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Sample records for fragments ii experimental

  1. Central effects of angiotensin II, its fragment and analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, V P; Klousha, V E; Petkov, V D; Markovska, V L; Svirskis, S V; Mountsinietse, R K; Anouans, Z E

    1984-01-01

    The effects of the octapeptide angiotensin II (AT II), its fragment Ile8 AT3-8 and the analogues Sar1 Ala8 AT II, Ala8 AT II and Ile8 AT II were studied with respect to: the level of biogenic amines (DA, 5-HT and their metabolites HVA and 5-HIAA) in the forebrain; the behaviour of the animals--haloperidol catalepsy, apomorphine stereotypy, unconditioned jumping reaction (UJR), convulsive threshold. Good correlation was found between the biochemical and behavioural effects. The fragment of AT II where phenylalanine is substituted at the C-terminal by Ile reduces the haloperidol-increased content of HVA, potentiates apomorphine stereotypy and reduces catalepsy, whereas the AT II analogues (where the C-terminal phenylalanine is substituted by Ala, and the N-terminal--by Sar) potentiate the effect of haloperidol increasing the HVA content, reduce apomorphine stereotypy and potentiate catalepsy; saralasine independently applied induces brief catalepsy; AT II, its fragment and analogues inhibit UJR, in combination with amphetamine and PTZ this effect becomes deeper; the duration of hexobarbital sleep is increased. The peptides investigated increase the convulsive threshold. The results show that the hexapeptide fragment has preserved the effects of AT II, whereas in the analogues (with changed C- and N-terminals) they are changed. The results obtained may be explained with the modulating influence of AT II-receptors on the DA-ergic receptors in the brain structures with which AT II and its fragment and analogues enter in contact.

  2. Fish responses to experimental fragmentation of seagrass habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macreadie, Peter I; Hindell, Jeremy S; Jenkins, Gregory P; Connolly, Rod M; Keough, Michael J

    2009-06-01

    Understanding the consequences of habitat fragmentation has come mostly from comparisons of patchy and continuous habitats. Because fragmentation is a process, it is most accurately studied by actively fragmenting large patches into multiple smaller patches. We fragmented artificial seagrass habitats and evaluated the impacts of fragmentation on fish abundance and species richness over time (1 day, 1 week, 1 month). Fish assemblages were compared among 4 treatments: control (single, continuous 9-m(2) patches); fragmented (single, continuous 9-m(2) patches fragmented to 4 discrete 1-m(2) patches); prefragmented/patchy (4 discrete 1-m(2) patches with the same arrangement as fragmented); and disturbance control (fragmented then immediately restored to continuous 9-m(2) patches). Patchy seagrass had lower species richness than actively fragmented seagrass (up to 39% fewer species after 1 week), but species richness in fragmented treatments was similar to controls. Total fish abundance did not vary among treatments and therefore was unaffected by fragmentation, patchiness, or disturbance caused during fragmentation. Patterns in species richness and abundance were consistent 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month after fragmentation. The expected decrease in fish abundance from reduced total seagrass area in fragmented and patchy seagrass appeared to be offset by greater fish density per unit area of seagrass. If fish prefer to live at edges, then the effects of seagrass habitat loss on fish abundance may have been offset by the increase (25%) in seagrass perimeter in fragmented and patchy treatments. Possibly there is some threshold of seagrass patch connectivity below which fish abundances cannot be maintained. The immediate responses of fish to experimental habitat fragmentation provided insights beyond those possible from comparisons of continuous and historically patchy habitat. ©2009 Society for Conservation Biology.

  3. Comparison of calculated and experimental results of fragmenting cylinder experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WILSON,L.T.; REEDAL,D.R.; KIPP,MARLIN E.; MARTINEZ,REINA R.; GRADY,D.E.

    2000-06-02

    The Grady-Kipp fragmentation model provides a physically based method for determining the fracture and breakup of materials under high loading rates. Recently, this model has been implemented into the CTH Shock Physics Code and has been used to simulate several published experiments. Materials studied in this paper are AerMet 100 steel and a 90% tungsten alloy. The experimental geometry consists of a right circular cylinder filled with an explosive main charge that is initiated at its center. The sudden expansion of the resulting detonation products causes fracture of the cylinder. Strain rates seen in the cylinder are on the order of 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1}. The average fragment sizes calculated with the Grady-Kipp fragmentation model successfully replicate the mean fragment size obtained from the experimental fragment distribution. When Poisson statistics are applied to the calculated local average fragment sizes, good correlation is also observed with the shape of the experimental cumulative fragment distribution. The experimental fragmentation results, CTH numerical simulations, and correlation of these numerical results with the experimental data are described.

  4. Detection of experimental myocarditis by monoclonal antimyosin antibody, Fab fragment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezkalla, S.; Kloner, R.A.; Khaw, B.A.; Haber, E.; Fallon, J.T.; Smith, F.E.; Khatib, R.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether monoclonal antimyosin Fab (antigen binding fragment) was capable of labeling hearts with experimental coxsackievirus myocarditis, and to determine whether Fab could be used for detecting myocardial damage in either early or chronic phases of the disease. Sixty-five, 3-week-old cesarean-derived 1 (CD 1) mice were divided into two groups: group I (noninfected animals) and group II (infected with coxsackievirus B3). Mice from each group were killed on days 7, 17, 30, or 90 of infection. Forty-eight hours before killing, mice were injected with monoclonal I-125 antimyosin, Fab (25 microCi/injection) and radioactivity was counted in the heart. Selected heart sections were also examined by autoradiography. Heart radioactivity, count/m/mg (m +/- SEM) on days 7, 17, 30, and 90 of infection was 10.8 +/- 1.7, 21.3 +/- 1.1, 11.2 +/- 3.4, and 12.4 +/- 1.5 for group I, versus 36.7 +/- 8.0 (p less than 0.01), 50.0 +/- 4.5 (p less than 0.001), 33.4 +/- 16.1 (p = NS), and 40.6 +/- 8.5 (p less than 0.01) for group II, respectively. Autoradiography revealed focal uptake within areas of necrotic myocardium. We conclude that I125 Fab may be useful in detecting myocardial damage in the experimental model of murine myocarditis up to day 90 of infection.

  5. Experimental and numerical study on fragmentation of steel projectiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopperstad O.S.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A previous experimental study on penetration and perforation of circular Weldox 460E target plates with varying thicknesses struck by blunt-nose projectiles revealed that fragmentation of the projectile occurred if the target thickness or impact velocity exceeded a certain value. Thus, numerical simulations that do not account for fragmentation during impact can underestimate the perforation resistance of protective structures. Previous numerical studies have focused primarily on the target plate behaviour. This study considers the behaviour of the projectile and its possible fragmentation during impact. Hardened steel projectiles were launched at varying velocities in a series of Taylor tests. The impact events were captured using a high-speed camera. Fractography of the fragmented projectiles showed that there are several fracture mechanisms present during the fragmentation process. Tensile tests of the projectile material revealed that the hardened material has considerable variations in yield stress and fracture stress and strain. In the finite element model, the stress-strain behaviour from tensile tests was used to model the projectile material with solid elements and the modified Johnson-Cook constitutive relation. Numerical simulations incorporating the variations in material properties are capable of reproducing the experimental fracture patterns, albeit the predicted fragmentation velocities are too low.

  6. Copper(II) complexes of rat amylin fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kállay, Csilla; Dávid, Agnes; Timári, Sarolta; Nagy, Eszter Márta; Sanna, Daniele; Garribba, Eugenio; Micera, Giovanni; De Bona, Paolo; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Sóvágó, Imre

    2011-10-14

    The fragments of rat amylin rIAPP(17-29) (Ac-VRSSNNLGPVLPP-NH(2)), rIAPP(17-22) (Ac-VRSSNN-NH(2)), rIAPP(19-22) (Ac-SSNN-NH(2)) and rIAPP(17-20) (Ac-VRSS-NH(2)) together with the related mutant peptides (Ac-VASS-NH(2) and Ac-VRAA-NH(2)) have been synthesized and their copper(II) complexes studied by potentiometric, UV-Vis, CD and EPR spectroscopic methods. Despite the lack of any common strongly coordinating donor functions some of these fragments are able to bind copper(II) ions in the physiological pH range. The longest fragment rat amylin(17-29) keeps one equivalent copper(II) ion in solution in the whole pH range, while two other peptides Ac-VRSSNN-NH(2) and Ac-SSNN-NH(2) are also able to interact with copper(II) ions in the slightly alkaline pH range. According to the spectral parameters of the complexes, the peptides can be classified into two different categories: (i) the tetrapeptides Ac-VRSS-NH(2), Ac-VASS-NH(2) and Ac-VRAA-NH(2) can interact with copper(II) only under strongly alkaline conditions (pH > 10.0) and the formation of only one species with four amide nitrogen coordination can be detected; (ii) the peptides Ac-VRSSNNLGPVLPP-NH(2), Ac-VRSSNN-NH(2) and Ac-SSNN-NH(2) can form complexes above pH 6.0 with the major stoichiometries [CuH(-2)L], [CuH(-3)L](-) and [CuH(-4)L](2-). These data support that rIAPP(17-29) can interact with copper(II) ions under physiological conditions and the SSNN tetrapeptide fragment can be considered as the shortest sequence responsible for metal binding. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations provide some information on the possible coordination modes of Ac-SSNN-NH(2) towards the copper(II) ion and suggest that for [CuH(-2)L], [CuH(-3)L](-) and [CuH(-4)L](2-), the binding of two, three and four deprotonated amide nitrogens, with NH(-) of the side chain of asparagine as anchoring group, is probable. Moreover, these data reveal that peptides can be effective metal binding ligands even in the absence of anchoring

  7. Experimental study of a new multifunctional device for rock fragmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Fu-jun(赵伏军); LI Xi-bing(李夕兵); FENG Tao(冯涛)

    2004-01-01

    A new multifunctional testing device for rock fragmentation was introduced, which can conduct many experiments such as single cutting under static load, crushing under impact load, thrusting under static load and cutting-impact test under the dynamic and static load. The results of granite and concrete's experiments with polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) flat cutters and carbide alloy cutters under different loadings show that the device has good performance, and the characteristics of broken rock under the combined loads are similar to that under the single static pressure or impact crushing the rock, and the combined loads can increase the effect of rock fragmentation obviously. The experimental methods and effects have the important meaning for studying new drilling tool on hard rock fragmentation.

  8. The effect of experimental sleep fragmentation on error monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Cheng-Hung; Fang, Ya-Wen; Tsai, Ling-Ling; Hsieh, Shulan

    2015-01-01

    Experimental sleep fragmentation (SF) is characterized by frequent brief arousals without reduced total sleep time and causes daytime sleepiness and impaired neurocognitive processes. This study explored the impact of SF on error monitoring. Thirteen adults underwent auditory stimuli-induced high-level (H) and low-level (L) SF nights. Flanker task performance and electroencephalogram data were collected in the morning following SF nights. Compared to LSF, HSF induced more arousals and stage N1 sleep, decreased slow wave sleep and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS), decreased subjective sleep quality, increased daytime sleepiness, and decreased amplitudes of P300 and error-related positivity (Pe). SF effects on N1 sleep were negatively correlated with SF effects on the Pe amplitude. Furthermore, as REMS was reduced by SF, post-error accuracy compensations were greatly reduced. In conclusion, attentional processes and error monitoring were impaired following one night of frequent sleep disruptions, even when total sleep time was not reduced.

  9. Rapid evolution accelerates plant population spread in fragmented experimental landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jennifer L; Kendall, Bruce E; Levine, Jonathan M

    2016-07-29

    Predicting the speed of biological invasions and native species migrations requires an understanding of the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of spreading populations. Theory predicts that evolution can accelerate species' spread velocity, but how landscape patchiness--an important control over traits under selection--influences this process is unknown. We manipulated the response to selection in populations of a model plant species spreading through replicated experimental landscapes of varying patchiness. After six generations of change, evolving populations spread 11% farther than nonevolving populations in continuously favorable landscapes and 200% farther in the most fragmented landscapes. The greater effect of evolution on spread in patchier landscapes was consistent with the evolution of dispersal and competitive ability. Accounting for evolutionary change may be critical when predicting the velocity of range expansions.

  10. Magnetic processes in a collapsing dense core. II. Fragmentation. Is there a fragmentation crisis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebelle, P.; Teyssier, R.

    2008-01-01

    Context: A large fraction of stars are found in binary systems. It is therefore important for our understanding of the star formation process, to investigate the fragmentation of dense molecular cores. Aims: We study the influence of the magnetic field, ideally coupled to the gas, on the fragmentation in multiple systems of collapsing cores. Methods: We present high resolution numerical simulations performed with the RAMSES MHD code starting with a uniform sphere in solid body rotation and a uniform magnetic field parallel to the rotation axis. We pay particular attention to the strength of the magnetic field and interpret the results using the analysis presented in a companion paper. Results: The results depend much on the amplitude, A, of the perturbations seeded initially. For a low amplitude, A=0.1, we find that for values of the mass-to-flux over critical mass-to-flux ratio, μ, as high as μ = 20, the centrifugally supported disk which fragments in the hydrodynamical case is stabilized and remains axisymmetric. Detailed investigations reveal that this is due to the rapid growth of the toroidal magnetic field induced by the differential motions within the disk. For values of μ smaller than ≃5, corresponding to higher magnetic intensities, there is no centrifugally supported disk because of magnetic braking. When the amplitude of the perturbation is equal to A=0.5, each initial peak develops independently and the core fragments for a large range of μ. Only for values of μ close to 1 is the magnetic field able to prevent the fragmentation. Conclusions: Since a large fraction of stars are binaries, the results of low magnetic intensities preventing the fragmentation in the case of weak perturbations is problematic. We discuss three possible mechanisms which could lead to the formation of binary systems, namely the presence of high amplitude fluctuations in the core initially, ambipolar diffusion and fragmentation during the second collapse.

  11. Mixed metal copper(II)-nickel(II) and copper(II)-zinc(II) complexes of multihistidine peptide fragments of human prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jószai, Viktória; Turi, Ildikó; Kállay, Csilla; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Di Natale, Giuseppe; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Sóvágó, Imre

    2012-07-01

    Mixed metal copper(II)-nickel(II) and copper(II)-zinc(II) complexes of four peptide fragments of human prion protein have been studied by potentiometric, UV-vis and circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques. One peptide contained three histidyl residues: HuPrP(84-114) with H85 inside and H96, H111 outside the octarepeat domain. The other three peptides contained two histidyl residues; H96 and H111 for HuPrP(91-115) and HuPrP(84-114)H85A while HuPrP(84-114)H96A contained the histidyl residues at positions 85 and 111. It was found that both histidines of the latter peptides can simultaneously bind copper(II) and nickel(II) ions and dinuclear mixed metal complexes can exist in slightly alkaline solution. One molecule of the peptide with three histidyl residues can bind two copper(II) and one nickel(II) ions. H85 and H111 were identified as the major copper(II) and H96 as the preferred nickel(II) binding sites in mixed metal species. The studies on the zinc(II)-PrP peptide binary systems revealed that zinc(II) ions can coordinate to the 31-mer PrP peptide fragments in the form of macrochelates with two or three coordinated imidazol-nitrogens but the low stability of these complexes cannot prevent the hydrolysis of the metal ion in slightly alkaline solution. These data provide further support for the outstanding affinity of copper(II) ions towards the peptide fragments of prion protein but the binding of nickel(II) can significantly modify the distribution of copper(II) among the available metal binding sites.

  12. The type II collagen fragments Helix-II and CTX-II reveal different enzymatic pathways of human cartilage collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charni-Ben Tabassi, N; Desmarais, S; Jensen, Anne-Christine Bay

    2008-01-01

    sections were then incubated for up to 84h in the presence or absence of E-64 and GM6001, inhibitors of cysteine proteases and MMPs, respectively. RESULTS: In vitro, Cats K, L and S generated large amount of Helix-II, but not CTX-II. Cat B generated CTX-II fragment, but destroyed Helix-II immunoreactivity...

  13. Electrospray ionization mass spectral characteristics and fragmentation mechanisms of Angiotensin II and its analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huihui; Yuan, Gu

    2006-05-01

    The characteristic fragmentation pathways of Angiotensin II and eight analogues were investigated by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The main fragmentations involve the cleavages of the CCO and CONH bonds with the loss of water, ammonia or carbon monoxide and rearrangements involving hydrogen atoms, and the MS/MS spectra give significant sequence information of these octapeptides. In addition, the two members of the analogues with the same mass and different elemental composition can be distinguished by the MS/MS spectra of [M + H]+ and fragment ions. These results show that ESI tandem mass spectrometry is an excellent tool for the structural identification of Angiotensin II and its analogues.

  14. Magnetic processes in a collapsing dense core. II Fragmentation. Is there a fragmentation crisis ?

    CERN Document Server

    Hennebelle, P

    2007-01-01

    Abridged. A large fraction of stars are found in binary systems. It is therefore important for our understanding of the star formation process, to investigate the fragmentation of dense molecular cores. We study the influence of the magnetic field, ideally coupled to the gas, on the fragmentation in multiple systems of collapsing cores. We present high resolution numerical simulations performed with the RAMSES MHD code starting with a uniform sphere in solid body rotation and a uniform magnetic field parallel to the rotation axis. We pay particular attention to the strength of the magnetic field and interpret the results using the analysis presented in a companion paper. The results depend much on the amplitude, $A$, of the perturbations seeded initially. For a low amplitude, $A=0.1$, we find that for values of the mass-to-flux over critical mass-to-flux ratio, $\\mu$, as high as $\\mu = 20$, the centrifugally supported disk which fragments in the hydrodynamical case, is stabilized and remains axisymmetric. Det...

  15. Coordination of dibensothiophenes and corannulenes to organometallic ruthenium (II) fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchi, Paul Anthony [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation contains five papers in the format required for journal publication which describe (in part) my research accomplishments as a graduate student at Iowa State University. This work can be broadly categorized as the binding of weakly-coordinating ligands to cationic organometallic ruthenium fragments, and consists of two main areas of study. Chapters 2-4 are investigations into factors that influence the binding of dibenzothiophenes to [Cp'Ru(CO)2(+ fragments, where Cp' = η5-C5H5 (Cp) and η5-C5Me5 (Cp*). Chapters 5 and 6 present the synthesis and structural characterization of complexes containing corannulene buckybowls that are η6-coordinated to [Cp*Ru(+ fragments. The first chapter contains a brief description of the difficulty in lowering sulfur levels in diesel fuel along with a review of corannulene derivatives and their metal complexes. After the final paper is a short summary of the work herein (Chapter 7). Each chapter is independent, and all equations, schemes, figures, tables, references, and appendices in this dissertation pertain only to the chapter in which they appear.

  16. An Experimental Study of Launch Vehicle Propellant Tank Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Erin; Jackson, Austin; Hays, Michael; Bangham, Mike; Blackwood, James; Skinner, Troy; Richman, Ben

    2014-01-01

    In order to better understand launch vehicle abort environments, Bangham Engineering Inc. (BEi) built a test assembly that fails sample materials (steel and aluminum plates of various alloys and thicknesses) under quasi-realistic vehicle failure conditions. Samples are exposed to pressures similar to those expected in vehicle failure scenarios and filmed at high speed to increase understanding of complex fracture mechanics. After failure, the fragments of each test sample are collected, catalogued and reconstructed for further study. Post-test analysis shows that aluminum samples consistently produce fewer fragments than steel samples of similar thickness and at similar failure pressures. Video analysis shows that there are several failure 'patterns' that can be observed for all test samples based on configuration. Fragment velocities are also measured from high speed video data. Sample thickness and material are analyzed for trends in failure pressure. Testing is also done with cryogenic and noncryogenic liquid loading on the samples. It is determined that liquid loading and cryogenic temperatures can decrease material fragmentation for sub-flight thicknesses. A method is developed for capture and collection of fragments that is greater than 97 percent effective in recovering sample mass, addressing the generation of tiny fragments. Currently, samples tested do not match actual launch vehicle propellant tank material thicknesses because of size constraints on test assembly, but test findings are used to inform the design and build of another, larger test assembly with the purpose of testing actual vehicle flight materials that include structural components such as iso-grid and friction stir welds.

  17. Angiotensin II during Experimentally Simulated Central Hypovolemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Theo Walther; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2016-01-01

    Central hypovolemia, defined as diminished blood volume in the heart and pulmonary vascular bed, is still an unresolved problem from a therapeutic point of view. The development of pharmaceutical agents targeted at specific angiotensin II receptors, such as the non-peptidergic AT2-receptor agonist...... of these agents in a hypovolemic setting. We argue that the latest debates on the effect of angiotensin II during hypovolemia might guide for future studies, investigating the effect of such agents during experimentally simulated central hypovolemia. The purpose of this review is to examine the role...... of angiotensin II during episodes of central hypovolemia. To examine this, we reviewed results from studies with three experimental models of simulated hypovolemia: head up tilt table test, lower body negative pressure, and hemorrhage of animals. A systemic literature search was made with the use of Pub...

  18. Faunal Communities Are Invariant to Fragmentation in Experimental Seagrass Landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Lefcheck

    Full Text Available Human-driven habitat fragmentation is cited as one of the most pressing threats facing many coastal ecosystems today. Many experiments have explored the consequences of fragmentation on fauna in one foundational habitat, seagrass beds, but have either surveyed along a gradient of existing patchiness, used artificial materials to mimic a natural bed, or sampled over short timescales. Here, we describe faunal responses to constructed fragmented landscapes varying from 4-400 m2 in two transplant garden experiments incorporating live eelgrass (Zostera marina L.. In experiments replicated within two subestuaries of the Chesapeake Bay, USA across multiple seasons and non-consecutive years, we comprehensively censused mesopredators and epifaunal communities using complementary quantitative methods. We found that community properties, including abundance, species richness, Simpson and functional diversity, and composition were generally unaffected by the number of patches and the size of the landscape, or the intensity of sampling. Additionally, an index of competition based on species co-occurrences revealed no trends with increasing patch size, contrary to theoretical predictions. We extend conclusions concerning the invariance of animal communities to habitat fragmentation from small-scale observational surveys and artificial experiments to experiments conducted with actual living plants and at more realistic scales. Our findings are likely a consequence of the rapid life histories and high mobility of the organisms common to eelgrass beds, and have implications for both conservation and restoration, suggesting that even small patches can rapidly promote abundant and diverse faunal communities.

  19. Investigation of Explosively Driven Fragmentation of Metals - Two Dimensional Fracture and Fragmentation of Metal Shells: Progress Report II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D

    2003-02-01

    High explosive enclosed by a metal case qualitatively describes an essential component of high energy systems of importance to the Department of Energy. Detonation of the high explosive causes intense transient pressure loading of the metal following arrival of normal or obliquely incident explosive detonation wave. Subsequent expansion and deformation of the metal case leads to eventual rupture and the opening of fractures and fissures. Details of the rupture process are critical to performance of the system. Consequently, it is essential that the material and kinematic issues governing the processes of dynamic loading and subsequent failure of an explosive-metal case component within a functioning system be adequately understood. Among the reasons are to quantify existing performance, characterize potential degradation of performance resulting from system aging, and optimizing or maintaining system performance through implementation of structural or material changes. The physical and engineering issues underlying this dynamic response and failure phenomena are not adequately understood. The purpose of the present program is to identify the key issues and develop theoretical, computational and experimental models needed to achieve a satisfactory theoretical and analysis framework for analysis of metal case failure in the explosive environment. Specific tasks within the present program include: (1) Models and theories currently being pursued based on physical principles of both the statistical fragmentation concepts of Mott and the energy-based concept of others show promise of providing the analytic and computational methodology capable of predicting explosion-induced fracture and fragmentation of metal components. Experimental studies initiated in the earlier effort offer promise to provide critical test data for validation. The present task shall involve the further refinement and development of the dynamic failure and fragmentation models and theories, and the

  20. Formation of insulin fragments by insulin-degrading enzyme: the role of zinc(II) and cystine bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellia, Francesco; Pietropaolo, Adriana; Grasso, Giuseppe

    2013-02-01

    Insulin is the hormone mainly involved in widespread diseases such as diabetes mellitus. It is widely recognized that metal ions such as zinc(II) as well as insulin degradation and insulin fragments are inexplicably linked to the hormone action. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) has been identified as the main factor of insulin degradation, but it is still unknown the exact way and location at which IDE action toward insulin occurs and how metal ions can modulate this interaction. Interestingly, some insulin fragments have different biological activity from the intact hormone, and it is not clear how they can be generated from insulin. In this work, the role of zinc(II) and cystine bridges in the degradation of insulin by IDE are investigated by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), and the experimental conditions at which peculiar insulin fragments having biological activity are formed by the action of IDE are found and discussed. Docking simulations of IDE/insulin A and B chains are in good accordance with the insulin fragments detected by HPLC-MS.

  1. Flash-induced structural dynamics in photosystem II membrane fragments of green plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Jörg; Renger, Gernot

    2009-07-07

    Time-resolved quasielastic neutron scattering with laser excitation is a promising novel pump-probe approach, which opens up new perspectives for the study of protein-membrane dynamics in specific functional states of even complex systems. This is demonstrated here for the case of photosystem II membrane fragments with inhibited electron transfer. In contrast to the case of the model system bacteriorhodopsin, a transient reduction of the dynamics is observed approximately 160 micros after the actinic laser flash. This effect is the first observation of a modulated structural dynamics in photosystem II membrane fragments.

  2. Angiotensin II during experimentally simulated central hypovolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo Walther Jensen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Central hypovolemia, defined as diminished blood volume in the heart and pulmonary vascular bed, is still an unresolved problem from a therapeutic point of view. The development of pharmaceutical agents targeted at specific angiotensin II receptors, like the non-peptidergic AT2-receptor agonist compound 21, is yielding many opportunities to uncover more knowledge about angiotensin II receptor profiles and possible therapeutic use. Cardiovascular, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective therapeutic use of compound 21 have been suggested. However, there has not yet been a focus on the use of these agents in a hypovolemic setting. We argue that the latest debates on the effect of angiotensin II during hypovolemia might guide for future studies investigating the effect of such agents during experimentally simulated central hypovolemia. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of angiotensin II during episodes of central hypovolemia.To examine this, we reviewed results from studies with three experimental models of simulated hypovolemia: head up tilt table test, lower body negative pressure, and hemorrhage of animals. A systemic literature search was made with the use of PubMed/MEDLINE for studies that measured variables of the renin-angiotensin system or its effect during simulated hypovolemia. 12 articles, using one of the three models, were included and showed a possible organ protective effect and an effect on the sympathetic system of angiotensin II during hypovolemia. The results support the possible organ protective vasodilatory role for the AT2-receptor during hypovolemia on both the kidney and the splanchnic tissue.

  3. The 3-7 fragment of angiotensin II is probably responsible for its psychoactive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braszko, J J; Własienko, J; Koziołkiewicz, W; Janecka, A; Wiśniewski, K

    1991-02-22

    The abilities of angiotensin II-(3-7)-pentapeptide (A-II-(3-7), 1 nmol) and angiotensin II (A-II, 1 nmol) to influence rat's psychomotor and cognitive behaviours were compared. Both peptides, given intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), 15 min before the experiment, increased number of crossings, rearings and bar approaches in the open field. A-II-(3-7) as well as A-II, at the same doses and routes, significantly intensified stereotypy produced by apomorphine (1 mg/kg) and amphetamine (6.5 mg/kg), both given intraperitoneally. The 3-7 fragment of A-II and A-II in equimolar doses (1 nmol, i.c.v.) were similarly effective in improving learning of conditioned avoidance responses and recall of a passive avoidance behaviour. Taken together, these data and our previous findings indicate that, in rats, the 3-7 fragment of A-II is responsible for the psychoactive properties of angiotensins.

  4. Direct versus indirect effects of habitat fragmentation on community patterns in experimental landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    With, Kimberly A; Pavuk, Daniel M

    2012-10-01

    Habitat area and fragmentation are confounded in many ecological studies investigating fragmentation effects. We thus devised an innovative experiment founded on fractal neutral landscape models to disentangle the relative effects of habitat area and fragmentation on arthropod community patterns in red clover (Trifolium pratense). The conventional approach in experimental fragmentation studies is to adjust patch size and isolation to create different landscape patterns. We instead use fractal distributions to adjust the overall amount and fragmentation of habitat independently at the scale of the entire landscape, producing different patch properties. Although habitat area ultimately had a greater effect on arthropod abundance and diversity in this system, we found that fragmentation had a significant effect in clover landscapes with ≤40 % habitat. Landscapes at these lower habitat levels were dominated by edge cells, which had fewer arthropods and lower richness than interior cells. Fragmentation per se did not have a direct effect on local-scale diversity, however, as demonstrated by the lack of a broader landscape effect (in terms of total habitat area and fragmentation) on arthropods within habitat cells. Fragmentation-through the creation of edge habitat-thus had a strong indirect effect on morphospecies richness and abundance at the local scale. Although it has been suggested that fragmentation should be important at low habitat levels (≤20-30 %), we show that fragmentation per se is significant only at intermediate (40 %) levels of habitat, where edge effects were neither too great (as at lower levels of habitat) nor too weak (as at higher levels of habitat).

  5. An experimental comparative study of radiography, ultrasonography and CT imaging in the IV catheter fragment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Shinhan University, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The objective of this study was to detect the fragments generated during IV (intravenous) catheter injection of contrast medium and drug administration in a clinical setting and removal was performed by experimentally producing a phantom, and to compare the radiography, ultrasonography, and multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) imaging and radiation dose. A 1 cm fragment of an 18 gage Teflon® IV catheter with saline was inserted into the IV control line. Radiography, CT, and ultrasonography were performed and radiography and CT dose were calculated. CT and ultrasonography showed an IV catheter fragment clinically and radiography showed no visible difference in the ability to provide a useful image of an IV catheter fragment modality (p >.05). Radiography of effective dose (0.2139 mSv·Gy-1·cm-2) form DAP DAP (0.93 μGy·m2 ), and dose length product (DLP) (201 mGy·cm) to effective dose was calculated as 0.483 mSv. IV catheter fragment were detected of radiography, ultrasonography and CT. These results can be obtained by menas of an excellent IV catheter fragment of detection capability CT. However, CT is followed by radiation exposure. IV catheter fragment confirming the position and information recommend an ultrasonography.

  6. Interaction of Cu(II and Ni(II with Ypk9 Protein Fragment via NMR Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Francesco Peana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available P1D2E3K4H5E6L7 (PK9-H, a fragment of Ypk9, the yeast homologue of the human Park9 protein, was studied for its coordination abilities towards Ni(II and Cu(II ions through mono- and bi-dimensional NMR techniques. Both proteins are involved in the transportation of metal ions, including manganese and nickel, from the cytosol to the lysosomal lumen. Ypk9 showed manganese detoxification role, preventing a Mn-induced Parkinsonism (PD besides mutations in Park9, linked to a juvenile form of the disease. Here, we tested PK9-H with Cu(II and Ni(II ions, the former because it is an essential element ubiquitous in the human body, so its trafficking should be strictly regulated and one cannot exclude that Ypk9 may play a role in it, and the latter because, besides being a toxic element for many organisms and involved in different pathologies and inflammation states, it seems that the protein confers protection against it. NMR experiments showed that both cations can bind PK9-H in an effective way, leading to complexes whose coordination mode depends on the pH of the solution. NMR data have been used to build a model for the structure of the major Cu(II and Ni(II complexes. Structural changes in the conformation of the peptide with organized side chain orientation promoted by nickel coordination were detected.

  7. Experimental investigation on the causes for pellet fragmentation under LOCA conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianco, Andrea

    2015-07-23

    An experimental investigation was conducted in hot cells on single fuel rod segments to appraise the behavior of fuel pellets fragmentation during a loss of coolant accident in a light water reactor. In pursuing the conceptual design of the experiment, calculations were performed to study the thermal-hydraulics boundary conditions and the fuel rod behavior during the transient. The experiment's results encompass non-destructive and destructive examinations. In order to describe the resulting fuel fragments size distribution, a semi-empirical correlation was derived from the fractal theory.

  8. An experimental study of hydromagmatic fragmentation through energetic, non-explosive magma-water mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, L.G.; Spieler, O.; Downey, W.S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report the first experimental investigation of non-explosive hydromagmatic fragmentation during energetic mixing with water. We mix magma and water by two methods: (1) pouring a basaltic melt between two converging water sprays; and (2) jetting basaltic melt at high pressure (3??MPa) through a nozzle into a tank of stagnant water. These experiments involved shear at relative velocities of ~ 5-16??m/s and vigorous mixing for less than a second, providing sufficient time for glassy rinds to grow but insufficient time for clot interiors to cool. In resulting fragments, we examined the gross morphology, which reflects fluid deformation during mixing, and surface textures, which reflect the growth and disruption of glassy rinds. We find major differences in both fragment morphology and surface texture between experiments. Water-spray experiments produced Pele's hair, thin bubble shards, melt droplets, and angular, fracture-bound droplet pieces. Melt-jet experiments produced mostly coarse (> 1??mm diameter), wavy fluidal fragments with broken ends. Fluidal surfaces of fragments produced by water-spray experiments were generally shiny under reflected light and, in microscopic examination, smooth down to micron scale, implying no disruption of glassy rinds, except for (a) rare flaking on Pele's hair that was bent prior to solidification; or (b) cracking and alligator-skin textures on segments of melt balls that had expanded before complete cooling. In contrast, textures of fluidal surfaces on fragments produced by melt-jet experiments are dull in reflected light and, in scanning electron images, exhibit ubiquitous discontinuous skins ("rinds") that are flaked, peeled, or smeared away in stripes. Adhering to these surfaces are flakes, blocks, and blobs of detached material microns to tens of microns in diameter. In the water-spray fragments, we interpret the scarcity of disrupted surface rinds to result from lack of bending after surfaces formed. In the

  9. Influence of the Fragmentation Process on the Eruptive Dynamics of Vulcanian Eruptions: an Experimental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, M. A.; Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Dingwell, D. B.; Richard, D.; Scheu, B.; Kueppers, U.; Delgado-Granados, H.; Navarrete Montesinos, M.

    2009-12-01

    During volcanic eruptions, the ejection velocity of the gas-pyroclast mixture is one of the main parameters that control the behavior of the eruptive column near the vent. Together with other factors such as density of the mixture, temperature and vent geometry, it determines whether a buoyant plume can develop or if the column will collapse leading to a pyroclastic flow. Thus, an accurate description of the relationship between conduit pressure and ejection velocity is required for an adequate hazard analysis. In addition, ejection velocities obtained from field observations allow us to estimate pre-eruption conduit pressures. Theoretical and experimental studies to date have largely neglected the effects of the magmatic fragmentation on the dynamics of the gas-pyroclast mixture. The eruptive dynamics of Vulcanian eruptions has been investigated using the 1-D shock-tube theory, which consists of pressurized magma separated from the air by a diaphragm. After the rupture of the diaphragm, a shock wave propagates into the air and a rarefaction wave propagates into the magma. If the differential pressure is high enough, a fragmentation front develops and travels through the magma while the fragments are ejected. For this study, fragmentation, ejection and shock wave velocities were simultaneously measured for each fragmentation experiment performed on natural volcanic samples with diverse porosities and different applied pressures (5-25 MPa). To this end, we used a synchronized array of dynamic pressure transducers, laser beams and receivers, charged wires and piezo film sensors. Our results show that the fragmentation process plays an important role in the dynamics of the gas-particles mixture for the following reasons: 1) the energy consumed by fragmentation reduces the energy available to accelerate the gas-particle mixture; 2) the grain-size distribution produced during fragmentation controls the mechanical and thermal coupling between the gas phase and the

  10. Angiotensin II and its 3-7 fragment improve recognition but not spatial memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braszko, J J; Kułakowska, A; Wiśniewski, K

    1995-01-01

    The effects of angiotensin II (AII), its 3-7 fragment [AII(3-7)] and the substituted 3-7 fragment [Leu-5,AII(3-7)] given intracerebroventricularly (ICV) at the dose of 1 nmole each, on spatial memory and recognition were tested. AII(3-7) increased while Leu-5,AII(3-7) slightly decreased session to session foot shock reinforced runtime to the goal in a complex 6 chamber maze. The animals treated with AII performed in the maze similarly to saline injected controls. Overall number of errors was unchanged in all peptide treated groups in comparison with the control group. Object recognition was significantly improved in all the peptide treated groups except for the Leu-5,AII(3-7) group. The results point to the facilitation of recognition and lack of influence on, or even attenuation of, spatial memory by AII and its 3-7 fragment. Leu-5,AII(3-7) caused similar though less pronounced effects.

  11. Effect of Spinach (Spinacea oleracea on DNA fragmentation in pentylenetetrazole induced experimental epileptic rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monami Mondal (Mukherjee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Epilepsy is a restrained neurological disorder, with a constant neuronal damage, ranging from severe, life-threatening and disabling situations. It leads to oxidative brain damages through DNA fragmentation. Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ is a convulsant used to produce experimental epileptic animals. Investigation proved; antioxidant enriched Spinacea oleracea (SO or spinach, a commonly available herb, has a modulatory role on the damaging effects of free radicals. Methods The study was conducted with twenty-four adult male Holtzman strain albino rats (200-250gm. These rats were divided into groups of Control, SO treated control, PTZ induced experimental epileptic group and SO pretreated PTZ induced experimental epileptic group. The epileptic model was prepared by intraperitoneal administration of PTZ at a dose of 40 mg/kg body weight. Aqueous leaf extract of SO was orally given at a dose of 400 mg /kg body weight, for fourteen consecutive days. After the behavioral study serum and brain tissue samples were collected for the estimation of nitric oxide (NO, DNA fragmentation and antioxidants level. Results Pretreatment with SO leaf extract showed significant decrease in the seizure score, ictal phase, serum NO level, LPO levels and rate of DNA fragmentation. The interictal phase, SOD, CAT, GSH activity of different parts of the brain were significantly increased in SO pretreated PTZ induced group. Conclusion SO is found to play a vital role to provide protection against the oxidative damage of epileptic brain by amending the levels of antioxidants and serum NO level.

  12. Experimental study of fission process by fragment-neutron correlation measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, Katsuhisa; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kanno, Ikuo; Kimura, Itsuro; Nakagome, Yoshihiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-07-01

    Fragment-neutron correlation measurement of {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) was carried out. The obtained results showed more statistical accuracy than that of reported thermal neutron reaction. Experimental results and it`s analysis made clear the following facts. The minimum values of <{eta}> (m*) are shown at about 90 and 145 {mu} and <{eta}> (m*) showed the symmetrical form with an axis of symmetrical fission. This tendency is same as the distribution of {sup 252}Cf(s.f). -dV/dTKE(m*) indicates the saw-teethed distribution as same as <{nu}>(m*). The distribution seems depend on stiffness of fission fragment affected by the shell effect. The level density parameter a(m*) of fission fragment obtained from {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) expresses the saw-teethed distribution as same as that of {sup 252}Cf(s.f). This distribution can be explained by the empirical equation under consideration of the fission fragment depending on the shell effect and the collective motion. (S.Y.)

  13. Modeling and experimental examination of water level effects on radon exhalation from fragmented uranium ore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yong-Jun; Dai, Xin-Tao; Ding, De-Xin; Zhao, Ya-Li

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a one-dimensional steady-state mathematical model of radon transport in fragmented uranium ore was established according to Fick's law and radon transfer theory in an air-water interface. The model was utilized to obtain an analytical solution for radon concentration in the air-water, two-phase system under steady state conditions, as well as a corresponding radon exhalation rate calculation formula. We also designed a one-dimensional experimental apparatus for simulating radon diffusion migration in the uranium ore with various water levels to verify the mathematical model. The predicted results were in close agreement with the measured results, suggesting that the proposed model can be readily used to determine radon concentrations and exhalation rates in fragmented uranium ore with varying water levels. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Search for a Phase Transition in Nuclear Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Chbihi, A; Salou, S; Gross, D H E

    1999-01-01

    Phase transitions of small isolated systems are signaled by the shape of the caloric equation of state e^*(T), the relationship between the excitation energy per nucleon e^* and temperature. In this work we compare the experimentally deduced e^*(T) to the theoretical predictions. The experimentally accessible temperature was extracted from evaporation spectra from incomplete fusion reactions leading to residue nuclei. The experimental e^*(T) dependence exhibits the characteristic S-shape at e^* = 2-3 MeV/A. Such behavior is expected for a finite system at a phase transition. The observed dependence agrees with predictions of the MMMC-model, which simulates the total accessible phase-space of fragmentation.

  15. Experimental and theoretical search for a phase transition in nuclear fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chbihi, A.; Schapiro, O.; Salou, S.; Gross, D. H. E.

    Phase transitions of small isolated systems are signaled by the shape of the caloric equation of state e*(T), the relationship between the excitation energy per nucleon e* and temperature. In this work we compare the experimentally deduced e*(T) to the theoretical predictions. The experimentally accessible temperature was extracted from evaporation spectra from incomplete fusion reactions leading to residue nuclei. The experimental e*(T) dependence exhibits the characteristic S-shape at e*= 2-3 MeV/A. Such behavior is expected for a finite system at a phase transition. The observed dependence agrees with predictions of the MMMC-model, which simulates the total accessible phase-space of fragmentation.

  16. Experimental Studies on Improved Plastic Bonded Explosives Materials (PBXs for Controlled Fragmentation Warheads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsharkawy Karim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes formulations of plastic bonded explosives (PBXs based on three highly brisant explosives, namely 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX, 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX and pentaerythritoltetranitrate (PETN with polyurethane (PU based on Glycidyl azide polymer (GAP as an energetic binder in comparison with composition-B, which used in the fragmentation warheads. The sensitivity and performance properties of different types of PBXs were evaluated by experimental results of prepared selected PBX compositions. Casting technique was used to prepare the selected compositions containing 14% PU based on GAP. It has been observed that the brisance of the PBX based on HMX was higher than that of comp-B by 21.3 %, the detonation velocity showed a remarkable increase of the order of 8480 (m/s while that of comp-B was 7638 (m/s. A controlled fragmentation warhead with an outer grooving warhead case of dimensions 100x35x4 mm was used and arena test was carried out to determine the lethal zone of the fragmentation warhead. The lethal zone obtained from arena test for PBX composition based on HMX named PBXHG4 was higher than that based on RDX or PETN, and than that of comp-B by 40%.

  17. Interaction of angiotensin II with the C-terminal 300-320 fragment of the rat angiotensin II receptor AT1a monitored by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, Nicola; Gaggelli, Elena; Gaggelli, Nicola; Lozzi, Luisa; Neri, Paolo; Valensin, Daniela; Valensin, Gianni

    2003-10-01

    Interaction between angiotensin II (Ang II) and the fragment peptide 300-320 (fCT300-320) of the rat angiotensin II receptor AT1a was demonstrated by relaxation measurements, NOE effects, chemical shift variations, and CD measurements. The correlation times modulating dipolar interactions for the bound and free forms of Ang II were estimated by the ratio of the nonselective and single-selective longitudinal relaxation rates. The intermolecular NOEs observed in NOESY spectra between HN protons of 9Lys(fCT) and 6His(ang), 10Phe(fCT) and 8Phe(ang), HN proton of 3Tyr(fCT) and Halpha of 4Tyr(ang), 5Phe(fCT)Hdelta and Halpha of 4Tyr(ang) indicated that Ang II aromatic residues are directly involved in the interaction, as also verified by relaxation data. Some fCT300-320 backbone features were inferred by the CSI method and CD experiments revealing that the presence of Ang II enhances the existential probability of helical conformations in the fCT fragment. Restrained molecular dynamics using the simulated annealing protocol was performed with intermolecular NOEs as constraints, imposing an alpha-helix backbone structure to fCT300-320 fragment. In the built model, one strongly preferred interaction was found that allows intermolecular stacking between aromatic rings and forces the peptide to wrap around the 6Leu side chain of the receptor fragment.

  18. Some comments to Cicero, De Natura Deorum II 37, 95-96: a fragment of Aristotle’s On Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton-Hermann Chroust

    1975-12-01

    Full Text Available A reconstruction of a likely theme in Aristotle’s On Philosophy with the help of its echo in Seneca, Dio Chrysostomus, Synesius and Psellus. Cicero’s, De Natura Deorum II 37, 95-96, might well be considered an authentic fragment of the Aristotelian On Philosophy.

  19. An Experimental Test of Competition among Mice, Chipmunks, and Squirrels in Deciduous Forest Fragments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse L Brunner

    Full Text Available Mixed hardwood forests of the northeast United States support a guild of granivorous/omnivorous rodents including gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis, eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus, and white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus. These species coincide geographically, co-occur locally, and consume similar food resources. Despite their idiosyncratic responses to landscape and patch variables, patch occupancy models suggest that competition may influence their respective distributions and abundances, and accordingly their influence on the rest of the forest community. Experimental studies, however, are wanting. We present the result of a large-scale experiment in which we removed white-footed mice or gray squirrels from small, isolated forest fragments in Dutchess County, New York, and added these mammals to other fragments in order to alter the abundance of these two species. We then used mark-recapture analyses to quantify the population-level and individual-level effects on resident mice, squirrels, and chipmunks. Overall, we found little evidence of competition. There were essentially no within-season numerical responses to changes in the abundance of putative competitors. Moreover, while individual-level responses (apparent survival and capture probability did vary with competitor densities in some models, these effects were often better explained by site-specific parameters and were restricted to few of the 19 sites we studied. With only weak or nonexistent competition among these three common rodent species, we expect their patterns of habitat occupancy and population dynamics to be largely independent of one another.

  20. Experimental study of dynamic fragmentation of shockloaded metals below and above melting

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    De Rességuier T.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The breakout and reflection of a strong shock-wave upon the free surface of a metallic sample may lead to ejecta production of many types. Spall fracture is due to tensile stresses which result from the interaction of the incident and the reflected release waves. When the sample remains in solid state, one or several layers of finite thickness, called spalls, can be created and ejected. When melting is initiated during shock-wave propagation, tensile stresses are generated in a liquid medium and lead to the creation of an expanding cloud of liquid debris. This phenomenon, sometimes referred to as microspalling, consists in a dynamic fragmentation process in the melted material. The present paper is devoted to the experimental investigation of the transition from spall fracture in solid state to the micro-spalling process in molten metals. This study, realized on tin and on iron, involves different shock generators (gas gun, pulsed laser… and diagnostics (velocimetry, high-speed optical shadowgraphy, fragments recovery.

  1. HYPOLIPEDEMIC EFFECT OF CYNODON DACTYLON ON HISTOPATHOLOGICAL STUDY AND DNA FRAGMENTATION ANALYSIS IN EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED HYPERCHOLESTEREMIC RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Selva Kumar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypercholesteremia is one of the risk factors for coronary artery disease. The present study highlights the efficacy of Ayurvedic herbal formulation Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda grass on histopathological study and DNA fragmentation analysis in experimentally induced hypercholesteremic rats. Four groups of rats were employed namely control, hypercholesterolemia rats (4% Cholesterol+1% cholic acid, Cynodon dactylon treatment in hypercholesteremic rats and Cynodon dactylon alone treated rats. Results of DNA fragmentation was found to be greater in High cholesterol diet fed groups. Lesser fragmentation was found in high cholesterol diet + Cynodon dactylon treated group when compared to the high cholesterol diet group. Cynodon dactylon alone treated group is comparably similar to that of normal group (lesser fragmentation. Histopathological study of thoracic aorta of Cynodon dactylon treated group shows decrease in atherogenicity compared to untreated high cholesterol diet fed rats. The data demonstrated that Cynodon dactylon formulation was associated with hypolipidemic effects on the experimentally induced hypercholesteremic rats.

  2. Experimental research of methods for clustering and selecting image fragments using spatial invariant equivalent models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilenko, Vladimir G.; Lazarev, Alexander A.; Nikitovich, Diana V.

    2014-08-01

    In the paper, we show that the nonlinear spatial non-linear equivalency functions on the basis of continuous logic equivalence (nonequivalence) operations have better discriminatory properties for comparing images. Further, using the equivalent model of multiport neural networks and associative memory, (including matrix-matrix and matrix-tensor with adaptive-weighted correlation, multi-port neural-net auto-associative and hetero-associative memory (MP NN AAM and HAM ) and the proposed architecture based on them, we show how we can modify these models and architectures for space-invariant associative recognition and clustering (high performance parallel clustering processing) images. We consider possible implementations of 2D image classifiers, devices for partitioning image fragments into clusters and their architectures. The main base unit of such architectures is a matrix-matrix or matrix-tensor equivalentor, which can be implemented on the basis of two traditional correlators. We show that the classifiers based on the equivalency paradigm and optoelectronic architectures with space-time integration and parallel-serial 2D images processing have advantages such as increased memory capacity (more than ten times of the number of neurons!), High performance in different modes . We present the results of associative significant dimension (128x128, 610x340) image recognition - renewal modeling. It will be shown that these models are capable to recognize images with a significant percentage (20- 30%) damaged pixels. The experimental results show that such models can be successfully used for auto-and heteroassociative pattern recognition. We show simulation results of using these modifications for clustering and learning models and algorithms for cluster analysis of specific images and divide them into categories of the array. Show example of a cluster division of image fragments, letters and graphics for clusters with simultaneous formation of the outputweighted spatial

  3. Habitat fragmentation, vole population fluctuations, and the ROMPA hypothesis: An experimental test using model landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzli, George O

    2016-11-01

    Increased habitat fragmentation leads to smaller size of habitat patches and to greater distance between patches. The ROMPA hypothesis (ratio of optimal to marginal patch area) uniquely links vole population fluctuations to the composition of the landscape. It states that as ROMPA decreases (fragmentation increases), vole population fluctuations will increase (including the tendency to display multi-annual cycles in abundance) because decreased proportions of optimal habitat result in greater population declines and longer recovery time after a harsh season. To date, only comparative observations in the field have supported the hypothesis. This paper reports the results of the first experimental test. I used prairie voles, Microtus ochrogaster, and mowed grassland to create model landscapes with 3 levels of ROMPA (high with 25% mowed, medium with 50% mowed and low with 75% mowed). As ROMPA decreased, distances between patches of favorable habitat (high cover) increased owing to a greater proportion of unfavorable (mowed) habitat. Results from the first year with intensive live trapping indicated that the preconditions for operation of the hypothesis existed (inversely density dependent emigration and, as ROMPA decreased, increased per capita mortality and decreased per capita movement between optimal patches). Nevertheless, contrary to the prediction of the hypothesis that populations in landscapes with high ROMPA should have the lowest variability, 5 years of trapping indicated that variability was lowest with medium ROMPA. The design of field experiments may never be perfect, but these results indicate that the ROMPA hypothesis needs further rigorous testing. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. AN IV CATHETER FRAGMENTS DURING MDCT SCANNING OF HUMAN ERROR: EXPERIMENTAL AND REPRODUCIBLE MICROSCOPIC MAGNIFICATION ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol [Dept. of Radiologic Science, Shin Heung College, Uijeongbu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Woong [Dept. of of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gang-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ji Won [Dept. of Radiological Science, Jeonju University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Sung Hwan [Dept. of of Prosthetics and Orthotics, Korean National College of Rehabilitation and Welfare, Pyeongtaek (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health College University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Won Kwan [Dept. of of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    The use of intravenous catheters are occasionally complicated by intravascular fragments and swelling of the catheter fragments. We present a patient in whom an intravenous catheter fragments was retrieved from the dorsal metacarpal vein following its incidental CT examination detection. The case of demonstrates the utility of microscopy and multi-detector CT in localizing small of subtle intravenous catheter fragments as a human error. A case of IV catheter fragments in the metacarpal vein, in which reproducible and microscopy data allowed complete localization of a missing fragments and guided surgery with respect to the optimal incision site for fragments removal. These reproducible studies may help to determine the best course of action and treatment for the patient who presents with such a case.

  5. On the simulation of enzymatic digest patterns: the fragmentation of oligomeric and polymeric galacturonides by endo-polygalacturonase II

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, J J; Williams, M A K; Hunt, Jonathan J; Cameron, Randall G; Williams, Martin A.K.

    2006-01-01

    A simulation methodology for predicting the time-course of enzymatic digestions is described. The model is based solely on the enzyme's subsite architecture and concomitant binding energies. This allows subsite binding energies to be used to predict the evolution of the relative amounts of different products during the digestion of arbitrary mixtures of oligomeric or polymeric substrates. The methodology has been specifically demonstrated by studying the fragmentation of a population of oligogalacturonides of varying degrees of polymerization, when digested by endo-polygalacturonase II (endo-PG II) from Aspergillus niger.

  6. Impact of radionuclides on maintenance of Experimental Breeder Reactor II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    More than 20 years of Experimental-Breeder-Reactor-II (EBR-II) operation has demonstrated the capability to maintain radioactive equipment without undue radiation exposure to operating and maintenance personnel. The dominant radioisotopes in EBR-II primary systems are the activated corrosion product /sup 54/Mn and the fission products /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs. The presence of radioisotopes from direct activation, deposit of activated corrosion products, and release of fission products from breached fuel elements dictates special procedures, equipment, and planning but does not prohibit maintenance activities. Since 1977, the average yearly exposure of operating and maintenance personnel has been reduced while the radioactivity of systems and components has increased.

  7. A doppel alpha-helix peptide fragment mimics the copper(II) interactions with the whole protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Mendola, Diego; Magrì, Antonio; Campagna, Tiziana; Campitiello, Maria Anna; Raiola, Luca; Isernia, Carla; Hansson, Orjan; Bonomo, Raffaele P; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2010-06-01

    The doppel protein (Dpl) is the first homologue of the prion protein (PrP(C)) to be discovered; it is overexpressed in transgenic mice that lack the prion gene, resulting in neurotoxicity. The whole prion protein is able to inhibit Dpl neurotoxicity, and its N-terminal domain is the determinant part of the protein function. This region represents the main copper(II) binding site of PrP(C). Dpl is able to bind at least one copper ion, and the specific metal-binding site has been identified as the histidine residue at the beginning of the third helical region. However, a reliable characterization of copper(II) coordination features has not been reported. In a previous paper, we studied the copper(II) interaction with a peptide that encompasses only the loop region potentially involved in metal binding. Nevertheless, we did not find a complete match between the EPR spectroscopic parameters of the copper(II) complexes formed with the synthesized peptide and those reported for the copper(II) binding sites of the whole protein. Herein, the synthesis of the human Dpl peptide fragment hDpl(122-139) (Ac-KPDNKLHQQVLWRLVQEL-NH(2)) and its copper(II) complex species are reported. This peptide encompasses the third alpha helix and part of the loop linking the second and the third helix of human doppel protein. The single-point-mutated peptide, hDpl(122-139)D124N, in which aspartate 124 replaces an asparagine residue, was also synthesized. This peptide was used to highlight the role of the carboxylate group on both the conformation preference of the Dpl fragment and its copper(II) coordination features. NMR spectroscopic measurements show that the hDpl(122-139) peptide fragment is in the prevailing alpha-helix conformation. It is localized within the 127-137 amino acid residue region that represents a reliable conformational mimic of the related protein domain. A comparison with the single-point-mutated hDpl(122-139)D124N reveals the significant role played by the aspartic

  8. Decommissioning of Experimental Breeder Reactor - II Complex, Post Sodium Draining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. A. (Bart) Michelbacher; S. Paul Henslee; Collin J. Knight; Steven R. sherman

    2005-09-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor - II (EBR-II) was shutdown in September 1994 as mandated by the United States Department of Energy. This sodium-cooled reactor had been in service since 1964. The bulk sodium was drained from the primary and secondary systems and processed. Residual sodium remaining in the systems after draining was converted into sodium bicarbonate using humid carbon dioxide. This technique was tested at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois under controlled conditions, then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary cooling system, followed by the primary tank. This process, terminated in 2002, was used to place a layer of sodium bicarbonate over all exposed surfaces of sodium. Treatment of the remaining EBR-II sodium is governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a RCRA Operating Permit in 2002, mandating that all hazardous materials be removed from EBR-II within a 10 year period, with the ability to extend the permit and treatment period for another 10 years. A preliminary plan has been formulated to remove the remaining sodium and NaK from the primary and secondary systems using moist carbon dioxide, steam and nitrogen, and a water flush. The moist carbon dioxide treatment was resumed in May 2004. As of August 2005, approximately 60% of the residual sodium within the EBR-II primary tank had been treated. This process will continue through the end of 2005, when it is forecast that the process will become increasingly ineffective. At that time, subsequent treatment processes will be planned and initiated. It should be noted that the processes and anticipated costs associated with these processes are preliminary. Detailed engineering has not been performed, and approval for these methods has not been obtained from the regulator or the sponsors.

  9. The role of pebble fragmentation in planetesimal formation II. Numerical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Jansson, Karl Wahlberg; Syed, Mohtashim Bukhari; Blum, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Some scenarios for planetesimal formation go through a phase of collapse of gravitationally bound clouds of mm-cm-sized pebbles. Such clouds can form for example through the streaming instability in protoplanetary disks. We model the collapse process with a statistical model to obtain the internal structure of planetesimals with solid radii between 10 and 1,000 km. In the collapse, pebbles collide and, depending on relative speed, collisions have different outcomes. A mixture of particle sizes inside a planetesimal leads to better packing capabilities and higher densities. In this paper we apply results from new laboratory experiments of dust aggregate collisions (presented in a companion paper) to model collision outcomes. We find that the internal structure of a planetesimal is strongly dependent on both its mass and the applied fragmentation model. Low-mass planetesimals have no/few fragmenting pebble collisions in the collapse phase and end up as porous pebble-piles. The amount of fragmenting collisions i...

  10. The role of pebble fragmentation in planetesimal formation I. Experimental study

    CERN Document Server

    Syed, M Bukhari; Jansson, K Wahlberg; Johansen, A

    2016-01-01

    Previous work on protoplanetary dust growth shows halt at centimeter sizes owing to the occurrence of bouncing at velocities of $\\geq$ 0.1 $ms^{-1}$ and fragmentation at velocities $\\geq$ 1 $ms^{-1}$. To overcome these barriers, spatial concentration of cm-sized dust pebbles and subsequent gravitational collapse have been proposed. However, numerical investigations have shown that dust aggregates may undergo fragmentation during the gravitational collapse phase. This fragmentation in turn changes the size distribution of the solids and thus must be taken into account in order to understand the properties of the planetesimals that form. To explore the fate of dust pebbles undergoing fragmenting collisions, we conducted laboratory experiments on dust-aggregate collisions with a focus on establishing a collision model for this stage of planetesimal formation. In our experiments, we analysed collisions of dust aggregates with masses between 1.4 g and 180 g, mass ratios between target and projectile from 125 to 1 ...

  11. The Effects of Habitat Fragmentation on the Behavior of the Cotton Rat (Sigmodon hispidus):Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, G.W.; Drelin, E.A.; Mabry, K.E.

    2001-07-01

    The authors studied the movements of cotton rats and cotton mice in experimental landscapes at the SRS in order to determine the effects of fragmentation and connectivity between habitat patches on dispersal movements and population dynamics. Densities between connected and isolated patches were not different. Small patches tended to support higher densities. Cotton rats were more common in corridors than expected and cotton mice were more likely to leave by a corridor.

  12. Sleep Fragmentation Hypersensitizes Healthy Young Women to Deep and Superficial Experimental Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovides, Stella; George, Kezia; Kamerman, Peter; Baker, Fiona C

    2017-07-01

    The effect of sleep deprivation on pain sensitivity has typically been studied using total and partial sleep deprivation protocols. These protocols do not mimic the fragmented pattern of sleep disruption usually observed in individuals with clinical pain conditions. Therefore, we conducted a controlled experiment to investigate the effect of sleep fragmentation on pain perception (deep pain: forearm muscle ischemia, and superficial pain: graded pin pricks applied to the skin) in 11 healthy young women after 2 consecutive nights of sleep fragmentation, compared with a normal night of sleep. Compared with normal sleep, sleep fragmentation resulted in significantly poorer sleep quality, morning vigilance, and global mood. Pin prick threshold decreased significantly (increased sensitivity), as did habituation to ischemic muscle pain (increased sensitivity), over the course of the 2 nights of sleep fragmentation compared with the night of normal sleep. Sleep fragmentation did not increase the maximum pain intensity reported during muscle ischemia (no increase in gain), and nor did it increase the number of spontaneous pains reported by participants. Our data show that sleep fragmentation in healthy, young, pain-free women increases pain sensitivity in superficial and deep tissues, indicating a role for sleep disruption, through sleep fragmentation, in modulating pain perception. Our findings that pain-free, young women develop hyperalgesia to superficial and deep muscle pain after short-term sleep disruption highlight the need for effective sleep management strategies in patients with pain. Findings also suggest the possibility that short-term sleep disruption associated with recurrent acute pain could contribute to increased risk for future chronic pain conditions. Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Behavioural activity of angiotensin II (3-7)4Phe--analogue of natural fragment 3-7 of angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoły, Z; Wiśniewski, K; Jachimowicz, A; Braszko, J

    1996-01-01

    A study was made of the influence of pentapeptide 3-7 angiotensin II [AII(3-7)], its analogue 3-7(4)Phe [AII(3-7)4Phe] and angiotensin II (AII) on the behaviour of adult male rats. The motility, stereotypy, spatial performance, learning of conditioned and passive avoidance responses allowing to avoid aversive stimulation were estimated. Examined peptides at the dose 1 nmol injected intracerebroventricularly 15 min before the experiment did not produce specific changes in psychomotor activity in the "open field" test and in retention of the spatial task in the Morris water maze. The rate of acquisition of conditioned avoidance responses was stimulated by AII(3-7)4Phe, AII(3-7) and AII administration. In the passive avoidance situation AII improved retention of the responses whereas analogue AII(3-7)4Phe and fragment 3-7 caused similar though less pronounced effect. All the peptides applied immediately before the experiment intensified stereotypy, a behaviour evoked by of apomorphine-1 mg/kg and amphetamine-7.5 mg/kg intraperitonealy injection. These results show similar psychotropic activity of analogue AII(3-7)4Phe, comparable with the activity of natural fragment 3-7 of angiotensin II.

