WorldWideScience

Sample records for fracture surface observations

  1. SEM observation and wettability of variously processed and fractured surface of dental zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarumi, Naoyoshi; Uo, Motohiro; Yamaga, Eiji; Watari, Fumio

    2012-12-01

    Current dental zirconia has several problems in clinical application such as chipping, fracture and detachment. To reduce these problems the surface after various treatments was analyzed by SEM observation, contact angle measurement and surface roughness measurement, and compared. The surface after mirror polishing was smooth. Porcelain layering was smooth except large formed grooves by bubbles. After sandblast and tribochemical treatments, the surfaces showed several micron-sized caving with micron to submicron-level irregularities. Sandblast and tribochemical treatments with the lager roughness had the smaller water contact angle than silicone wheel polishing. Clinically fractured surface of zirconia showed a more complex structure than manually fractured surface, which may be due to the various mode of stress to be imposed repetitively to various direction.

  2. Surface Deformation and Direct Field Observation to Constrain Conceptual Models of Hydraulic Fracture Growth and Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, W.; Murdoch, L.

    2016-12-01

    Hydraulic fractures can be created in shallow soil or bedrock to promote processes that destroy or remove chemical contaminants. The form of the fracture plays an important role in how it is used in such applications. We created more than 4500 environmental hydraulic fractures at approximately 300 sites since 1990, and we measured surface deformation at many. Several of these sites subsequently were excavated to evaluate fracture form in detail. In one recent example, six hydraulic fractures were created at 1.5m depth while we measured upward displacement and tilt at 15 overlying locations. We excavated in the vicinities of two of the fractures and mapped the exposed fractures. Tilt vectors were initially symmetric about the borehole but radiated from a point that moved southwest with time. Upward displacement of as much as 2.5 cm covered a region 5m to 6m across. The maximum displacement was roughly at the center of the deformed region but was 2m southwest of the borehole, consistent with the tilt data. Excavation revealed an oblong, proppant-filled fracture over 4.2 m in length with a maximum thickness of 1 cm, so the proppant covers a region that is smaller than the uplifted area and the proppant thickness is roughly half of the uplift. The fracture was shaped like a shallow saucer with maximum dips of approximately 15o at the southwestern end. The pattern of tilt and uplift generally reflect the aperture of the underlying pressurized fracture, but the deformation extends beyond the extent of the sand proppant so a quantitative interpretation requires inversion. Inversion of the tilt data using a simple double dislocation model under-estimates the extent but correctly predicts the depth, orientation, and off-centered location. Inversion of uplift using a model that assumes the overburden deforms like a plate over-estimates the extent. Neither can characterize the curved shape. A forward model using FEM analysis capable of representing 3D shapes is capable of

  3. Interpretation of Microseismicity Observed From Surface and Borehole Seismic Arrays During Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale - Bedding Plane Slip Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, F.; Jechumtalova, Z.; Eisner, L.

    2017-12-01

    We present a geomechanical model explaining microseismicity induced by hydraulic fracturing in shales developed from many datasets acquired with two most common types of seismic monitoring arrays, surface and dual-borehole arrays. The geomechanical model explains the observed source mechanisms and locations of induced events from two stimulated shale reservoirs. We observe shear dip-slip source mechanisms with nodal planes aligned with location trends. We show that such seismicity can be explained as a shearing along bedding planes caused by aseismic opening of vertical hydraulic fractures. The source mechanism inversion was applied only to selected high-quality events with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. We inverted P- and P- and S-wave arrival amplitudes to full-moment tensor and decomposed it to shear, volumetric and compensated linear vector dipole components. We also tested an effect of noise presented in the data to evaluate reliability of non-shear components. The observed seismicity from both surface and downhole monitoring of shale stimulations is very similar. The locations of induced microseismic events are limited to narrow depth intervals and propagate along distinct trend(s) showing fracture propagation in direction of maximum horizontal stress from injection well(s). The source mechanisms have a small non-shear component which can be partly explained as an effect of noise in the data, i.e. events represent shearing on faults. We observe predominantly dip-slip events with a strike of the steeper (almost vertical) nodal plane parallel to the fracture propagation. Therefore the other possible nodal plane is almost horizontal. The rake angles of the observed mechanisms divide these dip-slips into two groups with opposite polarities. It means that we observe opposite movements on the nearly identically oriented faults. Realizing a typical structural weakness of shale in horizontal planes, we interpret observed microseismicity as a result of shearing

  4. In situ observation of fluoride-ion-induced hydroxyapatite-collagen detachment on bone fracture surfaces by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindt, J H; Thurner, P J; Lauer, M E; Bosma, B L; Schitter, G; Fantner, G E; Izumi, M; Weaver, J C; Morse, D E; Hansma, P K

    2007-01-01

    The topography of freshly fractured bovine and human bone surfaces was determined by the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Fracture surfaces from both kinds of samples exhibited complex landscapes formed by hydroxyapatite mineral platelets with lateral dimensions ranging from ∼90 nm x 60 nm to ∼20 nm x 20 nm. Novel AFM techniques were used to study these fracture surfaces during various chemical treatments. Significant topographical changes were observed following exposure to aqueous solutions of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or highly concentrated sodium fluoride (NaF). Both treatments resulted in the apparent loss of the hydroxyapatite mineral platelets on a timescale of a few seconds. Collagen fibrils situated beneath the overlying mineral platelets were clearly exposed and could be resolved with high spatial resolution in the acquired AFM images. Time-dependent mass loss experiments revealed that the applied agents (NaF or EDTA) had very different resulting effects. Despite the fact that the two treatments exhibited nearly identical results following examination by AFM, bulk bone samples treated with EDTA exhibited a ∼70% mass loss after 72 h, whereas for the NaF-treated samples, the mass loss was only of the order of ∼10%. These results support those obtained from previous mechanical testing experiments, suggesting that enhanced formation of superficial fluoroapatite dramatically weakens the protein-hydroxyapatite interfaces. Additionally, we discovered that treatment with aqueous solutions of NaF resulted in the effective extraction of noncollagenous proteins from bone powder

  5. Physical fracture properties (fracture surfaces as information sources; crackgrowth and fracture mechanisms; exemples of cracks)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meny, Lucienne.

    1979-06-01

    Fracture surfaces are considered as a useful source of informations: an introduction to fractography is presented; the fracture surface may be observed through X ray microanalysis, and other physical methods such as Auger electron spectroscopy or secundary ion emission. The mechanisms of macroscopic and microscopic crackgrowth and fracture are described, in the case of unstable fracture (cleavage, ductile with shear, intergranular brittleness) and of progressive crack propagation (creep, fatigue). Exemples of cracks are presented in the last chapter [fr

  6. Water infiltration into exposed fractured rock surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, T.C.; Evans, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    Fractured rock media are present at many existing and potential waste disposal sites, yet characterization data and physical relationships are not well developed for such media. This study focused on water infiltration characteristics of an exposed fractured rock as an approach for defining the upper boundary condition for unsaturated-zone water percolation and contaminant transport modeling. Two adjacent watersheds of 0.24 and 1.73 ha with slopes up to 45% were instrumented for measuring rainfall and runoff. Fracture density was measured from readily observable fracture traces on the surface. Three methods were employed to evaluate the rainfall-runoff relationship. The first method used the annual totals and indicated that only 22.5% of rainfall occurred as runoff for the 1990-1991 water year, which demonstrates a high water intake rate by the exposed fracture system. The second method employed total rainfall and runoff for individual storms in conjunction with the commonly used USDA Soil Conservation Service curve number method developed for wide ranges of soils and vegetation. Curve numbers between 75 and 85 were observed for summer and winter storms with dry antecedent runoff conditions, while values exceeded 90 for wet conditions. The third method used a mass-balance approach for four major storms, which indicated that water intake rates ranged from 2.0 to 7.3 mm h -1 , yielding fracture intake velocities ranging from 122 to 293 m h -1 . The three analyses show the complexity of the infiltration process for fractured rock. However, they contribute to a better understanding of the upper boundary condition for predicting contaminant transport through an unsaturated fractured rock medium. 17 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  7. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2007-09-13

    The self-potential (SP) response during hydraulic fracturing of intact Sierra granite was investigated in the laboratory. Excellent correlation of pressure drop and SP suggests that the SP response is created primarily by electrokinetic coupling. For low pressures, the variation of SP with pressure drop is linear, indicating a constant coupling coefficient (Cc) of -200 mV/MPa. However for pressure drops >2 MPa, the magnitude of the Cc increases by 80% in an exponential trend. This increasing Cc is related to increasing permeability at high pore pressures caused by dilatancy of micro-cracks, and is explained by a decrease in the hydraulic tortuosity. Resistivity measurements reveal a decrease of 2% prior to hydraulic fracturing and a decrease of {approx}35% after fracturing. An asymmetric spatial SP response created by injectate diffusion into dilatant zones is observed prior to hydraulic fracturing, and in most cases this SP variation revealed the impending crack geometry seconds before failure. At rupture, injectate rushes into the new fracture area where the zeta potential is different than in the rock porosity, and an anomalous SP spike is observed. After fracturing, the spatial SP distribution reveals the direction of fracture propagation. Finally, during tensile cracking in a point load device with no water flow, a SP spike is observed that is caused by contact electrification. However, the time constant of this event is much less than that for transients observed during hydraulic fracturing, suggesting that SP created solely from material fracture does not contribute to the SP response during hydraulic fracturing.

  8. Uruguay - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface weather observation forms for 26 stations in Uruguay. Period of record 1896-2005, with two to eight observations per day. Files created through a...

  9. Mexico - Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Mexican Surface Daily Observations taken at 94 observatories located throughout Mexico, beginning in 1872 and going up through 1981. The data resided on paper...

  10. Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Surface Weather Observation Collection consists primarily of hourly, synoptic, daily, and monthly forms submitted to the archive by the National Weather Service...

  11. Land Surface Weather Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — METAR is the international standard code format for hourly surface weather observations. The acronym roughly translates from French as Aviation Routine Weather...

  12. Surface Weather Observations Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Weather Observation 1001 Forms is a set of historical manuscript records for the period 1893-1948. The collection includes two very similar form types: Form...

  13. Natural fracture systems on planetary surfaces: Genetic classification and pattern randomness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossbacher, Lisa A.

    1987-01-01

    One method for classifying natural fracture systems is by fracture genesis. This approach involves the physics of the formation process, and it has been used most frequently in attempts to predict subsurface fractures and petroleum reservoir productivity. This classification system can also be applied to larger fracture systems on any planetary surface. One problem in applying this classification system to planetary surfaces is that it was developed for ralatively small-scale fractures that would influence porosity, particularly as observed in a core sample. Planetary studies also require consideration of large-scale fractures. Nevertheless, this system offers some valuable perspectives on fracture systems of any size.

  14. Dynamic characterisation of the specific surface area for fracture networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovic, V.

    2017-12-01

    One important application of chemical transport is geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste for which crystalline rock is a prime candidate for instance in Scandinavia. Interconnected heterogeneous fractures of sparsely fractured rock such as granite, act as conduits for transport of dissolved tracers. Fluid flow is known to be highly channelized in such rocks. Channels imply narrow flow paths, adjacent to essentially stagnant water in the fracture and/or the rock matrix. Tracers are transported along channelised flow paths and retained by minerals and/or stagnant water, depending on their sorption properties; this mechanism is critical for rocks to act as a barrier and ultimately provide safety for a geological repository. The sorbing tracers are retained by diffusion and sorption on mineral surfaces, whereas non-sorbing tracers can be retained only by diffusion into stagnant water of fractures. The retention and transport properties of a sparsely fractured rock will primarily depend on the specific surface area (SSA) of the fracture network which is determined by the heterogeneous structure and flow. The main challenge when characterising SSA on the field-scale is its dependence on the flow dynamics. We first define SSA as a physical quantity and clarify its importance for chemical transport. A methodology for dynamic characterisation of SSA in fracture networks is proposed that relies on three sets of data: i) Flow rate data as obtained by a flow logging procedure; ii) transmissivity data as obtained by pumping tests; iii) fracture network data as obtained from outcrop and geophysical observations. The proposed methodology utilises these data directly as well as indirectly through flow and particle tracking simulations in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks. The methodology is exemplified using specific data from the Swedish site Laxemar. The potential impact of uncertainties is of particular significance and is illustrated for radionuclide

  15. Fracture surface energy of the Punchbowl fault, San Andreas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Judith S; Chester, Frederick M; Kronenberg, Andreas K

    2005-09-01

    Fracture energy is a form of latent heat required to create an earthquake rupture surface and is related to parameters governing rupture propagation and processes of slip weakening. Fracture energy has been estimated from seismological and experimental rock deformation data, yet its magnitude, mechanisms of rupture surface formation and processes leading to slip weakening are not well defined. Here we quantify structural observations of the Punchbowl fault, a large-displacement exhumed fault in the San Andreas fault system, and show that the energy required to create the fracture surface area in the fault is about 300 times greater than seismological estimates would predict for a single large earthquake. If fracture energy is attributed entirely to the production of fracture surfaces, then all of the fracture surface area in the Punchbowl fault could have been produced by earthquake displacements totalling <1 km. But this would only account for a small fraction of the total energy budget, and therefore additional processes probably contributed to slip weakening during earthquake rupture.

  16. Nano-scale characterization of fracture surfaces of blended epoxy resins related to fracture properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haris, Andi [Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Adachi, Tadaharu [Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)], E-mail: adachi@mech.titech.ac.jp; Araki, Wakako [Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2008-11-25

    The fracture surface morphologies of epoxy resins with different macromolecular structures created by blending two epoxy monomers with different molecular weights (Epikote 828 and Epikote 1001) were characterized using atomic force microscopy with different sampling intervals. A measured fracture surface parameter (roughness ratio, S{sub dr}) was quantitatively analyzed from the topographic images and then correlated to the measured fracture energy, G{sub IC}. The fracture energy increased with the content of Epikote 1001 monomer, {phi}. The nano-scale surface roughness strongly depended on {phi}, meaning that each epoxy resin can be considered to have a different material structure in several nano-scales; heterogeneity, network or crosslink, which can be observed at higher resolution, 6 nm for 3 x 3 {mu}m{sup 2} scanning area, and 2 nm for 1 x 1 {mu}m{sup 2} scanning area. The fracture property is thus sensitive to the observed nano-structure whereas the glassy modulus is not. Therefore, the combination of the viscoelastic and fracture properties can be tailored by changing the network or crosslink structure by blending monomers with different molecular weights.

  17. Interpretation and significance of reverse chevron-shaped markings on fracture surfaces of API X100 pipeline steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowards, Jeffrey W.; McCowan, Chris N.; Drexler, Elizabeth S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigated fractures of X100 steel linepine produced during fracture mechanics testing. ► Fractures exhibited a unique chevron pattern that points in the direction of crack propagation. ► A qualitative model is proposed to explain the fracture pattern formation. ► Findings indicate that careful interpretation of ductile material fractures is necessary. - Abstract: Fracture surfaces of X100 pipeline steels were examined with optical and electron microscopy after crack tip opening angle fracture testing. Some fracture surfaces exhibited chevron-shaped fracture patterns that are markedly different from classic chevron fracture. The chevron-shaped markings on the X100 fracture surfaces point in the direction of crack growth, rather than towards the location of fracture initiation, as observed in classic cases of chevron fracture. Existing models, predicting formation of chevron fracture patterns, do not explain the fracture behavior observed for X100 steel. A mechanism is proposed where reverse chevron-shaped patterns are developed due to the shape of the crack front itself. The chevron shape forms as a result of crack tunneling, and the overall pattern is developed on the fracture surface due to intermittent crack growth, resulting in alternating regions (bands) of fast fracture and slower, more ductile fracture. The contrast between these bands of alternating fracture defines the chevron. Care should be taken during interpretation of intermittent chevron markings on fractures of ductile materials, as they may point away from rather than towards the origin of fracture.

  18. On the nature of groundwater flow paths: Observations at fractures and fracture coating at road-cuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, A.; Hellmuth, K.-H.

    2001-01-01

    Preliminary investigations were conducted at fractures and their surface coatings exposed along recently quarried road-cuts to the north and east of Helsinki. While (sub)horizontal fractures were usually rare at depths more than a few meters, (sub)vertical fractures were dominating. Fracture fillings/coatings were mostly absent in the formers and generally thin in the latters. Often these fillings/coatings were representative for processes which occurred in the far past at conditions others than present ambient ones. But, on the other hand only a few cases of more intense rock matrix alteration in connection with these processes were observed. Post-glacial weathering has caused at many of the investigated sites surficial oxidation of Fe(II)-rich minerals which has led to mostly thin coatings of fracture surfaces by soft amorphous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides. Surface coatings were generally homogeneous with fairly even surface structures. It was found that at road-cuts huge areas of undamaged fracture surfaces were accessable to investigations. These can serve for demonstration purposes for the nature of contact surface between groundwater and rock. Despite some oxidation, these exposures give a fairly representative impression of the situation at greater depth where similar fracture types were reported in repository site investigations. (orig.)

  19. Fracture initiation associated with chemical degradation: observation and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byoungho Choi; Zhenwen Zhou; Chudnovsky, Alexander [Illinois Univ., Dept. of Civil and Materials Engineering (M/C 246), Chicago, IL (United States); Stivala, Salvatore S. [Stevens Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Hoboken, NJ (United States); Sehanobish, Kalyan; Bosnyak, Clive P. [Dow Chemical Co., Freeport, TX (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The fracture initiation in engineering thermoplastics resulting from chemical degradation is usually observed in the form of a microcrack network within a surface layer of degraded polymer exposed to a combined action of mechanical stresses and chemically aggressive environment. Degradation of polymers is usually manifested in a reduction of molecular weight, increase of crystallinity in semi crystalline polymers, increase of material density, a subtle increase in yield strength, and a dramatic reduction in toughness. An increase in material density, i.e., shrinkage of the degraded layer is constrained by adjacent unchanged material results in a buildup of tensile stress within the degraded layer and compressive stress in the adjacent unchanged material due to increasing incompatibility between the two. These stresses are an addition to preexisting manufacturing and service stresses. At a certain level of degradation, a combination of toughness reduction and increase of tensile stress result in fracture initiation. A quantitative model of the described above processes is presented in these work. For specificity, the internally pressurized plastic pipes that transport a fluid containing a chemically aggressive (oxidizing) agent is used as the model of fracture initiation. Experimental observations of material density and toughness dependence on degradation reported elsewhere are employed in the model. An equation for determination of a critical level of degradation corresponding to the offset of fracture is constructed. The critical level of degradation for fracture initiation depends on the rates of toughness deterioration and build-up of the degradation related stresses as well as on the manufacturing and service stresses. A method for evaluation of the time interval prior to fracture initiation is also formulated. (Author)

  20. Metallography of the indented aluminium sheet fracture surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.; Qaiser, S.; Haq, A.U.; Atkins, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    It was experimentally observed that indentation of aluminium sheet samples with a sharp tool leads the off cut metal into a flare out-curvature, whose shape depends upon the geometry of the tool, applied force, displacement, material properties etc. The crack initiation, crack propagation and fracture surfaces were studied. Type grain, fibers, cut marks and voids were analyzed on optical and scanning electron microscopes to see how these were produced,. and their relationship to the material inherent properties, since this phenomenon has hot been studied so far. The sharp tool angles were responsible for the plastic flow. Plastic work per volume, fracture toughness and deformation area of the indented material. The metallographic information provided details of sheet metal deformation, and failure into the particular shapes represented on the fracture surfaces. (author)

  1. Compressive Fracture of Brittle Geomaterial: Fractal Features of Compression-Induced Fracture Surfaces and Failure Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive fracture is one of the most common failure patterns in geotechnical engineering. For better understanding of the local failure mechanism of compressive fractures of brittle geomaterials, three compressive fracture tests were conducted on sandstone. Edge cracked semicircular bend specimens were used and, consequently, fresh and unfilled compressive fracture surfaces were obtained. A laser profilometer was employed to measure the topography of each rough fracture surface, followed by fractal analysis of the irregularities of the obtained compression-induced fracture surfaces using the cubic cover method. To carry out a contrastive analysis with the results of compressive fracture tests, three tension mode fracture tests were also conducted and the fractal features of the obtained fracture surfaces were determined. The obtained average result of the fractal dimensions of the compression-induced surfaces was 2.070, whereas the average result was 2.067 for the tension-induced fracture surfaces. No remarkable differences between the fractal dimensions of the compression-induced and tension-induced fracture surfaces may indicate that compressive fracture may occur, at least on the investigative scale of this work, in a similar manner to tension fracture.

  2. Surface Weather Observations Hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard hourly observations taken at Weather Bureau/National Weather Service offices and airports throughout the United States. Hourly observations began during the...

  3. Surface Weather Observing Manuals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Manuals and instructions for taking weather observations. Includes the annual Weather Bureau 'Instructions for Preparing Meteorological Forms...' and early airways...

  4. Surface Observation Climatic Summaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    FROK SOURLY OBSERVATIONS smsTICO N•IMER: 747880 S13MTIOR NAME: MACDILL AFB/ TAIPA FL PERIOD OF RECORD: AUG 80 - JUL 90 LST TO UPTC: + 5 MOMI*: SEP...AFB/ TAIPA FL PERIOD OF RECORD: AUG 80 - JUL 90 LST To UTC: + 5 MONTH: NOV HOURS: 15-17 °... o........° ..... ............ ........ .. o...OCCURRENCE OF CEILING VERSUS VISIBILITY UsAFrTAC, ASHEVILLE NC FROM BOURLY OBSERVATIONS STATION NUMBER: 747880 STATION mk4: MAcDILL AFB/ TAiPA FL PERIOD OF

  5. Fiber-Laden Proppant Placement in a Deformable Fracture: Influence of Fracture-Surface Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, R.; Detwiler, R. L.; Prioul, R.; Xu, W.; Ortega, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    During the shut-in stage of hydraulic fracturing, aperture decreases and proppant is trapped between the fracture walls. The amount and distribution of the trapped proppant determines the fracture permeability after fracture closure. Conventional fluids used in hydraulic fracturing typically form a uniform distribution of proppant within the fracture, i.e. proppant pack, and the fracture permeability is that of the proppant pack. In recent experiments, the addition of fibers to proppant mixtures has been shown to result in the formation of proppant-fiber islands surrounded by solids-free regions. The formation of such proppant-fiber islands has the potential to increase fracture permeability, however, the behavior of these islands when subjected to an applied stress is unknown. We present preliminary results from a series of experiments of fiber-proppant settling inside a deformable fracture with both smooth and rough walls. The experimental system consists of a 15cm x 15cm fracture cell that allows the direct application of a normal stress to the fracture surfaces while the entire flow field is imaged using a high-resolution CCD camera. The proppant mixture was prepared by adding 17.7% v/v of quartz sand and 0.4% v/v of polymeric fibers to a highly shear-thinning viscous fluid (0.48% w/w guar-water). The proppant mixture was injected into the fracture and allowed to settle uninterrupted for two hours before we incrementally increased the normal stress applied to the fracture surfaces from 0 to 90 kPa. The results for both smooth- and rough-walled fractures demonstrate the development of isolated proppant-fiber islands with some interconnected proppant-free regions. In the smooth-walled fracture, the isolated proppant islands settled towards the bottom of the fracture that resulted in some consolidation of the proppant mixture in the lower portion of the fracture. The proppant islands in the rough-walled fracture show a reduced amount of settling, resulting in

  6. Statistics of ductile fracture surfaces: the effect of material parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ponson, Laurent; Cao, Yuanyuan; Bouchaud, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    distributed. The three dimensional analysis permits modeling of a three dimensional material microstructure and of the resulting three dimensional stress and deformation states that develop in the fracture process region. Material parameters characterizing void nucleation are varied and the statistics......The effect of material parameters on the statistics of fracture surfaces is analyzed under small scale yielding conditions. Three dimensional calculations of ductile crack growth under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive...... of the resulting fracture surfaces is investigated. All the fracture surfaces are found to be self-affine over a size range of about two orders of magnitude with a very similar roughness exponent of 0.56 ± 0.03. In contrast, the full statistics of the fracture surfaces is found to be more sensitive to the material...

  7. AO Distal Radius Fracture Classification: Global Perspective on Observer Agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Prakash; Teunis, Teun; Giménez, Beatriz Bravo; Verstreken, Frederik; Di Mascio, Livio; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2017-02-01

    Background  The primary objective of this study was to test interobserver reliability when classifying fractures by consensus by AO types and groups among a large international group of surgeons. Secondarily, we assessed the difference in inter- and intraobserver agreement of the AO classification in relation to geographical location, level of training, and subspecialty. Methods  A randomized set of radiographic and computed tomographic images from a consecutive series of 96 distal radius fractures (DRFs), treated between October 2010 and April 2013, was classified using an electronic web-based portal by an invited group of participants on two occasions. Results  Interobserver reliability was substantial when classifying AO type A fractures but fair and moderate for type B and C fractures, respectively. No difference was observed by location, except for an apparent difference between participants from India and Australia classifying type B fractures. No statistically significant associations were observed comparing interobserver agreement by level of training and no differences were shown comparing subspecialties. Intra-rater reproducibility was "substantial" for fracture types and "fair" for fracture groups with no difference accounting for location, training level, or specialty. Conclusion  Improved definition of reliability and reproducibility of this classification may be achieved using large international groups of raters, empowering decision making on which system to utilize. Level of Evidence  Level III.

  8. Fractures on curved surfaces: A classic problem solved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-11-01

    Sheeting joints—large fractures parallel to a curved rock surface—are common in many locations on Earth, such as the iconic Half Dome in Yosemite National Park in California. Explaining how these fractures form has been a classic unsolved problem in geology. Martel solved the problem by reformulating the static equilibrium equations in a curvilinear reference frame. His analysis shows that compression along a curved surface can induce tension perpendicular to the surface, which can cause subsurface cracks to open. He found that the curvature of a rock surface plays a key role in the formation of fractures.

  9. 3-D description of fracture surfaces and stress-sensitivity analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.Q.; Jioa, D.; Meng, Y.F.; Fan, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Three kinds of reservoir cores (limestone, sandstone, and shale with natural fractures) were used to study the effect of morphology of fracture surfaces on stress sensitivity. The cores, obtained from the reservoirs with depths of 2170 to 2300 m, have fractures which are mated on a large scale, but unmated on a fine scale. A specially designed photoelectric scanner with a computer was used to describe the topography of the fracture surfaces. Then, theoretical analysis of the fracture closure was carried out based on the fracture topography generated. The scanning results show that the asperity has almost normal distributions for all three types of samples. For the tested samples, the fracture closure predicted by the elastic-contact theory is different from the laboratory measurements because plastic deformation of the aspirates plays an important role under the testing range of normal stresses. In this work, the traditionally used elastic-contact theory has been modified to better predict the stress sensitivity of reservoir fractures. Analysis shows that the standard deviation of the probability density function of asperity distribution has a great effect on the fracture closure rate.

  10. Effective Wettability of Heterogenous Fracture Surfaces Using the Lattice-Boltzmann Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Santos, J.; Prodanovic, M.; Landry, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Fracture walls in the subsurface are often structured by minerals of different composition (potentially further altered in contact with fluids during hydrocarbon extraction or CO2 sequestration), this yields in a heterogeneous wettability of the surface in contact with the fluids. The focus of our work is to study how surfaces presenting different mineralogy and roughness affect multiphase flow in fractures. Using the Shan-Chen model of the lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) we define fluid interaction and surface attraction parameters to simulate a system of a wetting and a non-wetting fluid. In this work, we use synthetically created fractures presenting different arrangements of wetting and non-wetting patches, and with or without roughness; representative of different mineralogy, similar workflow can be applied to fractures extracted from X-ray microtomography images of fractures porous media. The results from the LBM simulations provide an insight on how the distribution of mineralogy and surface roughness are related with the observed macroscopic contact angle. We present a comparison between the published analytical models, and our results based on surface areas, spatial distribution and local fracture aperture. The understanding of the variables that affect the contact angle is useful for the comprehension of multiphase processes in naturally fractured reservoirs like primary oil production, enhanced oil recovery and CO2 sequestration. The macroscopic contact angle analytical equations for heterogeneous surfaces with variable roughness are no longer valid in highly heterogeneous systems; we quantify the difference thus offering an alternative to analytical models.

  11. Fractal Dimension of Fracture Surface in Rock Material after High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Z. Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments on granite specimens after different high temperature under uniaxial compression were conducted and the fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM. The fractal dimensions of the fracture surfaces with increasing temperature were calculated, respectively. The fractal dimension of fracture surface is between 1.44 and 1.63. Its value approximately goes up exponentially with the increase of temperature. There is a quadratic polynomial relationship between the rockburst tendency and fractal dimension of fracture surface; namely, a fractal dimension threshold can be obtained. Below the threshold value, a positive correlativity shows between rockburst tendency and fractal dimension; when the fractal dimension is greater than the threshold value, it shows an inverse correlativity.

  12. Fracture Resistance, Surface Defects and Structural Strength of Glass

    OpenAIRE

    Rodichev, Y.M.; Veer, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper poses the theory that the fracture resistance of basic float glass is dependent on it physicochemical properties and the surface defects fonned under the float glass production, glass processing and handling at the service conditions compose the aggregate basis for structural glass strength assessment. The effect of loading conditions, constructional and technological factors on the engineering strength of glass can be evaluated in certain cases using fracture mechanics with inform...

  13. Surface self-potential patterns related to transmissive fracture trends during a water injection test

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesRoches, A. J.; Butler, K. E.; MacQuarrie, K. TB

    2018-03-01

    Variations in self-potential (SP) signals were recorded over an electrode array during a constant head injection test in a fractured bedrock aquifer. Water was injected into a 2.2 m interval isolated between two inflatable packers at 44 m depth in a vertical well. Negative SP responses were recorded on surface corresponding to the start of the injection period with strongest magnitudes recorded in electrodes nearest the well. SP response decreased in magnitude at electrodes further from the well. Deflation of the packer system resulted in a strong reversal in the SP signal. Anomalous SP patterns observed at surface at steady state were found to be aligned with dominant fracture strike orientations found within the test interval. Numerical modelling of fluid and current flow within a simplified fracture network showed that azimuthal patterns in SP are mainly controlled by transmissive fracture orientations. The strongest SP gradients occur parallel to hydraulic gradients associated with water flowing out of the transmissive fractures into the tighter matrix and other less permeable cross-cutting fractures. Sensitivity studies indicate that increasing fracture frequency near the well increases the SP magnitude and enhances the SP anomaly parallel to the transmissive set. Decreasing the length of the transmissive fractures leads to more fluid flow into the matrix and into cross-cutting fractures proximal to the well, resulting in a more circular and higher magnitude SP anomaly. Results from the field experiment and modelling provide evidence that surface-based SP monitoring during constant head injection tests has the ability to identify groundwater flow pathways within a fractured bedrock aquifer.

  14. Morphology Evolution on the Fracture Surface and Fracture Mechanisms of Multiphase Nanostructured ZrCu-Base Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qiu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A multiphase nanostructured ZrCu-base bulk alloy which showed a unique microstructure consisting of sub-micrometer scale Zr2Cu solid solution, nano-sized twinned plate-like ZrCu martensite (ZrCu (M, and retained ZrCu (B2 austenite was fabricated by copper mold casting. The observation of periodic morphology evolution on the fracture surface of the multiphase nanostructured ZrCu-base alloys has been reported, which suggested a fluctuant local stress intensity along the crack propagation. It is necessary to investigate the compressive deformation behavior and the fracture mechanism of the multiphase alloy and the relation to the unique microstructures. The results obtained in this study provide a better understanding of the deformation and fracture mechanisms of multiphase hybrid nanostructured ZrCu-based alloys and give guidance on how to improve the ductility/toughness of bulk ZrCu-based alloys.

  15. Prediction of Ductile Fracture Surface Roughness Scaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Needleman, Alan; Tvergaard, Viggo; Bouchaud, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    . Ductile crack growth in a thin strip under mode I, overall plane strain, small scale yielding conditions is analyzed. Although overall plane strain loading conditions are prescribed, full 3D analyses are carried out to permit modeling of the three dimensional material microstructure and of the resulting...... three dimensional stress and deformation states that develop in the fracture process region. An elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progressively cavitating plastic solid is used to model the material. Two populations of second phase particles are represented: large inclusions with low...... strength, which result in large voids near the crack tip at an early stage, and small second phase particles, which require large strains before cavities nucleate. The larger inclusions are represented discretely and various three dimensional distributions of the larger particles are considered...

  16. Scaling exponents for fracture surfaces in opal glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez-Guerrero, L., E-mail: guerreroleo@hotmail.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica. Cd. Universitaria s/n, C.P. 66450, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Center of Innovation, Research and Development on Engineering and Technology, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon Monterrey, C.P. 66600, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Garza, F.J., E-mail: fjgarza@gama.fime.uanl.mx [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Cd. Universitaria s/n, C.P. 66450, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Hinojosa, M., E-mail: hinojosa@gama.fime.uanl.mx [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica. Cd. Universitaria s/n, C.P. 66450, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Center of Innovation, Research and Development on Engineering and Technology, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon Monterrey, C.P. 66600, Apodaca, Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2010-09-25

    We have investigated the scaling properties of fracture surfaces in opal glass. Specimens with two different opacifying particle sizes (1 {mu}m and 0.4 {mu}m) were broken by three-point bending test and the resulting fracture surfaces were analyzed using Atomic Force Microscopy. The analysis of the self-affine behavior was performed using the Variable Bandwidth and Height-Height Correlation Methods, and both the roughness exponent, {zeta}, and the correlation length, {xi}, were determined. It was found that the roughness exponent obtained in both samples is {zeta} {approx} 0.8; whereas the correlation length in both fractures is of the order of the particle size, demonstrating the dependence of this self-affine parameter on the microstructure of opal glass.

  17. Contralateral hip fractures and other osteoporosis-related fractures in hip fracture patients: Incidence and risk factors. An observational cohort study of 1,229 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.H. Vochteloo (Anne); B.L. Borger van der Burg (Boudewijn); M.L. Röling (Maarten); D.H.-J. van Leeuwen (Diederik); P. van den Berg (Peter); A.H.P. Niggebrugge (Arthur); M.R. de Vries (Mark); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); R.M. Bloem (Rolf); R.G.H.H. Nelissen (Rob); P. Pilot (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To report risk factors, 1-year and overall risk for a contralateral hip and other osteoporosis-related fractures in a hip fracture population. Methods: An observational study on 1,229 consecutive patients of 50 years and older, who sustained a hip fracture between January 2005

  18. The effect of loading rate on ductile fracture toughness and fracture surface roughness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osovski, S.; Srivastava, Akhilesh Kumar; Ponson, L.

    2015-01-01

    The variation of ductile crack growth resistance and fracture surface roughness with loading rate is modeled under mode I plane strain, small scale yielding conditions. Three-dimensional calculations are carried out using an elastic-viscoplastic constitutive relation for a progressively cavitatin...

  19. Statistical analysis of surface lineaments and fractures for characterizing naturally fractured reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Genliang; George, S.A.; Lindsey, R.P.

    1997-08-01

    Thirty-six sets of surface lineaments and fractures mapped from satellite images and/or aerial photos from parts of the Mid-continent and Colorado Plateau regions were collected, digitized, and statistically analyzed in order to obtain the probability distribution functions of natural fractures for characterizing naturally fractured reservoirs. The orientations and lengths of the surface linear features were calculated using the digitized coordinates of the two end points of each individual linear feature. The spacing data of the surface linear features within an individual set were, obtained using a new analytical sampling technique. Statistical analyses were then performed to find the best-fit probability distribution functions for the orientation, length, and spacing of each data set. Twenty-five hypothesized probability distribution functions were used to fit each data set. A chi-square goodness-of-fit test was used to rank the significance of each fit. A distribution which provides the lowest chi-square goodness-of-fit value was considered the best-fit distribution. The orientations of surface linear features were best-fitted by triangular, normal, or logistic distributions; the lengths were best-fitted by PearsonVI, PearsonV, lognormal2, or extreme-value distributions; and the spacing data were best-fitted by lognormal2, PearsonVI, or lognormal distributions. These probability functions can be used to stochastically characterize naturally fractured reservoirs.

  20. Effect from surface treatment of nickel-titanium rotary files on the fracture resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo Hoon; Ha, Jung-Hong; Lee, Woo Cheol; Kwak, Sang-Won; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to compare the cyclic fatigue resistance and torsional resistance of rotary instruments with and without surface treatment. G6 A2 (Group A2) with and G6 A2 without surface treatment after machining (Group AN) were compared in this study. ProTaper F2 (Group F2) which has similar dimension and shape was also used for comparison. To evaluate the torsional resistance, ultimate torsional strength and distortion angle until fracture were recorded, and the toughness was calculated. The cyclic fatigue resistance was compared by evaluating the number of cycles to failure in a simulated canal. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (p = 0.05). After torsional and cyclic fatigue tests, all fracture fragments were observed under a scanning electron microscope. Group A2 showed higher cyclic fatigue resistance than the groups AN and F2 (p machining grooves were seen in groups AN and F2, group A2 showed smooth surface resulting from the surface treatment. The specimens of fracture fragments showed typical features of cyclic failure such as micro-cracks, overloaded fast fracture zone, and torsional fracture such as unwinding helix, circular abrasion marks and dimples. Under the conditions of this study, the surface treated instruments may improve cyclic fatigue resistance while maintaining the torsional resistances and mechanical properties. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Fracture Resistance, Surface Defects and Structural Strength of Glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodichev, Y.M.; Veer, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper poses the theory that the fracture resistance of basic float glass is dependent on it physicochemical properties and the surface defects fonned under the float glass production, glass processing and handling at the service conditions compose the aggregate basis for structural glass

  2. Observer agreement in pediatric semiquantitative vertebral fracture diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siminoski, Kerry; Lentle, Brian; Matzinger, Mary Ann; Shenouda, Nazih; Ward, Leanne M.

    2014-01-01

    The Genant semiquantitative (GSQ) method has been a standard procedure for diagnosis of vertebral fractures in adults but has only recently been shown to be of clinical utility in children. Observer agreement using the GSQ method in this age group has not been described. To evaluate observer agreement on vertebral readability and vertebral fracture diagnosis using the GSQ method in pediatric vertebral morphometry. Spine radiographs of 186 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were evaluated independently by three radiologists using the same GSQ methodology as in adults. A subset of 100 radiographs was evaluated on two occasions. An average of 4.7% of vertebrae were unreadable for the three radiologists. Intraobserver Cohen's kappa (κ) on readability ranged from 0.434 to 0.648 at the vertebral level and from 0.416 to 0.611 at the patient level, while interobserver κ for readability had a range of 0.330 to 0.504 at the vertebral level and 0.295 to 0.467 at the patient level. Intraobserver κ for the presence of vertebral fracture had a range of 0.529 to 0.726 at the vertebral level and was 0.528 to 0.767 at the patient level. Interobserver κ for fracture at the vertebral level ranged from 0.455 to 0.548 and from 0.433 to 0.486 at the patient level. Most κ values for both intra- and interobserver agreement in applying the GSQ method to pediatric spine radiographs were in the moderate to substantial range, comparable to the performance of the technique in adult studies. The GSQ method should be considered for use in pediatric research and clinical practice. (orig.)

  3. Observer agreement in pediatric semiquantitative vertebral fracture diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siminoski, Kerry [University of Alberta, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging and Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Edmonton (Canada); Lentle, Brian [University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology, Vancouver (Canada); BC Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Vancouver (Canada); Matzinger, Mary Ann; Shenouda, Nazih [University of Ottawa, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa (Canada); Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Department of Medical Imaging, Ottawa (Canada); Ward, Leanne M. [University of Ottawa, Department of Pediatrics, Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa (Canada); Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Research Institute, Ottawa (Canada); Collaboration: The Canadian STOPP Consortium

    2014-04-15

    The Genant semiquantitative (GSQ) method has been a standard procedure for diagnosis of vertebral fractures in adults but has only recently been shown to be of clinical utility in children. Observer agreement using the GSQ method in this age group has not been described. To evaluate observer agreement on vertebral readability and vertebral fracture diagnosis using the GSQ method in pediatric vertebral morphometry. Spine radiographs of 186 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were evaluated independently by three radiologists using the same GSQ methodology as in adults. A subset of 100 radiographs was evaluated on two occasions. An average of 4.7% of vertebrae were unreadable for the three radiologists. Intraobserver Cohen's kappa (κ) on readability ranged from 0.434 to 0.648 at the vertebral level and from 0.416 to 0.611 at the patient level, while interobserver κ for readability had a range of 0.330 to 0.504 at the vertebral level and 0.295 to 0.467 at the patient level. Intraobserver κ for the presence of vertebral fracture had a range of 0.529 to 0.726 at the vertebral level and was 0.528 to 0.767 at the patient level. Interobserver κ for fracture at the vertebral level ranged from 0.455 to 0.548 and from 0.433 to 0.486 at the patient level. Most κ values for both intra- and interobserver agreement in applying the GSQ method to pediatric spine radiographs were in the moderate to substantial range, comparable to the performance of the technique in adult studies. The GSQ method should be considered for use in pediatric research and clinical practice. (orig.)

  4. ON SURFACE FRACTURE OF RAIL HEADS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Datsyshyn

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The formation of crack-like defects in rails of railway tracks is a serious problem for engineering practice because of the danger of creating emergency situations. The purpose of this work is to establish theoretically the characteristic angle of propagation of surface cracks in the rail heads of railway rails, which is basic in the formation of typical surface contact fatigue damages, such as pitting, «checks» and «squat». It is also necessary to find the conditions for determining this angle. Methodology. The investigations were carried out on the basis of the method of singular integral equations. The rail damaged by the surface crack was modeled with a half-plane with an edge cut, and the action of the wheel on the rail by unidirectional repeated translational movement along the edge of the half-plane of the Hertzian contact forces with the tangential component. The problem of determining the stress intensity factors in the vicinity of the crack tip in the rail head was reduced to a system of two real singular integral equations which were solved numerically by the Gauss-Chebyshev mechanical quadrature method. The complexity of the problem consists in the fact that the boundaries of the contact areas and the opening of the crack faces are unknown beforehand and they change when the model contact forces move. These boundaries were determined simultaneously with solving the integral equations of the problem from additional conditions by the iteration method. Findings. The presence of the characteristic angle of propagation of mode II surface cracks in the rail head has been established theoretically and the conditions for its determination have been put down. The results obtained are in good agreement with engineering and experimental data. Originality. For the first time, the values of the characteristic angle were theoretically determined, under which at the initial stage, the surface contact fatigue cracks propagate in the

  5. Evaluation of the conditions imposed by the fracture surface geometry on water seepage through fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, Nestor O.; Faybishenko, B.

    2003-01-01

    In order to determine the geometric patterns of the fracture surfaces that imposes conditions on the fluid flow through fractured porous media, a series a fracture models have been analyzed using the RIMAPS technique and the variogram method. Results confirm that the main paths followed by the fluid channels are determined by the surface topography and remain constant during water seepage evolution. Characteristics scale lengths of both situations: fracture surface and the flow of water, are also found. There exists a relationship between the scale lengths corresponding to each situation. (author)

  6. Observation of fracture behavior of 3-D printed specimens under rolling contact fatigue in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizobe Koshiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer bearing was widely used in the corrosive conditions because of its high corrosion durability. The polymer bearing had been formed using molding and machining until the new 3-D printing method was developed. In this study, we performed the rolling contact fatigue tests of the 3-D printed specimens in water and observed the fracture behaviour of the specimens. We found that the surface cracks are related to both the rolling direction and the lamination directions.

  7. School playground surfacing and arm fractures in children: a cluster randomized trial comparing sand to wood chip surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W Howard

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The risk of playground injuries, especially fractures, is prevalent in children, and can result in emergency room treatment and hospital admissions. Fall height and surface area are major determinants of playground fall injury risk. The primary objective was to determine if there was a difference in playground upper extremity fracture rates in school playgrounds with wood fibre surfacing versus granite sand surfacing. Secondary objectives were to determine if there were differences in overall playground injury rates or in head injury rates in school playgrounds with wood fibre surfacing compared to school playgrounds with granite sand surfacing.The cluster randomized trial comprised 37 elementary schools in the Toronto District School Board in Toronto, Canada with a total of 15,074 students. Each school received qualified funding for installation of new playground equipment and surfacing. The risk of arm fracture from playground falls onto granitic sand versus onto engineered wood fibre surfaces was compared, with an outcome measure of estimated arm fracture rate per 100,000 student-months. Schools were randomly assigned by computer generated list to receive either a granitic sand or an engineered wood fibre playground surface (Fibar, and were not blinded. Schools were visited to ascertain details of the playground and surface actually installed and to observe the exposure to play and to periodically monitor the depth of the surfacing material. Injury data, including details of circumstance and diagnosis, were collected at each school by a prospective surveillance system with confirmation of injury details through a validated telephone interview with parents and also through collection (with consent of medical reports regarding treated injuries. All schools were recruited together at the beginning of the trial, which is now closed after 2.5 years of injury data collection. Compliant schools included 12 schools randomized to Fibar that installed

  8. GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations, 1998-present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GODAE, SFCOBS - Surface Temperature Observations: Ship, fixed/drifting buoy, and CMAN in-situ surface temperature. Global Telecommunication System (GTS) Data. The...

  9. Fracture behavior of short circumferentially surface-cracked pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnaswamy, P.; Scott, P.; Mohan, R.

