovirus (FPV), feline coronavirus, canine distemper virus, feline calicivirus, feline herpesvirus, Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis. A subset of...

  3. Microorganisms Resistant to Free-Living Amoebae

    OpenAIRE

    Greub, Gilbert; Raoult, Didier

    2004-01-01

    Free-living amoebae feed on bacteria, fungi, and algae. However, some microorganisms have evolved to become resistant to these protists. These amoeba-resistant microorganisms include established pathogens, such as Cryptococcus neoformans, Legionella spp., Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycobacterium avium, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Francisella tularensis, and emerging pathogens, such as Bosea spp., Simkania negevensis, Parachlamydia acanthamoebae, and Legionella-like amoe...

  4. Effect of cholinesterase inhibitor galanthamine on circulating tumor necrosis factor alpha in rats with lipopolysaccharide induced peritonitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhi-hai; MA Yue-feng; WU Jun-song; GAN Jian-xin; XU Shao-wen; JIANG Guan-yu

    2010-01-01

    Background The nervous system, through the vagus nerve and its neurotransmitter acetylcholine, can down-regulate the systemic inflammation in vivo, and recently, a role of brain cholinergic mechanisms in activating this cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway has been indicated. Galanthamine is a cholinesterase inhibitor and one of the centrally acting cholinergic agents available in clinic. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of galanthamine on circulating tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in rats with lipopolysaccharide-induced peritonitis and the possible role of the vagus nerve in the action of galanthamine.Methods Rat models of lipopolysaccharide-induced peritonitis and bilateral cervical vagotomy were produced. In the experiment 1, the rats were randomly divided into control group, peritonitis group, and peritonitis groups treated with three dosages of galanthamine. In the experiment 2, the rats were randomly divided into sham group, sham plus peritonitis group, sham plus peritonitis group treated with galanthamine, vagotomy plus peritonitis group, and vagotomy plus peritonitis group treated with galanthamine. The levels of plasma TNF-α were determined in every group. Results The level of circulating TNF-α was significantly increased in rats after intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin. Galanthamine treatment decreased the level of circulating TNF-α in rats with lipopolysaccharide-induced peritonitis, and there was significant difference compared with rats with lipopolysaccharide-induced peritonitis without treatment. The 3 mg/kg dosage of galanthamine had the most significant inhibition on circulating TNF-α level at all the three tested doses. Galanthamine obviously decreased the TNF-α level in rats with lipopolysaccharide-induced peritonitis with sham operation, but could not decrease the TNF-α level in rats with lipopolysaccharide-induced peritonitis with vagotomy. Conclusion Cholinesterase inhibitor galanthamine has an inhibitory effect on TNF

  5. Placental-mediated increased cytokine response to lipopolysaccharides: a potential mechanism for enhanced inflammation susceptibility of the preterm fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross MG

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Julie L Boles,1 Michael G Ross,1 Ron Beloosesky,2 Mina Desai,1 Louiza Belkacemi11Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California, Los Angeles, Torrance, CA, USA; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, IsraelBackground: Cerebral palsy is a nonprogressive motor impairment syndrome that has no effective cure. The etiology of most cases of cerebral palsy remains unknown; however, recent epidemiologic data have demonstrated an association between fetal neurologic injury and infection/inflammation. Maternal infection/inflammation may be associated with the induction of placental cytokines that could result in increased fetal proinflammatory cytokine exposure, and development of neonatal neurologic injury. Therefore, we sought to explore the mechanism by which maternal infection may produce a placental inflammatory response. We specifically examined rat placental cytokine production and activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 pathway in response to lipopolysaccharide exposure at preterm and near-term gestational ages.Methods: Preterm (e16 or near-term (e20 placental explants from pregnant rats were treated with 0, 1, or 10 µg/mL lipopolysaccharide. Explant integrity was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis alpha levels were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. TLR4 and phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB protein expression levels were determined by Western blot analysis.Results: At both e16 and e20, lactate dehydrogenase levels were unchanged by treatment with lipopolysaccharide. After exposure to lipopolysaccharide, the release of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis alpha from e16 placental explants increased by 4-fold and 8–9-fold, respectively (P < 0.05 versus

  6. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Serum Lipopolysaccharide Levels Predict Multiple Organ Failure and Death in Alcoholic Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelena, Javier; Altamirano, José; Abraldes, Juan G.; Affò, Silvia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Dominguez, Marlene; García-Pagán, Juan Carlos; Fernández, Javier; Arroyo, Vicente; Ginès, Pere; Louvet, Alexandre; Mathurin, Philippe; Mehal, Wajahat Z.; Caballería, Juan; Bataller, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) frequently progresses to multiple organ failure (MOF) and death. However, the driving factors are largely unknown. At admission, patients with AH often show criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) even in the absence of an infection. We hypothesize that the presence of SIRS may predispose to MOF and death. To test this hypothesis, we studied a cohort including 162 patients with biopsy-proven AH. The presence of SIRS and infections was assessed in all patients, and multivariate analyses identified variables independently associated with MOF and 90-day mortality. At admission, 32 (19.8%) patients were diagnosed with a bacterial infection, while 75 (46.3%) fulfilled SIRS criteria; 58 patients (35.8%) developed MOF during hospitalization. Short-term mortality was significantly higher among patients who developed MOF (62.1% versus 3.8%, P <0.001). The presence of SIRS was a major predictor of MOF (odds ratio = 2.69, P=0.025) and strongly correlated with mortality. Importantly, the course of patients with SIRS with and without infection was similar in terms of MOF development and short-term mortality. Finally, we sought to identify serum markers that differentiate SIRS with and without infection. We studied serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and lipopolysaccharide at admission. All of them predicted mortality. Procalcitonin, but not high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, serum levels identified those patients with SIRS and infection. Lipopolysaccharide serum levels predicted MOF and the response to prednisolone. Conclusion In the presence or absence of infections, SIRS is a major determinant of MOF and mortality in AH, and the mechanisms involved in the development of SIRS should be investigated; procalcitonin serum levels can help to identify patients with infection, and lipopolysaccharide levels may help to predict mortality and the response to steroids. PMID:25761863

  7. High glucose-boosted inflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide are suppressed by statin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nareika, A; Maldonado, A; He, L; Game, B A; Slate, E H; Sanders, J J; London, S D; Lopes-Virella, M F; Huang, Y