  14. Experimental simulation of fragmentation and stratification of core debris on the core catcher of a fast breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, Dipin S.; Vignesh, R. [Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Sudha, A. Jasmin, E-mail: jasmin@igcar.gov.in [Safety Engineering Division, Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India); Pushpavanam, S.; Sundararajan, T. [Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P. [Safety Engineering Division, Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Fragmentation of two simultaneous metals jets in a bulk coolant analysed. • Particle size from experiments compared with theoretical analysis. • Jet breakup modes explained using dimensionless numbers. • Settling aspects of aluminium and lead debris on collector plate studied. • Results analysed in light of core debris settling on core catcher in a FBR. - Abstract: The complex and coupled phenomena of two simultaneous molten metal jets fragmenting inside a quiescent liquid pool and settling on a collector plate are experimentally analysed in the context of safety analysis of a fast breeder reactor (FBR) in the post accident heat removal phase. Following a hypothetical core melt down accident in a FBR, a major portion of molten nuclear fuel and clad/structural material which are collectively termed as ‘corium’ undergoes fragmentation in the bulk coolant sodium in the lower plenum of the reactor main vessel and settles on the core catcher plate. The coolability of this decay heat generating debris bed is dependent on the particle size distribution and its layering i.e., stratification. Experiments have been conducted with two immiscible molten metals of different densities poured inside a coolant medium to understand their fragmentation behaviour and to assess the possibility of formation of a stratified debris bed. Molten aluminium and lead have been used as simulants in place of molten stainless steel and nuclear fuel to facilitate easy handling. This paper summarizes the major findings from these experiments. The fragmentation of the two molten metals are explained in the light of relevant dimensionless numbers such as Reynolds number and Weber Number. The mass median diameter of the fragmented debris is predicted from nonlinear stability analysis of slender jets for lead jet and using Rayleigh's classical theory of jet breakup for aluminium jet. The agreement of the predicted values with the experimental results is good. These

  15. Developing an Experimental Simulation Method for Rock Avalanches: Fragmentation Behavior of Brittle Analogue Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thordén Haug, Øystein; Rosenau, Matthias; Leever, Karen; Oncken, Onno

    2013-04-01

    Gravitational mass movement on earth and other planets show a scale dependent behavior, of which the physics is not fully understood. In particular, the runout distance for small to medium sized landslides (volume granular material down a chute. Though such granular avalanche models provide important insights into avalanche dynamics, they imply that the material fully disintegrate instantaneously. Observations from nature, however, suggests that a transition from solid to "liquid" occurs over some finite distance downhill, critically controlling the mobility and energy budget of the avalanche. Few experimental studies simulated more realistically the material failing during sliding and those were realized in a labscale centrifuge, where the range of volumes/scales is limited. To develop a new modeling technique to study the scale dependent runout behavior of rock avalanches, we designed, tested and verified several brittle materials allowing fragmentation to occur under normal gravity conditions. According to the model similarity theory, the analogue material must behave dynamically similar to the rocks in natural rock avalanches. Ideally, the material should therefore deform in a brittle manner with limited elastic and ductile strains up to a certain critical stress, beyond which the material breaks and deforms irreversibly. According to scaling relations derived from dimensional analysis and for a model-to-prototype length ratio of 1/1000, the appropriate yield strength for an analogue material is in the order of 10 kPa, friction coefficient around 0.8 and stiffness in the order of MPa. We used different sand (garnet, quartz) in combination with different matrix materials (sugar, salt, starch, plaster) to cement it. The deformation behavior and strength of the samples was tested using triaxial compression tests at atmospheric confining pressures. Proper material properties were obtained using well-sorted, well-rounded, medium grained quartz sand with gypsum

  16. Experimental study on the friction effect of plastic stents for biliary stone fragmentation (with video).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Kim, Gwangil; Jeong, Seok; Choi, Sung Hoon; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Lee, Don Haeng; Cho, Joo Young; Hong, Sung Pyo

    2017-06-16

    In patients with irretrievable or intractable bile duct stone, temporary insertion of a plastic stent (PS) followed by further endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or surgery has been recommended as a 'bridge' therapy. However, the exact mechanism of stone fragmentation has not been discovered. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether PS shape can facilitate stone fragmentation. Using a new in vitro bile flow phantom model, we compared the friction effect among three different PS groups (straight PS group, double pigtail-shaped PS group, and screw-shaped PS group) and a control group. Each group had 10 silicon tube blocks that separately contained one stone and two PS. The control group had 10 blocks each with only a stone and no PS. We carried out analysis of the friction effect by stone weight and volume changes among the groups, excluding fragmented stones. After 8 weeks, complete fragmentation was noted in one out of 34 cholesterol stones (2.9%) and in four out of six pigmented stones (66.7%). Fragmentation tended to be more prominent in the screw-shaped PS group than in the straight PS group, double pigtail-shaped group, and control group (volume change: -11.33%, 7.94%, 4.43%, and 2.05%, respectively, P = 0.1390; weight change: -9.30%, 0.71%, -0.10%, and -1.23%, respectively, P = 0.3553). Stone fragmentation may be induced by PS friction effect. Also, screw-shaped plastic stents may improve friction effect. These results may help guide future PS development and clinical decisions. © 2017 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  17. Single spin asymmetry in forward $pA$ collisions II: Fragmentation contribution

    CERN Document Server

    Hatta, Yoshitaka; Yoshida, Shinsuke; Yuan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    We compute the twist-three fragmentation contribution to the transverse single spin asymmetry (SSA) in light hadron production $p^\\uparrow p\\to hX$ and $p^\\uparrow A\\to hX$ including the gluon saturation effect in the unpolarized nucleon/nucleus. Together with the results in our previous paper, this completes the full evaluation of the SSA in this process in the "hybrid" formalism. We argue that the dependence of SSAs on the atomic mass number in the forward region can elucidate the relative importance of the soft gluon pole contribution from the twist-three quark-gluon-quark correlation in the polarized nucleon and the twist-three fragmentation contribution from the final state hadron.

  18. Single spin asymmetry in forward p A collisions. II. Fragmentation contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, Yoshitaka; Xiao, Bo-Wen; Yoshida, Shinsuke; Yuan, Feng

    2017-01-01

    We compute the twist-three fragmentation contribution to the transverse single spin asymmetry (SSA) in light hadron production p↑p →h X and p↑A →h X including the gluon saturation effect in the unpolarized nucleon/nucleus. Together with the results in our previous paper, this completes the full evaluation of the SSA in this process in the "hybrid" formalism. We argue that the dependence of SSAs on the atomic mass number in the forward region can elucidate the relative importance of the soft gluon pole contribution from the twist-three quark-gluon-quark correlation in the polarized nucleon and the twist-three fragmentation contribution from the final state hadron.

  19. The Role of Pebble Fragmentation in Planetesimal Formation. II. Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlberg Jansson, Karl; Johansen, Anders; Bukhari Syed, Mohtashim; Blum, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Some scenarios for planetesimal formation go through a phase of collapse of gravitationally bound clouds of millimeter- to centimeter-size pebbles. Such clouds can form, for example, through the streaming instability in protoplanetary disks. We model the collapse process with a statistical model to obtain the internal structure of planetesimals with solid radii between 10 and 1000 km. During the collapse, pebbles collide, and depending on their relative speeds, collisions have different outcomes. A mixture of particle sizes inside a planetesimal leads to better packing capabilities and higher densities. In this paper we apply results from new laboratory experiments of dust aggregate collisions (presented in a companion paper) to model collision outcomes. We find that the internal structure of a planetesimal is strongly dependent on both its mass and the applied fragmentation model. Low-mass planetesimals have no/few fragmenting pebble collisions in the collapse phase and end up as porous pebble piles. The number of fragmenting collisions increases with increasing cloud mass, resulting in wider particle size distributions and higher density. The collapse is nevertheless “cold” in the sense that collision speeds are damped by the high collision frequency. This ensures that a significant fraction of large pebbles survive the collapse in all but the most massive clouds. Our results are in broad agreement with the observed increase in density of Kuiper Belt objects with increasing size, as exemplified by the recent characterization of the highly porous comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko.

  20. Experimental investigation on the causes for pellet fragmentation under LOCA conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, A.; Vitanza, C.; Seidl, M.; Wensauer, A.; Faber, W.; Macián-Juan, R.

    2015-10-01

    This paper addresses a separate effect experiment performed with irradiated fuel to study fuel fragmentation and fission gas release during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). The paper presents a qualitative and quantitative investigation of the effects of the removal of the geometrical constraint provided by the cladding and the removal of the constraint given by the rod internal pressure in determining the extent of fuel fragmentation and fission gas release during a LOCA for fuel segments with a burnup of approximately 52 MWd/kgU. A review of previous LOCA tests was the starting point for the identification of these constraints and for the selection of the fuel rod burnup, the experiment's procedure and the boundary conditions. An out-of-pile test was considered representative for the scope, and the experiment was performed at the Halden Reactor Project hot cell in Kjeller (Norway) with heat provided by an electric oven. Three fuel rod segments were studied: 1) a fuel segment that experienced only ballooning without burst, 2) a fuel segment that experienced ballooning and burst and 3) a fuel segment that experienced neither ballooning nor burst. The neutron radiography and fuel fragment sifting showed that both cladding constraint and internal pressure play a role in the formation of fuel cracks and fragmentation, and the study of the fission gas release during the transient showed that removing the cladding constraint or the internal pressure increased the amount of fission gas release.

  1. Novel Bioinformatics–Based Approach for Proteomic Biomarkers Prediction of Calpain-2 & Caspase-3 Protease Fragmentation: Application to βII-Spectrin Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Assaad, Atlal; Dawy, Zaher; Nemer, Georges; Kobeissy, Firas

    2017-01-01

    The crucial biological role of proteases has been visible with the development of degradomics discipline involved in the determination of the proteases/substrates resulting in breakdown-products (BDPs) that can be utilized as putative biomarkers associated with different biological-clinical significance. In the field of cancer biology, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have shown to result in MMPs-generated protein BDPs that are indicative of malignant growth in cancer, while in the field of neural injury, calpain-2 and caspase-3 proteases generate BDPs fragments that are indicative of different neural cell death mechanisms in different injury scenarios. Advanced proteomic techniques have shown a remarkable progress in identifying these BDPs experimentally. In this work, we present a bioinformatics-based prediction method that identifies protease-associated BDPs with high precision and efficiency. The method utilizes state-of-the-art sequence matching and alignment algorithms. It starts by locating consensus sequence occurrences and their variants in any set of protein substrates, generating all fragments resulting from cleavage. The complexity exists in space O(mn) as well as in O(Nmn) time, where N, m, and n are the number of protein sequences, length of the consensus sequence, and length per protein sequence, respectively. Finally, the proposed methodology is validated against βII-spectrin protein, a brain injury validated biomarker.

  2. Novel Bioinformatics–Based Approach for Proteomic Biomarkers Prediction of Calpain-2 & Caspase-3 Protease Fragmentation: Application to βII-Spectrin Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Assaad, Atlal; Dawy, Zaher; Nemer, Georges; Kobeissy, Firas

    2017-01-01

    The crucial biological role of proteases has been visible with the development of degradomics discipline involved in the determination of the proteases/substrates resulting in breakdown-products (BDPs) that can be utilized as putative biomarkers associated with different biological-clinical significance. In the field of cancer biology, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have shown to result in MMPs-generated protein BDPs that are indicative of malignant growth in cancer, while in the field of neural injury, calpain-2 and caspase-3 proteases generate BDPs fragments that are indicative of different neural cell death mechanisms in different injury scenarios. Advanced proteomic techniques have shown a remarkable progress in identifying these BDPs experimentally. In this work, we present a bioinformatics-based prediction method that identifies protease-associated BDPs with high precision and efficiency. The method utilizes state-of-the-art sequence matching and alignment algorithms. It starts by locating consensus sequence occurrences and their variants in any set of protein substrates, generating all fragments resulting from cleavage. The complexity exists in space O(mn) as well as in O(Nmn) time, where N, m, and n are the number of protein sequences, length of the consensus sequence, and length per protein sequence, respectively. Finally, the proposed methodology is validated against βII-spectrin protein, a brain injury validated biomarker. PMID:28112201

  3. A specific binding site recognizing a fragment of angiotensin II in bovine adrenal cortex membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, S G; Fournier, A; Guillemette, G

    1994-12-12

    We have characterized a specific binding site for angiotensin IV in bovine adrenal cortex membranes. Pseudo-equilibrium studies at 37 degrees C for 2 h have shown that this binding site recognizes angiotensin IV with a high affinity (Kd = 0.24 +/- 0.03 nM). The binding site is saturable and relatively abundant (maximal binding capacity around 0.5 pmol/mg protein). Non-equilibrium kinetic analyses at 37 degrees C revealed a calculated kinetic Kd of 47 pM. The binding site is pharmacologically distinct from the classic angiotensin receptors AT1 or AT2. Competitive binding studies with bovine adrenal cortex membranes demonstrated the following rank order of effectiveness: angiotensin IV (Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe) = angiotensin II-(3-7) (Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro) > angiotensin III (Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe) > or = angiotensin II-(4-7) (Tyr-Ile-His-Pro) > angiotensin II (Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe) > angiotensin II-(1-6) (Asp-Arg-Val-Tyr-Ile-His) > angiotensin II-(4-8) (Tyr-Ile-His-Pro-Phe) > > > angiotensin II-(3-6) (Val-Tyr-Ile-His), angiotensin II-(4-6) (Tyr-Ile-His), L-158,809 (5,7-dimethyl-2-ethyl-3-[(2'(1-H-tetrazol-5-yl)[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-y l) methyl]-3-H-imidazo[4,5-beta]pyridine H2O) and PD 123319 (1-[4-(dimethylamino)3-methylphenyl]methyl-5-(diphenylacetyl)4,5,6 ,7- tetrahydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine-6-carboxylic acid). The divalent cations Mg2+ and Ca2+ were shown to diminish the binding of 125I-angiotensioffn IV to bovine adrenal cortex membranes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Fragmentation and Hadronization

    OpenAIRE

    Webber, B. R.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental data, theoretical ideas and models concerning jet fragmentation and the hadronization process are reviewed, concentrating on the following topics: factorization and small-x resummation of fragmentation functions, hadronization models, single-particle yields and spectra in Z decay, comparisons between quark and gluon jets, current and target fragmentation in deep inelastic scattering, heavy quark fragmentation, Bose-Einstein correlations and WW fragmentation.

  5. Exploring rearrangements along the fragmentation pathways of diuron anion: A combined experimental and computational investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanawati, Basem; Harir, Mourad; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2009-12-01

    Diuron (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea), a common herbicide from phenyl urea class, was investigated by studying the formation of several negative ions [M-H]- in the gas phase and the fragmentation behaviour of the thermodynamically most probably formed isomeric anions upon linear ion acceleration/collision experiments. The collision induced dissociation experiments (CID) were carried out in a hexapole-quadrupole-hexapole hybrid system coupled to 12 T magnet with infinity ICR cell for high resolution measurements. Two distinctive main pathways were observed in the MS/MS spectrum. Sustained off-resonance irradiation (SORI) experiments inside the ICR cell reinforce the fragmentation channels obtained from linear ion acceleration experiments. The fragmentation pathways were also completely investigated by the use of B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level of theory. Elimination of dimethylamine takes place in a two-step process, by which two successive 1,3 proton shifts occur. The second 1,3 proton shift is concerted with the departure of dimethylamine. The driving force for the (CH3)2NH elimination is the formation of isocyanate group. The formed primary product ion can further decompose to release HCl through a new transition state. A stable new aromatic product ion is formed with 10[pi] electrons. Loss of C3H5NO neutral from another anionic isomer of the precursor ion was also observed and is characteristic for the amide terminal of the diamide functional group. A concerted mechanism is proposed, by which N-C bond breakage and cyclization of the eliminated neutral fragment C3H5NO takes place simultaneously to form 1-methyl-aziridin-2-one.

  6. Experimental study on fragmentation behaviors of molten LBE and water contact interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄望哩; 洒荣园; 周丹娜; 姜华磊; 黄群英

    2015-01-01

    Based on the design of CLEAR (China LEAd-based Reactor), it is important to study the molten LBE (Lead-Bismuth Eutectic)/water interaction following an incidental steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) accident. Experiments were carried out to investigate the fragmentation behavior of the molten LBE/water contacting interface, with a high-speed video camera to record the fragmentation behavior of 300–600◦C LBE at 20◦C and 80◦C of water temperature. Violent explosion phenomenon occurred at water temperature of 20◦C, while no explosion occurred at 80◦C. Shapes of the LBE debris became round at 80◦C of water temperature, whereas the debris was of the needle-like shape at 20◦C. For all the molten LBE and water temperatures in the present study, the debris sized at 2.8–5.0 mm had the largest mass fraction. The results indicate that the dominant physical mechanism of the molten LBE fragmentation was the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability between LBE/water direct contact interface.

  7. Fragmentation energetics for angiotensin II and its analogs from time- and energy-resolved surface-induced dissociation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Julia; Bailey, Thomas H.; Futrell, Jean H.

    2004-05-01

    Surface-induced dissociation (SID) of four model peptides: DRVYIHPF, RVYIHPF, RVYIHAF, and RVYIHDF was studied using a novel Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) specially configured for SID experiments. The energetics and dynamics of peptide fragmentation were deduced by modeling the time- and energy-resolved survival curves for each precursor ion using an RRKM based approach developed in our laboratory. Accurate dissociation parameters can be obtained from these experiments because collision-energy-resolved SID data are very sensitive to both the energetics and dynamics of dissociation. We found that transition from selective to non-selective fragmentation as ion kinetic energy is increased is associated with a substantial (ca. 0.5 eV) increase in the dissociation energy and a 3-4 orders of magnitude increase in the pre-exponential factor. Dissociation thresholds for angiotensin analogs derived from the experimental data are as follows: 1.62 eV for RVYIHAF and RVYIHPF, 1.14 eV for RVYIHDF and 1.13 eV for DRVYIHPF. Pre-exponential factors of 8.2×1011, 7.2×1012, 3.1×108, and 5.0×107 s-1 were obtained for RVYIHPF, RVYIHAF, RVYIHDF, and DRVYIHPF, respectively. Contribution from shattering to the total decomposition of the precursor ion increases for kinetically hindered fragmentation. The largest contribution is observed for a peptide ion that has the largest negative reaction entropy--DRVYIHPF.

  8. Synthesis,Characterization,and Properties of Supported Tungstozincate Bridged by Co(II) Complex Fragment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Kun; LI Jia; LIU Hong-bo; CHEN Ya-guang

    2008-01-01

    [CoII(phen)3]2[{(ZnW12O40)CoII(phen)2(H2O)}2CoII(trien)2(NaH20)2]·3H2O was synthesized via hydrothermal technique and characterized with elemental analyses,IR spectroscopy,TGA-DTA,and variable temperature magnetic susceptibility.The compound crystallized in the monoclinic system with the space group P21/n,a=1.8210 nm,b=2.3592 nm,c=2.2932 nm,β=110.31°,V=9.239 nm3,Z=2,R1=0.0827.The compound consists of two coordination cations,three lattice water molecules,and a macroanion[{(ZnW12O40)Co(phen)2(H2O)}2Co(C6H18N4)2'(NaH2O)2]4-in which each supported Keggin anion[(ZnW12O40CoII(phen)2(H2O)]4-acts as a ligand to coordinate to central bridging Co2+ ion via a terminal oxygen atom.Hydrogen bonds are responsible for the construction of 3D architecture of the compound.The compound is paramagnetic with a weak antiferromagnetie interaction(θ=-46.796 K).

  9. Coagulation and Fragmentation in molecular clouds. II. The opacity of the dust aggregate size distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Ormel, C W; Tielens, A G G M; Dominik, C; Paszun, D

    2011-01-01

    The dust size distribution in molecular clouds can be strongly affected by ice-mantle formation and (subsequent) grain coagulation. Following previous work where the dust size distribution has been calculated from a state-of-the art collision model for dust aggregates that involves both coagulation and fragmentation (Paper I), the corresponding opacities are presented in this study. The opacities are calculated by applying the effective medium theory assuming that the dust aggregates are a mix of 0.1{\\mu}m silicate and graphite grains and vacuum. In particular, we explore how the coagulation affects the near-IR opacities and the opacity in the 9.7{\\mu}m silicate feature. We find that as dust aggregates grow to {\\mu}m-sizes both the near-IR color excess and the opacity in the 9.7 {\\mu}m feature increases. Despite their coagulation, porous aggregates help to prolong the presence of the 9.7{\\mu}m feature. We find that the ratio between the opacity in the silicate feature and the near-IR color excess becomes lowe...

  10. Copper(II) complexes of prion protein PEG11-tetraoctarepeat fragment: spectroscopic and voltammetric studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, Raffaele P; Di Natale, Giuseppe; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Tabbì, Giovanni; Vagliasindi, Laura I

    2009-04-14

    Spectroscopic (UV-Vis and EPR) and voltammetric studies have been carried out on the copper(II) complexes with the Ac-PEG11-(PHGGGWGQ)4-NH2 (L) polypeptide. In the ratios Cu : L 3 : 1 and 4 : 1, the two [Cu3(L)H(-6)] and [Cu4(L)H(-8)] complex species have been characterized at neutral pH values. All the copper atoms occupy similar coordination sites formed by imidazole, peptidic nitrogen atoms and carbonyl oxygen atoms in a square base pyramidal geometry. Voltammetric measurements on these systems point out the cooperativity in the electron transfer processes among the copper(II) sites during their reduction. NO interaction with these polynuclear copper species is characterized by the reduction of the copper sites through the formation of two different intermediate complex species. When an excess of the Ac-PEG11-(PHGGGWGQ)4-NH2 ligand is considered, frozen solution EPR parameters and UV-Vis spectroscopic data identify the [Cu(N(im))4]2+ chromophore, which does not interact with NO.

  11. Rapid experimental SAD phasing and hot-spot identification with halogenated fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D. Bauman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Through X-ray crystallographic fragment screening, 4-bromopyrazole was discovered to be a `magic bullet' that is capable of binding at many of the ligand `hot spots' found in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT. The binding locations can be in pockets that are `hidden' in the unliganded crystal form, allowing rapid identification of these sites for in silico screening. In addition to hot-spot identification, this ubiquitous yet specific binding provides an avenue for X-ray crystallographic phase determination, which can be a significant bottleneck in the determination of the structures of novel proteins. The anomalous signal from 4-bromopyrazole or 4-iodopyrazole was sufficient to determine the structures of three proteins (HIV-1 RT, influenza A endonuclease and proteinase K by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD from single crystals. Both compounds are inexpensive, readily available, safe and very soluble in DMSO or water, allowing efficient soaking into crystals.

  12. Macroscopic observables experimentally linked to microscopic processes in the explosive fracture and fragmentation of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, Lawrence M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-16

    The response of a metal element to explosive loading depends on a broad spectrum of explosive and metal properties, macroscopic geometry plays a crucial role in defining the localized loading history and the resulting gradients of interest, while microscopic effects and defects are generally believed responsible for damage nucleation. Certain experiments reduce the complexity by producing conditions that are uniform in some sense, allowing dynamic measurement of variables that can be correlated with corresponding microscopic effects observed in recovery experiments. Spherical expansion of thin shells, that eventually fragment, and steady wave loading of flat plates are two such experiments. Proton radiography, x-radiography, laser velocimetry, imaging IR, and visible light photography all have produced dynamic measurements in 4340 steel, copper, uranium alloys, tantalum, and titanium. Correlation of the macroscopic measurements with microscopy on recovered samples has been done with a statistical approach.

  13. Edge-mediated patterns of seed removal in experimentally connected and fragmented landscapes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, Michael, T.; Orrock, John, L.; Brudvig, Lars, A.

    2011-09-07

    While biological reserves remain central to biodiversity conservation, the amount of area available for terrestrial reserves may be inadequate for many taxa. Biodiversity spillover - the promotion of diversity in matrix areas surrounding reserves - might help address this shortfall in reserve area. However, the mechanistic underpinning of spillover remains uninvestigated. Two fundamental processes - seed dispersal and establishment - might generate plant biodiversity spillover. Here, we investigate the role of establishment in promoting spillover by assessing post-dispersal seed predation, a key component of establishment, in the matrix of a replicated, large-scale habitat fragmentation experiment, where spillover is relevated around patches connected by landscape corridors. Our results show that matrix seed predation may constrain the distance of this spillover effect by reducing establishment: seed removal was least at the matrix edge and increased further into the matrix. We found some support for matrix seed predation underpinning previously reported landscape-level variation in spillover. Of the three species we investigated, two showed evidence for elevated seed predation in the matrix surrounding the unconnected patches around which the lowest levels of spillover occur. However, seed predation did not explain connectivity-enhanced spillover, suggesting that seed dispersal likely drives this pattern. Management activities that increase seed deposition in the matrix may have beneficial effects via spillover. Our work also illustrates that matrix-mediated gradients in seed predation may be widespread, but likely vary depending upon matrix composition and the ecological system under consideration. In fragmented landscapes, this gradient could impact the distribution, abundance, and spread of plant species.

  14. Study of the twinned dendrite tip shape II: Experimental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado-Ordorica, M.A., E-mail: mario.salgado@novelis.com [Laboratoire de Simulation des Materiaux LSMX, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Station 12, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Burdet, P.; Cantoni, M. [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Microscopie Electronique CIME, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Station 12, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Rappaz, M. [Laboratoire de Simulation des Materiaux LSMX, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Station 12, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15

    The favorable growth kinetics of twinned dendrites can be explained by their complex morphology, multiple side branching mechanisms, growth undercooling and tip morphology. Three models were proposed for the twinned dendrite tip shape: (i) a grooved tip satisfying the Smith condition at the triple line; (ii) a doublon , i.e. a double-tip dendrite that grows with a narrow and deep liquid channel in its center; and (iii) a pointed (or edgy) tip, with consideration of the solid-liquid interfacial energy anisotropy. In the first part of this work, phase field simulations of half a twinned dendrite with an appropriate boundary condition to reproduce the Smith condition supported the doublon conjecture, with a narrow liquid channel ending its solidification with the formation of small liquid droplets. In this part, experimental observations of twinned dendrite tips reveal the presence of a small, but well-defined, groove, thus definitely eliminating the edged tip hypothesis. Focused ion beam nanotomography and energy-dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis in a transmission electron microscope reveal the existence of a positive solute gradient in a region localized within 2 {mu}m around the twin plane. In Al-Zn specimens, small particles aligned within the twin plane further support the doublon conjecture and the predicted formation of small liquid droplets below the doublon root.

  15. Fragmented testament: letters written by World War II resisters before their execution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Anne; Lefer, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Psychoanalysis does not always take moral greatness as a given, a fact attributed by Horney to Freud's view of psychology as a natural science. The French psychiatrist Henri Baruk, however, attempts to bridge the gap between normative and empirical considerations by proposing a model based on the Biblical concept of tsedek, a Hebrew term for altruism coupled with a strong sense of justice. Those who possessed these qualities, Baruk argued, had a more highly developed sense of Self and Other. Consistent with Baruk's model, we argue that moral greatness may be defined as a high degree of moral consciousness combined with courage. Character qualities of World War II resisters, as revealed in a review of over 200 letters written to family and friends immediately before their execution, indicate a strong sense of Self and Other and an equilibrium between a sense of duty and an affective impulse. These qualities are seen in letters written by those engaged in a broad spectrum of resistance activity. The interpersonal quality of these letters; the concern for the suffering that their deaths will cause others; the efforts to reassure those left behind and even to impart useful information and instructions; and the gratitude expressed for large and small favors, all suggest that altruism is a marker for moral greatness, and that it is present even in those whose resistance activity might not at first be classified as altruistic.

  16. Rapid experimental SAD phasing and hot-spot identification with halogenated fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, Joseph D.; Harrison, Jerry Joe E. K.; Arnold, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Through X-ray crystallographic fragment screening, 4-bromopyrazole was discovered to be a `magic bullet' that is capable of binding at many of the ligand `hot spots' found in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). The binding locations can be in pockets that are `hidden' in the unliganded crystal form, allowing rapid identification of these sites forin silicoscreening. In addition to hot-spot identification, this ubiquitous yet specific binding provides an avenue for X-ray crystallographic phase determination, which can be a significant bottleneck in the determination of the structures of novel proteins. The anomalous signal from 4-bromopyrazole or 4-iodopyrazole was sufficient to determine the structures of three proteins (HIV-1 RT, influenza A endonuclease and proteinase K) by single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) from single crystals. Both compounds are inexpensive, readily available, safe and very soluble in DMSO or water, allowing efficient soaking into crystals.

  17. Directly probing redox-linked quinones in photosystem II membrane fragments via UV resonance Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Yao, Mingdong; Pagba, Cynthia V; Zheng, Yang; Fei, Liping; Feng, Zhaochi; Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II (PSII) harvests sunlight with bound pigments to oxidize water and reduce quinone to quinol, which serves as electron and proton mediators for solar-to-chemical energy conversion. At least two types of quinone cofactors in PSII are redox-linked: QA, and QB. Here, we for the first time apply 257-nm ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy to acquire the molecular vibrations of plastoquinone (PQ) in PSII membranes. Owing to the resonance enhancement effect, the vibrational signal of PQ in PSII membranes is prominent. A strong band at 1661 cm(-1) is assigned to ring CC/CO symmetric stretch mode (ν8a mode) of PQ, and a weak band at 469 cm(-1) to ring stretch mode. By using a pump-probe difference UVRR method and a sample jet technique, the signals of QA and QB can be distinguished. A frequency difference of 1.4 cm(-1) in ν8a vibrational mode between QA and QB is observed, corresponding to ~86 mV redox potential difference imposed by their protein environment. In addition, there are other PQs in the PSII membranes. A negligible anharmonicity effect on their combination band at 2130 cm(-1) suggests that the 'other PQs' are situated in a hydrophobic environment. The detection of the 'other PQs' might be consistent with the view that another functional PQ cofactor (not QA or QB) exists in PSII. This UVRR approach will be useful to the study of quinone molecules in photosynthesis or other biological systems.

  18. Glass polymorphism in glycerol-water mixtures: II. Experimental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachler, Johannes; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Jahn, David A; Wong, Jessina; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Loerting, Thomas

    2016-04-28

    We report a detailed experimental study of (i) pressure-induced transformations in glycerol-water mixtures at T = 77 K and P = 0-1.8 GPa, and (ii) heating-induced transformations of glycerol-water mixtures recovered at 1 atm and T = 77 K. Our samples are prepared by cooling the solutions at ambient pressure at various cooling rates (100 K s(-1)-10 K h(-1)) and for the whole range of glycerol mole fractions, χ(g). Depending on concentration and cooling rates, cooling leads to samples containing amorphous ice (χg ≥ 0.20), ice (χ(g) ≤ 0.32), and/or "distorted ice" (0 density amorphous ice (HDA). PIA of ice domains within the glycerol-water mixtures is shown to be possible only up to χ(g) ≈ 0.32 (T = 77 K). This is rather surprising since it has been known that at χ(g) solution of χ(g) ≈ 0.38. Accordingly, in the range 0.32 density amorphous ice) transformation. At 0.15 glycerol-water domains and, finally, the melting of ice at high temperatures. Our work exemplifies the complex "phase" behavior of glassy binary mixtures due to phase-separation (ice formation) and polyamorphism, and the relevance of sample preparation, concentration as well as cooling rates. The presence of the distorted ice (called "interphase" by us) also explains the debated "drift anomaly" upon melting. These results are compatible with the high-pressure study by Suzuki and Mishima indicating disappearance of polyamorphism at P ≈ 0.03-0.05 GPa at χ(g) ≈ 0.12-0.15 [J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 141, 094505].

  19. Carbonic Anhydrase II: A Model System for Artificial Copper Center Design, Protein-guided Cycloadditions, Tethering Screenings and Fragment-based Lead Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Schulze Wischeler, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis a variety of quite different fragment-based lead discovery approaches have been applied to the target protein carbonic anhydrase II. The different projects were strongly supported and methodologically tailored towards protein crystallography; a method which is currently emerging as a routine analytical tool. This maturation mainly results from improved radiation sources and enhanced computing power. About 200-250 da...

  20. Experimental Study of Multi-Walled Composite Shell Fragments under Thermal Force Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Tairova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled composite shells are a relatively new prospective type of load carrying structures for rocket and space engineering. These CFRP structures are produced by injection and infusion methods and have several advantages in comparison with common structures such as stringer-frame, grid and sandwich structures with a light core. In particular, those have more structural parameters, which enable one to control mechanical properties of the structure, and this is important in designing the load carrying structures of different purpose.Presently, there are few national and foreign publications on experimental investigations of mechanical properties of multi-walled shells. That is why the objective of the paper is to conduct the experimental study of deformation and failure processes of a multi-walled panel both under steady-state heating and under unsteady-state one.The paper presents the results of two tests: (1 the study of deformation and failure modes under compression and complete heating up to a specified temperature and (2 validation of working capability of multi-walled samples under single-side heating and compression simulating a start and flight version of the “ Proton” launch vehicle.Experimental results have shown that average elastic properties of multi-walled samples slightly depend on temperature for the studied range (from room temperature up to 195C while strength properties considerably decrease with increasing temperature, and this is typical for CFRP structures under compression. However, under unsteady-state short-term heating the structure has a strength that exceeds the minimal necessary strength of load carrying structures of the “Proton” launch vehicle (the samples satisfy simulated start conditions of the “Proton” launch vehicle. This is because of a low heat conductivity of the multi-walled core: an unheated sheet holds a low temperature and high load carrying capacity.Obtained results can be used in

  1. Coordination Environment of Cu(II) Ions Bound to N-Terminal Peptide Fragments of Angiogenin Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrì, Antonio; Munzone, Alessia; Peana, Massimiliano; Medici, Serenella; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Hansson, Orjan; Satriano, Cristina; Rizzarelli, Enrico; La Mendola, Diego

    2016-08-01

    Angiogenin (Ang) is a potent angiogenic factor, strongly overexpressed in patients affected by different types of cancers. The specific Ang cellular receptors have not been identified, but it is known that Ang-actin interaction induces changes both in the cell cytoskeleton and in the extracellular matrix. Most in vitro studies use the recombinant form (r-Ang) instead of the form that is normally present in vivo ("wild-type", wt-Ang). The first residue of r-Ang is a methionine, with a free amino group, whereas wt-Ang has a glutamic acid, whose amino group spontaneously cyclizes in the pyro-glutamate form. The Ang biological activity is influenced by copper ions. To elucidate the role of such a free amino group on the protein-copper binding, we scrutinized the copper(II) complexes with the peptide fragments Ang(1-17) and AcAng(1-17), which encompass the sequence 1-17 of angiogenin (QDNSRYTHFLTQHYDAK-NH₂), with free amino and acetylated N-terminus, respectively. Potentiometric, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) studies demonstrate that the two peptides show a different metal coordination environment. Confocal microscopy imaging of neuroblastoma cells with the actin staining supports the spectroscopic results, with the finding of different responses in the cytoskeleton organization upon the interaction, in the presence or not of copper ions, with the free amino and the acetylated N-terminus peptides.

  2. Probing the copper(II) binding features of angiogenin. Similarities and differences between a N-terminus peptide fragment and the recombinant human protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Mendola, Diego; Farkas, Daniel; Bellia, Francesco; Magrì, Antonio; Travaglia, Alessio; Hansson, Örjan; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2012-01-02

    The angiogenin protein (hAng) is a potent angiogenic factor and its cellular activities may be affected by copper ions even if it is yet unknown how this metal ion is able to produce this effect. Among the different regions of hAng potentially able to bind copper ions, the N-terminal domain appears to be an ideal candidate. Copper(II) complexes of the peptide fragments encompassing the amino acid residues 4-17 of hAng protein were characterized by potentiometric, UV-vis, CD, and EPR spectroscopic methods. The results show that these fragments have an unusual copper(II) binding ability. At physiological pH, the prevailing complex species formed by the peptide encompassing the protein sequence 4-17 is [CuHL], in which the metal ion is bound to two imidazole and two deprotonated amide nitrogen atoms disposed in a planar equatorial arrangement. Preliminary spectroscopic (UV-vis, CD, and EPR) data obtained on the copper(II) complexes formed by the whole recombinant hAng protein, show a great similarity with those obtained for the N-terminal peptide fragments. These findings indicate that within the N-terminal domain there is one of the preferred copper(II) ions anchoring site of the whole recombinant hAng protein.

  3. Experimental design in analytical chemistry--part II: applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Najafabadi, Heshmatollah; Leardi, Riccardo; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the applications of experimental design to optimize some analytical chemistry techniques such as extraction, chromatography separation, capillary electrophoresis, spectroscopy, and electroanalytical methods.

  4. Differential sensor in front photopyroelectric technique: II. Experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, R; Moreno, I; Araujo-Andrade, C [Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Calz. Solidaridad Esquina Paseo de la Bufa s/n, CP 98060, Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); MarIn, E [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y TecnologIa Avanzada-Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, CP 11500, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Cruz-Orea, A [Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV-IPN, Av. IPN No. 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, CP 07360, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Pichardo-Molina, J L, E-mail: rumen@fisica.uaz.edu.m [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Loma del Bosque 115, Loma del Campestre, CP 37150, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2009-06-21

    We describe the differential cell design and the experimental (optical and electronic) setup for the differential front photopyroelectric technique, whose theory has been developed in the first part of this paper (Ivanov et al 2008 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 41 085106). We will show first how the direct (non-differential) front photopyroelectric theory described in our previous paper reproduces well the experimental results. The usefulness of the differential technique is demonstrated by means of experimental measurements of the thermal effusivity in binary ethanol-water and glycerol-water mixtures, based on a theoretical methodology that simplifies the measurement procedure and diminishes the experimental uncertainty.

  5. Cloning and expression of an anti-LDL(-) single-chain variable fragment, and its inhibitory effect on experimental atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazuma, Soraya M; Cavalcante, Marcela F; Telles, Andréia E R; Maranhão, Andrea Queiroz; Abdalla, Dulcineia S P

    2013-01-01

    The in vivo modified forms of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) are important for the formation of foam cells and as mediators of the immuno-inflammatory process involved in the progression of atherosclerosis. Electronegative LDL, LDL(-), is a LDL subfraction with pro-inflammatory properties that is present in human blood. To investigate possible atheroprotective effects, an anti-LDL(-) single-chain variable fragment (scFv) was expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris and its activity was evaluated in vitro against macrophages and in experimental atherosclerosis in Ldlr(-/-) mice. The recombinant 2C7 scFv was produced in a yield of 9.5 mg of protein/L. The specificity and affinity of purified 2C7 scFv against LDL(-) was confirmed by ELISA. To assess the activity of 2C7 scFv on foam cell formation, RAW 264.7 macrophages were exposed to LDL(-) in the presence or absence of 2C7 scFv. The 2C7 scFv inhibited the uptake of LDL(-) by macrophages in a dose-dependent manner, and internalization of LDL(-) by these cells was found to be mediated by the CD36 and CD14 receptor. In addition, compared with untreated cells, lipid accumulation in macrophages was decreased, and the expression of Cd36, Tlr-4 and Cox-2 was downregulated in macrophages treated with 2C7 scFv. Importantly, compared with untreated mice, the treatment of Ldlr(-/-) mice with 2C7 scFv decreased the atherosclerotic lesion area at the aortic sinus. In conclusion, our data show that 2C7 scFv inhibits foam cell formation and atherosclerotic plaque development by modulating the expression of genes relevant to atherogenesis. These results encourage further use of this antibody fragment in the development of new therapeutic strategies that neutralize the pro-atherogenic effects of LDL(-).

  6. Metallothionein I+II expression and their role in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, M; Hidalgo, J

    2000-01-01

    We examined the expression and roles of neuroprotective metallothionein-I+II (MT-I+II) in the rat CNS in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for the human autoimmune disease, multiple sclerosis (MS). EAE caused significant macrophage activation, T-lymphocyte infiltrat......We examined the expression and roles of neuroprotective metallothionein-I+II (MT-I+II) in the rat CNS in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for the human autoimmune disease, multiple sclerosis (MS). EAE caused significant macrophage activation, T...

  7. Tokamak experimental power reactor conceptual design. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-01

    Volume II contains the following appendices: (1) summary of EPR design parameters, (2) impurity control, (3) plasma computational models, (4) structural support system, (5) materials considerations for the primary energy conversion system, (6) magnetics, (7) neutronics penetration analysis, (8) first wall stress analysis, (9) enrichment of isotopes of hydrogen by cryogenic distillation, and (10) noncircular plasma considerations. (MOW)

  8. Animal experimentation-Part II: In periodontal research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T K Pal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Animals contribute to the development of medical and dental sciences by being sacrificed in the hands of scientists. The experimental design demands a specific type of animal to be used for experimentation. Each animal needs proper handling, care, and diet. Alongside specific advantages and disadvantages pertaining to each type of animal need to be understood well depending on the type of study/experiment. It is important for the researcher to know the disease susceptibility of each animal. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the salient factors that need to be considered for animal experimentations.

  9. Electron scattering by molecules. II - Experimental methods and data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajmar, S.; Chutjian, A.; Register, D. F.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental techniques for measuring electron-molecule collision cross sections are briefly summarized. A survey of the available experimental cross section data is presented. The emphasis here is on elastic scattering, rotational, vibrational and electronic excitations, total electron scattering, and momentum transfer in the few eV to few hundred eV impact energy range. Reference is made to works concerned with high energy electron scattering, innershell and multi-electron excitations, conicidence methods and electron scattering in laser fields.

  10. Contact Modelling in Resistance Welding, Part II: Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Contact algorithms in resistance welding presented in the previous paper are experimentally validated in the present paper. In order to verify the mechanical contact algorithm, two types of experiments, i.e. sandwich upsetting of circular, cylindrical specimens and compression tests of discs...... with a solid ring projection towards a flat ring, are carried out at room temperature. The complete algorithm, involving not only the mechanical model but also the thermal and electrical models, is validated by projection welding experiments. The experimental results are in satisfactory agreement...

  11. Experimentation on prisoners by the Japanese during World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girdwood, Ronald H

    1985-08-24

    Girdwood, president of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, recounts his experience in assessing and treating newly released Allied prisoners in the Far East during World War II. Although he had been posted to various locales and had interviewed many prison camp survivors, he had not heard direct accounts of germ warfare experiments allegedly performed by the Japanese on American, British, and Australian prisoners until they were reported on a British television program, Unit 731, on 13 August 1985. While poor medical care, abuse, and malnutrition were known, information about biological warfare disclosed on the television program was evidently not known to British, Indian, or Australian authorities until the war's end.

  12. Experimental analysis of the mechanism of chromatin remodeling by RNA polymerase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaykalova, Daria A.; Kulaeva, Olga I.; Pestov, Nikolai A.; Hsieh, Fu-Kai; Studitsky, Vasily M.

    2014-01-01

    The vital process of transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occurs in chromatin environment in eukaryotic cells; in fact, moderately transcribed genes retain nucleosomal structure. Recent studies suggest that chromatin structure presents a strong barrier for transcribing Pol II in vitro, and that DNA-histone interactions are only partially and transiently disrupted during transcript elongation on moderately active genes. Furthermore, elongating Pol II complex is one of the major targets during gene regulation. Below we describe a highly purified, defined experimental system that recapitulates many important properties of transcribed chromatin in vitro and allows detailed analysis of the underlying mechanisms. PMID:22910212

  13. Comparison of experimental data with predictions of various models for silicon and aluminum fragmentation under the effect of high-energy cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chechenin, N. G., E-mail: chechenin@sinp.msu.ru; Chuvilskaya, T. V.; Shirokova, A. A.; Kadmenskii, A. G. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    The accuracy attained in theoretically estimating the yields of isotopes and isobars and their energy, charge, and mass distributions in silicon fragmentation that occurs in spacecraft electronics under the effect of cosmic-ray protons is an important factor in forecasting the probability for single-event upsets in the electronics and the reliability of spacecraft operation in general. In previous studies of our group, it was shown that the results of the calculations are highly sensitive to the choice of parameters for opticalmodel potentials. In addition to cross sections for elastic and inelastic proton scattering and charge, mass, and energy distributions of heavy nuclear-reaction products, the results of our calculations for doubledifferential spectra of protons originating from the interaction of highly energetic (30-400 MeV) protons with aluminum and double-differential spectra of other particles (neutrons and alpha particles) arising in competing channels of the p + {sup 27}Al reaction are also described in the present article. The calculations in question were performed on the basis of the EMPIRE-II-19 code by using various optical-model potentials, including the Becchetti-Greenlees potential for the (p, n) channel, the Wilmore-Hodgson potential for the (p, n) channel, the Madland potential for the (p, p) channel, the Koning-Delaroche potential for the (p, p) channel, and the McFadden-Satchler potential for the (p, {alpha}) channel. A comparative analysis of the double-differential spectra obtained for outgoing protons, neutrons, and alpha particles experimentally and in the calculations of various authors was performed.

  14. Experimental Electron Heat Diffusion in TJ-II ECRH Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, V.I.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Herranz, J.; Castejon, F.

    2006-07-01

    Interpretative transport has been used to revisit the global scalings of TJ-II ECRH plasmas from a local perspective. Density, rotational transform and ERCH power scans were analysed based upon Thomson Scattering data (electron density and temperature) in steady state discharges. A simple formula to obtain the thermal conductivity, assuming pure diffusion and negligible convective heat fluxes was used in a set of 161 discharges. All the analysis was performed with the ASTRA transport shell. The density scan indicates that inside n=0,4 there is no significant change of e with density in the range studied (0.4 (1019m-3) 1.0), while in 0,5 <0,8 approximately, e decreases with density. In the rotational transform scan it is found that the values of e when a low order rational of the rotational transform is present locally seem to be smaller for the corresponding range, although it is apparent a general beneficial effect of the corresponding change in magnetic structure. Finally, in the ECRH power scan, e is found to have an overall increment in 0,2

  15. Simulation and Experimentation in an Astronomy Laboratory, Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, F. P.; Maurone, P. A.; Hones, M.

    1995-12-01

    The availability of low-cost, high-performance computing hardware and software has transformed the manner by which astronomical concepts can be re-discovered and explored in a laboratory that accompanies an astronomy course for non-scientist students. We report on a strategy for allowing each student to understand fundamental scientific principles by interactively confronting astronomical and physical phenomena, through direct observation and by computer simulation. Direct observation of physical phenomena, such as Hooke's Law, begins by using a computer and hardware interface as a data-collection and presentation tool. In this way, the student is encouraged to explore the physical conditions of the experiment and re-discover the fundamentals involved. The hardware frees the student from the tedium of manual data collection and presentation, and permits experimental design which utilizes data that would otherwise be too fleeting, too imprecise, or too voluminous. Computer simulation of astronomical phenomena allows the student to travel in time and space, freed from the vagaries of weather, to re-discover such phenomena as the daily and yearly cycles, the reason for the seasons, the saros, and Kepler's Laws. By integrating the knowledge gained by experimentation and simulation, the student can understand both the scientific concepts and the methods by which they are discovered and explored. Further, students are encouraged to place these discoveries in an historical context, by discovering, for example, the night sky as seen by the survivors of the sinking Titanic, or Halley's comet as depicted on the Bayeux tapestry. We report on the continuing development of these laboratory experiments. Futher details and the text for the experiments are available at the following site: http://astro4.ast.vill.edu/ This work is supported by a grant from The Pew Charitable Trusts.

  16. Effect of bicuculline and angiotensin II fragment 3-7 on learning and memory processes in rats chronically treated with ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuziemka-Leska, M; Car, H; Wiśniewski, K

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the possible influence of bicuculline, the antagonist of GABA-A receptor on behavioral activity (recall, acquisition of conditioned reflexes) of angiotension II fragment 3-7 (A II 3-7) in rats chronically treated with ethanol. Long term (9 weeks) ethanol intoxication profoundly impaired learning and memory processes in all testes used. The GABA-A receptor antagonist bicuculline (0.5 mg/kg ip) did not influence exploratory and motor activity in the control rats, but we observed tendency (without significance) to decrease the locomotor activity, in the alcohol-intoxicated groups of animals, when the drug was injected together with A II 3-7 (2 microgram icv). Bicuculline did not influence retrieval process in passive avoidance recall in both investigated groups, and when the drug was given together with AII 3-7 significantly enhanced its action in the control group and in rats chronically treated with ethanol. Bicuculline significantly improved acquisition in the active avoidance test in the control and alcohol-intoxicated groups. Bicuculline injected together with A II 3-7 significantly decreased its action in the control group. Coadministration of bicuculline with A II 3-7 did not significantly change the activity of A II 3-7 in the acquisition of active avoidance test in the alcohol-intoxicated groups of rats.

  17. Rapid changes in shape and cell architecture of isolated fragments of amphibian embryonic tissues as an experimental model of morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousov, L V; Dorfman, Y G; Cherdantsev, V G

    1975-07-01

    Changes in the shape and cell architecture of pieces of epithelial and neural ectoderm, mesoderm, neural tube, and combined ectomesodermal fragments from embryos of Rana temporaria 0-60 min after isolation were studied. The fragments were capable of changing their shape quickly (actually during separation) or after a latent period of several minutes. Rapid deformations were not prevented by cooling or by moderate doses of cyanide; as a rule they were connected with contraction of the surface area of the cells of the fragment and they can be regarded as relaxation to forms with lower mechanical energy. The direction of the deformation usually coincides with the subsequent normal morphogenesis of the particular anlage. Deformations with a latent period are suppressed by cooling and by the addition of cyanide, which lead to an increase in the surface area of individual cells, but they reduce the total surface area of the fragment. The shape of the fragments becomes more complex: they become irregularly twisted, they form folds, and they separate into spherical regions with stretched surfaces ("drops"). These processes are connected with the performance of positive mechanical work by the intracellular contractile systems. The reasons why the fragments become more complex in shape are discussed.

  18. Experimental Neutron-Induced Fission Fragment Mass Yields of 232Th and 238U at Energies from 10 to 33 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Simutkin, V D; Blomgren, J; Österlund, M; Bevilacqua, R; Ryzhov, I V; Tutin, G A; Yavshits, S G; Vaishnene, L A; Onegin, M S; Meulders, J P; Prieels, R

    2013-01-01

    Development of nuclear energy applications requires data for neutron-induced reactions for actinides in a wide neutron energy range. Here we describe measurements of pre-neutron emission fission fragment mass yields of 232Th and 238U at incident neutron energies from 10 to 33 MeV. The measurements were done at the quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam of the Louvain-la-Neuve cyclotron facility CYCLONE; a multi-section twin Frisch-gridded ionization chamber was used to detect fission fragments. For the peak neutron energies at 33, 45 and 60 MeV, the details of the data analysis and the experimental results have been published before and in this work we present data analysis in the low-energy tail of the neutron energy spectra. The preliminary measurement results are compared with available experimental data and theoretical predictions.

  19. The human tyrosine aminotransferase gene: characterization of restriction fragment length polymorphisms and haplotype analysis in a family with tyrosinemia type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, E M; Natt, E; Grimm, T; Odievre, M; Scherer, G

    1988-07-01

    Deficiency in hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) causes tyrosinemia type II, an autosomal recessively inherited disorder. Using a TAT cosmid clone, we have identified an MspI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) 5' to the TAT gene, with allele frequencies of 0.63 and 0.37. Analysis of the cloned maternal and paternal TAT alleles from a patient with tyrosinemia type II led to the identification of a HaeIII RFLP at the 3' end of the TAT gene, with allele frequencies of 0.94 and 0.06. The two RFLPs are 27 kb apart and in no allelic association. From haplotype frequencies, a polymorphism information content (PIC) value of 0.44 was obtained. The two RFLPs have allowed the unambiguous identification of the mutant TAT alleles in the patient's pedigree by haplotype analysis.

  20. Study of charm quark fragmentation into D{sup *} mesons with the H1 detector at HERA II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liptaj, Andrej

    2008-12-15

    In this work charm quark fragmentation into D{sup *} mesons is investigated in deep-inelastic electron proton collisions. This work is based on data collected in the years 2004 - 2007 by the H1 detector at HERA, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 354.1 pb{sup -1}. Three observables denoted z{sub jet},z{sub hem} and z{sub hem}{sup (jet)} are measured, each of them meant to approximate the momentum fraction of the charm quark transferred to the D{sup *} meson. In case of z{sub jet} the quark momentum is estimated as the momentum of the D{sup *} jet, for the two other observables it is approximated by the momentum of an appropriately chosen D{sup *} hemisphere. The visible range is defined by the phase space requirements on the DIS events: Q{sup 2} > 5 GeV{sup 2}, 0.05 < y < 0.6 and by the cuts applied on the reconstructed D{sup *{+-}} particles: 1.5 GeV < p{sub T}(D{sup *}) < 15.0 GeV and vertical stroke {eta}(D{sup *}) vertical stroke < 1.5. An additional constraint E{sub T}(D{sup *}jet) > 3.0 GeV enters the phase space definition in case of z{sub jet} and z{sub hem}{sup (jet)}, where a reconstructed jet containing the D{sup *} meson is required. Within this phase space the normalized single differential cross sections are measured in bins of the three observables. Two Monte Carlo models, RAPGAP and CASCADE, both interfaced with the PYTHIA program for the Lund string fragmentation, are used to make predictions of the respective cross sections for different parametrizations (Peterson and Kartvelishvili) of the charm fragmentation function. The difference in cross sections between data and Monte Carlo model predictions for different values of the fragmentation parameter is quantified by calculating values of {chi}{sup 2} in order to extract optimal parameters for the Peterson and Kartvelishvili parametrization. Using predictions from PYTHIA for e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation optimal parameters are extracted also from the published BELLE and ALEPH data

  1. Disentangling the drivers of reduced long-distance seed dispersal by birds in an experimentally fragmented landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriarte, María; Anciães, Marina; da Silva, Mariana T B; Rubim, Paulo; Johnson, Erik; Bruna, Emilio M

    2011-04-01

    Seed dispersal is a crucial component of plant population dynamics. Human landscape modifications, such as habitat destruction and fragmentation, can alter the abundance of fruiting plants and animal dispersers, foraging rates, vector movement, and the composition of the disperser community, all of which can singly or in concert affect seed dispersal. Here, we quantify and tease apart the effects of landscape configuration, namely, fragmentation of primary forest and the composition of the surrounding forest matrix, on individual components of seed dispersal of Heliconia acuminata, an Amazonian understory herb. First we identified the effects of landscape configuration on the abundance of fruiting plants and six bird disperser species. Although highly variable in space and time, densities of fruiting plants were similar in continuous forest and fragments. However, the two largest-bodied avian dispersers were less common or absent in small fragments. Second, we determined whether fragmentation affected foraging rates. Fruit removal rates were similar and very high across the landscape, suggesting that Heliconia fruits are a key resource for small frugivores in this landscape. Third, we used radiotelemetry and statistical models to quantify how landscape configuration influences vector movement patterns. Bird dispersers flew farther and faster, and perched longer in primary relative to secondary forests. One species also altered its movement direction in response to habitat boundaries between primary and secondary forests. Finally, we parameterized a simulation model linking data on fruit density and disperser abundance and behavior with empirical estimates of seed retention times to generate seed dispersal patterns in two hypothetical landscapes. Despite clear changes in bird movement in response to landscape configuration, our simulations demonstrate that these differences had negligible effects on dispersal distances. However, small fragments had reduced densities

  2. Neurobiologia do parkinsonismo: II. modelos experimentais Neurobiology of parkinsonism: II. experimental models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Ponzoni

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available O emprego de modelos experimentais de parkinsonismo tem contribuído não só para explicar o conhecimento das funções dos gânglios basais como também tem permitido o surgimento de várias hipóteses para explicar os processos neurodegeneratives do sistema nervoso central. Nesta revisão são apresentados e discutidos os modelos de parkinsonismo que utilizam neurotoxins como a 6-hidroxidopamina, MPTP e o manganês.The study of experimental models of parkinsonism has contributed to the knowledge of basal ganglia functions, as well as to the establishment of several hypothesis for the explanation of the cause and expression of central neurodegenerative disorders. In this review we present and discuss several models such as 6-hydroxydopamine, MPTP and manganese, all of them widely used to characterize the behavioral, cellular and molecular mechanisms of parkinsonism.

  3. Cleavage of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor and nuclear accumulation of the cytoplasmic carboxy-terminal fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Julia L; Mills, Sarah J; Naquin, Ryan T; Alam, Jawed; Re, Richard N

    2007-04-01

    Our published studies show that the distribution of the ANG II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor (AT(1)R), expressed as a enhanced yellow fluorescent fusion (YFP) protein (AT(1)R/EYFP), is altered upon cellular treatment with ANG II or coexpression with intracellular ANG II. AT(1)R accumulates in nuclei of cells only in the presence of ANG II. Several transmembrane receptors are known to accumulate in nuclei, some as holoreceptors and others as cleaved receptor products. The present study was designed to determine whether the AT(1)R is cleaved before nuclear transport. A plasmid encoding a rat AT(1)R labeled at the amino terminus with enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and at the carboxy terminus with EYFP was employed. Image analyses of this protein in COS-7 cells, CCF-STTG1 glial cells, and A10 vascular smooth muscle cells show the two fluorescent moieties to be largely spatially colocalized in untreated cells. ANG II treatment, however, leads to a separation of the fluorescent moieties with yellow fluorescence accumulating in more than 30% of cellular nuclei. Immunoblot analyses of extracts and conditioned media from transfected cells indicate that the CFP domain fused to the extracellular amino-terminal AT(1)R domain is cleaved from the membrane and that the YFP domain, together with the intracellular cytoplasmic carboxy terminus of the AT(1)R, is also cleaved from the membrane-bound receptor. The carboxy terminus of the AT(1)R is essential for cleavage; cleavage does not occur in protein deleted with respect to this region. Overexpressed native AT(1)R (nonfusion) is also cleaved; the intracellular 6-kDa cytoplasmic domain product accumulates to a significantly higher level with ANG II treatment.

  4. Modulation of the delayed rectifier K+ current in neurons by an angiotensin II type 2 receptor fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J; Richards, E M; Posner, P; Sumners, C

    1995-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) stimulates the delayed rectifier K+ current (IK) in neurons cultured from rat hypothalamus and brain stem via AT2 receptors, and this effect involves activation of a Gi protein and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). However, there was no evidence that the AT2 receptor involved in this response was the same as the recently cloned AT2 receptor. In the present study, intracellular injection of a 22-amino acid peptide (PEP-22) corresponding to the putative third intracellular loop of the cloned AT2 receptor elicited an increase in IK in cultured neurons that was similar to the effect produced by ANG II. Furthermore, this effect of PEP-22 was abolished by pertussis toxin (200 ng/ml, 24 h) pretreatment and also by superfusion of the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid (10 nM), suggesting the involvement of Gi protein and PP2A, respectively. Intracellular injection of a random peptide or normal pipette solution did not affect neuronal IK. This is direct evidence to link the cloned AT2 receptor to a defined response elicited by ANG II.