    1995-11-01

    This topical report summarizes the work performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Comniission's (NRC) research program entitled ''Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds'' that specifically focuses on pipes with short, circumferential surface cracks. The following details are provided in this report: (i) material property deteminations, (ii) pipe fracture experiments, (iii) development, modification and validation of fracture analysis methods, and (iv) impact of this work on the ASME Section XI Flaw Evaluation Procedures. The material properties developed and used in the analysis of the experiments are included in this report and have been implemented into the NRC's PIFRAC database. Six full-scale pipe experiments were conducted during this program. The analyses methods reported here fall into three categories (i) limit-load approaches, (ii) design criteria, and (iii) elastic-plastic fracture methods. These methods were evaluated by comparing the analytical predictions with experimental data. The results, using 44 pipe experiments from this and other programs, showed that the SC.TNP1 and DPZP analyses were the most accurate in predicting maximum load. New Z-factors were developed using these methods. These are being considered for updating the ASME Section XI criteria

  10. Effects of cementation surface modifications on fracture resistance of zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, Ramanathan; Kosmac, Tomaz; Bona, Alvaro Della; Yin, Ling; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effects of glass infiltration (GI) and alumina coating (AC) on the indentation flexural load and four-point bending strength of monolithic zirconia. Methods Plate-shaped (12 mm × 12 mm × 1.0 mm or 1.5 mm or 2.0 mm) and bar-shaped (4 mm × 3 mm × 25 mm) monolithic zirconia specimens were fabricated. In addition to monolithic zirconia (group Z), zirconia monoliths were glass-infiltrated or alumina-coated on their tensile surfaces to form groups ZGI and ZAC, respectively. They were also glass-infiltrated on their upper surfaces, and glass-infiltrated or alumina-coated on their lower (tensile) surfaces to make groups ZGI2 and ZAC2, respectively. For comparison, porcelain-veneered zirconia (group PVZ) and monolithic lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (group LiDi) specimens were also fabricated. The plate-shaped specimens were cemented onto a restorative composite base for Hertzian indentation using a tungsten carbide spherical indenter with a radius of 3.2 mm. Critical loads for indentation flexural fracture at the zirconia cementation surface were measured. Strengths of bar-shaped specimens were evaluated in four-point bending. Results Glass infiltration on zirconia tensile surfaces increased indentation flexural loads by 32% in Hertzian contact and flexural strength by 24% in four-point bending. Alumina coating showed no significant effect on resistance to flexural damage of zirconia. Monolithic zirconia outperformed porcelain-veneered zirconia and monolithic lithium disilicate glass-ceramics in terms of both indentation flexural load and flexural strength. Significance While both alumina coating and glass infiltration can be used to effectively modify the cementation surface of zirconia, glass infiltration can further increase the flexural fracture resistance of zirconia. PMID:25687628

  11. Effects of cementation surface modifications on fracture resistance of zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, Ramanathan; Kosmac, Tomaz; Della Bona, Alvaro; Yin, Ling; Zhang, Yu

    2015-04-01

    To examine the effects of glass infiltration (GI) and alumina coating (AC) on the indentation flexural load and four-point bending strength of monolithic zirconia. Plate-shaped (12 mm × 12 mm × 1.0 mm or 1.5 or 2.0 mm) and bar-shaped (4 mm × 3 mm × 25 mm) monolithic zirconia specimens were fabricated. In addition to monolithic zirconia (group Z), zirconia monoliths were glass-infiltrated or alumina-coated on their tensile surfaces to form groups ZGI and ZAC, respectively. They were also glass-infiltrated on their upper surfaces, and glass-infiltrated or alumina-coated on their lower (tensile) surfaces to make groups ZGI2 and ZAC2, respectively. For comparison, porcelain-veneered zirconia (group PVZ) and monolithic lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (group LiDi) specimens were also fabricated. The plate-shaped specimens were cemented onto a restorative composite base for Hertzian indentation using a tungsten carbide spherical indenter with a radius of 3.2mm. Critical loads for indentation flexural fracture at the zirconia cementation surface were measured. Strengths of bar-shaped specimens were evaluated in four-point bending. Glass infiltration on zirconia tensile surfaces increased indentation flexural loads by 32% in Hertzian contact and flexural strength by 24% in four-point bending. Alumina coating showed no significant effect on resistance to flexural damage of zirconia. Monolithic zirconia outperformed porcelain-veneered zirconia and monolithic lithium disilicate glass-ceramics in terms of both indentation flexural load and flexural strength. While both alumina coating and glass infiltration can be used to effectively modify the cementation surface of zirconia, glass infiltration can further increase the flexural fracture resistance of zirconia. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The relationship of seismic velocity structure and surface fracture characteristics of basalt outcrops to rippability estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, S.E.; Dougherty, M.E.; Pelton, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    Seismic velocity has been shown in previous engineering studies to be related to the fracture characteristics and rippability of rock outcrops. However, common methods of measuring seismic velocity in outcrops do not take into account the many possible travel paths for wave propagation and the fact that velocity zones may exist within an outcrop. Presented here are the results of using raytracing inversion of first-arrival travel-time data to map P-velocity structure in basalt outcrops, and also the investigation of the relationship of the mapped velocities to observed surface fractures and hand-sample P-velocities. It is shown that basalt outcrops commonly consist of an irregular near-surface low-velocity zone underlain by higher velocity material; that velocity gradients can exist in outcrops; that hand-sample velocity measurements are typically higher than outcrop-scale measurements; and that the characteristics of surface fractures are empirically related to near-surface P-velocity. All of these findings are relevant to the estimated rippability of rock in geotechnical engineering. The data for this study are derived from eleven sites on basalt outcrops of the Troodos Ophiolite in Cyprus. The basalt types include pillow basalts, massive flows, and a pillow breccia. A commonly available raytracing inversion program (RAYINVR) was used to produce a velocity profile of each outcrop. Different velocity zones were detailed by inverting observed travel times to produce a model of outcrop velocity structure which produces rippability profiles for each outcrop. 16 refs., 9 figs

  13. Fracture Phenomena in Amorphous Selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard-Andersen, Asger; Dahle, Birgit

    1966-01-01

    Fracture surfaces of amorphous selenium broken in flexure at room temperature have been studied. The fracture velocity was found to vary in different regions of the fracture surface. Peculiar features were observed in a transition zone between fast and slower fracture. In this zone cleavage steps...

  14. Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) surface observation data.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — GMOS global surface elemental mercury (Hg0) observations from 2013 & 2014. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Sprovieri, F., N. Pirrone,...

  15. Crack propagation in disordered materials: how to decipher fracture surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponson, L.

    For a half-century, engineers know how to describe and predict the propagation of a crack in a model elastic homogeneous medium. The case of real materials is much more complex. Indeed, we do not know how to relate their lifetime or their resistance to their microstructure. To achieve such a prediction, understanding the role of the microstructural disorder on the behavior of a crack is determinant. Fracture surfaces represent a promising field of investigation to address this question. From the study of various disordered materials, we propose a statistical description of their roughness and determine to which extent their properties are dependent of the material. We show that fracture surfaces display an anisotropic scale invariant geometry characterized by two universal exponents. Glass ceramics is then studied because its microstructure can be tuned in a controlled manner. Their fracture surfaces display the same general anisotropic properties but with surprisingly low exponents independent of the detail of the ceramics microstructure. This suggests the existence of a second universality class in failure problems. Using finally theoretical tools from out-of-equilibrium statistical physics and fracture mechanics, we relate the statistical properties of fracture surfaces with the mechanisms occurring at the microscopic scale during the failure of a material. In particular, we show that the first class of fracture surfaces results from a failure involving damage processes while the second one results from a perfectly brittle failure. Propagation de fissures dans les matériaux désordonnés : comment déchiffrer les surfaces de rupture. Depuis près d'un demi-siècle, les ingénieurs savent décrire et prévoir la propagation d'une fissure dans un milieu élastique homogène modèle. Le cas des matériaux réels est beaucoup plus complexe. En effet, on ne sait pas relier leur durée de vie ou leur résistance à leur microstructure. Passage obligé avant de telles

  16. Observations in Fracture Toughness Testing of Glasses and Optical Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Fracture toughness is a critical structural design parameter and an excellent metrics to rank materials. Itdetermines fracture strength by way of the flaws, both inherent and induced, and defines the endpoint of the slow crackgrowth curve. The fracture toughness of structural and optical ceramics, and glasses as measured by several techniques is compared. When good metrology is employed, the results are very comparable with two exceptions: materials exhibiting crack growth resistance and those with a low SCG exponents. For materials with R-curves, the result is a function of extension and can be minimized with short cracks. For materials with low SCG exponents, such as glasses, elimination of the corrosive media andor increasing the stress intensity rate minimizes effects. A summary of values is given, and it appears that highly modified glasses exhibit lower fracture toughness and slow crack growth exponent than high purity glasses such as fused silica.

  17. Fracture analysis of surface exfoliation on single crystal silicon irradiated by intense pulsed ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Shahid, Ijaz; Yu, Xiao; Zhang, Jie; Zhong, Haowen; Cui, Xiaojun; Liang, Guoying; Yu, Xiang; Huang, Wanying; Yan, Sha; Zhang, Gaolong; Zhang, Xiaofu; Le, Xiaoyun

    2017-12-01

    Surface exfoliation was observed on single crystal silicon surface irradiated by Intense Pulsed Ion Beam (IPIB). As the strong transient thermal stress impact induced by IPIB was mainly attributed to the exfoliation, a micro scale model combined with thermal conduction and linear elastic fracture mechanics was built to analyze the thermal stress distribution along the energy deposition process. After computation with finite element method, J integral parameter was applied as the criterion for crack development. It was demonstrated that the exfoliation initiation calls for specific material, crack depth and IPIB parameter. The results are potentially valuable for beam/target selection and IPIB parameter optimization.

  18. Fracture zones constrained by neutral surfaces in a fault-related fold: Insights from the Kelasu tectonic zone, Kuqa Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuai; Hou, Guiting; Zheng, Chunfang

    2017-11-01

    Stress variation associated with folding is one of the controlling factors in the development of tectonic fractures, however, little attention has been paid to the influence of neutral surfaces during folding on fracture distribution in a fault-related fold. In this study, we take the Cretaceous Bashijiqike Formation in the Kuqa Depression as an example and analyze the distribution of tectonic fractures in fault-related folds by core observation and logging data analysis. Three fracture zones are identified in a fault-related fold: a tensile zone, a transition zone and a compressive zone, which may be constrained by two neutral surfaces of fold. Well correlation reveals that the tensile zone and the transition zone reach the maximum thickness at the fold hinge and get thinner in the fold limbs. A 2D viscoelastic stress field model of a fault-related fold was constructed to further investigate the mechanism of fracturing. Statistical and numerical analysis reveal that the tensile zone and the transition zone become thicker with decreasing interlimb angle. Stress variation associated with folding is the first level of control over the general pattern of fracture distribution while faulting is a secondary control over the development of local fractures in a fault-related fold.

  19. Observation of ground deformation associated with hydraulic fracturing and seismicity in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubanek, J.; Liu, Y.; Harrington, R. M.; Samsonov, S.

    2017-12-01

    GNSS positioning and acceleration. We expect the joint data analysis of dense seismic and geodetic observations to give new insights about the correlation between surface deformation, fluid injection, and induced seismicity that can be used to assess the hazard potential of hydraulic fracturing in the WCSB.

  20. Observation of gliding arc surface treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Zhu, Jiajian; Ehn, A.

    2015-01-01

    . Water contact angle measurements indicate that the treatment uniformity improves significantly when the AC gliding arc is tilted to the polymer surface. Thickness reduction of the gas boundary layer, explaining the improvement of surface treatment, by the ultrasonic irradiation was directly observed...... surfaces. A gap was observed between the polymer surface and the luminous region of the plasma column, indicating the existence of a gas boundary layer. The thickness of the gas boundary layer is smaller at higher gas flow-rates or with ultrasonic irradiation to the AC gliding arc and the polymer surface......An alternating current (AC) gliding arc can be conveniently operated at atmospheric pressure and efficiently elongated into the ambient air by an air flow and thus is useful for surface modification. A high speed camera was used to capture dynamics of the AC gliding arc in the presence of polymer...

  1. Surface Observations from Punta Arenas, Chile

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface Observations from Punta Arenas, in extreme southern Chile. WMO station ID 85934. Period of record 1896-1954. The original forms were scanned at the Museo...

  2. Fracture Testing with Surface Crack Specimens. [especially the residual tensile strength test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    Recommendations are given for the design, preparation, and static fracture testing of surface crack specimens. The recommendations are preceded by background information including discussions of stress intensity factors, crack opening displacements, and fracture toughness values associated with surface crack specimens. Cyclic load and sustained load tests are discussed briefly.

  3. Inferring field-scale properties of a fractured aquifer from ground surface deformation during a well test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuite, Jonathan; Longuevergne, Laurent; Bour, Olivier; Boudin, Frédérick; Durand, Stéphane; Lavenant, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Fractured aquifers which bear valuable water resources are often difficult to characterize with classical hydrogeological tools due to their intrinsic heterogeneities. Here we implement ground surface deformation tools (tiltmetry and optical leveling) to monitor groundwater pressure changes induced by a classical hydraulic test at the Ploemeur observatory. By jointly analyzing complementary time constraining data (tilt) and spatially constraining data (vertical displacement), our results strongly suggest that the use of these surface deformation observations allows for estimating storativity and structural properties (dip, root depth, and lateral extension) of a large hydraulically active fracture, in good agreement with previous studies. Hence, we demonstrate that ground surface deformation is a useful addition to traditional hydrogeological techniques and opens possibilities for characterizing important large-scale properties of fractured aquifers with short-term well tests as a controlled forcing.

  4. A multi-surface plasticity model for ductile fracture simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keralavarma, Shyam M.

    2017-06-01

    The growth and coalescence of micro-voids in a material undergoing ductile fracture depends strongly on the loading path. Void growth occurs by diffuse plasticity in the material and is sensitive to the hydrostatic stress, while void coalescence occurs by the localization of plastic deformation in the inter-void ligaments under a combination of normal and shear stresses on the localization plane. In this paper, a micromechanics-based plasticity model is developed for an isotropic porous material, accounting for both diffuse and localized modes of plasticity at the micro-scale. A multi-surface approach is adopted, and two existing plasticity models that separately account for the two modes of yielding, above, are synthesized to propose an effective isotropic yield criterion and associated state evolution equations. The yield criterion is validated by comparison with quasi-exact numerical yield loci computed using a finite elements based limit analysis procedure. It is shown that the new criterion is in better agreement with the numerical loci than the Gurson model, particularly for large values of the porosity for which the loading path dependence of the yield stress is well predicted by the new model. Even at small porosities, it is shown that the new model predicts marginally lower yield stresses under low triaxiality shear dominated loadings compared to the Gurson model, in agreement with the numerical limit analysis data. Predictions for the strains to the onset of coalescence under proportional loading, obtained by numerically integrating the model, indicate that void coalescence tends to occur at relatively small plastic strain and porosity levels under shear dominated loadings. Implications on the prediction of ductility using the new model in fracture simulations are discussed.

  5. A NEW HIGH RESOLUTION OPTICAL METHOD FOR OBTAINING THE TOPOGRAPHY OF FRACTURE SURFACES IN ROCKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Ogilvie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Surface roughness plays a major role in the movement of fluids through fracture systems. Fracture surface profiling is necessary to tune the properties of numerical fractures required in fluid flow modelling to those of real rock fractures. This is achieved using a variety of (i mechanical and (ii optical techniques. Stylus profilometry is a popularly used mechanical method and can measure surface heights with high precision, but only gives a good horizontal resolution in one direction on the fracture plane. This method is also expensive and simultaneous coverage of the surface is not possible. Here, we describe the development of an optical method which images cast copies of rough rock fractures using in-house developed hardware and image analysis software (OptiProf™ that incorporates image improvement and noise suppression features. This technique images at high resolutions, 15-200 μm for imaged areas of 10 × 7.5 mm and 100 × 133 mm, respectively and a similar vertical resolution (15 μm for a maximum topography of 4 mm. It uses in-house developed hardware and image analysis (OptiProf™ software and is cheap and non-destructive, providing continuous coverage of the fracture surface. The fracture models are covered with dye and fluid thicknesses above the rough surfaces converted into topographies using the Lambert-Beer Law. The dye is calibrated using 2 devices with accurately known thickness; (i a polycarbonate tile with wells of different depths and (ii a wedge-shaped vial made from silica glass. The data from each of the two surfaces can be combined to provide an aperture map of the fracture for the scenario where the surfaces touch at a single point or any greater mean aperture. The topography and aperture maps are used to provide data for the generation of synthetic fractures, tuned to the original fracture and used in numerical flow modelling.

  6. Experimental observations of deformation caused by mineral dissolution in variable-aperture fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detwiler, Russell L.

    2008-08-01

    Problems such as CO2 sequestration, petroleum production and nuclear waste isolation involve the potential for rock-water reactions. Mineral alteration resulting from reactive fluid flow can lead to significant changes to fracture transport properties. At depth, these processes are further influenced by stresses in the host rock. To quantitatively explore these coupled processes, we built a new experimental apparatus designed to directly measure changes in fracture aperture in analog fractures subjected to the combined influence of a reactive fluid and an applied normal stress. Light transmission techniques provided direct measurements of the changing fracture aperture at high spatial resolution during two experiments in identical fractures with an initial mean fracture aperture of 95 μm. The two experiments were carried out at values of the dimensionless Damkohler number (Da = reaction rate/advection rate) that differed by a factor of 2. The high-Da experiment resulted in the formation of a large-scale dissolution channel in the middle of the fracture and regions with little dissolution and slow closure of the fracture surfaces. By contrast, the low-Da experiment exhibited relatively uniform dissolution across the width of the fracture, with locally enhanced dissolution in small aperture regions. This resulted in increased stresses in contacting asperities and eventual damage of the asperities accompanied by large (up to 50 μm), instantaneous displacements of the surfaces and corresponding reductions in fracture aperture. The results demonstrate the importance of the spatial variability of dissolution rates, which are controlled by both local reaction kinetics and hydrodynamics, in fractures deforming because of combined dissolution and mechanical stress.

  7. Titanium and steel fracture fixation plates with different surface topographies: Influence on infection rate in a rabbit fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metsemakers, W J; Schmid, Tanja; Zeiter, Stephan; Ernst, Manuela; Keller, Iris; Cosmelli, Nicolo; Arens, Daniel; Moriarty, T Fintan; Richards, R Geoff

    2016-03-01

    Implant-related infection is a challenging complication in musculoskeletal trauma surgery. In the present study, we examined the role of implant material and surface topography as influencing factors on the development of infection in an experimental model of plating osteosynthesis in the rabbit. The implants included in this experimental study were composed of: standard Electropolished Stainless Steel (EPSS), standard titanium (Ti-S), roughened stainless steel (RSS) and surface polished titanium (Ti-P). Construct stability and load-to-failure of Ti-P implants was compared to that of Ti-S implants in a rabbit cadaveric model. In an in vivo study, a rabbit humeral fracture model was used. Each rabbit received one of three Staphylococcus aureus inocula, aimed at determining the infection rate at a low, medium and high dose of bacteria. Outcome measures were quantification of bacteria on the implant and in the surrounding tissues, and determination of the infectious dose 50 (ID50). No significant differences were observed between Ti-S and Ti-P regarding stiffness or failure load in the cadaver study. Of the 72 rabbits eventually included in the in vivo study, 50 developed an infection. The ID50 was found to be: EPSS 3.89×10(3) colony forming units (CFU); RSS 8.23×10(3) CFU; Ti-S 5.66×10(3) CFU; Ti-P 3.41×10(3) CFU. Significantly lower bacterial counts were found on the Ti-S implants samples compared with RSS implants (ptitanium and steel implants with conventional or modified topographies. Ti-P implants, which have previously been shown in preclinical studies to reduce complications associated with tissue adherence, do not affect infection rate in this preclinical fracture model. Therefore, Ti-P implants are not expected to affect the infection rate, or influence implant stability in the clinical situation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of zirconia surface treatment on zirconia/veneer interfacial toughness evaluated by fracture mechanics method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gaoqi; Zhang, Song; Bian, Cuirong; Kong, Hui

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the airborne-particle abrasion and liner application on the interfacial toughness between veneering porcelain and zirconia core by means of a fracture mechanics test. Beam-shaped zirconia specimens were sectioned and divided into 4 groups according to different surface treatments as follows: Group C (control): no treatment; Group L: application of liner; Group A: airborne-particle abrasion with Al2O3 (sandblasting); and Group AL: airborne-particle abrasion and application of liner. The zirconia surfaces before and after sandblasting were observed and analyzed by SEM and white light interferometer. Specimens of each pretreated group were veneered with 3 core/veneer thickness ratios of 2:3, 1:1, and 3:2, corresponding to 3 phase angles respectively. Fracture mechanics test was performed on each specimen, the energy release rate G and phase angle ψ were calculated to characterize interfacial toughness. The experimental data were analyzed statistically using three-way ANOVA and the Tukey's HSD test. The surfaces of fractured specimens were examined by SEM and EDX. At each phase angle, the interfaces with no treatment had higher mean G values than that of other groups. All the specimens showed mixed failure mode with residual veneer or liner on the zirconia surfaces. The toughness of zirconia/veneer interface with no treatment is significantly higher than that of interfaces subjected to liner application and airborne-particle abrasion. Liner application and airborne-particle abrasion seem to reduce zirconia/veneer interfacial toughness. Therefore, the two surface treatment methods should be applied with caution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Surface Meteorological Observation System (SMOS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritsche, MT

    2008-03-01

    The Surface Meteorological Observation System (SMOS) mostly uses conventional in situ sensors to obtain 1-minute, 30-minute, and 1440-minute (daily) averages of surface wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, relative humidity (RH), barometric pressure, and precipitation at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) climate research site. The SMOSs are not calibrated as systems. The sensors and the data logger (which includes the analog-to-digital converter, or A/D) are calibrated separately. All systems are installed using components that have a current calibration. SMOSs have not been installed at extended facilities located within about 10 km of existing surface meteorological stations, such as those of the Oklahoma Mesonet. The Surface Meteorological Observation Systems are used to create climatology for each particular location, and to verify the output of numerical weather forecast and other model output. They are also used to “ground-truth” other remote sensing equipment.

  10. Microscopic observation and statics consideration of tensile fracture of TiC coating on stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okawa, Akira; Hasiguti, Ryukiti

    1986-01-01

    We have measured the tensile fracture properties of the TiC coated SUS316L stainless steel, applying a stress perpendicular to the plane of interface between the coating and the substrate. The fracture of the as grown or non-annealed specimens occurred partially within the TiC layer. A tensile fracture of the TiC coated specimens after vacuum annealing at about 1373 K (1100 deg C) presented arc-shape curved fracture surfaces which can be understood by statics consideration taking into account the maximum stress plane theory and the residual thermal stress. The strengths of non-annealed and annealed specimens are 34.4 MPa (350 kgf/cm 2 ) and 30.2 MPa (308 kgf/cm 2 ), respectively, expressed in terms of Weibull's 50 % fracture stresses. (author)

  11. The Relationship of Parathyroidectomy and Bisphosphonates With Fracture Risk in Primary Hyperparathyroidism: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Michael W; Zhou, Hui; Adams, Annette L; Ituarte, Philip H G; Li, Ning; Liu, In-Lu Amy; Haigh, Philip I

    2016-06-07

    The comparative effectiveness of surgical and medical treatments on fracture risk in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is unknown. To measure the relationship of parathyroidectomy and bisphosphonates with skeletal outcomes in patients with PHPT. Retrospective cohort study. An integrated health care delivery system. All enrollees with biochemically confirmed PHPT from 1995 to 2010. Bone mineral density (BMD) changes and fracture rate. In 2013 patients with serial bone density examinations, total hip BMD increased transiently in women with parathyroidectomy (4.2% at bisphosphonates (3.6% at 8 years). In 6272 patients followed for fracture, the absolute risk for hip fracture at 10 years was 20.4 events per 1000 patients who had parathyroidectomy and 85.5 events per 1000 patients treated with bisphosphonates compared with 55.9 events per 1000 patients without these treatments. The risk for any fracture at 10 years was 156.8 events per 1000 patients who had parathyroidectomy and 302.5 events per 1000 patients treated with bisphosphonates compared with 206.1 events per 1000 patients without these treatments. In analyses stratified by baseline BMD status, parathyroidectomy was associated with reduced fracture risk in both osteopenic and osteoporotic patients, whereas bisphosphonates were associated with increased fracture risk in these patients. Parathyroidectomy was associated with fracture risk reduction in patients regardless of whether they satisfied criteria from consensus guidelines for surgery. Retrospective study design and nonrandom treatment assignment. Parathyroidectomy was associated with reduced fracture risk, and bisphosphonate treatment was not superior to observation. National Institute on Aging.

  12. Dispersion analysis of passive surface-wave noise generated during hydraulic-fracturing operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Willis, Mark; Snieder, Roel; Haines, Seth S.; Behura, Jyoti; Batzle, Mike; Davidson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Surface-wave dispersion analysis is useful for estimating near-surface shear-wave velocity models, designing receiver arrays, and suppressing surface waves. Here, we analyze whether passive seismic noise generated during hydraulic-fracturing operations can be used to extract surface-wave dispersion characteristics. Applying seismic interferometry to noise measurements, we extract surface waves by cross-correlating several minutes of passive records; this approach is distinct from previous studies that used hours or days of passive records for cross-correlation. For comparison, we also perform dispersion analysis for an active-source array that has some receivers in common with the passive array. The active and passive data show good agreement in the dispersive character of the fundamental-mode surface-waves. For the higher mode surface waves, however, active and passive data resolve the dispersive properties at different frequency ranges. To demonstrate an application of dispersion analysis, we invert the observed surface-wave dispersion characteristics to determine the near-surface, one-dimensional shear-wave velocity.

  13. Dynamic Mechanical Properties and Fracture Surface Morphologies of Core-Shell Rubber (CSR) Toughened Epoxy at Liquid Nitrogen (Ln2) Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Magee, D.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties and fracture surface morphologies were evaluated for a commercial epoxy resin toughened with two types of core-shell rubber (CSR) toughening agents (Kane Ace(Registered TradeMark) MX130 and MX960). The impact resistance (R) was evaluated by the resulting breaking energy measured in Charpy impact tests conducted on an instrumented drop tower. The resulting fracture surface morphologies were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Fractographic observations of the CSR toughened epoxy tested at ambient temperature, showed a fracture as characterized by slender dendrite textures with large voids. The increasing number of dendrites and decreasing size of scale-like texture with more CSR particles corresponded with increased R. As the temperature decreased to Liquid Nitrogen (LN 2), the fracture surfaces showed a fracture characterized by a rough, torn texture containing many river markings and deep furrows.

  14. The study of broken quadrilateral surface in fractures of the acetabulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasartritha, Thavat; Chaivanichsiri, Paskorn

    2013-06-01

    Three-dimensional computerised tomography (3DCT) can provide comprehensive patho-anatomy of complex bone on a single image. Though important, the key articular quadrilateral [Q] surface has not been a part of the systems developed for classifying acetabulum fractures. The purpose of the study was to simplify the complexity of classification by the direct sign of the broken Q surface which lies opposite the entire floor of the acetabulum. The study reviewed 84 acetabular fractures using 3DCT images of the interior lateral view (IL) taken between June 2002 to December 2009. Fractures were traditionally classified using the anatomical disruption, plane of the fracture line breaking through or not through the bone column described by Judet and Letournel. The 3D images clearly show the primary site of impaction acting on the acetabulum and the whole course of fracture. The image could not illustrate disruption of the lips of acetabulum and congruity of hip joints in 20 cases of wall (W) fracture. There were 30 transverse (T) fractures classified when the acetabulum was divided horizontally from front to back into upper and lower parts and 34 cases of column (C) fracture when the main vertical lines run and collide along the anterior and posterior column. This study showed that the well-known complex fractures can be satisfactorily classified with the broad flat inner plane of the Q surface.

  15. Characterization of the 3-D fracture setting of an unstable rock mass: From surface and seismic investigations to numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombero, C.; Baillet, L.; Comina, C.; Jongmans, D.; Vinciguerra, S.

    2017-08-01

    The characterization of the fracturing state of a potentially unstable rock cliff is a crucial requirement for stability assessments and mitigation purposes. Classical measurements of fracture location and orientation can however be limited by inaccessible rock exposures. The steep topography and high-rise morphology of these cliffs, together with the widespread presence of fractures, can additionally condition the success of geophysical prospecting on these sites. In order to mitigate these limitations, an innovative approach combining noncontact geomechanical measurements, active and passive seismic surveys, and 3-D numerical modeling is proposed in this work to characterize the 3-D fracture setting of an unstable rock mass, located in NW Italian Alps (Madonna del Sasso, VB). The 3-D fracture geometry was achieved through a combination of field observations and noncontact geomechanical measurements on oriented pictures of the cliff, resulting from a previous laser-scanning and photogrammetric survey. The estimation of fracture persistence within the rock mass was obtained from surface active seismic surveys. Ambient seismic noise and earthquakes recordings were used to assess the fracture control on the site response. Processing of both data sets highlighted the resonance properties of the unstable rock volume decoupling from the stable massif. A finite element 3-D model of the site, including all the retrieved fracture information, enabled both validation and interpretation of the field measurements. The integration of these different methodologies, applied for the first time to a complex 3-D prone-to-fall mass, provided consistent information on the internal fracturing conditions, supplying key parameters for future monitoring purposes and mitigation strategies.

  16. Patients with prior vertebral or hip fractures treated with teriparatide in the Direct Assessment of Nonvertebral Fractures in Community Experience (DANCE) observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, D P; Feldman, R G; Gordon, M L; Gruber, B L; Lane, J M; Valenzuela, G; Yim, D; Alam, J; Krege, J H; Krohn, K

    2016-03-01

    In patients in the Direct Assessment of Nonvertebral Fractures in Community Experience (DANCE) observational study with and without a prior vertebral or hip fracture, the incidence of nonvertebral fractures was lower with >6 months of teriparatide treatment than during the first 6 months. Clinical evidence on the effect of teriparatide in patients with prior fracture is limited. In the DANCE observational study, the incidence of nonvertebral fragility fractures (NVFX) decreased significantly in patients receiving teriparatide for >6 months (6-24 months) versus >0 to ≤6 months (reference period). We performed a post hoc analysis to assess the effect of teriparatide 20 μg/day in patients who entered DANCE with prior vertebral or hip fractures. The incidence of patients experiencing a NVFX for four 6-month intervals during and after treatment was compared with the reference period. Overall, 4085 patients received ≥1 dose of teriparatide. Of 3720 with sufficient data for efficacy analysis, 692 had prior vertebral fracture, including 179 with previous kyphoplasty/vertebroplasty; 290 had prior hip fracture. These patients were older, and those with prior vertebral fractures had more comorbid conditions at baseline than those without prior vertebral fractures. The incidence of patients experiencing NVFX declined over time in all patient groups. The fracture incidence rate declined 49 and 46%, respectively, in patients with and without prior vertebral fracture and was 63 and 46% lower in patients with previous kyphoplasty/vertebroplasty and without prior vertebral fracture. NVFX declined 43 and 48% in patients with and without prior hip fracture. The reduced incidence over time was consistent in the subgroups (all interaction p values >0.05). Patients with prior fracture were more likely to experience serious adverse events. The incidence of NVFX decreased over time in patients receiving teriparatide in DANCE regardless of prior fracture status.

  17. Binding of oxygen on vacuum fractured pyrite surfaces: Reactivity of iron and sulfur surface sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlich, A. G.; Nesbitt, H. W.; Bancroft, G. M.; Szargan, R.

    2013-05-01

    Synchrotron radiation excited photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS) has been used to study the interaction of oxygen with vacuum fractured pyrite surfaces. Especially valence band spectra obtained with 30 eV photon energy were analyzed to provide a mechanism of the incipient steps of pyrite oxidation. These spectra are far more sensitive to the oxidation than sulfur or iron core level spectra. It is shown that oxygen is adsorbed on Fe(II) surface sites restoring the octahedral coordination of the Fe(II) sites. This process leads to the removal of two surface states in the valence band which are located at the low and high binding energy sides of the outer valence band, respectively. The existence of these surface states which have been proposed by calculations is experimentally proven. Furthermore, it is shown, that the sulfur sites are more reactive than expected. Sulfite like species are already formed after the lowest oxygen exposure of 10 L. This oxidation occurs at sulfur sites neighboring the Fe(II) surface sites. Oxidation of the S2 - surface sites which were considered as the most reactive species in former studies is second. No iron(III) oxides are formed during oxygen exposure, supporting the assumption that water plays an important role in the oxidation mechanism of pyrite surfaces.

  18. Inter- and intra-observer agreement of the AO classification for operatively treated distal radius fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buijtenen, Jesse M; van Tunen, Mischa L C; Zuidema, Wietse P; Heilbron, Emile A; de Haan, Jeroen; de Vet, Henrica C W; Derksen, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    The reproducibility of the AO classification for distal radius fractures remains a topic of debate. Previous studies showed variable reproducibility results. Important treatment decisions depend on correct classification, especially in comminuted, intra-articular fractures. Therefore, reliable reproducibility results need to be undisputedly determined. Hence, the study objective was to assess inter- and intra-observer agreement of the AO classification for operatively treated distal radius fractures. A database of 54 radiographs of all AO types (A, B and C) and groups (A2-3, B1-3, and C1-3) of distal radius fractures was assessed in twofold. Likewise, a subset of 152 radiographs of solely C-type groups (C1-3) was assessed. All fractures were classified by six observers with different experience levels: three consultant trauma surgeons, one sixth-year trauma surgery resident, a consultant trauma radiologist, and an intern with limited experienced. The inter-observer agreement of both main types and groups was moderate (κ = 0.49 resp. κ = 0.48) in combination with a good intra-observer agreement (κ = 0.68 resp. κ = 0.70). The inter-observer agreement of the subset C-type fractures group was fair (κ = 0.27) with moderate intra-observer agreement (κ = 0.43). According to these results, the reproducibility of the AO classification of main types and groups of distal radius fractures based on conventional radiographs is insufficient (κ < 0.50), especially at group level of C-type fractures.

  19. QAPP for Hydraulic Fracturing (HF) Surface Spills Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This QAPP provides information concerning the analysis of spills associated with hydraulic fracturing. This project is relevant to both the chemical mixing and flowback and produced water stages of the HF water cycle as found in the HF Study Plan.

  20. Electron microscopic observation of fractures in carbonaceous materials produced by cracking of natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, R.; Pelissier, J.; Pluchery, M.

    1964-01-01

    Circulating natural gas at 900 deg. C in an agglomerate of crushed graphite powder results in the formation of a compact material with high mechanical properties. Electron microscopic observation of fracture in resilience and compression specimens have been carried on, expecting a correlation between their mechanical properties and micrographic aspects. Fracture proceeds across the graphite grains and through the surrounding pyrocarbon as well. Heat-treated materials exhibit poorer mechanical properties: these changes could not be evidence in the micro-fractographic aspects of pyrocarbon; they may however account for differences in the fracture of the graphite grains. (authors) [fr

  1. A temporary filling material during endodontic treatment may cause tooth fractures in two-surface class II cavities in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennert, Christian; Fischer, Gesine Friederike; Vach, Kirstin; Woelber, Johan Peter; Hellwig, Elmar; Polydorou, Olga

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the effect of a zinc oxide/zinc sulphate-based cement as a temporary filling material during root canal treatment on the occurrence of cracks within the filling material or the tooth. Root canals of 122 extracted human molars were prepared using ProTaper instruments. Standardized occlusal-distal cavities were prepared. After placing calcium hydroxide into the root canals, the teeth were divided randomly into four groups containing 33 specimens each. In the Coltosol group, the cavity was completely filled with Coltosol® F. In the Coltosol-Clearfil group, a 2-mm layer of Coltosol® F was placed into the apical part of the pulp chamber, and in the Clearfil group, a foam pellet was placed into the coronal pulp chamber. The remaining cavities were filled with Clearfil™. In the control group, the cavities were not restored. The teeth were stored at 37 °C for 14 days and examined every 24 h under a stereomicroscope. Fractures of the filling and/or the tooth were only observed in the Coltosol group. All Coltosol® F restorations had cracks after 24 h. Tooth fractures were found in 25 (76 %) teeth. Among these teeth, 21 (84 %) had crown fractures, four (16 %) had root-crown fractures. All root-crown fractures were vertical. Coltosol® F when used alone led to tooth fractures in two-surface class II cavities in teeth undergoing root canal treatment. Coltosol® F solely used as restorative material may lead to tooth fractures in two-surface class II cavities.

  2. Combining periodic hydraulic tests and surface tilt measurements to explore in situ fracture hydromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuite, Jonathan; Longuevergne, Laurent; Bour, Olivier; Guihéneuf, Nicolas; Becker, Matthew W.; Cole, Matthew; Burbey, Thomas J.; Lavenant, Nicolas; Boudin, Frédéric

    2017-08-01

    Fractured bedrock reservoirs are of socio-economical importance, as they may be used for storage or retrieval of fluids and energy. In particular, the hydromechanical behavior of fractures needs to be understood as it has implications on flow and governs stability issues (e.g., microseismicity). Laboratory, numerical, or field experiments have brought considerable insights to this topic. Nevertheless, in situ hydromechanical experiments are relatively uncommon, mainly because of technical and instrumental limitations. Here we present the early stage development and validation of a novel approach aiming at capturing the integrated hydromechanical behavior of natural fractures. It combines the use of surface tiltmeters to monitor the deformation associated with the periodic pressurization of fractures at depth in crystalline rocks. Periodic injection and withdrawal advantageously avoids mobilizing or extracting significant amounts of fluid, and it hinders any risk of reservoir failure. The oscillatory perturbation is intended to (1) facilitate the recognition of its signature in tilt measurements and (2) vary the hydraulic penetration depth in order to sample different volumes of the fractured bedrock around the inlet and thereby assess scale effects typical of fractured systems. By stacking tilt signals, we managed to recover small tilt amplitudes associated with pressure-derived fracture deformation. Therewith, we distinguish differences in mechanical properties between the three tested fractures, but we show that tilt amplitudes are weakly dependent on pressure penetration depth. Using an elastic model, we obtain fracture stiffness estimates that are consistent with published data. Our results should encourage further improvement of the method.

  3. Measurement of Malrotation on Direct Radiography in Pediatric Distal Radius Fractures: Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duymus, Tahir Mutlu; Mutlu, Serhat; Komur, Baran; Mutlu, Harun; Yucel, Bulent; Parmaksizoglu, Atilla Sancar

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to test a mathematical method of measuring the malrotation of pediatric distal radius fractures (PDRFs) from direct radiographs. A total of 70 pediatric patients who presented at the Emergency Department with a distal radius fracture were evaluated. For 38 selected patients conservative treatment for PDRF was planned. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were taken of all of the patients for comparison before and after reduction. Radius bone diameters were measured in the coronal and sagittal planes on the healthy and fractured sides. Using the diameter values on the healthy side and the new diameter values on the fractured side in the rotation formula, the degree of malrotation between the fracture ends was calculated. The mean follow-up period was 13.5 months. Patients' mean age was 10.00 ± 3.19 years (range, 4-12 years). The rotation degree in the sagittal plane significantly differed between the proximal (26.52°±2.84°) and distal fracture ends (20.96°±2.73°) (P = 0.001). The rotation degree in the coronal plane significantly differed between the proximal (26.70°±2.38°) and distal fracture ends (20.26°±2.86°) (P = 0.001). The net rotation deformity of the fracture line was determined to be 5.55°± 3.54° on lateral radiographs and 5.44°± 3.35° on anteroposterior radiographs, no significant difference was observed between measurements (P >0.05). The malrotation deformity in PDRF occurs with greater rotation in the proximal fragment than in the distal fragment. The net rotation deformity created between the fracture ends can be calculated on direct radiographs. Diagnostic, Level II.

  4. Carotenoids and risk of fracture: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiuhong; Song, Chunli; Song, Xiaochao; Zhang, Xi; Li, Xinli

    2017-01-10

    To quantify the association between dietary and circulating carotenoids and fracture risk, a meta-analysis was conducted by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE databases for eligible articles published before May 2016. Five prospective and 2 case-control studies with 140,265 participants and 4,324 cases were identified in our meta-analysis. Among which 5 studies assessed the association between dietary carotenoids levels and hip fracture risk, 2 studies focused on the association between circulating carotenoids levels and any fracture risk. A random-effects model was employed to summarize the risk estimations and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Hip fracture risk among participants with high dietary total carotenoids intake was 28% lower than that in participants with low dietary total carotenoids (OR: 0.72; 95% CI: 0.51, 1.01). A similar risk of hip fracture was found for β-carotene based on 5 studies, the summarized OR for high vs. low dietary β-carotene was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.54, 0.95). However, a significant between-study heterogeneity was found (total carotene: I2 = 59.4%, P = 0.06; β-carotene: I2 = 74.4%, P = 0.04). Other individual carotenoids did not show significant associations with hip fracture risk. Circulating carotene levels had no significant association with any fracture risk, the pooled OR (95% CI) was 0.83 (0.59, 1.17). Based on the evidence from observational studies, our meta-analysis supported the hypothesis that higher dietary total carotenoids or β-carotene intake might be potentially associated with a low risk of hip fracture, however, future well-designed prospective cohort studies and randomized controlled trials are warranted to specify the associations between carotenoids and fracture.

  5. [Clinical observation on the influence of earthquake crush injury on postoperative wound healing of extremity fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fu-hong; Chen, Ze; Duan, Heng-qiong; Wan, Zhong-xian

    2008-10-01

    To observe the influence of earthquake crush injury on postoperative wound healing of extremity fractures. The study involved 85 patients with extremities fracture underwent internal fixation operation in 3 group, including 28 earthquake casualties with crush injuries in observation group, 27 earthquake casualties without crush injuries in control I group and 30 local patients during the same period in control II group. Urine routine, blood creatine kinase (CK) and wound conditions of patients in 3 groups were observed respectively. There was no significant difference in Urine routine and blood CK between 3 groups and was significant difference in wound conditions between observation group and each control group. Earthquake crush injuries can influence the postoperative wound healing of extremity fractures.

  6. Study of Relation between Shot Peening Parameters and Fatigue Fracture Surface Character of an AW 7075 Aluminium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Trško

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Shot peening is a well-known surface treatment method used for fatigue life improvement of cyclically loaded structural components. Since three main variables are considered in the peening process (peening intensity, coverage and peening media type, there is no direct way to choose the best combination of treatment parameters for the best performance, thus it has to be based on experience and laboratory tests. When shot peening is performed with inadequate parameters, or the peening process is not stable in time (decrease of the peening pressure, deterioration of the peening media and so on, it can result in significant degradation of the treated component fatigue properties, what is commonly called as the “overpeening” effect. When a premature fatigue fracture occurs in operation, the fracture surface analysis is usually the most important method of revealing the damage mechanism. This work is aimed at the study of the relation between the shot peening parameters and the fatigue fracture surface character on an AW 7075 aluminium alloy with an objective of identifying marks of overpeening and investigating the fatigue crack initiation mechanism. After performing the tests, it was observed that shot peening with optimized parameters creates a surface layer that is able to change the mechanism of the fatigue crack propagation and improve fatigue strength. On the other hand, using extensive peening parameters decrease the fatigue strength due to the creation of surface cracks and surface layer delamination.

  7. Computational study of flow anisotropy in sheared fractures with self-affine surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Michael; Schoenball, Martin; Ankit, Kumar; Nestler, Britta; Kohl, Thomas; Kühnle, Natalie; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Characterization of the hydraulic conductivities of rock masses is imperative for the development and engineering of various underground installations like geothermal power plants, waste repositories or tunnelling. The intrinsic permeability of intact rock is extremely low; however the rock mass usually contains a dense network of fractures with a relatively high hydraulic conductivity, which determines the hydraulic properties of the rock mass. Conventionally, in order to estimate the hydraulic conductivities of fractures, the cubic law for laminar fluid flow in a parallel plate model with constant aperture is applied. However, the surface of natural fractures is rough, which strongly affects the hydraulic properties of fractures and causes deviation from the analytical result. To enhance fluid flow in a fractured rock mass, well bores in an intact rock mass are pressurized with fluid to reduce effective normal stresses on pre-existing fractures to enable shearing. The shearing motion of rock enhances hydraulic anisotropy, since the rocks become more conductive parallel to the shearing direction and less conduction perpendicular to the shearing direction. In the current work, we present a numerical study of hydraulic anisotropy introduced as a result of shearing of algorithmically generated fractures. A rough surface can be mathematically described as self-affine structure with a correlation between heights of asperities and their spatial distribution. Fractures are generated by displacing two identical fractal rough surfaces incorporating dilation to obtain an aperture distribution. To investigate the geometrical and hydraulic properties of generated fractures, we use a finite element method to solve the Reynolds equations in a simplified 2D model. We identify a regime, where a simplified hydraulic fracture model is permitted. Using the 2D model, we make a statistical study of the hydraulic anisotropy for a representative set of 1000 algorithmically generated

  8. Effects of fracture surface roughness and shear displacement on geometrical and hydraulic properties of three-dimensional crossed rock fracture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Na; Liu, Richeng; Jiang, Yujing; Li, Bo; Yu, Liyuan

    2018-03-01

    While shear-flow behavior through fractured media has been so far studied at single fracture scale, a numerical analysis of the shear effect on the hydraulic response of 3D crossed fracture model is presented. The analysis was based on a series of crossed fracture models, in which the effects of fracture surface roughness and shear displacement were considered. The rough fracture surfaces were generated using the modified successive random additions (SRA) algorithm. The shear displacement was applied on one fracture, and at the same time another fracture shifted along with the upper and lower surfaces of the sheared fracture. The simulation results reveal the development and variation of preferential flow paths through the model during the shear, accompanied by the change of the flow rate ratios between two flow planes at the outlet boundary. The average contact area accounts for approximately 5-27% of the fracture planes during shear, but the actual calculated flow area is about 38-55% of the fracture planes, which is much smaller than the noncontact area. The equivalent permeability will either increase or decrease as shear displacement increases from 0 to 4 mm, depending on the aperture distribution of intersection part between two fractures. When the shear displacement continuously increases by up to 20 mm, the equivalent permeability increases sharply first, and then keeps increasing with a lower gradient. The equivalent permeability of rough fractured model is about 26-80% of that calculated from the parallel plate model, and the equivalent permeability in the direction perpendicular to shear direction is approximately 1.31-3.67 times larger than that in the direction parallel to shear direction. These results can provide a fundamental understanding of fluid flow through crossed fracture model under shear.

  9. Fracture Resistance Measurement Method for in situ Observation of Crack Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Horsewell, A.; Jørgensen, O.

    1998-01-01

    A special test fixture has been developed for fracture mechanical testing of brittle materials inside an environmental scanning electron microscope. The fixture loads a double cantilever beam specimen with pure bending moments and provides stable crack growth. Crack growth is detected by in situ...... observation and acoustic emission, As an example, crack growth in a cubic-phase yttria-stabilized zirconia is detected easily by in situ observation of the crack-tip region, Many fracture toughness measurements are obtained for each specimen, giving high confidence in the measured fracture toughness value......, In situ observation is useful for the study of toughening mechanisms and subcritical crack-growth behavior and to sort out erroneous measurements (e.g., due to crack branching)....

  10. Diagnostic value of 3 D CT surface reconstruction in spinal fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesling, S. [Department of Radiology, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Dietrich, K. [Department of Radiology, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Steinecke, R. [Department of Radiology, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Kloeppel, R. [Department of Radiology, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany); Schulz, H.G. [Department of Radiology, Univ. of Leipzig (Germany)

    1997-02-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the diagnostic value of three-dimensional (3 D) CT surface reconstruction in spinal fractures in comparison with axial and reformatted images. A total of 50 patients with different CT-proven spinal fractures were analysed retrospectively. Based on axial scans and reformatted images, the spinal fractures were classified according to several classifications as Magerl for the thoraco-lumbar and lower cervical spine by one radiologist. Another radiologist performed 3 D CT surface reconstructions with the aim of characterizing the different types of spinal fractures. A third radiologist classified the 3 D CT surface reconstruction according to the Magerl classification. The results of the blinded reading process were compared. It was checked to see in which type and subgroup 3 D surface reconstructions were helpful. Readers one and two obtained the same results in the classification. The 3 D surface reconstruction did not yield any additional diagnostic information concerning type A and B injuries. Indeed, the full extent of the fracture could be easier recognized with axial and reformatted images in all cases. In 10 cases of C injuries, the dislocation of parts of vertebrae could be better recognized with the help of 3 D reconstructions. A 3 D CT surface reconstruction is only useful in rotational and shear vertebral injuries (Magerl type C injury). (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Deposition behavior of polystyrene latex particles on solid surfaces during migration through an artificial fracture in a granite rock sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinju, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Satoru; Kuno, Yoshio

    2001-01-01

    The deposition behavior of colloids during transport through heterogeneous media was observed by conducting column experiments to study migration of polystyrene latex particles (diameter=309 nm) through columns packed with artificially fractured granite rock (length=300 and 150 mm). The experiments were conducted under conditions of different ionic strengths and flow rates. The results were similar to those for colloid deposition in columns packed with glass beads reported previously; the colloid breakthrough curves showed three stages, characterized by different rates of change in the concentration of effluent. Colloid deposition on the fracture surfaces was described by considering strong and weak deposition sites. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) observations indicated the existence of strong and weak sites on the fracture surfaces regardless of mineral composition. The observations also showed that the strong deposition sites tended to exist on surface irregularities such as cracks or protrusions. The degree of colloid deposition increased with increasing ionic strength and decreasing flow rate. The dependencies on ionic strength and flow rate agreed qualitatively with the DLVO theory and the previous experimental results, respectively. (author)

  12. Effect of surface morphology on the fracture strength of silicon nanobeams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan, Tuncay; Hines, Melissa A.; Zehnder, Alan T.

    2006-08-01

    The effect of nanoscale surface morphology on the fracture strength of 190-nm-thick, doubly clamped Si beams was measured experimentally. The surface morphology was controlled through aqueous etching and characterized by atomic force microscopy. The beams fractured along the primary cleavage planes, {111}. Fracture strength was extracted using finite element simulations of the experiment. Nanobeams etched with relatively smooth morphologies (0.4nm rms) were able to sustain a tensile stress of 15.8GPa, close to theoretical strengths predicted by previous atomistic calculations. In contrast, nanobeams decorated with nanometer-high step bunches (1.5nm rms) had a 20% lower fracture strength, 12.8GPa, suggesting that careful attention to processing is necessary for maximum strength.

