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Sample records for frail community-dwelling older

  1. Care for community-dwelling frail older people: a practice nurse perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindels, Jill; Cox, Karen; Widdershoven, Guy; van Schayck, Onno C P; Abma, Tineke A

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate care programmes for community-dwelling frail older people from a practice nurse perspective and gain a deeper understanding of their role within the programmes. In response to the increasing frail population, three regions in the Netherlands implemented care programmes, in which a proactive approach is used to identify frail older people in the community and provide them with the appropriate care and support. A constructivist grounded theory approach. A formative process evaluation was performed, in which study participants were practice nurses (n = 23) focusing on the identification of and care for frail older people in primary care settings. Based on the principles of grounded theory, data were collected via semi-structured interviews and focus groups and analysed. The practice nurses explain that 'building a trusting relationship' with the older person and 'making connections' between older people, family and other professionals are key elements of good care in the programmes. 'Targeting the wrong audience' and 'providing good care' reflect the doubts and feelings of insecurity the practice nurses have about the screening and selection procedures and their own role and expertise in the programme. According to the experiences of practice nurses, a trusting relationship with the older people is necessary to provide good care. Practice nurses feel they should receive more support and education to conquer issues concerning social problems in frail older people. Moreover, practice nurses considered the screening and selection procedures to be unsuccessful in identifying frail older people who do need care. A trusting relationship should be given high priority in the care for community-dwelling frail older people. To improve the care programmes, screening and selection procedures need adjustments. Practice nurses should receive more support in dealing with older people with psychosocial problems. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Supervision of care networks for frail community dwelling adults aged 75 years and older: protocol of a mixed methods study.

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    Verver, Didi; Merten, Hanneke; Robben, Paul; Wagner, Cordula

    2015-08-25

    The Dutch healthcare inspectorate (IGZ) supervises the quality and safety of healthcare in the Netherlands. Owing to the growing population of (community dwelling) older adults and changes in the Dutch healthcare system, the IGZ is exploring new methods to effectively supervise care networks that exist around frail older adults. The composition of these networks, where formal and informal care takes place, and the lack of guidelines and quality and risk indicators make supervision complicated in the current situation. This study consists of four phases. The first phase identifies risks for community dwelling frail older adults in the existing literature. In the second phase, a qualitative pilot study will be conducted to assess the needs and wishes of the frail older adults concerning care and well-being, perception of risks, and the composition of their networks, collaboration and coordination between care providers involved in the network. In the third phase, questionnaires based on the results of phase II will be sent to a larger group of frail older adults (n=200) and their care providers. The results will describe the composition of their care networks and prioritise risks concerning community dwelling older adults. Also, it will provide input for the development of a new supervision framework by the IGZ. During phase IV, a second questionnaire will be sent to the participants of phase III to establish changes of perception in risks and possible changes in the care networks. The framework will be tested by the IGZ in pilots, and the researchers will evaluate these pilots and provide feedback to the IGZ. The study protocol was approved by the Scientific Committee of the EMGO+institute and the Medical Ethical review committee of the VU University Medical Centre. Results will be presented in scientific articles and reports and at meetings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  3. Cost-effectiveness of a multidisciplinary intervention model for community-dwelling frail older people.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melis, R.J.F.; Adang, E.M.M.; Teerenstra, S.; Eijken, M.I.J. van; Wimo, A.; Achterberg, T. van; Lisdonk, E.H. van de; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is growing interest in geriatric care for community-dwelling older people. There are, however, relatively few reports on the economics of this type of care. This article reports about the cost-effectiveness of the Dutch Geriatric Intervention Program (DGIP) compared to usual care

  4. The (cost-)effectiveness of preventive, integrated care for community-dwelling frail older people: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looman, Wilhelmina Mijntje; Huijsman, Robbert; Fabbricotti, Isabelle Natalina

    2018-04-17

    Integrated care is increasingly promoted as an effective and cost-effective way to organise care for community-dwelling frail older people with complex problems but the question remains whether high expectations are justified. Our study aims to systematically review the empirical evidence for the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of preventive, integrated care for community-dwelling frail older people and close attention is paid to the elements and levels of integration of the interventions. We searched nine databases for eligible studies until May 2016 with a comparison group and reporting at least one outcome regarding effectiveness or cost-effectiveness. We identified 2,998 unique records and, after exclusions, selected 46 studies on 29 interventions. We assessed the quality of the included studies with the Effective Practice and Organization of Care risk-of-bias tool. The interventions were described following Rainbow Model of Integrated Care framework by Valentijn. Our systematic review reveals that the majority of the reported outcomes in the studies on preventive, integrated care show no effects. In terms of health outcomes, effectiveness is demonstrated most often for seldom-reported outcomes such as well-being. Outcomes regarding informal caregivers and professionals are rarely considered and negligible. Most promising are the care process outcomes that did improve for preventive, integrated care interventions as compared to usual care. Healthcare utilisation was the most reported outcome but we found mixed results. Evidence for cost-effectiveness is limited. High expectations should be tempered given this limited and fragmented evidence for the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of preventive, integrated care for frail older people. Future research should focus on unravelling the heterogeneity of frailty and on exploring what outcomes among frail older people may realistically be expected. © 2018 The Authors. Health and Social Care in the Community

  5. Nutritional Status and Habitual Dietary Intake Are Associated with Frail Skin Conditions in Community-Dwelling Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizaka, S; Nagata, S; Sanada, H

    2017-01-01

    Prevention of frail skin is important in older people because frail skin is associated with a risk of injury in this population. In this study, we investigated the association of nutritional status and habitual dietary intake with skin conditions in community-dwelling older people. Cross-sectional study. Three community settings in Japan from autumn to winter. Older people aged ≥65 years without care-need certification (n=118). Malnutrition and obesity were evaluated to assess the nutritional status. Nutrient and food group intakes per 1000 kcal were evaluated using a brief self-administered diet history questionnaire. Dietary patterns based on food groups were evaluated by principal component analysis. Skin condition parameters, including stratum corneum hydration, appearance of xerosis (specific symptom sum score [SRRC score]), and dermal intensity by high-frequency ultrasonography, were measured on a lower leg. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed with adjustment for confounders. The mean (standard deviation) age was 74.1 (4.8) years, and 83.1% of participants were female. A higher intake of plant fat (p=0.018) was associated with a lower SRRC score. Higher intakes of α-tocopherol (p=0.050) and vitamin C (p=0.017) were associated with increased dermal intensity. A body mass index ≥25 (p=0.016) was associated with decreased dermal intensity. A dietary pattern characterized by higher vegetable and fruit intake was associated with a better skin condition. Plant fat, antioxidant vitamins, and a dietary pattern characterized by vegetables and fruits showed positive and obesity showed negative associations for frail skin in community-dwelling older people.

  6. Self-Management Group Exercise Extends Healthy Life Expectancy in Frail Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Minoru; Arai, Hidenori

    2017-05-15

    Preventing frailty and its adverse health outcomes is crucial in countries with a large elderly population, such as Japan. Since the long-term care insurance (LTCI) system was launched, the number of certified older adults with LTCI service requirement has continued to increase. This is a serious problem, because the LTCI service requirement certification is equivalent to disability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a self-management group intervention on new LTCI service requirement certifications in community-dwelling older adults in Japan. We analyzed the cohort data from a prospective study. In this study, we recruited community-dwelling adults aged 65 years and older who were independent in a city in Kyoto prefecture in 2012. The subjects in the participation group (n = 1620) attended 60-min group training sessions once or twice every two weeks from December 2012 to December 2016. The exercise sessions consisted of mild-intensity aerobic exercise, mild strength training, flexibility and balance exercises, and cool-down activities. These exercise classes were facilitated by well-trained volunteer staff. The outcome measure was the number of new LTCI requirement certifications during a four-year follow-up period. During the four-year follow-up period, 247 subjects (15.2%) in the participation group and 334 (20.6%) in the control group were newly certified for LTCI service requirements. The hazard ratio for new LTCI service requirements in the participation group compared with the control group was 0.73 (95% CI = 0.62-0.86) in the four-year follow-up period. These results indicate the usefulness of self-management group exercise to reduce the incidence of disability in older adults. Thus, increasing self-management group activities in each community should be encouraged.

  7. Self-Management Group Exercise Extends Healthy Life Expectancy in Frail Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Yamada

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Preventing frailty and its adverse health outcomes is crucial in countries with a large elderly population, such as Japan. Since the long-term care insurance (LTCI system was launched, the number of certified older adults with LTCI service requirement has continued to increase. This is a serious problem, because the LTCI service requirement certification is equivalent to disability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a self-management group intervention on new LTCI service requirement certifications in community-dwelling older adults in Japan. We analyzed the cohort data from a prospective study. In this study, we recruited community-dwelling adults aged 65 years and older who were independent in a city in Kyoto prefecture in 2012. The subjects in the participation group (n = 1620 attended 60-min group training sessions once or twice every two weeks from December 2012 to December 2016. The exercise sessions consisted of mild-intensity aerobic exercise, mild strength training, flexibility and balance exercises, and cool-down activities. These exercise classes were facilitated by well-trained volunteer staff. The outcome measure was the number of new LTCI requirement certifications during a four-year follow-up period. During the four-year follow-up period, 247 subjects (15.2% in the participation group and 334 (20.6% in the control group were newly certified for LTCI service requirements. The hazard ratio for new LTCI service requirements in the participation group compared with the control group was 0.73 (95% CI = 0.62–0.86 in the four-year follow-up period. These results indicate the usefulness of self-management group exercise to reduce the incidence of disability in older adults. Thus, increasing self-management group activities in each community should be encouraged.

  8. Relation of Statin Use and Mortality in Community-Dwelling Frail Older Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

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    Pilotto, Alberto; Gallina, Pietro; Panza, Francesco; Copetti, Massimiliano; Cella, Alberto; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso; Daragjati, Julia; Ferrucci, Luigi; Maggi, Stefania; Mattace-Raso, Francesco; Paccalin, Marc; Polidori, Maria Cristina; Topinkova, Eva; Trifirò, Gianluca; Welmer, Anna-Karin; Strandberg, Timo; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2016-12-01

    Clinical decision-making for statin treatment in older patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) is under debate, particularly in community-dwelling frail patients at high risk of death. In this retrospective observational study on 2,597 community-dwelling patients aged ≥65 years with a previous hospitalization for CAD, we estimated mortality risk assessed with the Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI), based on the Standardized Multidimensional Assessment Schedule for Adults and Aged Persons (SVaMA), used to determine accessibility to homecare services/nursing home admission in 2005 to 2013 in the Padua Health District, Veneto, Italy. Participants were categorized as having mild (MPI-SVaMA-1), moderate (MPI-SVaMA-2), and high (MPI-SVaMA-3) baseline mortality risk, and propensity score-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of 3-year mortality rate were calculated according to statin treatment in these subgroups. Greater MPI-SVaMA scores were associated with lower rates of statin treatment and higher 3-year mortality rate (MPI-SVaMA-1 = 23.4%; MPI-SVaMA-2 = 39.1%; MPI-SVaMA-3 = 76.2%). After adjusting for propensity score quintiles, statin treatment was associated with lower 3-year mortality risk irrespective of MPI-SVaMA group (HRs [95% confidence intervals] 0.45 [0.37 to 0.55], 0.44 [0.36 to 0.53], and 0.28 [0.21 to 0.39] in MPI-SVaMA-1, -2, and -3 groups, respectively [interaction test p = 0.202]). Subgroup analyses showed that statin treatment was also beneficial irrespective of age (HRs [95% confidence intervals] 0.38 [0.27 to 0.53], 0.45 [0.38 to 0.54], and 0.44 [0.37 to 0.54] in 65 to 74, 75 to 84, and ≥85 year age groups, respectively [interaction test p = 0.597]). In conclusion, in community-dwelling frail older patients with CAD, statin treatment was significantly associated with reduced 3-year mortality rate irrespective of age and multidimensional impairment, although the frailest patients were less likely to be treated with statins. Copyright

  9. Supervision of care networks for frail community dwelling adults aged 75 years and older: protocol of a mixed methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verver, Didi; Merten, Hanneke; Robben, Paul; Wagner, Cordula

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Dutch healthcare inspectorate (IGZ) supervises the quality and safety of healthcare in the Netherlands. Owing to the growing population of (community dwelling) older adults and changes in the Dutch healthcare system, the IGZ is exploring new methods to effectively supervise care networks that exist around frail older adults. The composition of these networks, where formal and informal care takes place, and the lack of guidelines and quality and risk indicators make supervision complicated in the current situation. Methods and analysis This study consists of four phases. The first phase identifies risks for community dwelling frail older adults in the existing literature. In the second phase, a qualitative pilot study will be conducted to assess the needs and wishes of the frail older adults concerning care and well-being, perception of risks, and the composition of their networks, collaboration and coordination between care providers involved in the network. In the third phase, questionnaires based on the results of phase II will be sent to a larger group of frail older adults (n=200) and their care providers. The results will describe the composition of their care networks and prioritise risks concerning community dwelling older adults. Also, it will provide input for the development of a new supervision framework by the IGZ. During phase IV, a second questionnaire will be sent to the participants of phase III to establish changes of perception in risks and possible changes in the care networks. The framework will be tested by the IGZ in pilots, and the researchers will evaluate these pilots and provide feedback to the IGZ. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol was approved by the Scientific Committee of the EMGO+institute and the Medical Ethical review committee of the VU University Medical Centre. Results will be presented in scientific articles and reports and at meetings. PMID:26307619

  10. Identifying Frail-Related Biomarkers among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Japan: A Research Example from the Japanese Gerontological Evaluation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cable

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined correlating clinical biomarkers for the physical aspect of frailty among community-dwelling older adults in Japan, using Japanese Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES. We used information from the JAGES participants (N = 3,128 who also participated in the community health screening in 2010. We grouped participants’ response to the Study of Osteoporotic Fracture (SOF Frailty Index into robust (=0, intermediate frail (=1, and frail (=2+ ones to indicate physical aspect of frailty. Independent of sex and age, results from multinomial logistic regression showed above normal albumin and below normal HDL and haemoglobin levels were positively associated with intermediate frail (RRR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.22–3.23; RRR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.33–1.39; RRR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.23–1.51, resp. and frail cases (RRR = 2.27, 95% CI = 1.91–2.70; RRR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.51–1.68; RRR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.28–1.52, resp.. Limited to women, above normal Hb1Ac level was similarly associated with intermediate frail and frail cases (RRR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.02, 1.38; RRR = 2.56, 95% CI = 2.23–2.95, resp.. Use of relevant clinical biomarkers can help in assessment of older adults’ physical aspect of frailty.

  11. An evaluation of an integrated primary care approach to improve well-being among frail community-dwelling older people

    OpenAIRE

    Vestjens, Lotte; Murray Cramm, Jane; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A major challenge in primary health care is the substantial increase of the proportion of frail older persons with long-term conditions and multiple complex needs. The traditional primary care system in the Netherlands is fragmented and reactive. Consequently, current primary health care is not able to cope effectively with the increasing demands for health and social care, and to improve well-being among frail community-living older people. This calls for a fundamental transfor...

  12. Statin treatment and mortality in community-dwelling frail older patients with diabetes mellitus : A retrospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Pilotto (Alberto); F. Panza (Francesco); Copetti, M. (Massimiliano); Simonato, M. (Matteo); D. Sancarlo; P. Gallina (Pietro); T.E. Strandberg (Timo); A.J. Cruz-Jentoft (A.); Daragjati, J. (Julia); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); A. Fontana (Andrea); S. Maggi; F.U.S. Mattace Raso (Francesco); M. Paccalin; Polidori, M.C. (Maria Cristina); Schulz, R.-J. (Ralf-Joachim); E. Topinkova; G. Trifirò (Gianluca); A.-K. Welmer

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Older adults are often excluded from clinical trials. Decision making for administration of statins to older patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is under debate, particularly in frail older patients with comorbidity and high mortality risk. We tested the hypothesis that

  13. Strategies used by case managers supporting frail, community-dwelling older persons, to engage primary care physicians in interprofessional collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Van Durme, Thérèse; Cès, Sophie; Karam, Marlène; Macq, Jean; RCN 2014 Annual International Nursing Research Conference

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim Although it is known that case management for frail older persons (FOP) is more likely to foster positive outcomes when the case manager works closely with the primary care physicians (PCP) [1], engaging PCPs to collaborate is often a difficult process, especially when the case management function is new [2]. The aim of this study was to provide insight on how newly implemented case management projects managed to engage FOPs’ PCP in the case management process, (to what ext...

  14. Home-based video exercise intervention for community-dwelling frail older women: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Sonja; Kronborg, Christian; Puggaard, Lis

    2008-01-01

    call. The effect of intervention was evaluated by the physical performance test, mobility-tiredness score, maximal isometric handgrip and biceps strength, lower limb explosive power, repeated chair rise (5 times), 10-m maximal walking-speed, semi-tandem balance, and health-related quality of life......, handgrip, biceps strength, chair rise, and 10-m maximal walking-speed in the training group, and for walking-speed and self-rated health in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that homebased training for frail older women using an exercise video induces lasting health-related quality...... and health-related quality of life. METHODS: Communitydwelling frail women >/=75 yrs, receiving public home care, were randomized into a training group (n=30) and a control group (n=31). Participants exercised for 26 minutes, three times per week for five months. Both groups received a bi-weekly telephone...

  15. The effects of a life goal-setting technique in a preventive care program for frail community-dwelling older people: a cluster nonrandomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuri, Yoshimi; Takabatake, Shinichi; Nishikawa, Tomoko; Oka, Mari; Fujiwara, Taro

    2016-05-12

    Frailty among older people is associated with an increased risk of needing care. There have been many reports on preventive care programs for frail older people, but few have shown positive effects on disability prevention. Physical exercise programs for frail older people affect elements such as physical fitness and balance, but are less effective for disability outcomes and are not followed up in the longer term. We developed a life goal-setting technique (LGST). Our objective was to determine the effect of a LGST plus standard preventive care program for community-dwelling frail older people. We used a cluster nonrandomized controlled trial with seven intervention and nine matched control groups, with baseline assessment and follow-up at 3, 6, and 9 months. Participants were 176 frail older people, aged 65 years or over, living in the community in Izumi, Osaka, Japan. All participants attended regular 120 min preventive care exercise classes each week, over 3 months. They also received oral care and nutrition education. The intervention groups alone received life goal-setting support. We assessed outcomes longitudinally, comparing pre-intervention with follow-up. The primary outcome measure was health improvement according to the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare's "Kihon Checklist" for assessment of frailty and quality of life (QOL), analyzed with a two-way ANOVA and post-test comparison. Secondary outcomes included physical functions and assessment of life goals. The improvement on the Kihon Checklist for the intervention group was approximately 60 % from baseline to 9-months follow-up; the control group improved by approximately 40 %. The difference between groups was significant at 3-month (p = 0.043) and 6-month (p = 0.015) follow-ups but not at 9-month (p = 0.098) follow-up. Analysis of QOL yielded a significant time × group interaction effect (p = 0.022). The effect was significant at 3 months in the intervention

  16. The reduction of disability in community-dwelling frail older people: design of a two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial

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    Metzelthin Silke F

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frailty among older people is related to an increased risk of adverse health outcomes such as acute and chronic diseases, disability and mortality. Although many intervention studies for frail older people have been reported, only a few have shown positive effects regarding disability prevention. This article presents the design of a two-arm cluster randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and feasibility of a primary care intervention that combines the most promising elements of disability prevention in community-dwelling frail older people. Methods/design In this study twelve general practitioner practices were randomly allocated to the intervention group (6 practices or to the control group (6 practices. Three thousand four hundred ninety-eight screening questionnaires including the Groningen Frailty Indicator (GFI were sent out to identify frail older people. Based on their GFI score (≥5, 360 participants will be included in the study. The intervention will receive an interdisciplinary primary care intervention. After a comprehensive assessment by a practice nurse and additional assessments by other professionals, if needed, an individual action plan will be defined. The action plan is related to a flexible toolbox of interventions, which will be conducted by an interdisciplinary team. Effects of the intervention, both for the frail older people and their informal caregivers, will be measured after 6, 12 and 24 months using postal questionnaires and telephone interviews. Data for the process evaluation and economic evaluation will be gathered continuously over a 24-month period. Discussion The proposed study will provide information about the usefulness of an interdisciplinary primary care intervention. The postal screening procedure was conducted in two cycles between December 2009 and April 2010 and turned out to be a feasible method. The response rate was 79.7%. According to GFI scores 29

  17. Development of integrated care pathways: toward a care management system to meet the needs of frail and disabled community-dwelling older people

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    Nicole Dubuc

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The home care and services provided to older adults with the same needs are often inadequate and highly varied. Integrated care pathways (ICPs can resolve these issues. The aim of this study was to develop the content of ICPs to follow up frail and disabled community-dwelling older people.Theory and method: A rigorous process was applied according to a series of steps: identification of desirable characteristics and a theoretical framework; review of evidence-based practices and current practices; and determination of ICPs by an interdisciplinary task team.Results: ICPs are intended to prevent specific problems, maximize independence, and promote successful aging. They are organized according to a dynamic process: (1 needs assessment and assessment of risk/protection factors; (2 data-collection summary and goals identification; (3 planning of interventions from a client-centered view; (4 coordination, delivery, and follow-up; and (5 identification of variances, as well as review and adjustment of plans.Conclusion: Once computerized, these ICPs will facilitate the exchange of information as well as the clinical decision-making process with a perspective to adequately matching the needs of an individual person with resources that delay or slow the progression of frailty and disability. Once aggregated, the data will also support managers in organizing teamwork and follow-up for clients.

  18. Development of integrated care pathways: toward a care management system to meet the needs of frail and disabled community-dwelling older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Dubuc

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The home care and services provided to older adults with the same needs are often inadequate and highly varied. Integrated care pathways (ICPs can resolve these issues. The aim of this study was to develop the content of ICPs to follow up frail and disabled community-dwelling older people. Theory and method: A rigorous process was applied according to a series of steps: identification of desirable characteristics and a theoretical framework; review of evidence-based practices and current practices; and determination of ICPs by an interdisciplinary task team. Results: ICPs are intended to prevent specific problems, maximize independence, and promote successful aging. They are organized according to a dynamic process: (1 needs assessment and assessment of risk/protection factors; (2 data-collection summary and goals identification; (3 planning of interventions from a client-centered view; (4 coordination, delivery, and follow-up; and (5 identification of variances, as well as review and adjustment of plans. Conclusion: Once computerized, these ICPs will facilitate the exchange of information as well as the clinical decision-making process with a perspective to adequately matching the needs of an individual person with resources that delay or slow the progression of frailty and disability. Once aggregated, the data will also support managers in organizing teamwork and follow-up for clients.

  19. A comprehensive grid to evaluate case management's expected effectiveness for community-dwelling frail older people: results from a multiple, embedded case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Durme, Thérèse; Schmitz, Olivier; Cès, Sophie; Anthierens, Sibyl; Maggi, Patrick; Delye, Sam; De Almeida Mello, Johanna; Declercq, Anja; Macq, Jean; Remmen, Roy; Aujoulat, Isabelle

    2015-06-18

    Case management is a type of intervention expected to improve the quality of care and therefore the quality of life of frail, community-dwelling older people while delaying institutionalisation in nursing homes. However, the heterogeneity, multidimensionality and complexity of these interventions make their evaluation by the means of classical approaches inadequate. Our objective was twofold: (i) to propose a tool allowing for the identification of the key components that explain the success of case management for this population and (ii) to propose a typology based on the results of this tool. The process started with a multiple embedded case study design in order to identify the key components of case management. Based on the results of this first step, data were collected among 22 case management interventions, in order to evaluate their expected effectiveness. Finally, multiple correspondence analyses was conducted to propose a typology of case management. The overall approach was informed by Wagner's Chronic Care Model and the theory of complexity. The study identified a total of 23 interacting key components. Based on the clustering of response patterns of the 22 case management projects included in our study, three types of case management programmes were evidenced, situated on a continuum from a more "socially-oriented" type towards a more "clinically-oriented" type of case management. The type of feedback provided to the general practitioner about both the global geriatric assessment and the result of the intervention turned out to be the most discriminant component between the types. The study design allowed to produce a tool that can be used to distinguish between different types of case management interventions and further evaluate their effect on frail older people in terms of the delaying institutionalisation, functional and cognitive status, quality of life and societal costs.

  20. Opinions of dentists on the barriers in providing oral health care to community-dwelling frail older people: a questionnaire survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bots-Vantspijker, P.C.; Bruers, J.J.; Bots, C.P.; Vanobbergen, J.N.; De Visschere, L.M.; Baat, C. de; Schols, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent dentists in the Netherlands experience barriers in providing oral health care to community-dwelling older people. BACKGROUND: As most publications on the barriers in providing oral health care to older people consist of surveys on

  1. Opinions of dentists on the barriers in providing oral health care to community-dwelling frail older people: a questionnaire survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bots-VantSpijker, P.C.; Bruers, J.J.M.; Bots, C.P.; Vanobbergen, J.N.O.; De Visschere, L.M.J.; de Baat, C.; Schols, J.M.G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent dentists in the Netherlands experience barriers in providing oral health care to community-dwelling older people. Background: As most publications on the barriers in providing oral health care to older people consist of surveys on

  2. Interventions to prevent disability in frail community-dwelling elderly: a systematic review

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    van Rossum Erik

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an interest for intervention studies aiming at the prevention of disability in community-dwelling physically frail older persons, though an overview on their content, methodological quality and effectiveness is lacking. Methods A search for clinical trials involved databases PubMed, CINAHL and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and manually hand searching. Trials that included community-dwelling frail older persons based on physical frailty indicators and used disability measures for outcome evaluation were included. The selection of papers and data-extraction was performed by two independent reviewers. Out of 4602 titles, 10 papers remained that met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 9 were of sufficient methodological quality and concerned 2 nutritional interventions and 8 physical exercise interventions. Results No evidence was found for the effect of nutritional interventions on disability measures. The physical exercise interventions involved 2 single-component programs focusing on lower extremity strength and 6 multi-component programs addressing a variety of physical parameters. Out of 8 physical exercise interventions, three reported positive outcomes for disability. There was no evidence for the effect of single lower extremity strength training on disability. Differences between the multi-component interventions in e.g. individualization, duration, intensity and setting hamper the interpretation of the elements that consistently produced successful outcomes. Conclusion There is an indication that relatively long-lasting and high-intensive multicomponent exercise programs have a positive effect on ADL and IADL disability for community-living moderate physically frail older persons. Future research into disability prevention in physical frail older persons could be directed to more individualized and comprehensive programs.

  3. Effects of an interactive computer game exercise regimen on balance impairment in frail community-dwelling older adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szturm, Tony; Betker, Aimee L; Moussavi, Zahra; Desai, Ankur; Goodman, Valerie

    2011-10-01

    Due to the many problems associated with reduced balance and mobility, providing an effective and engaging rehabilitation regimen is essential to progress recovery from impairments and to help prevent further degradation of motor skills. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and benefits of physical therapy based on a task-oriented approach delivered via an engaging, interactive video game paradigm. The intervention focused on performing targeted dynamic tasks, which included reactive balance controls and environmental interaction. This study was a randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a geriatric day hospital. Thirty community-dwelling and ambulatory older adults attending the day hospital for treatment of balance and mobility limitations participated in the study. Participants were randomly assigned to either a control group or an experimental group. The control group received the typical rehabilitation program consisting of strengthening and balance exercises provided at the day hospital. The experimental group received a program of dynamic balance exercises coupled with video game play, using a center-of-pressure position signal as the computer mouse. The tasks were performed while standing on a fixed floor surface, with progression to a compliant sponge pad. Each group received 16 sessions, scheduled 2 per week, with each session lasting 45 minutes. Data for the following measures were obtained before and after treatment: Berg Balance Scale, Timed "Up & Go" Test, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, modified Clinical Test of Sensory Interaction and Balance, and spatiotemporal gait variables assessed in an instrumented carpet system test. Findings demonstrated significant improvements in posttreatment balance performance scores for both groups, and change scores were significantly greater in the experimental group compared with the control group. No significant treatment effect was observed in either group for the

  4. Nurse-led home visitation programme to improve health-related quality of life and reduce disability among potentially frail community-dwelling older people in general practice: a theory-based process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stijnen, Mandy M N; Jansen, Maria W J; Duimel-Peeters, Inge G P; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2014-10-25

    Population ageing fosters new models of care delivery for older people that are increasingly integrated into existing care systems. In the Netherlands, a primary-care based preventive home visitation programme has been developed for potentially frail community-dwelling older people (aged ≥75 years), consisting of a comprehensive geriatric assessment during a home visit by a practice nurse followed by targeted interdisciplinary care and follow-up over time. A theory-based process evaluation was designed to examine (1) the extent to which the home visitation programme was implemented as planned and (2) the extent to which general practices successfully redesigned their care delivery. Using a mixed-methods approach, the focus was on fidelity (quality of implementation), dose delivered (completeness), dose received (exposure and satisfaction), reach (participation rate), recruitment, and context. Twenty-four general practices participated, of which 13 implemented the home visitation programme and 11 delivered usual care to older people. Data collection consisted of semi-structured interviews with practice nurses (PNs), general practitioners (GPs), and older people; feedback meetings with PNs; structured registration forms filled-out by PNs; and narrative descriptions of the recruitment procedures and registration of inclusion and drop-outs by members of the research team. Fidelity of implementation was acceptable, but time constraints and inadequate reach (i.e., the relatively healthy older people participated) negatively influenced complete delivery of protocol elements, such as interdisciplinary cooperation and follow-up of older people over time. The home visitation programme was judged positively by PNs, GPs, and older people. Useful tools were offered to general practices for organising proactive geriatric care. The home visitation programme did not have major shortcomings in itself, but the delivery offered room for improvement. General practices received

  5. Dietary protein intake in community-dwelling, frail, and institutionalized elderly people: scope for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieland, Michael; Borgonjen-Van den Berg, Karin J; van Loon, Luc J C; de Groot, Lisette C P G M

    2012-03-01

    Adequate dietary protein intake is required to postpone and treat sarcopenia in elderly people. Insight into dietary protein intake in this heterogeneous population segment is needed to locate dietary inadequacies and to identify target populations and feeding strategies for dietary interventions. Therefore, we assessed dietary protein intake, distribution of protein intake throughout the day, and the use of protein-containing food sources in community-dwelling, frail, and institutionalized elderly people in the Netherlands. Secondary analyses were carried out using dietary data collected from studies among community-dwelling, frail, and institutionalized elderly people to evaluate protein intake characteristics. Dietary protein intake averaged 1.1 ± 0.3 g/kg-bw/day in community-dwelling, 1.0 ± 0.3 g/kg-bw/day in frail, and 0.8 ± 0.3 g/kg-bw/day in institutionalized elderly men. Similar protein intakes were found in women. Ten percent of the community-dwelling and frail elderly and 35% of the institutionalized elderly people showed a protein intake below the estimated average requirement (0.7 g/kg-bw/day). Protein intake was particularly low at breakfast in community-dwelling (10 ± 10 g), frail (8 ± 5 g), and institutionalized elderly people (12 ± 6 g) with bread and dairy products as predominant protein sources. Whereas daily protein intake is generally well above the recommended dietary allowance in community-dwelling and frail elderly people, a significant proportion of institutionalized elderly showed an intake below the current protein requirement, making them an important target population for dietary interventions. Particularly at breakfast, there is scope for improving protein intake.

  6. Development of a home visitation programme for the early detection of health problems in potentially frail community-dwelling older people by general practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stijnen, M.M.N.; Jansen, M.W.J.; Vrijhoef, H.J.M.; Duimel-Peeters, I.G.P.

    2013-01-01

    The integration within existing health care systems of preventive initiatives to maintain independent living among older people is increasingly emphasized. This article describes the development and refinement of the [G]OLD home visitation programme: an eight-step programme, including a

  7. Resilience in Rural Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Context: Identifying ways to meet the health care needs of older adults is important because their numbers are increasing and they often have more health care issues. High resilience level may be one factor that helps older adults adjust to the hardships associated with aging. Rural community-dwelling older adults often face unique challenges such…

  8. Differences in lifestyle, physical performance and quality of life between frail and robust Brazilian community-dwelling elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewo Sampaio, Priscila Yukari; Sampaio, Ricardo Aurélio Carvalho; Coelho Júnior, Hélio José; Teixeira, Luis Felipe M; Tessutti, Vitor D; Uchida, Marco Carlos; Arai, Hidenori

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the lifestyles, physical performance and quality of life (QOL) of frail and robust Brazilian community-dwelling older women, and to identify risk factors for frailty. Frailty was assessed using the Kihon Checklist. Lifestyles were assessed using a questionnaire. Physical performance was assessed by measuring walking speeds, performance on the one-leg stand test and the five-times chair stand test and handgrip strength. QOL was assessed using the Short Form-8 questionnaire. Participants were divided into frail and robust groups based on their total Kihon Checklist scores. A total of 109 participants (age 70.8 ± 6.87 years) were included in this study (robust n = 85, frail n = 24). Differences in living structures (P financial satisfaction (P = 0.004) and the frequencies with which participants leave the house (P performance (walking speed P financial dissatisfaction, a sedentary lifestyle, falls, and malnutrition. Furthermore, they showed poorer physical performance and QOL. An early, well-focused approach is crucial, especially for older adults who walk slowly and have bodily pain to preserve health and QOL. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 829-835. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  9. Nutritional status according to the mini nutritional assessment (MNA®) and frailty in community dwelling older persons: a close relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollwein, J; Volkert, D; Diekmann, R; Kaiser, M J; Uter, W; Vidal, K; Sieber, C C; Bauer, J M

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates the association between MNA results and frailty status in community-dwelling older adults. In addition the relevance of singular MNA items and subscores in this regard was tested. Cross-sectional study. Community-dwelling older adults were recruited in the region of Nürnberg, Germany. 206 volunteers aged 75 years or older without cognitive impairment (Mini Mental State Examination >24 points), 66.0% female. Frailty was defined according to Fried et al. as presence of three, pre-frailty as presence of one or two of the following criteria: weight loss, exhaustion, low physical activity, low handgrip strength and slow walking speed. Malnutrition (malnutrition (17-23.5 points) were determined by MNA®. 15.1% of the participants were at risk of malnutrition, no participant was malnourished. 15.5 % were frail, 39.8% pre-frail and 44.7% non-frail. 46.9% of the frail, 12.2% of the pre-frail and 2.2% of the non-frail participants were at risk of malnutrition (pmalnutrition were either pre-frail or frail. For the anthropometric, dietary, subjective and functional, but not for the general MNA subscore, frail participants scored significantly lower than pre-frail (p<0.01), and non-frail participants (p<0.01). Twelve of the 18 MNA items were also significantly associated with frailty (p<0.05). These results underline the close association between frailty syndrome and nutritional status in older persons. A profound understanding of the interdependency of these two geriatric concepts will represent the basis for successful treatment strategies.

  10. Exercise and Sleep in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junxin; Gooneratne, Nalaka

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia and other sleep complaints are highly prevalent in community-dwelling older adults yet often go under detected. Age-related physiological changes may affect sleep, but sleep disturbances and complaints should not be considered normal in this population. Various physiological, psychological, and social consequences have been associated with insomnia and sleep complaints. Treatment options are available so it is imperative to diagnose and treat these individuals to promote healthy aging. Exercise is known to have a wide variety of health benefits, but unfortunately most older adults engage in less exercise with advancing age. This paper describes age-related changes in sleep, clinical correlates of insomnia, consequences of untreated insomnia, and nonpharmacological treatments for insomnia in older adults, with a focus on the relationship between exercise and sleep in community-dwelling older adults with insomnia or sleep complaints. Possible mechanisms explaining the relationship between exercise and sleep are discussed. While the research to date shows promising evidence for exercise as a safe and effective treatment for insomnia and sleep complaints in community-dwelling older adults, future research is needed before exercise can be a first-line treatment for insomnia and sleep complaints in this population. PMID:27088071

  11. Psychological effects of exercise on community-dwelling older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tada A

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Akio Tada Faculty of Health Science, Hyogo University, Kakogawa, Hyogo, Japan Background: In recent years, there have been an increasing number of older adults who suffer from mental disorders globally.Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the effect of an intervention that consisted of an exercise program to improve the mental health of community-dwelling older adults.Participants and methods: The recruited participants of this study were community-dwelling older adults aged ≥60 years who participated in a comprehensive health promotion program in Kakogawa, Japan. Participants in the intervention group received an exercise program that was developed for older adults using Thera-Band. To measure participants’ mental health status, a Japanese version of the short form of the Profile of Mood States (POMS-SF was used. Stress markers were measured, such as salivary cortisol, alpha-amylase, and sIgA levels. All participants provided salivary samples and completed psychological questionnaires at baseline and 6-month follow-up.Results: No significant differences were observed between the intervention and control groups with respect to POMS-SF score and salivary biomarker profile at baseline. After the intervention, the intervention group showed a significant decrease in the POMS-SF “fatigue” score and cortisol level. No significant changes were observed in the control group.Conclusion: Simultaneous changes in feelings of fatigue and cortisol levels were observed among subjects who had received the intervention of regular exercise. Further research is needed to investigate the effectiveness of exercise intervention in improving mental health among older adults. Keywords: intervention, exercise, psychological status, stress, cortisol

  12. Frailty is associated with socioeconomic and lifestyle factors in community-dwelling older subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Stefano; Cella, Alberto; Puntoni, Matteo; Musacchio, Clarissa; Pomata, Monica; Torriglia, Domenico; Vello, Natalia; Molinari, Beba; Pandolfini, Valeria; Torrigiani, Claudio; Pilotto, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    This study assessed the association between frailty and sociodemographic, socioeconomic and lifestyle factors in community-dwelling older people. This was a cross-sectional survey in a population-based sample of 542 community-dwelling subjects aged 65 years and older living in a metropolitan area in Italy. Frailty was evaluated by means of the FRAIL scale proposed by the International Association of Nutrition and Aging. Basal and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL, IADL), physical activity, sociodemographic (age, gender, marital status and cohabitation), socioeconomic (education, economic conditions and occupational status) and lifestyle domains (cultural and technological fruition and social activation) were assessed through specific validated tools. Statistical analysis was performed through multinomial logistic regression. Impairments in ADL and IADL were significantly associated with frailty, while moderate and high physical activity were inversely associated with frailty. Moreover, regarding both socioeconomic variables and lifestyle factors, more disadvantaged socioeconomic conditions and low levels of cultural fruition were significantly associated with frailty. Socioeconomic and lifestyle factors, particularly cultural fruition, are associated with frailty independently from functional impairment and low physical activity. Cultural habits may therefore represent a new target of multimodal interventions against geriatric frailty.

  13. High Prevalence of Physical Frailty Among Community-Dwelling Malnourished Older Adults-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlaan, Sjors; Ligthart-Melis, Gerdien C; Wijers, Sander L J; Cederholm, Tommy; Maier, Andrea B; de van der Schueren, Marian A E

    2017-05-01

    Malnutrition and frailty are two geriatric syndromes that significantly affect independent living and health in community-dwelling older adults. Although the pathophysiology of malnutrition and physical frailty share common pathways, it is unknown to what extent these syndromes overlap and how they relate to each other. A systematic review was performed resulting in a selection of 28 studies that assessed both malnutrition and frailty in community-dwelling older adults. Furthermore, a meta-analysis was performed on 10 studies that used Mini- Nutritional Assessment and the Fried frailty phenotype to estimate the prevalence of malnutrition within physical frailty and vice versa. In the systematic review, 25 of the 28 studies used the Mini-Nutritional Assessment (long or short form) for malnutrition screening. For frailty assessment, 23 of the 28 studies focused on the physical frailty phenotype, of which 19 followed the original Fried phenotype. Fifteen studies analyzed the association between malnutrition and frailty, which was significant in 12 of these. The meta-analysis included 10 studies with a total of 5447 older adults. In this pooled population of community-dwelling older adults [mean (standard deviation) age: 77.2 (6.7) years], 2.3% was characterized as malnourished and 19.1% as physically frail. The prevalence of malnutrition was significantly associated with the prevalence of physical frailty (P dwelling older adults are related, but not interchangeable geriatric syndromes. Two out of 3 malnourished older adults were physically frail, whereas close to 10% of the physically frail older adults was identified as malnourished. Copyright © 2017 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluating an in-home multicomponent cognitive behavioural programme to manage concerns about falls and associated activity avoidance in frail community-dwelling older people: Design of a randomised control trial [NCT01358032

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Rossum Erik

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concerns about falls are frequently reported by older people. These concerns can have serious consequences such as an increased risk of falls and the subsequent avoidance of activities. Previous studies have shown the effectiveness of a multicomponent group programme to reduce concerns about falls. However, owing to health problems older people may not be able to attend a group programme. Therefore, we adapted the group approach to an individual in-home programme. Methods/Design A two-group randomised controlled trial has been developed to evaluate the in-home multicomponent cognitive behavioural programme to manage concerns about falls and associated activity avoidance in frail older people living in the community. Persons were eligible for study if they were 70 years of age or over, perceived their general health as fair or poor, had at least some concerns about falls and associated avoidance of activity. After screening for eligibility in a random sample of older people, eligible persons received a baseline assessment and were subsequently allocated to the intervention or control group. Persons assigned to the intervention group were invited to participate in the programme, while those assigned to the control group received care as usual. The programme consists of seven sessions, comprising three home visits and four telephone contacts. The sessions are aimed at instilling adaptive and realistic views about falls, as well as increasing activity and safe behaviour. An effect evaluation, a process evaluation and an economic evaluation are conducted. Follow-up measurements for the effect evaluation are carried out 5 and 12 months after the baseline measurement. The primary outcomes of the effect evaluation are concerns about falls and avoidance of activity as a result of these concerns. Other outcomes are disability and falls. The process evaluation measures: the population characteristics reached; protocol adherence by

  15. Community-dwelling older people's attitudes towards deprescribing in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, Caroline; Ouellet, Nicole; Reeve, Emily

    While there is evidence that supervised withdrawal of inappropriate medications might be beneficial for individuals with polypharmacy, little is known about their attitudes towards deprescribing. This study aimed to describe the situation among older community-dwelling Canadians. A self-administered survey was adapted from the Patients' Attitudes Towards Deprescribing questionnaire and distributed to 10 community pharmacies and 2 community centers. The participants rated their agreement on statements about polypharmacy/deprescribing on a 5-point, Likert-type scale. Correlations between the desire to have medications deprescribed and survey items were evaluated using Spearman's Rho and Goodman and Kurska's gamma rank correlations. From the 129 participants, 63% were women [median age: 76 (IQR:71-80); median number medication: 6 (IQR: 3-8)]. A proportion of 50.8% (95%CI: 41.6%-60.0%) expressed the desire to reduce their number of medications. This desire was strongly correlated with the individuals' feeling of taking a large number of medications and moderately correlated with the belief that some of the medications were no longer needed or that they were experiencing side effects. The results show that older individuals in the community are eager to undertake deprescribing, especially if they have a large number of medications, are experiencing side effects or feel some medications are no longer necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Relational coordination between community health nurses and other professionals in delivering care to community-dwelling frail people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Hoeijmakers, Marjan; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2014-03-01

    The first aim of this study was to investigate whether relational coordination is higher between primary care professionals and community health nurses than among other professionals. The second aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between different levels of relational coordination and primary care professionals' satisfaction with the care delivery of community health nurses. Community health nursing is based on the notion that all activities should respond to frail people's needs in a coordinated way, together with other professionals. Relational coordination is therefore important for the effective health-care delivery by these nurses. This cross-sectional study was performed among 167 professionals (n = 323, response rate 52%) who regularly worked with community health nurses. The results showed a higher degree of relational coordination with community health nurses than with other primary care professionals. Multilevel analyses revealed that professionals' satisfaction with the care delivered by community health nurses was influenced positively by relational coordination. Enhancing relational coordination between community health nurses and other primary care professionals in the neighborhood may improve the delivery of care to community-dwelling frail people. Comprehensive care delivery to community-dwelling frail people requires strong connections between all health and social care professionals. Community health nurses may be an important factor in strengthening these connections. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The effect of caregiver support interventions for informal caregivers of community-dwelling frail elderly: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Lopez Hartmann

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Informal caregivers are important resources for community-dwelling frail elderly. But caring can be challenging. To be able to provide long-term care to the elderly, informal caregivers need to be supported as well. The aim of this study is to review the current best evidence on the effectiveness of different types of support services targeting informal caregivers of community-dwelling frail elderly. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in Medline, PsychINFO, Ovid Nursing Database, Cinahl, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and British Nursing Index in september 2010. Results: Overall, the effect of caregiver support interventions is small and also inconsistent between studies. Respite care can be helpful in reducing depression, burden and anger. Interventions at the individual caregivers' level can be beneficial in reducing or stabilizing depression, burden, stress and role strain. Group support has a positive effect on caregivers' coping ability, knowledge, social support and reducing depression. Technology-based interventions can reduce caregiver burden, depression, anxiety and stress and improve the caregiver's coping ability. Conclusion: Integrated support packages where the content of the package is tailored to the individual caregivers' physical, psychological and social needs should be preferred when supporting informal caregivers of frail elderly. It requires an intense collaboration and coordination between all parties involved.

  18. Periodontal care for community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellen, R P

    1994-11-01

    The prevalence and severity of periodontitis increases with age. Epidemiologic studies have identified several risk variables associated with advancing periodontitis in older adults: namely tobacco smoking, frequency of dental appointments, infection with anaerobic bacteria considered periodontal pathogens, plaque and calculus accumulation, and some socioeconomic variables. Future morbidity from periodontitis might be reduced by minimizing the impact of these risk-associated variables at younger ages. Treatment of periodontal disease in community-dwelling older adults should be aimed at (1) targeting care to their overall health, functional, and esthetic needs; (2) strategic planning for maximal health and patient satisfaction; (3) documentation of past susceptibility and current risk; (4) control of principal risk factors; (4) investing time in patient education and informed consent; and (5) planning ahead for a potentially catastrophic decline in health. Periodontal treatment needs should be met in an integrated treatment plan that considers the overall prognosis for the dentition and individual teeth and the most efficacious prosthodontic options. Frequent recall for supportive periodontal care is essential. Several medical, physical, and societal impediments to provision of optimal care for older adults should be sought and minimized by the practitioner. Population dynamics and health-oriented activism among older adults are increasing the demand for essential and elective periodontal and prosthodontic services, which are met by implant-supported prostheses. Over the next few decades, as the incidence of tooth loss declines and our knowledge of the pathogenesis of periodontitis and biology of tissue regeneration increases, there will likely be a renewed emphasis on the preservation of the natural periodontium.

  19. Hypoactive sexual desire dysfunction in community-dwelling older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeleke, Berihun M; Bell, Robin J; Billah, Baki; Davis, Susan R

    2017-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of hypoactive sexual desire dysfunction (HSDD) and its associated factors in women aged 65 to 79 years. A questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study was conducted amongst community-dwelling older women. Participants were recruited between April and August 2014 from a national database based on electoral rolls. Sexual function and sexual distress were assessed by the Female Sexual Function Index and the Female Sexual Distress Scale-Revised, respectively. HSDD was defined as the presence of both low sexual desire and sexually related personal distress. The mean ± SD age of the 1,548 women was 71 ± 3.4 years and 52.6% were partnered. Among the participants, 88.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86.3%-89.6%) had low sexual desire, 15.5% (95% CI, 13.8%-17.4%) had sexually related personal distress, and 13.6% (95% CI, 11.9%-15.4%) had HSDD. The HSDD was more common among partnered than among unpartnered women (23.7% vs 5.9%; P desire.

  20. Polypharmacy and Gait Performance in Community-dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Claudene; Verghese, Joe

    2017-09-01

    To examine the relationship between polypharmacy and gait performance during simple (normal walk (NW)) and complex (walking while talking (WWT)) locomotion. Cross-sectional. Community. Community-dwelling older adults (N = 482). Polypharmacy, defined as use of five or more medications and a cohort-specific alternate definition of eight or more medications, was examined. Velocity (cm/s) measured quantitatively during NW and WWT conditions. The 164 participants (34%) with polypharmacy of five or more medications were older (77.0 ± 6.6 vs 76.0 ± 6.4) and more likely to have hypertension, congestive heart failure, diabetes mellitus, myocardial infarction, and higher body mass index (BMI) and to have fallen within the last year than the remaining 318 without polypharmacy and walked 6 cm/s slower (P = .004) during NW and 4 cm/s slower during WWT (P = .07), adjusting for age, sex, and education. Group differences were not statistically significant after adjusting for comorbidities. Prevalence of polypharmacy of eight or more medications was 10%. This group walked 11 cm/s slower during NW (P < .001) and 8.6 cm/s slower during WWT (P = .01) than those without polypharmacy, adjusted for age, sex, and education. Participants taking eight or more medications had slower NW (8.5 cm/s; P = .01), and WWT (6.9 cm/s; P = .07), compared to those without polypharmacy, adjusting for comorbidities. Adjustments for BMI, high-risk drugs, falls, and comorbidities yielded slower NW (9.4 cm/s, P = .005) and WWT (7.9 cm/s, P = .04 among those with polypharmacy compared to those without polypharmacy). These results suggest an association between polypharmacy and locomotion that medical comorbidities only partly explained. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. Neighborhood Environment and Falls among Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklett, Emily Joy; Lohman, Matthew C.; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2017-01-01

    Background: Falls present a major challenge to active aging, but the relationship between neighborhood factors and falls is poorly understood. This study examined the relationship between fall events and neighborhood factors, including neighborhood social cohesion (sense of belonging, trust, friendliness, and helpfulness) and physical environment (vandalism/graffiti, rubbish, vacant/deserted houses, and perceived safety walking home at night). Methods: Data were analyzed from 9259 participants over four biennial waves (2006–2012) of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a nationally representative sample of adults aged 65 and older in the United States. Results: In models adjusting for demographic and health-related covariates, a one-unit increase in neighborhood social cohesion was associated with 4% lower odds of experiencing a single fall (odds ratio (OR): 0.96, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93–0.99) and 6% lower odds of experiencing multiple falls (OR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.90–0.98). A one-unit increase in the physical environment scale was associated with 4% lower odds of experiencing a single fall (OR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.93–0.99) and with 5% lower odds of experiencing multiple falls (OR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.91–1.00) in adjusted models. Conclusions: The physical and social neighborhood environment may affect fall risk among community-dwelling older adults. Findings support the ongoing need for evidence-based fall prevention programming in community and clinical settings. PMID:28208598

  2. Physical activity level and fall risk among community-dwelling older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Low, Sok Teng; Balaraman, Thirumalaya

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To find the physical activity level and fall risk among the community-dwelling Malaysian older adults and determine the correlation between them. [Subjects and Methods] A cross-sectional study was conducted in which, the physical activity level was evaluated using the Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity questionnaire and fall risk with Fall Risk Assessment Tool. Subjects recruited were 132 community-dwelling Malaysian older adults using the convenience sampling method. [Results] T...

  3. Poor Appetite and Dietary Intake in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meij, Barbara S; Wijnhoven, Hanneke A H; Lee, Jung S; Houston, Denise K; Hue, Trisha; Harris, Tamara B; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Newman, Anne B; Visser, Marjolein

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Poor appetite in older adults leads to sub-optimal food intake and increases the risk of undernutrition. The impact of poor appetite on food intake in older adults is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the differences in food intake among older community-dwelling

  4. Psychosocial risk factors associated with falls among Chinese community-dwelling older adults in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Angela; Chi, Iris; Lou, Vivian W Q; Chan, Kin Sun

    2010-05-01

    This study examined the relationship between psychosocial factors and falls among community-dwelling older adults in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of China. The study included 1573 adults aged 60 or above who lived at home and who were applying for long-term care services. These participants were part of a large cross-sectional survey carried out between 2003 and 2004 in which they completed the Hong Kong Chinese version of the Resident Assessment Instrument-Home Care (RAI-HC) assessment. Of those persons who were surveyed, 516 (32.8%, 95% CI 30.5% to 35.2%) had fallen in the previous 90 days. Bivariate analyses showed that five psychosocial factors (depressive symptoms, fear of falling, a decline in social activities, the number of hours of informal care support during weekdays and living alone) were significantly associated with falls (P factor significantly associated with falls, after adjusting for the known significant factors related to falls. It was also found that more elders who lived with others had environmental hazards than those who lived alone (71.0% vs 29.0%, chi2 = 4.80, P = 0.028). These findings suggested that living with others may not be as safe as we assume. Interventions to increase awareness of home safety and to seek co-operation with family members in falls prevention are recommended. Fall preventive strategies should be educated to family members who are living with frail older adults. On the other hand, Chinese older adults who live alone often receive support from relatives or friends. Social support seems to be crucial to prevent them from falls and this measure is recommended to be continued in the community.

  5. Association between employee benefits and frailty in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Funes, José Alberto; Paniagua-Santos, Diana Leticia; Escobar-Rivera, Vicente; Navarrete-Reyes, Ana Patricia; Aguilar-Navarro, Sara; Amieva, Hélène

    2016-05-01

    The phenotype of frailty has been associated with an increased vulnerability for the development of adverse health-related outcomes. The origin of frailty is multifactorial and financial issues could be implicated, as they have been associated with health status, well-being and mortality. However, the association between economic benefits and frailty has been poorly explored. Therefore, the objective was to determine the association between employee benefits and frailty. A cross-sectional study of 927 community-dwelling older adults aged 70 years and older participating in the Mexican Study of Nutritional and Psychosocial Markers of Frailty was carried out. Employee benefits were established according to eight characteristics: bonus, profit sharing, pension, health insurance, food stamps, housing credit, life insurance, and Christmas bonus. Frailty was defined according to a slightly modified version of the phenotype proposed by Fried et al. Multinomial logistic regression models were run to determine the association between employee benefits and frailty adjusting by sociodemographic and health covariates. The prevalence of frailty was 14.1%, and 4.4% of participants rated their health status as "poor." Multinomial logistic regression analyses showed that employee benefits were statistically and independently associated with the frail subgroup (OR 0.85; 95% CI 0.74-0.98; P = 0.027) even after adjusting for potential confounders. Fewer employee benefits are associated with frailty. Supporting spreading employee benefits for older people could have a positive impact on the development of frailty and its consequences. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 606-611. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  6. Functional performance in physically frail community dwelling older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Giné Garriga, Maria

    2010-01-01

    En països desenvolupats, la característica demogràfica actual més rellevant és l'envelliment de la població. Tenint en compte el percentatge de gent gran i la tendència de la població en el futur, es considera essencial que els professionals de la salut i entitats responsables del sistema sanitari, estableixin estratègies que ens permetin avaluar objectivament els individus amb un major dèficit funcional per oferir intervencions adequades, i per tant, ens permetin assegurar un envelliment més...

  7. Macronutrient intake and inadequacies of community-dwelling older adults, a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, ter S.J.; Verlaan, S.; Mijnarends, D.; Schols, J.M.G.A.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.; Luiking, Y.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anorexia of ageing may predispose older adults to under-nutrition and protein energy malnutrition. Studies, however, report a large variation in nutrient inadequacies among community-dwelling older adults. Summary: This systematic review provides a comprehensive overview of the energy

  8. Comprehensive geriatric assessment : recognition of identified geriatric conditions by community-dwelling older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Marjon; Suijker, Jacqueline J.; Bol, Wietske; Hoff, Eva; ter Riet, Gerben; de Rooij, Sophia E.; van Charante, Eric P. Moll; Buurman, Bianca M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: to study (i) the prevalence of geriatric conditions in community-dwelling older persons at increased risk of functional decline and (ii) the extent to which older persons recognise comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA)-identified conditions as relevant problems. Methods: trained

  9. Emotion experience and frailty in a sample of Italian community-dwelling older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulasso A

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Anna Mulasso,1,2 Laura Argiolu,1 Mattia Roppolo,1 Danny Azucar,1 Emanuela Rabaglietti1 1Department of Psychology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy; 2NeuroMuscular Function Research Group, School of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy Abstract: Frailty increases individual vulnerability to external stressors and involves high risk for adverse geriatric outcomes. To date, few studies have addressed the role of emotion perception and its association with frailty in aged populations. This cross-sectional study aimed to explore whether a significant association between frailty and emotional experience exists in a sample of Italian community-dwelling older adults. Our sample consisted of 104 older adults (age 76±8 years; 59.6% women living in Piedmont, Italy. Frailty was measured using the Italian version of the Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI, and emotion perception was measured with the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS. The Mini–Mental State Examination was used as a screening tool for cognitive functions (people with a score ≤20 points were excluded. One-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA, adjusted for interesting variables, and post hoc tests were performed where appropriate. According to the TFI, 57.7% of participants resulted as frail. Analysis showed a significant greater severity of frailty in the low positive affect (PA group compared to the high PA group. Similarly, those with high negative affect (NA showed significantly higher levels of frailty than the low NA group. As expected, significant differences for frailty were also found among the groups composed of 1 people with high PA and low NA, 2 people with low PA or high NA, and 3 people with low PA and high NA. Post hoc tests showed a greater severity of frailty in the second and in the third groups compared to the first one. Lastly, robust participants aged >75 years showed higher levels of PA than the group

  10. Nurse-led multifactorial care in community-dwelling older people : Outcomes on daily functioning, experiences and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, M.

    2017-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis was to improve primary care for community-dwelling older people in the Netherlands. First, by studying the effectiveness of multifactorial care on health and daily functioning of community-dwelling older people, second by exploring the value of the multifactorial care

  11. Systematic Literature Review of Randomized Control Trials Assessing the Effectiveness of Nutrition Interventions in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandayrel, Kristofer; Wong, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Nutrition interventions may play an important role in maintaining the health and quality of life in community-dwelling older adults. To the authors' knowledge, no systematic literature review has been conducted on the effectiveness of nutrition interventions in the community-dwelling older adult population. Design: Systematic literature…

  12. Association between the metabolic syndrome and its components with falls in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Kuo-Chen; Pu, Shou-Jin; Lin, Chung-Hao; Chang, Hong-Jyun; Chen, Ying-Jen; Liu, Maw-Sen

    2012-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome and falls are both serious and common health problems in older adults. However, little is known about whether the metabolic syndrome contributes to falls. We investigated the relationship between the metabolic syndrome and its components with falls in community-dwelling older adults. We designed and conducted a cross-sectional study. A total of 1165 community-dwelling older adults who received a geriatric health examination, including interviewer-administered questionnaires and physical and biochemical examinations, were retrospectively enrolled from 2008 to 2010 and specifically asked about the history of falls in the preceding year. The mean age of the participants was 74.9 ± 6.7 years, and 54.3% were women. The overall prevalence of falls and metabolic syndrome were 17.9% and 27.3%, respectively. Compared with those who did not fall, the participants who fell had a higher prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (45.7% versus 23.3%, Prisk factor for falls in community-dwelling older adults (odds ratio=2.56, 95% confidence interval 1.86-3.51). Because falling is a multifactorial geriatric syndrome, many potential confounders, such as visual abnormalities, obesity, arthritis, and polypharmacy, were not considered in this study. The metabolic syndrome is an independent risk factor for falls in community-dwelling older adults and should be addressed with regard to prevention of falls.

  13. Physical activity level and fall risk among community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Sok Teng; Balaraman, Thirumalaya

    2017-07-01

    [Purpose] To find the physical activity level and fall risk among the community-dwelling Malaysian older adults and determine the correlation between them. [Subjects and Methods] A cross-sectional study was conducted in which, the physical activity level was evaluated using the Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity questionnaire and fall risk with Fall Risk Assessment Tool. Subjects recruited were 132 community-dwelling Malaysian older adults using the convenience sampling method. [Results] The majority of the participants were under the category of under-active regular light-activities and most of them reported low fall risk. The statistical analysis using Fisher's exact test did not show a significant correlation between physical activity level and fall risk. [Conclusion] The majority of community-dwelling Malaysian older adults are performing some form of physical activity and in low fall risk category. But this study did not find any significant correlation between physical activity level and fall risk among community-dwelling older adults in Malaysia.

  14. Statin Use and Decline in Gait Speed in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo-Ciganic, W. H.; Perera, S.; Gray, S. L.

    2015-01-01

    ObjectivesTo examine the association between statin use and objectively assessed decline in gait speed in community-dwelling older adults. DesignLongitudinal cohort study. SettingHealth, Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) Study. ParticipantsTwo thousand five participants aged 70-79 at baseli...

  15. The Effects of a 12-Week Walking Program on Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shun-Ping; Tsai, Tzu-I; Lii, Yun-Kung; Yu, Shu; Chou, Chen-Liang; Chen, I-Ju

    2009-01-01

    Walking is a popular and easily accessible form of physical activity. However, walking instruction for older adults is based on the evidence gathered from younger populations. This study evaluated walking conditions, strength, balance, and subjective health status after a 12-week walking-training program in community-dwelling adults greater than…

  16. Lack of anticipated support for care for community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Déborah Cristina de; Neri, Anita Liberalesso; D'Elboux, Maria José

    2016-06-01

    to identify the factors associated with lack of anticipated support for care for community-dwelling older adults. this study presents comparison and logistic regression analyses of data from 671 individuals who took part of the multicentric study entitled "Frailty in older Brazilians" - a quantitative, epidemiologic and transversal investigation carried out between 2008 and 2009. the subjective evaluation of anticipated support for care for community-dwelling older adults was a good indicator of risk for lack of anticipated support for care in women, older adults who live alone and those with poor self-rated health. it is necessary to reflect upon the formal support system currently available for older people in Brazil, considering that those who most frequently presented lack of anticipated support for care are an increasing population. The study also highlights the importance of using subjective methods for the evaluation of the adequacy of older adults' support network.

  17. Emergency Department Utilization and Self-Reported Symptoms in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Patricia; Kennedy, Richard; Williams, Courtney; Brown, Cynthia J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The rise in emergency department (ED) utilization among older adults is a nursing concern, because emergency nurses are uniquely positioned to positively impact the care of older adults. Symptoms have been associated with ED utilization, however, it remains unclear if symptoms are the primary reason for ED utilization. Purpose Describe the self-reported symptoms of community-dwelling older adults prior to accessing the emergency department. Examine the differences in self-reported symptoms among those who utilized the emergency department, and those who did not. Procedures A prospective longitudinal design was used. The sample included 403 community-dwelling older adults 75 years and older. Baseline in-home interviews were conducted followed by monthly telephone interviews over 15 months. Main Findings Commonly reported symptoms at baseline included pain, feeling tired, and having shortness of breath. In univariate analysis, pain, shortness of breath, fair/poor well-being, and feeling tired were significantly correlated with ED utilization. In multivariable models, problems with balance, and fair/poor well-being were significantly associated with ED utilization. Conclusions Several symptoms were common among this cohort of older adults. However, there were no significant differences in the types of symptoms reported by older adults who utilized the emergency department compared to those who did not use the emergency department. Based on these findings, symptoms among community-dwelling older adults may not be the primary reason for ED utilization. PMID:28131350

  18. A reliable measure of frailty for a community dwelling older population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fletcher Astrid

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frailty remains an elusive concept despite many efforts to define and measure it. The difficulty in translating the clinical profile of frail elderly people into a quantifiable assessment tool is due to the complex and heterogeneous nature of their health problems. Viewing frailty as a 'latent vulnerability' in older people this study aims to derive a model based measurement of frailty and examines its internal reliability in community dwelling elderly. Method The British Women's Heart and Health Study (BWHHS cohort of 4286 women aged 60-79 years from 23 towns in Britain provided 35 frailty indicators expressed as binary categorical variables. These indicators were corrected for measurement error and assigned relative weights in its association with frailty. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA reduced the data to a smaller number of factors and was subjected to confirmatory factor analysis (CFAwhich restricted the model by fitting the EFA-driven structure to observed data. Cox regression analysis compared the hazard ratios for adverse outcomes of the newly developed British frailty index (FI with a widely known FI. This process was replicated in the MRC Assessment study of older people, a larger cohort drawn from 106 general practices in Britain. Results Seven factors explained the association between frailty indicators: physical ability, cardiac symptoms/disease, respiratory symptoms/disease, physiological measures, psychological problems, co-morbidities and visual impairment. Based on existing concepts and statistical indices of fit, frailty was best described using a General Specific Model. The British FI would serve as a better population metric than the FI as it enables people with varying degrees of frailty to be better distinguished over a wider range of scores. The British FI was a better independent predictor of all-cause mortality, hospitalization and institutionalization than the FI in both cohorts. Conclusions

  19. Zero-Inflated Poisson Modeling of Fall Risk Factors in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dukyoo; Kang, Younhee; Kim, Mi Young; Ma, Rye-Won; Bhandari, Pratibha

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for falls among community-dwelling older adults. The study used a cross-sectional descriptive design. Self-report questionnaires were used to collect data from 658 community-dwelling older adults and were analyzed using logistic and zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) regression. Perceived health status was a significant factor in the count model, and fall efficacy emerged as a significant predictor in the logistic models. The findings suggest that fall efficacy is important for predicting not only faller and nonfaller status but also fall counts in older adults who may or may not have experienced a previous fall. The fall predictors identified in this study--perceived health status and fall efficacy--indicate the need for fall-prevention programs tailored to address both the physical and psychological issues unique to older adults. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Perceived Need for Mental Health Care Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido, Melissa M.; Kane, Robert L.; Kaas, Merrie; Kane, Rosalie A.

    2009-01-01

    Only half of older adults with a mental disorder use mental health services, and little is known about the causes of perceived need for mental health care (MHC). We used logistic regression to examine relationships among depression, anxiety, chronic physical illness, alcohol abuse and/or dependence, sociodemographics, and perceived need among a national sample of community-dwelling individuals 65 years of age and older (the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys data set). Less than h...

  1. Nurse-led multifactorial care in community-dwelling older people: Outcomes on daily functioning, experiences and costs

    OpenAIRE

    van Rijn, M.

    2017-01-01

    The overall aim of this thesis was to improve primary care for community-dwelling older people in the Netherlands. First, by studying the effectiveness of multifactorial care on health and daily functioning of community-dwelling older people, second by exploring the value of the multifactorial care by investigating experiences of older people with this nurse-led multifactorial care, and third by assessing per capita healthcare costs of older people. We evaluated the effects of nurse-led multi...

  2. Physical and psychological effects of Qigong exercise in community-dwelling older adults: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pei-Shiun; Knobf, M Tish; Oh, Byeonsang; Funk, Marjorie

    Older adults need exercise programs that correspond to age-related changes. The purpose of this study was to explore preliminary effects of an 8-week Qigong exercise intervention on the physical ability, functional and psychological health, and spiritual well-being of community-dwelling older adults. Forty-five community-dwelling adults with the mean age of 74.8 years participated a 1-h Health Qigong exercise session twice weekly for 8 weeks. The majority were female (84%) and white (91%), and lived with their spouse (49%). Physical ability (p Qigong exercise program over 8 weeks is feasible and has potential to improve physical ability, functional health, balance, psychological health, and spiritual well-being in older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Smoking increases risk for cognitive decline among community-dwelling older Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Nicole; Sachs-Ericsson, Natalie; Preacher, Kristopher J; Sheffield, Kristin M; Markides, Kyriakos

    2009-11-01

    Few studies have investigated smoking and cognitive decline (CD) among older Mexican Americans. In this study, the authors explore the relationship between smoking status and cognitive changes over time in a large sample of community-dwelling older adults of Mexican descent. Latent growth curve analyses were used to examine the decreasing growth in the number of correct responses on a test of cognitive functioning with increasing age (7 years with four data collection points). In-home interviews were obtained from participants residing in the Southwest United States. Participants were community-dwelling older Mexican Americans. Cognitive functioning was assessed at each of the four data collection points with the Mini-Mental State Examination. Participants' self-reports of health functioning and smoking status were obtained at baseline. With the inclusion of health variables and other control variables, the effect of smoking status on cognitive functioning was significant such that the decrease in the number of correct responses over time was greater for smokers than for nonsmokers. Smoking increases risk for CD among community-dwelling older Mexican Americans. There are numerous health benefits in quitting smoking, even for older adults who have been smoking for many years. Further efforts to ensure that smoking cessation and prevention programs are targeted toward Hispanics are necessary.