  5. Copper(II) interaction with peptide fragments of histidine-proline-rich glycoprotein: Speciation, stability and binding details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Mendola, Diego; Magrì, Antonio; Santoro, Anna Maria; Nicoletti, Vincenzo G; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2012-06-01

    GHHPH is the peptide repeat present in histidine-proline rich glycoprotein (HPRG), a plasma glycoprotein involved in angiogenesis process. The copper(II) ions interaction with mono (Ac-GHHPHG-NH(2)) and its bis-repeat (Ac-GHHPHGHHPHG-NH(2)) was investigated by means of potentiometric and spectroscopic techniques. To single out the copper(II) coordination environments of different species formed with Ac-GHHPHG-NH(2), three single point mutated peptides were also synthesized and their ability to coordinate Cu(2+) investigated. Ac-GHHPHG-NH(2) binds Cu(2+) by the imidazole side chain and the amide nitrogen deprotonation that takes place towards the N-terminus. The bis-repeat is able to bind Cu(2+) more efficiently than Ac-GHHPHG-NH(2). This difference is not only due to the number of His residues in the sequence but also to the different binding sites. In fact, the comparison of the potentiometric and spectroscopic data of the copper(II) complexes with a bis-repeatPeg construct Ac-(GHHPHG)-Peg-(GHHPHG)-NH(2) and those of the metal complexes with Ac-HGHH-NH(2), indicates that the central HGHH amino acid sequence is the main copper(II) binding site.

  6. Endothelium-dependent relaxation and angiotensin II sensitivity in experimental preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marijn van der Graaf

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We investigated endothelial dysfunction and the role of angiotensin (Ang-II type I (AT1-R and type II (AT2-R receptor in the changes in the Ang-II sensitivity in experimental preeclampsia in the rat. METHODS: Aortic rings were isolated from low dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS infused pregnant rats (experimental preeclampsia; n=9, saline-infused pregnant rats (n=8, and saline (n=8 and LPS (n=8 infused non-pregnant rats. Endothelium-dependent acetylcholine-mediated relaxation was studied in phenylephrine-preconstricted aortic rings in the presence of vehicle, N(G-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester and/or indomethacin. To evaluate the role for AT1-R and AT2-R in Ang-II sensitivity, full concentration response curves were obtained for Ang-II in the presence of losartan or PD123319. mRNA expression of the AT1-R and AT2-R, eNOS and iNOS, COX1 and COX2 in aorta were evaluated using real-time RT-PCR. RESULTS: The role of vasodilator prostaglandins in the aorta was increased and the role of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor and response of the AT1-R and AT2-R to Ang-II was decreased in pregnant saline infused rats as compared with non-pregnant rats. These changes were not observed during preeclampsia. CONCLUSION: Pregnancy induced adaptations in endothelial function, which were not observed in the rat model for preeclampsia. This role of lack of pregnancy induced endothelial adaptation in the pathophysiology of experimental preeclampsia needs further investigation.

  7. Many Drops Interactions II: Simulation of Coalescence, Flocculation and Fragmentation of Multiple Colliding Drops with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Acevedo-Malavé

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the SPH method is applied to simulate for the first time the multiple hydrodynamics collisions and the formation of clusters of equally sized liquid drops in three-dimensional space. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics is a Lagrangian mesh-free formalism and has been useful to model continuous fluid. This formalism is employed to solve the Navier-Stokes equations by replacing the fluid with a set of particles. These particles are interpolation points from which properties of the fluid can be determined. We observe that when the velocity of collision varies between 0.2 mm/ms and 30.0 mm/ms different results may arise, such as: coalescence, fragmentation and formation of clusters of liquid drops. The velocity vector fields formed inside the drops during the collision process are shown.

  8. PLANET FORMATION IN STELLAR BINARIES. II. OVERCOMING THE FRAGMENTATION BARRIER IN α CENTAURI AND γ CEPHEI-LIKE SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafikov, Roman R.; Silsbee, Kedron, E-mail: rrr@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    Planet formation in small-separation (∼20 AU) eccentric binaries such as γ Cephei or α Centauri is believed to be adversely affected by the presence of the stellar companion. Strong dynamical excitation of planetesimals by the eccentric companion can result in collisional destruction (rather than growth) of 1-100 km objects, giving rise to the ''fragmentation barrier'' for planet formation. We revise this issue using a novel description of secular dynamics of planetesimals in binaries, which accounts for the gravity of the eccentric, coplanar protoplanetary disk, as well as gas drag. By studying planetesimal collision outcomes, we show, in contrast to many previous studies, that planetesimal growth and subsequent formation of planets (including gas giants) in AU-scale orbits within ∼20 AU separation binaries may be possible, provided that the protoplanetary disks are massive (≳ 10{sup –2} M {sub ☉}) and only weakly eccentric (disk eccentricity ≲ 0.01). These requirements are compatible with both the existence of massive (several M{sub J} ) planets in γ Cep-like systems and the results of recent simulations of gaseous disks in eccentric binaries. Terrestrial and Neptune-like planets can also form in lower-mass disks at small (sub-AU) radii. We find that the fragmentation barrier is less of a problem in eccentric disks that are apsidally aligned with the binary orbit. Alignment gives rise to special locations, where (1) relative planetesimal velocities are low and (2) the timescale of their drag-induced radial drift is long. This causes planetesimal pileup at such locations in the disk and promotes their growth locally, helping to alleviate the timescale problem for core formation.

  9. Suppression of angiotensin II stimulated responses in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells of experimental cirrhotic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Functional responses to angiotensin II(AT-II) were determined in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from experimental cirrhotic rats.Our data showed that AT-II-stimulated extracellular acidification rate (ECAR),which was measured by Cytosesor microphysiometry,was significantly reduced in the aortic VSMCs from the cirrhotic rats as compared to those from the control animals.The ability of AT-II to promote formation of inositol phosphates,the second messenger produced by the activation of Gq-coupled receptors,was also considerably suppressed in the cirrhotic VSMCs.Furthermore,the maximal p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation stimulated by AT-II was significantly reduced in the cirrhotic VSMCs in contrast to that in the normal VSMCs.Taken together,our data clearly demonstrated that the functional responses to AT-II was severely suppressed in aortic VSMCs in cirrhosis,indicating the impairment of general Gq-coupled receptor signaling and subsequent biological function in the cirrhotic VSMCs.

  10. Synthesis and characterisation of estrogenic carriers for cytotoxic Pt(II) fragments: biological activity of the resulting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabano, Elisabetta; Cassino, Claudio; Bonetti, Samuele; Prandi, Cristina; Colangelo, Donato; Ghiglia, Annalisa; Osella, Domenico

    2005-10-07

    This paper describes the synthesis and the spectroscopic characterisation of cis-dichloro[N-(4-(17alpha-ethynylestradiolyl)-benzyl)-ethylenediamine]platinum(II) and cis-diamino[2-(4-(17alpha-ethynylestradiolyl)-benzoylamino)-malonato]platinum(II). These complexes were synthesised in good yield according to multi-step procedures based on the classical and non-classical Sonogashira coupling reaction, respectively. These compounds retain an acceptable degree of relative binding affinity (RBA) for the alpha form of estrogen receptor. Combined treatment of breast cancer cell lines, namely hormone-sensitive MCF-7 and hormone-insensitive MDA-MB-231 cell lines, indicates that these compounds maintain agonistic activity so that the potential advantage in vehiculation of the cytotoxic moiety by means of the receptor system is counteracted by the proliferative effect of the estrogenic component of the entire molecule, especially at low concentrations.

  11. New results on jet fragmentation at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jindariani, Sergo; /Florida U.

    2006-12-01

    Presented are the latest results of jet fragmentation studies at the Tevatron using the CDF Run II detector. Studies include the distribution of transverse momenta (Kt) of particles jets, two-particle momentum correlations, and indirectly global event shapes in p{bar p} collisions. Results are discussed within the context of recent Next-to-Leading Log calculations as well as earlier experimental results from the Tevatron and e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders.

  12. Experimental study of nuclear fragmentation of 200 and 400 MeV/u 12C ions in water for applications in particle therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haettner, E.; Iwase, H.; Krämer, M.; Kraft, G.; Schardt, D.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon ion beams in the energy range of about 100-450 MeV/u offer excellent conditions for tumour therapy, in particular for the treatment of deep-seated radio-resistant tumours. Their depth-dose distribution is characterized by a low dose in the entrance channel, small lateral beam spread and an elevated biological effectiveness in the Bragg peak region. In comparison to protons the radiation field of heavier ions stopping in tissue is however more complex due to nuclear fragmentation reactions occurring along their stopping path. This results in an attenuation of the primary beam flux and a build-up of lower-Z fragments with longer ranges causing the characteristic dose tail beyond the Bragg peak. In the present work the characteristics of secondary charged particles at various depths of water were investigated experimentally using 12C ion beams of 200 and 400 MeV/u delivered by the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS-18 at GSI Darmstadt. The nuclear charge Zf of secondary fragments was identified by combining energy loss and time-of-flight (TOF) measurements. Energy spectra and yields were recorded at lab angles of 0° - 10° and at seven different water depths corresponding to the entrance channel, the Bragg peak region and the tail of the Bragg curve.

  13. Experimental study of nuclear fragmentation of 200 and 400 MeV/u (12)C ions in water for applications in particle therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haettner, E; Iwase, H; Krämer, M; Kraft, G; Schardt, D

    2013-12-01

    Carbon ion beams in the energy range of about 100-450 MeV/u offer excellent conditions for tumour therapy, in particular for the treatment of deep-seated radio-resistant tumours. Their depth-dose distribution is characterized by a low dose in the entrance channel, small lateral beam spread and an elevated biological effectiveness in the Bragg peak region. In comparison to protons the radiation field of heavier ions stopping in tissue is however more complex due to nuclear fragmentation reactions occurring along their stopping path. This results in an attenuation of the primary beam flux and a build-up of lower-Z fragments with longer ranges causing the characteristic dose tail beyond the Bragg peak. In the present work the characteristics of secondary charged particles at various depths of water were investigated experimentally using (12)C ion beams of 200 and 400 MeV/u delivered by the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS-18 at GSI Darmstadt. The nuclear charge Zf of secondary fragments was identified by combining energy loss and time-of-flight (TOF) measurements. Energy spectra and yields were recorded at lab angles of 0° - 10° and at seven different water depths corresponding to the entrance channel, the Bragg peak region and the tail of the Bragg curve.

  14. A giant gastric bezoar in billroth II stomach: a case report on successful endoscopic removal via repeated fragmentation and dissolution technique negating the need for surgical intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yu Chieng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old gentleman presented with anemia. He had a history of perforated duodenal ulcer six years ago, with Billroth II repair performed. A large gastric bezoar (8X6cm2 with a clean base ulcer at the anastomotic junction was found during the initial Oesophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (OGDS. Rapid urease test was negative. He presented with melena during the subsequent follow up (OGDS showed a Forrest Ib prepylori ulcer. We have successful removed the gastric bezoar with dissolution therapy initially (injection of coke-cola into the bezoar, followed by drinking 325ml coca-cola twice daily, followed by four attempts of OGDS with endoscopic fragmentation. Histopathology reported as degenerated vegetable matter, acellular debris mixed with scattered fungal and bacterial colonies, which was compatible with bezoar. Follow up OGDS showed complete clearance of the bezoar. Coca-cola ingestion should be considered as initial treatment as it is non-invasive, and it enables further successful endoscopic fragmentation.

  15. BaSE-II: A Robust and Experimental PRS Receiver Development Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Rügamer, Alexander; Neumaier, Philipp; Sommer, Philipp; Garzia, Fabio; Rohmer, Günter; Konovaltsev, Andriy; Sgammini, Matteo; Meurer, Michael; Wendel, Jan; Schubert, Frank; Baumann, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    This paper features an experimental Galileo PRS receiver with a novel BOC tracking method and interference mitigation algorithms in time, frequency and spatial domain. The modified BaSE-II hardware architecture is outlined including a newly designed miniaturized 2x2 array antenna. A new, reliable and robust BOC tracking method is presented that fully exploits the subcarrier accuracy and allows reliable, fast and robust detection and correction of false locks to side pe...

  16. Experimental information - RED II INAHO | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data List Contact us RED...trol ID data and Group no of Target ID data. Microarray Microarray name RED : Rice 9k Array used in the RMOS...is Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Experimental information - RED II INAHO | LSDB Archive ...

  17. Zinc(II) interactions with brain-derived neurotrophic factor N-terminal peptide fragments: inorganic features and biological perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglia, Alessio; La Mendola, Diego; Magrì, Antonio; Pietropaolo, Adriana; Nicoletti, Vincenzo G; Grasso, Giuseppe; Malgieri, Gaetano; Fattorusso, Roberto; Isernia, Carla; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2013-10-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin essential for neuronal differentiation, growth, and survival; it is involved in memory formation and higher cognitive functions. The N-terminal domain of BDNF is crucial for the binding selectivity and activation of its specific TrkB receptor. Zn(2+) ion binding may influence BDNF activity. Zn(2+) complexes with the peptide fragment BDNF(1-12) encompassing the sequence 1-12 of the N-terminal domain of BDNF were studied by means of potentiometry, electrospray mass spectrometry, NMR, and density functional theory (DFT) approaches. The predominant Zn(2+) complex species, at physiological pH, is [ZnL] in which the metal ion is bound to an amino, an imidazole, and two water molecules (NH2, N(Im), and 2O(water)) in a tetrahedral environment. DFT-based geometry optimization of the zinc coordination environment showed a hydrogen bond between the carboxylate and a water molecule bound to zinc in [ZnL]. The coordination features of the acetylated form [AcBDNF(1-12)] and of a single mutated peptide [BDNF(1-12)D3N] were also characterized, highlighting the role of the imidazole side chain as the first anchoring site and ruling out the direct involvement of the aspartate residue in the metal binding. Zn(2+) addition to the cell culture medium induces an increase in the proliferative activity of the BDNF(1-12) peptide and of the whole protein on the SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. The effect of Zn(2+) is opposite to that previously observed for Cu(2+) addition, which determines a decrease in the proliferative activity for both peptide and protein, suggesting that these metals might discriminate and modulate differently the activity of BDNF.

  18. 6-OHDA lesions to amygdala and hippocampus attenuate memory-enhancing effect of the 3-7 fragment of angiotensin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnicka, M M; Braszko, J J; Wiśniewski, K

    1998-05-01

    We have previously shown that facilitatory effect of angiotensin II (AII) on the retrieval of memory is mediated by the dopaminergic system. In the present study, we searched for the influence of the 3-7 fragment of angiotensin II [AII(3-7)] on the retrieval processes in a passive avoidance situation after bilateral 6-OHDA lesions to the central amygdala (CA) and the CA4 field of the hippocampus (HI). AII(3-7) given 15 min before the retention testing, at the intracerebroventricular dose of 1 nmol, significantly prolonged avoidance latencies in sham-operated rats (i.e. improved retrieval of memory for the electric footshock experienced during the learning trial). Bilateral lesions to CA totally abolished, and to HI significantly diminished, this facilitatory effect. An increase of spontaneous locomotor activity in rats lesioned to CA and a decrease in rats lesioned to HI were unlikely to interfere with the cognitive effect of AII (3-7). These results suggest that the anatomical substrate of facilitating retrieval of information activity of AII(3-7) is closely related to the dopaminergic projection from the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra to CA and HI.

  19. Experimental and numerical study of the fragmentation of expanding warhead casings by using different numerical codes and solution techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John F.MOXNES; Anne K.PRYTZ; yvind FRYLAND; Siri KLOKKEHAUG; Stian SKRIUDALEN; Eva FRIIS; Jan A.TELAND; Cato DRUM; Gard DEGRDSTUEN

    2014-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in numerical simulations of fragmentation of expanding warheads in 3D. Accordingly there is a pressure on developers of leading commercial codes, such as LS-DYNA, AUTODYN and IMPETUS Afea, to implement the reliable fracture models and the efficient solution techniques. The applicability of the Johnsone Cook strength and fracture model is evaluated by comparing the fracture behaviour of an expanding steel casing of a warhead with experiments. The numerical codes and different numerical solution techniques, such as Eulerian, Lagrangian, Smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), and the corpuscular models recently implemented in IMPETUS Afea are compared. For the same solution techniques and material models we find that the codes give similar results. The SPH technique and the corpuscular technique are superior to the Eulerian technique and the Lagrangian technique (with erosion) when it is applied to materials that have fluid like behaviour such as the explosive and the tracer. The Eulerian technique gives much larger calculation time and both the Lagrangian and Eulerian techniques seem to give less agreement with our measurements. To more correctly simulate the fracture behaviours of the expanding steel casing, we applied that ductility decreases with strain rate. The phenomena may be explained by the realization of adiabatic shear bands. An implemented node splitting algorithm in IMPETUS Afea seems very promising.

  20. The structure of Abeta42 C-terminal fragments probed by a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun; Murray, Megan M; Bernstein, Summer L; Condron, Margaret M; Bitan, Gal; Shea, Joan-Emma; Bowers, Michael T

    2009-03-27

    The C-terminus of amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) 42 plays an important role in this protein's oligomerization and may therefore be a good therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Certain C-terminal fragments (CTFs) of Abeta42 have been shown to disrupt oligomerization and to strongly inhibit Abeta42-induced neurotoxicity. Here we study the structures of selected CTFs [Abeta(x-42); x=29-31, 39] using replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations and ion mobility mass spectrometry. Our simulations in explicit solvent reveal that the CTFs adopt a metastable beta-structure: beta-hairpin for Abeta(x-42) (x=29-31) and extended beta-strand for Abeta(39-42). The beta-hairpin of Abeta(30-42) is converted into a turn-coil conformation when the last two hydrophobic residues are removed, suggesting that I41 and A42 are critical in stabilizing the beta-hairpin in Abeta42-derived CTFs. The importance of solvent in determining the structure of the CTFs is further highlighted in ion mobility mass spectrometry experiments and solvent-free replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. A comparison between structures with solvent and structures without solvent reveals that hydrophobic interactions are critical for the formation of beta-hairpin. The possible role played by the CTFs in disrupting oligomerization is discussed.

  1. Experimental and numerical study of the fragmentation of expanding warhead casings by using different numerical codes and solution techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Moxnes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been increasing interest in numerical simulations of fragmentation of expanding warheads in 3D. Accordingly there is a pressure on developers of leading commercial codes, such as LS-DYNA, AUTODYN and IMPETUS Afea, to implement the reliable fracture models and the efficient solution techniques. The applicability of the Johnson–Cook strength and fracture model is evaluated by comparing the fracture behaviour of an expanding steel casing of a warhead with experiments. The numerical codes and different numerical solution techniques, such as Eulerian, Lagrangian, Smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH, and the corpuscular models recently implemented in IMPETUS Afea are compared. For the same solution techniques and material models we find that the codes give similar results. The SPH technique and the corpuscular technique are superior to the Eulerian technique and the Lagrangian technique (with erosion when it is applied to materials that have fluid like behaviour such as the explosive and the tracer. The Eulerian technique gives much larger calculation time and both the Lagrangian and Eulerian techniques seem to give less agreement with our measurements. To more correctly simulate the fracture behaviours of the expanding steel casing, we applied that ductility decreases with strain rate. The phenomena may be explained by the realization of adiabatic shear bands. An implemented node splitting algorithm in IMPETUS Afea seems very promising.

  2. Physical mapping of the restriction fragments obtained from bacteriophage T4 dC-DNA with the restriction endonucleases SmaI, KpnI and BglII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiko, H; Niggemann, E; Rüger, W

    1979-01-01

    The cytosine-containing DNA of a mutant of bacteriophage T4 was digested with restriction endonucleases SmaI, KpnI and BglII producing 5, 7 and 13 fragments respectively. Complete physical maps of the T4 genome were constructed with the enzymes SmaI and KpnI and an almost complete map with the enzyme BglII.

  3. Experimental observation of topological Fermi arcs in type-II Weyl semimetal MoTe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ke; Wan, Guoliang; Deng, Peng; Zhang, Kenan; Ding, Shijie; Wang, Eryin; Yan, Mingzhe; Huang, Huaqing; Zhang, Hongyun; Xu, Zhilin; Denlinger, Jonathan; Fedorov, Alexei; Yang, Haitao; Duan, Wenhui; Yao, Hong; Wu, Yang; Fan, Shoushan; Zhang, Haijun; Chen, Xi; Zhou, Shuyun

    2016-12-01

    Weyl semimetal is a new quantum state of matter hosting the condensed matter physics counterpart of the relativistic Weyl fermions originally introduced in high-energy physics. The Weyl semimetal phase realized in the TaAs class of materials features multiple Fermi arcs arising from topological surface states and exhibits novel quantum phenomena, such as a chiral anomaly-induced negative magnetoresistance and possibly emergent supersymmetry. Recently it was proposed theoretically that a new type (type-II) of Weyl fermion that arises due to the breaking of Lorentz invariance, which does not have a counterpart in high-energy physics, can emerge as topologically protected touching between electron and hole pockets. Here, we report direct experimental evidence of topological Fermi arcs in the predicted type-II Weyl semimetal MoTe2 (refs ,,). The topological surface states are confirmed by directly observing the surface states using bulk- and surface-sensitive angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and the quasi-particle interference pattern between the putative topological Fermi arcs in scanning tunnelling microscopy. By establishing MoTe2 as an experimental realization of a type-II Weyl semimetal, our work opens up opportunities for probing the physical properties of this exciting new state.

  4. Trans-amniotic stem cell therapy (TRASCET) minimizes Chiari-II malformation in experimental spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionigi, Beatrice; Brazzo, Joseph A; Ahmed, Azra; Feng, Christina; Wu, Yaotang; Zurakowski, David; Fauza, Dario O

    2015-06-01

    We sought to study the impact of trans-amniotic stem cell therapy (TRASCET) in the Chiari-II malformation in experimental spina bifida. Sprague-Dawley fetuses (n=62) exposed to retinoic acid were divided into three groups at term (21-22 days gestation): untreated isolated spina bifida (n=21), isolated spina bifida treated with intra-amniotic injection of concentrated, syngeneic, labeled amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cells (afMSCs) on gestational day 17 (n=28), and normal controls (n=13). Analyses included measurements of brainstem and cerebellar placement on high resolution MRI and histology. Statistical comparisons included ANOVA. In parallel to the expected induced coverage of the spina bifida in the afMSC-treated group (Pspina bifida by TRASCET minimizes the Chiari-II malformation in the retinoic acid rodent model, further suggesting it as a practical alternative for the prenatal management of spina bifida. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of polybrominated diphenyl ether metabolites based on calculated boiling points from COSMO-RS, experimental retention times, and mass spectral fragmentation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott; Gross, Michael S; Olson, James R; Zurek, Eva; Aga, Diana S

    2015-02-17

    The COnductor-like Screening MOdel for Realistic Solvents (COSMO-RS) was used to predict the boiling points of several polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and methylated derivatives (MeO-BDEs) of monohydroxylated BDE (OH-BDE) metabolites. The linear correlation obtained by plotting theoretical boiling points calculated by COSMO-RS against experimentally determined retention times from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry facilitated the identification of PBDEs and OH-BDEs. This paper demonstrates the applicability of COSMO-RS in identifying unknown PBDE metabolites of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and 2,2',4,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-100). Metabolites of BDE-47 and BDE-100 were formed through individual incubations of each PBDE with recombinant cytochrome P450 2B6. Using calculated boiling points and characteristic mass spectral fragmentation patterns of the MeO-BDE positional isomers, the identities of the unknown monohydroxylated metabolites were proposed to be 2'-hydroxy-2,3',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (2'-OH-BDE-66) from BDE-47, and 2'-hydroxy-2,3',4,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (2'-OH-BDE-119) and 4-hydroxy-2,2',3,4',6-pentabromodiphenyl ether (4-OH-BDE-91) from BDE-100. The collective use of boiling points predicted with COSMO-RS, and characteristic mass spectral fragmentation patterns provided a valuable tool toward the identification of isobaric compounds.

  6. Specific single chain variable fragment (ScFv) antibodies to angiotensin II AT(2) receptor: evaluation of the angiotensin II receptor expression in normal and tumor-bearing mouse lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Masaaki; Yan, Heping; Zegarra-Moro, Ofelia; Edl, Jennifer; Oursler, Stephanie; Chard-Bergstrom, Cindy; Andrews, Gordon; Kanehira, Tsutomu; Takekoshi, Susumu; Mernaugh, Ray

    2008-08-01

    To gain insight into the mechanism by which angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT(2)) regulates carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis, we have newly developed anti-AT(2) single chain variable fragment (ScFv) antibodies using a rodent phage-displayed recombinant antibody library with various peptide fragments of the receptor protein, and investigated the expression of the AT(2) receptor protein. The specificity of the antibodies was verified using AT(2) over-expressing COS-7 cells and AT(2) naturally expressing PC12W cells. In control wild type mouse lung, a stronger immunoreactivity was observed in bronchial epithelial cells. A moderate immunoreactivity was detected in pulmonary vascular walls and vascular endothelial cells. In the lungs possessing tobacco-specific nitrosamine (NNK)-induced tumors, significantly increased AT(2) and AT(1 )immunostaining was observed in adenomatous lesions. These data suggest that the increase in both receptors' expression in the alveolar epithelial cells may be accompanied with the onset of NNK-induced tumorigenesis and hence play important roles in lung tumorigenesis.

  7. Some Experimental Investigations on Gas Turbine Cooling Performed with Infrared Thermography at Federico II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Astarita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews some experimental measurements of convective heat transfer coefficient distributions which are connected with the cooling of gas turbines, performed by the authors’ research group at the University of Naples Federico II with infrared thermography. Measurements concern impinging jets, cooling of rotating disks, and gas turbine blades, which are either stationary or rotating. The heated thin foil sensor, associated with the detection of surface temperature by means of infrared thermography, is exploited to accurately measure detailed convective heat transfer coefficient maps. The paper also intends to show how to correctly apply the infrared technique in a variety of gas turbines cooling problems.

  8. Advances in Unsteady Boundary Layer Transition Research, Part II: Experimental Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Schobeiri

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This two-part article presents recent advances in boundary layer research into the unsteady boundary layer transition modeling and its validation. This, Part II, deals with the results of an inductive approach based on comprehensive experimental and theoretical studies of unsteady wake flow and unsteady boundary layer flow. The experiments were performed on a curved plate at a zero streamwise pressure gradient under periodic unsteady wake flow, in which the frequency of the periodic unsteady flow was varied. To validate the model, systematic experimental investigations were performed on the suction and pressure surfaces of turbine blades integrated into a high-subsonic cascade test facility, which was designed for unsteady boundary layer investigations. The analysis of the experiment's results and comparison with the model's prediction confirm the validity of the model and its ability to predict accurately the unsteady boundary layer transition.

  9. Fragmentation trees reloaded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böcker, Sebastian; Dührkop, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Untargeted metabolomics commonly uses liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to measure abundances of metabolites; subsequent tandem mass spectrometry is used to derive information about individual compounds. One of the bottlenecks in this experimental setup is the interpretation of fragmentation spectra to accurately and efficiently identify compounds. Fragmentation trees have become a powerful tool for the interpretation of tandem mass spectrometry data of small molecules. These trees are determined from the data using combinatorial optimization, and aim at explaining the experimental data via fragmentation cascades. Fragmentation tree computation does not require spectral or structural databases. To obtain biochemically meaningful trees, one needs an elaborate optimization function (scoring). We present a new scoring for computing fragmentation trees, transforming the combinatorial optimization into a Maximum A Posteriori estimator. We demonstrate the superiority of the new scoring for two tasks: both for the de novo identification of molecular formulas of unknown compounds, and for searching a database for structurally similar compounds, our method SIRIUS 3, performs significantly better than the previous version of our method, as well as other methods for this task. SIRIUS 3 can be a part of an untargeted metabolomics workflow, allowing researchers to investigate unknowns using automated computational methods.Graphical abstractWe present a new scoring for computing fragmentation trees from tandem mass spectrometry data based on Bayesian statistics. The best scoring fragmentation tree most likely explains the molecular formula of the measured parent ion.

  10. Quantum fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Peschanski, R

    1993-01-01

    Phenomenological and theoretical aspects of fragmentation for elementary particles (resp. nuclei) are discussed. It is shown that some concepts of classical fragmentation remain relevant in a microscopic framework, exhibiting non-trivial properties of quantum relativistic field theory (resp. lattice percolation). Email contact: pesch@amoco.saclay.cea.fr

  11. Nickel(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) metallo-intercalators: structural details of the DNA-binding by a combined experimental and computational investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauria, Antonino; Bonsignore, Riccardo; Terenzi, Alessio; Spinello, Angelo; Giannici, Francesco; Longo, Alessandro; Almerico, Anna Maria; Barone, Giampaolo

    2014-04-28

    We present a thorough characterization of the interaction of novel nickel(II) (1), copper(II) (2) and zinc(II) (3) Schiff base complexes with native calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA), in buffered aqueous solution at pH 7.5. UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD) and viscometry titrations provided clear evidence of the intercalative mechanism of the three square-planar metal complexes, allowing us to determine the intrinsic DNA-binding constants (K(b)), equal to 1.3 × 10(7), 2.9 × 10(6), and 6.2 × 10(5) M(-1) for 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Preferential affinity, of one order of magnitude, toward AT compared to GC base pair sequences was detected by UV-vis absorption titrations of 1 with [poly(dG-dC)]2 and [poly(dA-dT)]2. Structural details of the intercalation site of the three metal complexes within [dodeca(dA-dT)]2 were obtained by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations followed by density functional theory/molecular mechanics (DFT/MM) calculations. The calculations revealed that three major intermolecular interactions contribute to the strong affinity between DNA and the three metal complexes: (1) the electrostatic attraction between the two positively charged triethylammoniummethyl groups of the metal complexes and the negatively charged phosphate groups of the DNA backbone; (2) the intercalation of the naphthalene moiety within the four nitrogen bases of the intercalation site; (3) the metal coordination by exocyclic donor atoms of the bases, specifically the carbonyl oxygen and amine nitrogen atoms. Remarkably, the Gibbs formation free energy calculated for the intercalation complexes of 1, 2 and 3 with [dodeca(dA-dT)]2 in the implicit water solution is in agreement with the experimental Gibbs free energy values obtained from the DNA-binding constants as ΔG° = -RT ln(K(b)). In particular, the DNA-binding affinity trend, 1 > 2 > 3, is reproduced. Finally, the first shell coordination distances calculated for the intercalation complex 3/[dodeca(dA-dT)]2 are in

  12. Alveolar type II epithelial cell dysfunction in rat experimental hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenli Yang

    Full Text Available The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS develops when pulmonary vasodilatation leads to abnormal gas exchange. However, in human HPS, restrictive ventilatory defects are also observed supporting that the alveolar epithelial compartment may also be affected. Alveolar type II epithelial cells (AT2 play a critical role in maintaining the alveolar compartment by producing four surfactant proteins (SPs, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D which also facilitate alveolar repair following injury. However, no studies have evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment in experimental HPS. In this study, we evaluated the alveolar epithelial compartment and particularly AT2 cells in experimental HPS induced by common bile duct ligation (CBDL. We found a significant reduction in pulmonary SP production associated with increased apoptosis in AT2 cells after CBDL relative to controls. Lung morphology showed decreased mean alveolar chord length and lung volumes in CBDL animals that were not seen in control models supporting a selective reduction of alveolar airspace. Furthermore, we found that administration of TNF-α, the bile acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and FXR nuclear receptor activation (GW4064 induced apoptosis and impaired SP-B and SP-C production in alveolar epithelial cells in vitro. These results imply that AT2 cell dysfunction occurs in experimental HPS and is associated with alterations in the alveolar epithelial compartment. Our findings support a novel contributing mechanism in experimental HPS that may be relevant to humans and a potential therapeutic target.

  13. Experimental Infection of Domestic Pigs with African Swine Fever Virus Lithuania 2014 Genotype II Field Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, C; Soler, A; Nieto, R; Cano, C; Pelayo, V; Sánchez, M A; Pridotkas, G; Fernandez-Pinero, J; Briones, V; Arias, M

    2017-02-01

    An experimental infection was conducted to evaluate horizontal transmission, clinical, virological and humoral response induced in domestic pigs infected with African swine fever (ASF) genotype II virus circulating in 2014 into the European Union (EU). Ten naive pigs were placed in contact with eight pigs experimentally inoculated with the Lithuanian LT14/1490 ASF virus (ASFV) responsible for the first ASF case detected in wild boar in Lithuania in January 2014. Clinical examination and rectal temperature were recorded each day. Blood sampling from every animal was carried out twice weekly. Blood samples were examined for presence of ASF virus-specific antibodies and for determining the ASFV viral load. From the obtained results, it was concluded that the Lithuanian ASFV induced an acute disease which resulted in 94, 5% mortality. The disease was easily detected by real-time PCR prior to the onset of clinical signs and 33% of the animals seroconverted. All findings were in accordance with observations previously made in domestic pigs and wild boar when infected with ASF genotype II viruses characterized by a high virulence. One in-contact pig remained asymptomatic and survived the infection. The role of such animals in virus transmission would need further investigation.

  14. Fragmented Authoritarianism or Integrated Fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, Kjeld Erik

    of these business leaders prompts the question of whether we are seeing the development of distinct interest groups that could challenge Party and state authority and create a fragmented polity. However, through the nomenklatura system the Party has an important instrument of control to wield over business groups...... and the Party-state, I suggest the notion of integrated fragmentation....

  15. Validation of the THIRST steam generator thermalhydraulic code against the CLOTAIRE phase II experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietralik, J.M.; Campagna, A.O.; Frisina, V.C

    1999-04-01

    Steam generator thermalhydraulic codes are frequently used to calculate both global and local parameters inside a stern generator. The global parameters include heat transfer output, recirculation ratio, outlet temperatures, and pressure drops for operating and abnormal conditions. The local parameters are used in further analyses of flow-induced vibration, fretting wear, sludge deposition, and flow-accelerated corrosion. For these purposes, detailed, 3-dimensional 2-phase flow and heat transfer parameters are needed. To make the predictions more accurate and reliable, the codes need to be validated in geometries representative of real conditions. One such study is an international co-operative experimental program called CLOTAIRE, which is based in France. The CANDU Owners Group(COG) participated in the first two phases of the program. The results of the validation of Phase 1 were presented at the 1994 Steam Generator and Heat Exchanger Conference, and the results of the validation of Phase II are the subject of this report. THIRST is a thermalhydraulic, finite-volume code used to predict flow and heat transfer in steam generators. The local results of CLOTAIRE Phase II were used to validate the code. The results consist of the measurements of void fraction and axial gas-phase velocity in the U-bend region. The measurements were done using bi-optical probes. A comparison of global results indicates that the THIRST predictions, with the Chisholm void fraction model, are within 2% to 3% of the experimental results. Using THIRST with the homogeneous void fraction model, the global results were less accurate but still gave very good predictions; the greatest error was 10% for the separator pressure drop. Comparisons of the local predictions for void fraction and axial gas-phase velocity show good agreement. The Chisholm void fraction model generally gives better agreement with the experimental data, whereas the homogeneous model tends to overpredict the void fraction

  16. Validation of the THIRST steam generator thermalhydraulic code against the CLOTAIRE phase II experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietralik, J.M.; Campagna, A.O.; Frisina, V.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    Steam generator thermalhydraulic codes are used frequently to calculate both global and local parameters inside the steam generator. The former include heat transfer output, recirculation ratio, outlet temperatures, and pressure drops for operating and abnormal conditions. The latter are used in further analyses of flow-induced vibration, fretting wear, sludge deposition, and flow accelerated corrosion. For these purposes, detailed, three-dimensional two-phase flow and heat transfer parameters are needed. To make the predictions more accurate and reliable, the codes need to be validated in geometries representative of real conditions. One such study is an international cooperative experimental program called CLOTAIRE based in France. COG participated in the first two phases of the program; the results of the validation of Phase 1 were presented at the 1994 Steam Generator and Heat Exchanger Conference, and the results of the validation of Phase II are the subject of this paper. THIRST is a thermalhydraulic, finite volume code to predict the flow and heat transfer in steam generators. The local results of CLOTAIRE Phase II have been used to validate the code. These consist of the measurements of void fraction and axial gas-phase velocity in the U-bend region. The measurements were done using bi-optical probes. A comparison of global results indicates that the THIRST predictions, with the Chisholm void fraction model, are within 2 to 3% of the experimental results. Using THIRST with the homogeneous void fraction model, the global results were less accurate but still well predicted with the greatest error of 10% for the separator pressure drop. Comparisons of the local predictions for void fraction and axial gas-phase show good agreement. The Chisholm void fraction model generally gives better agreement with the experimental data while the homogeneous model tends to overpredict the void fraction and underpredict the gas velocity. (author)

  17. Polarized light scanning cryomacroscopy, part II: Thermal modeling and analysis of experimental observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, Justin S G; Solanki, Prem K; Eisenberg, David P; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-10-01

    This study aims at developing thermal analysis tools and explaining experimental observations made by means of polarized-light cryomacroscopy (Part I). Thermal modeling is based on finite elements analysis (FEA), where two model parameters are extracted from thermal measurements: (i) the overall heat transfer coefficient between the cuvette and the cooling chamber, and (ii) the effective thermal conductivity within the cryoprotective agent (CPA) at the upper part of the cryogenic temperature range. The effective thermal conductivity takes into account enhanced heat transfer due to convection currents within the CPA, creating the so-called Bénard cells. Comparison of experimental results with simulation data indicates that the uncertainty in simulations due to the propagation of uncertainty in measured physical properties exceeds the uncertainty in experimental measurements, which validates the modeling approach. It is shown in this study that while a cavity may form in the upper-center portion of the vitrified CPA, it has very little effect on estimating the temperature distribution within the domain. This cavity is driven by thermal contraction of the CPA, with the upper-center of the domain transitioning to glass last. Finally, it is demonstrated in this study that additional stresses may develop within the glass transition temperature range due to nonlinear behavior of the thermal expansion coefficient. This effect is reported here for the first time in the context of cryobiology, using the capabilities of polarized-light cryomacroscopy.

  18. Electronic and optical response of functionalized Ru(II) complexes: joint theoretical and experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilina, Svetlana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tretiak, Sergei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sykora, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albert, Victor [UNIV OF FLORIDA; Badaeva, Ekaterina [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Koposov, Alexey [UNIV OF WASHINGTON

    2008-01-01

    New photovoltaic and photocatalysis applications have been recently proposed based on the hybrid Ru(II)-bipyridine-complex/semiconductor quantum dot systems. In order to attach the Ru(II) complex to the surface of a semiconductor, a linking bridge -- a carboxyl group -- needs to be added to one or two of the 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) ligands. Such changes in the ligand structure affect electronic and optical properties and, consequently, the charge transfer reactivity of Ru(II)-systems. In this study, we analyze the effects brought by functionalization of bipyridine ligands with the methyl, carboxyl, and carboxilate groups on the electronic structure and optical response of the [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} complex. First principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent DFT (TDDFT) are used to simulate the ground and excited-state properties, respectively, of functionalized Ru-complexes in the gas phase and acetonitrile solution. In addition, an effective Frenkel exciton model is used to explain the optical activity and splitting patterns of the low-energy excited states in all molecules. All theoretical results nicely complement and allow for detailed interpretation of experimental absorption spectra of Ru-complexes that have been done in parallel with our theoretical investigations. We found that the carboxyl group breaks the degeneracy of two low-energy optically bright excited states and red-shifts the absorption spectrum, while leaves ionization and affinity energies of complexes almost unchanged. Experimental studies show that deprotonation of the carboxyl group in the Ru-complexes results in a slight blue shift and decrease of oscillator strengths of the low energy absorption peaks. Comparison of experimental and theoretical linear response spectra of deprotonated complexes demonstrate strong agreement if the theoretical calculations are performed with the addition of a dielectric continuum model. A polar solvent is found to

  19. A unique restriction site in the flaA gene allows rapid differentiation of group I and group II Clostridium botulinum strains by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Catherine J; Tran, Shulin; Tam, Kevin J; Austin, John W

    2007-09-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces the potent botulinum neurotoxin, the causative agent of botulism. Based on distinctive physiological traits, strains of C. botulinum can be divided into four groups: however, only groups I and II are associated with human illness. Alignment of the flaA gene sequences from 40 group I and 40 group II strains identified a single BsrG1 restriction cut site that was present at base pair 283 in all group II flaA sequences and was not found in any group I sequence. The flaA gene was amplified by rapid colony PCR from 22 group I strains and 18 group II strains and digested with BsrGI restriction enzyme. Standard agarose gel electrophoresis with ethidium bromide staining showed two fragments, following restriction digestion of group II flaA gene amplicons with BsrGI, but only a single band of uncut flaA from group I strains. Combining rapid colony PCR with BsrGI restriction digest of the flaA gene at 60 degrees C is a significant improvement over current methods, such as meat digestion or amplified fragment length polymorphism, as a strain can be identified as either group I or group II in under 5 h when starting with a visible plated C. botulinum colony.

  20. Experimental investigations of He II heat transfer through a short section of LHC inner triplet quadrupole heat exchanger

    CERN Document Server

    Darve, C; Nicol, T H; Peterson, Thomas J

    2001-01-01

    The LHC inner triplet quadrupoles, cooled by pressurized He II, are subjected to a total heat load of more than 7 W/m at nominal luminosity. The heat absorbed in pressurized He II will be transferred to the saturated, two-phase He II via a corrugated copper pipe. Experimental investigations of He II heat transfer across the corrugated pipe are reported. The test sample of corrugated pipe is filled with pressurized He II and with saturated He II on the outside. The maximum heat flux to the test sample is up to 145 W/m /sup 2/. The characteristics of the corrugated copper pipes under investigation are the Kapitza resistance, thermal conductivity of the material and the geometry of the pipe. The test results for a series of bath temperatures and surface treatments are included. (5 refs).

  1. Fragmentation in Biaxial Tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, G H; Archbold, G C; Hurricane, O A; Miller, P L

    2006-06-13

    We have carried out an experiment that places a ductile stainless steel in a state of biaxial tension at a high rate of strain. The loading of the ductile metal spherical cap is performed by the detonation of a high explosive layer with a conforming geometry to expand the metal radially outwards. Simulations of the loading and expansion of the metal predict strain rates that compare well with experimental observations. A high percentage of the HE loaded material was recovered through a soft capture process and characterization of the recovered fragments provided high quality data, including uniform strain prior to failure and fragment size. These data were used with a modified fragmentation model to determine a fragmentation energy.

  2. An experimental system for spectral line ratio measurements in the TJ-II stellarator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurro, B; Baciero, A; Fontdecaba, J M; Peláez, R; Jiménez-Rey, D

    2008-10-01

    The chord-integrated emissions of spectral lines have been monitored in the TJ-II stellarator by using a spectral system with time and space scanning capabilities and relative calibration over the entire UV-visible spectral range. This system has been used to study the line ratio of lines of different ionization stages of carbon (C(5+) 5290 A and C(4+) 2271 A) for plasma diagnostic purposes. The local emissivity of these ions has been reconstructed, for quasistationary profiles, by means of the inversion Fisher method described previously. The experimental line ratio is being empirically studied and in parallel a simple spectroscopic model has been developed to account for that ratio. We are investigating whether the role played by charge exchange processes with neutrals and the existence of non-Maxwellian electrons, intrinsic to Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) heating, leave any distinguishable mark on this diagnostic method.

  3. Experimental implementation of edge nodes for an OPS system based on Nios II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyun; Xu, Bo; Qiu, Kun; Zhou, Heng

    2008-12-01

    The advantages of Optical Packet Switching (OPS) are transparent data transmission and data format, flexible packet control and dynamic resource allocation. It thus can support high-speed transmission of wideband data networks. Unlike Optical Burst Switching (OBS) systems which need reserved channel to transmit destination address, an advanced OPS solution using Optical Orthogonal Code (OOC) label for payload transfer has been proposed in this paper. Different from other OPS systems, our edge nodes are required to realize some special tasks including extracting destination addresses of the received IP packet which is used as payload in our OPS systems and sending the addresses to the OOC label generator. The OOC label will later be used to identify the destination of each payload at the core node for optical switching. Meanwhile, the higher-priority flow can be prior-serviced according to the Type of Service (TOS) in the head of IP packet. It is experimentally shown that the edge nodes in this OPS system can effectively improve the efficiency of packet switching and the speed of data transmission. The edge node implementation contains two parts: the hardware and software. For the hardware part, all necessary modules have been integrated onto one PCB board, thus avoiding possible instability caused by interconnecting different modules like transmitting/receiving Ethernet frame module, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) processing module and optical transceiver module etc. from different Printed Circuit Boards (PCB). For the software part, the whole of system was based on MicroC/OS-II operating systems running on the Nios II soft core processor. It is verified by the experiment that embedded system designed with Nios II soft core CPU can help to speed up the hardware design. With the SOPC Builder's development environment, more attention can be paid to the structure and function of the system without worrying about the details of the circuit design, and better

  4. Experimental diagenesis of organo-mineral structures formed by microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Aude; Kappler, Andreas; Schmid, Gregor; Quaroni, Luca; Obst, Martin

    2015-02-18

    Twisted stalks are organo-mineral structures produced by some microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria at O2 concentrations as low as 3 μM. The presence of these structures in rocks having experienced a diagenetic history could indicate microbial Fe(II)-oxidizing activity as well as localized abundance of oxygen at the time of sediment deposition. Here we use spectroscopy and analytical microscopy to evaluate if--and what kind of--transformations occur in twisted stalks through experimental diagenesis. Unique mineral textures appear on stalks as temperature and pressure conditions increase. Haematite and magnetite form from ferrihydrite at 170 °C-120 MPa. Yet the twisted morphology of the stalks, and the organic matrix, mainly composed of long-chain saturated aliphatic compounds, are preserved at 250 °C-140 MPa. Our results suggest that iron minerals might play a role in maintaining the structural and chemical integrity of stalks under diagenetic conditions and provide spectroscopic signatures for the search of ancient life in the rock record.

  5. A novel urotensin II receptor antagonist, KR-36996, improved cardiac function and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy in experimental heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kwang-Seok; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yi, Kyu Yang; Lim, Chae Jo; Park, Byung Kil; Seo, Ho Won; Lee, Byung Ho

    2017-03-15

    Urotensin II and its receptor are thought to be involved in various cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and atherosclerosis. Since the regulation of the urotensin II/urotensin II receptor offers a great potential for therapeutic strategies related to the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, the study of selective and potent antagonists for urotensin II receptor is more fascinating. This study was designed to determine the potential therapeutic effects of a newly developed novel urotensin II receptor antagonist, N-(1-(3-bromo-4-(piperidin-4-yloxy)benzyl)piperidin-4-yl)benzo[b]thiophene-3-carboxamide (KR-36996), in experimental models of heart failure. KR-36996 displayed a high binding affinity (Ki=4.44±0.67nM) and selectivity for urotensin II receptor. In cell-based study, KR-36996 significantly inhibited urotensin II-induced stress fiber formation and cellular hypertrophy in H9c2UT cells. In transverse aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy model in mice, the daily oral administration of KR-36996 (30mg/kg) for 14 days significantly decreased left ventricular weight by 40% (Preceptor antagonist could efficiently attenuate both cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction in experimental heart failure. KR-36996 may be useful as an effective urotensin II receptor antagonist for pharmaceutical or clinical applications.

  6. Fluctuations of fragment observables

    CERN Document Server

    Gulminelli, F

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents a review of our present theoretical as well as experimental knowledge of different fluctuation observables relevant to nuclear multifragmentation. The possible connection between the presence of a fluctuation peak and the occurrence of a phase transition or a critical phenomenon is critically analyzed. Many different phenomena can lead both to the creation and to the suppression of a fluctuation peak. In particular, the role of constraints due to conservation laws and to data sorting is shown to be essential. From the experimental point of view, a comparison of the available fragmentation data reveals that there is a good agreement between different data sets of basic fluctuation observables, if the fragmenting source is of comparable size. This compatibility suggests that the fragmentation process is largely independent of the reaction mechanism (central versus peripheral collisions, symmetric versus asymmetric systems, light ions versus heavy ion induced reactions). Configurationa...

  7. Magma Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.

    2015-05-01

    Magma fragmentation is the breakup of a continuous volume of molten rock into discrete pieces, called pyroclasts. Because magma contains bubbles of compressible magmatic volatiles, decompression of low-viscosity magma leads to rapid expansion. The magma is torn into fragments, as it is stretched into hydrodynamically unstable sheets and filaments. If the magma is highly viscous, resistance to bubble growth will instead lead to excess gas pressure and the magma will deform viscoelastically by fracturing like a glassy solid, resulting in the formation of a violently expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. In either case, fragmentation represents the conversion of potential energy into the surface energy of the newly created fragments and the kinetic energy of the expanding gas-pyroclast mixture. If magma comes into contact with external water, the conversion of thermal energy will vaporize water and quench magma at the melt-water interface, thus creating dynamic stresses that cause fragmentation and the release of kinetic energy. Lastly, shear deformation of highly viscous magma may cause brittle fractures and release seismic energy.

  8. Investigation of mixed mode - I/II fracture problems - Part 1: computational and experimental analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Demir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, to investigate and understand the nature of fracture behavior properly under in-plane mixed mode (Mode-I/II loading, three-dimensional fracture analyses and experiments of compact tension shear (CTS specimen are performed under different mixed mode loading conditions. Al 7075-T651 aluminum machined from rolled plates in the L-T rolling direction (crack plane is perpendicular to the rolling direction is used in this study. Results from finite element analyses and fracture loads, crack deflection angles obtained from the experiments are presented. To simulate the real conditions in the experiments, contacts are defined between the contact surfaces of the loading devices, specimen and loading pins. Modeling, meshing and the solution of the problem involving the whole assembly, i.e., loading devices, pins and the specimen, with contact mechanics are performed using ANSYSTM. Then, CTS specimen is analyzed separately using a submodeling approach, in which three-dimensional enriched finite elements are used in FRAC3D solver to calculate the resulting stress intensity factors along the crack front. Having performed the detailed computational and experimental studies on the CTS specimen, a new specimen type together with its loading device is also proposed that has smaller dimensions compared to the regular CTS specimen. Experimental results for the new specimen are also presented.

  9. Design, simulation, and experimental verification of a computer model and enhanced position estimator for the NPS AUV II

    OpenAIRE

    Warner, David C.

    1991-01-01

    A full six-degree-of-freedom computer model of the Naval Postgraduate School Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (NPS AUV II) is developed. Hydrodynamic Coefficients are determined by geometric similarity with an existing swimmer delivery vehicle and analysis of initial open loop AUV II trials. Comparisons between simulated and experimental results demonstrate the validity of the model and the techniques used. A reduced order observer of lateral velocity was produced to provide an input for an enha...

  10. The angiotensin hexapeptide 3-8 fragment potently inhibits [125I]angiotensin II binding to non-AT1 or -AT2 recognition sites in bovine adrenal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, M F; Gessner, G W; Ly, C Q

    1992-08-25

    In the present studies, ligand competition experiments were conducted to examine the ability of angiotensin II peptide agonists and nonpeptide AT1- and AT2-selective receptor antagonists to inhibit the binding of [125I]angiotensin II to bovine adrenal cortical membranes. Angiotensin II, angiotensin III, the All-(3-8) hexapeptide fragment of angiotensin II, and the AT1-selective receptor antagonist L-158,809, inhibited [125I]angiotensin II binding in a biphasic fashion indicative of a ligand interaction at more than one recognition site. Approximately 20% of low affinity [125I]angiotensin II binding was inhibited only by high micromolar concentrations of L-158,809. RG 13647 (1(-1,4-benzodioxan-2-methyl)-5-diphenylacetyl-4,5,6,7-tetra hydro-1H-imidazo- [4,5,c]-pyridine-6-carboxylic acid) represents a potent and AT2-selective analog of PD 123177 and showed weak activity in competing for [125I]angiotensin II binding with an IC50 value of 100 microM. When subsequent competition studies were conducted in the presence of 1 microM L-158,809 to block [125I]angiotensin II to the AT1 receptor subtype, the angiotensin II agonists produced monophasic inhibition curves with AII-(3-8) showing the greatest activity (IC50 = 6 nM) followed by angiotensin III (IC50 = 15 nM) much greater than angiotensin II (IC50 = 110 nM). RG 13647 was not found to significantly inhibit this portion of [125I]angiotensin II binding. These data demonstrate that bovine adrenal cortex contains both the AT1 receptor subtype, as well as, a novel class of [125I]angiotensin II recognition sites which may be analogous to the recently described angiotensin IV (AT4) receptor.

  11. Framing Fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    , contain distinctive architectural traits, not only based on rational repetition, but also supporting composition and montage as dynamic concepts. Prefab architecture is an architecture of fragmentation, individualization and changeability, and this sets up new challenges for the architect. This paper...... into separate parts or systems: skeleton, skin, services, internal cladding, etc. Each building part/system is being conceived, produced, delivered and maintained by different construction companies. Basically the building is being fragmented into separate parts living their separate lives. The architect has...... to create architectural meaning and give character to an architecture of fragmentation. Layers are both seen as conceptual as well as material frames which define certain strong properties or meanings in the architectural work. Defining layers is a way of separating and organizing; it both defines...

  12. The angiotensin II type 2 receptor agonist Compound 21 is protective in experimental diabetes-associated atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chow, Bryna S M; Koulis, Christine; Krishnaswamy, Pooja;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Angiotensin II is well-recognised to be a key mediator in driving the pathological events of diabetes-associated atherosclerosis via signalling through its angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) subtype. However, its actions via the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) subtype...... are still poorly understood. This study is the first to investigate the role of the novel selective AT2R agonist, Compound 21 (C21) in an experimental model of diabetes-associated atherosclerosis (DAA). METHODS: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic Apoe-knockout mice were treated with vehicle (0.1 mol/l citrate...

  13. Mononuclear nickel (II) and copper (II) coordination complexes supported by bispicen ligand derivatives: Experimental and computational studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Nirupama; Niklas, Jens; Poluektov, Oleg; Van Heuvelen, Katherine M.; Mukherjee, Anusree

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis, characterization and density functional theory calculations of mononuclear Ni and Cu complexes supported by the N,N’-Dimethyl-N,N’-bis-(pyridine-2-ylmethyl)-1,2-diaminoethane ligand and its derivatives are reported. The complexes were characterized by X-ray crystallography as well as by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and EPR spectroscopy. The solid state structure of these coordination complexes revealed that the geometry of the complex depended on the identity of the metal center. Solution phase characterization data are in accord with the solid phase structure, indicating minimal structural changes in solution. Optical spectroscopy revealed that all of the complexes exhibit color owing to d-d transition bands in the visible region. Magnetic parameters obtained from EPR spectroscopy with other structural data suggest that the Ni(II) complexes are in pseudo-octahedral geometry and Cu(II) complexes are in a distorted square pyramidal geometry. In order to understand in detail how ligand sterics and electronics affect complex topology detailed computational studies were performed. The series of complexes reported in this article will add significant value in the field of coordination chemistry as Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes supported by tetradentate pyridyl based ligands are rather scarce.

  14. Experimental Study on Penetration Properties of High Velocity Fragment into Safety Liquid Cabin%高速破片侵彻防护液舱试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈晓乐; 朱锡; 侯海量; 陈长海

    2011-01-01

    为研究水下接触爆炸产生的高速破片在水中的侵彻特性,针对3.3 g立方体破片进行了水下弹道试验,结果表明:破片的侵彻阻力系数受形状的影响较大,撞击隔板时产生压缩波使破片产生墩粗和侵蚀,造成破片迎流面积的增加和质量的下降,从而使破片在速度较高时侵彻深度反而下降。%In order to study penetration properties of high velocity fragment produced by underwater contact explosion, underwater ballistic experiments of 3.3 g cubic fragment was carried out, the results show that resistance coefficient of fragment is significantly influenced by the fragment shape. When the fragment crash on the steel plate, it will bring about great compress wave which makes fragment generate mushrooming and erosion, so the incident flow area increases and the weight decreases, consequently the underwater penetration ability of the fragments decrease with the increasing of velocity.

  15. Changes and significance of IL-25 in chicken collagen II-induced experimental arthritis (CIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiwen, Wang; Zhaoliang, Su; Yinxia, Zhao; Siamak, Sandoghchian Shotorbani; Zhijun, Jiao; Yuan, Xue; Heng, Yang; Dong, Zheng; Yanfang, Liu; Pei, Shen; Shengjun, Wang; Qixiang, Shao; Xinxiang, Huang; Liwei, Lu; Huaxi, Xu

    2012-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease. It is a systemic inflammatory disease, characterized by chronic, symmetrical, multi-articular synovial arthritis. IL-25 (IL-17E) is a member of the recently emerged cytokine family (IL-17s), which is expressed in Th2 cells and bone marrow-derived mast cells. Unlike the other members of this family, IL-25 is capable of inducing Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) and also promotes the release of some pro-immune factors (IL-6 and IL-8). IL-25 is also a pleiotropic factor, which constitutes a tissue-specific pathological injury and chronic inflammation. In this study, we used chicken collagen II-induced experimental arthritis (CIA) model in DBA/1 mice to investigate the relationship between IL-25 and other inflammatory factors, revealing the possible mechanism in CIA. Our results showed that the expression level of IL-25 was enhanced in the late stage of CIA, and IL-17 was increased in the early stage of the disease. It is well known that IL-17 has a crucial role in the development of RA pathogenesis, and IL-25 plays a significant role in humoral immune. For reasons given above, we suggested that the IL-25 inhibited IL-17 expression to some extent, while enhancing the production of IL-4. It was confirmed that IL-25 not only regulated the cellular immune, but also involved the humoral immune in rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Analysis of Experimental Data for High Burnup PWR Spent Fuel Isotopic Validation - Vandellos II Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This report is one of the several recent NUREG/CR reports documenting benchmark-quality radiochemical assay data and the use of the data to validate computer code predictions of isotopic composition for spent nuclear fuel, to establish the uncertainty and bias associated with code predictions. The experimental data analyzed in the current report were acquired from a high-burnup fuel program coordinated by Spanish organizations. The measurements included extensive actinide and fission product data of importance to spent fuel safety applications, including burnup credit, decay heat, and radiation source terms. Six unique spent fuel samples from three uranium oxide fuel rods were analyzed. The fuel rods had a 4.5 wt % {sup 235}U initial enrichment and were irradiated in the Vandellos II pressurized water reactor operated in Spain. The burnups of the fuel samples range from 42 to 78 GWd/MTU. The measurements were used to validate the two-dimensional depletion sequence TRITON in the SCALE computer code system.

  17. A novel embeddable spherical smart aggregate for structural health monitoring: part II. Numerical and experimental verifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Qingzhao; Fan, Shuli; Mo, Y. L.; Song, Gangbing

    2017-09-01

    The newly developed spherical smart aggregate (SSA) based on a radially polarized spherical piezoceramic shell element has unique omnidirectional actuating and sensing capabilities that can greatly improve the detection aperture and provide additional functionalities in health monitoring applications in concrete structures. Detailed fabrication procedures and electrical characterization of the SSA have been previously studied (Part I). In this second paper (Part II), the functionalities of the SSA used in both active sensing and passive sensing approaches were investigated in experiments and numerical simulations. One SSA sample was embedded in a 1 ft3 concrete specimen. In the active sensing approach, the SSA was first utilized as an actuator to generate stress waves and six conventional smart aggregates (SA) mounted on the six faces of the concrete cube were utilized as sensors to detect the wave response. Conversely, the embedded SSA was then utilized as a sensor to successively detect the wave response from each SA. The experimentally obtained behavior of the SSA was then compared with the numerical simulation results. Further, a series of impact tests were conducted to verify the performance of the SSA in the detection of the impact events from different directions. Comparison with the wave response associated with different faces of the cube verified the omnidirectional actuating and sensing capabilities of the SSA.

  18. The Early Characterization of Irradiation Effects in Stainless Steels at the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. L. Porter

    2008-01-01

    The new Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program is revitalizing interest in materials development for fast spectrum reactors. With this comes the need for new, high-performance materials that are resistant to property changes caused by radiation damage. In the 1970s there was an effort to monitor the irradiation effects on stainless steels used in fast reactor cores, largely because there were a number of ‘surprises’ where materials subjected to a high flux of fast neutrons incurred dimensional and property changes that had not been expected. In the U.S., this applied to the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. Void swelling and irradiation-induced creep caused dimensional changes in the reactor components that shortened their useful lifetime and impacted reactor operations by creating fuel handling difficulties and reactivity anomalies. The surveillance programs and early experiments studied the simplest of austenitic stainless steels, such as Types 304 and 304L stainless steel, and led to some basic understanding of the links between these irradiation effects and microchemical changes within the steel caused by operational variables such as temperature, neutron flux and neutron fluence. Some of the observations helped to define later alloy development programs designed to produce alloys that were much more resistant to the effects of neutron irradiation.