  13. Properties of fracture surfaces of glassy polymers: chain scission versus chain pullout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, H.R.

    2010-01-01

    Fresh fracture surfaces formed by tensile failure of craze in molded polystyrene (PS) bars have been compared with the molded surfaces of the same bars, using an atomic force microscope with a thermal probe and operated in local thermal analysis. The results indicate that molecular weight is much

  14. Three-dimensional reconstruction of fracture surfaces of CFRP type composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, Raquel de Moraes

    2009-01-01

    The three-dimensional reconstruction of fracture surfaces of CFRP type composite materials is presented in this work as a possible method for the fractographic analysis of this material, whose rupture surface can present an accentuated roughness, with great variation in height. Two methods are presented for this purpose: the reconstruction for variable focus, carried through with images of optic microscopy and the reconstruction for parallax, carried through with pair of stereo images, obtained by means of scanning electronic microscopy. An evaluation is carried through for each one of the two methods, having argued its limits and the efficiency of each one of them, before the difficulties of analysis of unidirectional and multidirectional composite materials. The method of variable focus presented an excellent reconstruction result, but it has the need of a great number of images, spent time of the instrument and magnifying limit of the images as factors to be considered in the choice of better method. The tilting of the specimen, during the parallax method, discloses alterations in the histograms of the images acquired in the clockwise direction that limit the use of the method for materials with high roughness. The acquiring of images in only one direction and the construction of a region of interest, located in the center of the image are suggestions to turn the method most including. The linearity of the projections of features in the inclined image also suggests the possibility to carry through the reconstruction using, instead of only two, multiple images gotten in the counter-clockwise direction. The alterations proposals to modify the routine, are suggested so that the program can be applied in a more comprehensive form, independent of the quality of the observed fracture surface. (author)

  15. Open Surface Solar Irradiance Observations - A Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Lionel; Nüst, Daniel; Jirka, Simon; Maso, Joan; Ranchin, Thierry; Wald, Lucien

    2015-04-01

    The newly started project ConnectinGEO funded by the European Commission aims at improving the understanding on which environmental observations are currently available in Europe and subsequently providing an informational basis to close gaps in diverse observation networks. The project complements supporting actions and networking activities with practical challenges to test and improve the procedures and methods for identifying observation data gaps, and to ensure viability in real world scenarios. We present a challenge on future concepts for building a data sharing portal for the solar energy industry as well as the state of the art in the domain. Decision makers and project developers of solar power plants have identified the Surface Solar Irradiance (SSI) and its components as an important factor for their business development. SSI observations are crucial in the process of selecting suitable locations for building new plants. Since in-situ pyranometric stations form a sparse network, the search for locations starts with global satellite data and is followed by the deployment of in-situ sensors in selected areas for at least one year. To form a convincing picture, answers must be sought in the conjunction of these EO systems, and although companies collecting SSI observations are willing to share this information, the means to exchange in-situ measurements across companies and between stakeholders in the market are still missing. We present a solution for interoperable exchange of SSI data comprising in-situ time-series observations as well as sensor descriptions based on practical experiences from other domains. More concretely, we will apply concepts and implementations of the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) framework of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The work is based on an existing spatial data infrastructure (SDI), which currently comprises metadata, maps and coverage data, but no in-situ observations yet. This catalogue is already registered in the

  16. Magnesium intake, bone mineral density, and fractures: results from the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, Tonya S; Larson, Joseph C; Alghothani, Nora; Bout-Tabaku, Sharon; Cauley, Jane A; Chen, Zhao; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Jackson, Rebecca D

    2014-01-01

    Background: Magnesium is a necessary component of bone, but its relation to osteoporotic fractures is unclear. Objective: We examined magnesium intake as a risk factor for osteoporotic fractures and altered bone mineral density (BMD). Design: This prospective cohort study included 73,684 postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study. Total daily magnesium intake was estimated from baseline food-frequency questionnaires plus supplements. Hip fractures were confirmed by a medical record review; other fractures were identified by self-report. A baseline BMD analysis was performed in 4778 participants. Results: Baseline hip BMD was 3% higher (P 422.5 compared with magnesium. In contrast, risk of lower-arm or wrist fractures increased with higher magnesium intake [multivariate-adjusted HRs of 1.15 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.32) and 1.23 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.42) for quintiles 4 and 5, respectively, compared with quintile 1; P-trend = 0.002]. In addition, women with the highest magnesium intakes were more physically active and at increased risk of falls [HR for quintile 4: 1.11 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.16); HR for quintile 5: 1.15 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.20); P-trend magnesium intake is associated with lower BMD of the hip and whole body, but this result does not translate into increased risk of fractures. A magnesium consumption slightly greater than the Recommended Dietary Allowance is associated with increased lower-arm and wrist fractures that are possibly related to more physical activity and falls. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00000611. PMID:24500155

  17. In situ observation of fracture behavior of canine cortical bone under bending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zilan X. [Department of Orthopaedics, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street Suite 708 MSC 622, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Xu, Zhi-Hui [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); An, Yuehuei H. [Department of Orthopaedics, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street Suite 708 MSC 622, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Southside Hospital, North Shore-LIJ Health System, 217 East Main Street, Bay Shore, NY 11706 (United States); Li, Xiaodong, E-mail: xl3p@virginia.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, 122 Engineer' s Way, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Cortical bone provides many important body functions and maintains the rigidness and elasticity of bone. A common failure mode for bone structure is fracture under a bending force. In the current study, the fracture behavior of canine cortical bone under three-point bending was observed in situ using an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and an optical microscope to examine the fracture process in detail. Nanoindentation was carried out to determine the elastic modulus and hardness of different building blocks of the canine cortical bone. The results have shown that the special structure of Haversian systems has significant effects on directing crack propagation. Although Haversian systems contain previously believed weak points, and micro-cracks initiate within Haversian systems, our findings have demonstrated that macro-cracks typically form around the boundaries of Haversian systems, i.e. the cement lines. Micro-cracks that developed inside Haversian systems have the functions of absorbing and dissipating energy and slow down on expanding when interstitial tissue cannot hold any more pressure, then plastic deformation and fracture occur. - Highlights: • Macro- and micro-cracks occur in unique patterns in the bone fracturing process under a bending force. • Early developed micro-cracks inside Haversian systems absorb and dissipate energy in order to delay fracture initiation. • The mechanical properties of Haverisan systems and its surrounding structures influence the developments of macro- and micro-crack formation. • Previously believed weak spots in the bone matrix are not necessarily the origins of fracture development.

  18. Statistical properties of background fractures observed at the deep borehole in KAERI Underground Research Tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, S. H.; Lee, D. H.; Park, K. W.

    2010-01-01

    From the analyses of borehole logging and hydraulic test results, the statistical properties of background fractures were characterized, and HRDs were defined. According to the geological model of the KURT site, the hydrogeological units in the site were categorized to the hydraulic soil domains(HSDs), the hydraulic rock domains and the hydraulic conductor domains. In this study, we analyzed the properties of background fractures observed at Db-1, which is a deep borehole located in KURT with the depth of 600m, and characterized the HRDs in the site

  19. A study on the ductile fracture of a surface crack, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Masanori; Nishio, Tamaki; Yano, Kazunori; Machida, Kenji; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    1988-01-01

    Ductile fracture of surface crack is studied experimentally and numerically. At first, fatigue pre-crack is introduced, and the aspect ratios of the growing fatigue crack are measured. Then the ductile fracture test is carried out and the distributions of SZW and Δa are measured. It is noted that Δa is largest where φ, the angle from surface, is nearly 30deg. J integral distribution is evaluated by the finite element method, and it is shown that the J value is also the largest where φ is nearly 30deg. (author)

  20. Surface fracturing and graben subsidence during the 2014 Bárdarbunga dike intrusion in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rut Hjartardóttir, Ásta; Einarsson, Páll; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnús; Högnadóttir, Thordís

    2015-04-01

    A dike propagated laterally away from the Bárdarbunga central volcano in August 2014. The dike propagated about 48 km towards the northeast and north-northeast, mostly beneath the Vatnajökull glacier. However, the farthest 8 km of the dike were located north of the glacier, where the ice-free area allowed surface fractures and graben subsidence to be observed. This dike intrusion was accompanied by eruptions, the most prominent ones occurring within the graben at the distal end of the dike. In this study, photographs taken from airplanes were rectified by using the ArcGIS software. This was done in order to map the fractures and eruptive fissures which were formed or reactivated during this dike intrusion, and to show the temporal evolution of the fracture pattern. Ground deformation across the graben was measured from an airplane with a radar altimeter and kinematic GPS. The propagation of the dike was shown by laterally propagating earthquakes and by ground deformation recorded by GPS geodetic network. Three days after the dike had propagated north of the Vatnajökull glacier, new and reactivated fractures were detected in this area, above the dike. The fractures delineated two grabens in direct continuation of each other. The southern graben extended 5 km northwards from the glacier boundary, and was 700-1000 m wide. Before the eruptions, the northern graben was seen ~6.6-7.5 km north of the glacier, and was only 250-450 m wide. Two days later, on the 29th of August, a four-hour long eruption took place on a 600 m long eruptive fissure 6 km north of the glacier. Then, the narrow northern graben was seen extending about 1-1.6 km farther to the south than before the eruption, with the new eruptive fissure in the middle of it. The eruption resumed again two days later, extending the same eruptive fissure towards the south and north, to a total of ~1900 m length. This eruption is still ongoing (in January 2014). On the 5th of September, three short (~100 to 250 m

  1. Hydrochemistry of surface water and groundwater from a fractured ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The area is heavily populated with a high density of industrial activities which may pose a risk for groundwater and surface water resources. The groundwater and surface water quality was investigated as a basis for more future investigations. The results revealed highly variable water hydrochemistry. High values of ...

  2. Influence of different surface treatments on the fracture toughness of a commercial ZTA dental ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Teixeira da Silva

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate how mechanical surface treatments performed for removal of excess of molten glass, influence the fracture toughness of a dental zirconia toughened alumina (In-Ceram® Zirconia. Infiltrated ZTA disks were submitted to three different surface treatments (grinding, sandblasting and grinding + sandblasting + annealing. Fracture toughness was accessed through indentation strength test (IS. X ray diffraction was used to investigate the metastability of tetragonal zirconia particles under all treatments proposed. Kruskall-Wallis non-parametrical test and Weibull statistics were used to analyze the results. Grinding (group 1 introduced defects which decreased the fracture toughness and reliability, presenting the lowest K IC. On the other hand, grinding followed by sandblasting and annealing (group 3 presented the highest K IC. Sandblasting (group 2 presented the highest reliability but lower K IC compared to group 3.

  3. The use of surface geophysical techniques to detect fractures in bedrock; an annotated bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mark R.; Haeni, F.P.

    1987-01-01

    This annotated bibliography compiles references about the theory and application of surface geophysical techniques to locate fractures or fracture zones within bedrock units. Forty-three publications are referenced, including journal articles, theses, conference proceedings, abstracts, translations, and reports prepared by private contractors and U.S. Government agencies. Thirty-one of the publications are annotated. The remainder are untranslated foreign language articles, which are listed only as bibliographic references. Most annotations summarize the location, geologic setting, surface geophysical technique used, and results of a study. A few highly relevant theoretical studies are annotated also. Publications that discuss only the use of borehole geophysical techniques to locate fractures are excluded from this bibliography. Also excluded are highly theoretical works that may have little or no known practical application.

  4. The initiation and linkage of surface fractures above a buried strike ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It has already been established that these surface fractures dynamically evolve and link one another with progressive displacement on the master fault below. In the present study, two different series of riedel-type experiments were carried out with clay analogue models under different boundary conditions viz.,.

  5. Fracture behavior of circumferentially surface-cracked elbows. Technical report, October 1993--March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilinski, T.; Mohan, R.; Rudland, D.; Fleming, M. [and others

    1996-12-01

    This report presents the results from Task 2 of the Second International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG-2) program. The focus of the Task 2 work was directed towards furthering the understanding of the fracture behavior of long-radius elbows. This was accomplished through a combined analytical and experimental program. J-estimation schemes were developed for both axial and circumferential surface cracks in elbows. Large-scale, quasi-static and dynamic, pipe-system, elbow fracture experiments under combined pressure and bending loads were performed on elbows containing an internal surface crack at the extrados. In conjunction with the elbow experiments, material property data were developed for the A106-90 carbon steel and WP304L stainless steel elbow materials investigated. A comparison of the experimental data with the maximum stress predictions using existing straight pipe fracture prediction analysis methods, and elbow fracture prediction methods developed in this program was performed. This analysis was directed at addressing the concerns regarding the validity of using analysis predictions developed for straight pipe to predict the fracture stresses of cracked elbows. Finally, a simplified fitting flaw acceptance criteria incorporating ASME B2 stress indices and straight pipe, circumferential-crack analysis was developed.

  6. Fracture behavior of circumferentially surface-cracked elbows. Technical report, October 1993--March 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilinski, T.; Mohan, R.; Rudland, D.; Fleming, M.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents the results from Task 2 of the Second International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG-2) program. The focus of the Task 2 work was directed towards furthering the understanding of the fracture behavior of long-radius elbows. This was accomplished through a combined analytical and experimental program. J-estimation schemes were developed for both axial and circumferential surface cracks in elbows. Large-scale, quasi-static and dynamic, pipe-system, elbow fracture experiments under combined pressure and bending loads were performed on elbows containing an internal surface crack at the extrados. In conjunction with the elbow experiments, material property data were developed for the A106-90 carbon steel and WP304L stainless steel elbow materials investigated. A comparison of the experimental data with the maximum stress predictions using existing straight pipe fracture prediction analysis methods, and elbow fracture prediction methods developed in this program was performed. This analysis was directed at addressing the concerns regarding the validity of using analysis predictions developed for straight pipe to predict the fracture stresses of cracked elbows. Finally, a simplified fitting flaw acceptance criteria incorporating ASME B2 stress indices and straight pipe, circumferential-crack analysis was developed

  7. Effect of Heat Treatment, Pre-stress and Surface Hardening on Fracture Toughness of Micro-Alloyed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag Chaudhury, Joydeb

    2014-01-01

    Micro-alloyed steels are being increasingly accepted by industry in various fields of application and are available with a wide variety of microstructures. Extensive literature is available on their microstructure-property relationships. The superior mechanical properties of micro-alloyed steels are caused by fine-grained microstructures and precipitation of micro-alloying elements such as V, Ti and Nb that led to an improvement in yield strength, in the product of tensile strength and total elongation and in Charpy V-notch impact energy as well. The microstructural changes caused by heat treatment or residual stress state caused by surface hardening or mechanical means may influence the fracture toughness of these micro-alloyed steels. It is in this context that the present work begins with experimental determination of quasi-static initiation fracture toughness ( J 1c) of low carbon (0.19%) micro-alloyed steel in as-rolled condition without any heat treatment. The study further explores the effect of normalizing, shot-peening and cyaniding followed by shot-peening on fracture toughness of as-rolled steel under study. The normalizing heat treatment, shot-peening and cyaniding followed by shot-peening—each indicates a positive influence on initiation fracture toughness. Results, when compared, show that cyaniding followed by shot-peening have led to a 2.7 times increase in J 1c. Cyaniding followed by shot-peening may therefore be considered as having the most positive influence on initiation fracture toughness in as-rolled condition for the type of micro-alloyed steel under study. Although initiation fracture toughness is in general known to decrease with increase in yield strength in LEFM arena, the micro-alloyed steel under study when normalized displayed simultaneous improvement in yield strength and J 1c. All these observed effects of normalizing, shot-peening and cyaniding on initiation fracture toughness (elastic-plastic fracture mechanics) were explained

  8. FRACTURE BEHAVIOUR OF P/M Cr-V LEDEBURITIC STEEL WITH DIFFERENT SURFACE ROUGHNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Jurči

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The samples made from the Vanadis 6 PM ledeburitic tool steel were surface machined to different quality and heat treated by standard regime of the processing. Three point bending tests were carried out on processed samples. It was found that the flexural strength decreased with decreasing surface quality. The lowering of flexural strength has been accompanied with the decrease of the plastic component of plastic straining preceeding to fracture initiation (work of fracture of the material. It indicates that the surface roughness leads to the crack initiation before a larger plastic deformation of the material can be developed. Based on the results it can be suggested that to prevent the cracking of tools in the practice it is essential to make a surface machining (grinding, lapping, polishing to as high quality as possible.

  9. Fracture resistance of dental nickel–titanium rotary instruments with novel surface treatment: Thin film metallic glass coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wen Chi

    2017-05-01

    Conclusion: The novel surface treatment of Ti-Zr-B thin film metallic glass on dental NiTi rotary files can effectively improve the fatigue fracture resistance by offering a smooth coated surface with amorphous microstructure.

  10. Traumatic Vertebral Fractures and Concomitant Fractures of the Rib in Southwest China, 2001 to 2010: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongwei; Zhou, Yue; Ou, Lan; Li, Changqing; Liu, Jun; Xiang, Liangbi

    2015-11-01

    To our knowledge, the clinical characteristics of traumatic vertebral fractures and concomitant fractures of the rib (TVF-RF) have not been described in previous studies.To investigate the clinical characteristics of patients managed for TVF-RF. A retrospective study of 3142 patients who presented with traumatic vertebral fractures was performed. Two hundred twenty-six patients (7.2%) suffered from TVF-RF.Incidence rate ratios were then calculated with respect to the level of injury to the spine, the ASIA classification of neurological deficits and age.There were 171 male (75.7%) and 55 female (24.3%) patients with a mean age of 43.8 years. The most common mechanisms were falls from high heights in 81 cases and road traffic crashes in 67 cases. Right-sided rib injury occurred in 106 cases, left-sided injury occurred in 76 cases, and bilateral injury occurred in 44 cases. The most frequent location of the rib fractures was from the fourth rib to the ninth rib (70.3%, 510/725). Initial pulmonary complications (IPC) after trauma occurred in 116 cases (51.3%). The mortality rate for the entire group was 1.3% (3/226). The patients with thoracic vertebral fractures and neurological deficits had a higher frequency of multiple rib fractures and IPC than the other patients (P the increased number of rib fractures, the frequency of IPC and mean intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay also increased.The rates of complications for patients with rib fractures were significantly different from those without rib fractures. We should pay much attention to the patients who presented with thoracic vertebral fractures and neurological deficits for minimizing further complications and mortality in such patients who had a higher frequency of multiple rib fractures and IPC than the other patients.

  11. Pressure-Redistributing Support Surface Use and Pressure Ulcer Incidence in Elderly Hip Fracture Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Shayna E.; Shardell, Michelle; Hawkes, William G.; Margolis, David J.; Amr, Sania; Miller, Ram; Baumgarten, Mona

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To evaluate the association between pressure-redistributing support surface (PRSS) use and incident pressure ulcers in older adults with hip fracture. DESIGN Secondary analysis of data from prospective cohort with assessments performed as soon as possible after hospital admission and on alternating days for 21 days. SETTING Nine hospitals in the Baltimore Hip Studies network and 105 postacute facilities to which participants were discharged. PARTICIPANTS Six hundred fifty-eight people aged 65 and older who underwent surgery for hip fracture. MEASUREMENTS Full-body examination for pressure ulcers; bedbound status; and PRSS use, recorded as none, powered (alternating pressure mattresses, low-air-loss mattresses, and alternating pressure overlays), or nonpowered (high-density foam, static air, or gel-filled mattresses or pressure-redistributing overlays except for alternating pressure overlays). RESULTS Incident pressure ulcers (IPUs), Stage 2 or higher, were observed at 4.2% (195/4,638) of visits after no PRSS use, 4.5% (28/623) of visits after powered PRSS use, and 3.6% (54/1,496) of visits after nonpowered PRSS use. The rate of IPU per person-day of follow-up did not differ significantly between participants using powered PRSSs and those not using PRSSs. The rate also did not differ significantly between participants using nonpowered PRSSs and those not using PRSSs, except in the subset of bedbound participants (incidence rate ratio = 0.3, 95% confidence interval = 0.1–0.7). CONCLUSION PRSS use was not associated with a lower IPU rate. Clinical guidelines may need revision for the limited effect of PRSS use, and it may be appropriate to target PRSS use to bedbound patients at risk of pressure ulcers. PMID:21649630

  12. Fatigue crack growth and fracture mechanics analysis of a working roll surface layer material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Drobne

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue crack growth and fracture mechanics analysis of a working roll surface layer material is presented in this paper. The research is done on a hot strip mill working roll where High Chromium Steel is used for roll’s shell material. To obtain corresponding parameters, a rectangular single edge notched bend specimens – SENB, according to standard BS 7448, were used. The fatigue crack growth analysis was done on a resonant testing machine with use of special crack gauges, while for fracture mechanics parameters the electro–mechanical testing machine was used.

  13. Hydrochemistry of surface water and groundwater from a fractured ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sodium, sulphate, chloride reflecting more mineralized than surface water. The results also showed that water in the study ..... EC: electrical conductivity, DO: dissolved oxygen, SAR: sodium adsorption ratio, SI: saturation index. .... carbonate, bicarbonate for carbonate hardness. Hard water is not a health hazard, but it may ...

  14. Fracture Surface Morphology and Impact Strength of Cellulose/PLA Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Honghong; Qiang, Tao

    2017-06-07

    Polylactide (PLA)-based composite materials reinforced with ball-milled celluloses were manufactured by extrusion blending followed by injection molding. Their surface morphology from impact fracture were imaged with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and investigated by calculating their fractal dimensions. Then, linear regression was used to explore the relationship between fractal dimension and impact strength of the resultant cellulose/PLA composite materials. The results show that filling the ball-milled celluloses into PLA can improve the impact toughness of PLA by a minimum of 38%. It was demonstrated that the fracture pattern of the cellulose/PLA composite materials is different from that of pristine PLA. For the resultant composite materials, the fractal dimension of the impact fractured surfaces increased with increasing filling content and decreasing particle size of the ball-milled cellulose particles. There were highly positive correlations between fractal dimension of the fractured surfaces and impact strength of the cellulose/PLA composites. However, the linearity between fractal dimension and impact strength were different for the different methods, due to their different R-squared values. The approach presented in this work will help to understand the structure-property relationships of composite materials from a new perspective.

  15. Identification of Hydraulic Fracture Orientation from Ground Surface Using the Seismic Moment Tensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Birialtcev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microseismic monitoring from ground surface is applied in the development of hard-to-recover reserves, especially in the process of hydraulic fracturing (HF. This paper compares several methods of HF microseismic monitoring from the surface, including diffraction stacking, time reverse modeling, and spectral methods. In (Aki and Richards, 1980 it is shown that signal enhancement from seismic events under correlated noises significantly improves when applying the maximum likelihood method. The maximum likelihood method allows to exclude influence of the correlated noise, and also to estimate the seismic moment tensor from ground surface. Estimation of the seismic moment tensor allows to detect type and orientation of source. Usually, the following source types are identified: “Explosion Point” (EXP, “Tensile Crack” (TC, “Double-Couple” (DC and “Compensated Linear Vector Dipole” (CLVD. The orientation of the hydraulic fracture can be estimated even when there is no obvious asymmetry of the spatial distribution of the cloud of events. The features of full-wave location technology are presented. The paper also reviews an example of microseismic monitoring of hydraulic fracturing when there is no obvious asymmetry of microseismic activity cloud, but due to the estimation of the seismic moment tensor it becomes possible to identify with confidence the dominant direction of the fracture.

  16. Fracture characteristics in Japanese rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, Yuji; Sawada, Atsushi; Akahori, Kuniaki

    1999-11-01

    It is crucial for the performance assessment of geosphere to evaluate the characteristics of fractures that can be dominant radionuclide migration pathways from a repository to biosphere. This report summarizes the characteristics of fractures obtained from broad literature surveys and the fields surveys at the Kamaishi mine in northern Japan and at outcrops and galleries throughout the country. The characteristics of fractures described in this report are fracture orientation, fracture shape, fracture frequency, fracture distribution in space, transmissivity of fracture, fracture aperture, fracture fillings, alteration halo along fracture, flow-wetted surface area in fracture, and the correlation among these characteristics. Since granitic rock is considered the archetype fractured media, a large amount of fracture data is available in literature. In addition, granitic rock has been treated as a potential host rock in many overseas programs, and has JNC performed a number of field observations and experiments in granodiorite at the Kamaishi mine. Therefore, the characteristics of fractures in granitic rock are qualitatively and quantitatively clarified to some extent in this report, while the characteristics of fractures in another rock types are not clarified. (author)

  17. ACE inhibitors and the risk of fractures: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yan-Zhen; Huang, Zhen-Zi; Shen, Ze-Feng; Wu, Hai-Yang; Peng, Jia-Xin; Waye, Mary Miu Yee; Rao, Shi-Tao; Yang, Li

    2017-03-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on the risk of fractures. All the included articleswere retrieved from MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Database. Trial eligibility and methodological quality were assessed before data extraction. Relative risk (RR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were used to assess the effect. Six case-control studies with11,387,668 participants met the inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. A small but significant risk effect on fractures was shown in the overall analysis of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor users compared with nonusers (Pooled RR 1.27; 95% CI 1.01-1.60), although a relatively high heterogeneity was found across studies. In the stratified analysis, therewas no statistically significant association in the subgroups of hip fracture (Pooled RR 1.14; 95% CI 0.73-1.76) and the study quality (Pooled RR 1.13; 95% CI 0.89-1.44), while the over 65-year-old angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor users showed a stronger risk effect on fractures (Pooled RR 2.06; 95% CI 1.53-3.17). Moreover, age was found to be contributed a large part of the high heterogeneity across the included studies. This study demonstrated that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors might have a small but significant risk effect on fractures, especially for the over 65-year-old users. These results should be interpreted with caution as the relatively high heterogeneity across studies. Additional multiple observational studies and high quality data from randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm these findings.

  18. Tidal Disruption of Phobos as the Cause of Surface Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurford, T. A.; Asphaug, E.; Spitale, J. N.; Hemingway, D.; Rhoden, A. R.; Henning, W. G.; Bills, B. G.; Kattenhorn, S. A.; Walker, M.

    2016-01-01

    Phobos, the innermost satellite of Mars, displays an extensive system of grooves that are mostly symmetric about its sub-Mars point. Phobos is steadily spiraling inward due to the tides it raises on Mars lagging behind Phobos' orbital position and will suffer tidal disruption before colliding with Mars in a few tens of millions of years. We calculate the surface stress field of the deorbiting satellite and show that the first signs of tidal disruption are already present on its surface. Most of Phobos' prominent grooves have an excellent correlation with computed stress orientations. The model requires a weak interior that has very low rigidity on the tidal evolution time scale, overlain by an approximately 10-100 m exterior shell that has elastic properties similar to lunar regolith as described by Horvath et al. (1980).

  19. Surface Weather Observation 1001 Forms (Keyed)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In order to fill in the observation gap prior to the time when commercial aviation began in the U.S., The NCDC Climate Data Modernization Program (CDMP) retrieved...

  20. INTRA- AND INTER-OBSERVER AGREEMENT IN THE AO AND GARNAVOS SYSTEMS FOR DIAPHYSEAL HUMERUS FRACTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriqui, Roberto; Masuda, Rodrigo Yuzo; Utino, Artur Yudi; Pierami, Rafael; Matsunaga, Fábio Teruo; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun Sugawara

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare inter- and intra-observer agreement using the Garnavos and AO/ASIF systems for classifying humeral diaphysis fractures . Eighty X-ray images taken of humeral diaphysis fractures in adult patients (age≥18 years) between January 2013 and September 2015 in the Radiology Department of Hospital São Paulo were selected for subsequent classification by five orthopedic surgeons with differing levels of experience. The images were examined at two different times and reproducibility analysis was evaluated using Fleiss' kappa to verify intra- and inter-observer agreement . High-level agreement was observed for both classification systems, but particularly for the AO/ASIF classification. Inter-observer evaluation yielded excellent levels of agreement for both classifications, but principally for the Garnavos classification . Good or excellent inter- and intra-observer agreement was seen for both the AO/ASIF and Garnavos classification systems. However, intra-observer agreement was higher for the AO/ASIF system and inter-observer agreement was higher for the Garnavos classification. Level of Evidence II, Diagnostic Studies - Investigating a Diagnostic Examination.

  1. Surface Reconstruction from Parallel Curves with Application to Parietal Bone Fracture Reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Majeed

    Full Text Available Maxillofacial trauma are common, secondary to road traffic accident, sports injury, falls and require sophisticated radiological imaging to precisely diagnose. A direct surgical reconstruction is complex and require clinical expertise. Bio-modelling helps in reconstructing surface model from 2D contours. In this manuscript we have constructed the 3D surface using 2D Computerized Tomography (CT scan contours. The fracture part of the cranial vault are reconstructed using GC1 rational cubic Ball curve with three free parameters, later the 2D contours are flipped into 3D with equidistant z component. The constructed surface is represented by contours blending interpolant. At the end of this manuscript a case report of parietal bone fracture is also illustrated by employing this method with a Graphical User Interface (GUI illustration.

  2. Direct observation of fracture mechanisms in polymer-layered silicate nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manias, E.; Kramer, E.J.; Giannelis, E.P. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Han, W.J. [Motorola Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jandt, K.D. [Univ. of Bristol (United Kingdom). Dept. of Oral and Dental Sciences

    1997-09-01

    Conventional three point bending and TEM techniques are employed to determine the fracture toughness and identify the failure mechanisms in model layered-silicate polymer nanocomposites. In their pristine form most of these layered mica-type silicates contain a hydrated layer of cations between the silicate planes and only certain polar polymers can be intercalated. On the other hand, one can modify these inorganic host lattices by tethering cationic surfactant molecules on the silicate surfaces and in this way a very broad range of polymers--from non-polar polystyrene (PS) to strongly polar nylon--can be intercalated in them.

  3. Influence of Structural Features and Fracture Processes on Surface Roughness: A Case Study from the Krosno Sandstones of the Górka–Mucharz Quarry (Little Beskids, Southern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieczara Łukasz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of analysis of surface roughness parameters in the Krosno Sandstones of Mucharz, southern Poland. It was aimed at determining whether these parameters are influenced by structural features (mainly the laminar distribution of mineral components and directional distribution of non-isometric grains and fracture processes. The tests applied in the analysis enabled us to determine and describe the primary statistical parameters used in the quantitative description of surface roughness, as well as specify the usefulness of contact profilometry as a method of visualizing spatial differentiation of fracture processes in rocks. These aims were achieved by selecting a model material (Krosno Sandstones from the Górka-Mucharz Quarry and an appropriate research methodology. The schedule of laboratory analyses included: identification analyses connected with non-destructive ultrasonic tests, aimed at the preliminary determination of rock anisotropy, strength point load tests (cleaved surfaces were obtained due to destruction of rock samples, microscopic analysis (observation of thin sections in order to determine the mechanism of inducing fracture processes and a test method of measuring surface roughness (two- and three-dimensional diagrams, topographic and contour maps, and statistical parameters of surface roughness. The highest values of roughness indicators were achieved for surfaces formed under the influence of intragranular fracture processes (cracks propagating directly through grains. This is related to the structural features of the Krosno Sandstones (distribution of lamination and bedding.

  4. Interplay between tectonics and topography: Topographic stress controls on bedrock fractures and surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, S.; Perron, J. T.; Martel, S. J.; Holbrook, W. S.; St Clair, J. T.; Singha, K.

    2016-12-01

    The interaction of tectonics, topography, and surface processes influences the evolution of landscapes in tectonically active regions. Though tectonic controls on topography have been extensively studied, the influence of topography on tectonics has been examined less. Theoretical studies have suggested that topography can perturb the tectonic and gravitational stress fields in landscapes, which can influence bedrock fracture patterns and in turn influence erosion. This hypothesis implies that there could be a feedback between topographic stress and landscape evolution such that topographically induced bedrock fractures influence and are influenced by surface processes in evolving topography. In this work, we explore the predictions of a three-dimensional topographic stress model and illustrate how different topographic forms and tectonic settings could influence bedrock fracture patterns. We show that the stress field is most sensitive to topographic perturbations if the most compressive horizontal tectonic stress is oriented perpendicular to the long axis of elongated landforms such as ridges and valleys, and that topographic stress perturbations are most pronounced beneath landforms with higher mean curvatures, such as channel junctions and ridge crests. The shape of a predicted fracture-rich zone in the subsurface depends mainly on the orientation of landforms relative to the most compressive horizontal tectonic stress direction and a dimensionless ratio that expresses the relative magnitudes of topographic stresses associated with tectonics and topographic relief. Variations in this dimensionless ratio can also change the predicted orientations of potential opening-mode fracture planes beneath ridges and valleys. We use these model results to illustrate how topographic perturbations of three-dimensional tectonic and gravitational stresses could influence landscape evolution by altering the rates and spatial heterogeneity of surface processes such as

  5. Qualitative assessment of bone density at the distal articulating surface of the third metacarpal in Thoroughbred racehorses with and without condylar fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughridge, A B; Hess, A M; Parkin, T D; Kawcak, C E

    2017-03-01

    Changes in subchondral bone density, induced by the repetitive cyclical loading of exercise, may potentiate fatigue damage and the risk of fracture. To use computed tomography (CT) to characterise bone density patterns at the articular surface of the third metacarpal bone in racehorses with and without lateral condylar fractures. Case control METHODS: Computed tomographic images of the distal articulating surface of the third metacarpal bone were obtained from Thoroughbred racehorses subjected to euthanasia in the UK. Third metacarpal bones were divided into 3 groups based on lateral condyle status; fractured (FX, n = 42), nonfractured contralateral condyle (NFX, n = 42) and control condyles from horses subjected to euthanasia for reasons unrelated to the third metacarpal bone (control, n = 94). Colour CT images were generated whereby each colour represented a range of pixel values and thus a relative range of bone density. A density value was calculated qualitatively by estimating the percentage of each colour within a specific region. Subchondral bone density was assessed in 6 regions from dorsal to palmar and 1 mm medial and lateral to the centre of the lateral parasagittal groove in NFX and control condyles and 1 mm medial and lateral to the fracture in FX condyles. Bone density was significantly higher in the FX and NFX condyles compared with control condyles for all 6 regions. A significantly higher bone density was observed in FX condyles relative to NFX condyles in the lateral middle and lateral palmar regions. Fractured condyles had increased heterogeneity in density among the 6 regions of interest compared with control and NFX condyles. Adjacent to the fracture, a focal increase in bone density and increased heterogeneity of density were characteristic of limbs with lateral condylar fractures compared with control and NFX condyles. These differences may represent pathological changes in bone density that increase the risk for lateral condylar fractures in

  6. Fundamentals of Reservoir Surface Energy as Related to Surface Properties, Wettability, Capillary Action, and Oil Recovery from Fractured Reservoirs by Spontaneous Imbibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Zhengxin Tong; Evren Unsal; Siluni Wickramathilaka; Shaochang Wo; Peigui Yin

    2008-06-30

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the non-wetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed

  7. FUNDAMENTALS OF RESERVOIR SURFACE ENERGY AS RELATED TO SURFACE PROPERTIES, WETTABILITY, CAPILLARY ACTION, AND OIL RECOVERY FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY SPONTANEOUS IMBIBITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the nonwetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed

  8. Fundamentals of reservoir surface energy as related to surface properties, wettability, capillary action, and oil recovery from fractured reservoirs by spontaneous imbibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman R. Morrow; Herbert Fischer; Yu Li; Geoffrey Mason; Douglas Ruth; Siddhartha Seth; Jason Zhengxin Tong; Peigui Yin; Shaochang Wo

    2006-06-08

    The objective of this project is to increase oil recovery from fractured reservoirs through improved fundamental understanding of the process of spontaneous imbibition by which oil is displaced from the rock matrix into the fractures. Spontaneous imbibition is fundamentally dependent on the reservoir surface free energy but this has never been investigated for rocks. In this project, the surface free energy of rocks will be determined by using liquids that can be solidified within the rock pore space at selected saturations. Thin sections of the rock then provide a two-dimensional view of the rock minerals and the occupant phases. Saturations and oil/rock, water/rock, and oil/water surface areas will be determined by advanced petrographic analysis and the surface free energy which drives spontaneous imbibition will be determined as a function of increase in wetting phase saturation. The inherent loss in surface free energy resulting from capillary instabilities at the microscopic (pore level) scale will be distinguished from the decrease in surface free energy that drives spontaneous imbibition. A mathematical network/numerical model will be developed and tested against experimental results of recovery versus time over broad variation of key factors such as rock properties, fluid phase viscosities, sample size, shape and boundary conditions. Two fundamentally important, but not previously considered, parameters of spontaneous imbibition, the capillary pressure acting to oppose production of oil at the outflow face and the pressure in the non-wetting phase at the no-flow boundary versus time, will also be measured and modeled. Simulation and network models will also be tested against special case solutions provided by analytic models. In the second stage of the project, application of the fundamental concepts developed in the first stage of the project will be demonstrated. The fundamental ideas, measurements, and analytic/numerical modeling will be applied to mixed

  9. The effect of crack propagation mechanism on the fractal dimension of fracture surfaces in steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Strnadel, B.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 3-4 (2008), s. 726-738 ISSN 0013-7944 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/0646; GA AV ČR IAA200410502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : low-alloyed steel * fracture surface * fractography Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.713, year: 2008

  10. The all-ceramic, inlay supported fixed partial denture. Part 4. Fracture surface analyses of an experimental model, all-ceramic, inlay supported fixed partial denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M C; Sornsuwan, T; Swain, M V

    2013-06-01

    In the previous three papers, the authors sought to conduct a thorough analysis of the feasibility for the use of zirconia in inlay supported, fixed partial dentures via finite element analysis (FEA). Correlating the response of the numerical model against the experimental model has never been satisfactorily performed for an anatomically accurate ceramic bridge; such validation is crucial if the results from the FEA are to be confidently relied upon. Part 4 of this series is a detailed fractographic analysis of the zirconia bridge that was the model for the experimental validation, performed in order to confirm the fracture origin/s and fracture trajectory as predicted from the FEA. Established fractographic techniques involving optical examination followed by examination with scanning electron microscopy were conducted. The porous, granular surface of zirconia (both partially and fully sintered) does not lend itself to easy surface analysis but the classic fractographic signs (hackle lines, wake hackle lines and compression curl) are present. Use of linear fracture elastic mechanics allowed the calculation of theoretical critical flaw size and a comparison to two defects or inclusions found at the primary origin of fracture. Excellent agreement between the fracture sites and paths of travel as predicted in the numerical analysis exist with fractographic analysis. Furthermore, the calculated critical flaw size of 30 μm to 40 μm equates very well with defects seen at the general vicinity of the primary fracture origin and the general observed size of critical flaws in machined ceramics which range between 20 μm to 50 μm, thus providing further confirmation. The fractographic analysis detailed in this study provides validation of the 'zones of failure' as predicted in our FEA. Additionally, the excellent correlation between the calculated critical flaw size and the defects observed at the primary fracture site demonstrates that field of experimental mechanics is

  11. Osteoporosis-Related Fractures in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Long-Term Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate: An Observational Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Ayami; Ikeda, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Akio; Minami, Chiaki; Tan, Motomu; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2018-04-05

    Patients with HIV infection may have a higher prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia, as well as an increased risk of bone fracture compared with non-HIV-infected individuals. Antiretroviral therapy is thought to be one of factors associated to osteoporosis-related bone fractures. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of long-term exposure to tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) on the cumulative risk of osteoporosis-related bone fractures in Japanese patients with HIV infection. This observational cohort study comprised a joint HIV-related drug survey of patients treated with TDF between April 2004 and March 2013. Thirty-five healthcare facilities in Japan participated in the survey. The incidence of osteoporosis-related fractures was extracted from all adverse events (AEs) using standardized Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities queries, and used to calculate the fracture rate per 10,000 patient-years (PY). Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate the cumulative probability of fracture during the study period. A total of 3251 patients who received TDF or TDF/emtricitabine between April 2004 and March 2013 were analyzed in this study; 93.5% of patients were male. The fracture rate was 13.5 per 10,000 PY in males and 42.2 per 10,000 PY in females. The mean age for male patients with osteoporosis-related fracture was 43.2 years, whereas it was 65.7 years in female patients. The cumulative probability of osteoporosis-related fracture increased after ≥ 5 years of TDF exposure. The rate of hip fracture (95% confidence interval) was 7.2 (3.1-14.2) per 10,000 PY. Among HIV-infected patients in Japan, treatment with TDF for ≥ 5 years increases the risk of bone fractures in younger men, in addition to that seen in older post-menopausal women.

  12. Surface Airways Observations (SAO) Hourly Data 1928-1948 (CDMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset consists of hourly U.S. surface airways observations (SAO). These observations extend as far back as 1928, from the time when commercial aviation began...

  13. Failure of heterogeneous materials: Scaling properties of fracture surfaces and implications on models of cracks in disordered media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamy, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    While there exists a unified theoretical framework - Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) - to describe the failure of homogeneous materials, understanding and modelling the mechanical properties of heterogeneous media continue to raise significant fundamental challenges. These mechanical properties, observed at the macroscopic scale, result from microscopic processes occurring at the scale of the material. To include these local processes into a statistical description constitutes then a crucial step toward the setup of predictive macroscopic models. Crack surface roughness is a consequence of these local processes. Consequently, many fractography experiments have focussed on their analysis. In this context, it was recently evidenced that, in many materials, fracture surfaces exhibit anisotropic scaling properties reminiscent to interface growth problems, fully characterized by two couples of parameters: The roughness exponents and the characteristic length-scales measured along and perpendicular to the direction of crack growth respectively. While the characteristic length-scales do depend on the considered material, the exponents are surprisingly universal: Two distinct sets of critical exponents are observed whether the surfaces are examined at scales below or above the size of the damaged zone at the crack front. Models of crack growth in disordered media are discussed at the light of these experimental observations. In particular, one can derive a model from LEFM which describe the development of crack roughness as an ``elastic'' manifold creeping in a random media. This approach captures quantitatively the experimental observations performed at length-scales above the size of the process zone. In this approach, the onset of crack propagation can be interpreted as a dynamic phase transition while sub-critical crack growth can be assimilated to thermally-assisted depinning.

  14. Freeze-fracture studies of photoreceptor membranes: new observations bearing upon the distribution of cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, L D; Cohen, A I

    1983-09-01

    We performed electron microscopy of replicas from freeze-fractured retinas exposed during or after fixation to the cholesterol-binding antibiotic, filipin. We observed characteristic filipin-induced perturbations throughout the disk and plasma membranes of retinal rod outer segments of various species. It is evident that a prolonged exposure to filipin in fixative enhances rather than reduces presumptive cholesterol detection in the vertebrate photoreceptor cell. In agreement with the pattern seen in our previous study (Andrews, L.D., and A. I. Cohen, 1979, J. Cell Biol., 81:215-228), filipin-binding in membranes exhibiting particle-free patches seemed largely confined to these patches. Favorably fractured photoreceptors exhibited marked filipin-binding in apical inner segment plasma membrane topologically confluent with and proximate to the outer segment plasma membrane, which was comparatively free of filipin binding. A possible boundary between these differing membrane domains was suggested in a number of replicas exhibiting lower filipin binding to the apical plasma membrane of the inner segment in the area surrounding the cilium. This area contains a structure (Andrews, L. D., 1982, Freeze-fracture studies of vertebrate photoreceptors, In Structure of the Eye, J. G. Hollyfield and E. Acosta Vidrio, editors, Elsevier/North-Holland, New York, 11-23) that resembles the active zones of the nerve terminals for the frog neuromuscular junction. These observations lead us to hypothesize that these structures may function to direct vesicle fusion to occur near them, in a domain of membrane more closely resembling outer than inner segment plasma membrane. The above evidence supports the views that (a) all disk membranes contain cholesterol, but the particle-free patches present in some disks trap cholesterol from contiguous particulate membrane regions; (b) contiguous inner and outer segment membranes may greatly differ in cholesterol content; and (c) the suggested

  15. On the mechanical interaction between a fluid-filled fracture and the earth's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, D.D.; Holzhausen, G.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanical interaction between a fluid-filled fracture (e.g., hydraulic fracture joint, or igneous dike) and the earth's surface is analyzed using a two-dimensional elastic solution for a slit of arbitrary inclination buried beneath a horizontal free surface and subjected to an arbitrary pressure distribution. The solution is obtained by iteratively superimposing two fundamental sets of analytical solutions. For uniform internal pressure the slit behaves essentially as if it were in an infinite region if the depth-to-center is three times greater than the half-length. For shallower slits interaction with the free surface is pronounced: stresses and displacements near the slit differ by more than 10% from values for the deeply buried slit. The following changes are noted as the depth-to-center decreases: 1. (1) the mode I stress intensity factor increases for both ends of the slit, but more rapidly at the upper end; 2. (2) the mode II stress-intensity factor is significantly different from zero (except for vertical slits) suggesting propagation out of the original plane of the slit; 3. (3) displacements of the slit wall are asymmetric such that the slit gaps open more widely near the upper end. Similar changes are noted if fluid density creates a linear pressure gradient that is smaller than the lithostatic gradient. Under such conditions natural fractures should propagate preferentially upward toward the earth's surface requiring less pressure as they grow in length. If deformation near the surface is of interest, the model should account explicitly for the free surface. Stresses and displacements at the free surface are not approximated very well by values calculated along a line in an infinite region, even when the slit is far from the line. As depth-to-center of a shallow pressurized slit decreases, the following changes are noted: 1. (1) displacements of the free surface increase to the same order of magnitude as the displacements of the slit walls, 2. (2

  16. High volume hydraulic fracturing operations: potential impacts on surface water and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrdjen, Igor; Lee, Jiyoung

    2016-08-01

    High volume, hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) processes, used to extract natural gas and oil from underground shale deposits, pose many potential hazards to the environment and human health. HVHF can negatively affect the environment by contaminating soil, water, and air matrices with potential pollutants. Due to the relatively novel nature of the process, hazards to surface waters and human health are not well known. The purpose of this article is to link the impacts of HVHF operations on surface water integrity, with human health consequences. Surface water contamination risks include: increased structural failure rates of unconventional wells, issues with wastewater treatment, and accidental discharge of contaminated fluids. Human health risks associated with exposure to surface water contaminated with HVHF chemicals include increased cancer risk and turbidity of water, leading to increased pathogen survival time. Future research should focus on modeling contamination spread throughout the environment, and minimizing occupational exposure to harmful chemicals.

  17. Using skin surface temperature to differentiate between complex regional pain syndrome type 1 patients after a fracture and control patients with various complaints after a fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.P. Niehof (Sjoerd); A. Beerthuizen (Annemerle); F.J.P.M. Huygen (Frank); F.J. Zijlstra (Freek)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: In this study, we assessed the validity of skin surface temperature recordings, based on various calculation methods applied to the thermographic data, to diagnose acute complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS1) fracture patients. METHODS: Thermographic recordings of the

  18. Fracture-free surfaces of CAD/CAM lithium metasilicate glass-ceramic using micro-slurry jet erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ling; Baba, Takashi; Nakanishi, Yoshitaka

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports the use of micro-slurry jet erosion (MSJE) on CAD/CAM lithium mesilicate glass ceramic (LMGC) that is capable of achieving the fracture-free surface quality. A computer-controlled MSJE process using a low-pressure and low-concentration alumina slurry was applied to diamond-ground LMGC surfaces with surface and subsurface damage. The MSJE processed and diamond-ground LMGC surfaces were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine surface morphology, fractures, and residual defects. 3D confocal laser microscopy (CLM) was used to quantitatively characterize all machined surface textures as a function of processing conditions. Our results show that surface and subsurface damage induced in diamond-ground surfaces were significantly diminished after 50-cycle MSJE processing. Fracture-free surfaces were obtained after 100 MSJE cycles. Our measured parameters of the 3D surface topography included the average surface roughness, maximum peak-valley height, highest peak height, lowest valley height, and kurtosis and absolute skewness of height distributions. All these parameters were significantly reduced with the increase of MSJE cycles. This work implies that MSJE promises to be an effective manufacturing technique for the generation of fracture-free LMGC surfaces which are crucial for high-quality monolithic restorations made from the material. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. FATIGUE LIFE PREDICTION BASED ON MACROSCOPIC PLASTIC ZONE ON FRACTURE SURFACE OF AISI-SAE 1018 STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Domínguez Almaraz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with rotating bending fatigue tests at high speed (150 Hz carried out on AISI-SAE 1018 steel with a high content of impurities (non metallic inclusions, for which the high experimental stress inside the specimen is close to the elastic limit of the material. Simulations of rotating loading are obtained by Visual NASTRAN software in order to determine the numerical stresse and strain distributions inside a hypothetical homogeneous specimen; later, this information is used for the experimental set up. A general description of experimental test machine and experimental conditions are developed and then, the experimental results are presented and discussed according the observed failure origin related to the non metallic inclusions and the associated high stress zones. Finally, a simple model is proposed to predict the fatigue life for this non homogeneous steel under high speed rotating bending fatigue tests close to the elastic limit, based on the rate between the visual macro-plastic deformation zone at fracture surface and the total fracture surface, together with the crack initiation inclusion (or inclusions located at this zone.