  4. The Relationship of Sleep Duration with Obesity and Sarcopenia in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Meng-Yueh; Wang, Li-Ying; Chen, Hsi-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported the relationship between sleep duration and obesity in elderly adults; however, little is known about the relationship of sleep duration and sarcopenia. We examined the relationship of sleep duration with obesity and sarcopenia in community-dwelling older adults. A total of 488 community-dwelling adults (224 men and 264 women) aged ≥65 years were included in the analysis. Self-reported sleep duration and anthropometric data were collected. Skeletal muscle mass was estimated using the predicted equation from a bioelectrical impedance analysis measurement. Obesity and sarcopenia were defined according to the body mass index and the skeletal muscle mass index, respectively. The association between sleep duration and sarcopenia exhibited a U shape in older adults. Compared to adults with 6-8 h of sleep, adults with adults with ≥8 h of sleep had a nearly 2-fold increased risk of sarcopenia (OR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.01-3.54). Older adults with a sleep duration obesity (OR: 2.15, 95% CI: 1.08-4.30). After gender stratification, the association between obesity and short sleep duration was more robust in women. There were significant associations of sleep duration with either obesity or sarcopenia in community-dwelling older adults. Gender differences in these associations were also observed.

  5. Association between chronic musculoskeletal pain and executive function in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, S; Sawa, R; Nakatsu, N; Saito, T; Sugimoto, T; Nakamura, R; Misu, S; Ueda, Y; Ono, R

    2017-11-01

    We examined the association of chronic musculoskeletal pain with executive function in community-dwelling older adults. This cross-sectional study recruited 234 community-dwelling older adults in Japan (mean age: 72.7, women: 62.8%). Chronic musculoskeletal pain was defined as having moderate or more severe pain lasting ≥ 3 months. Executive function was assessed using the Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST), Trail Making Test (TMT) parts A and B, Letter Verbal Fluency Test (LVFT) and Category Verbal Fluency Test (CVFT). Prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal pain was 19% (n = 44). In the univariate analysis, the DSST and CVFT scores were significantly lower in the chronic musculoskeletal pain group than in the control group (DSST: chronic musculoskeletal pain group vs. control group, 40.2 vs. 45.4, respectively, p dwelling older adults. The association of chronic musculoskeletal pain with executive function requires further investigation. Our results suggest an association between moderate-severe chronic musculoskeletal pain and impairments of semantic fluency and processing speed in community-dwelling older adults. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  6. The effectiveness of Pilates on balance and falls in community dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephs, Sharon; Pratt, Mary Lee; Calk Meadows, Emily; Thurmond, Stephanie; Wagner, Amy

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether Pilates is more effective than traditional strength and balance exercises for improving balance measures, balance confidence and reducing falls in community dwelling older adults with fall risk. Thirty-one participants with fall risk were randomly assigned to the Pilates group (PG) or the traditional exercise group (TG). Both groups participated in 12 weeks of exercise, 2 times/week for 1 h. There was significant improvement in the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale for both the PG (mean difference = 6.31, p Balance Confidence Scale (mean difference = 10.57, p = .008). Both Pilates and traditional balance programs are effective at improving balance measures in community dwelling older adults with fall risk, with the Pilates group showing improved balance confidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sedentary behavior and sleep efficiency in active community-dwelling older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Madden, Kenneth M.; Ashe, Maureen C.; Lockhart, Chris; Chase, Jocelyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Previous studies have demonstrated that aerobic exercise interventions have a positive impact on sleep efficiency in older adults. However, little work has been done on the impact of sedentary behavior (sitting, watching television, etc.) on sleep efficiency. Methods: 54 Community-dwelling men and women >65 years of age living in Whistler, British Columbia (mean 71.5 years) were enrolled in this cross-sectional observational study. Measures of sleep efficiency as well as averag...

  8. Costs of Malnutrition in Institutionalized and Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abizanda, Pedro; Sinclair, Alan; Barcons, Núria; Lizán, Luis; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess health economics evidence published to date on malnutrition costs in institutionalized or community-dwelling older adults. A systematic search of the literature published until December 2013 was performed using standard literature, international and national electronic databases, including MedLine/PubMed, Cochrane Library, ISI WOK, SCOPUS, MEDES, IBECS, and Google Scholar. Publications identified referred to the economic burden and use of medical resources associated with malnutrition (or risk of malnutrition) in institutionalized or community-dwelling older adults, written in either English or Spanish. Costs were updated to 2014 (€). A total of 9 studies of 46 initially retrieved met the preestablished criteria and were submitted to thorough scrutiny. All publications reviewed involved studies conducted in Europe, and the results regarding the contents of all the studies showed that total costs associated with malnutrition in institutionalized and community-dwelling older adults were considerably higher than those of well-nourished ones, mainly due to a higher use of health care resources (GP consultations, hospitalizations, health care monitoring, and treatments). Interventions to reduce the prevalence of malnutrition, such as the use of oral nutritional supplements, showed an important decrease in-hospital admissions and medical visits. Malnutrition is associated with higher health care costs in institutionalized or community-dwelling older adults. The adoption of nutritional interventions, such as oral nutritional supplements, may have an important impact in reducing annual health care costs per patient. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Association between statin use and physical function among community-dwelling older Japanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Hisashi; Ihara, Kazushige; Kera, Takeshi; Hirano, Hirohiko; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Masashi; Kojima, Motonaga; Obuchi, Shuichi

    2018-04-01

    Statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS) are the muscle-related side-effects of statins, but the association between statin use and physical function among community-dwelling older adults is unclear. The objective of the present study was to examine the association between statin use and physical function among community-dwelling older Japanese adults by considering the risk factors of statin-associated muscle symptoms. The participants were 1022 community-dwelling older adults aged 65-88 years, who participated in comprehensive health checkups from 2013 to 2015. Statin use in the participants (381 men and 559 women) was verified by using data from their medicine notebooks. The differences between statin use (users and non-users) and physical functions (grip strength, knee extension torque, normal and maximum gait speed, Timed Up & Go test, one-legged stance, quadriceps muscle thickness and echo intensity) were analyzed using the t-test. Multiple regression analyses were also carried out to examine the association between statin use and physical function. A total of 93 men (24.4%) and 154 women (27.5%) were statin users. Grip strength, normal gait speed and one-legged stance declined significantly in statin users compared with the non-users. In multiple regression analysis while controlling for the risk factors of statin-associated muscle symptoms, including age, sex, body mass index and number of medicines, no independent association, between statin use and the reduction of physical functions, was observed. Statin use was not associated with the decline of physical function in community-dwelling older Japanese adults. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 623-630. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  10. Comparison of seven fall risk assessment tools in community-dwelling Korean older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taekyoung; Xiong, Shuping

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to compare seven widely used fall risk assessment tools in terms of validity and practicality, and to provide a guideline for choosing appropriate fall risk assessment tools for elderly Koreans. Sixty community-dwelling Korean older women (30 fallers and 30 matched non-fallers) were evaluated. Performance measures of all tools were compared between the faller and non-faller groups through two sample t-tests. Receiver Operating Characteristic curves were generated with odds ratios for discriminant analysis. Results showed that four tools had significant discriminative power, and the shortened version of Falls Efficacy Scale (SFES) showed excellent discriminant validity, followed by Berg Balance Scale (BBS) with acceptable discriminant validity. The Mini Balance Evaluation System Test and Timed Up and Go, however, had limited discriminant validities. In terms of practicality, SFES was also excellent. These findings suggest that SFES is the most suitable tool for assessing the fall risks of community-dwelling Korean older women, followed by BBS. Practitioner Summary: There is no general guideline on which fall risk assessment tools are suitable for community-dwelling Korean older women. This study compared seven widely used assessment tools in terms of validity and practicality. Results suggested that the short Falls Efficacy Scale is the most suitable tool, followed by Berg Balance Scale.

  11. The effectiveness of beauty care on self-rated health among community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Hisashi; Inomata, Takashi; Otsuka, Rika; Sugiyama, Yoichi; Hirano, Hirohiko; Obuchi, Shuichi

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance and improvement of self-rated health is important for prolonging healthy life expectancy in a well-aged society. In the present study, we examined the effectiveness of beauty care on self-rated health among community-dwelling older people through a quasi- randomized controlled trial by propensity score matching (PSM). One hundred twelve community-dwelling older people who were recruited from the local community, participated in a beauty care program that consisted of two training sessions per month for 3 months and daily enforcement of facial skin care (intervention group). Seven hundred fifty-nine participants who received a comprehensive geriatric assessment were treated as a control group. Sex, age, BMI, lifestyle habits, hand grip strength, walking speed, skeletal muscle mass, bone density, medical history and life function (Kihon Checklist) were matched by the PSM method. We compared the subjects' self-rated health, depressive mood status (self-rating depression scale: SDS), and the frequency of going outdoors in the intervention and control groups before and after intervention. The improvements of SDS were significantly greater in the intervention group than in the control group. The self-rated health and the frequency of going outdoors were maintained in the intervention group but were significantly decreased in the control group. We conclude that beauty care is effective for maintaining and improving the self-rated health and depression status of community-dwelling older people and that it may help prolong healthy life expectancy.

  12. Neuroticism (not depressive symptoms) predicts memory complaints in some community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merema, Matt R; Speelman, Craig P; Foster, Jonathan K; Kaczmarek, Elizabeth A

    2013-08-01

    To examine whether depressive symptoms are useful predictors of subjective memory complaints in community-dwelling older adults, beyond the predictive utility already provided by memory performance and characteristics of personality. Using hierarchical regression, we examined the relationship between depressive symptoms and subjective memory complaints, controlling for age, gender, education, memory performance, conscientiousness, and neuroticism. Community-dwelling older adults aged 66 to 90 years (N = 177) who responded to a newspaper advertisement for a memory study in Perth, Western Australia. The General Frequency of Forgetting scale (for memory complaints), Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (for depressive symptoms), NEO-Five Factor Inventory (for conscientiousness and neuroticism), and the Visual Reproduction and Logical Memory subtests from the Wechsler Memory Scale-4th Edition (for visual and verbal memory). The hierarchical regression analysis indicated that while depressive symptoms significantly predicted memory complaints after variance associated with age, gender, education, memory performance, and conscientiousness was partialled out, they accounted for almost none of the variance in complaints when neuroticism was partialled out. The well-established relationship between depression and memory complaints may exist in some community-dwelling older adult populations only on account of the manner in which both are associated with neuroticism. Copyright © 2013 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Predicting falls in community-dwelling older adults: A systematic review of task performance-based assessment tools

    OpenAIRE

    Power, Valerie; van de ven, Pepijn; Nelson, John; Clifford, Amanda M

    2014-01-01

    peer-reviewed INTRODUCTION: Falls among community-dwelling older adults are a common yet often preventable occurrence. Clinicians frequently use task-based assessment tools to evaluate clients' balance and mobility with the aim of predicting falls and providing targeted fall prevention interventions, but no consensus exists on the optimum tool(s) to use for this purpose. This review aims to identify the task-based assessment tools that can best predict falls among community-dwelling older ...

  14. Exercise for fall risk reduction in community-dwelling older adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Catherine M; Sran, Meena M; Harrison, Elizabeth L

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of exercise on falls and fall risk reduction in community-dwelling older adults and to present an updated synthesis of outcome measures for the assessment of fall risk in community-dwelling older adults. A systematic review was performed, considering English-language articles published from 2000 to 2006 and accessible through MEDLINE, CINAHL, PEDro, EMBASE, and/or AMED. Included were randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) that used an exercise or physical activity intervention and involved participants over age 50. Screening and methodological quality for internal validity were conducted by two independent reviewers. The search retrieved 156 abstracts; 22 articles met the internal validity criteria. Both individualized and group exercise programmes were found to be effective in reducing falls and fall risk. The optimal type, frequency, and dose of exercise to achieve a positive effect have not been determined. A variety of outcome measures have been used to measure fall risk, especially for balance. Falls and fall risk can be reduced with exercise interventions in the community-dwelling elderly, although the most effective exercise variables are unknown. Future studies in populations with comorbidities known to increase fall risk will help determine optimal, condition-specific fall-prevention programmes. Poor balance is a key risk factor for falls; therefore, the best measure of this variable should be selected when evaluating patients at risk of falling.

  15. Nutritional intervention and physical training in malnourished frail community-dwelling elderly persons carried out by trained lay "buddies": study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, Thomas E; Lackinger, Christian; Haider, Sandra; Luger, Eva; Kapan, Ali; Luger, Maria; Schindler, Karin E

    2013-12-27

    In elderly persons frailty and malnutrition are very common and can lead to serious health hazards such as increased mortality, morbidity, dependency, institutionalization and a reduced quality of life. In Austria, the prevalence of frailty and malnutrition are increasing steadily and are becoming a challenge for our social system. Physical training and adequate nutrition may improve this situation. In this randomized controlled trial, 80 malnourished frail community-dwelling patients (≥ 65 years) hospitalized at wards for internal medicine are recruited. Additionally, 80 lay volunteers (≥ 50 years), named buddies are recruited and subsequently trained regarding health enhancing physical activity and nutrition in four standardized training sessions. These buddies visit the malnourished frail persons at home twice a week for about one hour during an initial period of 10-12 weeks. While participants allocated to the intervention group (n = 40) receive intervention to improve their fluid intake, protein and energy intake, perform strength training and try to increase their baseline activities, the control group (n = 40) only gets home visits without any intervention. After 10-12 weeks, both, the intervention and the control group, receive the nutritional intervention and the physical training. Health, nutritional and frailty status, physical fitness, body composition and chronic inflammation of buddies and frail persons are recorded before the intervention, after 10-12 weeks, 6 and 12 months. To your knowledge this trial is the first of its kind to provide nutritional and physical activity interventions to malnourished frail community-dwelling persons by trained lay buddies, in which an improvement of the frail persons' and the buddies' health status is measured. This study assesses the efficacy of such an intervention and may offer new perspectives for the management of frailty and malnutrition. [corrected] ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01991639.

  16. The relative and absolute reliability of the Functional Independence and Difficulty Scale in community-dwelling frail elderly Japanese people using long-term care insurance services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takashi; Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Watanabe, Shuichiro

    2017-06-01

    The newly developed Functional Independence and Difficulty Scale is a tool for assessing the performance of basic activities of daily living in terms of both independence and difficulty. The reliability of this new scale has not been assessed. The aim of this study was to examine the relative reliability and absolute reliability of the newly developed scale in community-dwelling frail elderly people in Japan. Participants were 47 community-dwelling elderly subjects (22 for assessing test-retest reliability and 25 for assessing inter-rater reliability). As relative reliability indices, intra-class correlation coefficients were used. From an absolute reliability perspective, we conducted Bland-Altman analysis and calculated the limit of agreement or minimal detectable change to determine the acceptable range of error. Intra-class correlation coefficients for test-retest and inter-rater reliability were 0.90 (P reliability was -5.2 to 1.8, representing an increase of over six points for improvement and a decrease of over two points for decline of basic activities of daily living ability. The minimal detectable change for inter-rater reliability was 3.7, indicating that a three-point difference might be existed between difference raters. The results of this study demonstrated that the FIDS appeared to be a reliable instrument for use in Japanese community-dwelling frail elderly people. While further research using a large and more diverse sample of participants is needed, our findings support the use of FIDS in clinical practice or clinical research targeting frail elderly Japanese people.

  17. The prevalence of frailty and related factors in community-dwelling Turkish elderly according to modified Fried Frailty Index and FRAIL scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akın, Sibel; Mazıcıoglu, Mumtaz M; Mucuk, Salime; Gocer, Semsinnur; Deniz Şafak, Elif; Arguvanlı, Sibel; Ozturk, Ahmet

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence of frailty with the Fried Frailty Index (FFI) and FRAIL scales (Fatigue, Resistance, Ambulation, Illness, Low weight) and also its associated factors in the community-dwelling Turkish elderly. This is a cross-sectional population-based study in an urban area with a population of over 1,200,000. We sampled 1/100 of the elderly population. Frailty prevalence was assessed with a modified version of the FFI and FRAIL scale. Nutritional status was assessed by Mini Nutritional Assessment. Cognitive function was assessed by Mini-Mental State Examination. Depressive mood was assessed by GDS. Functional capacity was assessed by the instrumental activities of daily living scale. Falls and fear of falling were noted. Uni- and multivariate analyses were done to determine associated factors for frailty. A total of 906 community-dwelling elderly were included, in whom the mean age and standard deviation (SD) of age were 71.5 (5.6) years (50.6 % female). We detected frailty (female 30.4 %, male 25.2 %), pre-frailty and non-frailty prevalence with FFI as 27.8, 34.8, and 37.4 %, respectively. The prevalence of frailty (female 14.5 %, male 5.4 %), pre-frailty and non-frailty with the FRAIL scale was detected as 10, 45.6, and 44.4 %. Coexisting associated factors related with frailty in both models were found as depressive mood, cognitive impairment, and malnutrition in multivariate analysis. According to both scales, frailty was strongly associated with cognitive impairment, depressive mood, and malnutrition in the community-dwelling Turkish elderly population.

  18. Feasibility and Acceptability of Qigong Exercise in Community-Dwelling Older Adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pei-Shiun; Knobf, M Tish; Funk, Marjorie; Oh, Byeongsang

    2018-01-01

    Qigong exercise has been shown to improve physical and psychological well-being in adults with chronic conditions, but little is known about the feasibility and acceptability of engaging in a qigong exercise program in community-dwelling older adults in the United States. The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility, acceptance, and adherence to an 8-week qigong exercise intervention in community-dwelling American older adults. An exploratory study design. Two senior centers in southern Connecticut. Forty-five community-dwelling older adults aged 65 to 85 years enrolled. A supervised 1-h health qigong exercise session twice weekly for 8 weeks. An investigator-designed questionnaire with seven items that were rated on a 1 to 6 scale, with higher scores indicating better results, and nine open-ended questions were used to obtain data on feasibility and acceptability. Adherence was calculated as the proportion of the 16 planned sessions attended. Of the 45 older adults enrolled, 6 never started and 6 withdrew, with 33 evaluable at the end of the intervention. The mean age of the sample was 74.8 years; the majority were female (84.4%) and white (91.1%). Mean scores on aspects of difficulty, acceptability, suitability, or effectiveness of qigong exercise were all ≥5. Participants identified benefits of qigong exercise, such as calming and relaxing feelings, inner peace, better balance, and flexibility. Attendance rate was 78.8%, with 94% performing qigong exercise at least once weekly outside the class. All participants indicated that they would recommend qigong exercise to others. No adverse events occurred. An 8-week qigong exercise program was feasible, acceptable, and safe for American older adults. Future robust randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  19. Delta Activity at Sleep Onset and Cognitive Performance in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Makoto; Beaudreau, Sherry A; Gould, Christine E; Hantke, Nathan C; Jordan, Josh T; O'Hara, Ruth

    2016-04-01

    Frontal intermittent rhythmic delta activity (FIRDA) has long been considered to be an abnormal variant in the electroencephalogram (EEG) among older adults. Prior work also indicates a predominance of slow wave EEG activity among patients with dementia. However, instability of state control occurring with aging generally and among many neurodegenerative diseases raises the possibility that FIRDA might represent the intrusion of sleep related elements of the EEG into the waking state. We examined delta activity at sleep onset (DASO) in community-dwelling, older adults without dementia, and examined whether this activity is related to poorer cognitive performance. 153 community-dwelling, older adults without dementia underwent overnight polysomnography and measures of global cognition, delayed verbal memory, information processing speed, attention, inhibition, verbal naming, and visuospatial ability. Delta activity during sleep/wake transitions (scored either as Waking or N1) was analyzed visually. Participants were 83 women and 70 men, mean age 71.3 ± 0.6 y. DASO was present in 30 participants (19.6%). Age, years of education, sex, and body mass index did not differ between DASO (+) and (-) groups. Multiple regression analyses indicated faster reading of the Stroop color words in DASO (+) subjects (P = 0.007). None of the other cognitive domains differed between the two groups. DASO was relatively common in our sample of community-dwelling, older adults without dementia. DASO was not associated with poorer performance on any cognitive domain. Instead, individuals with DASO demonstrated better performance on a simple reading task. Although these findings suggest that an abnormal EEG activity may represent normal variation, our work underscores the importance of distinguishing DASO from FIRDA when examining sleep in older adults. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 725. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  20. Variables explaining health-related quality of life in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor-Glittenberg, Cecelia; Lehmann, Sara; Okada, Mari; Rosen, Danielle; Brewer, Kathryn; Bay, R Curtis

    2014-01-01

    Although health-related quality of life (HRQL) has been linked to numerous factors in older adults, limited or conflicting studies have investigated variables explaining HRQL in healthy, community-dwelling older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether physical activity, gait speed, balance, strength, endurance, and flexibility were associated with HRQL in healthy, community-dwelling older adults. Participants of this cross-sectional, correlational research design study included residents of a senior living community, aged 60 years and older who were independent in at least unlimited household ambulation. These residents participated in tests of physical activity, gait speed, balance, strength, endurance, flexibility, and HRQL (Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey, SF-36). The physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) component summary scores of the SF-36 were calculated. Data were collected on 84 participants (mean [SD] age = 78.6 (5.9) years, 54.8% women). Significant correlations were found between the PCS and fast gait speed (FGS) (r = 0.43; p Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale (r = 0.44; p balance, and lower body strength were associated with the PCS of the SF-36; however, FGS was the only variable that uniquely contributed to the variance in the PCS. Body mass index was associated with the MCS; however, only balance uniquely contributed to the variance in the MCS. Physical activity was not associated with the PCS or MCS. The results of this study support the assessment of FGS in community-dwelling older adults to gain insight into physical health status. Interventions directed toward FGS, balance, and BMI may contribute to optimum HRQL in this population.

  1. Predicting sarcopenia from functional measures among community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Michelle; Glenn, Jordan M; Binns, Ashley

    2016-02-01

    Sarcopenia is defined as age-related lean tissue mass (LTM) loss resulting in reduced muscular strength, physical function, and mobility. Up to 33 % of older adults currently are sarcopenic, with likely many more undiagnosed. The purpose of this investigation was to predict sarcopenia status from easily accessible functional measures of community-dwelling older adults. Forty-three community-dwelling older adults (n = 32 females and n = 11 males) participated in the present investigation. Inclusion criteria included ≥65 years of age, mini-mental state examination score ≥24, and no falls within previous 12 months. All subjects completed their appendicular skeletal mass (ASM) assessment via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and were categorized as either sarcopenic or non-sarcopenic. Physical assessments included 10-m usual walk, hand-grip (HG) strength, 6-min walk, 8-ft up-and-go, 30-s chair stand, 30-s arm curl, and sit-to-stand muscular power. A forward, stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that age, sex, weight, height, 10-m walk, HG, and sit-to-stand muscular power account for 96.1 % of the variance in ASM. The area under the curve was 0.92 for correctly identifying sarcopenic participants compared to their actual classification. This is the first prediction model used to identify sarcopenia based on parameters of demographic and functional fitness measures in community-dwelling older adults. The ability to accurately identify sarcopenia in older adults is imperative to their quality of life and ability to perform activities of daily living.

  2. A measure of fall risk behaviors and perceptions among community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Hon Keung; Carter, Rickey E

    2006-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the interaction between behavioral and environmental circumstances associated with falls among community-dwelling older adults. This study is designed to develop an instrument that measures community-dwelling older adults' participation in and perceptions of fall risk behaviors. Eighty-seven community-dwelling older adults aged 60 or above (mean +/- SD = 76 +/- 7.9), who had experienced at least one fall in the past 12 months, completed a questionnaire dealing with frequency of their participation in fall risk behaviors, their perceptions of these behaviors, and their fall history. Data were subjected to exploratory factor analysis. A 20-item instrument consisting of three constructs was presented as the Fall Risk Behaviors and Perceptions Scale (FRB&PS). Two of the three constructs of the instrument were de-stabilizers and non-supports, both of which measure participation in fall risk behaviors; the third was perceptions of fall risk behaviors. Internal consistency coefficient of the FRB&PS is 0.733 with a root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) score of 0.075, which indicates an adequate model fit. Results from the stepwise regression analyses indicated that adults aged 75 and above (the old-old) participated less frequently in fall risk activities (p = 0.025), and had more knowledge about fall risks as measured by a higher perception score (p = 0.025) than those aged 60 to 75 (the young-old). Older men tended to participate more frequently in fall risk activities (p = 0.020) than older women; in addition, those older adults who are more mobile (p = 0.002) also participated more frequently in fall risk behaviors than those who are less mobile. Preliminary findings indicate that the pilot FRB&PS is a reliable and valid instrument to measure community-dwelling older adults' participation in and perceptions of fall risk behaviors. Additional psychometric validation of the FRB&PS on predicting the likelihood of falls is

  3. Potentially inappropriate prescribing in community-dwelling older people across Europe: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommelein, Eline; Mehuys, Els; Petrovic, Mirko; Somers, Annemie; Colin, Pieter; Boussery, Koen

    2015-12-01

    Potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) is one of the main risk factors for adverse drug events (ADEs) in older people. This systematic literature review aims to determine prevalence and type of PIP in community-dwelling older people across Europe, as well as identifying risk factors for PIP. The PubMed and Web of Science database were searched systematically for relevant manuscripts (January 1, 2000-December 31, 2014). Manuscripts were included if the study design was observational, the study participants were community-dwelling older patients in Europe, and if a published screening method for PIP was used. Studies that focused on specific pathologies or that focused on merely one inappropriate prescribing issue were excluded. Data analysis was performed using R statistics. Fifty-two manuscripts were included, describing 82 different sample screenings with an estimated overall PIP prevalence of 22.6 % (CI 19.2-26.7 %; range 0.0-98.0 %). Ten of the sample screenings were based on the Beers 1997 criteria, 19 on the Beers 2003 criteria, 14 on STOPP criteria (2008 version), 8 on START-criteria (2008 version), and 7 on the PRISCUS list. The 24 remaining sample screenings were carried out using compilations of screening methods or used country-specific lists such as the Laroche criteria. It appears that only PIP prevalence calculated from insurance data significantly differs from the other data collection method categories. Furthermore, risk factors most often positively associated with PIP prevalence were polypharmacy, poor functional status, and depression. Drug groups most often involved in PIP were anxiolytics (ATC-code: N05B), antidepressants (N06A), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and anti-rheumatic products (M01A). PIP prevalence in European community-dwelling older adults is high and depends partially on the data collection method used. Polypharmacy, poor functional status, and depression were identified as the most common risk factors for PIP.

  4. A critical appraisal of nutritional intervention studies in malnourished, community dwelling older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de van der Schueren, M A E; Wijnhoven, H A H; Kruizenga, H M; Visser, M

    2016-10-01

    With the rapidly increasing number of malnourished older persons in the community, this review aims to summarize the effects of nutritional intervention studies for this target group. Based on 2 previous reviews (2009, 2011) an update of the literature was performed. Selected were higher quality studies which included malnourished community dwelling older adults who received dietetic counselling and/or oral nutritional supplements. Ten studies were included. Six studies showed (trends towards) weight gain. Meta-analysis showed a modest effect of the intervention on weight gain, standardized mean difference 0.210 kg (95% CI 0.03-0.40). Effects on other relevant functional and clinical outcomes were inconsistent. Studies were hampered by low sample sizes, low adherence to the interventions, and participants not meeting nutritional requirements. Currently, nutritional intervention studies for malnourished community dwelling older adults show limited effects, which may be caused by methodological shortcomings and participants not meeting treatment goals. High quality studies are eagerly awaited to be able to identify (sub)groups of older persons who are most likely to benefit from nutritional support. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  5. Social risk factors for falls among rural Nigerian community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruf, Fatai Adesina; Muonwe, Chidile; Odetunde, Marufat

    2016-06-01

    Reports on social risk factors for falls are scarce. This study explored the associations of selected sociodemographic and health variables with falls among rural Nigerian community-dwelling older adults. The present cross-sectional study involved 131 community-dwelling older adults (84 women and 47 men) recruited at an outreach center. Demographic (age, sex and marital status), social (frequency of visiting relations and friends, and number of consistent informal carers) and health (number of comorbid conditions) variables were recorded. Having fewer than two informal carers (0.26, 95% CI 0.10-0.68) was independently associated with reduced risk for falls. Visiting relations and friends less than twice per week was independently associated with greater risks for falls (3.85, 95% CI 1.42-10.46) and recurrent falls (4.86, 95% CI 1.25-18.85). The number of informal carers and frequency of social visits are risk factors for falls in older adults, and need to be taken into consideration in any strategy for fall prevention in older adults. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2015; ●●: ●●-●●. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  6. The health benefits following regular ongoing exercise lifestyle in independent community-dwelling older Taiwanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Yi; Yeh, Chih-Jung; Wang, Chia-Wei; Wang, Chun-Feng; Lin, Yen-Ling

    2011-03-01

    To examine the effect of regular ongoing exercise lifestyle on mental and physical health in a group of independent community-dwelling Taiwanese older adults over a 2-year period. 197 older adults (mean age 72.5 years; 106 men and 91 women) who were independent in walking, instrumental and basic activities of daily living completed the baseline and a 2-year follow-up assessment. Older adults regularly performing exercises during the 2-year study period were grouped into regular exercise group; otherwise in the irregular exercise group. Baseline and follow-up assessments included a face-to-face interview and a battery of performance tests. The regular exercise group showed significantly less depression (P = 0.03) and tended to regress less on the performance tests (P = 0.025-0.410) across 2 years compared to the irregular exercise group. Regular exercise is important for maintaining or even improving mental and functional health, even for independent community-dwelling older adults. © 2010 The Authors. Australasian Journal on Ageing © 2010 ACOTA.

  7. Albumin levels and cause-specific mortality in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Yi; Hu, Hsiao-Yun; Huang, Nicole; Chou, Yi-Chang; Li, Chung-Pin; Chou, Yiing-Jenq

    2018-04-09

    To investigate the association between serum albumin levels and cause-specific mortality among community-dwelling older adults. This cohort study was based on data obtained from the government-sponsored Annual Geriatric Health Examination Program for the older adults in Taipei City between 2006 and 2010. The study sample consisted of 77,531 community-dwelling Taipei citizens (≥65 years old). Mortality was determined by matching the participants' medical records with national death files. Serum albumin levels were categorized into dwelling older adults had a mean albumin level of 4.3 g/dL, which significantly reduced by age. Compared to albumin levels ≥4.4 g/dL, mildly low albumin levels (4.2-4.3 g/dL) were associated with an increased mortality risk (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.16, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-1.28 for all-cause mortality), and albumin levels dwelling older adults, and mortality risk increased as the albumin level decreased. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Purpose in life is associated with mortality among community-dwelling older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Patricia A; Barnes, Lisa L; Buchman, Aron S; Bennett, David A

    2009-06-01

    To assess the association between purpose in life and all-cause mortality in community-dwelling elderly persons. We used data from 1238 older persons without dementia from two longitudinal cohort studies (Rush Memory and Aging Project and Minority Aging Research Study) with baseline evaluations of purpose in life and up to 5 years of follow-up to test the hypothesis that greater purpose in life is associated with a reduced risk of mortality among community-dwelling older persons. The mean +/- standard deviation score on the purpose in life measure at baseline was 3.7 +/- 0.5 (range = 2-5), with higher scores indicating greater purpose in life. During the 5-year follow-up (mean = 2.7 years), 151 of 1238 persons (12.2%) died. In a proportional hazards model adjusted for age, sex, education, and race, a higher level of purpose in life was associated with a substantially reduced risk of mortality (hazard ratio = 0.60, 95% Confidence Interval = 0.42, 0.87). Thus, the hazard rate for a person with a high score on the purpose in life measure (score = 4.2, 90th percentile) was about 57% of the hazard rate of a person with a low score (score = 3.1, 10th percentile). The association of purpose in life with mortality did not differ among men and women or whites and blacks. Further, the finding persisted after the addition of terms for several potential confounders, including depressive symptoms, disability, neuroticism, the number of chronic medical conditions, and income. Greater purpose in life is associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality among community-dwelling older persons.

  9. Optimizing social participation in community-dwelling older adults through the use of behavioral coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provencher, Véronique; Desrosiers, Johanne; Demers, Louise; Carmichael, Pierre-Hugues

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to (1) determine the categories of behavioral coping strategies most strongly correlated with optimal seniors' social participation in different activity and role domains and (2) identify the demographic, health and environmental factors associated with the use of these coping strategies optimizing social participation. The sample consisted of 350 randomly recruited community-dwelling older adults (≥65 years). Coping strategies and social participation were measured, respectively, using the Inventory of Coping Strategies Used by the Elderly and Assessment of Life Habits questionnaires. Information about demographic, health and environmental factors was also collected during the interview. Regression analyses showed a strong relationship between the use of cooking- and transportation-related coping strategies and optimal participation in the domains of nutrition and community life, respectively. Older age and living alone were associated with increased use of cooking-related strategies, while good self-rated health and not living in a seniors' residence were correlated with greater use of transportation-related strategies. Our study helped to identify useful behavioral coping strategies that should be incorporated in disability prevention programs designed to promote community-dwelling seniors' social participation. However, the appropriateness of these strategies depends on whether they are used in relevant contexts and tailored to specific needs. Our results support the relevance of including behavioral coping strategies related to cooking and transportation in disability prevention programs designed to promote community-dwelling seniors' social participation in the domains of nutrition and community life, respectively. Older age and living alone were associated with increased use of cooking-related strategies, while good self-rated health and not living in a seniors' residence were correlated with greater use of transportation

  10. Association of day length and weather conditions with physical activity levels in older community dwelling people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles D Witham

    Full Text Available Weather is a potentially important determinant of physical activity. Little work has been done examining the relationship between weather and physical activity, and potential modifiers of any relationship in older people. We therefore examined the relationship between weather and physical activity in a cohort of older community-dwelling people.We analysed prospectively collected cross-sectional activity data from community-dwelling people aged 65 and over in the Physical Activity Cohort Scotland. We correlated seven day triaxial accelerometry data with daily weather data (temperature, day length, sunshine, snow, rain, and a series of potential effect modifiers were tested in mixed models: environmental variables (urban vs rural dwelling, percentage of green space, psychological variables (anxiety, depression, perceived behavioural control, social variables (number of close contacts and health status measured using the SF-36 questionnaire.547 participants, mean age 78.5 years, were included in this analysis. Higher minimum daily temperature and longer day length were associated with higher activity levels; these associations remained robust to adjustment for other significant associates of activity: age, perceived behavioural control, number of social contacts and physical function. Of the potential effect modifier variables, only urban vs rural dwelling and the SF-36 measure of social functioning enhanced the association between day length and activity; no variable modified the association between minimum temperature and activity.In older community dwelling people, minimum temperature and day length were associated with objectively measured activity. There was little evidence for moderation of these associations through potentially modifiable health, environmental, social or psychological variables.

  11. Urinary incontinence, mental health and loneliness among community-dwelling older adults in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickley, Andrew; Santini, Ziggi Ivan; Koyanagi, Ai

    2017-04-08

    Urinary incontinence (UI) is associated with worse health among older adults. Little is known however, about its relation with loneliness or the role of mental health in this association. This study examined these factors among older adults in Ireland. Data were analyzed from 6903 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 50 collected in the first wave of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) in 2009-11. Information was obtained on the self-reported occurrence (yes/no) and severity (frequency/activity limitations) of UI in the past 12 months. Loneliness was measured using the UCLA Loneliness Scale short form. Information was also obtained on depression (CES-D), anxiety (HADS-A) and other sociodemographic variables. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between variables. In a model adjusted for all potential confounders except mental disorders, compared to no UI, any UI was associated with significantly higher odds for loneliness (odds ratio: 1.51). When depression was included in the analysis, the association was attenuated and became non-significant while the inclusion of anxiety had a much smaller effect. Similarly, although frequency of UI and activity limitations due to UI were both significantly associated with loneliness prior to adjustment for mental disorders, neither association remained significant after adjustment for both depression and anxiety. UI is associated with higher odds for loneliness among older community-dwelling adults but this association is largely explained by comorbid mental health problems, in particular, depression.

  12. Factors associated with risk for assisted living among community-dwelling older Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabayama, Mai; Mikami, Hiroshi; Kamide, Kei

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the factors associated with risk for assisted living among community-dwelling older people, we conducted a large-scale survey in an urban city in Japan. Population-based cross-sectional study. A mid-sized urban city in western Japan with a population of approximately 410,000. Nondisabled and nondemented community-dwelling older people (≥65 years). A self-administered postal questionnaire, including a health checklist for the screening of older people at high risk for assisted living, as well as demographic/sociodemographic questions on sex, age, present illness, living alone, duration of residence within the current city, community participation, and employment status, was distributed. There were 41,796 returned questionnaires (response rate: 73.8%, average age: 72.0). Participants who were at high risk for assisted living accounted for 25.2%. The independent factors associated with risk for men and women were higher age, present illness, lack of community participation, unemployment, andLiving alone was a significant factor for men, whereas it was insignificant among women. The types of illnesses among people at risk were different between men and women. Higher age, present illness, and several social factors were independently associated with high-risk status for assisted living in the large-scale whole community survey, and there was a sex difference. Our results may provide basic information for the further application of effective preventive intervention in the community. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence of faecal incontinence in community-dwelling older people in Bali, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyasa, I Gede Putu Darma; Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Lynn, Penelope Ann; Skuza, Pawel Piotr; Paterson, Jan

    2015-06-01

    To explore the prevalence rate of faecal incontinence in community-dwelling older people, associated factors, impact on quality of life and practices in managing faecal incontinence. Using a cross-sectional design, 600 older people aged 60+ were randomly selected from a population of 2916 in Bali, Indonesia using a simple random sampling technique. Three hundred and three participants were interviewed (response rate 51%). The prevalence of faecal incontinence was 22.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 18.0-26.8). Self-reported constipation (odds ratio (OR) 3.68, 95% CI 1.87-7.24) and loose stools (OR 2.66, 95% CI 1.47-4.78) were significantly associated with faecal incontinence. There was a strong positive correlation between total bowel control score and total quality-of-life score (P < 0.001, rs = 0.61) indicating significant alterations in quality of life. The current management practices varied from changing diet, visiting health-care professionals, and using modern and traditional medicines. Faecal incontinence is common among community-dwelling older people in Bali. © 2014 ACOTA.

  14. Life-space mobility and dimensions of depressive symptoms among community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polku, Hannele; Mikkola, Tuija M; Portegijs, Erja; Rantakokko, Merja; Kokko, Katja; Kauppinen, Markku; Rantanen, Taina; Viljanen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    To examine the association between life-space mobility and different dimensions of depressive symptoms among older community-dwelling people. Cross-sectional analyses of baseline data of the 'Life-Space Mobility in Old Age' cohort study were carried out. The participants were community-dwelling women and men aged 75-90 years (N = 848). Data were gathered via structured interviews in participants' home. Life-space mobility (the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Life-Space Assessment - questionnaire) and depressive symptoms (Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, CES-D) were assessed. Other factors examined included sociodemographic factors, difficulties walking 500 m, number of chronic diseases and the sense of autonomy in participation outdoors (subscale of Impact on Participation and Autonomy questionnaire). Poorer life-space mobility was associated with higher prevalence of different dimensions of depressive symptoms. The associations were partially mediated through walking difficulties, health and the sense of autonomy in participation outdoor activities. Poorer life-space mobility interrelates with higher probability for depressive symptoms, thus compromising older adults' mental wellbeing. A focus on older adults' life-space mobility may assist early identification of persons, who have elevated risk for depressive symptoms. The association between life-space mobility and depressive symptoms should be studied further utilizing longitudinal study designs to examine temporality and potential causality.

  15. Self-Reported Hearing Impairment and Incident Frailty in English Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A 4-Year Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljas, Ann E M; Carvalho, Livia A; Papachristou, Efstathios; Oliveira, Cesar De; Wannamethee, S Goya; Ramsay, Sheena E; Walters, Kate

    2017-05-01

    To examine the association between hearing impairment and incident frailty in older adults. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses with 4-year follow-up using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Community. Community-dwelling individuals aged 60 and older with data on hearing and frailty status (N = 2,836). Hearing impairment was defined as poor self-reported hearing. Having none of the five Fried frailty phenotype components (slow walking, weak grip, self-reported exhaustion, weight loss and low physical activity) was defined as not frail, having one or two as prefrail, and having three or more as frail. Participants who were not frail at baseline were followed for incident prefrailty and frailty. Participants who were prefrail at baseline were followed for incident frailty. One thousand three hundred ninety six (49%) participants were not frail, 1,178 (42%) were prefrail, and 262 (9%) were frail according to the Fried phenotype. At follow-up, there were 367 new cases of prefrailty and frailty among those who were not frail at baseline (n = 1,396) and 133 new cases of frailty among those who were prefrail at baseline (n = 1,178). Cross-sectional analysis showed an association between hearing impairment and frailty (age- and sex-adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.37-2.01), which remained after further adjustments for wealth, education, cardiovascular disease, cognition, and depression. In longitudinal analyses, nonfrail participants with hearing impairment were at greater risk of becoming prefrail and frail at follow-up (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.05-1.95), but the association was attenuated after further adjustment. Prefrail participants with hearing impairment had a greater risk of becoming frail at follow-up (OR = 1.64, 95% CI = 1.07-2.51) even after further adjustment. Hearing impairment in prefrail older adults was associated with greater risk of becoming frail, independent of covariates, suggesting that hearing

  16. A Multicomponent Exercise Intervention that Reverses Frailty and Improves Cognition, Emotion, and Social Networking in the Community-Dwelling Frail Elderly: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco José; Gómez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; Pérez-Ros, Pilar; Martínez-Arnau, Francisco Miguel; Cabo, Helena; Tsaparas, Konstantina; Salvador-Pascual, Andrea; Rodriguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Viña, José

    2016-05-01

    group 28.9 SD 3.9 vs 25.9 SD 7.3 control group), geriatric depression scale from Yesavage (trained group 2.3 SD 2.2 vs 3.2 SD 2.0 control group), EuroQol quality-of-life scale (trained group 8.2 SD 1.6 vs 7.6 SD 1.3 control group), and Duke social support (trained group 48.5 SD 9.3 vs 41.2 SD 8.5 control group). This program is unique in that it leads to a decrease in the number of visits to primary care physician (trained group 1.3 SD 1.4 vs 2.4 SD 2.9 control group) and to a significant improvement in frailty biomarkers. We have designed a multicomponent exercise intervention that reverses frailty and improves cognition, emotional, and social networking in a controlled population of community-dwelling frail older adults. ClinicalTrials.gov. Identifier: NCT02331459. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of frailty among Japanese, Brazilian Japanese descendants and Brazilian community-dwelling older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Priscila Yukari Sewo; Sampaio, Ricardo Aurélio Carvalho; Yamada, Minoru; Ogita, Mihoko; Arai, Hidenori

    2015-06-01

    To investigate frailty in Japanese, Brazilian Japanese descendants and Brazilian older women. The collected data included sociodemographic and health-related characteristics, and the frailty index Kihon Checklist. We analyzed the differences between the mean scores of Kihon Checklist domains (using ancova) and the percentage of frail women (using χ(2)-test). We carried out a binary logistic regression with Kihon Checklist domains. A total of 211 participants (Japanese n = 84, Brazilian Japanese descendants n = 55, Brazilian n = 72) participated in this research. The Brazilian participants had the highest total Kihon Checklist scores (more frail), whereas the Brazilian Japanese descendants had the lowest scores (P Brazilian group had more participants with oral dysfunction (P Brazilian women were likely to be more frail than the participants in other groups. More than the environment itself, the lifestyle and sociodemographic conditions could affect the frailty of older Brazilian women. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  18. Neighborhood attributes security and solidarity promote the well-being of community-dwelling older people in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane M; Nieboer, Anna P

    2014-07-01

    To determine whether the neighborhood attributes solidarity and security positively affect the well-being of community-dwelling older people in the Netherlands after accounting for individual characteristics, and to test if a higher level of security in combination with a stronger sense of neighborhood solidarity results in a higher level of well-being. The study sample for the cross-sectional study consisted of 869 out of 2212 (39% response rate) independently-living older adults (aged >70 years) in 92 neighborhoods of Rotterdam. We fitted a hierarchical random-effects model to account for the structure of the study design: 869 older people (level 1) nested in 92 neighborhoods (level 2) in 10 districts (level 3). Neighborhood security and solidarity among neighbors varied significantly among the 10 districts. Univariate analyses showed that education, income, neighborhood security and solidarity within neighborhoods (all P ≤ 0.001) were significantly related to the well-being of community-dwelling older people. Multilevel analyses showed neighborhood security and solidarity within neighborhoods predicted the well-being of community-dwelling older people. Furthermore, a positive interaction effect was found between neighborhood security and solidarity within neighborhoods, and well-being of community-dwelling older people. Neighborhood security and solidarity among neighbors are important for the well-being of community-dwelling older people. Furthermore, neighborhoods with high levels of perceived security in combination with stronger solidarity among neighbors are especially beneficial to the well-being of community-dwelling older people. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  19. Balance Training with Wii Fit Plus for Community-Dwelling Persons 60 Years and Older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopchand-Martin, Sharmella; McLean, Roshé; Gordon, Carron; Nelson, Gail

    2015-06-01

    This study sought to determine the effect of 6 weeks of training, using activities from the Nintendo(®) (Kyoto, Japan) "Wii™ Fit Plus" disc, on balance in community-dwelling Jamaicans 60 years and older. A single group pretest/posttest design was used. Thirty-three subjects enrolled and 28 completed the study. Participants completed 30-minute training sessions on the Nintendo "Wii Fit" twice per week for 6 weeks. Activities used included "Obstacle Course," "Penguin Slide," "Soccer Heading," "River Bubble," "Snow Board," "Tilt Table," "Skate Board," and "Yoga Single Tree Pose." Balance was assessed with the Berg Balance Scale, the Multi Directional Reach Test, the Star Excursion Balance Test and the Modified Clinical Test for Sensory Integration in Balance. There was significant improvement in the mean Berg Balance Scale score (P=0.004), Star Excursion Balance Test score (SEBT) (PBalance. Balance games on the Nintendo "Wii Fit Plus" disc can be used as a tool for balance training in community-dwelling persons 60 years of age and older.

  20. Drug-related problems among community-dwelling older adults in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiadan; Meng, Long; Liu, Yu; Lv, Liping; Sun, Shusen; Long, Rui; Shan, Xuefeng; Song, Jie; Qiu, Feng

    2018-04-01

    Background Little is known about the extent of drug-related problems (DRPs) in community-dwelling older adult patients with chronic diseases in mainland China. Setting A medication therapy review service at a community health center in Chongqing, China. Objective To identify and categorize DRPs along with pharmacists' recommendations in addressing the DRPs identified. Method The study was conducted between May 2015 and July 2016. A total of 102 community-dwelling older adults were included. MTR was carried out by clinical pharmacists. DRPs and pharmacotherapy recommendations were recorded and analyzed. Main outcome measure The number of drug-related problems and main problem categories. Results The average age of patients was 69.4 years. Patients took an average of 6.3 medications. A total of 489 DRPs were identified (mean of 4.8 per patient). The most common category was under-treated (27.8%) followed by over- or under-dose (18.8%) and monitoring (17.8%). The number of medications taken was the significant associated factor for DRPs. Pharmacists made 526 recommendations to address the DRPs (mean of 1.1 recommendations per DRP). Primary care providers accepted 68.1% of these recommendations, and implemented 60.9% of them. Conclusion The prevalence of DRPs among studied patient population was high. Pharmacists may play a vital role in addressing the DRPs and optimize pharmacotherapy through MTR service located in community health centers.

  1. Late life anxiety is associated with decreased memory and executive functioning in community dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yochim, Brian P; Mueller, Anne E; Segal, Daniel L

    2013-08-01

    This study assessed the degree to which anxiety and depression symptoms are associated with memory and executive functioning among community-dwelling older adults (N=120; M age=74.9 years, SD=7.2 years; 62% women). Participants completed the Geriatric Anxiety Scale, Geriatric Depression Scale, Comorbidity Index, California Verbal Learning Test, Second Edition (CVLT-II), and the Trail Making, Verbal Fluency, and 20 Questions subtests of the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS). Multiple regression analyses indicated that anxiety and depression predicted poorer ability to learn new information (CVLT-II, Trials 1-5). Both anxiety and depression predicted performance on the D-KEFS Trail Making test, Number-Letter Switching condition. Anxiety, but not depression, predicted decreased categorization as measured by the D-KEFS 20 Questions, Initial Abstraction Score. Depression but not anxiety, predicted performance on D-KEFS Letter Fluency and Category Fluency. Findings suggest that anxiety and depression have unique relationships with cognitive functioning in community-dwelling older adults. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Life-Space Predicts Health Care Utilization in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Richard E; Williams, Courtney P; Sawyer, Patricia; Lo, Alexander X; Connelly, Kay; Nassel, Ariann; Brown, Cynthia J

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether decline in life-space mobility predicts increased health care utilization among community-dwelling older adults. Health care utilization (number of emergency department [ED] visits and hospitalizations) was self-reported during monthly interviews among 419 community-dwelling African American and non-Hispanic White adults aged 75 years and older in The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Study of Aging II. Life-space was measured using the UAB Life-Space Assessment. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine associations of life-space at the beginning of each interval with health care utilization over the 1-month interval. Overall, 400 participants were followed for 36 months. A 10-point decrease in life-space was associated with 14% increased odds of an ED visit and/or hospitalization over the next month, adjusting for demographics, transportation difficulty, comorbidity, and having a doctor visit in the last month. Life-space is a practical alternative in predicting future health care utilization to performance-based measures, which can be difficult to incorporate into clinical or public health practice.

  3. Urinary Incontinence: Its Assessment and Relationship to Depression among Community-Dwelling Multiethnic Older Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Laganà

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary Incontinence (UI affects many older adults. Some of its deleterious consequences include stress, major depression, diminished quality of life, sexual dysfunction, and familial discord. Of the various mental health problems identified in the literature as being comorbid with UI, the most notable one continues to be depression. Despite a wealth of research contributions on this topic, the available literature is underrepresentative of ethnic minority older women. Culture has been shown to have a significant impact on a woman’s perception of her own UI symptoms; this demonstrates the necessity for the recruitment of ethnically and culturally diverse samples when studying UI. In the present study, we determined the prevalence of UI among 140 community-dwelling, ethnically diverse older women (28.2%, discovered that our new UI screener is reliable, and did not find the UI-depression link to be significant. The clinical and research implications of our findings are discussed.

  4. Community-Dwelling Older Adults' Adherence to Environmental Fall Prevention Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Suzänne F; Coogle, Constance L; Cotter, James J; Welleford, E Ayn; Copolillo, Al

    2017-08-01

    This study examined the impact of personalized versus generalized education about environmental fall prevention recommendations on older adults' adherence with recommendations. Secondary aims focused on the impact of recent falls and perceived susceptibility of future falls on adherence with recommendations. Twenty-four community-dwelling older adults aged 65 to 89 years were randomized into two groups to receive either personalized or generalized education intervention on environmental fall prevention recommendations. A significant difference was found in the mean total percentage of adherence with recommendations of those receiving personalized education (69%) compared with those receiving generalized education (37%). No statistically significant relationship was found between sustaining recent falls, nor perceived susceptibility to future falls, and their extent of adherence with environmental fall prevention recommendations. Providing personalized education for environmental fall prevention recommendations may improve older adults' adherence with the recommendations given.

  5. Long-term effects of mnemonic training in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Ruth; Brooks, John O; Friedman, Leah; Schröder, Carmen M; Morgan, Kevin S; Kraemer, Helena C

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate the long-term effect of mnemonic training on memory performance in older adults. Five years after participation in a mnemonic training study, we followed-up 112 community-dwelling older adults, 60 years of age and over. Delayed recall of a word list was assessed prior to, and immediately following mnemonic training, and at the 5-year follow-up. Overall, there was no significant difference between word recall prior to training and that exhibited at follow-up. However, pre-training performance, gain scores in performance immediately post-training and use of the mnemonic predicted performance at follow-up. Individuals who self-reported using the mnemonic exhibited the highest performance overall, with scores significantly higher than at pre-training. Our findings suggest that mnemonic training has long-term benefits for some older adults, particularly those who continue to employ the mnemonic.

  6. Application of Pole Walking to Day Service Centers for Use by Community-dwelling Frail Elderly People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Ota

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The effects of 3 months of pole walking on community-dwelling elderly day service users showed improved Physical Component Summary scores of higher QoL. However, there was no significant effect of physical functions due to the intervention.

  7. Improving nursing students' assessment of fall risk in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Susan K

    2016-12-09

    Nationally, approximately one third of older adults fall each year. Falls and resulting injury result in decreased mobility, functional impairment, loss of independence, and increased mortality. Utilization of evidence-based protocols by health care providers to identify older adults at risk of falling is limited, and rates of participation by older adults in prevention activities is low. Because of nursing's increasing role in caring for older adults, development of fall prevention education for nursing students would result in increased awareness of the need for fall prevention in community-dwelling older adults and increased access of older adults to falls risk assessment. There is a need to extend research to inform teaching and learning strategies for fall prevention. After pretesting, a convenience sample of 52 undergraduate nursing students and 22 graduate nursing students completed an online education program and performed a falls risk assessment on an older adult. After completing the clinical assignment, students completed a posttest and self-efficacy survey. Data were analyzed using multivariate statistical tests. Results revealed an increase in knowledge and student self-reporting of efficacy of fall risk assessment skills for the older adult population. This study suggests that nursing students acquired the necessary knowledge and self-efficacy for assessing fall risk of older adults through the combination of an online learning module and participating in actual fall risk assessment of an older adult.

  8. The reliability and preliminary validity of game-based fall risk assessment in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Minoru; Aoyama, Tomoki; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Buichi; Nagai, Koutatsu; Tatematsu, Noriatsu; Uemura, Kazuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Tsuboyama, Tadao; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the Nintendo Wii Fit program could be used for fall risk assessment in healthy, community-dwelling older adults. Forty-five community-dwelling older women participated in this study. The "Basic Step" and "Ski Slalom" modules were selected from the Wii Fit game program. The following 5 physical performance tests were performed: the 10-m walk test under single- and dual-task conditions, the Timed Up and Go test under single- and dual-task conditions, and the Functional Reach test. Compared with the faller group, the nonfaller group showed a significant difference in the Basic Step (P fall risk assessment using the Basic Step has a high generality and is useful in community-dwelling older adults. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Self-reported skin concerns: An epidemiological study of community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdell, Fiona; Dyson, Judith; Long, Judith; Macleod, Una

    2018-03-25

    To identify the frequency and impact of self-reported skin concerns in community-dwelling older people. Globally, the population is getting older and it is essential to develop effective interventions to promote healthy ageing. Skin change with age is inevitable and renders this often neglected organ more vulnerable to damage and breakdown; this can be costly to individuals and society. Maintenance of skin health in older people presents a health challenge that has yet to be fully understood or addressed. Cross-sectional, self-reported questionnaire survey in England. Patients registered with participating general practices (n = 3), aged ≥70 years, living in their own homes and able to give informed consent (n = 3,359) were sent a letter of invitation to a free health and care assessment, and 1116 responded. When asked "do you have any concerns about your skin?", 16.5% (n = 183) said yes. Of this group, the most common concerns were dry skin 80.7% (n = 146), itching 56.9% (n = 103) and aged appearance 61% (n = 113). Itch, dry skin and inflammation were rated as most bothersome. There was a significant association between the dry skin and itch χ 2 (1) = 6.9, p dwelling older people suffer from skin concerns predominantly dry skin and itching that is often bothersome. Skin health assessment is often absent in routine consultations with community-dwelling older people. Dry, itchy skin is prevalent and can be simply managed with low-cost interventions. This has the potential to reduce suffering and maintain or improve skin barrier function. Nurses and other health professionals should therefore routinely assess and advise on skin health care for this population. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Frailty as a Predictor of Nursing Home Placement Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Gotaro

    Frailty has been recognized as a medical syndrome characterized by decreased physiological reserve and vulnerability to poor resolution of homeostasis. Frailty is common in nursing homes and as many as 90% of nursing home patients are frail or prefrail. Previous studies have examined frailty as a risk factor for nursing home placement and yielded inconsistent results. The current study aims to systematically review the literature and to conduct a meta-analysis to combine the risk measures to provide the evidence on frailty as a predictor of nursing home placement among community-dwelling older adults. A systematic literature search was performed in July 2015 using 6 databases (Scopus, Embase, CINAHL Plus, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library). Any cohort studies examining associations between frailty and risk of subsequent nursing home placement among community-dwelling older adults published from 2000 to July 2015 were potentially eligible. The numbers of those who were admitted to nursing homes and who were not, according to frailty categories, were used to calculate pooled odds ratio (OR) using fixed-effect models. The included studies were assessed for heterogeneity, methodological quality, and publication bias. The systematic literature search and hand-search identified 885 potentially relevant studies, among which 5 studies including 3528 community-dwelling older adults were selected for this review. Meta-analyses were performed using data from these studies and showed that both frailty and prefrailty significantly predicted nursing home placement (5 studies: pooled OR = 5.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.94-10.60, P dwelling older adults. It is noteworthy that adherence to the exercise programs was high and adverse events were not reported in most of the trials. These findings suggest that physical exercise can potentially prevent or reverse frailty and may lead to decreased risks of nursing home placement in older adults. This systematic review

  11. Core muscle strengthening's improvement of balance performance in community-dwelling older adults: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Nicole; Tevald, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effect of core muscle strengthening on balance in community-dwelling older adults, 24 healthy men and women between 65 and 85 years old were randomized to either exercise (EX; n = 12) or control (CON; n = 12) groups. The exercise group performed a core strengthening home exercise program thrice weekly for 6 wk. Core muscle (curl-up test), functional reach (FR) and Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) were assessed at baseline and follow-up. There were no group differences at baseline. At follow-up, EX exhibited significantly greater improvements in curl-up (Cohen's d = 4.4), FR (1.3), and SEBT (>1.9 for all directions) than CON. The change in curl-up was significantly correlated with the change in FR (r = .44, p = .03) and SEBT (r > .61, p ≤ .002). These results suggest that core strengthening should be part of a comprehensive balance-training program for older adults.

  12. Depression and Psychosocial Risk Factors among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhui; Theng, Yin-Leng; Foo, Schubert

    2015-12-01

    Depression is the most common mental and emotional disorder that emerges in the late stages of life. It is closely associated with poor health, disability, mortality, and suicide. The study examines the risk factors of depression in late life, especially the psychosocial factors, among a sample comprising 162 community-dwelling Singaporean adults aged 65 years and above. An interview-based structured survey was conducted in multiple senior activity centers located in different parts of Singapore. Results from the hierarchical regression analysis show that 32.9% of the variance in geriatric depression can be explained by the three psychosocial factors, among which loneliness, perceived social support, and the emotional regulation component of resilience are significantly associated with depression in older adults. Large-scale studies should be conducted to confirm the findings of the present study, and to further examine the predictive effects of these psychosocial factors on depression among older adults.

  13. Association between physiological falls risk and physical performance tests among community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devinder K A; Pillai, Sharmila G K; Tan, Sin Thien; Tai, Chu Chiau; Shahar, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Physical performance and balance declines with aging and may lead to increased risk of falls. Physical performance tests may be useful for initial fall-risk screening test among community-dwelling older adults. Physiological profile assessment (PPA), a composite falls risk assessment tool is reported to have 75% accuracy to screen for physiological falls risk. PPA correlates with Timed Up and Go (TUG) test. However, the association between many other commonly used physical performance tests and PPA is not known. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between physiological falls risk measured using PPA and a battery of physical performance tests. One hundred and forty older adults from a senior citizens club in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (94 females, 46 males), aged 60 years and above (65.77±4.61), participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were screened for falls risk using PPA. A battery of physical performance tests that include ten-step test (TST), short physical performance battery (SPPB), functional reach test (FRT), static balance test (SBT), TUG, dominant hand-grip strength (DHGS), and gait speed test (GST) were also performed. Spearman's rank correlation and binomial logistic regression were performed to examine the significantly associated independent variables (physical performance tests) with falls risk (dependent variable). Approximately 13% older adults were at high risk of falls categorized using PPA. Significant differences (Page, TST, SPPB, FRT, SBT, TUG between high and low falls risk group. A significant (Pphysiological falls risk (Pfalls screening to categorize high and low physiological falls risk among community-dwelling older adults. A more comprehensive assessment of falls risk can be performed thereafter for more specific intervention of underlying impairments.

  14. Persistent sleep disturbance: a risk factor for recurrent depression in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun; Cho, Hyong Jin; Olmstead, Richard; Levin, Myron J; Oxman, Michael N; Irwin, Michael R

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the associations between the temporal and severity characteristics of sleep disturbance and subsequent depression in community-dwelling older adults. A prospective cohort study with assessment of sleep disturbance and depression at baseline and across 2 years of follow-up. Three urban communities in the United States. Community-dwelling older adults in whom prior depression (n = 145), current depression (n = 68), or never mentally ill (n = 206) were diagnosed at the baseline assessment. Major depression at year 2, defined by the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Among patients with either a depression history or current depression at baseline, persistent sleep disturbance throughout year 1 was associated with persistent or recurrent depression at year 2, after adjustment for group status, antidepressant and hypnotic sedative use, severity of depressive symptoms, chronic medical burden, and sociodemographic variables (adjusted odds ratio = 5.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.16 to 23.29). Among those who were not depressed at year 1, persistent sleep disturbance throughout year 1 predicted depression recurrence during year 2 (adjusted hazards ratio = 16.05, CI = 1.21 to 213.06), independent of the severity of sleep disturbance. None of the older adults who were never mentally ill developed a depression. Persistent sleep disturbance during a year-long period is associated with depression the following year. Among older adults with prior depression, identification of those with persistent sleep disturbance may optimize the efficacy of sleep related interventions to improve depression remission and/or prevent late-life depression.

  15. Frailty and incident depression in community-dwelling older people: results from the ELSA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Nicola; Solmi, Marco; Maggi, Stefania; Noale, Marianna; Sergi, Giuseppe; Manzato, Enzo; Prina, A Matthew; Fornaro, Michele; Carvalho, André F; Stubbs, Brendon

    2017-12-01

    Frailty and pre-frailty are two common conditions in the older people, but whether these conditions could predict depression is still limited to a few longitudinal studies. In this paper, we aimed to investigate whether frailty and pre-frailty are associated with an increased risk of depression in a prospective cohort of community-dwelling older people. Four thousand seventy-seven community-dwelling men and women over 60 years without depression at baseline were included from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Frailty status was defined according to modified Fried's criteria (weakness, weight loss, slow gait speed, low physical activity and exhaustion) and categorized as frailty (≥3 criteria), pre-frailty (1-2 criteria) or robustness (0 criterion). Depression was diagnosed as ≥4 out of 8 points of Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, after 2 years of follow-up. Over a 2-year follow-up, 360 individuals developed depression. In a logistic regression analysis, adjusted for 18 potential baseline confounders, pre-frailty (odds ratio (OR) = 0.89; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.54-1.46; p = 0.64) and frailty (OR = 1.22; 95% CI, 0.90-1.64; p = 0.21) did not predict the onset of depression at follow-up. Among the criteria included in the frailty definition, only slow gait speed (OR = 1.82; 95% CI, 1.00-3.32; p = 0.05) appeared to predict a higher risk of depression. Among older community dwellers, frailty and pre-frailty did not predict the onset of depression during 2 years of follow-up, when accounting for potential confounders, whilst slow gait speed considered alone may predict depression in the older people. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Are frailty components associated with disability in specific activities of daily living in community-dwelling older adults? A multicenter Canadian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provencher, Véronique; Béland, François; Demers, Louise; Desrosiers, Johanne; Bier, Nathalie; Ávila-Funes, José Alberto; Galand, Claude; Julien, Dominic; Fletcher, John D; Trottier, Lise; Hami, Benyahia

    2017-11-01

    Current studies show the relevance of geriatric prevention and rehabilitation programs to slow down the development of disability in community-dwelling older adults who are becoming frail. This evidence reveals the importance of improving knowledge on how individual components of frailty and specific disability in basic and instrumental activities of daily living (ADL) are related, to offer early, targeted, and tailored interventions. The objective was to examine the association between each of the five frailty phenotype components (weakness, slowness, exhaustion, low physical activity, weight loss) and disability in specific ADL pertaining to physical aspects (bathing, dressing, cutting toe nails, transportation, shopping, housekeeping, food purchasing, food preparation) and cognitive aspects (finances, telephone, medication). A cross-sectional design involving 1643 community-dwelling older adults (65+) from the longitudinal multi-center FRéLE study was used. Disability was defined as needing help or being unable to perform specific ADL. Multiple logistic regressions were adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, clinical variables, and for 4 other frailty components. Results showed that low physical activity and slowness were significantly linked to disability in all physical and cognitive aspects of ADL (OR: 1.71-9.42; pdisability in the physical aspects of instrumental ADL (transportation, shopping, housekeeping, food purchasing, food preparation) (OR: 1.73-9.42; pdisability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The burden of hospitalised fall-related injury in community-dwelling older people in Victoria: a database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Trang; Day, Lesley; Finch, Caroline F

    2014-04-01

    To estimate the burden of hospitalised fall-related injury in community-dwelling older people in Victoria. We analysed fall-related, person-identifying hospital discharge data and patient-level hospital treatment costs for community-dwelling older people aged 65+ years from Victoria between 1 July 2005 and 30 June 2008, inclusive. Key outcomes of interest were length of stay (LOS)/episode, cumulative LOS (CLOS)/patient and inpatient costs. The burden of hospitalised fall-related injury in community-dwelling older people aged 65+ years in Victoria was 284,781 hospital bed days in 2005-06, rising to 310,031 hospital bed days in 2007-08. Seventy-one per cent of episodes were multiday. One in 15 acute care episodes was a high LOS outlier and 14% of patients had ≥1 episode classified as high LOS outlier. The median CLOS/patient was nine days (interquartile range 2-27). The annual costs of inpatient care, in June 2009 prices, for fall-related injury in community-dwelling people aged 65+ years in Victoria rose from $213 million in 2005-06 to $237 million in 2007-08. The burden of hospitalised fall-related injury in community-dwelling older women, people aged 85+ years and those with comorbidity was considerable. The burden of hospitalised fall-related injury in community-dwelling older people aged 65+ years in Victoria is significantly more than previously projected. Importantly, this study identifies that women, patients with comorbidity and those aged 85+ years account for a considerable proportion of this burden. A corresponding increase in falls prevention effort is required to ensure that the burden is properly addressed. © 2014 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2014 Public Health Association of Australia.