  19. The metal loading ability of beta-amyloid N-terminus: a combined potentiometric and spectroscopic study of copper(II) complexes with beta-amyloid(1-16), its short or mutated peptide fragments, and its polyethylene glycol (PEG)-ylated analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damante, Chiara A; Osz, Katalin; Nagy, Zoltán; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Grasso, Giulia; Impellizzeri, Giuseppe; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Sóvágó, Imre

    2008-10-20

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming a rapidly growing health problem, as it is one of the main causes of dementia in the elderly. Interestingly, copper(II) (together with zinc and iron) ions are accumulated in amyloid deposits, suggesting that metal binding to Abeta could be involved in AD pathogenesis. In Abeta, the metal binding is believed to occur within the N-terminal region encompassing the amino acid residues 1-16. In this work, potentiometric, spectroscopic (UV-vis, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) approaches were used to investigate the copper(II) coordination features of a new polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated Abeta peptide fragment encompassing the 1-16 amino acid residues of the N-terminal region (Abeta(1-16)PEG). The high water solubility of the resulting metal complexes allowed us to obtain a complete complex speciation at different metal-to-ligand ratios ranging from 1:1 to 4:1. Potentiometric and ESI-MS data indicate that Abeta(1-16)PEG is able to bind up to four copper(II) ions. Furthermore, in order to establish the coordination environment at each metal binding site, a series of shorter peptide fragments of Abeta, namely, Abeta(1-4), Abeta(1-6), AcAbeta(1-6), and AcAbeta(8-16)Y10A, were synthesized, each encompassing a potential copper(II) binding site. The complexation properties of these shorter peptides were also comparatively investigated by using the same experimental approach.

  20. Experimental and theoretical evaluation of multisite cadmium(II) exchange in designed three-stranded coiled-coil peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Saumen; Iranzo, Olga; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2012-04-11

    An important factor that defines the toxicity of elements such as cadmium(II), mercury(II), and lead(II) with biological macromolecules is metal ion exchange dynamics. Intriguingly, little is known about the fundamental rates and mechanisms of metal ion exchange into proteins, especially helical bundles. Herein, we investigate the exchange kinetics of Cd(II) using de novo designed three-stranded coiled-coil peptides that contain metal complexing cysteine thiolates as a model for the incorporation of this ion into trimeric, parallel coiled coils. Peptides were designed containing both a single Cd(II) binding site, GrandL12AL16C [Grand = AcG-(LKALEEK)(5)-GNH(2)], GrandL26AL30C, and GrandL26AE28QL30C, as well as GrandL12AL16CL26AL30C with two Cd(II) binding sites. The binding of Cd(II) to any of these sites is of high affinity (K(A) > 3 × 10(7) M(-1)). Using (113)Cd NMR spectroscopy, Cd(II) binding to these designed peptides was monitored. While the Cd(II) binding is in extreme slow exchange regime without showing any chemical shift changes, incremental line broadening for the bound (113)Cd(II) signal is observed when excess (113)Cd(II) is titrated into the peptides. Most dramatically, for one site, L26AL30C, all (113)Cd(II) NMR signals disappear once a 1.7:1 ratio of Cd(II)/(peptide)(3) is reached. The observed processes are not compatible with a simple "free-bound" two-site exchange kinetics at any time regime. The experimental results can, however, be simulated in detail with a multisite binding model, which features additional Cd(II) binding site(s) which, once occupied, perturb the primary binding site. This model is expanded into differential equations for five-site NMR chemical exchange. The numerical integration of these equations exhibits progressive loss of the primary site NMR signal without a chemical shift change and with limited line broadening, in good agreement with the observed experimental data. The mathematical model is interpreted in molecular

  1. Final Safety Analysis Addenda to Hazards Summary Report, Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II): upgrading of plant protection system. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, N. L.; Keeton, J. M.; Sackett, J. I. [comps.

    1980-06-01

    This report is the second in a series of compilations of the formal Final Safety Analysis Addenda (FSAA`s) to the EBR-II Hazard Summary Report and Addendum. Sections 2 and 3 are edited versions of the original FSAA`s prepared in support of certain modifications to the reactor-shutdown-system portion of the EBR-II plant-protection system. Section 4 is an edited version of the original FSAA prepared in support of certain modifications to a system classified as an engineered safety feature. These sections describe the pre- and postmodification system, the rationale for the modification, and required supporting safety analysis. Section 5 provides an updated description and analysis of the EBR-II emergency power system. Section 6 summarizes all significant modifications to the EBR-II plant-protection system to date.

  2. Influence of the solvent on the self-assembly of a modified amyloid beta peptide fragment. II. NMR and computer simulation investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamley, I W; Nutt, D R; Brown, G D; Miravet, J F; Escuder, B; Rodríguez-Llansola, F

    2010-01-21

    The conformation of a model peptide AAKLVFF based on a fragment of the amyloid beta peptide Abeta16-20, KLVFF, is investigated in methanol and water via solution NMR experiments and molecular dynamics computer simulations. In previous work, we have shown that AAKLVFF forms peptide nanotubes in methanol and twisted fibrils in water. Chemical shift measurements were used to investigate the solubility of the peptide as a function of concentration in methanol and water. This enabled the determination of critical aggregation concentrations. The solubility was lower in water. In dilute solution, diffusion coefficients revealed the presence of intermediate aggregates in concentrated solution, coexisting with NMR-silent larger aggregates, presumed to be beta-sheets. In water, diffusion coefficients did not change appreciably with concentration, indicating the presence mainly of monomers, coexisting with larger aggregates in more concentrated solution. Concentration-dependent chemical shift measurements indicated a folded conformation for the monomers/intermediate aggregates in dilute methanol, with unfolding at higher concentration. In water, an antiparallel arrangement of strands was indicated by certain ROESY peak correlations. The temperature-dependent solubility of AAKLVFF in methanol was well described by a van't Hoff analysis, providing a solubilization enthalpy and entropy. This pointed to the importance of solvophobic interactions in the self-assembly process. Molecular dynamics simulations constrained by NOE values from NMR suggested disordered reverse turn structures for the monomer, with an antiparallel twisted conformation for dimers. To model the beta-sheet structures formed at higher concentration, possible model arrangements of strands into beta-sheets with parallel and antiparallel configurations and different stacking sequences were used as the basis for MD simulations; two particular arrangements of antiparallel beta-sheets were found to be stable, one

  3. Identification and characterization of a novel angiotensin binding site in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells that is specific for the hexapeptide (3-8) fragment of angiotensin II, angiotensin IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, K L; Hanesworth, J M; Ball, A E; Felgenhauer, G P; Hosick, H L; Harding, J W

    1993-03-19

    This study demonstrates the existence of a previously unrecognized class of angiotensin binding sites on vascular smooth muscle that exhibit high affinity and specificity for the hexapeptide (3-8) fragment of angiotensin II (AngIV). Binding of [125I]AngIV is saturable, reversible and describes a pharmacologic profile that is distinct and separate from the classic AT1 or AT2 angiotensin receptors. Saturation binding studies utilizing cultured vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from bovine aorta (BVSM) revealed that [125I]AngIV bound to a single high affinity site with an associated Hill coefficient of 0.99 +/- 0.003, exhibiting a KD = 1.85 +/- 0.45 nM and a corresponding Bmax = 960 +/- 100 fmol mg-1 protein. Competition binding curves in BVSM demonstrated the following rank order effectiveness: AngIV > AngII(3-7) > AngIII > Sar1,Ile8 AngII > AngII > AngII(1-7) > AngII(4-8), DuP 753, PD123177. The presence of the non-hydrolyzable GTP analog GTP gamma S, had no effect on [125I]AngIV binding affinity in BVSM. The presence of this novel angiotensin binding site on smooth muscle in high concentration suggests the possibility that this system may play an important, yet unrecognized role in vascular control.

  4. Experimental and theoretical approaches for Cd(II) biosorption from aqueous solution using Oryza sativa biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, Manal; Nasr, Mahmoud; Helmi, Shacker; Nagy, Heba

    2016-11-01

    Biomass of Oryza sativa (OS) was tested for the removal of Cd(II) ions from synthetic and real wastewater samples. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of operating parameters on Cd(II) biosorption. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were used to examine the surface characteristics of the Cd(II)-loaded biomass. The maximum removal efficiency of Cd(II) was 89.4% at optimum pH 6.0, biosorbent dose 10.0 g L(-1), initial Cd(II) 50 mg L(-1), and biosorbent particle size 0.5 mm. The applicability of Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms to the sorbent system implied the existence of both monolayer and heterogeneous surface conditions. Kinetic studies revealed that the adsorption process of Cd(II) followed the pseudo-second-order model (r2: 0.99). On the theoretical side, an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was applied to select the operating parameter that mostly influences the Cd(II) biosorption process. Results from ANFIS indicated that pH was the most influential parameter affecting Cd(II) removal efficiency, indicating that the biomass of OS was strongly pH sensitive. Finally, the biomass was confirmed to adsorb Cd(II) from real wastewater samples with removal efficiency close to 100%. However, feasibility studies of such systems on a large-scale application remain to be investigated.

  5. Bespoke Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The Ph.D. -project Bespoke Fragments seeks to explore and utilise the space emerging between the potentials of digital drawing and fabrication and the field of materials and their properties and capacities. Within this span, the project is situated in a shuttling between the virtual and the actual......, the emergence of virtual space is no longer limited to the computer's digital world, but extends into the materials' world. Creation and uncertainty are allowed as virtual parameters in both the digital and reality. Based on this notion the project suggests utilising that exact potential to develop...

  6. Twenty-four hours, or five days, of continuous sleep deprivation or experimental sleep fragmentation do not alter thirst or motivation for water reward in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Michael A; McCarley, Robert W; Strecker, Robert E

    2010-12-25

    Sleep disruption results in an increased demand for energy, which typically causes hyperphagia in an attempt to redress the energy metabolism imbalance. Therefore, experiments combining food reward and sleep disruption may underestimate the effect of sleep disruption due to their contradictory influences on behavior (for example on operant measures of attention). In contrast, water is not a central component of energy metabolism and thus thirst may not be affected by sleep disruption. However, little work has been done examining the effect of sleep disruption on thirst and motivation for water. The effect of total sleep deprivation (SD) and experimental sleep fragmentation (SF) on thirst and motivation for water was assessed. In experiment 1 (using 22 month old male Fisher-Norway rats) the amount of water consumed during a 15 min period immediately following a period of 24h SD or SF (in which water was not available) was measured, and, in a separate session, the amount of water consumed during the 24h of SD or SF was measured. Thereafter, the effect of 5 days SD or SF on motivation for water was assessed with the progressive ratio task (using water reward), which is widely used to assess motivation. Experiment 2 (using 6 month, and 22 month, old male Sprague- Dawley rats) followed an identical design except that the SF condition was dropped (due to a lack of any difference between the SD and SF conditions in experiment 1), and only the 6 month old rats experienced the full 5 day SD condition. Daily measurements of body weight and food consumption were recorded in experiment 2 in order to confirm previously published findings that food consumption goes up and body weight declines in sleep deprived rats. In both experiments the quantity of water rats consumed during a 15 min period immediately following the 24h period of sleep disruption, or consumed during the 24h period of SD or SF, did not change compared to control rats. Furthermore, 5 days of SD or SF had no

  7. Experimental and DFT characterization, antioxidant and anticancer activities of a Cu(II)-irbesartan complex: structure-antihypertensive activity relationships in Cu(II)-sartan complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islas, María S; Luengo, Alicia; Franca, Carlos A; Merino, Mercedes Griera; Calleros, Laura; Rodriguez-Puyol, Manuel; Lezama, Luis; Ferrer, Evelina G; Williams, Patricia A M

    2016-10-01

    The coordination compound of the antihypertensive ligand irbesartan (irb) with copper(II) (CuIrb) was synthesized and characterized by FTIR, FT-Raman, UV-visible, reflectance and EPR spectroscopies. Experimental evidence allowed the implementation of structural and vibrational studies by theoretical calculations made in the light of the density functional theory (DFT). This compound was designed to induce structural modifications on the ligand. No antioxidant effects were displayed by both compounds, though CuIrb behaved as a weak 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH(·)) scavenger (IC50 = 425 μM). The measurements of the contractile capacity on human mesangial cell lines showed that CuIrb improved the antihypertensive effects of the parent medication. In vitro cell growth inhibition against prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP and DU 145) was measured for CuIrb, irbesartan and copper(II). These cell lines have been selected since the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor (that was blocked by the angiotensin receptor blockers, ARB) has been identified in them. The complex exerted anticancer behavior (at 100 μM) improving the activity of the ligand. Flow cytometry determinations were used to determine late apoptotic mechanisms of cell death. Experimental and DFT characterization of an irbesartan copper(II) complex has been performed. The complex exhibits low scavenging activity against DPPH(·) and significant growth inhibition of LNCaP and DU 145 prostate cancer cell lines. Flow cytometry determinations were used to determine late apoptotic mechanisms of cell death. This compound improved the antihypertensive effect of irbesartan. This effect was observed earlier for the mononuclear Cu-candesartan complex, but not in structurally modified sartans forming dinuclear or octanuclear Cu-sartan compounds.

  8. Design theory and experimental investigation of the low frequency and high power rare earth magnetostrictive flextensional transducer (II). Experimental part

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Xiping; LI Bin; SUN Jincai

    2002-01-01

    Vibrating modes of the manufactured flextensional transducer and its shell are experimentally investigated. The result are consistent with the theoretical calculations. The acoustical performances for the transducer are measured: resonance frequency is 1.16 kHz in the underwater, bandwidth is 680 Hz, mechanical quality factor is 1.71, transmitting currant response is 186.1 dB, electromechanical efficiency is 13.1%.

  9. HEMODYNAMIC AND STRUCTURAL MODIFICATIONS IN CONTINUOUS INFUSION WITH ANGIOTENSIN. II. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minela Aida Maranduca

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS is a hormonal system which contributes to the regulation of both arterial pressure and extra cellular fluids volume. The increase of RAAS, especially at angiotensin II (Ang II level, affects the target organs and increases the risk of cardio-vascular issues, by increasing arterial pressure and through the direct effect of Ang II upon the vascular endothelium and the renal and cardiac tissue. Ang II reduces the renal capacity of sodium excretion and initiates a set of events which increase arterial pressure. Increase of arterial pressure is necessary for re-establishing sodium excretion, being realized by the pressure-natriuresis relationship. Arterial hypertension affects the target organs (heart, kidneys and leads to a vicious circle which contributes to maintaining a high arterial pressure. Materials and Method: Male Wistar rats subjected on a normal diet, received either a sham operation (n=9 or continuous angiotensin II (Ang II infusion (300ng/kgc/ min subcutaneously, via mini pumps. Water ingestion and systolic blood pressure were measured for 14 days, after which the animals were sacrificed under anesthesia with ketamin, and the xylasin body weight, water ingestion, heart mass, right and left ventricular mass, right and left kidney mass were measured. Results: After 14 days of Ang II infusion, bodily weight decreased, systolic blood pressure increased, heart and left ventricular mass indexed to body weight were significantly enhanced compared with the sham group, and kidneys mass indexed to body weight was similar in the two groups.

  10. Towards novel 5-HT7versus 5-HT1A receptor ligands among LCAPs with cyclic amino acid amide fragments: design, synthesis, and antidepressant properties. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, Vittorio; Kurczab, Rafał; Partyka, Anna; Satała, Grzegorz; Witek, Jagna; Jastrzębska-Więsek, Magdalena; Pawłowski, Maciej; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Wesołowska, Anna; Zajdel, Paweł

    2015-03-06

    A 26-membered library of novel long-chain arylpiperazines, which contained primary and tertiary amides of cyclic amino acids (proline and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxamide) in the terminal fragment was synthesized and biologically evaluated for binding affinity for 5-HT7 and 5-HT1A receptors. Docking studies confirmed advantages of Tic-amide over Pro-amide fragment for interaction with 5-HT7 receptors. Selected compounds 32 and 28, which behaved as 5-HT7Rs antagonist and 5-HT1A partial agonist, respectively, produced antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test in mice after acute treatment in doses of 10 mg/kg (32) and 1.25 mg/kg (28). Compound 32 reduced immobility in a manner similar to the selective 5-HT7 antagonist SB-269970.

  11. First experimental results of a cryogenic stopping cell with short-lived, heavy uranium fragments produced at 1000 MeV/u

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purushothaman, S.; Reiter, M. P.; Haettner, E.; Dendooven, P.; Dickel, T.; Geissel, H.; Ebert, J.; Jesch, C.; Plass, W. R.; Ranjan, M.; Weick, H.; Amjad, F.; Ayet, S.; Diwisch, M.; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Greiner, F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Knoebel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Lang, J.; Moore, I. D.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Petrick, M.; Pfuetzner, M.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Rink, A. -K.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Scheidenberger, C.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, Y. K.; Winfield, J. S.; Yavor, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    A cryogenic stopping cell (CSC) has been commissioned with U-238 projectile fragments produced at 1000 MeV/u. The spatial isotopic separation in flight was performed with the FRS applying a monoenergetic degrader. For the first time, a stopping cell was operated with exotic nuclei at cryogenic tempe

  12. Experimental study of the mechanism of production of intermediate-mass fragments in relativistic /ital p/+Au and /sup 4/He+Au interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avdeichikov, V. V.; Bogdanov, A. I.; Budilov, V. A.; Ganza, E. A.; Gorshkova, N. L.; Denisenko, K. G.; Zhidkov, N. K.; Lozhkin, O. V.; Murin, Y. A.; Nikitin, V. A.; and others

    1988-12-01

    Differential cross sections for production of intermediate-mass fragments (/ital Z/=5--12) have been measured in the reactions /ital p/+Au/r arrow//ital Z/+/ital X/ and /sup 4/He+Au/r arrow//ital Z/+/ital X/ at angles 35--135/degree/. The energy range of the proton beam was 2.6--7.5 GeV, and that of the /sup 4/He beam 1.3--13.5 GeV. Total cross sections have been measured for production of fragments with /ital Z/=5--9 and have been approximated by the function sigma(/ital Z/)/similar to//ital Z//sup /minus//tau//. For the reaction /sup 4/He+Au a minimum of the function /tau/(/ital E//sub /sup 4/He/) is observed at /ital E//congruent/6 GeV. The cross sections are analyzed in the framework of a model which assumes the existence of two sources of fragments with different transport velocity. The nonmonotonic behavior of the parameter /tau/ is related to the cross-section component due to decay of the fast source of fragments.

  13. An analytical and experimental stress analysis of a practical mode II fracture-test specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, D. B.; Jones, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    A boundary collocation method has been employed to determine the Mode II stress intensity factors for a pair of through-the-thickness edge cracks in a finite isotropic plate. An elastostatic analysis has been carried out in terms of the complete Williams stress function employing both even and odd components. The results of the numerical analysis were verified by a two-step procedure whereby the symmetric and antisymmetric portions of the solution were independently compared with existing solutions. The complete solution was verified by comparison with a photoelastic analysis. A compact shear specimen (CSS) of Hysol epoxy resin was loaded in a photoelastic experiment designed to study the isochromatic fringe patterns resulting from the Mode II crack tip stress distribution. The experiment verified that a pure Mode II stress distribution existed in the neighborhood of the crack tips and confirmed the accuracy of the boundary collocation solution for the Mode II stress intensity factors.

  14. Filtrates & Residues: Experimental Work with Tin (II) Chloride in a High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Manuela Martin

    1988-01-01

    Presents a high school chemistry lab experiment using tin (II) chloride to explore the concepts of hydrolysis, Le Chatelier's principle, and electrolysis. Presents methodology and the chemistry involved. Offers questions for the students. (MVL)

  15. Experimental study on NO oxidation by K2S2O8 + Fe(II)EDTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui; Huang, Hao; Tao, Gong-Kai; Xie, Jing; Yang, Cheng; Huang, Ting

    2017-06-01

    NO absorption and oxidation by K2S2O8 + Fe(II)EDTA system was studied in a lab-scale bubble reactor. The effects of different additives, reaction temperatures, pH values, K2S2O8 and Fe(II)EDTA concentrations on NO conversion were systematic investigated. Results indicated that NO conversion rate of K2S2O8 + Fe(II)EDTA system increased to 91.6% when concentrations of K2S2O8 and Fe(II)EDTA were both 30 mmol/L at 80 °C. NO conversion rate was positively correlated with the SO42- concentration in absorption solution, and it kept around 80% in a wide pH range, which made this technology to be a promising method for the denitrification of coal-fired flue gas.

  16. Combined experimental and theoretical study on the reactivity of compounds I and II in horseradish peroxidase biomimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Li; Franke, Alicja; Brindell, Małgorzata; Oszajca, Maria; Zahl, Achim; van Eldik, Rudi

    2014-10-27

    For the exploration of the intrinsic reactivity of two key active species in the catalytic cycle of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), Compound I (HRP-I) and Compound II (HRP-II), we generated in situ [Fe(IV) O(TMP(+.) )(2-MeIm)](+) and [Fe(IV) O(TMP)(2-MeIm)](0) (TMP=5,10,15,20-tetramesitylporphyrin; 2-MeIm=2-methylimidazole) as biomimetics for HRP-I and HRP-II, respectively. Their catalytic activities in epoxidation, hydrogen abstraction, and heteroatom oxidation reactions were studied in acetonitrile at -15 °C by utilizing rapid-scan UV/Vis spectroscopy. Comparison of the second-order rate constants measured for the direct reactions of the HRP-I and HRP-II mimics with the selected substrates clearly confirmed the outstanding oxidizing capability of the HRP-I mimic, which is significantly higher than that of HRP-II. The experimental study was supported by computational modeling (DFT calculations) of the oxidation mechanism of the selected substrates with the involvement of quartet and doublet HRP-I mimics ((2,4) Cpd I) and the closed-shell triplet spin HRP-II model ((3) Cpd II) as oxidizing species. The significantly lower activation barriers calculated for the oxidation systems involving (2,4) Cpd I than those found for (3) Cpd II are in line with the much higher oxidizing efficiency of the HRP-I mimic proven in the experimental part of the study. In addition, the DFT calculations show that all three reaction types catalyzed by HRP-I occur on the doublet spin surface in an effectively concerted manner, whereas these reactions may proceed in a stepwise mechanism with the HRP-II mimic as oxidant. However, the high desaturation or oxygen rebound barriers during CH bond activation processes by the HRP-II mimic predict a sufficient lifetime for the substrate radical formed through hydrogen abstraction. Thus, the theoretical calculations suggest that the dissociation of the substrate radical may be a more favorable pathway than desaturation or

  17. Computer Simulations to Study Diffraction Effects of Stacking Faults in Beta-SiC: II. Experimental Verification. 2; Experimental Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujar, Vijay V.; Cawley, James D.; Levine, S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Earlier results from computer simulation studies suggest a correlation between the spatial distribution of stacking errors in the Beta-SiC structure and features observed in X-ray diffraction patterns of the material. Reported here are experimental results obtained from two types of nominally Beta-SiC specimens, which yield distinct XRD data. These samples were analyzed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and the stacking error distribution was directly determined. The HRTEM results compare well to those deduced by matching the XRD data with simulated spectra, confirming the hypothesis that the XRD data is indicative not only of the presence and density of stacking errors, but also that it can yield information regarding their distribution. In addition, the stacking error population in both specimens is related to their synthesis conditions and it appears that it is similar to the relation developed by others to explain the formation of the corresponding polytypes.

  18. Experimental and Computational Evidence for the Reduction Mechanisms of Aromatic N-oxides by Aqueous Fe(II)-Tiron Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiling; Dong, Hao; Zhang, Huichun

    2016-01-05

    A combined experimental-theoretical approach was taken to elucidate the reduction mechanisms of five representative aromatic N-oxides (ANOs) by Fe(II)-tiron complex and to identify the rate-limiting step. Based on the possible types of complexes formed with the reductant, three groups of ANOs were studied: type I refers to those forming 5-membered ring complexes through the N and O atoms on the side chain; type II refers to those forming 6-membered ring complexes through the N-oxide O atom and the O atom on the side chain; and type III refers to complexation through the N-oxide O atom only. Density functional theory calculations suggested that the elementary reactions, including protonation, N-O bond cleavage, and the second electron transfer processes, are barrierless, indicating that the first electron transfer is rate-limiting. Consistent with the theoretical results, the experimental solvent isotope effect, KIEH, for the reduction of quinoline N-oxide (a type III ANO) was obtained to be 1.072 ± 0.025, suggesting protonation was not involved in the rate-limiting step. The measured nitrogen kinetic isotope effect, KIEN, for the reduction of pyridine N-oxide (a type III ANO) (1.022 ± 0.006) is in good agreement with the calculated KIEN for its first electron transfer (1.011-1.028), confirming that the first electron transfer is rate-limiting. Electrochemical cell experiments demonstrated that the electron transfer process can be facilitated significantly by type I complexation with FeL2(6-) (1:2 Fe(II)-tiron complex), to some extent by type II complexation with free Fe(II), but not by weak type III complexation.

  19. Theoretical and experimental studies of Cu(II) and Zn(II) coordination compounds with N,O donor bidentate Schiff base ligand containing amino phenol moiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmariya, Brajendra S.; Tiwari, Anjali; Mishra, A. P.; Naikoo, Gowhar Ahmad

    2016-09-01

    We report here two mononuclear Cu(II) and Zn(II) coordination compounds of general formula [CuII(L)2].2H2O (1) and [ZnII(L)2].3H2O (2) derived from bidentate 2-chloro-6-{[(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]amino}-4 nitrophenol ligand (HL). These compounds were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, uv-vis, 1H NMR, molar conductance, thermal, PXRD, SEM-EDX and electrochemical studies. The PXRD and SEM analysis shows the amorphous/nanocrystalline nature of 1 and crystalline nature of 2. The diffraction peak broadening was explained in terms of domain size and the crystallite lattice strain. Thermogravimetric analysis in the range of 300-1172 K has been performed to determine the thermal stability of synthesized compounds. The non-isothermal kinetic parameters of degradation process were calculated using Coats-Redfern (C-R), Piloyan-Novikova (P-N) and Horowitz-Metzger (H-M) methods assuming first order degradation and proposed a random nucleation mechanism of thermal decomposition for both compounds. The cyclic voltammetric studies reveal the irreversibility of the oxidation/reduction process of synthesized compounds. To support the experimental findings theoretical calculations by means of DFT and TD-DFT at B3LYP level were incorporated. In addition; frequency calculations, HOMO-LUMO, energy gap (ΔE), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), spin density and crystal packing were also computed at the same level of theory.

  20. Copper(II)-bis-histidine coordination structure in a fibrillar amyloid β-peptide fragment and model complexes revealed by electron spin echo envelope modulation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Guzmán, Jessica; Sun, Li; Mehta, Anil K; Dong, Jijun; Lynn, David G; Warncke, Kurt

    2013-09-23

    Truncated and mutated amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are models for systematic study-in homogeneous preparations-of the molecular origins of metal ion effects on Aβ aggregation rates, types of aggregate structures formed, and cytotoxicity. The 3D geometry of bis-histidine imidazole coordination of Cu(II) in fibrils of the nonapetide acetyl-Aβ(13-21)H14A has been determined by powder (14) N electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy. The method of simulation of the anisotropic combination modulation is described and benchmarked for a Cu(II) -bis-cis-imidazole complex of known structure. The revealed bis-cis coordination mode, and the mutual orientation of the imidazole rings, for Cu(II) in Ac-Aβ(13-21)H14A fibrils are consistent with the proposed β-sheet structural model and pairwise peptide interaction with Cu(II) , with an alternating [-metal-vacancy-]n pattern, along the N-terminal edge. Metal coordination does not significantly distort the intra-β-strand peptide interactions, which provides a possible explanation for the acceleration of Ac-Aβ(13-21)H14A fibrillization by Cu(II) , through stabilization of the associated state and low-reorganization integration of β-strand peptide pair precursors.

  1. Final safety analysis addendum to hazard summary report, experimental breeder reactor No. II (EBR-II): the EBR-II cover-gas cleanup system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fryer, R M; Monson, L R; Price, C C; Hooker, D W

    1979-04-01

    This report evaluates abnormal and accident conditions postulated for the EBR-II cover-gas cleanup system (CGCS). Major considerations include loss of CGCS function with a high level of cover-gas activity, loss of the liquid-nitrogen coolant required for removing fission products from the cover gas, contamination of the cover gas from sources other than the reactor, and loss of system pressure boundary. Calculated exposures resulting from the maximum hypothetical accident (MHA) are less than 2% of the 25-Rem limit stipulated in U.S. Regulation 10 CFR 100; i.e., a person standing at any point on an exclusion boundary (area radius of 600 m) for 2 h following onset of the postulated release would receive less than 0.45 Rem whole-body dose. The on-site whole-body dose (10 m from the source) would be less than 16 Rem.

  2. [Conformational polymorphysm of G-rich fragments of DNA Alu-repeats. II. the putative role of G-quadruplex structures in genomic rearrangements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varizhuk, A M; Sekridova, A V; Tankevich, M V; Podgorsky, V S; Smirnov, I P; Pozmogova, G E

    2016-11-01

    Three evolutionary conserved sites of Alu repeats (PQS2, PQS3 and PQS4) were shown to form stable inter- and intramolecular G-quadruplexes (GQs) in vitro. Structures and topologies of these GQs were elucidated using spectral methods. Self-association of G-rich Alu fragments was studied. Dimeric GQ formation from two distal identical or different putative quadruplex sites - (PQS2)2, (PQS3)2 or PQS2-PQS3 - within one lengthy DNA strand was demonstrated by a FRET-based method. Oligomer PQS4 (folded into a parallel intramolecular GQ) was shown to form stacks of quadruplexes that are stabilized by stacking interactions of external G-tetrads (this was confirmed by DOSY NMR, AFM microscopy and differential CD spectroscopy). Comparative analysis of the properties of various GQs allowed us to put forward a hypothesis of two general mechanisms of intermolecular GQ-dependant genomic rearrangements: 1) formation of a dimeric GQs; 2) association of pre-folded intramolecular parallel GQs from different strands into GQ-stacks. Thus, the observed co-localization of G-rich motifs of Alu elements with double-strand break hotspots and rearrangement hotspots may be accounted for by the specific secondary structure of these motifs. At the same time, this is likely primarily due to high abundance of such G-rich Alu fragments in the genome.

  3. CCDC 1048727: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : bis(2-(hydroxyimino)propanoato)-tin(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Khanderi, Jayaprakash

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  4. CCDC 1048729: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : bis(2-(hydroxyimino)-3-phenylpropanoato)-tin(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Khanderi, Jayaprakash

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  5. CCDC 1515632: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : hexakis(dimethyl sulfoxide)-manganese(ii) tetraiodide

    KAUST Repository

    Haque, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  6. CCDC 1048728: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : ammonium tris(2-(methoxyimino)propanoato)-tin(ii) dihydrate

    KAUST Repository

    Khanderi, Jayaprakash

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  7. CCDC 1010350: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : dichloro-(methylenebis(di-t-butylphosphine))-palladium(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Roesle, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  8. CCDC 721713: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : Dichloro-(ethyl phenylalaninate)-tris(pyridine)-ruthenium(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Reiner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  9. CCDC 713129: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : (eta^6^-Benzylammonium)-dichloro-(dimethylsulfoxide-S)-ruthenium(ii) chloride

    KAUST Repository

    Reiner, T.

    2011-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  10. Mustard gas and American race-based human experimentation in World War II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan L

    2008-01-01

    This essay examines the risks of racialized science as revealed in the American mustard gas experiments of World War II. In a climate of contested beliefs over the existence and meanings of racial differences, medical researchers examined the bodies of Japanese American, African American, and Puerto Rican soldiers for evidence of how they differed from whites.

  11. An Experimental Evaluation of Hyperactivity and Food Additives. 1977-Phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, J. Preston; And Others

    Phase II of a study on the effectiveness of B. Feingold's recommended diet for hyperactive children involved the nine children (mean age 9 years) who had shown the "best" response to diet manipulation in Phase I. Each child served as his own control and was challenged with specified amounts of placebo and artificial color containing food…

  12. Saturation of Energy Levels in Analytical Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry. II. Experimental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-30

    RESEARCH Contract N14-76-C-0838 Task Ao. NR 051-622 TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 34 SATURATION OF ENERGY LEVELS IN ANALYTICAL ATOMIC FLUORESCENCE SPECTROMETRY II...an assumption which is valid only if the daral o’l of 111, cxcilIatio n pulse is mucl ) longer than the fluorescence life- time of the tjaii!,ition

  13. Analysis of Software Development Methodologies to Build Safety Software Applications for the SATEX-II: A Mexican Experimental Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Cisneros, Jorge; Vargas Martinez, Hector; Pedroza Melendez, Alejandro; Alonso Arevalo, Miguel

    2013-09-01

    Mexico is a country where the experience to build software for satellite applications is beginning. This is a delicate situation because in the near future we will need to develop software for the SATEX-II (Mexican Experimental Satellite). SATEX- II is a SOMECyTA's project (the Mexican Society of Aerospace Science and Technology). We have experienced applying software development methodologies, like TSP (Team Software Process) and SCRUM in other areas. Then, we analyzed these methodologies and we concluded: these can be applied to develop software for the SATEX-II, also, we supported these methodologies with SSP-05-0 Standard in particular with ESA PSS-05-11. Our analysis was focusing on main characteristics of each methodology and how these methodologies could be used with the ESA PSS 05-0 Standards. Our outcomes, in general, may be used by teams who need to build small satellites, but, in particular, these are going to be used when we will build the on board software applications for the SATEX-II.

  14. Synthesis, crystal structure and luminescent properties of some Zn(II) Schiff base complexes: experimental and computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltayeb, Naser Eltaher; Teoh, Siang Guan; Adnan, Rohana; Teh, Jeannie Bee-Jan; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2011-07-01

    A series of Zn(II)-Schiff bases I, II and III complexes were synthesized by reaction of o-phenylenediamine with 3-methylsalicylaldehyde, 4-methylsalicylaldehyde and 5-methylsalicylaldehyde. These complexes were characterized using FT-IR, UV-Vis, Diffuse reflectance UV-Vis, elemental analysis and conductivity. Complex III was characterized by XRD single crystal, which crystallizes in the triclinic system, space group P-1, with lattice parameters a=9.5444(2) Å, b=11.9407(2) Å, c=21.1732(3) Å, V=2390.24(7) Å(3), D ( c )=1.408 Mg m(-3), Z=4, F(000)=1050, GOF=0.981, R1=0.0502, wR2=0.1205. Luminescence property of these complexes was investigated in DMF solution and in the solid state. Computational study of the electronic properties of complex III showed good agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Experimental investigation of the landing characteristics of hypersonic flight vehicles (Saenger II/Horus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huenecke, Klaus; Mertens, Josef

    An experimental study of the landing characteristics of the Saenger concept for a two-stage, fully reusable space transport vehicle which takes off from a conventional runway and reaches earth orbit, is reported. The problem of maneuvering during reentry is reviewed, and the experimental program is summarized. The test results, which demonstrate the stability of the vehicle during reentry and landing, are reviewed and discussed.

  16. Response surface modeling of Pb(II) removal from aqueous solution by Pistacia vera L.: Box-Behnken experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Demirel, Sevgi; Vanderbei, Robert J

    2009-11-15

    A three factor, three-level Box-Behnken experimental design combining with response surface modeling (RSM) and quadratic programming (QP) was employed for maximizing Pb(II) removal from aqueous solution by Antep pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) shells based on 17 different experimental data obtained in a lab-scale batch study. Three independent variables (initial pH of solution (pH(0)) ranging from 2.0 to 5.5, initial concentration of Pb(II) ions (C(0)) ranging from 5 to 50 ppm, and contact time (t(C)) ranging from 5 to 120 min) were consecutively coded as x(1), x(2) and x(3) at three levels (-1, 0 and 1), and a second-order polynomial regression equation was then derived to predict responses. The significance of independent variables and their interactions were tested by means of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with 95% confidence limits (alpha=0.05). The standardized effects of the independent variables and their interactions on the dependent variable were also investigated by preparing a Pareto chart. The optimum values of the selected variables were obtained by solving the quadratic regression model, as well as by analysing the response surface contour plots. The optimum coded values of three test variables were computed as x(1)=0.125, x(2)=0.707, and x(3)=0.107 by using a LOQO/AMPL optimization algorithm. The experimental conditions at this global point were determined to be pH(0)=3.97, C(0)=43.4 ppm, and t(C)=68.7 min, and the corresponding Pb(II) removal efficiency was found to be about 100%.

  17. Experimental and theoretical study on a new copper(II) complex derived from pyridoxal hydrochloride and 1,2-diaminocyclohexane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Senjuti; Sikdar, Yeasin; Sanyal, Ria; Goswami, Sanchita

    2017-01-01

    In this work, guided by a pyridoxal derived Schiff base ligand, H2PydChda [5-Hydroxymethyl-4-({2-[5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyridin-3-hydroxy-4-ylethylene)-amino]-cyclohexylimino}-methyl)-2-methylpyridin-3-ol], a new copper(II) complex, [Cu(PydChda-2H+)]2·4ClO4·2H2O was constructed and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction study. DFT calculations further substantiate the experimental features. Additionally, experiments were performed to demonstrate the accessibility to any enzymatic activity and the complex provides positive response for phosphatase activity towards 4-NPP substrate.

  18. The removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams using an aqueous metal sulfate absorbent : Part II. the regeneration of copper sulfide to copper oxide - An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maat, H.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities for a selective and efficient method to convert copper(II) sulfide (CuS) into copper(II) oxide (CuO). The oxidation of copper sulfide has been studied experimentally using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures ranging from 450 to 75

  19. The removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams using an aqueous metal sulfate absorbent: Part II. The regeneration of copper sulfide to copper oxide—an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat, ter H.; Hogendoorn, J.A.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2005-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities for a selective and efficient method to convert copper(II) sulfide (CuS) into copper(II) oxide (CuO). The oxidation of copper sulfide has been studied experimentally using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures ranging from 450 to 75

  20. The removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams using an aqueous metal sulfate absorbent : Part II. the regeneration of copper sulfide to copper oxide - An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Maat, H.; Hogendoorn, J. A.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities for a selective and efficient method to convert copper(II) sulfide (CuS) into copper(II) oxide (CuO). The oxidation of copper sulfide has been studied experimentally using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) at temperatures ranging from 450 to

  1. Modeling powder encapsulation in dosator-based machines: II. Experimental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawam, Ammar; Schultz, Leon

    2011-12-15

    A theoretical model was previously derived to predict powder encapsulation in dosator-based machines. The theoretical basis of the model was discussed earlier. In this part; the model was evaluated experimentally using two powder formulations with substantially different flow behavior. Encapsulation experiments were performed using a Zanasi encapsulation machine under two sets of experimental conditions. Model predicted outcomes such as encapsulation fill weight and plug height were compared to those experimentally obtained. Results showed a high correlation between predicted and actual outcomes demonstrating the model's success in predicting the encapsulation of both formulations. The model is a potentially useful in silico analysis tool that can be used for capsule dosage form development in accordance to quality by design (QbD) principles.

  2. Distribution of sac pressure in an experimental aneurysm model after endovascular repair: the effect of endoleak types I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenos, Eleftherios S; Stevens, Scott L; Freeman, Michael B; Pacanowski, John P; Cassada, David C; Goldman, Mitchell H

    2003-06-01

    To study in an experimental aneurysm model the differential distribution of strain/pressure (S/P) on the aneurysm wall before and after endograft exclusion and in the presence of individual type I and type II endoleaks. Two tapered elliptical Gore-Tex patches were sutured to an anterior and posterior longitudinal arteriotomy of an 8-mm Gore-Tex tube graft, thus creating a fusiform aneurysm. Two S/P transducers were placed at the proximal sac adjacent to the proximal neck, 2 at the site of the widest sac diameter, and 2 at the sac adjacent to the distal neck. The aneurysm, which was connected to a pulsatile pump system, was excluded using a 10-mm endograft. Type I and type II endoleaks were created and tested individually. S/P measurements were obtained at systemic systolic pressures (BP) of 80, 110, and 150 mmHg. Thrombosis of the sac contents was induced by injection of thrombin and calcium in the sac. Angiography was used to verify presence or absence of flow in the sac. Aneurysm exclusion resulted in significant S/P reductions at all 3 BP levels versus prior to exclusion (p0.05 for all 3 BP levels). In the presence of a proximal type I endoleak, S/P distribution was not uniform, and S/P at the proximal neck was close to S/P prior to exclusion (p>0.05 no graft versus type I endoleak for all 3 BP levels). This was also true in the presence of thrombus. With a type II endoleak, S/P was more evenly distributed and was not significantly elevated compared to the pressure without an endoleak (p>0.05, graft versus type II endoleak for all 3 BP levels). Thrombus had no effect on intrasac S/P with a type II endoleak. Intrasac S/P was significantly higher in the presence of a type I endoleak compared to a type II endoleak when BP=150 mmHg (p=0.008). Endovascular exclusion of an aneurysm results in uniform S/P reduction in the aneurysm sac. Type I endoleak, but not type II endoleak, results in significantly higher S/P in an area of the sac adjacent to the proximal neck

  3. Experimental investigation on the mechanism of chelation-assisted, copper(II) acetate-accelerated azide-alkyne cycloaddition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Gui-Chao; Guha, Pampa M; Brotherton, Wendy S; Simmons, J Tyler; Stankee, Lisa A; Nguyen, Brian T; Clark, Ronald J; Zhu, Lei

    2011-09-07

    A mechanistic model is formulated to account for the high reactivity of chelating azides (organic azides capable of chelation-assisted metal coordination at the alkylated azido nitrogen position) and copper(II) acetate (Cu(OAc)(2)) in copper(II)-mediated azide-alkyne cycloaddition (AAC) reactions. Fluorescence and (1)H NMR assays are developed for monitoring the reaction progress in two different solvents, methanol and acetonitrile. Solvent kinetic isotopic effect and premixing experiments give credence to the proposed different induction reactions for converting copper(II) to catalytic copper(I) species in methanol (methanol oxidation) and acetonitrile (alkyne oxidative homocoupling), respectively. The kinetic orders of individual components in a chelation-assisted, copper(II)-accelerated AAC reaction are determined in both methanol and acetonitrile. Key conclusions resulting from the kinetic studies include (1) the interaction between copper ion (either in +1 or +2 oxidation state) and a chelating azide occurs in a fast, pre-equilibrium step prior to the formation of the in-cycle copper(I)-acetylide, (2) alkyne deprotonation is involved in several kinetically significant steps, and (3) consistent with prior experimental and computational results by other groups, two copper centers are involved in the catalysis. The X-ray crystal structures of chelating azides with Cu(OAc)(2) suggest a mechanistic synergy between alkyne oxidative homocoupling and copper(II)-accelerated AAC reactions, in which both a bimetallic catalytic pathway and a base are involved. The different roles of the two copper centers (a Lewis acid to enhance the electrophilicity of the azido group and a two-electron reducing agent in oxidative metallacycle formation, respectively) in the proposed catalytic cycle suggest that a mixed valency (+2 and +1) dinuclear copper species be a highly efficient catalyst. This proposition is supported by the higher activity of the partially reduced Cu(OAc)(2) in

  4. Sequence and functional analysis of a 7.2 kb DNA fragment containing four open reading frames located between RPB5 and CDC28 on the right arm of chromosome II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, M; Kiesau, P; Proft, M; Entian, K D

    1995-07-01

    In a coordinated approach, several laboratories sequenced Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome II during the European BRIDGE project. Here we report on the sequence and functional analysis of a 7217 bp fragment located on the right arm of chromosome II between RPB5 and CDC28. The fragment contains four open reading frames probably encoding proteins of 79.2 kDa (corresponding gene YBR156c), 12.1 kDa (YBR157c), 62.7 kDa (YBR158w) and 38.7 kDa (YBR159w). All four open reading frames encode new proteins, as concluded from data base searches. The respective genes were destroyed by gene replacement in one allele of diploid cells. After sporulation and tetrad analysis, the resulting mutant haploid strains were investigated. No phenotype with respect to spore germination, viability, carbohydrate utilization, and growth was found for YBR157c, encoding the smallest open reading frame investigated. Gene replacement within the YBR156c gene encoding a highly basic and possibly nuclear located protein was lethal. Ybr158 revealed similarities to the Grrl (Cat80) protein with respect to the leucine-rich region. Cells harboring a mutation in the YBR158w gene showed strongly reduced growth as compared to the wild-type cells. The protein predicted from YBR159w shared 33% identical amino acid residues with the human estradiol 17-beta-hydroxysterol dehydrogenase 3. Haploid ybr159c mutants were only able to grow at reduced temperatures, but even under these conditions the mutants grew slower than wild-type strains.

  5. NBI Calculations for the TJ-II Experimental Discharges; Ajustes de los Perfiles Radiales de Densidad y Temperatura para las Descargas con NBI del TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guasp, J.; Fuentes, C.; Liniers, M.

    2005-07-01

    The density and electron temperature radial profiles, corresponding to the experimental TJ-II campaigns 2003-2004, with NBI, have been fitted to simple functionals in order to allow a fast approximative evaluation for any given density and injected power... The fits have been calculated, separately, for the four possibilities: ECRH and NBI Phases as well as On and Off Axis ECRH injection. The average difference between the experimental profiles for the individual discharges and the fit predictions are around 8% for the density and 10% for the temperature. The behaviour of the predicted profiles with average line density and injected power has been analysed. The central electron temperature decreases monotonically with increasing density and the ECRH phase On Axis central value is clearly higher than the Off axis one. The radial density profiles narrow with increasing density and the NBI On axis case is clearly wider than de Off one. The electron temperature profile widens slightly with increasing density and the width of the On Axix case is lesser than for the Off case in all phases. There exist Fortran subroutines, available at the three CIEMAT computers, allowing the fast approximative evaluation of all these profiles. (Author) 8 refs.

  6. Structure and pathogenicity of antibodies specific for citrullinated collagen type II in experimental arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uysal, Hüseyin; Bockermann, Robert; Nandakumar, Kutty S

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies to citrulline-modified proteins have a high diagnostic value in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, their biological role in disease development is still unclear. To obtain insight into this question, a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies was generated against a major triple helical...... collagen type II (CII) epitope (position 359-369; ARGLTGRPGDA) with or without arginines modified by citrullination. These antibodies bind cartilage and synovial tissue, and mediate arthritis in mice. Detection of citrullinated CII from RA patients' synovial fluid demonstrates that cartilage-derived CII...

  7. Sedimentation equilibria of ferrofluids: II. Experimental osmotic equations of state of magnetite colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luigjes, B.; Thies-Weesie, D.M.E.; Erné, B.H.; Philipse, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    The first experimental osmotic equation of state is reported for well-defined magnetic colloids that interact via a dipolar hard-sphere potential. The osmotic pressures are determined from the sedimentation equilibrium concentration profiles in ultrathin capillaries using a low-velocity analytical c

  8. Parametric and non-parametric modeling of short-term synaptic plasticity. Part II: Experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dong; Wang, Zhuo; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z; Berger, Theodore W

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a synergistic parametric and non-parametric modeling study of short-term plasticity (STP) in the Schaffer collateral to hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron (SC) synapse. Parametric models in the form of sets of differential and algebraic equations have been proposed on the basis of the current understanding of biological mechanisms active within the system. Non-parametric Poisson-Volterra models are obtained herein from broadband experimental input-output data. The non-parametric model is shown to provide better prediction of the experimental output than a parametric model with a single set of facilitation/depression (FD) process. The parametric model is then validated in terms of its input-output transformational properties using the non-parametric model since the latter constitutes a canonical and more complete representation of the synaptic nonlinear dynamics. Furthermore, discrepancies between the experimentally-derived non-parametric model and the equivalent non-parametric model of the parametric model suggest the presence of multiple FD processes in the SC synapses. Inclusion of an additional set of FD process in the parametric model makes it replicate better the characteristics of the experimentally-derived non-parametric model. This improved parametric model in turn provides the requisite biological interpretability that the non-parametric model lacks.

  9. Controlling and culturing diversity: experimental zoology before World War II and Vienna's Biologische Versuchsanstalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Cheryl A; Brauckmann, Sabine

    2015-04-01

    Founded in Vienna in 1903, the Institute for Experimental Biology pioneered the application of experimental methods to living organisms maintained for sustained periods in captivity. Its Director, the zoologist Hans Przibram, oversaw until 1938, the attempt to integrate ontogeny with studies of inheritance using precise and controlled measurements of the impact of environmental influences on the emergence of form and function. In the early years, these efforts paralleled and even fostered the emergence of experimental biology in America. But fate intervened. Though the Institute served an international community, most of its resident scientists and staff were of Jewish ancestry. Well before the Nazis entered Austria in 1938, these men and women were being fired and driven out; some, including Przibram, were eventually killed. We describe the unprecedented facilities built and the topics addressed by the several departments that made up this Institute, stressing those most relevant to the establishment and success of the Journal of Experimental Zoology, which was founded just a year later. The Institute's diaspora left an important legacy in North America, perhaps best embodied by the career of the developmental neuroscientist Paul Weiss. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A Transverse Oscillation Approach for Estimation of Three-Dimensional Velocity Vectors, Part II: Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2014-01-01

    The 3-D transverse oscillation method is investigated by estimating 3-D velocities in an experimental flowrigsystem. Measurements of the synthesized transverse oscillatingfields are presented as well. The method employs a 2-D transducer; decouples the velocity estimation; and estimates the axial,...

  11. Experimental and computational investigation of the sII binary He-THF hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Nikolaos I; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N; Stubos, Athanassios K; Martín, Angel; Rovetto, Laura J; Florusse, Louw J; Peters, Cor J

    2011-02-17

    The objective of this work is to study the binary He-THF hydrate with both experimental and theoretical approaches. Experimental data for the hydrate equilibrium at pressures up to 12.6 MPa are reported for the binary He-THF hydrate with stoichiometric THF composition (i.e., 5.56 mol % THF). These data are used to calibrate a thermodynamic model [J. Phys. Chem. C2009, 113, 422] for the prediction of hydrate equilibrium that is based on the van der Waals-Platteeuw statistical thermodynamic theory. Then this model is used to extrapolate the obtained experimental data to much higher pressures, and good agreement is observed with other available experimental data at pressures up to 150 MPa. This model is also capable of estimating the cavity occupancies for He and THF. The results show that the large cavities are completely occupied by THF molecules, whereas the small ones are partially occupied by He atoms. The He occupancy of the small cavities is less than 60%, even at high pressures (100 MPa). The occupancies predicted from this model are in close agreement with similar results from molecular simulations and a previously reported thermodynamic approach.

  12. Protective influences on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by MHC class I and class II alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustafa, M; Vingsbo, C; Olsson, T;

    1994-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is influenced by polymorphism of the MHC. We have previously found that Lewis rats with certain MHC haplotypes are susceptible to disease induced with the myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide 63-88, whereas Lewis rats with other MHC haplotypes...

  13. Experimental Determination of Third Derivative of the Gibbs Free Energy, G II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koga, Yoshikata; Westh, Peter; Inaba, Akira

    2010-01-01

    We have been evaluating third derivative quantities of the Gibbs free energy, G, by graphically differentiating the second derivatives that are accessible experimentally, and demonstrated their power in elucidating the mixing schemes in aqueous solutions. Here we determine directly one of the third...

  14. Virtual fragment screening: an exploration of various docking and scoring protocols for fragments using Glide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawatkar, Sameer; Wang, Hongming; Czerminski, Ryszard; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane

    2009-08-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery approaches allow for a greater coverage of chemical space and generally produce high efficiency ligands. As such, virtual and experimental fragment screening are increasingly being coupled in an effort to identify new leads for specific therapeutic targets. Fragment docking is employed to create target-focussed subset of compounds for testing along side generic fragment libraries. The utility of the program Glide with various scoring schemes for fragment docking is discussed. Fragment docking results for two test cases, prostaglandin D2 synthase and DNA ligase, are presented and compared to experimental screening data. Self-docking, cross-docking, and enrichment studies are performed. For the enrichment runs, experimental data exists indicating that the docking decoys in fact do not inhibit the corresponding enzyme being examined. Results indicate that even for difficult test cases fragment docking can yield enrichments significantly better than random.

  15. Dust evolution, a global view: II. Top-down branching, nanoparticle fragmentation and the mystery of the diffuse interstellar band carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. P.

    2016-12-01

    The origin of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), one of the longest-standing mysteries of the interstellar medium (ISM), is explored within the framework of The Heterogeneous dust Evolution Model for Interstellar Solids (THEMIS). The likely nature of the DIB carriers and their evolution is here explored within the framework of the structures and sub-structures inherent to doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon grains in the ISM. Based on the natural aromatic-rich moieties (asphaltenes) recovered from coal and oil, the likely structure of their interstellar analogues is investigated within the context of the diffuse band problem. It is here proposed that the top-down evolution of interstellar carbonaceous grains, and, in particular, a-C(:H) nanoparticles, is at the heart of the formation and evolution of the DIB carriers and their associations with small molecules and radicals, such as C2, C3, CH and CN. It is most probable that the DIBs are carried by dehydrogenated, ionized, hetero-cyclic, olefinic and aromatic-rich moieties that form an integral part of the contiguous structure of hetero-atom-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon nanoparticles and their daughter fragmentation products. Within this framework, it is proposed that polyene structures in all their variants could be viable DIB carrier candidates.

  16. DIissolution of low enriched uranium from the experimental breeder reactor-II fuel stored at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Almond, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-28

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is actively engaged in the development of electrochemical processing technology for the treatment of fast reactor fuels using irradiated fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) as the primary test material. The research and development (R&D) activities generate a low enriched uranium (LEU) metal product from the electrorefining of the EBR-II fuel and the subsequent consolidation and removal of chloride salts by the cathode processor. The LEU metal ingots from past R&D activities are currently stored at INL awaiting disposition. One potential disposition pathway is the shipment of the ingots to the Savannah River Site (SRS) for dissolution in H-Canyon. Carbon steel cans containing the LEU metal would be loaded into reusable charging bundles in the H-Canyon Crane Maintenance Area and charged to the 6.4D or 6.1D dissolver. The LEU dissolution would be accomplished as the final charge in a dissolver batch (following the dissolution of multiple charges of spent nuclear fuel (SNF)). The solution would then be purified and the 235U enrichment downblended to allow use of the U in commercial reactor fuel. To support this potential disposition path, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a dissolution flowsheet for the LEU using samples of the material received from INL.

  17. Thiocyanate-free cyclometalated ruthenium(II) sensitizers for DSSC: a combined experimental and theoretical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitumalla, Ramesh Kumar; Gupta, Kankatala S V; Malapaka, Chandrasekhram; Fallahpour, Reza; Islam, Ashraful; Han, Liyuan; Kotamarthi, Bhanuprakash; Singh, Surya Prakash

    2014-02-14

    In an effort to bring out efficient thiocyanate-free dyes for dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) we have designed, synthesized and characterized four novel cyclometalated ruthenium(II) dyes (M1 to M4) with superior photochemical properties. All dyes contain terpyridyl ligands (TPY) with carboxylic acids as anchoring groups and cyclometalated ligand (TPY-C) with substituents for fine tuning the electronic properties. We obtain a broad absorption band which extends up to 725 nm due to metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) when donating groups are used, which slightly blue-shifts when a withdrawing group is used. In addition to the CT, small HOMO-LUMO gaps are obtained from electrochemical measurements which indicate characteristics of an ideal sensitizer. All four dyes were used as sensitizers for DSSC and photoelectrochemical measurements were carried out. Reasonably good efficiency (7.1%) has been achieved for . We have carried out periodic-DFT studies of these dyes adsorbed on the (TiO2)38 cluster. They revealed that, in bidentate bridging mode the dyes preferably bind with the help of two carboxylic groups onto the TiO2. To the best of our knowledge we are the first to do DFT studies of thiocyanate free cyclometalated ruthenium(ii) dyes tethered to TiO2.

  18. The HIT-II Spherical Torus: Physics and Key Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redd, A. J.; Hamp, W. T.; Izzo, V. A.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.

    2004-11-01

    Discharges in the HIT-II spherical torus device [Redd et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2006 (2002)] can be driven by either Ohmic or Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) current drive. A new CHI operating regime has been explored, with toroidal plasma currents of up to 350 kA, I_p/I_TF ratios of up to 1.2, and internal probing data which may demonstrate the formation of a closed-flux core. The key to acheiving these results is the magnetic field shear in the CHI injector region, with a minimum shear necessary for current build-up. Ohmic plasma performance has also improved, with peak currents up to 300 kA, with and without transient CHI startup. The CHI startup technique [Raman et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2565 (2004)] provides more robust discharges, with a wider operating space and more efficient use of the transformer Volt-seconds, than unassisted Ohmic. Finally, CHI can be used to enhance an Ohmic plasma current without significantly degrading the quality of the discharge. Results will be presented for each HIT--II operating regime, including empirical performance scalings and applicable parametric operating spaces.

  19. Experimental Validation of RELAP5 and TRACE5 for Licensing Studies of the Boron Injection System of Atucha II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro I. Lazarte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental validation of RELAP5 and TRACE5 for licensing studies of the Atucha II-PHWR nuclear power plant. A scaled experimental facility, representing the boron injection system of Atucha II, was built. The system has a fundamental importance for loss of coolant accidents (LOCA and anticipated transients without scram (ATWS. The experiment consists of the discharge of a tank that represents the boron tank filled with air or a mixture of air-water onto a discharge tank that represents the moderator tank. Both tanks are connected by a pipe which includes a valve and an orifice plate to model the pressure losses due to the fittings in the real system. The pressure and water level measured in the tanks are compared with the RELAP5 and TRACE5 predictions. The codes predict the pressure in the tanks accurately. However, both codes overpredict the heat transfer in the boron tank air-water interface which produces a greater expansion of the air which leads to a small discrepancy in the boron tank level prediction.

  20. Heat shock protein 70 protects against seizure-induced neuronal cell death in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activation-induced nitric oxide synthase II expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chen, Shang-Der; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Samuel H H; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2014-02-01

    Status epilepticus induces subcellular changes that may eventually lead to neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. Based on an animal model of status epilepticus, our laboratory showed previously that sustained hippocampal seizure activity activates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and upregulates nitric oxide synthase (NOS) II gene expression, leading to apoptotic neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. The present study examined the potential modulatory role of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) on NF-κB signaling in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus. In Sprague-Dawley rats, kainic acid (KA) was microinjected unilaterally into the hippocampal CA3 subfield to induce prolonged bilateral seizure activity. Expression of HSP70 was elevated as early as 1h after the elicitation of sustained seizure activity, followed by a progressive elevation that peaked at 24h. Pretreatment with an antisense oligonucleotide against hsp70 decreased the HSP70 expression, and significantly augmented IκB kinase (IKK) activity and phosphorylation of IκBα, alongside enhanced nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB in the hippocampal CA3 neurons and glial cells. These cellular events were followed by enhanced upregulation of NOS II and peroxynitrite expression 3h after sustained seizure activity that led to an increase of caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation in the hippocampal CA3 neurons 7days after experimental status epilepticus. We concluded that HSP70 protects against apoptotic cell death induced by NF-κB activation and NOS II-peroxynitrite signaling cascade in the hippocampal CA3 and glial cells following experimental status epilepticus via suppression of IKK activity and deactivation of IκBα.

  1. HLA class I and class II conserved extended haplotypes and their fragments or blocks in Mexicans: implications for the study of genetic diversity in admixed populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Zúñiga

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes are highly polymorphic and informative in disease association, transplantation, and population genetics studies with particular importance in the understanding of human population diversity and evolution. The aim of this study was to describe the HLA diversity in Mexican admixed individuals. We studied the polymorphism of MHC class I (HLA-A, -B, -C, and class II (HLA-DRB1, -DQB1 genes using high-resolution sequence based typing (SBT method and we structured the blocks and conserved extended haplotypes (CEHs in 234 non-related admixed Mexican individuals (468 haplotypes by a maximum likelihood method. We found that HLA blocks and CEHs are primarily from Amerindian and Caucasian origin, with smaller participation of African and recent Asian ancestry, demonstrating a great diversity of HLA blocks and CEHs in Mexicans from the central area of Mexico. We also analyzed the degree of admixture in this group using short tandem repeats (STRs and HLA-B that correlated with the frequency of most probable ancestral HLA-C/-B and -DRB1/-DQB1 blocks and CEHs. Our results contribute to the analysis of the diversity and ancestral contribution of HLA class I and HLA class II alleles and haplotypes of Mexican admixed individuals from Mexico City. This work will help as a reference to improve future studies in Mexicans regarding allotransplantation, immune responses and disease associations.