  20. Hydraulic Shearing and Hydraulic Jacking Observed during Hydraulic Stimulations in Fractured Geothermal Reservoir in Pohang, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, K. B.; Park, S.; Xie, L.; Kim, K. I.; Yoo, H.; Kim, K. Y.; Choi, J.; Yoon, K. S.; Yoon, W. S.; Lee, T. J.; Song, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) relies on sufficient and irreversible enhancement of reservoir permeability through hydraulic stimulation and possibility of such desirable change of permeability is an open question that can undermine the universality of EGS concept. We report results of first hydraulic stimulation campaign conducted in two deep boreholes in fractured granodiorite geothermal reservoir in Pohang, Korea. Borehole PX-1, located at 4.22 km, was subjected to the injection of 3,907 m3 with flow rate of up to 18 kg/s followed by bleeding off of 1,207 m3. The borehole PX-2, located at 4.35 km, was subjected to the injection of 1,970 m3 with flow rate of up to 46 kg/sIn PX-1, a sharp distinct decline of wellhead pressure was observed at around 16 MPa of wellhead pressure which was similar to the predicted injection pressure to induce hydraulic shearing. Injectivity interpretation before and after the hydraulic shearing indicates that permanent increase of permeability was achieved by a factor of a few. In PX-2, however, injectivity was very small and hydraulic shearing was not observed due possibly to the near wellbore damage made by the remedying process of lost circulation such as using lost circulation material during drilling. Flow rate of larger than 40 kg/s was achieved at very high well head pressure of nearly 90 MPa. Hydraulic jacking, that is reversible opening and closure of fracture with change of injection pressure, was clearly observed. Although sharp increase of permeability due to fracture opening was achieved with elevated injection pressure, the increased permeability was reversed with decreased injection pressure.Two contrasting response observed in the same reservoir at two different boreholes which is apart only 600 m apart provide important implication that can be used for the stimulation strategy for EGS.This work was supported by the New and Renewable Energy Technology Development Program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology

  1. Traumatic fractures as a result of falls in children and adolescents: A retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongwei; Yu, Hailong; Zhou, Yue; Li, Changqing; Liu, Jun; Ou, Lan; Zhao, Yiwen; Song, Guoli; Han, Jianda; Chen, Yu; Xiang, Liangbi

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence and pattern of traumatic fractures (TFs) as a result of falls in a population of children and adolescents (≤18 years old) in China.This was a cross-sectional study. We retrospectively reviewed 1412 patients who were children and adolescents with TFs as a result of falls admitted to our university-affiliated hospitals in China from 2001 to 2010. Etiologies included high fall (height ≥2) and low fall (height fall (1059, 75.0%) and high fall (353, 25.0%). There were 2073 fractures in total and 92 patients (6.5%) presented with multiple fractures. The most common fracture sites were upper extremity fractures in 814 patients (57.6%) and lower extremity fractures in 383 patients (27.1%), followed by craniofacial fractures in 233 patients (16.5%). A total of 231 (16.4%) patients suffered a nerve injury. The frequencies of early and late complications/associated injuries were 19.5% (n = 275) and 9.2% (n = 130). The frequencies of emergency admission, nerve injury, spinal fracture, lower extremity fractures, craniofacial fracture, sternum and rib fracture, and early complications/ASOIs were significantly larger in high fall than low fall (all P fall than high fall. The frequencies of spinal fracture (P = .039), lower extremity fractures (P = .048), and craniofacial fracture (P = .041) were significantly larger in female than the male patients. The frequency of upper extremity fractures (P fall, spinal fracture, and craniofacial fracture were significantly larger in patients with nerve injury than other patients without nerve injury (all P falls and upper extremity fractures were the most common etiologies and sites, respectively. High fall, spinal fracture and craniofacial fracture were risk factors for nerve injury. Therefore, we should focus on patients who were caused by high fall and presented with spinal and craniofacial fracture to determine the presence of a nerve injury so that we

  2. Influence of surface treatment on the in-vitro fracture resistance of zirconia-based all-ceramic anterior crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitter, M; Lotze, G; Bömicke, W; Rues, S

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of surface treatment on the fracture resistance of zirconia-based all-ceramic anterior crowns. Sixty-four zirconia-based all-ceramic anterior crowns, veneered by use of a press-on technique, were produced. For 48 crowns intraoral adjustment was simulated (A-group), 16 crowns remained unadjusted (WA-group). The adjusted area was then treated in three ways: 1. no further surface treatment; 2. polishing, with irrigation, using polishers interspersed with diamond grit for ceramics; and 3. polishing and glaze firing. Half of the specimens were loaded until fracture in an universal testing device without artificial ageing; the other crowns underwent thermocycling and chewing simulation before ultimate-load testing. Explorative statistical analysis was performed by use of non-parametric and parametric tests. In addition, fracture-strength tests according to ISO 6872 were performed for veneer ceramic subjected to the different surface treatments. Finite element analysis was also conducted for the crowns, and surface roughness was measured. Crowns in the A-group were more sensitive to aging than crowns in the WA-group (p=0.038). Although both polishing and glaze firing slightly improved the fracture resistance of the specimens, the fracture resistance in the WA-group (initial fracture resistance (IFR): 652.0 ± 107.7N, remaining fracture resistance after aging (RFR): 560.6 ± 233.3N) was higher than the fracture resistance in the A-group (polished: IFR: 477.9 ± 108.8N, RFR: 386.0 ± 218.5N; glaze firing: IFR: 535.5 ± 128.0N, RFR: 388.6 ± 202.2N). Surface roughness without adjustment was Ra=0.1 μm; for adjustment but without further treatment it was Ra=1.4 μm; for adjustment and polishing it was Ra=0.3 μm; and for adjustment, polishing, and glazing it was Ra=0.6 μm. Stress distributions obtained by finite element analysis in combination with fracture strength tests showed that fractures most probably originated from

  3. Observation of optimal gecko's adhesion on nanorough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugno, Nicola M; Lepore, Emiliano

    2008-12-01

    In this letter we report experimental observations on the times of adhesion of living Tokay geckos (Gekko geckos) on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) inverted surfaces. Two different geckos (male and female) and three surfaces with different root mean square (RMS) roughness (RMS=42, 618 and 931 nm) have been considered, for a total of 72 observations. The measured data are proved to be statistically significant, following the Weibull Statistics with coefficients of correlation between 0.781 and 0.955. The unexpected result is the observation of a maximal gecko adhesion on the surface with intermediate roughness of RMS=618 nm, that we note has waviness comparable to the seta size.

  4. OBSERVED ASTEROID SURFACE AREA IN THE THERMAL INFRARED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, C. R. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Kramer, E.; Sonnett, S. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wright, E. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Grav, T. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The rapid accumulation of thermal infrared observations and shape models of asteroids has led to increased interest in thermophysical modeling. Most of these infrared observations are unresolved. We consider what fraction of an asteroid’s surface area contributes the bulk of the emitted thermal flux for two model asteroids of different shapes over a range of thermal parameters. The resulting observed surface in the infrared is generally more fragmented than the area observed in visible wavelengths, indicating high sensitivity to shape. For objects with low values of the thermal parameter, small fractions of the surface contribute the majority of thermally emitted flux. Calculating observed areas could enable the production of spatially resolved thermal inertia maps from non-resolved observations of asteroids.

  5. Metallurgical aspects of fatigue fractured surfaces of al grain refined by some rare earth materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaid, A.I.O.

    2005-01-01

    Aluminum and aluminum alloys are widely used materials in the automobile and air craft industries due to their high strength-to-weight ratio, in addition to some other attractive characteristics e.g. corrosion resistance and high electrical and thermal conductivities. Aluminum and its alloys are normally grain refined by Ti or Ti+B to enhance their surface quality and improve their mechanical strength. Although the effect of addition of these grain refiners on the microstructure mechanical behaviour has been investigated and reported, little work has been published on the effect of the refiners on the fatigue life of aluminum and its alloys. In this paper, the effect of addition of some rare earth materials, namely Vanadium and Zirconium on the fatigue life of commercially pure aluminum grain refined by Ti or Ti+B is reported and discussed. Furthermore, metallurgical aspects of these elements on the fatigue fractured surfaces are also discussed using scanning electron microscopy, SEM. Finally, photoscans of the fractured surfaces at different fatigue stresses are presented and discussed. (author)

  6. Surface Airways Observations (SAO) Hourly Data (1965-1981) (CDMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset consists primarily of U.S. surface airways observations (SAO) data beginning in 1965 and extending through 1981. Note that a few stations have already...

  7. Observations of the atmospheric surface layer parameters over a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    1999-08-11

    Aug 11, 1999 ... This paper discusses the observations of the Atmospheric Surface Layer (ASL) parameters dur- ing the solar eclipse of August 11th, 1999. Intensive surface layer experiments were conducted at. Ahmedabad (23◦21 N, 72◦36 E), the western part of India, which was close to the totality path. This rare event ...

  8. Some observations on boiling heat transfer with surface oscillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, H.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of surface oscillation on pool boiling heat transfer are experimentally studied. Experiments were performed in saturated ethanol and distilled water, covering the range from nucleate to film boiling except in the transition region. Two different geometries were employed as the heating surface with the same wetting area, stainless steel pipe and molybdenum ribbon. The results confirm earlier work on the effect of surface oscillation especially in lower heat flux region of nucleate boiling. Interesting boiling behavior during surface oscillation is observed, which was not referred to in previous work. (2 figures) (Author)

  9. Radiographic observation and semi-analytical reconstruction of fracture process zone silicate composite specimen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavřík, Daniel; Jandejsek, Ivan; Fíla, Tomáš; Veselý, V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 3 (2013), s. 315-326 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/11/1551 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : cementitious composite * quasi-brittle fracture * fracture process zone * digital radiography Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics http://journal.it.cas.cz/index.php?stranka= contents

  10. Observation of melt surface depressions during electron beam evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa

    2000-08-01

    Depths of depressed surface of liquid gadolinium, cerium and copper during electron beam evaporation were measured by triangulation method using a CCD camera. The depression depths estimated from the balance of the vapor pressure and the hydrostatic pressure at the evaporation surface agreed with the measured values. The periodic fluctuation of atomic beam was observed when the depression of 3∼4 mm in depth was formed at the evaporation spot. (author)

  11. Observation of a prewetting transition during surface melting of caprolactam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandavarkar, Sumant; Geertman, Rob M.; de Jeu, Wim H.

    1992-10-01

    The surface-induced melting of the closed-packed (100) face of the anisotropic molecular crystal caprolactam has been studied using x-ray reflectivity. A thin-to-thick film prewetting transition is observed at about 13 K below the bulk melting point. Only above this transition does the thickness of the quasiliquid layer increase continuously with temperature. We speculate that initially the surface melting proceeds via layering transitions.

  12. Effect of implantoplasty on fracture resistance and surface roughness of standard diameter dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Berenguer, Xavier; García-García, Marta; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Sanz-Alonso, Mariano; Figueiredo, Rui; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard

    2018-01-01

    To assess the effect of implantoplasty on the fracture resistance, surface roughness, and macroscopic morphology of standard diameter (4.1 mm) external connection dental implants. An in vitro study was conducted in 20 screw-shaped titanium dental implants with an external connection. In 10 implants, the threads and surface were removed and polished with high-speed burs (implantoplasty), while the remaining 10 implants were used as controls. The final implant dimensions were recorded. The newly polished surface quality was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by 3D surface roughness analysis using a confocal laser microscope. Finally, all the implants were subjected to a mechanical pressure resistance test. A descriptive analysis of the data was made. Also, Student's t tests were employed to detect differences regarding the compression tests. Implantoplasty was carried out for a mean time of 10 min and 48 s (standard deviation (SD) of 1 min 22 s). Macroscopically, the resulting surface had a smooth appearance, although small titanium shavings and silicon debris were present. The final surface roughness (S a values 0.1 ± 0.02 μm) was significantly lower than that of the original (0.75 ± 0.08 μm S a ) (p = .005). There was minimal reduction in the implant's inner body diameter (0.19 ± 0.03 mm), and no statistically significant differences were found between the test and control implants regarding the maximum resistance force (896 vs 880 N, respectively). Implantoplasty, although technically demanding and time-consuming, does not seem to significantly alter fracture resistance of standard diameter external connection implants. A smooth surface with S a values below 0.1 μm can be obtained through the use of silicon polishers. A larger sample is required to confirm that implantoplasty does not significantly affect the maximum resistance force of standard diameter external connection implants. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published

  13. Viscosity and surface tension effects during multiphase flow in propped fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzikowski, Michał; Dąbrowski, Marcin

    2017-04-01

    Geological sequestration of CO2 was proposed as an important mechanism to reduce its emission into atmosphere. CO2 exhibits a higher affinity to organic matter than methane molecules and, potentially, it could be pumped and stored in shale reservoirs while enhancing late stage shale gas production. A successful analysis of CO2 sequestration in low matrix permeability rocks such as shales requires a thorough understanding of multiphase flow in stimulated rock fractures, which provide most significant pathways for fluids in such systems. Multiphase fracture flows are also of great relevance to brine, oil and gas migration in petroleum systems, water and stream circulation in geothermal reservoirs, and chemical transport of non-aqueous phase liquids in shallow hydrogeological systems, particularly in partially saturated zones. There are various physical models that describe phenomena taking place during multiphase flow through porous media. One of key aspects that need to be considered are pore-scale effects related to capillarity. Unfortunately, detailed models that describe motion and evolution of phase or component boundary require direct numerical simulations and spatial resolutions that are hard to reach when considering industrial relevant systems. Main aim of the presented work was the development of reduced 2.5D models based on Brinkman approximation of thin domain flow that would be able to capture local scale phenomena without expensive 3D simulations. Presented approach was designed specifically to tackle incompressible and immiscible systems and is based on Continuous Surface Force approach presented by Brackbill et al., implemented using Lattice Boltzmann Method. Presented approach where firstly validated against standard test cases with known classical solution and known experimental data. In the second part, we present and discuss two component, immiscible permeability data for rough and propped fracture obtained with our code for a rage of proppants

  14. Morphological Changes Of The Root Surface And Fracture Resistance After Treatment Of Root Fracture By CO2 Laser And Glass Ionomer Or Mineral Trioxide Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Y. A.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.; Ghaith, M. E.

    2009-09-01

    This in vitro study evaluates the morphological changes of the root surface and fracture resistance after treatment of root cracks by CO2 laser and glass Ionomer or mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA). Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary central incisor teeth with similar dimension were selected. Crowns were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction, and the lengths of the roots were adjusted to 13 mm. A longitudinal groove with a dimension of 1×5 mm2 and a depth of 1.5 mm was prepared by a high speed fissure bur on the labial surface of the root. The roots were divided into 5 groups: the 10 root grooves in group 1 were remained unfilled and were used as a control group. The 10 root grooves in group 2 were filled with glass Ionomer, 10 root grooves in group 3 were filled with MTA, the 10 root grooves in group 4 were filled with glass Ionomer and irradiated by CO2 laser and the 10 root grooves in group 5 were filled with MTA and irradiated with CO2 laser. Scanning electron microscopy was performed for two samples in each group. Tests for fracture strength were performed using a universal testing machine and a round tip of a diameter of 4 mm. The force was applied vertically with a constant speed of 1 mm min 1. For each root, the force at the time of fracture was recorded in Newtons. Results were evaluated statistically with ANOVA and Turkey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) tests. SEM micrographs revealed that the melted masses and the plate-like crystals formed a tight Chemical bond between the cementum and glass Ionomer and melted masses and globular like structure between cementum and MTA. The mean fracture resistance was the maximum fracture resistance in group 5 (810.8 N). Glass Ionomer and MTA with the help of CO2 laser can be an alternative to the treatment of tooth crack or fracture. CO2 laser increase the resistance of the teeth to fracture.

  15. Fracture rate and back pain during and after discontinuation of teriparatide: 36 month data from the European Forsteo Observational Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fahrleitner-Pammer, A.; Langdahl, B.; Marin, F.; Jakob, F.; Karras, D.; Barrett, A.; Ljunggren, O.; Walsh, J.B.; Rajzbaum, G.; Barker, C.; Lems, W.F.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: In this observational study in postmenopausal women with severe osteoporosis, the incidence of fractures was decreased during 18 months of teriparatide treatment with no evidence of further change in the subsequent 18-month post-teriparatide period when most patients took other osteoporosis

  16. Estrogen and androgen receptor activities of hydraulic fracturing chemicals and surface and ground water in a drilling-dense region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Davis, J. Wade; Hormann, Anette M.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid rise in natural gas extraction using hydraulic fracturing increases the potential for contamination of surface and ground water from chemicals used throughout the process. Hundreds of products containing more than 750 chemicals and components are potentially used throughout the extraction process, including more than 100 known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals. We hypothesized thataselected subset of chemicalsusedin natural gas drilling operationsandalso surface and ground water samples collected in a drilling-dense region of Garfield County, Colorado, would exhibit estrogen and androgen receptor activities. Water samples were collected, solid-phase extracted, and measured for estrogen and androgen receptor activities using reporter gene assays in human cell lines. Of the 39 unique water samples, 89%, 41%, 12%, and 46% exhibited estrogenic, antiestrogenic, androgenic, and antiandrogenic activities, respectively. Testing of a subset of natural gas drilling chemicals revealed novel antiestrogenic, novel antiandrogenic, and limited estrogenic activities. The Colorado River, the drainage basin for this region, exhibited moderate levels of estrogenic, antiestrogenic, and antiandrogenic activities, suggesting that higher localized activity at sites with known natural gas–related spills surrounding the river might be contributing to the multiple receptor activities observed in this water source. The majority of water samples collected from sites in a drilling-dense region of Colorado exhibited more estrogenic, antiestrogenic, or antiandrogenic activities than reference sites with limited nearby drilling operations. Our data suggest that natural gas drilling operationsmayresult in elevated endocrine-disrupting chemical activity in surface and ground water.

  17. Development of autoradiographic method for measuring sorption of radionuclides on natural fracture surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muuronen, S.

    1983-11-01

    On the basis of positive results about sorption of radionuclides in rock thin sections an autoradiographic method applicable for measurement sorption of radionuclides on rough rock surfaces was developed. There is no method available because 1) a plane film cannot be used because due to the roughness of rock surfaces 2) rock samples used in this investigation cannot be studied with microscopes and 3) autoradiogram cannot be studied fixed on the surface of a rock sample because the colours of the minerals in the sample will interfere with the interpretation. This report discusses experimental work done to find an useful proedure. In the development of the method main emphasis was put on investigation of the following steps: 1) preparation of the sample for equilibration and spiking; 2) properties of the covering paint for the rock surface and 3) testing of autoradiographic methods using different nuclear emulsions. As the result of these experiments promising autoradiograms with gel emulsion for sawed rock surfaces and with stripping film for rough rock surfaces were obtained. The mineralogic disribution of sorbed activity is easily seen in autoradiograms. Much work must still be done to get reliable quantitative information from autoradiograms. For developing of the autoradiographic method sawed plane rock samples of quartz feldspar intergrowth, pegmatite and limestone were used. In addition core samples of tonalite and mica gneiss from Olkiluoto were utilized. The distribution coefficients (Ksub(a)) obtained for cesium were 560 x 10 -4 and 620 x 10 -4 m 3 /m 2 for tonalite and mica gneiss, respectively. The results are little higher but of the same order of magnitude as obtained by the autoradiographic method using rock thin sections and by the batch method using crused samples. The natural fracture surface sorption study is a logical step in determining the scaling factor from laboratory to field studies. Field data will be needed to determine whether laboratory

  18. Influence of material ductility and crack surface roughness on fracture instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khezrzadeh, Hamed; Wnuk, Michael P; Yavari, Arash

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a stability analysis for fractal cracks. First, the Westergaard stress functions are proposed for semi-infinite and finite smooth cracks embedded in the stress fields associated with the corresponding self-affine fractal cracks. These new stress functions satisfy all the required boundary conditions and according to Wnuk and Yavari's (2003 Eng. Fract. Mech. 70 1659-74) embedded crack model they are used to derive the stress and displacement fields generated around a fractal crack. These results are then used in conjunction with the final stretch criterion to study the quasi-static stable crack extension, which in ductile materials precedes the global failure. The material resistance curves are determined by solving certain nonlinear differential equations and then employed in predicting the stress levels at the onset of stable crack growth and at the critical point, where a transition to the catastrophic failure occurs. It is shown that the incorporation of the fractal geometry into the crack model, i.e. accounting for the roughness of the crack surfaces, results in (1) higher threshold levels of the material resistance to crack propagation and (2) higher levels of the critical stresses associated with the onset of catastrophic fracture. While the process of quasi-static stable crack growth (SCG) is viewed as a sequence of local instability states, the terminal instability attained at the end of this process is identified with the global instability. The phenomenon of SCG can be used as an early warning sign in fracture detection and prevention.

  19. Land Surface Microwave Emissivity Dynamics: Observations, Analysis and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yudong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Kumar, Sujay; Ringerud, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Land surface microwave emissivity affects remote sensing of both the atmosphere and the land surface. The dynamical behavior of microwave emissivity over a very diverse sample of land surface types is studied. With seven years of satellite measurements from AMSR-E, we identified various dynamical regimes of the land surface emission. In addition, we used two radiative transfer models (RTMs), the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) and the Community Microwave Emission Modeling Platform (CMEM), to simulate land surface emissivity dynamics. With both CRTM and CMEM coupled to NASA's Land Information System, global-scale land surface microwave emissivities were simulated for five years, and evaluated against AMSR-E observations. It is found that both models have successes and failures over various types of land surfaces. Among them, the desert shows the most consistent underestimates (by approx. 70-80%), due to limitations of the physical models used, and requires a revision in both systems. Other snow-free surface types exhibit various degrees of success and it is expected that parameter tuning can improve their performances.

  20. Depression after low-energy fracture in older women predicts future falls: a prospective observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Falls are one of the main causes of fractures in elderly people and after a recent fracture, the risk of another fall is increased, resulting in subsequent fracture. Therefore, risk factors for future falls should be determined. We prospectively investigated the relationship between depression and the incidence of falls in post-menopausal women after a low-energy fracture. Methods At baseline, 181 women aged 60 years and older who presented with a recent low-energy fracture were evaluated at the fracture and osteoporosis outpatient clinics of two hospitals. As well as clinical evaluation and bone mineral density tests, the presence of depression (measured using the Edinburgh Depression Scale, EDS, depression cut-off > 11) and risk factors for falling were assessed. During two years of follow-up, the incidence of falls was registered annually by means of detailed questionnaires and interviews. Results Seventy-nine (44%) of the women sustained at least one fall during follow-up. Of these, 28% (n = 22) suffered from depression at baseline compared to 10% (n = 10) of the 102 women who did not sustain a fall during follow-up (Χ2 = 8.76, df = 1, p = .003). Multiple logistic regression showed that the presence of depression and co-morbidity at baseline were independently related to falls (OR = 4.13, 95% CI = 1.58-10.80; OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.11-4.56, respectively) during follow-up. Conclusions The presence of depression in women aged 60 years and older with recent low-energy fractures is an important risk factor for future falls. We propose that clinicians treating patients with recent low-energy fractures should anticipate not only on skeletal-related risk factors for fractures, but also on fall-related risk factors including depression. PMID:22060677

  1. Land-Surface-Atmosphere Coupling in Observations and Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan K Betts

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal cycle and the daily mean at the land-surface result from the coupling of many physical processes. The framework of this review is largely conceptual; looking for relationships and information in the coupling of processes in models and observations. Starting from the surface energy balance, the role of the surface and cloud albedos in the shortwave and longwave fluxes is discussed. A long-wave radiative scaling of the diurnal temperature range and the night-time boundary layer is summarized. Several aspects of the local surface energy partition are presented: the role of soilwater availability and clouds; vector methods for understanding mixed layer evolution, and the coupling between surface and boundary layer that determines the lifting condensation level. Moving to larger scales, evaporation-precipitation feedback in models is discussed; and the coupling of column water vapor, clouds and precipitation to vertical motion and moisture convergence over the Amazon. The final topic is a comparison of the ratio of surface shortwave cloud forcing to the diabatic precipitation forcing of the atmosphere in ERA-40 with observations.

  2. Mechanical properties, fracture surface characterization, and microstructural analysis of six noble dental casting alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Yurdanur; Brantley, William A; Johnston, William M; Dasgupta, Tridib

    2011-06-01

    Because noble dental casting alloys for metal ceramic restorations have a wide range of mechanical properties, knowledge of these properties is needed for rational alloy selection in different clinical situations where cast metal restorations are indicated. The purpose of this study was to compare the mechanical properties and examine both the fracture and polished surfaces of 6 noble casting alloys that span many currently marketed systems. Five alloys were designed for metal ceramic restorations, and a sixth Type GPT has Type IV alloy for fixed prosthodontics (Maxigold KF) was included for comparison. Specimens (n=6) meeting dimensional requirements for ISO Standards 9693 and 8891 were loaded to failure in tension using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 2 mm/min. Values of 0.1% and 0.2% yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, elastic modulus, and percentage elongation were obtained. Statistical comparisons of the alloy mechanical properties were made using 1-way ANOVA and the REGW multiple-range test (α=.05). Following fracture surface characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), specimens were embedded in epoxy resin, polished, and again, examined with the SEM. When the multiple comparisons were considered, there were generally no significant differences in the elastic modulus, 0.1% and 0.2% offset yield strength, and ultimate tensile strength for the d.SIGN 91 (Au-Pd), d.SIGN 59 (Pd-Ag), Capricorn 15 (Pd-Ag-Au) and Maxigold KF (Au-Ag-Pd) alloys, except that the ultimate tensile strength was significantly lower (PAg-Pd alloys. Wide variation was found in percentage elongation, with the Pd-Ag and Pd-Ag-Au alloys having the highest values and the Au-Pd-Pt and Au-Ag-Pd alloys having the lowest values. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Using microstructure observations to quantify fracture properties and improve reservoir simulations. Final report, September 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laubach, S.E.; Marrett, R.; Rossen, W.; Olson, J.; Lake, L.; Ortega, O.; Gu, Y.; Reed, R.

    1999-01-01

    The research for this project provides new technology to understand and successfully characterize, predict, and simulate reservoir-scale fractures. Such fractures have worldwide importance because of their influence on successful extraction of resources. The scope of this project includes creation and testing of new methods to measure, interpret, and simulate reservoir fractures that overcome the challenge of inadequate sampling. The key to these methods is the use of microstructures as guides to the attributes of the large fractures that control reservoir behavior. One accomplishment of the project research is a demonstration that these microstructures can be reliably and inexpensively sampled. Specific goals of this project were to: create and test new methods of measuring attributes of reservoir-scale fractures, particularly as fluid conduits, and test the methods on samples from reservoirs; extrapolate structural attributes to the reservoir scale through rigorous mathematical techniques and help build accurate and useful 3-D models of the interwell region; and design new ways to incorporate geological and geophysical information into reservoir simulation and verify the accuracy by comparison with production data. New analytical methods developed in the project are leading to a more realistic characterization of fractured reservoir rocks. Testing diagnostic and predictive approaches was an integral part of the research, and several tests were successfully completed.

  4. Surface mapping of magnetic hot stars. Theories versus observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochukhov, O.

    2018-01-01

    This review summarises results of recent magnetic and chemical abundance surface mapping studies of early-type stars. We discuss main trends uncovered by observational investigations and consider reliability of spectropolarimetric inversion techniques used to infer these results. A critical assessment of theoretical attempts to interpret empirical magnetic and chemical maps in the framework of, respectively, the fossil field and atomic diffusion theories is also presented. This confrontation of theory and observations demonstrates that 3D MHD models of fossil field relaxation are successful in matching the observed range of surface magnetic field geometries. At the same time, even the most recent time-dependent atomic diffusion calculations fail to reproduce diverse horizontal abundance distributions found in real magnetic hot stars.

  5. Dense surface seismic data confirm non-double-couple source mechanisms induced by hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesicek, Jeremy; Cieślik, Konrad; Lambert, Marc-André; Carrillo, Pedro; Birkelo, Brad

    2016-01-01

    We have determined source mechanisms for nine high-quality microseismic events induced during hydraulic fracturing of the Montney Shale in Canada. Seismic data were recorded using a dense regularly spaced grid of sensors at the surface. The design and geometry of the survey are such that the recorded P-wave amplitudes essentially map the upper focal hemisphere, allowing the source mechanism to be interpreted directly from the data. Given the inherent difficulties of computing reliable moment tensors (MTs) from high-frequency microseismic data, the surface amplitude and polarity maps provide important additional confirmation of the source mechanisms. This is especially critical when interpreting non-shear source processes, which are notoriously susceptible to artifacts due to incomplete or inaccurate source modeling. We have found that most of the nine events contain significant non-double-couple (DC) components, as evident in the surface amplitude data and the resulting MT models. Furthermore, we found that source models that are constrained to be purely shear do not explain the data for most events. Thus, even though non-DC components of MTs can often be attributed to modeling artifacts, we argue that they are required by the data in some cases, and can be reliably computed and confidently interpreted under favorable conditions.

  6. Estimates of surface methane emissions over Europe using observed surface concentrations and the FLEXPART trajectory model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, C. J.; Kiemle, C.; Kawa, S. R.; Aalto, T.; Necki, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Arduini, J.; Apadula, F.; Berkhout, H.; Hatakka, J.; O'Doherty, S.

    2013-12-01

    We use surface methane observations from nine European ground stations, and the FLEXPART Lagrangian transport model to obtain surface methane emissions for 2010. Our inversion shows the strongest emissions from the Netherlands and the coal mines in Upper Silesia Poland. This is qualitatively consistent with the EDGAR surface flux inventory. We also report significant surface fluxes from wetlands in southern Finland during July and August and reduced wetland fluxes later in the year. Our simulated methane surface concentration captures at least half of the daily variability in the observations, suggesting that the transport model is correctly simulating the regional transport pathways over Europe. We also use our trajectory model to determine whether future space-based remote sensing instruments (MERLIN) will be able to detect both natural and anthropogenic changes in the surface flux strengths.

  7. Influence of stress-induced deformations on observed water flow in fractures at the Climax granitic stock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, D.G.

    1987-06-01

    Three examples of stress-induced displacement influence on fracture-dominated hydrology were noted in drifts 1400 ft below surface in granite. Seepage into drifts was limited to portions of shears near a fault zone. No water entered the drifts from the fault itself, although its orientation relative to Basin and Range extension is favorable for fracture opening. Localization of seepage appears to result from excavation block motion that increased apertures of the shear zones in contrast to the fault where asperities had been destroyed by earlier shearing thus minimizing aperture increases. Seepage was also noted, in an adjoining drift, from a set of shallow-dip healed fractures that intersected the rib, and from vertical fractures that increased the crown. The restricted location of this seepage apparently was a result of shear opening of the joints that occurred because of cantilevered support of tabular rock between joints. Interpretation of paleostresses based on joint chronologies and orientations indicates that sets subjected to shear stresses at a time when normal stresses were low contained mineral infilling. Sets subjected to shear stresses at a time when the normal stresses were significant had minimal mineral infilling. 8 refs., 7 figs

  8. Fracture resistance of dental nickel-titanium rotary instruments with novel surface treatment: Thin film metallic glass coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chih-Wen; Deng, Yu-Lun; Lee, Jyh-Wei; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2017-05-01

    Dental nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary instruments are widely used in endodontic therapy because they are efficient with a higher success rate. However, an unpredictable fracture of instruments may happen due to the surface characteristics of imperfection (or irregularity). This study assessed whether a novel surface treatment could increase fatigue fracture resistance of dental NiTi rotary instruments. A 200- or 500-nm thick Ti-zirconium-boron (Ti-Zr-B) thin film metallic glass was deposited on ProTaper Universal F2 files using a physical vapor deposition process. The characteristics of coating were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffractometry. In cyclic fatigue tests, the files were performed in a simulated root canal (radius=5 mm, angulation=60°) under a rotating speed of 300rpm. The fatigue fractured cross sections of the files were analyzed with their fractographic performances through scanning electron microscopy images. The amorphous structure of the Ti-Zr-B coating was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. The surface of treated files presented smooth morphologies without grinding irregularity. For the 200- and 500-nm surface treatment groups, the coated files exhibited higher resistance of cyclic fatigue than untreated files. In fractographic analysis, treated files showed significantly larger crack-initiation zone; however, no significant differences in the areas of fatigue propagation and catastrophic fracture were found compared to untreated files. The novel surface treatment of Ti-Zr-B thin film metallic glass on dental NiTi rotary files can effectively improve the fatigue fracture resistance by offering a smooth coated surface with amorphous microstructure. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Does sarcopenia predict change in mobility after hip fracture? a multicenter observational study with one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steihaug, Ole Martin; Gjesdal, Clara Gram; Bogen, Bård; Kristoffersen, Målfrid Holen; Lien, Gunhild; Hufthammer, Karl Ove; Ranhoff, Anette Hylen

    2018-03-05

    Patients with hip fracture frequently have sarcopenia and are at great risk of loss of mobility. We have investigated if sarcopenia predicts change in mobility after hip fracture. This is a prospective, multicenter observational study with one-year follow-up. Patients with hip fracture who were community-living and capable of walking before the fracture were included at three hospitals in Norway (2011-2013). The primary outcome of the study was change in mobility, measured by the New Mobility Score (NMS). Sarcopenia was determined postoperatively by anthropometry, grip strength, and NMS. We included 282 participants and sarcopenia status was determined in 201, of whom 38% (77/201) had sarcopenia, 66% (128/194) had low muscle mass, 52% (116/222) had low grip strength and 8% (20/244) had low pre-fracture mobility (NMS mobility (effect 0.2 points; 95% CI -0.5 to 0.9, P = 0.6), but it was associated with having lower mobility at one-year (NMS 5.8 (SD 2.3) vs. 6.8 (SD 2.2), P = 0.003), becoming a resident of a nursing home (odds ratio 3.2, 95% CI 0.9 to 12.4, P = 0.048), and the combined endpoint of becoming a resident of a skilled nursing home or death (odds ratio 3.6, 95% CI 1.2 to 12.2, P = 0.02). Sarcopenia did not predict change in mobility in the year after hip fracture.

  10. Peridotite dissolution and carbonation rates at fracture surfaces under conditions relevant for in situ mineralization of CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, R.; Spiers, C.J.; Drury, M.R.; Kandianis, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Whereas the dissolution of pure single phases (e.g. olivine and other mafic minerals) has been the focus of many studies, no investigation has been reported on the progress of reactions at and within polymineralic, transgranular fracture surfaces cutting peridotites. We document experiments that

  11. Scale-dependence of hydraulic properties observed in fractured sedimentary rocks through large scale pumping test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guihéneuf, N.; Dausse, A.; de Dreuzy, J. R.; Cherry, J. A.; Parker, B. L.

    2016-12-01

    Predicting flow in fractured reservoirs remains challenging as it highly depends on hydraulic connectivity of fractures which can vary from point to point. Classical pumping experiments conducted in fractured reservoirs often display fractional flow and anomalous slow diffusion due to bottlenecks or dead zones, characteristic of heterogeneity. In order to investigate reservoir properties at a contaminated site in the Simi Hills (South California, USA), composed by sandstones (dominant calcite cement) inter-bedded with fine-grained formations (shales, siltstones and mudstones), a large scale pumping test was performed in a major fault over 151 days. Deconvolution was applied first to remove the effect of variable flow rates and obtain constant-rate responses of the reservoir. Next, pressure-transients were analyzed both in time and space to get flow dimension, n, through the pressure derivative and extract the anomalous diffusion exponent, dw, as well as the fractal dimension, df. Analysis revealed at least two kinds of responses characterized by flow dimensions of 0.08 and 0.39 and anomalous diffusion exponents of 2.16 and 2.93, respectively. These properties, which can be related to major geological structures (i.e. major faults and surrounding fractures network), shows decreasing hydraulic properties (transmissivity, T, and storativity, S), and consequently, decreasing hydraulic connectivity, with increasing scale of investigation. In particular, the major fault (n = 0.39 ; dw = 2.93) shows a relationship of about T S3 with T r-1.36 and S r-0.43, consistent with flow within a fracture, while the surrounding fractures network (n = 0.08 ; dw = 2.16) displays a relationship which follow T S with T r-1.07 and S r-0.91. This scale-dependence of hydraulic properties may help improve groundwater flow prediction in such fractured reservoirs and could be taken into account for long-term transport of contaminants at this site.

  12. Is surgeons' experience important on intra- and inter-observer reliability of classifications used for adult femoral neck fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Ali; Kumbaracı, Mert; Kalenderer, Önder; İlyas, Gökhan; Bacaksız, Tayfun; Karapınar, Levent

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate whether surgeons' experience affect inter- and intra-observer reliability among mostly used classification systems for femoral neck fractures. A power point presentation was prepared with 107 slides which were antero-posterior radiographs of each femoral neck fracture. Five residents, 5 orthopaedic surgeons and 5 senior orthopaedic surgeons reviewed this presentation and classified the fractures according to Garden, Pauwels and AO classifications. The order of the slides was changed and reviews were repeated after 3 months. Fleiss kappa and intraclass correlation coefficient values were calculated to evaluate inter and intra-observer reliability. Garden and AO classifications' inter-observer reliabilities were similar and higher than Pauwels classification. Among three experience groups, the inter-observer reliability for Garden classification was highest in senior surgeon group, the interobserver reliability for AO classification was highest in surgeon group, and interobserver reliability of Pauwels classification was highest in low experienced groups (residents and surgeons). Intra-observer reliability was highest for Garden and lowest for Pauwels classifications. Surgical experience was found to be not effective for intraobserver reliability. Both Garden and AO classifications were more reliable than Pauwels classification. Surgical experience was not significantly important on these three classification systems' evaluation. Level IV, Diagnostic study. Copyright © 2016 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Observed source parameters for dynamic rupture with non-uniform initial stressand relatively high fracture energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, Nicholas M.; Kilgore, Brian D.; McGarr, Arthur F.; Fletcher, Jon Peter B.; Evans, John R.; Steven R. Baker,

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted dynamic rupture propagation experiments to establish the relations between in-source stress drop, fracture energy and the resulting particle velocity during slip of an unconfined 2 m long laboratory fault at normal stresses between 4 and 8 MPa. To produce high fracture energy in the source we use a rough fault that has a large slip weakening distance. An artifact of the high fracture energy is that the nucleation zone is large such that precursory slip reduces fault strength over a large fraction of the total fault length prior to dynamic rupture, making the initial stress non-uniform. Shear stress, particle velocity, fault slip and acceleration were recorded coseismically at multiple locations along strike and at small fault-normal distances. Stress drop increases weakly with normal stress. Average slip rate depends linearly on the fault strength loss and on static stress drop, both with a nonzero intercept. A minimum fracture energy of 1.8 J/m2 and a linear slip weakening distance of 33 μm are inferred from the intercept. The large slip weakening distance also affects the average slip rate which is reduced by in-source energy dissipation from on-fault fracture energy.Because of the low normal stress and small per event slip (∼86 μm), no thermal weakening such as melting or pore fluid pressurization occurs in these experiments. Despite the relatively high fracture energy, and the very low heat production, energy partitioning during these laboratory earthquakes is very similar to typical earthquake source properties. The product of fracture energy and fault area is larger than the radiated energy. Seismic efficiency is low at ∼2%. The ratio of apparent stress to static stress drop is ∼27%, consistent with measured overshoot. The fracture efficiency is ∼33%. The static and dynamic stress drops when extrapolated to crustal stresses are 2–7.3 MPa and in the range of typical earthquake stress drops. As the relatively high fracture

  14. Talar body fatigue stress fractures: three cases observed in elite female gymnasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, F. [National Institute of Sports Medicine of the Italian Olympic Committee, Rome (Italy); Dragoni, S. [National Institute of Sports Medicine of the Italian Olympic Committee, Rome (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Medicina dello Sport, Rome (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    To introduce and emphasize the clinical and radiological findings of three talar body fatigue stress fractures in competitive athletes. Clinical and radiographic skeletal records of 24,562 athletes taken between 1962 and 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. Among these, 6851 files related to acute foot and ankle injuries or chronic post-traumatic sequelae were found. There were 925 (3.76%) stress fatigue fractures selected from the whole collection. Among these there were three cases (0.32%) of talar body stress fractures diagnosed in elite female gymnasts 15 - 17 years old. The negative first radiograph become positive 4-6 weeks later. Scintigraphy was positive at an early stage and consistent for the diagnosis. CT and MRI gave positive results 1-2 weeks after the beginning of symptoms which were always greatly diagnostic. The sports medicine literature lacks reports of talar body fatigue stress fractures. The poor initial sensitivity of radiography makes it problematic to establish an early diagnosis. A wise combination of scintigraphy, CT and MRI has therefore to be relied upon. Familiarity with this rare location for a stress fracture may prevent delayed diagnosis and long-lasting damage, both of which are important factors in competitive athletes. (orig.)

  15. Talar body fatigue stress fractures: three cases observed in elite female gymnasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, F.; Dragoni, S.

    2005-01-01

    To introduce and emphasize the clinical and radiological findings of three talar body fatigue stress fractures in competitive athletes. Clinical and radiographic skeletal records of 24,562 athletes taken between 1962 and 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. Among these, 6851 files related to acute foot and ankle injuries or chronic post-traumatic sequelae were found. There were 925 (3.76%) stress fatigue fractures selected from the whole collection. Among these there were three cases (0.32%) of talar body stress fractures diagnosed in elite female gymnasts 15 - 17 years old. The negative first radiograph become positive 4-6 weeks later. Scintigraphy was positive at an early stage and consistent for the diagnosis. CT and MRI gave positive results 1-2 weeks after the beginning of symptoms which were always greatly diagnostic. The sports medicine literature lacks reports of talar body fatigue stress fractures. The poor initial sensitivity of radiography makes it problematic to establish an early diagnosis. A wise combination of scintigraphy, CT and MRI has therefore to be relied upon. Familiarity with this rare location for a stress fracture may prevent delayed diagnosis and long-lasting damage, both of which are important factors in competitive athletes. (orig.)

  16. Clinical observation of biomimetic mineralized collagen artificial bone putty for bone reconstruction of calcaneus fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yong-Xiong; Yang, Guang-Gang; Li, Zhong-Wan; Shi, Zhong-Min; Sun, Zhan-Dong

    2018-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated clinical outcomes of biomimetic mineralized collagen artificial bone putty for bone reconstruction in the treatment of calcaneus fracture. Sixty cases of calcaneal fractures surgically treated with open reduction and internal fixation in our hospital from June 2014–2015 were chosen and randomly divided into two groups, including 30 cases treated with biomimetic mineralized collagen artificial bone putty as treatment group, and 30 cases treated with autogenous ilia as control group. The average follow-up time was 17.2 ± 3.0 months. The results showed that the surgery duration and postoperative drainage volume of treatment group were significantly lower than control group; there were no statistically significant differences in the fracture healing time, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scores at 3 and 12 months after surgery, Böhler’s angle, Gissane’s angle and height of calcaneus between the two groups. There were no significant differences in wound complication and reject reaction between the two groups, while significant difference in donor site complication. As a conclusion, the implantation of biomimetic mineralized collagen artificial bone putty in the open reduction of calcaneal fracture resulted in reliable effect and less complications, which is suitable for clinical applications in the treatment of bone defect in calcaneal fractures.

  17. Changes in Fracture Compliance Due to Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, M.; Dahi Taleghani, A.; Sayers, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Rock fractures are a source of extra compliance, and the effect of fractures on seismic wave propagation can be quantified in terms of the normal and shear fracture compliances. However, fractures are usually assumed to be smooth discontinuities with no preferential orientation for slippage. This assumption rarely matches with outcrop studies. Irregularities always exist on the fracture faces in the form of hackles, slickensides, or gouges. These features may facilitate movement in one direction while oppose shear deformation in the other direction due to the saw-tooth structure of irregularities. This direction dependence of the shear compliance of the fracture planes may affect the measured ratio of normal to shear fracture compliance for different locations along the fracture. Furthermore, these effects may contribute to the pressure dependence of fracture compliance, because fracture opening or shear sliding would change the number of asperities in contact and, consequently, affect the ratio of the normal to shear compliance. Here, we use numerical modeling to investigate the change in normal and shear compliance caused by the presence of slickensides. The effect of the hackles' geometry, the friction coefficient between the fracture surfaces, and the offset between the fracture faces will be discussed in this presentation. Our analysis shows that even in the case of low asperity angles or small offsets between the fracture faces, the fracture compliance ratio could be greater than one, in agreement with several field observations available in the literature.

  18. Fracture performance of high strength steels, aluminium and magnesium alloys during plastic deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of uniaxial tension tests were performed for 5052 and 6061 aluminum alloys, AZ31B magnesium alloy, TRIP600 and DP600 steels, to obtain a better understanding of their fracture performance. Scanning electron microscope (SEM observation of the microstructure evolution was conducted. The dimple structure, orientation relationship between the fracture surface and tensile direction, necking behavior were analyzed. The fracture mechanism and fracture mode of each material was discussed in detail. The results show that TRIP600 steel is subject to a typical inter-granular ductile fracture combined by shear fracture. DP600 steel belongs to mainly ductility mixed with normal fracture. Both 5052 and 6061 aluminum alloys are subject to a mixed ductility fracture and brittle fracture. AA5052 and AA6061 belong to a typical shear fracture and a normal fracture, respectively. Magnesium AZ31B is typical of a brittle fracture combined with normal fracture.

  19. Aerosol Observing System Surface Meteorology (AOSMET) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrouac, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Aerosol Observing System (AOS) surface meteorology instrument is an ancillary sensor that provides temperature, relative humidity, pressure, wind speed and direction, and precipitation data relevant to the AOS. It consists of a Vaisala WXT520 Weather Transmitter mounted on top of the AOS aerosol inlet, at a height of approximately 10 meters.

  20. Surface Roughness Effects on Fluid Transport Through a Natural Rock Fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, D.M.; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, D.H.

    2008-04-01

    Fluid flow through rock fractures can be orders of magnitude faster than through the adjacent low-permeability rock. Understanding how fluid moves through these pathways is important for the prediction of sequestered CO2 transport in geologic reservoirs. Reservoir-scale, discrete-fracture simulators use simplified models of flow through fractures to determine transport properties in complex fracture networks. A high level of approximation is required in these reservoir-scale simulations due to the number of fractures within the domain of interest and because of the limited amount of information that can be obtained from geophysical well-logs (Long et al. (1996)). For this study, flow simulations through a CT-scanned fracture were performed to evaluate different fluid transport parameters that are important in geological flow analysis. The ‘roughness’ of the fracture was varied to determine the effect of the bumpy fracture walls on the fluid flow. The permeability and effective aperture were determined for flow under a constant pressure head. The fracture roughness is shown to dramatically reduce the flow through the fracture, and various relations are described.