  18. Reducing depression among community-dwelling older adults using life-story review: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Moon Fai; Leong, Katherine S P; Heng, Boon Ling; Mathew, Blessy Koottappal; Khan, Sher Banu A L; Lourdusamy, Sumathi Sagayamary; Nagapan, Mina; Woo, Sook Fan; Chee, Wai Yan; Ho, Roger C M; Taylor, Beverley Joan

    2014-01-01

    A life-story review can serve as an effective intervention to express one's inner feelings and provide emotional catharsis. The research aim was to examine the effects of life-story review on depression levels in community-dwelling older adults in Singapore. This pilot experimental pre-post-follow-up study was conducted from July 2012 to February 2013. Twenty-nine older Malays aged 60 and above, with mild to moderate depression, were randomly allocated to the life-story review (intervention) group (n = 15) or the non life-story review (control) group (n = 14). Depressive symptoms were measured by the Geriatric Depression Scale-15 and collected five times over eight weeks. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the effects of the intervention on the elders' depression levels, controlled for age, gender, medication use, existence of chronic disease, and diary writing experience. Reductions in depression scores were found in the intervention group from week 1 (Mean ± SD 5.9 ± 2.3) to week 8 (1.9 ± 1.6) compared with the control group (week 1: 5.0 ± 1.3; week 8: 3.5 ± 1.5). At week 8, the intervention group showed a significantly lower level of depression than the control group (χ(2) = 14.61, p story review in improving depression levels in cognitively intact community dwelling older adults. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Preclinical disability as a risk factor for falls in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough-Gorr, Kerri M; Erpen, Thomas; Gillmann, Gerhard; von Renteln-Kruse, Wolfgang; Iliffe, Steve; Beck, John C; Stuck, Andreas E

    2008-03-01

    Falls are common and serious problems in older adults. The goal of this study was to examine whether preclinical disability predicts incident falls in a European population of community-dwelling older adults. Secondary data analysis was performed on a population-based longitudinal study of 1644 community-dwelling older adults living in London, U.K.; Hamburg, Germany; Solothurn, Switzerland. Data were collected at baseline and 1-year follow-up using a self-administered multidimensional health risk appraisal questionnaire, including validated questions on falls, mobility disability status (high function, preclinical disability, task difficulty), and demographic and health-related characteristics. Associations were evaluated using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Overall incidence of falls was 24%, and increased by worsening mobility disability status: high function (17%), preclinical disability (32%), task difficulty (40%), test-of-trend p fall risk factors, preclinical disability (odds ratio [OR] = 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.5), task difficulty (OR = 1.7, 95% CI, 1.1-2.6) and history of falls (OR = 4.7, 95% CI, 3.5-6.3) were the strongest significant predictors of falls. In stratified multivariate analyses, preclinical disability equally predicted falls in participants with (OR = 1.7, 95% CI, 1.0-3.0) and without history of falls (OR = 1.8, 95% CI, 1.1-3.0). This study provides longitudinal evidence that self-reported preclinical disability predicts incident falls at 1-year follow-up independent of other self-reported fall risk factors. Multidimensional geriatric assessment that includes preclinical disability may provide a unique early warning system as well as potential targets for intervention.

  20. Prevalence and factors associated with xerostomia and hyposalivation among community-dwelling older people in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Yuki; Hirano, Hirohiko; Yoshida, Hideyo; Obuchi, Shuichi; Ihara, Kazushige; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Mataki, Shiro

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the prevalence and factors associated with xerostomia and hyposalivation among community-dwelling older people. Xerostomia and hyposalivation are common symptoms in the older population. This study included with 894 community-dwelling, Japanese older people (355 men, 539 women; age 65-84 years) who participated in a comprehensive geriatric health examination, which included questionnaires and interviews regarding medical history, medications, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence (TMIG-IC), depressive condition. The Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) was used to evaluate depression. Resting salivary flow rate was evaluated by the modified cotton roll method. In this study, 34.8% of the participants (mean age, 73.5 ± 5.0 years) complained about xerostomia, while the prevalence of hyposalivation was 11.5%. Multiple regression analysis revealed hypnotics use [odds ratio (OR) = 1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.13-2.61], SDS (OR = 1.05, CI = 1.04-1.07) and TMIG-IC total points (OR = 0.87, CI = 0.76-0.99) to be significantly associated with xerostomia. In contrast, female gender (OR = 2.59, CI = 1.55-4.31) and the use of agents affecting digestive organs (OR = 1.78, CI = 1.11-2.86) were associated with hyposalivation. Our findings showed that the prevalence of xerostomia and hyposalivation were approximately 1 in 3 and 1 in 10 respectively. The factors associated with psychological factors and high-level functional competence, while hyposalivation was associated with medications and gender, as well as systemic and/or metabolic differences. It is important to consider these multidimensional factors associated with xerostomia and hyposalivation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Dyspnea in Community-Dwelling Older Persons: A Multifactorial Geriatric Health Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Brienne; Tinetti, Mary E.; Van Ness, Peter H.; Han, Ling; Leo-Summers, Linda; Newman, Anne B.; Lee, Patty J.; Fragoso, Carlos A. Vaz

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The evaluation of dyspnea in older persons is traditionally focused on cardiorespiratory diseases, rather than systematically evaluating the multiple impairments that often occur with advancing age and which may also contribute to dyspnea. Accordingly, we have evaluated the associations between a broad array of cardiorespiratory and non-cardiorespiratory impairments and dyspnea in older persons. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Cardiovascular Health Study. Participants 4,413 community-dwelling persons; mean age was 72.6, 57.1% were female, 4.5% were African-American, 27.2% had less than a high school education, and 54.7% were ever-smokers. Measurements Dyspnea severity (American Thoracic Society grade ≥2 defined moderate-to-severe) and several impairments, including those established by: spirometry (forced expiratory volume in 1-second [FEV1]), maximal inspiratory pressure (respiratory muscle strength), echocardiography, ankle-brachial index, blood pressure, whole-body muscle mass (bioelectrical impedance), single chair stand (lower extremity function), grip strength, serum hemoglobin and creatinine, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Mini Mental State Examination, medication use, and body mass index (BMI). Results In a multivariable logistic regression model, impairments having strong associations with moderate-to-severe dyspnea included: FEV1 dyspnea included respiratory muscle weakness, diastolic cardiac dysfunction, grip weakness, anxiety symptoms, and use of cardiovascular and psychoactive medications (adjORs ranged from 1.31-1.71). Conclusion In community-dwelling older persons, several cardiorespiratory and non-cardiorespiratory impairments were significantly associated with moderate-to-severe dyspnea, akin to a multifactorial geriatric health condition. PMID:27549914

  2. Reliability and minimal detectable change of gait variables in community-dwelling and hospitalized older fallers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hars, Mélany; Herrmann, François R; Trombetti, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Gait variables may constitute surrogate outcomes for fall risk. Their reliability in a specific population of older fallers has not been fully established, which limits their research and clinical applications. This study aimed to determine test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change (MDC) values for selected fall-related gait variables in older adults with a recent fall history. Community-dwelling (n=30) and hospitalized (n=30) fallers aged≥65 years were assessed twice using an instrumented pressure-sensitive walkway, under single- and dual-task gait conditions. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC(2,1)), standard error of measurement (SEM; SEM%) and MDC at 95% confidence level (MDC95; MDC95%), were used as reliability estimates. The ICC(2,1) for gait velocity was greater than 0.84 across all gait conditions and groups; SEM% and MDC95% did not exceed 6.5% and 18.1%, respectively. Gait variability measures returned lower ICC(2,1) (range 0.18-0.79), and markedly higher SEM% (16.3-31.9%) and MDC95% (45.3-88.3%). Overall, hospitalized fallers exhibited larger SEM and MDC95 values for variability measures compared to community-dwellers in all gait conditions, while larger values were found for all variables while dual-tasking compared to single-tasking in both groups. Gait velocity was found to be highly reliable and likely to be sensitive to change over repeated sessions in community-dwelling and hospitalized older fallers, both under single- and dual-task conditions. Gait variability measures showed lower reliability, irrespective of gait condition or group, displaying consistently larger measurement error, particularly under dual-task conditions. Clinicians should consider MDC95 values before using gait variability variables as evaluative outcome measures at patient level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamic gait stability, clinical correlates, and prognosis of falls among community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Tanvi; Espy, Debbie; Yang, Feng; Pai, Yi-Chung

    2011-05-01

    To establish an accurate measure for prognostic assessment of fall risk in community-dwelling older adults, this study examined the prediction accuracy of a dynamic gait stability measure and common clinical tests for slip-related falls among these adults. Participants were tested for their fall-risk likelihood on a slip-test. Biomechanics research laboratory. Community-dwelling older adults (N=119; ≥65y). Not applicable. Participants performed a battery of clinical tests, including Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up & Go (TUG) test, static posturography, isometric muscle strength, and bone density. They were then exposed to an unannounced slip during gait. The dynamic stability during unperturbed gait was measured based on the center of mass position and velocity relative to the limits of stability against backward falling. Accuracy of each measure was examined for prediction of slip outcome (fall or recovery). On the slip, 59 participants fell, 56 recovered their balance, and 4 were harness-assisted. Dynamic stability predicted fall outcome with 69% accuracy. Except for TUG and bone density, no other measure could differentiate fallers from nonfallers; TUG predicted 56% of fall outcomes. Reproduction of actual falls provides a new benchmark for evaluating the prognostic power of different performance-based assessment tools. The TUG was able to better predict fall outcome than other clinical measures; however, the new dynamic gait stability measure was more sensitive than TUG in its prediction of falls. Ultrasound bone scan could be used to screen older adults for fall risk. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of falls risk in community-dwelling older adults using body-worn sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Barry R; Doheny, Emer P; Walsh, Cathal; Cunningham, Clodagh; Crosby, Lisa; Kenny, Rose A

    2012-01-01

    Falls are the most common cause of injury and hospitalization and one of the principal causes of death and disability in older adults worldwide. This study aimed to determine if a method based on body-worn sensor data can prospectively predict falls in community-dwelling older adults, and to compare its falls prediction performance to two standard methods on the same data set. Data were acquired using body-worn sensors, mounted on the left and right shanks, from 226 community-dwelling older adults (mean age 71.5 ± 6.7 years, 164 female) to quantify gait and lower limb movement while performing the 'Timed Up and Go' (TUG) test in a geriatric research clinic. Participants were contacted by telephone 2 years following their initial assessment to determine if they had fallen. These outcome data were used to create statistical models to predict falls. Results obtained through cross-validation yielded a mean classification accuracy of 79.69% (mean 95% CI: 77.09-82.34) in prospectively identifying participants that fell during the follow-up period. Results were significantly (p falls risk estimation using two standard measures of falls risk (manually timed TUG and the Berg balance score, which yielded mean classification accuracies of 59.43% (95% CI: 58.07-60.84) and 64.30% (95% CI: 62.56-66.09), respectively). Results suggest that the quantification of movement during the TUG test using body-worn sensors could lead to a robust method for assessing future falls risk. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Urinary incontinence and quality of life among older community-dwelling Australian men: the CHAMP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Po Wan; Cumming, Robert G; Chan, Lewis; Seibel, Markus J; Naganathan, Vasi; Creasey, Helen; Le Couteur, David; Waite, Louise M; Sambrook, Philip N; Handelsman, David

    2010-05-01

    to describe the prevalence and impact on quality of life of urinary incontinence in a population-based cohort of older community-dwelling Australian men. the population comprised 1,705 men aged >or=70 years participating in the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project, a population-based study of urban older Australian men. data were collected between January 2005 and June 2007, and the participation rate was 47%. Data on demographics, medical history and from the 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) and International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire were collected. Urinary incontinence was defined as urinary leakage at least two times a week over the past 4 weeks. the prevalence of urinary incontinence was 14.8%, increasing from 12.0% for men aged 70-74 years old to 16.3% for those aged >or=90 years, with urgency incontinence being the most frequent type of urinary incontinence. Daily urine leakage was reported by 3% of men. Men with incontinence had lower overall SF-12 scores with greater impact on the physical (PCS) than the mental (MCS) components of that scale. After adjusting for age, number of co-morbidities, enlarged prostate and prostate cancer, men with incontinence had worse PCS (43.6 vs 45.9) and MCS scores (52.2 vs 54.6) compared with continent men. urinary incontinence is common among older community-dwelling men and is associated with worse quality of life with greater impact on physical than mental factors. As the population ages, urinary incontinence prevalence will increase and increased resources will be needed to address this growing problem.

  6. Effects of Perceived Neighbourhood Environments on Self-Rated Health among Community-Dwelling Older Chinese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Wong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In response to the growing number of older people living in cities, the World Health Organization (WHO introduced the concept of “Age-Friendly Cities” (AFC to guide the way in designing physical and social environments to encourage active ageing. Limited research has studied the effects of neighbourhood age-friendliness on elderly health outcomes. Using the example of a highly urbanized city in Asia, this study examined the effects of perceived age-friendliness of neighbourhood environments on self-rated health (SRH among community-dwelling older Chinese. A multi-stage sampling method was used to collect views of community-dwelling older people from two local districts of Hong Kong. A structured questionnaire covering the WHO’s eight AFC domains was developed to collect information on the perceived neighbourhood environments, SRH and individual characteristics. Age-friendliness of neighbourhood was assessed by mean scores of AFC domains, which was used to predict SRH with adjustment for individual and objective neighbourhood characteristics. Furthermore, 719 respondents aged ≥60 years completed the questionnaire, of which 44.5% reported good SRH. Independent of individual and objective neighbourhood characteristics, multiple logistics regressions showed that higher satisfaction on outdoor spaces and buildings, transportation, housing, social participation, and respect and social inclusion was significantly associated with increased odds of reporting good SRH by more than 20% (p < 0.05. Individuals aged 70–79 years, being female, lower education and residents of public or subsidized housing were less likely to report good SRH, after controlling for individual and neighbourhood characteristics. In addition to age, gender, education and housing type, AFC environments have important contributive influence on SRH, after controlling for individual and objective neighbourhood characteristics.

  7. Falls and comorbid conditions among community dwelling Arkansas older adults from a population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Masil; Azhar, Gohar; Kilmer, Greta; Miller, Sabra; Bynum, LaTonya; Balamurugan, Appathurai

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of self-reported falls and associated comorbid conditions among community dwelling Arkansas older adults (ages 65 years and older) was estimated using data from the 2010 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. 1,653 Arkansas older adults were surveyed. Eighteen percent of them had sustained a fall at least once in the past three months prior to the survey period. After adjusting for age, general health, coronary heart disease, diabetes status and quality rest or sleep in a multinomial logistic regression, we found that older adults with visual impairment (OR = 1.47; 95% CI: 1.02, 2.12), and those who use special equipment (OR = 2.85; 95% CI: 1.94, 4.19) were more likely to have sustained a fall. An integrated multidisciplinary approach in caring for older adults is imperative for preventing falls and fall-related injuries. This can also reduce-fall-related hospitalizations and potentially result in substantial cost savings as well as improve the quality of life of older Arkansans.

  8. The prevalence, characteristics and correlates of falls in Korean community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, K-R; Kang, Y; Hwang, E-H; Jung, D

    2009-09-01

    The risk factors for falls that have been reported in Caucasian older adults may not be the same for Korean older adults. To examine the prevalence, characteristics and correlates of falls among community-dwelling older adults in Korea. A stratified random sampling method was conducted to recruit participants, and 335 were eligible to participate from September 2006 to March 2007. Socio-demographic data, history of disease and medications, activities of daily living (ADL), cognitive status, health behaviour and fall incidents were collected. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the sample. The prevalence of falls was obtained. Univariate analyses for risk factors of falls using chi-square and t-test statistics, and multivariate logistic regression analyses for correlates of falls were performed. Of the 335 older adults, 48 (15%) elderly had experienced falls. There was a significant difference between older adults who fell and those who did not fall with regard to ADL and exercise behaviour. Non-fallers had higher ADL scores and showed higher levels of adherence to exercise than fallers. The independent risk factor for falls was ADL. In this study, an individual's functional status and exercise engagement were significant factors that differentiated fallers and non-fallers. Therefore, an effective fall prevention programme should be focused on encouraging older adults to participate in regular exercise.

  9. Life space and mental health: a study of older community-dwelling persons in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byles, Julie E; Leigh, Lucy; Vo, Kha; Forder, Peta; Curryer, Cassie

    2015-01-01

    The ability of older people to mobilise within and outside their community is dependent on a number of factors. This study explored the relationship between spatial mobility and psychological health among older adults living in Australia. The survey sample consisted of 260 community-dwelling men and women aged 75-80 years, who returned a postal survey measuring spatial mobility (using the Life Space Questionnaire) and psychological health (using the SF36 Health Related Quality of Life Profile). From the Life Space Questionnaire, participants were given a life-space score and multinomial regression was used to explore the potential effect of mental health on life-space score. The study found a significant association between mental health and life space. However, gender, physical functioning, and ability to drive were most strongly associated with the extent of life space and spatial mobility. Compared to men, older women are more likely to experience less spatial mobility and restricted life space, and hence are more vulnerable to social isolation. Mental health and life space were associated for the older people in this study. These findings have important implications for health policy and highlight the need to support older persons to maintain independence and social networks, and to successfully age in place within their community. This study also highlights the utility of the Life Space Questionnaire in terms of identifying older persons at risk of poorer mental health.

  10. Experiences of community-dwelling older adults with the use of telecare in home care services: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Cecilie; Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid; Moe, Carl Erik; Haraldstad, Kristin; Thygesen, Elin

    2017-12-01

    The aging population will lead to a rise in the number of people with age-related diseases, and increasing demand for home care services. Telecare is seen as a solution to this challenge by promoting aging in place. Nevertheless, there is still a poor understanding of older adults' experiences with the actual use of telecare. The aim of this review was to identify and synthesize the best available qualitative evidence of community-dwelling older adults' experience with the use of telecare in home care services. This review considered studies that focused on qualitative data, examining older adults' experiences with the use of active and passive technology devices, such as personal alarms and sensor technology, in the context of home care services. This review systematically searched the databases Scopus, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and SveMed+ to find both published and unpublished studies in English, Norwegian, Swedish and Danish, from 2005 to 2017. Methodological quality of the included studies was assessed independently by two reviewers using the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument. Qualitative data were extracted from papers included in the review using the standardized Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Qualitative research findings were pooled using the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument, and involved aggregation and synthesis of findings. A total of 118 findings from 11 studies were aggregated into 20 categories. The categories generated seven synthesized findings: 1) Aging in place is desired; however, it may also be related to feeling isolated and lonely. 2) Telecare contributes to safety, security, and aging in place. 3) Privacy is not seen as a problem by most older adults because the technology is intended to help them live safely in their own home. 4) Some telecare devices have side effects, especially new technology. Some devices do not work outside

  11. Decline in Literacy and Incident AD Dementia Among Community-Dwelling Older Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Wilson, Robert S; Han, S Duke; Leurgans, Sue; Bennett, David A; Boyle, Patricia A

    2017-06-01

    To quantify longitudinal change in financial and health literacy and examine the associations of declining literacy with incident Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Data came from 799 participants of an ongoing cohort study. Literacy was measured using a battery of 32 questions. Clinical diagnoses were made annually following uniform structured procedures. The associations of declining literacy with incident AD dementia and MCI were tested using a joint model for longitudinal and time-to-event data. We observed an overall decline in total literacy score over up to 6 years of follow-up ( p literacy was associated with higher risks for incident AD dementia (hazard ratio = 4.526, 95% confidence interval = [2.993, 6.843], p literacy among community-dwelling older persons predicts adverse cognitive outcomes and serves as an early indicator of impending dementia.

  12. Dementia Literacy among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Urban China: A Cross-sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveDelay in seeking diagnosis of dementia is common in China. Misinformation and poor knowledge about dementia may contribute to it. The study was designed to explore the nationwide dementia literacy among older adults in urban China and to investigate the factors associated with overall dementia literacy.MethodsIn a cross-sectional study, a convenience sample of 3,439 community-dwelling old adults aged 60 and over was recruited from 34 cities in 20 provinces between June 20 and August 20, 2014. All participants were administered the face-to-face mental health literacy questionnaire, which included the prevalence, symptoms, intention, and options for treatment of dementia. Stepwise multivariate regression analysis was used to explore factors associated with overall dementia literacy.ResultsThe response rate was 87.4%. The overall dementia literacy was 55.5% (SD = 20.9% among all respondents. The correct response rate was higher for questions on symptoms (58.7–89.6%, but lower for questions on the prevalence (22.2% and choosing appropriate professional care personnel (22.2%. Being male [OR = 1.256, 95% CI (1.022–1.543], having lower per capita annual income [OR = 1.314, 95% CI (1.064–1.623], lower education [OR = 1.462, 95% CI (1.162–1.839], and suspected depression [OR = 1.248, 95% CI (1.009–1.543] were negatively associated with overall dementia literacy.ConclusionDementia literacy among community-dwelling older adults in urban China remains very low, in particular about the impact of dementia and appropriate treatment personnel. Community educational programs aiming to close this knowledge gap are encouraged to focus on those in the population at highest risk of low dementia literacy.

  13. Risk factors of indoor fall injuries in community-dwelling older women: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jia; Xia, Qinghua; Jiang, Yu; Zhou, Peng; Li, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the study were to explore the characteristics and the potential risk factors of indoor fall injuries in community-dwelling older women, and to provide evidence for the future intervention strategy. A prospective cohort of 3043 women aged 60 years old and above from 3 selected counties in Shanghai was followed up on the outcomes of indoor fall injuries for up to 1 year. Demographic and health data were collected during admission; the physical function, balance ability and home-living environment were examined by a structured questionnaire when admitted. The outcome of indoor fall injury was investigated by a visit in month 3, month 6 and month 12 after baseline survey. Univariate analysis and Multiple Logistic Regression Model were used to examine the associations between potential risk factors and outcomes of indoor fall injuries. Two hundred and thirty-one of the 3043 women (7.6%) eventually suffered indoor fall injuries at least once during the 1-year follow-up. The injurious falls of women were significantly associated with age, educational level, marital status, health status, balance ability, physical activity and home-living environment in the univariate analyses. Women who worried about falls and restrained activities for it were more likely to suffer fall injury. Younger women, with less chronic disease, with good balance ability and living in good corridor environment, were less likely to receive fall injury in multiple logistic regression analyses. Multidimensional factors were associated with indoor fall injuries for community-dwelling older women. Proper clinical treatment of chronic disease and improvement of women's balance ability, as well as reducing the risk factor of indoor environment, which will play vital roles in preventing indoor fall injuries, should be prioritized for the intervention strategy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Apathy is associated with incident dementia in community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dalen, Jan Willem; Van Wanrooij, Lennard L; Moll van Charante, Eric P; Richard, Edo; van Gool, Willem A

    2018-01-02

    To assess whether apathy and depressive symptoms are independently associated with incident dementia during 6-year follow-up in a prospective observational population-based cohort study. Participants were community-dwelling older people in the Prevention of Dementia by Intensive Vascular Care trial, aged 70-78 years, without dementia at baseline. Apathy and depressive symptoms were measured using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15). Dementia during follow-up was established by clinical diagnosis confirmed by an independent outcome adjudication committee. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using Cox regression analyses. Given its potentially strong relation with incipient dementia, the GDS item referring to memory complaints was assessed separately. Dementia occurred in 232/3,427 (6.8%) participants. Apathy symptoms were associated with dementia (HR 1.28, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12-1.45; p < 0.001), also after adjustment for age, sex, Mini-Mental State Examination score, disability, and history of stroke or cardiovascular disease (HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.06-1.40; p = 0.007), and in participants without depressive symptoms (HR 1.26, 95% CI 1.06-1.49; p = 0.01). Depressive symptoms were associated with dementia (HR 1.12, 95% CI 1.05-1.19), also without apathy symptoms (HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.03-1.31; p = 0.015), but not after full adjustment or after removing the GDS item on memory complaints. Apathy and depressive symptoms are independently associated with incident dementia in community-dwelling older people. Subjective memory complaints may play an important role in the association between depressive symptoms and dementia. Our findings suggest apathy symptoms may be prodromal to dementia and might be used in general practice to identify individuals without cognitive impairment at increased risk of dementia. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Predictors of computer use in community-dwelling, ethnically diverse older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Julie M; Carlson, Mike; Jordan-Marsh, Maryalice; Clark, Florence

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we analyzed self-reported computer use, demographic variables, psychosocial variables, and health and well-being variables collected from 460 ethnically diverse, community-dwelling elders to investigate the relationship computer use has with demographics, well-being, and other key psychosocial variables in older adults. Although younger elders with more education, those who employ active coping strategies, or those who are low in anxiety levels are thought to use computers at higher rates than do others, previous research has produced mixed or inconclusive results regarding ethnic, gender, and psychological factors or has concentrated on computer-specific psychological factors only (e.g., computer anxiety). Few such studies have employed large sample sizes or have focused on ethnically diverse populations of community-dwelling elders. With a large number of overlapping predictors, zero-order analysis alone is poorly equipped to identify variables that are independently associated with computer use. Accordingly, both zero-order and stepwise logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the correlates of two types of computer use: e-mail and general computer use. Results indicate that younger age, greater level of education, non-Hispanic ethnicity, behaviorally active coping style, general physical health, and role-related emotional health each independently predicted computer usage. Study findings highlight differences in computer usage, especially in regard to Hispanic ethnicity and specific health and well-being factors. Potential applications of this research include future intervention studies, individualized computer-based activity programming, or customizable software and user interface design for older adults responsive to a variety of personal characteristics and capabilities.

  16. Prevalence of fear of falling and associated factors among Japanese community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Yoshihito; Arima, Kazuhiko; Tsujimoto, Ritsu; Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Nishimura, Takayuki; Mizukami, Satoshi; Okabe, Takuhiro; Tanaka, Natsumi; Honda, Yuzo; Izutsu, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Naoko; Ohmachi, Izumi; Kanagae, Mitsuo; Abe, Yasuyo; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi

    2018-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of fear of falling and associated factors among Japanese community-dwelling older adults.Cross-sectional study between 2011 and 2013.Community in which residents voluntarily attended a health examination.We recruited 844 older adults (male, n = 350; female, n = 494) aged 60 to 92 years from among those who presented at the health examination.We assessed fear of falling, falls in the previous year, pain, comorbidity, and cataracts. Five times chair stand time was applied as an indicator of physical performance.The prevalence of fear of falling was 26.9% and 43.3% among the men and women, respectively. Men and women who feared falling were older (P fear of falling.The prevalence of fear of falling was similar to previous reports. Advanced age, falls in previous year, and pain were associated with fear of falling in men. A longer 5 times chair stand time was also associated with fear of falling among older adult women. Maintenance of physical function and pain management might be important for older adults with fear of falling.

  17. Understanding views on everyday use of personal health information: Insights from community dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, A L; Osterhage, K; Demiris, G; Phelan, E A; Thielke, S M; Turner, A M

    2017-04-11

    Older adults apply various strategies to pursue healthy aging, but we know little about their views and use of personal health information to accomplish those ends. As a first step in formulating the role of personal health information management (PHIM) in healthy aging, we explored the perspectives of older adults on health and health information used in their everyday lives through four focus groups with 25 community-dwelling adults aged 60 and over. We found that the concept of wellness-the holistic and multidimensional nature of health and wellbeing-plays prominently in how older adults think about health and health information. Participants expressed wellness from a position of personal strength, rather than health-related deficits, by focusing on wellness activities for staying healthy through: (1) personal health practices, (2) social network support, and (3) residential community engagement. Although these themes involve personal health information, existing PHIM systems that focus on disease management are generally not designed to support wellness activities. Substantial opportunity exists to fill this wellness support gap with innovative health information technology designed for older adults. Findings carry implications for the design of PHIM tools that support healthy aging and methods for engaging older adults as co-producers of this critical support.

  18. Feasibility of repeated self-measurements of maximum step length and gait speed by community-dwelling older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, K.T.; Schoon, Y.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Self-management of mobility and fall risk can be important in fall prevention; however, it remains unstudied. Therefore, the current study assessed whether community-dwelling older persons were able to repeatedly self-assess maximum step length (MSL) and gait speed (GS) in their own home

  19. Measuring frailty in Dutch community-dwelling older people : Reference values of the Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Assen, M.A.L.M.; Pallast, Esther; El Fakiri, Fatima; Gobbens, R.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to provide reference values of the Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI) for community-dwelling older people by age, sex, marital status, ethnicity, education, income, and residence, and examine the effects of these seven socio-demographic variables on

  20. Pain and the Risk for Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbs, B.; Binnekade, T.T.; Eggermont, L.H.P.; Sepehry, A.; Patchay, S.; Schofield, P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to establish the association between pain and falls in community-dwelling older adults. Data Sources: Electronic databases from inception until March 1, 2013, including Cochrane Library, CINAHL, EBSCO, EMBASE, PubMed, and PsycINFO. Study

  1. Cross-sectional association between medical expenses and intellectual activity in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Kimiko; Kurumatani, Norio; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2017-08-25

    Little is known concerning the lifestyle habits and health conditions in community-dwelling elderly who do not get medical care. We investigated the cross-sectional association between medical expenses (ME) and intellectual activity (IA) in community-dwelling older Japanese. Self-administered questionnaires were mailed to all residents born between 1945 and 1949 and covered by A City's medical insurance system (n = 19,354). Independent variables including health behaviors, oral health, social capital, neighborhood environment, and physical and mental functioning were included in the questionnaires. Medical fee receipts were used to evaluate ME for fiscal 2014, and respondents were classified into no, low, medium, and high ME groups. Higher-level functional capacity was evaluated using the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence, which is comprised of three subscales: instrumental activities of daily living, IA, and social role. Poisson regression models were used to examine the association of ME with IA, with the low ME group as reference. Questionnaires were returned by 12,747 individuals (response rate 65.9%). The no ME group had the lowest response rate, the worst lifestyle behaviors, and the lowest social capital, but no problems with neighborhood environment. Higher-level functional capacity, especially IA, was reduced in both the high ME and no ME groups. After adjustments for age, gender, health insurance, accessibility to public facilities in their residential area, family size, body mass index, and physical and mental functioning, the prevalence ratio (PR) for impaired IA lost its significance in the high ME group (PR 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.90-1.05), but remained significant in the no ME group (1.19, 1.08-1.31). After additional adjustments for health behaviors (i.e., health checks, smoking, fitness, and dietary variety), the PR of the no ME group was attenuated towards the null (1.08, 0.98-1.20). Community-dwelling

  2. International classification of function, disability and health framework for fall risk stratification in community dwelling older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Majumi M. Noohu; Aparajit B. Dey; Shashi Sharma; Mohammed E. Hussain

    2017-01-01

    Falls is an important cause for mortality and morbidity in older adults. The fall risk assessment is an integral component of fall prevention in older adults. The international classification of function, disability and health (ICF) can be an ideal comprehensive model for fall risk assessment. There is lack of information relating ICF and fall risk assessment in community dwelling older adults. In this study we tried to assess the fall risk using different domains of ICF using various clinica...

  3. Successful coping in urban, community-dwelling older adults with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGrezia, Mary G; Scrandis, Debra

    2015-01-01

    By 2015, 50% of HIV-infected individuals in the United States will be 50 years of age and older. Examining successful coping in older adults with HIV could expand existing coping toolkits, enhance disease management, and improve overall outcomes. We explored how urban, community-dwelling older adults (N = 40) coped with HIV infection, comorbidities, and related stressors. Participants completed an individual or focus group interview session using open-ended questions formulated from extended participant observation. Data were analyzed for theme development using interpretive hermeneutics and qualitative content analysis. Stressors included HIV, comorbidities, fear, anger, stigma, and finances. Three themes for successful coping were identified: accessing support, helping selves and helping others, and tapping into spirituality. Participants engaged in active, meaning-based strategies to successfully cope with HIV and related stressors. These strategies can be adapted for other older adults with HIV, leading to holistic care and improved outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Incidence of and risk factors for falls following hip fracture in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumway-Cook, Anne; Ciol, Marcia A; Gruber, William; Robinson, Cynthia

    2005-07-01

    Hip fracture is a major medical problem among older adults, leading to impaired balance and gait and loss of functional independence. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of and risk factors for falls 6 months following hospital discharge for a fall-related hip fracture in older adults. Ninety of 100 community-dwelling older adults (> or =65 years of age) hospitalized for a fall-related hip fracture provided data for this study. An observational cohort study used interviews and medical records to obtain information on demographics, prefracture health, falls, and functional status. Self-report of falls and performance-based measures of balance and mobility were completed 6 months after discharge. A total of 53.3% of patients (48/90) reported 1 or more falls in the 6 months after hospitalization. Older adults who fell following discharge had greater declines in independence in activities of daily living and lower performance on balance and mobility measures. Prefracture fall history and use of a gait device predicted postdischarge falls. Falls following hip fracture can be predicted by premorbid functional status.

  5. Gluteal muscle composition differentiates fallers from non-fallers in community dwelling older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired balance, loss of mobility and falls are major problems associated with changes in muscle in older adults. However, the extent to which muscle composition and related performance measures for different lower limb muscles are associated with falls in older individuals is unclear. This study evaluated lower limb muscle attenuation, intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) infiltration and muscle performance in older fallers and non-fallers. Methods For this cross-sectional study, fifty-eight community dwelling older individuals (>65 years) were classified into fallers (n = 15) or non-fallers (n = 43). Computed tomography (CT) was used to determine muscle attenuation and intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) of multiple thigh and hip muscles. Muscle performance was assessed with isokinetic dynamometry. Results For both groups, Rectus Femoris showed the highest muscle attenuation and lowest IMAT infiltration, and Gluteus Maximus and Gluteus Medius/Minimus muscles had the lowest muscle attenuation and highest IMAT infiltration. Fallers exhibited lower muscle attenuation and higher IMAT infiltration than non-faller participants in most muscles, where the gluteal muscles were the most affected (p Gluteus Medius/Minimus and hip abduction strength. Conclusions While fallers were generally differentiated from non-fallers by muscle composition, the most affected muscles were the proximal gluteal muscles of the hip joint accompanied by lower hip abduction strength, which may contribute to impaired balance function and increased risk for falls. PMID:24666603

  6. Gluteal muscle composition differentiates fallers from non-fallers in community dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inacio, Mario; Ryan, Alice S; Bair, Woei-Nan; Prettyman, Michelle; Beamer, Brock A; Rogers, Mark W

    2014-03-25

    Impaired balance, loss of mobility and falls are major problems associated with changes in muscle in older adults. However, the extent to which muscle composition and related performance measures for different lower limb muscles are associated with falls in older individuals is unclear. This study evaluated lower limb muscle attenuation, intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) infiltration and muscle performance in older fallers and non-fallers. For this cross-sectional study, fifty-eight community dwelling older individuals (>65 years) were classified into fallers (n = 15) or non-fallers (n = 43). Computed tomography (CT) was used to determine muscle attenuation and intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) of multiple thigh and hip muscles. Muscle performance was assessed with isokinetic dynamometry. For both groups, Rectus Femoris showed the highest muscle attenuation and lowest IMAT infiltration, and Gluteus Maximus and Gluteus Medius/Minimus muscles had the lowest muscle attenuation and highest IMAT infiltration. Fallers exhibited lower muscle attenuation and higher IMAT infiltration than non-faller participants in most muscles, where the gluteal muscles were the most affected (p abduction torque (p Gluteus Medius/Minimus and hip abduction strength. While fallers were generally differentiated from non-fallers by muscle composition, the most affected muscles were the proximal gluteal muscles of the hip joint accompanied by lower hip abduction strength, which may contribute to impaired balance function and increased risk for falls.

  7. Correlate of self-care and self-neglect among community-dwelling older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardan, Homa; Hamid, TengkuAizan; Redzuan, Ma’rof; Ibrahim, Rahimah

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of self-neglect among the elderly is expected to rise with a rapid increase in the growth of the older population. However, self-neglect in the elderly and the factors related to it are not fully understood due to the limited research in the area, lack of consensus in the definition of the concept, and limited instrumentation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between selected socio-demographic factors on self-care and self-neglect among older persons living in the community. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey design with cluster sampling was adopted for the study. Data were gathered from 201 older persons aged 60 years and over in the state of Selangor, Malaysia, through face-to-face interviews in their homes with a team of trained enumerators. A new instrument was developed to measure self-neglect. Results: The internal consistency of the new instrument showed a reliability of 0.90. A significant bivariate relationship was noted between self-care and self-neglect. The socio-demographic factors were also reported between self-care and self-neglect. Conclusions: The new instrument of elder self-neglect (ESN) could be used to measure self-neglect in a community dwelling. The need to increase the self-care skills and the capacity of self-care among older adults is crucial in order to reduce self-neglect and enhance their well-being. PMID:25949256

  8. Exercise and sleep in community-dwelling older adults: evidence for a reciprocal relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierzewski, Joseph M; Buman, Matthew P; Giacobbi, Peter R; Roberts, Beverly L; Aiken-Morgan, Adrienne T; Marsiske, Michael; McCrae, Christina S

    2014-02-01

    Exercise behaviour and sleep are both important health indicators that demonstrate significant decreases with age, and remain modifiable well into later life. The current investigation examined both the chronic and acute relationships between exercise behaviour and self-reported sleep in older adults through a secondary analysis of a clinical trial of a lifestyle intervention. Seventy-nine community-dwelling, initially sedentary, older adults (mean age = 63.58 years, SD = 8.66 years) completed daily home-based assessments of exercise behaviour and sleep using daily diary methodology. Assessments were collected weekly and continued for 18 consecutive weeks. Multilevel models revealed a small positive chronic (between-person mean-level) association between exercise and wake time after sleep onset, and a small positive acute (within-person, day-to-day) association between exercise and general sleep quality rating. The within-person exercise and general sleep quality rating relationship was found to be reciprocal (i.e. sleep quality also predicted subsequent exercise behaviour). As such, it appears exercise and sleep are dynamically related in older adults. Efforts to intervene on either sleep or exercise in late-life would be wise to take the other into account. Light exposure, temperature regulation and mood may be potential mechanisms of action through which exercise can impact sleep in older adults. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  9. Mobility limitations and cognitive deficits as predictors of institutionalization among community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bonsdorff, Mikaela; Rantanen, Taina; Laukkanen, Pia; Suutama, Timo; Heikkinen, Eino

    2006-01-01

    Mobility limitations and cognitive disorders have often been observed as risks for institutionalization. However, their combined effects on risk of institutionalization among initially community-dwelling older people have been less well reported. A prospective cohort study with 10-year surveillance on institutionalization. Study population (n = 476) consisted of 75- and 80-year-old people who were community-dwelling, had not been diagnosed with dementia, and participated in tests on walking speed and cognitive capacity at a research centre. Cognitive capacity was measured with three validated psychometric tests that were from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, Wechsler Memory Scale and Schaie-Thurstone Adult Mental Abilities Test. Mobility was measured with walking speed over a 10-m distance. Exclusive distribution based study groups were formed with cut-offs at the lowest third as follows: no limitation, solely mobility limitation, solely cognitive deficits, and combined mobility limitation and cognitive deficits. Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine the relative risks of institutionalization for the study groups. Eleven percent of the participants were institutionalized during the 10-year surveillance. The risk for institutionalization was 4.9 times greater (95% confidence interval: 2.1-11.2) for those who had co-existing mobility limitations and cognitive deficits than for those with no limitations. The findings show that the accumulation of limitations in physical and cognitive performance substantially decreases the possibility for a person remaining at home. This might be due to a decreased reserve capacity and ineffective compensatory strategies. Therefore, interventions targeted to improve even one limitation, or prevent accumulation of these risk factors, could significantly reduce the risk of institutionalization. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Hospitalization, Depression and Dementia in Community-Dwelling Older Americans: Findings from the National Health and Aging Trends Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydow, Dimitry S.; Zivin, Kara; Langa, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of both dementia and depression among community-dwelling older Americans, and to determine if hospitalization is independently associated with dementia or depression in this population. Method This cross-sectional study utilized data from a nationally representative, population-based sample of 7,197 community-dwelling adults ≥ 65 years old interviewed in 2011 as part of the National Health and Aging Trends Study. Information on hospitalizations was obtained from self or proxy-report. Possible and probable dementia was assessed according to a validated algorithm. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Patient Health Questionnaire-2. Results An estimated 3.1 million community-dwelling older Americans may have dementia, and approximately 5.3 million may have substantial depressive symptoms. After adjusting for demographic and social characteristics, medical diagnoses, smoking history, serious falls, and pain symptoms, being hospitalized in the previous year was independently associated with greater odds of probable dementia (odds ratio [OR]: 1.42, 95% confidence interval[95%CI]: 1.16, 1.73) and substantial depressive symptoms (OR: 1.60, 95%CI: 1.29, 1.99). Conclusions Dementia and depression are common in community-dwelling older Americans, and hospitalization is associated with these conditions. Additional research increasing understanding of the bi-directional relationship between hospitalizations, dementia, and depression, along with targeted interventions to reduce hospitalizations, are needed. PMID:24388630

  11. Association between physiological falls risk and physical performance tests among community-dwelling older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh DK

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Devinder KA Singh,1 Sharmila GK Pillai,1 Sin Thien Tan,1 Chu Chiau Tai,1 Suzana Shahar2 1Physiotherapy Programme, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, 2Nutrition and Dietetics Programme, School of Healthcare Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Physical performance and balance declines with aging and may lead to increased risk of falls. Physical performance tests may be useful for initial fall-risk screening test among community-dwelling older adults. Physiological profile assessment (PPA, a composite falls risk assessment tool is reported to have 75% accuracy to screen for physiological falls risk. PPA correlates with Timed Up and Go (TUG test. However, the association between many other commonly used physical performance tests and PPA is not known. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between physiological falls risk measured using PPA and a battery of physical performance tests.Methods: One hundred and forty older adults from a senior citizens club in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (94 females, 46 males, aged 60 years and above (65.77±4.61, participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were screened for falls risk using PPA. A battery of physical performance tests that include ten-step test (TST, short physical performance battery (SPPB, functional reach test (FRT, static balance test (SBT, TUG, dominant hand-grip strength (DHGS, and gait speed test (GST were also performed. Spearman’s rank correlation and binomial logistic regression were performed to examine the significantly associated independent variables (physical performance tests with falls risk (dependent variable.Results: Approximately 13% older adults were at high risk of falls categorized using PPA. Significant differences (P<0.05 were demonstrated for age, TST, SPPB, FRT, SBT, TUG between high and low falls risk group. A significant (P<0.01 weak correlation

  12. Does smart home technology prevent falls in community-dwelling older adults: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Eva; Cotea, Cristina; Pullman, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Falls in older Australians are an increasingly costly public health issue, driving the development of novel modes of intervention, especially those that rely on computer-driven technologies. The aim of this paper was to gain an understanding of the state of the art of research on smart homes and computer-based monitoring technologies to prevent and detect falls in the community-dwelling elderly. Cochrane, Medline, Embase and Google databases were searched for articles on fall prevention in the elderly using pre-specified search terms. Additional papers were searched for in the reference lists of relevant reviews and by the process of 'snowballing'. Only studies that investigated outcomes related to falling such as fall prevention and detection, change in participants' fear of falling and attitudes towards monitoring technology were included. Nine papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The following outcomes were observed: (1) older adults' attitudes towards fall detectors and smart home technology are generally positive; (2) privacy concerns and intrusiveness of technology were perceived as less important to participants than their perception of health needs and (3) unfriendly and age-inappropriate design of the interface may be one of the deciding factors in not using the technology. So far, there is little evidence that using smart home technology may assist in fall prevention or detection, but there are some indications that it may increase older adults' confidence and sense of security, thus possibly enabling aging in place.

  13. Effect of age, education and health status on community dwelling older men's health concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Cara

    2012-06-01

    A significant gap in evidence characterizes the process of establishing patient-centered health priorities for older men. A cross-sectional postal survey of 2325 Canadian community dwelling men aged 55-97 years old was conducted in 2008 to gauge older men's level of concern for 24 different health items, to determine the impact of age, education and health status on these perceptions, and to ascertain whether men perceive that their health concerns are being attended to. Health issues of greatest concern to men were mobility impairment (64% of respondents), memory loss (64%), and medication side effects (63%). Respondents with lower educational attainment expressed greater concern about their health and were almost 2-fold times more likely to report being concerned about stroke, heart disease and prostate disorders in analyses that controlled for age and health status. Physical and mental health were independently associated with various concerns about health, but old age was not a reliable predictor, with only younger men (erectile dysfunction. Health items of greatest concern to men tended to be those with the lowest screening or counseling rates: these included incontinence, osteoporosis, mobility impairment, falls, anxiety issues, memory loss and depression. An improved consumer-guided agenda for addressing older men's health in the coming decade is urgently required.

  14. Relationship between Social Support Networks and Physical Functioning in Older Community-Dwelling Mexicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel; González-Mantilla, Fabiola; Correa-Muñoz, Elsa; Retana-Ugalde, Raquel

    2017-08-31

    Some studies have demonstrated the relationship between social support networks (SSNs) and health status. In this sense, it has been considered that physical and mental functioning is a key indicator of the health in the age people. The aim of this study was to determine the association between social support networks and physical functioning. A cross-sectional study was carried out including a convenience sample of 150 older community-dwelling Mexicans. We assessed the familial, extra-familial and institutional SSNs; social contacts; the activities of daily living (ADL); the instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs); and physical functioning task (PFT) performance among study participants. Of the 150 older subjects, 53 reported living alone (35%), 113 (75%) reported having few SSNs, and 37 (25%) reported having enough SSNs. Persons with few familial SSNs were at increased odds of demonstrating dependence in at least one of the ADL (OR = 3.25, 95% CI 1.06-9.92, p social contacts were at increased odds of demonstrating dependence in at least one of the IADL (OR = 6.96, 95% CI 1.57-30.7, p social contacts were the main risk factors for PFT dependence, with ORs of 3.70 (95% CI 1.21-11.2, p < 0.05) and 3.85 (95% CI 1.10-13.5, p < 0.05), respectively. Our findings suggest that having few SSNs could be a significant risk factor for reduced physical functioning in older adults.

  15. Effectiveness of an oral health educational program on community-dwelling older people with xerostomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Yuki; Yoshida, Naomi; Kono, Yoko; Hirano, Hirohiko; Yoshida, Hideyo; Mataki, Shiro; Sugimoto, Kumiko

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the changes in oral health and function through an oral health educational program for the independent older people with xerostomia. Community-dwelling older people with xerostomia aged over 65 years who participated in a preliminary comprehensive health survey in 2011 were recruited for the educational program. A total of 47 participants were randomly assigned into two groups, the intervention group (n = 26) and the control group (n = 21). The intervention group attended a 90-min oral health education program every 2 weeks for 3 months. The program consisted of oral hygiene instruction, facial and tongue muscle exercise, and salivary gland massage. The control group was provided only general information about oral health. The assessments of oral function, such as oral diadochokinesis of articulation, swallowing, taste threshold and salivary flow rate, were carried out before and after 3 months with or without intervention. A total of 38 participants (21 of intervention group and 17 of control group) completed the study protocol. In the intervention group, resting salivation significantly improved after the program. The second and third cumulated Repetitive Saliva Swallowing Test times significantly improved in the intervention group. The threshold for bitterness significantly lowered in the intervention group, whereas the sour threshold significantly heightened in the control group after 3 months (P < 0.05). The present study suggests that the educational program targeting oral function improvement is effective among the independent older population. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  16. Comparison of Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis and Air Displacement Plethysmography in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, K Brent; McIntosh, Emily I; Vallis, Lori Ann

    2016-05-01

    Clinicians and researchers use body composition measurements to identify individuals who may be at risk of adverse health complications. This study compared two commonly used two-compartmental anthropometric models (bioelectrical impedance analysis [BIA] and air displacement plethysmography [ADP]) to determine whether these two cost-effective methods would provide similar fat free mass index (FFMI) values in a mixed and sex-separated sample population of healthy older adults. Community-dwelling older adults (N= 37, 18 men) aged 74.5 ± 5.2 years participated. FFMIBIAwas correlated with FFMIADP(r= .916); however, these correlations were markedly reduced when the population was split by sex (r< .60). The level of agreement between the difference values (FFMIBIA- FFMIADP) fluctuated ± 2.1 kg/m(2)(illustrated via Bland-Altman plots), but these differences were not statistically different from 0. Findings from the current work suggest that clinicians must be cautious when using portable devices such as BIA to assess FFMI in an older adult population. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. Physiological and psychosocial factors in spiritual needs attainment for community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Jennifer A; Howard, Elizabeth P; Bryan, Margaret; Mitchell, Susan L

    Spiritual well-being enhances older persons' health status. Factors that optimize their spiritual well-being are not well-established. To describe spiritual needs attainment and identify factors associated with such attainment among community-dwelling older persons. Cross-sectional. Sixty-five U.S. continuing care retirement communities or independent housing facilities. 4077 persons entering the facilities between January 1, 2007 and November 30, 2016. Standardized Community Health Assessment and Wellness Survey instruments were used to determine the proportion of subjects reporting their spiritual needs were met. Multivariate logistic regression identified characteristics independently associated with this outcome. Among the 4077 subjects (mean age 81.6 ± 7.5; male, 28.8%; and White race, 70.7%), 93.4% stated their spiritual needs were met. Factors independently associated with a greater likelihood of spiritual needs attainment were: satisfaction with life (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.00, 3.96; p dwelling older persons reported their spiritual needs were met. Adequate sleep, pain relief, and having a person with whom to discuss death are potentially modifiable factors that may promote spiritual needs attainment in this population, which in turn, may improve their health outcomes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Insomnia Severity Index: psychometric properties with Chinese community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Doris S F

    2010-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index. Despite the high prevalence of insomnia in older people and its detrimental impact on well-being and healthcare costs, this problem is almost always undetected and consequently under-treated. The Insomnia Severity Index is psychometrically sound in measuring perceived insomnia severity. However, it has had very limited application in non-White populations. An instrument validation study was carried out between October 2008 and April 2009. The Insomnia Severity Index was translated into Chinese using Brislin's model and administered to a convenience sample of 585 older Chinese people recruited from three community centres for elders. Other instruments were also administered, including the Chinese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Geriatric Depression Scale. Cronbach's alpha of the Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index was 0.81, with item-to-total correlations in the range of 0.34-0.67. Construct validity was supported by its moderate relationship with the Chinese Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and sleep efficiency. The Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index also indicated more severe level of insomnia in older people who reported depressed mood on the Geriatric Depression Scale. Discriminant validity was supported as the Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index could discriminate poorer sleepers from normal sleepers. Exploratory factor analysis identified a two-factor structure for the Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index in measuring the severity and impacts of insomnia on the Chinese older people. The Chinese version of the Insomnia Severity Index is a culturally-relevant and psychometrically-sound instrument for assessing severity and impact of insomnia in Chinese community-dwelling older people. Nurses can use this tool to assess older people's perceptions of insomnia. © 2010 The

  19. Experiences of community-dwelling older adults with the use of telecare in home care services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Cecilie; Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid; Moe, Carl Erik

    2017-01-01

    contributes to safety, security, and aging in place. 3) Privacy is not seen as a problem by most older adults because the technology is intended to help them live safely in their own home. 4) Some telecare devices have side effects, especially new technology. Some devices do not work outside the home, thus...... limiting active aging. 5) Some older adults experience a misfit between technology and needs. They must see the value of a telecare device to use it. 6) Telecare may enforce an identity with negative connotations on older adults, as frail and helpless people. Autonomy is considered important. 7) Lack...... of understanding can hamper the correct use of telecare. Specific strategies may be needed. CONCLUSIONS: The experiences with the use of telecare are diverse. Findings indicate telecare systems can promote safety and security to age in place that is a wish of many older adults. However, "one size does not fit all...

  20. Identifying Balance and Fall Risk in Community-Dwelling Older Women: The Effect of Executive Function on Postural Control

    OpenAIRE

    Muir-Hunter, Susan W.; Clark, Jennifer; McLean, Stephanie; Pedlow, Sam; Van Hemmen, Alysia; Montero Odasso, Manuel; Overend, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The mechanisms linking cognition, balance function, and fall risk among older adults are not fully understood. An evaluation of the effect of cognition on balance tests commonly used in clinical practice to assess community-dwelling older adults could enhance the identification of at-risk individuals. The study aimed to determine (1) the association between cognition and clinical tests of balance and (2) the relationship between executive function (EF) and balance under single- and d...

  1. Improved Prediction of Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults Through Phase-Dependent Entropy of Daily-Life Walking

    OpenAIRE

    Espen A. F. Ihlen; Kimberley S. van Schooten; Sjoerd M. Bruijn; Sjoerd M. Bruijn; Jaap H. van Dieën; Jaap H. van Dieën; Beatrix Vereijken; Jorunn L. Helbostad; Mirjam Pijnappels; Mirjam Pijnappels

    2018-01-01

    Age and age-related diseases have been suggested to decrease entropy of human gait kinematics, which is thought to make older adults more susceptible to falls. In this study we introduce a new entropy measure, called phase-dependent generalized multiscale entropy (PGME), and test whether this measure improves fall-risk prediction in community-dwelling older adults. PGME can assess phase-dependent changes in the stability of gait dynamics that result from kinematic changes in events such as he...

  2. Stair negotiation time in community-dwelling older adults: normative values and association with functional decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh-Park, Mooyeon; Wang, Cuiling; Verghese, Joe

    2011-12-01

    To establish reference values for stair ascent and descent times in community-dwelling, ambulatory older adults, and to examine their predictive validity for functional decline. Longitudinal cohort study. Mean follow-up time was 1.8 years (maximum, 3.2y; total, 857.9 person-years). Community sample. Adults 70 years and older (N=513; mean age, 80.8 ± 5.1y) without disability or dementia. Not applicable. Time to ascend and descend 3 steps measured at baseline. A 14-point disability scale assessed functional status at baseline and at follow-up interviews every 2 to 3 months. Functional decline was defined as an increase in the disability score by 1 point during the follow-up period. The mean±SD stair ascent and descent times for 3 steps were 2.78 ± 1.49 and 2.83 ± 1.61 seconds, respectively. The proportion of self-reported and objective difficulty was higher with longer stair ascent and descent times (PRehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sedative load and salivary secretion and xerostomia in community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiisanoja, Antti; Syrjälä, Anna-Maija; Komulainen, Kaija; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Taipale, Heidi; Knuuttila, Matti; Ylöstalo, Pekka

    2016-06-01

    The aim was to investigate how sedative load and the total number of drugs used are related to hyposalivation and xerostomia among 75-year-old or older dentate, non-smoking, community-dwelling people. The study population consisted of 152 older people from the Oral Health GeMS study. The data were collected by interviews and clinical examinations during 2004-2005. Sedative load, which measures the cumulative effect of taking multiple drugs with sedative properties, was calculated using the Sedative Load Model. The results showed that participants with a sedative load of either 1-2 or ≥3 had an increased likelihood of having low stimulated salivary flow (xerostomia (OR: 2.5, CI: 0.5-12) compared with participants without a sedative load. The results showed that the association between the total number of drugs and hyposalivation was weaker than the association between sedative load and hyposalivation. Sedative load is strongly related to hyposalivation and to a lesser extent with xerostomia. The adverse effects of drugs on saliva secretion are specifically related to drugs with sedative properties. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Physical Activity in Relation to Sleep Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junxin; Yang, Binbin; Varrasse, Miranda; Ji, Xiaopeng; Wu, MaoChun; Li, Manman; Li, Kun

    2018-02-27

    This cross-sectional study was conducted to describe physical activity and sleep in 290 community-dwelling Chinese older adults and to examine the association between physical activity and poor sleep outcomes. Almost half of the sample were poor sleepers. The majority of the sample regularly participated in walking, some household activity and light sports; yet, only a small portion were involved in work-related activity or in strenuous sports. A greater level of overall physical activity [Odds Ratio (OR) =0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) = (0.73,0.86)], leisure-time exercise [OR=0.77, 95%CI=(0.68,0.85)], and household activity [OR=0.66, 95%CI= (0.56,0.78)] were associated with reduced likelihood of being poor sleepers and other poor sleep outcomes, independent of covariates including age, sex, education, family income, the number of children, drinking, and sleep hygiene. Future larger scale studies that incorporate both objective and subjective measures are needed to further examine the association and to explore the effects of different types of activity on sleep and other well-beings in older adults.

  5. Objective but not subjective sleep predicts memory in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavuoto, Marina G; Ong, Ben; Pike, Kerryn E; Nicholas, Christian L; Bei, Bei; Kinsella, Glynda J

    2016-08-01

    Research on the relationship between habitual sleep patterns and memory performance in older adults is limited. No previous study has used objective and subjective memory measures in a large, older-aged sample to examine the association between sleep and various domains of memory. The aim of this study was to examine the association between objective and subjective measures of sleep with memory performance in older adults, controlling for the effects of potential confounds. One-hundred and seventy-three community-dwelling older adults aged 65-89 years in Victoria, Australia completed the study. Objective sleep quality and length were ascertained using the Actiwatch 2 Mini-Mitter, while subjective sleep was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Memory was indexed by tests of retrospective memory (Hopkins Verbal Learning Test - Revised), working memory (n-back, 2-back accuracy) and prospective memory (a habitual button pressing task). Compared with normative data, overall performance on retrospective memory function was within the average range. Hierarchical regression was used to determine whether objective or subjective measures of sleep predicted memory performances after controlling for demographics, health and mood. After controlling for confounds, actigraphic sleep indices (greater wake after sleep onset, longer sleep-onset latency and longer total sleep time) predicted poorer retrospective (∆R(2)  = 0.05, P = 0.016) and working memory (∆R(2)  = 0.05, P = 0.047). In contrast, subjective sleep indices did not significantly predict memory performances. In community-based older adults, objectively-measured, habitual sleep indices predict poorer memory performances. It will be important to follow the sample longitudinally to determine trajectories of change over time. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  6. Socioeconomic status and bone health in community-dwelling older men: the CHAMP Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabipour, I; Cumming, R; Handelsman, D J; Litchfield, M; Naganathan, V; Waite, L; Creasey, H; Janu, M; Le Couteur, D; Sambrook, P N; Seibel, M J

    2011-05-01

    The association between socioeconomic status (SES) and bone health, specifically in men, is unclear. Based upon data from the large prospective Concord Health in Ageing Men Project (CHAMP) Study of community-dwelling men aged 70 years or over, we found that specific sub-characteristics of SES, namely, marital status, living circumstances, and acculturation, reflected bone health in older Australian men. Previous studies reported conflicting results regarding the relationship between SES and bone health, specifically in men. The main objective of this study was to investigate associations of SES with bone health in community-dwelling men aged 70 years or over who participated in the baseline phase of the CHAMP Study in Sydney, Australia. The Australian Socioeconomic Index 2006 (AUSEI06) based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations was used to determine SES in 1,705 men. Bone mineral density and bone mineral content (BMC) were determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone-related biochemical and hormonal parameters, including markers of bone turnover, parathyroid hormone, and vitamin D, were measured in all men. General linear models adjusted for age, weight, height, and bone area revealed no significant differences across crude AUSEI06 score quintiles for BMC at any skeletal site or for any of the bone-related biochemical measures. However, multivariate regression models revealed that in Australian-born men, marital status was a predictor of higher lumbar BMC (β = 0.07, p = 0.002), higher total body BMC (β = 0.05, p = 0.03), and lower urinary NTX-I levels (β=-0.08, p = 0.03), while living alone was associated with lower BMC at the lumbar spine (β=-0.05, p = 0.04) and higher urinary NTX-I levels (β=0.07, p = 0.04). Marital status was also a predictor of higher total body BMC (β = 0.14, p = 0.003) in immigrants from Eastern and South Eastern Europe. However, in immigrants from Southern

  7. Utilization of Mental Health Care by Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Melissa M.; Kane, Robert L.; Kaas, Merrie; Kane, Rosalie A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Older adults tend to underutilize mental health care (MHC). The objective of this study was to examine relationships among perceived need for care, illness characteristics, attitudes toward care, and probability of MHC utilization by older adults. Design, Setting, and Participants 1,681 community-dwelling adults ≥ 65 from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (2001–2003). Measurements Self-reported MHC use and perceived need for care in the past 12 months, past-year and history of mental illness, physical illness, attitudes toward care, and sociodemographics. Results Of the entire sample, 6.5% received some type of MHC in the past year, although 65.9% of those with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 72.5% with anxiety did not receive MHC. Among respondents with past-year depression or anxiety, utilization was less likely for those with low World Health Organization Disability Assessment Scale (WHO-DAS) self-care ability. Utilization was more likely for those with more chronic physical conditions and worse WHO-DAS cognitive capacity. Of those with perceived need for MHC, 17% did not receive it. Among respondents with perceived need, subthreshold generalized anxiety disorder was associated with lower likelihood of utilization. Utilization was more likely for older respondents, those with more household members, at least a high school education, and better self-care ability. 41% of those who perceived a need for care but did not use it met past-year diagnostic criteria for anxiety and 17% met criteria for MDD. Conclusions Understanding the perceptions that underlie individuals’ health care-seeking behavior is an important step toward reducing underutilization of MHC by older adults. PMID:21198461

  8. Physical activity levels of community-dwelling older adults are influenced by winter weather variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G R; Brandon, C; Gill, D P

    2017-07-01

    Winter weather conditions may negatively influence participation of older adults in daily physical activity (PA). Assess the influence of winter meteorological variables, day-time peak ambient temperature, windchill, humidity, and snow accumulation on the ground to accelerometer measured PA values in older adults. 50 community-dwelling older adults (77.4±4.7yrs; range 71-89; 12 females) living in Southwestern Ontario (Latitude 42.9°N Longitude 81.2° W) Canada, wore a waist-borne accelerometer during active waking hours (12h) for 7 consecutive days between February and April 2007. Hourly temperature, windchill, humidity, and snowfall accumulation were obtained from meteorological records and time locked to hourly accelerometer PA values. Regression analysis revealed significant relationships between time of day, ambient daytime high temperature and a humidity for participation in PA. Windchill temperature added no additional influence over PA acclamation already influenced by ambient day-time temperature and the observed variability in PA patterns relative to snow accumulation over the study period was too great to warrant its inclusion in the model. Most PA was completed in the morning hours and increased as the winter month's transitioned to spring (February through April). An equation was developed to adjust for winter weather conditions using temperature, humidity and time of day. Accurate PA assessment during the winter months must account for the ambient daytime high temperatures, humidity, and time of day. These older adults were more physically active during the morning hours and became more active as the winter season transitioned to spring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Receipt of Caregiving and Fall Risk in US Community-dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Geoffrey J; Hays, Ron D; Wallace, Steven P; Shapiro, Martin F; Yakusheva, Olga; Ettner, Susan L

    2017-04-01

    Falls and fall-related injuries (FRI) are common and costly occurrences among older adults living in the community, with increased risk for those with physical and cognitive limitations. Caregivers provide support for older adults with physical functioning limitations, which are associated with fall risk. Using the 2004-2012 waves of the Health and Retirement Study, we examined whether receipt of low (0-13 weekly hours) and high levels (≥14 weekly hours) of informal care or any formal care is associated with lower risk of falls and FRIs among community-dwelling older adults. We additionally tested whether serious physical functioning (≥3 activities of daily living) or cognitive limitations moderated this relationship. Caregiving receipt categories were jointly significant in predicting noninjurious falls (P=0.03) but not FRIs (P=0.30). High levels of informal care category (P=0.001) and formal care (Pfall risk relative to low levels of informal care. Among individuals with ≥3 activities of daily living, fall risks were reduced by 21% for those receiving high levels of informal care; additionally, FRIs were reduced by 42% and 58% for those receiving high levels of informal care and any formal care. High levels of informal care receipt were also associated with a 54% FRI risk reduction among the cognitively impaired. Fall risk reductions among older adults occurred predominantly among those with significant physical and cognitive limitations. Accordingly, policy efforts involving fall prevention should target populations with increased physical functioning and cognitive limitations. They should also reduce financial barriers to informal and formal caregiving.

  10. Relationship between physical performance and cognitive performance measures among community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Huiloo; Singh, Devinder Kaur Ajit; Din, Normah Che; Badrasawi, Manal; Manaf, Zahara Abdul; Tan, Sin Thien; Tai, Chu Chiau; Shahar, Suzana

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is correlated with physical function. However, the results in the literature are inconsistent with cognitive and physical performance measures. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the association between cognitive performance and physical function among older adults. A total of 164 older adults aged ≥60 years and residing in low-cost housing areas in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia participated in this study. Cognitive performance was measured using the Mini Mental State Examination, clock drawing test, Rey auditory verbal learning test, digit symbol test, digit span test, matrix reasoning test, and block design test. Physical performance measures were assessed using the ten step test for agility, short physical performance battery test for an overall physical function, static balance test using a Pro.Balance board, and dynamic balance using the functional reach test. There was a negative and significant correlation between agility and the digit symbol test (r=-0.355), clock drawing test (r=-0.441), matrix reasoning test (r=-0.315), and block design test (r=-0.045). A significant positive correlation was found between dynamic balance, digit symbol test (r=0.301), and matrix reasoning test (r=0.251). The agility test appeared as a significant (R (2)=0.183, R (2)=0.407, R (2)=0.299, P<0.05) predictor of some cognitive performance measures, including the digit span test, clock drawing test, and Mini Mental State Examination. These results suggest that a decline in most cognitive performance measures can be predicted by poor execution of a more demanding physical performance measure such as the ten step test for agility. It is imperative to use a more complex and cognitively demanding physical performance measure to identify the presence of an overall cognitive impairment among community-dwelling older adults. It may also be beneficial to promote more complex and cognitively challenging exercises and activities among older adults for optimal

  11. Differences in life satisfaction among older community-dwelling Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquine, María J; Maldonado, Yadira; Zlatar, Zvinka; Moore, Raeanne C; Martin, Averria Sirkin; Palmer, Barton W; Jeste, Dilip V

    2015-01-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing ethnic/racial group of the older adult population in the United States, yet little is known about positive mental health in this group. We examined differences in life satisfaction between demographically matched groups of older Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites, and sought to identify specific factors associated with these differences Participants included 126 community-dwelling English-speaking Hispanics aged 50 and older, and 126 age-, gender-, and education-matched non-Hispanic Whites. Participants completed standardized measures of life satisfaction and postulated correlates, including physical, cognitive, emotional and social functioning, as well as positive psychological traits and religiosity/spirituality. Hispanics reported greater life satisfaction than non-Hispanic Whites (p life satisfaction, except that Hispanics had lower levels of cognitive performance, and higher levels of daily spiritual experiences, private religious practices and compassion (ps spiritual experiences, religious practices, and compassion were significantly associated with life satisfaction in the overall sample. Multivariable analyses testing the influence of these three factors on the association between ethnicity and life satisfaction showed that higher spirituality among Hispanics accounted for ethnic differences in life satisfaction. English-speaking Hispanics aged 50 and older appeared to be more satisfied with their lives than their non-Hispanic White counterparts, and these differences were primarily driven by higher spirituality among Hispanics. Future studies should examine positive mental health among various Hispanic subgroups, including Spanish speakers, as an important step toward development of culturally sensitive prevention and intervention programs aimed at promoting positive mental health.

  12. Effect of therapeutic horseback riding on balance in community-dwelling older adults with balance deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homnick, Douglas N; Henning, Kim M; Swain, Charlene V; Homnick, Tamara D

    2013-07-01

    Falls are an important cause of morbidity in older adults. Equine-assisted activities including therapeutic riding (TR) benefit balance and neuromuscular control in patients with neurological disabilities but have not been systematically studied in older adults at greater risk for falls due to balance deficits. The effect of an 8-week TR program on measures of balance and quality of life in community-dwelling older adults with established balance deficits was evaluated. This was a pretest-post-test single-group trial of a TR program on measures of balance and quality of life. The study was conducted at a Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship (PATH) International Premier riding center. The subjects comprised 9 adults (5 female, 4 males) with a mean age 76.4 years (range 71-83 years). This included an 8-week observation period followed by an 8-week TR program consisting of 1 hour per week of supervised horseback riding and an 8-week follow-up period. SUBJECTS received balance testing at weeks 0, 8, 16, and 24 using the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale (FABS), and quality of life was measured at weeks 8 and 16 using the Rand SF (short form) 36 quality-of-life measure. OUTCOME MEASURES were change in the FABS and Rand SF 36. There was no significant difference in balance scores between the start and end of the observation period. There was a significant improvement in the balance score and perception of general health from the start to the end of the intervention period, and no significant difference between the end of the intervention and the end of study, suggesting that improvements may have been sustained. TR is a safe activity for older adults with mild to moderate balance deficits and leads to both improvements in balance and quality of life. Longer and larger studies to assess the benefit of equine-assisted activities on improvements in balance and reduction in fall risk are needed.