  2. Effects of acrylamide graded doses on metallothioneins I and II induction and DNA fragmentation: Bochemical and histomorphological changes in the liver of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbel, Imen; Elwej, Awatef; Chaabene, Mariem; Boudawara, Ons; Marrakchi, Rim; Jamoussi, Kamel; Boudawara, Tahya Sellami; Zeghal, Najiba

    2017-08-01

    The present study investigates the toxic effects of acrylamide (ACR) administered to rats at two doses on (i) oxidative stress and disruption of pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance in hepatic cells and (ii) its correlation with metallothioneins (MTs) genes expression, DNA damage and histomorphological changes. Treated rats with 20 and 40 mg/kg body weight of ACR led to an increase in malondialdehyde, hydrogen peroxide, advanced oxidation protein products, protein carbonyl levels as well as an alteration in the antioxidant status. Total MT content in the liver and MT I and MT II genes induction were increased. Plasma transaminases activities, albumin, total protein and glucose levels were also increased, while alkaline phosphatase activity was decreased. Moreover, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, TC/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL-C/HDL-C ratios were increased, while HDL-C decreased in a dose-dependent manner. A random DNA degradation was observed only in the liver of ACR-treated rats with the highest dose. These changes were confirmed by histopathological observations.

  3. EFFECT OF DENTIN TUBULES TO THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DENTIN.PART II:EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huo Bo; Zheng Quanshui; Zhang Qing; Wang Jiade

    2000-01-01

    To verify the theoretical models of varying transversely isotropic stress-strain relations of dentin established in the preceding work(Part I),we perform a set of experiments.Because of the very fine tooth size,it usually seems to be difficult to directly measure the inhomogeneons and anisotropic parameters of dentin.In this paper,by the digital speckle correlation method,tensile experiments are made on the small dentin samples either parallel or perpendicular to the dentin tubules.With the theoretically predicted elastic stress-strain relations,an optimization method is proposed to fit the strain curve adapted to the experimental data.The results show that the theoretical elastic stress-strain relations coincides very well with the experimental observations.The determined Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of dentin matrix are 29.5GPa and 0.44,respectively,in the optimization sense.

  4. The effect of selective photosuppression of sensitized pathogenic microflora: Part II. Experimental validation on animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masychev, Viktor I.; Risovannaya, Olga N.

    2005-03-01

    Results of in vivo experiments have shown the maximum effectiveness of combined use of photo sensitizer 0,1% gel Radachlorine simultaneously with continuous and super pulse low energy irradiation of the diode laser with energy density 400 J/cm2, and power 1W. Given parameters have lead to complete elimination of Streptococcus pyogenes from inflammation foci in oral cavity of experimental animals.

  5. Failure mode transition in AHSS resistance spot welds. Part II: Experimental investigation and model validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouranvari, M., E-mail: mpouranvari@yahoo.com [Young Researchers Club, Dezful Branch, Islamic Azad University, Dezful (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Marashi, S.P.H.; Safanama, D.S. [Mining and Metallurgical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Interfacial to pullout failure mode transition for AHSS RSWs is experimentally studied. {yields} Relation between failure mode and metallurgical factors of AHSS RSW is studied. {yields} HAZ softening reduces FZ size require to ensure pullout failure. {yields} HAZ softening enhances energy absorption capability of AHSS RSW. {yields} Good agreement between model prediction and experimental results was observed. - Abstract: The objective of this paper is to investigate and analyze the transition criteria from interfacial to pullout failure mode in AHSS resistance spot welds during the tensile-shear test by the use of both experimental and analytical approaches. Spot welds were made on three dual phase steel grades including DP600, DP780 and DP980. A low strength drawing quality special killed (DQSK) steel and AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel were also tested as a baseline for comparison. The microstructure and mechanical strength of the welds were characterized using metallographic techniques and the tensile-shear testing. Correlations among critical fusion zone (FZ) size required to ensure the pullout failure mode, weld microstructure and weld hardness characteristics were developed. It was found that critical FZ size increases in the order of DQSK, DP600, DP980, DP780 and AISI304. No direct relationship was found between the tensile strength of the base metal and the critical FZ size. It was concluded that low hardness ratio of FZ to pullout failure location and high susceptibility to form shrinkage voids are two primary reasons for high tendency of AHSS to fail in interfacial mode. HAZ softening can improve RSW mechanical performance in terms of load bearing capacity and energy absorption capability. This phenomenon promotes PF mode at smaller FZ sizes. This fact can explain smaller critical FZ size measured for DP980 in comparison with DP780. The results obtained from the model were compared to the experimental results and the literature

  6. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

  7. Adaptation and cognition. II. Experimental study of the homospatial process in artistic creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, A; Sobel, R S

    1981-07-01

    In a previously reported experimental study from an ongoing program of research on the creative process, the type of cognition designated as homospatial thinking was shown to function in the creation of literary metaphor. Homospatial thinking consists of actively conceiving two or more discrete entities occupying the same space, a conception leading to the articulation of new identities. Under experimental conditions involving facilitation of homospatial thinking through presentation of superimposed visual images, and control presentation of the same images separated and side by side, the superimposed presentation stimulated significantly more creative literary metaphors. In the currently reported experiment, the effect of such stimuli on creation in the visual arts was assessed. Forty-three artist subjects were randomly assigned either to a control group viewing three sets of slide photographs paired side by side on a projection screen or to an experimental group viewing the identical pairs of slide images superimposed on each other. Each subject created a pastel drawing stimulated by each of the three slide pairs. Resulting drawings were categorized according to the type of composition produced and quality of all drawings were independently rated by two internationally prominent artists. The primary results were that drawings produced in the superimposed slide condition which contained elements from both slides intermingled together were rated significantly more creative than a single element composition and also more creative than similar composition drawings stimulated by the separated slide condition (p less than .05). Production of a final drawing in which individual components are recognizable and intermingled together in response to the superimposed stimulus condition indicates the operation of homospatial thinking involving elements occupying the same space. Consequently, the results indicate a relationship between homospatial thinking and creative visual

  8. Experimental hypervelocity impact into quartz sand. II - Effects of gravitational acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gault, D. E.; Wedekind, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental results for craters formed by aluminum spheres impacting at normal incidence against quartz sand targets in gravitational acceleration environments ranging from 0.073 to 1.0 g (g = 980 cm/sq sec) are reported. Impact velocities varied from 0.4 to 8.0 km/sec. Crater dimensions and formation times are compared with results from a simplified dimensional analysis of the cratering processes. Although the comparison indicates a dominant role of gravity relative to the target strength for craters formed in sand, the results serve primarily to emphasize that both gravity and strength are variables of fundamental significance to cratering processes.

  9. A mathematical model of ethanol fermentation from cheese whey. II. Simulation and comparison with experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chen-Jen; Bajpai, R.K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A cybernetic model for microbial growth on mixed substrates was used to simulate the anaerobic fermentation of cheese whey and multiple sugars in semisynthetic media by Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 397. The model simulations quite successfully predicted the observed behavior in batch and during transients in continuous operation, in single-substrate systems as well as in media involving multiple substrates, and in semisynthetic and reconstituted cheese whey solutions. The results of simulations and their comparison with the experimental data are presented. 7 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Experimental verification of proton beam monitoring in a human body by use of activity image of positron-emitting nuclei generated by nuclear fragmentation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Teiji; Miyatake, Aya; Inoue, Kazumasa; Gomi-Miyagishi, Tomoko; Kohno, Ryosuke; Kameoka, Satoru; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Ogino, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Proton therapy is a form of radiotherapy that enables concentration of dose on a tumor by use of a scanned or modulated Bragg peak. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate the proton-irradiated volume accurately. The proton-irradiated volume can be confirmed by detection of pair-annihilation gamma rays from positron-emitting nuclei generated by the nuclear fragmentation reaction of the incident protons on target nuclei using a PET apparatus. The activity of the positron-emitting nuclei generated in a patient was measured with a PET-CT apparatus after proton beam irradiation of the patient. Activity measurement was performed in patients with tumors of the brain, head and neck, liver, lungs, and sacrum. The 3-D PET image obtained on the CT image showed the visual correspondence with the irradiation area of the proton beam. Moreover, it was confirmed that there were differences in the strength of activity from the PET-CT images obtained at each irradiation site. The values of activity obtained from both measurement and calculation based on the reaction cross section were compared, and it was confirmed that the intensity and the distribution of the activity changed with the start time of the PET imaging after proton beam irradiation. The clinical use of this information about the positron-emitting nuclei will be important for promoting proton treatment with higher accuracy in the future.

  11. Performance of Higher Order Campbell methods, Part II: calibration and experimental application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elter, Zs.; de Izarra, G.; Filliatre, P.; Jammes, C.; Pázsit, I.

    2016-11-01

    Applying Higher Order Campbelling methods in neutron flux monitoring with fission chambers is advantageous due to their capabilities to suppress the impact of unwanted noises and signal contributions (such as gamma radiation). This work aims to verify through experimental results that the basic assumptions behind the Higher Order Campelling methods are valid in critical reactors. The experiments, reported in this work, were performed at the MINERVE reactor in Cadarache. It is shown that the calibration of a fission chamber and the associated electronic system is possible in higher order mode. With the use of unbiased cumulant estimators and with digital processing, it is shown that over a wide count rate range, accurate count rate estimation can be achieved based on signal samples of a few ms, which is a significant progress compared to similar experimental results in the literature. The difference between the count rate estimated by pulse counting and by the Higher Order Campelling is less than 4%. The work also investigates the possibility of monitoring transient events. For this purpose, a control rod drop event was followed in Higher Order Campbelling mode.

  12. Influence of a stationary magnetic field on water relations in lettuce seeds. Part II: experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, F G; Pascual, L A; Fundora, I A

    2001-12-01

    An experimental study on water absorption by lettuce seeds previously treated in a stationary magnetic field of 0-10 mT is presented. A significant increase in the rate with which the seeds absorb water is observed in the interval 0-10 mT of magnetic treatment. An increment in the total mass of absorbed water in this interval is also observed. These results are consistent with the reports on the increase of germination rate of the seeds, and the theoretical calculation of the variations induced by magnetic fields in the ionic currents across the cellular membrane. The fields originate in changes in the ionic concentration and thus in the osmotic pressure which regulates the entrance of water to the seeds. The good correlation between the theoretical approach and experimental results provides strong evidence that the magnetic field alters the water relations in seeds, and this effect may be the explanation of the reported alterations in germination rate of seeds by the magnetic field.

  13. Serial displacement chromatofocusing and its applications in multidimensional chromatography and gel electrophoresis: II. Experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hong; Li, Xiang; Bieberich, Charles; Frey, Douglas D

    2009-02-06

    Part I of this study investigated the theory and basic characteristics of "serial displacement chromatofocusing" (SDC). In Part II of this study, SDC is applied to two prototype applications which have potential uses in proteomics and related areas involving the analysis of complex analyte mixtures. In the first application, SDC was used as a prefractionation method prior to two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) to separate a human prostate cancer cell lysate. It was observed that the resolution achieved in narrow-pI-range 2D-PAGE was improved when using SDC prefractionation, so that SDC may be useful as a low-cost, high-speed, and highly scalable alternative to electrophoretic prefractionation methods for 2D-PAGE. The second application involves the use of SDC as the first dimension, and reversed-phase chromatography as the second dimension, to produce a novel, fully automated, two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography technique. The method was shown to have performance advantages over one-dimensional reversed-phase chromatography for peptide separations.

  14. Microwave air plasmas in capillaries at low pressure II. Experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancu, G. D.; Leroy, O.; Coche, P.; Gadonna, K.; Guerra, V.; Minea, T.; Alves, L. L.

    2016-11-01

    This work presents an experimental study of microwave (2.45 GHz excitation frequency) micro-plasmas, generated in dry air (N2 80%: O2 20%) within a small radius silica capillary (345 µm inner radius) at low pressure (300 Pa) and low powers (80-130 W). Experimental diagnostics are performed using optical emission spectroscopy calibrated in absolute intensity. Axial-resolved measurements (50 µm spatial resolution) of atomic transitions N(3p4S)  →  N(3s4P) O(3p5P)  →  O(3s5S) and molecular transitions N2(C,v‧)  →  N2(B,v″) \\text{N}2+ (B,v‧)  →  \\text{N}2+ (X,v″) allow us to obtain, as a function of the coupled power, the absolute densities of N(3p4S), O(3p5P), N2(C), N2(B) and \\text{N}2+ (B), as well as the gas (rotational) temperature (700-1000 K), the vibrational temperature of N2(C,v) (7000-10 000 K) and the excitation temperatures of N2(C) and N2(B) (11 000 K). The analysis of the H β line-width gives an upper limiting value of 1013 cm-3 for the electron density; its axial variation (4  ×  1011-6  ×  1012 cm-3) being estimated by solving the wave electrodynamics equations for the present geometry, plasma length and electron-neutral collision frequency. The experimental results were compared with the results from a 0D model, presented in companion paper I [1], which couples the system of rate balance equations for the dominant neutral and charged plasma species to the homogeneous two-term electron Boltzmann equation, taking the measured gas temperature and the estimated electron density as input parameters. Good qualitative agreement is found between the measurements and calculations of the local species densities for various powers and axial positions. The dissociation degree of oxygen is found above 10%. Moreover, both the measurements and calculations show evidence of the non-equilibrium behavior of low-temperature plasmas, with vibrational and excitation temperatures at least

  15. Potentiometric and spectroscopic studies on the copper(II) complexes of rat amylin fragments. The anchoring ability of specific non-coordinating side chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávid, Ágnes; Kállay, Csilla; Sanna, Daniele; Lihi, Norbert; Sóvágó, Imre; Várnagy, Katalin

    2015-10-21

    Copper(ii) complexes of peptides modelling the sequence of the 17-22 residues of rat amylin have been studied by potentiometric, UV-Vis, CD and ESR spectroscopic methods. The peptides were synthesized in N-terminally free forms, NH2-VRSSNN-NH2, NH2-VRSSAA-NH2, NH2-VRAANN-NH2, NH2-VRSS-NH2, NH2-SSNN-NH2, NH2-SSNA-NH2 and NH2-AANN-NH2, providing a possibility for the comparison of the metal binding abilities of the amino terminus and the -SSNN- domain. The amino terminus was the primary ligating site in all cases and the formation of only mononuclear complexes was obtained for the tetrapeptides. The thermodynamic stability of the (NH2, N(-), N(-)) coordinated complexes was, however, enhanced by the asparaginyl moiety in the case of NH2-SSNN-NH2, NH2-SSNA-NH2 and NH2-AANN-NH2. Among the hexapeptides the formation of dinuclear complexes was characteristic for NH2-VRSSNN-NH2 demonstrating the anchoring ability of the -SSNN- (SerSerAsnAsn) domain. The complexes of the heptapeptide NH2-GGHSSNN-NH2 were also studied and the data supported the above mentioned anchoring ability of the -SSNN- site.

  16. The structure of small, vapor-deposited particles. II - Experimental study of particles with hexagonal profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacaman, M. J.; Heinemann, K.; Yang, C. Y.; Poppa, H.

    1979-01-01

    'Multiply-twinned' gold particles with hexagonal bright field TEM profile were determined to be icosahedra composed of 20 identical and twin-related tetrahedral building units that do not have an fcc structure. The crystal structure of these slightly deformed tetrahedra is rhombohedral. Experimental evidence supporting this particle model was obtained by selected-zone dark field and weak beam dark field electron microscopy. In conjunction with the results of part I, it has been concluded that multiply-twinned gold particles of pentagonal or hexagonal profile that are found during the early stages of the vapor deposition growth process on alkali halide surfaces do not have an fcc crystal structure, which is in obvious contrast to the structure of bulk gold.

  17. Carbide Type Influence on Tribological Properties of Hard Faced Steel Layer Part II- Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lazic

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented a preceding procedure that should be conducted in order to successfully regenerate damaged forging dies by the hard facing process. After the tool damage types identification, as well as their causes, we have chosen the procedure and the parameters of hard facing that we further corrected by conducting the test hard facings on models. Thus, we were able to relate the experimental results outputs with the repair technology, taking as a criterion the quality of the surface layers wear resistance such as friction coefficient and width of hard faced zone, hardness and its distribution in cross section, then microstructure of characteristic of hard faced zones, etc. This research points out significancy of tribological properties of certain types of carbides and their effects on metal matrix, in which carbides are embedded. Our tribological investigations have shown that the working life of the hard faced tool can be longer than that of the new tool.

  18. Sedimentation equilibria of ferrofluids: II. Experimental osmotic equations of state of magnetite colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luigjes, Bob; Thies-Weesie, Dominique M E; Erné, Ben H; Philipse, Albert P

    2012-06-20

    The first experimental osmotic equation of state is reported for well-defined magnetic colloids that interact via a dipolar hard-sphere potential. The osmotic pressures are determined from the sedimentation equilibrium concentration profiles in ultrathin capillaries using a low-velocity analytical centrifuge, which is the subject of the accompanying paper I. The pressures of the magnetic colloids, measured accurately to values as low as a few pascals, obey Van 't Hoff's law at low concentrations, whereas at increasing colloid densities non-ideality appears in the form of a negative second virial coefficient. This virial coefficient corresponds to a dipolar coupling constant that agrees with the coupling constant obtained via independent magnetization measurements. The coupling constant manifests an attractive potential of mean force that is significant but yet not quite strong enough to induce dipolar chain formation. Our results disprove van der Waals-like phase behavior of dipolar particles for reasons that are explained.

  19. Computational and Experimental Determination of Fragmentation for Naturally Fragmenting Warheads

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    measurements. The transducers were used with an ultrasonic pulser/receiver (Panametrics 5050 PR). A high-viscosity fluid - (Dapco couplant paste) was...4L * P2 N "𔃼-331 mok N3 W’.4 In .4 1311 3 44 C; g4 83 1 O 1 u 3 il 0 . 0 * N Z N Z NyIxW r cc c I: N I z eN 11- Nmm n I- . NI-W NIm.7 NIV. AmNIt

  20. Effect of angiotensin II receptor blocker on experimental periodontitis in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Naoto; Moriyama, Keiji; Ganburged, Ganjargal

    2013-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by aneurysm and dilatation of the aortic root, tall stature, and ectopia lentis. These manifestations reflect excessive signaling of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Moreover, cases are frequently associated with severe periodontitis, which is a chronic inflammation of the gingiva, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. Recently, angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) were discovered to be an effective drug class that can prevent aortic aneurysm and dilation in Marfan syndrome by inhibiting TGF-β signaling. To investigate the effect of ARB on the progression of periodontitis, the application of a potent ARB, telmisartan, was examined in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome (MgΔ). Six-week-old male heterozygous MgΔ and wild-type mice were challenged with Porphyromonas gingivalis, which causes chronic periodontitis, with and without telmisartan application. After infection, alveolar bone resorption was measured by micro-computed tomography (μCT), and inflammatory cytokine levels were examined. Infection of Porphyromonas gingivalis induced alveolar bone resorption in both MgΔ and wild-type mice. The amount of resorption was significantly larger in the former than the latter. Immunoarray and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analyses demonstrated that interleukin-17 (IL-17) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels were significantly higher in infected MgΔ mice than infected wild-type mice. Telmisartan treatment significantly suppressed the alveolar bone resorption of infected MgΔ mice. Telmisartan also significantly decreased levels of TGF-β, IL-17, and TNF-α in infected MgΔ mice to levels seen in infected wild-type mice. This study suggests that ARB can prevent the severe periodontitis frequently seen in Marfan syndrome.

  1. MarsSedEx I and II: Experimental investigation of gravity effects on sedimentation on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, N. J.; Kuhn, B.; Gartmann, A.

    2014-12-01

    Sorting of sedimentary rocks is a proxy for the environmental conditions at the time of deposition, in particular the runoff that moved and deposited the material forming the rocks. Settling of sediment is strongly influenced by the gravity of a planetary body. As a consequence, sorting of a sedimentary rock varies with gravity for a given depth and velocity of surface runoff. Theoretical considerations for spheres indicate that sorting is less uniform on Mars than on Earth for runoff of identical depth. The effects of gravity on flow hydraulics limit the use of common, semi-empirical models developed to simulate particle settling in terrestrial environments, on Mars. Assessing sedimentation patterns on Mars, aimed at identifying strata potentially hosting traces of life, is potentially affected by such uncertainties. Using first-principle approaches, e.g. through Computational Fluid Dynamics, for calculating settling velocities on other planetary bodies requires a large effort and is limited by the values of boundary conditions, e.g. the shape of the particle. The degree of uncertainty resulting from the differences in gravity on Earth and Mars was therefore tested during three reduced-gravity flights, the MarsSedEx I and II missions, conducted in November 2012 and 2013. Nine types of sediment, ranging in size, shape and density were tested in custom-designed settling tubes during parabolas of Martian gravity lasting 20 to 25 seconds. Based on the observed settling velocities, the uncertainties of empirical relationships developed on Earth to assess particle settling on Mars are discussed. In addition, the potential effects of reduced gravity on patterns of erosion, transport and sorting of sediment, including the implications for identifying strata bearing traces of past life on are examined.

  2. Synthesis, experimental and theoretical characterization of a Mn(II) complex of N,N‧-dipyridoxyl(1,2-diaminobenzene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toozandejani, Tina; Beyramabadi, S. Ali; Chegini, Hamed; Khashi, Maryam; Morsali, Ali; Pordel, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Herein, hopping to biological and catalytic applications, synthesis of a Mn(II) complex of the N,N‧-dipyridoxyl(1,2-diaminobenzene) [Hdbnd 2L] Schiff-base has been reported. The Mn complex was characterized experimentally and theoretically. The optimized geometry and vibrational frequencies of the complex were computed by using the density functional theory (DFT) methods. In the optimized geometry of the octahedral complex, the dianionic L2- acts as a tetradentate ligand. Four coordination positions of the square plane have been occupied with two azomethine nitrogens and two phenolic oxygens of the L2- ligand. Two coordinated methanol ligands are perpendicular to the square plane. Also, properties of the Mnsbnd N and Mnsbnd O bonds were explored investigated using the Atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis.

  3. Structural and spectral properties of a zinc(II) coordination polymer: a combined experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jin-Ming; Li, Guang-Yue; Li, Yue-Hua; Cui, Guang Hua

    2014-10-15

    A novel 1D zinc(II) coordination polymer [Zn(bbbm)Cl2]n (where bbbm=1,4-bis(N-benzimidazolyl)butane) was synthetized by ZnCl2 and bbbm ligand under hydrothermal conditions, and its structural and spectral properties were studied by both experimental and theoretical techniques. The center zinc(II) ion displays four-coordinated in a tetrahedral geometry by two chloride anions and two N atoms of distinct bbbm ligands. Adjacent chains are further connected into a 2D layer structure through π-π stacking interactions. Vibrational frequencies of [Zn(bbbm)Cl2]n have been calculated using DFT/B3LYP/TZVP method, and well reproduced IR data. Furthermore, the vertical excitation energies from time-dependent DFT calculation confirmed that the fluorescent peaks at 385nm and 450nm could respectively be assigned to the π→π(*) transition within the bbbm ligands and π→n transition from chloride anion to bbbm ligand.

  4. Protective role of Nigella sativa against experimentally induced type-II diabetic nuclear damage in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Sheikh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To identify the anti-mutagenic effect of Nigella sativa on the experimentally induced chronic diabetes (type – II in Wistar rats.Materials and Methods: The anti-mutagenic effect was evaluated in Nigella sativa treated diabetic rats against the streptozotocin - nicotinamide (STZ-NA (at a dose rate of 45-110 i.p mg/kg b.wt for 90 days induced type-II diabetes mellitus using bone marrow micronucleus tests. The antioxidant status was tested by estimating the serum levels of lipid peroxidation and superoxide dismutase.Results: Our results indicated that diabetic rats treated with Nigella sativa decreased the frequency of micronuclei in the erythrocytes of bone marrow (P < 0.05 and enhanced the antioxidant status (P < 0.05 in the treated diabetic rats as compared to controls.Conclusion: The observations indicated that the diabetic patients are more prone to cell mutations which are related to the level of cellular oxidative status and it could be reduced by Nigella sativa.

  5. Mapeamento dos fragmentos de vegetação florestal nativa da bacia hidrográfica do rio Alegre, Espírito Santo, a partir de imagens do satélite IKONOS II Native forest fragmentation mapping of the Alegre river watershed, Espirito Santo State, Brazil, using IKONOS II data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melchior Carlos do Nascimento

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available O estudo teve como objetivos elaborar o mapa de uso da terra e diagnosticar, em nível de paisagem, os fragmentos de vegetação florestal nativa por meio da classificação visual da imagem do satélite IKONOS II. A pesquisa foi desenvolvida na bacia hidrográfica do rio Alegre, situada no extremo sul do Estado do Espírito Santo, Brasil. Foram mapeadas 12 classes de uso da terra, destacando-se 475 fragmentos florestais. As classes cafezal (2.086,2 ha, pastagem (14.130,1 ha e fragmento florestal (2.978,9 ha ocuparam 92,16% (19.195,2 ha da área total da bacia, que é de 20.819,8 ha. A maioria dos fragmentos florestais possui formas fortemente alongadas e área média de 6,3 ha. Também se constatou que a maior parte está sujeita a um elevado nível de perturbação, com 452 e 166 fragmentos florestais vizinhos às classes pastagem e cafezal, respectivamente.The main objective of this study was to create land use and diagnosis maps, at landscape level, of the native forest fragmentation through visual classification using IKONOS II data. The study was conducted in the river Alegre watershed, situated in the south region of State of Espirito Santo, Brazil. Twelve land use classes were mapped, pointing out 475 forest fragments. The classes of coffee plantation (2,086.2 ha, pasture (14,130.1 ha and forest fragmentation (2,978.9 ha occupied 92.16% (19,195.2 ha of the total study area, which was about 20,819.8 ha. The majority of the forest fragments presented strongly elongated shapes, with an average of 6.3 ha. It was also noticed that most of them presented a high level of disturbance, with 452 and 166 forest fragments neighboring the pasture and coffee plantation classes, respectively.

  6. The potential effect of the angiotensin II receptor blocker telmisartan in regulating OVA-induced airway remodeling in experimental rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Fattah, Maha M; Salama, Abeer A A; Shehata, Basim A; Ismaiel, Ismaiel E

    2015-10-01

    Bronchial asthma is a true ascending clinical problem. Angiotensin II is now accused to be potentially implicated in its pathogenesis, being a potent pro-inflammatory mediator with remodeling effects. This study aims to evaluate the possible protective effect of telmisartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker, on experimentally-induced bronchial asthma. Animals were divided into 5 groups; a normal control group, an asthma control group, a reference treatment group, receiving dexamethasone, and two treatment groups, receiving telmisartan in two dose levels. Bronchial asthma was induced by intraperitoneal sensitization followed by intranasal challenge with ovalbumin (OVA). Test agents were administered prior to each intranasal OVA challenge. Lung function tests, namely tidal volume (TV) and peak expiratory flow rate (PEF) were assessed 1h after the last challenge. One day after the last challenge, absolute eosinophil counts (AEC) in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) were assessed. Serum immunoglobulin E (IgE) as well as BALF total nitrate/nitrite (NOx) were assessed. Oxidative and inflammatory biomarkers, namely lung tissue superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reduced (GSH), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-5 (IL-5), were also assessed, in addition to histopathological study. Telmisartan administration in both doses significantly improved TV, PEF, AEC, IgE, NOx, GSH, SOD, TNF-α and IL-5 values compared to asthma control values. Histopathological study strongly supported the results of biochemical estimations, particularly regarding airway remodeling. These results suggest that telmisartan may have potential protecting effects against experimental bronchial asthma, probably due to its bronchodilator, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  7. Photoinactivation of Photosystem II in wild-type and chlorophyll b-less barley leaves: which mechanism dominates depends on experimental circumstances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Yang, Wenquan; Qin, Lin; Fan, Da-Yong; Chow, Wah Soon

    2015-12-01

    Action spectra of photoinactivation of Photosystem II (PS II) in wild-type and chlorophyll b-less barley leaf segments were obtained. Photoinactivation of PS II was monitored by the delivery of electrons from PS II to PS I following single-turnover flashes superimposed on continuous far-red light, the time course of photoinactivation yielding a rate coefficient k i. Susceptibility of PS II to photoinactivation was quantified as the ratio of k i to the moderate irradiance (I) of light at each selected wavelength. k i/I was very much higher in blue light than in red light. The experimental conditions permitted little excess light energy absorbed by chlorophyll (not utilized in photochemical conversion or dissipated in controlled photoprotection) that could lead to photoinactivation of PS II. Therefore, direct absorption of light by Mn in PS II, rather than by chlorophyll, was more likely to have initiated the much more severe photoinactivation in blue light than in red light. Mutant leaves were ca. 1.5-fold more susceptible to photoinactivation than the wild type. Neither the excess-energy mechanism nor the Mn mechanism can explain this difference. Instead, the much lower chlorophyll content of mutant leaves could have exerted an exacerbating effect, possibly partly due to less mutual shading of chloroplasts in the mutant leaves. In general, which mechanism dominates depends on the experimental conditions.

  8. Zernike test. I - Analytical aspects. II - Experimental aspects. [interferometric phase error test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The Zernike phenomenon is interpreted in general interferometric terms to gain insight into the optimum design of disks suitable for a particular experimental situation. The design of Zernike disks for measuring small low-order aberrations is considered and evaluated; optimum parameters for disks 2, 3, 4, and 5 microns in radius are determined for an f/12 large-space-telescope system with an obscuration ratio of 0.4 at 0.6 micron. It is shown that optimization in this case provides sensitivities of better than one hundredth of a wavelength for the measurement of low-order aberrations. The procedure for manufacturing a Zernike disk is then described in detail, and results are reported for tests of a laboratory Zernike figure sensor containing a disk manufactured according to this procedure. In the tests, a laboratory wavefront-error simulator was used to introduce small aberration ranges, measurements of the changes in reimaged pupil intensity introduced by the disk were made for several aberration settings, and the measured changes were compared with the values predicted by the interferometric theory of Zernike tests. The results are found to agree within an error of one two-hundredth of a wavelength.

  9. Comparison of chemical and thermal protein denaturation by combination of computational and experimental approaches. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Christiansen, Alexander; Samiotakis, Antonios; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Cheung, Margaret S.

    2011-11-01

    Chemical and thermal denaturation methods have been widely used to investigate folding processes of proteins in vitro. However, a molecular understanding of the relationship between these two perturbation methods is lacking. Here, we combined computational and experimental approaches to investigate denaturing effects on three structurally different proteins. We derived a linear relationship between thermal denaturation at temperature Tb and chemical denaturation at another temperature Tu using the stability change of a protein (ΔG). For this, we related the dependence of ΔG on temperature, in the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation, to that of ΔG on urea concentration in the linear extrapolation method, assuming that there is a temperature pair from the urea (Tu) and the aqueous (Tb) ensembles that produces the same protein structures. We tested this relationship on apoazurin, cytochrome c, and apoflavodoxin using coarse-grained molecular simulations. We found a linear correlation between the temperature for a particular structural ensemble in the absence of urea, Tb, and the temperature of the same structural ensemble at a specific urea concentration, Tu. The in silico results agreed with in vitro far-UV circular dichroism data on apoazurin and cytochrome c. We conclude that chemical and thermal unfolding processes correlate in terms of thermodynamics and structural ensembles at most conditions; however, deviations were found at high concentrations of denaturant.

  10. Marine molluscs in environmental monitoring. II. Experimental exposure to selected pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Vladimir; Mokady, Ofer; Fishelson, Lev; Feldstein, Tamar; Abelson, Avigdor

    2003-10-01

    In an effort to establish biomonitoring programmes for routine and emergency monitoring of littoral marine habitats, organismal responses are examined in two ways: firstly, in controlled, laboratory studies, where the response may be accurately characterized; secondly, in field-collected specimens, with the hope of obtaining evidence regarding disturbances such as the ones caused by anthropogenic pollution. In many cases, there is a gap between the two types of studies, and different species and experimental and/or analytical procedures are used. In a series of recent studies, we have examined responses of field-collected molluscs, and interpreted our findings with respect to pollution. Here, we report a complementary study, in which molluscs collected from reference and polluted sites were exposed to cadmium or DDT under controlled laboratory conditions. Using fluorescent probes and microfluorometry, we examined the effect of these pollutants on paracellular permeability, lysosomal stability and metabolic status of mitochondria. Our findings indicate that molluscs from polluted sites are less affected, showing significantly smaller alterations in all examined parameters. These findings are in line with previous results showing higher levels of activity of cellular defence mechanisms in molluscs collected from polluted sites. Taken together, the results may be used to establish a reliable biomonitoring system. The sensitivity of the suggested methodology is also expected to qualify such a system for early warning.

  11. Study of a novel silica gel-water adsorption chiller. Part II. Experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, D.C.; Wu, J.Y.; Xia, Z.Z.; Zhai, H.; Wang, R.Z. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Dou, W.D. [Jiangsu Shuangliang Air Conditioning Equipment Co., Ltd, Jiangsu 214444 (China)

    2005-11-01

    The prototype of a novel silica gel-water adsorption chiller is built and its performance is tested in detail. The experimental results show that the refrigerating capacity (RC) and COP of the chiller are 7.15 and 0.38kW, respectively, when the hot water temperature is 84.8{sup o}C, the cooling water temperature is 30.6{sup o}C, and the chilled water outlet temperature is 11.7{sup o}C. The RC will reach 6kW under the condition of 65{sup o}C hot water temperature, 30.5{sup o}C cooling water temperature and 17.6{sup o}C chilled water temperature. The results confirm that this kind of adsorption chiller is an effective refrigerating machine though its performance is not as fine as the prediction results. Also it is well effectively driven by a low-grade heat source. Therefore, its applications to the low-grade heat source are much attractive. (author)

  12. Sensory perception in cetaceans: Part II – Promising experimental approaches to study chemoreception in dolphins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothee eKremers

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemosensory perception in cetaceans remains an intriguing issue as morphological, neuroanatomical and genetic studies draw unclear conclusions, while behavioral data suggest that dolphins may use it for food selection or socio-sexual interactions. Experimental approaches have been scarce due to the practical difficulties of testing chemoreception in wild dolphins. Go/no-go tasks are one elegant way to investigate discrimination abilities; however, they require to train the animals, thus preventing spontaneous responses and hence the expression of preferences. Here, we aimed at testing potential spontaneous responses to chemical stimuli and developed novel procedures. First, we conducted a study to test whether captive dolphins respond to a biologically relevant smell. Therefore, we placed dead fish within an opaque barrel at the border of the pool and counted the number of respirations at proximity as an indicator of investigation. The same dead fishes were presented several times during experiments lasting three consecutive days. From the second day on (i.e. when the odor composition changed, dolphins breathed more often close to the fish-smelling barrel than close to the visually identical but empty control barrel. Second, we conducted a study to test whether dolphins are able to discriminate food flavors. Captive dolphins are commonly provided with ice cubes as a source of enrichment. We took this opportunity to provide ice cubes with different flavors and to compare the reaction to these different flavors as a measure of discrimination. Hence, we used the latency of return to the ice cube begging spot as a measure of discrimination from the previous ice cube flavor. Thus, our method used a non-invasive and easily replicable technique based on the spontaneous begging responses of dolphins toward more or less attractive items bearing biological relevance. The procedures used enabled us to show that dolphins may discriminate odors and flavors

  13. Coal char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, L.L.

    1995-07-01

    A series of investigations of coal and char fragmentation during pulverized coal combustion is reported for a suite of coals ranging in rank from lignite to low-volatile (lv) bituminous coal under combustion conditions similar to those found in commercial-scale boilers. Experimental measurements are described that utilize identical particle sizing characteristics to determine initial and final size distributions. Mechanistic interpretation of the data suggest that coal fragmentation is an insignificant event and that char fragmentation is controlled by char structure. Chars forming cenospheres fragment more extensively than solid chars. Among the chars that fragment, large particles produce more fine material than small particles. In all cases, coal and char fragmentation are seen to be sufficiently minor as to be relatively insignificant factors influencing fly ash size distribution, particle loading, and char burnout.

  14. Understanding the Excited State Behavior of Cyclometalated Bis(tridentate)ruthenium(II) Complexes: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitner, Christoph; Erdmann, Elisa; Seidel, Wolfram W; Heinze, Katja

    2015-12-07

    The synthesis and characterization of the donor-acceptor substituted cyclometalated ruthenium(II) polypyridine complex isomers [Ru(dpb-NHCOMe)(tpy-COOEt)](PF6) 1(PF6) and [Ru(dpb-COOEt)(tpy-NHCOMe)](PF6) 2(PF6) (dpbH = 1,3-dipyridin-2-ylbenzene, tpy = 2,2';6,2"-terpyridine) with inverted functional group pattern are described. A combination of resonance Raman spectroscopic and computational techniques shows that all intense visible range absorption bands arise from mixed Ru → tpy/Ru → dpb metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excitations. 2(PF6) is weakly phosphorescent at room temperature in fluid solution and strongly emissive at 77 K in solid butyronitrile matrix, which is typical for ruthenium(II) polypyridine complexes. Density functional theory calculations revealed that the weak emission of 2(PF6) arises from a (3)MLCT state that is efficiently thermally depopulated via metal-centered ((3)MC) excited states. The activation barrier for the deactivation process was estimated experimentally from variable-temperature emission spectroscopic measurements as 11 kJ mol(-1). In contrast, 1(PF6) is nonemissive at room temperature in fluid solution and at 77 K in solid butyronitrile matrix. Examination of the electronic excited states of 1(PF6) revealed a ligand-to-ligand charge-transfer ((3)LL'CT) as lowest-energy triplet state due to the very strong push-pull effect across the metal center. Because of the orthogonality of the participating ligands, emission from the (3)LL'CT is symmetry-forbidden. Hence, in this type of complex a stronger push-pull effect does not increase the phosphorescence quantum yields but completely quenches the emission.

  15. [Experimental Research of Hg (II) Removal from Aqueous Solutions of HgCl2 with Nano-TiO2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiong; Zhang, Jin-yang; Wang, Ding-yong; Qin, Cai-qing; Xu, Feng; Luo Cheng-zhong; Yang, Xi

    2016-01-15

    Mercury removal from aqueous solutions of HgCl2 was studied by indoor simulation experiments, and the effects of three different diameter of particles of Nano-TiO2 ( Nano-Titanium Dioxide) at different dosage, pH, adsorption time and the initial concentration of Hg2+ on the mercury adsorption from simulated wastewater were investigated. The single factor experiments showed that the optimal conditions were: 7.5 g x L(-1) of 5 nm TiO2 or 2.0 g x L(-1) of 100 nm TiO2, pH 8.0, initial concentration of Hg2+ 15 x mg x L(-1) adsorption time 5 min, and under these conditions the adsorption rates reached 99.5% and 99.3%, relatively. When the content of 25 nm TiO2 was 10 g x L(-1), and the other conditions were pH 8.0, initial concentration of Hg2+ 15 mg x L(-1), adsorption time 60 min, the adsorption rate was 62.8%. The Hg(II) removal effects of the TiO2 particles with different diameters followed the order of 100 nm TiO2 > 5 nm TiO2 > 25 nm TiO2. Component adsorption results showed that the 5 nm TiO2 component adsorption effect was superior to its single adsorption effect, while there was little difference between 100 nm TiO2 component adsorption effect and its single adsorption effect. The results of orthogonal experiments indicated that the influencing factors of the adsorption rate followed the order of pH > the initial concentration of Hg2+ > time > dosage. The optimal experiment scheme was: pH 8.0, a dosage of 100 nm Nano-TiO2 of 2.0 g x L(-1) an initial Hg2+ concentration of 25 mg x L(-1) and adsorption time of 10 min. Under the experimental conditions, the maximum adsorption rate reached 99.9%, at the same time, the equilibrium concentration of Hg(II) was 0.033 mg x L(-1) adsorptive capacity was 26.95 mg x g(-1). The adsorption isotherm was in line with the Langmuir isotherm equation, indicating that the Hg(II) uptake by 100 nm Nano-TiO2 was typical monolayer adsorption.

  16. New information on photon fragmentation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Klasen, M

    2014-01-01

    Thermal photons radiated in heavy-ion collisions represent an important signal for a recently discovered new state of matter, the deconfined quark-gluon plasma. However, a clean identification of this signal requires precise knowledge of the prompt photons produced simultaneously in hard collisions of quarks and gluons, mostly through their fragmentation. In this Letter, we demonstrate that PHENIX data on photons produced in proton-proton collisions with low transverse momenta allow to extract new information on this fragmentation process. In particular, these data favor one parameterization (BFG II) over the two other frequently used photon fragmentation functions (BFG I and GRV NLO).

  17. On Disciplinary Fragmentation and Scientific Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balietti, Stefano; Mäs, Michael; Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Why are some scientific disciplines, such as sociology and psychology, more fragmented into conflicting schools of thought than other fields, such as physics and biology? Furthermore, why does high fragmentation tend to coincide with limited scientific progress? We analyzed a formal model where scientists seek to identify the correct answer to a research question. Each scientist is influenced by three forces: (i) signals received from the correct answer to the question; (ii) peer influence; and (iii) noise. We observed the emergence of different macroscopic patterns of collective exploration, and studied how the three forces affect the degree to which disciplines fall apart into divergent fragments, or so-called “schools of thought”. We conducted two simulation experiments where we tested (A) whether the three forces foster or hamper progress, and (B) whether disciplinary fragmentation causally affects scientific progress and vice versa. We found that fragmentation critically limits scientific progress. Strikingly, there is no effect in the opposite causal direction. What is more, our results shows that at the heart of the mechanisms driving scientific progress we find (i) social interactions, and (ii) peer disagreement. In fact, fragmentation is increased and progress limited if the simulated scientists are open to influence only by peers with very similar views, or when within-school diversity is lost. Finally, disciplines where the scientists received strong signals from the correct answer were less fragmented and experienced faster progress. We discuss model’s implications for the design of social institutions fostering interdisciplinarity and participation in science. PMID:25790025

  18. Asymmetry effects in fragment production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Varinderjit

    2016-05-01

    The production of different fragments has been studied by taking into account the mass asymmetry of the reaction and employing the momentum dependent interactions. Two different set of asymmetric reactions have been analyzed while keeping Atotal fixed using soft momentum dependent equation of state. Our results indicate that the impact of momentum dependent interactions is different in lighter projectile systems as compared to heavier ones. The comparative analysis of IQMD simulations with the experimental data in case of heavier projectile and lighter target system for the reaction of 197Au+27Al (η = 0.7) at E = 600 MeV/nucleon shows that with the inclusion of MDI we are able, upto some extent, to reproduce the experimental universality of rise and fall of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs).

  19. Solar Neutrinos. II. Experimental

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Raymond Jr.

    1964-01-01

    A method is described for observing solar neutrinos from the reaction Cl{sup 37}(nu,e{sup -})Ar{sup 37} in C{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}. Two 5 00-gal tanks of C{sub 2}Cl{sub 4} were placed in a limestone mine (1800 m.w.e.) and the resulting Ar{sup 37} activity induced by cosmic mesons( mu ) was measured to determine the necessary conditions for solar neutrino observations. (R.E.U.)

  20. The FERRUM project: Experimental lifetimes and transition probabilities from highly excited even 4d levels in Fe ii

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, H; Engström, L; Lundberg, H

    2015-01-01

    We report lifetime measurements of the 6 levels in the 3d6(5D)4d e6G term in Fe ii at an energy of 10.4 eV, and f -values for 14 transitions from the investigated levels. The lifetimes were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on ions in a laser-produced plasma. The high excitation energy, and the fact that the levels have the same parity as the the low-lying states directly populated in the plasma, necessitated the use of a two-photon excitation scheme. The probability for this process is greatly enhanced by the presence of the 3d6(5D)4p z6F levels at roughly half the energy di?erence. The f -values are obtained by combining the experimental lifetimes with branching fractions derived using relative intensities from a hollow cathode discharge lamp recorded with a Fourier transform spectrometer. The data is important for benchmarking atomic calculations of astrophysically important quantities and useful for spectroscopy of hot stars.

  1. Probabilistic evidential assessment of gunshot residue particle evidence (Part II): Bayesian parameter estimation for experimental count data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, A; Bozza, S; Taroni, F

    2011-03-20

    Part I of this series of articles focused on the construction of graphical probabilistic inference procedures, at various levels of detail, for assessing the evidential value of gunshot residue (GSR) particle evidence. The proposed models--in the form of Bayesian networks--address the issues of background presence of GSR particles, analytical performance (i.e., the efficiency of evidence searching and analysis procedures) and contamination. The use and practical implementation of Bayesian networks for case pre-assessment is also discussed. This paper, Part II, concentrates on Bayesian parameter estimation. This topic complements Part I in that it offers means for producing estimates usable for the numerical specification of the proposed probabilistic graphical models. Bayesian estimation procedures are given a primary focus of attention because they allow the scientist to combine (his/her) prior knowledge about the problem of interest with newly acquired experimental data. The present paper also considers further topics such as the sensitivity of the likelihood ratio due to uncertainty in parameters and the study of likelihood ratio values obtained for members of particular populations (e.g., individuals with or without exposure to GSR).

  2. The FERRUM project: Experimental lifetimes and transition probabilities from highly excited even 4d levels in Fe ii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, H.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Lundberg, H.

    2015-12-01

    We report lifetime measurements of the 6 levels in the 3d6(5D)4d e6G term in Fe ii at an energy of 10.4 eV, and f-values for 14 transitions from the investigated levels. The lifetimes were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on ions in a laser-produced plasma. The high excitation energy, and the fact that the levels have the same parity as the the low-lying states directly populated in the plasma, necessitated the use of a two-photon excitation scheme. The probability for this process is greatly enhanced by the presence of the 3d6(5D)4p z6F levels at roughly half the energy difference. The f-values are obtained by combining the experimental lifetimes with branching fractions derived using relative intensities from a hollow cathode discharge lamp recorded with a Fourier transform spectrometer. The data is important for benchmarking atomic calculations of astrophysically important quantities and useful for spectroscopy of hot stars.

  3. Scaling properties of crack branching and brittle fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uvarov S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is focused on the correlation of scaling properties of crack branching and brittle fragmentation with damage accumulation and a change in the fracture mechanism. The experimental results obtained from the glass fragmentation tests indicate that the size distribution of fragments has a fractal character and is described by a power law.

  4. Experimental and computational studies on 4-[(3,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)methoxy]phthalonitrile and synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of its novel phthalocyanine magnesium(II) and tin(II) metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçay, Hakkı Türker; Bayrak, Rıza; Sahin, Ertan; Karaoğlu, Kaan; Demirbaş, Umit

    2013-10-01

    The molecular structure of the substituted phthalonitrile was analyzed crystallographically and compared with optimized geometric structure. The structural properties of the compound such as energy, vibrational frequency, ground state transitions, (1)H and (13)C NMR chemical shifts, NBO analysis and hyperpolarizability were computed by DFT (Density Functional Theory) method and compared with experimental results. The novel Mg(II) and Sn(II) phthalocyanines synthesized from the substituted phthalonitrile and their aggregation behaviors were investigated in different solvents and at different concentrations in DMSO.

  5. Mechanisms in Impact Fragmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Wittel, Falk K.; Carmona, Humberto A.; Kun, Ferenc; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2015-01-01

    The brittle fragmentation of spheres is studied numerically by a 3D Discrete Element Model. Large scale computer simulations are performed with models that consist of agglomerates of many spherical particles, interconnected by beam-truss elements. We focus on a detailed description of the fragmentation process and study several fragmentation mechanisms involved. The evolution of meridional cracks is studied in detail. These cracks are found to initiate in the inside of the specimen with quasi...

  6. Energetic Light Fragment Production Capability in MCNP6

    CERN Document Server

    Kerby, Leslie M; Gudima, Konstantin K; Sierk, Arnold J; Bull, Jeffrey S; James, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to enable MCNP6 to produce high-energy light fragments. These energetic light fragments may be emitted by our models through three processes: Fermi breakup, preequilibrium, and coalescence. We explore the emission of light fragments through each of these mechanisms and demonstrate an improved agreement with experimental data achieved by extending precompound models to include emission of fragments heavier than $^4$He.

  7. Fragmentation of relativistic oxygen nuclei in interactions with a proton

    CERN Document Server

    Glagolev, V V; Lipin, V D; Lutpullaev, S L; Olimov, K K; Yuldashev, A A; Yuldashev, B S; Olimov, Kh.K.

    2001-01-01

    The data on investigation of inelastic interactions of 16O nuclei with a proton at 3.25 A GeV/c momentum by the bubble chamber method are presented. The separate characteristics as fragments isotopic composition and as topo-logical cross sections of fragmentation channels are given. The processes of light fragments formation and breakup of 16O nucleus on multicharge fragments have been investigated. The comparison of experimental data with the calculations by statistical multifragmentation model was conducted.

  8. Experimental validation of improved 3D SBP positioning algorithm in PET applications using UW Phase II Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, L. S.; Bonifacio, D. A. B.; DeWitt, Don; Miyaoka, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Continuous scintillator-based detectors have been considered as a competitive and cheaper approach than highly pixelated discrete crystal positron emission tomography (PET) detectors, despite the need for algorithms to estimate 3D gamma interaction position. In this work, we report on the implementation of a positioning algorithm to estimate the 3D interaction position in a continuous crystal PET detector using a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). The evaluated method is the Statistics-Based Processing (SBP) technique that requires light response function and event position characterization. An algorithm has been implemented using the Verilog language and evaluated using a data acquisition board that contains an Altera Stratix III FPGA. The 3D SBP algorithm was previously successfully implemented on a Stratix II FPGA using simulated data and a different module design. In this work, improvements were made to the FPGA coding of the 3D positioning algorithm, reducing the total memory usage to around 34%. Further the algorithm was evaluated using experimental data from a continuous miniature crystal element (cMiCE) detector module. Using our new implementation, average FWHM (Full Width at Half Maximum) for the whole block is 1.71±0.01 mm, 1.70±0.01 mm and 1.632±0.005 mm for x, y and z directions, respectively. Using a pipelined architecture, the FPGA is able to process 245,000 events per second for interactions inside of the central area of the detector that represents 64% of the total block area. The weighted average of the event rate by regional area (corner, border and central regions) is about 198,000 events per second. This event rate is greater than the maximum expected coincidence rate for any given detector module in future PET systems using the cMiCE detector design.

  9. DNA fragmentation in apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Cleavage of chromosomal DNA into oligonucleosomal size fragments is an integral part of apoptosis. Elegant biochemical work identified the DNA fragmentation factor (DFF) as a major apoptotic endonuclease for DNA fragmentation in vitro. Genetic studies in mice support the importance of DFF in DNA fragmentation and possibly in apoptosis in vivo. Recent work also suggests the existence of additional endonucleases for DNA degradation. Understanding the roles of individual endonucleases in apoptosis, and how they might coordinate to degrade DNA in different tissues during normal development and homeostasis, as well as in various diseased states, will be a major research focus in the near future.

  10. Parton Propagation and Fragmentation in QCD Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto Accardi, Francois Arleo, William Brooks, David D' Enterria, Valeria Muccifora

    2009-12-01

    We review recent progress in the study of parton propagation, interaction and fragmentation in both cold and hot strongly interacting matter. Experimental highlights on high-energy hadron production in deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering, proton-nucleus and heavy-ion collisions, as well as Drell-Yan processes in hadron-nucleus collisions are presented. The existing theoretical frameworks for describing the in-medium interaction of energetic partons and the space-time evolution of their fragmentation into hadrons are discussed and confronted to experimental data. We conclude with a list of theoretical and experimental open issues, and a brief description of future relevant experiments and facilities.

  11. An improved algorithm for MFR fragment assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontaxis, Georg, E-mail: georg.kontaxis@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Max F. Perutz Laboratories, Department of Structural and Computational Biology, Centre for Molecular Biology (Austria)

    2012-06-15

    A method for generating protein backbone models from backbone only NMR data is presented, which is based on molecular fragment replacement (MFR). In a first step, the PDB database is mined for homologous peptide fragments using experimental backbone-only data i.e. backbone chemical shifts (CS) and residual dipolar couplings (RDC). Second, this fragment library is refined against the experimental restraints. Finally, the fragments are assembled into a protein backbone fold using a rigid body docking algorithm using the RDCs as restraints. For improved performance, backbone nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) may be included at that stage. Compared to previous implementations of MFR-derived structure determination protocols this model-building algorithm offers improved stability and reliability. Furthermore, relative to CS-ROSETTA based methods, it provides faster performance and straightforward implementation with the option to easily include further types of restraints and additional energy terms.

  12. Inclusion compounds between α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrins: iron II lactate: a theoretical and experimental study using diffusion coefficients and molecular mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Rosiley A.; Lino, Antonio C. S.; Takahata, Yuji

    2003-01-01

    The inclusion compounds between iron II lactate and three different cyclodextrins (CDs) were studied by means of experimental and theoretical data. The importance of iron II in the human metabolism effort the necessity of a minimum concentration to the human life. Malnutrition is one great problem in social politics of many countries on the world. The possibility to the development of novel medicines with the iron II species stable look for an increase on the efficiency for this kind of aid. Kinetics measurements confirm the possibility to stop the oxidation reaction. It was the first indication of efficient molecular encapsulation. Diffusion coefficient measurements were carried out by Taylor-Aris diffusion technique. The decrease of diffusion coefficients measured for iron II lactate when alone and forming the inclusion complexes was obtained for all hosts molecules used. Molecular Mechanics calculations were performed to elucidate the perfect arrange of iron II lactate inside CDs cavity. No great differences were obtained to the binding energy for the different hosts. Using the software HyperChem6.03v MM+, AMBER94 and OPLS Forced Fields for iron atom in two chemical environments (a) vacuum and (b) with addition of 250 water molecules (MM+). The solvent treatment was decisive to the order of stability. This order was β-CD>γ-CD>α-CD, the same order of solubility in water. The results contained in this work confirm the possibility to protect iron II lactate against oxidation.

  13. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frégeau, M. O.; Bryś, T.; Gamboni, Th.; Geerts, W.; Oberstedt, S.; Oberstedt, A.; Borcea, R.

    2013-12-01

    The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF) technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD) diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD) show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  14. The VERDI fission fragment spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frégeau M.O.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The VERDI time-of-flight spectrometer is dedicated to measurements of fission product yields and of prompt neutron emission data. Pre-neutron fission-fragment masses will be determined by the double time-of-flight (TOF technique. For this purpose an excellent time resolution is required. The time of flight of the fragments will be measured by electrostatic mirrors located near the target and the time signal coming from silicon detectors located at 50 cm on both sides of the target. This configuration, where the stop detector will provide us simultaneously with the kinetic energy of the fragment and timing information, significantly limits energy straggling in comparison to legacy experimental setup where a thin foil was usually used as a stop detector. In order to improve timing resolution, neutron transmutation doped silicon will be used. The high resistivity homogeneity of this material should significantly improve resolution in comparison to standard silicon detectors. Post-neutron fission fragment masses are obtained form the time-of-flight and the energy signal in the silicon detector. As an intermediary step a diamond detector will also be used as start detector located very close to the target. Previous tests have shown that poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposition (pCVD diamonds provides a coincidence time resolution of 150 ps not allowing complete separation between very low-energy fission fragments, alpha particles and noise. New results from using artificial single-crystal diamonds (sCVD show similar time resolution as from pCVD diamonds but also sufficiently good energy resolution.

  15. HETC-3STEP included fragmentation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigyo, Nobuhiro; Iga, Kiminori; Ishibashi, Kenji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-01

    High Energy Transport Code (HETC) based on the cascade-evaporation model is modified to calculate the fragmentation cross section. For the cascade process, nucleon-nucleon cross sections are used for collision computation; effective in-medium-corrected cross sections are adopted instead of the original free-nucleon collision. The exciton model is adopted for improvement of backward nucleon-emission cross section for low-energy nucleon-incident events. The fragmentation reaction is incorporated into the original HETC as a subroutine set by the use of the systematics of the reaction. The modified HETC (HETC-3STEP/FRG) reproduces experimental fragment yields to a reasonable degree. (author)

  16. Modified Empirical Parametrization of Fragmentation Cross Sections

    CERN Document Server

    Sümmerer, K

    2000-01-01

    New experimental data obtained mainly at the GSI/FRS facility allow to modify the empirical parametrization of fragmentation cross sections, EPAX. It will be shown that minor modifications of the parameters lead to a much better reproduction of measured cross sections. The most significant changes refer to the description of fragmentation yields close to the projectile and of the memory effect of neutron-deficient projectiles.

  17. Fragment correlations from NAUTILUS multidetector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizard, G. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire

    1995-12-31

    It is shown on a few examples how heavy fragment correlations, induced either by conservation laws or by Coulomb interaction can bring physical information on nuclear reactions. All the experimental data discussed have been obtained at GANIL using the NAUTILUS gaseous multi detectors DELF and XYZT, which - due to their good spatial and time resolution and their large solid angle coverage - have proved to be efficient tools for multifragment correlation studies. Different reactions of Ar, Kr, Xe, and Pb beams on Au targets are discussed. It is shown that velocity and angular correlations between fragments provide a powerful clock to scrutinize the details of the hot nuclei decay history. (K.A.). 18 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Design, synthesis, characterization and antibacterial and antifungal activity of a new 2-{(E-[(4-aminophenylimino]-methyl}-4,6-dichlorophenol and its complexes with Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II: An experimental and DFT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakirdere Emine Gulhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the complexes of Co (II, Ni (II, Cu (II and Zn (II with 2-(E-(4-aminophenyliminomethyl-4,6-dichlorophenol were prepared and characterized by physical, spectral and analytical data. The metal: ligand stoichiometric ratio is 1:2 in all the complexes. The results suggested that the Schiff bases are coordinated to the metal ions through the phenolic oxygens and azomethine nitrogen to give mononuclear complexes. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of elemental analysis, IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectra, UV-VIS, magnetic susceptibility measurements and thermogravimetric analyses. Both the antibacterial and antifungal activities and MIC values of compounds were reported. Among the tested compounds, the most effective compound providing a MIC value of 64 μg/mL is Zn(L2 against C. tropicalis and B. subtilis. The theoretically optimized geometries of complexes have tetrahedral structures. The computed stretching frequencies of C=N, C-O and N-H bonds were found to be in good agreement with experimental data. All calculated frequencies fall within about 5% of the experimental frequency regions.

  19. Gravitational fragmentation - A comparison with W49A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keto, Eric R.; Lattanzio, John C.; Monaghan, Joe J.

    1991-01-01

    The process of gravitational fragmentation of molecular clouds is investigated through a comparison of numerical and observational results. The expected millimeter wave molecular line emission from a model fragmenting cloud generated by a numerical hydrodynamic simulation is calculated and compared with observations of HCO(+) from the star-forming region W49A. This investigation suggests that the rotating ring of H II regions, the necklace in W49A, may have formed in the gravitational fragmentation of a flattened rotating molecular cloud.

  20. Dicopper(II) anthraquinophanes as multielectron reservoirs for oxidation and reduction: a joint experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, María; Barros, Wdeson P; Acosta, Alvaro; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; Li, Yanling; Journaux, Yves; De Munno, Giovanni; Armentano, Donatella; Ruiz-García, Rafael; Cano, Joan

    2014-10-20

    Two new dinuclear copper(II) metallacyclophanes with 1,4-disubstituted 9,10-anthraquinonebis(oxamate) bridging ligands are reported that can reversibly take and release electrons at the redox-active ligand and metal sites, respectively, to give the corresponding mono- and bis(semiquinonate and/or catecholate) Cu(II)2 species and mixed-valent Cu(II)/Cu(III) and high-valent Cu(III)2 ones. Density functional calculations allow us to give further insights on the dual ligand- and metal-based character of the redox processes in this novel family of antiferromagnetically coupled di- copper(II) anthraquinophanes. This unique ability for charge storage could be the basis for the development of new kinds of molecular spintronic devices, referred to as molecular magnetic capacitors (MMCs).

  1. String fragmentation; La fragmentation des cordes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, H.J.; Werner, K. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et des Technologies Associees - SUBATECH, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 44 - Nantes (France)

    1997-10-01

    The classical string model is used in VENUS as a fragmentation model. For the soft domain simple 2-parton strings were sufficient, whereas for higher energies up to LHC, the perturbative regime of the QCD gives additional soft gluons, which are mapped on the string as so called kinks, energy singularities between the leading partons. The kinky string model is chosen to handle fragmentation of these strings by application of the Lorentz invariant area law. The `kinky strings` model, corresponding to the perturbative gluons coming from pQCD, takes into consideration this effect by treating the partons and gluons on the same footing. The decay law is always the Artru-Menessier area law which is the most realistic since it is invariant to the Lorentz and gauge transformations. For low mass strings a manipulation of the rupture point is necessary if the string corresponds already to an elementary particle determined by the mass and the flavor content. By means of the fragmentation model it will be possible to simulate the data from future experiments at LHC and RHIC 3 refs.