    2007-02-01

    It has been established that periodontal diseases are more prevalent and of greater severity in diabetic patients than in nondiabetic patients. Recent studies have underscored the role of monocytes and macrophages in periodontal tissue inflammation and destruction in diabetic patients. Although it has been shown that monocytes isolated from diabetic patients produce more inflammatory cytokines and that gingival crevicular fluid collected from diabetic patients contains higher levels of inflammatory cytokines than that obtained from nondiabetic patients, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. U937 histiocytes cultured in medium containing either normal (5 mM) or high (25 mM) glucose were treated with 100 ng/ml of lipopolysaccharide for 24h. After the treatment, cytokines in the medium and cytokine mRNA in the cells were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbet assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively. In this study, we demonstrated that the pre-exposure of U937 histiocytes to high glucose concentrations markedly increased the lipopolysaccharide-induced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and the cellular inducible nitric oxide level compared with pre-exposure to normal glucose. Our data also showed that the increased secretion of cytokines was a result of increased mRNA expression. Furthermore, the effects of statin and peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor agonists on high glucose-enhanced secretion of cytokines were determined. The results showed that simvastatin, but not fenofibrate or pioglitazone, inhibited high glucose-enhanced cytokine release. This study has shown that high glucose concentrations and lipopolysaccharide act synergistically to stimulate the secretion of inflammatory mediators, and that statin is capable of suppressing the high glucose-boosted proinflammatory response. This study therefore delineates a novel mechanism by which hyperglycemia enhances the inflammatory responses of

  8. Anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant activity of dihydroasparagusic acid in lipopolysaccharide-activated microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemme, Adele; Togna, Anna Rita; Mastrofrancesco, Arianna; Cammisotto, Vittoria; Ottaviani, Monica; Bianco, Armandodoriano; Venditti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The activation of microglia and subsequent release of toxic pro-inflammatory factors are crucially associated with neurodegenerative disease, characterized by increased oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, including Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and multiple sclerosis. Dihydroasparagusic acid is the reduced form of asparagusic acid, a sulfur-containing flavor component produced by Asparagus plants. It has two thiolic functions able to coordinate the metal ions, and a carboxylic moiety, a polar function, which may enhance excretion of the complexes. Thiol functions are also present in several biomolecules with important physiological antioxidant role as glutathione. The aim of this study is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potential effect of dihydroasparagusic acid on microglial activation in an in vitro model of neuroinflammation. We have used lipopolysaccharide to induce an inflammatory response in primary rat microglial cultures. Our results suggest that dihydroasparagusic acid significantly prevented lipopolysaccharide-induced production of pro-inflammatory and neurotoxic mediators such as nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α, prostaglandin E2, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 protein expression and lipoxygenase activity in microglia cells. Moreover it effectively suppressed the level of reactive oxygen species and affected lipopolysaccharide-stimulated activation of mitogen activated protein kinase, including p38, and nuclear factor-kB pathway. These results suggest that dihydroasparagusic acid's neuroprotective properties may be due to its ability to dampen induction of microglial activation. It is a compound that can effectively inhibit inflammatory and oxidative processes that are important factors of the etiopathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Immunosuppressive components of extracellular lipopolysaccharide highly virulent strain Salmonella typhimurium 1468].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molozhavaia, O S; Borisova, E V

    2002-01-01

    Immunosuppressive activity of culture liquid substrate (CFS) of highly virulent strain Salmonella typhimurium has been studied. A model of delayed hypersensitivity (DHS) to nonbacterial antigen in mice, a method of gel-filtration through the sephadex column G-200, immunosorbents were used. Three components with immunosuppressive activity: thermolabile component and thermostable one with direct immunosuppressive action and the third thermolabile component which manifested inductive immunosuppressive activity only after redox treatment have been revealed in the strain CFS. O-specific and lipid parts were found in the composition of all the components. This allowed them to be related to lipopolysaccharide.

  10. Priming, induction and modulation of plant defence responses by bacterial lipopolysaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Mari-Anne; Dow, J. Maxwell; Molinaro, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    to the triggering of defence responses or to the priming of the plant to respond more rapidly and/or to a greater degree to subsequent pathogen challenge. LPS from symbiotic bacteria can have quite different effects on plants to those of pathogens. Some details are emerging of the structures within LPS......Bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) have multiple roles in plant-microbe interactions. LPS contributes to the low permeability of the outer membrane, which acts as a barrier to protect bacteria from plant-derived antimicrobial substances. Conversely, perception of LPS by plant cells can lead...

  11. Antioxidant properties of lutein contribute to the protection against lipopolysaccharide-induced uveitis in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yao Xin-Sheng; Yao Nan; Lan Fang; Tsoi Bun; He Rong-Rong; Kurihara Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Lutein is an important eye-protective nutrient. This study investigates the protective effects and mechanisms of lutein on lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced uveitis in mice. Methods Lutein, suspended in drinking water at a final concentration of 12.5 and 25 mg/mL, was administered to mice at 0.1 mL/10 g body weight for five consecutive days. Control and model group received drinking water only. Uveitis was induced by injecting LPS (100 mg per mouse) into the footpad in the...

  12. Antioxidant properties of lutein contribute to the protection against lipopolysaccharide-induced uveitis in mice

    OpenAIRE

    He, Rong-rong; Tsoi, Bun; Lan, Fang; Yao, Nan; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Kurihara, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Background Lutein is an important eye-protective nutrient. This study investigates the protective effects and mechanisms of lutein on lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced uveitis in mice. Methods Lutein, suspended in drinking water at a final concentration of 12.5 and 25 mg/mL, was administered to mice at 0.1 mL/10 g body weight for five consecutive days. Control and model group received drinking water only. Uveitis was induced by injecting LPS (100 mg per mouse) into the footpad in the model an...

  13. Effects of schisandrin on transcriptional factors in lipopolysaccharide-pretreated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lian Yu; Hung, Tran Manh; Bae, Kihwan; Jang, Sehyun; Shin, Eun Myoung; Chung, Ji Won; Kang, Sam Sik; Kim, Hyun Pyo; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2009-03-01

    Schisandrin is the main active ingredient isolated from Schisandra chinensis Baill. Recent studies have demonstrated that schisandrin exhibits anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we examined whether the order of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment affects the mechanism of schisandrin anti-inflammatory activity. We found that the antiinflammatory mechanisms are not the same depending on whether macrophages were treated with schisandrin before or after LPS. The main difference is that inhibitor kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) degradation was not inhibited when macrophages were pretreated by LPS before schisandrin and was weakly inhibited when macrophages were pretreated by schisandrin before LPS.