  13. Dimensions and correlates of quality of life according to frailty status: a cross-sectional study on community-dwelling older adults referred to an outpatient geriatric service in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castelli Manuela

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a lack of knowledge concerning the relationship between two closely-linked multidimensional variables: frailty and quality of life (QOL. The aim of this study was to investigate dimensions and correlates of QOL associated with frailty status among community-dwelling older outpatients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 239 community-dwelling outpatients aged 65+ (mean age 81.5 years consecutively referred to a geriatric medicine clinic in Italy between June and November 2009. Participants underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment, including assessment of their frailty status according to the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF criteria, and QOL, which was evaluated by using the Older People's QOL (OPQOL questionnaire. One-way ANOVA and chi-squared tests were used to find correlates of frailty, including QOL dimensions, after stratification of participants in the "robust" (n = 72, "pre-frail" (n = 89 and "frail" (n = 78 groups. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to find correlates of QOL in the overall sample and among "frail" and "robust" participants. Results A negative trend of QOL with frailty status was found for almost all dimensions of QOL (health, independence, home and neighbourhood, psychological and emotional well-being, and leisure, activities and religion except for social relationships and participation and financial circumstances. Independent correlates of a poor QOL in the total sample were "reduced energy level" (SOF criterion for frailty, depressive status, dependence in transferring and bathing abilities and money management (adjusted R squared 0.39; among "frail" participants the associations were with depressive status and younger age, and among "robust" participants the association was with lower body mass index. Conclusions Five out of seven dimensions of QOL were negatively affected by frailty, but only one SOF criterion for frailty was independently related

  14. Falls in the community-dwelling older adult: A review for primary-care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa A Soriano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Theresa A Soriano1, Linda V DeCherrie2, David C Thomas11The Samuel Bronfman Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA; 2Brookdale Department of Geriatrics and Adult Development, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USAAbstract: Falls in the elderly are an important independent marker of frailty. Up to half of elderly people over 65 experience a fall every year. They are associated with high morbidity and mortality and are responsible for greater than 20 billion dollars a year in healthcare costs in the United States. This article presents a review and guide for the primary care provider of the predisposing and situational risk factors for falls; comprehensive assessment for screening and tailored intervention; and discussion of single and multicomponent measures for fall prevention and management in the older person living in the community. Interventions for the cognitively impaired and demented elderly will also be addressed.Keywords: falls, elderly, community-dwelling, review

  15. Risk factors and mediating pathways of loneliness and social support in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnittger, Rebecca I B; Wherton, Joseph; Prendergast, David; Lawlor, Brian A

    2012-01-01

    To develop biopsychosocial models of loneliness and social support thereby identifying their key risk factors in an Irish sample of community-dwelling older adults. Additionally, to investigate indirect effects of social support on loneliness through mediating risk factors. A total of 579 participants (400 females; 179 males) were given a battery of biopsychosocial assessments with the primary measures being the De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale and the Lubben Social Network Scale along with a broad range of secondary measures. Bivariate correlation analyses identified items to be included in separate psychosocial, cognitive, biological and demographic multiple regression analyses. The resulting model items were then entered into further multiple regression analyses to obtain overall models. Following this, bootstrapping mediation analyses was conducted to examine indirect effects of social support on the subtypes (emotional and social) of loneliness. The overall model for (1) emotional loneliness included depression, neuroticism, perceived stress, living alone and accommodation type, (2) social loneliness included neuroticism, perceived stress, animal naming and number of grandchildren and (3) social support included extraversion, executive functioning (Trail Making Test B-time), history of falls, age and whether the participant drives or not. Social support influenced emotional loneliness predominantly through indirect means, while its effect on social loneliness was more direct. These results characterise the biopsychosocial risk factors of emotional loneliness, social loneliness and social support and identify key pathways by which social support influences emotional and social loneliness. These findings highlight issues with the potential for consideration in the development of targeted interventions.

  16. Neuroticism modifies the association of vision impairment and cognition among community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynes, Bruce I; Shah, Raj; Leurgans, Sue; Bennett, David

    2013-01-01

    Vision impairment (best-corrected binocular visual acuity worse than 20/40) is a common age-related health condition requiring adaptation to maintain well-being. Whether neuroticism, a personality trait associated with decreased ability to adapt to change, modifies the association of vision impairment with worse cognition is uncertain. Using baseline visual acuity, neuroticism and cognitive function data from 714 community-dwelling, older participants in the Rush Memory and Aging Project, we examined whether self-reported neuroticism level modified the cross-sectional association between vision impairment and lower cognitive level. Women represented 76% of the participants. The mean age was 79.6 (SD = 6.9) years and the mean education level was 14.6 (SD = 2.9) years; 26% of the participants had vision impairment. In a linear regression model adjusted for age, sex and education, each unit higher in neuroticism level worsened the association between vision impairment and lower global cognitive function level (parameter estimate for vision impairment and neuroticism interaction term = -0.017; standard error = 0.005; p = 0.001). For participants with vision impairment, a high neuroticism level (50th percentile or above) was associated with a mean global cognitive score that was 0.297 z-score units lower than for participants with a low neuroticism level (p persons, neuroticism modifies the association between vision impairment and cognitive function level. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. The relation between social network site usage and loneliness and mental health in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, S; Peek, S T M; Wouters, E J M

    2015-09-01

    Loneliness is expected to become an even bigger social problem in the upcoming decades, because of the growing number of older adults. It has been argued that the use of social network sites can aid in decreasing loneliness and improving mental health. The purpose of this study was to examine whether and how social network sites usage is related to loneliness and mental health in community-dwelling older adults. The study population included community-dwelling older adults aged 60 and over residing in the Netherlands (n = 626) collected through the LISS panel (www.lissdata.nl). Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses, adjusted for potentially important confounders, were conducted in order to investigate the relation between social network sites usage and (emotional and social) loneliness and mental health. More than half of the individuals (56.2%) reported to use social network sites at least several times per week. Social network sites usage appeared unrelated to loneliness in general, and to emotional and social loneliness in particular. Social network sites usage also appeared unrelated to mental health. Several significant associations between related factors and the outcomes at hand were detected. In this sample, which was representative for the Dutch population, social network sites usage was unrelated to loneliness and/or mental health. The results indicate that a simple association between social network site usage and loneliness and mental health as such, cannot automatically be assumed in community-dwelling older adults. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Does smart home technology prevent falls in community-dwelling older adults: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Pietrzak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Falls in older Australians are an increasingly costly public health issue, driving the development of novel modes of intervention, especially those that rely on computer-driven technologies. Objective: The aim of this paper was to gain an understanding of the state of the art of research on smart homes and computer-based monitoring technologies to prevent and detect falls in the community-dwelling elderly. Method: Cochrane, Medline, Embase and Google databases were searched for articles on fall prevention in the elderly using pre-specified search terms. Additional papers were searched for in the reference lists of relevant reviews and by the process of ‘snowballing’. Only studies that investigated outcomes related to falling such as fall prevention and detection, change in participants’ fear of falling and attitudes towards monitoring technology were included. Results: Nine papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The following outcomes were observed: (1 older adults’ attitudes towards fall detectors and smart home technology are generally positive; (2 privacy concerns and intrusiveness of technology were perceived as less important to participants than their perception of health needs and (3 unfriendly and age-inappropriate design of the interface may be one of the deciding factors in not using the technology. Conclusion: So far, there is little evidence that using smart home technology may assist in fall prevention or detection, but there are some indications that it may increase older adults’ confidence and sense of security, thus possibly enabling aging in place.

  19. Nutritional risk, hospitalization and mortality among community-dwelling Canadians aged 65 or older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramage-Morin, Pamela L; Gilmour, Heather; Rotermann, Michelle

    2017-09-20

    Nutritional risk has been associated with various negative health outcomes among older people. Limited longitudinal research has examined the relationship between nutritional risk and hospitalization and death in community-dwelling older people. Data from the 2008/2009 Canadian Community Health Survey-Healthy Aging (CCHS-HA) linked to the Discharge Abstract Database and the Canadian Mortality Database were used to estimate the prevalence of nutritional risk among seniors and examine its relationship with acute care hospitalization and death during the 25- to 36-month period following the CCHS-HA interview. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify important covariates, while adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, health status, and lifestyle factors. A third (34%; 979,000) of Canadians aged 65 or older living in 9 provinces (excluding Quebec) were at nutritional risk in 2008/2009. These seniors had a higher risk of an acute care hospitalization (hazard ratio (HR) 1.2; 95% CI: 1.1 to 1.4) or death (HR 1.6; 95% CI: 1.3 to 2.0) during the follow-up period, even when potential confounders were taken into account. Seniors at nutritional risk in 2008/2009 were more likely than those not at nutritional risk to die during follow-up (9% versus 5%) and averaged shorter survival times: 498 days (95% CI: 462 to 534) compared with 538 days (95% CI: 501 to 574). Based on an analysis of data from a large population-based survey linked to routinely collected hospital and death data, nutritional risk is independently associated with acute care hospitalization and mortality. Results highlight the importance of monitoring seniors for nutritional risk.

  20. Depressive symptomatology and fall risk among community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Geoffrey J; Hays, Ron D; Wallace, Steven P; Shapiro, Martin F; Ettner, Susan L

    2017-04-01

    Falls are common among older adults and may be related to depressive symptoms (DS). With advancing age, there is an onset of chronic conditions, sensory impairments, and activity limitations that are associated with falls and with depressive disorders. Prior cross-sectional studies have observed significant associations between DS and subsequent falls as well as between fractures and subsequent clinical depression and DS. The directionality of these observed relationship between falls and DS is in need of elaboration given that cross-sectional study designs can yield biased estimates of the DS-falls relationship. Using 2006-2010 Health and Retirement Study data, cross-lagged panel structural equation models were used to evaluate associations between falls and DS among 7233 community-dwelling adults ages ≥65. Structural coefficients between falls and DS (in 2006→2008, 2008→2010) were estimated. A good-fitting model was found: Controlling for baseline (2006) physical functioning, vision, chronic conditions, and social support and neighborhood social cohesion, falls were not associated with subsequent DS, but a 0.5 standard deviation increase in 2006 DS was associated with a 30% increase in fall risk two years later. This DS-falls relationship was no longer significant when use of psychiatric medications, which was positively associated with falls, was included in the model. Using sophisticated methods and a large U.S. sample, we found larger magnitudes of effect in the DS-falls relationship than in prior studies-highlighting the risk of falls for older adults with DS. Medical providers might assess older individuals for DS as well as use of psychotropic medications as part of a broadened falls prevention approach. National guidelines for fall risk assessments as well as quality indicators for fall prevention should include assessment for clinical depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sleep Architecture and Mental Health Among Community-Dwelling Older Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smagula, Stephen F; Reynolds, Charles F; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Dam, Thuy-Tien; Hughes-Austin, Jan M; Paudel, Misti; Redline, Susan; Stone, Katie L; Cauley, Jane A

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the association of mood and anxiety symptoms with sleep architecture (the distribution of sleep stages) in community-dwelling older men. We used in-home unattended polysomnography to measure sleep architecture in older men. Men were categorized into 4 mental health categories: (a) significant depressive symptoms only (DEP+ only, Geriatric Depression Scale ≥ 6), (b) significant anxiety symptoms only (ANX+ only, Goldberg Anxiety Scale ≥ 5), (c) significant depressive and anxiety symptoms (DEP+/ANX+), or (d) no significant depressive or anxiety symptoms (DEP-/ANX-). Compared with men without clinically significant symptomology, men with depressive symptoms spent a higher percentage of time in Stage 2 sleep (65.42% DEP+ only vs 62.47% DEP-/ANX-, p = .003) and a lower percentage of time in rapid eye movement sleep (17.05% DEP+ only vs 19.44% DEP-/ANX-, p = .0005). These differences persisted after adjustment for demographic/lifestyle characteristics, medical conditions, medications, and sleep disturbances, and after excluding participants using psychotropic medications. The sleep architecture of ANX+ or DEP+/ANX+ men did not differ from asymptomatic men. Depressed mood in older adults may be associated with accelerated age-related changes in sleep architecture. Longitudinal community-based studies using diagnostic measures are needed to further clarify relationships among common mental disorders, aging, and sleep. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Does smart home technology prevent falls in community-dwelling older adults: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Pietrzak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Falls in older Australians are an increasingly costly public health issue, driving the development of novel modes of intervention, especially those that rely on computer-driven technologies.Objective: The aim of this paper was to gain an understanding of the state of the art of research on smart homes and computer-based monitoring technologies to prevent and detect falls in the community-dwelling elderly.Method: Cochrane, Medline, Embase and Google databases were searched for articles on fall prevention in the elderly using pre-specified search terms. Additional papers were searched for in the reference lists of relevant reviews and by the process of ‘snowballing’. Only studies that investigated outcomes related to falling such as fall prevention and detection, change in participants’ fear of falling and attitudes towards monitoring technology were included.Results: Nine papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The following outcomes were observed: (1 older adults’ attitudes towards fall detectors and smart home technology are generally positive; (2 privacy concerns and intrusiveness of technology were perceived as less important to participants than their perception of health needs and (3 unfriendly and age-inappropriate design of the interface may be one of the deciding factors in not using the technology.Conclusion: So far, there is little evidence that using smart home technology may assist in fall prevention or detection, but there are some indications that it may increase older adults’ confidence and sense of security, thus possibly enabling aging in place. 

  3. The effects of sedative music on sleep quality of older community-dwelling adults in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Angela; Taylor, Beverley Joan; Thayala, Jeff; Chan, Moon Fai

    2014-02-01

    To examine the effects of music listening on sleep quality amongst older community-dwelling adults in Singapore. In a randomized controlled study, a cohort of older adults (N=60) age 55 years or above were recruited in one community centre. Sleep quality, as measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), was the primary outcome. Participants' demographic variables including age, gender, religion, education level, marital and financial status, any chronic illness, previous experiences of music intervention as well as depression levels were collected. Participants were asked to listen to soft, instrumental slow sedative music without lyrics, of approximately 60-80 beats per minute, and 40 min in duration, for 6 weeks. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the effects of the intervention on the elders' sleep quality. Significant reductions in PSQI scores were found in the intervention group (n=28) from baseline (mean±SD, 10.2±2.5) to week 6 (5.9±2.4, psleep quality than the control (χ(2)=61.84, psleep quality. Not only does this process improve their sleeping quality at old age, it also individualizes and enhances the quality of care provided by the healthcare provider as the therapeutic relationship between provider and client is being established. Contemporary gerontology is progressively characterized by collaboration between several approaches with the intent to comprehend the mental aspects of the multifarious process of ageing. Music listening is one such avenue to enhance sleep quality amongst older adults and make an essential contribution to healthy ageing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Symptoms of Apathy Independently Predict Incident Frailty and Disability in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Emmeline; Shapiro, Miriam; Holtzer, Roee; Barzilai, Nir; Milman, Sofiya; Verghese, Joe

    2017-05-01

    Although depressive symptoms are widely recognized as a predictor of functional decline among older adults, little is known about the predictive utility of apathy in this population. We prospectively examined apathy symptoms as predictors of incident slow gait, frailty, and disability among non-demented, community-dwelling older adults. We examined 2 independent prospective cohort studies-the LonGenity study (N = 625, 53% women, mean age = 75.2 years) and the Central Control of Mobility in Aging (CCMA) study (N = 312, 57% women, mean age = 76.4 years). Individuals were recruited from 2008 to 2014. Apathy was assessed using 3 items from the Geriatric Depression Scale. Slow gait was defined as 1 standard deviation or more below age- and sex-adjusted mean values, frailty was defined using the Cardiovascular Health Study criteria, and disability was assessed with a well-validated disability scale. The prevalence of apathy was 20% in the LonGenity cohort and 26% in the CCMA cohort. The presence of apathy at baseline, independent of depressive symptoms (besides apathy), increased the risk of developing incident slow gait (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.10; 95% CI, 1.36-3.24; P = .001), frailty (HR = 2.86; 95% CI, 1.96-4.16; P Apathy is associated with increased risk of developing slow gait, frailty, and disability, independent of other established risk factors, in non-demented older adults. Apathy should be screened for as a potentially preventable cause of functional decline in clinical psychiatric settings. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  5. Clinical and Community Strategies to Prevent Falls and Fall-Related Injuries Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Piliae, Ruth E; Peterson, Rachel; Mohler, Martha Jane

    2017-09-01

    Falls in older adults are the result of several risk factors across biological and behavioral aspects of the person, along with environmental factors. Falls can trigger a downward spiral in activities of daily living, independence, and overall health outcomes. Clinicians who care for older adults should screen them annually for falls. A multifactorial comprehensive clinical fall assessment coupled with tailored interventions can result in a dramatic public health impact, while improving older adult quality of life. For community-dwelling older adults, effective fall prevention has the potential to reduce serious fall-related injuries, emergency room visits, hospitalizations, institutionalization, and functional decline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An investigation of clinical and sensor-based fall-risk assessment in community-dwelling older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Power, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    peer-reviewed Accurate, efficient methods of assessing fall-risk are required to identify at-risk community-dwelling older adults and implement timely falls prevention interventions. Sensor-based fall-risk assessment (SBFRA) methods have been developed to objectively assess and quantify fall-risk by analysing functional task performance, but research exploring their clinical applications is lacking. The current research aimed to investigate if SBFRA could perform clinically-meaningful f...

  7. Aromatherapy: Does It Help to Relieve Pain, Depression, Anxiety, and Stress in Community-Dwelling Older Persons?

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Shuk Kwan; Tse, M. Y. Mimi

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of an aromatherapy programme for older persons with chronic pain. The community-dwelling elderly people who participated in this study underwent a four-week aromatherapy programme or were assigned to the control group, which did not receive any interventions. Their levels of pain, depression, anxiety, and stress were collected at the baseline and at the postintervention assessment after the conclusion of the four-week programme. Eighty-two participants took part i...

  8. Minor positive effects of health-promoting senior meetings for older community-dwelling persons on loneliness, social network, and social support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustafsson S

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Susanne Gustafsson,1,2 Helene Berglund,1,3 Joel Faronbi,1,4 Emmelie Barenfeld,1,2,5 Isabelle Ottenvall Hammar1,2 1Frail Elderly Research Support Group (FRESH, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, 2Gothenburg University Centre for Ageing and Health (AgeCap, 3Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden; 4Department of Nursing Science, College of Health Science, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria; 5Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the 1-year effect of the health-promoting intervention “senior meetings” for older community-dwelling persons regarding loneliness, social network, and social support.Methods: Secondary analysis of data was carried out from two randomized controlled studies: Elderly Persons in the Risk Zone and Promoting Aging Migrants’ Capabilities. Data from 416 participants who attended the senior meetings and the control group at baseline and the 1-year follow-up in the respective studies were included. Data were aggregated and analyzed with chi-square test and odds ratio (OR to determine the intervention effect.Results: The senior meetings had a positive effect on social support regarding someone to turn to when in need of advice and backing (OR 1.72, p=0.01. No positive intervention effect could be identified for loneliness, social network, or other aspects of social support.Conclusion: Health-promoting senior meetings for older community-dwelling persons have a minor positive effect on social support. The senior meetings might benefit from a revision to reinforce content focused on loneliness, social network, and social support. However, the modest effect could also depend on the lack of accessible social resources to meet participants’ identified needs, a possible hindrance for a

  9. Relationship between chronic kidney disease with diabetes or hypertension and frailty in community-dwelling Japanese older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungchul; Lee, Sangyoon; Harada, Kazuhiro; Bae, Seongryu; Makizako, Hyuma; Doi, Takehiko; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Hotta, Ryo; Nakakubo, Sho; Park, Hyuntae; Suzuki, Takao; Shimada, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between kidney function with concomitant diabetes or hypertension and frailty in community-dwelling Japanese older adults. The participants were 9606 residents (community-dwelling Japanese older adults) who completed baseline assessments. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (mL/min/1.73 m 2 ) was determined according to the serum creatinine level, and participants were classified into four mutually exclusive categories: ≥60.0 (normal range), 45.0-59.9, 30.0-44.9 and who met three, four or five criteria satisfied the definition of having frailty. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the relationships between estimated glomerular filtration rate and frailty. After multivariate adjustment, participants with lower kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate hypertension (OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.45-5.12) showed a significantly increased risk of frailty in the lower kidney function group, regardless of multivariate controls. Furthermore, the analyses showed an even greater increase in the risk of frailty in patients with a history of both diabetes and hypertension (OR 3.67, 95% CI 1.13-14.1) CONCLUSIONS: A lower level of kidney function was associated with a higher risk of frailty in community-dwelling Japanese older adults. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1527-1533. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  10. Mail-Based Intervention for Sarcopenia Prevention Increased Anabolic Hormone and Skeletal Muscle Mass in Community-Dwelling Japanese Older Adults: The INE (Intervention by Nutrition and Exercise) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Minoru; Nishiguchi, Shu; Fukutani, Naoto; Aoyama, Tomoki; Arai, Hidenori

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the Intervention by Nutrition and Exercise (INE) study was to investigate the effects of a mail-based intervention for sarcopenia prevention on muscle mass and anabolic hormones in community-dwelling older adults. A cluster-randomized controlled trial. This trial recruited community-dwelling adults aged 65 years and older in Japan. The 227 participants were cluster randomized into a walking and nutrition (W/N) group (n = 79), a walking (W) group (n = 71), and a control (C) group (n = 77). We analyzed the physical and biochemical measurements in this substudy. Six months of mail-based intervention (a pedometer-based walking program and nutritional supplementation). The skeletal muscle mass index (SMI) using the bioelectrical impedance data acquisition system, biochemical measurements, such as those of insulinlike growth factor (IGF-1), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), and 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25[OH]D), as well as frailty, were assessed by the Cardiovascular Health Study criteria. Participants in the W/N and W groups had significantly greater improvements in SMI, IGF-1, and 25(OH)D (P < .05) than those in the C group. Participants in the W/N group had significantly greater improvements in DHEA-S (P < .05) than in the other groups. These effects were more pronounced in frail, older adults. These results suggest that the mail-based walking intervention of the remote monitoring type for sarcopenia prevention can increase anabolic hormone levels and SMI in community-dwelling older adults, particularly in those who are frail. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sexual Activity and Satisfaction in Healthy Community-dwelling Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompeter, Susan E.; Bettencourt, Ricki; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Female sexual dysfunction is a focus of medical research but few studies describe the prevalence and covariates of recent sexual activity and satisfaction in older community-dwelling women. METHODS 1303 older women from the Rancho Bernardo Study were mailed a questionnaire on general health, recent sexual activity, sexual satisfaction, and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). RESULTS 806 of 921 respondents (87.5%) age ≥40 years answered questions about recent sexual activity. Their median age was 67; mean years since menopause, 25; most were upper-middle class; 57% had attended at least one year of college; 90% reported good to excellent health. Half (49.8%) reported sexual activity within the past month with or without a partner, the majority of whom reported arousal (64.5%), lubrication (69%), and orgasm (67.1%) at least most of the time, although one-third reported low, very low, or no sexual desire. Although frequency of arousal, lubrication, and orgasm decrease with age, the youngest (80 yrs) women reported a higher frequency of orgasm satisfaction. Emotional closeness during sex was associated with more frequent arousal, lubrication, and orgasm; estrogen therapy was not. Overall, two-thirds of sexually active women were moderately or very satisfied with their sex life, as were almost half of sexually inactive women. CONCLUSION Half these women were sexually active, with arousal, lubrication, and orgasm maintained into old age, despite low libido in one-third. Sexual satisfaction increased with age and did not require sexual activity. PMID:22195529

  12. Predictors of outcomes following reablement in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntland, Hanne; Kjeken, Ingvild; Langeland, Eva; Folkestad, Bjarte; Espehaug, Birgitte; Førland, Oddvar; Aaslund, Mona Kristin

    2017-01-01

    Reablement is a rehabilitation intervention for community-dwelling older adults, which has recently been implemented in several countries. Its purpose is to improve functional ability in daily occupations (everyday activities) perceived as important by the older person. Performance and satisfaction with performance in everyday life are the major outcomes of reablement. However, the evidence base concerning which factors predict better outcomes and who receives the greatest benefit in reablement is lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the potential factors that predict occupational performance and satisfaction with that performance at 10 weeks follow-up. The sample in this study was derived from a nationwide clinical controlled trial evaluating the effects of reablement in Norway and consisted of 712 participants living in 34 municipalities. Multiple linear regression was used to investigate possible predictors of occupational performance (COPM-P) and satisfaction with that performance (COPM-S) at 10 weeks follow-up based on the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). The results indicate that the factors that significantly predicted better COPM-P and COPM-S outcomes at 10 weeks follow-up were higher baseline scores of COPM-P and COPM-S respectively, female sex, having a fracture as the major health condition and high motivation for rehabilitation. Conversely, the factors that significantly predicted poorer COPM-P and COPM-S outcomes were having a neurological disease other than stroke, having dizziness/balance problems as the major health condition and having pain/discomfort. In addition, having anxiety/depression was a predictor of poorer COPM-P outcomes. The two regression models explained 38.3% and 38.8% of the total variance of the dependent variables of occupational performance and satisfaction with that performance, respectively. The results indicate that diagnosis, functional level, sex and motivation are significant predictors of

  13. Sedative load and functional outcomes in community-dwelling older Australian men: the CHAMP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnjidic, Danijela; Le Couteur, David G; Hilmer, Sarah N; Cumming, Robert G; Blyth, Fiona M; Naganathan, Vasi; Waite, Louise; Handelsman, David J; Bell, John Simon; J S, Bell

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between sedative load and functional outcomes in community-dwelling older Australian men. A total of 1696 males aged ≥ 70 years, enrolled in the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project, were studied. Participants underwent assessments during 2005-2007. Sedative load was computed using a published model. Outcomes included activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), physical performance measures and a clinical diagnosis of cognitive impairment. Of the participants, 15.3% took medications with sedative properties. After adjusting for age, education, depressive symptoms and comorbidities, participants who took one medication with sedation as a prominent side effect (sedative load = 1) had odds ratio (OR) of 2.15 (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.20-3.85) for ADL disability, compared with participants with sedative load = 0. Participants who took at least one primary sedative or two medications with sedation as a prominent side effect (sedative load ≥ 2) had an OR of 1.55 (95% CI: 1.02-2.35) for IADL disability, compared with participants with sedative load = 0. The mean 6-m walking speed (P = 0.001) and grip strength (P = 0.003) were significantly different between sedative load groups in unadjusted models only. No association between sedative load and poorer performance on balance and chair stands tests or cognitive impairment was observed. Participants with sedative load of one were more likely to report ADL disability, whereas participants with sedative load of ≥2 were more likely to report IADL disability. Higher sedative load was not associated with poorer physical performance or cognitive impairment in older Australian men. © 2012 The Authors Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  14. The association between bone turnover markers and kyphosis in community-dwelling older adults

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    Corinne R. McDaniels-Davidson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Hyperkyphosis, accentuated curvature of the thoracic spine, is often attributed to osteoporosis, yet its underlying pathophysiology is not well understood. Bone turnover markers (BTM reflect the dynamic process of bone formation and resorption. This study examined the association between serum BTM levels and kyphosis in community-dwelling older adults. Methods: Between 2003 and 2006, 760 men and women in the Rancho Bernardo Study age 60 and older had blood drawn and kyphosis measured. Fasting serum was assayed for N-telopeptide (NTX and procollagen type 1 n-terminal propeptide (P1NP, markers of bone resorption and formation, respectively. Participants requiring two or more 1.7 cm blocks under their head to achieve a neutral supine position were classified as having accentuated kyphosis. Analyses were stratified by sex and use of estrogen therapy (ET. Odds of accentuated kyphosis were calculated for each standard deviation increase in log-transformed BTM. Results: Mean age was 75 years. Overall, 51% of 341 non-ET using women, 41% of 111 ET-using women, and 75% of 308 men had accentuated kyphosis. In adjusted models, higher P1NP and NTX were associated with decreased odds of accentuated kyphosis in non-ET using women (P1NP: OR = 0.78 [95% CI, 0.58–0.92]; NTX: OR = 0.68 [95% CI, 0.54–0.86], but not in men or ET-using women (p > 0.05. Conclusions: The selective association of higher bone turnover with reduced odds of accentuated kyphosis in non-ET using women suggests that elevated BTM were associated with a lower likelihood of hyperkyphosis only in the low estrogen/high BTM environment characteristic of postmenopausal women who are not using ET. Keywords: Kyphosis, Hyperkyphosis, Bone turnover, Bone remodeling, P1NP, NTX

  15. Psychotropic drug use and alcohol drinking in community-dwelling older Australian men: the CHAMP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilomäki, Jenni; Gnjidic, Danijela; Hilmer, Sarah N; Le Couteur, David G; Naganathan, Vasi; Cumming, Robert G; Waite, Louise M; Seibel, Markus J; Blyth, Fiona M; Handelsman, David J; Bell, J Simon

    2013-03-01

    To explore the association between psychotropic drug use and alcohol drinking in community-dwelling older Australian men. We conducted a cross-sectional population-based study using baseline data collected between 2005 and 2007 from 1705 participants in the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project (CHAMP) conducted in Sydney, Australia. All participants were men aged ≥70 years. The prevalence of antidepressant and sedative or anxiolytic drug use was ascertained at clinical examinations and alcohol drinking was self-reported. Logistic regression models were used to compute the unadjusted and adjusted prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between sedative or anxiolytic use and antidepressant use with drinking patterns. In the study sample, 8.0% used an antidepressant, 5.7% used a sedative or anxiolytic, 33.7% were daily drinkers, 13.9% were binge drinkers, 19.2% were heavy drinkers and 11.0% were problem drinkers. Overall, 27.1% of antidepressant users were daily drinkers and 42.7% of sedative or anxiolytic users were daily drinkers. Sedative or anxiolytic use was associated with daily drinking (prevalence ratio = 1.42; 95% confidence intervals 1.09-1.76) but not with other drinking patterns. The associations between antidepressant use and alcohol drinking were not statistically significant. Potential psychotropic drug-alcohol interactions were common in older Australian men. Users of sedative or anxiolytic drugs were more likely to engage in daily drinking compared with non-users of sedative or anxiolytic drugs. Clinicians should monitor patients prescribed sedative or anxiolytic drugs for possible adverse events arising from concomitant use with alcohol. © 2012 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  16. Prospective study of progression of kidney dysfunction in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesso, Ricardo; Prado, Fernando; Vicioso, Belinda; Ramos, Luiz R

    2008-04-01

    Few prospective studies have assessed renal dysfunction in older persons. We sought to define kidney dysfunction among a community-based cohort of elderly subjects and to determine the factors for its progression. The Epidemiologia do Idoso (EPIDOSO) Study is a prospective study of individuals > or =65 years old (mean 72.6 +/- 0.3), living in the community in the city of São Paulo. The creatinine clearance (CrCl) of 269 individuals of this cohort was estimated during 8 years of follow-up. The rate of decline in CrCl was calculated using linear regression analysis and dividing the group into tertiles of CrCl change. Overall mean change in CrCl was -2.37 +/- 0.23 mL/min per year. Mean age increased with the greatest degree of decline in renal function (71.1 +/- 0.59, 72.5 +/- 0.54 and 74.3 +/- 0.58, for the first, second and third CrCl change tertiles, respectively, P < 0.01). A higher value of baseline CrCl was associated with progressive decline in CrCl (P < 0.01). Diastolic BP was greater in the second versus the first estimated glomerular filtration rate tertile (83 +/- 1 vs 80 +/- 1 mmHg, P < 0.05). High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was inversely associated with CrCl decline (P < 0.05). Progression of kidney dysfunction occurs in most community-dwelling elderly. Strategies aimed at slowing the progression should be considered for possible risk factors of older age, baseline CrCl, BP and HDL.

  17. Reliability and validity of the Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI) among Chinese community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lijuan; Liu, Na; Tian, Xiaoyu; Qiao, Xiaoxia; Gobbens, Robbert J J; Kane, Robert L; Wang, Cuili

    2017-11-01

    To translate the Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI) into Chinese and assess its reliability and validity. A sample of 917 community-dwelling older people, aged ≥60 years, in a Chinese city was included between August 2015 and March 2016. Construct validity was assessed using alternative measures corresponding to the TFI items, including self-rated health status (SRH), unintentional weight loss, walking speed, timed-up-and-go tests (TUGT), making telephone calls, grip strength, exhaustion, Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ), Geriatric Depression scale (GDS-15), emotional role, Adaptability Partnership Growth Affection and Resolve scale (APGAR) and Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS). Fried's phenotype and frailty index were measured to evaluate criterion validity. Adverse health outcomes (ADL and IADL disability, healthcare utilization, GDS-15, SSRS) were used to assess predictive (concurrent) validity. The internal consistency reliability was good (Cronbach's α=0.71). The test-retest reliability was strong (r=0.88). Kappa coefficients showed agreements between the TFI items and corresponding alternative measures. Alternative measures correlated as expected with the three domains of TFI, with an exclusion that alternative psychological measures had similar correlations with psychological and physical domains of the TFI. The Chinese TFI had excellent criterion validity with the AUCs regarding physical phenotype and frailty index of 0.87 and 0.86, respectively. The predictive (concurrent) validities of the adverse health outcomes and healthcare utilization were acceptable (AUCs: 0.65-0.83). The Chinese TFI has good validity and reliability as an integral instrument to measure frailty of older people living in the community in China. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Oral health status and self-reported functional dependence in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yau-Hua; Lai, Yu-Lin; Cheung, Wai S; Kuo, Hsu-Ko

    2011-03-01

    To assess the strength of association between graded groups of oral health status and self-reported functional dependence in community-dwelling older adults. Population-based cross-sectional study. National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999 to 2004. Three thousand eight hundred fifty-six participants aged 60 and older (mean age 71.2) without missing values in the examined correlates. Oral health status was evaluated according to edentulism, severity of periodontal disease, and recommendation of periodontal care and compared with that of healthy controls. Self-reported functional dependence was assessed according to 19 questions in five domains: activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), leisure and social activities (LSAs), lower extremity mobility (LEM), and general physical activities (GPAs). After controlling for demographic and dental variables, health-related behaviors, C-reactive protein, and comorbidities, edentulism was significantly associated with disability in IADLs (odds ratio (OR)=1.58), LSAs (OR=1.63), LEM (OR=1.31), and GPAs (OR=1.45) compared with healthy controls. Likewise, severe periodontitis was associated with disability in IADLs (OR=1.58), LSAs (OR=1.70), and LEM (OR=1.63). The trends toward disability in IADLs, LSAs, LEM, and GPAs were statistically significant across increasing severity of oral health problems. Poor oral health, specifically edentulism and severe periodontitis, is associated with multiple domains of late-life disability, but a causal relationship cannot be established based on current study design. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Nutritional strategies for frail older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posthauer, Mary Ellen; Collins, Nancy; Dorner, Becky; Sloan, Colleen

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this continuing education article are to analyze the aging process and its effect on the nutritional status of frail older adults; determine how sarcopenia, anorexia, malnutrition, and Alzheimer disease increase the risk for pressure ulcer development and impact the healing process; and to apply evidence-based nutrition guidelines and implement practical solutions for wound healing.

  20. Association of Neuromuscular Attributes With Performance-Based Mobility Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults With Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Catherine T; Ward, Rachel E; Suri, Pradeep; Kiely, Dan K; Ni, Pengsheng; Anderson, Dennis E; Bean, Jonathan F

    2017-07-01

    To identify differences in health factors, neuromuscular attributes, and performance-based mobility among community-dwelling older adults with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis; and to determine which neuromuscular attributes are associated with performance-based measures of mobility. Cross-sectional; secondary data analysis of a cohort study. Outpatient rehabilitation center. Community-dwelling adults aged ≥65 years with self-reported mobility limitations and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (N=54). Not applicable. Short Physical Performance Battery score, habitual gait speed, and chair stand test. Symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis was classified using self-reported symptoms of neurogenic claudication and imaging. Among 430 community-dwelling older adults, 54 (13%) met criteria for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. Compared with participants without symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis, those with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis had more comorbidities, higher body mass index, greater pain, and less balance confidence. Participants with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis had greater impairment in trunk extensor muscle endurance, leg strength, leg strength asymmetry, knee flexion range of motion (ROM), knee extension ROM, and ankle ROM compared with participants without symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. Five neuromuscular attributes were associated with performance-based mobility among participants with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis: trunk extensor muscle endurance, leg strength, leg strength asymmetry, knee flexion ROM, and knee extension ROM asymmetry. Community-dwelling older adults with self-reported mobility limitations and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis exhibit poorer health characteristics, greater neuromuscular impairment, and worse mobility when compared with those without symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. Poorer trunk extensor muscle endurance, leg strength, leg strength asymmetry, knee flexion ROM, and knee extension ROM asymmetry

  1. Relationship between physical performance and cognitive performance measures among community-dwelling older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won HL

    2014-10-01

    measure such as the ten step test for agility. It is imperative to use a more complex and cognitively demanding physical performance measure to identify the presence of an overall cognitive impairment among community-dwelling older adults. It may also be beneficial to promote more complex and cognitively challenging exercises and activities among older adults for optimal physical and cognitive function. Keywords: cognitive performance, physical performance, older adults

  2. A survey of foot problems in community-dwelling older Greek Australians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menz Hylton B

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot problems are common in older people and are associated with impaired mobility and quality of life. However, the characteristics of foot problems in older Australians for whom English is a second language have not been evaluated. Methods One hundred and four community-dwelling people aged 64 to 90 years with disabling foot pain (according to the case definition of the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index, or MFPDI were recruited from four Greek elderly citizens clubs in Melbourne, Australia. All participants completed a Greek language questionnaire consisting of general medical history, the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 (SF-36 questionnaire, the MFPDI, and specific questions relating to foot problems and podiatry service utilisation. In addition, all participants underwent a brief clinical foot assessment. Results The MFPDI score ranged from 1 to 30 (median 14, out of a total possible score of 34. Women had significantly higher total MFPDI scores and MFPDI subscale scores. The MFPDI total score and subscale scores were significantly associated with most of the SF-36 subscale scores. The most commonly reported foot problem was difficulty finding comfortable shoes (38%, and the most commonly observed foot problem was the presence of hyperkeratotic lesions (29%. Only 13% of participants were currently receiving podiatry treatment, and 40% stated that they required more help looking after their feet. Those who reported difficulty finding comfortable shoes were more likely to be female, and those who required more help looking after their feet were more likely to be living alone and have osteoarthritis in their knees or back. Conclusions Foot problems appear to be common in older Greek Australians, have a greater impact on women, and are associated with reduced health-related quality of life. These findings are broadly similar to previous studies in English-speaking older people in Australia. However, only a small

  3. Comprehensive geriatric assessment, multifactorial interventions and nurse-led care coordination to prevent functional decline in community-dwelling older persons: protocol of a cluster randomized trial

    OpenAIRE

    Suijker, Jacqueline J; Buurman, Bianca M; ter Riet, Gerben; van Rijn, Marjon; de Haan, Rob J; de Rooij, Sophia E; Moll van Charante, Eric P

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Functional decline in community-dwelling older persons is associated with the loss of independence, the need for hospital and nursing-home care and premature death. The effectiveness of multifactorial interventions in preventing functional decline remains controversial. The aim of this study is to investigate whether functional decline in community-dwelling older persons can be delayed or prevented by a comprehensive geriatric assessment, multifactorial interventions and n...

  4. Implementing the chronic care model for frail older adults in the Netherlands: study protocol of ACT (frail older adults: care in transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntinga Maaike E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care for older adults is facing a number of challenges: health problems are not consistently identified at a timely stage, older adults report a lack of autonomy in their care process, and care systems are often confronted with the need for better coordination between health care professionals. We aim to address these challenges by introducing the geriatric care model, based on the chronic care model, and to evaluate its effects on the quality of life of community-dwelling frail older adults. Methods/design In a 2-year stepped-wedge cluster randomised clinical trial with 6-monthly measurements, the chronic care model will be compared with usual care. The trial will be carried out among 35 primary care practices in two regions in the Netherlands. Per region, practices will be randomly allocated to four allocation arms designating the starting point of the intervention. Participants: 1200 community-dwelling older adults aged 65 or over and their primary informal caregivers. Primary care physicians will identify frail individuals based on a composite definition of frailty and a polypharmacy criterion. Final inclusion criterion: scoring 3 or more on a disability case-finding tool. Intervention: Every 6 months patients will receive a geriatric in-home assessment by a practice nurse, followed by a tailored care plan. Expert teams will manage and train practice nurses. Patients with complex care needs will be reviewed in interdisciplinary consultations. Evaluation: We will perform an effect evaluation, an economic evaluation, and a process evaluation. Primary outcome is quality of life as measured with the Short Form-12 questionnaire. Effect analyses will be based on the “intention-to-treat” principle, using multilevel regression analysis. Cost measurements will be administered continually during the study period. A cost-effectiveness analysis and cost-utility analysis will be conducted comparing mean total costs to functional

  5. Discrimination ability of comorbidity, frailty, and subjective health to predict mortality in community-dwelling older people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusumastuti, Sasmita; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Lund, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the added value of comorbidity, frailty, and subjective health to mortality predictions in community-dwelling older people and whether it changes with increasing age. PARTICIPANTS: 36,751 community-dwelling subjects aged 50-100 from the longitudinal Survey of Health......, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe. METHODS: Mortality risk associated with Comorbidity Index, Frailty Index, Frailty Phenotype, and subjective health was analysed using Cox regression. The extent to which health indicators modified individual mortality risk predictions was examined and the added ability......, and household income. CONCLUSION: Calendar age encompasses most of the discrimination ability to predict mortality. The added value of comorbidity, frailty, and subjective health to mortality predictions decreases with increasing age....

  6. Purpose in Life and Cerebral Infarcts in Community Dwelling Older Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Boyle, Patricia A.; Wilson, Robert S.; Levine, Steven R.; Schneider, Julie A.; Bennett, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Purpose in life, the sense that life has meaning and direction, is associated with reduced risks of adverse health outcomes. However, it remains unknown whether purpose in life protects against the risk of cerebral infarcts among community-dwelling older persons. We tested the hypothesis that greater purpose in life is associated with lower risk of cerebral infarcts. Methods Participants came from the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Each participant completed a standard measure of purpose in life. Uniform neuropathologic examination identified macroscopic infarcts and microinfarcts, blinded to clinical information. Association of purpose in life with cerebral infarcts was examined in ordinal logistic regression models using a semiquantitative outcome. Results 453 participants were included in the analyses. The mean score on the measure of purpose was 3.5 (Standard Deviation=0.47, range=2.1-5.0). Macroscopic infarcts were found in 154 (34.0 %) persons, and microinfarcts were found in 128 (28.3%) persons. Greater purpose in life was associated with a lower odds of having one or more macroscopic infarcts (Odds Ratio=0.535, 95% Confidence Interval=0.346-0.826, p=.005), but we did not find association with microinfarcts (Odds Ratio=0.780, 95% Confidence Interval=0.495-1.229, p=.283). These results persisted after adjusting for vascular risk factors of body mass index, history of smoking, diabetes, and blood pressure, as well as measures of negative affect, physical activity, and clinical stroke. The association with macroscopic infarcts was driven by lacunar infarcts, and was independent of cerebral atherosclerosis and arteriolosclerosis. Conclusions Purpose in life may affect risk for cerebral infarcts, specifically macroscopic lacunar infarcts. PMID:25791714

  7. Purpose in life and cerebral infarcts in community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Boyle, Patricia A; Wilson, Robert S; Levine, Steven R; Schneider, Julie A; Bennett, David A

    2015-04-01

    Purpose in life, the sense that life has meaning and direction, is associated with reduced risks of adverse health outcomes. However, it remains unknown whether purpose in life protects against the risk of cerebral infarcts among community-dwelling older people. We tested the hypothesis that greater purpose in life is associated with lower risk of cerebral infarcts. Participants came from the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Each participant completed a standard measure of purpose in life. Uniform neuropathologic examination identified macroscopic infarcts and microinfarcts, blinded to clinical information. Association of purpose in life with cerebral infarcts was examined in ordinal logistic regression models using a semiquantitative outcome. Four hundred fifty-three participants were included in the analyses. The mean score on the measure of purpose was 3.5 (SD, 0.5; range, 2.1-5.0). Macroscopic infarcts were found in 154 (34.0%) people, and microinfarcts were found in 128 (28.3%) people. Greater purpose in life was associated with a lower odds of having more macroscopic infarcts (odds ratio, 0.535; 95% confidence interval, 0.346-0.826; P=0.005), but we did not find association with microinfarcts (odds ratio, 0.780; 95% confidence interval, 0.495-1.229; P=0.283). These results persisted after adjusting for vascular risk factors of body mass index, history of smoking, diabetes mellitus, and blood pressure, as well as measures of negative affect, physical activity, and clinical stroke. The association with macroscopic infarcts was driven by lacunar infarcts, and was independent of cerebral atherosclerosis and arteriolosclerosis. Purpose in life may affect risk for cerebral infarcts, specifically macroscopic lacunar infarcts. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Consequences of interaction of functional, somatic, mental and social problems in community-dwelling older people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne H van Houwelingen

    Full Text Available This study explores the combination of four common health problems in older people and whether problems on four domains result in an additional effect on indicators of poor health. For this purpose, a total of 2681 participants (32% male, mean age 82 years of the Integrated Systematic Care for Older People (ISCOPE study were screened on the presence of health problems on four domains (functional, somatic, mental, social with the postal ISCOPE questionnaire. Extensive interview data on health indicators were obtained at baseline and at 12-months follow-up, including disability (Groningen Activities Restriction Scale, GARS, cognitive function (Mini-Mental State Examination, MMSE, depressive symptoms (Geriatric Depression Scale-15, GDS, loneliness (loneliness scale of De Jong Gierveld, and health-related quality of life (EQ-5D. General practitioner (GP contact time (min/year was estimated via GP electronic medical records. Of the study population, 9% had no health problems according to the screening, 8% had problems on one domain, 27% on two, 38% on three and 18% on four domains. At baseline, the number of health domains with problems was associated with poorer scores on the GARS, the MMSE, the GDS-15, the loneliness scale, the EQ-5D and with more GP contact time (p <0.001. Problems on all four domains had an additional negative effect on these health indicators (all pinteraction <0.001. At follow-up, an increased number of domains with problems was associated with an increased decline in health indicators (all p<0.001 and with an additional negative effect on GP contact time of the presence of problems on all four domains (pinteraction <0.001. We conclude that combinations of functional, somatic, mental and social problems are associated with poor health indicators in community-dwelling older people. Since problems on four domains have an additional effect on health, individuals with combined functional, somatic, mental and social problems could

  9. Sleep Quality and 1-Year Incident Cognitive Impairment in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Olivier; Lorrain, Dominique; Forget, Hélène; Dubé, Micheline; Grenier, Sébastien; Préville, Michel; Hudon, Carol

    2012-01-01

    incident cognitive impairment in community-dwelling older adults. SLEEP 2012;35(4):491-499. PMID:22467987

  10. Effects of a dietary self-management programme for community-dwelling older adults: a quasi-experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su-Hui; Huang, Yu-Ping; Shao, Jung-Hua

    2017-09-01

    Nutritional health plays a crucial role in determining successful ageing and differs by different living area. Although nutritional interventions have long been advocated, little research has directly assessed the effectiveness of nutritional interventions on community-dwelling older adults in urban and rural areas and compared intervention effects on these two populations. To examine the effectiveness of a 12-week dietary self-management programme for salt-, fluid-, fat- and cholesterol-intake behaviours of community-dwelling older adults and to compare these effects in rural- and urban-dwelling older adults. For this quasi-experimental two-group study, older adults (≥65 years old) were recruited from two randomly selected public health centres in a rural north-eastern county and a northern city of Taiwan from January through December 2011. Outcomes included nutritional status, nutritional self-efficacy and health locus of control. Data were collected at baseline and 12 weeks later. To compare changes in outcome variables over time between the control (usual care) and intervention (nutritional programme) groups and between the urban- and rural-dwelling participants in the experimental group, we used generalised estimating equation analysis. Of the 129 participants, 120 completed this study (58 in the intervention group and 62 in the control group). After 12 weeks, the intervention group had significantly better nutritional status and higher internal health locus of control than the control group. Moreover, older rural participants who received the intervention tended towards higher nutritional self-efficacy and internal health locus of control than their urban counterparts. Our research findings support the positive effect of our nutritional self-management programme for community-dwelling older adults. The knowledge gained from this study can help stakeholders recognise the need for healthcare policy to establish effective strategies and sustainable

  11. Initial Impressions of Community-Dwelling Older Adults and Case Managers about Community-Based Telehealth Kiosks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Karen L.; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Mecca, Laurel Person; Garlock, Laurie A.; Schulz, Richard; Dick, Andrew W.; Olshansky, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Community-based (multi-user) telehealth interventions may be beneficial for older adults, but there is little research regarding community-based telehealth. We used a qualitative descriptive approach to examine the acceptability and perceived value of community-based telehealth kiosks with regard to current health self-management practices of community-dwelling older adults as a first step in feasibility assessment. Participants included residents (n=6) and community agency case managers (n=3) of a HUD-subsidized senior apartment building. Both positive impressions and concerns of each group are presented. Findings helped guide the plans for future telehealth kiosk implementation and training. PMID:20509594

  12. Medication Exposure and Risk of Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection in Community-Dwelling Older People and Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haran, John P; Bradley, Evan; Howe, Emily; Wu, Xun; Tjia, Jennifer

    2018-02-01

    It is unclear how medication exposures differ in their association with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI) in elderly nursing home (NH) residents and community-dwelling individuals. This study examined these exposures to determine whether the risk of rCDI differs according to living environment. Retrospective. Academic and community healthcare settings. Individuals aged 65 and older with CDI (N = 616). Information on participant characteristics and medications was extracted from the electronic medical record (EMR). We used separate extended Cox models according to living environment to identify the association between medication use and risk of rCDI. Of the 616 elderly adults treated for CDI, 24.1% of those living in the community and 28.1% of NH residents experienced recurrence within 1 year. For community-dwelling participants, the risk of rCDI was 1.6 times as high with antibiotic exposure and 2.5 times as high with acid-reducing medication exposure, but corticosteroid exposure was associated with a 39% lower risk of recurrence. For NH residents, the risk of rCDI was 2.9 times as high with acid-reducing medication exposure and 5.9 times as high with corticosteroid medication exposure. Antibiotic exposure was associated with an increased risk of recurrence only in community-dwelling participants (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.63, 95% confidence interval = 1.00-2.67). Risk of rCDI is greater with acid-reducing medication use than antibiotic use after initial CDI treatment, although the risk varied depending on living environment. Corticosteroid use is associated with greater risk of recurrence in NH residents but lower risk in community-dwelling elderly adults. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  13. Self-reported vs state-recorded motor vehicle collisions among older community dwelling individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singletary, B A; Do, A N; Donnelly, J P; Huisingh, C; Mefford, M T; Modi, R; Mondesir, F L; Ye, Y; Owsley, C; McGwin, G

    2017-04-01

    Motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) continue to place an increased burden on both individuals and health care systems. Self-reported and state-recorded police reports are the most common methods for MVC evaluation in epidemiologic studies, with varying degrees of agreement of information when compared in previous studies. The objective of the current study is to address the differences in MVC reporting and provide a more robust measure of the agreement between self-reported and state-recorded MVCs in a community dwelling population of older adults. A three-year prospective study was conducted in a population-based sample of 2000 licensed drivers aged 70 and older. At annual visits, participants were asked to self-report information on any MVC that occurred over the prior year where police were called to the scene. Information on police-reported MVCs was also ascertained from Alabama official state-recorded databases. The kappa coefficient was calculated to determine overall agreement between any self-reported and state-recorded crashes, as well as the raw number of crashes reported. In addition, agreement was stratified by demographics, health status, medication use, functional status (i.e. vision, cognition), and driving habits. 1747 participants who completed three years of follow up were involved in 225 state-recorded MVCs and 208 self-reported MVCs yielding overall substantial agreement between any self-report and state-recorded MVC (kappa=0.64). Cumulative number of self-reported and state-recorded MVCs was also compared, with agreement slightly reduced (kappa=0.55). The clinical characteristic resulting in the greatest variation in agreement with drivers was impaired contrast sensitivity showing better agreement between self-reported and state-recorded MVCs (kappa=0.9) than those with non-impaired contrast sensitivity (kappa=0.6). Study results showed substantial agreement between self-reported and state-recorded MVCs for any MVC involvement among the study

  14. Prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in independent community-dwelling older adults: The Fujiwara-kyo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Masanori; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Tomoda, Koichi; Fujita, Yukio; Yamauchi, Motoo; Osa, Takao; Uyama, Hiroki; Okamoto, Nozomi; Kurumatani, Norio; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    As the Japanese population ages, the number of older patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is expected to increase, but the prevalence of COPD in patients aged ≥80 years remains unclear. The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence of COPD in independent community-dwelling older adults aged ≥80 years. We investigated the prevalence of COPD in 2862 independent community-dwelling older adults (1504 men, 1358 women, mean age 77.7 ± 7.0 years) who underwent spirometry in the Fujiwara-kyo study, a study of successful aging in older adults. Those participants with airflow limitation (forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity dwelling older adults aged ≥80 years. However, the benefits of the spirometric screening and treatment for these patients needs to be determined. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2421-2426. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Incident Falls in Community Dwelling Older Men: The Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Naomi; Chan, Lewis; Cumming, Robert G; Blyth, Fiona M; Handelsman, David J; Seibel, Markus J; Waite, Louise M; Le Couteur, David G; Naganathan, Vasi

    2016-12-01

    We sought to determine which lower urinary tract symptoms are associated with incident falls in community dwelling older men. The Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project involves a representative sample of community dwelling men 70 years old or older in a defined geographic region in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Included in analysis were 1,090 men without neurological diseases, poor mobility or dementia at baseline. Lower urinary tract symptoms were assessed using I-PSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) and incontinence was assessed using ICIQ (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire) at baseline. I-PSS subscores were calculated for storage and voiding symptoms. Incident falls in 1 year were determined by telephone followup every 4 months. I-PSS storage and voiding subscores were associated with falls. Urgency incontinence was associated with falls (adjusted incidence rate ratio 2.57, 95% CI 1.54-4.30). In addition, intermediate to high I-PSS storage subscores without urgency incontinence were associated with falls (adjusted incidence rate ratio 1.72, 95% CI 1.24-2.38). Other types of incontinence and urgency alone without urgency incontinence were not associated with falls. Lower urinary tract storage and voiding symptoms were associated with falls in community dwelling older men. Of the symptoms of overactive bladder urgency incontinence carried a high risk of falls. Storage symptoms also contributed to the fall risk independently of urgency incontinence. Circumstances of falls among men with lower urinary tract symptoms should be explored to understand how lower urinary tract symptoms increase the fall risk and generate hypotheses regarding potential interventions. Furthermore, trials to treat lower urinary tract symptoms in older men should include falls as an end point. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fall-Related Psychological Concerns and Anxiety among Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Christine Payette

    Full Text Available Fear of falling and other fall-related psychological concerns (FRPCs, such as falls-efficacy and balance confidence, are highly prevalent among community-dwelling older adults. Anxiety and FRPCs have frequently, but inconsistently, been found to be associated in the literature. The purpose of this study is to clarify those inconsistencies with a systematic review and meta-analysis and to evaluate if the strength of this relationship varies based on the different FRPC constructs used (e.g., fear of falling, falls-efficacy or balance confidence. A systematic review was conducted through multiple databases (e.g., MEDLINE, PsycINFO to include all articles published before June 10th 2015 that measured anxiety and FRPCs in community-dwelling older adults. Active researchers in the field were also contacted in an effort to include unpublished studies. The systematic review led to the inclusion of twenty relevant articles (n = 4738. A random-effect meta-analysis revealed that the mean effect size for fear of falling and anxiety is r = 0.32 (95% CI: 0.22-0.40, Z = 6.49, p < 0.001 and the mean effect size for falls-efficacy or balance confidence and anxiety is r = 0.31 (95% CI: 0.23-0.40, Z = 6.72, p < 0.001. A Q-test for heterogeneity revealed that the two effect sizes are not significantly different (Q(19 = 0.13, p = n.s.. This study is the first meta-analysis on the relationship between anxiety and FRPCs among community-dwelling older adults. It demonstrates the importance of considering anxiety when treating older adults with FRPCs.

  17. Sarcopenia as a Risk Factor for Cognitive Deterioration in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A 1-Year Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Shu; Yamada, Minoru; Shirooka, Hidehiko; Nozaki, Yuma; Fukutani, Naoto; Tashiro, Yuto; Hirata, Hinako; Yamaguchi, Moe; Tasaka, Seishiro; Matsushita, Tomofumi; Matsubara, Keisuke; Tsuboyama, Tadao; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this 1-year prospective study was to determine whether sarcopenia is an independent risk factor of cognitive deterioration in community-dwelling older adults. One-year prospective study. Japanese community. A total of 131 community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years and older participated in this study. We defined sarcopenia using the diagnostic algorithm recommended by the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia, and the participants were classified into the sarcopenia and normal groups according to this definition. The participants' cognitive functions were assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) during pre- and postdata collection (after 1 year). The rate of change in pre- and post-MMSE scores during the follow-up term was significantly different between the 2 groups (normal group, -0.32 ± 8.39%; sarcopenia group, -5.86 ± 5.16%; P = .002). The analysis of covariance, adjusted for demographic data and the pre-MMSE scores, showed a significant change in the MMSE scores between the normal and sarcopenia group (F = 9.30, P = .003). Furthermore, in the multivariate logistic regression analysis, the cognitive function was significantly more likely to deteriorate (defined as a loss of at least 2 points of MMSE) in the sarcopenia group during the follow-up term (odds ratio: 7.86, 95% confidence interval: 1.53-40.5). Sarcopenia was identified as an independent risk factor of cognitive deterioration in community-dwelling older adults during the 1-year study period. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Subjective cognitive decline and fall risk in community-dwelling older adults with or without objective cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirooka, Hidehiko; Nishiguchi, Shu; Fukutani, Naoto; Tashiro, Yuto; Nozaki, Yuma; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2017-07-19

    The association between subjective cognitive decline and falls has not been clearly determined. Our aim was to explore the effect of subjective cognitive decline on falls in community-dwelling older adults with or without objective cognitive decline. We included 470 older adults (mean age 73.6 ± 5.2; 329 women) living in the community and obtained data on fall history directly from the participants. Subjective cognitive decline was assessed using a self-administered question. Objective cognitive function was measured using the Mini-Mental State Examination. Statistical analyses were carried out separately for participants with objective cognitive decline and those without. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that, among participants without objective cognitive decline, subjective cognitive decline was positively associated with falls [OR 1.91; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17-3.12; p = 0.01). Conversely, among participants with objective cognitive decline, subjective cognitive decline was negatively associated with falls (OR 0.07; 95% CI 0.01-0.85, p = 0.04). The result suggests that the objective-subjective disparity may affect falls in community-dwelling older adults. The presence of subjective cognitive decline was significantly positively associated with falls among cognitively intact older adults. However, among their cognitively impaired peers, the absence of subjective cognitive decline was positively associated with falls.

  19. Factors associated with the 6-minute walk test in nursing home residents and community-dwelling older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballer, Vicent-Benavent; Lisón, Juan Francisco; Rosado-Calatayud, Pedro; Amer-Cuenca, Juan José; Segura-Orti, Eva

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The main objective of this study was to determine the contributions and extent to which certain physical measurements explain performance in the 6-minute walk test in healthy older adults living in a geriatric nursing home and for older adults dwelling in the community. [Subjects] The subjects were 122 adults aged 65 and older with no cognitive impairment who were independent in their daily activities. [Methods] The 6-minute walk test, age, body mass index, walking speed, chair stand test, Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up-and-Go test, rectus femoris cross-sectional area, Short Physical Performance Battery, and hand-grip strength were examined. [Results] Strong significant associations were found between mobility, lower-limb function, balance, and the 6-minute walk test. A stepwise multiple regression on the entire sample showed that lower-limb function was a significant and independent predictor for the 6-minute walk test. Additionally, lower-limb function was a strong predictor for the 6-minute walk test in our nursing home group, whereas mobility was found to be the best predictor in our community-dwelling group. [Conclusion] Better lower-limb function, balance, and mobility result in a higher distance covered by healthy older adults. Lower-limb function and mobility appeared to best determine walking performance in the nursing home and community-dwelling groups, respectively. PMID:26696740

  20. Cognitive Impairment, Oral Self-care Function and Dental Caries Severity in Community-dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Clark, Jennifer JJ; Chen, Hong; Naorungroj, Supawadee

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether oral self-care function mediates the associations between cognitive impairment and caries severity in community-dwelling older adults. Background Cognitive impairment significantly affects activities of daily living and compromises oral health, systemic health and quality of life in older adults. However, the associations among cognitive impairment, oral self-care capacity and caries severity remain unclear. This increases difficulty in developing effective interventions for cognitively impaired patients. Materials and methods Medical, dental, cognitive and functional assessments were abstracted from the dental records of 600 community-dwelling elderly. 230 participants were selected using propensity score matching and categorised into normal, cognitive impairment but no dementia (CIND) and dementia groups based on their cognitive status and a diagnosis of dementia. Multivariable regressions were developed to examine the mediating effect of oral self-care function on the association between cognitive status and number of caries or retained roots. Results Cognitive impairment, oral self-care function and dental caries severity were intercorrelated. Multivariable analysis showed that without adjusting for oral self-care capacity, cognition was significantly associated with the number of caries or retained roots (p = 0.003). However, the association was not significant when oral self-care capacity was adjusted (p = 0.125). In contrast, individuals with impaired oral self-care capacity had a greater risk of having a caries or retained root (RR = 1.67, 95% CI 1.15, 2.44). Conclusion Oral care capacity mediates the association between cognition and dental caries severity in community-dwelling older adults. PMID:23758583

  1. Falls self-efficacy and falls incidence in community-dwelling older people: the mediating role of coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loft, Christine C; Jones, Fergal W; Kneebone, Ian I

    2017-11-08

    A cognitive behavioral model predicts that coping responses mediate the relationship between falls related psychological concerns and falls incidence, in community-dwelling older people. If empirical support could be found for this pathway then interventions could be developed to reduce falls risk by targeting coping strategies. Therefore, this study aimed to begin the process of testing whether coping responses mediate the association between falls self-efficacy (a principal element of falls related psychological concerns) and falls incidence, in community-dwelling older people. In a cross-sectional design, 160 community-dwelling older people (31 male, 129 female; mean age 83.47 years) completed the Falls Efficacy Scale-International, the Revised-Ways of Coping Questionnaire, the Turning to Religion subscale of the COPE, and a falls questionnaire. Data were analyzed via mediation analysis using a bootstrapping approach. Lower falls self-efficacy was associated with higher falls incidence, and more self-controlling coping was found to be a partial mediator of this association, with a confidence interval for the indirect effect of (0.003, 0.021) and an effect size of κ 2 = 0.035. The association was not mediated by the other measured coping responses; namely, turning to religion, distancing, seeking social support, accepting responsibility, escape-avoidance, planful problem-solving, and positive reappraisal. Self-controlling coping may mediate the association between falls self-efficacy and falling. If longitudinal studies confirm this finding then coping could be targeted in interventions to reduce falls.

  2. Dual-tasking over an extended walking distance is associated with falls among community-dwelling older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirashima K

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Kenichi Hirashima,1,2 Yumi Higuchi,1 Masakazu Imaoka,1 Emiko Todo,1 Tomomi Kitagawa,1 Tetsuya Ueda11Graduate School of Comprehensive Rehabilitation, Osaka Prefecture University, Habikino Campus, Habikino City, Osaka, Japan; 2Faculty of Health and Welfare, Department of Physical Therapy, Tokushima Bunri University, Nishihamaboji, Yamashiro Town, Tokushima City, Tokushima, Japan Aim: Dual-task methods, in which walking is the primary task, are not sufficient for accurately screening for the risk of falls among healthy older adults. Therefore, the goal of this research was to investigate whether using a dual-task method over an extended walking distance can predict falls among community-dwelling older adults.Methods: We enrolled independent community-dwelling adults aged ≥65 years. Physical performance, cognitive function, psychological function, and a dual-task test were assessed at baseline. Our dual-task test required the subjects to walk 60 m while stepping over lines. The intervals between the lines ranged from 50–100 cm and were unequal. Falls and fall-related injuries were measured over a 12-month follow-up period using monthly postal surveys. Results: Ninety-two of 118 subjects (mean age, 75.4±5.5 years completed the 12-month follow-up. Sixteen (17.4% of fallers had injurious falls or fell more than or equal to two times. There were no significant differences between the fallers and non-fallers, except in age and in the number of missteps during the dual-task test when walking ≥40 m. The Kaplan–Meier analysis revealed that those who had more than one misstep while walking ≥40 m had a significantly higher incidence of injurious or multiple falls than those who had no missteps.Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the dual-task method with an extended walking distance may be able to predict falls among community-dwelling older adults. Keywords: cohort study, community-dwelling older adults, dual-task, falls

  3. Hearing handicap predicts the development of depressive symptoms after 3 years in older community-dwelling Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hideyuki; Nishiwaki, Yuji; Michikawa, Takehiro; Kikuchi, Yuriko; Mizutari, Kunio; Takebayashi, Toru; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    To examine the association between hearing handicap and depressive symptoms in older community-dwelling Japanese. Community-based cohort study. Kurabuchi Town, Gunma Prefecture, Japan. Five hundred eighty residents (261 men, 319 women) aged 65 and older without depressive symptoms. In a baseline examination performed in 2005/06, participants answered the 10-item screening version of the Hearing Handicap Inventory for Elderly (HHIE-S). They were divided into two groups according to their scores: a group with no hearing handicap (HHIE-S scores of handicap group (HHIE-S scores of > or =10). The Geriatric Depression Scale was used to identify depressive symptoms in face-to-face home visit interviews conducted in 2008, and the association between hearing handicap and depressive symptoms was assessed using logistic regression. The incidence of depressive symptoms was 19.6% in the group with a hearing handicap and 8.0% in the group without a hearing handicap. When compared with the subjects without hearing handicap, subjects with a hearing handicap had a multiadjusted odds ratio of depressive symptoms of 2.45 (95% confidence interval=1.26-4.77). The association remained significant even when hearing impairment measured with pure-tone audiometry was added to the multiadjusted model. A hearing handicap can predict future depressive symptoms in older community-dwelling people.