  2. Fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasak, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Fragmentation is a degradation pathway ubiquitously observed in proteins despite the remarkable stability of peptide bond; proteins differ only by how much and where cleavage occurs. The goal of this review is to summarize reports regarding the non-enzymatic fragmentation of the peptide backbone of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The sites in the polypeptide chain susceptible to fragmentation are determined by a multitude of factors. Insights are provided on the intimate chemical mechanisms that can make some bonds prone to cleavage due to the presence of specific side-chains. In addition to primary structure, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures have a significant impact in modulating the distribution of cleavage sites by altering local flexibility, accessibility to solvent or bringing in close proximity side chains that are remote in sequence. This review focuses on cleavage sites observed in the constant regions of mAbs, with special emphasis on hinge fragmentation. The mechanisms responsible for backbone cleavage are strongly dependent on pH and can be catalyzed by metals or radicals. The distribution of cleavage sites are different under acidic compared to basic conditions, with fragmentation rates exhibiting a minimum in the pH range 5–6; therefore, the overall fragmentation pattern observed for a mAb is a complex result of structural and solvent conditions. A critical review of the techniques used to monitor fragmentation is also presented; usually a compromise has to be made between a highly sensitive method with good fragment separation and the capability to identify the cleavage site. The effect of fragmentation on the function of a mAb must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on whether cleavage sites are observed in the variable or constant regions, and on the mechanism of action of the molecule. PMID:21487244

  3. Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic characterization and nonlinear optical properties of manganese (II) complex of picolinate: A combined experimental and computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf; Çoşut, Bünyemin; Zorlu, Yunus; Erkovan, Mustafa; Yerli, Yusuf

    2016-02-01

    A novel manganese (II) complex with picolinic acid (pyridine 2-carboxylic acid, Hpic), namely, [Mn(pic)2(H2O)2] was prepared and its crystal structure was fully characterized by using single crystal X-ray diffraction. Picolinate (pic) ligands were coordinated to the central manganese(II) ion as bidentate N,O-donors through the nitrogen atoms of pyridine rings and the oxygen atoms of carboxylate groups forming five-membered chelate rings. The spectroscopic characterization of Mn(II) complex was performed by the applications of FT-IR, Raman, UV-vis and EPR techniques. In order to support these studies, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out by using B3LYP level. IR and Raman spectra were simulated at B3LYP level, and obtained results indicated that DFT calculations generally give compatible results to the experimental ones. The electronic structure of the Mn(II) complex was predicted using time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method with polarizable continuum model (PCM). Molecular stability, hyperconjugative interactions, intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and bond strength were investigated by applying natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Nonlinear optical properties of Mn(II) complex were investigated by the determining of molecular polarizability (α) and hyperpolarizability (β) parameters.

  4. Platelet aggregation responses and virus isolation from platelets in calves experimentally infected with type I or type II bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, P H; Bell, T G; Grooms, D L; Kaiser, L; Maes, R K; Baker, J C

    2001-10-01

    Altered platelet function has been reported in calves experimentally infected with type II bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). The purpose of the present study was to further evaluate the ability of BVDV isolates to alter platelet function and to examine for the presence of a virus-platelet interaction during BVDV infection. Colostrum-deprived Holstein calves were obtained immediately after birth, housed in isolation, and assigned to 1 of 4 groups (1 control and 3 treatment groups). Control calves (n = 4) were sham inoculated, while calves in the infected groups (n = 4 for each group) were inoculated by intranasal instillation with 10(7) TCID50 of either BVDV 890 (type II), BVDV 7937 (type II), or BVDV TGAN (type I). Whole blood was collected prior to inoculation (day 0) and on days 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 after inoculation for platelet function testing by optical aggregometry by using adenosine diphosphate and platelet activating factor. The maximum percentage aggregation and the slope of the aggregation curve decreased over time in BVDV-infected calves; however, statistically significant differences (Freidman repeated measures ANOVA on ranks, P infected with the type II BVDV isolates. Bovine viral diarrhea virus was not isolated from control calves, but was isolated from all calves infected with both type II BVDV isolates from days 4 through 12 after inoculation. In calves infected with type I BVDV, virus was isolated from 1 of 4 calves on days 4 and 12 after inoculation and from all calves on days 6 and 8 after inoculation. Altered platelet function was observed in calves infected with both type II BVDV isolates, but was not observed in calves infected with type I BVDV. Altered platelet function may be important as a difference in virulence between type I and type II BVDV infection.

  5. Embedded Fragments Registry (EFR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — In 2009, the Department of Defense estimated that approximately 40,000 service members who served in OEF/OIF may have embedded fragment wounds as the result of small...

  6. DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rex, A S; Aagaard, J.; Fedder, J

    2017-01-01

    Sperm DNA Fragmentation has been extensively studied for more than a decade. In the 1940s the uniqueness of the spermatozoa protein complex which stabilizes the DNA was discovered. In the fifties and sixties, the association between unstable chromatin structure and subfertility was investigated....... In the seventies, the impact of induced DNA damage was investigated. In the 1980s the concept of sperm DNA fragmentation as related to infertility was introduced as well as the first DNA fragmentation test: the Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay (SCSA). The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labelling...... (TUNEL) test followed by others was introduced in the nineties. The association between DNA fragmentation in spermatozoa and pregnancy loss has been extensively investigated spurring the need for a therapeutic tool for these patients. This gave rise to an increased interest in the aetiology of DNA damage...

  7. Fragmentation Main Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The fragmentation model combines patch size and patch continuity with diversity of vegetation types per patch and rarity of vegetation types per patch. A patch was...

  8. Structure of the C-terminal fragment 300-320 of the rat angiotensin II AT1A receptor and its relevance with respect to G-protein coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzoni, L; Nicastro, G; Pertinhez, T A; Tatò, M; Nakaie, C R; Paiva, A C; Schreier, S; Spisni, A

    1997-04-11

    Angiotensin II AT1A receptor is coupled to G-protein, and the molecular mechanism of signal transduction is still unclear. The solution conformation of a synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 300-320 of the rat AT1A receptor, located in the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail and indicated by mutagenesis work to be critical for the G-protein coupling, has been investigated by circular dichroism (CD), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and restrained molecular dynamics calculations. The CD data indicate that, in acidic water, at concentration below 0.8 mM, the peptide exists in a predominantly coil structure while at higher concentration it can form helical aggregates; addition of small amounts of trifluoroethanol induces a secondary structure, mostly due to the presence of helical elements. Using NMR-derived constraints, an ensemble of conformers for the peptide has been determined by restrained molecular dynamics calculations. Analysis of the converged three-dimensional structures indicates that a significant population of them adopts an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation that, depending upon experimental conditions, presents a variable extension in the stretch Leu6-Tyr20. An equilibrium with nonhelical structured conformers is also observed. We suggest that the capability of the peptide to modulate its secondary structure as a function of the medium dielectric constant, as well as its ability to form helical aggregates by means of intermolecular hydrophobic interactions, can play a significant role for G-protein activation.

  9. An experimental and theoretical approach of spectroscopic and structural properties of a new chelidamate copper (II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vural, Hatice; Uçar, İbrahim; Soylu, M Serkan

    2014-03-25

    The crystal structure of new chelidamate complex of copper (II) ion, [Cu(chel)H2O(pym)]·H2O [chel: chelidamate or 4-hydroxypyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate; pym: 2-Pyridylmethanol] has been determined by single crystal X-ray crystallographic method. The complex was characterized by IR and UV-Vis spectroscopic techniques. The magnetic environment of copper (II) ion has been defined by electron paramagnetic technique (EPR). The central copper (II) ion is six-coordinate with a distorted octahedral geometry, which exhibits Jahn-Teller distortions along one of the O-Cu-O axes with tetragonality of 0.81. Chelidamate behaved as a tridentate ligand was bonded to Cu(II) ion through carboxyl oxygens with nitrogen. The crystal structure is stabilized by O-H⋯O hydrogen bond and π-π interactions. Theoretical calculations have been carried out by using the DFT method. The modeling of copper (II) complex was made by geometric optimization. The geometry optimization and EPR study were carried out using the following unrestricted hybrid density functionals: LSDA, BPV86, B3LYP, B3PW91, MPW1PW91 and HCTH. Frontier molecular orbital energies, absorption wavelengths and excitation energy were computed by time dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method with polarizable continuum model. IR spectra were discussed and compared to other relevant complexes together with theoretical results. The natural charges on the atoms and second-order interaction energies were derived from natural bond orbital analysis (NBO).

  10. Thermodynamics of fragment binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenczy, György G; Keserű, György M

    2012-04-23

    The ligand binding pockets of proteins have preponderance of hydrophobic amino acids and are typically within the apolar interior of the protein; nevertheless, they are able to bind low complexity, polar, water-soluble fragments. In order to understand this phenomenon, we analyzed high resolution X-ray data of protein-ligand complexes from the Protein Data Bank and found that fragments bind to proteins with two near optimal geometry H-bonds on average. The linear extent of the fragment binding site was found not to be larger than 10 Å, and the H-bonding region was found to be restricted to about 5 Å on average. The number of conserved H-bonds in proteins cocrystallized with multiple different fragments is also near to 2. These fragment binding sites that are able to form limited number of strong H-bonds in a hydrophobic environment are identified as hot spots. An estimate of the free-energy gain of H-bond formation versus apolar desolvation supports that fragment sized compounds need H-bonds to achieve detectable binding. This suggests that fragment binding is mostly enthalpic that is in line with their observed binding thermodynamics documented in Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) data sets and gives a thermodynamic rationale for fragment based approaches. The binding of larger compounds tends to more rely on apolar desolvation with a corresponding increase of the entropy content of their binding free-energy. These findings explain the reported size-dependence of maximal available affinity and ligand efficiency both behaving differently in the small molecule region featured by strong H-bond formation and in the larger molecule region featured by apolar desolvation.

  11. The FERRUM Project: experimental and theoretical transition rates of forbidden [Sc II] lines and radiative lifetimes of metastable Sc II levels

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, H; Lundin, P; Schef, P; Hibbert, A; Lundberg, H; Mannervik, S; Norlin, L -O; Royen, P

    2008-01-01

    Context. In many plasmas, long-lived metastable atomic levels are depopulated by collisions (quenched) before they decay radiatively. In low-density regions, however, the low collision rate may allow depopulation by electric dipole (E1) forbidden radiative transitions, so-called forbidden lines (mainly M1 and E2 transitions). If the atomic transition data are known, these lines are indicators of physical plasma conditions and used for abundance determination. Aims. Transition rates can be derived by combining relative intensities between the decay channels, so-called branching fractions (BFs), and the radiative lifetime of the common upper level. We use this approach for forbidden [Sc ii] lines, along with new calculations. Methods. Neither BFs for forbidden lines, nor lifetimes of metastable levels, are easily measured in a laboratory. Therefore, astrophysical BFs measured in Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) spectra of the strontium filament of Eta Carinae are combined with lifetime measurements u...

  12. The Normal-incidence Vacuum-ultraviolet Spectrometer for the TJ-II and First Experimental Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, K.J.; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.

    2002-07-01

    A normal-incidence spectrometer, operating in the extreme-ultraviolet and ultraviolet wavelength regions, has been commissioned for the TJ-II stellarator. The instrument has been custom built by McPherson, Chelmsford, MA, and has several unique features and accessories that are described here. The instrument and CCD detector has been tested and calibrated, and its performance evaluated, using spectral lines from glow discharges and a RF excited flow lamp. Finally, the first spectra collected with the instrument of TJ-II plasmas are presented and a preliminary estimation of an oxygen ion temperature is made. (Author) 23 refs.

  13. CCDC 970790: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-[bis(mu~2~-Pyrazine)-(mu~2~-hexafluorosilicate)-copper(ii) hydrate

    KAUST Repository

    Shekhah, Osama

    2014-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  14. CCDC 1528379: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-[(mu7-4,4'-Sulfonyldibenzoato)-lead(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Al Kordi, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  15. CCDC 1010345: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : (propane-1,3-diylbis(diethylphosphine))-bis(trifluoromethanesulfonato)-palladium(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Roesle, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  16. CCDC 1010346: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : (propane-1,3-diylbis(diisopropylphosphine))-(trifluoromethanesulfonato)-aqua-palladium(ii) trifluoromethanesulfonate

    KAUST Repository

    Roesle, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  17. CCDC 1029960: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-[triethylammonium (mu-1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylato)-cobalt(ii) monohydrate

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Hai-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  18. Education as Experimentation: A Planned Variation Model. Volume IIIA: Findings: Cohort II; Interim Findings: Cohort III. Volume IIIB: Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Linda B.; And Others

    This segment of the national evaluation study of the Follow Through Planned Variation Model reviews the background of the study, describes 13 of the Follow Through models involved, and presents an analysis of the effects of these models on students. The analysis is based on data from 4 years of Follow Through participation by Cohort II children…

  19. [Experimental study on effects of acupoint application with Leima type II plaster on collagen-induced arthritis in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Fang, Jian-Qiao; Zhou, Ya-Feng

    2011-09-01

    To observe the therapeutic effect of acupoint application with Leima type II plaster on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and probe its mechanism. Bovine type II collagen was injected intradermally into the middle line of the back to induce CIA model with 48 Wistar rats. Then the rats were randomly divided into a model control group (group A), a matrix control group (group B), acupoint application group with plaster of low concentration (group C) and high concentration plaster group (group D), 12 rats in each group. Group C and group D were treated with low and high concentration of Leima type II plaster, and "Shenzhu" (GV 12), "Zhiyang" (GV 9) and "Mingmen" (GV 4) were selected, each application for about 15 hours, once each day for 30 days. Group B was used the same method of acupoint application except using non-drug matrix plaster, and group A was not given any treatment. The morphous and the histopathological changes of affection joint were observed. The paw edema volume after 30 days treatment in group C was significantly lower than that in group B (P plaster has a good therapeutic effect on CIA rats and the protective mechanism is related to the reduction of anti-type II collagen antibody level so as to carry out anti-inflammatory effect and immunosuppression.

  20. Enantioseparation of Amino Acids by Micelle-Enhanced Ultrafiltration : Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Copper(II) Amino Acid Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de T.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    A micelle-enhanced ultrafiltration system, which can potentially be used for large scale separations, has been used to investigate the resolution of amino acid enantiomers. For this purpose amino acid derivatives were synthesized, which in combination with copper(II) ions were used as chiral selecto

  1. A novel cryptic binding motif, LRSKSRSFQVSDEQY, in the C-terminal fragment of MMP-3/7-cleaved osteopontin as a novel ligand for α9β1 integrin is involved in the anti-type II collagen antibody-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyuki Kon

    Full Text Available Osteopontin (OPN is a multifunctional protein that has been linked to various intractable inflammatory diseases. One way by which OPN induces inflammation is the production of various functional fragments by enzyme cleavage. It has been well appreciated that OPN is cleaved by thrombin, and/or matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -7 (MMP-3/7. Although the function of thrombin-cleaved OPN is well characterized, little is known about the function of MMP-3/7-cleaved OPN. In this study, we found a novel motif, LRSKSRSFQVSDEQY, in the C-terminal fragment of MMP-3/7-cleaved mouse OPN binds to α9β1 integrin. Importantly, this novel motif is involved in the development of anti-type II collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA. This study provides the first in vitro and in vivo evidence that OPN cleavage by MMP-3/7 is an important regulatory mechanism for CAIA.

  2. Experimental analysis and mathematical prediction of Cd(II) removal by biosorption using support vector machines and genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlihor, Raluca Maria; Diaconu, Mariana; Leon, Florin; Curteanu, Silvia; Tavares, Teresa; Gavrilescu, Maria

    2015-05-25

    We investigated the bioremoval of Cd(II) in batch mode, using dead and living biomass of Trichoderma viride. Kinetic studies revealed three distinct stages of the biosorption process. The pseudo-second order model and the Langmuir model described well the kinetics and equilibrium of the biosorption process, with a determination coefficient, R(2)>0.99. The value of the mean free energy of adsorption, E, is less than 16 kJ/mol at 25 °C, suggesting that, at low temperature, the dominant process involved in Cd(II) biosorption by dead T. viride is the chemical ion-exchange. With the temperature increasing to 40-50 °C, E values are above 16 kJ/mol, showing that the particle diffusion mechanism could play an important role in Cd(II) biosorption. The studies on T. viride growth in Cd(II) solutions and its bioaccumulation performance showed that the living biomass was able to bioaccumulate 100% Cd(II) from a 50 mg/L solution at pH 6.0. The influence of pH, biomass dosage, metal concentration, contact time and temperature on the bioremoval efficiency was evaluated to further assess the biosorption capability of the dead biosorbent. These complex influences were correlated by means of a modeling procedure consisting in data driven approach in which the principles of artificial intelligence were applied with the help of support vector machines (SVM), combined with genetic algorithms (GA). According to our data, the optimal working conditions for the removal of 98.91% Cd(II) by T. viride were found for an aqueous solution containing 26.11 mg/L Cd(II) as follows: pH 6.0, contact time of 3833 min, 8 g/L biosorbent, temperature 46.5 °C. The complete characterization of bioremoval parameters indicates that T. viride is an excellent material to treat wastewater containing low concentrations of metal.

  3. Feasibility of processing the experimental breeder reactor-II driver fuel from the Idaho National Laboratory through Savannah River Site's H-Canyon facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magoulas, V. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-07-28

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to evaluate the potential to receive and process the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) uranium (U) recovered from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) driver fuel through the Savannah River Site’s (SRS) H-Canyon as a way to disposition the material. INL recovers the uranium from the sodium bonded metallic fuel irradiated in the EBR-II reactor using an electrorefining process. There were two compositions of EBR-II driver fuel. The early generation fuel was U-5Fs, which consisted of 95% U metal alloyed with 5% noble metal elements “fissium” (2.5% molybdenum, 2.0% ruthenium, 0.3% rhodium, 0.1% palladium, and 0.1% zirconium), while the later generation was U-10Zr which was 90% U metal alloyed with 10% zirconium. A potential concern during the H-Canyon nitric acid dissolution process of the U metal containing zirconium (Zr) is the explosive behavior that has been reported for alloys of these materials. For this reason, this evaluation was focused on the ability to process the lower Zr content materials, the U-5Fs material.

  4. Size-selected genomic libraries: the distribution and size-fractionation of restricted genomic DNA fragments by gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondo, Y

    1995-02-01

    By using one-dimensional genome scanning, it is possible to directly identify the restricted genomic DNA fragment that reflects the site of genetic change. The subsequent strategies to obtain the molecular clones of the corresponding restriction fragment are usually as follows: (i) the restriction of a mass quantity of an appropriate genomic DNA, (ii) the size-fractionation of the restricted DNA on a preparative electrophoresis gel in order to enrich the corresponding restriction fragment, (iii) the construction of the size-selected libraries from the fractionated genomic DNA, and (iv) the screening of the library to obtain an objective clone which is identified on the analytical genome scanning gel. A knowledge of the size distribution pattern of restriction fragments of the genomic DNA makes it possible to calculate the heterogeneity or complexity of the restriction fragment in each size-fraction. This manuscript first describes the distribution of the restriction fragments with respect to their length. Some examples of the practical application of this theory to genome scanning is then discussed using presumptive genome scanning gels. The way to calculate such DNA complexities in the prepared size-fractionated samples is also demonstrated. Such information should greatly facilitate the design of experimental strategies for the cloning of a certain size of genomic DNA after digestion with restriction enzyme(s) as is the case with genome scanning.

  5. Experimental and theoretical analyses of penetration processes of externally applied rotating helical magnetic perturbation fields in TEXTOR and HYBTOK-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Y [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Bock, M F M de [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, EURATOM Association, Postbus 1207, NL-3430 BE Nieuwegein, The (Netherlands); Finken, K H [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Jakubowski, M [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Jaspers, R [FOM Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, EURATOM Association, Postbus 1207, NL-3430 BE Nieuwegein, The (Netherlands); Koslowski, H R [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Kraemer-Flecken, A [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Lehnen, M [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Liang, Y [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Loewenbrueck, K [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Matsunaga, G [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 311-0193 (Japan); Reiser, D [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Samm, U [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany); Sewell, G [Mathematics Department Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Takamura, S [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, 464-8603 Nagoya (Japan); Unterberg, B; Wolf, R C; Zimmermann, O [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, D-52425 (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    Penetration processes of rotating helical magnetic perturbation field into tokamak plasmas have been investigated by the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) in TEXTOR. Experimental observations of the field penetration and field amplification are performed and the data are interpreted by theoretical analyses based on a linearized two-fluid plasma model. It is observed that the growth of the forced magnetic reconnection by the rotating DED-field is accompanied by a change in the plasma fluid rotation. The theoretical model is also applied to the DED experiment in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. It is confirmed that the theoretical analyses can explain the observed radial profiles of the DED-field in the plasma by inserting small magnetic pick-up coils in HYBTOK-II.

  6. Line-Shape Code Comparison through Modeling and Fitting of Experimental Spectra of the C ii 723-nm Line Emitted by the Ablation Cloud of a Carbon Pellet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Koubiti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Various codes of line-shape modeling are compared to each other through the profile of the C ii 723-nm line for typical plasma conditions encountered in the ablation clouds of carbon pellets, injected in magnetic fusion devices. Calculations were performed for a single electron density of 1017 cm−3 and two plasma temperatures (T = 2 and 4 eV. Ion and electron temperatures were assumed to be equal (Te = Ti = T. The magnetic field, B, was set equal to either to zero or 4 T. Comparisons between the line-shape modeling codes and two experimental spectra of the C ii 723-nm line, measured perpendicularly to the B-field in the Large Helical Device (LHD using linear polarizers, are also discussed.

  7. Assessment of Fragmentation Performance of Blast-enhanced Explosive Fragmentation Munitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    aluminized blast-enhanced PAX-Al composition. The experimental assessment of the fragmentation performance of tested charges was accomplished using...charges, rapid expansion of high pressure detonation products results in high-strain high-strain-rate dilation of the hardened steel shell, which...eventually ruptures generating a “spray” of high-velocity steel fragments. Defining the longitudinal axis of the munition as the polar axis z, the

  8. New information on photon fragmentation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Michael; König, Florian

    2014-08-01

    Thermal photons radiated in heavy-ion collisions represent an important signal for a recently discovered new state of matter, the deconfined quark-gluon plasma. However, a clean identification of this signal requires precise knowledge of the prompt photons produced simultaneously in hard collisions of quarks and gluons, mostly through their fragmentation. In this paper, we demonstrate that PHENIX data on photons produced in proton-proton collisions with low transverse momenta allow to extract new information on this fragmentation process. While existing data do not yet convincingly favor one parameterization (BFG II) over the two other frequently used photon fragmentation functions (BFG I and GRV NLO), the data sets recorded by PHENIX and STAR at BNL RHIC in 2013 with tenfold higher statistics should allow for such an analysis.

  9. New information on photon fragmentation functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, Michael; Koenig, Florian [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Muenster (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Thermal photons radiated in heavy-ion collisions represent an important signal for a recently discovered new state of matter, the deconfined quark-gluon plasma. However, a clean identification of this signal requires precise knowledge of the prompt photons produced simultaneously in hard collisions of quarks and gluons, mostly through their fragmentation. In this paper, we demonstrate that PHENIX data on photons produced in proton-proton collisions with low transverse momenta allow one to extract new information on this fragmentation process. While existing data do not yet convincingly favor one parameterization (BFG II) over the two other frequently used photon fragmentation functions (BFG I and GRV NLO), the data sets recorded by PHENIX and STAR at BNL RHIC in 2013 with tenfold higher statistics should allow for such an analysis. (orig.)

  10. Chiral induction effects in ruthenium(II) amino alcohol catalysed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones: an experimental and theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petra; Reek; Handgraaf; Meijer; Dierkes; Kamer; Brussee; Schoemaker; van Leeuwen PW

    2000-08-04

    The enantioselective outcome of transfer hydrogenation reactions that are catalysed by ruthenium(II) amino alcohol complexes was studied by means of a systematically varied series of ligands. It was found that both the substituent at the 1-position in the 2-amino-1-alcohol ligand and the substituent at the amine functionality influence the enantioselectivity of the reaction to a large extent: enantioselectivities (ee values) of up to 95% were obtained for the reduction of acetophenone. The catalytic cycle of ruthenium(II) amino alcohol catalysed transfer hydrogenation was examined at the density functional theory level. The formation of a hydrogen bond between the carbonyl functionality of the substrate and the amine proton of the ligand, as well as the formation of an intramolecular H...H bond and a planar H-Ru-N-H moiety are crucially important for the reaction mechanism. The enantioselective outcome of the reaction can be illustrated with the aid of molecular modelling by the visualisation of the steric interactions between the ketone and the ligand backbone in the ruthenium(II) catalysts.

  11. Stability hierarchy between Piracetam forms I, II, and III from experimental pressure-temperature diagrams and topological inferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscani, Siro; Céolin, René; Minassian, Léon Ter; Barrio, Maria; Veglio, Nestor; Tamarit, Josep-Lluis; Louër, Daniel; Rietveld, Ivo B

    2016-01-30

    The trimorphism of the active pharmaceutical ingredient piracetam is a famous case of polymorphism that has been frequently revisited by many researchers. The phase relationships between forms I, II, and III were ambiguous because they seemed to depend on the heating rate of the DSC and on the history of the samples or they have not been observed at all (equilibrium II-III). In the present paper, piezo-thermal analysis and high-pressure differential thermal analysis have been used to elucidate the positions of the different solid-solid and solid-liquid equilibria. The phase diagram, involving the three solid phases, the liquid phase and the vapor phase, has been constructed. It has been shown that form III is the high-pressure, low-temperature form and the stable form at room temperature. Form II is stable under intermediary conditions and form I is the low pressure, high temperature form, which possesses a stable melting point. The present paper demonstrates the strength of the topological approach based on the Clapeyron equation and the alternation rule when combined with high-pressure measurements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Syphilis and human experimentation from the first appearance of the disease to World War II: a historical perspective and reflections on ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuerda-Galindo, E; Sierra-Valentí, X; González-López, E; López-Muñoz, F

    2014-10-01

    Physicians have conducted research on syphilis for centuries, seeking to understand its etiology and the means of transmission as well as find ways to prevent and cure the disease. Their research practices often strayed from today's ethical standards. In this paper we review ethical aspects of the long history of research on syphilis with emphasis on the experiments performed in the 20th century. The description of research around the time of World War II covers medical experiments carried out in US prisons and in the experimentation centers established by Japanese doctors in occupied territory, as well as experiments in Nazi Germany and the treatment of syphilitics there.

  13. Fragments of Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    Time travel films necessarily fragment linear narratives, as scenes are revisited with differences from the first time we saw it. Popular films such as Back to the Future mine comedy from these visitations, but there are many different approaches. One extreme is Chris Marker's La Jetée - a film...... made almost completely of still images, recounting the end of the world. These stills can be viewed as fragments that have survived the end of the world and now provide the only access to the events that occured. Shane Carruth's Primer has a different approach to time travel, the narrative diegesis...

  14. The Serendipity of Fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leixnering, Stephan; Meyer, Renate E.

    , it was the central government’s task to coordinate, steer and control the newly emerged decentralized organizations. This raises questions about the overall design of the public sector at present. Our paper engages with the prevalent public governance phenomenon of fragmentation from a design perspective in order...... form of organizing between networks and formal organization: lacking a single center and featuring multiplex and multifaceted relations within the politico-administrative apparatus and between government and PSOs, high fragmentation, local and robust action, but latent structures of significant formal...

  15. IMPACT fragmentation model developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, Marlon E.; Mains, Deanna L.

    2016-09-01

    The IMPACT fragmentation model has been used by The Aerospace Corporation for more than 25 years to analyze orbital altitude explosions and hypervelocity collisions. The model is semi-empirical, combining mass, energy and momentum conservation laws with empirically derived relationships for fragment characteristics such as number, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and spreading velocity as well as event energy distribution. Model results are used for several types of analysis including assessment of short-term risks to satellites from orbital altitude fragmentations, prediction of the long-term evolution of the orbital debris environment and forensic assessments of breakup events. A new version of IMPACT, version 6, has been completed and incorporates a number of advancements enabled by a multi-year long effort to characterize more than 11,000 debris fragments from more than three dozen historical on-orbit breakup events. These events involved a wide range of causes, energies, and fragmenting objects. Special focus was placed on the explosion model, as the majority of events examined were explosions. Revisions were made to the mass distribution used for explosion events, increasing the number of smaller fragments generated. The algorithm for modeling upper stage large fragment generation was updated. A momentum conserving asymmetric spreading velocity distribution algorithm was implemented to better represent sub-catastrophic events. An approach was developed for modeling sub-catastrophic explosions, those where the majority of the parent object remains intact, based on estimated event energy. Finally, significant modifications were made to the area-to-mass ratio distribution to incorporate the tendencies of different materials to fragment into different shapes. This ability enabled better matches between the observed area-to-mass ratios and those generated by the model. It also opened up additional possibilities for post-event analysis of breakups. The paper will discuss

  16. Experimental diabetes increases insulin-like growth factor I and II receptor concentration and gene expression in kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, H.; Shen-Orr, Z.; Stannard, B.; Burguera, B.; Roberts, C.T. Jr.; LeRoith, D. (National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-12-01

    Insulinlike growth factor I (IGF-I) is a mitogenic hormone with important regulatory roles in growth and development. One of the target organs for IGF-I action is the kidney, which synthesizes abundant IGF-I receptors and IGF-I itself. To study the involvement of IGF-I and the IGF-I receptor in the development of nephropathy, one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus, we measured the expression of these genes in the kidney and in other tissues of the streptozocin-induced diabetic rat. The binding of 125I-labeled IGF-I to crude membranes was measured in the same tissues. We observed a 2.5-fold increase in the steady-state level of IGF-I-receptor mRNA in the diabetic kidney, which was accompanied by a 2.3-fold increase in IGF-I binding. In addition to this increase in IGF-I binding to the IGF-I receptor, there was also binding to a lower-molecular-weight material that may represent an IGF-binding protein. No change was detected in the level of IGF-I-peptide mRNA. Similarly, IGF-II-receptor mRNA levels and IGF-II binding were significantly increased in the diabetic kidney. IGF-I- and IGF-II-receptor mRNA levels and IGF-I and IGF-II binding returned to control values after insulin treatment. Because the IGF-I receptor is able to transduce mitogenic signals on activation of its tyrosine kinase domain, we hypothesize that, among other factors, high levels of receptor in the diabetic kidney may also be involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Increased IGF-II-receptor expression in the diabetic kidney may be important for the intracellular transport and packaging of lysosomal enzymes, although a role for this receptor in signal transduction cannot be excluded. Finally, the possible role of IGF-binding proteins requires further study.

  17. Spin dependence of heavy quark fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornet, Fernando [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos and Centro Anadaluz de Fisica de Particulas, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)], E-mail: cornet@ugr.es; Garcia Canal, Carlos A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67, La Plata (1900) (Argentina)

    2008-05-01

    We propose that the non-perturbative part of the fragmentation function describing the transition from a heavy quark to a heavy meson is proportional to the square of the produced meson wave function at the origin, taking into account hyperfine interactions. We analyze the effects of this proposal on the number of pseudoscalar mesons compared to the number of vector mesons produced and find a good agreement with experimental data. Finally, we discuss further experimental checks for our hypothesis.

  18. Size Effects in Heavy Ions Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Barrañon, A; Dorso, C O

    2003-01-01

    Rise-Plateau Caloric curves for different Heavy Ion collisions have been obtained, in the range of experimental observations. Limit temperature decreases when the residual size is increased, in agreement with recent theoretical analysis of experimental results reported by other Collaborations. Besides, promptly emitted particles influence on temperature plateau is shown. LATINO binary interaction semiclassical model is used to reproduce the inter-nucleonic forces via Pandharipande Potential and fragments are detected with an Early Cluster Recognition Algorithm.

  19. Task I: Dark Matter Search Experiments with Cryogenic Detectors: CDMS-I and CDMS-II Task II: Experimental Study of Neutrino Properties: EXO and KamLAND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, Blas [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Gratta, Giorgio [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2013-08-30

    Dark Matter Search - During the period of performance, our group continued the search for dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles or WIMPs. As a key member of the CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) collaboration, we completed the CDMS II experiment which led the field in sensitivity for more than five years. We fabricated all detectors, and participated in detector testing and verification. In addition, we participated in the construction and operation of the facility at the Soudan Underground Laboratory and played key roles in the data acquisition and analysis. Towards the end of the performance period, we began operating the SuperCDMS Soudan experiment, which consists of 15 advanced Ge (9 kg) detectors. The advanced detector design called iZIP grew out of our earlier DOE Particle Detector R&D program which demonstrated the rejection of surface electrons to levels where they are no longer the dominant source of background. Our group invented this advanced design and these larger detectors were fabricated on the Stanford campus in collaboration with the SLAC CDMS group and the Santa Clara University group. The sensitivity reach is expected to be up to 5 times better than CDMS II after two years of operation. We will check the new limits on WIMPs set by XENON100, and we expect improved sensitivity for light mass WIMPs beyond that of any other existing experiment. Our group includes the Spokesperson for SuperCDMS and continues to make important contributions to improvements in the detector technology which are enabling the very low trigger thresholds used to explore the low mass WIMP region. We are making detailed measurements of the charge transport and trapping within Ge crystals, measuring the diffusive trapping distance of the quasiparticle excitations within the Al phonon collector fins on the detector surface, and we are contributing to the development of much improved detector Monte Carlos which are essential to guide the detector

  20. Correlation measurements of fission-fragment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberstedt, S.; Belgya, T.; Billnert, R.; Borcea, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Göök, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Karlsson, J.; Kis, Z.; Martinez, T.; Oberstedt, A.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Takác, K.

    2010-10-01

    For the development of future nuclear fission applications and for a responsible handling of nuclear waste the a-priori assessment of the fission-fragments' heat production and toxicity is a fundamental necessity. The success of an indispensable modelling of the fission process strongly depends on a good understanding of the particular mechanism of scission, the mass fragmentation and partition of excitation energy. Experimental observables are fission-fragment properties like mass- and energy-distributions, and the prompt neutron as well as γ-ray multiplicities and emission spectra. The latter quantities should preferably be known as a function of fragment mass and excitation energy. Those data are highly demanded as published by the OECD-NEA in its high priority data request list. With the construction of the double (v, E) spectrometer VERDI we aim at measuring pre- and post-neutron masses directly and simultaneously to avoid prompt neutron corrections. From the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron fission-fragment data the prompt neutron multiplicity may then be inferred fully correlated with fragment mass yield and total kinetic energy. Using an ultra-fast fission event trigger spectral prompt fission γ-ray measurements may be performed. For that purpose recently developed lanthanum-halide detectors, with excellent timing characteristics, were coupled to the VERDI spectrometer allowing for a very good discrimination of fission γ-rays and prompt neutrons due to their different time-of-flight.

  1. Fragmentation of mercury compounds under ultraviolet light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkonen, E.; Löytynoja, T.; Hautala, L.; Jänkälä, K.; Huttula, M.

    2015-08-01

    Ultraviolet light induced photofragmentation of mercury compounds is studied experimentally with electron energy resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence techniques and theoretically with computational quantum chemical methods. A high resolution photoelectron spectrum using synchrotron radiation is presented. Fragmentation of the molecule is studied subsequent to ionization to the atomic-mercury-like d orbitals. State dependent fragmentation behaviour is presented and specific reactions for dissociation pathways are given. The fragmentation is found to differ distinctly in similar orbitals of different mercury compounds.

  2. Fragmentation of mercury compounds under ultraviolet light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokkonen, E.; Hautala, L.; Jänkälä, K.; Huttula, M. [Centre for Molecular Materials Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Löytynoja, T. [Centre for Molecular Materials Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Division of Theoretical Chemistry & Biology, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-08-21

    Ultraviolet light induced photofragmentation of mercury compounds is studied experimentally with electron energy resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence techniques and theoretically with computational quantum chemical methods. A high resolution photoelectron spectrum using synchrotron radiation is presented. Fragmentation of the molecule is studied subsequent to ionization to the atomic-mercury-like d orbitals. State dependent fragmentation behaviour is presented and specific reactions for dissociation pathways are given. The fragmentation is found to differ distinctly in similar orbitals of different mercury compounds.

  3. Pyroprocessing of Oxidized Sodium-Bonded Fast Reactor Fuel -- an Experimental Study of Treatment Options for Degraded EBR-II Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. D. Herrmann; L. A. Wurth; N. J. Gese

    2013-09-01

    An experimental study was conducted to assess pyrochemical treatment options for degraded EBR-II fuel. As oxidized material, the degraded fuel would need to be converted back to metal to enable electrorefining within an existing electrometallurgical treatment process. A lithium-based electrolytic reduction process was studied to assess the efficacy of converting oxide materials to metal with a particular focus on the impact of zirconium oxide and sodium oxide on this process. Bench-scale electrolytic reduction experiments were performed in LiCl-Li2O at 650 °C with combinations of manganese oxide (used as a surrogate for uranium oxide), zirconium oxide, and sodium oxide. The experimental study illustrated how zirconium oxide and sodium oxide present different challenges to a lithium-based electrolytic reduction system for conversion of select metal oxides to metal.

  4. DFT calculations and experimental FT-IR, dispersive-Raman and EPR spectral studies of Copper (II) chloride complex with 3-amino-1-methylbenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumru, Mustafa; Bardakçı, Tayyibe; Güner, Sadik

    2014-04-05

    In this study, we present the synthesis and the characterization of Copper (II) chloride complex with 3-amino-1-methylbenzene (3A1MB). This complex was characterized by vibrational and EPR spectroscopic techniques and elemental analysis. The molecular structure and spectrometry of this complex: Cu(3A1MB)2Cl2 and its ligand: 3A1MB have been investigated theoretically by performing DFT/B3LYP calculations. Cu(3A1MB)2Cl2 has been optimized as two conformers and the more stable conformer is determined. The optimized geometries and calculated vibrational frequencies have been evaluated via comparison with experimental values, and the normal modes were assigned on the basis of the percent potential energy distribution (PED). A good agreement between calculated and experimental data is observed.

  5. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter R Underhill

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134-144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively. Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132-145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively. Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA.

  6. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Hunter R; Kitzman, Jacob O; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C; Daza, Riza; Baker, Daniel N; Gligorich, Keith M; Rostomily, Robert C; Bronner, Mary P; Shendure, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134-144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132-145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA.

  7. Fragmented Work Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Humle, Didde Maria; Reff Pedersen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    by exploring how different types of fragmentation create meanings. This is done by studying the work stories of job and personnel consultants and by drawing on the results of a narrative, ethnographic study of a consultancy. The analysis demonstrates how work stories are social practices negotiated, retold...

  8. Picking Up (On) Fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, Phil

    2015-01-01

    abstractThis article discusses the implications for archival and media archaeological research and reenactment artwork relating to a recent arts practice project: reenacttv: 30 lines / 60 seconds. It proposes that archival material is unstable but has traces and fragments that are full of creative p

  9. Fragments of the Past

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Szende

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With travel being made more accessible throughout the decades, the hospitality industry constantly evolved their practices as society and technology progressed. Hotels looked for news ways up service their customers, which led to the invention of the Servidor in 1918. Once revolutionary innovations have gone extinct, merely becoming fragments of the past.

  10. Cryobiology of coral fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Mary; Farrell, Ann; Carter, Virginia L

    2013-02-01

    Around the world, coral reefs are dying due to human influences, and saving habitat alone may not stop this destruction. This investigation focused on the biological processes that will provide the first steps in understanding the cryobiology of whole coral fragments. Coral fragments are a partnership of coral tissue and endosymbiotic algae, Symbiodinium sp., commonly called zooxanthellae. These data reflected their separate sensitivities to chilling and a cryoprotectant (dimethyl sulfoxide) for the coral Pocillopora damicornis, as measured by tissue loss and Pulse Amplitude Modulated fluorometry 3weeks post-treatment. Five cryoprotectant treatments maintained the viability of the coral tissue and zooxanthellae at control values (1M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0h exposures, and 1.5M dimethyl sulfoxide at 1.0 and 1.5h exposures, P>0.05, ANOVA), whereas 2M concentrations did not (Pcoral tissue, but not in the zooxanthellae. During the winter when the fragments were chilled, the coral tissue remained relatively intact (∼25% loss) post-treatment, but the zooxanthellae numbers in the tissue declined after 5min of chilling (Pcoral tissue (∼75% loss) and zooxanthellae numbers declined in response to chilling alone (Pcoral against tissue loss after 45min of cryoprotectant exposure (P>0.05, ANOVA), but it did not protect against the loss of zooxanthellae (Pcoral fragment complex and future cryopreservation protocols must be guided by their greater sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Picking Up (On) Fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellis, Phil

    2015-01-01

    abstractThis article discusses the implications for archival and media archaeological research and reenactment artwork relating to a recent arts practice project: reenacttv: 30 lines / 60 seconds. It proposes that archival material is unstable but has traces and fragments that are full of creative p

  12. Wildlife habitat fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John. Lehmkuhl

    2005-01-01

    A primary issue in forest wildlife management is habitat fragmentation and its effects on viability, which is the "bottom line" for plant and animal species of conservation concern. Population viability is the likelihood that a population will be able to maintain itself (remain viable) over a long period of time-usually 100 years or more. Though it is true...

  13. Theoretical and experimental studies of two Co(II) and Ni(II) coordination complex with N,O donor 2-chloro-6-{[(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]amino}-4 nitrophenol ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmariya, Brajendra S.; Tiwari, Sandeep; Tiwari, Anjali; Mishra, A. P.; Naikoo, Gowhar Ahmad; Pandit, Umar J.

    2016-07-01

    Here we report two mononuclear Co(II) and Ni(II) complexes of general formula [M(L)2(H2O)].2H2O; {M = CoII & NiII} derived from bidentate 2-chloro-6-{[(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)methylidene]amino}-4 nitrophenol ligand (HL). These compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, spectral (FT-IR, electronic and 1H-NMR), molar conductance, thermal, PXRD, SEM and electrochemical studies. Distorted octahedral geometry was proposed around the metal center with ligand (HL). The PXRD and SEM analysis shows the crystalline nature of complexes. The broadening of diffraction peaks were explained in terms of domain size and the lattice strain according to Scherrer and Williamson-Hall method. TG of the synthesized complexes illustrates their general decomposition pattern and thermal stability. The kinetic and thermodynamic parameters viz. activation energy (E∗), pre-exponential factor (Z), entropy of activation (ΔS∗), enthalpy of activation (ΔH∗) and free energy of activation (ΔG∗) of degradation process were also evaluated using Coats-Redfern (C-R), Piloyan-Novikova (P-N) and Horowitz-Metzger (H-M) methods for both complexes assuming first order degradation. The optical band gap values of complexes were found to be in good agreement with calculated HOMO-LUMO energy gap (ΔE) and lie in semiconducting range. The cyclic voltammetric studies of synthesized compounds were carried out in order to examine their electrochemical behavior. In addition theoretical calculations by means of DFT at B3LYP level were incorporated to support the experimental findings.

  14. Research on the photoelectric measuring method of warhead fragment velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ji; Yu, Lixia; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2016-09-01

    The velocity of warhead fragment is the key criteria to determine its mutilation efficiency. But owing to the small size, larger quantity, irregular shape, high speed, arbitrary direction, large dispersion of warhead fragment and adverse environment, the test of fragment velocity parameter is very difficult. The paper designed an optoelectronic system to measure the average velocity of warhead fragments accurately. The apparatus included two parallel laser screens spaced apart at a known fixed distance for providing time measurement between start and stop signals. The large effective screen area was composed of laser source, retro-reflector and large area photo-diode. Whenever a moving fragment interrupted two optical screens, the system would generate a target signal. Due to partial obscuration of the incident energy and the poor test condition of the explosion, fragment target signal is easily disturbed. Therefore, fragments signal processing technology has become a key technology of the system. The noise of signal was reduced by employing wavelet decomposition and reconstruction. The time of fragment passing though the target was obtained by adopting peak detection algorithm. Based on the method of search peak in different width scale and waveform trend by using optima wavelet, the problem of rolling waveform was solved. Lots of fragments experiments of the different types of the warheads were conducted. Experimental results show that: warhead fragments capture rate of system is better than 98%, which can give velocity of each fragment in the density of less than 20 pieces per m2.

  15. Temperature dependent fission fragment distribution in the Langevin equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kun; MA Yu-Gang; ZHENG Qing-Shan; CAI Xiang-Zhou; FANG De-Qing; FU Yao; LU Guang-Cheng; TIAN Wen-Dong; WANG Hong-Wei

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependent width of the fission fragment distributions was simulated in the Langevin equation by taking two-parameter exponential form of the fission fragment mass variance at scission point for each fission event. The result can reproduce experimental data well, and it permits to make reliable estimate for unmeasured product yields near symmetry fission.

  16. Improved Empirical Parametrization of Fragmentation Cross Sections

    CERN Document Server

    Sümmerer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    A new version is proposed for the universal empirical formula, EPAX, which describes fragmentation cross sections in high-energy heavy-ion reactions. The new version, EPAX 3, can be shown to yield cross sections that are in better agreement with experimental data for the most neutron-rich fragments than the previous version. At the same time, the very good agreement of EPAX 2 with data on the neutron-deficient side has been largely maintained. Comparison with measured cross sections show that the bulk of the data is reproduced within a factor of about 2, for cross sections down to the pico-barn range.

  17. Parton-to-Pion Fragmentation Reloaded

    CERN Document Server

    de Florian, D; Epele, M; Hernandez-Pinto, R J; Stratmann, M

    2014-01-01

    We present a new, comprehensive global analysis of parton-to-pion fragmentation functions at next-to-leading order accuracy in QCD. The obtained results are based on the latest experimental information on single-inclusive pion production in electron-positron annihilation, lepton-nucleon deep-inelastic scattering, and proton-proton collisions. An excellent description of all data sets is achieved, and the remaining uncertainties in parton-to-pion fragmentation functions are estimated based on the Hessian method. Extensive comparisons to the results from our previous global analysis are performed.

  18. Angular Momentum Population in Projectile Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolyák, Zs.; Gladnishki, K. A.; Gerl, J.; Hellström, M.; Kopatch, Y.; Mandal, S.; Górska, M.; Regan, P. H.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Gsi-Isomer Collaboration

    2004-02-01

    Isomeric states in neutron-deficient nuclei around A ≈190 have been identified following the projectile fragmentation of a relativistic energy 238U beam. The deduced isomeric ratios are compared with a model based on the abrasion-ablation description. The experimental isomeric ratios are lower by a factor of ≈2 than the calculated ones assuming the `sharp cutoff' approximation. The observation of the previously reported isomeric Iπ=43/2- state in 215Ra represents the current record for the highest discrete spin state observed following a projectile fragmentation reaction.

  19. Neo-Epitopes—Fragments of Cartilage and Connective Tissue Degradation in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis and Unclassified Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maijer, Karen I; Gudmann, Natasja Stæhr; Karsdal, Morten Asser

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Tissue destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is predominantly mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), thereby generating protein fragments. Previous studies have revealed that these fragments include MMP-mediated collagen type I, II, and III degradation, citrullinated and MMP...

  20. Lesions and distribution of viral antigen following an experimental infection of young seronegative calves with virulent bovine virus diarrhea virus-type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J A; West, K H; Cortese, V S; Myers, S L; Carman, S; Martin, K M; Haines, D M

    1998-07-01

    During the past several years, acute infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) have been causally linked to hemorrhagic and acute mucosal disease-like syndromes with high mortality. The majority of BVDVs isolated in such cases have been classified as type II on the basis of genetic and antigenic characteristics. It was our objective to examine clinical disease, lesions and potential sites of viral replication, following experimental BVDV type II infection in young calves. On approximately day 35 after birth, calves that had received BVDV-antibody-negative colostrum were infected by intranasal inoculation of 5 x 10(5) TCID50 of BVDV type II isolate 24,515 in 5 mL of tissue culture fluid (2.5 mL/nostril). Calves were monitored twice daily for signs of clinical disease. Approximately 48-72 h after infection, all calves developed transient pyrexia (39.4-40.5 degrees C) and leukopenia. Beginning on approximately day 7 after infection, all calves developed watery diarrhea, pyrexia (40.5-41.6 degrees C), marked leukopenia (> or = 75% drop from preinoculation values), variable thrombocytopenia, and moderate to severe depression. Calves were euthanized on days 10, 11, or 12 after infection due to severe disease. Gross and histological lesions consisted of multifocal bronchointerstitial pneumonia (involving 10%-25% of affected lungs), bone marrow hypoplasia and necrosis, and minimal erosive lesions in the alimentary tract. Immunohistochemical staining for BVDV revealed widespread viral antigen usually within epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mononuclear phagocytes in multiple organs, including lung, Peyer's patches, gastric mucosa, thymus, adrenal gland, spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow, and skin. This BVDV type II isolate caused rapidly progressive, severe multisystemic disease in seronegative calves that was associated with widespread distribution of viral antigen and few gross or histological inflammatory lesions.

  1. Syphilis and human experimentation from World War II to the present: a historical perspective and reflections on ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuerda-Galindo, E; Sierra-Valenti, X; González-López, E; López-Muñoz, F

    2014-11-01

    Even after the Nuremberg code was published, research on syphilis often continued to fall far short of ethical standards. We review post-World War II research on this disease, focusing on the work carried out in Guatemala and Tuskegee. Over a thousand adults were deliberately inoculated with infectious material for syphilis, chancroid, and gonorrhea between 1946 and 1948 in Guatemala, and thousands of serologies were performed in individuals belonging to indigenous populations or sheltered in orphanages. The Tuskegee syphilis study, conducted by the US Public Health Service, took place between 1932 and 1972 with the aim of following the natural history of the disease when left untreated. The subjects belonged to a rural black population and the study was not halted when effective treatment for syphilis became available in 1945.

  2. Impact of benznidazole on infection course in mice experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi I, II, and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruendling, Ana Paula; Massago, Miyoko; Teston, Ana Paula M; Monteiro, Wuelton M; Kaneshima, Edilson N; Araújo, Silvana M; Gomes, Mônica L; Barbosa, Maria das Graças V; Toledo, Max Jean O

    2015-06-01

    American trypanosomiasis is an emerging zoonosis in the Brazilian Amazon. Studies on benznidazole (BZ) chemotherapy with Trypanosoma cruzi from this region have great relevance, given the different discrete typing units (DTUs) that infect humans in the Amazon and other regions of Brazil. We performed a parasitological, histopathological, and molecular analysis of mice inoculated with strains of T. cruzi I, II, and IV that were BZ-treated during the acute phase of infection. Groups of Swiss mice were inoculated; 13 received oral BZ, whereas the other 13 comprised the untreated controls. Unlike parasitemia, the infectivity and mortality did not vary among the DTUs. Trypanosoma cruzi DNA was detected in all tissues analyzed and the proportion of organs parasitized varied with the parasite DTU. The BZ treatment reduced the most parasitological parameters, tissue parasitism and the inflammatory processes at all infection stages and for all DTUs. However, the number of significant reductions varied according to the DTU and infection phase.

  3. Fragment size distribution statistics in dynamic fragmentation of laser shock-loaded tin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua He

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the geometric statistics method to characterize the size distribution of tin fragments produced in the laser shock-loaded dynamic fragmentation process. In the shock experiments, the ejection of the tin sample with etched V-shape groove in the free surface are collected by the soft recovery technique. Subsequently, the produced fragments are automatically detected with the fine post-shot analysis techniques including the X-ray micro-tomography and the improved watershed method. To characterize the size distributions of the fragments, a theoretical random geometric statistics model based on Poisson mixtures is derived for dynamic heterogeneous fragmentation problem, which reveals linear combinational exponential distribution. The experimental data related to fragment size distributions of the laser shock-loaded tin sample are examined with the proposed theoretical model, and its fitting performance is compared with that of other state-of-the-art fragment size distribution models. The comparison results prove that our proposed model can provide far more reasonable fitting result for the laser shock-loaded tin.

  4. Matricryptins and matrikines: biologically active fragments of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Salza, Romain

    2014-07-01

    Numerous extracellular proteins and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) undergo limited enzymatic cleavage resulting in the release of fragments exerting biological activities, which are usually different from those of the full-length molecules. In this review, we define matrikines and matricryptins, which are bioactive fragments released from the extracellular matrix proteins, proteoglycans and GAGs and report their major biological activities. These fragments regulate a number of physiopathological processes including angiogenesis, cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, neurodegenerative diseases and wound healing. The challenges to translate these fragments from molecules biologically active in vitro and in experimental models to potential drugs are discussed in the last part of the review.

  5. Fragmentation of methane molecules by antiproton impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehzadeh, Arash; Kirchner, Tom

    2016-09-01

    Extending previous work for proton impact, we have investigated the fragmentation of methane molecules due to collisions with antiprotons in the 25 keV to 5 MeV impact energy range. The multi-center nature of the problem is addressed by using a spectral representation of the molecular Hartree-Fock-level Hamiltonian and a single-center expansion of the initially populated molecular orbitals. The two-center basis generator method (TC-BGM) is used for orbital propagation. Electron-removal cross sections obtained from the TC-BGM solutions are complemented with a dynamical decay-route fragmentation model to calculate cross sections for the production of fragment ions. Good agreement with the available experimental data is observed for CH4+,CH3+,CH2+and CH+. Work supported by NSERC, Canada.

  6. Electroeluting DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzosa-Alvarez, Ana L; Sandoval-Cabrera, Antonio; Torres-Huerta, Ana L; Bermudez-Cruz, Rosa M

    2010-09-05

    Purified DNA fragments are used for different purposes in Molecular Biology and they can be prepared by several procedures. Most of them require a previous electrophoresis of the DNA fragments in order to separate the band of interest. Then, this band is excised out from an agarose or acrylamide gel and purified by using either: binding and elution from glass or silica particles, DEAE-cellulose membranes, "crush and soak method", electroelution or very often expensive commercial purification kits. Thus, selecting a method will depend mostly of what is available in the laboratory. The electroelution procedure allows one to purify very clean DNA to be used in a large number of applications (sequencing, radiolabeling, enzymatic restriction, enzymatic modification, cloning etc). This procedure consists in placing DNA band-containing agarose or acrylamide slices into sample wells of the electroeluter, then applying current will make the DNA fragment to leave the agarose and thus be trapped in a cushion salt to be recovered later by ethanol precipitation.

  7. Construção artesanal de um eletrodo íon seletivo a chumbo(II: uma alternativa para disciplinas experimentais Homemade construction of a lead(II ion selective electrode: an alternative to experimental subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatas Gomes da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This works proposes a homemade construction of a lead(II ISE of solid membrane (Ag2S/PbS to determine Pb2+ ions in potentiometric titrations, using damaged combined glass electrodes. This electrode can be constructed in teaching laboratories, using it as a learning tool related to the theoretical principle of ISE. The analytical curve obtained (y = 27.056x + 337.58; R = 0.996 was linear on the range of 1 x 10-5 to 1 mol L-1 and has presented a very close behavior of the Nernstian. The homemade ISE has presented a similar selectivity to the commercial electrodes, showing to be a good alternative to the experimental activities on teaching laboratories.

  8. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the charge-separation energies of hydrated zinc(II): redefinition of the critical size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Theresa E; Armentrout, P B

    2009-12-10

    In the preceding article, the hydration energies of Zn(2+)(H(2)O)(n) complexes, where n = 6-10, were measured using threshold collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer (GIBMS) coupled with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The present investigation explores the charge-separation processes observed, Zn(2+)(H(2)O)(n) --> ZnOH(+)(H(2)O)(m) + H(+)(H(2)O)(n-m-1), and the competition between this process and the loss of water. Our results demonstrate that charge-separation processes occur at variable complex sizes of n = 6, 7, and 8, prompting a redefinition of the critical size for charge separation. Experimental kinetic energy-dependent cross sections are analyzed to yield 0 K threshold energies for the charge-separation products and the effects of competition with this channel on the energies for losing one and two water ligands after accounting for multiple collisions, kinetic shifts, and energy distributions. A complete reaction coordinate is calculated for the n = 7 complex dissociating into ZnOH(+)(H(2)O)(3) + H(+)(H(2)O)(3). Calculated rate-limiting transition states for n = 6-8 are also compared to experimental threshold measurements for the charge-separation processes.

  9. Non-standard coupled extensional and bending bias tests for planar pantographic lattices. Part II: comparison with experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Emilio; Barcz, Katarzyna; Rizzi, Nicola Luigi

    2016-10-01

    In dell'Isola et al. (Zeitschrift für Angewandte Math und Physik 66(6):3473-3498, 2015, Proc R Soc Lond A Math Phys Eng Sci 472(2185):1-23, 2016) pantographic sheets are proposed as a basic constituent for a novel metamaterial. In Part I, see Turco et al. (Zeitschrift für Angewandte Math und Physik, doi: 10.1007/s00033-016-0713-4, 2016), two different numerical models are applied in order to design an experimental setup aimed to prove the effectiveness of introduced concept. The aim of this paper is to prove that the Hencky-type model introduced for planar pantographic sheets allows for the correct prediction, in a large range of imposed displacements, of the experimental measurements concerning specimens undergoing coupled bending and extensional deformations. The four-parameter numerical model introduced is shown to have a large range of applicability: Indeed without changing the values of the material parameters previously attributed in simple extensional tests to a specific specimen by a best-fit procedure, it is possible to forecast its behavior in all the considered type of imposed deformations. The measurements performed include the determination of reactive forces exerted by used hard devices, and the numerical modeling is able to predict very carefully quantitatively and qualitatively also this complex aspect of phenomenology, where previously attempted models seem to have failed.

  10. Fragmentation and momentum correlations in heavy-ion collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sakshi Gautam; Rajni Kant

    2012-03-01

    The role of momentum correlations in the production of light and medium mass fragments is studied by imposing momentum cut in the clusterization of the phase space. Our detailed investigation shows that momentum cut has a major role to play in the emission of fragments. A comparison with the experimental data is also presented. The calculations showed better agreement with the experimental data when momentum cut is imposed.

  11. A large-scale forest fragmentation experiment: the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Robert M; Didham, Raphael K; Fahrig, Lenore; Ferraz, Gonçalo; Hector, Andy; Holt, Robert D; Kapos, Valerie; Reynolds, Glen; Sinun, Waidi; Snaddon, Jake L; Turner, Edgar C

    2011-11-27

    Opportunities to conduct large-scale field experiments are rare, but provide a unique opportunity to reveal the complex processes that operate within natural ecosystems. Here, we review the design of existing, large-scale forest fragmentation experiments. Based on this review, we develop a design for the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) Project, a new forest fragmentation experiment to be located in the lowland tropical forests of Borneo (Sabah, Malaysia). The SAFE Project represents an advance on existing experiments in that it: (i) allows discrimination of the effects of landscape-level forest cover from patch-level processes; (ii) is designed to facilitate the unification of a wide range of data types on ecological patterns and processes that operate over a wide range of spatial scales; (iii) has greater replication than existing experiments; (iv) incorporates an experimental manipulation of riparian corridors; and (v) embeds the experimentally fragmented landscape within a wider gradient of land-use intensity than do existing projects. The SAFE Project represents an opportunity for ecologists across disciplines to participate in a large initiative designed to generate a broad understanding of the ecological impacts of tropical forest modification.

  12. Data Mining-based Fragmentation of XML Data Warehouses

    CERN Document Server

    Mahboubi, Hadj

    2008-01-01

    With the multiplication of XML data sources, many XML data warehouse models have been proposed to handle data heterogeneity and complexity in a way relational data warehouses fail to achieve. However, XML-native database systems currently suffer from limited performances, both in terms of manageable data volume and response time. Fragmentation helps address both these issues. Derived horizontal fragmentation is typically used in relational data warehouses and can definitely be adapted to the XML context. However, the number of fragments produced by classical algorithms is difficult to control. In this paper, we propose the use of a k-means-based fragmentation approach that allows to master the number of fragments through its $k$ parameter. We experimentally compare its efficiency to classical derived horizontal fragmentation algorithms adapted to XML data warehouses and show its superiority.

  13. Peptide fragmentation induced by radicals at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilkov, Andrey N; Laiko, Victor V; Doroshenko, Vladimir M

    2009-04-01

    A novel ion dissociation technique, which is capable of providing an efficient fragmentation of peptides at essential atmospheric pressure conditions, is developed. The fragmentation patterns observed often contain c-type fragments that are specific to electron capture dissociation/electron transfer dissociation (ECD/ETD), along with the y-/b-type fragments that are specific to collision-activated dissociation (CAD). In the presented experimental setup, ion fragmentation takes place within a flow reactor located in the atmospheric pressure region between the ion source and the mass spectrometer. According to a proposed mechanism, the fragmentation results from the interaction of ESI-generated analyte ions with the gas-phase radical species produced by a corona discharge source.