  1. Precipitants of Delirium in Older Inpatients Admitted in Surgery for Post-Fall Hip Fracture: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinoff, E; Try, A; Chabot, J; Lee, L; Zukor, D; Beauchet, O

    2018-01-01

    Hip fractures precipitate several acute adverse outcomes in elderly people, thus leading to chronic adverse outcomes. The objective of our study was to examine the clinical characteristics associated with incident delirium in community dwelling elderly individuals who have a hip fracture. Retrospective observational cohort study. Data was collected from an academic tertiary hospital affiliated with McGill University. 114 elderly individuals who were above 65 years of age, who underwent surgery for a fractured hip. The main outcome variable was incident delirium, which was assessed by chart reviews of notes and observations recorded by nurses and physicians when patients were admitted post operatively to the surgical unit. Covariates included age, sex, length of stay, delay to surgery, number of medical comorbidities, number of medications and hip fracture location, and were extracted from medical records. Baseline mobility and functional status, preoperative cognitive impairment, postoperative complications, regular psychotropic medications, psychotropic medications in hospital, and location of discharge were also assessed through chart review. The results demonstrated that 17.5% of participants with a diagnosis of delirium had a longer length of hospitalization (p = 0.01), a lower baseline functional status (p = 0.03) and pre-operative cognitive impairment (p = 0.01). Patients receiving new psychotropic medications in hospital were more likely to have delirium (OR = 4.6, p = 0.01) which was independent of pre-operative cognitive impairment. We have shown that an association exists between psychotropic medication prescription and incident delirium in patients with hip fractures, even when adjusting for cognitive impairment. Hence, the prescription of psychotropic drugs should be judicious in these patients so as minimize the risk of adverse outcomes.

  2. Attribution of observed surface humidity changes to human influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Katharine M; Gillett, Nathan P; Jones, Philip D; Thorne, Peter W

    2007-10-11

    Water vapour is the most important contributor to the natural greenhouse effect, and the amount of water vapour in the atmosphere is expected to increase under conditions of greenhouse-gas-induced warming, leading to a significant feedback on anthropogenic climate change. Theoretical and modelling studies predict that relative humidity will remain approximately constant at the global scale as the climate warms, leading to an increase in specific humidity. Although significant increases in surface specific humidity have been identified in several regions, and on the global scale in non-homogenized data, it has not been shown whether these changes are due to natural or human influences on climate. Here we use a new quality-controlled and homogenized gridded observational data set of surface humidity, with output from a coupled climate model, to identify and explore the causes of changes in surface specific humidity over the late twentieth century. We identify a significant global-scale increase in surface specific humidity that is attributable mainly to human influence. Specific humidity is found to have increased in response to rising temperatures, with relative humidity remaining approximately constant. These changes may have important implications, because atmospheric humidity is a key variable in determining the geographical distribution and maximum intensity of precipitation, the potential maximum intensity of tropical cyclones, and human heat stress, and has important effects on the biosphere and surface hydrology.

  3. Optimism, Cynical Hostility, Falls, and Fractures: The Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauley, Jane A; Smagula, Stephen F; Hovey, Kathleen M; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Andrews, Christopher A; Crandall, Carolyn J; LeBoff, Meryl S; Li, Wenjun; Coday, Mace; Sattari, Maryam; Tindle, Hilary A

    2017-02-01

    Traits of optimism and cynical hostility are features of personality that could influence the risk of falls and fractures by influencing risk-taking behaviors, health behaviors, or inflammation. To test the hypothesis that personality influences falls and fracture risk, we studied 87,342 women enrolled in WHI-OS. Optimism was assessed by the Life Orientation Test-Revised and cynical hostility, the cynicism subscale of the Cook-Medley questionnaire. Higher scores indicate greater optimism and hostility. Optimism and hostility were correlated at r = -0. 31, p optimism and hostility with tests for trends; Q1 formed the referent group. The average follow-up for fractures was 11.4 years and for falls was 7.6 years. In multivariable (MV)-adjusted models, women with the highest optimism scores (Q4) were 11% less likely to report ≥2 falls in the past year (odds ratio [OR] = 0.89; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.85-0.90). Women in Q4 for hostility had a 12% higher risk of ≥2 falls (OR = 1.12; 95% CI 1.07-1.17). Higher optimism scores were also associated with a 10% lower risk of fractures, but this association was attenuated in MV models. Women with the greatest hostility (Q4) had a modest increased risk of any fracture (MV-adjusted hazard ratio = 1. 05; 95% CI 1.01-1.09), but there was no association with specific fracture sites. In conclusion, optimism was independently associated with a decreased risk of ≥2 falls, and hostility with an increased risk of ≥2 falls, independent of traditional risk factors. The magnitude of the association was similar to aging 5 years. Whether interventions aimed at attitudes could reduce fall risks remains to be determined. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  4. Characteristics of fractures and hydrogeologic properties observed at the TB-5 borehole in the KURT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Sung Hoon; Koh, Yong Kwon; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Kyung Su; Kim, Geon Young; Park, Kyung Woo; Ryu, Ji Hun

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the results of the core logging, acoustic televiewing and hydraulic tests conducted at the TB-5 borehole in the KURT(KAERI Underground Research Tunnel), and characterized the geometrical properties of the fractures and the hydraulic properties of the zone crossing the borehole. Based on the characterization results, the test zone where the researches on the influence of the water pressure on the fracture aperture and the geochemical changes of groundwater due to the engineering barriers of the subsurface repository for radioactive waste

  5. Moored surface buoy observations of the diurnal warm layer

    KAUST Repository

    Prytherch, J.

    2013-09-01

    An extensive data set is used to examine the dynamics of diurnal warming in the upper ocean. The data set comprises more than 4700 days of measurements at five sites in the tropics and subtropics, obtained from surface moorings equipped to make comprehensive meteorological, incoming solar and infrared radiation, and high-resolution subsurface temperature (and, in some cases, velocity) measurements. The observations, which include surface warmings of up to 3.4°C, are compared with a selection of existing models of the diurnal warm layer (DWL). A simple one-layer physical model is shown to give a reasonable estimate of both the magnitude of diurnal surface warming (model-observation correlation 0.88) and the structure and temporal evolution of the DWL. Novel observations of velocity shear obtained during 346 days at one site, incorporating high-resolution (1 m) upper ocean (5-15 m) acoustic Doppler current profile measurements, are also shown to be in reasonable agreement with estimates from the physical model (daily maximum shear model-observation correlation 0.77). Physics-based improvements to the one-layer model (incorporation of rotation and freshwater terms) are discussed, though they do not provide significant improvements against the observations reported here. The simplicity and limitations of the physical model are used to discuss DWL dynamics. The physical model is shown to give better model performance under the range of forcing conditions experienced across the five sites than the more empirical models. ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  6. A model of three-dimensional topographic stresses with implications for bedrock fractures, surface processes, and landscape evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, S.; Perron, J. T.; Martel, S. J.; Holbrook, W. S.; St. Clair, J.

    2017-04-01

    Bedrock fractures influence the rates of surface processes that drive landscape evolution and are in turn influenced by landforms that perturb ambient tectonic and gravitational stress fields. In this modeling study, we examine how three-dimensional topography and tectonic stress regimes influence elastic stress fields and bedrock fracture patterns beneath Earth's surface. We illustrate general effects of landform orientation and of tectonic stress magnitude and anisotropy using boundary element models of stresses beneath synthetic elongated ridges with different aspect ratios. We then examine the more detailed effects of landform shape using natural landscapes in Colorado and South Carolina. We show that the stress field is most sensitive to topographic perturbations if the most compressive horizontal tectonic stress is oriented perpendicular to the long axis of elongated landforms such as ridges and valleys and that topographic stress perturbations are most pronounced beneath landforms with higher mean curvatures, such as channel junctions and ridge crests. The shape of a predicted fracture-rich zone in the subsurface depends mainly on the orientation of landforms relative to the most compressive horizontal tectonic stress direction and a dimensionless ratio that expresses the relative magnitudes of topographic stresses associated with horizontal tectonic compression and topographic relief. Variations in this dimensionless ratio can also change the predicted orientations of potential opening-mode fracture planes. We use these model results to illustrate how topographic perturbations of three-dimensional tectonic and gravitational stresses could influence landscape evolution by altering the rates and spatial heterogeneity of surface processes and groundwater flow.

  7. Analysis of stress fractures associated with lameness in Thoroughbred flat racehorses training on different track surfaces undergoing nuclear scintigraphic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, M C; Bonder, D; Boston, R C; Ross, M W

    2015-05-01

    There is limited information regarding the impact of training track surface on the occurrence of stress fractures. To evaluate the impact of training track surface on the proportion of long bone and pelvic stress fractures associated with lameness in Thoroughbred horses in flat race training undergoing nuclear scintigraphic examination. Retrospective study. Scintigraphic examinations of Thoroughbred flat racehorses were evaluated from 2 hospitals (hospital A [Toronto Equine Hospital], 2003-2009, and hospital B [George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania], 1994-2006). Horses admitted to hospital A trained at a single track, at which the main training surface changed from dirt to synthetic on 27 August 2006. Two distinct populations existed at hospital B: horses that trained on dirt (numerous trainers) and those that trained on turf (single trainer). All scintigraphic images were evaluated by a blinded reviewer. Fisher's exact test and logistic regression were used when appropriate, and significance was set at Pfractures detected in scintigraphic examinations from horses training on a synthetic surface (31.7%) in comparison to scintigraphic examinations from horses training on a dirt surface (23.0%) at an earlier point in time (P = 0.03). There was a greater proportion of hindlimb/pelvic and tibial stress fractures diagnosed in horses from the synthetic surface-trained group than from the dirt-trained group at hospital A (Pfractures diagnosed, but other factors, such as training philosophy, appear to be important. Future prospective investigations to fully elucidate the relationship between training track surface and the proportion of stress fractures and other nonfatal musculoskeletal injuries are warranted. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  8. The influence of Y-TZP surface treatment on topography and ceramic/resin cement interfacial fracture toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, P N G; Bastian, F L; Jardim, P M

    2017-09-01

    Consider the efficacy of glass infiltration etching (SIE) treatment as a procedure to modify the zirconia surface resulting in higher interfacial fracture toughness. Y-TZP was subjected to 5 different surface treatments conditions consisting of no treatment (G1), SIE followed by hydrofluoric acid treatment (G2), heat treated at 750°C (G3), hydrofluoric acid treated (G4) and airborne-particle abrasion with alumina particles (G5). The effect of surface treatment on roughness was evaluated by Atomic Force Microscopy providing three different parameters: R a , R sk and surface area variation. The ceramic/resin cement interface was analyzed by Fracture Mechanics K I test with failure mode determined by fractographic analysis. Weibull's analysis was also performed to evaluate the structural integrity of the adhesion zone. G2 and G4 specimens showed very similar, and high R a values but different surface area variation (33% for G2 and 13% for G4) and they presented the highest fracture toughness (K IC ). Weibull's analysis showed G2 (SIE) tendency to exhibit higher K IC values than the other groups but with more data scatter and a higher early failure probability than G4 specimens. Selective glass infiltration etching surface treatment was effective in modifying the zirconia surface roughness, increasing the bonding area and hence the mechanical imbrications at the zirconia/resin cement interface resulting in higher fracture toughness (K IC ) values with higher K IC values obtained when failure probability above 20% was expected (Weibull's distribution) among all the experimental groups. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sensitivity of surface meteorological analyses to observation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Daniel Paul

    A computationally efficient variational analysis system for two-dimensional meteorological fields is developed and described. This analysis approach is most efficient when the number of analysis grid points is much larger than the number of available observations, such as for large domain mesoscale analyses. The analysis system is developed using MATLAB software and can take advantage of multiple processors or processor cores. A version of the analysis system has been exported as a platform independent application (i.e., can be run on Windows, Linux, or Macintosh OS X desktop computers without a MATLAB license) with input/output operations handled by commonly available internet software combined with data archives at the University of Utah. The impact of observation networks on the meteorological analyses is assessed by utilizing a percentile ranking of individual observation sensitivity and impact, which is computed by using the adjoint of the variational surface assimilation system. This methodology is demonstrated using a case study of the analysis from 1400 UTC 27 October 2010 over the entire contiguous United States domain. The sensitivity of this approach to the dependence of the background error covariance on observation density is examined. Observation sensitivity and impact provide insight on the influence of observations from heterogeneous observing networks as well as serve as objective metrics for quality control procedures that may help to identify stations with significant siting, reporting, or representativeness issues.

  10. Microseismic signatures of hydraulic fracture growth in sediment formations: Observations and modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fischer, Tomáš; Hainzl, S.; Eisner, L.; Shapiro, S. A.; Le Calvez, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. B2 (2008), B02307/1-B02307/12 ISSN 0148-0227 Grant - others:EC(XE) MTKI-CT-2004-517242 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : microseismic data * hydraulic fracture simulation * Texas Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 3.147, year: 2008

  11. Comparison of three fixations for tibial plateau fractures by biomechanical study and radiographic observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-wei; Liu, Guo-dong; Ou, Shan; Jiang, Xie-yuan; Fei, Jun; Wu, Li-jun

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the fixation effects of three fixation devices for tibial plateau fracture (AO/OTA classification 41 A1). Sixteen human cadaver tibial specimens were randomly divided into four groups. An A1 fracture model was established. The fractures were subsequently fixed by axial controlled intramedullary nail, external fixation and steel plate fixation. Each specimen was subjected to axial compression, torsion test and three-point bending test. Then a rat model was used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of these three fixations by evaluation of callus formation time and healing time. It was found that the axial controlled intramedullary nail group obtained superior biomechanical properties of resistance ability of bending, torsional and axial compressive, compared with external fixation and steel plate group. In animal experiments, the axial controlled intramedullary nail group had a significant shorter callus occurrence and healing time than steel plate and external fixator group. The axial controlled intramedullary nail fixation has a superior biomechanical characteristic and fixation effect for tibial plateau fractures than steel plate and external fixator. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Clinical observation of proximal femoral anti-rotation nail for the treatment of femoral intertrochanteric fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fang-Gui; Wang, De-Xin; Hu, Yu-Tong; Xu, Rong-Ming

    2017-10-25

    To explore the curative effect and the recessive loss of blooding of PFNA for the treatment of intertrochanteric fractures of femur. From January 2012 to January 2015, a total of 49 patients with intertrochanteric fractures of femur were treated with proximal femoral anti-rotation nail including 41 males and 8 females with an average age of 79 years old ranging from 65 to 91 years old. According to the modified Evans type, 1 case was type I, 12 cases were type II, 36 cases were type III. All cases were fresh fractures. Patients had hip pain, movement limited, joint swelling, bruising, extorsion deformity, X-ray and CT examination showed completely fractures. All patients were treated by closed reduction and PFNA internal fixation. Three comminuted fractures using closed reduction were not satisfied, then were treated by limited PFNA fixation after open reduction. The patients' incision got the grade A healing, no complications such as infection and internal fixation failure happened. All patients were followed up from 6 to 36 months (means 22 months). The pain VAS score decreased from preoperative 7.70±1.97 to 1.00±0.26 at 6 months after operation( P <0.01). Harris hip score improved from preoperative 8.70±4.19 to 91.70±5.31 at 6 months after operation( P <0.01). The outcome at 6 months after operation was excellent in 34 cases, good in 7, poor in 1. The fracture healing time was from 8 to 16 weeks with an average of 12 weeks after operation. One patient with osteoporosis, crushing broken, poor compliance, associated with schizophrenia at the same time, appeared with the displacement of the femoral greater trochanter, with conservative treatment for healing. Intertrochanteric fractures of femur are common in the elderly trauma, in pain relief, recovery of hip function, to provide quality of life for the patients, PFNA achieved satisfactory effect, but its existence is worth to pay close attention to the recessive loss of blood.

  13. Asian Dust Weather Categorization with Satellite and Surface Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tang-Huang; Hsu, N. Christina; Tsay, Si-Chee; Huang, Shih-Jen

    2011-01-01

    This study categorizes various dust weather types by means of satellite remote sensing over central Asia. Airborne dust particles can be identified by satellite remote sensing because of the different optical properties exhibited by coarse and fine particles (i.e. varying particle sizes). If a correlation can be established between the retrieved aerosol optical properties and surface visibility, the intensity of dust weather can be more effectively and consistently discerned using satellite rather than surface observations. In this article, datasets consisting of collocated products from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aqua and surface measurements are analysed. The results indicate an exponential relationship between the surface visibility and the satellite-retrieved aerosol optical depth, which is subsequently used to categorize the dust weather. The satellite-derived spatial frequency distributions in the dust weather types are consistent with China s weather station reports during 2003, indicating that dust weather classification using satellite data is highly feasible. Although the period during the springtime from 2004 to 2007 may be not sufficient for statistical significance, our results reveal an increasing tendency in both intensity and frequency of dust weather over central Asia during this time period.

  14. Venus Surface Composition Constrained by Observation and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Martha; Treiman, Allan; Helbert, Jörn; Smrekar, Suzanne

    2017-11-01

    New observations from the Venus Express spacecraft as well as theoretical and experimental investigation of Venus analogue materials have advanced our understanding of the petrology of Venus melts and the mineralogy of rocks on the surface. The VIRTIS instrument aboard Venus Express provided a map of the southern hemisphere of Venus at ˜1 μm allowing, for the first time, the definition of surface units in terms of their 1 μm emissivity and derived mineralogy. Tessera terrain has lower emissivity than the presumably basaltic plains, consistent with a more silica-rich or felsic mineralogy. Thermodynamic modeling and experimental production of melts with Venera and Vega starting compositions predict derivative melts that range from mafic to felsic. Large volumes of felsic melts require water and may link the formation of tesserae to the presence of a Venus ocean. Low emissivity rocks may also be produced by atmosphere-surface weathering reactions unlike those seen presently. High 1 μm emissivity values correlate to stratigraphically recent flows and have been used with theoretical and experimental predictions of basalt weathering to identify regions of recent volcanism. The timescale of this volcanism is currently constrained by the weathering of magnetite (higher emissivity) in fresh basalts to hematite (lower emissivity) in Venus' oxidizing environment. Recent volcanism is corroborated by transient thermal anomalies identified by the VMC instrument aboard Venus Express. The interpretation of all emissivity data depends critically on understanding the composition of surface materials, kinetics of rock weathering and their measurement under Venus conditions. Extended theoretical studies, continued analysis of earlier spacecraft results, new atmospheric data, and measurements of mineral stability under Venus conditions have improved our understanding atmosphere-surface interactions. The calcite-wollastonite CO2 buffer has been discounted due, among other things, to

  15. Ocean Surface Wind Speed of Hurricane Helene Observed by SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Qing; Cheng, Yongcun; Li, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    The hurricanes can be detected by many remote sensors, but synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can yield high-resolution (sub-kilometer) and low-level wind information that cannot be seen below the cloud by other sensors. In this paper, an assessment of SAR capability of monitoring high......-resolution hurricane was conducted. A case study was carried out to retrieve ocean surface wind field from C-band RADARSAT-1 SAR image which captured the structure of hurricane Helene over the Atlantic Ocean on 20 September, 2006. With wind direction from the outputs of U.S. Navy Operational Global Atmospheric...... CIWRAP models have been tested to extract wind speed from SAR data. The SAR retrieved ocean surface winds were compared to the aircraft wind speed observations from stepped frequency microwave radiometer (SFMR). The results show the capability of hurricane wind monitoring by SAR....

  16. Ocean Surface Carbon Dioxide Fugacity Observed from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Xie, Xiaosu

    2014-01-01

    We have developed and validated a statistical model to estimate the fugacity (or partial pressure) of carbon dioxide (CO2) at sea surface (pCO2sea) from space-based observations of sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll, and salinity. More than a quarter million in situ measurements coincident with satellite data were compiled to train and validate the model. We have produced and made accessible 9 years (2002-2010) of the pCO2sea at 0.5 degree resolutions daily over the global ocean. The results help to identify uncertainties in current JPL Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) model-based and bottom-up estimates over the ocean. The utility of the data to reveal multi-year and regional variability of the fugacity in relation to prevalent oceanic parameters is demonstrated.

  17. The TOAR database on observations of surface ozone (and more)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, M. G.; Schröder, S.; Cooper, O. R.; Galbally, I. E.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; von Schneidemesser, E.; Tanimoto, H.; Elshorbany, Y. F.; Naja, M. K.; Seguel, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    In support of the first Tropospheric Ozone Assessment Report (TOAR) a relational database of global surface ozone observations has been developed and populated with hourly measurement data and enhanced metadata. A comprehensive suite of ozone data products including standard statistics, health and vegetation impact metrics, and trend information, are made available through a common data portal and a web interface. These data form the basis of the TOAR analyses focusing on human health, vegetation, and climate relevant ozone issues. Cooperation among many data centers and individual researchers worldwide made it possible to build the world's largest collection of in-situ hourly surface ozone data covering the period from 1970 to 2015. By combining the data from almost 10,000 measurement sites around the world with global metadata information, new analyses of surface ozone have become possible, such as the first globally consistent characterisations of measurement sites as either urban or rural/remote. Exploitation of these global metadata allows for new insights into the global distribution, and seasonal and long-term changes of tropospheric ozone and they enable TOAR to perform the first, globally consistent analysis of present-day ozone concentrations and recent ozone changes with relevance to health, agriculture, and climate. This presentation will provide a summary of the TOAR surface observations database including recent additions of ozone precursor and meteorological data. We will demonstrate how the database can be accessed and the data can be used, and we will discuss its limitations and the potential for closing some of teh remaining data gaps.

  18. ENSO impact on surface radiative fluxes as observed from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, R. T.; Grodsky, S. A.; Zhang, B.; Busalacchi, A.; Chen, W.

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the impact of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on surface radiative fluxes over the tropical Pacific using satellite observations and fluxes derived from selected atmospheric reanalyses. Agreement between the two in this region is important because reanalysis information is frequently used to assess surface energy budget sensitivity to ENSO. We found that during the traditional ENSO, the maximum variance of anomalous incoming solar radiation is located just west of the dateline and coincides with the area of the largest anomalous SST gradient. It can reach up to 60 W/m2 and lags behind the Niño3 index by about a month, suggesting a response to anomalous SST gradient. The magnitude of longwave anomaly is only half that large and varies in phase with the SST anomaly. Similar anomalies were derived from outputs: from the European Centre for Medium-Weather Forecasts Reanalysis Interim (ERA-I), from the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis version 2 (MERRA-2), from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 1 (R1), and from the Japanese JRA55 reanalysis. Among the four reanalyses used, results from ERA-I are the closest to observations. We have also investigated the surface wind divergence/convergence and found that the main factor limiting eastward excursions of convection is the surface wind convergence. Due to the wind divergence pattern normally present over the eastern cold tongue, anomalous convection extends into the eastern equatorial Pacific only during the strongest warm events. Our analysis also considers the El Niño Modoki events, for which the radiation flux patterns are shifted westward following the SST pattern.

  19. Analysis of the structural parameters that influence gas production from the Devonian shale. Annual progress report, 1979-1980. Volume II. Data repository and reports published during fiscal year 1979-1980: regional structure, surface structure, surface fractures, hydrology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negus-De Wys, J.; Dixon, J. M.; Evans, M. A.; Lee, K. D.; Ruotsala, J. E.; Wilson, T. H.; Williams, R. T.

    1980-10-01

    This volume comprises appendices giving regional structure data, surface structure data, surface fracture data, and hydrology data. The fracture data covers oriented Devonian shale cores from West Virginia, Ohio, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Kentucky. The subsurface structure of the Eastern Kentucky gas field is also covered. (DLC)

  20. Observational study of surface wind along a sloping surface over mountainous terrain during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Hee; Lee, Gyuwon; Joo, Sangwon; Ahn, Kwang-Deuk

    2018-03-01

    The 2018 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games will be held in Pyeongchang, Korea, during February and March. We examined the near surface winds and wind gusts along the sloping surface at two outdoor venues in Pyeongchang during February and March using surface wind data. The outdoor venues are located in a complex, mountainous terrain, and hence the near-surface winds form intricate patterns due to the interplay between large-scale and locally forced winds. During February and March, the dominant wind at the ridge level is westerly; however, a significant wind direction change is observed along the sloping surface at the venues. The winds on the sloping surface are also influenced by thermal forcing, showing increased upslope flow during daytime. When neutral air flows over the hill, the windward and leeward flows show a significantly different behavior. A higher correlation of the wind speed between upper- and lower-level stations is shown in the windward region compared with the leeward region. The strong synoptic wind, small width of the ridge, and steep leeward ridge slope angle provide favorable conditions for flow separation at the leeward foot of the ridge. The gust factor increases with decreasing surface elevation and is larger during daytime than nighttime. A significantly large gust factor is also observed in the leeward region.

  1. [Calcaneus fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, M P; Sanders, R W

    2011-10-01

    Fractures of the calcaneus generally occur in the setting of high-energy trauma, resulting in complex, three-dimensionally oriented fracture patterns. Surgical treatment is typically indicated for displaced intra-articular fractures, permitting restoration of calcaneal height, width and overall morphology, in addition to the posterior facet articular surface where possible, and enabling late in situ arthrodesis as a means of salvage in the event of post-traumatic arthritis. The present article briefly discusses our preferred methods for the management of calcaneal fractures. An English full text version of this article is available at SpringerLink as supplemental.

  2. Danish, national cross-sectional observational study on the prevalence of prior major osteoporotic fractures in adults presenting with hip fracture—limitations and scope for fracture liaison services in prevention of hip fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, A.; Abrahamsen, B.; Johansen, P. B.

    2018-01-01

    . Identification of vertebral fractures in particular is lacking. Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of prior major osteoporotic fractures (MOF) in the prior 10 years preceding hip fracture in order to provide information about the potential for prevention of hip fractures...... if occurring more than 6 months before the present fracture. Results: A total of 28% of hip fracture patients (32% of women and 19% of men) had at least one recognized MOF in the preceding 10 years. Forearm and humerus fractures constituted > 70% of prior MOF. In both genders, vertebral fractures only...... represented a small percentage (2.6%) of previously recognized MOF. Men were less likely than women to have experienced a prior MOF, chiefly due to fewer forearm and humerus fractures. Conclusion: The majority of hip fractures—and in particular hip fractures in men—occur without a previously treated MOF...

  3. The Fracture of Plasma-Treated Polyurethane Surface under Fatigue Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya A. Morozov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasma treatment of soft polymers is a promising technique to improve biomedical properties of the materials. The response to the deformation of such materials is not yet clear. Soft elastic polyurethane treated with plasma immersion ion implantation is subjected to fatigue uniaxial loading. The influence of the strain amplitude and the plasma treatment regime on damage character is discussed. Surface defects are studied in unloaded and stretched states of the material. As a result of fatigue loading, transverse cracks (with closed overlapping edges as well as with open edges deeply propagating into the polymer and longitudinal folds which are break and bend inward, appear on the surface. Hard edges of cracks cut the soft polymer which is squeezed from the bulk to the surface. The observed damages are related to the high stiffness of the modified surface and its transition to the polymer substrate.

  4. Suzaku observations of low surface brightness cluster Abell 1631

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babazaki, Yasunori; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Ota, Naomi; Sasaki, Shin; Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung; Pratt, Gabriel W.; Matsumoto, Hironori

    2018-04-01

    We present analysis results for a nearby galaxy cluster Abell 1631 at z = 0.046 using the X-ray observatory Suzaku. This cluster is categorized as a low X-ray surface brightness cluster. To study the dynamical state of the cluster, we conduct four-pointed Suzaku observations and investigate physical properties of the Mpc-scale hot gas associated with the A 1631 cluster for the first time. Unlike relaxed clusters, the X-ray image shows no strong peak at the center and an irregular morphology. We perform spectral analysis and investigate the radial profiles of the gas temperature, density, and entropy out to approximately 1.5 Mpc in the east, north, west, and south directions by combining with the XMM-Newton data archive. The measured gas density in the central region is relatively low (a few ×10-4 cm-3) at the given temperature (˜2.9 keV) compared with X-ray-selected clusters. The entropy profile and value within the central region (r < 0.1 r200) are found to be flatter and higher (≳400 keV cm2). The observed bolometric luminosity is approximately three times lower than that expected from the luminosity-temperature relation in previous studies of relaxed clusters. These features are also observed in another low surface brightness cluster, Abell 76. The spatial distributions of galaxies and the hot gas appear to be different. The X-ray luminosity is relatively lower than that expected from the velocity dispersion. A post-merger scenario may explain the observed results.

  5. Planetary surface characterization from dual-polarization radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkki, Anne; Planetary Radar Team of the Arecibo Observatory

    2017-10-01

    We present a new method to investigate the physical properties of planetary surfaces using dual-polarization radar measurements. The number of radar observations has increased radically during the last five years, allowing us to compare the radar scattering properties of different small-body populations and compositional types. There has also been progress in the laboratory studies of the materials that are relevant to asteroids and comets.In a typical planetary radar measurement a circularly polarized signal is transmitted using a frequency of 2380 MHz (wavelength of 12.6 cm) or 8560 MHz (3.5 cm). The echo is received simultaneously in the same circular (SC) and the opposite circular (OC) polarization as the transmitted signal. The delay and doppler frequency of the signal give highly accurate astrometric information, and the intensity and the polarization are suggestive of the physical properties of the target's near-surface.The radar albedo describes the radar reflectivity of the target. If the effective near-surface is smooth and homogeneous in the wavelength-scale, the echo is received fully in the OC polarization. Wavelength-scale surface roughness or boulders within the effective near-surface volume increase the received echo power in both polarizations. However, there is a lack in the literature describing exactly how the physical properties of the target affect the radar albedo in each polarization, or how they can be derived from the radar measurements.To resolve this problem, we utilize the information that the diffuse components of the OC and SC parts are correlated when the near-surface contains wavelength-scale scatterers such as boulders. A linear least-squares fit to the detected values of OC and SC radar albedos allows us to separate the diffusely scattering part from the quasi-specular part. Combined with the spectro-photometric information of the target and laboratory studies of the permittivity-density dependence, the method provides us with a

  6. Use of Pressure-Redistributing Support Surfaces among Elderly Hip Fracture Patients across the Continuum of Care: Adherence to Pressure Ulcer Prevention Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Mona; Margolis, David; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Rich, Shayna; Langenberg, Patricia; Shardell, Michelle; Palmer, Mary H.; McArdle, Patrick; Sterling, Robert; Jones, Patricia S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the frequency of use of pressure-redistributing support surfaces (PRSS) among hip fracture patients and to determine whether higher pressure ulcer risk is associated with greater PRSS use. Design and Methods: Patients (n = 658) aged [greater than or equal] 65 years who had surgery for hip fracture were examined by research…

  7. Use of new satellite sea surface temperature observations in OSTIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Emma; Mao, Chongyuan; Good, Simon

    2017-04-01

    OSTIA is the Met Office's Operational SST (Sea Surface Temperature) and Ice Analysis system, which produces L4 (globally complete, gridded) analyses on a daily basis. The product is made freely available through CMEMS (Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service). Additional satellite SST datasets have been assimilated into the OSTIA analysis operationally from 15 March 2016. These datasets are ACSPO VIIRS L3U from NOAA/NESDIS/STAR and AMSR2 L2P from REMSS (Remote Sensing Systems). This has led to a sizable improvement in the RMS error of the OSTIA analysis compared to independent Argo observations. Test runs assimilating ACSPO VIIRS and REMSS AMSR2 observations separately have indicated that the total improvement is due to the action of both datasets together rather than one or the other. In addition, ACSPO VIIRS replaced MetOp-A AVHRR as the reference satellite dataset used in OSTIA on 6 November 2016. The reference satellite data, in addition to in situ observations, are used for bias correction of the other satellite data types used in the analysis. The change to using VIIRS as a reference has led to notable improvements in regional biases for OSTIA compared to Argo, drifters and other satellite SST datasets, particularly in the high latitudes. Methods will be described and validation results shown in this presentation.

  8. Factors associated to institutionalization and mortality over three years, in elderly people with a hip fracture-An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriz-Otano, Francisco; Pla-Vidal, Jorge; Tiberio-López, Gregorio; Malafarina, Vincenzo

    2016-07-01

    To identify the factors associated to institutionalization and mortality in elderly patients with hip fractures (HF). Thirty-six months observational study. A post-acute rehabilitation ward. subjects living in the community or in nursing-home, above the age of 65, with HF. The following were registered: comorbidity, intra-hospital complications, Barthel index, walking ability and Mini Mental State Examination, as well as blood samples upon admission and discharge. Destination upon discharge was recorded as well as mortality during hospital stay and over the three-year follow up. a total of 430 subjects were included in the study. Twenty-three patients (5.3%) died during their stay in hospital and 152 (35.3%) during follow up after discharge. Forty-five patients (10.5%) were institutionalized upon discharge. In adjusted analysis, the factors that predict intra-hospital mortality are higher comorbidity (OR, 1.46; 95%CI, 1.06-2.01), and the number of complications (OR, 1.71; 95%CI, 1.16-2.64). Factors that predict mortality in the long term are age (HR 1.04; 95%CI, 1.01-1.06), comorbidity (HR 1.19, 95% CI, 1.09-1.30), the number of complications (HR 1.17, 95%CI, 1.05-1.31). The factors that predicted new institutionalization were age (OR 1.04, 95%CI, 0.98-1.09), living alone (OR 3.95, 95%CI, 1.38-11.3), and length of hospital stay (OR 1.02 95%CI, 1.00-1.03). Mortality 3 years after a hip fracture and institutionalization are associated to age, the loss of autonomy in walking, a worse cognitive status and living alone before the fracture. Identification of and, when possible, intervention upon these factors can improve care of elderly people with hip fractures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Interactions of tensile fractures with the surrounding lithology and other tensile fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Tensile (mode 1) fractures such as joints and veins are ubiquitous in the upper crust and are potential pathways for fluid migration. Fractures often cross cut one another and terminate at other fractures. This is dependent on whether the older fracture was open or shut when the younger fracture propagated. There is a paucity of data concerning the geometric properties of the fracture intersections (branchlines), including their orientations, length, continuity and connectivity. This poster aims to investigate how natural hydraulic fractures propagated and interacted along branchlines, through study of well-preserved, three-dimensional exposures of natural hydraulic fracture surfaces that cut the organic rich Bituminous Shale (Mulgrave Shale Member of the Lower Jurassic Whitby Mudstone Formation) at Saltwick Nab, Whitby, the Yorkshire coast, UK. A specific objective is to investigate the possible influence of branchlines on key structures associated with fracture surfaces, such as fracture tip lines, radial striations and arrest lines, as well as petrographic differences between fractured and non-fractured rocks. These relationships will be investigated by quantifying: a) the spacings between neighbouring arrest lines, measured in directions parallel and perpendicular to the sedimentary layering, and b) the scaling relationships between arrest lines observed on large and smaller fracture surfaces. Combining these findings with previous work it will be possible to make models for how natural hydraulic fractures propagate and terminate giving a greater understanding of how natural hydraulic fractures link together within an exhumed shale analogue, such as those seen at Saltwick Nab. It may also provide an insight in to the growth of anthropogenic hydraulic fractures that are induced during stimulation of shale gas and oil reservoirs.

  10. Electrical resistivity dynamics beneath a fractured sedimentary bedrock riverbed in response to temperature and groundwater–surface water exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Steelman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bedrock rivers occur where surface water flows along an exposed rock surface. Fractured sedimentary bedrock can exhibit variable groundwater residence times, anisotropic flow paths, and heterogeneity, along with diffusive exchange between fractures and rock matrix. These properties of the rock will affect thermal transients in the riverbed and groundwater–surface water exchange. In this study, surface electrical methods were used as a non-invasive technique to assess the scale and temporal variability of riverbed temperature and groundwater–surface water interaction beneath a sedimentary bedrock riverbed. Conditions were monitored at a semi-daily to semi-weekly interval over a full annual period that included a seasonal freeze–thaw cycle. Surface electromagnetic induction (EMI and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT methods captured conditions beneath the riverbed along a pool–riffle sequence of the Eramosa River in Canada. Geophysical datasets were accompanied by continuous measurements of aqueous specific conductance, temperature, and river stage. Time-lapse vertical temperature trolling within a lined borehole adjacent to the river revealed active groundwater flow zones along fracture networks within the upper 10 m of rock. EMI measurements collected during cooler high-flow and warmer low-flow periods identified a spatiotemporal riverbed response that was largely dependent upon riverbed morphology and seasonal groundwater temperature. Time-lapse ERT profiles across the pool and riffle sequence identified seasonal transients within the upper 2 and 3 m of rock, respectively, with spatial variations controlled by riverbed morphology (pool versus riffle and dominant surficial rock properties (competent versus weathered rock rubble surface. While the pool and riffle both exhibited a dynamic resistivity through seasonal cooling and warming cycles, conditions beneath the pool were more variable, largely due to the formation of river

  11. High-Speed Observations of Dynamic Fracture Propagation in Solids and Their Implications in Earthquake Rupture Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uenishi, Koji

    2016-04-01

    This contribution outlines our experimental observations of seismicity-related fast fracture (rupture) propagation in solids utilising high-speed analog and digital photography (maximum frame rate 1,000,000 frames per second) over the last two decades. Dynamic fracture may be triggered or initiated in the monolithic or layered seismic models by detonation of micro explosives, a projectile launched by a gun, laser pulses and electric discharge impulses, etc. First, we have investigated strike-slip rupture along planes of weakness in transparent photoelastic (birefringent) materials at a laboratory scale and shown (at that time) extraordinarily fast rupture propagation in a bi-material system and its possible effect on the generation of large strong motion in the limited narrow areas in the Kobe region on the occasion of the 1995 Hyogo-ken Nanbu, Japan, earthquake (Uenishi Ph.D. thesis 1997, Uenishi et al. BSSA 1999). In this series of experiments, we have also modelled shallow dip-slip earthquakes and indicated a possible origin of the asymmetric ground motion in the hanging and foot-walls. In the photoelastic photographs, we have found the unique dynamic wave interaction and generation of specific shear and interface waves numerically predicted by Uenishi and Madariaga (Eos 2005), and considered as a case study the seismic motion associated with the 2014 Nagano-ken Hokubu (Kamishiro Fault), Japan, dip-slip earthquake (Uenishi EFA 2015). Second, we have experimentally shown that even in a monolithic material, rupture speed may exceed the local shear wave speed if we employ hyperelasically behaving materials like natural rubber (balloons) (Uenishi Eos 2006, Uenishi ICF 2009, Uenishi Trans. JSME A 2012) but fracture in typical monolithic thin fluid films (e.g. soap bubbles, which may be treated as a solid material) propagates at an ordinary subsonic (sub-Rayleigh) speed (Uenishi et al. SSJ 2006). More recent investigation handling three-dimensional rupture propagation

  12. Cluster observations of surface waves on the dawn flank magnetopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Owen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available On 14 June 2001 the four Cluster spacecraft recorded multiple encounters of the dawn-side flank magnetopause. The characteristics of the observed electron populations varied between a cold, dense magnetosheath population and warmer, more rarified boundary layer population on a quasi-periodic basis. The demarcation between these two populations can be readily identified by gradients in the scalar temperature of the electrons. An analysis of the differences in the observed timings of the boundary at each spacecraft indicates that these magnetopause crossings are consistent with a surface wave moving across the flank magnetopause. When compared to the orientation of the magnetopause expected from models, we find that the leading edges of these waves are approximately 45° steeper than the trailing edges, consistent with the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH driving mechanism. A stability analysis of this interval suggests that the magnetopause is marginally stable to this mechanism during this event. Periods in which the analysis predicts that the magnetopause is unstable correspond to observations of greater wave steepening. Analysis of the pulses suggests that the waves have an average wavelength of approximately 3.4 RE and move at an average speed of ~65km s-1 in an anti-sunward and northward direction, despite the spacecraft location somewhat south of the GSE Z=0 plane. This wave propagation direction lies close to perpendicular to the average magnetic field direction in the external magnetosheath, suggesting that these waves may preferentially propagate in the direction that requires no bending of these external field lines

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; MHD waves and unstabilities; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  13. Fractal patterns of fractures in granites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velde, B.; Dubois, J.; Moore, D.; Touchard, G.

    1991-01-01

    Fractal measurements using the Cantor's dust method in a linear one-dimensional analysis mode were made on the fracture patterns revealed on two-dimensional, planar surfaces in four granites. This method allows one to conclude that: 1. (1)|The fracture systems seen on two-dimensional surfaces in granites are consistent with the part of fractal theory that predicts a repetition of patterns on different scales of observation, self similarity. Fractal analysis gives essentially the same values of D on the scale of kilometres, metres and centimetres (five orders of magnitude) using mapped, surface fracture patterns in a Sierra Nevada granite batholith (Mt. Abbot quadrangle, Calif.). 2. (2)|Fractures show the same fractal values at different depths in a given batholith. Mapped fractures (main stage ore veins) at three mining levels (over a 700 m depth interval) of the Boulder batholith, Butte, Mont. show the same fractal values although the fracture disposition appears to be different at different levels. 3. (3)|Different sets of fracture planes in a granite batholith, Central France, and in experimental deformation can have different fractal values. In these examples shear and tension modes have the same fractal values while compressional fractures follow a different fractal mode of failure. The composite fracture patterns are also fractal but with a different, median, fractal value compared to the individual values for the fracture plane sets. These observations indicate that the fractal method can possibly be used to distinguish fractures of different origins in a complex system. It is concluded that granites fracture in a fractal manner which can be followed at many scales. It appears that fracture planes of different origins can be characterized using linear fractal analysis. ?? 1991.

  14. Direct observation of a surface resonance state and surface band inversion control in black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlen, N.; Sanna, A.; Senkovskiy, B. V.; Petaccia, L.; Fedorov, A. V.; Profeta, G.; Grüneis, A.

    2018-01-01

    We report a Cs-doping-induced band inversion and the direct observation of a surface resonance state with an elliptical Fermi surface in black phosphorus (BP) using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. By selectively inducing a higher electron concentration (1.7 ×1014cm-2 ) in the topmost layer, the changes in the Coulomb potential are sufficiently large to cause surface band inversion between the parabolic valence band of BP and a parabolic surface state around the Γ point of the BP Brillouin zone. Tight-binding calculations reveal that band gap openings at the crossing points in the two high-symmetry directions of the Brillouin zone require out-of-plane hopping and breaking of the glide mirror symmetry. Ab initio calculations are in very good agreement with the experiment if a stacking fault on the BP surface is taken into account. The demonstrated level of control over the band structure suggests the potential application of few-layer phosphorene in topological field-effect transistors.

  15. Adatom Fe(III on the hematite surface: Observation of a key reactive surface species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosso Kevin M

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The reactivity of a mineral surface is determined by the variety and population of different types of surface sites (e.g., step, kink, adatom, and defect sites. The concept of "adsorbed nutrient" has been built into crystal growth theories, and many other studies of mineral surface reactivity appeal to ill-defined "active sites." Despite their theoretical importance, there has been little direct experimental or analytical investigation of the structure and properties of such species. Here, we use ex-situ and in-situ scanning tunneling microcopy (STM combined with calculated images based on a resonant tunneling model to show that observed nonperiodic protrusions and depressions on the hematite (001 surface can be explained as Fe in an adsorbed or adatom state occupying sites different from those that result from simple termination of the bulk mineral. The number of such sites varies with sample preparation history, consistent with their removal from the surface in low pH solutions.

  16. Nose fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It most ... occurs with other fractures of the face. Nose injuries and neck ...

  17. Observations. Surface and Atmospheric Climate Change. Chapter 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trenberth, K.E.; Jones, P.D.; Ambenje, P.; Bojariu, R.; Easterling, D.; Klein Tank, A.; Parker, D.; Rahimzadeh, F.; Renwick, J.A.; Rusticucci, M.; Soden, B.; Zhai, P.

    2007-09-15

    This chapter assesses the observed changes in surface and atmospheric climate, placing new observations and new analyses made during the past six years (since the Third Assessment Report TAR) in the context of the previous instrumental record. In previous IPCC reports, palaeo-observations from proxy data for the pre-instrumental past and observations from the ocean and ice domains were included within the same chapter. This helped the overall assessment of the consistency among the various variables and their synthesis into a coherent picture of change. A short synthesis and scrutiny of the consistency of all the observations is included here (see Section 3.9). In the TAR, surface temperature trends were examined from 1860 to 2000 globally, for 1901 to 2000 as maps and for three sub-periods (1910-1945, 1946-1975 and 1976-2000). The first and third sub-periods had rising temperatures, while the second sub-period had relatively stable global mean temperatures. The 1976 divide is the date of a widely acknowledged 'climate shift' and seems to mark a time when global mean temperatures began a discernible upward trend that has been at least partly attributed to increases in greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The picture prior to 1976 has essentially not changed and is therefore not repeated in detail here. However, it is more convenient to document the sub-period after 1979, rather than 1976, owing to the availability of increased and improved satellite data since then (in particular Television InfraRed Observation Satellite (TIROS) Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) data) in association with the Global Weather Experiment (GWE) of 1979. The post-1979 period allows, for the first time, a global perspective on many fields of variables, such as precipitation, that was not previously available. The availability of high-quality data has led to a focus on the post-1978 period, although physically this new regime seems to have begun in 1976

  18. A multicomponent tracer field experiment to measure the flow volume, surface area, and rectilinear spacing of fractures away from the wellbore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathles, L. M.; Sanford, W. E.; Hawkins, A.; Li, Y. V.

    2017-12-01

    The nature of flow in fractured porous media is important to almost all subsurface processes including oil and gas recovery, contaminant transport and remediation, CO2 sequestration, and geothermal heat extraction. One would like to know, under flowing conditions, the flow volume, surface area, effective aperture, and rectilinear spacing of fractures in a representative volume of rock away from the well bore, but no methods currently allow acquisition of this data. It could, however, be collected by deploying inert tracers with a wide range of aqueous diffusion constants (e.g., rapidly diffusing heat to non-diffusing nanoparticle) in the following fashion: The flow volume is defined by the heated volume measured by resistivity surveys. The fracture volume within this flow volume is indicate by the nanoparticle transit time. The average fracture spacing is indicated by the evolving thermal profile in the monitor and the production wells (measured by fiber optic cable), and by the retention of absorbing tracers. The average fracture aperture is determined by permeability measurements and the average fracture separation. We have proposed a field test to redundantly measure these fracture parameters in the fractured Dakota Sandstone where it approaches the surface in Ft Collins, Colorado. Five 30 m deep wells (an injection, production, and 3 monitor wells) cased to 20 m are proposed. The experiments will involve at least 9 different tracers. The planned field test and its potential significance will be described.

  19. Is it time to revisit the AO classification of fractures of the distal radius? Inter- and intra-observer reliability of the AO classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, C E; Hickson, C; Hedley, H; Parsons, N R; Costa, M L

    2015-06-01

    We conducted an observational radiographic study to determine the inter- and intra-observer reliability of the AO classification of fractures of the distal radius. Plain posteroanterior and lateral radiographs of 456 patients with an acute fracture of the distal radius were classified by a consultant orthopaedic hand specialist and two specialist trainees, and the k coefficient for the inter- and intra-observer reliability of the type, group and subgroup classification was calculated. Only the type of fracture (A, B or C) was found to provide substantial intra-observer reliability (k type 0.65). The inclusion of 'group' and 'subgroup' into the classification reduced the inter-observer reliability to fair (kgroup 0.29, ksubgroup = 0.28) and the intra-observer reliability to moderate (kgroup 0.53, ksubgroup 0.49). Disagreement was found to arise between specific subgroups, which may be amenable to clarification. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  20. Assessment of Surface Water Contamination from Coalbed Methane Fracturing-Derived Volatile Contaminants in Sullivan County, Indiana, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszaros, Nicholas; Subedi, Bikram; Stamets, Tristan; Shifa, Naima

    2017-09-01

    There is a growing concern over the contamination of surface water and the associated environmental and public health consequences from the recent proliferation of hydraulic fracturing in the USA. Petroleum hydrocarbon-derived contaminants of concern [benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX)] and various dissolved cations and anions were spatially determined in surface waters around 15 coalbed methane fracking wells in Sullivan County, IN, USA. At least one BTEX compound was detected in 69% of sampling sites (n = 13) and 23% of sampling sites were found to be contaminated with all of the BTEX compounds. Toluene was the most common BTEX compound detected across all sampling sites, both upstream and downstream from coalbed methane fracking wells. The average concentration of toluene at a reservoir and its outlet nearby the fracking wells was ~2× higher than other downstream sites. However, one of the upstream sites was found to be contaminated with BTEX at similar concentrations as in a reservoir site nearby the fracking well. Calcium (~60 ppm) and sulfates (~175 ppm) were the dominant cations and anions, respectively, in surface water around the fracking sites. This study represents the first report of BTEX contamination in surface water from coalbed methane hydraulic fracturing wells.