  14. Highly sensitive fluorescent stain for detecting lipopolysaccharides in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Zhou, Ayi; Cai, Wanhui; Yu, Dongdong; Zhu, Zhongxin; Jiang, Chengxi; Jin, Litai

    2015-08-01

    A sensitive and simple technique was developed for the visualization of gel-separated lipopolysaccharides by using a hydrazide derivative, UGF202. As low as 0.5-1 ng total LPS could be detected by UGF202 stain, which is 2- and 16-fold more sensitive than that of the commonly used Pro-Q Emerald 300 and Keenan et al. developed silver stain, respectively. The results indicated that UGF202 stain could be a good choice for LPS determination in polyacrylamide gels. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Genes of the adaptive immune system are expressed early in zebrafish larval development following lipopolysaccharide stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fengling; ZHANG Shicui; WANG Zhiping; LI Hongyan

    2011-01-01

    Information regarding immunocompetence of the adaptive immune system (AIS) in zebrafish Danio rerio remains limited. Here, we stimulated an immune response in fish embryos,larvae and adults using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and measured the upregulation of a number of AIS-related genes (Rag2, AID, TCRAC, IgLC-1, mIg, sIg, IgZ and DAB) 3 and 18 h later. We found that all of the genes evaluated were strongly induced following LPS stimulation, with most of them responding at 8 d post fertilization. This confirms that a functional adaptive immune response is present in D. rerio larvae, and provides a window for further functional analyses.

  16. Dose dependency and individual variability of the lipopolysaccharide-induced bovine acute phase protein response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, S.; Andersen, P.H.; Tølbøll, T.

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the dose dependency and the individual variability of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute phase protein response in cattle, 8 nonlactating, nonpregnant Danish Holstein cows were challenged 3 times each by intravenous injection of increasing doses (10, 100, and 1000 ng...... for several days after each LPS injection, and their increase or decrease was significantly related to LPS dose. In addition to dose dependency, the response was also dependent on the individual, as APP concentrations differed significantly among cows. To compare APP production in 2 consecutive challenges...

  17. Structure of the O-specific polysaccharide from the lipopolysaccharide of Aeromonas sobria strain Pt312.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turska-Szewczuk, Anna; Pietras, Hubert; Duda, Katarzyna A; Kozińska, Alicja; Pękala, Agnieszka; Holst, Otto

    2015-02-11

    The O-specific polysaccharide (OPS) obtained by mild-acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide from Aeromonas sobria strain Pt312 was studied by sugar and methylation analyses along with 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, including 2D 1H,1H COSY, TOCSY, NOESY, 1H-detected 1H,13C HSQC, and HMBC experiments. The sequence of the sugar residues was determined using 1H,1H NOESY and 1H,13C HMBC experiments. It was found that the OPS was built up of disaccharide repeating units composed of GlcpNAc and non-stoichiometrically O-acetylated Rhap residues, and had the structure.

  18. Structure of the polysaccharides from the lipopolysaccharide of Azospirillum brasilense Jm125A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigida, Elena N; Fedonenko, Yuliya P; Shashkov, Alexander S; Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Konnova, Svetlana A; Ignatov, Vladimir V; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2015-10-30

    Two polysaccharides were obtained by mild acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of associative nitrogen-fixing bacteria Azospirillum brasilense Jm125A2 isolated from the rhizosphere of a pearl millet. The following structures of the polysaccharides were established by sugar and methylation analyses, Smith degradation, and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy: [Formula: see text] Structure 1 has been reported earlier for a polysaccharide from A. brasilense S17 (Fedonenko YP, Konnova ON, Zdorovenko EL, Konnova SA, Zatonsky GV, Shaskov AS, Ignatov VV, Knirel YA. Carbohydr Res 2008;343:810-6), whereas to our knowledge structure 2 has not been hitherto found in bacterial polysaccharides.

  19. HemoHIM, a herbal preparation, alleviates airway inflammation caused by cigarette smoke and lipopolysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Na-Rae; Kim, Sung-Ho; Ko, Je-Won; Park, Sung-Hyeuk; Lee, In-Chul; Ryu, Jung-Min; Kim, Jong-Choon; Shin, In-Sik

    2017-01-01

    HemoHIM, herbal preparation has designed for immune system recovery. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of HemoHIM on cigarette smoke (CS) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mouse model. To induce COPD, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to CS for 1 h per day (eight cigarettes per day) for 4 weeks and intranasally received LPS on day 26. HemoHIM was administrated to mice at a dose of 50 or 100 mg/kg 1h before CS exposure. HemoHIM reduced the inf...

  20. DMPD: Function of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) and CD14, thereceptor for LPS/LBP complexes: a short review. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1373512 Function of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) and CD14, thereceptor for LPS/LBP complex....html) (.csml) Show Function of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) and CD14, thereceptor for LPS/LBP complex...ride (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) and CD14, thereceptor for LPS/LBP complexes: a short review. Authors Schuma

  1. Cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of kernel extract from Adenanthera pavonina on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated rat peritoneal macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arunagirinathan Koodalingam; Ramar Manikandan; Munisamy Indhumathi; Ethala Subramani Kaviya

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity ofAdenanthera pavonina (A. pavonina) extracts.Methods:Rat peritoneal macrophages were treated with different concentrations of lipopolysaccharide andH2O2 in the presence and absence of kernel extract from A. pavonina.Nitric oxide, superoxide anion generation, cell viability and nuclear fragmentation were investigated.Results:The pre-treatment of kernel extract fromA. pavonina suppressed nitric oxide, superoxide anion, cell death, nuclear fragmentation in lipopolysaccharide andH2O2 stimulated or induced macrophages, respectively.Conclusions:These results suggest thatA. pavonina extract suppresses the intra cellular peroxide production.

  2. Structural studies of the polysaccharides from the lipopolysaccharides of Azospirillum brasilense Sp246 and SpBr14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigida, Elena N; Fedonenko, Yuliya P; Shashkov, Alexander S; Grinev, Vyacheslav S; Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Konnova, Svetlana A; Ignatov, Vladimir V; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2014-10-29

    Lipopolysaccharides from closely related Azospirillum brasilense strains, Sp246 and SpBr14, were obtained by phenol-water extraction. Mild acid hydrolysis of the lipopolysaccharides followed by GPC on Sephadex G-50 resulted in polysaccharide mixtures. On the basis of sugar and methylation analyses, Smith degradation and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy data, it was concluded that both bacteria possess the same two distinct polysaccharides having structures 1 and 2: [structure: see text]. Structure 1 has been reported earlier for a polysaccharide of A. brasilense 54 [Fedonenko et al., 2011] whereas to our knowledge structure 2 has not been hitherto found in bacterial polysaccharides.