  4. Development of a Social Activities Scale for Community-Dwelling Older Women Requiring Support in Japan: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Michiyo; Kawahara, Kayoko; Saeki, Kazuko

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a scale for measuring the social activities of community-dwelling older women requiring support in Japan. A methodological study was performed of 118 older women (>65 years old) requiring support and residing in region A of Japan. An anonymous questionnaire was administered through individual interviews, and valid responses were obtained from 110 people. The construct validity of the resulting scale was assessed by exploratory factor analysis. Criterion-related validity was tested by calculating Spearman's rank correlation coefficient between the resulting scale and the existing Social Activity Index for Elderly People (SAI-E). Reliability was tested by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The Social Activity Scale for Community-Dwelling Older Women Requiring Support (SASOWS) was created. This scale comprised the following three subscales: "interactions with familiar people," "consulting with care service providers," and "performing proactive creative activities at home". Correlation of SASOWS with the existing SAI-E resulted in a correlation coefficient of .521 (p women requiring support. Future studies should continue to examine the items and usefulness of this scale. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Impact of poor sleep quality and physical inactivity on cognitive function in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakakubo, Sho; Makizako, Hyuma; Doi, Takehiko; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Lee, Sangyoon; Lee, Sungchul; Hotta, Ryo; Bae, Seongryu; Suzuki, Takao; Shimada, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the combination of subjective sleep quality and physical activity is associated with cognitive performance among community-dwelling older adults. Cross-sectional data on 5381 older adults who participated in part of the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology - Study of Geriatric Syndromes were analyzed. We assessed general cognitive impairment using the Mini-Mental State Examination, and also assessed story memory, attention, executive function and processing speed using the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology Functional Assessment Tool. Physical activity was assessed using two questionnaires, and participants were categorized as active or inactive. Sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and participants were categorized as having poor (PS) or good sleep quality (GS). Participants in the inactive + PS group had worse performances than those in the active + GS group in all cognitive measures (Mini-Mental State Examination: P = 0.008, story memory: P = 0.007, other cognitive measures: P sleep quality were associated with poor cognitive performance among community-dwelling older adults. The combination of poor sleep quality and physical inactivity also worsened cognitive performance. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1823-1828. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  6. Clinical Definitions of Sarcopenia and Risk of Hospitalization in Community-Dwelling Older Men: The Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Peggy M; Lui, Li-Yung; Taylor, Brent C; McCulloch, Charles E; Cauley, Jane A; Lapidus, Jodi; Orwoll, Eric; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2017-10-01

    The association between various definitions of sarcopenia and hospitalization has not been evaluated in community-dwelling older men. We used data from 1,516 participants at Visit 3 of the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study who also had linked Medicare Fee-For-Service Claims data available. We examined the association between several sarcopenia definitions (International Working Group, European Working Group for Sarcopenia in Older Persons, Foundation for the NIH Sarcopenia Project, Baumgartner, and Newman) and hospitalization, using two-part ("hurdle") models, adjusted for age, clinical center, functional limitations, self-reported health, comorbidity, and cognitive function. Predictors included sarcopenia status (the summary definitions and the components of slowness, weakness, and/or lean mass); outcomes included hospitalization and cumulative inpatient days/year in the 3 years following the Visit 3 exam. After accounting for confounding factors, none of the summary definitions or the definition components (slowness, weakness, or low lean mass) were associated with likelihood of hospitalization, the rate ratio of inpatient days among those hospitalized, or the mean rate of inpatient days amongst all participants. Sarcopenia was not associated hospitalization in community-dwelling older men. These results provide further evidence that current sarcopenia definitions are unlikely to identify those who are most likely to have greater hospitalization. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Prediction of future falls in a community dwelling older adult population using instrumented balance and gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, C M; Gröger, I; Rupprecht, R; Marcar, V L; Gaßmann, K G

    2016-04-01

    The role of instrumented balance and gait assessment when screening for prospective fallers is currently a topic of controversial discussion. This study analyzed the association between variables derived from static posturography, instrumented gait analysis and clinical assessments with the occurrence of prospective falls in a sample of community dwelling older people. In this study 84 older people were analyzed. Based on a prospective occurrence of falls, participants were categorized into fallers and non-fallers. Variables derived from clinical assessments, static posturography and instrumented gait analysis were evaluated with respect to the association with the occurrence of prospective falls using a forward stepwise, binary, logistic regression procedure. Fallers displayed a significantly shorter single support time during walking while counting backwards, increased mediolateral to anteroposterior sway amplitude ratio, increased fast mediolateral oscillations and a larger coefficient (Coeff) of sway direction during various static posturography tests. Previous falls were insignificantly associated with the occurrence of prospective falls. Variables derived from posturography and instrumented gait analysis showed significant associations with the occurrence of prospective falls in a sample of community dwelling older adults.

  8. Frailty as a Predictor of Future Falls Among Community-Dwelling Older People: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Gotaro

    2015-12-01

    Although multiple longitudinal studies have investigated frailty as a predictor of future falls, the results were mixed. Thus far, no systematic review or meta-analysis on this topic has been conducted. To review the evidence of frailty as a predictor of future falls among community-dwelling older people. Systematic review of literature and meta-analysis were performed using 6 electronic databases (Embase, Scopus, MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library) searching for studies that prospectively examined risk of future fall risk according to frailty among community-dwelling older people published from 2010 to April 2015 with no language restrictions. Of 2245 studies identified through the systematic review, 11 studies incorporating 68,723 individuals were included in the meta-analysis. Among 7 studies reporting odds ratios (ORs), frailty and prefrailty were significantly associated with higher risk of future falls (pooled OR = 1.84, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.43-2.38, P dwelling older people despite various criteria used to define frailty. The future fall risk according to frailty seemed to be higher in men than in women. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel use of the Wii Balance Board to prospectively predict falls in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Boon-Chong; Clark, Ross A; Pua, Yong-Hao

    2015-06-01

    The Wii Balance Board has received increasing attention as a balance measurement tool; however its ability to prospectively predict falls is unknown. This exploratory study investigated the use of the Wii Balance Board and other clinical-based measures for prospectively predicting falls among community-dwelling older adults. Seventy-three community-dwelling men and women, aged 60-85years were followed-up over a year for falls. Standing balance was indexed by sway velocities measured using the Wii Balance Board interfaced with a laptop. Clinical-based measures included Short Physical Performance Battery, gait speed and Timed-Up-and-Go test. Multivariable regression analyses were used to assess the ability of the Wii Balance Board measure to complement the TUG test in fall screening. Individually, the study found Wii Balance Board anteroposterior (odds ratio 1.98, 95% CI 1.16 to 3.40, P=0.01) and mediolateral (odds ratio 2.80, 95% CI 1.10 to 7.13, p=0.03) sway velocity measures predictive of prospective falls. However, when each velocity measure was adjusted with body mass index and Timed-Up-and-Go, only anteroposterior sway velocity was predictive of prospective falls (odds ratio 2.21, 95% CI 1.18 to 4.14). A faster anteroposterior velocity was associated with increased odds of falling. Area-under-the-curves for Wii Balance Board sway velocities were 0.67 and 0.71 for anteroposterior and mediolateral respectively. The Wii Balance Board-derived anteroposterior sway velocity measure could complement existing clinical-based measures in predicting future falls among community-dwelling older adults. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number: ACTRN12610001099011. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Modifiable Risk Factors for Pneumonia Requiring Hospitalization among Community-Dwelling Older Adults: The Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; De Rekeneire, Nathalie; Allore, Heather; Chen, Shu; O’Leary, John R.; Bauer, Douglas C.; Harris, Tamara B.; Newman, Anne B.; Yende, Sachin; Weyant, Robert J.; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Quagliarello, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Background Pneumonia requiring hospitalization remains a major public health problem among community-dwelling older adults. Impaired oral hygiene is a modifiable risk factor for healthcare-associated pneumonia, but its role in community-acquired pneumonia is unclear. Objectives To identify novel modifiable risk factors, focusing on oral hygiene, for pneumonia requiring hospitalization among community-dwelling older adults. Design Prospective observational cohort study Setting Memphis, Tennessee and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Participants Of 3075 well-functioning community-dwelling adults aged 70–79 years enrolled in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study from 1997–1998, 1441 had complete data, dental exam within six months of baseline, and were eligible for this study. Measurements The primary outcome was pneumonia requiring hospitalization through 2008. Results Of 1441 participants, 193 were hospitalized for pneumonia. In a multivariable model, male gender (HR 2.07, 95%CI 1.51–2.83), white race (HR 1.44, 95%CI 1.03–2.01), history of pneumonia (HR 3.09, 95%CI 1.86–5.14), pack-years of smoking (HR 1.006, 95%CI 1.001–1.011), and percent predicted FEV1 (moderate vs. mild/normal lung function [HR 1.78, 95%CI 1.28–2.48], severe vs. mild/normal lung function [HR 2.90, 95%CI 1.51–5.57]) were non-modifiable risk factors for pneumonia. Incident mobility limitation (HR 1.77, 95%CI 1.32–2.38) and higher mean oral plaque score (HR 1.29, 95%CI 1.02–1.64) were modifiable risk factors for pneumonia. Average Attributable Fractions revealed that 11.5% of pneumonias were attributed to incident mobility limitation and 10.3% to mean oral plaque score ≥1. Conclusion Incident mobility limitation and higher mean oral plaque score were two modifiable risk factors attributable for 22% of pneumonias requiring hospitalization. These data suggest innovative opportunities for pneumonia prevention among community-dwelling older adults. PMID:23772872

  11. Predictors of outcomes following reablement in community-dwelling older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuntland H

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hanne Tuntland,1,2 Ingvild Kjeken,3,4 Eva Langeland,2,5 Bjarte Folkestad,2,6 Birgitte Espehaug,7 Oddvar Førland,2,8 Mona Kristin Aaslund1 1Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, 2Centre for Care Research Western Norway, Bergen University College, Bergen, 3National Advisory Unit on Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, 4Department of Occupational Therapy, Prosthetics and Orthotics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, 5Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College, 6Uni Research Rokkan Centre, 7Centre for Evidence-Based Practice, Bergen University College, 8Faculty of Health Studies, VID Specialized University, Campus Bergen, Bergen, Norway Background: Reablement is a rehabilitation intervention for community-dwelling older adults, which has recently been implemented in several countries. Its purpose is to improve functional ability in daily occupations (everyday activities perceived as important by the older person. Performance and satisfaction with performance in everyday life are the major outcomes of reablement. However, the evidence base concerning which factors predict better outcomes and who receives the greatest benefit in reablement is lacking. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the potential factors that predict occupational performance and satisfaction with that performance at 10 weeks follow-up. Methods: The sample in this study was derived from a nationwide clinical controlled trial evaluating the effects of reablement in Norway and consisted of 712 participants living in 34 municipalities. Multiple linear regression was used to investigate possible predictors of occupational performance (COPM-P and satisfaction with that performance (COPM-S at 10 weeks follow-up based on the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM

  12. Assessment of postural balance in community-dwelling older adults - methodological aspects and effects of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Grønbech

    The overall purpose of this thesis was to examine selected methodological aspects and novel approaches for measuring postural balance older adults, and to examine the effects of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training on selected physiological, psychological and functional outcome variables...... in community-dwelling older adults. In Study I balance control was investigated using force plate analysis of Centre of Pressure (COP) excursion during static bilateral standing in 32 community-dwelling older adults at three different time-points (09:00, 12:30, and 16:00) throughout the day. An overall...... significant time-of-day effect was observed for all selected COP variables. The greatest change in all COP variables was observed (on average ~15%) between midday (12:30) and the afternoon (16:00), indicating that a systematic time-of-day influence on static postural balance exists in community-dwelling older...

  13. Effect of the Japanese preventive-care version of the Minimum Data Set--Home Care on the health-related behaviors of community-dwelling, frail older adults and skills of preventive-care managers: a quasi-experimental study conducted in Japan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Igarashi, Ayumi; Ikegami, Naoki; Yamada, Yukari

    2009-01-01

    -care version of the Minimum Data Set--Home Care and asked to employ it in their interactions with clients during the intervention period (intervention group). The health-related behaviors of older adults (maintenance of self-care and consumption of a balanced diet) were assessed by self-rating methods...

  14. Multi-morbidity, disability and adaptation strategies among community-dwelling adults aged 75 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Hon K; Vogtle, Laura K

    2016-10-01

    The impact of multi-morbidity and disability on the use of adaptation strategies in older adults has not been well researched. This study investigated categories of adaptation strategies that community-dwelling older adults use to complete their daily activities, identified factors that are associated with the use of behavioral adaptations, and examined the relationship among multi-morbidity, disability and adaptation strategies in this population. A mixed methods research design was used. 105 community-dwelling older adults with ages ranging from 75 to 94 years completed a questionnaire and semi-structured interview on types of chronic illnesses (multi-morbidity), amount of difficulty in completing daily activities (degree of disability), and types of behavioral efforts made to complete daily activities that are challenging (adaptation strategies). The model of selective optimization with compensation (SOC) was used to categorize these strategies. The findings revealed that older adults use a wide range of adaptations with compensation and selection the most (40.4%) and least (16.5%) frequently reported respectively. Degree of disability was uniquely associated with the frequency of using SOC strategies while controlling for other factors. Furthermore, degree of disability was a mediator for multi-morbidity in predicting frequency of using SOC strategies. The findings support that older adults using behavioral adaptations to cope with functional decline is prevalent. Knowing the types of adaptation that older adults employed and the indirect relationship between multi-morbidity and frequency of using SOC strategies, with degree of disability as the mediator will be helpful in planning interventions and prevention programs for educating older adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Patterns of perspectives on fall-prevention beliefs by community-dwelling older adults: a Q method investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shueh-Fen; Huang, Su-Fei; Lu, Li-Ting; Wang, Mei-Chuen; Liao, Jung-Yu; Guo, Jong-Long

    2016-07-07

    Falling has high incidence and reoccurrence rates and is an essential factor contributing to accidental injury or death for older adults. Enhancing the participation of community-dwelling older adults in fall-prevention programs is crucial. Understanding fall-prevention beliefs will be beneficial for developing a community-based fall-prevention program. The aim of the present study was to identify the distinct types of subjective views on the fall-prevention beliefs of community-dwelling older adults aged 80 years and older by applying the Q method. The Q method was adopted to investigate the pattern of perception on fall-prevention beliefs. Forty-two older adults aged 80 - 92 years from a community care center in Northern Taiwan were recruited and requested to complete a Q-sorting. A series of Q-sorts was performed by the participants to rank 30 statements into a normal distribution Q-sort grid. The Q-sorts were subjected to principal component analysis by using PQMethod software Version 2.35. Four statistically independent perspectives were derived from the analysis and reflected distinct viewpoints on beliefs related to fall prevention. Participants in the Considerate perspective believed that health problems caused by falling were serious and fall prevention could decrease the burden they place on their family. Participants in the Promising perspective believed that existing health problems could cause a fall and that fall prevention contributed to their well-being. Participants in the Adaptable perspective perceived low barriers to execute fall prevention and displayed self-confidence and independence in preventing falls. Participants in the Ignorance perspective believed that they could not prevent falls and perceived barriers to fall prevention. By combining theoretical constructs and the Q methodology approach, this study identified four distinct perspectives on fall prevention among community-dwelling older adults. Critical reflection on older adult

  16. Relationships Between Performance on Assessments of Executive Function and Fall Risk Screening Measures in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Jennifer; Shubert, Tiffany; Forgarty, Kieran; Chase, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Fall-related injuries are a leading cause of institutionalization and morbidity in older adults. Limitations in cognition, including deficits in higher cognitive processes, like executive function (EF), contribute to a higher risk of falling in older adults. Specifically, declines in EF have been associated with changes in gait, limited mobility, and an increased frequency of falling. It is unknown whether associations between performance on commonly used clinical assessments of EF and performance on commonly used physical performance measures of fall risk are present. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between a clinical measure of EF, the Trail Making Test Part B (TMT-B), and 3 physical performance measures of fall risk: the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, gait speed, and the Five Times Sit to Stand (FTSTS) test, in a group of community-dwelling older adults. Forty-seven community-dwelling older adults met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Demographic information was obtained and measures of fall risk and cognition were performed. Correlations and linear regression analyses to assess relationships between measures were completed. To account for the high prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in this population, the sample was screened and stratified for MCI in post hoc analyses. The EF performance was not significantly correlated with performance on the FTSTS test (ρ = 0.26, P > .05) but was significantly correlated with the TUG test (ρ = 0.31, P fall risk assessments that integrate a mobility task for those individuals who screen positive for MCI. For those who screened negative, no significant relationship exists. Given the large prevalence of undiagnosed MCI in community-dwelling older adults, this finding could be used as an indication to screen older adults for MCI. Screening tools that require cognitive resources such as gait speed appear to have significant relationships with performance of EF for those who screen positive for

  17. Aromatherapy: does it help to relieve pain, depression, anxiety, and stress in community-dwelling older persons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shuk Kwan; Tse, M Y Mimi

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of an aromatherapy programme for older persons with chronic pain. The community-dwelling elderly people who participated in this study underwent a four-week aromatherapy programme or were assigned to the control group, which did not receive any interventions. Their levels of pain, depression, anxiety, and stress were collected at the baseline and at the postintervention assessment after the conclusion of the four-week programme. Eighty-two participants took part in the study. Forty-four participants (37 females, 7 males) were in the intervention group and 38 participants (30 females, 8 males) were in the control group. The pain scores were 4.75 (SD 2.32) on a 10-point scale for the intervention group and 5.24 (SD 2.14) for the control group before the programme. There was a slight reduction in the pain score of the intervention group. No significant differences were found in the same-group and between-group comparisons for the baseline and postintervention assessments. The depression, anxiety, and stress scores for the intervention group before the programme were 11.18 (SD 6.18), 9.64 (SD 7.05), and 12.91 (SD 7.70), respectively. A significant reduction in negative emotions was found in the intervention group (Paromatherapy programme can be an effective tool to reduce pain, depression, anxiety, and stress levels among community-dwelling older adults.

  18. The influence of chair seat height on the performance of community-dwelling older adults' 30-second chair stand test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yi-Liang

    2013-06-01

    Although chair seat height affects the performance of sit-to-stand movement, no previous study has examined the influence of chair seat height on the 30-second chair stand test (CST). Fifty-five community-dwelling older adults (age 70.0 ± 6.3 years) performed the test from the standard height of 43 cm and then from five randomly ordered seat heights from 80 to 120 % of each participant's lower leg length. Chair seat height significantly influences the performance of community-dwelling older adults' 30-s CST (F = 57.50, p  0.95) and between the standard and 90 % conditions (p = 0.353). When comparing the scores between the randomly ordered chair seat heights, all comparisons were significantly different (p Chair seat height's relation to the lower leg length should be considered when interpreting 30-s CST scores. Additionally, it is necessary to optimize the chair seat height when using the 30-s CST as an outcome measure for exercise intervention or to screen for people with weaker lower extremities.

  19. Efficacy of Nintendo Wii Training on Mechanical Leg Muscle Function and Postural Balance in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Martin G; Laessoe, Uffe; Hendriksen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Older adults show increased risk of falling and major risk factors include impaired lower extremity muscle strength and postural balance. However, the potential positive effect of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training on muscle strength and postural balance in older adults is unknown....... METHODS: This randomized controlled trial examined postural balance and muscle strength in community-dwelling older adults (75±6 years) pre- and post-10 weeks of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training (WII, n = 28) or daily use of ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer insoles (controls [CON], n = 30). Primary...... end points were maximal muscle strength (maximal voluntary contraction) and center of pressure velocity moment during bilateral static stance. RESULTS: Intention-to-treat analysis with adjustment for age, sex, and baseline level showed that the WII group had higher maximal voluntary contraction...

  20. Explaining discrepancies in self-reported quality of life in frail older people: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vorst, Anne; Zijlstra, G A Rixt; De Witte, Nico; Vogel, Ruth G M; Schols, Jos M G A; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M

    2017-10-26

    Most research on multidimensional frailty focuses on deficits and risks of adverse outcomes. However, although some frail older people report a low quality of life (QoL), others still report a relatively high QoL. More knowledge about these discrepancies might give new insight into developing frailty prevention strategies. Therefore, this mixed-method study aimed (a) to identify characteristics related to QoL among frail older people; and (b) to explain discrepancies between higher and lower levels of QoL, with a specific interest in identifying strengths frail older people with a higher QoL still have. Semi-structured interviews were held with community-dwelling, frail older people with higher (n = 16) and lower levels of QoL (n = 18). Frailty was assessed with the Comprehensive Frailty Assessment Instrument, which measures environmental, physical, psychological, and social frailty. Other quantitative measures included socio-demographic characteristics, overall QoL, meaning in life, and mastery. The qualitative part focused on the meaning and maintenance of QoL (among other factors), despite being frail. Possible explanations for discrepancies in QoL were explored. Frail older people with a higher QoL were older, had lower levels of psychological frailty, and reported higher meaning in life compared to those with a lower QoL. Outcomes of qualitative analysis showed that participants in the high QoL subgroup adapted more effectively to difficulties, had more things in prospect, performed more activities, and were more satisfied with their social network compared to the low QoL subgroup. This exploratory study suggests possibilities to promote and improve QoL by strengthening specific resources among frail older people.

  1. Living alone and fall risk factors in community-dwelling middle age and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Sharon; Painter, Jane; Hudson, Suzanne

    2009-08-01

    As part of a larger study on fall-related risk factors, this study investigated the relationship between living alone status and fall-related variables among community-dwelling adults who lived in a rural county in eastern North Carolina. A convenience sample of 666 community-dwelling adults ages 50 and over participated in this 4-year study and completed a fall questionnaire. Significant findings were found in relation to living alone status and experiencing a fall, who they informed about their fall, injuries, safety equipment, ambulatory devices, and personal emergency response system usage. Three hundred thirty-eight participants stated they lived alone, compared to 300 who lived with others. The percentage reporting a fall was appreciably larger for those living alone (52%) than for those living with others (48%) in both genders in all age groups except for the 61-70 year old adults where the percentage was less. Findings from this research enhance knowledge about the prevalence and contributing fall-related factors in adults who live alone compared to those who live with others. Insights gained from this research will assist community and public health leaders and health care professionals in developing more efficacious intervention strategies to prevent or reduce falls, and associated psychological and physical consequences.

  2. Motivational interviewing and exercise programme for community-dwelling older persons with chronic pain: a randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Mimi M Y; Vong, Sinfia K S; Tang, Shuk Kwan

    2013-07-01

    To examine the effectiveness of an integrated motivational interviewing and physical exercise programme on pain, physical and psychological function, quality of life, self-efficacy, and compliance with exercise for community-dwelling older persons with chronic pain. Chronic pain is common among older persons. Indeed, motivation for managing pain is poor, and may cause negative consequences. Motivational interviewing maybe effective in treating chronic pain. Single-blinded randomised control study. Older persons with chronic pain (n = 56) were recruited from two elderly community centres. They were blinded from the group allocation. The programme was conducted by an motivational interviewing-trained physiotherapist and registered nurses. Participants in the experimental group received an 8-week integrated motivational interviewing and physical exercise programme, while the control group received regular activities in the centre. Motivational interviewing used open-ended questions to encourage participants to express and recognise their pain and behaviours and professional feedback was given accordingly. Pain intensity, pain self-efficacy, anxiety, happiness, depression, mobility and quality of life were measured before and after the motivational interviewing and physical exercise programme. Attendance and compliance rate of the programme was calculated in the experimental group. Significant improvements in pain intensity, pain self-efficacy, anxiety, happiness and mobility after the motivational interviewing and physical exercise programme (all p Motivational interviewing and physical exercise programme is effective in improving pain, physical mobility, psychological well-being and self-efficacy for community-dwelling older persons with chronic pain. Motivational interviewing is a feasible counselling technique whose content can be modified based on target group to change maladaptive behaviours, elicit ambivalences and enhance self-efficacy for making changes. Thus

  3. Association between sarcopenia and nutritional status and physical activity among community-dwelling Chinese adults aged 60 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Shan; Cao, Li; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Jianghua; Liu, Ping; Yang, Ying; Hao, Qiukui; Dong, Birong

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the association between sarcopenia and nutritional status and physical activity among community-dwelling Chinese people aged 60 years and older. This study was carried out on 836 community-dwelling Chinese individuals aged ≥60 years to evaluate sarcopenia using the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia criteria. Sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle habits were collected using a general questionnaire. Nutritional status was assessed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment and biochemical parameters, whereas physical activity was assessed using the long form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. In addition, univariate and multivariate analysis was used to analyze the association between sarcopenia with nutritional status and physical activity. The total prevalence rate of sarcopenia was 10.5%, 47 (11.3%) men and 41 (9.7%) women who were classified as sarcopenia. The prevalence of sarcopenia was significantly lower among the participants of normal nutrition status. Compared with the participants with sarcopenia, those without sarcopenia had higher levels of prealbumin (P Nutritional Assessment score (adjusted OR 0.769, 95% CI 0.689-0.859, P nutritional status, but not with physical activity, based on a questionnaire. Further studies should evaluate whether maintaining a good nutritional status might be effective in lowering the risk of sarcopenia. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1959-1966. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  4. Depressive Symptom Dimensions and Their Association with Hippocampal and Entorhinal Cortex Volumes in Community Dwelling Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre M. O’Shea

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Research has shown that depression is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD and subsequent cognitive decline. This is compounded by evidence showing an association between depression and reduced hippocampal volumes; a primary structure implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. Less is known about the relationship between depression and other AD vulnerable regions such as the entorhinal cortex. Given the heterogeneity of depressive symptom presentation, we examined whether symptom dimensions were associated with hippocampal and entorhinal cortex volumes in community dwelling older adults.Methods: Eighty-one community dwelling adults completed the Beck Depression Inventory – second edition and underwent structural neuroimaging. Measures of hippocampal and entorhinal cortex volumes were obtained using FreeSurfer software. Linear regression models included regions of interest as dependent variables, with depressive symptom dimensions, as independent variables, controlling for total intracranial volumes, age, education, and gender.Results: Somatic symptoms were negatively associated with total, right, and left hippocampal volumes. Affective symptoms were negatively associated with total entorhinal cortex volumes, with a marginal main effect on left entorhinal cortex volumes.Conclusion: Our findings provide support for examining depressive symptoms and their association with AD vulnerable regions along subdimensions of affective, cognitive, and somatic symptoms to better understand profiles of symptoms most associated with these regions. Conceptualizing depressive symptoms in this way may also better inform treatment approaches in terms of targeting types of symptoms that may be more closely linked to poorer brain and cognitive health outcomes.

  5. Management and outcomes of ST-elevation myocardial infarction in nursing home versus community-dwelling older patients: a propensity matched study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Sahil; Kolte, Dhaval; Gupta, Tanush; Mujib, Marjan; Aronow, Wilbert S; Agarwal, Pallak; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Jain, Diwakar; Ahmed, Ali; Fonarow, Gregg C; Frishman, William H; Panza, Julio A

    2014-08-01

    The influence of admission source (nursing home [NH] versus community-dwelling) on treatment strategies and outcomes among elderly patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has not been investigated. Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases from 2003 to 2010 were used to identify 270,117 community-dwelling and 4082 NH patients 75 years of age or older with STEMI. Retrospective observational study. Propensity scores for admission source were used to assemble a matched cohort of 3081 community-dwelling and 3132 NH patients, who were balanced on baseline demographic and clinical characteristics. Bivariate logistic regression models were then used to determine the associations of NH with in-hospital outcomes among matched patients. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in patients with STEMI presenting from a NH as compared with community-dwelling patients (30.5% versus 27.6%; odds ratio [OR] 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.29; P = .012). Overall, NH patients were less likely to receive reperfusion (thrombolysis, percutaneous coronary intervention, or coronary artery bypass grafting) (11.5% versus 13.4%; OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.72-0.98; P = .022). However, rates of percutaneous coronary intervention alone were similar in both groups (9.9% in NH versus 9.1% in community-dwelling; OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.93-1.30; P = .276). Mean length of stay was also similar in both groups (5.68 ± 5.40 days in NH versus 5.69 ± 4.98 days in community-dwelling, P = .974). Compared with their community-dwelling counterparts, older NH patients are less likely to receive reperfusion therapy for STEMI and have higher in-hospital mortality. Copyright © 2014 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Walking can be more effective than balance training in fall prevention among community-dwelling older adults.

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    Okubo, Yoshiro; Osuka, Yosuke; Jung, Songee; Rafael, Figueroa; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; Aiba, Tatsuya; Kim, Teaho; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effects of walking on falls among community-dwelling older adults while accounting for exposures. A total of 90 older adults, ranging in age from 65 to 79 years, were allocated into either the walking (brisk walking, n = 50) or the balance (balance and strength training, n = 40) group to participate in a 3-month supervised and 13-month unsupervised fall-prevention program held from 2012 to 2014 in Japan. Falls and trips that occurred during the 16-month period were monitored with a monthly fall calendar. The risk of falls and trips was evaluated by person-year, physically active person-day and person-step. The walking group showed a significant reduction in the fall risk when evaluated by the falls per physically active person-day (rate ratio 0.38, 95% confidence interval 0.19-0.77) and falls per person-step (rate ratio 0.47, 95% confidence interval 0.26-0.85) compared with the balance group. In contrast, the number of trips significantly increased with walking, even when evaluated as trips per physically active person-day (rate ratio 1.50, 95% confidence interval 1.12-2.00). The present findings suggest that walking among community-dwelling older adults can be more effective for fall prevention than balance training. However, because walking can induce more trips, walking should not be recommended for older adults who are susceptible to falling or frailty. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  7. International classification of function, disability and health framework for fall risk stratification in community dwelling older adults

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    Majumi M. Noohu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Falls is an important cause for mortality and morbidity in older adults. The fall risk assessment is an integral component of fall prevention in older adults. The international classification of function, disability and health (ICF can be an ideal comprehensive model for fall risk assessment. There is lack of information relating ICF and fall risk assessment in community dwelling older adults. In this study we tried to assess the fall risk using different domains of ICF using various clinical tools. A total of 255 subjects were recruited through convenient sampling method from geriatric clinic (OPD of All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. The study was single session cross-section design. The body mass index (BMI, grip strength, depression score (Geriatric depression scale:short form; GDS-S and co morbidities were used to assess body function and structure domain, timed up and go (TUG, Berg balance scale (BBS and elderly fall screening test (EFST scores were used for activity domain, selfreported cause of fall, medications and uses of assistive device for environmental factors. Then the association of body function and structure, activity and environmental factors were determined with falls. There was an association of fall in analysis in subjects with no fall and one or more falls for, BMI, grip strength (kg, GDS-S score, no. of co morbidities, chronic pain, TUG, BBS, TUG (s, BBS, EFST, slip/trip, walking cane, hypoglycemic and antihypertensives medications (unadjusted and adjusted odds ratio.The diabetes, and hyper tension showed association for adjusted odds ratio only. In subjects with one fall and more than one fall, TUG, BBS, EFST, GDS-S score, NSAIDS and antidepressants use showed a significant association with fall (unadjusted and adjusted odds ratio. The ICF may be used in routine for fall risk assessment in community dwelling older adults.

  8. Positive and negative associations of individual social capital factors with health among community-dwelling older people.

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    Kabayama, Mai; Watanabe, Chie; Ryuno, Hirochika; Kamide, Kei

    2017-12-01

    Previous literature has found positive correlations between social capital and health in older adults, fewer studies have investigated the subdimension's effects of social capital on health. We aimed to determine the individual social capital subfactors in community-dwelling older adults in Japan, and to analyze the associations of these factors with physical and mental health. We sent a self-administered questionnaire assessing their perception of social group activity as the individual social capital, and mental and physical health (measured by the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36) to 4320 randomly selected older people. There were 1836 valid responses. We clarified that people who participated in any social activity group were in significantly better physical and mental health compared with the people who did not. By the factor analysis of the perception for the social group activity, we identified three components of the individual social capital aspect that we termed harmonious, hierarchic and diversity. Using multiple linear regression, we found the hierarchic aspect was significantly negatively associated with mental health, whereas the harmonious aspect was significantly positively associated with mental and physical health, and diversity was significantly positively associated with mental health. As the previous research literature on social capital has mainly emphasized its positive health consequences, the present findings provide a novel demonstration that some aspects of individual social capital can have negative associations with health outcomes in community-dwelling older people. For the practical application of promoting a healthier society, it is important to consider both the positive and negative sides of social capital. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2427-2434. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  9. Frailty in Community-Dwelling Older People in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kuwaiti, Saleha Jaber; Aziz, Faisal; Blair, Iain

    2015-01-01

    Frailty describes the aging-associated loss of physiological and psychological reserves, leading to an increased risk of adverse health outcomes. Many developed countries view frailty as a major priority for their health and social care systems. Less is known about frailty in less-developed countries. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of frailty in a sample of community-dwelling older people in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). This was a cross-sectional study of community-dwelling Emirati adults aged 55 years and older (n = 160) in Abu Dhabi, UAE. Data were collected at interview by questionnaire and physical measurements. Frailty was defined according to the criteria of the Fried Frailty Index. The prevalence of frailty and its association with selected independent variables were assessed. The overall prevalence of frailty (95% CI) was 47% (39-55). Higher levels of frailty were seen in older age groups, women, those who were non-married, those with recent hospital admission, those with comorbid conditions, those on more than five medications, and those with lower forced expiratory volume and mini-mental state examination score. After adjustment in a multiple logistic regression model, only age and gender were found to be independently associated with frailty. A high prevalence of frailty was found among older Emiratis. Given that frailty is associated with adverse health outcomes and can be a means of identifying opportunities for intervention in clinical practice and health policy, further attention and consideration within professional and public health policy circles are needed.

  10. Nutritional status of community-dwelling older people with dementia: associations with individual and family caregivers' characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullier, Laetitia; Lagarde, Alexia; Bouisson, Jean; Bergua, Valérie; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the associations of individual characteristics of both older people with dementia and family caregivers with the nutritional status of older people with dementia. This cross-sectional study comprising 56 community-dwelling older persons with dementia and 56 family caregivers was conducted at home by a psychogerontologist working for a community gerontological center. Older people with dementia were assessed with Mini mental state examination, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, Activities of Daily Living (ADL), and NeuroPsychiatric Inventory (NPI) and family caregivers with the Burden Interview (Zarit scale), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and the emotional impact measure of NPI. For both, nutritional status was evaluated using the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). Among older people with dementia, 58.9% were at risk of malnutrition and 23.2% presented a poor nutritional status, and among the family caregivers, 32.1% and 5.4%, respectively. The MNA score of older people with dementia was strongly and inversely associated with the ADL score and was strongly and positively associated with the MNA score of family caregiver. These two factors significantly explained 32% of variation of MNA score of older people with dementia. These findings confirm the value of investigating nutritional deficiencies in dementia within the caregiving dyad and suggest that the functional status of older people with dementia and the nutritional status of family caregivers should be carefully assessed. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Association Between Social Participation and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Kimiko; Kurumatani, Norio; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2016-10-05

    Population-based data examining the relationship between social participation (SP) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) are scarce. This study examined the cross-sectional relationship between SP and IADL in community-dwelling elderly persons. Self-administered questionnaires were mailed to 23 710 residents aged ≥65 years in Nara, Japan (response rate: 74.2%). Data from 14 956 respondents (6935 males and 8021 females) without dependency in basic activities of daily living (ADL) were analyzed. The number, type, and frequency of participation in social groups (SGs) were used to measure SP. SGs included volunteer groups, sports groups, hobby groups, senior citizens' clubs, neighborhood community associations, and cultural groups. IADL was evaluated using the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence. Logistic regression models stratified by gender were used. After adjustment for putative confounding factors, including demographics, health status, life-style habits, ADL, depression, cognitive function, social networks, social support, and social roles, participation in various SGs among both genders was inversely associated with poor IADL, showing a significant dose-response relationship between an increasing number of SGs and a lower proportion of those with poor IADL (P for trend participation and poor IADL was observed for all types of SGs among females, whereas the association was limited to sports groups and senior citizens' clubs among males. Our results show that participation in a variety of SGs is associated with independent IADL among the community-dwelling elderly, regardless of gender. However, the beneficial effects of frequent participation on IADL may be stronger for females than for males.

  12. Can peer education improve beliefs, knowledge, motivation and intention to engage in falls prevention amongst community-dwelling older adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, Linda A M; Berlach, Richard G; Hill, Keith D; Hill, Anne-Marie

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of delivering a contemporary peer-led falls prevention education presentation on community-dwelling older adults' beliefs, knowledge, motivation and intention to engage in falls prevention strategies. A two-group quasi-experimental pre-test-post-test study using a convenience sample was conducted. A new falls prevention training package for peer educators was developed, drawing on contemporary adult learning and behaviour change principles. A 1-h presentation was delivered to community-dwelling older adults by peer educators trained with the new package (intervention group). Control group participants received an existing, 1-h falls prevention presentation by trained peer educators who had not received the adult learning and behaviour change training. Participants in both groups completed a purpose-developed questionnaire at pre-presentation, immediately post-presentation and at one-month follow-up. Participants' levels of beliefs, knowledge, motivation and intention were compared across these three points of time. Generalised estimating equations models examined associations in the quantitative data, while deductive content analysis was used for qualitative data. Participants (control n  = 99; intervention n  = 133) in both groups showed significantly increased levels of beliefs and knowledge about falls prevention, and intention to engage in falls prevention strategies over time compared to baseline. The intervention group was significantly more likely to report a clear action plan to undertake falls prevention strategies compared to the control group. Peer-led falls prevention education is an effective approach for raising older adults' beliefs, knowledge and intention to engage in falls prevention strategies.

  13. Reactive stepping behaviour in response to forward loss of balance predicts future falls in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Christopher P; Cronin, Neil J; Nicholson, Deanne; Lichtwark, Glen A; Mills, Peter M; Kerr, Graham; Cresswell, Andrew G; Barrett, Rod S

    2015-01-01

    a fall occurs when an individual experiences a loss of balance from which they are unable to recover. Assessment of balance recovery ability in older adults may therefore help to identify individuals at risk of falls. The purpose of this 12-month prospective study was to assess whether the ability to recover from a forward loss of balance with a single step across a range of lean magnitudes was predictive of falls. two hundred and one community-dwelling older adults, aged 65-90 years, underwent baseline testing of sensori-motor function and balance recovery ability followed by 12-month prospective falls evaluation. Balance recovery ability was defined by whether participants required either single or multiple steps to recover from forward loss of balance from three lean magnitudes, as well as the maximum lean magnitude participants could recover from with a single step. forty-four (22%) participants experienced one or more falls during the follow-up period. Maximal recoverable lean magnitude and use of multiple steps to recover at the 15% body weight (BW) and 25%BW lean magnitudes significantly predicted a future fall (odds ratios 1.08-1.26). The Physiological Profile Assessment, an established tool that assesses variety of sensori-motor aspects of falls risk, was also predictive of falls (Odds ratios 1.22 and 1.27, respectively), whereas age, sex, postural sway and timed up and go were not predictive. reactive stepping behaviour in response to forward loss of balance and physiological profile assessment are independent predictors of a future fall in community-dwelling older adults. Exercise interventions designed to improve reactive stepping behaviour may protect against future falls. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The effectiveness of a combined exercise intervention on physical fitness factors related to falls in community-dwelling older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang J

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Jie Zhuang,1,* Liang Huang,1,2,* Yanqiang Wu,3 Yanxin Zhang2 1School of Kinesiology, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Sport and Exercise Science, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 3Shanghai Municipal Center for Students' Physical Fitness and Health Surveillance, Shanghai, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of an innovative exercise program on muscle strength, balance, and gait kinematics in elderly community-dwellers. The exercise program included strength and balance training and the 8-form Tai Chi Chuan. The measurements were carried out at baseline and 12 weeks, and consisted of four physical performance tests, joint isokinetic strength tests, and three-dimensional gait analysis. Fifty-six community-dwelling older adults aged 60–80 years old were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. After 12 weeks, the intervention group showed a 17.6% improvement in the timed up and go test, accompanied by a 54.7% increase in the 30-second chair stand test score. Significant increases in the score of star excursion balance tests, and the strength of the extensor and flexor muscles at knee and ankle joints were also observed. In addition, the intervention group walked at a faster speed with a longer step length, shorter support phase, and a greater sagittal plane range of motion at the hip and ankle joints. No statistical improvements were seen in the control group. This study provided an effective, evidence-based falls prevention program that can be implemented in community settings to improve physical fitness and reduce fall risks among community-dwelling older adults. The star excursion balance test could be a sensitive measure of physical performance for fall risk assessment in older people. Keywords: Tai Chi Chuan, resistance training, balance, fall prevention, fall

  15. Determinants of protein-energy malnutrition in community-dwelling older adults: a systematic review of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pols-Vijlbrief, Rachel; Wijnhoven, Hanneke A H; Schaap, Laura A; Terwee, Caroline B; Visser, Marjolein

    2014-11-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition is associated with numerous poor health outcomes, including high health care costs, mortality rates and poor physical functioning in older adults. This systematic literature review aims to identify and provide an evidence based overview of potential determinants of protein-energy malnutrition in community-dwelling older adults. A systematic search was conducted in PUBMED, EMBASE, CINAHL and COCHRANE from the earliest possible date through January 2013. Observational studies that examined determinants of protein-energy malnutrition were selected and a best evidence synthesis was performed to summarize the results. In total 28 studies were included in this review from which 122 unique potential determinants were derived. Thirty-seven determinants were examined in sufficient number of studies and were included in a best evidence synthesis. The best evidence score comprised design (cross-sectional, longitudinal) and quality of the study (high, moderate) to grade the evidence level. Strong evidence for an association with protein-energy malnutrition was found for poor appetite, and moderate evidence for edentulousness, having no diabetes, hospitalization and poor self-reported health. Strong evidence for no association was found for anxiety, chewing difficulty, few friends, living alone, feeling lonely, death of spouse, high number of diseases, heart failure and coronary failure, stroke (CVA) and the use of anti-inflammatory medications. This review shows that protein-energy malnutrition is a multifactorial problem and that different domains likely play a role in the pathway of developing protein-energy malnutrition. These results provide important knowledge for the development of targeted, multifactorial interventions that aim to prevent the development of protein-energy malnutrition in community-dwelling older adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Efeito de um programa de resistência muscular na capacidade funcional e na força muscular dos extensores do joelho em idosas pré-frágeis da comunidade: ensaio clínico aleatorizado do tipo crossover Impact of resistance exercise program on functional capacity and muscular strength of knee extensor in pre-frail community-dwelling older women: a randomized crossover trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lygia P. Lustosa

    2011-08-01

    vulnerability. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to verify the effect of a muscle-strengthening program with load in pre-frail elder women with regards to the functional capacity, knee extensor muscle strength and their correlation. METHODS: Thrity-two pre-frail community-dwelling women participated in this study. Potential participants with cognitive impairment (MEEM, lower extremities orthopedic surgery, fractures, inability to walk unaided, neurological diseases, acute inflammatory disease, tumor growth, regular physical activity and current use of immunomodulators were excluded. All partcipants were evaluated by a blinded assessor using: Timed up and go (TUG, 10-Meter Walk Test (10MWT and knee extensor muscle strength (Byodex System 3 Pro® isokinetic dynamometer at angular speeds of 60 and 180(0/s. The intervention consisted of strengthening exercises of the lower extremities at 70% of 1RM, three times/ week for ten weeks. The statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA and Spearman tests RESULTS: After the intervention, it was observed statistical significance on the work at 180(0/s (F=12.71, p=0.02, on the power at 180(0/s (F=15.40, p=0.02 and on the functional capacity (TUG, F=9.54, p=0.01; TC10, F=3.80, p=0.01. There was a good negative and statistically significant correlation between the TUG and work at 60(0/s, such as the TUG and work at 180(0/s (r=-0.65, p=0.01; r=-0.72, p=0.01. CONCLUSION: The intervention improved the muscular power and the functional capacity. The increase of the power correlated with function, which is an important variable of the quality of life in the pre-frail elders. Article registered in the ISRCT register under number ISRCTN62824599.

  17. Modifiable risk factors for pneumonia requiring hospitalization of community-dwelling older adults: the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; De Rekeneire, Nathalie; Allore, Heather; Chen, Shu; O'Leary, John R; Bauer, Douglas C; Harris, Tamara B; Newman, Anne B; Yende, Sachin; Weyant, Robert J; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Quagliarello, Vincent

    2013-07-01

    To identify novel modifiable risk factors, focusing on oral hygiene, for pneumonia requiring hospitalization of community-dwelling older adults. Prospective observational cohort study. Memphis, Tennessee, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Of 3,075 well-functioning community-dwelling adults aged 70 to 79 enrolled in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study from 1997 to 1998, 1,441 had complete data in the data set of all variables used, a dental examination within 6 months of baseline, and were eligible for this study. The primary outcome was pneumonia requiring hospitalization through 2008. Of 1,441 participants, 193 were hospitalized for pneumonia. In a multivariable model, male sex (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.51-2.83), white race (HR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.03-2.01), history of pneumonia (HR = 3.09, 95% CI = 1.86-5.14), pack-years of smoking (HR = 1.006, 95% CI = 1.001-1.011), and percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 minute (moderate vs mild lung disease or normal lung function, HR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.28-2.48; severe lung disease vs mild lung disease or normal lung function, HR = 2.90, 95% CI = 1.51-5.57) were nonmodifiable risk factors for pneumonia. Incident mobility limitation (HR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.32-2.38) and higher mean oral plaque score (HR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.02-1.64) were modifiable risk factors for pneumonia. Average attributable fractions revealed that 11.5% of cases of pneumonia were attributed to incident mobility limitation and 10.3% to a mean oral plaque score of 1 or greater. Incident mobility limitation and higher mean oral plaque score were two modifiable risk factors that 22% of pneumonia requiring hospitalization could be attributed to. These data suggest innovative opportunities for pneumonia prevention among community-dwelling older adults. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. A longitudinal investigation of fear of falling, fear of pain, and activity avoidance in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Martin, Ronald R; Sharpe, Donald; Lints, Amanda C; McCreary, Donald R; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2007-12-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the role of fear of falling, fear of pain, and associated activity avoidance in the prediction of pain and falls. A 6-month longitudinal study of older community-dwelling adults. The authors found that fear of falling is a better predictor of falls than is activity avoidance. Moreover, fear of pain did not predict future pain-related avoidance or future pain in the sample of seniors. The findings confirm the ability of fear of falling to predict falls but challenge preexisting models developed to account for the relationship between falls and fear. The findings also suggest limits on the generalizability of fear-avoidance models of pain. The authors conclude by suggesting mechanisms that could account for the relationship of fears with falls and pain. Unlike previous conceptualizations, these mechanisms do not rely on activity avoidance as an explanation.

  19. Longitudinal association between habitual walking and fall occurrences among community-dwelling older adults: analyzing the different risks of falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Yoshiro; Seino, Satoshi; Yabushita, Noriko; Osuka, Yosuke; Jung, Songee; Nemoto, Miyuki; Figueroa, Rafael; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal study was to examine the association between habitual walking and multiple or injurious falls (falls) among community-dwelling older adults, by considering the relative risk of falling. A cohort of Japanese community-dwelling older adults (n=535) aged 60-91 years (73.1±6.6 year, 157 men and 378 women) who underwent community-based health check-ups from 2008 to 2012 were followed until 2013. Incidence rate of falls between walkers and non-walkers was compared separately by the number of risk factors (Groups R0, R1, R2, R3 and R4+). The Cox proportional hazard model was used to assess the association between habitual walking and falls separately by lower- (Rrisk groups. In Groups R0 and R1, the incidence of falls was lower in walkers than non-walkers; however, in Groups R2, R3, and R4+, the incidence of falls was higher in walkers. The Cox proportional hazard model showed that habitual walking was not significantly associated with falls (hazard ratio (HR): 0.88, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.48-1.62) among the lower risk group but that it was significantly associated with increased falls (HR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.04-3.43) among the higher risk group. The significant interaction between habitual walking and higher risk of falling was found (Prisk factors for falling, caution is needed when recommending walking because walking can actually increase their risk of experiencing multiple or injurious falls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Importance of social relationships in the association between sleep duration and cognitive function: data from community-dwelling older Singaporeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Grand H-L; Chan, Angelique; Lo, June C

    2017-06-15

    Aging is accompanied by cognitive decline that is escalated in older adults reporting extreme sleep duration. Social relationships can influence health outcomes and thus may qualify the association between sleep duration and cognitive function. The present study examines the moderating effects of marital status, household size, and social network with friends and relatives on the sleep-cognition association among older adults. Data (N = 4,169) came from the Social Isolation, Health, and Lifestyles Survey, a nationally representative survey of community-dwelling older Singaporeans (≥ 60 years). Sleep duration and social relationships were self-reported. Cognitive function was assessed with the Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire. Regression analysis revealed that the inverted U-shaped association between sleep duration and cognitive function was less profound among older adults who were married (vs. unmarried) and those who had stronger (vs. weaker) social networks. In contrast, it was more prominent among individuals who had more (vs. fewer) household members. Being married and having stronger social networks may buffer against the negative cognitive impact of extreme sleep duration. But larger household size might imply more stress for older persons, and therefore strengthen the sleep duration-cognitive function association. We discuss the potential biological underpinnings and the policy implications of the findings. Although our findings are based on a large sample, replication studies using objective measures of sleep duration and other cognitive measures are needed.

  1. The Prevalence and Correlates of Gambling Participation among Community-Dwelling Chinese Older Adults in the U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijia Chen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the prevalence and correlates of gambling participation and problems among community-dwelling Chinese older adults in the U.S. Based on a community-based participatory research approach, the study enrolled 3,159 Chinese older adults aged 60 years and above in the greater Chicago area. Among the participants, 58.9% were women and the average age was 72.8 years. Overall, 467 older adults had engaged in gambling in the past twelve months and 65 older adults had experienced any risk of problem gambling. Visiting a casino was the most commonly reported type of gambling, whereas betting on Mahjong had the highest frequency. Being male, lower educational levels, higher income levels, having more children, living in the U.S. for a longer period of time, living in the community for a longer period of time, better health status, lower quality of life, and improved health over the past year were significantly correlated with any gambling in the past year. Younger age, being male, and living with more people were significantly correlated with experiencing any risk of problem gambling in the past year. Future studies should be conducted to better examine the health effects of gambling and problem gambling among Chinese older adults.

  2. Effects of interactive pictorial education on community dwelling older adult's self efficacy and knowledge for safe medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myonghwa

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of interactive pictorial education on community dwelling older Korean adults' self-efficacy and knowledge for safe medication. A quasi-experimental, three-group pre- and post-intervention design was used in this study. The interactive pictorial education was designed to suit the learning patterns and psychomotor skills of older adults. The education content, dealing with safe medication, was delivered over three sessions. A total of 136 older adults from local senior centers were assigned to one of the three groups: a) interactive pictorial education plus information booklet (experimental); b) education only with information booklet (conventional); or c) no intervention (control). Participants receiving interactive pictorial education had significantly higher self-efficacy (F=24.32, pcontrol group at post intervention. Post-hoc analyses indicated that both the interactive pictorial and the information booklet groups had significantly higher self-efficacy and knowledge scores than the control group at the post-test point (pinteractive pictorial group had higher self-efficacy and knowledge scores than the information booklet group at the post-test point (pinteractive pictorial education is an innovative approach that provides a means for older adults to learn appropriate medication use to improve their own health. It empowers older adults with different literacy levels to enhance their self-efficacy and knowledge for the safe use of medication.

  3. Morphological and qualitative characteristics of the quadriceps muscle of community-dwelling older adults based on ultrasound imaging: classification using latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Hisashi; Kera, Takeshi; Hirayama, Ryo; Hirano, Hirohiko; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Ihara, Kazushige; Kojima, Motonaga; Obuchi, Shuichi

    2018-04-01

    Muscle thickness and echo intensity measured using ultrasound imaging represent both increased muscle volume and connective tissue accumulation. In combination, these ultrasound measurements can be utilized for assessing sarcopenia in community-dwelling older adults. This study aimed to determine whether morphological and qualitative characteristics classified by quadriceps muscle thickness and echo intensity measured using ultrasound are associated with muscle strength, physical function, and sarcopenia in community-dwelling older adults. Quadriceps muscle thickness and echo intensity were measured using ultrasound imaging in 1239 community-dwelling older adults. Latent class analyses were conducted to classify participants based on similarity in the subcutaneous fat thickness (FT), quadriceps muscle thickness (MT), subcutaneous fat echo intensity (FEI), and muscle echo intensity (MEI), which were assessed using ultrasound imaging. Morphological and qualitative characteristics were classified into four types as follows: (A) normal, (B) sarcopenic obesity, (C) obesity, and (D) sarcopenia type. Knee extension strength was significantly greater in A than in B and D. FT and percent body fat were greater in C than in the other types. The correlation between the ultrasound measures and knee extension strength differed among the classification types. The classification types were significantly associated with sarcopenia prevalence. Classification of the morphological and qualitative characteristics obtained from ultrasound imaging may be useful for assessing sarcopenia in community-dwelling older adults.

  4. Ankle brachial index values, leg symptoms, and functional performance among community-dwelling older men and women in the lifestyle interventions and independence for elders study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The prevalence and significance of low normal and abnormal ankle brachial index (ABI) values in a community dwelling population of sedentary, older individuals is unknown. We describe the prevalence of categories of definite peripheral artery disease (PAD), borderline ABI, low-normal ABI and no PAD...

  5. Comprehensive geriatric assessment, multifactorial interventions and nurse-led care coordination to prevent functional decline in community-dwelling older persons: protocol of a cluster randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suijker, Jacqueline J.; Buurman, Bianca M.; ter Riet, Gerben; van Rijn, Marjon; de Haan, Rob J.; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Moll van Charante, Eric P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Functional decline in community-dwelling older persons is associated with the loss of independence, the need for hospital and nursing-home care and premature death. The effectiveness of multifactorial interventions in preventing functional decline remains controversial. The aim of this

  6. Instructions influence response to the Chinese version of the Movement-Specific Reinvestment Scale in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thomson Wl; Abernethy, Bruce; Masters, Rich Sw

    2016-12-01

    To examine whether differences emerged when the Chinese version of the Movement-Specific Reinvestment Scale (MSRS-C) was administered to community-dwelling older adults with instructions to respond in the context of "general" movements, walking, using chopsticks or dressing. Furthermore, the difference between the six-point Likert scale and four-point Likert scale response formats of the MSRS-C was investigated. The study was implemented in the community of Hong Kong with 52 older adults (mean age 77.4 years). Telephone interviews were carried out on two occasions for each participant. Participants provided a verbal response to each of 10 questions from the MSRS-C with different response formats (i.e., six-point or four-point Likert Scales) and different instructions in the response context (i.e. general, walking, using chopsticks, dressing). The sequence of response format and context was randomized for each participant. Older fallers scored significantly higher on the MSRS-C (general) with six-point or four-point response formats than non-fallers. The MSRS-C (general) and MSRS-C (walking) were not statistically different, and showed good discriminative power for previous older fall status (older fallers or older non-fallers). However, MSRS-C (chopsticks) and MSRS-C (dressing) failed to differentiate older fallers from older non-fallers. Both the MSRS-C (general) and MSRS-C (walking) with a six-point or a four-point response format showed good discrimination of older fallers from non-fallers. Older adults might respond to the MSRS-C with respect to the most challenging movements (e.g. fall-related movements) in their daily living. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 1305-1311. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  7. Low patient activation levels in frail older adults: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbeek, Anouk; Rietjens, Judith A C; Jabbarian, Lea J; Severijnen, Johan; Swart, Siebe J; van der Heide, Agnes; Korfage, Ida J

    2018-01-05

    Frail older adults are increasingly expected to self-manage their health and healthcare. We assessed the extent to which this group is able to take up this responsibility by measuring their level of activation as patients (i.e. their knowledge, skills and confidence to self-manage their health and healthcare). Further, we studied which characteristics of older adults were associated with patient activation. In this cross-sectional study 200 frail, competent adults (median age 87 years) participated. Participants were community-dwelling adults who received home care and residents of care homes. Data were collected via personal interviews in participants' homes. The main outcome measure was patient activation assessed by the short version of the Patient Activation Measure (PAM-13; range: 0-100). The PAM distinguishes four levels of increasing activation with level 1 indicating poor patient activation and level 4 adequate patient activation. Other studied variables were: multimorbidity, type of residency, frailty (Tilburg Frailty Index), mental competence (Mini Mental State Examination), health-related quality of life (SF-12), satisfaction with healthcare (subscale Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire) and personal characteristics (age, gender, marital status, educational level). Regression analyses were performed to investigate which variables were associated with patient activation. Participants had a median PAM score of 51. Thirty-nine percent had level 1 activation, 31% level 2, 26% level 3 and 5% level 4. Fifty-nine percent of community dwelling adults had level 1 or 2 activation versus 81% of care home residents (p = 0.007). Mental competence (Effect: 0.52, CI: 0.03-1.01, p = 0.04) and health-related quality of life (Effect: 0.15, CI: 0.01-0.30, p = 0.04 for physical health; Effect: 0.20, CI: 0.07-0.34, p = 0.003 for mental health) were positively associated with patient activation. Frailty (Effect: -1.06, CI: -1.75 - -0.36, p = 0.003) was

  8. Home- and Community-Based Occupational Therapy Improves Functioning in Frail Older People: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Coninck, Leen; Bekkering, Geertruida E; Bouckaert, Leen; Declercq, Anja; Graff, Maud J L; Aertgeerts, Bert

    2017-08-01

    The objective is to assess the effectiveness of occupational therapy to improve performance in daily living activities in community-dwelling physically frail older people. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis. We included randomized controlled trials reporting on occupational therapy as intervention, or as part of a multidisciplinary approach. This systematic review was carried out in accordance with the Cochrane methods of systematic reviews of interventions. Meta-analyses were performed to pool results across studies using the standardized mean difference. The primary outcome measures were mobility, functioning in daily living activities, and social participation. Secondary outcome measures were fear of falling, cognition, disability, and number of falling persons. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Overall, the studies were of reasonable quality with low risk of bias. There was a significant increase in all primary outcomes. The pooled result for functioning in daily living activities was a standardized mean difference of -0.30 (95% CI -0.50 to -0.11; P = .002), for social participation -0.44 (95% CI -0.69, -0.19; P = .0007) and for mobility -0.45 (95% CI -0.78 to -0.12; P = .007). All secondary outcomes showed positive trends, with fear of falling being significant. No adverse effects of occupational therapy were found. There is strong evidence that occupational therapy improves functioning in community-dwelling physically frail older people. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  9. Associated factors for falls among the community-dwelling older people assessed by annual geriatric health examinations.

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    Chung-Hao Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Falls are very common among the older people. Nearly one-third older people living in a community fall each year. However, few studies have examined factors associated with falls in a community-dwelling population of older Taiwanese adults. OBJECTIVES: To identify the associated factors for falls during the previous 12 months among the community-dwelling Taiwanese older people receiving annual geriatric health examinations. PARTICIPANTS: People aged sixty-five years or older, living in the community, assessed by annual geriatric health examinations METHODS: 1377 community-dwellers aged ≥65 years who received annual geriatric health examinations at one hospital in northern Taiwan between March and November of 2008. They were asked about their history of falls during the year prior to their most recent health examination. RESULTS: The average age of the 1377 participants was 74.9±6.8 years, 48.9% of which were women. Three-hundred and thirteen of the participants (22.7% had at least one fall during the previous year. Multivariate analysis showed that odds ratio for the risk of falling was 1.94 (95% CI 1.36-2.76 when the female gender group is compared with the male gender group. The adjusted odds ratios of age and waist circumference were 1.03 (95% CI 1.00-1.06 and 1.03 (95% CI 1.01-1.05 respectively. The adjusted odds ratios of visual acuity, Karnofsky scale, and serum albumin level were 0.34 (95% CI 0.15-0.76, 0.94 (95% CI 0.89-0.98, and 0.37 (95% CI 0.18-0.76 respectively. Larger waist circumference, older age, female gender, poorer visual acuity, lower score on the Karnofsky Performance Scale, and lower serum albumin level were the independent associated factors for falls. CONCLUSION: In addition to other associated factors, waist circumference should be included as a novel risk factor for falls.

  10. [Factors Influencing Physical Activity among Community-dwelling Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Path Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sun Joo; Park, Hyunju; Kim, Hyunjung; Chang, Sun Ju

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify factors influencing physical activity among community-dwelling older adults with type 2 diabetes. The study design was based on the Theory of Triadic Influence. A total of 242 older adults with type 2 diabetes participated in this study. Six variables related to physical activity in older adults, including self-efficacy, social normative belief, attitudes, intention, experience, and level of physical activity, were measured using reliable instruments. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation analyses, and a path analysis. The mean physical activity score was 104.2, range from zero to 381.21. The path analysis showed that self-efficacy had the greatest total effect on physical activity. Also, experience had direct and total effects on physical activity as well as mediated the paths of social normative beliefs to attitudes and intention to physical activity. These factors accounted for 10% of the total variance, and the fit indices of the model satisfied the criteria of fitness. The findings of the study reveal the important role of self-efficacy and past experience in physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes.

  11. Vitamin D and actigraphic sleep outcomes in older community-dwelling men: the MrOS sleep study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Jennifer; Stone, Katie L; Wei, Esther K; Harrison, Stephanie L; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Lane, Nancy E; Paudel, Misti; Redline, Susan; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Orwoll, Eric; Schernhammer, Eva

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining adequate serum levels of vitamin D may be important for sleep duration and quality; however, these associations are not well understood. We examined whether levels of serum 25(OH)D are associated with objective measures of sleep in older men. Cross-sectional study within a large cohort of community-dwelling older men, the MrOS study. Among 3,048 men age 68 years or older, we measured total serum vitamin D. Objective estimates of nightly total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and wake time after sleep onset (WASO) were obtained using wrist actigraphy worn for an average of 5 consecutive 24-h periods. 16.4% of this study population had low levels of vitamin D (sleep duration, (odds ratio [OR] for the highest (≥ 40.06 ng/mL) versus lowest (sleep efficiency of less than 70% (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 0.97-2.18; Ptrend = 0.004), after controlling for age, clinic, season, comorbidities, body mass index, and physical and cognitive function. Lower vitamin D levels were also associated with increased WASO in age-adjusted, but not multivariable adjusted models. Among older men, low levels of total serum 25(OH)D are associated with poorer sleep including short sleep duration and lower sleep efficiency. These findings, if confirmed by others, suggest a potential role for vitamin D in maintaining healthy sleep. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  12. Association between sarcopenia with lifestyle and family function among community-dwelling Chinese aged 60 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Shan; Wang, Hui; Cao, Li; Liu, Ping; Zhou, Jianghua; Yang, Ying; Dong, Birong

    2017-08-18

    Sarcopenia is defined as the age-related decline in skeletal muscle mass and function. The risk factors and causes of sarcopenia must be identified to develop prevention and treatment strategies for this syndrome. Our aim was to examine the association between sarcopenia with lifestyle and family function among community-dwelling Chinese people aged 60 years and older. We conducted this study to evaluate sarcopenia among 834 community-dwelling Chinese individuals aged ≥60 years using the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia (AWGS) criteria. The sociodemographic characteristics, food consumption patterns, habits of smoking, and alcohol consumption of the participants were collected using a general questionnaire, whereas physical activity was assessed using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ; long-form version). Family function was assessed using the Family APGAR scale. In addition, the association of sarcopenia with lifestyle and family function was examined using univariate and multivariate analyses. The total prevalence rate of sarcopenia was 10.6%. Female participants with sarcopenia had a lower frequency per week of nut consumption than those without sarcopenia (p sarcopenia versus those without sarcopenia were not significant. Among the participants, the mean Family APGAR score was 8 (standard deviation [SD] = 0.92). For both sexes, participants with sarcopenia had lower family function scores than those without sarcopenia. In the multivariate model, after adjustment for all covariates, frequency per week of nut consumption (adjusted OR 0.724, 95% CI 0.532-0.985, P sarcopenia. The relationship between other lifestyle habits and sarcopenia was not significant. There was significant association between sarcopenia with intake of nuts and family function. Further studies should evaluate if adequate intake of nuts and a well-functioning family may be effective in lowering the risk of sarcopenia.

  13. Evaluation of dementia-prevention classes for community-dwelling older adults with mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yasuyo; Urakami, Katsuya

    2012-03-01

    The number of elderly people with dementia in Japan is likely to increase as the population ages. In some areas in Tottori Prefecture, dementia-prevention classes have been conducted for several years. In the present study, we evaluated dementia-prevention classes in nine districts of Tottori Prefecture in terms of cognitive function, assessment by the leader and subjective evaluation by participants. The study's subjects included 112 community-dwelling elderly residents who were selected after a two-step screening. Data were collected according to the following four factors: (i) evaluation of cognitive function at the beginning and end of classes; (ii) the content of the classes; (iii) observations regarding the state of subjects; and (iv) participants' subjective evaluation obtained via a questionnaire distributed at the final class. In terms of cognitive function among all subjects, scores significantly improved after the dementia-prevention classes. However, there were no significant cognitive improvements in the districts where programmes were biased towards a single category (e.g. systemic exercise, creative activities). Based on class leaders' assessments, subjects showed improved appearance and facial expression in later classes. Participants became more involved in the programmes, and their interests in others increased. In terms of their daily lives, subjects became more involved with others and more active after participating in the classes. Dementia-prevention classes improved not only cognitive function but also other aspects of daily life, as well. We thought it was important to evaluate both objective and subjective factors related to the classes. © 2012 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2012 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  14. Comparison of two balance training programs on balance in community dwelling older adults

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    Shefali Walia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Impaired balance has been associated with an increased risk for falls and a resulting increase in the mortality rate of elder people. Thus, balance-training interventions have an important place in fall prevention. This study was designed with the purpose of identifying the appropriate balance-training program for community dwelling elderly adults with an active lifestyle. A sample of 70 elderly adults were randomly allocated into two groups: group 1 (n=35 received general balance and mobility exercise; group 2 (n=35 received specific balance strategy training. The intervention consisted of 5 sessions/week for 4 weeks. The outcome measures were Timed up and go test (TUGT and Berg balance scale (BBS. An inter-group (2-way mixed model analysis of co-variance and intra-group (repeated measures analysis was done to find the change in balance scores. After the intervention, the TUGT scores in group 1 were, mean=10.38 s, standard deviation (SD=1.59 s and in group 2 were, mean=9.27 s, SD=1.13 s. Post training, BBS scores for group 1 were, mean=54.69, SD=1.13, and for group 2 were, mean=55.57, SD =0.56. There was a significant group × time effect for TUGT and BBS score. All the subjects showed significant changes in balance scores after balance training interventions. The subjects who participated in the specific balance-strategy training significantly improved their functional mobility, as shown on the TUGT, compared to the general training group.

  15. Neighborhood environmental factors are related to health-enhancing physical activity and walking among community dwelling older adults in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyeyemi, Adewale L; Kolo, Sanda M; Oyeyemi, Adetoyeje Y; Omotara, Babatunji A

    2018-02-23

    Health promotion strategies grounded by evidence-based determinants of physical activity constitute an important focus of physiotherapy practice in the twenty-first century. This study investigated associations between neighborhood environmental factors and health-related moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and walking for transportation and recreation among community dwelling Nigerian older adults. A representative sample of 353 Nigerian older adults (age = 68.9 ± 9.13 years) in a cross-sectional survey provided self-reported min/week of MVPA and walking for transportation and recreation and perceived neighborhood environmental factors. In multilevel linear regression analyses, proximity of destinations (β = 3.291; CI = 0.392, 6.191), access to services and places (β = 4.417; CI = 0.995, 7.838), esthetics (β = 3.603; CI = 0.617, 6.590), traffic safety (β = 5.685; CI = 3.334, 8.036), and safety from crime (β = 1.717; CI = 0.466, 2.968) were related to more MVPA. Also, proximity of destinations (β = 1.656; CI = 0.022, 3.291) and safety from crime (β = 2.205; CI = 0.018, 4.579) were related to more transport walking. Access to services and places (β = 2.086; CI = 0.713, 3.459) and walking infrastructure and safety (β = 1.741; CI = 0.199, 3.282) were related to more recreational walking. Six of eight supportive environmental factors were associated with more physical activity among community dwelling older Nigerian adults. Policy makers including physiotherapists in this role can use the evidence to inform community-based physical activity and health promotion programs for older adults in Nigeria.

  16. Social support differentially moderates the impact of neuroticism and extraversion on mental wellbeing among community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, J E; Lawlor, B A

    2012-10-01

    Personality affects psychological wellbeing, and social support networks may mediate this effect. This may be particularly pertinent in later life, when social structures change significantly, and can lead to a decline in psychological wellbeing. To examine, in an older population, whether the relationships between neuroticism and extraversion and mental wellbeing are moderated by available social support networks. We gathered information from 536 community-dwelling older adults, regarding personality, social support networks, depressive symptomatology, anxiety and perceived stress, as well as controlling for age and gender. Neuroticism and extraversion interacted with social support networks to determine psychological wellbeing (depression, stress and anxiety). High scores on the social support networks measure appear to be protective against the deleterious effects of high scores on the neuroticism scale on psychological wellbeing. Meanwhile, individuals high in extraversion appear to require large social support networks in order to maintain psychological wellbeing. Large familial and friendship social support networks are associated with good psychological wellbeing. To optimise psychological wellbeing in older adults, improving social support networks may be differentially effective for different personality types.