  1. Ultra high vacuum scanning Auger/electron microscopy studies of oxidation and B surface segregation of in situ fractured B- doped Ni3Al alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agterveld, D.T.L. van; Koch, S.A.; Palasantzas, G.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2001-01-01

    This paper focuses on local probe Auger spectroscopy studies of segregation and oxidation of in situ fractured Ni3Al specimens, both with and without B-doping. Although immediately after in situ fracture small amounts of segregated B at grain boundaries were observed occasionally in the B-doped

  2. Modeling and observational occurrences of near-surface drainage in Utopia Planitia, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costard, F.; Sejourne, A.; Kargel, J.; Godin, E.

    2016-12-01

    During the past 15 years, evidence for an ice-rich planet Mars has rapidly mounted, become increasingly varied in terms of types of deposits and types of observational data, and has become more widespread across the surface. The mid-latitudes of Mars, especially Utopia Planitia, show many types of interesting landforms similar to those in periglacial landscapes on Earth that suggest the presence of ice-rich permafrost. These include thermal contraction polygonal networks, scalloped terrains similar to thermokarst pits, debris flows, small mounds like pingos and rock glaciers. Here, we address questions concerning the influence of meltwater in the Utopia Planitia (UP) landscape using analogs of near-surface melting and drainage along ice-wedge troughs on Bylot Island, northern Canada. In Utopia Planitia, based on the identification of sinuous channel-like pits within polygonal networks, we suggest that episodic underground melting was possible under severe periglacial climate conditions. In UP, the collapse pattern and morphology of unconnected sinuous elongated pits that follow the polygon crack are similar to underground melting in Bylot Island (Nunavut, Canada). Based on this terrestrial analogue, we develop a thermal model that consists of a thick insulating dusty layer over ice-saturated dust during a period of slight climatic warming relative to today's climate. In the model, the melting point is reached at depths down to 150 m. We suggest that small-scale melting could have occurred below ground within ground-ice polygonal fractures and pooled in underground cavities. Then the water may have been released episodically causing mechanical erosion as well as undermining and collapse. After melting, the dry surface dusty layer might have been blown away, thus exposing the degraded terrain of the substrate layer.

  3. Quantifying Surface Energy Flux Estimation Uncertainty Using Land Surface Temperature Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, A. N.; Hunsaker, D.; Thorp, K.; Bronson, K. F.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing with thermal infrared is widely recognized as good way to estimate surface heat fluxes, map crop water use, and detect water-stressed vegetation. When combined with net radiation and soil heat flux data, observations of sensible heat fluxes derived from surface temperatures (LST) are indicative of instantaneous evapotranspiration (ET). There are, however, substantial reasons LST data may not provide the best way to estimate of ET. For example, it is well known that observations and models of LST, air temperature, or estimates of transport resistances may be so inaccurate that physically based model nevertheless yield non-meaningful results. Furthermore, using visible and near infrared remote sensing observations collected at the same time as LST often yield physically plausible results because they are constrained by less dynamic surface conditions such as green fractional cover. Although sensitivity studies exist that help identify likely sources of error and uncertainty, ET studies typically do not provide a way to assess the relative importance of modeling ET with and without LST inputs. To better quantify model benefits and degradations due to LST observational inaccuracies, a Bayesian uncertainty study was undertaken using data collected in remote sensing experiments at Maricopa, Arizona. Visible, near infrared and thermal infrared data were obtained from an airborne platform. The prior probability distribution of ET estimates were modeled using fractional cover, local weather data and a Penman-Monteith mode, while the likelihood of LST data was modeled from a two-source energy balance model. Thus the posterior probabilities of ET represented the value added by using LST data. Results from an ET study over cotton grown in 2014 and 2015 showed significantly reduced ET confidence intervals when LST data were incorporated.

  4. In-situ Observation of Fracture Behavior on Nano Structure in NITE SiC/SiC Composite by HVEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibayama, Tamaki; Hamada, Kouichi; Watanabe, Seiichi; Matsuo, Genichiro; Kishimoto, Hirotatsu

    2011-01-01

    We have been successfully done in situ observation on the sequence of fracture event at the interface of NITE SiC/SiC composite examined by using miniaturized double notched shear specimen for TEM prepared by Focused Ion Beam method. In this study, we used nano-mechanics TEM experimental apparatus to investigate not only microstructure evolution and but also load and displacement curve at once in High Voltage Electron Microscope. Our results summarize as follows. Cracks were initiated at the interface between carbon coating layer on the SiC fiber and SiC matrices, and propagated along the interface. Load drop in the load and displacement curve during in-situ TEM was clearly observed at the crack initiation. The shear strength by using the miniaturized specimen is about ten times higher than that obtained by the standard testing.

  5. Collision and Break-off : Numerical models and surface observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrill, Andrew; van Hunen, Jeroen; Allen, Mark

    2013-04-01

    The process of continental collision and slab break-off has been explored by many authors using a number of different numerical models and approaches (Andrews and Billen, 2009; Gerya et al., 2004; van Hunen and Allen, 2011). One of the challenges of using numerical models to explore collision and break-off is relating model predictions to real observables from current collision zones. Part of the reason for this is that collision zones by their nature destroy a lot of potentially useful surface evidence of deep dynamics. One observable that offers the possibility for recording mantle dynamics at collision zones is topography. Here we present topography predictions from numerical models and show how these can be related to actual topography changes recoded in the sedimentary record. Both 2D and 3D numerical simulation of the closure of a small oceanic basin are presented (Bottrill et al., 2012; van Hunen and Allen, 2011). Topography is calculated from the normal stress at the surface applied to an elastic beam, to give a more realist prediction of topography by accounting for the expected elasticity of the lithosphere. Predicted model topography showed a number of interesting features on the overriding plate. The first is the formation of a basin post collision at around 300km from the suture. Our models also showed uplift postdating collision between the suture and this basin, caused by subduction of buoyant material. Once break-off has occurred we found that this uplift moved further into the overriding plate due to redistribution of stresses from the subducted plate. With our 3D numerical models we simulate a collision that propagates laterally along a subduction system. These models show that a basin forms, similar to that found in our 2D models, which propagates along the system at the same rate as collision. The apparent link between collision and basin formation leads to the investigation into the stress state in the overriding lithosphere. Preliminary

  6. Fracture Rate, Quality of Life and Back Pain in Patients with Osteoporosis Treated with Teriparatide: 24-Month Results from the Extended Forsteo Observational Study (ExFOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdahl, Bente L; Ljunggren, Östen; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent; Marin, Fernando; Kapetanos, George; Kocjan, Tomaz; Lespessailles, Eric; Napoli, Nicola; Nikolic, Tatjana; Petto, Helmut; Moll, Thomas; Lindh, Erik

    2016-09-01

    We describe the pre-planned interim analysis of fracture outcomes, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and back pain in patients with severe osteoporosis treated with teriparatide for up to 24 months in the Extended Forsteo (Forsteo(®) is a registered trade name of Eli Lilly and Company) Observational Study (ExFOS), a prospective, multinational, observational study. Data on incident clinical fractures, HRQoL (EQ-5D questionnaire) and back pain [100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS)] were collected. The number of patients with fractures was summarised in 6-month intervals and fracture rate over each 6-month period was assessed using logistic regression for repeated measures. Changes from baseline in EQ-5D and back pain VAS were analysed using mixed models for repeated measures. Of 1454 patients in the active treatment cohort, 90.6 % were female and 14.4 % were taking glucocorticoids. During teriparatide treatment (median duration 23.7 months), 103 patients (7.1 %) sustained a total of 122 incident clinical fractures (21 % vertebral, 79 % non-vertebral). A 49 % decrease in the odds of fractures and a 75 % decrease in the odds of clinical vertebral fractures were observed in the >18- to 24-month period versus the first 6-month period (both p teriparatide treatment. In conclusion, patients with severe osteoporosis showed a significant reduction in the incident fracture rate during 24 months of teriparatide treatment in routine clinical practice, accompanied by a significant improvement in HRQoL and reduction in back pain. Results should be interpreted in the context of the non-controlled design of this observational study.

  7. The initiation and linkage of surface fractures above a buried strike ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    models and finally (at a minimum shear strain of 1.4) gave rise to a through-going fault parallel to the basement fault without development of any other fracture. Conjugate Riedel (R ) shears develop only within the thicker (T > 18) clay models at a minimum shear strain of 0.7. With increasing deformation (at a minimum shear ...

  8. [Clinical observation on the effect of joint mobilization in treating elderly patients after distal radius fractures operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xue-Feng; Cai, Hong-Xin; Lin, Ge-Sheng; Fang, Ji-Shi; Wang, Yong; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Tu, Xu-Hui

    2017-07-25

    To investigate the effect of joint mobilization on postoperative wrist joint function, pain and grip strength for elderly patients with distal radius fracture. From January 2015 to June 2016, a total of 67 elderly patients with distal radius fracture were randomly divided into routine exercise group and joint mobilization group. Among them, 37 patients in the routine exercise group underwent conventional distal radius fracture postoperative joint function exercise regimen, including 16 males and 21 females with a mean age of (67.8±3.2) years old ranging from 60 to 72 years old;the injured side was dominant in 23 cases and non-dominant in 14 cases;injury mechanism was fall in 26 cases, traffic accident in 11 cases; for AO type, 6 cases were type B3, 18 cases were type C1, 7 cases were type C2, 6 cases was type C3. Other 30 patients in the joint mobilization group underwent joint mobilization on the basis of the routine exercise group including 14 males and 16 females with a mean age of (67.1±4.0) years old ranging from 61 to 74 years old; the injured side was dominant in 21 cases and non-dominant in 9 cases;injury mechanism was fall in 25 cases, traffic accident in 5 cases;for AO type, 8 cases were type B3, 13 cases were type C1, 6 cases were type C2, 9 cases were type C3. The wrist joint activity, Gartland-Werley wrist joint function score, VAS pain score and grip strength were observed at 3 months afrer treatment. After 3 months' treatment, the VAS in the routine exercise group was higher than that of the joint mobilization group ( P routine exercise group( P routine exercise group, the average angle of flexion, extension, radial deviation were significantly higher than those of joint mobilization group( P routine exercise group compared with joint mobilization group had no significant difference ( P >0.05). In the comparison of each item of Gartland-Werley, there was no significant difference between two groups in residual deformity and complication( P >0

  9. Observing the Agulhas Current with sea surface temperature and altimetry data: challenges and perspectives

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Krug, Marjolaine, J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available -Red Sea Surface Temperature datasets still suffer from inadequate cloud masking algorithms, particularly in regions of strong temperature gradient. Despite both Sea Surface Height and Sea Surface Temperature observations being severely compromised...

  10. Some observations on the greenhouse effect at the Earth's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akitt, J. W.

    2018-01-01

    It is shown that the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and water vapour reflect back to the surface, all IR radiation originating at the surface within their respective spectral bands. This reflection occurs in a very thin layer at the surface, not much over 12 cm in thickness. Heat is lost from the surface by heat exchange with the atmosphere and by loss of radiation. About 52% of radiation leaves the surface in two principal window regions but this is not enough to account for the earth's equilibrium temperature. This window radiation seems to disappear quite quickly and is replaced by black body radiation. It is this which eventually contributes to the earth's radiation balance, and has to originate approximately between 40 and 50 km altitude where the temperature is about correct, near 255 K. Doubling the CO2 concentration increases the surface temperature by about 0.9 °C and this need not have any influence higher up in the atmosphere. The surface temperature seems indeed to have no direct influence on the earth's external radiation balance.

  11. Surface wave propagation over sinusoidally varying topography: Theory and observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A. G.; Heathershaw, A. D.

    Linear perturbation theory is used to show that the reflection coefficient of a patch of sinusoidal ripples on an otherwise flat bed is oscillatory in the quotient of the length of the patch and the surface wave length, and strongly dependent upon the quotient of the surface and bed wave numbers. Resonant interaction between the surface waves and the ripples if the surface wavenumber is half the ripple wavenumber is demonstrated. Few ripples, of relatively small steepness, are required to produce a substantial reflected wave. In resonant cases, the partially standing wave on the up-wave side of the ripple patch gives way, in an almost linear manner over the the ripple patch itself, to a progressive (transmitted) wave on the down-wave side. Wave tank data agree well with predictions, and suggest coupling between wave reflection and ripple growth on an erodible bed.

  12. From Ground Truth to Space: Surface, Subsurface and Remote Observations Associated with Nuclear Test Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, A. J.; Anderson, D.; Burt, C.; Craven, J.; Kimblin, C.; McKenna, I.; Schultz-Fellenz, E. S.; Miller, E.; Yocky, D. A.; Haas, D.

    2016-12-01

    Underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) result in numerous signatures that manifest on a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Currently, prompt signals, such as the detection of seismic waves provide only generalized locations and the timing and amplitude of non-prompt signals are difficult to predict. As such, research into improving the detection, location, and identification of suspect events has been conducted, resulting in advancement of nuclear test detection science. In this presentation, we demonstrate the scalar variably of surface and subsurface observables, briefly discuss current capabilities to locate, detect and characterize potential nuclear explosion locations, and explain how emergent technologies and amalgamation of disparate data sets will facilitate improved monitoring and verification. At the smaller scales, material and fracture characterization efforts on rock collected from legacy UNE sites and from underground experiments using chemical explosions can be incorporated into predictive modeling efforts. Spatial analyses of digital elevation models and orthoimagery of both modern conventional and legacy nuclear sites show subtle surface topographic changes and damage at nearby outcrops. Additionally, at sites where such technology cannot penetrate vegetative cover, it is possible to use the vegetation itself as both a companion signature reflecting geologic conditions and showing subsurface impacts to water, nutrients, and chemicals. Aerial systems based on RGB imagery, light detection and ranging, and hyperspectral imaging can allow for combined remote sensing modalities to perform pattern recognition and classification tasks. Finally, more remote systems such as satellite based synthetic aperture radar and satellite imagery are other techniques in development for UNE site detection, location and characterization.

  13. Fractal Characteristics of Rock Fracture Surface under Triaxial Compression after High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. L. Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM test on 30 pieces of fractured granite has been researched by using S250MK III SEM under triaxial compression of different temperature (25~1000°C and confining pressure (0~40 MPa. Research results show that (1 the change of fractal dimension (FD of rock fracture with temperature is closely related to confining pressure, which can be divided into two categories. In the first category, when confining pressure is in 0~30 MPa, FD fits cubic polynomial fitting curve with temperature, reaching the maximum at 600°C. In the second category, when confining pressure is in 30~40 MPa, FD has volatility with temperature. (2 The FD of rock fracture varies with confining pressure and is also closely related to the temperature, which can be divided into three categories. In the first category, FD has volatility with confining pressure at 25°C, 400°C, and 800°C. In the second category, it increases exponentially at 200°C and 1000°C. In the third category, it decreases exponentially at 600°C. (3 It is found that 600°C is the critical temperature and 30 MPa is the critical confining pressure of granite. The rock transfers from brittle to plastic phase transition when temperature exceeds 600°C and confining pressure exceeds 30 MPa.

  14. Comparisons of TBS and lumbar spine BMD in the associations with vertebral fractures according to the T-scores: A cross-sectional observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jie-Eun; Kim, Kyoung Min; Kim, Lee-Kyung; Kim, Kyong Young; Oh, Tae Jung; Moon, Jae Hoon; Choi, Sung Hee; Lim, Soo; Kim, Sang Wan; Shin, Chan Soo; Jang, Hak Chul

    2017-12-01

    Trabecular bone score (TBS) is a parameter of bone quality that has been shown to be related to vertebral fractures. This study aimed to analyze the difference in discriminatory power of TBS for vertebral fractures according to the bone mineral density (BMD) T-score. Areal BMD at the lumbar spine (LS, L1-L4), femur neck (FN) and total hip were assessed using dual x-ray absorptiometry (Discovery W, Hologic, Bedford, MA) in 929 women aged 50years or older. TBS was analyzed using iNsight software (Med-Imaps, Pessac, France). Vertebral fractures were identified on lateral X-ray films of the thoracic and lumbar spine using a semi-quantitative method. The study subjects consisted of 158 subjects (17.0%) with normal BMD, 461 (49.6%) with osteopenia and 310 (33.4%) with osteoporosis. The incident vertebral fractures were observed in 92 (9.9%) subjects, including 59 fractures in osteoporosis, 29 fractures in osteopenia, and only 4 fractures in normal BMD. We stratified study subjects into two groups according to their BMD T-scores, osteoporosis or osteopenia/normal BMD. The logistic regression model showed that LS BMD values per each 1 standard deviation (SD) decrease were significantly associated with increased risk of vertebral fracture in both osteoporosis and osteopenia/normal BMD group with stronger association in osteoporosis group. However, a TBS value that was lower by 1SD was significantly associated with vertebral fracture risk only in the osteopenia/normal BMD group. The TBS use in addition to FN BMD and age also showed significantly better discriminatory power for vertebral fracture only in the osteopenia/normal BMD group, but not osteoporosis group. In conclusion, TBS is significantly associated with vertebral fractures in subjects with osteopenia/normal BMD levels. Additional assessment of bone microarchitecture using TBS is better able to identify women at risk of fracture, in particular, those with relatively higher BMD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All

  15. Mechanical test and fractal analysis on anisotropic fracture of cortical bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Dagang [State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Chen, Bin, E-mail: bchen@cqu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Ye, Wei [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Gou, Jihua [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Fan, Jinghong [Division of Mechanical Engineering, Alfred University, Alfred, NY 14802 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The mechanical properties of the cortical bone of fresh bovine femora along three different directions are tested through four-point bending experiments. • SEM observation shows that the roughness of the fracture surfaces of the three different directions of the bone are remarkably different. • The fractal dimensions of the different fracture surfaces of the bone are calculated by box-counting method in MATLAB. • The fracture energies of the different fracture directions are calculated based on their fractal models. - Abstract: The mechanical properties of the cortical bone of fresh bovine femora along three different directions are tested through four-point bending experiments. It is indicated that the fracture energy along the transversal direction of the bone is distinctly larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture surfaces of the three different directions are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is shown that the roughness of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is obviously larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. It is also revealed that the osteons in the bone are perpendicular to the fracture surface of the transversal direction and parallel to the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. Based on these experimental results, the fractal dimensions of the fracture surfaces of different directions are calculated by box-counting method in MATLAB. The calculated results show that the fractal dimension of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture energies of different directions are also calculated based on their fractal models. It is denoted that the fracture energy of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The calculated results are in

  16. Mechanical test and fractal analysis on anisotropic fracture of cortical bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Dagang; Chen, Bin; Ye, Wei; Gou, Jihua; Fan, Jinghong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The mechanical properties of the cortical bone of fresh bovine femora along three different directions are tested through four-point bending experiments. • SEM observation shows that the roughness of the fracture surfaces of the three different directions of the bone are remarkably different. • The fractal dimensions of the different fracture surfaces of the bone are calculated by box-counting method in MATLAB. • The fracture energies of the different fracture directions are calculated based on their fractal models. - Abstract: The mechanical properties of the cortical bone of fresh bovine femora along three different directions are tested through four-point bending experiments. It is indicated that the fracture energy along the transversal direction of the bone is distinctly larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture surfaces of the three different directions are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is shown that the roughness of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is obviously larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. It is also revealed that the osteons in the bone are perpendicular to the fracture surface of the transversal direction and parallel to the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. Based on these experimental results, the fractal dimensions of the fracture surfaces of different directions are calculated by box-counting method in MATLAB. The calculated results show that the fractal dimension of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture energies of different directions are also calculated based on their fractal models. It is denoted that the fracture energy of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The calculated results are in

  17. Acidization of shales with calcite cemented fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Kamil; Szymczak, Piotr; Jarosiński, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Investigation of cores drilled from shale formations reveals a relatively large number of calcite-cemented fractures. Usually such fractures are reactivated during fracking and can contribute considerably to the permeability of the resulting fracture network. However, calcite coating on their surfaces effectively excludes them from production. Dissolution of the calcite cement by acidic fluids is investigated numerically with focus on the evolution of fracture morphology. Available surface area, breakthrough time, and reactant penetration length are calculated. Natural fractures in cores from Pomeranian shale formation (northern Poland) were analyzed and classified. Representative fractures are relatively thin (0.1 mm), flat and completely sealed with calcite. Next, the morphology evolution of reactivated natural fractures treated with low-pH fluids has been simulated numerically under various operating conditions. Depth-averaged equations for fracture flow and reactant transport has been solved by finite-difference method coupled with sparse-matrix solver. Transport-limited dissolution has been considered, which corresponds to the treatment with strong acids, such as HCl. Calcite coating in reactivated natural fractures dissolves in a highly non-homogeneous manner - a positive feedback between fluid transport and calcite dissolution leads to the spontaneous formation of wormhole-like patterns, in which most of the flow is focused. The wormholes carry reactive fluids deeper inside the system, which dramatically increases the range of the treatment. Non-uniformity of the dissolution patterns provides a way of retaining the fracture permeability even in the absence of the proppant, since the less dissolved regions will act as supports to keep more dissolved regions open. Evolution of fracture morphology is shown to depend strongly on the thickness of calcite layer - the thicker the coating the more pronounced wormholes are observed. However the interaction between

  18. Effect of anodic surface treatment on PAN-based carbon fiber and its relationship to the fracture toughness of the carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarraf, Hamid; Skarpova, Ludmila

    2008-01-01

    The effect of anodic surface treatment on the polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers surface properties and the mechanical behavior of the resulting carbon fiber-polymer composites has been studied in terms of the contact angle measurements of fibers and the fracture toughness of composites...

  19. Effects of multiple root canal usage on the surface topography and fracture of two different Ni-Ti rotary file systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottoor, Jojo; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy; Gopikrishna, Velayutham; Krithikadatta, Jogikalmat

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of multiple root canal usage on the surface topography and fracture of Twisted File (TF) and ProTaper (PT) rotary Ni-Ti file systems, using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Ten sets of PT and TF instruments were used to prepare the mesial canals of mandibular first molars. TF 25, 0.06 taper and PT F1 instruments were analyzed by SEM when new and thereafter every three root canal usages. This sequence was repeated for both the TF and PT groups until 12 uses. Two images of the instrument were recorded, one of the instrument tip and the other 5 mm from the tip, both at × 100 magnification. The sequential use was continued till the instrument fractured and the number of root canal usages for the file to fracture was noted. All fracture surfaces were examined under the SEM. Fresh TF instruments showed no surface wear when compared to PT instruments (P 0.05), while at the 9 th usage TF showed a steep increase in the spiral distortion score when compared to PT (P < 0.05). PT instruments fractured at a mean root canal usage of 17.4, while TF instruments showed a mean root canal usage of 11.8. Fractographically, all the TF instruments failed due to torsion, while all the PT instruments failed because of cyclic fatigue. PT instruments showed more resistance to fracture than TF instruments.

  20. Fracture Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Dong Il; Jeong, Gyeong Seop; Han, Min Gu

    1992-08-01

    This book introduces basic theory and analytical solution of fracture mechanics, linear fracture mechanics, non-linear fracture mechanics, dynamic fracture mechanics, environmental fracture and fatigue fracture, application on design fracture mechanics, application on analysis of structural safety, engineering approach method on fracture mechanics, stochastic fracture mechanics, numerical analysis code and fracture toughness test and fracture toughness data. It gives descriptions of fracture mechanics to theory and analysis from application of engineering.

  1. Physical basis for river segmentation from water surface observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samine Montazem, A.; Garambois, P. A.; Calmant, S.; Moreira, D. M.; Monnier, J.; Biancamaria, S.

    2017-12-01

    With the advent of satellite missions such as SWOT we will have access to high resolution estimates of the elevation, slope and width of the free surface. A segmentation strategy is required in order to sub-sample the data set into reach master points for further hydraulic analyzes and inverse modelling. The question that arises is : what will be the best node repartition strategy that preserves hydraulic properties of river flow? The concept of hydraulic visibility introduced by Garambois et al. (2016) is investigated in order to highlight and characterize the spatio-temporal variations of water surface slope and curvature for different flow regimes and reach geometries. We show that free surface curvature is a powerful proxy for characterizing the hydraulic behavior of a reach since concavity of water surface is driven by variations in channel geometry that impacts the hydraulic properties of the flow. We evaluated the performance of three segmentation strategies by means of a well documented case, that of the Garonne river in France. We conclude that local extrema of free surface curvature appear as the best candidate for locating the segment boundaries for an optimal hydraulic representation of the segmented river. We show that for a given river different segmentation scales are possible: a fine-scale segmentation which is driven by fine-scale hydraulic to large-scale segmentation driven by large-scale geomorphology. The segmentation technique is then applied to high resolution GPS profiles of free surface elevation collected on the Negro river basin, a major contributor of the Amazon river. We propose two segmentations: a low-resolution one that can be used for basin hydrology and a higher resolution one better suited for local hydrodynamic studies.

  2. Hydraulic Conductivity Modeling of Fractured Rock at Grasberg Surface Mine, Papua-Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tedy Agung Cahyadi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Packer tests and slug tests were conducted at 49 points at the Grasberg surface mine, Indonesia to obtain hydraulic conductivity data. The HC-system approach, which relies on rock quality designation, lithology permeability index, depth index, and gouge content designation, was applied. Geotechnical drill holes in 441 locations, consisting of 4,850 points of information, were used to determine the K values using the equation K = 2x10-6x HC0.5571. The K values, which were within the range of 10-8 and 10-5 m/s, were distributed into five alternative 3D distributions using Ordinary Kriging (OK and Artificial Neural Network (ANN. The result of the ANN modeling showed that some of the K values, with log K varying from -10.51 m/s to -3.09 m/s, were outside the range of the observed K values. The OK modeling results of K values, with log K varying from -8.12 m/s to -5.75 m/s, were within the range of the observed K values. The ANN modeled K values were slightly more varied than the OK modeled values. The result of an alternative OK modeling was chosen to represent the existing data population of flow media because it fits well to the geological conditions.

  3. Inter-observer agreement between 2-dimensional CT versus 3-dimensional I-Space model in the Diagnosis of Occult Scaphoid Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Drijkoningen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The I-Space is a radiological imaging system in which Computed Tomography (CT-scans can be evaluated as a three dimensional hologram. The aim of this study is to analyze the value of virtual reality (I-Space in diagnosing acute occult scaphoid fractures.   Methods: A convenient cohort of 24 patients with a CT-scan from prior studies, without a scaphoid fracture on radiograph, yet high clinical suspicion of a fracture, were included in this study. CT-scans were evaluated in the I-Space by 7 observers of which 3 observers assessed the scans in the I-Space twice. The observers in this study assessed in the I-Space whether the patient had a scaphoid fracture. The kappa value was calculated for inter- and intra-observer agreement. Results: The Kappa value varied from 0.11 to 0.33 for the first assessment. For the three observers who assessed the CT-scans twice; observer 1 improved from a kappa of 0.33 to 0.50 (95% CI 0.26-0.74, P=0.01, observer 2 from 0.17 to 0.78 (95% CI 0.36-1.0, P

  4. Integrated In Situ Stress Estimation by Hydraulic Fracturing, Borehole Observations and Numerical Analysis at the EXP-1 Borehole in Pohang, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanna; Xie, Linmao; Min, Ki-Bok; Bae, Seongho; Stephansson, Ove

    2017-12-01

    It is desirable to combine the stress measurement data produced by different methods to obtain a more reliable estimation of in situ stress. We present a regional case study of integrated in situ stress estimation by hydraulic fracturing, observations of borehole breakouts and drilling-induced fractures, and numerical modeling of a 1 km-deep borehole (EXP-1) in Pohang, South Korea. Prior to measuring the stress, World Stress Map (WSM) and modern field data in the Korean Peninsula are used to construct a best estimate stress model in this area. Then, new stress data from hydraulic fracturing and borehole observations is added to determine magnitude and orientation of horizontal stresses. Minimum horizontal principal stress is estimated from the shut-in pressure of the hydraulic fracturing measurement at a depth of about 700 m. The horizontal stress ratios ( S Hmax/ S hmin) derived from hydraulic fracturing, borehole breakout, and drilling-induced fractures are 1.4, 1.2, and 1.1-1.4, respectively, and the average orientations of the maximum horizontal stresses derived by field methods are N138°E, N122°E, and N136°E, respectively. The results of hydraulic fracturing and borehole observations are integrated with a result of numerical modeling to produce a final rock stress model. The results of the integration give in situ stress ratios of 1.3/1.0/0.8 ( S Hmax/ S V/ S hmin) with an average azimuth of S Hmax in the orientation range of N130°E-N136°E. It is found that the orientation of S Hmax is deviated by more than 40° clockwise compared to directions reported for the WSM in southeastern Korean peninsula.

  5. Insights about transport mechanisms and fracture flow channeling from multi-scale observations of tracer dispersion in shallow fractured crystalline rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guihéneuf, N; Bour, O; Boisson, A; Le Borgne, T; Becker, M W; Nigon, B; Wajiduddin, M; Ahmed, S; Maréchal, J-C

    2017-11-01

    In fractured media, solute transport is controlled by advection in open and connected fractures and by matrix diffusion that may be enhanced by chemical weathering of the fracture walls. These phenomena may lead to non-Fickian dispersion characterized by early tracer arrival time, late-time tailing on the breakthrough curves and potential scale effect on transport processes. Here we investigate the scale dependency of these processes by analyzing a series of convergent and push-pull tracer experiments with distance of investigation ranging from 4m to 41m in shallow fractured granite. The small and intermediate distances convergent experiments display a non-Fickian tailing, characterized by a -2 power law slope. However, the largest distance experiment does not display a clear power law behavior and indicates possibly two main pathways. The push-pull experiments show breakthrough curve tailing decreases as the volume of investigation increases, with a power law slope ranging from -3 to -2.3 from the smallest to the largest volume. The multipath model developed by Becker and Shapiro (2003) is used here to evaluate the hypothesis of the independence of flow pathways. The multipath model is found to explain the convergent data, when increasing local dispersivity and reducing the number of pathways with distance which suggest a transition from non-Fickian to Fickian transport at fracture scale. However, this model predicts an increase of tailing with push-pull distance, while the experiments show the opposite trend. This inconsistency may suggest the activation of cross channel mass transfer at larger volume of investigation, which leads to non-reversible heterogeneous advection with scale. This transition from independent channels to connected channels when the volume of investigation increases suggest that both convergent and push-pull breakthrough curves can inform the existence of characteristic length scales. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Insights about transport mechanisms and fracture flow channeling from multi-scale observations of tracer dispersion in shallow fractured crystalline rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guihéneuf, N.; Bour, O.; Boisson, A.; Le Borgne, T.; Becker, M. W.; Nigon, B.; Wajiduddin, M.; Ahmed, S.; Maréchal, J.-C.

    2017-11-01

    In fractured media, solute transport is controlled by advection in open and connected fractures and by matrix diffusion that may be enhanced by chemical weathering of the fracture walls. These phenomena may lead to non-Fickian dispersion characterized by early tracer arrival time, late-time tailing on the breakthrough curves and potential scale effect on transport processes. Here we investigate the scale dependency of these processes by analyzing a series of convergent and push-pull tracer experiments with distance of investigation ranging from 4 m to 41 m in shallow fractured granite. The small and intermediate distances convergent experiments display a non-Fickian tailing, characterized by a -2 power law slope. However, the largest distance experiment does not display a clear power law behavior and indicates possibly two main pathways. The push-pull experiments show breakthrough curve tailing decreases as the volume of investigation increases, with a power law slope ranging from - 3 to - 2.3 from the smallest to the largest volume. The multipath model developed by Becker and Shapiro (2003) is used here to evaluate the hypothesis of the independence of flow pathways. The multipath model is found to explain the convergent data, when increasing local dispersivity and reducing the number of pathways with distance which suggest a transition from non-Fickian to Fickian transport at fracture scale. However, this model predicts an increase of tailing with push-pull distance, while the experiments show the opposite trend. This inconsistency may suggest the activation of cross channel mass transfer at larger volume of investigation, which leads to non-reversible heterogeneous advection with scale. This transition from independent channels to connected channels when the volume of investigation increases suggest that both convergent and push-pull breakthrough curves can inform the existence of characteristic length scales.

  7. Spectroscopic observations of the Moon at the lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunzhao; Hapke, Bruce

    2018-02-01

    The Moon's reflectance spectrum records many of its important properties. However, prior to Chang'E-3 (CE-3), no spectra had previously been measured on the lunar surface. Here we show the in situ reflectance spectra of the Moon acquired on the lunar surface by the Visible-Near Infrared Spectrometer (VNIS) onboard the CE-3 rover. The VNIS detected thermal radiation from the lunar regolith, though with much shorter wavelength range than typical thermal radiometer. The measured temperatures are higher than expected from theoretical model, indicating low thermal inertia of the lunar soil and the effects of grain facet on soil temperature in submillimeter scale. The in situ spectra also reveal that 1) brightness changes visible from orbit are related to the reduction in maturity due to the removal of the fine and weathered particles by the lander's rocket exhaust, not the smoothing of the surface and 2) the spectra of the uppermost soil detected by remote sensing exhibit substantial differences with that immediately beneath, which has important implications for the remote compositional analysis. The reflectance spectra measured by VNIS not only reveal the thermal, compositional, and space-weathering properties of the Moon but also provide a means for the calibration of optical instruments that view the surface remotely.

  8. Observed linear trend in few surface weather elements over the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    total precipitation amount (TP). Linear regression analysis is used to construct the trend in variables listed in table 1 (Pant and. Rupa Kumar 1997; Bhutiyani et al. 2007, 2009,. Dimri and Das 2011). Linear regression equation of the following form is developed at each station for surface weather variables listed in table 1 to.

  9. High-resolution observations of combustion in heterogeneous surface fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Louise Loudermilk; Gary L. Achtemeier; Joseph J. O' Brien; J. Kevin Hiers; Benjamin S. Hornsby

    2014-01-01

    In ecosystems with frequent surface fires, fire and fuel heterogeneity at relevant scales have been largely ignored. This could be because complete burns give an impression of homogeneity, or due to the difficulty in capturing fine-scale variation in fuel characteristics and fire behaviour. Fire movement between patches of fuel can have implications for modelling fire...

  10. Proton pump inhibitor use and fracture risk - effect modification by histamine H1 receptor blockade. Observational case-control study using National Prescription Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Vestergaard, Peter

    2013-11-01

    It remains unknown why proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use may be associated with risk of osteoporotic fractures; evidence of direct effects on calcium absorption or on the osteoclast in humans is weak or absent. However, the ensuing increased gastrin levels may cause histamine production through hypertrophy of gastric enterochromaffin like cells, which could lead to bone loss. We speculated that H1 receptor antagonists (H1RA) used for allergies would then reduce the effect of PPI on bone. We therefore conducted a register-based case-control study comprising 124,655 patients with hospital treated fractures, who were matched 3:1 with non fracture control subjects of the same age and gender. Use of prescription medications was retrieved from the National Prescription Database and data was analyzed using conditional logistic regression analysis. We observed a significant interaction between PPI and H1RA use on fracture risk in general (adjusted OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.87-0.98) though not on hip fracture risk (adjusted OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.85-1.16). There was a significant modification of the interaction by age (peffects of PPI on bone could be driven by in part by increased histamine release as the increased fracture risk can be modified by H1RA. © 2013.

  11. Effects of parathyroidectomy versus observation on the development of vertebral fractures in mild primary hyperparathyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstam, Karolina; Heck, Ansgar; Mollerup, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Mild primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common disease especially in middle-aged and elderly women. The diagnosis is frequently made incidentally and treatment strategies are widely discussed. OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of parathyroidectomy (PTX) compared with observation (OBS...

  12. Factors associated with subluxation in mallet fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, A; Braun, Y; Oflazoglu, K; Meijs, T; Ring, D; Chen, N

    2017-02-01

    Radiographs and medical record of all adult patients with a mallet fracture in three hospitals between 2004 and 2014 were reviewed. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes and text search in radiographic reports were used to identify all acute patients with potential mallet fractures in our institutional database. Manually checking, 392 true mallet fractures were identified among them, 78 had subluxation at the time of diagnosis and 19 had subluxation at a later time point during treatment. Fragment size, fragment displacement, and interval between injury and treatment were associated with initial and late subluxation. Subluxation was not observed when the fracture size was less than 39% of the total articular surface. For each 1% increase in total articular surface involvement in fractures with more than 39% involvement, the risk of subluxation increased by 4% and for each 1% of displacement, the risk of subluxation increased by 4%. IV.

  13. Preexisting lesions associated with complete diaphyseal fractures of the third metacarpal bone in 12 Thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Sarah N; Spriet, Mathieu; Garcia, Tanya C; Uzal, Francisco A; Stover, Susan M

    2017-07-01

    We characterized features of complete diaphyseal fractures of third metacarpal bones in Thoroughbred racehorses. Given that stress fractures are known to occur in the third metacarpal bone, an additional aim was to determine if complete fractures are associated with signs of a preexisting incomplete stress fracture. Bilateral metacarpi from 12 Thoroughbred racehorses euthanized because of complete unilateral metacarpal diaphyseal fracture were examined visually and radiographically. Open, comminuted, transverse or short oblique fractures occurred in the middle of the diaphysis or supracondylar region. Periosteal surface discoloration and bone callus formation contiguous with the fracture line were present in fractured bones. All contralateral intact metacarpi had gross anatomic lesions, and 10 had radiographic abnormalities similar to those observed on fractured metacarpi. Catastrophic metacarpal fractures occurred in racehorses with bilateral evidence of preexisting bone injury.

  14. Monolithic zirconia dental crowns. Internal fit, margin quality, fracture mode and load at fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriwer, Christian; Skjold, Anneli; Gjerdet, Nils Roar; Øilo, Marit

    2017-09-01

    Dental all-ceramic restorations of zirconia, with and without an aesthetic veneering layer, have become a viable alternative to conventional metal-ceramic restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether factors of the production methods or the material compositions affect load at fracture, fracture modes, internal fit or crown margins of monolithic zirconia crowns. Sixty crowns made from six different commercially available dental zirconias were produced to a model tooth with a shallow circumferential chamfer preparation. Internal fit was assessed by the replica method. The crown margin quality was assessed by light microscopy on an ordinal scale. The cemented crowns were loaded centrally in the occlusal fossa with a horizontal steel cylinder with a diameter of 13mm at 0.5mm/min until fracture. Fractographic analysis was performed on the fractured crowns. There were statistically significant differences among the groups regarding crown margins, internal fit and load at fracture (pFracture analyses revealed that all fractures started cervically and propagated to the occlusal surface similar to clinically observed fractures. There was statistically significant correlation between margin quality and load at fracture (Spearman's rank correlation, pfracture. The hard-machined Y-TZP zirconia crowns had the best margin quality and the highest load at fracture. Reduction of margin flaws will improve fracture strength of monolithic zirconia crowns and thereby increase clinical success. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Chemical reaction on solid surface observed through isotope tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ken-ichi

    1983-01-01

    In order to know the role of atoms and ions on solid surfaces as the partners participating in elementary processes, the literatures related to the isomerization and hydrogen exchanging reaction of olefines, the hydrogenation of olefines, the metathesis reaction and homologation of olefines based on solid catalysts were reviewed. Various olefines, of which the hydrogen atoms were substituted with deuterium at desired positions, were reacted using various solid catalysts such as ZnO, K 2 CO 3 on C, MoS 2 (single crystal and powder) and molybdenum oxide (with various carriers), and the infra-red spectra of adsorbed olefines on catalysts, the isotope composition of reaction products and the production rate of the reaction products were measured. From the results, the bonding mode of reactant with the atoms and ions on solid surfaces, and the mechanism of the elementary process were considered. The author emphasized that the mechanism of the chemical reaction on solid surfaces and the role of active points or catalysts can be made clear to the considerable extent by combining isotopes suitably. (Yoshitake, I.)

  16. Nucleation at the Contact Line Observed on Nanotextured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostinski, A. B.; Gurganus, C.; Charnawskas, J. C.; Shaw, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Surface nucleation, and contact nucleation in particular, are important for many physical processes, including pharmaceutical drug synthesis, metallurgy, and heterogeneous ice nucleation. It has been conjectured that roughness plays a role in surface nucleation, the tendency for freezing to begin preferentially at the liquid-gas interface. Using high speed imaging, we sought evidence for freezing at the contact line on catalyst substrates with imposed characteristic length scales (texture). It is found that nano-scale texture causes a shift in the nucleation of ice in super-cooled water to the three-phase contact line, while micro-scale texture does not. The reduction in the Gibbs barrier for nucleation at the droplet triple line suggests that a line tension, inversely proportional to the surface feature length scale, may be the relevant physical mechanism. A survey of line tension values in literature supports this hypothesis. This work suggests that the physical morphology of a particle, and not just its chemical composition, is important for characterizing a nucleation catalyst.

  17. SCANNING ELECTRON-MICROSCOPIC EVALUATION OF THE FRACTURED SURFACES OF CANINE CALCULI FROM SUBSTRATA WITH DIFFERENT SURFACE FREE-ENERGY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    UYEN, HMW; JONGEBLOED, WL; BUSSCHER, HJ

    1991-01-01

    The strength of adhesion between dental calculus and enamel or dentin surfaces determines the ease with which the calculus can be removed by brushing or professional dental treatment. In this study, we examined the adhesion of canine calculi formed on substrata with different surface free energies

  18. Fracture, roughness and phase transformation in CAD/CAM milling and subsequent surface treatments of lithium metasilicate/disilicate glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alao, Abdur-Rasheed; Stoll, Richard; Song, Xiao-Fei; Abbott, John R; Zhang, Yu; Abduo, Jaafar; Yin, Ling

    2017-10-01

    This paper studied surface fracture, roughness and morphology, phase transformations, and material removal mechanisms of lithium metasilicate/disilicate glass ceramics (LMGC/LDGC) in CAD/CAM-milling and subsequent surface treatments. LMGC (IPS e.max CAD) blocks were milled using a chairside dental CAD/CAM milling unit and then treated in sintering, polishing and glazing processes. X-ray diffraction was performed on all processed surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was applied to analyse surface fracture and morphology. Surface roughness was quantitatively characterized by the arithmetic average surface roughness R a and the maximum roughness R z using desktop SEM-assisted morphology analytical software. The CAD/CAM milling induced extensive brittle cracks and crystal pulverization on LMGC surfaces, which indicate that the dominant removal mechanism was the fracture mode. Polishing and sintering of the milled LMGC lowered the surface roughness (ANOVA, p 0.05). In comparison of all applied fabrication process routes, it is found that CAD/CAM milling followed by polishing and sintering produced the smoothest surface with R a = 0.12 ± 0.08µm and R z = 0.89 ± 0.26µm. Thus , it is proposed as the optimized process route for LMGC/LDGC in dental restorations. This route enables to manufacture LMGC/LDGC restorations with cost effectiveness, time efficiency, and improved surface quality for better occlusal functions and reduced bacterial plaque accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Finite element analysis of surface cracks in the Wilkins Ice Shelf using fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plate, Carolin; Müller, Ralf; Gross, Dietmar; Humbert, Angelika; Braun, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Ice shelves, located between the warming atmosphere and the ocean, are sensitive elements of the climate system. The Wilkins Ice Shelf is situated in the south-western part of the Antarctic Peninsula, a well known hot spot of global warming. Recent break-up events exemplified the potential of disintegration of the ice shelf. A multi interdisciplinary project consisting of remote sensing, modeling of the ice dynamics and fracture mechanics intends to improve the understanding of the impacts of temperature increase on ice shelf stability. As a part of this project the aim of this presentation is to demonstrate the fracture mechanical approach using finite elements and configurational forces. For fracture mechanical purposes the material behavior of ice is treated as a brittle solid, and linear fracture mechanics is used. Crucial to all methods in linear fracture mechanics is the evaluation of the stress intensity factor K which is a measure for the load concentration at the crack tip and which depends on the geometry of the body and on the applied loading. The computed value of K can be compared to the critical stress intensity factor Kc, a material property obtained from experimental examinations, to judge whether a crack will propagate. One very effective procedure to obtain the stress intensity factor takes advantage of configurational forces, which can be easily obtained in the finite element analysis. An initial investigation is based on a 2-dimensional analysis of a single crack with a mode-I load type using a static plane strain model in the finite element analysis software COMSOL and additional routines to compute and evaluate the configurational forces. Analytical solutions of simple geometry and load cases are called on in comparison. The application to the Wilkins Ice Shelf follows by using material parameters, geometries and loading situations, which are obtained from literature values, remote sensing data analysis and modeling of the ice dynamics

  20. HUMeral Shaft Fractures: MEasuring Recovery after Operative versus Non-operative Treatment (HUMMER): A multicenter comparative observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.C. Mahabier (Kiran); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); H.W. Bolhuis (Hugo); P.K. Bos (Koen); M.W.G.A. Bronkhorst (Maarten); M.M.M. Bruijninckx (Milko); J. de Haan (Jeroen); W. Deenik (Wendy); B.J. Dwars (Boudewijn); M.G. Eversdijk (Martin); J.C. Goslings (Carel); R. Haverlag (Robert); M.J. Heetveld (Martin); A.J.H. Kerver (Albert J.H.); K.A. Kolkman (Karel); K. Leenhouts (Kees); S.A.G. Meylaerts (Sven); H. Poeze; R.W. Poolman (Rudolf); B.J. Punt (Bas); W.H. Roerdink (Herbert); G.R. Roukema (Gert); J.B. Sintenie (Jan Bernard); N.M.R. Soesman (Nicolaj); A.F.K. Tanka (Andras); E.J.T. ten Holder (Edgar); M. van der Elst (Maarten); F.H.W.M. van der Heijden (Frank); F.M. van der Linden (Frits); P. van der Zwaal (Peer); J.P. van Dijk (Johannes); H.P.W. van Jonbergen; E.J.M.M. Verleisdonk (Egbert); J.P.A.M. Vroemen (Jos); M. Waleboer (Marco); P. Wittich (Philippe); W.P. Zuidema (Wietse); S. Polinder (Suzanne); M.H.J. Verhofstad (Michiel); D. den Hartog (Dennis); R. Onstenk (Ron)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Fractures of the humeral shaft are associated with a profound temporary (and in the elderly sometimes even permanent) impairment of independence and quality of life. These fractures can be treated operatively or non-operatively, but the optimal tailored treatment is an

  1. Coincident Observations of Surface Ozone and NMVOCs over Abu Dhabi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Naveed; Majeed, Tariq; Iqbal, Mazhar; Tarasick, David; Davies, Jonathan; Riemer, Daniel; Apel, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The vertical profiles of ozone are measured coincidently with non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) at the meteorological site located at the Abu Dhabi international airport (latitude 24.45N; longitude 54.22E) during the years 2012 - 2014. Some of the profiles show elevated surface ozone >95 ppbv during the winter months (December, January and February). The ground-level NMVOCs obtained from the gas chromatography-flame ionization detection/mass spectrometry system also show elevated values of acetylene, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, benzene, and toluene. NMVOCs and ozone abundances in other seasons are much lower than the values in winter season. NMVOCs are emitted from an extensive number of sources in urban environments including fuel production, distribution, and consumption, and serve as precursor of ozone. Transport sources contribute a substantial portion of the NMVOC burden to the urban atmosphere in developed regions. Abu Dhabi is located at the edge of the Arabian Gulf and is highly affected by emissions from petrochemical industries in the neighboring Gulf region. The preliminary results indicate that wintertime enhancement in ozone is associated with large values of NMVOCs at Abu Dhabi. The domestic production of surface ozone is estimated from the combination of oxygen recombination and NMVOCs and compared with the data. It is estimated that about 40-50% of ozone in Abu Dhabi is transported from the neighbouring petrochemical industries. We will present ozone sounding and NMVOCs data and our model estimates of surface ozone, including a discussion on the high levels of the tropospheric ozone responsible for contaminating the air quality in the UAE. This work is supported by National Research Foundation, UAE.