  3. Effects of tylosin on serum cytokine levels in healthy and lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Ayse; Yazar, Enver; Uney, Kamil; Elmas, Muammer; Altan, Feray; Cetin, Gul

    2010-03-01

    The effects of different doses of tylosin on serum cytokine concentrations were investigated in healthy and lipopolysaccharide-treated mice. The mice were divided into seven groups. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was injected into the positive control group. The other six groups received three different tylosin doses concurrently without or with LPS: 10 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, 500 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg + LPS, 100 mg/kg + LPS and 500 mg/kg + LPS. After treatment, serum samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 24 hours. Serum tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 1beta (IL1beta) and IL10 levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Tylosin doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg induced no cytokine production in the healthy mice. Tylosin at 500 mg/kg had no effect on TNFalpha or IL1beta production, but it induced IL10 production in healthy mice. All doses of tylosin reduced the elevated TNFalpha and IL1beta in LPS-treated mice but increased their IL10 levels. In conclusion, these data suggest that tylosin has an immunomodulatory effect at the dose recommended for use against infection.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Biosynthesis Genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Promote Resistance to Antimicrobial Chemokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Erickson

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial chemokines (AMCs are a recently described family of host defense peptides that play an important role in protecting a wide variety of organisms from bacterial infection. Very little is known about the bacterial targets of AMCs or factors that influence bacterial susceptibility to AMCs. In an effort to understand how bacterial pathogens resist killing by AMCs, we screened Yersinia pseudotuberculosis transposon mutants for those with increased binding to the AMCs CCL28 and CCL25. Mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs were subjected to AMC killing assays, which revealed their increased sensitivity to chemokine-mediated cell death. The majority of the mutants exhibiting increased binding to AMCs contained transposon insertions in genes related to lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. A particularly strong effect on susceptibility to AMC mediated killing was observed by disruption of the hldD/waaF/waaC operon, necessary for ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose synthesis and a complete lipopolysaccharide core oligosaccharide. Periodate oxidation of surface carbohydrates also enhanced AMC binding, whereas enzymatic removal of surface proteins significantly reduced binding. These results suggest that the structure of Y. pseudotuberculosis LPS greatly affects the antimicrobial activity of AMCs by shielding a protein ligand on the bacterial cell surface.

  5. Lycopene stabilizes lipoprotein levels during D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide induced hepatitis in experimental rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheik Abdulazeez Sheriff; Thiruvengadam Devaki

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of lycopene on lipoprotein metabolism during D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide (D-Gal/LPS) induced hepatitis in experimental rats. Methods: The efficacy of lycopene was validated during D-Gal/LPS induced hepatitis by analyzing the activity of lipid metabolizing enzymes such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL), lecithin-cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) and hepatic triglyceride lipase (HTGL). Lipo protein analyses were done by the estimation of very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL). Results: The toxic insult of D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide (D-Gal/LPS) in experimental group of animals reduces the normal values of lipid metabolizing enzymes due to liver injury. The significant drop in the levels of HDL and concomitant increase in the values of VLDL and LDL were observed. The pretreatment of lycopene restore these altered values to near normal level in experimental group of animals. Conclusions: In the light of results, it can be concluded that administration lycopene stabilizes the lipoprotein levels by regulating the lipid metabolizing enzymes through its antioxidant defense and helps to maintain the normal lipid metabolism during toxic injury in liver.

  6. Reliability of plasma lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) from repeated measures in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citronberg, Jessica S; Wilkens, Lynne R; Lim, Unhee; Hullar, Meredith A J; White, Emily; Newcomb, Polly A; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lampe, Johanna W

    2016-09-01

    Plasma lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), a measure of internal exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, has been associated with several chronic conditions and may be a marker of chronic inflammation; however, no studies have examined the reliability of this biomarker in a healthy population. We examined the temporal reliability of LBP measured in archived samples from participants in two studies. In Study one, 60 healthy participants had blood drawn at two time points: baseline and follow-up (either three, six, or nine months). In Study two, 24 individuals had blood drawn three to four times over a seven-month period. We measured LBP in archived plasma by ELISA. Test-retest reliability was estimated by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Plasma LBP concentrations showed moderate reliability in Study one (ICC 0.60, 95 % CI 0.43-0.75) and Study two (ICC 0.46, 95 % CI 0.26-0.69). Restricting the follow-up period improved reliability. In Study one, the reliability of LBP over a three-month period was 0.68 (95 % CI: 0.41-0.87). In Study two, the ICC of samples taken ≤seven days apart was 0.61 (95 % CI 0.29-0.86). Plasma LBP concentrations demonstrated moderate test-retest reliability in healthy individuals with reliability improving over a shorter follow-up period.

  7. Effects of Lipopolysaccharide and Progesterone Exposures on Embryonic Cerebral Cortex Development in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronnes, Ashlie A; Koschnitzky, Jenna; Daza, Ray; Hitti, Jane; Ramirez, Jan Marino; Hevner, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Our objective was to determine if progesterone pretreatment could ameliorate the detrimental effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation on cortical neurogenesis. Timed pregnant mouse dams (n = 8) were given intraperitoneal injections of progesterone (42 mg/kg) or vehicle on embryonic day 17.5. Two hours later, mice were given intraperitoneal LPS (140 μg/kg) or vehicle. Mice were sacrificed 16 hours later on embryonic day 18. Two-color immunofluorescence was performed with primary antibodies T-box transcription factor 2 (Tbr2), ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1), cleaved caspase 3 (CC3), and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Cells were counted, and statistical analysis was determined using analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer method. The Tbr2 intermediate neural progenitor cell density decreased after LPS exposure (P = .0022). Pre-exposure to progesterone statistically increased Tbr2 intermediate neural progenitors compared to LPS treatment alone and was similar to controls (P = .0022). After LPS exposure, microglia displayed an activated phenotype, and cell density was increased (P < .001). Cell death rates were low among study groups but was increased in LPS exposure groups compared to progesterone alone (P = .0015). Lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammation reduces prenatal neurogenesis in mice. Pre-exposure with progesterone is associated with increased neurogenesis. Progesterone may protect the preterm brain from defects of neurogenesis induced by inflammation.