  17. The effect of therapeutic horseback riding on balance in community-dwelling older adults: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homnick, Tamara D; Henning, Kim M; Swain, Charlene V; Homnick, Douglas N

    2015-02-01

    Equine assisted activities (hippotherapy and therapeutic riding) improve balance in patients with disabilities such as cerebral palsy, but have not been systematically studied in older adults, at risk of falls due to balance deficits. We conducted a 10-week, single blind, controlled trial of the effect of a therapeutic horseback riding course on measures of balance in community-dwelling adults 65 years and older. Nine riders and six controls completed the trial. Controls were age matched to riders and all participants were recruited from the local community. Both groups showed improvements in balance during the trial, but did not reach statistical significance. Sample size was small, participants had relatively high initial balance scores, and controls tended to increase their physical activities, likely influencing outcomes. No adverse events occurred and the supervised therapeutic riding program appeared to be a safe and effective form of exercise to improve balance in older adults. A power analysis was performed to estimate numbers of participants needed for a larger study. © The Author(s) 2012.

  18. Physiotherapy to improve physical activity in community-dwelling older adults with mobility problems (Coach2Move): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Nienke M; Staal, J Bart; Teerenstra, Steven; Adang, Eddy M M; Rikkert, Marcel G M Olde; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2013-12-17

    Older adults can benefit from physical activity in numerous ways. Physical activity is considered to be one of the few ways to influence the level of frailty. Standardized exercise programs do not necessarily lead to more physical activity in daily life, however, and a more personalized approach seems appropriate. The main objective of this study is to investigate whether a focused, problem-oriented coaching intervention ('Coach2Move') delivered by a physiotherapist specializing in geriatrics is more effective for improving physical activity, mobility and health status in community-dwelling older adults than usual physiotherapy care. In addition, cost-effectiveness will be determined. The design of this study is a single-blind randomized controlled trial in thirteen physiotherapy practices. Randomization will take place at the individual patient level. The study population consists of older adults, ≥70 years of age, with decreased physical functioning and mobility and/or a physically inactive lifestyle. The intervention group will receive geriatric physiotherapy according to the Coach2Move strategy. The control group will receive the usual physiotherapy care. Measurements will be performed by research assistants not aware of group assignment. The results will be evaluated on the amount of physical activity (LASA Physical Activity Questionnaire), mobility (modified 'get up and go' test, walking speed and six-minute walking test), quality of life (SF-36), degree of frailty (Evaluative Frailty Index for Physical Activity), fatigue (NRS-fatigue), perceived effect (Global Perceived Effect and Patient Specific Complaints questionnaire) and health care costs. Most studies on the effect of exercise or physical activity consist of standardized programs. In this study, a personalized approach is evaluated within a group of frail older adults, many of whom suffer from multiple and complex diseases and problems. A complicating factor in evaluating a new approach is that it

  19. Can resources moderate the impact of levels of frailty on adverse outcomes among (pre-) frail older people? A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Op Het Veld, Linda P M; Ament, Bart H L; van Rossum, Erik; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; de Vet, Henrica C W; Hajema, KlaasJan; Beurskens, Anna J H M

    2017-08-17

    Higher levels of frailty result in higher risks of adverse frailty outcomes such as hospitalisation and mortality. There are, however, indications that more factors than solely frailty play a role in the development of these outcomes. The presence of resources, e.g. sufficient income and good self-management abilities, might slow down the pathway from level of frailty to adverse outcomes (e.g. mortality). In the present paper we studied whether resources (i.e. educational level, income, availability of informal care, living situation, sense of mastery and self-management abilities) moderate the impact of the level of frailty on the adverse outcomes mortality, hospitalisation and the development of disability over a two-year period. Longitudinal data on a sample of 2420 community-dwelling pre-frail and frail older people were collected. Participants filled out a questionnaire every six months, including measures of frailty, resources and outcomes. To study the moderating effects of the selected resources their interaction effects with levels of frailty on outcomes were studied by means of multiple logistics and linear regression models. Frail older participants had increased odds of mortality and hospitalisation, and had more deteriorating disability scores compared to their pre-frail counterparts. No moderating effects of the studied resources were found for the outcomes mortality and hospitalisation. Only for the outcome disability statistically significant moderating effects were present for the resources income and living situation, yet these effects were in the opposite direction to what we expected. Overall, the studied resources showed hardly any statistically significant moderating effects and the directions of the trends were inconsistent. Frail participants were more at risk of mortality, hospitalisation, and an increase in disability. However, we were unable to demonstrate a clear moderating effect of the studied resources on the adverse outcomes

  20. Prevalence and correlates of dizziness in community-dwelling older people: a cross sectional population based study

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    de Moraes Suzana Albuquerque

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dizziness is a common complaint among older adults and has been linked to a wide range of health conditions, psychological and social characteristics in this population. However a profile of dizziness is still uncertain which hampers clinical decision-making. We therefore sought to explore the relationship between dizziness and a comprehensive range of demographic data, diseases, health and geriatric conditions, and geriatric syndromes in a representative sample of community-dwelling older people. Methods This is a cross-sectional, population-based study derived from FIBRA (Network for the Study of Frailty in Brazilian Elderly Adults, with 391 elderly adults, both men and women, aged 65 years and older. Elderly participants living at home in an urban area were enrolled through a process of random cluster sampling of census regions. The outcome variable was the self-report of dizziness in the last year. Several feelings of dizziness were investigated including vertigo, spinning, light or heavy headedness, floating, fuzziness, giddiness and instability. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to estimate the adjusted odds ratios and build the probability model for dizziness. Results The complaint of dizziness was reported by 45% of elderly adults, from which 71.6% were women (p=0.004. The multivariate regression analysis revealed that dizziness is associated with depressive symptoms (OR = 2.08; 95% CI 1.29–3.35, perceived fatigue (OR = 1.93; 95% CI 1.21-3.10, recurring falls (OR = 2.01; 95% CI 1.11-3.62 and excessive drowsiness (OR = 1.91; 95% CI 1.11–3.29. The discrimination of the final model was AUC = 0.673 (95% CI 0.619-0.727 (p Conclusions The prevalence of dizziness in community-dwelling elderly adults is substantial. It is associated with other common geriatric conditions usually neglected in elderly adults, such as fatigue and drowsiness, supporting its possible multifactorial manifestation. Our

  1. What factors influence community-dwelling older people’s intent to undertake multifactorial fall prevention programs?

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    Hill KD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Keith D Hill,1,2 Lesley Day,3 Terry P Haines4,5 1School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 2National Ageing Research Institute, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC, Australia; 3Falls Prevention Research Unit, Monash Injury Research Institute, Monash University, VIC, Australia; 4Allied Health Research Unit, Southern Health, Cheltenham, VIC, Australia; 5Physiotherapy Department, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing, and Health Sciences, Monash University, VIC, Australia Purpose: To investigate previous, current, or planned participation in, and perceptions toward, multifactorial fall prevention programs such as those delivered through a falls clinic in the community setting, and to identify factors influencing older people’s intent to undertake these interventions.Design and methods: Community-dwelling people aged >70 years completed a telephone survey. Participants were randomly selected from an electronic residential telephone listing, but purposeful sampling was used to include equal numbers with and without common chronic health conditions associated with fall-related hospitalization. The survey included scenarios for fall prevention interventions, including assessment/multifactorial interventions, such as those delivered through a falls clinic. Participants were asked about previous exposure to, or intent to participate in, the interventions. A path model analysis was used to identify factors associated with intent to participate in assessment/multifactorial interventions.Results: Thirty of 376 participants (8.0% reported exposure to a multifactorial falls clinic-type intervention in the past 5 years, and 16.0% expressed intention to undertake this intervention. Of the 132 participants who reported one or more falls in the past 12 months, over one-third were undecided or disagreed that a falls clinic type of intervention would be of benefit to them. Four elements

  2. Effects of progressive resistance training on physical disability among older community-dwelling people with history of hip fracture.

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    Edgren, Johanna; Rantanen, Taina; Heinonen, Ari; Portegijs, Erja; Alén, Markku; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Kallinen, Mauri; Sipilä, Sarianna

    2012-04-01

    Hip fracture is a common trauma in older people, and often leads to decreased muscle strength and increased physical disability. This randomized controlled trial examined whether three months of progressive resistance training (PRT) can reduce physical disability among older people with a history of hip fracture. A population-based sample of 60-85-year-old community- dwelling persons, with hip fractures sustained on average three years earlier, were enrolled in the study. Of 78 people participating in laboratory assessments, those without contraindications for participation in resistance training were randomly assigned to a training group (TG, n=22) or a control group (CG, n=21). TG took part in resistance training for three months twice a week. Training focused on lower limb muscles. Disability was assessed by a validated questionnaire containing six questions on activities of daily living (ADL) and nine on instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). A sum score was calculated separately for both items. High scores indicated more difficulties. Group differences were analysed with the Mann-Whitney and Chi-square tests. The effects of PRT on disability were tested with the McNemar test and by covariance analysis (ANCOVA). TG and CG were comparable with respect to gender, age, chronic diseases, BMI, time since fracture, self-reported health, and level of physical activity at baseline. The ADL sum score in TG was 1.8 (2.0) at baseline and 1.1 (1.3) after follow-up; in CG values were 1.7 (1.8) and 1.5 (1.8) (ANCOVA p=0.034). IADL sum scores in TG were 3.9 (4.6) at baseline and 2.2 (3.8) after follow-up, and in CG 3.4 (3.6) and 2.4 (2.3) (ANCOVA p=0.529). Progressive resistance training reduced self-reported difficulties in ADL, even several years after fracture. More research is still needed on how to prevent physical disability among community-dwelling older people, especially after hip fracture.

  3. Evaluation of the comprehensive health program "Sumida TAKE10!" for community-dwelling older adults, which aims to prevent or delay the need for long-term nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mika; Moriyasu, Ai; Kumagai, Shu; Furuna, Taketo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the comprehensive health program "Sumida TAKE10!", which aims to improve dietary habits and promote physical activity among community-dwelling older adults including the pre-frail elderly. This study has been ongoing since 2005 in Sumida Ward, Tokyo with the ultimate aim of preventing or delaying the need for long-term nursing care. We used the term "pre-frail elderly" for older adults who are at risk of requiring long-term care.Methods "Sumida TAKE10!" consists of a general lecture in a public hall followed by 5 educational sessions biweekly at 4-6 community centers. From 2008 to 2013, 402 participants aged ≥65 years were enrolled and included as subjects of the study. The main outcome measures were changes in 10 food intake frequencies, food frequency score (FFS), dietary variety score (DVS), frequency of exercise (obtained via questionnaire) and physical fitness (5-meter maximal walking time, 5-meter walking time, handgrip strength, one-leg standing time with eyes opened (time to upright posture for standing on one leg with eyes open), and the timed up & go test). The secondary outcome measures were changes in the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology (TMIG) Index of Competence score, appetite, frequency of walking and sports, self-rated health, frequency of leaving the house, communication with neighbors, engagement in hobbies, participation in group activities and participation in volunteer activities (obtained via questionnaire).Results Compared to baseline, all outcomes showed significant improvement. "Sumida TAKE10!" can improve dietary habits and increase the physical activity of participants. Positive secondary effects were seen for life function, self-rated health, and social activities. Almost identical positive results were obtained from the pre-frail elderly group, while improvement was also seen in the dietary habits of the subjects who do not cook.Conclusion These results suggest

  4. The Association between Sleep Problems, Sleep Medication Use, and Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Results from the Health and Retirement Study 2010

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    Yaena Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Very few studies have assessed the impact of poor sleep and sleep medication use on the risk of falls among community-dwelling older adults. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between sleep problems, sleep medication use, and falls in community-dwelling older adults. Methods. The study population comprised a nationally representative sample of noninstitutionalized older adults participating in the 2010 Health and Retirement Study. Proportion of adults reporting sleep problems, sleep medication use, and fall was calculated. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed to examine the impact of sleep problems and sleep medication use on the risk of falls after controlling for covariates. Results. Among 9,843 community-dwelling older adults, 35.8% had reported a fall and 40.8% had reported sleep problems in the past two years. Sleep medication use was reported by 20.9% of the participants. Older adults who do have sleep problems and take sleep medications had a significant high risk of falls, compared to older adults who do not have sleep problems and do not take sleep medications. The other two groups also had significantly greater risk for falls. Conclusion. Sleep problems added to sleep medication use increase the risk of falls. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these observed findings.

  5. The Association between Sleep Problems, Sleep Medication Use, and Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Results from the Health and Retirement Study 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background. Very few studies have assessed the impact of poor sleep and sleep medication use on the risk of falls among community-dwelling older adults. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between sleep problems, sleep medication use, and falls in community-dwelling older adults. Methods. The study population comprised a nationally representative sample of noninstitutionalized older adults participating in the 2010 Health and Retirement Study. Proportion of adults reporting sleep problems, sleep medication use, and fall was calculated. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed to examine the impact of sleep problems and sleep medication use on the risk of falls after controlling for covariates. Results. Among 9,843 community-dwelling older adults, 35.8% had reported a fall and 40.8% had reported sleep problems in the past two years. Sleep medication use was reported by 20.9% of the participants. Older adults who do have sleep problems and take sleep medications had a significant high risk of falls, compared to older adults who do not have sleep problems and do not take sleep medications. The other two groups also had significantly greater risk for falls. Conclusion. Sleep problems added to sleep medication use increase the risk of falls. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these observed findings. PMID:27547452

  6. Depressive symptoms and cognitive decline: A longitudinal analysis of potentially modifiable risk factors in community dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Damien; Kiss, Alex; Lanctot, Krista; Herrmann, Nathan

    2016-01-15

    Depressive symptoms have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline in later life. There are no interventions proven to reduce risk of cognitive decline in older adults with depression, and it is unclear how these effects are mediated. We aim to determine what mediates the relationship between depressive symptoms and cognitive decline in later life. Seven thousand six hundred and sixty six community dwelling older adults (age ≥ 50) from the English Longitudinal study of Ageing (ELSA) underwent clinical assessment. Inflammation was assessed with C Reactive Protein and depressive symptoms were assessed with the 8-item version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies (CESD) scale. Five thousand, five hundred and ninety (73.5%) had a follow-up cognitive assessment after a median of 47 months. Depressive symptoms were independently associated with cognitive decline (B=0.09, pdepressive symptoms. Low physical activity (z=2.16, p=0.03) and inflammation (z=2.3, p=0.02) mediated the relationship between depressive symptoms and cognitive decline while hypertension, diabetes and smoking also contributed. This is an observational study with a limited duration of follow up. Not all variables related to cognitive decline were accounted for in this analysis. The relationship between depressive symptoms and cognitive decline in later life appears to be mediated by low physical activity, increased inflammation and vascular risk factors that may be amenable to modification. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Linking Spiritual and Religious Coping With the Quality of Life of Community-Dwelling Older Adults and Nursing Home Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Magalhães Vitorino BSN, MSc

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study examined the effect of Positive and Negative Spiritual and Religious Coping (SRC upon older Brazilian’s quality of life (QOL. Method: A secondary analysis of data collected from 77 nursing home residents (NHRs; M age = 76.56 and 326 community-dwelling residents (CDRs; M age = 67.22 years was conducted. Participants had completed the Brief SRC, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF and World Health Organization Quality of Life-OLD (WHOQOL-OLD. A General Linear Model regression analysis was undertaken to assess the effects of SRC upon 10 aspects of participants’ QOL. Results: Positive ( F = 6.714, df = 10, p < .001 as opposed to Negative ( F = 1.194, df = 10, p = .294 SRC was significantly associated with QOL. Positive SRC was more strongly associated with NHR’s physical, psychological, and environmental QOL, and their perceived sensory abilities, autonomy, and opportunities for intimacy. Conclusion: Positive SRC behaviors per se were significantly associated with QOL ratings across both study samples. The effect size of Positive SRC was much larger among NHRs across six aspects of QOL. Place of residence (POR in relation to SRC and QOL in older age warrants further study.

  8. Measurement and visualization of face-to-face interaction among community-dwelling older adults using wearable sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masumoto, Kouhei; Yaguchi, Takaharu; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Tani, Hideaki; Tozuka, Keisuke; Kondo, Narihiko; Okada, Shuichi

    2017-10-01

    A number of interventions have been undertaken to develop and promote social networks among community-dwelling older adults. However, it has been difficult to examine the effects of these interventions, because of problems in assessing interactions. The present study was designed to quantitatively measure and visualize face-to-face interactions among elderly participants in an exercise program. We also examined relationships among interactional variables, personality and interest in community involvement, including interactions with the local community. Older adults living in the same community were recruited to participate in an exercise program that consisted of four sessions. We collected data on face-to-face interactions of the participants by using a wearable sensor technology device. Network analysis identified the communication networks of participants in the exercise program, as well as changes in these networks. Additionally, there were significant correlations between the number of people involved in face-to-face interactions and changes in both interest in community involvement and interactions with local community residents, as well as personality traits, including agreeableness. Social networks in the community are essential for solving problems caused by the aging society. We showed the possible applications of face-to-face interactional data for identifying core participants having many interactions, and isolated participants having only a few interactions within the community. Such data would be useful for carrying out efficient interventions for increasing participants' involvement with their community. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1752-1758. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  9. Relative and Absolute Reliability of Timed Up and Go Test in Community Dwelling Older Adult and Healthy Young People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Azadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Relative and absolute reliability are psychometric properties of the test that many clinical decisions are based on them. In many cases, only relative reliability takes into consideration while the absolute reliability is also very important. Methods & Materials: Eleven community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years and older (69.64±3.58 and 20 healthy young in the age range 20 to 35 years (28.80±4.15 using three versions of Timed Up and Go test were evaluated twice with an interval of 2 to 5 days. Results: Generally, the non-homogeneity of the study population was stratified to increase the Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC this coefficient in elderly people is greater than young people and with a secondary task is reduced. In This study, absolute reliability indices using different data sources and equations lead to in more or less similar results. At general, in test–retest situations, the elderly more than the young people must be changed to be interpreted as a real change, not random. The random error contribution is slightly greater in elderly than young and with a secondary task is increased.It seems, heterogeneity leads to moderation in absolute reliability indices. Conclusion: In relative reliability studies, researchers and clinicians should pay attention to factors such as homogeneity of population and etc. As well as, absolute reliability beside relative reliability is needed and necessary in clinical decision making.

  10. Perceived loneliness and general cognitive status in community-dwelling older adults: the moderating influence of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Charlene L M; Yu, Junhong; Lee, Tatia M C

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between depression, loneliness, and cognitive functioning among the elderly is not well understood in the literature. In the present study, we tested the moderating influence of depressive symptoms on loneliness and cognitive functioning. We recruited 100 community-dwelling older adults in Hong Kong. Demographic information, perceived loneliness, depressed mood, and general cognitive status were assessed. Results indicated that married participants reported lower levels of perceived loneliness (t (96) = 2.26, p = .03). We found a significant moderating effect of depressive symptoms on the relationship between perceived loneliness and general cognitive status (B = -.05, p = .002). Perceived loneliness correlated negatively with general cognitive status only in participants with higher levels of depressed mood (B = -.16, p = .01). Together, these findings suggest that perceived loneliness combined with depressed mood is related to poorer general cognitive status in older adults. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  11. Comparison of fall risk education methods for primary prevention with community-dwelling older adults in a senior center setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Renée M; Roginski, Aileen; Walker, Jason

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which of 2 primary prevention education programs was more effective in increasing knowledge and prompting behavior change to reduce fall risks among community-dwelling older adults who attended Senior Centers. A convenience sample (N=69) was recruited at 4 local senior centers to compare 2 fall risk education methods. Subjects were divided randomly by location into a class and pamphlet (CP) group (n = 35) that received a one-hour class plus written information and a pamphlet only (PO) group (n = 34) that received only written information. Pretesting for level of knowledge was conducted at baseline and at 2 weeks following the intervention and data were also collected on risk factor reduction behaviors. There was no significant difference (p=0.34) between groups for knowledge posttests. The CP group reported 121 changes to reduce fall risk while the PO group reported 120 changes. Subjects who had been injured by past falls (n=22) were significantly (p=0.04) more likely to report changes than those who had not fallen or were not injured by a fall. Both methods prompted fall risk reduction behaviors. This study provides an example of community-based, primary prevention programs designed to reduce fall risk factors among older adults.

  12. Identifying balance and fall risk in community-dwelling older women: the effect of executive function on postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir-Hunter, Susan W; Clark, Jennifer; McLean, Stephanie; Pedlow, Sam; Van Hemmen, Alysia; Montero Odasso, Manuel; Overend, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms linking cognition, balance function, and fall risk among older adults are not fully understood. An evaluation of the effect of cognition on balance tests commonly used in clinical practice to assess community-dwelling older adults could enhance the identification of at-risk individuals. The study aimed to determine (1) the association between cognition and clinical tests of balance and (2) the relationship between executive function (EF) and balance under single- and dual-task testing. Participants (24 women, mean age of 76.18 [SD 16.45] years) completed six clinical balance tests, four cognitive tests, and two measures of physical function. Poor balance function was associated with poor performance on cognitive testing of EF. In addition, the association with EF was strongest under the dual-task timed up-and-go (TUG) test and the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale. Measures of global cognition were associated only with the dual-task performance of the TUG. Postural sway measured with the Standing Balance Test, under single- or dual-task test conditions, was not associated with cognition. Decreased EF was associated with worse performance on functional measures of balance. The relationship between EF and balance was more pronounced with dual-task testing using a complex cognitive task combined with the TUG.

  13. Impact of Driving Cessation on Trajectories of Life-Space Scores Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisingh, Carrie; Levitan, Emily B; Sawyer, Patricia; Kennedy, Richard; Brown, Cynthia J; McGwin, Gerald

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the trajectories of life-space before and after the transition to driving cessation among a diverse sample of community-dwelling older adults. Life-space scores and self-reported driving cessation were assessed at annual visits from baseline through Year 6 among participants in the University of Alabama at Birmingham Study of Aging. Approximately 58% of older adults reported having stopped driving during the 6 years of follow-up. After adjusting for potential confounders, results from a random intercept model indicate that mean life-space scores decreased about 1 to 2 points every year ( p = .0011) and approximately 28 points at the time of driving cessation ( p space decline post driving cessation was not significantly different from the rate of decline prior to driving cessation. Driving cessation was associated with a precipitous decline in life-space score; however, the driving cessation event did not accelerate the rate of life-space decline.

  14. Identifying Balance and Fall Risk in Community-Dwelling Older Women: The Effect of Executive Function on Postural Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jennifer; McLean, Stephanie; Pedlow, Sam; Van Hemmen, Alysia; Montero Odasso, Manuel; Overend, Tom

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The mechanisms linking cognition, balance function, and fall risk among older adults are not fully understood. An evaluation of the effect of cognition on balance tests commonly used in clinical practice to assess community-dwelling older adults could enhance the identification of at-risk individuals. The study aimed to determine (1) the association between cognition and clinical tests of balance and (2) the relationship between executive function (EF) and balance under single- and dual-task testing. Methods: Participants (24 women, mean age of 76.18 [SD 16.45] years) completed six clinical balance tests, four cognitive tests, and two measures of physical function. Results: Poor balance function was associated with poor performance on cognitive testing of EF. In addition, the association with EF was strongest under the dual-task timed up-and-go (TUG) test and the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale. Measures of global cognition were associated only with the dual-task performance of the TUG. Postural sway measured with the Standing Balance Test, under single- or dual-task test conditions, was not associated with cognition. Conclusions: Decreased EF was associated with worse performance on functional measures of balance. The relationship between EF and balance was more pronounced with dual-task testing using a complex cognitive task combined with the TUG. PMID:24799756

  15. Long-Term Effects of a Screening Intervention for Depression on Suicide Rates among Japanese Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Sakashita, Tomoe

    2016-04-01

    To explore the long-term impact of a universal screening intervention for depression on suicide rates among older community-dwelling adults, with gender as an effect modifier. Controlled cohort study reporting long-term follow-up of previous research. Two sets of three municipalities in Japan were assigned as intervention and control regions and compared with the surrounding zone and prefecture. Intervention area residents aged 60 years and older (14,291) were invited to participate in a 2-year intervention (2005-2006). Four population-based dynamic cohorts of residents aged 65 years and older (1999-2010) were included as subjects, 6 years before and after the intervention started. At-risk residents within the intervention region (4,918) were invited for a two-step screening program; 2,552 participated in the program linked with care/support services for 2 years. An education program open to the public was held. Changes in suicide from a 6-year baseline to the 2-year intervention and a 4-year follow-up in the intervention region (11,700 adults ≥65 years) were compared with a matched control and two comparison areas using mixed-effects negative binomial regression models. Suicide rates among older adults exposed to screening were compared with those of the control region. Suicide rates in the intervention region decreased by 48%, which was significantly greater than in the three comparison areas. The program's benefits lasted longer for women than men. Screening exposure may be associated with decreased suicide risk over the 4-year follow-up. Universal screening may decrease suicide rates among older adults, with potential gender differences in treatment response. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Socio-demographics, spirituality, and quality of life among community-dwelling and institutionalized older adults: A structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Christian Albert F; Sarmiento, Winona D; Songco, Francis Justin G; Macindo, John Rey B; Conde, Alita R

    2016-01-01

    The increasing life expectancy of the population prompts an array of health conditions that impair an older adults' quality of life (QoL). Although demographics and spirituality have been associated with QoL, limited literature elucidated the exact mechanisms of their interactions, especially in a culturally-diverse country like Philippines. Hence, this study determined the relationship among socio-demographics, spirituality, and QoL of Filipino older adults in a community and institutional setting. A predictive-correlational study among 200 randomly-selected community-dwelling and institutionalized older adults was conducted, with a 99% power and a medium effect size. Data were collected using a three-part questionnaire from September to November 2015. The questionnaire was composed of the robotfoto, Spirituality Assessment Scale, and modified Older People's Quality of Life which assessed socio-demographics, spirituality, and QoL. Analysis showed that institutionalization in a nursing home positively and negatively affected spirituality and QoL, generating an acceptable model (χ(2)/df=2.12, RMSEA=0.08, and CFI=0.95). The negative direct effect of institutionalization on social relationship, leisure, & social activities QoL (β=-0.42, pspirituality and QoL dimensions. The development of a structural model illustrating the interrelationship of socio-demographics, spirituality, and QoL helps healthcare professionals in predicting facets of spirituality and QoL that can be compromised by living in a nursing home. This understanding provides impetus in evaluating and refining geriatric healthcare programs, policies, and protocols to render individualized, holistic care in a socially-cohesive environment among older adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Self-Reported Hindering Health Complaints of Community-Dwelling Older Persons: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie C E van Blijswijk

    Full Text Available Proactive care for community-dwelling older persons targeting self-reported hindering health complaints might prevent a decline in function. We investigated the spectrum of self-reported hindering complaints of community-dwelling older persons, the association with functional outcomes, and help-seeking behavior for these complaints.Within the ISCOPE trial, participants (aged ≥75 years received the ISCOPE screening questionnaire, including the open-ended question "At the moment, which health complaints limit you the most in your day-to-day life?". After coding the answers with the ICPC-1-NL, we examined the prevalence and the association between the number and type of complaints and functional outcomes (Groningen Activities Restriction Scale, quality of life measured on Cantril's Ladder, Mini-Mental State Examination, Geriatric Depression Scale-15, and De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale. Electronic patient registers were searched for the most reported complaints.7285 participants (median age: 81.0 years [IQR 77.8-85.3], 38.6% males reported 13,524 hindering complaints (median 1, range 0-18; 32.7% reported no complaints. Participants mostly reported problems with walking/standing (22.1%, pain (20.8% or weakness/tiredness (8.5%. These complaints were mentioned in the electronic patient registers in 28.3%, 91.3% and 55.5%, respectively. Higher numbers of hindering complaints were related to poorer scores on the number of domains with problems, Cantril's Ladder for quality of life, Groningen Activities Restriction Scale, Geriatric Depression Scale, and De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale. Self-reported weakness, problems with walking/standing, visual limitations, cognitive problems, dyspnea and back complaints were associated with poorer scores on the number of domains with problems, Groningen Activities Restriction Scale, MMSE or Geriatric Depression Scale.One third of the participants reported no hindering complaints. Problems with walking

  18. Fitness and health-related quality of life dimensions in community-dwelling middle aged and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivares Pedro R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to identify the physical fitness (PF tests of a multi-component battery more related to the perception of problems in each dimension of the health-related quality of life (HRQoL assessed by the EuroQol 5 dimensions 3 level questionnaire (EQ-5D-3L in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 7104 participants (6243 females and 861 males aged 50-99 years who were recruited in the framework of the Exercise Looks After You Program, which is a public health program designed to promote physical activity (PA in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. Participants were assessed by the EQ-5D-3L questionnaire and a battery of fitness tests. The responses to each EQ-5D-3L dimension were collapsed into a two-tier variable consisting of «perceive problems» and «do not perceive problems». Correlation coefficients for the relationships between the HRQoL variables, between the PF variables, and between the HRQoL and PF variables were obtained. Two logistic regression models, one adjusted and one unadjusted, were developed for each EQ-5D-3L dimension. Results There were significant correlations between all variables except anxiety/depression and the back scratch test. The PF tests that correlated best with the HRQoL dimensions were the Timed Up-and-Go Test (TUG and the 6-min walk; pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression correlated less well. All PF tests correlated, especially the TUG and 6-min walk tests. Unadjusted logistic models showed significant goodness of fit for the mobility and pain/discomfort dimensions only. Adjusted logistic models showed significant goodness of fit for all dimensions when the following potential confounding variables were included: age, gender, weekly level of PA, smoking and alcohol habits, body mass index, and educational level. For all dimensions, the highest odds ratios for the association with PF tests were

  19. Effectiveness of Aromatherapy Massage and Inhalation on Symptoms of Depression in Chinese Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Mei; Li, Yanzhang; Tang, Ping; Zhang, Yuping; Cao, Min; Ni, Junwei; Xing, Mengmeng

    2018-03-22

    Geriatric depression is a major public health problem in China. The study compared the intervention and follow-up effects of aromatherapy massage and inhalation on symptoms of depression in community-dwelling older adults after an 8-week intervention. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted on community-dwelling adults ≥60 years old, with symptoms of depression. Participants were randomly assigned, by Latin Square, to aromatherapy massage, inhalation, or control groups (each n = 20). The aromatherapy massage group received 30 min of aromatherapy massage with 5 mL oil, twice weekly for 8 weeks. The oil contained 50 μL (one drop) of compound essential oils (lavender [Lavandula angustifolia], sweet orange [Citrus sinensis], and bergamot (Citrus bergamia in a 2:1:1 ratio)], diluted in sweet almond oil to a concentration of 1%. The aromatherapy inhalation group received 30 min of nasal inhalation of 50 μL of the compound essential oils blended in 10 mL of purified water, twice weekly for 8 weeks. The control group received no intervention. The Geriatric Depression Scale Short Form (GDS-SF) and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) were used for assessment at pretest, posttest, and 6- and 10-week follow-ups in all groups. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) concentration was assessed pretest and posttest. Postintervention, the aromatherapy massage and inhalation groups demonstrated significantly lower GDS-SF and PHQ-9 scores than control participants. Compared with the pretest, the GDS-SF and PHQ-9 scores for depressive symptoms in both experimental groups remained lower at posttest (8 weeks), 6-week (14 weeks), and 10-week (18 weeks) follow-ups. However, the GDS-SF and PHQ-9 scores did not differ among the four time points in the control group. The posttest 5-HT concentrations in the aromatherapy massage and inhalation groups were increased over pretest values. Both aromatherapy massage and aromatherapy inhalation may have important

  20. Gluteal muscle composition differentiates fallers from non-fallers in community dwelling older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Inacio, Mario; Ryan, Alice S; Bair, Woei-Nan; Prettyman, Michelle; Beamer, Brock A; Rogers, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired balance, loss of mobility and falls are major problems associated with changes in muscle in older adults. However, the extent to which muscle composition and related performance measures for different lower limb muscles are associated with falls in older individuals is unclear. This study evaluated lower limb muscle attenuation, intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) infiltration and muscle performance in older fallers and non-fallers. Methods For this cross-sectional study, ...

  1. Adherence and Attrition in Fall Prevention Exercise Programs for Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osho, Oluwaseyi; Owoeye, Oluwatoyosi; Armijo-Olivo, Susan

    2017-08-03

    Fall prevention exercise programs have been reported to be effective in minimizing falls in older adults. However, adherence and attrition in exercise programs remain a challenge. This study reviewed the evidence on how levels of adherence and attrition in fall prevention exercise programs may affect magnitude of effect of fall risk reduction in community-dwelling older adults. A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials on fall prevention exercise programs for community-dwelling older adults aged 65+ years published between 2005 and 2016 from six databases were undertaken. Twenty articles met inclusion criteria. Results showed that program adherence >80% may result in greater fall risk reduction compared to lower levels of adherence. A possible inverse relationship exists between attrition levels and effect sizes of fall prevention exercise programs. Future studies should properly report falls/fallers and a consensus on a standardized measure for reporting adherence to fall prevention exercise programs is recommended.

  2. Virtual Reality Training With Three-Dimensional Video Games Improves Postural Balance and Lower Extremity Strength in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongwoo; Choi, Wonjae; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho; Lee, Seungwon

    2017-10-01

    Avatar-based three-dimensional technology is a new approach to improve physical function in older adults. The aim of this study was to use three-dimensional video gaming technology in virtual reality training to improve postural balance and lower extremity strength in a population of community-dwelling older adults. The experimental group participated in the virtual reality training program for 60 min, twice a week, for 6 weeks. Both experimental and control groups were given three times for falls prevention education at the first, third, and fifth weeks. The experimental group showed significant improvements not only in static and dynamic postural balance but also lower extremity strength (p video gaming technology might be beneficial for improving postural balance and lower extremity strength in community-dwelling older adults.

  3. Risk Factors of Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Logistic Regression Tree Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takashi; Noe, Douglas A.; Bailer, A. John

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: A novel logistic regression tree-based method was applied to identify fall risk factors and possible interaction effects of those risk factors. Design and Methods: A nationally representative sample of American older adults aged 65 years and older (N = 9,592) in the Health and Retirement Study 2004 and 2006 modules was used.…

  4. Unattended autonomous surveillance in community-dwelling older adults: a field study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.S.M. Kort; Joost van Hoof

    2008-01-01

    Home automation that allows for telecare services is increasingly becoming a tool to help older adults live independently and to improve perceived safety and security. The number of older adults receiving professional care, in relation to housing, on a daily basis is not very large. Only 15%

  5. Risk factors and protective factors associated with incident or increase of frailty among community-dwelling older adults: A systematic review of longitudinal studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeyun Feng

    Full Text Available Frailty is one of the greatest challenges facing our aging population, as it can lead to adverse outcomes such as institutionalization, hospitalization, and mortality. However, the factors that are associated with frailty are poorly understood. We performed a systematic review of longitudinal studies in order to identify the sociodemographic, physical, biological, lifestyle-related, and psychological risk or protective factors that are associated with frailty among community-dwelling older adults.A systematic literature search was conducted in the following databases in order to identify studies that assessed the factors associated with of frailty among community-dwelling older adults: Embase, Medline Ovid, Web of Science, Cochrane, PsychINFO Ovid, CINAHL EBSCOhost, and Google Scholar. Studies were selected if they included a longitudinal design, focused on community-dwelling older adults aged 60 years and older, and used a tool to assess frailty. The methodological quality of each study was assessed using the Quality of Reporting of Observational Longitudinal Research checklist.Twenty-three studies were included. Significant associations were reported between the following types of factors and frailty: sociodemographic factors (7/7 studies, physical factors (5/6 studies, biological factors (5/7 studies, lifestyle factors (11/13 studies, and psychological factors (7/8 studies. Significant sociodemographic factors included older age, ethnic background, neighborhood, and access to private insurance or Medicare; significant physical factors included obesity and activities of daily living (ADL functional status; significant biological factors included serum uric acid; significant lifestyle factors included a higher Diet Quality Index International (DQI score, higher fruit/vegetable consumption and higher tertile of all measures of habitual dietary resveratrol exposure; significant psychological factors included depressive symptoms.A broad range of

  6. Association of total daily physical activity with disability in community-dwelling older persons: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Raj C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on findings primarily using self-report measures, physical activity has been recommended to reduce disability in old age. Collecting objective measures of total daily physical activity in community-dwelling older adults is uncommon, but might enhance the understanding of the relationship of physical activity and disability. We examined whether greater total daily physical activity was associated with less report of disability in the elderly. Methods Data were from the Rush Memory and Aging Project, a longitudinal prospective cohort study of common, age-related, chronic conditions. Total daily physical activity was measured in community-dwelling participants with an average age of 82 using actigraphy for approximately 9 days. Disability was measured via self-reported basic activities of daily living (ADL. The odds ratio and 95% Confidence Interval (CI were determined for the baseline association of total daily physical activity and ADL disability using a logistic regression model adjusted for age, education level, gender and self-report physical activity. In participants without initial report of ADL disability, the hazard ratio and 95% CI were determined for the relationship of baseline total daily physical activity and the development of ADL disability using a discrete time Cox proportional hazard model adjusted for demographics and self-report physical activity. Results In 870 participants, the mean total daily physical activity was 2. 9 × 105 counts/day (range in 105 counts/day = 0.16, 13. 6 and the mean hours/week of self-reported physical activity was 3.2 (SD = 3.6. At baseline, 718 (82.5% participants reported being independent in all ADLs. At baseline, total daily physical activity was protective against disability (OR per 105 counts/day difference = 0.55; 95% CI = 0.47, 0.65. Of the participants without baseline disability, 584 were followed for 3.4 years on average. Each 105 counts/day additional total

  7. Psychometrics of the Home Safety Self-Assessment Tool (HSSAT) to prevent falls in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Machiko R; Saharan, Sumandeep; Rajendran, Sheela; Nochajski, Susan M; Schweitzer, Jo A

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To identify psychometric properties of the Home Safety Self-Assessment Tool (HSSAT) to prevent falls in community-dwelling older adults. METHOD. We tested content validity, test-retest reliability, interrater reliability, construct validity, convergent and discriminant validity, and responsiveness to change. RESULTS. The content validity index was .98, the intraclass correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability was .97, and the interrater reliability was .89. The difference on identified risk factors between the use and nonuse of the HSSAT was significant (p = .005). Convergent validity with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Home Safety Checklist was high (r = .65), and discriminant validity with fear of falling was very low (r = .10). The responsiveness to change was moderate (standardized response mean = 0.57). CONCLUSION. The HSSAT is a reliable and valid instrument to identify fall risks in a home environment, and the HSSAT booklet is effective as educational material leading to improvement in home safety. Copyright © 2014 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  8. Social Support, Social Strain, and Cognitive Function Among Community-Dwelling U.S. Chinese Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shaoqing; Wu, Bei; Bailey, Donald E; Dong, XinQi

    2017-07-01

    Limited research is available on the relationship between social support, social strain, and cognitive function among community-dwelling U.S. Chinese older adults. This study aims to examine the associations between social support/strain and cognitive outcomes. Data were drawn from the Population-Based Study of Chinese Elderly (N = 3,159). Cognitive function was measured by a battery of tests including the East Boston Memory Test, the Digit Span Backwards assessment, and the Symbol Digit Modalities Test. Social support and strain were measured by the scales drawn from the Health and Retirement study. Multiple regression analyses were conducted. Social support was significantly associated with global cognitive function (β = .11, SE = .02, p Social strain was significantly associated with global cognitive function (β = .23, SE = .05, p social support/strain, higher support from friends was significantly associated with higher global cognitive function (β = .04, SE = .02, p cognitive function (β = .10, SE = .03, p Social support and strain were associated with cognitive outcomes. Future longitudinal studies should be conducted. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Systematic Review of the Clinical Application of Exposure Techniques to Community-Dwelling Older Adults with Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Nimali; Finkelstein-Fox, Lucy; Sar-Graycar, Lili; Ojie, Mary-Jane; Bruce, Martha L; Difede, JoAnn

    2017-01-01

    Although exposure techniques are a first-line intervention for anxiety, clear evidence is lacking for their efficacy in treating the prevalent and debilitating condition of late life anxiety. This study sought to review the current literature on use of exposure with community-dwelling older patients. Searches of electronic databases were conducted to identify articles published through December 7, 2016. Inclusion criteria were: 1) sample age > 55, 2) therapy that included exposure, 3) anxiety as a target of the treatment. Exclusion criteria were: 1) not available in English, 2) no quantitative data, 3) inpatient setting. Methodological data and findings were extracted from the articles chosen for review. The 54 eligible articles presented a total of 16 case studies, 9 uncontrolled trials, 24 controlled trials, and 6 secondary studies. A majority of the studies were conducted in the U.S.A with participants who received individual treatment. In vivo and imaginal exposure were the most frequently delivered techniques, and most treatments were multicomponent. Most studies found a reduction in anxiety symptoms. Important research gaps need to be addressed. The surveyed research provides a modest foundation of evidence for mental health practitioners who wish to incorporate exposure into treatment plans.

  10. Validity and usefulness of hand-held dynamometry for measuring muscle strength in community-dwelling older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abizanda, Pedro; Navarro, José Luis; García-Tomás, María Isabel; López-Jiménez, Esther; Martínez-Sánchez, Esther; Paterna, Gema

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to determine the validity and usefulness of hand-held dynamometry for measuring muscle strength in independent community-dwelling older persons. Cross-sectional study was performed in 281 subjects aged over 65, mean age of 74.3 years. The strength of six muscle groups was measured in three consecutive attempts using JAMAR hand-held dynamometers. Individual values, maximums and means, intra- and inter-individual variability, test-retest reliability and concurrent validity with functional tests are described. The main results were: strength increased with each attempt for all muscle groups, suggesting technique learning, except for pinch and grip, suggesting muscle fatigability. Relative intra- and inter-individual variability was higher in women; it was lower for the pinch and grip strength. Test-retest reliability was very good and concurrent validity with functional tests was good. We conclude that hand-held dynamometry is valid and useful for determining functionality. It is recommended to perform three attempts for all strength measurements, except for pinch and grip, in which one is sufficient. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Correlates associated with the desire for PEG tube placement at the end of life among community-dwelling older Mexican Americans: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, M Rosina; Macias, R Lillianne; Becho, Johanna; Wood, Robert C; Hernandez, Arthur E; Espino, David V

    2013-04-01

    Use of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tubes in older adults remains controversial. This cross-sectional study examines community-dwelling Mexican American older adults' attitudes toward PEG tube placement in the hypothetical event of a terminal illness. Interviews were conducted with 100 community-dwelling Mexican American (MA's) adults, age 60 and over, in San Antonio, Texas. Subjects were screened for cognitive competence using Folstein's mini-mental examination. This was followed by an evaluation of socioeconomic status, depressive symptoms, religiosity, health status and attitudes toward end-of-life care, including PEG tube feeding. Higher income MA's, professionals, those without a living will, those who saw religious belief as not important and those who attended church less than once a month were more likely to agree with PEG placement (all P desire for insertion of a PEG tube at the end of life. This is the first community-based study to describe older Mexican American's attitudes toward PEG tube placement at the end of life. Older community-dwelling Mexican Americans with higher incomes, lack of a living will or low religious involvement might be more likely to choose PEG tube placement even in the context of a terminal condition.

  12. Admissions to inpatient care facilities in the last year of life of community-dwelling older people in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbeek, Anouk; Van den Block, Lieve; Korfage, Ida J; Penders, Yolanda W H; van der Heide, Agnes; Rietjens, Judith A C

    2017-10-01

    In the last year of life, many older people rather avoid admissions to inpatient care facilities. We describe and compare such admissions in the last year of life of 5092 community-dwelling older people in 15 European countries (+Israel). Proxy-respondents of the older people, who participated in the longitudinal SHARE study, reported on admissions to inpatient care facilities (hospital, nursing home or hospice) during the last year of their life. Multivariable regression analyses assessed associations between hospitalizations and personal/contextual characteristics. The proportion of people who had been admitted at least once to an inpatient care facility in the last year of life ranged from 54% (France) to 76% (Austria, Israel, Slovenia). Admissions mostly concerned hospitalizations. Multivariable analyses showed that especially Austrians, Israelis and Poles had higher chances of being hospitalized. Further, hospitalizations were more likely for those being ill for 6 months or more (OR:1.67, CI:1.39-2.01), and less likely for persons aged 80+ (OR:0.54, CI:0.39-0.74; compared with 48-65 years), females (OR:0.74, CI:0.63-0.89) and those dying of cardiovascular diseases (OR:0.66, CI:0.51-0.86; compared with those dying of cancer). Although healthcare policies increasingly stress the importance that people reside at home as long as possible, admissions to inpatient care facilities in the last year of life are relatively common across all countries. Furthermore, we found a striking variation concerning the proportion of admissions across countries which cannot only be explained by patient needs. It suggests that such admissions are at least partly driven by system-level or cultural factors. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  13. Improved Prediction of Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults Through Phase-Dependent Entropy of Daily-Life Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espen A. F. Ihlen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Age and age-related diseases have been suggested to decrease entropy of human gait kinematics, which is thought to make older adults more susceptible to falls. In this study we introduce a new entropy measure, called phase-dependent generalized multiscale entropy (PGME, and test whether this measure improves fall-risk prediction in community-dwelling older adults. PGME can assess phase-dependent changes in the stability of gait dynamics that result from kinematic changes in events such as heel strike and toe-off. PGME was assessed for trunk acceleration of 30 s walking epochs in a re-analysis of 1 week of daily-life activity data from the FARAO study, originally described by van Schooten et al. (2016. The re-analyzed data set contained inertial sensor data from 52 single- and 46 multiple-time prospective fallers in a 6 months follow-up period, and an equal number of non-falling controls matched by age, weight, height, gender, and the use of walking aids. The predictive ability of PGME for falls was assessed using a partial least squares regression. PGME had a superior predictive ability of falls among single-time prospective fallers when compared to the other gait features. The single-time fallers had a higher PGME (p < 0.0001 of their trunk acceleration at 60% of their step cycle when compared with non-fallers. No significant differences were found between PGME of multiple-time fallers and non-fallers, but PGME was found to improve the prediction model of multiple-time fallers when combined with other gait features. These findings suggest that taking into account phase-dependent changes in the stability of the gait dynamics has additional value for predicting falls in older people, especially for single-time prospective fallers.

  14. The effects of loaded and unloaded high-velocity resistance training on functional fitness among community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jordan M; Gray, Michelle; Binns, Ashley

    2015-11-01

    Physical function declines up to 4% per year after the age of 65. High-velocity training is important for maintaining muscular power and ultimately, physical function; however, whether performing high-velocity training without external resistance increases functional fitness among older adults remains unclear. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate loaded and unloaded high-velocity training on lower body muscular power and functional fitness in older adults. Fifty-seven community-dwelling older adults (n = 16 males, n = 41 females) participated in this study. Inclusion criteria comprised ≥65 years of age, ≥24 on the Mini-mental state examination and no falls within past year. Two groups completed a 20-week high-velocity training intervention. The non-weighted group (UNLOAD, n = 27) performed the protocol without external load while the intervention group (LOAD, n = 30) used external loads via exercise machines. Functional fitness was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), Senior Fitness Test (SFT), hand-grip and lower body power measures. Multivariate ANOVA revealed that both groups had significant improvements for average (17.21%) and peak (9.26%) lower body power, along with the SFT arm curl (16.94%), chair stand (20.10%) and 8 ft. up-and-go (15.67%). Improvements were also noticed for SPPB 8 ft. walk (25.21%). However, improvements for all functional fitness measures were independent of training group. Unloaded high-velocity training increased functional fitness and power the same as loaded training. The ability of high-velocity movements to elicit gains in functional fitness without external loads may help health professionals develop fitness programs when time/space is limiting factor. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. [Association of physical functions with leisure-time, household, and occupational physical activity in community-dwelling older adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Kenji; Tsuji, Taishi; Yoon, Ji-Yeong; Muraki, Toshiaki; Okura, Tomohiro

    2010-01-01

    The study objective was to cross-sectionally examine the relationships among leisure-time, household, and occupational physical activity with physical functions in Japanese older adults. We randomly enrolled 189 community-dwelling older adults, aged 65 to 85 years, as subjects from the Basic Resident Register of Kasama City, Ibaraki prefecture. Physical activity was assessed by the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly. Analysis of covariance was performed to determine the relationships between physical activity and physical functions, after adjustment for age and sex. Leisure-time physical activity significantly correlated with one-leg balance with eyes open, sit and reach, timed standing test from along sitting position on the floor, functional reach, 5-repetition sit-to-stand, timed up and go, 5-m habitual walk, choice stepping reaction time, and power in sit-to-stand tests. Household physical activity was significantly related to 5-repetition sit-to-stand and ability in sit-to-stand. Total (leisure-time plus household plus occupational) activity was significantly correlated with one-leg balance with eyes open, functional reach, and power in sit-to-stand tests. Post-hoc testing indicated that the levels of physical functions were higher in the subjects of the third tertile than in those of the first or second tertile. No difference was found in physical functions between the first and second tertile. Leisure-time physical activity was related to many physical functions. Household physical activity was also related to lower-extremity functions. Our data suggest that medium- or high-level physical activity may be necessary for older adults to maintain their physical functions.

  16. Development of TUA-WELLNESS screening tool for screening risk of mild cognitive impairment among community-dwelling older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanoh D

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Divya Vanoh,1 Suzana Shahar,1 Razali Rosdinom,2 Normah Che Din,3 Hanis Mastura Yahya,4 Azahadi Omar5 1Dietetic Programme, Centre of Healthcare Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Department of Psychiatry, University Kebangsaan Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Health Psychology Programme, 4Nutrition Programme, Faculty of Health Sciences, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 5Institute of Public Health, Ministry of Health, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background and aim: Focus on screening for cognitive impairment has to be given particular importance because of the rising older adult population. Thus, this study aimed to develop and assess a brief screening tool consisting of ten items that can be self-administered by community dwelling older adults (TUA-WELLNESS. Methodology: A total of 1,993 noninstitutionalized respondents aged 60 years and above were selected for this study. The dependent variable was mild cognitive impairment (MCI assessed using neuropsychological test batteries. The items for the screening tool comprised a wide range of factors that were chosen mainly from the analysis of ordinal logistic regression (OLR and based on past literature. A suitable cut-off point was developed using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: A total of ten items were included in the screening tool. From the ten items, eight were found to be significant by ordinal logistic regression and the remaining two items were part of the tool because they showed strong association with cognitive impairment in previous studies. The area under curve (AUC, sensitivity, and specificity for cut-off 11 were 0.84%, 83.3%, and 73.4%, respectively. Conclusion: TUA-WELLNESS screening tool has been used to screen for major risk factors of MCI among Malaysian older adults. This tool is only suitable for basic MCI risk screening purpose and should not be used for diagnostic

  17. Apathy and cognitive and functional decline in community-dwelling older adults: Results from the Baltimore ECA longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Diana E.; Ko, Jean Y.; Lyketsos, Constantine; Rebok, George W.; Eaton, William W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Apathy, a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome, commonly affects patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Prevalence estimates for apathy range widely and are based on cross-sectional data and / or clinic samples. This study examines the relationships between apathy and cognitive and functional declines in non-depressed community-based older adults. Methods Data on 1,136 community-dwelling adults age 50 and older from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA) study, with 1 and 13 years of follow-up, were used. Apathy was assessed with a subscale of items from the General Health Questionnaire. Chi-square, t-tests, logistic regression, and Generalized Estimating Equations were used to accomplish the study’s objectives. Results The prevalence of apathy at Wave 1 was 23.7%. Compared to those without, individuals with apathy were on average older, more likely to be female, and have lower MMSE scores and impairments in basic and instrumental functioning at baseline. Apathy was significantly associated with cognitive decline (OR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.06, 2.60) and declines in instrumental (OR = 4.42; 95% CI = 2.65, 7.38) and basic (OR=2.74; 95%CI= 1.35, 5.57) function at 1 year follow-up, even after adjustment for baseline age, level of education, race, and depression at follow-up. At 13 years of follow-up, apathetic individuals were not at greater risk for cognitive decline but were 2-fold more likely to have functional decline. Incidence of apathy at 1- year follow up and 13- year follow-up was respectively, 22.6% and 29.4%. Conclusions These results underline the public health importance of apathy and the need for further population-based studies in this area. PMID:20478091

  18. Improved Prediction of Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults Through Phase-Dependent Entropy of Daily-Life Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlen, Espen A F; van Schooten, Kimberley S; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; van Dieën, Jaap H; Vereijken, Beatrix; Helbostad, Jorunn L; Pijnappels, Mirjam

    2018-01-01

    Age and age-related diseases have been suggested to decrease entropy of human gait kinematics, which is thought to make older adults more susceptible to falls. In this study we introduce a new entropy measure, called phase-dependent generalized multiscale entropy (PGME), and test whether this measure improves fall-risk prediction in community-dwelling older adults. PGME can assess phase-dependent changes in the stability of gait dynamics that result from kinematic changes in events such as heel strike and toe-off. PGME was assessed for trunk acceleration of 30 s walking epochs in a re-analysis of 1 week of daily-life activity data from the FARAO study, originally described by van Schooten et al. (2016). The re-analyzed data set contained inertial sensor data from 52 single- and 46 multiple-time prospective fallers in a 6 months follow-up period, and an equal number of non-falling controls matched by age, weight, height, gender, and the use of walking aids. The predictive ability of PGME for falls was assessed using a partial least squares regression. PGME had a superior predictive ability of falls among single-time prospective fallers when compared to the other gait features. The single-time fallers had a higher PGME ( p prediction model of multiple-time fallers when combined with other gait features. These findings suggest that taking into account phase-dependent changes in the stability of the gait dynamics has additional value for predicting falls in older people, especially for single-time prospective fallers.

  19. Vitamin D and subjective memory complaint in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annweiler, Cedric; Doineau, Lise; Gerigne, Lucie; Provendier, Anais; Karras, Spyridon N; Beauchet, Olivier; Fantino, Bruno; Duval, Guillaume T

    2018-02-01

    Older adults with hypovitaminosis D report more often subjective cognitive complaints, especially with regards to memory. This raises prospects that vitamin D may improve older adults' subjective experience of memory disorders. To determine among older community-dwellers whether higher serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentrations were associated with fewer memory complaints, while considering the different subtypes of memory complaints. One hundred eighty Caucasian community-dwellers with memory complaint and no dementia (mean±standard deviation, 71.1±3.4years; 33.3%female) from the French 'EVATEM study' were included in this analysis. Subjective memory complaints regarding memory lapses, problems learning new information, problems finding words, problems calculating and problems concentrating were assessed using a standardized questionnaire. Participants were categorized according to the highest tertile of serum 25OHD (i.e., ≥68nmol/L). Age, gender, body mass index, morbidities burden, use of vitamin D supplements, cognitive performance, mood, serum concentrations of calcium, parathyroid hormone and vitamin B12, creatinine clearance, and season of evaluation were used as potential confounders. Compared to participants with 25OHDmemorizing new information in older community-dwellers. This novel finding provides a scientific base for vitamin D replacement trials attempting to improve older patients' subjective experience of cognitive decline. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Dog ownership, functional ability, and walking in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Radius, Kaitlyn; Black, David R; Gretebeck, Randall J; Ziemba, Rosemary; Glickman, Lawrence T

    2013-07-01

    Regular walking improves overall health and functional ability of older adults, yet most are sedentary. Dog ownership/pet responsibility may increase walking in older adults. Goals of this study were to identify factors that influence older adult walking and compare physical activity, functional ability and psychosocial characteristics by dog ownership status. In this cross-sectional study, older adults (65-95 years of age, n = 1091) completed and returned questionnaires via postal mail. Measures included: Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly, Physical Functioning Questionnaire and Theory of Planned Behavior Questionnaire. Dog owner/dog walkers (n = 77) reported significantly (P owner/nondog walkers (n = 83) and nondog owners (n = 931). Dog owner/nondog walkers reported lower intention and perceived behavioral control and a less positive attitude than dog owner/dog walkers (P owner/ dog walkers were significantly different than the nondog walker groups in nearly every study variable. Many dog owners (48.1%) reported walking their dogs regularly and the dog owner/dog walkers participated in nearly 50% more total walking than the 2 nondog walking groups, suggesting that pet obligation may provide a purposeful activity that motivates some older dog owners to walk.

  1. External validation of the Vulnerable Elder's Survey for predicting mortality and emergency admission in older community-dwelling people: a prospective cohort study.

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Emma; McDowell, Ronald; Bennett, Kathleen; Fahey, Tom; Smith, Susan M

    2017-01-01

    Background Prospective external validation of the Vulnerable Elder?s Survey (VES-13) in primary care remains limited. The aim of this study is to externally validate the VES-13 in predicting mortality and emergency admission in older community-dwelling adults. Methods Design: Prospective cohort study with 2 years follow-up (2010?2012). Setting: 15 General Practices (GPs) in the Republic of Ireland. Participants: n?=?862, aged ?70?years, community-dwellers Exposure: VES-13 calculated at baseli...

  2. Convergent validity of the interRAI-HC for societal costs estimates in comparison with the RUD Lite instrument in community dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lier, Lisanne I; van der Roest, Henriëtte G; van Hout, Hein P J; van Eenoo, Liza; Declercq, Anja; Garms-Homolová, Vjenka; Onder, Graziano; Finne-Soveri, Harriet; Jónsson, Pálmi V; Hertogh, Cees M P M; Bosmans, Judith E

    2016-08-25

    The interRAI-Home Care (interRAI-HC) instrument is commonly used in routine care to assess care and service needs, resource utilisation and health outcomes of community dwelling home care clients. Potentially, the interRAI-HC can also be used to calculate societal costs in economic evaluations. The purpose of this study was to assess the convergent validity of the interRAI-HC instrument in comparison with the RUD Lite instrument for the calculation of societal costs among care-dependent community dwelling older adults. A within-subject design was used. Participants were 65 years and older and received professional community care in five countries. The RUD Lite was administered by trained (research) nurses or self-reports within 4 weeks after the interRAI-HC assessment. Agreement between the interRAI-HC and RUD Lite estimates was assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficients. We hypothesised that there was strong correlation (Spearman's ρ > 0.5) between resource utilisation estimates, costs of care estimates and total societal cost estimates derived from both instruments. Strong correlation was found between RUD Lite and interRAI-HC resource utilisation assessments for eight out of ten resource utilisation items. Total societal costs according to the RUD Lite were statistically significantly lower than according to the interRAI-HC (mean difference €-804, 95 % CI -1340; -269). The correlation between the instruments for total societal costs and all six cost categories was strong. The interRAI-HC has good convergent validity as compared with the RUD-Lite instrument to estimate societal cost of resource utilisation in community dwelling older adults. Since interRAI-HC assessments are part of routine care in many community care organisations and countries already, this finding may increase the feasibility of performing economic evaluations among community dwelling older adults.

  3. Protein Intake and Mobility Limitation in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: the Health ABC Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houston, Denise K.; Tooze, Janet A.; Garcia, Katelyn; Visser, Marjolein; Rubin, Susan; Harris, Tamara B.; Newman, Anne B.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.

    OBJECTIVES: The current Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for protein is based on short-term nitrogen balance studies in young adults and may underestimate the amount needed to optimally preserve physical function in older adults. We examined the association between protein intake and the onset of

  4. Predictors of Adult Education Program Satisfaction in Urban Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takashi; López, Erick B.; Keene, Jennifer R.; Kinney, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Lifelong learning is receiving greater attention due to population aging in modern societies. Lifelong learning benefits individuals by supporting their physical, psychological, social, and economic well-being. However, older adults generally have lower motivation for learning than younger adults, and facilitating long-term participation in…

  5. Physical and Leisure Activity in Older Community-Dwelling Canadians Who Use Wheelchairs: A Population Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista L. Best

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Physical and leisure activities are proven health promotion modalities and have not been examined in older wheelchair users. Main Objectives. Examine physical and leisure activity in older wheelchair users and explore associations between wheelchair use and participation in physical and leisure activity, and wheelchair use, physical and leisure activity, and perceived health. Methods. 8301 Canadians ≥60 years of age were selected from the Canadian Community Health Survey. Sociodemographic, health-related, mobility-related, and physical and leisure activity variables were analysed using logistic regression to determine, the likelihood of participation in physical and leisure activity, and whether participation in physical and leisure activities mediates the relationship between wheelchair use and perceived health. Results. 8.3% and 41.3% older wheelchair users were physically and leisurely active. Wheelchair use was a risk factor for reduced participation in physical (OR=44.71 and leisure activity (OR=10.83. Wheelchair use was a risk factor for poor perceived health (OR=10.56 and physical and leisure activity negatively mediated the relationship between wheelchair user and perceived health. Conclusion. There is a need for the development of suitable physical and leisure activity interventions for older wheelchair users. Participation in such interventions may have associations with health benefits.

  6. Differences in perception of gerotranscendence behaviors between college students and community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Jeffrey A; Lai, Duc; Ebel, Donald

    2015-08-01

    Within the field of gerontology, several different theories have attempted to explain common psychological and social changes associated with the aging process. The Theory of Gerotranscendence is one such theory which purports that a shift in meta-perspective from a more materialistic and pragmatic view of the world to a more cosmic and transcendent one occurs as we age. Corresponding with this shift in meta-perspective, the individual exhibits certain behaviors that could be mistaken as signs of psychopathology if viewed based on the assumptions of more culturally-assimilated theories of aging. The purpose of this study was to examine the difference in perception of gerotranscendence behaviors between college students and older adults. Perceptions were quantified using an instrument that described many behaviors indicative of gerotranscendence within the context of a written narrative depicting an older adult living in an assisted living facility. Respondents were then asked to rate these behaviors in terms of how unusual they were and how concerning they were. As hypothesized, results indicated that several behaviors indicative of gerotranscendence were rated as more concerning and unusual by college students compared to older adults. Implications of these findings in terms of interactions between younger and older individuals occurring in the community and within healthcare settings are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Active ageing and quality of life : Community-dwelling older adults in deprived neighbourhoods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bielderman, Johanne Henrike

    2016-01-01

    Socioeconomic factors may influence health and quality of life. Older adults residing in deprived neighbourhoods are at risk to develop negative health outcomes with adverse consequences for a person’s quality of life. Therefore, it is crucial to determine feasible and effective ways to maintain or

  8. Community-Dwelling Adults versus Older Adults: Psychopathology and the Continuum Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagana, Luciana; Tramutolo, Carmine; Boncori, Lucia; Cruciani, Anna Clara

    2012-01-01

    Little empirical evidence is available on older adults regarding the existence of a continuum between "normal" personality traits and DSM-IV-TR Axes I and II disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Given the typical complexity of clinical presentations in advanced age, it is feasible to expect a dimensional conceptualization…

  9. A critical appraisal of nutritional intervention studies in malnourished, community dwelling older persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schueren, M.A.E.; Wijnhoven, H A H; Kruizenga, H M; Visser, M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: With the rapidly increasing number of malnourished older persons in the community, this review aims to summarize the effects of nutritional intervention studies for this target group. METHODS: Based on 2 previous reviews (2009, 2011) an update of the literature was performed.

  10. Determining Risk of Falls in Community Dwelling Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Using Posttest Probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusardi, Michelle M; Fritz, Stacy; Middleton, Addie; Allison, Leslie; Wingood, Mariana; Phillips, Emma; Criss, Michelle; Verma, Sangita; Osborne, Jackie; Chui, Kevin K

    Falls and their consequences are significant concerns for older adults, caregivers, and health care providers. Identification of fall risk is crucial for appropriate referral to preventive interventions. Falls are multifactorial; no single measure is an accurate diagnostic tool. There is limited information on which history question, self-report measure, or performance-based measure, or combination of measures, best predicts future falls. First, to evaluate the predictive ability of history questions, self-report measures, and performance-based measures for assessing fall risk of community-dwelling older adults by calculating and comparing posttest probability (PoTP) values for individual test/measures. Second, to evaluate usefulness of cumulative PoTP for measures in combination. To be included, a study must have used fall status as an outcome or classification variable, have a sample size of at least 30 ambulatory community-living older adults (≥65 years), and track falls occurrence for a minimum of 6 months. Studies in acute or long-term care settings, as well as those including participants with significant cognitive or neuromuscular conditions related to increased fall risk, were excluded. Searches of Medline/PubMED and Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) from January 1990 through September 2013 identified 2294 abstracts concerned with fall risk assessment in community-dwelling older adults. Because the number of prospective studies of fall risk assessment was limited, retrospective studies that classified participants (faller/nonfallers) were also included. Ninety-five full-text articles met inclusion criteria; 59 contained necessary data for calculation of PoTP. The Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) was used to assess each study's methodological quality. Study design and QUADAS score determined the level of evidence. Data for calculation of sensitivity (Sn), specificity (Sp), likelihood ratios (LR), and Po

  11. Determining Risk of Falls in Community Dwelling Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Using Posttest Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Stacy; Middleton, Addie; Allison, Leslie; Wingood, Mariana; Phillips, Emma; Criss, Michelle; Verma, Sangita; Osborne, Jackie; Chui, Kevin K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Falls and their consequences are significant concerns for older adults, caregivers, and health care providers. Identification of fall risk is crucial for appropriate referral to preventive interventions. Falls are multifactorial; no single measure is an accurate diagnostic tool. There is limited information on which history question, self-report measure, or performance-based measure, or combination of measures, best predicts future falls. Purpose: First, to evaluate the predictive ability of history questions, self-report measures, and performance-based measures for assessing fall risk of community-dwelling older adults by calculating and comparing posttest probability (PoTP) values for individual test/measures. Second, to evaluate usefulness of cumulative PoTP for measures in combination. Data Sources: To be included, a study must have used fall status as an outcome or classification variable, have a sample size of at least 30 ambulatory community-living older adults (≥65 years), and track falls occurrence for a minimum of 6 months. Studies in acute or long-term care settings, as well as those including participants with significant cognitive or neuromuscular conditions related to increased fall risk, were excluded. Searches of Medline/PubMED and Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) from January 1990 through September 2013 identified 2294 abstracts concerned with fall risk assessment in community-dwelling older adults. Study Selection: Because the number of prospective studies of fall risk assessment was limited, retrospective studies that classified participants (faller/nonfallers) were also included. Ninety-five full-text articles met inclusion criteria; 59 contained necessary data for calculation of PoTP. The Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) was used to assess each study's methodological quality. Data Extraction: Study design and QUADAS score determined the level of evidence. Data for calculation

  12. User Acceptance of Wrist-Worn Activity Trackers Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Mixed Method Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Arjun; Kim, Ben; Nguyen, Olivier; Stolee, Paul; Tung, James; Lee, Joon

    2017-11-15

    Wearable activity trackers are newly emerging technologies with the anticipation for successfully supporting aging-in-place. Consumer-grade wearable activity trackers are increasingly ubiquitous in the market, but the attitudes toward, as well as acceptance and voluntary use of, these trackers in older population are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess acceptance and usage of wearable activity trackers in Canadian community-dwelling older adults, using the potentially influential factors as identified in literature and technology acceptance model. A mixed methods design was used. A total of 20 older adults aged 55 years and older were recruited from Southwestern Ontario. Participants used 2 different wearable activity trackers (Xiaomi Mi Band and Microsoft Band) separately for each segment in the crossover design study for 21 days (ie, 42 days total). A questionnaire was developed to capture acceptance and experience at the end of each segment, representing 2 different devices. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 4 participants, and a content analysis was performed. Participants ranged in age from 55 years to 84 years (mean age: 64 years). The Mi Band gained higher levels of acceptance (16/20, 80%) compared with the Microsoft Band (10/20, 50%). The equipment characteristics dimension scored significantly higher for the Mi Band (Pacceptance (Paccepting of wearable activity trackers, and they had a clear understanding of its value for their lives. Wearable activity trackers were uniquely considered more personal than other types of technologies, thereby the equipment characteristics including comfort, aesthetics, and price had a significant impact on the acceptance. Results indicated that privacy was less of concern for older adults, but it may have stemmed from a lack of understanding of the privacy risks and implications. These findings add to emerging research that investigates acceptance and factors that may influence acceptance of

  13. Transportation use in community-dwelling older adults: association with participation and leisure activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan-Oliel, Noémi; Mazer, Barbara; Gélinas, Isabelle; Dobbs, Bonnie; Lefebvre, Hélène

    2010-12-01

    This article presents a study that compared participation by elderly individuals living in the community according to primary transportation mode used, and estimated the association between transportation, personal factors, and environmental factors. Participants included 90 adults aged 65 and older (M=76.3 years; SD=7.7). They were classified according to their primary transportation mode: driver, passenger, public transport user, walk, or adapted transport/taxi user. Participation was measured with the Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique (CHART) and the Nottingham Leisure Questionnaire (NLQ). Overall, results indicated that drivers, public transport users, and walkers had higher participation levels compared to passengers and adapted transport/taxi users. This study suggests that clinicians should consider older adults' use of transportation in an attempt to encourage and maximize their participation.