  2. Investigating stellar surface rotation using observations of starspots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korhonen, Heidi Helena

    2011-01-01

    Rapid rotation enhances the dynamo operating in stars, and thus also introduces significantly stronger magnetic activity than is seen in slower rotators. Many young cool stars still have the rapid, primordial rotation rates induced by the interstellar molecular cloud from which they were formed...... information on the rotation of the star. At times even information on the spot rotation at different stellar latitudes can be obtained, similarly to the solar surface differential rotation measurements using magnetic features as tracers. Here, I will review investigations of stellar rotation based...

  3. Application of Finite Element Method to Analyze the Influences of Process Parameters on the Cut Surface in Fine Blanking Processes by Using Clearance-Dependent Critical Fracture Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phyo Wai Myint

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The correct choice of process parameters is important in predicting the cut surface and obtaining a fully-fine sheared surface in the fine blanking process. The researchers used the value of the critical fracture criterion obtained by long duration experiments to predict the conditions of cut surfaces in the fine blanking process. In this study, the clearance-dependent critical ductile fracture criteria obtained by the Cockcroft-Latham and Oyane criteria were used to reduce the time and cost of experiments to obtain the value of the critical fracture criterion. The Finite Element Method (FEM was applied to fine blanking processes to study the influences of process parameters such as the initial compression, the punch and die corner radii and the shape and size of the V-ring indenter on the length of the sheared surface. The effects of stress triaxiality and punch diameters on the cut surface produced by the fine blanking process are also discussed. The verified process parameters and tool geometry for obtaining a fully-fine sheared SPCC surface are described. The results showed that the accurate and stable prediction of ductile fracture initiation can be achieved using the Oyane criterion.

  4. In-situ SEM observation on fracture behavior of austempered silicon alloyed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Crack initiation, propagation and microfracture processes of austempered high silicon cast steel have been investigated by using an in-situ tensile stage installed inside a scanning electron microscope chamber. It is revealed that micro cracks always nucleate at the yielding near imperfections and the boundary of matrix-inclusions due to the stress concentration. There are four types of crack propagations in the matrix: crack propagates along the boundary of two clusters of bainitic ferrite; crack propagates along the boundary of ferrite朼ustenite in bainitic ferrite laths; crack propagates into bainitic ferrite laths; crack nucleates and propagates in the high carbon brittle plate shape martensite which is transformed from some blocky retained austenite due to plastic deformation. Based on the observation and analysis of microfracture processes, a schematic diagram of the crack nucleation and propagation process of high silicon cast steel is proposed

  5. Diminished bone strength is observed in adult women and men who sustained a mild trauma distal forearm fracture during childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Joshua N; Khosla, Sundeep; Achenbach, Sara J; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Kirmani, Salman; McCready, Louise K; Melton, L Joseph; Amin, Shreyasee

    2014-10-01

    Children and adolescents who sustain a distal forearm fracture (DFF) owing to mild, but not moderate, trauma have reduced bone strength and cortical thinning at the distal radius and tibia. Whether these skeletal deficits track into adulthood is unknown. Therefore, we studied 75 women and 75 men (age range, 20 to 40 years) with a childhood (age bicycle) had values similar to controls. Consistent findings were observed at the distal tibia. Furthermore, women and men with a mild trauma childhood DFF had significant deficits in distal radius cortical area (p < 0.05), and significantly lower dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-derived bone density at the radius, hip, and total body regions compared to controls (all p < 0.05). By contrast, women and men with a moderate trauma childhood DFF had bone density, structure, and strength that did not differ significantly from controls. These findings in young adults are consistent with our observations in children/adolescents with DFF, and they suggest that a mild trauma childhood DFF may presage suboptimal peak bone density, structure, and strength in young adulthood. Children and adolescents who suffer mild trauma DFFs may need to be targeted for lifestyle interventions to help achieve improved skeletal health. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  6. Impact of additional surface observation network on short range ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    has recently deployed a high-density network of. AWS over whole of India ... Weather with Observational Meso-Network and. Atmospheric Modeling .... of data assimilation in cyclic mode. In the cyclic data assimilation, model integrates forward in time and the information content propagates with the model flow. Advection of ...

  7. Short frontal plane fractures involving the dorsoproximal articular surface of the proximal phalanx: Description of the injury and a technique for repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, I M; Minshall, G J

    2018-01-01

    Chip fractures of the dorsoproximal articular margin of the proximal phalanx are common injuries in racehorses. Large fractures can extend distal to the joint capsule insertion and have been described as dorsal frontal fractures. To report the location and morphology of short frontal plane fractures involving the dorsoproximal articular surface of the proximal phalanx and describe a technique for repair under arthroscopic and radiographic guidance. Single centre retrospective case study. Case records of horses with frontal plane fractures restricted to the dorsoproximal epiphysis and metaphysis of the proximal phalanx referred to Newmarket Equine Hospital were retrieved, images reviewed and lesion morphology described. A technique for repair and the results obtained are reported. A total of 22 fractures in 21 horses commencing at the proximal articular surface exited the dorsal cortex of the proximal phalanx distal to the metacarpophalangeal/metatarsophalangeal joint capsule in 17 hind- and five forelimbs. All were in Thoroughbred racehorses. In 16 cases these were acute racing or training injuries; 20 fractures were medial, one lateral and one was midline. All were repaired with a single lag screw using arthroscopic and radiographically determined landmarks. A total of 16 horses raced after surgery with performance data similar to their preinjury levels. The study demonstrates substantial morphological similarities between individual lesions supporting a common pathophysiology, but does not identify precise causation. There are no cases managed differently that might permit assessment of the comparative efficacy of the treatment described. Short frontal plane fractures involving the dorsoproximal margin of the proximal phalanx that exit the bone distal to the metacarpophalangeal/metatarsophalangeal joint capsule have substantial morphological similarities, are amenable to minimally invasive repair and carry a good prognosis for return to training and racing.

  8. Soesterberg, Netherlands. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-07-13

    r____ 7__ C NE o4 2.6 2±2 ;d___ ___ 6.1 6.7 ENE 301 6.6 . .~___ ___ . E lei i.7 2.1 *7_ 9,g_ (,.s __ CESE 7 _ 2.2 lei .e____ _ _ 4.2 r,. 8 SE 60 i_ .5... MEC OBSOLETE -4- N, ~ - f* f*i7 NNE- UATA PRUCESSING BRANCH ETAC/USAF SURFACE WINDS 3 AIR wEATHER SERVICE/MAC PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND I DIRECTION...73 73 74 8-T 30/ 29 4. 3.9’ 62 62 70 66 23/ 2714.3 46j ~ 46 5-7 -- T 26f 25 2.6 .9, __ 1, _ 27_7_2 4 6 24/ 23 1.6 lei 20~ -20 23 4 2 22/ 211 ___9 7 7

  9. Observational Effects of Magnetism in O Stars: Surface Nitrogen Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, F.; Escolano, C.; Wade, G. A.; Donati, J. F.; Bouret, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Aims. We investigate the surface nitrogen content of the six magnetic O stars known to date as well as of the early B-type star Tau Sco.. We compare these abundances to predictions of evolutionary models to isolate the effects of magnetic field on the transport of elements in stellar interiors. Methods. We conduct a quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the ample stars with state-of-the-art atmosphere models. We rely on high signal-to-noise ratio, high resolution optical spectra obtained with ESPADONS at CFHT and NARVAL at TBL. Atmosphere models and synthetic spectra are computed with the code CMFGEN. Values of N/H together with their uncertainties are determined and compared to predictions of evolutionary models. Results. We find that the magnetic stars can be divided into two groups: one with stars displaying no N enrichment (one object); and one with stars most likely showing extra N enrichment (5 objects). For one star (Ori C) no robust conclusion can be drawn due to its young age. The star with no N enrichment is the one with the weakest magnetic field, possibly of dynamo origin. It might be a star having experienced strong magnetic braking under the condition of solid body rotation, but its rotational velocity is still relatively large. The five stars with high N content were probably slow rotators on the zero age main sequence, but they have surface N/H typical of normal O stars, indicating that the presence of a (probably fossil) magnetic field leads to extra enrichment. These stars may have a strong differential rotation inducing shear mixing. Our results shOuld be viewed as a basis on which new theoretical simulations can rely to better understand the effect of magnetism on the evolution of massive stars.

  10. Can a semi-automated surface matching and principal axis-based algorithm accurately quantify femoral shaft fracture alignment in six degrees of freedom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crookshank, Meghan C; Beek, Maarten; Singh, Devin; Schemitsch, Emil H; Whyne, Cari M

    2013-07-01

    Accurate alignment of femoral shaft fractures treated with intramedullary nailing remains a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. The aim of this study is to develop and validate a cone-beam CT-based, semi-automated algorithm to quantify the malalignment in six degrees of freedom (6DOF) using a surface matching and principal axes-based approach. Complex comminuted diaphyseal fractures were created in nine cadaveric femora and cone-beam CT images were acquired (27 cases total). Scans were cropped and segmented using intensity-based thresholding, producing superior, inferior and comminution volumes. Cylinders were fit to estimate the long axes of the superior and inferior fragments. The angle and distance between the two cylindrical axes were calculated to determine flexion/extension and varus/valgus angulation and medial/lateral and anterior/posterior translations, respectively. Both surfaces were unwrapped about the cylindrical axes. Three methods of matching the unwrapped surface for determination of periaxial rotation were compared based on minimizing the distance between features. The calculated corrections were compared to the input malalignment conditions. All 6DOF were calculated to within current clinical tolerances for all but two cases. This algorithm yielded accurate quantification of malalignment of femoral shaft fractures for fracture gaps up to 60 mm, based on a single CBCT image of the fractured limb. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Do thoraco-lumbar spinal injuries classification systems exhibit lower inter- and intra-observer agreement than other fractures classifications?: A comparison using fractures of the trochanteric area of the proximal femur as contrast model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Julio; Zamora, Tomas; Klaber, Ianiv; Carmona, Maximiliano; Palma, Joaquin; Campos, Mauricio; Yurac, Ratko

    2016-04-01

    It has been postulated that the complex patterns of spinal injuries have prevented adequate agreement using thoraco-lumbar spinal injuries (TLSI) classifications; however, limb fracture classifications have also shown variable agreements. This study compared agreement using two TLSI classifications with agreement using two classifications of fractures of the trochanteric area of the proximal femur (FTAPF). Six evaluators classified the radiographs and computed tomography scans of 70 patients with acute TLSI using the Denis and the new AO Spine thoraco-lumbar injury classifications. Additionally, six evaluators classified the radiographs of 70 patients with FTAPF using the Tronzo and the AO schemes. Six weeks later, all cases were presented in a random sequence for repeat assessment. The Kappa coefficient (κ) was used to determine agreement. Inter-observer agreement: For TLSI, using the AOSpine classification, the mean κ was 0.62 (0.57-0.66) considering fracture types, and 0.55 (0.52-0.57) considering sub-types; using the Denis classification, κ was 0.62 (0.59-0.65). For FTAPF, with the AO scheme, the mean κ was 0.58 (0.54-0.63) considering fracture types and 0.31 (0.28-0.33) considering sub-types; for the Tronzo classification, κ was 0.54 (0.50-0.57). Intra-observer agreement: For TLSI, using the AOSpine scheme, the mean κ was 0.77 (0.72-0.83) considering fracture types, and 0.71 (0.67-0.76) considering sub-types; for the Denis classification, κ was 0.76 (0.71-0.81). For FTAPF, with the AO scheme, the mean κ was 0.75 (0.69-0.81) considering fracture types and 0.45 (0.39-0.51) considering sub-types; for the Tronzo classification, κ was 0.64 (0.58-0.70). Using the main types of AO classifications, inter- and intra-observer agreement of TLSI were comparable to agreement evaluating FTAPF; including sub-types, inter- and intra-observer agreement evaluating TLSI were significantly better than assessing FTAPF. Inter- and intra-observer agreements using the Denis

  12. Reconstruction of cloud-free time series satellite observations of land surface temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghafarian Malamiri, H.R.; Menenti, M.; Jia, L.; den Ouden, H.

    2012-01-01

    Time series satellite observations of land surface properties, like Land Surface Temperature (LST), often feature missing data or data with anomalous values due to cloud coverage, malfunction of sensor, atmospheric aerosols, defective cloud masking and retrieval algorithms. Preprocessing procedures

  13. Summary of Meteorological Observations, Surface (SMOS), Imperial Beach, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    OBSERVATIONS) #!11’ IMPV’!AL B[ACH, CALIFORNIA 7Oct7-12 OCT STA~e " ATUM lM Tune MONTS ALL WEATHER 2CASS OSONS (L.0T..l~nM TAIIW IlmlceAU.IT.N~ MEAN...PSYCHROMETRIC SUMMARY Im f il ,it r, AI r ti. LektF L +NJ I A- 02 rc m ’A e L vrn seon" ItOW"il U aT I TmP6 WE V UM ATUM DIP01 (3) TOTAL TOTAL (F) 0 1

  14. Japan Fracture Observational Study (JFOS): patient characteristics and interim data on the use of daily teriparatide in Japanese patients with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soen, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Saeko; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Sato, Masayo; Tsujimoto, Mika; Yamamoto, Takanori; Enomoto, Hiroyuki; Krege, John H

    2015-01-01

    This report from the Japan Fracture Observational Study (JFOS) describes the design of the study, baseline characteristics of the patients, and interim results. This is an interim analysis from an ongoing observational study of male and female patients with osteoporosis initiating daily teriparatide treatment observed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. There was no control group. Baseline data were collected on demographic characteristics, medical and osteoporosis history, prior use of medications and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This interim analysis includes preliminary information concerning incidence of clinical fractures, bone mineral density (BMD), procollagen type 1 aminoterminal propeptide (P1NP), back pain, HRQoL, and adverse events. Baseline observations were completed for 1810 patients; 90.1% were female. Compared with osteoporotic patients treated with teriparatide in other observational studies, those in JFOS were older but had fewer osteoporosis risk factors. The incidence of clinical fractures was 2.9% at 6 months and 3.7% at 12 months. At 12 months, mean BMD was 8.9% higher at the lumbar spine and 0.8% higher at the total hip compared to baseline. At 6 months, the median serum concentration of P1NP was 187.7% higher than at baseline. At 12 months, back pain scores assessed by visual analog scale (VAS) were lower and HRQoL scores were higher than at baseline. No new safety signals were observed. This is the first report from an observational study of daily teriparatide in Japanese osteoporotic patients at high risk of fractures. Patients in JFOS were older but had fewer osteoporosis risk factors than those treated with teriparatide in other observational studies. The interim analysis suggests that the clinical profile of teriparatide in the real world is similar to that observed in clinical trials and observational studies conducted in Europe and the United States.

  15. Ozone time scale decomposition and trend assessment from surface observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boleti, Eirini; Hueglin, Christoph; Takahama, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    Emissions of ozone precursors have been regulated in Europe since around 1990 with control measures primarily targeting to industries and traffic. In order to understand how these measures have affected air quality, it is now important to investigate concentrations of tropospheric ozone in different types of environments, based on their NOx burden, and in different geographic regions. In this study, we analyze high quality data sets for Switzerland (NABEL network) and whole Europe (AirBase) for the last 25 years to calculate long-term trends of ozone concentrations. A sophisticated time scale decomposition method, called the Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) (Huang,1998;Wu,2009), is used for decomposition of the different time scales of the variation of ozone, namely the long-term trend, seasonal and short-term variability. This allows subtraction of the seasonal pattern of ozone from the observations and estimation of long-term changes of ozone concentrations with lower uncertainty ranges compared to typical methodologies used. We observe that, despite the implementation of regulations, for most of the measurement sites ozone daily mean values have been increasing until around mid-2000s. Afterwards, we observe a decline or a leveling off in the concentrations; certainly a late effect of limitations in ozone precursor emissions. On the other hand, the peak ozone concentrations have been decreasing for almost all regions. The evolution in the trend exhibits some differences between the different types of measurement. In addition, ozone is known to be strongly affected by meteorology. In the applied approach, some of the meteorological effects are already captured by the seasonal signal and already removed in the de-seasonalized ozone time series. For adjustment of the influence of meteorology on the higher frequency ozone variation, a statistical approach based on Generalized Additive Models (GAM) (Hastie,1990;Wood,2006), which corrects for meteorological

  16. Recent variations of cloudiness over Russia from surface daytime observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernokulsky, A V; Mokhov, I I; Bulygina, O N

    2011-01-01

    Changes of total and low cloud fraction and the occurrence of different cloud types over Russia were assessed. The analysis was based on visual observations from more than 1600 meteorological stations. Differences between the 2001-10 and 1991-2000 year ranges were evaluated. In general, cloud fraction has tended to increase during recent years. A major increase of total cloud fraction and a decrease of the number of days without clouds are revealed in spring and autumn mostly due to an increase of the occurrence of convective and non-precipitating stratiform clouds. In contrast, the occurrence of nimbostratus clouds has tended to decrease. In general, the ratio between the occurrence of cumulonimbus and nimbostratus clouds has increased for the period 2001-10 relative to 1991-2000. Over particular regions, a decrease of total cloud fraction and an increase of the number of days without clouds are noted.

  17. Land surface water cycles observed with satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Njoku, E. G.; Brakenridge, G. R.; Kim, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Acceleration of the global water cycle may lead to increased global precipitation, faster evaporation and a consequent exacerbation of hydrologic extreme. In the U.S. national assessment of the potential consequences of climate variability and change, two GCMs (CGCM1 and HadCM2) show a large increase in precipitation in the future over the southwestern U.S. particularly during winter (Felzer and Heard, 1999). Increased precipitation potentially has important impacts on agricultural and water use in the southeast U.S. (Hatch et al., 1999) and in the central Great Plains (Nielsen, 1997). A hurricane model predicts a 40% precipitation increase for severe hurricanes affecting southeastern Florida, which provokes substantially greater flooding that could negate most of the benefits of present water-management practices in this basin (Gutowski et al., 1994). Thus, it is important to observe the hydroclimate on a continuous longterm basis to address the question of increased precipitation in the enhanced water cycle.

  18. Imaging of surface wave phase velocities from array phase observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidle, Christian; Maupin, Valerie

    2010-05-01

    While temporary deployments some 10 years ago were largely based on short-period seismometers, the availability of broadband instruments in instrument pools increased strongly in recent years and as such modern temporary deployments for passive seismological recordings often consist to a large extent, if not exclusively, of broadband instruments. This opens for new analysis approaches as the broadband seismic wavefield is obtained at a relatively high spatial sampling relative to the wavelength. In an attempt to infer surface wave phase velocity anomalies beneath Southern Norway based on data from a temporary network of 41 broadband instruments, we present a new approach to overcome the limitations of two-station phase measurements (on the great circle with the source) and instead exploit the two-dimensional nature of the wavefield by taking into account phase measurements at all stations of the array from a single event. This is based on the assumption that the wavefield is at least piecewise linear within the study region. By triangulation of the network region and linear estimation of the phase gradient in each triangle we get without further a priori assumptions a coarse image of the phase velocity variations within our network. The image can be significantly refined for a single event recording by stacking multiple images based on arbitrary subsets of the available data. Phase velocity anomalies measured from single event recordings can be biased and blurred by non-plane arriving wavefield, reflections and diffractions of heterogeneities. Therefore, by averaging over velocity fields from different events with varying backazimuths, artefacts are reduced and the recovered image significantly improved. Another way to improve the recovered structures is to take into account the spatial variation of the amplitude field. However, while the phase between two neighboring stations may be (at least close to) linear, the amplitude may not, hence estimation of the second

  19. A 65--70 year oscillation in observed surface temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, M.E.; Ramankutty, N.

    1994-01-01

    There are three possible sources for the 65--70-year ''global'' oscillation: (1) random forcing of the ocean by the atmosphere, such as by white noise; (2) external oscillatory forcing of the climate system, such as by a variation in the solar irradiance; and (3) an internal oscillation of the atmosphere-ocean system. It is unlikely that putative variations in solar irradiance are the source of the oscillation because solar forcing should generate a global response, but the oscillation is not global. It is also unlikely that white-noise forcing is the source of the oscillation because such forcing should generate an oceanwide response, but the oscillation is not panoceanic. Consequently, the most probable cause of the oscillation is an internal oscillation of the atmosphere-ocean system. This conclusion is supported by a growing body of observational evidence and coupled atmosphere/ocean general circulation model simulation results. Comparison of the regional and global-mean temperature changes caused by the oscillation with those induced by GHG + ASA forcing shows that the rapid rise in global-mean temperature between about 1908 and 1946, and the subsequent reversal of this warming until about 1965 were the result of the oscillation. In the North Atlantic and North American regions, the domination of the GHG + ASA-induced warming by the oscillation has obscured and confounded detection of this warming

  20. Fracture strength of direct surface-retained fixed partial dentures : Effect of fiber reinforcement versus the use of particulate filler composites only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumbuloglu, Ovul; Ozcan, Mutlu; User, Atilla

    This study compared the fracture strengths and analyzed the failure types of direct, surface-retained, anterior fixed-partial-dentures (FPD), reinforced with four types of fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) versus non-fiber-reinforced FPDs made of three particulate filler composites (PFC). To this

  1. Fracture formation post impact on Enceladus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Kathleen; Roberts, James

    2017-10-01

    Saturn’s small icy moon Enceladus was observed by the Cassini mission to have jets of ice and vapor emanating from its southern polar terrain (SPT), creating a plume. The fact that the activity is only observed in one region has not been well explained. Hypotheses include a regional sea beneath the SPT or a global ocean that is thicker beneath the SPT, which feeds a group of fractures observed there called the tiger stripes. As Enceladus orbits Saturn, stresses acting on the moon may open and close the fractures enabling interior volatiles to escape and form the plume. Here we investigate how these fractures could have formed and the activity begun. We propose that an impact could have either punctured through or caused substantial melt and fracturing in an ice shell connecting to a liquid layer below. Our goal is to determine whether a formation of fractures resembling the tiger stripes could emerge post-impact.Previous work by Roberts and Stickle (LPSC 2017, #1955) modeled an impact into an ice shell over an ocean and calculated penetration depth and melt temperatures and volumes through the shell thickness. Fracturing would occur during and after the impact, the crater would collapse, water would begin to refreeze and subsequent fluid exchange would occur. Working forward from a point after impact and as the ice shell begins refreezing, we performed finite element modeling to simulate the probable formation of fractures based on the resulting stress regime. Here we explore fracture formation for shells ranging from 1 km to 5 km thick (consistent with gravity and libration studies), to explore formation as the shell cools and thickens through time. We emplaced several fractures, penetrating either entirely or partially across the base to surface. Fracture interactions, tidal stress forcing with orbital true anomalies and ocean water pressurization are considered free parameters in the model. We present results for a number of parameter value combinations and

  2. Some observations of the influence of δ-ferrite content on the hardness, galling resistance, and fracture toughness of selected commercially available iron-based hardfacing alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockeram, B. V.

    2002-11-01

    Iron-based weld hardfacing deposits are used to provide a wear-resistant surface for a structural base material. Iron-based hardfacing alloys that are resistant to corrosion in oxygenated aqueous environments contain high levels of chromium and carbon, which results in a dendritic microstructure with a high volume fraction of interdendrite carbides which provide the needed wear resistance. The ferrite content of the dendrites depends on the nickel content and base composition of the iron-based hardfacing alloy. The amount of ferrite in the dendrites is shown to have a significant influence on the hardness and galling wear resistance, as determined using ASTM G98 methods. Fracture-toughness ( K IC) testing in accordance with ASTM E399 methods was used to quantify the damage tolerance of various iron-based hardfacing alloys. Fractographic and microstructure examinations were used to determine the influence of microstructure on the wear resistance and fracture toughness of the iron-based hardfacing alloys. A crack-bridging toughening model was shown to describe the influence of ferrite content on the fracture toughness. A higher ferrite content in the dendrites of an iron-based hardfacing alloy reduces the tendency for plastic stretching and necking of the dendrites, which results in improved wear resistance, high hardness, and lower fracture-toughness values. A NOREM 02 hardfacing alloy has the most-optimum ferrite content, which results in the most-desired balance of galling resistance and high K IC values.

  3. Reactive surface organometallic complexes observed using dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Pump, Eva

    2016-08-15

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy (DNP SENS) is an emerging technique that allows access to high-sensitivity NMR spectra from surfaces. However, DNP SENS usually requires the use of radicals as an exogenous source of polarization, which has so far limited applications for organometallic surface species to those that do not react with the radicals. Here we show that reactive surface species can be studied if they are immobilized inside porous materials with suitably small windows, and if bulky nitroxide bi-radicals (here TEKPol) are used as the polarization source and which cannot enter the pores. The method is demonstrated by obtaining significant DNP enhancements from highly reactive complelxes [(equivalent to Si-O-)W(Me)(5)] supported on MCM-41, and effects of pore size (6.0, 3.0 and 2.5 nm) on the performance are discussed.

  4. Application of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to fracture studies of ferritic steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P A; Novovic, M; Randle, V; Bowen, P

    2002-03-01

    The application of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to fracture studies has provided a new method for investigating the crystallography of fracture surfaces. The crystallographic indices of cleavage planes can be measured both directly from the fracture surface and indirectly from metallographic sections perpendicular to the plane of the adjoining fracture surfaces. The results of direct individual cleavage facet plane orientation measurements are presented for carbon-manganese (C-Mn) and low-alloy Mn-Mo-Ni (similar to ASTM A553 type-B). Pressure vessel steel weld metals, obtained from fracture surfaces of Charpy impact test specimens fractured at various test temperatures and for an ultra-low carbon steel (Fe-0.002C- 0.058P) fractured at -196 degrees C by impact. In addition to the direct measurement from the fracture surface, cleavage facet orientation measurements for the ultra-low carbon steel were complemented by the results obtained from the metallographic sections. Fractographic observations revealed that cleavage fracture is accommodated by a microvoid coalescence fracture micromechanism, which was induced by decohesion of second phase particles (inclusions). The correlation between the direct and indirect methodologies shows that the cleavage facet planes are dominated by the [001] plane orientations, and indicated that even when information concerning the full five degrees of freedom is inaccessible, the cleavage facet plane could still be determined. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of direct orientation measurements from the fracture surface and indirectly by a destructive sectioning technique are discussed.

  5. Effects of multiple root canal usage on the surface topography and fracture of two different Ni-Ti rotary file systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jojo Kottoor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of multiple root canal usage on the surface topography and fracture of Twisted File (TF and ProTaper (PT rotary Ni-Ti file systems, using scanning electron microscope (SEM. Materials and Methods: Ten sets of PT and TF instruments were used to prepare the mesial canals of mandibular first molars. TF 25, 0.06 taper and PT F1 instruments were analyzed by SEM when new and thereafter every three root canal usages. This sequence was repeated for both the TF and PT groups until 12 uses. Two images of the instrument were recorded, one of the instrument tip and the other 5 mm from the tip, both at ×100 magnification. The sequential use was continued till the instrument fractured and the number of root canal usages for the file to fracture was noted. All fracture surfaces were examined under the SEM. Results: Fresh TF instruments showed no surface wear when compared to PT instruments (P 0.05, while at the 9 th usage TF showed a steep increase in the spiral distortion score when compared to PT (P < 0.05. PT instruments fractured at a mean root canal usage of 17.4, while TF instruments showed a mean root canal usage of 11.8. Fractographically, all the TF instruments failed due to torsion, while all the PT instruments failed because of cyclic fatigue. Conclusion: PT instruments showed more resistance to fracture than TF instruments.

  6. Wettability of quartz surface as observed by NMR transverse relaxation time (T2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Mohammad Monzurul; Katika, Konstantina; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    the wettability property of quartz surface by using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) method. The principle of this method is that protons in water relax faster when it comes close to solid surface. We observed that quart is highly water wet. A layer of water (bound water) forms on the quartz surface when...

  7. HI observations of low surface brightness galaxies : Probing low-density galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBlok, WJG; McGaugh, SS; vanderHulst, JM

    1996-01-01

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) 21-cm HI observations of 19 late-type low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Our main findings are that these galaxies, as well as having low surface brightnesses, have low HI surface densities, about a factor of

  8. Surface potential effects in low-energy current image diffraction patterns observed on the Al(001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine structure observed in high-resolution low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) measurements near the energy threshold for emergence of new beams has been attributed to surface barrier effects. Recently, the surface barrier has been suggested as the source of the fine structure observed in current image diffraction (CID) patterns obtained by rastering the primary beam across an Al(001) crystal surface at a constant energy. This suggestion was based on kinematic arguments which correlated the emergence angle for a new electron beam with the observed structure in the CID pattern. In this work, the angular dependence of the elastic component of the total crystal reflectivity is calculated at constant energy. The calculations are based on full dynamical theories such as used in LEED but incorporating different surface barrier models to account for the saturating image potential. The results are compared with the experimental CID results

  9. Microscopic observation of pattern attack by aggressive ions on finished surface of aluminium alloy sacrificial anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaifol Samsu; Muhammad Daud; Siti Radiah Mohd Kamarudin; Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Azali Muhammad; Mohd Shaari Ripin; Rusni Rejab; Mohd Shariff Sattar

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a microscopic observation on submerged finished surface of aluminium alloy sacrificial anode. Experimental tests were carried out on polished surface aluminium anode exposed to seawater containing aggressive ions in order to observe of pattern corrosion attack on corroding surface of anode. Results have shown, at least under the present testing condition, that surface of sacrificial anode were attack by an aggressive ion such as chloride along grain boundaries. In addition, results of microanalysis showed that the corrosion products on surface of aluminium alloy have Al, Zn and O element for all sample and within the pit was consists of Al, Zn, O and Cl element. (author)

  10. Use of Pressure-Redistributing Support Surfaces Among Elderly Hip Fracture Patients Across the Continuum of Care: Adherence to Pressure Ulcer Prevention Guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgarten, Mona; Margolis, David; Orwig, Denise; Hawkes, William; Rich, Shayna; Langenberg, Patricia; Shardell, Michelle; Palmer, Mary H.; McArdle, Patrick; Sterling, Robert; Jones, Patricia S.; Magaziner, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the frequency of use of pressure-redistributing support surfaces (PRSS) among hip fracture patients and to determine whether higher pressure ulcer risk is associated with greater PRSS use. Design and Methods: Patients (n = 658) aged ≥65 years who had surgery for hip fracture were examined by research nurses at baseline and on alternating days for 21 days. Information on PRSS use and pressure ulcer risk factors was recorded at each assessment visit. Other information was o...

  11. Fracture behaviour of P/M Cr-V ledeburitic steel with different surface roughness

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurči, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    -, č. 18 (2011), s. 36-43 ISSN 1335-0803 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1821 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : PM Cr-V ledeburitic steel * Microstructure * Surface roughness * Three point bending strength * Fractography Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy http://fstroj.uniza.sk/journal-mi/current.html

  12. Parathyroid hormone response to severe vitamin D deficiency is sex associated: an observational study of 571 hip fracture inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Monaco, M; Castiglioni, C; Vallero, F; Di Monaco, R; Tappero, R

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the association between sex and parathyroid hormone response to severe vitamin D deficiency after hip fracture. Cross-sectional study. Rehabilitation hospital in Italy. 571 consecutive inpatients with hip fracture and severe vitamin D deficiency (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D secondary hyperparathyroidism (serum PTH >75pg/ml) or functional hypoparathyroidism, i.e., inappropriate normal levels of PTH (≤75pg/ml). Among the 571 patients, 336 (59%) had functional hypoparathyroidism, whereas 235 (41%) had secondary hyperparathyroidism. PTH status was significantly different between sexes (p=0.003): we found functional hypoparathyroidism in 61% of women and 43% of men (secondary hyperparathyroidism in 39% of women and 57% of men). The significance of the between-sex difference was maintained after adjustment for age, estimated GFR, phosphate, albumin-adjusted total calcium, albumin, Barthel index scores, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and hip fracture type (either cervical or trochanteric). The adjusted odds ratio was 1.85 (95%CI from 1.09 to 3.13; p=0.023). Data shows that PTH response to vitamin D deficiency was sex-associated following a fracture of the hip. The higher prevalence of secondary hyperparathyroidism may play a role in the known prognostic disadvantage found in hip-fracture men.

  13. Effects of self-reported age at nonsurgical menopause on time to first fracture and bone mineral density in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Shannon D; Lehman, Amy; Thomas, Fridtjof; Johnson, Karen C; Jackson, Rebecca; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Ko, Marcia; Chen, Zhao; Curb, J David; Howard, Barbara V

    2015-10-01

    Menopause is a risk factor for fracture; thus, menopause age may affect bone mass and fracture rates. We compared bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture rates among healthy postmenopausal women with varying ages at self-reported nonsurgical menopause. We compared hazard ratios for fractures and differences in BMD among 21,711 postmenopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study cohort who had no prior hysterectomy, oophorectomy, or hormone therapy and had varying self-reported ages at menopause (menopause age groups. After multivariable adjustments for known risk factors for fracture, women who underwent menopause before age 40 years had a higher fracture risk at any site compared with women who underwent menopause at age 50 years or older (hazard ratio, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.44; P = 0.03). In a subset with BMD measurements (n = 1,351), whole-body BMD was lower in women who reported menopause before age 40 years than in women who reported menopause at ages 40 to 49 years (estimated difference, -0.034 g/cm; 95% CI, -0.07 to -0.004; P = 0.03) and women who reported menopause at age 50 years or older (estimated difference, -0.05 g/cm; 95% CI, -0.08 to -0.02; P menopause before age 40 years than in women who underwent menopause at age 50 years or older (estimated difference, -0.05 g/cm; 95% CI, -0.08 to -0.01; P = 0.01), and total spine BMD was lower in women who underwent menopause before age 40 years than in women who underwent menopause at age 50 years or older (estimated difference, -0.11 g/cm; 95% CI, -0.16 to -0.06; P menopause at ages 40 to 49 years (estimated difference, -0.09 g/cm; 95% CI, -0.15 to -0.04; P menopause may be a risk factor contributing to decreased BMD and increased fracture risk in healthy postmenopausal women. Our data suggest that menopause age should be taken into consideration, along with other osteoporotic risk factors, when estimating fracture risk in postmenopausal women.

  14. Application of elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics methods to surface flaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccabe, Donald E.; Ernst, Hugo A.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Fuel tanks that are a part of the External Tank assembly for the Space Shuttle are made of relatively thin 2219-T87 aluminum plate. These tanks contain about 917 m of fusion weld seam, all of which is nondestructively inspected for flaws and all those found are repaired. The tanks are subsequently proof-tested to a pressure that is sufficiently severe to cause weld metal yielding in a few local regions of the weld seam. The work undertaken in the present project was to develop a capability to predict flaw growth from undetected surface flaws that are assumed to be located in the highly stressed regions. The technical challenge was to develop R-curve prediction capability for surface cracks in specimens that contain the flaws of unusual sizes and shapes deemed to be of interest. The test techniques developed and the elastic-plastic analysis concepts adopted are presented. The flaws of interest were quite small surface cracks that were narrow-deep ellipses that served to exacerbate the technical difficulties involved.

  15. Application of elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics methods to surface flaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Donald E.; Ernst, Hugo A.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    Fuel tanks that are a part of the External Tank assembly for the Space Shuttle are made of relatively thin 2219-T87 aluminum plate. These tanks contain about 917 m of fusion weld seam, all of which is nondestructively inspected for flaws and all those found are repaired. The tanks are subsequently proof-tested to a pressure that is sufficiently severe to cause weld metal yielding in a few local regions of the weld seam. The work undertaken in the present project was to develop a capability to predict flaw growth from undetected surface flaws that are assumed to be located in the highly stressed regions. The technical challenge was to develop R-curve prediction capability for surface cracks in specimens that contain the flaws of unusual sizes and shapes deemed to be of interest. The test techniques developed and the elastic-plastic analysis concepts adopted are presented. The flaws of interest were quite small surface cracks that were narrow-deep ellipses that served to exacerbate the technical difficulties involved.

  16. Direct Observation of Domain-Wall Surface Tension by Deflating or Inflating a Magnetic Bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueying; Vernier, Nicolas; Zhao, Weisheng; Yu, Haiming; Vila, Laurent; Zhang, Yue; Ravelosona, Dafiné

    2018-02-01

    The surface energy of a magnetic domain wall (DW) strongly affects its static and dynamic behaviors. However, this effect is seldom directly observed, and some of the related phenomena are not well understood. Moreover, a reliable method to quantify the DW surface energy is still absent. Here, we report a series of experiments in which the DW surface energy becomes a dominant parameter. We observe that a semicircular magnetic domain bubble can spontaneously collapse under the Laplace pressure induced by DW surface energy. We further demonstrate that the surface energy can lead to a geometrically induced pinning when the DW propagates in a Hall cross or from a nanowire into a nucleation pad. Based on these observations, we develop two methods to quantify the DW surface energy, which can be very helpful in the estimation of intrinsic parameters such as Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions or exchange stiffness in magnetic ultrathin films.

  17. Emergence of Anomalous Transport in Stressed Rough Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, P. K.; Brown, S.; Alves da Silva, J.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid flow and tracer transport in fractured rock controls many natural and engineered processes in the geosciences, and therefore has been extensively studied. Geologic fractures, however, are always under significant overburden stress. While confining stress has been shown to impact fluid flow through rough-walled fractures in a fundamental way, studies of anomalous tracer transport at the scale of individual fractures have so far ignored the potential role of confining stress.Here, we report the emergence of anomalous (non-Fickian) transport through a rough-walled fracture as a result of increasing the normal stress on the fracture. We generate fracture surfaces with fractal roughness, and solve the elastic contact problem between the two surfaces to obtain the 3D fracture geometry for increasing levels of normal stress. We then simulate fluid flow and particle transport through the stressed rough fracture. We observe a transition from Fickian to anomalous transport as the normal stress on the fracture increases.We show that the origin of this anomalous transport behavior can be traced to the self-organization of the flow field into a heterogeneous structure dominated by preferential channels and stagnation zones, as a result of the larger number of contacts in a highly stressed fracture. We also propose a spatial Markov model that reproduces the transport behavior at the scale of the entire fracture with only three physical parameters. Our results point to a heretofore unrecognized link between geomechanics and anomalous particle transport in fractured media. Finally, we show preliminary laboratory experiment results that confirm our findings. (a) Magnitude of the volumetric flux at each discretization grid block at low stress. (b) Magnitude of the volumetric flux for a highly stressed fracture. Values are normalized with the mean volumetric flux.

  18. Homogenizing Surface and Satellite Observations of Cloud. Aspects of Bias in Surface Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-10

    configuration, as well as the experience, location and procedure adopted by the observer. Where the clouds exhibit vertical development the observer includes the...Australasia which was thus removed from the list of analysis areas. 2.4 Discuuios of Ressite Figures 3 to 6 illustrate diurnal plots of the frequency of...a small group of stations may be expected to exhibit more marked variability compaed to the mean result for a larger number of stations. Figure 7 to

  19. Standard practice for fracture testing with surface-crack tension specimens

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the design, preparation, and testing of surface-crack tension (SCT) specimens. It relates specifically to testing under continuously increasing force and excludes cyclic and sustained loadings. The quantity determined is the residual strength of a specimen having a semielliptical or circular-segment fatigue crack in one surface. This value depends on the crack dimensions and the specimen thickness as well as the characteristics of the material. 1.2 Metallic materials that can be tested are not limited by strength, thickness, or toughness. However, tests of thick specimens of tough materials may require a tension test machine of extremely high capacity. The applicability of this practice to nonmetallic materials has not been determined. 1.3 This practice is limited to specimens having a uniform rectangular cross section in the test section. The test section width and length must be large with respect to the crack length. Crack depth and length should be chosen to suit the ultimate pu...

  20. [Observation of osteoclasts on the root surface during human deciduous teeth resorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiang-jun; Liang, Xing; Chen, Ming; Wang, Hang; Xie, Zhi-gang; Yang, Xiao-yu

    2004-08-01

    To observe osteoclasts on the resorbing surface of human deciduous teeth. After fixing the collected deciduous teeth, we prepared the tooth slices without decalcification, treated them with HE and TRAP dyestuff, and observed the osteoclasts under light and scanning electron microscope. There were large quantity of various forms of overlapping and huge osteoclasts with many nuclei and silk-like protuberances on the resorbing surface of deciduous teeth. The multinucleated osteoclasts align on the surface of coarse dentin. On the resorbing surface of human deciduous teeth there are large amount of osteoclasts which can be used as a source of studying human osteoclast.

  1. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis of a pressure vessel with an axial outer surface flaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurich, D.

    1988-04-01

    Elastic-plastic finite element analyses of a test vessel (steel 1.6310=20 MnMoNi 55) with a semi-elliptical axial outer surface crack have been performed. The variations of J and CTOD along the crack front and the stresse state in the vicinity of the crack are presented. The applicability of approaches to determine J is examined. The FE results are compared with the experimental data. The results are analyzed with respect to the validity of J-controlled crack growth. It will be shown that the local ductile crack growth and, especially, the 'canoe effect' for a semi-elliptical crack can only be described correctly if local J R -curves are used which account for the varying triaxiality of the stress state along the crack front. (orig./HP) [de

  2. On-Site Radon Detection of Mining-induced Fractures from Overlying Strata to the Surface: A Case Study of the Baoshan Coal Mine in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale longwall mining of shallow coal seams may cause mining-induced fractures that can project completely through to the surface. This could lead to a series of mine safety and environmental issues, further deteriorating the already fragile ecological environment in the Western mining areas in China. Therefore, an accurate and effective understanding of the spatiotemporal evolution law of mining-induced fractures in overlying strata and its relationship to upper aquifers is critical. In this paper, the application of the geophysical-chemical properties of radon in mining engineering is explored as a potential solution to the shortcomings of existing surveying methods. A radioactive measurement method is proposed for the detection of the development of mining-induced fractures from overlying strata to the surface in the Baoshan Coal Mine (BCM. The on-site test indicated that the first weighting step is approximately 60 m, the average periodic weighting step is approximately 20 m, and the influence coverage of the advanced abutment pressure is approximately 30 m. The presented method could be used as an indirect technical support to increase the safety of coal mining by acting as a simple, fast, and reliable method of detecting mining-induced fractures in overlying strata.

  3. Splinting of Longitudinal Fracture: An Innovative Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Bansal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma may result in craze lines on the enamel surface, one or more fractured cusps of posterior teeth, cracked tooth syndrome, splitting of posterior teeth, and vertical fracture of root. Out of these, management of some fractures is of great challenge and such teeth are generally recommended for extraction. Literature search reveals attempts to manage such fractures by full cast crown, orthodontic wires, and so forth, in which consideration was given to extracoronal splinting only. However, due to advancement in materials and technologies, intracoronal splinting can be achieved as well. In this case report, longitudinal fractures in tooth #27, tooth #37, and tooth #46 had occurred. In #27, fracture line was running mesiodistally involving the pulpal floor resulting in a split tooth. In teeth 37 and 46, fractures of the mesiobuccal cusp and mesiolingual cusp were observed, respectively. They were restored with cast gold inlay and full cast crown, respectively. Longitudinal fracture of 27 was treated with an innovative approach using intracanal reinforced composite with Ribbond, external reinforcement with an orthodontic band, and full cast metal crown to splint the split tooth.

  4. Splinting of Longitudinal Fracture: An Innovative Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Rashmi; Chowdhary, Priyanka; Gurtu, Anuraag; Mehrotra, Nakul; Kishore, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Trauma may result in craze lines on the enamel surface, one or more fractured cusps of posterior teeth, cracked tooth syndrome, splitting of posterior teeth, and vertical fracture of root. Out of these, management of some fractures is of great challenge and such teeth are generally recommended for extraction. Literature search reveals attempts to manage such fractures by full cast crown, orthodontic wires, and so forth, in which consideration was given to extracoronal splinting only. However, due to advancement in materials and technologies, intracoronal splinting can be achieved as well. In this case report, longitudinal fractures in tooth #27, tooth #37, and tooth #46 had occurred. In #27, fracture line was running mesiodistally involving the pulpal floor resulting in a split tooth. In teeth 37 and 46, fractures of the mesiobuccal cusp and mesiolingual cusp were observed, respectively. They were restored with cast gold inlay and full cast crown, respectively. Longitudinal fracture of 27 was treated with an innovative approach using intracanal reinforced composite with Ribbond, external reinforcement with an orthodontic band, and full cast metal crown to splint the split tooth.

  5. Splinting of Longitudinal Fracture: An Innovative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Rashmi; Chowdhary, Priyanka; Gurtu, Anuraag; Mehrotra, Nakul; Kishore, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Trauma may result in craze lines on the enamel surface, one or more fractured cusps of posterior teeth, cracked tooth syndrome, splitting of posterior teeth, and vertical fracture of root. Out of these, management of some fractures is of great challenge and such teeth are generally recommended for extraction. Literature search reveals attempts to manage such fractures by full cast crown, orthodontic wires, and so forth, in which consideration was given to extracoronal splinting only. However, due to advancement in materials and technologies, intracoronal splinting can be achieved as well. In this case report, longitudinal fractures in tooth #27, tooth #37, and tooth #46 had occurred. In #27, fracture line was running mesiodistally involving the pulpal floor resulting in a split tooth. In teeth 37 and 46, fractures of the mesiobuccal cusp and mesiolingual cusp were observed, respectively. They were restored with cast gold inlay and full cast crown, respectively. Longitudinal fracture of 27 was treated with an innovative approach using intracanal reinforced composite with Ribbond, external reinforcement with an orthodontic band, and full cast metal crown to splint the split tooth. PMID:27247808

  6. Pisiform malalignment associated with distal radius fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Takafumi; Zenke, Yukichi; Yamanaka, Yoshiaki; Menuki, Kunitaka; Sakai, Akinori

    2018-03-01

    The association of scaphoid or other carpal bone fractures with distal radius fractures is frequently reported, whereas few studies have described pisiform malalignment associated with distal radius fractures. The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency and characteristics of pisiform malalignment associated with distal radius fractures. We performed a retrospective study by reviewing the data of 152 consecutive patients with a mean age of 63 years who were treated surgically for distal radius fractures during a five-year period. We evaluated the pisotriquetral joint via preoperative sagittal computed tomography (CT) and assessed pisiform malalignment. Pisiform malalignment was defined as follows: (1) wide type, joint space ≥4.0 mm; (2) non-parallel type, loss of parallelism of the joint surface of ≥20°; or (3) overriding type, proximal or distal overriding of the pisotriquetral joint ≥2.0 mm. We investigated the relationship between pisiform malalignment and the patterns of distal radius fractures. Pisiform malalignment was assessed using postoperative CT to determine whether it had been reduced. Pisiform malalignment was observed in 48 cases involving 44 patients with a mean age of 58 (17-81) years. The patients included 16, 17, and 15 cases of the wide type, non-parallel type, and overriding type, respectively. Distal radius fractures with dorsal displacement exhibited pisiform malalignment significantly more frequently than those with volar displacement. No significant difference was noted between intra- and extra-articular fractures or between patients with and without distal ulnar fractures. Among the 22 pisiform malalignment cases assessed via postoperative CT, 15 cases were reduced, and 7 cases remained malaligned. The non-parallel type exhibited the lowest reduction rate among the 3 types. Among distal radius fractures, 29% were complicated by pisiform malalignment. Distal radius fractures with dorsal displacement exhibited a

  7. Hip fracture risk in relation to vitamin D supplementation and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials and observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roddam Andrew W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin D supplementation for fracture prevention is widespread despite conflicting interpretation of relevant randomised controlled trial (RCT evidence. This study summarises quantitatively the current evidence from RCTs and observational studies regarding vitamin D, parathyroid hormone (PTH and hip fracture risk. Methods We undertook separate meta-analyses of RCTs examining vitamin D supplementation and hip fracture, and observational studies of serum vitamin D status (25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD level, PTH and hip fracture. Results from RCTs were combined using the reported hazard ratios/relative risks (RR. Results from case-control studies were combined using the ratio of 25(OHD and PTH measurements of hip fracture cases compared with controls. Original published studies of vitamin D, PTH and hip fracture were identified through PubMed and Web of Science databases, searches of reference lists and forward citations of key papers. Results The seven eligible RCTs identified showed no significant difference in hip fracture risk in those randomised to cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol supplementation versus placebo/control (RR = 1.13[95%CI 0.98-1.29]; 801 cases, with no significant difference between trials of 21 (heterogeneity = 51.02, p 216 (heterogeneity = 137.9, p 29 (heterogeneity = 149.68, p Conclusions Neither higher nor lower dose vitamin D supplementation prevented hip fracture. Randomised and observational data on vitamin D and hip fracture appear to differ. The reason for this is unclear; one possible explanation is uncontrolled confounding in observational studies. Post-fracture PTH levels are unrelated to hip fracture risk.