  8. Molecular Architecture of an N-formyltransferase from Salmonella enterica O60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, Colin R; Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M

    2017-03-02

    N-formylated sugars are found on the lipopolysaccharides of various pathogenic Gram negative bacteria including Campylobacter jejuni 81116, Francisella tularensis, Providencia alcalifaciens O30, and Providencia alcalifaciens O40. The last step in the biosynthetic pathways for these unusual sugars is catalyzed by N-formyltransferases that utilize N(10)-formyltetrahydrofolate as the carbon source. The substrates are dTDP-linked amino sugars with the functional groups installed at either the C-3' or C-4' positions of the pyranosyl rings. Here we describe a structural and enzymological investigation of the putative N-formyltransferase, FdtF, from Salmonella enterica O60. In keeping with its proposed role in the organism, the kinetic data reveal that the enzyme is more active with dTDP-3-amino-3,6-dideoxy-d-galactose than with dTDP-3-amino-3,6-dideoxy-d-glucose. The structural data demonstrate that the enzyme contains, in addition to the canonical N-formyltransferase fold, an ankyrin repeat moiety that houses a second dTDP-sugar binding pocket. This is only the second time an ankyrin repeat has been shown to be involved in small molecule binding. The research described herein represents the first structural analysis of a sugar N-formyltransferase that specifically functions on dTDP-3-amino-3,6-dideoxy-d-galactose in vivo and thus adds to our understanding of these intriguing enzymes.

  9. Prenatal transportation alters the acute phase response (APR) of bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the acute phase response (APR) to a postnatal Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day...

  10. Role of CD14 in a Mouse Model of Acute Lung Inflammation Induced by Different Lipopolysaccharide Chemotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anas, A.A.; Hovius, J.W.R.; van 't Veer, C.; van der Poll, T.; de Vos, A.F.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Recognition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is required for effective defense against invading gram-negative bacteria. Recently, in vitro studies revealed that CD14 is required for activation of the myeloid differentiation factor (MyD)88-dependent Toll-like receptor (TLR)4 signaling pathway

  11. Immunization with lipopolysaccharide-deficient whole cells provides protective immunity in an experimental mouse model of Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Quintanilla, Meritxell; Pulido, Marina R; Pachón, Jerónimo; McConnell, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The increasing clinical importance of infections caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii warrants the development of novel approaches for prevention and treatment. In this context, vaccination of certain patient populations may contribute to reducing the morbidity and mortality caused by this pathogen. Vaccines against Gram-negative bacteria based on inactivated bacterial cells are highly immunogenic and have been shown to produce protective immunity against a number of bacterial species. However, the high endotoxin levels present in these vaccines due to the presence of lipopolysaccharide complicates their use in human vaccination. In the present study, we used a laboratory-derived strain of A. baumannii that completely lacks lipopolysaccharide due to a mutation in the lpxD gene (IB010), one of the genes involved in the first steps of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, for vaccination. We demonstrate that IB010 has greatly reduced endotoxin content (infection tissue bacterial loads and significantly lower serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 compared to control mice in a mouse model of disseminated A. baumannii infection. Importantly, immunized mice were protected from infection with the ATCC 19606 strain and an A. baumannii clinical isolate. These data suggest that immunization with inactivated A. baumannii whole cells deficient in lipopolysaccharide could serve as the basis for a vaccine for the prevention of infection caused by A. baumannii.

  12. Different effects of lipopolysaccharide on plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 production in aortic media in vivo and in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, R.T.J. van; Quax, P.H.A.; Tippins, J.R.; Antoniw, J.W.; Andreotti, F.; Maseri, A.; Kluft, C.; Sperti, G.

    1996-01-01

    Background: Lipopolysaccharide (endotoxin) has been shown to increase the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) in the vessel wall. Endotoxin is known to increase PAI-1 production in endothelial cells, but its action on smooth muscle cells (SMCs) is presently not clear. In thi

  13. Starch source in high concentrate rations does not affect rumen pH, histamine and lipopolysaccharide concentrations in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilachai, R.; Schonewille, J.T.; Thamrongyoswittayakul, C.; Aiumlamai, S.; Wachirapakom, C.; Everts, H.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    The replacement of ground corn by cassava meal on rumen pH, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and histamine concentrations under typical Thai feeding conditions (high concentrate diets and rice straw as the sole source of roughage) was investigated. Four rumen-fistulated crossbred Holstein, non-pregnant, dry

  14. The Crystal Structure of Lipopolysaccharide Binding Protein Reveals the Location of a Frequent Mutation that Impairs Innate Immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eckert, J.K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, J.I.; Gurtler, K.; Oh, D.Y.; Sur, S.; Lundvall, L.; Hamann, L.; Ploeg, A. van der; Pickkers, P.; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, E.; Kubarenko, A.V.; Weber, A.N.; Kabesch, M.; Kumpf, O.; An, H.J.; Lee, J.O.; Schumann, R.R.

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding protein (LBP) is an acute-phase protein that initiates an immune response after recognition of bacterial LPS. Here, we report the crystal structure of murine LBP at 2.9 A resolution. Several structural differences were observed between LBP and the related

  15. Lipopolysaccharide induces expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha in rat brain : inhibition by methylprednisolone and by rolipram

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttini, M; Mir, A; Appel, K; Wiederhold, KH; Limonta, S; GebickeHaerter, PJ; Boddeke, HWGM

    1997-01-01

    1 We have investigated the effects of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) type TV inhibitor rolipram and of the glucocorticoid methylprednisolone on the induction of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA and protein in brains of rats after peripheral administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). 2 Aft

  16. Lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of IP-10 mRNA in rat brain and in cultured rat astrocytes and microglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, LQ; Gourmala, N; Boddeke, HWGM; Gebicke-Haerter, PJ

    1998-01-01

    Using mRNA differential display technique, we have found a differentially expressed band in rat brain, designated HAP(2)G1, which was the strongest one induced in response to peripheral administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Sequence analysis showed that HAP(2)G1 cDNA is the rat homologue of th

  17. Lipopolysaccharide quantification and alkali-based inactivation in polysaccharide preparations to enable in vitro immune modulatory studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govers, Coen; Tomassen, Monic M.M.; Rieder, Anne; Ballance, Simon; Knutsen, Svein H.; Mes, Jurriaan J.

    2016-01-01

    The correct identification of immune-modulatory activity of polysaccharides is often hampered by immune-stimulatory contaminants, with pyrogens such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a very potent example. In order to avoid false positive immuno-stimulatory properties to be attributed to polysaccharide

  18. Lipopolysaccharide quantification and alkali-based inactivation in polysaccharide preparations to enable in vitro immune modulatory studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govers, Coen; Tomassen, Monic M.M.; Rieder, Anne; Ballance, Simon; Knutsen, Svein H.; Mes, Jurriaan J.