  14. Physical Activity in Community Dwelling Older People: A Systematic Review of Reviews of Interventions and Context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olawale Olanrewaju

    Full Text Available The promotion and maintenance of higher physical activity (PA levels in the older population is an imperative for cognitive and healthy ageing but it is unclear what approaches are best suited to achieve this for the increasing number of older people living in the community. Effective policies should be informed by robust, multi-disciplinary and multi-dimensional evidence, which not only seeks what works, but in 'what context? In addition to evidence on the efficacy and effectiveness of PA for maintaining cognitive health, social contexts such as 'how do we actually get older people to partake in PA?' and 'how do we sustain that activity long-term?' also need highlighting. This review is part of a comprehensive evidence synthesis of preventive interventions in older age, with a focus on healthy behaviours to identify evidence gaps and inform policy relating to ageing well and cognitive health. An overview of systematic reviews of PA was conducted to explore three topics: (1 PA efficacy or effectiveness for primary prevention of cognitive decline in 55+; (2 Interventions efficacious or effective for increasing PA uptake and maintenance in 55+; (3 barriers and facilitators to PA in 55+.Multiple databases were searched for studies in English from OECD countries between 2000 and 2016. Quality of included reviews in questions (1 and (2 were assessed using AMSTAR. Review protocols were registered on PROSPERO (CRD42014015554, 42014015584, CRD42014015557 and reviews follow PRISMA guideline.Overall, 40 systematic reviews were included. Question 1 (n = 14. 8,360 participants. Evidence suggests that PA confer mild positive effects on cognition in older adults with and without previous cognitive impairment. However, there is insufficient evidence of a dose-response relationship. Evidence on the effects of PA on delay of dementia onset is inconclusive. Question 2 (n = 17. 79,650 participants. Evidence supports the effectiveness of a variety of interventions

  15. Reliability of the senior fitness test in community-dwelling older people with cognitive impairment.

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    Hesseberg, Karin; Bentzen, Hege; Bergland, Astrid

    2015-03-01

    In older people with cognitive impairment, we require reliable and valid measures to assess physical fitness and to measure change, for example, as a result of an exercise intervention. The purpose of our study was to determine the relative and absolute test-retest reliability of the Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in older people with cognitive impairment. A test-retest reliability study was conducted for the Senior Fitness Test in older people with cognitive impairment. Participants were tested at two time points with a time interval of 24 hours to 1 week between tests. The Intraclass Correlation Coefficient model 3.1 (ICC, 3.1) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was used as a measure of relative reliability. The standard error of measurement and minimal detectable change (MDC) were used to measure absolute reliability. The ICC reflected very high reliability (0.93-0.98) in all SFT items, indicating that there was no systematic error in the measurements. MDC values at the 90% CIs were calculated: chair stand test = 2.0 repetitions, armcurl test = 2.3 repetitions, chair sit and reach test = 6.0 cm, back scratch test = 4.6 cm, 2.45-m up-and-go test = 1.4 seconds and 6-minute walk test = 37.1 metres. The SFT battery showed high to very high test-retest reliability and thus may be suitable for detecting changes in physical fitness and evaluating physical fitness in older people with cognitive impairment, both in research and for clinical purposes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Physical activity in non-frail and frail older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, F.M.; Prins, R.G.; Etman, A.; Ploeg, H.P. van der; Vries, S.I. de; Lenthe, F.J. van; Pierik, F.H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Physical activity (PA) is important for healthy ageing. Better insight into objectively measured PA levels in older adults is needed, since most previous studies employed self-report measures for PA assessment, which are associated with overestimation of PA. Aim This study aimed to

  17. Factors associated with occasional and recurrent falls in Mexican community-dwelling older people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mino-León, Dolores; Cruz-Arenas, Esteban

    2018-01-01

    Falls are a frequent event among older adults that can cause wounds, disability, psychological disorders, and premature death. Although the large number of existing studies on the issue, few have been conducted in middle- and low-income countries. The objective of the present study is to identify the sociodemographic, medical, and functional performance factors associated with occasional and recurrent falls in Mexican older adults dwelling in community. Cross-sectional analysis of 9 598 adults ≥60 years old who participated in the fourth round (2015) of the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Bivariate tests were performed to evaluate the differences between covariates by distinct fall groups (no falls, occasional falls, and recurrent falls). Multiple logistic regressions with unadjusted and adjusted models were estimated. Approximately 46% of older adults had had at least one fall during the previous two years (one fall 16% and recurrent falls 30%). Occasional falls were only associated with being a woman; in addition to the sex, recurrent falls were strongly associated with advanced age, rural residence, bad and very bad self-perception of health status, activity-limiting pain, urinary incontinence, depression, arthritis, limitations in basic activities of daily living, and limitations in advanced activities of daily living. Falls, primarily recurrent falls, deserve to be addressed through multifactorial strategies that include different areas of intervention. PMID:29462159

  18. Storytelling by community-dwelling older adults: perspectives of home care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastel-Smith, Beth; Binder, Brenda; Hersch, Gayle; Davidson, Harriett A; Walsh, Teresa

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this exploratory, qualitative study was to investigate storytelling by home care clients to their home care workers (HCWs). Specific research questions were: (a) When does storytelling by a care recipient occur during usual care?; (b) How do HCWs engage older clients in storytelling?; (c) How do HCWs respond to the stories told by clients?; and (d) What is the perceived effect of storytelling by older clients on the relationship between the client and the HCW? Two focus groups consisting of 10 HCWs each were conducted. Verbatim transcripts of both focus groups were analyzed using the constant comparative analysis method. Categories and concepts were identified. Characteristics of the HCW and client set the stage for storytelling. The process of storytelling included context, triggers, and temporal aspects. HCWs also shared the content of stories, the impact on their relationship with the client, and the perceived effect on each individual. A visual model depicting the nature of storytelling in association with the care of older clients is presented. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Prospective Study of Arterial Stiffness and Subsequent Cognitive Decline Among Community-Dwelling Older Japanese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Taniguchi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV is inversely associated with cognitive function. However, it is not known whether baPWV predicts cognitive decline (CD in later life. We examined whether or not baPWV is an independent risk marker of subsequent CD in a population of older Japanese. Methods: Among 982 adults aged 65 years or older who participated in a baseline survey, 526 cognitively intact adults (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] score ≥24; mean [SD] age, 71.7 [5.6] years; women, 57.8% were followed for a period of up to 5 years. Pulse wave velocity was determined using an automated waveform analyser. Cognition was assessed by the MMSE, and CD was defined as a decrease of two points or more on the MMSE. Results: During an average follow-up of 3.4 years, 85 participants (16.2% developed CD. After controlling for important confounders, the odds ratios for CD in the highest and middle tertiles of baPWV, as compared with the lowest tertile, were 2.95 (95% confidence interval, 1.29–6.74 and 2.39 (95% confidence interval, 1.11–5.15, respectively. Conclusions: High baPWV was an independent predictor of CD in a general population of older adults and may be useful in the clinical evaluation of elders.

  20. Functional-Strengthening: A Pilot Study on Balance Control Improvement in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micah D. Josephson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Adults over the age of 65 have a 1 in 3 chance of falling; in 2012, more than $30 billion was spent on medical costs due to these falls. The division of resistance training and neuromotor training balance improvement interventions has shown to yield low to moderate results. Athletes combine both resistance training and skill development (function training to improve skilled performance. Older adults may not be performing high-level sports activities, but still require strength, power, and functional fitness levels to perform relatively high-level skills. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of combining resistance and functional training into functional-strength training on dynamic balance control in moderately active older adults. Eighteen healthy older adults were divided into three groups; functional resistance, standard resistance, and control. All groups met for their intervention twice a week for six weeks. Dynamic balance was assessed using the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale (0-40. Results of individual paired T-tests showed a significant improvement in balance control in the functional resistance group (t(5 =-3.492, p=.017 and a very large effect size (d=1.33 whereas neither the standard resistance nor control group had a significant reduction in the risk of falls. Manipulating multidimensional, neuromotor function during resistance training exercises is an effective method of applying the overload principle in order to reduce falls risk in moderately active seniors.

  1. Navigating the urban food environment: challenges and resilience of community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Plaza, Corrine E; Morland, Kimberly B; Pierre, Jennifer A; Spark, Arlene; Filomena, Susan E; Noyes, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Identify factors involved in food shopping among older urban adults. A qualitative study of 30 in-depth interviews and 15 "tagalong" shopping trip observations were conducted. Brooklyn, New York. Black, white, and Latino men and women aged 60-88 years. Transcripts were coded inductively to identify emergent themes. Older adults shopped at multiple stores to obtain the quality of foods preferred at prices that fit their food budgets. Participants often traveled outside their neighborhoods to accomplish this, and expressed dissatisfaction with the foods locally available. Adaptive food shopping behaviors included walking or the use of public transit to purchase food in small batches, as well as reliance on community resources and social network members. Participants identified a number of multilayered factors and challenges involved in procuring food. These factors conform to elements of ecological behavioral models described as intrapersonal, social, and environmental level influences and have resulted in adaptive behaviors for this population. These findings provide evidence that can be used to develop more effective programs, as well as promote testable interventions aimed at keeping older adults independent and capable of acquiring food that meets their age-specific needs. Copyright © 2013 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Feasibility of Pilates exercise to decrease falls risk: a pilot randomized controlled trial in community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Anna L; Talevski, Jason; Bohensky, Megan A; Brand, Caroline A; Cameron, Peter A; Morello, Renata T

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of Pilates exercise in older people to decrease falls risk and inform a larger trial. Pilot Randomized controlled trial. Community physiotherapy clinic. A total of 53 community-dwelling people aged ⩾60 years (mean age, 69.3 years; age range, 61-84). A 60-minute Pilates class incorporating best practice guidelines for exercise to prevent falls, performed twice weekly for 12 weeks. All participants received a letter to their general practitioner with falls risk information, fall and fracture prevention education and home exercises. Indicators of feasibility included: acceptability (recruitment, retention, intervention adherence and participant experience survey); safety (adverse events); and potential effectiveness (fall, fall injury and injurious fall rates; standing balance; lower limb strength; and flexibility) measured at 12 and 24 weeks. Recruitment was achievable but control group drop-outs were high (23%). Of the 20 participants who completed the intervention, 19 (95%) attended ⩾75% of the classes and reported classes were enjoyable and would recommend them to others. The rate of fall injuries at 24 weeks was 42% lower and injurious fall rates 64% lower in the Pilates group, however, was not statistically significant (P = 0.347 and P = 0.136). Standing balance, lower-limb strength and flexibility improved in the Pilates group relative to the control group (P Pilates in older people would be feasible and is warranted given the acceptability and potential positive effects of Pilates on fall injuries and fall risk factors. The protocol for this study is registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN1262000224820). © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Sleep-disordered breathing and daytime cardiac conduction abnormalities on 12-lead electrocardiogram in community-dwelling older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Younghoon; Picel, Katherine; Adabag, Selcuk; Vo, Tien; Taylor, Brent C; Redline, Susan; Stone, Katie; Mehra, Reena; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2016-12-01

    Nocturnal cardiac conduction abnormalities are commonly observed in patients with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). However, few population-based studies have examined the association between SDB and daytime cardiac conduction abnormalities. We examined a random sample of 471 community-dwelling men, aged ≥67 years, enrolled in the multi-center Outcomes of Sleep Disorders in Older Men (MrOS Sleep) study. SDB severity was categorized using percent of total sleep time with oxygen saturation <90 % (%TST < 90) and apnea hypopnea index (AHI). Cardiac conduction parameters were assessed by resting 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG). All analyses were adjusted for age, site, β-blocker use, coronary heart disease, calcium channel blocker use, and use of antiarrhythmic medications. Mean age was 77 ± 6 years, median %TST < 90 was 0.7 (IQR 0.00-3.40), and median AHI was 7.06 (IQR 2.55-15.32). Men with greater nocturnal hypoxemia (%TST < 90 ≥ 3.5 %) compared with those without hypoxemia (%TST < 90 < 1.0 %) had a lower odds of bradycardia (OR 0.55 [0.32-0.94]) and right bundle branch block (RBBB) (OR 0.24 [0.08-0.75]) but a higher odds of ventricular paced rhythm (OR 4.42 [1.29-15.19]). Heart rate (HR) increased in a graded manner with increasing %TST < 90 (p-trend 0.01) and increasing AHI (p-trend 0.006), but these gradients were small in absolute magnitude. There were no associations of SDB measures with other ECG conduction parameters. Greater nocturnal hypoxemia in older men was associated with a lower prevalence of daytime sinus bradycardia and RBBB, a higher prevalence of ventricular paced rhythm, and higher resting HR.

  4. Patterns of comorbidity in community-dwelling older people hospitalised for fall-related injury: A cluster analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finch Caroline F

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-dwelling older people aged 65+ years sustain falls frequently; these can result in physical injuries necessitating medical attention including emergency department care and hospitalisation. Certain health conditions and impairments have been shown to contribute independently to the risk of falling or experiencing a fall injury, suggesting that individuals with these conditions or impairments should be the focus of falls prevention. Since older people commonly have multiple conditions/impairments, knowledge about which conditions/impairments coexist in at-risk individuals would be valuable in the implementation of a targeted prevention approach. The objective of this study was therefore to examine the prevalence and patterns of comorbidity in this population group. Methods We analysed hospitalisation data from Victoria, Australia's second most populous state, to estimate the prevalence of comorbidity in patients hospitalised at least once between 2005-6 and 2007-8 for treatment of acute fall-related injuries. In patients with two or more comorbid conditions (multicomorbidity we used an agglomerative hierarchical clustering method to cluster comorbidity variables and identify constellations of conditions. Results More than one in four patients had at least one comorbid condition and among patients with comorbidity one in three had multicomorbidity (range 2-7. The prevalence of comorbidity varied by gender, age group, ethnicity and injury type; it was also associated with a significant increase in the average cumulative length of stay per patient. The cluster analysis identified five distinct, biologically plausible clusters of comorbidity: cardiopulmonary/metabolic, neurological, sensory, stroke and cancer. The cardiopulmonary/metabolic cluster was the largest cluster among the clusters identified. Conclusions The consequences of comorbidity clustering in terms of falls and/or injury outcomes of hospitalised patients

  5. Cognitive intervention through a training program for picture book reading in community-dwelling older adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Kuraoka, Masataka; Yasunaga, Masashi; Nonaka, Kumiko; Sakurai, Ryota; Takeuchi, Rumi; Murayama, Yoh; Ohba, Hiromi; Fujiwara, Yoshinori

    2014-11-21

    Non-pharmacological interventions are expected to be important strategies for reducing the age-adjusted prevalence of senile dementia, considering that complete medical treatment for cognitive decline has not yet been developed. From the viewpoint of long-term continuity of activity, it is necessary to develop various cognitive stimulating programs. The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of a cognitive intervention through a training program for picture book reading for community-dwelling older adults. Fifty-eight Japanese older participants were divided into the intervention and control groups using simple randomization (n =29 vs 29). In the intervention group, participants took part in a program aimed at learning and mastering methods of picture book reading as a form of cognitive training intervention. The control group listened to lectures about elderly health maintenance. Cognitive tests were conducted individually before and after the programs. The rate of memory retention, computed by dividing Logical Memory delayed recall by immediate recall, showed a significant interaction (p < .05) in analysis of covariance. Simple main effects showed that the rate of memory retention of the intervention group improved after the program completion (p < .05). In the participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) examined by Japanese version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA-J) (n =14 vs 15), significant interactions were seen in Trail Making Test-A (p < .01), Trail Making Test-B (p < .05), Kana pick-out test (p < .05) and the Mini-Mental State Examination (p < .05). The intervention effect was found in delayed verbal memory. This program is also effective for improving attention and executive function in those with MCI. The short-term interventional findings suggest that this program might contribute to preventing a decline in memory and executive function. UMIN000014712 (Date of ICMJE and WHO compliant trial information

  6. Drug Burden Index and change in cognition over time in community-dwelling older men: the CHAMP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamsen, Kris M; Gnjidic, Danijela; Hilmer, Sarah N; Ilomäki, Jenni; Le Couteur, David G; Blyth, Fiona M; Handelsman, David J; Naganathan, Vasi; Waite, Louise M; Cumming, Robert G; Bell, J Simon

    2017-03-01

    Anticholinergic and sedative medications are associated with acute cognitive impairment, but the long-term impact on change in cognition is unclear. This study investigated the effect of anticholinergic and sedative medications, quantified using the Drug Burden Index (DBI), on change in cognition over time in community-dwelling older men. This was a prospective cohort study of men aged ≥70 years in Sydney, Australia. DBI was assessed at baseline, 2, and 5 years. Cognitive performance was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) at each wave. Logistic quantile mixed-effects modelling was used to assess the adjusted effect of DBI on the median MMSE-time profile. Analyses were restricted to men with English-speaking backgrounds (n = 1059, 862, and 611 at baseline, 2, and 5 years). Overall, 292 (27.7%), 258 (29.9%), and 189 (31.3%) men used anticholinergic or sedative medications at baseline, 2, and 5 years. There was a concave relationship between MMSE and time, where higher DBI corresponded to lower MMSE scores (coefficient: -0.161; 95% CI: -0.250 to -0.071) but not acceleration of declining MMSE over time. Exposure to anticholinergic and sedative medications is associated with a small impairment in cognitive performance but not decline in cognition over time. KEY MESSAGES Exposure to anticholinergic and sedative medications, quantified using the Drug Burden Index, is associated with small cross-sectional impairments in cognitive performance. There was no evidence that exposure to anticholinergic and sedative medications is associated with accelerating decline in cognitive performance over a 5-year follow-up. Older people taking anticholinergic and sedative medications may derive immediate but small benefits in cognitive performance from clinical medication reviews to minimize or cease prescribing of these medications.

  7. The linear relationship between the Vulnerable Elders Survey-13 score and mortality in an Asian population of community-dwelling older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jye; Lin, Wender; Chang, Ling-Hui

    2018-01-01

    The Vulnerable Elders Survey-13 (VES-13) has been used as a screening tool to identify vulnerable community-dwelling older persons for more in-depth assessment and targeted interventions. Although many studies supported its use in different populations, few have addressed Asian populations. The optimal scaling system for the VES-13 in predicting health outcomes also has not been adequately tested. This study (1) assesses the applicability of the VES-13 to predict the mortality of community-dwelling older persons in Taiwan, (2) identifies the best scaling system for the VES-13 in predicting mortality using generalized additive models (GAMs), and (3) determines whether including covariates, such as socio-demographic factors and common geriatric syndromes, improves model fitting. This retrospective longitudinal cohort study analyzed the data of 2184 community-dwelling persons 65 years old or older from the 2003 wave of the national-wide Taiwan Longitudinal Study on Aging. Cox proportional hazards models and Generalized Additive Models (GAMs) were used. The VES-13 significantly predicted the mortality of Taiwan's community-dwelling elders. A one-point increase in the VES-13 score raised the risk of death by 26% (hazard ratio, 1.26; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-1.32). The hazard ratio of death increased linearly with each additional VES-13 score point, suggesting that using a continuous scale is appropriate. Inclusion of socio-demographic factors and geriatric syndromes improved the model-fitting. The VES-13 is appropriate for an Asian population. VES-13 scores linearly predict the mortality of this population. Adjusting the weighting of the physical activity items may improve the performance of the VES-13. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fall risk in Chinese community-dwelling older adults: A physiological profile assessment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siong, Kar-Ho; Kwan, Marcella Mun-San; Lord, Stephen R; Lam, Andrew Kwok-Cheung; Tsang, William Wai-Nam; Cheong, Allen Ming-Yan

    2016-02-01

    The short-form Physiological Profile Assessment (PPA) is increasingly used in clinical practice for assessing fall risk in older people. However, a normative database is only available for Caucasian populations. The purpose of the present study was to develop a normative database for Hong Kong Chinese older people and examine the fall risk profile of this population. A total of 622 participants aged 60-95 years were recruited. Participants underwent the PPA (containing tests of contrast sensitivity, proprioception, quadriceps strength, reaction time and sway), and composite fall risk scores were computed. Participants were then followed up for falls for 1 year. Quadriceps strength and lower limb proprioception scores were comparable with those reported for Caucasian populations. However, contrast sensitivity, simple reaction time and postural sway scores were relatively poor. The average composite fall risk score was 1.7 ± 1.5, showing a "moderate" fall risk when compared with the Caucasian norms. Despite the relatively poor physical performances and moderately high fall risk scores, the incidence of one plus falls in the 1-year follow-up period was just 16.4%, with just 2.6% reporting two plus falls. The area under the curve for composite fall risk scores in discriminating fallers from non-fallers was 0.53 (95% CI 0.45-0.60). Despite poorer performance in PPA tests, the incidence of prospective falls in a Hong Kong Chinese population was low. In consequence, the PPA could not discriminate well between fallers and non-fallers. The present study provided normality data for short-form PPA measures for older Chinese people as a reference for further studies. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  9. Functional Goals and Predictors of Their Attainment in Low-Income Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldersen, Brian W; Wolff, Jennifer L; Roberts, Laken; Bridges, Allysin E; Gitlin, Laura N; Szanton, Sarah L

    2017-05-01

    To describe functional goals and factors associated with goal attainment among low-income older adults with disabilities living in the community. Secondary analysis. Participants' homes. Older adults (N=226) with disability who participated in the Community Aging in Place, Advancing Better Living for Elders trial. A 5-month, home-based, person-directed, structured program delivered by an interprofessional team: occupational therapist, registered nurse, and handyman. Process of occupational therapist goal setting and attainment at the final occupational therapist visit. Participants identified 728 functional goals (mean of 3.2 goals per participant), most commonly related to transferring (22.0%; n=160 goals), changing or maintaining body position (21.4%; n=156 goals), and stair climbing (13.0%; n=95 goals). Participants attained 73.5% (n=535) of goals. Goal attainment was highest for stair climbing (86.3%), transferring (85.6%), and self-care (84.6%); walking goals were less likely attained (54.0%). Goal attainment was not associated with age, sex, education, depressive symptoms, function, or health-related quality of life but was less likely among participants who had severe pain compared with those without pain (adjusted odds ratio, 0.38; 95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.86). When participant readiness to change score increases by 1 point on the 4-point scale, goal attainment was 62% more likely (adjusted odds ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.14-2.29). Home-based collaborative goal setting between older adults and occupational therapists is feasible and particularly effective when individuals are ready or willing to adopt new strategies to achieve identified goals. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Falls in the community-dwelling older adult: A review for primary-care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Theresa A; DeCherrie, Linda V; Thomas, David C

    2007-01-01

    Falls in the elderly are an important independent marker of frailty. Up to half of elderly people over 65 experience a fall every year. They are associated with high morbidity and mortality and are responsible for greater than 20 billion dollars a year in healthcare costs in the United States. This article presents a review and guide for the primary care provider of the predisposing and situational risk factors for falls; comprehensive assessment for screening and tailored intervention; and discussion of single and multicomponent measures for fall prevention and management in the older person living in the community. Interventions for the cognitively impaired and demented elderly will also be addressed. PMID:18225454

  11. Lower leg muscle density is independently associated with fall status in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank-Wilson, A W; Farthing, J P; Chilibeck, P D; Arnold, C M; Davison, K S; Olszynski, W P; Kontulainen, S A

    2016-07-01

    Muscle density is a risk factor for fractures in older adults; however, its association with falls is not well described. After adjusting for biologically relevant confounding factors, a unit decrease in muscle density was associated with a 17 % increase in odds of reporting a fall, independent of functional mobility. Falls are the leading cause of injury, disability, and fractures in older adults. Low muscle density (i.e., caused by muscle adiposity) and functional mobility have been identified as risk factors for incident disability and fractures in older adults; however, it is not known if these are also independently associated with falls. The purpose of this study was to explore the associations of muscle density and functional mobility with fall status. Cross-sectional observational study of 183 men and women aged 60-98 years. Descriptive data, including a 12-month fall recall, Timed Up and Go (TUG) test performance, lower leg muscle area, and density. Odds ratio (OR) of being a faller were calculated, adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, general health status, diabetes, and comorbidities. Every mg/cm(3) increase in muscle density (mean 70.2, SD 2.6 mg/cm(3)) independently reduced the odds of being a faller by 19 % (OR 0.81 [95 % CI 0.67 to 0.97]), and every 1 s longer TUG test time (mean 9.8, SD 2.6 s) independently increased the odds by 17 % (OR 1.17 [95 % CI 1.01 to 1.37]). When both muscle density and TUG test time were included in the same model, only age (OR 0.93 [95 % CI 0.87 to 0.99]) and muscle density (OR 0.83 [95 % CI 0.69 to 0.99]) were independently associated with fall status. Muscle density was associated with fall status, independent of functional mobility. Muscle density may compliment functional mobility tests as a biometric outcome for assessing fall risk in well-functioning older adults.

  12. Correlate of self-care and self-neglect among community-dwelling older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Mardan, Homa; Hamid, TengkuAizan; Redzuan, Ma?rof; Ibrahim, Rahimah

    2014-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of self-neglect among the elderly is expected to rise with a rapid increase in the growth of the older population. However, self-neglect in the elderly and the factors related to it are not fully understood due to the limited research in the area, lack of consensus in the definition of the concept, and limited instrumentation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between selected socio-demographic factors on self-care and self-neglect among ...

  13. Participation restriction, not fear of falling, predicts actual balance and mobility abilities in rural community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Leslie K; Painter, Jane A; Emory, Amanda; Whitehurst, Patricia; Raby, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Fear of falling (FOF) has been correlated with an increased risk for falls, self-restriction of physical activity, and subsequent decrease in quality of life in older adults. The relationship between perceived FOF, participation restriction, and balance and mobility abilities is unclear, as results from prior studies are inconsistent. Few studies have used the Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (SAFE) as a standard measure of FOF, although this survey provides both a measure of FOF and participation restriction. Only one study has explored the relationship of individual items from the SAFE with balance and mobility tests that predict fall risk. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between FOF and participation restriction as measured by the SAFE and actual balance and mobility abilities in a diverse group of older adults. Eighty-two community-dwelling older adults (17 men) with a mean age of 74 (SD = 8.8; range = 55-91) participated in this study. The sample comprised 45% African Americans and 54% whites. Fear of falling and participation restriction were assessed using the SAFE, a self-assessment survey. The SAFE assesses information about participation in 11 functional activities as well as the extent to which fear is a source of participation restriction. Balance and functional mobility were measured using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Timed Get Up & Go Test (TUG), respectively. Participants were categorized as low (N = 36), mixed (N = 19), or high (N = 24) risk for future falls based on their past fall history and results on the BBS and the TUG. Data analysis included χ(2) and Spearman correlation and 2 regression analyses. Both SAFE FOF and participation restriction scores were significantly correlated with BBS and TUG scores. However, SAFE participation restriction scores, but not SAFE FOF scores, predicted BBS and TUG scores. SAFE FOF scores could discriminate older adults at high risk for falls from

  14. Nutritional Status and Falls in Community-Dwelling Older People: A Longitudinal Study of a Population-Based Random Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Ming-Hung; Guo, How-Ran

    2014-01-01

    Background Falls are common in older people and may lead to functional decline, disability, and death. Many risk factors have been identified, but studies evaluating effects of nutritional status are limited. To determine whether nutritional status is a predictor of falls in older people living in the community, we analyzed data collected through the Survey of Health and Living Status of the Elderly in Taiwan (SHLSET). Methods SHLSET include a series of interview surveys conducted by the government on a random sample of people living in community dwellings in the nation. We included participants who received nutritional status assessment using the Mini Nutritional Assessment Taiwan Version 2 (MNA-T2) in the 1999 survey when they were 53 years or older and followed up on the cumulative incidence of falls in the one-year period before the interview in the 2003 survey. Results At the beginning of follow-up, the 4440 participants had a mean age of 69.5 (standard deviation  = 9.1) years, and 467 participants were “not well-nourished,” which was defined as having an MNA-T2 score of 23 or less. In the one-year study period, 659 participants reported having at least one fall. After adjusting for other risk factors, we found the associated odds ratio for falls was 1.73 (95% confidence interval, 1.23, 2.42) for “not well-nourished,” 1.57 (1.30, 1.90) for female gender, 1.03 (1.02, 1.04) for one-year older, 1.55 (1.22, 1.98) for history of falls, 1.34 (1.05, 1.72) for hospital stay during the past 12 months, 1.66 (1.07, 2.58) for difficulties in activities of daily living, and 1.53 (1.23, 1.91) for difficulties in instrumental activities of daily living. Conclusion Nutritional status is an independent predictor of falls in older people living in the community. Further studies are warranted to identify nutritional interventions that can help prevent falls in the elderly. PMID:24614184

  15. Ethnic Differences in Fall Risk Among Community-Dwelling Older People in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fakiri, Fatima; Kegel, Amber A; Schouten, Gea M; Berns, Mary P H

    2018-03-01

    This study measures the prevalence of falls and fear of falling among a population sample aged ≥65 years from different ethnic minorities living in the Netherlands, and examines whether ethnicity contributed to the differences in fall risk. We analyzed data from 8,892 Dutch, Moroccan, Turkish, and Surinamese participants. Descriptive statistics and multiple regression analyses were conducted with falls and fear of falling as the dependent variable and ethnicity as the independent variable. Moroccan, Turkish, and Surinamese older adults had a significantly higher odds ratio (OR) for fear of falling than their Dutch counterparts (OR = 2.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.05, 4.31]; OR = 2.09, 95% CI = [1.07, 4.09]; and OR = 2.49, 95% CI = [1.53, 4.03], respectively). The association between ethnicity and falling disappeared after controlling for socio-demographic and health characteristics. Dutch minority older adults were at higher risk for fear of falling than their Dutch counterparts. The study underlines the need for targeting culture-sensitive interventions.

  16. Urinary incontinence, mental health and loneliness among community-dwelling older adults in Ireland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stickley, Andrew; Santini, Ziggi Ivan; Koyanagi, Ai

    2017-01-01

    the UCLA Loneliness Scale short form. Information was also obtained on depression (CES-D), anxiety (HADS-A) and other sociodemographic variables. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between variables. Results In a model adjusted for all potential confounders except mental...... disorders, compared to no UI, any UI was associated with significantly higher odds for loneliness (odds ratio: 1.51). When depression was included in the analysis, the association was attenuated and became non-significant while the inclusion of anxiety had a much smaller effect. Similarly, although...... frequency of UI and activity limitations due to UI were both significantly associated with loneliness prior to adjustment for mental disorders, neither association remained significant after adjustment for both depression and anxiety. Conclusion UI is associated with higher odds for loneliness among older...

  17. Gait characteristics under different walking conditions: Association with the presence of cognitive impairment in community-dwelling older people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie De Cock

    Full Text Available Gait characteristics measured at usual pace may allow profiling in patients with cognitive problems. The influence of age, gender, leg length, modified speed or dual tasking is unclear.Cross-sectional analysis was performed on a data registry containing demographic, physical and spatial-temporal gait parameters recorded in five walking conditions with a GAITRite® electronic carpet in community-dwelling older persons with memory complaints. Four cognitive stages were studied: cognitively healthy individuals, mild cognitive impaired patients, mild dementia patients and advanced dementia patients.The association between spatial-temporal gait characteristics and cognitive stages was the most prominent: in the entire study population using gait speed, steps per meter (translation for mean step length, swing time variability, normalised gait speed (corrected for leg length and normalised steps per meter at all five walking conditions; in the 50-to-70 years old participants applying step width at fast pace and steps per meter at usual pace; in the 70-to-80 years old persons using gait speed and normalised gait speed at usual pace, fast pace, animal walk and counting walk or steps per meter and normalised steps per meter at all five walking conditions; in over-80 years old participants using gait speed, normalised gait speed, steps per meter and normalised steps per meter at fast pace and animal dual-task walking. Multivariable logistic regression analysis adjusted for gender predicted in two compiled models the presence of dementia or cognitive impairment with acceptable accuracy in persons with memory complaints.Gait parameters in multiple walking conditions adjusted for age, gender and leg length showed a significant association with cognitive impairment. This study suggested that multifactorial gait analysis could be more informative than using gait analysis with only one test or one variable. Using this type of gait analysis in clinical practice

  18. Longitudinal Assessment of PTH in Community-Dwelling Older Women—Elevations Are Not Associated With Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchebner, David; Malmgren, Linnea; Christensson, Anders; McGuigan, Fiona; Gerdhem, Paul; Ridderstråle, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Context: In older women, the magnitude of elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) and its consequence is unclear. Objective: To describe normal PTH profiles over time and the association with mortality. Design and Participants: There were 1044 community-dwelling women in the Malmö Osteoporosis Prospective Risk Assessment cohort (OPRA) who attended baseline (age 75 years). Follow-ups were attended by 715 (age 80 years) and 382 (age 85 years). Main Outcome Measures: PTH, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and mortality. Results: At age 75 years, PTH levels for most (n = 877, 88%) were within the normal reference range (NRR) (i.e., PTH increased in 60% of all women (n = 390) but increases of up to 50% above baseline values (64%; n=250) still resulted in PTH levels within the NRR. These women had lower 25OHD levels (74 vs 83 nmol/L, P = 0.001). Only when increases were >50% was PTH elevated beyond the NRR (mean 7.1 ± 3.3). Here, a pronounced decline in eGFR (56 vs 61 mL/min/1.73 m2, P = 0.002) was found, despite no further changes in 25OHD. Extending the observational period until age 85 years gave similar results. Baseline PTH levels above NRR were associated with mortality (hazard ratio, 1.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-1.8; P = 0.007), although not after adjustment for covariates (P = 0.082). Conclusions: Most women remained within normal PTH ranges despite large increases of up to 50%. PTH elevated above normal is not independently associated with mortality; impaired kidney function and low 25OHD status may be more prognostic in the very old. PMID:29264515

  19. Longitudinal Assessment of PTH in Community-Dwelling Older Women-Elevations Are Not Associated With Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchebner, David; Malmgren, Linnea; Christensson, Anders; McGuigan, Fiona; Gerdhem, Paul; Ridderstråle, Martin; Åkesson, Kristina

    2017-06-01

    In older women, the magnitude of elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) and its consequence is unclear. To describe normal PTH profiles over time and the association with mortality. There were 1044 community-dwelling women in the Malmö Osteoporosis Prospective Risk Assessment cohort (OPRA) who attended baseline (age 75 years). Follow-ups were attended by 715 (age 80 years) and 382 (age 85 years). PTH, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and mortality. At age 75 years, PTH levels for most (n = 877, 88%) were within the normal reference range (NRR) ( i.e. , PTH increased in 60% of all women (n = 390) but increases of up to 50% above baseline values (64%; n=250) still resulted in PTH levels within the NRR. These women had lower 25OHD levels (74 vs 83 nmol/L, P = 0.001). Only when increases were >50% was PTH elevated beyond the NRR (mean 7.1 ± 3.3). Here, a pronounced decline in eGFR (56 vs 61 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , P = 0.002) was found, despite no further changes in 25OHD. Extending the observational period until age 85 years gave similar results. Baseline PTH levels above NRR were associated with mortality (hazard ratio, 1.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-1.8; P = 0.007), although not after adjustment for covariates ( P = 0.082). Most women remained within normal PTH ranges despite large increases of up to 50%. PTH elevated above normal is not independently associated with mortality; impaired kidney function and low 25OHD status may be more prognostic in the very old.

  20. Assessment of nutritional risk in community-dwelling older adults (65 to 75 years) in Kolkata, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Mondrita; Saha, Indranil; Chaudhuri, Debnath

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to profile nutritional risk factors in a population of community-dwelling older adults in Kolkata, India. We applied the short version of the Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF) questionnaire among 500 participants (65 to 75 years)--263 males and 237 females. The prevalence of undernutrition was 8.8% in females and 4.9% in males; a risk of undernutrition was found in 24.5% females and 17.5% males. All those with undernutrition or at-risk were studied further using the full version of the MNA. Data regarding education, occupation, socioeconomic status, and food intake pattern were also collected. Females had a significantly lower (P females were financially dependent on others. Moderate appetite loss was commonly found (64.9%), and in 24.3% of the participants appetite loss was severe. Digestive and chewing problems were present in 32.4% and 21.6% of study participants, respectively. The rate of psychological stress and/or acute disease 3 months prior to study was 47%, and 62.2% of the study population were taking 3 or more medicines per day. Weight loss of greater than 3 kg and of 1 to 3 kg during past 3 months of the study period was observed in 27% and 32.5% of the population, respectively. Undernourished individuals were also found to consume fewer protein-rich foods. We hypothesize that low education levels and lack of financial independence were the strongest underlying causes of high undernutrition in this population, particularly, among females.

  1. Geriatric Case Managers' Perspectives on Suicide Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovak, Karen; Pope, Natalie D; Brewer, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that clinical screening for suicide, along with firearm assessment and safety counseling, are important in service provision to older adults. It is unclear, however, how geriatric case managers respond to these issues. This study surveyed geriatric case managers (n=161) from Area Agencies on Aging in Ohio on their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to suicide, firearm assessment, and safety counseling. Results indicated that the majority of respondents (70%) agree their clients are at risk for suicide. However, few (30%) in this study reported that they assess for firearms and less than half (48%) discuss firearms with their clients/family members when specifically assessing for suicide. Analyses identified barriers that contribute to the decreased likelihood that routine firearm assessment and safety counseling would occur, such as lack of training and time. Implications include the need for training with geriatric case managers that addresses barriers to suicide, firearm assessment and safety counseling as a means to decrease these population risks.

  2. Worship Attendance and the Disability Process in Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the contribution of religious involvement to age-related declines in health by examining the association of worship attendance with measures of different stages in the disability continuum. Method. Participants included 5,863 Black and White older adults from the Chicago Health and Aging Project. Worship attendance was coded in 3 levels: very frequent (several times a week or more), frequent (several times a month), and infrequent (several times a year or less). Measures of disability included self-reported instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and activities of daily living (ADL) disability as well as observed physical function. Results. In multiple regression models adjusted for demographic factors, compared with those with infrequent worship attendance, those with frequent or very frequent attendance had lower levels of IADL and ADL disability and higher levels of physical performance at baseline. These associations remained significant in models that adjusted for health and cognitive status. There was no association between frequency of worship attendance and change in disability or physical function over time. Discussion. These results suggest that more frequent worship attendance does not contribute to slowing the progress of disability in late life. Future research is needed to better understand the development of the differences in disability associated with worship attendance observed at baseline. PMID:23325504

  3. Psychosocial factors and health as determinants of quality of life in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Caroline E; Gow, Alan J; Corley, Janie; Pattie, Alison; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J

    2012-04-01

    It is important to understand the determinants of differences in quality of life in old age and to include a wide range of possible predictors. The present study investigated the determinants of quality of life in two groups of older adults for whom there was an unusually informative set of possible predictor variables. Participants were members of the Lothian Birth Cohorts of 1921 (n = 550) or 1936 (n = 1,091). Four facets of quality of life (QoL) and general QoL were measured using the WHOQOL-BREF. Possible determinants included personality traits, measured with the International Personality Item Pool (IPIP) scales; childhood and old age general cognitive ability, measured with the Moray House Test; minor psychological symptoms, measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS); physical health, assessed by grip strength and cardiovascular disease history; and sociodemographic factors, assessed by interview. Linear regression analyses revealed that HADS depression had the greatest influence on quality of life. Personality traits, most notably Emotional Stability, also predicted quality of life to varying degrees, along with factors reflecting current life circumstances. There were differences between the two cohorts in the variables which predicted quality of life. There were different, conceptually relevant, contributions to the different QoL facets. Personality traits and minor depressive symptoms have an important influence on self-reported quality of life in old age. Quality of life may be influenced more by current than past circumstances, and this relationship may change with age.

  4. Depressive symptomatology and fracture risk in community-dwelling older men and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitson, Heather E.; Sanders, Linda; Pieper, Carl F.; Gold, Deborah T.; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Richards, J. Brent; Adachi, Jonathan D.; Lyles, Kenneth W.

    2009-01-01

    Background and aims Previous studies suggest that depression increases risk of falls, low bone mineral density, and fractures. Our aim was to evaluate whether depressive symptomatology alone predicts 5-year clinical fracture risk in older adults. Methods In this secondary analysis of a communitybased, prospective cohort study including 4175 women and 1652 men in Canada, depressive symptomatology was assessed at baseline by the mental health inventory-5 (MHI-5) and the mental component score (MCS) of the short form 36 questionnaire (SF-36). Fracture events were assessed annually for five years; all reported incident fragility fractures were confirmed radiographically. Results Depressive symptomatology did not predict time to first fracture in men (hazard ratio [HR] 0.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45–1.65) or women (HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.86–1.39). Results were similar after controlling for potential confounders. Depressive symptoms were not significantly associated with baseline bone mineral density at the lumbar spine or femoral neck. Women with depressive symptoms were more likely to report falls in the previous month (odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% CI 1.12–2.06, p=0.01). This association did not achieve statistical significance in men (OR 1.71, 95% CI 0.96–3.04, p=0.07). Conclusion In this large, community cohort, depressive symptomatology did not predict five-year risk of clinical fracture. Further research is needed to determine if individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) are at higher fracture risk and whether neuroendocrine or hormonal dysregulation might contribute to such risk in MDD. PMID:19179844

  5. Assessment of balance and risk for falls in a sample of community-dwelling adults aged 65 and older

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colonvega Makasha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls are a major health concern for older adults and their impact is a significant public health problem. The chief modifiable risk factors for falls in community-dwellers are psychotropic drugs, polypharmacy, environmental hazards, poor vision, lower extremity impairments, and balance impairments. This study focused on balance impairments. Its purpose was to assess the feasibility of recruiting older adults with possible balance problems for research conducted at a chiropractic research center, and to explore the utility of several widely used balance instruments for future studies of the effect of chiropractic care on balance in older adults. Methods This descriptive study was conducted from September through December 2004. Participants were recruited through a variety of outreach methods, and all were provided with an educational intervention. Data were collected at each of two visits through questionnaires, interviews, and physical examinations. Balance was assessed on both visits using the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABCS, the Berg Balance Scale (BBS, and the One Leg Standing Test (OLST. Results A total of 101 participants enrolled in the study. Advertising in the local senior newspaper was the most effective method of recruitment (46%. The majority of our participants were white (86% females (67%. About one third (32% of participants had a baseline BBS score below 46, the cut-off point for predicting risk of falling. A mean improvement in BBS scores of 1.7 points was observed on the second visit. For the subgroup with baseline scores below 46, the mean change was 4.5 points, but the group mean remained below 46 (42.5. Conclusion Recruitment of community-dwelling seniors for fall-related research conducted at a chiropractic research center appears feasible, and the most successful recruitment strategies for this center appeared to be a combination of targeted newspaper ads and personal contact through

  6. Occurrence of Malnutrition and Associated Factors in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Those with a Recent Diagnosis of Cancer Are at Higher Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Broeke, C; De Burghgraeve, T; Ummels, M; Gescher, N; Deckx, L; Tjan-Heijnen, V; Buntinx, F; van den Akker, M

    2018-01-01

    In older adults, nutritional health is essential for good quality of life and living independently at home. Especially in cancer patients, malnutrition is common and known to complicate treatment. This study aims to evaluate the nutritional status and its associated factors in community-dwelling older adults with and without cancer. This is an observational study. This study focuses on older community-dwelling people. This study included older people with and without cancer (≥70 years). Cancer patients included patients with a new diagnosis of breast, lung, prostate, or colorectal cancer. Data collection included measures of nutritional status, quality of life, depression, fatigue, distress and functional status. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to assess the association between personal characteristics and malnutrition. Data were available for 657 people; 383 people without cancer and 274 with a cancer diagnosis. Overall, malnutrition was detected in 245 (37.5%) people; in cancer patients this was 66.1%. Multivariate analysis showed that having cancer (OR 14.4, 95% CI: 8.01 - 23.3), being male (OR 2.38, 95% CI: 1.49 - 3.70), having depression (OR 13.5, 95% CI: 6.02-30.0), distress (OR 2.60, 95% CI: 1.55 - 4.37) and impaired instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) (OR 2.63, 95% CI: 1.63 - 4.24) were associated with a higher risk of malnutrition. The prevalence of malnutrition in community-dwelling older people is high, particularly in patients with cancer. Benchmarking and routine screening of older patients may be helpful strategies to increase awareness of (risk of) malnutrition among professionals.

  7. Assessment of postural balance in community-dwelling older adults - methodological aspects and effects of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Martin Grønbech

    2014-01-01

    The overall purpose of this thesis was to examine selected methodological aspects and novel approaches for measuring postural balance older adults, and to examine the effects of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training on selected physiological, psychological and functional outcome variables in community-dwelling older adults. In Study I balance control was investigated using force plate analysis of Centre of Pressure (COP) excursion during static bilateral standing in 32 community-dwelling older adults at three different time-points (09:00, 12:30, and 16:00) throughout the day. An overall significant time-of-day effect was observed for all selected COP variables. The greatest change in all COP variables was observed (on average ~15%) between midday (12:30) and the afternoon (16:00), indicating that a systematic time-of-day influence on static postural balance exists in community-dwelling older adults. Consequently, longitudinal (i.e. pre-to-post training) comparisons of postural balance in in older adults with repeated assessments should be conducted at the same time-of-day. In Study II a novel approach for measuring postural balance (using the Nintendo Wii Stillness and Agility tests) was examined for reproducibility and concurrent validity in 30 community-dwelling older adults. While the Nintendo Wii Stillness test showed a high reproducibility, a systematic learning effect between successive sessions was observed for the Agility test. Moderate-to-excellent concurrent validity was seen for the Stillness test. In contrast, the Agility test revealed a poor concurrent validity. In conclusion, the Wii Stillness test seems to represent a low-cost objective reproducible test of postural balance in community-dwelling older adults and appears feasible in various clinical settings. A habituation (familiarization) period is necessary for the Wii Agility test to avoid a systematic learning effect between successive test sessions. Study III investigated the effect of ten

  8. Dental caries, periodontal disease, and cardiac arrhythmias in community-dwelling older persons aged 80 and older: is there a link?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm-Pedersen, Poul; Avlund, Kirsten; Morse, Douglas E

    2005-01-01

    the Kungsholmen Project, which is an ongoing, longitudinal, population-based study of the oldest old. The present study included 125 dentate individuals. MEASUREMENTS: Data from interviews, a medical examination, and an oral examination. The assessment of cardiac arrhythmia was based on a clinical examination......OBJECTIVES: To examine whether caries or periodontitis is associated with cardiac arrhythmias in community-dwelling people aged 80 and older. SETTING: Urban, community-based population in Stockholm, Sweden. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. PARTICIPANTS: Eligible persons were identified through...... indicate that there may be a link between active root caries and cardiac arrhythmias in the oldest old. Nevertheless, although a biological pathway is not obvious, it is plausible that both are simply markers of declining general health. The results suggest the need for further study of these relationships....

  9. Frailty and cardiovascular risk in community-dwelling elderly: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Natalia Aquaroni; Pessoa, Germane Silva; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Dias, Rosangela Correa; Perracini, Monica Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests a possible bidirectional connection between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the frailty syndrome in older people. To verify the relationship between CVD risk factors and the frailty syndrome in community-dwelling elderly. This population-based study used data from the Fragilidade em Idosos Brasileiros (FIBRA) Network Study, a cross-sectional study designed to investigate frailty profiles among Brazilian older adults. Frailty status was defined as the presence of three or more out of five of the following criteria: unintentional weight loss, weakness, self-reported fatigue, slow walking speed, and low physical activity level. The ascertained CVD risk factors were self-reported and/or directly measured hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, waist circumference measurement, and smoking. Of the 761 participants, 9.7% were characterized as frail, 48.0% as pre-frail, and 42.3% as non-frail. The most prevalent CVD risk factor was hypertension (84.4%) and the lowest one was smoking (10.4%). It was observed that among those participants with four or five risk factors there was a higher proportion of frail and pre-frail compared with non-frail (Fisher's exact test: P=0.005; P=0.021). Self-reported diabetes mellitus was more prevalent among frail and pre-frail participants when compared with non-frail participants (Fisher's exact test: P≤0.001; P≤0.001). There was little agreement between self-reported hypertension and hypertension identified by blood pressure measurement. Hypertension was highly prevalent among the total sample. In addition, frail and pre-frail older people corresponded to a substantial proportion of those with more CVD risk factors, especially diabetes mellitus, highlighting the need for preventive strategies in order to avoid the co-occurrence of CVD and frailty.

  10. Age-dependent changes in physical performance and body composition in community-dwelling Japanese older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makizako, Hyuma; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Doi, Takehiko; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Lee, Sangyoon; Lee, Sung Chul; Harada, Kazuhiro; Hotta, Ryo; Nakakubo, Sho; Bae, Seongryu; Harada, Kenji; Yoshida, Daisuke; Uemura, Kazuki; Anan, Yuya; Park, Hyuntae; Suzuki, Takao

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the age-dependent changes in the parameters of physical performance and body composition in Japanese older adults who are independently dwelling in the community. We also examined whether the age-dependent changes differ among physical performance and body composition parameters. Cross-sectional data from 10 092 community-dwelling older adults (mean age 73.6 years; 5296 women) were analyzed. The measures of physical performance included hand-grip strength, the five-times-sit-to-stand test, and walking speed. Body composition parameters (body weight, fat mass, and appendicular skeletal muscle mass) were measured with a bioelectrical impedance analyser. Correlations between age and the physical performance and body composition parameters were tested. The T-scores of physical performance and body composition measurements were calculated and presented according to 5-year age groups to examine the differences in age-dependent changes in physical performance and body composition parameters. All physical performance measures significantly decreased with aging. The cumulative mean T-scores according to age group showed different age-dependent changes between body mass index (BMI) and appendicular skeletal muscle mass index (ASMI) (cumulative mean T-score change of BMI and ASMI of -5.7 to -2.9 and -12.7 to -12.1, respectively). The slope declines in age-associated changes were greater in grip strength (β = -0.77, 95% confidence interval = -0.82 to -0.76) for men and in walking speed (β = -0.95, 95% confidence interval = -0.99 to -0.90) for women. The patterns of age-dependent decreases in physical performance measures differed among parameters and between sexes. There is a possibility of a difference in the age-related slope patterns among parameters; decreases in grip strength in men and walking speed in women may be more prominent with advancing age. Furthermore, the decrease in ASMI with age is more striking than that of BMI.

  11. Factors associated with recognition and prioritization for falling, and the effect on fall incidence in community dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Sofie; Schoe, Jolanda; van Rijn, Marjon; Abu-Hanna, Ameen; Moll van Charante, Eric P; van der Velde, Nathalie; de Rooij, Sophia E

    2015-12-17

    risk and prioritizes for preventive care is small. Recurrent falls in the past year, severe fear-of-falling and use of a walking aid were associated with prioritization. Prioritization was associated with a greater fall-risk during first six months, which appeared to level out at one-year follow-up. These results could aid in the identification of community-dwellings likely to benefit from fall-preventive interventions. NTR2653 , 17 December 2010.

  12. The walk ratio: Investigation of invariance across walking conditions and gender in community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogen, Bård; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf; Ranhoff, Anette Hylen; Aaslund, Mona Kristin

    2018-02-21

    The step length-cadence ratio, also called the walk ratio (WR; cm/steps/min) is a measure of cautious gait, poor balance control or impaired gait, but has not been investigated for both genders in a general population of older adults across different speeds and conditions. The participants were community-dwelling volunteers between 70 and 81 years. They walked 6.5 m under four different conditions: At preferred speed, fast speed, during a dual task condition and on an uneven surface. Step length (cm) and cadence (steps/minute) was captured using a body-worn sensor. Both cadence and step lengths were adjusted for body height. 70 older adults participated (mean age 75.5 (SD 3.4), 60 percent women). The WR was 0.60 cm/steps/min (SD 0.07) during preferred speed walking, 0.58 cm/steps/min (SD 0.07) during fast walking, 0.68 cm/steps/min (SD 0.18) during dual task-walking and 0.59 cm/steps/min (0.07) during uneven surface-walking. In planned pairwise comparisons, the WR during dual task was significantly different from preferred speed walking (mean difference -0.087 cm/steps/min, 95% CI -0.140, -0.033), from fast speed walking (mean difference -0.098 cm/steps/min, 95% CI -0.154, -0.041) and uneven surface walking (mean difference 0.092 cm/steps/min, 95% CI 0.040, 0.145). There were no gender differences except during the fast walking condition, where women had a significantly lower WR than the men (0.56 cm/steps/min vs 0.61 cm/steps/min, p = 0.002). We found that the WR is invariant during different speeds, and during an uneven surface condition, but is affected during a dual task-condition, when attention must be divided between a cognitive and a motor task. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Cross-cultural validation of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) in Portuguese community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Daniela; Santos, Sónia

    The Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) is a highly reliable instrument to assess fear of falling among older population. This study aimed to develop a European Portuguese version of the FES-I (FES-I (P) ) and analyse its psychometric properties in terms of internal consistency, test-retest reliability, concurrent and convergent validity. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data collection integrated a socio-demographic questionnaire which included falls history and presence/absence of fear of falling, the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Timed Up and Go (TUG) and the Five Times Sit to Stand Test (FTSST). Descriptive and inferential statistical analyses were performed. A total of 100 Portuguese community-dwelling older people (74.27±8.7years old) have participated in the study. From these, 82 have participated in the reliability study. The FES-I (P) had excellent internal consistency (α=0,978) and test-retest reliability (ICC 2,1 =0,999). A significant negative correlation was found between the FES-I (P) and the ABC (r s =-0.85; pvalidity. FES-I (P) scores were significantly higher among those who were female, had ≥1 falls in the last year and reported having fear of falling. Significant correlations were found between the FES-I (P) and age (r s =0.337; pvalidity. FES-I (P) is a reliable and valid measure of fear of falling for Portuguese community-living older people. Future studies should explore the FES-I (P) responsiveness to change over time and analyse its psychometric properties in samples of both non-community-dwelling and community-dwelling older adults with different health conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Willingness to use and pay for options of care for community-dwelling older people in rural Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Hoi Le

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The proportion of people in Vietnam who are 60 years and over has increased rapidly. The emigration of young people and impact of other socioeconomic changes leave more elderly on their own and with less family support. This study assesses the willingness to use and pay for different models of care for community-dwelling elderly in rural Vietnam. Methods In 2007, people aged 60 and older and their family representatives, living in 2,240 households, were randomly selected from the FilaBavi Demographic Surveillance Site. They were interviewed using structured questionnaires to assess dependence in activities of daily living (ADLs, willingness to use and to pay for day care centres, mobile care teams, and nursing centres. Respondent socioeconomic characteristics were extracted from the FilaBavi repeated census. Percentages of those willing to use models and the average amount (with 95% confidence intervals they are willing to pay were estimated. Multivariate analyses were performed to measure the relationship of willingness to use services with ADL index and socioeconomic factors. Four focus group discussions were conducted to explore people's perspectives on the use of services. The first discussion group was with the elderly. The second discussion group was with their household members. Two other discussion groups included community association representatives, one at the communal level and another at the village level. Results Use of mobile team care is the most requested service. The fewest respondents intend to use a nursing centre. Households expect to use services for their elderly to a greater extent than do the elderly themselves. Willingness to use services decreases when potential fees increase. The proportion of respondents who require that services be free-of-charge is two to three times higher than the proportion willing to pay full cost. Households are willing to pay more than the elderly for day care and nursing

  15. Self-Selected and Maximal Walking Speeds Provide Greater Insight Into Fall Status Than Walking Speed Reserve Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Addie; Fulk, George D; Herter, Troy M; Beets, Michael W; Donley, Jonathan; Fritz, Stacy L

    2016-07-01

    To determine the degree to which self-selected walking speed (SSWS), maximal walking speed (MWS), and walking speed reserve (WSR) are associated with fall status among community-dwelling older adults. WS and 1-year falls history data were collected on 217 community-dwelling older adults (median age = 82, range 65-93 years) at a local outpatient PT clinic and local retirement communities and senior centers. WSR was calculated as a difference (WSRdiff = MWS - SSWS) and ratio (WSRratio = MWS/SSWS). SSWS (P fall status. The cutpoints identified were 0.76 m/s for SSWS (65.4% sensitivity, 70.9% specificity), 1.13 m/s for MWS (76.6% sensitivity, 60.0% specificity), and 0.24 m/s for WSRdiff (56.1% sensitivity, 70.9% specificity). SSWS and MWS better discriminated between fallers and non-fallers (SSWS: AUC = 0.69, MWS: AUC = 0.71) than WSRdiff (AUC = 0.64). SSWS and MWS seem to be equally informative measures for assessing fall status in community-dwelling older adults. Older adults with SSWSs less than 0.76 m/s and those with MWSs less than 1.13 m/s may benefit from further fall risk assessment. Combining SSWS and MWS to calculate an individual's WSR does not provide additional insight into fall status in this population. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES:: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Describe the different methods for calculating walking speed reserve and discuss the potential of the metric as an outcome measure; (2) Explain the degree to which self-selected walking speed, maximal walking speed, and walking speed reserve are associated with fall status among community-dwelling older adults; and (3) Discuss potential limitations to using walking speed reserve to identify fall status in populations without mobility restrictions. Advanced : The Association of Academic Physiatrists is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to

  16. Training with a balance exercise assist robot is more effective than conventional training for frail older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Kenichi; Kondo, Izumi; Hirano, Satoshi; Kagaya, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Eiichi; Osawa, Aiko; Fujinori, Yoichi

    2017-11-01

    To examine the efficacy of postural strategy training using a balance exercise assist robot (BEAR) as compared with conventional balance training for frail older adults. The present study was designed as a cross-over trial without a washout term. A total of 27 community-dwelling frail or prefrail elderly residents (7 men, 20 women; age range 65-85 years) were selected from a volunteer sample. Two exercises were prepared for interventions: robotic exercise moving the center of gravity by the balance exercise assist robot system; and conventional balance training combining muscle-strengthening exercise, postural strategy training and applied motion exercise. Each exercise was carried out twice a week for 6 weeks. Participants were allocated randomly to either the robotic exercise first group or the conventional balance exercise first group. preferred and maximal gait speeds, tandem gait speeds, timed up-and-go test, functional reach test, functional base of support, center of pressure, and muscle strength of the lower extremities were assessed before and after completion of each exercise program. Robotic exercise achieved significant improvements for tandem gait speed (P = 0.012), functional reach test (P = 0.002), timed up-and-go test (P = 0.023) and muscle strength of the lower extremities (P = 0.001-0.030) compared with conventional exercise. In frail or prefrail older adults, robotic exercise was more effective for improving dynamic balance and lower extremity muscle strength than conventional exercise. These findings suggest that postural strategy training with the balance exercise assist robot is effective to improve the gait instability and muscle weakness often seen in frail older adults. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1982-1990. © 2017 The Authors. Geriatrics & Gerontology International published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japan Geriatrics Society.

  17. Self-reported vision impairment and incident prefrailty and frailty in English community-dwelling older adults: findings from a 4-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljas, Ann E M; Carvalho, Livia A; Papachristou, Efstathios; De Oliveira, Cesar; Wannamethee, S Goya; Ramsay, Sheena E; Walters, Kate R

    2017-11-01

    Little is known about vision impairment and frailty in older age. We investigated the relationship of poor vision and incident prefrailty and frailty. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses with 4-year follow-up of 2836 English community-dwellers aged ≥60 years. Vision impairment was defined as poor self-reported vision. A score of 0 out of the 5 Fried phenotype components was defined as non-frail, 1-2 prefrail and ≥3 as frail. Participants non-frail at baseline were followed-up for incident prefrailty and frailty. Participants prefrail at baseline were followed-up for incident frailty. 49% of participants (n=1396) were non-frail, 42% (n=1178) prefrail and 9% (n=262) frail. At follow-up, there were 367 new cases of prefrailty and frailty among those non-frail at baseline, and 133 new cases of frailty among those prefrail at baseline. In cross-sectional analysis, vision impairment was associated with frailty (age-adjustedandsex-adjusted OR 2.53, 95% CI 1.95 to 3.30). The association remained after further adjustment for wealth, education, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, falls, cognition and depression. In longitudinal analysis, compared with non-frail participants with no vision impairment, non-frail participants with vision impairment had twofold increased risks of prefrailty or frailty at follow-up (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.32 to 3.24). The association remained after further adjustment. Prefrail participants with vision impairment did not have greater risks of becoming frail at follow-up. Non-frail older adults who experience poor vision have increased risks of becoming prefrail and frail over 4 years. This is of public health importance as both vision impairment and frailty affect a large number of older adults. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. An isokinetic training program for reducing falls in a community-dwelling older adult: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Justin A; Hines, Roger W; McDaniel, Laura T; Shelden, Brenda L

    2013-01-01

    With the population older than 65 years, projected to double by the year 2030, falls in older adults are a substantial health concern. Muscle strength deficits are one of the multifactorial components linked to increased fall risk, and decreasing these deficits has been one of the goals of interventions designed to decrease fall risk. These interventions have traditionally focused on improving peak torque; however, recent research suggests that exercise protocols that focus on the rate of torque development (RTD) may be more effective in decreasing fall risk. This case report examines clinical outcomes following implementation of an isokinetic strengthening protocol coupled with a balance program designed to reduce fall risk in a community-dwelling older adult. The individual was a 70-year-old woman with a history of 3 falls over the past 8 months and no related medical etiology who had self-limited her activities because of fear of another fall. She was classified as having substantial risk for future falls because of fall history, increased fear of falling, and below age norms on the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), and the Timed Up and Go (TUG). The treatment program consisted of 12 weeks of high-intensity isokinetic knee extensor training, high challenge dynamic gait and balance activities, and core strengthening. The isokinetic protocol consisted of 4 sets of 10 concentric-only repetitions at speeds of 240°/sec and 300°/sec for a total of 8 work sets. Dynamic gait activities incorporating directional and obstacle drills, and rocker and balance boards were used for balance training activities. Progressive theraband exercises were used for core strengthening. As her home program, the participant was encouraged to return to line dancing twice per week. During the 12-week protocol, the participant completed two 90-minute therapy sessions and two 90-minute dance classes per week. After the 12 weeks of treatment, knee extensor peak torque at 150 ms improved on the right

  19. Application of a fall screening algorithm stratified fall risk but missed preventive opportunities in community-dwelling older adults: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Susan W; Berg, Katherine; Chesworth, Bert; Klar, Neil; Speechley, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Evaluate the ability of the American and British Geriatrics Society fall prevention guideline's screening algorithm to identify and stratify future fall risk in community-dwelling older adults. Prospective cohort of community-dwelling older adults (n = 117) aged 65 to 90 years. Fall history, balance, and gait measured during a comprehensive geriatric assessment at baseline. Falls data were collected monthly for 1 year. The outcomes of any fall and any injurious fall were evaluated. The algorithm stratified participants into 4 hierarchal risk categories. Fall risk was 33% and 68% for the "no intervention" and "comprehensive fall evaluation required" groups respectively. The relative risk estimate for falling comparing participants in the 2 intervention groups was 2.08 (95% CI 1.42-3.05) for any fall and 2.60 (95% Cl 1.53-4.42) for any injurious fall. Prognostic accuracy values were: sensitivity of 0.50 (95% Cl 0.36-0.64) and specificity of 0.82 (95% CI 0.70-0.90) for any fall; and sensitivity of 0.56 (95% CI 0.38-0.72) and specificity of 0.78 (95% Cl 0.67-0.86) for any injurious fall. The algorithm was able to identify and stratify fall risk for each fall outcome, though the values of prognostic accuracy demonstrate moderate clinical utility. The recommendations of fall evaluation for individuals in the highest risk groups appear supported though the recommendation of no intervention in the lowest risk groups may not address their needs for fall prevention interventions. Further evaluation of the algorithm is recommended to refine the identification of fall risk in community-dwelling older adults.

  20. Minor positive effects of health-promoting senior meetings for older community-dwelling persons on loneliness, social network, and social support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Susanne; Berglund, Helene; Faronbi, Joel; Barenfeld, Emmelie; Ottenvall Hammar, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the 1-year effect of the health-promoting intervention “senior meetings” for older community-dwelling persons regarding loneliness, social network, and social support. Methods Secondary analysis of data was carried out from two randomized controlled studies: Elderly Persons in the Risk Zone and Promoting Aging Migrants’ Capabilities. Data from 416 participants who attended the senior meetings and the control group at baseline and the 1-year follow-up in the respective studies were included. Data were aggregated and analyzed with chi-square test and odds ratio (OR) to determine the intervention effect. Results The senior meetings had a positive effect on social support regarding someone to turn to when in need of advice and backing (OR 1.72, p=0.01). No positive intervention effect could be identified for loneliness, social network, or other aspects of social support. Conclusion Health-promoting senior meetings for older community-dwelling persons have a minor positive effect on social support. The senior meetings might benefit from a revision to reinforce content focused on loneliness, social network, and social support. However, the modest effect could also depend on the lack of accessible social resources to meet participants’ identified needs, a possible hindrance for a person’s capability. This makes it necessary to conduct further research to evaluate the effect of the senior meetings and other health-promoting initiatives on social aspects of older community-dwelling people’s lives, since these aspects are of high importance for life satisfaction and well-being in old age. PMID:29158669

  1. Quantifying the magnitude of risk for balance impairment on falls in community-dwelling older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Susan W; Berg, Katherine; Chesworth, Bert; Klar, Neil; Speechley, Mark

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate and summarize the evidence linking balance impairment as a risk factor for falls in community-dwelling older adults. Systematic review and meta-analysis. English language articles in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL (1988-2009), under keywords of accidental falls, aged, risk factors, and hip, radius, ulna, and humerus fractures; and bibliographies of retrieved articles. Community-dwelling older adults in a prospective study, at least 1-year duration, age more than 60 years, and samples not specific to a single disease-defined population were included. Sample size, inclusion/exclusion criteria, demographics, clinical balance measurement scale, type of fall outcome, method of fall ascertainment, length of follow-up, and odds ratio (OR) or risk ratio (RR) were extracted. Studies must have reported adjustment for confounders. Random effects meta-analysis to generate summary risk estimate was used. A priori evaluation of sources of heterogeneity was performed. Twenty-three studies met the selection criteria. A single summary measure could not be calculated because of the nonequivalence of the OR and RR, producing an overall fall risk of RR of 1.42 (1.08, 1.85) and OR of 1.98 (1.60, 2.46). Balance impairment imparts a moderate increase on fall risk in community-dwelling older adults. The type of fall outcome, the length of follow-up, and the balance measurement tool impact the magnitude of the association. Specific balance measurement scales were identified with associations for an increased fall risk, but further research is required to refine recommendations for their use in clinical practice. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Minor positive effects of health-promoting senior meetings for older community-dwelling persons on loneliness, social network, and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Susanne; Berglund, Helene; Faronbi, Joel; Barenfeld, Emmelie; Ottenvall Hammar, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the 1-year effect of the health-promoting intervention "senior meetings" for older community-dwelling persons regarding loneliness, social network, and social support. Secondary analysis of data was carried out from two randomized controlled studies: Elderly Persons in the Risk Zone and Promoting Aging Migrants' Capabilities. Data from 416 participants who attended the senior meetings and the control group at baseline and the 1-year follow-up in the respective studies were included. Data were aggregated and analyzed with chi-square test and odds ratio (OR) to determine the intervention effect. The senior meetings had a positive effect on social support regarding someone to turn to when in need of advice and backing (OR 1.72, p =0.01). No positive intervention effect could be identified for loneliness, social network, or other aspects of social support. Health-promoting senior meetings for older community-dwelling persons have a minor positive effect on social support. The senior meetings might benefit from a revision to reinforce content focused on loneliness, social network, and social support. However, the modest effect could also depend on the lack of accessible social resources to meet participants' identified needs, a possible hindrance for a person's capability. This makes it necessary to conduct further research to evaluate the effect of the senior meetings and other health-promoting initiatives on social aspects of older community-dwelling people's lives, since these aspects are of high importance for life satisfaction and well-being in old age.