  14. Correlation measurements of fission-fragment properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oberstedt A.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available For the development of future nuclear fission applications and for a responsible handling of nuclear waste the a-priori assessment of the fission-fragments’ heat production and toxicity is a fundamental necessity. The success of an indispensable modelling of the fission process strongly depends on a good understanding of the particular mechanism of scission, the mass fragmentation and partition of excitation energy. Experimental observables are fission-fragment properties like mass- and energy-distributions, and the prompt neutron as well as γ-ray multiplicities and emission spectra. The latter quantities should preferably be known as a function of fragment mass and excitation energy. Those data are highly demanded as published by the OECD-NEA in its high priority data request list. With the construction of the double (v, E spectrometer VERDI we aim at measuring pre- and post-neutron masses directly and simultaneously to avoid prompt neutron corrections. From the simultaneous measurement of pre- and post-neutron fission-fragment data the prompt neutron multiplicity may then be inferred fully correlated with fragment mass yield and total kinetic energy. Using an ultra-fast fission event trigger spectral prompt fission γ-ray measurements may be performed. For that purpose recently developed lanthanum-halide detectors, with excellent timing characteristics, were coupled to the VERDI spectrometer allowing for a very good discrimination of fission γ-rays and prompt neutrons due to their different time-of-flight.

  15. Effect of systemic administration of nicotine on healing in osseous defects. An experimental study in rabbits. Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balatsouka, Dimitra; Gotfredsen, Klaus; Sørensen, Lars

    2006-01-01

    placed mini-osmotic pumps for 8 weeks. The animals underwent three surgical operations during the experimental period, and body weight was registered weekly. Blood samples were collected to determine cotinine and prostaglandin E(2) levels. Bone preparations were made in the right leg of all rabbits after...... 4 weeks and in the left leg after 6 weeks of nicotine/placebo exposure. Thus, 2- and 4-week healing groups were created for the bone defects. After 8 weeks, the animals were killed. Tissue blocks including the bone defects were prepared for histological analysis. RESULTS: The animals in the test...... group lost weight, while the control group gained weight during the experiment. The prostaglandin E(2) levels in plasma increased significantly following nicotine exposure in the test group. No significant differences in the percentage of vessels and bone density in the osseous defects were found...

  16. Ethyl pyruvate therapy attenuates experimental severe arthritis caused by type II collagen (CII) in the mouse (CIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, R; Mazzon, E; Galuppo, M; Esposito, E; Bramanti, P; Fink, M P; Cuzzocrea, S

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that ethyl pyruvate (EP), a simple aliphatic ester with anti-inflammatory effects, can reduce type II collagen-induced mouse arthritis (CIA). DBA/1J mice were used for the study, developing erosive hind paw arthritis when immunized with CII in an emulsion in complete Freund?s adjuvant (CFA). The incidence of CIA was 100 percent by day 28 in the CII-challenged mice, and the severity of CIA progressed over a 35-day period with radiographic evaluation revealing focal resorption of bone. The histopathology of CIA included erosion of the cartilage at the joint margins. EP-treatment (40 mg/kg/day i.p.) starting at the onset of arthritis (day 25) ameliorated the clinical signs at days 26-35 and improved histological status in the joint and paw. Immunohistochemical analysis for nitrotyrosine, poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) revealed a positive staining in inflamed joints from mice subjected to CIA, while no staining was observed for HO-1 and Nrf-2 in the same group. The degree of staining for nitrotyrosine, PAR, iNOS, was significantly reduced in CII-challenged mice treated with the EP. Immuno-positive-staining for HO-1 and Nrf-2 was observed instead, in joints obtained from the EP-treated group. Plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and the joint tissue levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α and MIP-2 were also significantly reduced by EP treatment. Thirty-five days after immunization, EP-treatment significantly increased plasma levels of IL-10. These data demonstrate that EP treatment exerts an anti-inflammatory effect during chronic inflammation and is able to ameliorate the tissue damage associated with CIA.

  17. Water cluster fragmentation probed by pickup experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuanfu; Kresin, Vitaly V.; Pysanenko, Andriy; Fárník, Michal

    2016-09-01

    Electron ionization is a common tool for the mass spectrometry of atomic and molecular clusters. Any cluster can be ionized efficiently by sufficiently energetic electrons, but concomitant fragmentation can seriously obstruct the goal of size-resolved detection. We present a new general method to assess the original neutral population of the cluster beam. Clusters undergo a sticking collision with a molecule from a crossed beam, and the velocities of neat and doped cluster ion peaks are measured and compared. By making use of longitudinal momentum conservation, one can reconstruct the sizes of the neutral precursors. Here this method is applied to H2O and D2O clusters in the detected ion size range of 3-10. It is found that water clusters do fragment significantly upon electron impact: the deduced neutral precursor size is ˜3-5 times larger than the observed cluster ions. This conclusion agrees with beam size characterization by another experimental technique: photoionization after Na-doping. Abundant post-ionization fragmentation of water clusters must therefore be an important factor in the interpretation of experimental data; interestingly, there is at present no detailed microscopic understanding of the underlying fragmentation dynamics.

  18. Heavy meson fragmentation at LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Gomshi Nobary

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available   Large Hadron Collider (LHC at CERN will provide excellent opportunity to study the production and decay of heavy mesons and baryons with high statistics. We aim at the heavy mesons in this work and calculate their fragmentation functions consistent with this machine and present their total fragmentation probabilities and average fragmentation parameters.

  19. SCALING AND 4-QUARK FRAGMENTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHOLTEN, O; BOSVELD, GD

    1991-01-01

    The conditions for a scaling behaviour from the fragmentation process leading to slow protons are discussed- The scaling referred to implies that the fragmentation functions depend on the light-cone momentum fraction only. It is shown that differences in the fragmentation functions for valence- and

  20. Characterizing the paramagnetic behavior of Cu{sup 2+} doped nickel(II) dipicolinato by using theoretical and experimental EPR and UV–vis studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yıldırım, İlkay [Department of Radiotherapy, Vocational School of Health Services, Biruni University, Topkapı, 34010 Istanbul (Turkey); Çelik, Yunus [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Science, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Atakum, 55139 Samsun (Turkey); Karabulut, Bünyamin, E-mail: bbulut@omu.edu.tr [Department of Computer Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Atakum, 55139 Samsun (Turkey)

    2016-02-15

    In this study, the paramagnetism in bis(hydrogeno pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato) nickel(II) trihydrate, [Ni(Hdpc){sub 2}]·3H{sub 2}O, has been investigated after doping the sample with Cu{sup 2+} ions. The g and hyperfine parameters were obtained by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments performed at ambient temperature. The study shows that Cu{sup 2+} ion defects the structure and exists interstitially in the lattice having a distorted local environment. It also shows the existence of two magnetically inequivalent Cu{sup 2+} sites. Experimental values for both EPR and optical spectrum studies were verified by using the appropriate theoretical approaches.

  1. Experimental radiative lifetimes for highly excited states and calculated oscillator strengths for lines of astrophysical interest in singly ionized cobalt (Co II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinet, P.; Fivet, V.; Palmeri, P.; Engström, L.; Hartman, H.; Lundberg, H.; Nilsson, H.

    2016-11-01

    This work reports new experimental radiative lifetimes and calculated oscillator strengths for transitions of astrophysical interest in singly ionized cobalt. More precisely, 19 radiative lifetimes in Co+ have been measured with the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique using one- and two-step excitations. Out of these, seven belonging to the high lying 3d7(4F)4d configuration in the energy range 90 697-93 738 cm-1 are new, and the other 12 from the 3d7(4F)4p configuration with energies between 45 972 and 49 328 cm-1 are compared with previous measurements. In addition, a relativistic Hartree-Fock model including core-polarization effects has been employed to compute transition rates. Supported by the good agreement between theory and experiment for the lifetimes, new reliable transition probabilities and oscillator strengths have been deduced for 5080 Co II transitions in the spectral range 114-8744 nm.

  2. A Class of Methods for the Analysis of Blade Tip Timing Data from Bladed Assemblies Undergoing Simultaneous Resonances—Part II: Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gallego-Garrido

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Blade tip timing is a technique for the measurement of vibrations in rotating bladed assemblies. In Part I of this work a class of methods for the analysis of blade tip timing data from bladed assemblies undergoing two simultaneous synchronous resonances was developed. The approaches were demonstrated using data from a mathematical simulation of tip timing data. In Part II the methods are validated on an experimental test rig. First, the construction and characteristics of the rig will be discussed. Then, the performance of the analysis techniques when applied to data from the rig will be compared and analysed. It is shown that accurate frequency estimates are obtained by all the methods for both single and double resonances. Furthermore, the recovered frequencies are used to calculate the amplitudes of the blade tip responses. The presence of mistuning in the bladed assembly does not affect the performance of the new techniques.

  3. Structural, vibrational, and electronic properties of an uncoordinated pseudoephedrine derivative and its mononuclear and trinuclear copper(II)-coordinated compounds: A combined theoretical and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Israel; Ávila-Torres, Yenny; Barba-Behrens, Norah; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2014-11-01

    Multicopper oxidases are fundamental in a variety of biological processes in bacteria, fungi and vertebrates. The catalytic center in these enzymes is formed basically by three copper ions, bridged by oxygen bonds. In order to get insights into the reactivity of these complex systems, biomimetic compounds are usually synthesized. Accordingly, in this work, we studied structural, vibrational, and electronic properties of an uncoordinated pseudoephedrine derivative, as well as its corresponding mononuclear and trinuclear copper(II)-coordinated complexes by means of density functional theory. The calculations are compared with experimental results using measurements of the infrared spectra. It is obtained that the molecular configuration of the pseudoephedrine amino-alcohol derivative is stabilized by hydrogen bonding Osbnd H⋯N and by Csbnd H⋯π interactions that are not present in the mononuclear and trinuclear compounds. The coordination compounds show octahedral and square pyramid geometries, respectively, which are slightly distorted by Jahn-Teller effects. The analysis of their theoretical and experimental IR spectra reveals signals related with hydrogen bonding as well as metal-ligand vibrational modes. Regarding the electronic structure, the density of states was calculated in order to analyze the atomic orbital contributions present in these compounds. This analysis would provide useful insights about the optical behavior, for example, in the visible region of the spectrum of the coordinated compounds. At these energies, the optical absorption would be influenced by the orbital interaction of the Cu2+d orbitals with sp ones of the ligand, reflecting a decrease of the HOMO-LUMO gap of the organic ligand due to the presence of the copper(II) ions.

  4. Picking Up (On Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Ellis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the implications for archival and media archaeological research and reenactment artwork relating to a recent arts practice project: reenacttv: 30 lines / 60 seconds. It proposes that archival material is unstable but has traces and fragments that are full of creative potential to re-think and re-examine past media historical events through a media archaeological approach to reenactment. The article contains images and links to videos from the final reenactment artworks as well as from rehearsals in Vienna and Bradford.

  5. An Archeology of Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald L. Bruns

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a short (fragmentary history of fragmentary writing from the German Romantics (F. W. Schlegel, Friedrich Hölderlin to modern and contemporary concrete or visual poetry. Such writing is (often deliberately a critique of the logic of subsumption that tries to assimilate whatever is singular and irreducible into totalities of various categorical or systematic sorts. Arguably, the fragment (parataxis is the distinctive feature of literary Modernism, which is a rejection, not of what precedes it, but of what Max Weber called “the rationalization of the world” (or Modernity whose aim is to keep everything, including all that is written, under surveillance and control.

  6. The effect of radiative feedback on disc fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Anthony; Stamatellos, Dimitris

    2017-02-01

    Protostellar discs may become massive enough to fragment producing secondary low-mass objects: planets, brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We study the effect of radiative feedback from such newly formed secondary objects using radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We compare the results of simulations without any radiative feedback from secondary objects with those where two types of radiative feedback are considered: (i) continuous and (ii) episodic. We find that (i) continuous radiative feedback stabilizes the disc and suppresses further fragmentation, reducing the number of secondary objects formed; (ii) episodic feedback from secondary objects heats and stabilizes the disc when the outburst occurs, but shortly after the outburst stops, the disc becomes unstable and fragments again. However, fewer secondary objects are formed compared to the case without radiative feedback. We also find that the mass growth of secondary objects is mildly suppressed due to the effect of their radiative feedback. However, their mass growth also depends on where they form in the disc and on their subsequent interactions, such that their final masses are not drastically different from the case without radiative feedback. We find that the masses of secondary objects formed by disc fragmentation are from a few MJ to a few 0.1 M⊙. Planets formed by fragmentation tend to be ejected from the disc. We conclude that planetary-mass objects on wide orbits (wide-orbit planets) are unlikely to form by disc fragmentation. Nevertheless, disc fragmentation may be a significant source of free-floating planets and brown dwarfs.

  7. Generic behaviours in impact fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sator, N.; Mechkov, S.; Sausset, F. [Paris-6 Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Lab. de Physique Theorique de la Matiere Condensee, UMR CNRS 7600, 75 - Paris (France); Mechkov, S. [Ecole Normale Superieure, Lab. de Physique Statistique, 75 - Paris (France)

    2008-02-15

    From atomic nuclei to supernovae, including plates and rocks, every cohesive system can be broken into fragments, provided that the deposited energy is sufficiently large compared to its cohesive energy. We present a simple numerical model for investigating the general properties of fragmentation. By use of molecular dynamics simulations, we study the impact fragmentation of a solid disk of interacting particles with a wall. Regardless of the particular form of the interaction potential, the fragment size distribution exhibits a power law behaviour with an exponent that increases logarithmically with the energy deposited in the system, in agreement with experiments. We expect this behaviour to be generic in fragmentation phenomena. (authors)

  8. Fission Fragment characterization with FALSTAFF at NFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pancin J.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Neutrons for Science (NFS facility will be one of the first installations of the SPIRAL2 facility. NFS will be composed of a time-of-flight baseline and irradiation stations and will allow studying neutron-induced reactions for energies going from some hundreds of keV up to 40 MeV. Continuous and quasi-monoenergetic energy neutron beams will be available. Taking advantage of this new installation, the development of an experimental setup for a full characterization of actinide fission fragments in this energy domain has been undertaken. To achieve this goal a new detection system called FALSTAFF (Four Arm cLover for the STudy of Actinide Fission Fragments in under development. In this paper, the characteristics of the NFS facility will be exposed and the motivations for the FALSTAFF experiment will be presented. The experimental setup will be described and the expected resolutions based on realistic GEANT4 simulations will be discussed.

  9. Micromorphological Aspects of Forensic Geopedology II: Ultramicroscopic vs Microscopic Characterization of Phosphatic Impregnations on Soil Particles in Experimental Burials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, S. I. E.; Trombino, L.; Cattaneo, C.

    2012-04-01

    Grows up the importance of the role played by soil scientists in the modern forensic sciences, in particular when buried human remains strongly decomposed or skeletonized are found in different environment situations. Among the different techniques normally used in geopedology, it is usefull to apply in such forensic cases, soil micromorphology (including optical microscopy and ultramicroscopy) that has been underused up today, for various kind of reasons. An interdisciplinary Italian-team, formed by earth scientists and legal medicine, is working on several sets of experimental burial of pigs and piglets in different soil types and for different times of burial, in order to get new evidences on environmental behaviour related to the burial, focalising on geopedological and micropedological aspects. The present work is focused on: - ultramicroscopic (SEM-EDS) characterization of the phosphatic impregnation (by body fluids) on soils sampled under the dead bodies of five couples of pigs, buried respectively for one month, six month, one year, two years and two years and half in two different areas; - microscopic (petrographic microscope) and ultramicroscopic (SEM-EDS) cross characterization of the phosphatic impregnation (by body fluids) on soils sampled under the dead bodies of several piglets, buried for twenty months. The first results show trends of persistency of such phosphatic features, mainly related to the grain size of the impregnated soil particles and weather conditions (or seasons) of exhumation, while apparently time since burial is only marginally effective for the investigated burial period. Further experiments are in progress in order to clarify the pathways of phosphorus precipitation and leaching for longer times of burial and different seasons of exhumation, both from the microscopic and the pedological/chemical point of view.

  10. Filtering Chromatic Aberration for Wide Acceptance Angle Electrostatic Lenses II--Experimental Evaluation and Software-Based Imaging Energy Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazekas, Ádám; Daimon, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Tóth, László

    2016-03-01

    Here, the experimental results of the method of filtering the effect of chromatic aberration for wide acceptance angle electrostatic lens-based system are described. This method can eliminate the effect of chromatic aberration from the images of a measured spectral image sequence by determining and removing the effect of higher and lower kinetic energy electrons on each different energy image, which leads to significant improvement of image and spectral quality. The method is based on the numerical solution of a large system of linear equations and equivalent with a multivariate strongly nonlinear deconvolution method. A matrix whose elements describe the strongly nonlinear chromatic aberration-related transmission function of the lens system acts on the vector of the ordered pixels of the distortion free spectral image sequence, and produces the vector of the ordered pixels of the measured spectral image sequence. Since the method can be applied not only on 2D real- and $k$ -space diffraction images, but also along a third dimension of the image sequence that is along the optical or in the 3D parameter space, the energy axis, it functions as a software-based imaging energy analyzer (SBIEA). It can also be applied in cases of light or other type of optics for different optical aberrations and distortions. In case of electron optics, the SBIEA method makes possible the spectral imaging without the application of any other energy filter. It is notable that this method also eliminates the disturbing background significantly in the present investigated case of reflection electron energy loss spectra. It eliminates the instrumental effects and makes possible to measure the real physical processes better.

  11. Use of a Ni60Ti shape memory alloy for active jet engine chevron application: II. Experimentally validated numerical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, D. J.; Mooney, J. T.; Lagoudas, D. C.; Calkins, F. T.; Mabe, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    A shape memory alloy (SMA) composition of Ni60Ti40 (wt%) was chosen for the fabrication of active beam components used as cyclic actuators and incorporated into morphing aerospace structures. The active structure is a variable-geometry chevron (VGC) designed to reduce jet engine noise in the take-off flight regime while maintaining efficiency in the cruise regime. This two-part work addresses the training, characterization and derived material properties of the new nickel-rich NiTi composition, the assessment of the actuation properties of the active beam actuator and the accurate analysis of the VGC and its subcomponents using a model calibrated from the material characterization. The second part of this two-part work focuses on the numerical modeling of the jet engine chevron application, where the end goal is the accurate prediction of the VGC actuation response. A three-dimensional (3D) thermomechanical constitutive model is used for the analysis and is calibrated using the axial testing results from part I. To best capture the material response, features of several SMA constitutive models proposed in the literature are combined to form a new model that accounts for two material behaviors not previously addressed simultaneously. These are the variation in the generated maximum actuation strain with applied stress level and a smooth strain-temperature constitutive response at the beginning and end of transformation. The accuracy of the modeling effort is assessed by comparing the analysis deflection predictions for a given loading path imposed on the VGC or its subcomponents to independently obtained experimental results consisting of photogrammetric data. For the case of full actuation of the assembled VGC, the average error in predicted centerline deflection is less than 6%.

  12. Simulation of natural fragmentation of rings cut from warheads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Moxnes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural fragmentation of warheads that detonates causes the casing of the warhead to split into various sized fragments through shear or radial fractures depending on the toughness, density, and grain size of the material. The best known formula for the prediction of the size distribution is the Mott formulae, which is further examined by Grady and Kipp by investigating more carefully the statistical most random way of portioning a given area into a number of entities. We examine the fragmentation behavior of radially expanding steel rings cut from a 25 mm warhead by using an in house smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH simulation code called REGULUS. Experimental results were compared with numerical results applying varying particle size and stochastic fracture strain. The numerically obtained number of fragments was consistent with experimental results. Increasing expansion velocity of the rings increases the number of fragments. Statistical variation of the material parameters influences the fragment characteristics, especially for low expansion velocities. A least square regression fit to the cumulative number of fragments by applying a generalized Mott distribution shows that the shape parameter is around 4 for the rings, which is in contrast to the Mott distribution with a shape parameter of ½. For initially polar distributed particles, we see signs of a bimodal cumulative fragment distribution. Adding statistical variation in material parameters of the fracture model causes the velocity numerical solutions to become less sensitive to changes in resolution for Cartesian distributed particles.

  13. Ab initio structural modeling of and experimental validation for Chlamydia trachomatis protein CT296 reveal structural similarity to Fe(II) 2-oxoglutarate-dependent enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemege, Kyle E.; Hickey, John M.; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P.; Zhang, Yang; Hefty, P. Scott (Michigan); (Kansas); (HWMRI)

    2012-02-13

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a medically important pathogen that encodes a relatively high percentage of proteins with unknown function. The three-dimensional structure of a protein can be very informative regarding the protein's functional characteristics; however, determining protein structures experimentally can be very challenging. Computational methods that model protein structures with sufficient accuracy to facilitate functional studies have had notable successes. To evaluate the accuracy and potential impact of computational protein structure modeling of hypothetical proteins encoded by Chlamydia, a successful computational method termed I-TASSER was utilized to model the three-dimensional structure of a hypothetical protein encoded by open reading frame (ORF) CT296. CT296 has been reported to exhibit functional properties of a divalent cation transcription repressor (DcrA), with similarity to the Escherichia coli iron-responsive transcriptional repressor, Fur. Unexpectedly, the I-TASSER model of CT296 exhibited no structural similarity to any DNA-interacting proteins or motifs. To validate the I-TASSER-generated model, the structure of CT296 was solved experimentally using X-ray crystallography. Impressively, the ab initio I-TASSER-generated model closely matched (2.72-{angstrom} C{alpha} root mean square deviation [RMSD]) the high-resolution (1.8-{angstrom}) crystal structure of CT296. Modeled and experimentally determined structures of CT296 share structural characteristics of non-heme Fe(II) 2-oxoglutarate-dependent enzymes, although key enzymatic residues are not conserved, suggesting a unique biochemical process is likely associated with CT296 function. Additionally, functional analyses did not support prior reports that CT296 has properties shared with divalent cation repressors such as Fur.

  14. Stone fragmentation by ultrasound

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Shrivastava; Kailash

    2004-08-01

    The presence of kidney stone in the kidney causes discomfort to patients. Hence, removal of such stones is important which is commonly done these days, non-destructively, with lithotripters without surgery. Commercially, lithotripters like extra-corporeal shock wave lithotripters (ESWL) made by Siemens etc are in routine use. These methods are very cumbersome and expensive. Treatment of the patients also takes comparatively more time because of more number of sittings. Some delicate nerves and fibres in the surrounding areas of the stones present in the kidney are also damaged by high ultrasonic intensity used in such systems. In the present work, enhancement of the kidney stone fragmentation by using ultrasound is studied. The cavitation bubbles are found to implode faster, with more disintegration efficiency of the lithotripters, which give better treatment to the patients.

  15. A decadal view of magma fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.

    2010-12-01

    Although the past decade has seen fundamental advances in studies of explosive volcanism, the disruption to air traffic caused by the 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, highlights the need for improved understanding of magmatic fragmentation in general, and of fine ash generation in particular. To develop a theoretical basis for predicting the fine ash content of eruptive plumes, we need to understand not only fragmentation mechanisms but also the dependence of those mechanisms on conditions of magma ascent and degassing. Experimental and analytical approaches to this problem include experimental studies of vesiculation and permeability development in silicic melts, quantitative textural studies of pyroclasts to constrain conditions that reduce fragmentation efficiency (that is, allow vesicular clasts to be preserved), direct experiments on fragmentation in both natural and analog materials, and determination of total grain size distributions (TGSDs) of pyroclastic deposits. Experiments on silicic melts have demonstrated that very high supersaturations (overpressures ΔP) may be achieved in silicic melts prior to homogeneous bubble nucleation, and that the high bubble number densities of silicic pumice require not only homogeneous nucleation but also nucleation of a mixed H2O-CO2 gas phase. In most pumice and scoria clasts, resulting vesicle populations form power law size distributions; power law exponents >3 in silicic tephras indicate that small vesicles comprise most of the vesicle volume (consistent with rapid late-stage vesiculation at high ΔP), while exponents 60-70%) and show no dependence on either melt composition or mass eruption rate; this suggests that melt porosity is more important than either decompression rate or magma rheology for clast preservation. These pyroclasts also have uniformly high permeabilities, high pore connectivity, and simple porous pathways, all of which suggest that ease of gas escape also contributed to clast

  16. Pit Fragment Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility contains two large (20 foot high by 20 foot diameter) double walled steel tubs in which experimental munitions are exploded while covered with sawdust....

  17. Modelling of the PELE fragmentation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreault, J.

    2014-05-01

    The Penetrator with Enhanced Lateral Effect (PELE) is a type of explosive-free projectile that undergoes radial fragmentation upon an impact with a target plate. This type of projectile is composed of a brittle cylindrical shell (the jacket) filled in its core with a material characterized with a large Poisson's ratio. Upon an impact with a target, the axial compression causes the filling to expand in the radial direction. However, due to the brittleness of the jacket material, very little radial deformation can occur which creates a radial stress between the two materials and a hoop stress in the jacket. Fragmentation of the jacket occurs if the hoop stress exceeds the material's ultimate stress. The PELE fragmentation dynamics is explored via Finite-Element Method (FEM) simulations using the Autodyn explicit dynamics hydrocode. The numerical results are compared with an analytical model based on wave interactions, as well as with the experimental investigation of Paulus and Schirm (1996). The comparison is based on the mechanical stress in the filling and the qualitative fragmentation of the jacket.

  18. CONTROL OF FRAGMENTATION BY BLASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Božić

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The degree of fragmentation influences the economy of the excavation operations. Characteristics of blasted rock such as fragment size, volume and mass are fundamental variables effecting the economics of a mining operation and are in effect the basis for evaluating the quality of a blast. The properties of fragmentation, such as size and shape, are very important information for the optimization of production. Three factors control the fragment size distribution: the rock structure, the quantity of explosive and its distribution within the rock mass. Over the last decade there have been considerable advances in our ability to measure and analyze blasting performance. These can now be combined with the continuing growth in computing power to develop a more effective description of rock fragmentation for use by future blasting practitioners. The paper describes a view of the fragmentation problem by blasting and the need for a new generation of engineering tools to guide the design and implementation of blasting operations.

  19. Nuclear fragmentation measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Napoli, M. [INFN - Sezione di Catania (Italy); Agodi, C.; Blancato, A. A.; Cavallaro, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Sardina, D.; Scuderi, V. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy); Battistoni, G. [INFN - Sezione di Milano (Italy); Bondi, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Nicolosi, D.; Raciti, G.; Tropea, S. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Catania (Italy); Giacoppo, F. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo (Norway); Morone, M. C. [Dipartimento di Biopatologia e Diagnostica per Immagini, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Pandola, L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy); Rapisarda, E. [Nuclear and Radiation Physics Section, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Celestijnenlaan Heverlee (Belgium); Romano, F. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (Italy) and Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche E. Fermi Roma (Italy); and others

    2013-04-19

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary in hadrontherapy and space radiation protection, to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections has been measured and in particular, to our knowledge, no double differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in literature. We have measured the double differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the {sup 12}C fragmentation at 62 AMeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been also used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before.

  20. Limestone fragmentation and attrition during fluidized bed oxyfiring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrizio Scala; Piero Salatino [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - CNR, Napoli (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Attrition/fragmentation of limestone under simulated fluidized bed oxyfiring conditions was investigated by means of an experimental protocol that had been previously developed for characterization of attrition/fragmentation of sorbents in air-blown atmospheric fluidized bed combustors. The protocol was based on the use of different and mutually complementary techniques. The extent and pattern of attrition by surface wear in the dense phase of a fluidized bed were assessed in experiments carried out with a bench scale fluidized bed combustor under simulated oxyfiring conditions. Sorbent samples generated during simulated oxyfiring tests were further characterized from the standpoint of fragmentation upon high velocity impact by means of a purposely designed particle impactor. Results showed that under calcination-hindered conditions attrition and fragmentation patterns are much different from those occurring under air-blown atmospheric combustion conditions. Noteworthy, attrition/fragmentation enhanced particle sulfation by continuously regenerating the exposed particle surface. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  1. Quantification of projection angle in fragment generator warhead

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.D.DHOTE; K.P.S.MURTHY; K.M.RAJAN; M.M.SUCHEENDRAN

    2014-01-01

    Tactical Ballistic Missile (TBM) class target neutralization by the fragment spray of a Fragment Generator Warhead (FGW) calls for quantification of fragment projection angle scatter to finalize the end game engagement logic. For conventional axi-symmetric warhead, dispersion is assumed to be normal with a standard deviation of 30. However, such information is not available in case of FGW. Hence, a set of experiments are conducted to determine the dispersion of fragments. The experiments are conducted with a specific configuration of FGW in an identical arena to quantify the scatter and then verified its applicability to other configurations having a range of L/D and C/M ratios, and contoured fragmenting discs. From the experimental study, it is concluded that the scatter in projection angle follows normal distribution with a standard deviation of 0.75? at Chi-square significance level of 0.01(c20.99).

  2. Quantification of projection angle in fragment generator warhead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.D. Dhote

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tactical Ballistic Missile (TBM class target neutralization by the fragment spray of a Fragment Generator Warhead (FGW calls for quantification of fragment projection angle scatter to finalize the end game engagement logic. For conventional axi-symmetric warhead, dispersion is assumed to be normal with a standard deviation of 30. However, such information is not available in case of FGW. Hence, a set of experiments are conducted to determine the dispersion of fragments. The experiments are conducted with a specific configuration of FGW in an identical arena to quantify the scatter and then verified its applicability to other configurations having a range of L/D and C/M ratios, and contoured fragmenting discs. From the experimental study, it is concluded that the scatter in projection angle follows normal distribution with a standard deviation of 0.75° at Chi-square significance level of 0.01(χ20.99.

  3. Nuclear fragmentation measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Napoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Battistoni, G.; Blancato, A. A.; Bondı, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Giacoppo, F.; Morone, M. C.; Nicolosi, D.; Pandola, L.; Raciti, G.; Rapisarda, E.; Romano, F.; Sardina, D.; Scuderi, V.; Sfienti, C.; Tropea, S.

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear fragmentation measurements are necessary in hadrontherapy and space radiation protection, to predict the effects of the ion nuclear interactions within the human body. Nowadays, a very limited set of carbon fragmentation cross sections has been measured and in particular, to our knowledge, no double differential fragmentation cross sections at intermediate energies are available in literature. We have measured the double differential cross sections and the angular distributions of the secondary fragments produced in the 12C fragmentation at 62 AMeV on a thin carbon target. The experimental data have been also used to benchmark the prediction capability of the Geant4 Monte Carlo code at intermediate energies, where it was never tested before.

  4. Fragmentation of a viscoelastic food by human mastication

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Naoki; Shiozawa, Kouichi

    2010-01-01

    Fragment-size distributions have been studied experimentally in masticated viscoelastic food (fish sausage).The mastication experiment in seven subjects was examined. We classified the obtained results into two groups, namely, a single lognormal distribution group and a lognormal distribution with exponential tail group. The facts suggest that the individual variability might affect the fragmentation pattern when the food sample has a much more complicated physical property. In particular, the latter result (lognormal distribution with exponential tail) indicates that the fragmentation pattern by human mastication for fish sausage is different from the fragmentation pattern for raw carrot shown in our previous study. The excellent data fitting by the lognormal distribution with exponential tail implies that the fragmentation process has a size-segregation-structure between large and small parts.In order to explain this structure, we propose a mastication model for fish sausage based on stochastic processes.

  5. Determination of the Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) of Photocatalytic Oxidation (PCO) Purifiers for Indoor Air Pollutants Using a Closed-Loop Reactor. Part II: Experimental Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héquet, Valérie; Batault, Frédéric; Raillard, Cécile; Thévenet, Frédéric; Le Coq, Laurence; Dumont, Éric

    2017-03-06

    The performances of a laboratory PhotoCatalytic Oxidation (PCO) device were determined using a recirculation closed-loop pilot reactor. The closed-loop system was modeled by associating equations related to two ideal reactors: a perfectly mixed reservoir with a volume of VR = 0.42 m³ and a plug flow system corresponding to the PCO device with a volume of VP = 5.6 × 10(-3) m³. The PCO device was composed of a pleated photocatalytic filter (1100 cm²) and two 18-W UVA fluorescent tubes. The Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) of the apparatus was measured under different operating conditions. The influence of three operating parameters was investigated: (i) light irradiance I from 0.10 to 2.0 mW·cm(-2); (ii) air velocity v from 0.2 to 1.9 m·s(-1); and (iii) initial toluene concentration C₀ (200, 600, 1000 and 4700 ppbv). The results showed that the conditions needed to apply a first-order decay model to the experimental data (described in Part I) were fulfilled. The CADR values, ranging from 0.35 to 3.95 m³·h(-1), were mainly dependent on the light irradiance intensity. A square root influence of the light irradiance was observed. Although the CADR of the PCO device inserted in the closed-loop reactor did not theoretically depend on the flow rate (see Part I), the experimental results did not enable the confirmation of this prediction. The initial concentration was also a parameter influencing the CADR, as well as the toluene degradation rate. The maximum degradation rate rmax ranged from 342 to 4894 ppbv/h. Finally, this study evidenced that a recirculation closed-loop pilot could be used to develop a reliable standard test method to assess the effectiveness of PCO devices.

  6. A theoretical and experimental investigation of the spectroscopic properties of a DNA-intercalator salphen-type Zn(II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancardi, Alessandro; Burgalassi, Azzurra; Terenzi, Alessio; Spinello, Angelo; Barone, Giampaolo; Biver, Tarita; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2014-06-10

    The photophysical and DNA-binding properties of the cationic zinc(II) complex of 5-triethylammonium methyl salicylidene ortho-phenylenediiminato (ZnL(2+)) were investigated by a combination of experimental and theoretical methods. DFT calculations were performed on both the ground and the first excited states of ZnL(2+) and on its possible mono- and dioxidation products, both in vacuo and in selected solvents mimicked by the polarizable continuum model. Comparison of the calculated absorption and fluorescence transitions with the corresponding experimental data led to the conclusion that visible light induces a two-electron photooxidation process located on the phenylenediiminato ligand. Kinetic measurements, performed by monitoring absorbance changes over time in several solvents, are in agreement with a slow unimolecular photooxidation process, which is faster in water and slower in less polar solvents. Moreover, structural details of ZnL-DNA binding were obtained by DFT calculations on the intercalation complexes between ZnL and the d(ApT)2 and d(GpC)2 dinucleoside monophosphate duplexes. Two main complementary binding interactions are proposed: 1) intercalation of the central phenyl ring of the ligand between the stacked DNA base pairs; 2) external electrostatic attraction between the negatively charged phosphate groups and the two cationic triethylammonium groups of the Schiff-base ligand. Such suggestions are supported by fluorescence titrations performed on the ZnL/DNA system at different ionic strengths and temperatures. In particular, the values of the DNA-binding constants obtained at different temperatures provided the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the binding and confirmed that two competitive mechanisms, namely, intercalation and external interaction, are involved. The two mechanisms are coexistent at room temperature under physiological conditions.

  7. Ultrasonic assisted dispersive solid-phase microextraction of Eriochrome Cyanine R from water sample on ultrasonically synthesized lead (II) dioxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon: Experimental design methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Sonia; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Mansoorkhani, Mohammad Javad Khoshnood; Asfaram, Arash; Bazrafshan, Ali Akbar; Purkait, Mihir Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The present research focus on designing an appropriate dispersive solid-phase microextraction (UA-DSPME) for preconcentration and determination of Eriochrome Cyanine R (ECR) in aqueous solutions with aid of sonication using lead (II) dioxide nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon (PbO-NPs-AC). This material was fully identified with XRD and SEM. Influence of pH, amounts of sorbent, type and volume of eluent, and sonication time on response properties were investigated and optimized by central composite design (CCD) combined with surface response methodology using STATISTICA. Among different solvents, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was selected as an efficient eluent, which its combination by present nanoparticles and application of ultrasound waves led to enhancement in mass transfer. The predicted maximum extraction (100%) under the optimum conditions of the process variables viz. pH 4.5, eluent 200μL, adsorbent dosage 2.5mg and 5min sonication was close to the experimental value (99.50%). at optimum conditions some experimental features like wide 5-2000ngmL(-1) ECR, low detection limit (0.43ngmL(-1), S/N=3:1) and good repeatability and reproducibility (relative standard deviation, <5.5%, n=12) indicate versatility in successful applicability of present method for real sample analysis. Investigation of accuracy by spiking known concentration of ECR over 200-600ngmL(-1) gave mean recoveries from 94.850% to 101.42% under optimal conditions. The procedure was also applied for the pre-concentration and subsequent determination of ECR in tap and waste waters.

  8. Detection of fission fragments by secondary emission; Detection des fragments de fission par emission secondaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audias, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    This fission fragment detecting apparatus is based on the principle that fragments traversing a thin foil will cause emission of secondary electrons. These electrons are then accelerated (10 kV) and directly detected by means of a plastic scintillator and associated photomultiplier. Some of the advantages of such a detector are, its rapidity, its discriminating power between alpha particles and fission fragments, its small energy loss in detecting the fragments and the relatively great amount of fissionable material which it can contain. This paper is subdivided as follows: a) theoretical considerations b) constructional details of apparatus and some experimental details and c) a study of the secondary emission effect itself. (author) [French] Le detecteur de fragments de fission que nous avons realise est base sur le principe de l'emission secondaire produite par les fragments de fission traversant une feuille mince: les electrons secondaires emis sont acceleres a des tensions telles (de l'ordre de 10 kV), qu'ils soient directement detectables par un scintillateur plastique associe a un photomultiplicateur. L'interet d'un tel detecteur reside: dans sa rapidite, sa tres bonne discrimination alpha, fission, la possibilite de detecter les fragments de fission avec une perte d'energie pouvant rester relativement faible, et la possibilite d'introduire des quantites de matiere fissile plus importantes que dans les autres types de detecteurs. Ce travail comporte: -) un apercu bibliographique de la theorie du phenomene, -) realisation et mise au point du detecteur avec etude experimentale de quelques parametres intervenant dans l'emission secondaire, -) etude de l'emission secondaire (sur la face d'emergence des fragments de fission) en fonction de l'energie du fragment et en fonction de l'epaisseur de matiere traversee avant emission secondaire, et -) une etude comparative de l'emission secondaire sur la

  9. Carbon Fragmentation Cross Sections for Hadrontherapy and Space Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Napoli, M.; Agodi, C.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Nicolosi, D.; Pandola, L.; Raciti, G.; Romano, F.; Sardina, D.; Scuderi, V.; Tropea, S.; Bondì, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.

    2014-05-01

    Fragmentation reactions represent a serious complication in hadrontherapy and space radiation protection. In order to predict their effects, both reliable Monte Carlo codes and experimental data are needed. The shortage of precise measurements, especially of double differential cross sections, has triggered many dedicated experiments at relativistic energies. Aiming to explore the Fermi energy regime, as well, where different reaction mechanisms are involved, we measured the 12C fragmentation at 62 AMeV on a 12C and a 197Au target. A high granularity Si-CsI hodoscope allowed to identify the charge and the mass of detected fragments and measure their energy and emission angle. In this work we report the double differential cross sections for the production of different fragments as a function of the emission angle. Experimental results are compared with the GEANT-4 Monte Carlo predictions performed using two reaction models, the Quantum Molecular Dynamic and the Binary Light Ion Cascade.

  10. Thermodynamical string fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nadine; Sjöstrand, Torbjörn

    2017-01-01

    The observation of heavy-ion-like behaviour in pp collisions at the LHC suggests that more physics mechanisms are at play than traditionally assumed. The introduction e.g. of quark-gluon plasma or colour rope formation can describe several of the observations, but as of yet there is no established paradigm. In this article we study a few possible modifications to the Pythia event generator, which describes a wealth of data but fails for a number of recent observations. Firstly, we present a new model for generating the transverse momentum of hadrons during the string fragmentation process, inspired by thermodynamics, where heavier hadrons naturally are suppressed in rate but obtain a higher average transverse momentum. Secondly, close-packing of strings is taken into account by making the temperature or string tension environment-dependent. Thirdly, a simple model for hadron rescattering is added. The effect of these modifications is studied, individually and taken together, and compared with data mainly from the LHC. While some improvements can be noted, it turns out to be nontrivial to obtain effects as big as required, and further work is called for.

  11. Thermodynamical String Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    The observation of heavy-ion-like behaviour in pp collisions at the LHC suggests that more physics mechanisms are at play than traditionally assumed. The introduction e.g. of quark-gluon plasma or colour rope formation can describe several of the observations, but as of yet there is no established paradigm. In this article we study a few possible modifications to the Pythia event generator, which describes a wealth of data but fails for a number of recent observations. Firstly, we present a new model for generating the transverse momentum of hadrons during the string fragmentation process, inspired by thermodynamics, where heavier hadrons naturally are suppressed in rate but obtain a higher average transverse momentum. Secondly, close-packing of strings is taken into account by making the temperature or string tension environment-dependent. Thirdly, a simple model for hadron rescattering is added. The effect of these modifications is studied, individually and taken together, and compared with data mainly from...

  12. Fragmentation Considered Poisonous

    CERN Document Server

    Herzberg, Amir

    2012-01-01

    We present practical poisoning and name-server block- ing attacks on standard DNS resolvers, by off-path, spoofing adversaries. Our attacks exploit large DNS responses that cause IP fragmentation; such long re- sponses are increasingly common, mainly due to the use of DNSSEC. In common scenarios, where DNSSEC is partially or incorrectly deployed, our poisoning attacks allow 'com- plete' domain hijacking. When DNSSEC is fully de- ployed, attacker can force use of fake name server; we show exploits of this allowing off-path traffic analy- sis and covert channel. When using NSEC3 opt-out, attacker can also create fake subdomains, circumvent- ing same origin restrictions. Our attacks circumvent resolver-side defenses, e.g., port randomisation, IP ran- domisation and query randomisation. The (new) name server (NS) blocking attacks force re- solver to use specific name server. This attack allows Degradation of Service, traffic-analysis and covert chan- nel, and also facilitates DNS poisoning. We validated the attac...

  13. The effect of radiative feedback on disc fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Mercer, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Protostellar discs may become massive enough to fragment producing secondary low-mass objects: planets, brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We study the effect of radiative feedback from such newly-formed secondary objects using radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We compare the results of simulations without any radiative feedback from secondary objects with those where two types of radiative feedback are considered: (i) continuous, and (ii) episodic. We find that: (i) continuous radiative feedback stabilizes the disc and suppresses further fragmentation, reducing the number secondary objects formed; (ii) episodic feedback from secondary objects heats and stabilises the disc when the outburst occurs, but shortly after the outburst stops, the disc becomes unstable and fragments again. However, fewer secondary objects are formed compared to the the case without radiative feedback. We also find that the mass growth of secondary objects is mildly suppressed due to the effect of their radiative feedback. However, th...

  14. Experimental radiative lifetimes for highly excited states and calculated oscillator strengths for lines of astrophysical interest in singly ionized cobalt (Co II)

    CERN Document Server

    Quinet, P; Palmeri, P; Engstrom, L; Hartman, H; Lundberg, H; Nilsson, H

    2016-01-01

    This work reports new experimental radiative lifetimes and calculated oscillator strengths for transitions of astrophysical interest in singly ionized cobalt. More pre- cisely, nineteen radiative lifetimes in Co+ have been measured with the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique using one- and two-step excitations. Out of these, seven belonging to the high lying 3d$^7$($^4$F)4d configuration in the energy range 90697 - 93738 cm$^{-1}$ are new, and the other twelve from th3d$^7$($^4$F)F)4p configuration with energies between 45972 and 49328 cm$^{-1}$1 are compared with previous measurements. In addition, a relativistic Hartree-Fock model including core-polarization e?ects has been employed to compute transition rates. Supported by the good agreement between theory and experiment for the lifetimes, new reliable transition probabilities and os- cillator strengths have been deduced for 5080 Co II transitions in the spectral range 114 - 8744 nm.

  15. Experimental generation of 8.4 dB entangled state with an optical cavity involving a wedged type-II nonlinear crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yaoyao; Jia, Xiaojun; Li, Fang; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2015-02-23

    Entangled state of light is one of the essential quantum resources in quantum information science and technology. Especially, when the fundamental principle experiments have been achieved in labs and the applications of continuous variable quantum information in the real world are considered, it is crucial to design and construct the generation devices of entangled states with high entanglement and compact configuration. We have designed and built an efficient and compact light source of entangled state, which is a non-degenerate optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) with the triple resonance of the pump and two subharmonic modes. A wedged type-II KTP crystal inside the NOPA is used for implementing frequency-down-conversion of the pump field to generate the optical entangled state and achieving the dispersion compensation between the pump and the subharmonic waves. The EPR entangled state of light with quantum correlations of 8.4 dB for both amplitude and phase quadratures are experimentally produced by a single NOPA under the pump power of 75 mW.

  16. On determination of the degree of dissociation of hydrogen in non-equilibrium plasmas by means of emission spectroscopy: II. Experimental verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, B P [Faculty of Physics, St.-Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, 198504 (Russian Federation); Lang, N [INP Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19 (Germany); Pipa, A V [INP Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19 (Germany); Roepcke, J [INP Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald, Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Str. 19 (Germany)

    2006-02-15

    The method of spectroscopic determination of the degree of dissociation of hydrogen in non-equilibrium plasma, proposed in our previous paper, was verified under various plasma conditions. Three different gas discharges have been used, namely: (i) a DC-arc discharge (ii) an RF discharge, f = 200 kHz and (iii) an MW discharge, f = 2.45 GHz, under pressure p = 0.3-8 mbar. Relative intensities of atomic and molecular spectroscopic lines, the H{sub {alpha}} and H{sub {beta}} line and the (2-2)Q1 line of the Fulcher-{alpha} system, and the gas temperature were measured in a wide range of discharge conditions and used for the determination of the degree of dissociation of hydrogen. It is shown that the method leads to plausible results in the whole range of discharge conditions studied in this paper. In particular, for the first time an influence of the redistribution of the population density of excited hydrogen atoms among fine structure sublevels on values of the degree of dissociation of hydrogen obtained by the method was investigated experimentally. It is also shown, that the influence is rather significant. The assumption of Boltzmann populations of the sublevels is more appropriate than neglecting the redistribution after electron impact excitation for p > 1 mbar.

  17. The Impact of Dark and Visible Fragmentation on Market Quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degryse, H.A.; de Jong, F.C.J.M.; van Kervel, V.L.

    2011-01-01

    Two important characteristics of current European equity markets are rooted in changes in financial regulation (the Markets in Financial Instruments Directive). The regulation (i) allows new trading venues to emerge, generating a fragmented market place and (ii) allows for a substantial fraction of

  18. Bimodal pattern in the fragmentation of Au quasi-projectiles

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, M; D'Agostino, M; Gramegna, F; Gulminelli, F; Vannini, G

    2006-01-01

    Signals of bimodality have been investigated in experimental data of quasi-projectile decay produced in Au+Au collisions at 35 AMeV. This same data set was already shown to present several signals characteristic of a first order, liquid-gas-like phase transition. For the present analysis, events are sorted in bins of transverse energy of light charged particles emitted by the quasi-target source. A sudden change in the fragmentation pattern is observed from the distributions of the asymmetry of the two largest fragments, and the charge of the largest fragment. This latter distribution shows a bimodal behavior. The interpretation of this signal is discussed.

  19. Biomechanical evaluation of fixation degree of fragments by periosteal osteosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barabash Yu.A.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Expansion of indications for surgery and plate osteosynthesis of long bones points to increased number of complications caused by instability of fragments, that can be associated in their turn with constructive features or iatrogenic factors. Insufficient rigidity of fragment fixation is due to incorrect technical treatment and wrong choice of fixator. Biomechanical parameters of periosteal fixation rigidity have been experimentally proved, depending on fixator lever

  20. Fragmentation pathwaysfor selected electronic states of theacetylene dication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipov, Timur; Rescigno, Thomas N.; Weber, Thorsten; Miyabe,Shungo; Jahnke, T.; Alnaser, A.; Hertlein, Markus P.; Jagutzki, O.; Schmidt, L.Ph.H.; Schoffler, M.; Foucar, L.; Schossler, S.; Havermeier,T.; Odenweller,M.; Voss, S.; Feinberg, Ben; Landers, Alan; Prior, MichaelH.; Dorner, Reinhart; Cocke, C.L.; Belkacem, Ali

    2007-12-18

    Coincident measurement of the Auger electron and fragmention momenta emitted after carbon core-level photoionization of acetylenehas yielded new understanding of how the dication fragments. Ab initiocalculations and experimental data, including body-frame Auger angulardistributions, are used to identify the parent electronic states andtogether yield a comprehensive map of the dissociation pathways whichinclude surface crossings and barriers to direct dissociation. The Augerangular distributions show evidence of core-holelocalization.

  1. HCH for Checking Containment of XPath Fragment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Hua Feng; Yu-Guo Liao; Yong Zhang

    2007-01-01

    XPath is ubiquitous in XML applications for navigating XML trees and selecting a set of element nodes. In XPath query processing, one of the most important issues is how to efficiently check containment relationship between two XPath expressions. To get out of the intricacy and complexity caused by numerous XPath features, we investigate this issue on a frequently used fragment of XPath expressions that consists of node tests, the child axis (/), the descendant axis (//), branches ([]) and label wildcards (*). Prior work has shown that homomorphism technology can be used for containment checking. However, homomorphism is the sufficient but not necessary condition for containment. For special classes of this fragment, the homomorphism algorithm returns false negatives. To address this problem, this paper proposes two containment techniques, conditioned homomorphism and hidden conditioned homomorphism, and then presents sound algorithms for checking containment. Experimental results confirm the practicability and efficiency of the proposed algorithms.

  2. DebriSat Fragment Characterization System and Processing Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, M.; Shiotani, B.; M. Carrasquilla; Fitz-Coy, N.; Liou, J. C.; Sorge, M.; Huynh, T.; Opiela, J.; Krisko, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2016-01-01

    The DebriSat project is a continuing effort sponsored by NASA and DoD to update existing break-up models using data obtained from hypervelocity impact tests performed to simulate on-orbit collisions. After the impact tests, a team at the University of Florida has been working to characterize the fragments in terms of their mass, size, shape, color and material content. The focus of the post-impact effort has been the collection of 2 mm and larger fragments resulting from the hypervelocity impact test. To date, in excess of 125K fragments have been recovered which is approximately 40K more than the 85K fragments predicted by the existing models. While the fragment collection activities continue, there has been a transition to the characterization of the recovered fragments. Since the start of the characterization effort, the focus has been on the use of automation to (i) expedite the fragment characterization process and (ii) minimize the effects of human subjectivity on the results; e.g., automated data entry processes were developed and implemented to minimize errors during transcription of the measurement data. At all steps of the process, however, there is human oversight to ensure the integrity of the data. Additionally, repeatability and reproducibility tests have been developed and implemented to ensure that the instrumentations used in the characterization process are accurate and properly calibrated.

  3. An Algebra for Program Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Bent Bruun; Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Møller-Pedersen, Birger

    1985-01-01

    Program fragments are described either by strings in the concrete syntax or by constructor applications in the abstract syntax. By defining conversions between these forms, both may be intermixed. Program fragments are constructed by terminal and nonterminal symbols from the grammar and by variab...

  4. Complete axiomatizations for XPath fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Cate, B.; Litak, T.; Marx, M.

    2010-01-01

    We provide complete axiomatizations for several fragments of Core XPath, the navigational core of XPath 1.0 introduced by Gottlob, Koch and Pichler. A complete axiomatization for a given fragment is a set of equivalences from which every other valid equivalence is derivable; equivalences can be thou

  5. Evaluating the effectiveness of care integration strategies in different healthcare systems in Latin America: the EQUITY-LA II quasi-experimental study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, María-Luisa; Vargas, Ingrid; Unger, Jean-Pierre; De Paepe, Pierre; Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; Samico, Isabella; Albuquerque, Paulette; Eguiguren, Pamela; Cisneros, Angelica Ivonne; Rovere, Mario; Bertolotto, Fernando

    2015-07-31

    Although fragmentation in the provision of healthcare is considered an important obstacle to effective care, there is scant evidence on best practices in care coordination in Latin America. The aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of a participatory shared care strategy in improving coordination across care levels and related care quality, in health services networks in six different healthcare systems of Latin America. A controlled before and after quasi-experimental study taking a participatory action research approach. In each country, two comparable healthcare networks were selected--intervention and control. The study contains four phases: (1) A baseline study to establish network performance in care coordination and continuity across care levels, using (A) qualitative methods: semi-structured interviews and focus groups with a criterion sample of health managers, professionals and users; and (B) quantitative methods: two questionnaire surveys with samples of 174 primary and secondary care physicians and 392 users with chronic conditions per network. Sample size was calculated to detect a proportion difference of 15% and 10%, before and after intervention (α=0.05; β=0.2 in a two-sided test); (2) a bottom-up participatory design and implementation of shared care strategies involving micro-level care coordination interventions to improve the adequacy of patient referral and information transfer. Strategies are selected through a participatory process by the local steering committee (local policymakers, health care network professionals, managers, users and researchers), supported by appropriate training; (3) Evaluation of the effectiveness of interventions by measuring changes in levels of care coordination and continuity 18 months after implementation, applying the same design as in the baseline study; (4) Cross-country comparative analysis. This study complies with international and national legal stipulations on ethics. Conditions of the study procedure

  6. Experimental Validation of Multi-Epitope Peptides Including Promising MHC Class I- and II-Restricted Epitopes of Four Known Leishmania infantum Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agallou, Maria; Athanasiou, Evita; Koutsoni, Olga; Dotsika, Eleni; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a significant worldwide health problem for which no vaccine exists. Activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells is crucial for the generation of protective immunity against parasite. Recent trend in vaccine design has been shifted to epitope-based vaccines that are more specific, safe, and easy to produce. In the present study, four known antigenic Leishmania infantum proteins, cysteine peptidase A (CPA), histone H1, KMP-11, and Leishmania eukaryotic initiation factor (LeIF) were analyzed for the prediction of binding epitopes to H2(d) MHC class I and II molecules, using online available algorithms. Based on in silico analysis, eight peptides including highly scored MHC class I- and II-restricted epitopes were synthesized. Peptide immunogenicity was validated in MHC compatible BALB/c mice immunized with each synthetic peptide emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant/incomplete Freund's adjuvant. CPA_p2, CPA_p3, H1_p1, and LeIF_p6 induced strong spleen cell proliferation upon in vitro peptide re-stimulation. In addition, the majority of the peptides, except of LeIF_p1 and KMP-11_p1, induced IFN-γ secretion, while KMP-11_p1 indicated a suppressive effect on IL-10 production. CPA_p2, CPA_p3, LeIF_p3, and LeIF_p6 induced IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells indicating a TH1-type response. In addition, CPA_p2, CPA_p3, and H1_p1 induced also the induction of CD8(+) T cells. The induction of peptide-specific IgG in immunized mice designated also the existence of B cell epitopes in peptide sequences. Combining immunoinformatic tools and experimental validation, we demonstrated that CPA_p2, CPA_p3, H1_p1, H1_p3, CPA_p2, LeIF_p3, and LeIF_p6 are likely to include potential epitopes for the induction of protective cytotoxic and/or TH1-type immune responses supporting the feasibility of peptide-based vaccine development for leishmaniasis.

  7. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) complexes of N, N' – ... temperature and coordinated water were determined ... indicating fairly stable complex compounds (Table 1). The complex compounds are insoluble [Table 2] in water and common organic solvents, but are readily soluble in ...

  8. Driven fragmentation of granular gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Hidalgo, Raúl; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2008-06-01

    The dynamics of homogeneously heated granular gases which fragment due to particle collisions is analyzed. We introduce a kinetic model which accounts for correlations induced at the grain collisions and analyze both the kinetics and relevant distribution functions these systems develop. The work combines analytical and numerical studies based on direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations. A broad family of fragmentation probabilities is considered, and its implications for the system kinetics are discussed. We show that generically these driven materials evolve asymptotically into a dynamical scaling regime. If the fragmentation probability tends to a constant, the grain number diverges at a finite time, leading to a shattering singularity. If the fragmentation probability vanishes, then the number of grains grows monotonously as a power law. We consider different homogeneous thermostats and show that the kinetics of these systems depends weakly on both the grain inelasticity and driving. We observe that fragmentation plays a relevant role in the shape of the velocity distribution of the particles. When the fragmentation is driven by local stochastic events, the long velocity tail is essentially exponential independently of the heating frequency and the breaking rule. However, for a Lowe-Andersen thermostat, numerical evidence strongly supports the conjecture that the scaled velocity distribution follows a generalized exponential behavior f(c) approximately exp(-cn) , with n approximately 1.2 , regarding less the fragmentation mechanisms.

  9. Gladiolus plants transformed with single-chain variable fragment antibodies to Cucumber mosaic virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic plants of Gladiolus ‘Peter Pears’ or ‘Jenny Lee’ were developed that contain single-chain variable fragments (scFv) to Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) subgroup I or II. The CMV subgroup I heavy and light chain scFv fragments were placed under control of either the duplicated CaMV 35S or suga...

  10. Vapor film collapse triggered by external pressure pulse and the fragmentation of melt droplet in FCIs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qian; TONG Lili; CAO Xuewu; KRIVENTSEV Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    The fragmentation process of high-temperature molten drop is a key factor to determine the ratio heat transferred to power in FCIs,which estimates the possible damage degree during the hypothetical severe accident in the nuclear reactors.In this paper,the fragmentation process of melt droplet in FCIs is investigated by theoretic analysis.The fragmentation mechanism is studied when an external pressure pulse applied to a melt droplet,which is surrounded by vapor film.The vapor film collapse which induces fragmentation of melt droplet is analyzed and modeled.And then the generated pressure is calculated.The vapor film collapse model is introduced to fragmentation correlation,and the predicted fragment size is calculated and compared with experimental data.The result shows that the developed model can predict the diameter of fragments and can be used to calculate the fragmentation process appreciatively.

  11. The spectroscopy of fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, W.R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Collaboration: La Direction des Sciences de la Matiere du CEA (FR); Le Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique de Belgique (BE)

    1998-12-31

    High-resolution measurements on {gamma} rays from fission fragments have provided a rich source of information, unobtainable at the moment in any other way, on the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei. In recent years important data have been obtained on the yrast- and near yrast-structure of neutron-rich fission fragments. We discuss the scope of measurements which can be made on prompt gamma rays from secondary fission fragments, the techniques used in the experiments and some results recently obtained. (author) 24 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. MHC class II up-regulation and co-localization with Fas in experimental models of immune-mediated bone marrow failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erie, Andrew J.; Samsel, Leigh; Takaku, Tomoiku; Desierto, Marie J.; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; McCoy, J. Philip; Young, Neal S.; Chen, Jichun

    2011-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that gamma interferon (IFN-γ) promotes MHC class II expression on bone marrow (BM) cell targets that facilitates T cell-mediated BM destruction in immune-mediated BM failure. Materials and Methods Allogeneic lymph node (LN) cells were infused into MHC or minor histocompatibility antigen (minor-H) mismatched hosts to induce BM failure. MHC class II and Fas expression and cell apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. MHC class II-Fas co-localization was detected by ImageStream Imaging Flow Cytometry and other cell-cell associations were visualized by confocal microscopy. T cell-mediated BM cell apoptosis and effects of IFN-γ on MHC class II-Fas co-localization on normal BM cells were studied using cell culture in vitro followed by conventional and imaging flow cytometry. Results BM failure animals had significantly up-regulated MHC class II expression on CD4−CD8−CD11b−CD45R− residual BM cells and significantly increased MHC class II-Fas co-localization on BM CD150+ and CD34+ hematopoietic cells. MHC class II+Fas+ BM cells were closely associated with CD4+ T cells in the BM of affected animals, and they were significantly more responsive to T-cell mediated cell apoptosis relative to MHC class II−Fas− BM cells. Infusion of IFN-γ-deficient LN cells into minor-H mismatched recipients resulted in no MHC class II-Fas up-regulation and no clinically overt BM failure. Treatment with recombinant IFN-γ significantly increased both MHC class II-Fas co-expression and co-localization on normal BM cells. Conclusion Elevation of the inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ stimulated MHC class II expression and MHC class II-Fas co-localization, which may facilitate T-cell mediated cell destruction. PMID:21635935

  13. Attosecond-recollision-controlled selective fragmentation of polyatomic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xinhua; Doblhoff-Dier, Katharina; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus S; Kartashov, Daniil; Xu, Huailiang; Rathje, Tim; Paulus, Gerhard G; Baltuška, Andrius; Gräfe, Stefanie; Kitzler, Markus

    2012-12-14

    Control over various fragmentation reactions of a series of polyatomic molecules (acetylene, ethylene, 1,3-butadiene) by the optical waveform of intense few-cycle laser pulses is demonstrated experimentally. We show both experimentally and theoretically that the responsible mechanism is inelastic ionization from inner-valence molecular orbitals by recolliding electron wave packets, whose recollision energy in few-cycle ionizing laser pulses strongly depends on the optical waveform. Our work demonstrates an efficient and selective way of predetermining fragmentation and isomerization reactions in polyatomic molecules on subfemtosecond time scales.