    2016-01-01

    The correct identification of immune-modulatory activity of polysaccharides is often hampered by immune-stimulatory contaminants, with pyrogens such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a very potent example. In order to avoid false positive immuno-stimulatory properties to be attributed to

  19. Lipopolysaccharide induces expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha in rat brain : inhibition by methylprednisolone and by rolipram

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttini, M; Mir, A; Appel, K; Wiederhold, KH; Limonta, S; GebickeHaerter, PJ; Boddeke, HWGM

    1997-01-01

    1 We have investigated the effects of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) type TV inhibitor rolipram and of the glucocorticoid methylprednisolone on the induction of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA and protein in brains of rats after peripheral administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). 2 Aft

  20. Serum amyloid P component bound to gram-negative bacteria prevents lipopolysaccharide-mediated classical pathway complement activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, CJC; van Leeuwen, EMM; van Bommel, T; Verhoef, J; van Kessel, KPM; van Strijp, JAG

    Although serum amyloid P component (SAP) is known to bind many ligands, its biological function is not yet clear. Recently, it was demonstrated that SAP binds to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), In the present study, SAP was shown to bind to gram-negative bacteria expressing short types of LPS or

  1. Supplementation of Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product can attenuate the acute phase response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was designed to determine if feeding a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product to weaned pigs would reduce stress and acute phase responses (APR) following a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pigs (n=30; 6.4±0.1 kilograms body weight) were housed individually in pens with ad libi...

  2. Supplementation with a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product alters the metabolic response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in weaned pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was designed to determine if feeding a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product to weaned pigs would alter the metabolic response following a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pigs (n=30; 6.4+/-0.1 kg BW) were housed individually with ad libitum access to feed and water. Pigs were...

  3. The O-specific polysaccharide structure from the lipopolysaccharide of the Gram-negative bacterium Raoultella terrigena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Serena; Molinaro, Antonio; Dubery, Ian; Lanzetta, Rosa; Parrilli, Michelangelo

    2007-08-13

    The structure of the repeating unit of the O-specific polysaccharide from the lipopolysaccharide of the enterobacterium Raoultella terrigena was determined by means of chemical and spectroscopical methods and was found to be a linear tetrasaccharide containing a cyclic acetal of pyruvic acid (Pyr) as depicted below.[Carbohydrate structure: see text].

  4. Serum amyloid P component bound to gram-negative bacteria prevents lipopolysaccharide-mediated classical pathway complement activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, CJC; van Leeuwen, EMM; van Bommel, T; Verhoef, J; van Kessel, KPM; van Strijp, JAG

    2000-01-01

    Although serum amyloid P component (SAP) is known to bind many ligands, its biological function is not yet clear. Recently, it was demonstrated that SAP binds to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), In the present study, SAP was shown to bind to gram-negative bacteria expressing short types of LPS or lipo-olig

  5. Copper sulfate pentahydrate reduced epithelial cytotoxicity induced by lipopolysaccharide from enterogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyzi, Adel; Delkhosh, Aref; Nasrabadi, Hamid Tayefi; Cheraghi, Omid; Khakpour, Mansour; Barekati-Mowahed, Mazyar; Soltani, Sina; Mohammadi, Seyede Momeneh; Kazemi, Masoumeh; Hassanpour, Mehdi; Rezabakhsh, Aysa; Maleki-Dizaji, Nasrin; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Namdarian, Reza

    2017-05-01

    The over usage of multiple antibiotics contributes to the emergence of a whole range of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria causing enterogenic infections in poultry science. Therefore, finding an appropriate alternative natural substance carrying an antibacterial capacity would be immensely beneficial. It has been previously discovered that the different types of cupric salts, especially copper sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO4·5H2O), to carry a potent bactericidal capacity. We investigated the neutralizing effect of CuSO4·5H2O (6.25μg/ml) on the reactive oxygen species generation, and expression of MyD88, an essential adaptor protein of Toll-like receptor, and NF-κB in three intestinal epithelial cell lines exposed to 50ng/ml lipopolysaccharide. In order to find the optimal cupric sulfate concentration without enteritis-inducing toxicity, broiler chickens were initially fed with water containing 0.4, 0.5, and 1mg/l during a period of 4days. After determination of appropriate dosage, two broiler chickens and turkey flocks with enteritis were fed with cupric compound for 4days. We found that cupric sulfate can lessen the cytotoxic effect of lipopolysaccharide by reducing the reactive oxygen species content (p<0.05). Additionally, the expression of MyD88 and NF-κB was remarkably down-regulated in the presence of lipopolysaccharide and cupric sulfate. The copper sulfate in doses lower than 0.4mg/ml expressed no cytotoxic effect on the liver, kidney, and the intestinal tract while a concentration of 0.5 and 1mg/ml contributed to a moderate to severe tissue injuries. Pearson Chi-Square analysis revealed the copper cation significantly diminished the rate of mortality during 4-day feeding of broiler chicken and turkey with enteritis (p=0.000). Thus, the results briefed above all confirm the potent anti-bactericidal feature of cupric sulfate during the course of enteritis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS STUDY OF INTERACTIONS OF POLYMYXIN B3 AND ITS ALA-MUTANTS WITH LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisnyak Yu. V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Emergence of nosocomial bacterial pathogens (especially Gram-negative bacteria with multiple resistance against almost all available antibiotics is a growing medical problem. No novel drugs targeting multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria have been developed in recent years. In this context, there has been greatly renewed interest to cyclic lipodecapeptides polymyxins. Polymyxins exhibit rapid bactericidal activity, they are specific and highly potent against Gramnegative bacteria, but have potential nephrotoxic side effects. So polymyxins are attractive lead compounds to develop analogues with improved microbiological, pharmacological and toxicological properties. A detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of polymyxin interactions with its cell targets is a prerequisite for the purposeful improvement of its therapeutic properties. The primary cell target of a polymyxin is a lipopolysaccharide (LPS in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. The binding site of polymyxin on LPS has been supposed to be Kdo2-lipid A fragment. Methods. For all molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation experiments the YASARA suite of programs was used. Complex of antimicrobial peptide polymyxin В3 (PmB3 with Kdo2-lipid A portion of E. coli lipopolysaccharide was constructed by rigid docking with flexible side chains of the peptide. By alanine scanning of polymyxin В3 bound to LPS followed by simulated annealing minimization of the complexes in explicit water environment, the molecular aspects of PmB3-LPS binding have been studied by 20 ns molecular dynamics simulations at 298 K and pH 7.0. The AMBER03 force field was used with a 1.05 nm force cutoff. To treat long range electrostatic interactions the Particle Mesh Ewald algorithm was used. Results. Ala-mutations of polymyxin’s residues Dab1, Dab3, Dab5, Dab8 and Dab9 in the PmB3-LPS complex caused sustained structural changes resulting in the notable loss in stability of