  3. Prevalence of frailty and prefrailty among community-dwelling older adults in low-income and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardhana, Dhammika D; Hardoon, Sarah; Rait, Greta; Weerasinghe, Manuj C; Walters, Kate R

    2018-03-01

    To systematically review the research conducted on prevalence of frailty and prefrailty among community-dwelling older adults in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) and to estimate the pooled prevalence of frailty and prefrailty in community-dwelling older adults in LMICs. Systematic review and meta-analysis. PROSPERO registration number is CRD42016036083. MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, Web of Science, CINAHL and WHO Global Health Library were searched from their inception to 12 September 2017. Low-income and middle-income countries. Community-dwelling older adults aged ≥60 years. We screened 7057 citations and 56 studies were included. Forty-seven and 42 studies were included in the frailty and prefrailty meta-analysis, respectively. The majority of studies were from upper middle-income countries. One study was available from low-income countries. The prevalence of frailty varied from 3.9% (China) to 51.4% (Cuba) and prevalence of prefrailty ranged from 13.4% (Tanzania) to 71.6% (Brazil). The pooled prevalence of frailty was 17.4% (95% CI 14.4% to 20.7%, I 2 =99.2%) and prefrailty was 49.3% (95% CI 46.4% to 52.2%, I 2 =97.5%). The wide variation in prevalence rates across studies was largely explained by differences in frailty assessment method and the geographic region. These findings are for the studies with a minimum recruitment age 60, 65 and 70 years. The prevalence of frailty and prefrailty appears higher in community-dwelling older adults in upper middle-income countries compared with high-income countries, which has important implications for healthcare planning. There is limited evidence on frailty prevalence in lower middle-income and low-income countries. CRD42016036083. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Fall Prevention Self-Assessments Via Mobile 3D Visualization Technologies: Community Dwelling Older Adults' Perceptions of Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Julian; Money, Arthur; Atwal, Anita

    2017-06-19

    In the field of occupational therapy, the assistive equipment provision process (AEPP) is a prominent preventive strategy used to promote independent living and to identify and alleviate fall risk factors via the provision of assistive equipment within the home environment. Current practice involves the use of paper-based forms that include 2D measurement guidance diagrams that aim to communicate the precise points and dimensions that must be measured in order to make AEPP assessments. There are, however, issues such as "poor fit" of equipment due to inaccurate measurements taken and recorded, resulting in more than 50% of equipment installed within the home being abandoned by patients. This paper presents a novel 3D measurement aid prototype (3D-MAP) that provides enhanced measurement and assessment guidance to patients via the use of 3D visualization technologies. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of older adults with regard to the barriers and opportunities of using the 3D-MAP application as a tool that enables patient self-delivery of the AEPP. Thirty-three community-dwelling older adults participated in interactive sessions with a bespoke 3D-MAP application utilizing the retrospective think-aloud protocol and semistructured focus group discussions. The system usability scale (SUS) questionnaire was used to evaluate the application's usability. Thematic template analysis was carried out on the SUS item discussions, think-aloud, and semistructured focus group data. The quantitative SUS results revealed that the application may be described as having "marginal-high" and "good" levels of usability, along with strong agreement with items relating to the usability (P=.004) and learnability (Passessment (SA). The application was seen as a useful tool to enhance visualization of measurement guidance and also to promote independent living, ownership of care, and potentially reduce waiting times. Several design and functionality recommendations

  5. Associations Between Resilience, Community Belonging, and Social Participation Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Results From the Eastern Townships Population Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, Mélanie; Roy, Mathieu; Michallet, Bernard; St-Hilaire, France; Maltais, Danielle; Généreux, Mélissa

    2017-12-01

    To examine the associations between resilience, community belonging, and social participation, and the moderating effect of resilience on the association between community belonging and social participation among community-dwelling older adults. Cross-sectional; secondary analyses of the Eastern Townships Population Health Survey. Community. A sample (N=4541) of women (n=2485) and men (n=2056) aged ≥60 years was randomly selected according to area. Most participants had resilience were collected by phone interviewer-administered questionnaire. A social participation scale measured frequency of participation in 8 community activities. A 4-point Likert scale ranging from "very strong" to "very weak" estimated sense of belonging to the local community. Social participation and sense of belonging questions came from Statistics Canada surveys. Resilience was assessed with the 10-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, capturing the ability to cope with adversity. Controlling for age, education, and psychological distress, greater resilience and community belonging were associated with greater social participation among women (R 2 =.13; Presilience, especially in men. Greater community belonging further enhanced social participation, especially among women (P=.03) and men (Presilience (moderator effect). Resilience moderates the association between community belonging and social participation among community-dwelling older women and, especially, men. Interventions targeting social participation should consider the potential impact of resilience on improving community belonging. Future studies should investigate why resilience moderates associations between community belonging and social participation, and how to enhance resilience among older adults. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Psychometric Properties of Persian Translated Version of Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC in Arak Community-dwelling Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Khajavi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Balance deficiency, falls and fear of fall are important problems that can resulted in reversed health outcomes including decreased quality of life. The purpose of this study was surveying factor structure, validation, and reliability determination of Persian translated version of Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale in community-dwelling older adults of Arak city. Materials and Methods: Research method was descriptive in form of psychometry. The statistic population was older adults of Arak in year 2012 and 308 subjects with mean age 69.38 years were selected availably. Data were collected by Persian translated version of Activities-specific Balance Confidence that is a 16-item scale and evaluates balance confidence in activities of daily living. Data were analyzed by Exploratory Factor Analysis. Test-retest and internal reliability were calculated by Pearson correlation coefficient and Chronbach’s Alpha. Data were analyzed with SPSS-16. Results: The findings resulted in extraction of one factor with eigenvalue over one that explained 82.89% of total variance. Test-retest reliability between 1 to 4 weeks and internal reliability (Chronbach’s alpha were 0.82 and 0.98, respectively. Gutmann split-half correlation coefficient and intra-class correlation coefficient were calculated 95% and 85%, respectively. Conclusion: Persian translated version of Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC-F is a valid and reliable tool for Iranian community-dwelling older adults that can be used in clinical and research purpose.

  7. Distance to achieve steady state walking speed in frail elderly persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindemann, U.; Najafi, B.; Zijlstra, W.; Hauer, K.; Muche, R.; Becker, C.; Aminian, K.

    This study aims to determine the length of the gait initiation phase before achieving steady state walking in frail older people. Based on body fixed sensors, habitual walking was analysed in 116 community-dwelling older persons (mean age 83.1 years, 84% women). The start of steady state walking was

  8. Interrater and Test-Retest Reliability and Minimal Detectable Change of the Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest) and Subsystems With Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang-Hsu, Elizabeth; Smith, Susan S

    2017-01-10

    Falls are a common cause of injuries and hospital admissions in older adults. Balance limitation is a potentially modifiable factor contributing to falls. The Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest), a clinical balance measure, categorizes balance into 6 underlying subsystems. Each of the subsystems is scored individually and summed to obtain a total score. The reliability of the BESTest and its individual subsystems has been reported in patients with various neurological disorders and cancer survivors. However, the reliability and minimal detectable change (MDC) of the BESTest with community-dwelling older adults have not been reported. The purposes of our study were to (1) determine the interrater and test-retest reliability of the BESTest total and subsystem scores; and (2) estimate the MDC of the BESTest and its individual subsystem scores with community-dwelling older adults. We used a prospective cohort methodological design. Community-dwelling older adults (N = 70; aged 70-94 years; mean = 85.0 [5.5] years) were recruited from a senior independent living community. Trained testers (N = 3) administered the BESTest. All participants were tested with the BESTest by the same tester initially and then retested 7 to 14 days later. With 32 of the participants, a second tester concurrently scored the retest for interrater reliability. Testers were blinded to each other's scores. Intraclass correlation coefficients [ICC(2,1)] were used to determine the interrater and test-retest reliability. Test-retest reliability was also analyzed using method error and the associated coefficients of variation (CVME). MDC was calculated using standard error of measurement. Interrater reliability (N = 32) of the BESTest total score was ICC(2, 1) = 0.97 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94-0.99). The ICCs for the individual subsystem scores ranged from 0.85 to 0.94. Test-retest reliability (N = 70) of the BESTest total score was ICC(2,1) = 0.93 (95% CI, 0.89-0.96). ICCs for the

  9. Efficacy of ankle control balance training on postural balance and gait ability in community-dwelling older adults: a single-blinded, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeongjin; Lee, Yong Woo

    2017-09-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to investigate the effects of ankle control balance training (ACBT) on postural balance and gait ability in community-dwelling older adults. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-four subjects were randomly divided into two groups, with 27 subjects in the ACBT group and 27 subjects in the control group. Subjects in the ACBT group received ACBT for 60 minutes, twice per week for 4 weeks, and all subjects had undergone fall prevention education for 60 minutes, once per week for 4 weeks. The main outcome measures, including the Berg balance scale; the functional reach test and one leg stance test for postural balance; and the timed up-and-go test and 10-meter walking test for gait ability, were assessed at baseline and after 4 weeks of training. [Results] The postural balance and gait ability in the ACBT group improved significantly compared to those in the control group, except BBS. [Conclusion] The results of this study showed improved postural balance and gait abilities after ACBT and that ACBT is a feasible method for improving postural balance and gait ability in community-dwelling older adults.

  10. Gender differences in the relationship between walking activity and sleep disturbance among community-dwelling older adult with diabetes in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hui-Ping; Chen, Ching-Huey; Lin, Ming-Hsing; Wang, Chong-Shan; Yang, Yi-Ching; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Wu, Jin-Shang; Lin, Sang-I

    2017-12-22

    This study explored the gender differences in the relationship between walking activity and sleep disturbances. A cross-sectional study of 201 community-dwelling older adults with diabetes was conducted in southern Taiwan. Using the Taiwanese version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, self-administered short version (IPAQ-SS), information on physical activity and sleep disturbance conditions was collected. Among older female adults with diabetes, 54.2% reported sleep disturbance significantly higher than males (38.1%). Logistic regression analysis suggested that for women, in addition to the active group, older adults in the low-active, high-walking group exhibited a significantly lower rate of sleep disturbance than did those who walked less.

  11. Five dimensions of wellness and predictors of cognitive health protection in community-dwelling older adults: a historical COLLAGE cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strout, Kelley A; Howard, Elizabeth P

    2015-03-01

    Wellness is associated with cognitive health protection; however, findings are limited because they only examine variable(s) within one dimension of wellness. This research examined the association between multiple dimensions of wellness and cognition among aging adults. The sample included 5,605 male and female community-dwelling adults 60 years and older. Four dimensions of wellness demonstrated a statistically significant higher mean difference in cognitively healthy older adults compared to cognitively impaired older adults, F(4, 5,595) = 47.57, p < .001. Emotional wellness demonstrated the strongest association with cognitive health, followed by physical and spiritual wellness, F(5, 5,372) = 50.35, p < .001. Future research is needed to examine the cognitive protective benefits of wellness using longitudinal, prospective designs that control for the potential temporal relationship between wellness and cognition. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Japanese version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment cut-off score to clarify improvement of mild cognitive impairment after exercise training in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nara, Marina; Sugie, Masamitsu; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Koyama, Teruyuki; Sengoku, Renpei; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Obuchi, Shuichi; Harada, Kazumasa; Kyo, Shunei; Ito, Hideki

    2018-02-02

    Physical exercise improves cognitive function in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, information about whether the degree of MCI before exercise training affects improvement in cognitive function is lacking. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the cut-off value in a MCI screening tool that predicts reversal to normal cognitive function after exercise training in older adults with MCI. Participants included 112 Japanese community-dwelling older adult outpatients (37 men, 75 women; mean age 76.3 years). We administered the Japanese version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA-J) before and after exercise training. MCI was defined as a MoCA-J score dwelling Japanese older adults with MCI. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; ••: ••-••. © 2018 The Authors Geriatrics & Gerontology International published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japan Geriatrics Society.

  13. A Prospective Cohort Study on the Effect of a Balance Training Program, Including Calf Muscle Strengthening, in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritz, Carol A; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2016-01-01

    Falls are the number 1 cause of injury, fractures, and death among the older population. In fact, one-third of adults older than 60 years will experience 1 or more falls annually. Factors including inactivity and decreased mobility are associated with overall declines in strength, balance, and functional mobility in older adults. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a balance training program, including calf muscle strengthening, in community-dwelling older adults and to evaluate how calf muscle strength correlates with risk factors for falls. Community-dwelling older adults from a local senior center were invited to participate in a 5-week (10 sessions), 1-on-1, balance training program, which included calf muscle strengthening. All the participants were evaluated before and after the intervention. The outcome measures were static balance, unilateral heel-rise test, Timed Up and Go test (TUG), the 30-second Chair Stand Test (30-sCST), and the Activity Balance Confidence Scale. Twenty-eight participants (6 males and 22 females) mean (standard deviation) age of 78 years were included in the study and completed the baseline evaluation. Eight participants did not complete the study. Static balance with eyes closed, heel rise, TUG, 30-sCST, and the Activity Balance Confidence Scale improved significantly (P calf muscle strengthening performed twice a week for 5 weeks resulted in significant improvements in calf muscle strength, functional performance and balance, as well as a significant improvement in balance confidence. The results from this study identify the importance unilateral calf muscle strength has to falls risk among older adults.

  14. Management of falls in community-dwelling older adults: clinical guidance statement from the Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy of the American Physical Therapy Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avin, Keith G; Hanke, Timothy A; Kirk-Sanchez, Neva; McDonough, Christine M; Shubert, Tiffany E; Hardage, Jason; Hartley, Greg

    2015-06-01

    Falls in older adults are a major public health concern due to high prevalence, impact on health outcomes and quality of life, and treatment costs. Physical therapists can play a major role in reducing fall risk for older adults; however, existing clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) related to fall prevention and management are not targeted to physical therapists. The purpose of this clinical guidance statement (CGS) is to provide recommendations to physical therapists to help improve outcomes in the identification and management of fall risk in community-dwelling older adults. The Subcommittee on Evidence-Based Documents of the Practice Committee of the Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy developed this CGS. Existing CPGs were identified by systematic search and critically appraised using the Appraisal of Guidelines, Research, and Evaluation in Europe II (AGREE II) tool. Through this process, 3 CPGs were recommended for inclusion in the CGS and were synthesized and summarized. Screening recommendations include asking all older adults in contact with a health care provider whether they have fallen in the previous year or have concerns about balance or walking. Follow-up should include screening for balance and mobility impairments. Older adults who screen positive should have a targeted multifactorial assessment and targeted intervention. The components of this assessment and intervention are reviewed in this CGS, and barriers and issues related to implementation are discussed. A gap analysis supports the need for the development of a physical therapy-specific CPG to provide more precise recommendations for screening and assessment measures, exercise parameters, and delivery models. This CGS provides recommendations to assist physical therapists in the identification and management of fall risk in older community-dwelling adults. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  15. Management of Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Clinical Guidance Statement From the Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy of the American Physical Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avin, Keith G.; Hanke, Timothy A.; Kirk-Sanchez, Neva; McDonough, Christine M.; Shubert, Tiffany E.; Hartley, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Background Falls in older adults are a major public health concern due to high prevalence, impact on health outcomes and quality of life, and treatment costs. Physical therapists can play a major role in reducing fall risk for older adults; however, existing clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) related to fall prevention and management are not targeted to physical therapists. Objective The purpose of this clinical guidance statement (CGS) is to provide recommendations to physical therapists to help improve outcomes in the identification and management of fall risk in community-dwelling older adults. Design and Methods The Subcommittee on Evidence-Based Documents of the Practice Committee of the Academy of Geriatric Physical Therapy developed this CGS. Existing CPGs were identified by systematic search and critically appraised using the Appraisal of Guidelines, Research, and Evaluation in Europe II (AGREE II) tool. Through this process, 3 CPGs were recommended for inclusion in the CGS and were synthesized and summarized. Results Screening recommendations include asking all older adults in contact with a health care provider whether they have fallen in the previous year or have concerns about balance or walking. Follow-up should include screening for balance and mobility impairments. Older adults who screen positive should have a targeted multifactorial assessment and targeted intervention. The components of this assessment and intervention are reviewed in this CGS, and barriers and issues related to implementation are discussed. Limitations A gap analysis supports the need for the development of a physical therapy–specific CPG to provide more precise recommendations for screening and assessment measures, exercise parameters, and delivery models. Conclusion This CGS provides recommendations to assist physical therapists in the identification and management of fall risk in older community-dwelling adults. PMID:25573760

  16. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Arabic version of the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly among community-dwelling older adults in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alqarni AM

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ayidh M Alqarni,1,2 Vishal Vennu,1 Sulaiman A Alshammari,3 Saad M Bindawas1 1Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Physical Therapy, King Abdullah Hospital, Bisha, Saudi Arabia; 3Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Purpose: Older adults are the fastest growing population group worldwide. Regular physical activity (PA is reported to reduce the risk of health conditions and improve personal well-being. Few validated instruments can be used to measure the PA levels among older adults in Saudi Arabia. The Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE is used worldwide for evaluating the PA levels of the elderly in epidemiological studies. However, this scale has not been translated into Arabic. This study aimed to cross-culturally adapt the PASE into Arabic language and evaluate its reliability and validity among community-dwelling older adults in Saudi Arabia. Patients and methods: This study was a cross-sectional one following Beaton guidelines to translate and perform cultural adaptation, as well as test the reliability and validity of the PASE Arabic version (PASE-A. Elderly (N=74 people from both genders, who lived in a community dwelling in Riyadh city, were selected from several primary health care centers. The study used Cronbach’s alpha coefficient to assess the internal consistency reliability, while intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2,1 was used for test–retest reliability and the Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (r was used to evaluate the correlation among PASE-A and grip strength, Timed Up and Go test, body mass index, and fat percentage. Results: Out of 74 older adults, 59 (79.7% completed the PASE-A questionnaire twice. The internal consistency of the PASE-A components was good (Cronbach’s alpha 0.70–0.75, and the reliability of the components

  17. Frailty as a Risk Factor for Falls Among Community Dwelling People: Evidence From a Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mei-Hsun; Chang, Shu-Fang

    2017-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the relationships between different frailty stages and the fall incidence rates of community-dwelling older adults. The differences between various frailty indicators regarding assessment accuracy of the fall incidence rates of community-dwelling elders were also analyzed. Finally, the relationship between frailty and recurrent falls was explored. This study comprised a systematic literature review and meta-analysis. Two researchers independently examined and extracted the related literature. The key search terms included frailty, frail, fall, older people, older, geriatric, and senior. The literature sampling period was from January 2001 to December 2016. The quality of each paper was assessed according to the guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). The databases of the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, and MEDLINE were used to conduct a systematic literature search by using the random effect mode to analyze the compiled papers. A total of 102,130 community-dwelling older adults ≥65 years of age and 33,503 older adults who had experienced a fall were compiled to investigate the relationship between frailty and falls. The meta-analysis results revealed that compared with robust older adults, frail older adults demonstrated the greatest risk for falls, followed by prefrail older adults. Furthermore, the use of different frailty indicators to predict the fall incidence rates of older adults yielded nonsignificantly different outcomes. In short, studies of either cardiovascular health or osteoporotic fracture indicators are effective for predicting the risk for falls in older people. Finally, this study confirmed that compared with robust older adults, frail older adults were more likely to experience recurrent falls. Frailty is a crucial healthcare topic of people with geriatric syndromes. Frail older adults are

  18. Physical Fitness Measures as Potential Markers of Low Cognitive Function in Japanese Community-Dwelling Older Adults without Apparent Cognitive Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Narazaki, Eri Matsuo, Takanori Honda, Yu Nofuji, Koji Yonemoto, Shuzo Kumagai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Detecting signs of cognitive impairment as early as possible is one of the most urgent challenges in preventive care of dementia. It has still been unclear whether physical fitness measures can serve as markers of low cognitive function, a sign of cognitive impairment, in older people free from dementia. The aim of the present study was to examine an association between each of five physical fitness measures and global cognition in Japanese community-dwelling older adults without apparent cognitive problems. The baseline research of the Sasaguri Genkimon Study was conducted from May to August 2011 in Sasaguri town, Fukuoka, Japan. Of the 2,629 baseline subjects who were aged 65 years or older and not certified as individuals requiring nursing care by the town, 1,552 participants without apparent cognitive problems (Mini-Mental State Examination score ≥24 were involved in the present study (59.0% of the baseline subjects, median age: 72 years, men: 40.1%. Global cognitive function was measured by the Japanese version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment. Handgrip strength, leg strength, sit-to-stand rate, gait speed, and one-leg stand time were examined as physical fitness measures. In multiple linear regression analyses, each of the five physical fitness measures was positively associated with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment score after adjusting for age and sex (p < 0.001. These associations were preserved after additional adjustment for years of formal education, body mass index, and other confounding factors (p < 0.001. The present study first demonstrated the associations between multiple aspects of physical fitness and global cognitive function in Japanese community-dwelling older people without apparent cognitive problems. These results suggest that each of the physical fitness measures has a potential as a single marker of low cognitive function in older populations free from dementia and thereby can be useful in community

  19. Community-based fall assessment compared with hospital-based assessment in community-dwelling older people over 65 at high risk of falling: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Sanjay; Myint, Phyo K; Clark, Allan; Das, Partha; Ring, Liam; Trepte, Nicola J B

    2011-02-01

    The effectiveness of community-based fall assessment programs in older people is unclear. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of community-based fall assessment compared with hospital-based assessment. A randomized un-blind study was conducted in 369 older adults aged 65 years and over at high risk of falling. Participants were drawn from a larger cohort of community-dwelling older people. Eligible participants were identified by means of a simple five-item screening tool. A randomly chosen subset population of people at high risk of falling was then randomized into two arms, community-based and hospital-based fall assessments. The total number of falls in both groups was recorded by following up subjects' diaries and telephone interviews at 3, 6 and 12 months. Incidence Rate Ratios (IRR) for the rate of falls at 12 months between community- and hospital-based assessments were analysed as primary outcome, by intention-to-treat analysis. A total of 349 participants completed the study. Attendance to community-based assessment was significantly higher compared with hospital-based assessment in this older population (p=0.012). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in total number of falls at the 12 month follow-up. According to Negative Binomial regression, the adjusted IRR of falls in the community based arm was not significantly different from the hospital-based one (IRR 0.95; 95% CI 0.58-1.45, p=0.83). This study showed the increased risk of falling according to community-based fall assessment program with respect to a traditional hospital-based one in community-dwelling older adults at high risk of falling.

  20. Combined Effects of Sedentary Behavior and Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity on Cardiovascular Health in Older, Community-Dwelling Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloway, Shannon; Wilbur, JoEllen; Schoeny, Michael E; Semanik, Pamela A; Marquez, David X

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the combined effects of sedentary behavior and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) on cardiovascular health in older Latinos. In a cross-sectional sample of 147 older, community-dwelling Latinos, time spent in sedentary behavior and MVPA were obtained using accelerometers. Analyses examined the effects of a measure of physical activity that combined levels of sedentary behavior (± 10 daily hours) and MVPA ( 150 weekly minutes) on cardiovascular health outcomes (blood pressure, BMI, waist circumference, cardiorespiratory fitness). Results suggest that cardiovascular health benefits of MVPA on BMI (p = .005), waist circumference (p = .002), and cardiorespiratory fitness (p = .012) may depend on a participant's level of sedentary behavior. For all three, health benefits of 30-150 weekly minutes of MVPA were found only for those without excessive sedentary behavior (≥ 10 hr). Sedentary behavior may negatively impact cardiovascular health despite moderate participation in MVPA. Health guidelines should suggest reducing sedentary behavior while increasing MVPA.

  1. What works better for community-dwelling older people at risk to fall?: a meta-analysis of multifactorial versus physical exercise-alone interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridou, Eleni Th; Manti, Eirini G; Ntinapogias, Athanasios G; Negri, Eva; Szczerbinska, Katarzyna

    2009-08-01

    To compare and quantify the effectiveness of multifactorial versus exercise-alone interventions in reducing recurrent falls among community-dwelling older people. A meta-analysis of recently published studies on fall prevention interventions was conducted. Measure of the overall effectiveness was the combined risk ratio for recurrent falls, whereas heterogeneity was explored via metaregression analyses. Ten of the 52 identified studies met the preset criteria and were included in the analysis. The exercise-alone interventions were about 5 times more effective compared to multifactorial ones. Short-term interventions, smaller samples, and younger age related to better outcomes. From cost-efficiency and public health perspectives, exercise-alone interventions can be considered valuable, as they are more likely to be implemented in countries with less resources. Further qualitative research is needed, however, to explore determinants of willingness to participate and comply with interventions aiming to prevent recurrent falls among older people.

  2. The effects of an integrated health education and exercise program in community-dwelling older adults with hypertension: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeon-Hwan; Song, Misoon; Cho, Be-Long; Lim, Jae-Young; Song, Wook; Kim, Seon-Ho

    2011-01-01

    the aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of HAHA (Healthy Aging and Happy Aging) program, which is an integrated health education and exercise program for community-dwelling older adults with hypertension. older adults with hypertension from one senior center were randomly allocated to experimental (n=18) or control group (n=22). Experimental group received health education, individual counseling and tailored exercise program for 12 weeks. the mean ages were 71 years (experimental group) and 69 (control group). After the intervention, systolic blood pressure of experimental group was significantly decreased than that of control group. Scores of exercise self-efficacy, general health, vitality, social functioning, and mental health in SF-36 were statistically higher than those of control group. the HAHA program was effective in control of systolic blood pressure and improving self-efficacy for exercise and health-related quality of life. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of postural balance in community-dwelling older adults - methodological aspects and effects of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Grønbech

    (familiarization) period is necessary for the Wii Agility test to avoid a systematic learning effect between successive test sessions. Study III investigated the effect of ten weeks of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training on static postural balance, mechanical lower limb muscle function, and functional...... performance in 58 community-dwelling older adults. Additionally, the study investigated the participant motivation for this type of training (Exergaming). Marked improvements in maximal leg muscle strength, rapid force capacity and functional performance were observed following the period of biofeedback......The overall purpose of this thesis was to examine selected methodological aspects and novel approaches for measuring postural balance older adults, and to examine the effects of biofeedback-based Nintendo Wii training on selected physiological, psychological and functional outcome variables...

  4. Adapted physical activity is beneficial on balance, functional mobility, quality of life and fall risk in community-dwelling older women: a randomized single-blinded controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, E; Prókai, L; Mészáros, L; Gondos, T

    2013-06-01

    Exercise programmes have important role in prevention of falls, but to date, we have little knowledge about the effects of Adapted Physical Activity programme on balance of older women. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an Adapted Physical Activity programme on balance, risk of falls and quality of life in community-dwelling older women. This was a randomized controlled study. Community, in a local sport centre. Older women aged over 60 years. Seventy-six women were randomised to an exercise group providing Adapted Physical Activity programme for 25 weeks or a control group (in which they did not participate in any exercise programme). The one-leg stance test, Timed Up and Go test, incidence of fall and the quality of life (SF-36V2) were measured at baseline and after 25 weeks. The one-leg stance test and the Timed Up and Go test in the exercise group was significantly better than in the control group after the intervention period (P=0.005; P=0.001, respectively). The Physical Functioning, Vitality and General Health subdomains of quality of life were also significantly better in the exercise group compared to the control group (P=0.004; P=0.005; P=0.038, respectively). Relative risk was 0.40 (90% CI 0.174 to 0.920) and the number needed to treat was 5 (95% CI 2.3 to 23.3). This 25-week Adapted Physical Activity programme improves static balance, functional mobility, as well as Physical Functioning, Vitality and General Health subdomains of quality of life. Based on our results, the Adapted Physical Activity programme may be a promising fall prevention exercise programme improving static balance and functional mobility for community-dwelling older women.

  5. Depression Affects the Scores of All Facets of the WHOQOL-BREF and May Mediate the Effects of Physical Disability among Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Chang

    Full Text Available Geriatric depression is associated with the overall quality of life (QOL. However, how depressive symptoms affect the different domains and facets of QOL in older adults, and whether depressive symptoms mediate the relationship between physical disability and QOL in older adults are unclear.A total of 490 ambulatory community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years or above were interviewed using the brief version of the World Health Organisation Quality of Life instrument (WHOQOL-BREF, the Modified Barthel Index (MBI, the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15, and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE. Sequential models for multiple linear regressions were analysed to determine if the MBI, GDS-15 and MMSE scores predict the WHOQOL-BREF scores. The potential mediation effects of depression (as determined by the GDS-15 on the relationship between MBI and WHOQOL-BREF were also analysed.The GDS-15 score was predictive of the scores of the four domains and all 26 facets of the WHOQOL-BREF. The significant predictive effects of the MBI score on 15 of the 26 facets of the WHOQOL-BREF were reduced to three after the adjustment for the GDS-15 score. Depression (as assessed by the GDS-15 is a mediator of the relationship between MBI and the physical, psychological and environmental domains of the WHOQOL-BREF.Depression (assessed by the GDS-15 may affect the scores of every domain and all facets of the WHOQOL-BREF in the elderly. Furthermore, it may mediate the relationship between the MBI and on QOL scores. We recommend taking depressive symptoms into consideration when measuring community-dwelling older adults' QOL and providing active ageing programs.

  6. Comprehensive geriatric assessment, multifactorial interventions and nurse-led care coordination to prevent functional decline in community-dwelling older persons: protocol of a cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suijker Jacqueline J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional decline in community-dwelling older persons is associated with the loss of independence, the need for hospital and nursing-home care and premature death. The effectiveness of multifactorial interventions in preventing functional decline remains controversial. The aim of this study is to investigate whether functional decline in community-dwelling older persons can be delayed or prevented by a comprehensive geriatric assessment, multifactorial interventions and nurse-led care coordination. Methods/Design In a cluster randomized controlled trial, with the general practice as the unit of randomization, 1281 participants from 25 general practices will be enrolled in each condition to compare the intervention with usual care. The intervention will focus on older persons who are at increased risk for functional decline, identified by an Identification of Seniors at Risk Primary Care (ISAR-PC score (≥ 2. These older persons will receive a comprehensive geriatric assessment, an individually tailored care and treatment plan, consisting of multifactorial, evidence-based interventions and subsequent nurse-led care coordination. The control group will receive 'care as usual' by the general practitioner (GP. The main outcome after 12 months is the level of physical functioning on the modified Katz-15 index score. The secondary outcomes are health-related quality of life, psychological and social functioning, healthcare utilization and institutionalization. Furthermore, a process evaluation and cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed. Discussion This study will provide new knowledge regarding the effectiveness and feasibility of a comprehensive geriatric assessment, multifactorial interventions and nurse-led elderly care in general practice. Trial registration NTR2653 Grant Unrestricted grant 'The Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and development' no 313020201

  7. Comprehensive geriatric assessment, multifactorial interventions and nurse-led care coordination to prevent functional decline in community-dwelling older persons: protocol of a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suijker, Jacqueline J; Buurman, Bianca M; ter Riet, Gerben; van Rijn, Marjon; de Haan, Rob J; de Rooij, Sophia E; Moll van Charante, Eric P

    2012-04-01

    Functional decline in community-dwelling older persons is associated with the loss of independence, the need for hospital and nursing-home care and premature death. The effectiveness of multifactorial interventions in preventing functional decline remains controversial. The aim of this study is to investigate whether functional decline in community-dwelling older persons can be delayed or prevented by a comprehensive geriatric assessment, multifactorial interventions and nurse-led care coordination. In a cluster randomized controlled trial, with the general practice as the unit of randomization, 1281 participants from 25 general practices will be enrolled in each condition to compare the intervention with usual care. The intervention will focus on older persons who are at increased risk for functional decline, identified by an Identification of Seniors at Risk Primary Care (ISAR-PC) score (≥ 2). These older persons will receive a comprehensive geriatric assessment, an individually tailored care and treatment plan, consisting of multifactorial, evidence-based interventions and subsequent nurse-led care coordination. The control group will receive 'care as usual' by the general practitioner (GP). The main outcome after 12 months is the level of physical functioning on the modified Katz-15 index score. The secondary outcomes are health-related quality of life, psychological and social functioning, healthcare utilization and institutionalization. Furthermore, a process evaluation and cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed. This study will provide new knowledge regarding the effectiveness and feasibility of a comprehensive geriatric assessment, multifactorial interventions and nurse-led elderly care in general practice. NTR2653 GRANT: Unrestricted grant 'The Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and development' no 313020201.

  8. The effect of a dual task on gait speed in community dwelling older adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erin; Cusack, Tara; Blake, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    Reduced walking speed in older adults is associated with adverse health outcomes. This review aims to examine the effect of a cognitive dual-task on the gait speed of community-dwelling older adults with no significant pathology affecting gait. Electronic database searches were performed in, Web of Science, PubMed, SCOPUS, Embase and psychINFO. Eligibility and methodological quality was assessed by two independent reviewers. The effect size on gait speed was measured as the raw mean difference (95% confidence interval) between single and dual-task performance. Pooled estimates of the overall effect were computed using a random effects method and forest plots generated. 22 studies (27 data sets) with a population of 3728 were reviewed and pooled for meta-analysis. The mean walking speed of participants included in all studies was >1.0m/s and all studies reported the effect of a cognitive dual-task on gait speed. Sub-analysis examined the effect of type of cognitive task (mental-tracking vs. verbal-fluency). Mean single-task gait speed was 1.21 (0.13)m/s, the addition of a dual-task reduced speed by 0.19 m/s to 1.02 (0.16)m/s (pgait speed. The cross-sectional design of the studies made quality assessment difficult. Despite efforts, high heterogeneity remained, possibly due to participant characteristics and testing protocols. This meta-analysis shows that in community-dwelling older adults, the addition of a dual-task significantly reduces gait speed and may indicate the value of including dual-task walking as part of the standard clinical assessment of older people. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of a multifactorial interdisciplinary intervention on mobility-related disability in frail older people: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairhall, Nicola; Sherrington, Catherine; Kurrle, Susan E; Lord, Stephen R; Lockwood, Keri; Cameron, Ian D

    2012-10-15

    Interventions that enhance mobility in frail older people are needed to maintain health and independence, yet definitive evidence of effective interventions is lacking. Our objective was to assess the impact of a multifactorial intervention on mobility-related disability in frail older people. We conducted a randomised, controlled trial with 241 frail community-dwelling older people in Sydney, Australia. Participants were classified as frail using the Cardiovascular Health Study definition, did not have severe cognitive impairment and were recently discharged from an aged care and rehabilitation service. The experimental group received a 12 month multifactorial, interdisciplinary intervention targeting identified frailty components. Two physiotherapists delivered a home exercise program targeting mobility, and coordinated management of psychological and medical conditions with other health professionals. The control group received usual care. Disability in the mobility domain was measured at baseline and at 3 and 12 months using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework. Participation (involvement in life situations) was assessed using the Life Space Assessment and the Goal Attainment Scale. Activity (execution of mobility tasks) was measured using the 4-metre walk and self-report measures. The mean age of participants was 83.3 years (SD: 5.9 years). Of the participants recruited, 216 (90%) were followed-up at 12 months. At this time point, the intervention group had significantly better scores than the control group on the Goal Attainment Scale (odds ratio 2.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3 to 3.3, P = 0.004) and Life Space Assessment (4.68 points, 95% CI 1.4 to 9.9, P = 0.005). There was no difference between groups on the global measure of participation or satisfaction with ability to get out of the house. At the activity level, the intervention group walked 0.05 m/s faster over 4 m (95% CI 0.0004 to 0.1, P = 0.048) than

  10. Effect of a multifactorial interdisciplinary intervention on mobility-related disability in frail older people: randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairhall Nicola

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventions that enhance mobility in frail older people are needed to maintain health and independence, yet definitive evidence of effective interventions is lacking. Our objective was to assess the impact of a multifactorial intervention on mobility-related disability in frail older people. Methods We conducted a randomised, controlled trial with 241 frail community-dwelling older people in Sydney, Australia. Participants were classified as frail using the Cardiovascular Health Study definition, did not have severe cognitive impairment and were recently discharged from an aged care and rehabilitation service. The experimental group received a 12 month multifactorial, interdisciplinary intervention targeting identified frailty components. Two physiotherapists delivered a home exercise program targeting mobility, and coordinated management of psychological and medical conditions with other health professionals. The control group received usual care. Disability in the mobility domain was measured at baseline and at 3 and 12 months using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health framework. Participation (involvement in life situations was assessed using the Life Space Assessment and the Goal Attainment Scale. Activity (execution of mobility tasks was measured using the 4-metre walk and self-report measures. Results The mean age of participants was 83.3 years (SD: 5.9 years. Of the participants recruited, 216 (90% were followed-up at 12 months. At this time point, the intervention group had significantly better scores than the control group on the Goal Attainment Scale (odds ratio 2.1; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.3 to 3.3, P = 0.004 and Life Space Assessment (4.68 points, 95% CI 1.4 to 9.9, P = 0.005. There was no difference between groups on the global measure of participation or satisfaction with ability to get out of the house. At the activity level, the intervention group walked 0.05 m

  11. Effects of a multifactorial fall prevention program on fall incidence and physical function in community-dwelling older adults with risk of falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsuei-Chen; Chang, Ku-Chou; Tsauo, Jau-Yih; Hung, Jen-Wen; Huang, Yu-Ching; Lin, Sang-I

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate effects of a multifactorial fall prevention program on fall incidence and physical function in community-dwelling older adults. Multicenter randomized controlled trial. Three medical centers and adjacent community health centers. Community-dwelling older adults (N=616) who have fallen in the previous year or are at risk of falling. After baseline assessment, eligible subjects were randomly allocated into the intervention group (IG) or the control group (CG), stratified by the Physiological Profile Assessment (PPA) fall risk level. The IG received a 3-month multifactorial intervention program including 8 weeks of exercise training, health education, home hazards evaluation/modification, along with medication review and ophthalmology/other specialty consults. The CG received health education brochures, referrals, and recommendations without direct exercise intervention. Primary outcome was fall incidence within 1 year. Secondary outcomes were PPA battery (overall fall risk index, vision, muscular strength, reaction time, balance, and proprioception), Timed Up & Go (TUG) test, Taiwan version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, EuroQol-5D, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), and the Falls Efficacy Scale-International at 3 months after randomization. Participants were 76±7 years old and included low risk 25.6%, moderate risk 25.6%, and marked risk 48.7%. The cumulative 1-year fall incidence was 25.2% in the IG and 27.6% in the CG (hazard ratio=.90; 95% confidence interval, .66-1.23). The IG improved more favorably than the CG on overall PPA fall risk index, reaction time, postural sway with eyes open, TUG test, and GDS, especially for those with marked fall risk. The multifactorial fall prevention program with exercise intervention improved functional performance at 3 months for community-dwelling older adults with risk of falls, but did not reduce falls at 1-year follow-up. Fall incidence might have been decreased simultaneously in both

  12. Reference values and age and sex differences in physical performance measures for community-dwelling older Japanese: a pooled analysis of six cohort studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Seino

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine age- and sex-specific reference values for six physical performance measures, i.e. hand-grip strength, one-legged stance, and gait speed and step length at both usual and maximum paces, and to investigate age and sex differences in these measures among community-dwelling older Japanese adults. METHODS: We conducted a pooled analysis of data from six cohort studies collected between 2002 and 2011 as part of the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology-Longitudinal Interdisciplinary Study on Aging. The pooled analysis included cross-sectional data from 4683 nondisabled, community-dwelling adults aged 65 years or older (2168 men, 2515 women; mean age: 74.0 years in men and 73.9 years in women. RESULTS: Unweighted simple mean (standard deviation hand-grip strength, one-legged stance, usual gait speed, usual gait step length, maximum gait speed, and maximum gait step length were 31.7 (6.7 kg, 39.3 (23.0 s, 1.29 (0.25 m/s, 67.7 (10.0 cm, 1.94 (0.38 m/s, and 82.3 (11.6 cm, respectively, in men and 20.4 (5.0 kg, 36.8 (23.4 s, 1.25 (0.27 m/s, 60.8 (10.0 cm, 1.73 (0.36 m/s, and 69.7 (10.8 cm, respectively, in women. All physical performance measures showed significant decreasing trends with advancing age in both sexes (all P<0.001 for trend. We also constructed age- and sex-specific appraisal standards according to quintiles. With increasing age, the sex difference in hand-grip strength decreased significantly (P<0.001 for age and sex interaction. In contrast, sex differences significantly increased in all other measures (all P<0.05 for interactions except step length at maximum pace. CONCLUSION: Our pooled analysis yielded inclusive age- and sex-specific reference values and appraisal standards for major physical performance measures in nondisabled, community-dwelling, older Japanese adults. The characteristics of age-related decline in physical performance measures differed between sexes.

  13. Comparison of segmental multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for the assessment of body composition in a community-dwelling older population.

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    Kim, Miji; Shinkai, Shoji; Murayama, Hiroshi; Mori, Seijiro

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the agreement of segmental multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis (SMF-BIA) for the assessment of whole-body and appendicular fat mass (FM) and lean soft tissue mass (LSTM) compared with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in a community-dwelling Japanese older population. The study population included 551 community-dwelling Japanese older adults (241 men and 310 women) aged between 65 and 87 years. Agreement between SMF-BIA and DXA for whole-body and appendicular body composition was assessed using simple linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis. High coefficients of determination (R(2)) were observed for whole-body FM (R(2) = 0.91, standard error of estimate [SEE] = 1.4 kg in men and R(2) = 0.94, SEE = 1.2 kg in women) between SMF-BIA and DXA. The R(2) coefficient for whole-body LSTM was higher in men (R(2) = 0.88, SEE = 1.9 kg) than in women (R(2) = 0.83, SEE = 1.5 kg). There was systematic bias with overestimation of whole-body FM and underestimation of whole-body LSTM by SMF-BIA. Proportional bias was noted for measurement of whole-body FM and LSTM in both men and women, but there was no proportional bias between the two methods for measurement of appendicular LSTM (r = 0.05, P = 0.428 and r = -0.10, P = 0.070 for men and women, respectively). SMF-BIA is a good alternative for estimating the whole-body and appendicular FM and LSTM in a community-dwelling Japanese older population, although it overestimated FM and underestimated LSTM when validated against DXA. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  14. Sarcopenia as a predictor of all-cause mortality among community-dwelling older people: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Liu, Ping; Hao, Qiukui; Hai, Shan; Wang, Hui; Cao, Li; Dong, Birong

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to examine the association between sarcopenia and all-cause mortality among community-dwelling older people. A systematic review was performed using three electronic databases (EMBASE, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library) to identify prospective cohort studies from January 2009 to February 2017 examining sarcopenia as a predictor of all-cause mortality among community-dwelling older people. We conducted a pooled analysis of mortality associated with sarcopenia, and subgroup analyses based on measurements of muscle mass and length of follow-up by employing a random-effects model. Sensitivity analyses were performed evaluate the cause of high heterogeneity. In addition, methodological quality, heterogeneity and publication bias were evaluated. Of 1703 studies identified, 6 studies incorporating 7367 individuals were included in the meta-analysis for all-cause mortality. The pooled hazard ratios (HRs) of all-cause mortality from the combination of included studies suggested participants with sarcopenia had a significantly higher rate of mortality (pooled HR 1.60, 95%CI 1.24-2.06, I 2 =27.8%, p=0.216) than participants without sarcopenia. The subgroup analysis for length of follow-up suggested studies with a follow-up period of less than 5 years found a higher risk of all-cause mortality (pooled HR 2.09, 95%CI 1.21-3.60) than studies with a follow-up period of 5 years or more (pooled HR 1.52, 95%CI 1.14-2.01). A subgroup of anthropometric measures was found to identify higher mortality risks (pooled HR 2.26, 95%CI 1.30-3.92) than a subgroup of dual-energy x-ray (DXA) absorptiometry (pooled HR 1.82, 95%CI 1.04-3.18) factors or a subgroup of bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) factors (pooled HR 1.31, 95%CI 1.15-1.49). Sarcopenia is a predictor of all-cause mortality among community-dwelling older people. Therefore, it is important to diagnose sarcopenia and to intervene, in order to reduce mortality rates in the

  15. External validation of the Probability of repeated admission (Pra) risk prediction tool in older community-dwelling people attending general practice: a prospective cohort study.

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    Wallace, Emma; McDowell, Ronald; Bennett, Kathleen; Fahey, Tom; Smith, Susan M

    2016-11-14

    Emergency admission is associated with the potential for adverse events in older people and risk prediction models are available to identify those at highest risk of admission. The aim of this study was to externally validate and compare the performance of the Probability of repeated admission (Pra) risk model and a modified version (incorporating a multimorbidity measure) in predicting emergency admission in older community-dwelling people. 15 general practices (GPs) in the Republic of Ireland. n=862, ≥70 years, community-dwelling people prospectively followed up for 2 years (2010-2012). Pra risk model (original and modified) calculated for baseline year where ≥0.5 denoted high risk (patient questionnaire, GP medical record review) of future emergency admission. Emergency admission over 1 year (GP medical record review). descriptive statistics, model discrimination (c-statistic) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic). Of 862 patients, a total of 154 (18%) had ≥1 emergency admission(s) in the follow-up year. 63 patients (7%) were classified as high risk by the original Pra and of these 26 (41%) were admitted. The modified Pra classified 391 (45%) patients as high risk and 103 (26%) were subsequently admitted. Both models demonstrated only poor discrimination (original Pra: c-statistic 0.65 (95% CI 0.61 to 0.70); modified Pra: c-statistic 0.67 (95% CI 0.62 to 0.72)). When categorised according to risk-category model, specificity was highest for the original Pra at cut-point of ≥0.5 denoting high risk (95%), and for the modified Pra at cut-point of ≥0.7 (95%). Both models overestimated the number of admissions across all risk strata. While the original Pra model demonstrated poor discrimination, model specificity was high and a small number of patients identified as high risk. Future validation studies should examine higher cut-points denoting high risk for the modified Pra, which has practical advantages in terms of application in GP. The

  16. Community pharmacists' evaluation of potentially inappropriate prescribing in older community-dwelling patients with polypharmacy: observational research based on the GheOP³S tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommelein, Eline; Mehuys, Els; Van Tongelen, Inge; Petrovic, Mirko; Somers, Annemie; Colin, Pieter; Demarche, Sophie; Van Hees, Thierry; Christiaens, Thierry; Boussery, Koen

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to (i) determine the prevalence of potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) in community-dwelling older polypharmacy patients using the Ghent Older People's Prescriptions community-Pharmacy Screening (GheOP³S) tool, (ii) identify the items that account for the highest proportion of PIP and (iii) identify the patient variables that may influence the occurrence of PIP. Additionally, pharmacist-physician contacts emerging from PIP screening with the GheOP³S tool and feasibility of the GheOP³S tool in daily practice were evaluated. A prospective observational study was carried out between December 2013 and July 2014 in 204 community pharmacies in Belgium. Patients were eligible if they were (i) ≥70 years, (ii) community-dwelling, (iii) using ≥5 chronic drugs, (iv) a regular visitor of the pharmacy and (v) understanding Dutch or French. Community pharmacists used a structured interview to obtain demographic data and medication use and subsequently screened for PIP using the GheOP³S tool. A Poisson regression was used to investigate the association between different covariates and the number of PIP. In 987 (97%) of 1016 included patients, 3721 PIP items were detected (median of 3 per patient; inter quartile range: 2-5). Most frequently involved with PIP are drugs for the central nervous system such as hypnosedatives, antipsychotics and antidepressants. Risk factors for a higher PIP prevalence appeared to be a higher number of drugs (30% extra PIPs per 5 extra drugs), female gender (20% extra PIPs), higher body mass index (BMI, 20% extra PIPs per 10-unit increase in BMI) and poorer functional status (30% extra PIPs with 6-point increase). The feasibility of the GheOP³S tool was acceptable although digitalization of the tool would improve implementation. Despite detecting at least one PIP in 987 patients, only 39 physicians were contacted by the community pharmacists to discuss the items. A high prevalence of PIP in community-dwelling

  17. Epidemiology and Long-term Clinical and Biologic Risk Factors for Pneumonia in Community-Dwelling Older Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Karina; Loehr, Laura; Folsom, Aaron R.; Newman, Anne B.; Weissfeld, Lisa A.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; London, Stephanie J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Bauer, Doug C.; Angus, Derek C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Preventing pneumonia requires better understanding of incidence, mortality, and long-term clinical and biologic risk factors, particularly in younger individuals. Methods: This was a cohort study in three population-based cohorts of community-dwelling individuals. A derivation cohort (n = 16,260) was used to determine incidence and survival and develop a risk prediction model. The prediction model was validated in two cohorts (n = 8,495). The primary outcome was 10-year risk of pneumonia hospitalization. Results: The crude and age-adjusted incidences of pneumonia were 6.71 and 9.43 cases/1,000 person-years (10-year risk was 6.15%). The 30-day and 1-year mortality were 16.5% and 31.5%. Although age was the most important risk factor (range of crude incidence rates, 1.69-39.13 cases/1,000 person-years for each 5-year increment from 45-85 years), 38% of pneumonia cases occurred in adults risk of pneumonia, reduced lung function was the most important risk factor (relative risk = 6.61 for severe reduction based on FEV1 by spirometry). A clinical risk prediction model based on age, smoking, and lung function predicted 10-year risk (area under curve [AUC] = 0.77 and Hosmer-Lemeshow [HL] C statistic = 0.12). Model discrimination and calibration were similar in the internal validation cohort (AUC = 0.77; HL C statistic, 0.65) but lower in the external validation cohort (AUC = 0.62; HL C statistic, 0.45). The model also calibrated well in blacks and younger adults. C-reactive protein and IL-6 were associated with higher pneumonia risk but did not improve model performance. Conclusions: Pneumonia hospitalization is common and associated with high mortality, even in younger healthy adults. Long-term risk of pneumonia can be predicted in community-dwelling adults with a simple clinical risk prediction model. PMID:23744106

  18. Operational definitions of sarcopenia and their associations with 5-year changes in falls risk in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D; Hayes, A; Sanders, K M; Aitken, D; Ebeling, P R; Jones, G

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia may be diagnosed in the clinic using operational definitions based on low muscle mass or function. This prospective, population-based study revealed that sex-specific associations may exist between operational definitions of sarcopenia and falls in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults. The objective of this study is to verify associations between sarcopenia and falls risk and to determine changes in sarcopenia prevalence over 5 years in middle-aged and older men and women according to different anthropometric and performance-based operational definitions. N = 681 volunteers (48% female; mean ± SD age 61.4 ± 7.0 years) participated in baseline and follow-up assessments (mean 5.1 ± 0.5 years later). Appendicular lean mass (ALM) was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, hand grip (HGS) and lower-limb (LLS) strength were assessed by dynamometry, and falls risk was determined using the physiological profile assessment. Anthropometric definitions (ALM/height squared [ALM-H], ALM/weight × 100 and a residuals method [ALM-R]) and performance-based definitions (HGS, LLS and upper- and lower-limb muscle quality [LMQ]) of sarcopenia were examined. The lowest 20% of the sex-specific distribution for each definition at baseline was classified as sarcopenia. Sarcopenia prevalence increased after 5 years for all operational definitions except ALM-H (men: -4.0%; women: -5.5%). Men classified with sarcopenia according to anthropometric definitions, and women classified with sarcopenia according to performance-based definitions, had significant increases in falls risk over 5 years (all P risk over 5 years in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults, but sex-specific differences may exist according to different anthropometric or performance-based definitions.

  19. Examining evidence based resistance plus balance training in community-dwelling older adults with complex health care needs: Trial protocol for the Muscling Up Against Disability project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Justin W L; Henwood, Tim; Gardiner, Paul; Tuckett, Anthony; Hodgkinson, Brent; Rouse, Kevin

    Progressive resistance plus balance training (PRBT) has been demonstrated as effective in reducing later life physical disability, falls risk and poor health, even among those with complex health care needs. However, few studies have examined the influence of PRBT on health service utilisation, cognitive wellbeing and training modality acceptance or undertaken a cost benefit analysis. This project will investigate the broad scope benefits of PRBT participation among community-dwelling older Australians receiving Government supported aged care packages for their complex health care needs. Using a modified stepped-wedge design, 248 community-dwelling adults 65 years and older with some level of government support aged care have been randomised into the study. Those randomised to exercise undertake six months of twice weekly machine-based, moderate to high intensity, supervised PRBT, followed by a six month unsupervised, unsupported follow-up. Controls spend six months undertaking usual activities, before entering the PRBT and follow-up phases. Data are collected at baseline and after each of the six month phases. Measures include level of and change in health and care needs, body composition, muscle capacity, falls, sleep, quality of life, nutritional and mental health status. In addition, acceptance and engagement is determined through telephone and focus group interviews complementing a multi-model health cost benefit evaluation. It is hypothesised this study will demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of PRBT in improving primary and secondary health outcomes for older adults with aged care needs, and will support the value of this modality of exercise as an integral evidence-based service model of care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Nine-Year Follow-up Study of Sleep Patterns and Mortality in Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Chung; Su, Tung-Ping; Chou, Pesus

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To simultaneously explore the associations between mortality and insomnia, sleep duration, and the use of hypnotics in older adults. Design: A fixed cohort study. Setting: A community in Shih-Pai area, Taipei, Taiwan. Participants: A total of 4,064 participants over the age of 65 completed the study. Intervention: N/A. Measurements and Results: Insomnia was classified using an exclusionary hierarchical algorithm, which categorized insomnia as “no insomnia,” “subjective poor sleep quality,” “Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index > 5 insomnia,” “1-month insomnia disorder,” and “6-month insomnia disorder.” The main outcome variables were 9-year all-cause mortality rates. In the all-cause mortality analyses, when hypnotic use, depressive symptoms and total sleep time were excluded from a proportional hazards regression model, subjects with “Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index > 5 insomnia” had a higher mortality risk (HR: 1.21, 95% CI: 1.01-1.45). In the full model, frequent hypnotic use and long sleep duration predicted higher mortality rates. However, the increased mortality risk for subjects with “Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index > 5 insomnia” was not observed in the full model. On the contrary, individuals with a 6-month DSM-IV insomnia disorder had a lower risk for premature death (HR: 0.64, 95% CI: 0.43-0.96). Conclusions: Long sleep duration and frequent hypnotics use predicted an increased mortality risk within a community-dwelling sample of older adults. The association between insomnia and mortality was affected by insomnia definition and other parameters related to sleep patterns. Citation: Chen HC; Su TP; Chou P. A nine-year follow-up study of sleep patterns and mortality in community-dwelling older adults in Taiwan. SLEEP 2013;36(8):1187-1198. PMID:23904679

  1. Prevalence and determinants of differences in cystatin C and creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate in community-dwelling older adults: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Helen; Werner, Karin; Christensson, Anders; Pihlsgård, Mats; Elmståhl, Sölve

    2017-12-04

    Differences in cystatin C and creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) can lead to clinical uncertainty. Existing eGFR equations perform poorly in a subset of individuals. This study aims to describe the prevalence of differences between cystatin C-based (eGFR cys ) and creatinine-based (eGFR creat ) eGFR in older adults and to explore which subsets of individuals may be most affected by differing estimations. In this cross-sectional study, participants from a cohort of community-dwelling older adults were examined at a baseline visit in 2001-2004 as part of the larger "Good Aging in Skåne" study. Exposure variables were obtained from questionnaires, interviews, examinations, and medical records. Blood samples were taken during the baseline visit, cryopreserved, and analyzed at a later time for biomarkers. The CKD-EPI equations were used to estimate GFR. Initial descriptive analyses were performed on 2931 individuals. A total of 2532 participants were included in the final multiple linear regression. Nearly two-thirds of participants had eGFR differences exceeding 10%, with nearly 20 % of participants having eGFR differences exceeding 30%. Smoking, age, body mass index (BMI), C-reactive protein (CRP), glucocorticoid use, and mean eGFR were correlated with differences between eGFR creat and eGFR cys . Differences between eGFR creat and eGFR cys are common and often of large magnitude in this community-dwelling population of older adults. The finding of multiple non-GFR determinants correlated to differences in GFR estimations can help direct future research to improve eGFR equations for subgroups prone to conflicting GFR estimations or to guide choice of biomarker for GFR estimation in these subgroups.

  2. Association Between Calcium or Vitamin D Supplementation and Fracture Incidence in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jia-Guo; Zeng, Xian-Tie; Wang, Jia; Liu, Lin

    2017-12-26

    The increased social and economic burdens for osteoporosis-related fractures worldwide make the prevention of such injuries a major public health goal. Previous studies have reached mixed conclusions regarding the association between calcium, vitamin D, or combined calcium and vitamin D supplements and fracture incidence in older adults. To investigate whether calcium, vitamin D, or combined calcium and vitamin D supplements are associated with a lower fracture incidence in community-dwelling older adults. The PubMed, Cochrane library, and EMBASE databases were systematically searched from the inception dates to December 24, 2016, using the keywords calcium, vitamin D, and fracture to identify systematic reviews or meta-analyses. The primary randomized clinical trials included in systematic reviews or meta-analyses were identified, and an additional search for recently published randomized trials was performed from July 16, 2012, to July 16, 2017. Randomized clinical trials comparing calcium, vitamin D, or combined calcium and vitamin D supplements with a placebo or no treatment for fracture incidence in community-dwelling adults older than 50 years. Two independent reviewers performed the data extraction and assessed study quality. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate risk ratios (RRs), absolute risk differences (ARDs), and 95% CIs using random-effects models. Hip fracture was defined as the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes were nonvertebral fracture, vertebral fracture, and total fracture. A total of 33 randomized trials involving 51 145 participants fulfilled the inclusion criteria. There was no significant association of calcium or vitamin D with risk of hip fracture compared with placebo or no treatment (calcium: RR, 1.53 [95% CI, 0.97 to 2.42]; ARD, 0.01 [95% CI, 0.00 to 0.01]; vitamin D: RR, 1.21 [95% CI, 0.99 to 1.47]; ARD, 0.00 [95% CI, -0.00 to 0.01]. There was no significant association of combined calcium and vitamin D with hip fracture

  3. Relationship between social support networks and diabetes control and its impact on the quality of life in older community-dwelling Mexicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel; Flores-Bello, Cristina; Correa-Muñoz, Elsa; Retana-U Galde, Raquel; Ruiz-Ramos, Mirna

    2016-11-29

    To determine the relationship between social support networks and diabetes control and its impact on quality of life in older community-dwelling Mexicans. A cross-sectional study was carried out on a convenience sample of 182 older diabetic people who were active participants in community self-care and mutual help groups in Mexico City for more than one year. All were independents and had medical diagnostics determining that they had diabetes without complications for one year or more. We measured biochemical and anthropometric parameters, social support networks for older people (SSN-Older) and perceived quality of life. Patients with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus had HbA1c (%) ≥ 8. It was found that 65% (118/182) of the elderly diabetics in the study were controlled. We observed a significantly higher average score in the SSN-Older scale on the extra-familial support subscale in the controlled diabetic group compared with the uncontrolled group (57 ± 25 vs. 49 ± 30, p social support networks, especially community self-help groups, represent a determining social capital for control of diabetes mellitus in older people in the community.

  4. Long-term moderate alcohol consumption does not exacerbate age-related cognitive decline in healthy, community-dwelling older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaak Nasser Moussa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent census data has found that roughly 40% of adults 65 years and older not only consume alcohol but also drink more of it than previous generations. Older drinkers are more vulnerable than younger counterparts to the psychoactive effects of alcohol due to natural biological changes that occur with aging. This study was specifically designed to measure the effect of long-term moderate alcohol consumption on cognitive health in older adult drinkers. An extensive battery of validated tests commonly used in aging and substance use literature was used to measure performance in specific cognitive domains, including working memory and attention. An age (young, old * alcohol consumption (light, moderate factorial study design was used to evaluate the main effects of age and alcohol consumption on cognitive performance. The focus of the study was then limited to light and moderate older drinkers, and whether or not long–term moderate alcohol consumption exacerbated age-related cognitive decline. No evidence was found to support the idea that long-term moderate alcohol consumption in older adults exacerbates age-related cognitive decline. Findings were specific to healthy community dwelling social drinkers in older age and they should not be generalized to individuals with other consumption patterns, like heavy drinkers, binge drinkers or ex-drinkers.

  5. A snapshot of the prevalence of physical activity amongst older, community dwelling people in Victoria, Australia: patterns across the 'young-old' and 'old-old'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson Sandra

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical activity has a range of health benefits for older people. The aim of this study was to determine physical activity prevalence and attitudes amongst respondents to a trial screening survey. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted. Subjects were community dwelling older people aged ≥ 65 years, recruited via general practices in Victoria, Australia. Participants completed a mailed screening tool containing the Geriatric Depression Scale, the Active Australia survey and the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire. Results Of 330 participants, 20% were ≥ 80 years. Activity levels were similar to those reported in population studies. The proportion of participants reporting physical activity was greatest for the walking category, but decreased across categories of physical activity intensity. The oldest-old were represented at all physical activity intensity levels. Over half reported exercising at levels that, according to national criteria are, 'sufficient to attain health benefit'. A greater proportion of participants aged 85 years and older were unaware of key physical activity messages, compared to participants aged less than 85 years. Conclusion Most population surveys do not provide details of older people across age categories. This survey provided information on the physical activity of people up to 91 years old. Physical activity promotion strategies should be tailored according to the individual's needs. A better understanding of the determinants of physical activity behaviour amongst older sub-groups is needed to tailor and target physical activity promotion strategies and programs to maximise physical activity related health outcomes for older people.

  6. Effectiveness of a multifaceted podiatry intervention to prevent falls in community dwelling older people with disabling foot pain: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spink, Martin J; Menz, Hylton B; Fotoohabadi, Mohammad R; Wee, Elin; Landorf, Karl B; Hill, Keith D; Lord, Stephen R

    2011-06-16

    To determine the effectiveness of a multifaceted podiatry intervention in preventing falls in community dwelling older people with disabling foot pain. Parallel group randomised controlled trial. University health sciences clinic in Melbourne, Australia. 305 community dwelling men and women (mean age 74 (SD 6) years) with disabling foot pain and an increased risk of falling. 153 were allocated to a multifaceted podiatry intervention and 152 to routine podiatry care, with 12 months' follow-up. Multifaceted podiatry intervention consisting of foot orthoses, advice on footwear, subsidy for footwear ($A100 voucher; £65; €74), a home based programme of foot and ankle exercises, a falls prevention education booklet, and routine podiatry care for 12 months. The control group received routine podiatry care for 12 months. Proportion of fallers and multiple fallers, falling rate, and injuries resulting from falls during follow-up. Overall, 264 falls occurred during the study. 296 participants returned all 12 calendars: 147 (96%) in the intervention group and 149 (98%) in the control group. Adherence was good, with 52% of the participants completing 75% or more of the requested three exercise sessions weekly, and 55% of those issued orthoses reporting wearing them most of the time. Participants in the intervention group (n=153) experienced 36% fewer falls than participants in the control group (incidence rate ratio 0.64, 95% confidence interval 0.45 to 0.91, P=0.01). The proportion of fallers and multiple fallers did not differ significantly between the groups (relative risk 0.85, 0.66 to 1.08, P=0.19 and 0.63, 0.38 to 1.04, P=0.07). One fracture occurred in the intervention group and seven in the control group (0.14, 0.02 to 1.15, P=0.07). Significant improvements in the intervention group compared with the control group were found for the domains of strength (ankle eversion), range of motion (ankle dorsiflexion and inversion/eversion), and balance (postural sway on the

  7. Living Legends: Effectiveness of a Program to Enhance Sense of Purpose and Meaning in Life Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chippendale, Tracy; Boltz, Marie

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the therapeutic benefits (i.e., sense of purpose and meaning in life) of the Living Legends program, which includes life review writing and an intergenerational exchange, compared with life review writing alone, for community-dwelling older adults. This study was a randomized controlled trial with a connected qualitative component. We analyzed quantitative data using independent-samples t tests and written descriptions of program experiences using Collaizi's qualitative methodology; we then used a triangulation protocol to integrate the qualitative and quantitative data. For participants in the writing workshop plus intergenerational exchange, sense of purpose and meaning in life increased significantly (ppurpose and meaning in life, a factor known to prevent cognitive loss and disability, compared with life review writing alone. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  8. Effects of a multifactorial intervention comprising resistance exercise, nutritional and psychosocial programs on frailty and functional health in community-dwelling older adults: A randomized, controlled, cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Satoshi; Nishi, Mariko; Murayama, Hiroshi; Narita, Miki; Yokoyama, Yuri; Nofuji, Yu; Taniguchi, Yu; Amano, Hidenori; Kitamura, Akihiko; Shinkai, Shoji

    2017-11-01

    To examine the effects of a multifactorial intervention on frailty and functional health among community-dwelling older adults, a 6-month randomized, controlled, cross-over trial was carried out within the Hatoyama Cohort Study. A total of 77 pre-frail or frail older adults (mean age 74.6 years) were randomly allocated to an immediate intervention group (IIG; n = 38) or delayed intervention group (DIG; n = 39). The IIG participated in a twice-weekly multifactorial intervention comprising resistance exercise, nutritional education and psychosocial programs. No intervention was given to the DIG during the initial 3-month period, and both groups were crossed over for the latter 3-month period. Pre-frailty and frailty were determined by using the Check-List 15, which was validated against Fried's frailty criteria. Effects of the intervention on primary (Check-List 15 score and frailty status) and secondary outcomes (physical and psychosocial functions, and nutritional intake) were examined for both 3-month periods. As compared with the DIG, the IIG had significant reductions in Check-List 15 score (-0.36 points; 95% CI -0.74 to -0.03), frailty prevalence (-23.5%, 95% CI -40.4 to -6.7), Timed Up and Go test (-0.25 s, 95% CI -0.47 to -0.08), and Geriatric Depression Score (-0.92 points, 95% CI -1.44 to -0.39), and improvements in the Dietary Variety Score (0.65 points, 95% CI 0.05-1.25), and protein (1.9% E, 95% CI 1.1-2.7) and micronutrient intakes at 3 months, all of which, excluding protein and micronutrient intakes, persisted at 6 months. The DIG showed similar intervention effects in the latter 3-month period. This 3-month multifactorial intervention reduced frailty and improved functional health. These intervention effects persisted for at least 3 months post-intervention. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2034-2045. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.