  14. Attosecond-recollision-controlled selective fragmentation of polyatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Xinhua; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus S; Kartashov, Daniil; Xu, Huailiang; Rathje, Tim; Paulus, Gerhard G; Baltuška, Andrius; Gräfe, Stefanie; Kitzler, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Control over various fragmentation reactions of a series of polyatomic molecules (acetylene, ethylene, 1,3-butadiene) by the optical waveform of intense few-cycle laser pulses is demonstrated experimentally. We show both experimentally and theoretically that the responsible mechanism is inelastic ionization from inner-valence molecular orbitals by recolliding electron wavepackets, whose recollision energy in few-cycle ionizing laser pulses strongly depends on the optical waveform. Our work demonstrates an efficient and selective way of pre-determining fragmentation and isomerization reactions in polyatomic molecules on sub-femtosecond time-scales.

  15. Mechanics of fragmentation of crocodile skin and other thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhao; Pugno, Nicola M; Buehler, Markus J

    2014-05-27

    Fragmentation of thin layers of materials is mediated by a network of cracks on its surface. It is commonly seen in dehydrated paintings or asphalt pavements and even in graphene or other two-dimensional materials, but is also observed in the characteristic polygonal pattern on a crocodile's head. Here, we build a simple mechanical model of a thin film and investigate the generation and development of fragmentation patterns as the material is exposed to various modes of deformation. We find that the characteristic size of fragmentation, defined by the mean diameter of polygons, is strictly governed by mechanical properties of the film material. Our result demonstrates that skin fragmentation on the head of crocodiles is dominated by that it features a small ratio between the fracture energy and Young's modulus, and the patterns agree well with experimental observations. Understanding this mechanics-driven process could be applied to improve the lifetime and reliability of thin film coatings by mimicking crocodile skin.

  16. Mechanics of fragmentation of crocodile skin and other thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhao; Pugno, Nicola M.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-05-01

    Fragmentation of thin layers of materials is mediated by a network of cracks on its surface. It is commonly seen in dehydrated paintings or asphalt pavements and even in graphene or other two-dimensional materials, but is also observed in the characteristic polygonal pattern on a crocodile's head. Here, we build a simple mechanical model of a thin film and investigate the generation and development of fragmentation patterns as the material is exposed to various modes of deformation. We find that the characteristic size of fragmentation, defined by the mean diameter of polygons, is strictly governed by mechanical properties of the film material. Our result demonstrates that skin fragmentation on the head of crocodiles is dominated by that it features a small ratio between the fracture energy and Young's modulus, and the patterns agree well with experimental observations. Understanding this mechanics-driven process could be applied to improve the lifetime and reliability of thin film coatings by mimicking crocodile skin.

  17. Enhancing XML Data Warehouse Query Performance by Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Mahboubi, Hadj

    2009-01-01

    XML data warehouses form an interesting basis for decision-support applications that exploit heterogeneous data from multiple sources. However, XML-native database systems currently suffer from limited performances in terms of manageable data volume and response time for complex analytical queries. Fragmenting and distributing XML data warehouses (e.g., on data grids) allow to address both these issues. In this paper, we work on XML warehouse fragmentation. In relational data warehouses, several studies recommend the use of derived horizontal fragmentation. Hence, we propose to adapt it to the XML context. We particularly focus on the initial horizontal fragmentation of dimensions' XML documents and exploit two alternative algorithms. We experimentally validate our proposal and compare these alternatives with respect to a unified XML warehouse model we advocate for.

  18. Validation of Geant4 fragmentation for Heavy Ion Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolst, David; Cirrone, Giuseppe A. P.; Cuttone, Giacomo; Folger, Gunter; Incerti, Sebastien; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Koi, Tatsumi; Mancusi, Davide; Pandola, Luciano; Romano, Francesco; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Guatelli, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    12C ion therapy has had growing interest in recent years for its excellent dose conformity. However at therapeutic energies, which can be as high as 400 MeV/u, carbon ions produce secondary fragments. For an incident 400 MeV/u 12C ion beam, ∼ 70 % of the beam will undergo fragmentation before the Bragg Peak. The dosimetric and radiobiological impact of these fragments must be accurately characterised, as it can result in increasing the risk of secondary cancer for the patient as well as altering the relative biological effectiveness. This work investigates the accuracy of three different nuclear fragmentation models available in the Monte Carlo Toolkit Geant4, the Binary Intranuclear Cascade (BIC), the Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) and the Liege Intranuclear Cascade (INCL++). The models were benchmarked against experimental data for a pristine 400 MeV/u 12C beam incident upon a water phantom, including fragment yield, angular and energy distribution. For fragment yields the three alternative models agreed between ∼ 5 and ∼ 35 % with experimental measurements, the QMD using the ;Frag; option gave the best agreement for lighter fragments but had reduced agreement for larger fragments. For angular distributions INCL++ was seen to provide the best agreement among the models for all elements with the exception of Hydrogen, while BIC and QMD was seen to produce broader distributions compared to experiment. BIC and QMD performed similar to one another for kinetic energy distributions while INCL++ suffered from producing lower energy distributions compared to the other models and experiment.

  19. Fragmentation Wave in Viscoelastic Medium Containing Bubbles and Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, M.; Nakamura, K.; Takayama, K.

    2007-12-01

    We conducted fragmentation experiment using viscoelastic silicone compound with various pressure, vesicularity, crystallinity and permeability to understand the magma fragmentation in an explosive volcanic eruption. We used a vertical shock tube to generate rapid decompression. The specimen was pressurized with nitrogen very slowly so that the pores are filled with the high-pressure gas. Then the membranes separating the high- pressure part from the atmospheric pressure part are artificially ruptured, and the specimen is rapidly decompressed. The fragmentation behavior of the specimen is photographed by a high-speed video camera. The fragmentation wave velocity is measured from the video images. After each experiment, the fragments are taken out of the chamber on top of the shock tube carefully and the structures are observed. We obtained the following results from the observation of the fragmentation speed. The fragmentation speed is in the range of 20-40 m/s. Its dependence on the void fraction is not clear in the present experimental conditions with void fraction ranging from 0.33 to 0.44. It tends to be decreased by existence of crystals and increase of permeability. The larger it is, the larger is the acceleration of the fragments. We have noticed significant cavitation in the viscoelastic compound after rapid decompression. The bubbles are generated homogeneously within the compound. The cavitation occurred regardless of the initial gas-saturation condition of the compound. It was not observed with slow decompression, though the decompression amplitude is the same. The bubble nucleation depending on the decompression rate might be significant also in the volcanic processes with rapid decompression and magma fragmentation.

  20. Statistical mechanics of fragmentation processes of ice and rock bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashkirov, A. G.; Vityazev, A. V.

    1996-09-01

    It is a well-known experimental fact that impact fragmentation, specifically of ice and rock bodies, causes a two-step ("knee"-shaped) power distribution of fragment masses with exponent values within the limits -4 and -1.5 (here and henceforth the differential distribution is borne in mind). A new theoretical approach is proposed to determine the exponent values, a minimal fracture mass, and properties of the knee. As a basis for construction of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of condensed matter fragmentation the maximum-entropy variational principle is used. In contrast to the usual approach founded on the Boltzmann entropy the more general Tsallis entropy allowing stationary solutions not only in the exponential Boltzmann-Gibbs form but in the form of the power (fractal) law distribution as well is invoked. Relying on the analysis of a lot of published experiments a parameter β is introduced to describe an inhomogeneous distribution of the impact energy over the target. It varies from 0 (for an utterly inhomogeneous distribution of the impact energy) to 1 (for a homogeneous distribution). The lower limit of fragment masses is defined as a characteristic fragment mass for which the energy of fragment formation is minimal. This mass value depends crucially on the value of β. It is shown that for β≪1 only small fragments can be formed, and the maximal permitted fragment (of mass m1) is the upper boundary of the first stage of the fracture process and the point where the knee takes place. The second stage may be realized after a homogeneous redistribution of the remainder of the impact energy over the remainder of the target (when β→1). Here, the formation of great fragments is permitted only and the smallest of them (of mass m2) determines a lower boundary of the second stage. Different forms of the knee can be observed depending on relations between m1 and m2.

  1. Laboratory Photo-chemistry of PAHs: Ionization versus Fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhen, Junfeng; Paardekooper, Daniel M; Ligterink, Niels; Linnartz, Harold; NAhon, Laurent; Joblin, Christine; Tielens, Alexander G G M

    2015-01-01

    Interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are expected to be strongly processed by vacuum ultraviolet photons. Here, we report experimental studies on the ionization and fragmentation of coronene (C24H12), ovalene (C32H14) and hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC; C42H18) cations by exposure to synchrotron radiation in the range of 8--40 eV. The results show that for small PAH cations such as coronene, fragmentation (H-loss) is more important than ionization. However, as the size increases, ionization becomes more and more important and for the HBC cation, ionization dominates. These results are discussed and it is concluded that, for large PAHs, fragmentation only becomes important when the photon energy has reached the highest ionization potential accessible. This implies that PAHs are even more photo-stable than previously thought. The implications of this experimental study for the photo-chemical evolution of PAHs in the interstellar medium are briefly discussed.

  2. Energy Dependence of String Fragmentation Function and φ Meson Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SA Ben-Hao; CAI Xu; Chinorat Kobdaj; WANG Zhong-Qi; YAN Yu-Peng; ZHOU Dai-Mei

    2004-01-01

    The φ meson productions in A u+A u and/or P b+Pb collisions at AGS, SPS, RHIC, and LHC energies have been studied systematically with a hadron and string cascade model LUCIAE.After considering the energy dependence of the model parameter α in string fragmentation function and adjusting it to the experimental data of charged multiplicity to a certain extent, the model predictions for φ meson yield, rapidity, and transverse mass distributions are compatible with the experimental data at AGS, SPS and RHIC energies. A calculation for Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energy is given as well. The obtained fractional variable in string fragmentation function shows a saturation in energy dependence. It is discussed that the saturation of fractional variable in string fragmentation function might be a qualitative representation of the energy dependence of nuclear transparency.

  3. A murine experimental anthracycline extravasation model: pathology and study of the involvement of topoisomerase II alpha and iron in the mechanism of tissue damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thougaard, Annemette V; Langer, Seppo W; Hainau, Bo;

    2010-01-01

    The bisdioxopiperazine topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor dexrazoxane has successfully been introduced into the clinic as an antidote to accidental anthracycline extravasation based on our preclinical mouse studies. The histology of this mouse extravasation model was investigated and found...

  4. Experimental evidences of the NO action on a recombinant PrxII F from pea plant and its effect preventing the citrate synthase aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daymi Camejo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available S-nitrosylation is emerging as a key post-translational protein modification for the transduction of NO as a signaling molecule in plants. This data article supports the research article entitled “Functional and structural changes in plant mitochondrial PrxII F caused by NO” [1]. To identify the Cys residues of the recombinant PrxII F modified after the treatment with S-nitrosylating agents we performed the LC ESI–QTOF tandem MS and MALDI peptide mass fingerprinting analysis. Change in A650 nm was monitored to estimate the thermal aggregation of citrate synthase in the presence S-nitrosylated PrxII F. The effect of the temperature on the oligomerization pattern and aggregation of PrxII F was analysed by SDS-PAGE and changes in absorbance at 650 nm, respectively.

  5. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Cheng; Tsang, M B; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy released by splitting Uranium and Thorium isotopes into two, three, four, up to eight fragments with nearly equal size are studied. We found that the energy released come from equally splitting the $^{235,238}$U and $^{230,232}$Th nuclei into to three fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model is employed to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for the excited nuclei. Weighing the the probability distributions of fragments multiplicity at different excitation energies for the $^{238}$U nucleus, we found that an excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u is optimal for the $^{235}$U, $^{238}$U, $^{230}$Th and $^{232}$Th nuclei to release nuclear energy of about 0.7-0.75 MeV/u.

  6. Quark to $\\Lambda$-hyperon spin transfers in the current-fragmentation region

    CERN Document Server

    Chi, Yujie

    2013-01-01

    We perform a study on the struck quark to the $\\Lambda$-hyperon fragmentation processes by taking into account the anti-quark fragmentations and intermediate decays from other hyperons. We concentrate on how the longitudinally polarized quark fragments to the longitudinally polarized $\\Lambda$, how unpolarized quark and anti-quark fragment to the unpolarized $\\Lambda$, and how quark and anti-quark fragment to the $\\Lambda$ through the intermediate decay processes. We calculate the effective fragmentation functions in the light-cone SU(6) quark-spectator-diquark model via the Gribov-Lipatov relation, with the Melosh-Wigner rotation effect also included. The calculated results are in reasonable agreement with the HERMES semi-inclusive $ep$ experimental data and the OPAL and ALEPH $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilation experimental data.

  7. Use of fragmentation beams at LNS with CHIMERA detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianí R.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent intensity upgrade of the LNS fragmentation beam is discussed. The available beams, the tagging procedures and details on the beam quality are reported. The experimental program started with the CHIMERA detector using such beams is also discussed with preliminary results and future perspectives.

  8. Rotational state effect and fragmentation of small polyatomic molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhaunerchyk, V; Geppert, W D; Hamberg, M; Kaminska, M; Vigren, E; Al-Khalili, A; Rosen, S; Danielsson, M; Oesterdahl, F; Larsson, M; Thomas, R D [Department of Physics, Albanova University Centre, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Bednarska, V; Petrignani, A; Zande, W J van der [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, PO Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bahati, E; Bannister, M E; Fogle, M R; Vane, C R, E-mail: vz@physto.s [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6377 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    In the paper we report the first experimental observation of rotational state effects in dissociative recombination of H{sub 2}{sup +}. We also report the branching fractions from the DR of BH{sub 2}{sup +} N{sub 3}{sup +} and O{sub 3}{sup +} and the dynamics occurring in the full fragmentation channel are discussed.

  9. Hands as markers of fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barnard

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Margaret Atwood is an internationally read, translated, and critiqued writer whose novels have established her as one of the most esteemed authors in English (McCombs & Palmer, 1991:1. Critical studies of her work deal mainly with notions of identity from psychoanalytical perspectives. This study has identified a gap in current critical studies on Atwood’s works, namely the challenging of textual unity which is paralleled in the challenging of the traditional (single narrative voice. The challenging of textual unity and the single narrative voice brings about the fragmentation of both. This article will focus on the role that hands play as markers of fragmentation in “The Blind Assassin” (2000. In the novel, the writing hand destabilises the narrative voice, since it is not connected to the voice of a single author. If the author of the text – the final signified – is eliminated, the text becomes fragmentary and open, inviting the reader to contribute to the creation of meaning. Hands play a signficant role in foregrounding the narrator’s fragmented identity, and consequently, the fragmentation of the text. We will investigate this concept in the light of Roland Barthes’ notion of the scriptor, whose hand is metaphorically severed from his or her “voice”. Instead of the text being a unified entity, it becomes unstable and it displays the absence of hierarchical textual levels. Based mainly on Barthes’ writings, this article concludes that hands foreground the narrator’s fragmented identity, which is paralleled in the fragmented text.

  10. Phenomenology of Dihadron Fragmentation Function

    CERN Document Server

    Courtoy, A

    2016-01-01

    We report on the phenomenological results obtained through Dihadron Fragmentation Functions related processes. In 2015, an update on the fitting techniques for the Dihadron Fragmentation Functions has led to an improved extraction of the transversity PDF and, as a consequence, the nucleon tensor charge. We discuss the impact of the determination of the latter on search for physics Beyond the Standard Model, focusing on the error treatment. We also comment on the future of the extraction of the subleading-twist PDF $e(x)$ from JLab soon-to-be-released Beam Spin Asymmetry data.

  11. Transversity and dihadron fragmentation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Bacchetta, A; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Radici, Marco

    2005-01-01

    The observation of the quark transversity distribution requires another soft object sensitive to the quark's transverse spin. Dihadron fragmentation functions represent a convenient tool to analyze partonic spin, which can influence the angular distribution of the two hadrons. In particular, the so-called interference fragmentation functions can be used to probe transversity both in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering as well as proton-proton collisions. We discuss two single-spin asymmetries sensitive to transversity in the these two processes, at leading twist and leading order in alpha_S.

  12. RIA Fragmentation Line Beam Dumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, W

    2003-08-08

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator project involves generating heavy-element ion beams for use in a fragmentation target line to produce beams for physics research. The main beam, after passing through the fragmentation target, may be dumped into a beam dump located in the vacuum cavity of the first dipole magnet. For a dump beam power of 100 kW, cooling is required to avoid excessive high temperatures. The proposed dump design involves rotating cylinders to spread out the energy deposition and turbulent subcooled water flow through internal water cooling passages to obtain high, nonboiling, cooling rates.

  13. Absolute fragmentation cross sections in atom-molecule collisions: Scaling laws for non-statistical fragmentation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.; Gatchell, M.; Stockett, M. H.; Alexander, J. D.; Schmidt, H. T.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H., E-mail: henning@fysik.su.se [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Zhang, Y. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Physics, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Rousseau, P.; Maclot, S.; Delaunay, R.; Adoui, L. [CIMAP, UMR 6252, CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, bd Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, Esplanade de la Paix, F-14032 Caen (France); Domaracka, A.; Huber, B. A. [CIMAP, UMR 6252, CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, bd Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Schlathölter, T. [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-06-14

    We present scaling laws for absolute cross sections for non-statistical fragmentation in collisions between Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH/PAH{sup +}) and hydrogen or helium atoms with kinetic energies ranging from 50 eV to 10 keV. Further, we calculate the total fragmentation cross sections (including statistical fragmentation) for 110 eV PAH/PAH{sup +} + He collisions, and show that they compare well with experimental results. We demonstrate that non-statistical fragmentation becomes dominant for large PAHs and that it yields highly reactive fragments forming strong covalent bonds with atoms (H and N) and molecules (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}). Thus nonstatistical fragmentation may be an effective initial step in the formation of, e.g., Polycyclic Aromatic Nitrogen Heterocycles (PANHs). This relates to recent discussions on the evolution of PAHNs in space and the reactivities of defect graphene structures.

  14. Wikipedia’s World War II : Fragmenting the narrative?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribbens, Kees

    2016-01-01

    Though grand narratives may have lost their appeal in recent decades, this hardly seems to have influenced the importance attributed to WWII in Europe and North America. The social need for stories of dramatic episodes in recent history is still met by the supply of information and representations i

  15. Wikipedia’s World War II : Fragmenting the narrative?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribbens, Kees

    Though grand narratives may have lost their appeal in recent decades, this hardly seems to have influenced the importance attributed to WWII in Europe and North America. The social need for stories of dramatic episodes in recent history is still met by the supply of information and representations

  16. Combinatorial Labeling Method for Improving Peptide Fragmentation in Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchibhotla, Bhanuramanand; Kola, Sankara Rao; Medicherla, Jagannadham V.; Cherukuvada, Swamy V.; Dhople, Vishnu M.; Nalam, Madhusudhana Rao

    2017-06-01

    Annotation of peptide sequence from tandem mass spectra constitutes the central step of mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Peptide mass spectra are obtained upon gas-phase fragmentation. Identification of the protein from a set of experimental peptide spectral matches is usually referred as protein inference. Occurrence and intensity of these fragment ions in the MS/MS spectra are dependent on many factors such as amino acid composition, peptide basicity, activation mode, protease, etc. Particularly, chemical derivatizations of peptides were known to alter their fragmentation. In this study, the influence of acetylation, guanidinylation, and their combination on peptide fragmentation was assessed initially on a lipase (LipA) from Bacillus subtilis followed by a bovine six protein mix digest. The dual modification resulted in improved fragment ion occurrence and intensity changes, and this resulted in the equivalent representation of b- and y-type fragment ions in an ion trap MS/MS spectrum. The improved representation has allowed us to accurately annotate the peptide sequences de novo. Dual labeling has significantly reduced the false positive protein identifications in standard bovine six peptide digest. Our study suggests that the combinatorial labeling of peptides is a useful method to validate protein identifications for high confidence protein inference. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Energetics of glass fragmentation: Experiments on synthetic and natural glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolzenburg, S.; Russell, J. K.; Kennedy, L. A.

    2013-11-01

    Natural silicate glasses are an essential component of many volcanic rock types including coherent and pyroclastic rocks; they span a wide range of compositions, occur in diverse environments, and form under a variety of pressure-temperature conditions. In subsurface volcanic environments (e.g., conduits and feeders), melts intersect the thermodynamically defined glass transition temperature to form glasses at elevated confining pressures and under differential stresses. We present a series of room temperature experiments designed to explore the fundamental mechanical and fragmentation behavior of natural (obsidian) and synthetic glasses (Pyrex™) under confining pressures of 0.1-100 MPa. In each experiment, glass cores are driven to brittle failure under compressive triaxial stress. Analysis of the load-displacement response curves is used to quantify the storage of energy in samples prior to failure, the (brittle) release of elastic energy at failure, and the residual energy stored in the post-failure material. We then establish a relationship between the energy density within the sample at failure and the grain-size distributions (D-values) of the experimental products. The relationship between D-values and energy density for compressive fragmentation is significantly different from relationships established by previous workers for decompressive fragmentation. Compressive fragmentation is found to have lower fragmentation efficiency than fragmentation through decompression (i.e., a smaller change in D-value with increasing energy density). We further show that the stress storage capacity of natural glasses can be enhanced (approaching synthetic glasses) through heat treatment.

  18. A thermodynamic theory of dynamic fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yew, Ching H. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States); Taylor, P.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    We present a theory of dynamic fragmentation of brittle materials based on thermodynamic arguments. We recover the expressions for average fragment size and number as originally derived by Grady. We extend the previous work by obtaining descriptions of fragment size distribution and compressibility change due to the fragmentation process. The size distribution is assumed to be proportional to the spectral power of the strain history and a sample distribution is presented for a fragmentation process corresponding to a constant rate strain history. The description of compressibility change should be useful in computational studies of fragmentation. These results should provide insight into the process of fragmentation of brittle materials from hypervelocity impact.

  19. Transportation of the Fission Fragments by the Gas Flow with Aerosol

    CERN Document Server

    Gangrsky, Yu P; Zhemenik, V I; Myshinskii, G V; Penionzhkevich, Yu E; Selesh, O

    2001-01-01

    The experimental set-up for the transportation of the fission fragments by the gaseous flow with aerosols is described. The results of the set-up testing using the {238}U photofission fragments are presented. The obtained parameters (transport efficiency up to 60 % and transport time down to 0.1 s at 1 m distance) allow one to use this set-up in the experiments on the heavy nuclei fission and fragment properties investigation.

  20. Atrophy of type I and II muscle fibers is reversible in the case of grade >2 fatty degeneration of the supraspinatus muscle: an experimental study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabis, Jaroslaw; Danilewicz, Marian; Zwierzchowski, Jacek T; Niedzielski, Kryspin

    2016-03-01

    Although clinical investigations indicate that the limit of reversibility of rotator cuff muscles fibers type I and II atrophy is grade 2 of fatty degeneration (FD) according to the Goutallier computed tomography classification, little is known about the morphometric verification of these findings. The supraspinatus tendon was detached from the greater tubercle and the infraspinatus and subscapularis in 12 rabbits, and a 12-week observation period followed. This proved to be sufficient for development of grade >2 FD of the supraspinatus tendon. The tendon was then reinserted. The animals were euthanized 24 weeks after tendon reconstruction. The sections of middle part of supraspinatus were stained for adenosine triphosphatase reaction, and morphometric measurements were taken of type I and II muscle fiber diameters. The contralateral shoulders served as controls. The macroscopic inspection of the supraspinatus tendons revealed complete healing in all cases. No statistically significant differences were found between controls and operated-on shoulders for type I (P = .13) and type II (P = .55) muscle fibers. Atrophy of type I and II muscle fibers in rabbit supraspinatus muscle, characterized by grade >2 fatty degeneration according to the Goutallier computed tomography classification, is reversible after 24 weeks from reattachment of its tendon. A requirement for type I and II muscle fibers hypertrophy is a change in the biomechanical and functional conditions of the muscle after its tendon is reconstructed. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fractal analysis of experimentally generated pyroclasts: A tool for volcanic hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugini, Diego; Kueppers, Ulrich

    2012-06-01

    Rapid decompression experiments on natural volcanic rocks mimick explosive eruptions. Fragment size distributions (FSD) of such experimentally generated pyroclasts are investigated using fractal geometry. The fractal dimension of fragmentation, D, of FSD is measured for samples from Unzen (Japan) and Popocatépetl (Mexico) volcanoes. Results show that: (i) FSD are fractal and can be quantified by measuring D values; (ii) D increases linearly with potential energy for fragmentation (PEF) and, thus, with increasing applied pressure; (iii) the rate of increase of D with PEF depends on open porosity: the higher the open porosity, the lower the increase of D with PEF; (iv) at comparable open porosity, samples display a similar behavior for any rock composition. The method proposed here has the potential to become a standard routine to estimate eruptive energy of past and recent eruptions using values of D and open porosity, providing an important step towards volcanic hazard assessment.

  2. An auxiliary mode of apoptotic DNA fragmentation provided by phagocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Dorian; Tanaka, Masato; Sakahira, Hideki; Fukuyama, Hidehiro; Suzuki, Misao; Yamamura, Ken-ichi; Ohsawa, Yoshiyuki; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2000-01-01

    CAD (caspase-activated DNase) can cause DNA fragmentation in apoptotic cells. Transgenic mice that ubiquitously express a caspase-resistant form of the CAD inhibitor (ICAD) were generated. Thymocytes prepared from the mice were resistant to DNA fragmentation induced by a variety of stimuli. However, similar numbers of TUNEL-positive cells were present in adult tissues of transgenic and wild-type mice. Exposure to γ-irradiation caused a striking increase in the number of TUNEL-positive cells in the thymus of wild-type, but not transgenic, mice. TUNEL-positive nuclei in transgenic mice were confined to thymic macrophages. When apoptotic thymocytes from the transgenic mice were cocultured with macrophages, the thymocytes underwent phagocytosis and their chromosomal DNA underwent fragmentation. This DNA fragmentation was sensitive to inhibitors that block the acidification of lysosomes. Hence, we conclude that the DNA fragmentation that occurs during apoptosis not only can result cell-autonomously from CAD activity but can also be attributed to a lysosomal acid DNase(s), most likely DNase II, after the apoptotic cells are engulfed. PMID:10716943

  3. Circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments as a novel diagnostic biomarker for pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Ahrens, Maike

    2013-01-01

    2 small nuclear RNA (RNU2-1). Importantly, we found that the assay signal discriminating tumor from controls was derived from U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) fragments (RNU2-1f) and not from miR-1246. In addition, we observed a remarkable stability of RNU2-1f in serum and provide experimental evidence...... and specificity of 97.7% [95% CI = (87.7, 99.9)] and 90.6% [95% CI = (80.7, 96.5)], respectively [area under the ROC curve 0.972]. Of note, patients with CRC were detected with our assay as early as UICC Stage II with a sensitivity of 81%. In conclusion, this is the first report showing that fragments of U2 sn...... with primary human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we identified 15 diagnostic microRNA candidates. Of those miR-1246 was selected based on its high abundance in serum of tumor carrying mice. Subsequently, we noted a cross reactivity of the established miR-1246 assays with RNA fragments derived from U...

  4. Population pressure and farm fragmentation:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    small but farms are further fragmented into diminutive size fields due to ... terms of household characteristics; land use and performance indicators; technology adoption .... 'best' unit of measurement of farm size, and size of enterprises within farms will ..... less common, accounting for 18 percent (3 percent) and 10 percent (7.

  5. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Cheng [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Souza, S.R. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Cidade Universitária, Caixa Postal 68528, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tsang, M.B. [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zhang, Feng-Shou, E-mail: fszhang@bnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2016-08-15

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting {sup 230,232}Th and {sup 235,238}U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for {sup 230,232}Th and {sup 235,238}U are around 0.7–0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  6. Nuclear energy release from fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Souza, S. R.; Tsang, M. B.; Zhang, Feng-Shou

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that binary fission occurs with positive energy gain. In this article we examine the energetics of splitting uranium and thorium isotopes into various numbers of fragments (from two to eight) with nearly equal size. We find that the energy released by splitting 230,232Th and 235,238U into three equal size fragments is largest. The statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) is applied to calculate the probability of different breakup channels for excited nuclei. By weighing the probability distributions of fragment multiplicity at different excitation energies, we find the peaks of energy release for 230,232Th and 235,238U are around 0.7-0.75 MeV/u at excitation energy between 1.2 and 2 MeV/u in the primary breakup process. Taking into account the secondary de-excitation processes of primary fragments with the GEMINI code, these energy peaks fall to about 0.45 MeV/u.

  7. The Fragmentation of Literary Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Syllabi from some 20 colleges and universities were reviewed with prominent English and literature departments and a discussion was held with a number of professors who teach literary theory. It is suggested that devolution and fragmentation of theory might be a survival strategy, an adaptation to the new realties of academic institutions.

  8. Fragmented nature : consequences for biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, Han; Ritchie, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species

  9. Fragmented nature: consequences for biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, H.; Ritchie, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species

  10. Fragmented nature : consequences for biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, Han; Ritchie, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species

  11. Fragmented nature: consequences for biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, H.; Ritchie, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss how fragmentation of resources and habitat operate differently on species diversity across spatial scales, ranging from positive effects on local species coexistence to negative effect on intermediate spatial scales, to again positive effects on large spatial and temporal scales. Species

  12. The fragment spin difference scheme for triplet-triplet energy transfer coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhi-Qiang; Hsu, Chao-Ping

    2010-08-21

    To calculate the electronic couplings in both inter- and intramolecular triplet energy transfer (TET), we have developed the "fragment spin difference" (FSD) scheme. The FSD was a generalization from the "fragment charge difference" (FCD) method of Voityuk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 5607 (2002)] for electron transfer (ET) coupling. In FSD, the spin population difference was used in place of the charge difference in FCD. FSD is derived from the eigenstate energies and populations, and therefore the FSD couplings contain all contributions in the Hamiltonian as well as the potential overlap effect. In the present work, two series of molecules, all-trans-polyene oligomers and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were tested for intermolecular TET study. The TET coupling results are largely similar to those from the previously developed direct coupling scheme, with FSD being easier and more flexible in use. On the other hand, the Dexter's exchange integral value, a quantity that is often used as an approximate for the TET coupling, varies in a large range as compared to the corresponding TET coupling. To test the FSD for intramolecular TET, we have calculated the TET couplings between zinc(II)-porphyrin and free-base porphyrin separated by different numbers of p-phenyleneethynylene bridge units. Our estimated rate constants are consistent with experimentally measured TET rates. The FSD method can be used for both intermolecular and intramolecular TET, regardless of their symmetry. This general applicability is an improvement over most existing methodologies.

  13. The fragment spin difference scheme for triplet-triplet energy transfer coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhi-Qiang; Hsu, Chao-Ping

    2010-08-01

    To calculate the electronic couplings in both inter- and intramolecular triplet energy transfer (TET), we have developed the "fragment spin difference" (FSD) scheme. The FSD was a generalization from the "fragment charge difference" (FCD) method of Voityuk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 5607 (2002)] for electron transfer (ET) coupling. In FSD, the spin population difference was used in place of the charge difference in FCD. FSD is derived from the eigenstate energies and populations, and therefore the FSD couplings contain all contributions in the Hamiltonian as well as the potential overlap effect. In the present work, two series of molecules, all-trans-polyene oligomers and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were tested for intermolecular TET study. The TET coupling results are largely similar to those from the previously developed direct coupling scheme, with FSD being easier and more flexible in use. On the other hand, the Dexter's exchange integral value, a quantity that is often used as an approximate for the TET coupling, varies in a large range as compared to the corresponding TET coupling. To test the FSD for intramolecular TET, we have calculated the TET couplings between zinc(II)-porphyrin and free-base porphyrin separated by different numbers of p-phenyleneethynylene bridge units. Our estimated rate constants are consistent with experimentally measured TET rates. The FSD method can be used for both intermolecular and intramolecular TET, regardless of their symmetry. This general applicability is an improvement over most existing methodologies.

  14. Metastable fragmentation of silver bromide clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L' Hermite, J.M.; Rabilloud, F.; Marcou, L.; Labastie, P. [Lab. CAR/IRSAMC, Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France)

    2001-06-01

    The abundance spectra and the fragmentation channels of silver bromide clusters have been measured and analyzed. The most abundant species are Ag{sub n}Br{sub n} {sub -} {sub 1}{sup +} and Ag {sub n}Br {sub n} {sub +} {sub 1}{sup -} and Ag {sub 14}Br {sub 13}{sup +} is a magic number, revealing their ionic nature. However, some features depart from what is generally observed for alkali-halide ionic clusters. From a certain size, Ag {sub n}Br {sub n} {sub -} {sub 1}{sup +} is no more the main series, and Ag {sub n}Br {sub n} {sub -} {sub 2,} {sub 3}{sup +} series become almost as important. The fast fragmentation induced by a UV laser makes the cations lose more bromine than silver ions and lead to more silver-rich clusters. Negative ions mass spectra contain also species with more silver atoms than required by stoichiometry. We have investigated the metastable fragmentation of the cations using a new experimental method. The large majority of the cations release mainly a neutral Ag {sub 3}Br {sub 3} cluster. These decay channels are in full agreement with our recent ab initio DFT calculations, which show that Ag {sup +}-Ag {sup +} repulsion is reduced due to a globally attractive interaction of their d orbitals. This effect leads to a particularly stable trimer (AgBr) {sub 3} and to quasi-planar cyclic structures of (AgBr) {sub n} clusters up to n = 6. We have shown that these two features may be extended to other silver halides, to silver hydroxides (AgOH) {sub n}, and to cuprous halide compounds. (orig.)

  15. A Comparison of Predictive Thermo and Water Solvation Property Prediction Tools and Experimental Data for Selected Traditional Chemical Warfare Agents and Simulants II: COSMO RS and COSMOTherm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    A COMPARISON OF PREDICTIVE THERMO AND WATER SOLVATION PROPERTY PREDICTION TOOLS AND EXPERIMENTAL DATA FOR...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Comparison of Predictive Thermo and Water Solvation Property Prediction Tools and Experimental Data for Selected...ambient temperature. We then directed these descriptions of each molecule to COSMOTherm to calculate boiling point, vapor pressure, water solubility

  16. CCDC 1505385: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-[bis(mu-pyrazine)-(mu-oxido)-(mu-fluoro)-tetrafluoro-nickel(ii)-niobium(v) dihydrate

    KAUST Repository

    Bhatt, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  17. CCDC 928610: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-[(mu~5~-Biphenyl-2,4,4',6-tetracarboxylato)-tetrakis(N,N-dimethylacetamide-O)-di-lead(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Lou, Xin-Hua

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  18. CCDC 879685: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : Chloro-(3,5-di-t-butyl-2,6-bis((di-t-butylphosphino)oxy)phenyl)-nickel(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2012-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  19. CCDC 928611: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-[(mu8-Biphenyl-2,4,4',6-tetracarboxylato)-di-zinc(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Lou, Xin-Hua

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  20. CCDC 928609: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-[(mu7-Biphenyl-2,4,4',6-tetracarboxylato)-triaqua-di-cadmium(ii) monohydrate

    KAUST Repository

    Lou, Xin-Hua

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  1. CCDC 1010349: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : aqua-(ethane-1,2-diylbis(di-t-butylphosphine))-(trifluoromethanesulfonato)-palladium(ii) trifluoromethanesulfonate

    KAUST Repository

    Roesle, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  2. CCDC 897156: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : bis(2-(bis(2-methoxyphenyl)phosphino)benzenesulfonato)-palladium(ii) 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane solvate

    KAUST Repository

    Rünzi, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  3. CCDC 992440: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : hydrido-((1,2-phenylenebis(methylene))bis(bis(adamantan-1-yl)phosphine))-triphenylphosphine-palladium(ii) trifluoromethanesulfonate methanol solvate

    KAUST Repository

    Christl, Josefine T.

    2014-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  4. CCDC 879686: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : (3,5-Di-t-butyl-2,6-bis((diphenylphosphino)oxy)phenyl)-iodo-nickel(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2012-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  5. CCDC 770990: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-[(mu~2~-trans-4,4'-stilbenedicarboxylato)-(1,10-phenanthroline)-zinc(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Kole, G.K.

    2011-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  6. CCDC 879684: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : chloro-(2,6-bis((bis(cyclopentyl)phosphino)oxy)-4-(ethoxycarbonyl)phenyl)-nickel(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2012-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  7. CCDC 813380: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : trans-bis(1,3-Dibenzyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-benzimidazol-2-ylidene)-bis(thiocyanato)-nickel(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Jothibasu, R.

    2011-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  8. CCDC 897155: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : (2-(bis(2-methoxyphenyl)phosphino)benzenesulfonato)-(2-((2-methoxyphenyl)(methyl)phosphino)benzenesulfonato)-palladium(ii) methanol solvate

    KAUST Repository

    Rünzi, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  9. CCDC 813382: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : cis-bis(1-Methyl-3-propyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-benzimidazol-2-ylidene)-bis(thiocyanato)-nickel(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Jothibasu, R.

    2011-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  10. CCDC 894986: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : (2-(1,3-Dimesityl-1,3,2-diazaphospholidin-2-yl)benzenesulfonato)-methyl-pyridine-palladium(ii)

    KAUST Repository

    Wucher, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  11. CCDC 914600: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-(bis(mu~2~-4,4'-Ethyne-1,2-diyldipyridine)-(mu~2~-hexafluorosilicato)-copper(ii) unknown solvate)

    KAUST Repository

    Nugent, P.

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  12. CCDC 914601: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : catena-(bis(mu~2~-4,4'-Ethyne-1,2-diyldipyridine)-(mu~2~-hexafluorosilicato)-copper(ii) methanol solvate)

    KAUST Repository

    Nugent, P.

    2013-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  13. Synthesis, X-ray structure, spectroscopic characterization and nonlinear optical properties of triaqua(1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylato)manganese(II) dihydrate: A combined experimental and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamer, Ömer; Avcı, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf; Çoşut, Bünyemin; Zorlu, Yunus; Erkovan, Mustafa; Yerli, Yusuf

    2015-11-01

    The triaqua(1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylato)manganese(II) dihydrate complex was prepared and its crystal structure was determined by using single crystal X-ray diffraction. Its structure was also characterized by the applying of FT-IR, Raman and UV-vis spectroscopies. The manganese(II) ion was located to center of distorted pentagonal-bipyramidal geometry. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurement was carried out on the Mn(II) complex. In order to support experimental results, density functional theory calculations were performed at HSEH1PBE level and LanL2DZ basis set. Obtained results indicated that theoretical results can replace the experimental ones. The relatively active ν(CO) ν(CC) and ν(CN) stretching vibration peaks appeared in IR and Raman spectra of complex 1 which are indicators of charge transfer within complex 1 suggest that complex 1 is a good candidate for nonlinear optical materials. The HOMO and LUMO energies determined that complex 1 is stable and the charge transfer occurs within complex 1.

  14. Radiolytic mapping of solvent-contact surfaces in Photosystem II of higher plants: experimental identification of putative water channels within the photosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Laurie K; Sallans, Larry; Bellamy, Henry; Goettert, Jost S; Limbach, Patrick A; Bricker, Terry M

    2013-08-09

    Photosystem II uses water as an enzymatic substrate. It has been hypothesized that this water is vectored to the active site for water oxidation via water channels that lead from the surface of the protein complex to the Mn4O5Ca metal cluster. The radiolysis of water by synchrotron radiation produces amino acid residue-modifying OH(•) and is a powerful technique to identify regions of proteins that are in contact with water. In this study, we have used this technique to oxidatively modify buried amino acid residues in higher plant Photosystem II membranes. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was then used to identify these oxidized amino acid residues that were located in several core Photosystem II subunits (D1, D2, CP43, and CP47). While, as expected, the majority of the identified oxidized residues (≈75%) are located on the solvent-exposed surface of the complex, a number of buried residues on these proteins were also modified. These residues form groups which appear to lead from the surface of the complex to the Mn4O5Ca cluster. These residues may be in contact with putative water channels in the photosystem. These results are discussed within the context of a number of largely computational studies that have identified putative water channels in Photosystem II.

  15. Certain features of the stopping power of gases for fission fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demidovich, N.N.; Nakhutin, I.E.; Shatunov, V.G.

    1975-11-20

    The stopping power for the Cf/sup 252/ spontaneous fission fragments in air down to energies approx.0.8 MeV was investigated. The experimental dependence of the electronic stopping power of air for fission fragments differs from that predicted by the theory. (AIP)

  16. Ion-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon collisions: kinetic energy releases for specific fragmentation channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitsma, G.; Zettergren, H.; Boschman, L.; Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2013-01-01

    We report on 30 keV He2 + collisions with naphthalene (C10H8) molecules, which leads to very extensive fragmentation. To unravel such complex fragmentation patterns, we designed and constructed an experimental setup, which allows for the determination of the full momentum vector by measuring charged

  17. Ion-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon collisions: kinetic energy releases for specific fragmentation channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitsma, Geert; Zettergren, H.; Boschman, Leon; Bodewits, Erwin; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We report on 30 keV He2+ collisions with naphthalene (C10H8) molecules, which leads to very extensive fragmentation. To unravel such complex fragmentation patterns, we designed and constructed an experimental setup, which allows for the determination of the full momentum vector by measuring charged

  18. Observation of anisotropic fragmentation in methane subjected to femtosecond radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Strohaber, J; Kolomenskii, A A; Schuessler, H A

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental results on the ionization/dissociation of methane in femtosecond pulses of radiation. Angular and intensity dependent yields of singly and doubly charged species were measured using an imaging mass spectrometer. The measured data shows that all fragments yields exhibit some degree of anisotropy as a result of them being preferably ejected parallel to the polarization direction. Additionally, an anomalous perpendicular fragmentation pattern is found for CH\\-(2)\\+(2+). We find evidence of multiple dissociation mechanisms including statistical decay, field assisted dissociation and Coulomb explosion.

  19. Evidence of type-II band alignment in III-nitride semiconductors: experimental and theoretical investigation for In 0.17 Al 0.83 N/GaN heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaming; Xu, Fujun; Zhang, Xia; An, Wei; Li, Xin-Zheng; Song, Jie; Ge, Weikun; Tian, Guangshan; Lu, Jing; Wang, Xinqiang; Tang, Ning; Yang, Zhijian; Li, Wei; Wang, Weiying; Jin, Peng; Chen, Yonghai; Shen, Bo

    2014-10-06

    Type-II band alignment structure is coveted in the design of photovoltaic devices and detectors, since it is beneficial for the transport of photogenerated carriers. Regrettably, for group-III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, all existing devices are limited to type-I heterostructures, owing to the unavailable of type-II ones. This seriously restricts the designing flexibility for optoelectronic devices and consequently the relevant performance of this material system. Here we show a brandnew type-II band alignment of the lattice-matched In 0.17 Al 0.83 N/GaN heterostructure from the perspective of both experimental observations and first-principle theoretical calculations. The band discontinuity is dominated by the conduction band offset ΔEC, with a small contribution from the valence band offset ΔEV which equals 0.1 eV (with E(AlInN(VBM) being above E(GaN)(VBM)). Our work may open up new prospects to realize high-performance III-Nitrides optoelectronic devices based on type-II energy band engineering.

  20. Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.H. Riitters

    2009-01-01

    Effective resource management takes into account the administrative and biophysical settings within which natural resources occur. A setting may be described in many ways; for example, by forest land ownership, by reserved and roadless designation, or by the distribution of human populations in relation to forest (chapter 3). The physical arrangement of forest in a...

  1. Calculation of IR-spectra of structural fragments of lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkacheva, O. Yu.; Ishankhodzhaeva, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    To study structure of softwood lignins the experimental and theoretical IR-spectra in middle IR-diapason were analyzed. To interpret these data the quantum chemical calculations of IR-spectra of general dimmer fragments of softwood lignins by method of density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) with 6-31G(d,p) as basis set were carried out. These calculations showed that frequencies of normal vibrations of fragment with β-alkyl-aryl linkage are close to the experimental values of the IR absorption bands of lignin, and infrared spectrum of this structure is similar to the experimental spectrum of lignin. The calculations with accounting for the solvent showed a strong increase in the intensity of the majority of the bands and the solvent effect on the frequencies of vibrations.

  2. Efficient and accurate fragmentation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Spencer R; Bertoni, Colleen; Brorsen, Kurt R; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Three novel fragmentation methods that are available in the electronic structure program GAMESS (general atomic and molecular electronic structure system) are discussed in this Account. The fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method can be combined with any electronic structure method to perform accurate calculations on large molecular species with no reliance on capping atoms or empirical parameters. The FMO method is highly scalable and can take advantage of massively parallel computer systems. For example, the method has been shown to scale nearly linearly on up to 131 000 processor cores for calculations on large water clusters. There have been many applications of the FMO method to large molecular clusters, to biomolecules (e.g., proteins), and to materials that are used as heterogeneous catalysts. The effective fragment potential (EFP) method is a model potential approach that is fully derived from first principles and has no empirically fitted parameters. Consequently, an EFP can be generated for any molecule by a simple preparatory GAMESS calculation. The EFP method provides accurate descriptions of all types of intermolecular interactions, including Coulombic interactions, polarization/induction, exchange repulsion, dispersion, and charge transfer. The EFP method has been applied successfully to the study of liquid water, π-stacking in substituted benzenes and in DNA base pairs, solvent effects on positive and negative ions, electronic spectra and dynamics, non-adiabatic phenomena in electronic excited states, and nonlinear excited state properties. The effective fragment molecular orbital (EFMO) method is a merger of the FMO and EFP methods, in which interfragment interactions are described by the EFP potential, rather than the less accurate electrostatic potential. The use of EFP in this manner facilitates the use of a smaller value for the distance cut-off (Rcut). Rcut determines the distance at which EFP interactions replace fully quantum

  3. Excessive cytosolic DNA fragments as a potential trigger of Graves’ disease: an encrypted message sent by animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqian Luo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Graves’ hyperthyroidism is caused by autoantibodies directed against the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR that mimic the action of TSH. The establishment of Graves’ hyperthyroidism in experimental animals has proven to be an important approach to dissect the mechanisms of self-tolerance breakdown that lead to the production of thyroid-stimulating TSHR autoantibodies (TSAbs. ‘Shimojo’s model was the first successful Graves’ animal model, wherein immunization with fibroblasts cells expressing TSHR and a major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II molecule, but not either alone, induced TSAb production in AKR/N (H-2k mice. This model highlights the importance of coincident MHC class II expression on TSHR-expressing cells in the development of Graves’ hyperthyroidism. These data are also in agreement with the observation that Graves’ thyrocytes often aberrantly express MHC class II antigens via mechanisms that remain unclear. Our group demonstrated that cytosolic self-genomic DNA fragments derived from sterile injured cells can induce aberrant MHC class II expression and production of multiple inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in thyrocytes in vitro, suggesting that severe cell injury may initiate immune responses in a way that is relevant to thyroid autoimmunity mediated by cytosolic DNA signaling. Furthermore, more recent successful Graves’ animal models were primarily established by immunizing mice with TSHR-expressing plasmids or adenovirus. In these models, double-stranded DNA vaccine contents presumably exert similar immune-activating effect in cells at inoculation sites and thus might pave the way toward successful Graves’ animal models. This review focuses on evidence suggesting that cell injury-derived self-DNA fragments could act as Graves’ disease triggers.

  4. Magnetic-Moment Fragmentation and Monopole Crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Brooks-Bartlett

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Coulomb phase, with its dipolar correlations and pinch-point–scattering patterns, is central to discussions of geometrically frustrated systems, from water ice to binary and mixed-valence alloys, as well as numerous examples of frustrated magnets. The emergent Coulomb phase of lattice-based systems has been associated with divergence-free fields and the absence of long-range order. Here, we go beyond this paradigm, demonstrating that a Coulomb phase can emerge naturally as a persistent fluctuating background in an otherwise ordered system. To explain this behavior, we introduce the concept of the fragmentation of the field of magnetic moments into two parts, one giving rise to a magnetic monopole crystal, the other a magnetic fluid with all the characteristics of an emergent Coulomb phase. Our theory is backed up by numerical simulations, and we discuss its importance with regard to the interpretation of a number of experimental results.

  5. Estimates of the influence of nuclear deformations on the lifetimes of heavy-fragment radioactivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silisteanu, I.; Ivascu, M. (Institutul Central de Fizica, Bucharest (Romania))

    1989-09-01

    We estimate the influence of nuclear ground-state deformations on the lifetimes of heavy-fragment radioactivities. It is shown that deviations from sphericity of the fragments lead to significant corrections of the lifetimes of heavy-fragment radioactivities. Other ideas and refinements recognised within fission-like calculations are extended here to include the excitation of collective modes as a mechanism for enhancing heavy-fragment radioactivity. The estimations are performed for the most interesting cases under the current experimental search. (author).

  6. Fragmentation in the biopharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Andrew D; Varela, Francisco E

    2017-02-01

    The large number of biopharmaceutical mergers and acquisitions (M&A) that occurred over the past decade has generated questions about whether the industry is consolidating around too-few players, negatively impacting both the number of medicines developed and overall innovation. However, closer examination of the level of biopharmaceutical consolidation by prescription sales shows that the industry was more fragmented in 2015 than in 2003. The trend towards increasing fragmentation is also observed across noncommercial and independent metrics over the same time period. The number and size of M&A deals has masked an active and competitive marketplace in which market growth and the number of companies entering the market exceeded the apparent reduction in the number of players caused by acquisitions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fragment separator momentum compression schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, Laura, E-mail: bandura@anl.gov [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab, Michigan State University, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Erdelyi, Bela [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States); Hausmann, Marc [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Kubo, Toshiyuki [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako (Japan); Nolen, Jerry [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Portillo, Mauricio [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Sherrill, Bradley M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab, Michigan State University, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

    2011-07-21

    We present a scheme to use a fragment separator and profiled energy degraders to transfer longitudinal phase space into transverse phase space while maintaining achromatic beam transport. The first order beam optics theory of the method is presented and the consequent enlargement of the transverse phase space is discussed. An interesting consequence of the technique is that the first order mass resolving power of the system is determined by the first dispersive section up to the energy degrader, independent of whether or not momentum compression is used. The fragment separator at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is a specific application of this technique and is described along with simulations by the code COSY INFINITY.

  8. Fragment separator momentum compression schemes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandura, L.; Erdelyi, B.; Hausmann, M.; Kubo, T.; Nolen, J.; Portillo, M.; Sherrill, B.M. (Physics); (MSU); (Northern Illinois Univ.); (RIKEN)

    2011-07-21

    We present a scheme to use a fragment separator and profiled energy degraders to transfer longitudinal phase space into transverse phase space while maintaining achromatic beam transport. The first order beam optics theory of the method is presented and the consequent enlargement of the transverse phase space is discussed. An interesting consequence of the technique is that the first order mass resolving power of the system is determined by the first dispersive section up to the energy degrader, independent of whether or not momentum compression is used. The fragment separator at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is a specific application of this technique and is described along with simulations by the code COSY INFINITY.

  9. Fragmentation in filamentary molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Contreras, Yanett; Rathborne, Jill M; Sanhueza, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Recent surveys of dust continuum emission at sub-mm wavelengths have shown that filamentary molecular clouds are ubiquitous along the Galactic plane. These structures are inhomogeneous, with over-densities that are sometimes associated with infrared emission and active of star formation. To investigate the connection between filaments and star formation, requires an understanding of the processes that lead to the fragmentation of filaments and a determination of the physical properties of the over-densities (clumps). In this paper, we present a multi-wavelength study of five filamentary molecular clouds, containing several clumps in different evolutionary stages of star formation. We analyse the fragmentation of the filaments and derive the physical properties of their clumps. We find that the clumps in all filaments have a characteristic spacing consistent with the prediction of the `sausage' instability theory, regardless of the complex morphology of the filaments or their evolutionary stage. We also find t...

  10. Fragmentering og korridorer i landskabet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershøj, M.; Madsen, A. B.

    , at fragmentering af habitater resulterer i en reduktion og isolering af mange plante- og dyrepopulationer. Det er desuden vist, at korridorer har en funktion som habitater, hvilket er medvirkende til, at et område med korridorer kan huse flere arter og individer end et tilsvarende område uden korridorer. Der......Rapporten indeholder en litteraturudredning, der er baseret på en bearbejdning af den tilgængelige nationale og internationale litteratur omhandlende fragmentering og korridorer på det botaniske og zoologiske område. I alt 1.063 titler ligger til grund for udredningen. Udredningen har vist...... mangler dog entydige beviser for, at korridorer kan være af afgørende betydning for rekolonisering af habitater, i hvilke en given art er forsvundet. Afslutningsvis gives en liste med forskningsbehov samt en række anbefalinger....

  11. A murine experimental anthracycline extravasation model: pathology and study of the involvement of topoisomerase II alpha and iron in the mechanism of tissue damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The bisdioxopiperazine topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor dexrazoxane has successfully been introduced into the clinic as an antidote to accidental anthracycline extravasation based on our preclinical mouse studies. The histology of this mouse extravasation model was investigated and found...... with dense dermal connective tissue. The extension of this fibrosis was quantified, and dexrazoxane intervention resulted in a statistically significant decrease in fibrosis extension, as also observed in the clinic. Several mechanisms have been proposed in anthracycline extravasation cytotoxicity, and we...... tested two major hypotheses: (1) interaction with topoisomerase II alpha and (2) the formation of tissue damaging reactive oxygen species following redox cycling of an anthracycline Fe(2+) complex. Dexrazoxane could minimise skin damage via both mechanisms, as it stops the catalytic activity...

  12. Numerical solution of $Q^2$ evolution equations for fragmentation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Hirai, M

    2011-01-01

    Semi-inclusive hadron-production processes are becoming important in high-energy hadron reactions. They are used for investigating properties of quark-hadron matters in heavy-ion collisions, for finding the origin of nucleon spin in polarized lepton-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon reactions, and possibly for finding exotic hadrons. In describing the hadron-production cross sections in high-energy reactions, fragmentation functions are essential quantities. A fragmentation function indicates the probability of producing a hadron from a parton. Its $Q^2$ dependence is described by the standard DGLAP (Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi) evolution equations, which are often used in theoretical and experimental analyses of the fragmentation functions and in calculating semi-inclusive cross sections. The DGLAP equations are complicated integro-differential equations, which cannot be solved in an analytical method. In this work, a simple method is employed for solving the evolution equations by using Gauss-Legen...

  13. New neutron-deficient isotopes from 78Kr fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, B.; Goigoux, T.; Ascher, P.; Gerbaux, M.; Giovinazzo, J.; Grévy, S.; Kurtukian Nieto, T.; Magron, C.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Guadilla, V.; Montaner-Piza, A.; Morales, A. I.; Orrigo, S. E. A.; Rubio, B.; Ahn, D. S.; Doornenbal, P.; Fukuda, N.; Inabe, N.; Kiss, G.; Kubo, T.; Kubono, S.; Nishimura, S.; Phong, V. H.; Sakurai, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Söderström, P.-A.; Sumikama, T.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Wu, J.; Fujita, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Gelletly, W.; Aguilera, P.; Molina, F.; Diel, F.; Lubos, D.; de Angelis, G.; Napoli, D.; Borcea, C.; Boso, A.; Cakirli, R. B.; Ganioglu, E.; Chiba, J.; Nishimura, D.; Oikawa, H.; Takei, Y.; Yagi, S.; Wimmer, K.; de France, G.; Go, S.

    2016-06-01

    In an experiment with the RIKEN projectile fragment separator called BigRIPS at the RIKEN Nishina Center, the fragmentation of a 78Kr beam allowed the observation of new neutron-deficient isotopes at the proton drip line. Clean identification spectra could be produced and 63Se,67Kr, and 68Kr were identified for the first time. In addition, 59Ge was also observed. Three of these isotopes, 59Ge,63Se, and 67Kr, are potential candidates for ground-state two-proton radioactivity. In addition, the isotopes 58Ge,62Se, and 66Kr were also sought but without success. The present experiment also allowed the determination of production cross sections for some of the most exotic isotopes. These measurements confirm the trend already observed that the empirical parametrization of fragmentation cross sections, EPAX, significantly overestimates experimental cross sections in this mass region.

  14. Apoptosis in immune cells induced by fission fragment 147Pm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuShou-Peng; ZhangLan-Sheng; 等

    1997-01-01

    Apoptosis in human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Molt-4 cell and macrophage cell line Ana-1 cell could be induced by fission fragment 147Pm,The cumulative absorption dose of 147Pm in cultural cells through different periods were estimated.By using fluorescence microscopy and microautoradiographic tracing it can be found that Molt-4 and Anal-1 cells internally irradiated by 147Pm,displayed an obvious nuclear fragmentation and a marked phknosis in immune cell nucei,as well as DNA chain fragmentation and apoptotic bodies formation.The microautoradiographic study showed that 147Pm could infiltrate thourgh cell membrane and displayed membrane-seeking condensation in cells.At the same time.the membrane-bounded apoptotic bodies were observed.Experimental results in recent study provide evidence that Molt-4 and Ano-1 immune cells undergo apoptosis while internally irradiated with 147Pm.

  15. Source size scaling of fragment production in projectile breakup

    CERN Document Server

    Beaulieu, L; Fox, D; Das-Gupta, S; Pan, J; Ball, G C; Djerroud, B; Doré, D; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Guinet, D; Hagberg, E; Horn, D; Laforest, R; Larochelle, Y; Lautesse, P; Samri, M; Roy, R; Saint-Pierre, C

    1996-01-01

    Fragment production has been studied as a function of the source mass and excitation energy in peripheral collisions of $^{35}$Cl+$^{197}$Au at 43 MeV/nucleon and $^{70}$Ge+$^{nat}$Ti at 35 MeV/nucleon. The results are compared to the Au+Au data at 600 MeV/nucleon obtained by the ALADIN collaboration. A mass scaling, by $A_{source} \\sim$ 35 to 190, strongly correlated to excitation energy per nucleon, is presented, suggesting a thermal fragment production mechanism. Comparisons to a standard sequential decay model and the lattice-gas model are made. Fragment emission from a hot, rotating source is unable to reproduce the experimental source size scaling.

  16. The fragmentation of Kosmos 2163

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    On 6 Dec. 1991 Kosmos 2163, a maneuverable Soviet spacecraft which had been in orbit for 58 days, experienced a major breakup at an altitude of approximately 210 km. Although numerous pieces of debris were created, the fragments decayed rapidly leaving no long-term impact on the near-Earth environment. The assessed cause of the event is the deliberate detonation of an explosive device. Details of this event are presented.

  17. Modeling of Fragmentation of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parul; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Carlozzi, Alexander; Hart, Kenneth; Bryson, Katie; Sears, Derek

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand fragmentation and fracture of a given asteroid and mechanisms of break-up. The focus of the present work is to develop modeling techniques for stony asteroids in 10m-100m range to answer two questions: 1) What is the role of material makeup of an asteroid in the stress distribution? 2)How is stress distribution altered in the presence of pre-existing defects?

  18. Experimental electron energy-loss spectra and cross sections for the 4/2/S - 4/2/P transition in Zn II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutjian, A.; Newell, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    Electron energy-loss spectra and differential cross sections are reported for inelastic scattering from Zn II. Measurements were carried out in a crossed electron beam-ion beam apparatus, at incident electron energies of 30, 40, 50, 60, 75, 85, and 100 eV, and at a scattering angle of 14 deg. The present results are the first reported measurements of inelastic electron scattering from an ion.

  19. Mechanistic insights into acetophenone transfer hydrogenation catalyzed by half-sandwich ruthenium(II) complexes containing 2-(diphenylphosphanyl)aniline - a combined experimental and theoretical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bacchi; M. Balordi; R. Cammi; L. Elviri; C. Pelizzi; F. Picchioni; V. Verdolino; K. Goubitz; R. Peschar; P. Pelagatti

    2008-01-01

    Several new half-sandwich ruthenium(II) complexes containing 2-(diphenyphosphanyl)aniline (PNH2) of formula {Ru[(kappa P-2,N)PNH2](p-cymene)Cl}Y [Y = Cl (1a), PF6 (1b), BF4 (1c), BPh4 (1d), TfO (1e)] were synthesized and fully characterized both in solution (H-1 NMR and P-31{H-1) NMR spectroscopy) a

  20. Mass dependence of critical parameter and multiplicity of intermediatemass fragments in heavy ion reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The mass dependence of critical parameters for the liquid-gas phase transition andmultiplicity of intermediate mass fragment in the heavyion reaction is qualitatively explored under the frameworkof lattice gas model. Some results are compared with experimental data.