  7. Differentially Gene Expression Profile Related to Inflammation in Endometrial Cells Induce by Lipopolysaccharide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-hua QIN; Ruo-guang WANG; Sheng LI; Chun-mei LI

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate differentially expressed genes related to inflammation in endometrial cells induced by Lipopolysaccharide(LPS).Methods Normal endometrium in the proliferative phase of specimen from 3 cases for the experiment was collected. The LPS group were treated with 50 μg/ml LPS. Total RNA was extracted using Trizol reagent from cells. RNA quality was assessed by determining the OD260/280 ratio by agarose gel electrophoresis, the chip was scanned by laser scanner. The acquired was analyzed. Results A total of differentially expressed genes were found, these genes were relative to many aspects. Among them, the expression of genes involved in inflammation were up-regulated by LPS, such as overexpression of lL-lβ, 8, etc.Conclusion The results indicates that inflammation-related genes may be one of the mechanisms of abnormal uterine bleeding by LPS-induced.

  8. Sepsis progression to multiple organ dysfunction in carotid chemo/baro-denervated rats treated with lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardocci, Gino; Martin, Aldo; Abarzúa, Sebastián; Rodríguez, Jorge; Simon, Felipe; Reyes, Edison P; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Navarro, Cristina; Cortes, Paula P; Fernández, Ricardo

    2015-01-15

    Sepsis progresses to multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) due to the uncontrolled release of inflammatory mediators. Carotid chemo/baro-receptors could play a protective role during sepsis. In anesthetized male rats, we measured cardiorespiratory variables and plasma TNF-α, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, and MOD marker levels 90min after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration in control (SHAM surgery) and bilateral carotid chemo/baro-denervated (BCN) rats. BCN prior to LPS blunted the tachypneic response and enhanced tachycardia and hypotension. BCN-LPS rats also showed blunted plasma glucocorticoid responses, boosted epinephrine and TNF-α responses, and earlier MOD onset with a lower survival time compared with SHAM-LPS rats. Consequently, the complete absence of carotid chemo/baro-sensory function modified the neural, endocrine and inflammatory responses to sepsis. Thus, carotid chemo/baro-receptors play a protective role in sepsis.

  9. Low dose of lipopolysaccharide pretreatment can alleviate the inflammatory response in wound infection mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Wang; Yang Liu; Yan-Rui Zhao; Jun-Lin Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Purpose:To assess the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pretreatment on wound infection mouse model and evaluate the biological safety of the optimal pretreatment dose in vivo.Methods:Mice were pretreated with LPS of different doses at 48 and 24 h before femoral medial longitudinal incision was made and infected with different bacteria.Results:It is showed that 0.5 mg/kg/time of LPS pretreatment can significantly alleviate the inflammation in mouse model infected with methicillin-resistances Staphylococcus aureus,methicillin-sensitive S.aureus,Pseudomonas aeruginosa,or Escherichia coli compared with doses of 0.25 mg/kg/time,1 mg/kg/time,and 1.5 mg/kg/time.Conclusions:LP5 pretreatment can alleviate the inflammation in mouse model and the optimal dose is 0.5 mg/kg/time,and meanwhile it does not damage organs' function.

  10. Expression of lung vascular and airway ICAM-1 after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck-Schimmer, B; Schimmer, R C; Warner, R L

    1997-01-01

    ]anti-ICAM-1 to airway surfaces increased 11-fold in a TNF-alpha-dependent manner. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses of lung tissue revealed ICAM-1 upregulation in the bronchiolar epithelium and in peribronchiolar smooth muscle. Soluble ICAM-1 could also be detected in bronchoalveolar......Airway instillation of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into rat lungs induces neutrophil accumulation, which is known to be intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)-dependent. In the present study, ICAM-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) of whole lung was found to increase by 20-fold in this inflammatory...... model. This increase was reduced by 81% after treatment of animals with anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) antibody and by 37% after treatment with anti-interleukin-1 (IL-1) antibody. The same interventions reduced whole-lung ICAM-1 protein by 85% and 25%, respectively. The studies were...

  11. Bacteriophage adhesin-coated long-period gratings for bacterial lipopolysaccharide recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koba, Marcin; Śmietana, Mateusz; Brzozowska, Ewa; Górska, Sabina; Mikulic, Predrag; Bock, Wojtek J.

    2014-05-01

    In this work we report an application of the optical fiber long-period gratings (LPGs) working near the dispersion turning point of higher order cladding modes for bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) recognition. We show that when the LPG is functionalized with the bacteriophage adhesin, it is capable of very specific LPS detection. Thus, we compare label-free binding effect for specific to the adhesin LPS-positive and non-specific LPS-negative. The resonance wavelength shift induced by the LPS-positive reaches 2.9 nm, while for LPS-negative the shift is negligible. The LPG-based sensing structure allows for monitoring of the binding phenomenon in real time and with good accuracy.

  12. Microglial ablation and lipopolysaccharide preconditioning affects pilocarpine-induced seizures in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirrione, M.M.; Mirrione, M.M.; Konomosa, D.K.; Ioradanis, G.; Dewey, S.L.; Agzzid, A.; Heppnerd, F.L.; Tsirka, St.E.

    2010-04-01

    Activated microglia have been associated with neurodegeneration in patients and in animal models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (TLE), however their precise functions as neurotoxic or neuroprotective is a topic of significant investigation. To explore this, we examined the effects of pilocarpine-induced seizures in transgenic mice where microglia/macrophages were conditionally ablated. We found that unilateral ablation of microglia from the dorsal hippocampus did not alter acute seizure sensitivity. However, when this procedure was coupled with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) preconditioning (1 mg/kg given 24 h prior to acute seizure), we observed a significant pro-convulsant phenomenon. This effect was associated with lower metabolic activation in the ipsilateral hippocampus during acute seizures, and could be attributed to activity in the mossy fiber pathway. These findings reveal that preconditioning with LPS 24 h prior to seizure induction may have a protective effect which is abolished by unilateral hippocampal microglia/macrophage ablation.

  13. Follistatin-like protein 1 suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokines expression during neuroinflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Liu, Yi; Han, Ying-Guang; Li, Jing-Kun; Jia, Jia-Lin; Chen, Bin; Yao, Zhi-Xiao; Nie, Lin; Cheng, Lei

    2017-04-01

    Follistain-like protein 1 (FSTL1), has been recently demonstrated to be involved in the embryo development of nervous system and glioblastoma. However, the role of FSTL1 in neuroinflammation remains unexplored. In this study, the expression of FSTL1 in astrocytes was verified and its role was studied in neuroinflammation induced by in vivo intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or LPS treatment to astrocytes in vitro. FSTL1 was significantly induced after ICV LPS injection or LPS treatment. FSTL1 suppressed upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines in astrocytes after LPS treatment. Moreover, FSTL1 downregulated expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines through suppressing MAPK/p-ERK1/2 pathway in astrocytes. Our results suggest that FSTL1 may play an anti-inflammatory role in neuroinflammation mediated by astrocytes.

  14. Analyses of performance of novel sensors with different coatings for detection of Lipopolysaccharide

    KAUST Repository

    Mohd. Syaifudin, A. R.

    2011-10-01

    Interdigital sensors have been widely used for non-destructive applications. New types of planar interdigital sensors have been fabricated with different coating materials to assess the response to Lipopolysaccharide, LPS. All the coatings were selected and optimized to be stable in water, as the measurements take place in water media. Moreover, the coatings have been designed to have available carboxylic or amine functional groups. The use of these functional groups is a widely used technique to specifically binding of biomolecules. The coated sensors were then immobilized with Polymyxin B(PmB) which has the specific binding properties to LPS. This paper will highlight the fabrication process and initial investigations on the sensors\\' performance based on Impedance Spectroscopy. © 2011 IEEE.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide-induced experimental immune activation does not impair memory functions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoleit, Jan-Sebastian; Oberbeck, J Reiner; Lichte, Philipp; Kobbe, Philipp; Wolf, Oliver T; Montag, Thomas; del Rey, Adriana; Gizewski, Elke R; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2010-11-01

    Systemic immune activation occurring together with release of peripheral cytokines can affect behavior and the functioning of the central nervous system (CNS). However, it remains unknown whether and to what extent cognitive functions like memory and attention are affected during transient immune activation. We employed a human endotoxemia model and standardized neuropsychological tests to assess the cognitive effects of an experimental inflammation in two groups of 12 healthy young men before and after intravenous injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, Escherichia coli, 0.4 ng/kg) or physiological saline. Endotoxin administration caused a profound transient physiological response with elevations in body temperature, number of circulating neutrophils, and increases in plasma cytokine levels [interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α], and concentrations of norepinephrine, ACTH and cortisol. However, these changes in immune and neuroendocrine parameters were not associated with alterations of memory performance, selective attention or executive functions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Protective effect of carvacrol on acute lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaosheng; Jia, Aiqing

    2014-08-01

    Carvacrol, the major component of Plectranthus amboinicus, has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of carvacrol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia and acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with LPS and the mortality of mice for 7 days were observed twice a day. Meanwhile, the protective effect of carvacrol (20, 40 or 80 mg/kg) on LPS-induced endotoxemia were detected. Using an experimental model of LPS-induced ALI, we examined the effect of carvacrol in resolving lung injury. The results showed that carvacrol could improve survival during lethal endotoxemia and attenuate LPS-induced ALI in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of carvacrol may be due to its ability to inhibit NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways, thereby inhibiting inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production.

  17. Importance of Lipopolysaccharide and Cyclic β-1,2-Glucans in Brucella-Mammalian Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas F. Haag

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucella species are the causative agents of one of the most prevalent zoonotic diseases: brucellosis. Infections by Brucella species cause major economic losses in agriculture, leading to abortions in infected animals and resulting in a severe, although rarely lethal, debilitating disease in humans. Brucella species persist as intracellular pathogens that manage to effectively evade recognition by the host's immune system. Sugar-modified components in the Brucella cell envelope play an important role in their host interaction. Brucella lipopolysaccharide (LPS, unlike Escherichia coli LPS, does not trigger the host's innate immune system. Brucella produces cyclic β-1,2-glucans, which are important for targeting them to their replicative niche in the endoplasmic reticulum within the host cell. This paper will focus on the role of LPS and cyclic β-1,2-glucans in Brucella-mammalian infections and discuss the use of mutants, within the biosynthesis pathway of these cell envelope structures, in vaccine development.

  18. Anti-CD163-dexamethasone conjugate inhibits the acute phase response to lipopolysaccharide in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Karen Louise; Møller, Holger Jon; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov;

    2016-01-01

    /kg) 24 h prior to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (2.5 mg/kg intraperitoneal). We measured plasma concentrations of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) 2 h post-LPS and liver mRNAs and serum concentrations of the rat acute phase protein α-2-macroglobulin (α-2-M) 24 h after LPS. Also...... μg/mL, P = 0.04) after LPS compared to low dose dexamethasone treated animals, while none of the free dexamethasone doses had an effect on liver mRNA or serum levels of α-2-M. Also, the conjugate reduced TNF-α (7208 ± 1977 pg/mL vs 21583 ± 7117 pg/mL, P = 0.03) and IL-6 (15685 ± 3779 pg/mL vs 25715...

  19. Lipopolysaccharide and silica-stimulated mononuclear cell prostaglandin production in ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neville A. Punchard

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal, lipopolysaccharide (LPS and silica-stimulated prostaglandin (PG production were compared between peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC from UC patients and healthy subjects (HS. Basal and LPS-stimulated PBMNC PGI2, but not PGE2, production was greater in UC. LPS stimulated both PGE2 and PGI2 by PBMNC from HS and UC patients. Silica stimulated production of both PGs by cells from HS but only PGE2 by cells from UC patients. The differences in responses to silica and LPS may result from differences in activation of NFκB or, alternatively, prior sensitisation to one of these agents. That PBMNC PGE2 production is not increased in UC, as it is in Crohn’s disease, suggests that there are differences in PBMNC behaviour between these two diseases.

  20. Hepatoprotective activity of Tridax procumbens against d-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced hepatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, Vilwanathan; Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2005-10-03

    The hepatoprotective activity of aerial parts of Tridax procumbens was investigated against d-Galactosamine/Lipopolysaccharide (d-GalN/LPS) induced hepatitis in rats. d-GalN/LPS (300 mg/kg body weight/30 microg/kg body weight)-induced hepatic damage was manifested by a significant increase in the activities of marker enzymes (aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase and gamma glutamyl transferase) and bilirubin level in serum and lipids both in serum and liver. Pretreatment of rats with a chloroform insoluble fraction from ethanolic extract of Tridax procumbens reversed these altered parameters to normal values. The biochemical observations were supplemented by histopathological examination of liver sections. Results of this study revealed that Tridax procumbens could afford a significant protection in the alleviation of d-GalN/LPS-induced hepatocellular injury.