  8. Impact of Assimilating Surface Velocity Observations on the Model Sea Surface Height Using the NCOM-4DVAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-26

    surface velocity observations available in 15-min intervals for each drifter. The observations are given an error standard deviation value of 0.02m s21... Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 The public reporting... statistical analysis is done by not only examining the SSH forecast error across the entire do- main, but also by concentrating on the areamost densely covered

  9. Fracture in Soft Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole

    Fracture is a phenomenon that is generally associated with solids. A key element in fracture theory is the so-called weakest link idea that fracture initiates from the largest pre-existing material imperfection. However, recent work has demonstrated that fracture can also happen in liquids, where...... surface tension will act to suppress such imperfections. Therefore, the weakest link idea does not seem immediately applicable to fracture in liquids. This presentation will review fracture in liquids and argue that fracture in soft liquids is a material property independent of pre-existing imperfections....... The following questions then emerge: What is the material description needed to predict crack initiation, crack speed and crack shape in soft materials and liquids....

  10. Greenland surface mass-balance observations from the ice-sheet ablation area and local glaciers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machguth, Horst; Thomsen, Henrik H.; Weidick, Anker

    2016-01-01

    Glacier surface mass-balance measurements on Greenland started more than a century ago, but no compilation exists of the observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. Such data could be used in the evaluation of modelled surface mass balance, or to document changes in g...

  11. Direct observation of surface reconstruction and termination on a complex metal oxide catalyst by electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2012-03-19

    On the surface: The surface reconstruction of an MoVTeO complex metal oxide catalyst was observed directly by various electron microscopic techniques and the results explain the puzzling catalytic behavior. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Greenland surface mass-balance observations from the ice-sheet ablation area and local glaciers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machguth, Horst; Thomsen, Henrik H.; Weidick, Anker; Ahlstrøm, Andreas P.; Abermann, Jakob; Andersen, Morten L.; Andersen, Signe B.; Bjørk, Anders A.; Box, Jason E.; Braithwaite, Roger J.; Bøggild, Carl E.; Citterio, Michele; Clement, Poul; Colgan, William; Fausto, Robert S.; Gleie, Karin; Gubler, Stefanie; Hasholt, Bent; Hynek, Bernhard; Knudsen, Niels T.; Larsen, Signe H.; Mernild, Sebastian H.; Oerlemans, Johannes; Oerter, Hans; Olesen, Ole B.; Smeets, C. J P Paul; Steffen, Konrad; Stober, Manfred; Sugiyama, Shin; Van As, Dirk; Van Den Broeke, Michiel R.; Van De Wal, Roderik S W

    2016-01-01

    Glacier surface mass-balance measurements on Greenland started more than a century ago, but no compilation exists of the observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. Such data could be used in the evaluation of modelled surface mass balance, or to document changes in

  13. Mapping Surface Broadband Albedo from Satellite Observations: A Review of Literatures on Algorithms and Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface albedo is one of the key controlling geophysical parameters in the surface energy budget studies, and its temporal and spatial variation is closely related to the global climate change and regional weather system due to the albedo feedback mechanism. As an efficient tool for monitoring the surfaces of the Earth, remote sensing is widely used for deriving long-term surface broadband albedo with various geostationary and polar-orbit satellite platforms in recent decades. Moreover, the algorithms for estimating surface broadband albedo from satellite observations, including narrow-to-broadband conversions, bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF angular modeling, direct-estimation algorithm and the algorithms for estimating albedo from geostationary satellite data, are developed and improved. In this paper, we present a comprehensive literature review on algorithms and products for mapping surface broadband albedo with satellite observations and provide a discussion of different algorithms and products in a historical perspective based on citation analysis of the published literature. This paper shows that the observation technologies and accuracy requirement of applications are important, and long-term, global fully-covered (including land, ocean, and sea-ice surfaces, gap-free, surface broadband albedo products with higher spatial and temporal resolution are required for climate change, surface energy budget, and hydrological studies.

  14. The impact of land surface temperature on soil moisture anomaly detection from passive microwave observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Parinussa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available For several years passive microwave observations have been used to retrieve soil moisture from the Earth's surface. Low frequency observations have the most sensitivity to soil moisture, therefore the current Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS and future Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP satellite missions observe the Earth's surface in the L-band frequency. In the past, several satellite sensors such as the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E and WindSat have been used to retrieve surface soil moisture using multi-channel observations obtained at higher microwave frequencies. While AMSR-E and WindSat lack an L-band channel, they are able to leverage multi-channel microwave observations to estimate additional land surface parameters. In particular, the availability of Ka-band observations allows AMSR-E and WindSat to obtain coincident surface temperature estimates required for the retrieval of surface soil moisture. In contrast, SMOS and SMAP carry only a single frequency radiometer and therefore lack an instrument suited to estimate the physical temperature of the Earth. Instead, soil moisture algorithms from these new generation satellites rely on ancillary sources of surface temperature (e.g. re-analysis or near real time data from weather prediction centres. A consequence of relying on such ancillary data is the need for temporal and spatial interpolation, which may introduce uncertainties. Here, two newly-developed, large-scale soil moisture evaluation techniques, the triple collocation (TC approach and the Rvalue data assimilation approach, are applied to quantify the global-scale impact of replacing Ka-band based surface temperature retrievals with Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA surface temperature output on the accuracy of WindSat and AMSR-E based surface soil moisture retrievals. Results demonstrate that under sparsely vegetated conditions, the use of

  15. Observation on Surface Change of Fragile Glass: Temperature - Time Dependence Studied by X-Ray Reflectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikkawa, Hiroyuki; Kitahara, Amane; Takahashi, Isao

    2004-01-01

    The structural change of a fragile glass surface close to the glass transition temperature Tg is studied by using X-ray reflectivity. Measurements were performed on surfaces of maltitol, which is a typical polyalcohol fragile glass with Tg = 320K. Upon both heating and cooling, we find the following features which are also noticed in silicate glass surfaces: (i) On heating, the surface morphology indicates a variation at temperatures below Tg; (ii) A drastic increase in surface roughness occurs at a temperature about 333K on heating, which is 13K higher than Tg; (iii) During the cooling of the sample, formation of a low-density surface layer (3nm at 293K) is observed. Prior to the crystallization, nm - μm sized domains were grown at the surface, which might not be reported for other glasses

  16. X-ray dynamic observation of the evolution of the fracture process zone in a quasi-brittle specimen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumpová, Ivana; Fíla, Tomáš; Vavřík, Daniel; Keršner, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 8 (2015), C08004 ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MK(CZ) DF11P01OVV001 Keywords : inspection with x- rays * detection of defects * fracture Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 1.310, year: 2015 http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-0221/10/08/C08004/pdf/1748-0221_10_08_C08004.pdf

  17. Creep fracture mechanics parameters for internal axial surface cracks in pressurized cylinders and creep crack growth analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Jianfeng; Tu Shantung; Gong Jianming; Sun Wei

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, a low alloy Cr-Mo steel cylinder subjected to internal pressure at high temperature with a semi-elliptical crack located at the inner surface is considered. The creep crack driving force parameter C*-integrals calculated by finite element (FE) method, are compared with results from previous studies, which indicates that empirical equations may be inaccurate under some conditions. A total of 96 cases for wide practical ranges of geometry and material parameters are performed to obtain systematic FE results of C*-integral, which are tabulated and formulated in this paper. It is observed that the maximum C*-integral may occur neither at the deepest point nor at the surface point when the aspect ratio is large enough and the value of C*-integral is significantly sensitive to the crack depth ratio. Furthermore, based on the proposed equations for estimating C*-integrals and a step-by-step analysis procedure, crack profile development, crack depth, crack length and remaining life prediction are obtained for surface cracks with various initial aspect ratios. It is found that when the crack depth ratio is increased, there is no obvious convergence of crack aspect ratio observed. The magnitude of half crack length increment is always minor compared with the crack depth increment. In addition, the remaining life is much more dependent on the surface crack depth than on the surface crack length. - Highlights: → Existing empirical equations of C*-integral for surface cracks may be inaccurate. → Systematic FE results of C*-integral from 96 cases are tabulated and formulated. → Maximum C*-integral may not occur at deepest/surface point if a/c is large enough. → The value of C*-integral is significantly sensitive to the crack depth ratio. → Crack profile development, crack size and remaining life prediction are obtained.

  18. Observation of modified radiative properties of cold atoms in vacuum near a dielectric surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V V; Cornelussen, R A; Heuvell, H B van Linden van den; Spreeuw, R J C

    2004-01-01

    We have observed a distance-dependent absorption linewidth of cold 87 Rb atoms close to a dielectric-vacuum interface. This is the first observation of modified radiative properties in vacuum near a dielectric surface. A cloud of cold atoms was created using a magneto-optical trap (MOT) and optical molasses cooling. Evanescent waves (EW) were used to observe the behaviour of the atoms near the surface. We observed an increase of the absorption linewidth by up to 25% with respect to the free-space value. Approximately half the broadening can be explained by cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) as an increase of the natural linewidth and inhomogeneous broadening. The remainder we attribute to local Stark shifts near the surface. By varying the characteristic EW length we have observed a distance dependence characteristic for CQED

  19. Rapid imbibition of water in fractures within unsaturated sedimentary rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C.-L.; Perfect, E.; Donnelly, B.; Bilheux, H. Z.; Tremsin, A. S.; McKay, L. D.; DiStefano, V. H.; Cai, J. C.; Santodonato, L. J.

    2015-03-01

    The spontaneous imbibition of water and other liquids into gas-filled fractures in variably-saturated porous media is important in a variety of engineering and geological contexts. However, surprisingly few studies have investigated this phenomenon. We present a theoretical framework for predicting the 1-dimensional movement of water into air-filled fractures within a porous medium based on early-time capillary dynamics and spreading over the rough surfaces of fracture faces. The theory permits estimation of sorptivity values for the matrix and fracture zone, as well as a dispersion parameter which quantifies the extent of spreading of the wetting front. Quantitative data on spontaneous imbibition of water in unsaturated Berea sandstone cores were acquired to evaluate the proposed model. The cores with different permeability classes ranging from 50 to 500 mD and were fractured using the Brazilian method. Spontaneous imbibition in the fractured cores was measured by dynamic neutron radiography at the Neutron Imaging Prototype Facility (beam line CG-1D, HFIR), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Water uptake into both the matrix and the fracture zone exhibited square-root-of-time behavior. The matrix sorptivities ranged from 2.9 to 4.6 mm s-0.5, and increased linearly as the permeability class increased. The sorptivities of the fracture zones ranged from 17.9 to 27.1 mm s-0.5, and increased linearly with increasing fracture aperture width. The dispersion coefficients ranged from 23.7 to 66.7 mm2 s-1 and increased linearly with increasing fracture aperture width and damage zone width. Both theory and observations indicate that fractures can significantly increase spontaneous imbibition in unsaturated sedimentary rock by capillary action and surface spreading on rough fracture faces. Fractures also increase the dispersion of the wetting front. Further research is needed to investigate this phenomenon in other natural and engineered porous media.

  20. Inter and intra-observer agreement evaluation of the AO and the Tronzo classification systems of fractures of the trochanteric area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Julio; Zamora, Tomas; Besa, Pablo; Zamora, Maximiliano; Schweitzer, Daniel; Klaber, Ianiv

    2015-01-01

    We performed an agreement study of the AO and the Tronzo classifications of fractures of the trochanteric area to determine if they allow communication among practitioners with different levels of expertise. Complete radiographs of 70 patients with trochanteric fractures were classified by nine evaluators (three hip sub-specialists, three orthopaedic surgery residents and three medical interns) using the AO and the Tronzo classifications. After a six-week interval, all cases were presented in a random sequence for repeat evaluation. The Kappa coefficient (k) was used to determine inter- and intra-observer agreement. Inter-observer: considering the main AO fracture types, the agreement was moderate for sub-specialists (k = 0.60 [0.50-0.70]), residents (k = 0.58 [0.48-0.69]) and medical interns (k = 0.56 [0.45-0.69]). Using AO sub-types, all groups achieved fair agreement (sub-specialists: k = 0.31 [0.25-0.38]; residents: k = 0.32 [0.26-0.38]; medical interns: k = 0.30 [0.24-0.36]). For the Tronzo classification, sub-specialists (k = 0.56 [0.48-0.65]) and residents (k = 0.47 [0.39-0.55]) obtained moderate agreement; medical interns reached fair agreement (k = 0.33 [0.25-0.41]). Intra-observer: considering the main AO fracture types, sub-specialists (k = 0.79 [0.69-0.89]), residents (k = 0.71 [0.60-0.81]) and medical interns (k = 0.70 [0.59-0.82]) obtained substantial agreement. Considering AO sub-types, sub-specialists (k = 0.50 [0.45-0.56]) and medical interns (k = 0.54 [0.48-0.69]) achieved moderate agreement; residents (k = 0.39 [0.33-0.45]) achieved fair agreement. Using the Tronzo classification, all groups obtained substantial agreement (sub-specialists: k = 0.66 [0.58-0.74]; residents: k = 0.63 [0.55-0.71]; medical interns: k = 0.68 [0.60-0.76]). The AO classification allows an adequate communication when considering the main fracture types; the agreement within sub-types is not satisfactory. The Tronzo classification does not allow reliable communication

  1. Advancing land surface model development with satellite-based Earth observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Rene; Dutra, Emanuel; Trigo, Isabel F.; Balsamo, Gianpaolo

    2017-05-01

    The land surface forms an essential part of the climate system. It interacts with the atmosphere through the exchange of water and energy and hence influences weather and climate, as well as their predictability. Correspondingly, the land surface model (LSM) is an essential part of any weather forecasting system. LSMs rely on partly poorly constrained parameters, due to sparse land surface observations. With the use of newly available land surface temperature observations, we show in this study that novel satellite-derived datasets help improve LSM configuration, and hence can contribute to improved weather predictability. We use the Hydrology Tiled ECMWF Scheme of Surface Exchanges over Land (HTESSEL) and validate it comprehensively against an array of Earth observation reference datasets, including the new land surface temperature product. This reveals satisfactory model performance in terms of hydrology but poor performance in terms of land surface temperature. This is due to inconsistencies of process representations in the model as identified from an analysis of perturbed parameter simulations. We show that HTESSEL can be more robustly calibrated with multiple instead of single reference datasets as this mitigates the impact of the structural inconsistencies. Finally, performing coupled global weather forecasts, we find that a more robust calibration of HTESSEL also contributes to improved weather forecast skills. In summary, new satellite-based Earth observations are shown to enhance the multi-dataset calibration of LSMs, thereby improving the representation of insufficiently captured processes, advancing weather predictability, and understanding of climate system feedbacks.

  2. Greenland surface mass-balance observations from the ice-sheet ablation area and local glaciers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machguth, Horst; Thomsen, Henrik H.; Weidick, Anker

    2016-01-01

    Glacier surface mass-balance measurements on Greenland started more than a century ago, but no compilation exists of the observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. Such data could be used in the evaluation of modelled surface mass balance, or to document changes...... in glacier melt independently from model output. Here, we present a comprehensive database of Greenland glacier surface mass-balance observations from the ablation area of the ice sheet and local glaciers. The database spans the 123 a from 1892 to 2015, contains a total of similar to 3000 measurements from......-term time series of which there are only two exceeding 20 a. We use the data to analyse uncertainties in point measurements of surface mass balance, as well as to estimate surface mass-balance profiles for most regions of Greenland....

  3. Retrieval of Compositional End-Members From Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity Observations in a Soil-Filled Fracture in Marathon Valley, Endeavour Crater Rim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, N. T.; Arvidson, R. E.; O'Sullivan, J. A.; Catalano, J. G.; Guinness, E. A.; Politte, D. V.; Gellert, R.; VanBommel, S. J.

    2018-01-01

    The Opportunity rover investigated a gentle swale on the rim of Endeavour crater called Marathon Valley where a series of bright planar outcrops are cut into polygons by fractures. A wheel scuff performed on one of the soil-filled fracture zones revealed the presence of three end-members identified on the basis of Pancam multispectral imaging observations covering 0.4 to 1 μm: red and dark pebbles, and a bright soil clod. Multiple overlapping Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) measurements were collected on three targets within the scuff zone. The field of view of each APXS measurement contained various proportions of the Pancam-based end-members. Application of a log maximum likelihood method for retrieving the composition of the end-members using the 10 APXS measurements shows that the dark pebble end-member is compositionally similar to average Mars soil, with slightly elevated S and Fe. In contrast, the red pebble end-member exhibits enrichments in Al and Si and is depleted in Fe and Mg relative to average Mars soil. The soil clod end-member is enriched in Mg, S, and Ni. Thermodynamic modeling of the soil clod end-member composition indicates a dominance of sulfate minerals. We hypothesize that acidic fluids in fractures leached and oxidized the basaltic host rock, forming the red pebbles, and then evaporated to leave behind sulfate-cemented soil.

  4. Effect of minodronate on the speed of sound of the calcaneus in postmenopausal women with an increased risk of fractures: A clinical practice-based observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Jun; Takada, Tetsuya

    2015-10-01

    We previously reported that alendronate and risedronate reduce the urinary levels of cross-linked N-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (NTX) by 44.9% and 34.7%, respectively, at 3 months after the start of treatment, and increase the speed of sound (SOS) of the calcaneus by 0.6% and 0.65%, respectively, at 12 months after the start of treatment in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. The aim of the present clinical practice-based observational study was to examine the effect of treatment with minodronate for 12 months on the SOS of the calcaneus and on bone turnover markers in postmenopausal women with an increased risk of fractures. Forty-two postmenopausal women with osteoporosis or osteopenia with a clinical risk factor for fractures who had been treated with minodronate for > 12 months were enrolled in the study. The SOS and bone turnover markers were monitored during treatment with minodronate for 12 months. Compared to their baseline values, the urinary levels of NTX at 3 months and the serum levels of alkaline phosphatase at 12 months were significantly decreased at 47.5% and 25.8%, respectively. At 12 months, the SOS increased modestly, but significantly, by 0.47%, compared to the baseline value. The present study confirmed that minodronate suppressed bone turnover and modestly increased the SOS of the calcaneus in postmenopausal women with an increased risk of fractures. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  5. CT of the acetabular fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magu, N.K.; Moda, S.K.; Magu, Sarita; Airon, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    Nine patients with 10 injured hips, in whom acetabular fractures with posterior dislocation of the femoral heads were demonstrated on initial radiography, underwent CT. CT was found superior in detecting the presence of intra-articular bony fragments in Group A patients (40%), where conventional radiography exhibited congruous manipulative reduction of the joint surfaces. The spatial position of the intra-articular fragments could not be ascertained on conventional radiography in 40% of the patients in Group B, in whom congruous manipulative reduction could not be achieved and subluxation of the femoral heads was observed. On conventional radiography, it was also difficult to appreciate the presence of intra-articular fragments in 60% of the patients in Group B, in whom either the dislocation could not be reduced (40%) or the femoral head redislocated after close manipulative reduction (20%). CT proved its superiority in detecting the extent of the fractures of the acetabular roof, posterior and anterior acetabular margins, the quadrilateral plate along with rotation of the acetabular columns and displacements of the major fractured fragments. Associated fractures of the sacrum (20%), and traumatic lesions of the sacro-iliac joint (20%), not apparent on conventional radiography were well demonstrated by CT. As a result of CT, the treatment was changed in 60% of the patients in Group A, and 40% in Group B. In addition, CT permitted a better choice of surgical technique in the management of acetabular fractures. (author). 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Recent Observations in Surface Electromyography Recording of Triceps Brachii Muscle in Patients and Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Asraf Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To observe and analyse the literature on the use of surface electromyography electrodes, including the shape, size, and metal composition of the electrodes used, the interelectrode distance, and the anatomical locations on the muscle at which the electrodes are placed, for the observation of the triceps brachii muscle activity in patients and athletes.

  7. Analyses of fractured implant fixture after prolonged implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Han-Cheol; Lee, June-Kyu; Chung, Chae-Heon

    2004-07-01

    Although fortunately rare, fracture of implants causes significant problems for both clinicians and patients. The major cause of a fractured implant may be corrosion fatigue fracture. To investigate how to increase the fatigue life and corrosion resistance of dental implants, the surface morphology of six Steri-Oss fractured implants was analyzed. The period of implantation after loading in patient jaws varied between 23 months and 37 months. The topography and surface chemical composition were studied with electron probe micro-analysis (point mapping, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy) and field emission scanning electron microscopy. All samples were fractured at the screw root and the crest formed a keen-edged shape. The five samples were fractured at the first thread of the fixture and one sample at the third thread of fixture. The fatigue cracks were mainly nucleated and grown at scratches occurring for the screw root and crest formation and the cervix portion of the implant having a small curvature. The pits were nucleated in the vicinity of inclusions such as SiO2 and corrosion fatigue cracking was predominantly propagated. Corrosion products were found on the opposite side of the starting point of corrosion fatigue crack. From observations of fatigue striations, it is possible to predict the life time of fractured implants and estimate the cleavage fracture and dimple fracture of implants. In this study, analysis of fractured surfaces revealed the characteristics of the implant materials, problems of design, fatigue life, and manufacturing process. In order to protect against corrosion fatigue fractures and prolong the fatigue life of dental implants, we must consider the implant design, implant manufacturing, and surface treatment of the implant materials.

  8. Temporal observations of surface soil moisture using a passive microwave sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, T.J.; O'Neill, P.

    1987-01-01

    A series of 10 aircraft flights was conducted over agricultural fields to evaluate relationships between observed surface soil moisture and soil moisture predicted using passive microwave sensor observations. An a priori approach was used to predict values of surface soil moisture for three types of fields: tilled corn, no-till corn with soybean stubble, and idle fields with corn stubble. Acceptable predictions were obtained for the tilled corn fields, while poor results were obtained for the others. The source of error is suspected to be the density and orientation of the surface stubble layer; however, further research is needed to verify this explanation. Temporal comparisons between observed, microwave predicted, and soil water-simulated moisture values showed similar patterns for tilled well-drained fields. Divergences between the observed and simulated measurements were apparent on poorly drained fields. This result may be of value in locating and mapping hydrologic contributing areas

  9. Advancing land surface model development with satellite-based Earth observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Rene; Dutra, Emanuel; Trigo, Isabel F.; Balsamo, Gianpaolo

    2017-04-01

    The land surface forms an essential part of the climate system. It interacts with the atmosphere through the exchange of water and energy and hence influences weather and climate, as well as their predictability. Correspondingly, the land surface model (LSM) is an essential part of any weather forecasting system. LSMs rely on partly poorly constrained parameters, due to sparse land surface observations. With the use of newly available land surface temperature observations, we show in this study that novel satellite-derived datasets help to improve LSM configuration, and hence can contribute to improved weather predictability. We use the Hydrology Tiled ECMWF Scheme of Surface Exchanges over Land (HTESSEL) and validate it comprehensively against an array of Earth observation reference datasets, including the new land surface temperature product. This reveals satisfactory model performance in terms of hydrology, but poor performance in terms of land surface temperature. This is due to inconsistencies of process representations in the model as identified from an analysis of perturbed parameter simulations. We show that HTESSEL can be more robustly calibrated with multiple instead of single reference datasets as this mitigates the impact of the structural inconsistencies. Finally, performing coupled global weather forecasts we find that a more robust calibration of HTESSEL also contributes to improved weather forecast skills. In summary, new satellite-based Earth observations are shown to enhance the multi-dataset calibration of LSMs, thereby improving the representation of insufficiently captured processes, advancing weather predictability and understanding of climate system feedbacks. Orth, R., E. Dutra, I. F. Trigo, and G. Balsamo (2016): Advancing land surface model development with satellite-based Earth observations. Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., doi:10.5194/hess-2016-628

  10. Evaluation of the Reanalysis Surface Incident Shortwave Radiation Products from NCEP, ECMWF, GSFC, and JMA Using Satellite and Surface Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotong Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar radiation incident at the Earth’s surface (Rs is an essential component of the total energy exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Reanalysis data have been widely used, but a comprehensive validation using surface measurements is still highly needed. In this study, we evaluated the Rs estimates from six current representative global reanalyses (NCEP–NCAR, NCEP-DOE; CFSR; ERA-Interim; MERRA; and JRA-55 using surface measurements from different observation networks [GEBA; BSRN; GC-NET; Buoy; and CMA] (674 sites in total and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System (CERES EBAF product from 2001 to 2009. The global mean biases between the reanalysis Rs and surface measurements at all sites ranged from 11.25 W/m2 to 49.80 W/m2. Comparing with the CERES-EBAF Rs product, all the reanalyses overestimate Rs, except for ERA-Interim, with the biases ranging from −2.98 W/m2 to 21.97 W/m2 over the globe. It was also found that the biases of cloud fraction (CF in the reanalyses caused the overestimation of Rs. After removing the averaged bias of CERES-EBAF, weighted by the area of the latitudinal band, a global annual mean Rs values of 184.6 W/m2, 180.0 W/m2, and 182.9 W/m2 were obtained over land, ocean, and the globe, respectively.

  11. Medical Complications Predict Cognitive Decline in Nondemented Hip Fracture Patients-Results of a Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Juliana; Eschbach, Daphne; Aigner, Rene; Oberkircher, Ludwig; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Bliemel, Christopher; Buecking, Benjamin

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors that are associated with cognitive decline in the long-term follow-up after hip fractures in previously nondemented patients. A consecutive series of 402 patients with hip fractures admitted to our university hospital were analyzed. After exclusion of all patients with preexisting dementia, 266 patients were included, of which 188 could be examined 6 months after surgery. Additional to several demographic data, cognitive ability was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Patients with 19 or less points on the MMSE were considered demented. Furthermore, geriatric scores were recorded, as well as perioperative medical complications. Mini-Mental State Examination was performed again 6 months after surgery. Of 188 previously nondemented patients, 12 (6.4%) patients showed a cognitive decline during the 6 months of follow-up. Multivariate regression analysis showed that age ( P = .040) and medical complications ( P = .048) were the only significant independent influencing factors for cognitive decline. In our patient population, the incidence of dementia exceeded the average age-appropriate cognitive decline. Significant independent influencing factors for cognitive decline were age and medical complications.

  12. Cryogenic fracturing of calcite flowstone in caves: theoretical considerations and field observations in Kents Cavern, Devon, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundberg Joyce

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Several caves in Devon, England, have been noted for extensive cracking of substantial flowstone floors. Conjectural explanations have included earthquake damage, local shock damage from collapsing cave passages, hydraulic pressure, and cryogenic processes. Here we present a theoretical model to demonstrate that frost-heaving and fracture of flowstone floors that overlie wet sediments is both a feasible and likely consequence of unidirectional air flow or cold-air ponding in caves, and argue that this is the most likely mechanism for flowstone cracking in caves located in Pleistocene periglacial environments outside of tectonically active regions. Modeled parameters for a main passage in Kents Cavern, Devon, demonstrate that 1 to 6 months of -10 to -15° C air flow at very modest velocities will result in freezing of 1 to 3 m of saturated sediment fill. The resultant frost heave increases with passage width and depth of frozen sediments. In the most conservative estimate, freezing over one winter season of 2 m of sediment in a 6-m wide passage could fracture flowstone floors up to ~13 cm thick, rising to ~23 cm in a 12-m wide passage. Natural flaws in the flowstone increase the thickness that could be shattered. These numbers are quite consistent with the field evidence.

  13. Studies of Transport Properties of Fractures: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen R. Brown

    2006-06-30

    We proposed to study several key factors controlling the character and evolution of fracture system permeability and transport processes. We suggest that due to surface roughness and the consequent channeling in single fractures and in fracture intersections, the tendency of a fracture system to plug up, remain permeable, or for permeability to increase due to chemical dissolution/precipitation conditions will depend strongly on the instantaneous flow channel geometry. This geometry will change as chemical interaction occurs, thus changing the permeability through time. To test this hypothesis and advance further understanding toward a predictive capability, we endeavored to physically model and analyze several configurations of flow and transport of inert and chemically active fluids through channels in single fractures and through fracture intersections. This was an integrated program utilizing quantitative observations of fractures and veins in drill core, quantitative and visual observations of flow and chemical dissolution and precipitation within replicas of real rough-walled fractures and fracture intersections, and numerical modeling via lattice Boltzmann methods.

  14. Observation of a distinct surface molecular orientation in films of a high mobility conjugated polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuettfort, Torben; Thomsen, Lars; McNeill, Christopher R

    2013-01-23

    The molecular orientation and microstructure of films of the high-mobility semiconducting polymer poly(N,N-bis-2-octyldodecylnaphthalene-1,4,5,8-bis-dicarboximide-2,6-diyl-alt-5,5-2,2-bithiophene) (P(NDI2OD-T2)) are probed using a combination of grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. In particular a novel approach is used whereby the bulk molecular orientation and surface molecular orientation are simultaneously measured on the same sample using NEXAFS spectroscopy in an angle-resolved transmission experiment. Furthermore, the acquisition of bulk-sensitive NEXAFS data enables a direct comparison of the information provided by GIWAXS and NEXAFS. By comparison of the bulk-sensitive and surface-sensitive NEXAFS data, a distinctly different molecular orientation is observed at the surface of the film compared to the bulk. While a more "face-on" orientation of the conjugated backbone is observed in the bulk of the film, consistent with the lamella orientation observed by GIWAXS, a more "edge-on" orientation is observed at the surface of the film with surface-sensitive NEXAFS spectroscopy. This distinct edge-on surface orientation explains the high in-plane mobility that is achieved in top-gate P(NDI2OD-T2) field-effect transistors (FETs), while the bulk face-on texture explains the high out-of-plane mobilities that are observed in time-of-flight and diode measurements. These results also stress that GIWAXS lacks the surface sensitivity required to probe the microstructure of the accumulation layer that supports charge transport in organic FETs and hence may not necessarily be appropriate for correlating film microstructure and FET charge transport.

  15. Terminal Sliding Mode Control with Unidirectional Auxiliary Surfaces for Hypersonic Vehicles Based on Adaptive Disturbance Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naibao He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel flight control scheme is proposed using the terminal sliding mode technique, unidirectional auxiliary surfaces and the disturbance observer model. These proposed dynamic attitude control systems can improve control performance of hypersonic vehicles despite uncertainties and external disturbances. The terminal attractor is employed to improve the convergence rate associated with the critical damping characteristics problem noted in short-period motions of hypersonic vehicles. The proposed robust attitude control scheme uses a dynamic terminal sliding mode with unidirectional auxiliary surfaces. The nonlinear disturbance observer is designed to estimate system uncertainties and external disturbances. The output of the disturbance observer aids the robust adaptive control scheme and improves robust attitude control performance. Finally, simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed terminal sliding mode with unidirectional auxiliary surfaces.

  16. Failure modes observed on worn surfaces of W-C-Co sputtered coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramalho, A.; Cavaleiro, A.; Miranda, A.S.; Vieira, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    During scratch testing, the indenter gives rise to a distribution of stresses similar to that observed in tribocontacts. In this work, r.f.-sputtered W-C-Co coatings deposited from sintered WC + Co (6, 10 and 15 wt.% Co) at various substrate biases were scratched and tested tribologically and the morphology of the damaged surfaces was analysed. The cobalt content of the coatings is the main factor determining their tribological characteristics. The failure modes observed on the worn pin-on-disc tested surfaces are explained and compared with those obtained by scratch testing. In spite of it not being possible to establish quantitative results for the wear resistance of W-C-Co coatings from scratch testing, an estimation can be performed based on the observation of the failure modes in the scratch track. Thus scratch testing can be used to predict the tribological behaviour of coated surfaces. This possibility can reduce the number and cost of tribological tests. (orig.)

  17. Observation of surface superconductivity and paramagnetic Meissner effect in a spherical single crystal of Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Pradip; Tomy, C.V.; Takeya, H.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Grover, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    We report the observation of surface superconductivity as well as paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME), along with peak effect phenomena (PE) in ac and dc magnetization measurements in a high purity spherical single crystal of niobium. We study how the surface superconductivity and the PME evolve over the field (H) and the temperature (T) phase-space. We observe from our data that the magnitude of the PME progressively weakens as the temperature is decreased or magnetic field is increased. A vortex phase diagram is constructed by marking the onset positions of the PE (H p on ), the upper critical field (H c2 ) and the surface critical field (H c3 ). Unlike a previous report which shows the existence of a multi-critical point in the phase diagram of a Nb crystal, where H p , H c2 and H c3 lines meet, we do not observe a multi-critical point in our weak pinning crystal. (author)

  18. Water Surface Reconstruction in Airborne Laser Bathymetry from Redundant Bed Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandlburger, G.; Pfeifer, N.; Soergel, U.

    2017-09-01

    In airborne laser bathymetry knowledge of exact water level heights is a precondition for applying run-time and refraction correction of the raw laser beam travel path in the medium water. However, due to specular reflection especially at very smooth water surfaces often no echoes from the water surface itself are recorded (drop outs). In this paper, we first discuss the feasibility of reconstructing the water surface from redundant observations of the water bottom in theory. Furthermore, we provide a first practical approach for solving this problem, suitable for static and locally planar water surfaces. It minimizes the bottom surface deviations of point clouds from individual flight strips after refraction correction. Both theoretical estimations and practical results confirm the potential of the presented method to reconstruct water level heights in dm precision. Achieving good results requires enough morphological details in the scene and that the water bottom topography is captured from different directions.

  19. WATER SURFACE RECONSTRUCTION IN AIRBORNE LASER BATHYMETRY FROM REDUNDANT BED OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mandlburger

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In airborne laser bathymetry knowledge of exact water level heights is a precondition for applying run-time and refraction correction of the raw laser beam travel path in the medium water. However, due to specular reflection especially at very smooth water surfaces often no echoes from the water surface itself are recorded (drop outs. In this paper, we first discuss the feasibility of reconstructing the water surface from redundant observations of the water bottom in theory. Furthermore, we provide a first practical approach for solving this problem, suitable for static and locally planar water surfaces. It minimizes the bottom surface deviations of point clouds from individual flight strips after refraction correction. Both theoretical estimations and practical results confirm the potential of the presented method to reconstruct water level heights in dm precision. Achieving good results requires enough morphological details in the scene and that the water bottom topography is captured from different directions.

  20. Colloid migration in fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, J.R. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1989-09-15

    Field studies at the Nevada Test Site by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have demonstrated that radionuclides are being transported by colloidal material suspended in groundwater. This observation is counter to most predictions from contaminant transport models because the models assume adsorbed species are immobile. The purpose of this research is to quantify the transport processes for colloidal materials and develop the mechanistic understanding necessary to predict radionuclide transport in fractured media. There were three areas of investigation during this year that have addressed these issues: chemical control of colloid deposition on clean mineral surfaces, colloid accumulation on fracture surfaces, and the influence of deposited colloids on colloid and tracer migration. 7 refs.

  1. Observation of hidden Fermi surface nesting in a two dimensional conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, K.; Stagerescu, C.; Smith, K.E.; Greenblatt, M.; Ramanujachary, K.

    1996-01-01

    We report the first direct measurement of hidden Fermi surface nesting in a two dimensional conductor. The system studied was Na 0.9 Mo 6 O 17 , and the measured Fermi surface consists of electron and hole pockets that can be combined to form sets of pseudo-one-dimensional Fermi surfaces, exhibiting the nesting necessary to drive a Peierls transition to a charge density wave state. The observed nesting vector is shown to be in excellent agreement with theory. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  2. Observation of surface-guided waves in holey hypersonic phononic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchabane, Sarah; Gaiffe, Olivier; Ulliac, Gwenn; Salut, Roland; Achaoui, Younes; Laude, Vincent

    2011-04-01

    We observe experimentally the propagation of surface-guided waves in a hypersonic phononic crystal, both in the radiative and nonradiative regions of the spectrum. Combining electrical measurements in reflection and transmission as well as optical maps of the surface displacement, a band gap extending from 0.6 to 0.95 GHz is identified in a square lattice array of 1 μm radius air holes milled in lithium niobate. The optical measurements reveal the transmission of surface-guided waves above the band gap, well inside the sound cone.

  3. Detecting tangential dislocations on planar faults from traction free surface observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, Ioan R; Volkov, Darko

    2009-01-01

    We propose in this paper robust reconstruction methods for tangential dislocations on planar faults. We assume that only surface observations are available, and that a traction free condition applies at that surface. This study is an extension to the full three dimensions of Ionescu and Volkov (2006 Inverse Problems 22 2103). We also explore in this present paper the possibility of detecting slow slip events (such as silent earthquakes, or earthquake nucleation phases) from GPS observations. Our study uses extensively an asymptotic estimate for the observed surface displacement. This estimate is first used to derive what we call the moments reconstruction method. Then it is also used for finding necessary conditions for a surface displacement field to have been caused by a slip on a fault. These conditions lead to the introduction of two parameters: the activation factor and the confidence index. They can be computed from the surface observations in a robust fashion. They indicate whether a measured displacement field is due to an active fault. We also infer a second, combined, reconstruction technique blending least square minimization and the moments method. We carefully assess how our reconstruction method is affected by the sensitivity of the observation apparatus and the stepsize for the grid of surface observation points. The maximum permissible stepsize for such a grid is computed for different values of fault depth and orientation. Finally we present numerical examples of reconstruction of faults. We demonstrate that our combined method is sharp, robust and computationally inexpensive. We also note that this method performs satisfactorily for shallow faults, despite the fact that our asymptotic formula deteriorates in that case

  4. Constraining the physical properties of compositionally distinctive surfaces on Mars from overlapping THEMIS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, A.; Rogers, D.

    2017-12-01

    Better constraints on the physical properties (e.g. grain size, rock abundance, cohesion, porosity and amount of induration) of Martian surface materials can lead to greater understanding of outcrop origin (e.g. via sedimentary, effusive volcanic, pyroclastic processes). Many outcrop surfaces on Mars likely contain near-surface (thermal conductivity of the outcrop materials just below. Fortunately, vertical heterogeneity within near-surface materials can result in unique, and possibly predictable, diurnal and seasonal temperature patterns. The KRC thermal model has been utilized in a number of previous studies to predict thermal inertia of surface materials on Mars. Here we use KRC to model surface temperatures from overlapping Mars Odyssey THEMIS surface temperature observations that span multiple seasons and local times, in order to constrain both the nature of vertical heterogeneity and the underlying outcrop thermal inertia for various spectrally distinctive outcrops on Mars. We utilize spectral observations from TES and CRISM to constrain the particle size of the uppermost surface. For this presentation, we will focus specifically on chloride-bearing units in Terra Sirenum and Meridiani Planum, as well as mafic and feldspathic bedrock locations with distinct spectral properties, yet uncertain origins, in Noachis Terra and Nili Fossae. We find that many of these surfaces exhibit variations in apparent thermal inertia with season and local time that are consistent with low thermal inertia materials overlying higher thermal inertia substrates. Work is ongoing to compare surface temperature measurements with modeled two-layer scenarios in order to constrain the top layer thickness and bottom layer thermal inertia. The information will be used to better interpret the origins of these distinctive outcrops.

  5. How to most effectively expand the global surface ozone observing network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofen, E. D.; Bowdalo, D.; Evans, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Surface ozone observations with modern instrumentation have been made around the world for more than 40 years. Some of these observations have been made as one-off activities with short-term, specific science objectives and some have been made as part of wider networks which have provided a foundational infrastructure of data collection, calibration, quality control, and dissemination. These observations provide a fundamental underpinning to our understanding of tropospheric chemistry, air quality policy, atmosphere-biosphere interactions, etc. brought together eight of these networks to provide a single data set of surface ozone observations. We investigate how representative this combined data set is of global surface ozone using the output from a global atmospheric chemistry model. We estimate that on an area basis, 25 % of the globe is observed (34 % land, 21 % ocean). Whereas Europe and North America have almost complete coverage, other continents, Africa, South America, Australia, and Asia (12-17 %) show significant gaps. Antarctica is surprisingly well observed (78 %). Little monitoring occurs over the oceans, with the tropical and southern oceans particularly poorly represented. The surface ozone over key biomes such as tropical forests and savanna is almost completely unmonitored. A chemical cluster analysis suggests that a significant number of observations are made of polluted air masses, but cleaner air masses whether over the land or ocean (especially again in the tropics) are significantly under-observed. The current network is unlikely to see the impact of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) but may be capable of detecting other planetary-scale signals. Model assessment and validation activities are hampered by a lack of observations in regions where the models differ substantially, as is the ability to monitor likely changes in surface ozone over the next century. Using our methodology we are able to suggest new sites which would help to close

  6. How to most effectively expand the global surface ozone observing network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Sofen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface ozone observations with modern instrumentation have been made around the world for more than 40 years. Some of these observations have been made as one-off activities with short-term, specific science objectives and some have been made as part of wider networks which have provided a foundational infrastructure of data collection, calibration, quality control, and dissemination. These observations provide a fundamental underpinning to our understanding of tropospheric chemistry, air quality policy, atmosphere–biosphere interactions, etc. brought together eight of these networks to provide a single data set of surface ozone observations. We investigate how representative this combined data set is of global surface ozone using the output from a global atmospheric chemistry model. We estimate that on an area basis, 25 % of the globe is observed (34 % land, 21 % ocean. Whereas Europe and North America have almost complete coverage, other continents, Africa, South America, Australia, and Asia (12–17 % show significant gaps. Antarctica is surprisingly well observed (78 %. Little monitoring occurs over the oceans, with the tropical and southern oceans particularly poorly represented. The surface ozone over key biomes such as tropical forests and savanna is almost completely unmonitored. A chemical cluster analysis suggests that a significant number of observations are made of polluted air masses, but cleaner air masses whether over the land or ocean (especially again in the tropics are significantly under-observed. The current network is unlikely to see the impact of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO but may be capable of detecting other planetary-scale signals. Model assessment and validation activities are hampered by a lack of observations in regions where the models differ substantially, as is the ability to monitor likely changes in surface ozone over the next century. Using our methodology we are able to suggest new

  7. Global observation-based diagnosis of soil moisture control on land surface flux partition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Taylor, Christopher M.; Harris, Phil P.; Ghent, Darren; Veal, Karen L.; Folwell, Sonja S.

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture plays a central role in the partition of available energy at the land surface between sensible and latent heat flux to the atmosphere. As soils dry out, evapotranspiration becomes water-limited ("stressed"), and both land surface temperature (LST) and sensible heat flux rise as a result. This change in surface behaviour during dry spells directly affects critical processes in both the land and the atmosphere. Soil water deficits are often a precursor in heat waves, and they control where feedbacks on precipitation become significant. State-of-the-art global climate model (GCM) simulations for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) disagree on where and how strongly the surface energy budget is limited by soil moisture. Evaluation of GCM simulations at global scale is still a major challenge owing to the scarcity and uncertainty of observational datasets of land surface fluxes and soil moisture at the appropriate scale. Earth observation offers the potential to test how well GCM land schemes simulate hydrological controls on surface fluxes. In particular, satellite observations of LST provide indirect information about the surface energy partition at 1km resolution globally. Here, we present a potentially powerful methodology to evaluate soil moisture stress on surface fluxes within GCMs. Our diagnostic, Relative Warming Rate (RWR), is a measure of how rapidly the land warms relative to the overlying atmosphere during dry spells lasting at least 10 days. Under clear skies, this is a proxy for the change in sensible heat flux as soil dries out. We derived RWR from MODIS Terra and Aqua LST observations, meteorological re-analyses and satellite rainfall datasets. Globally we found that on average, the land warmed up during dry spells for 97% of the observed surface between 60S and 60N. For 73% of the area, the land warmed faster than the atmosphere (positive RWR), indicating water stressed conditions and increases in sensible heat flux

  8. Intramedullary nailing of femoral shaft fractures in polytraumatized patients. a longitudinal, prospective and observational study of the procedure-related impact on cardiopulmonary- and inflammatory responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husebye Elisabeth E

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early intramedullary nailing (IMN of long bone fractures in severely injured patients has been evaluated as beneficial, but has also been associated with increased inflammation, multi organ failure (MOF and morbidity. This study was initiated to evaluate the impact of primary femoral IMN on coagulation-, fibrinolysis-, inflammatory- and cardiopulmonary responses in polytraumatized patients. Methods Twelve adult polytraumatized patients with femoral shaft fractures were included. Serial blood samples were collected to evaluate coagulation-, fibrinolytic-, and cytokine activation in arterial blood. A flow-directed pulmonary artery (PA catheter was inserted prior to IMN. Cardiopulmonary function parameters were recorded peri- and postoperatively. The clinical course of the patients and complications were monitored and recorded daily. Results Mean Injury Severity Score (ISS was 31 ± 2.6. No procedure-related effect of the primary IMN on coagulation- and fibrinolysis activation was evident. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α increased significantly from 6 hours post procedure to peak levels on the third postoperative day. Interleukin-6 (IL-6 increased from the first to the third postoperative day. Interleukin-10 (IL-10 peaked on the first postoperative day. A procedure-related transient hemodynamic response was observed on indexed pulmonary vascular resistance (PVRI two hours post procedure. 11/12 patients developed systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, 7/12 pneumonia, 3/12 acute lung injury (ALI, 3/12 adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, 3/12 sepsis, 0/12 wound infection. Conclusion In the polytraumatized patients with femoral shaft fractures operated with primary IMN we observed a substantial response related to the initial trauma. We could not demonstrate any major additional IMN-related impact on the inflammatory responses or on the cardiopulmonary function parameters. These results have to be interpreted

  9. The observed sensitivity of the global hydrological cycle to changes in surface temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkin, Phillip A; Janowiak, John; Smith, Thomas M; Sapiano, Mathew R P

    2010-01-01

    Climate models project large changes in global surface temperature in coming decades that are expected to be accompanied by significant changes in the global hydrological cycle. Validation of model simulations is essential to support their use in decision making, but observing the elements of the hydrological cycle is challenging, and model-independent global data sets exist only for precipitation. We compute the sensitivity of the global hydrological cycle to changes in surface temperature using available global precipitation data sets and compare the results against the sensitivities derived from model simulations of 20th century climate. The implications of the results for the global climate observing system are discussed.

  10. Parameters and a magnitude moment relationship from small earthquakes observed during hydraulic fracturing experiments in crystalline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, C.

    1982-04-01

    Using source parameters estimated from seismic spectra and magnitudes estimated from coda lengths, we demonstrate that the log-linear relationship between moment and magnitude holds for events with magnitudes as low as -6. Using, as a data set, events induced by hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal site, we find that the relationship between magnitude M and seismic moment (Mo) is log (Mo) = 17.27+0.77 M Moreover, the linear relationship between seismic moment and source radius (r) holds for the Fenton Hill microearthquakes. Analyses of the Fenton Hill data yield the following relationship. log (r) = 2.28+0.19 log (Mo)

  11. Characterization of Surface Heterogeneity among Asteroid Taxonomic Classes according to Sloan Digital Sky Survey Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkham, Sunny; Ziffer, Julie; Nelson, Tyler

    2016-10-01

    This research characterizes the extent of surface heterogeneity among asteroid classes by the extent of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) color variance within multiple observations of the same asteroid. The SDSS MOC4 database includes data from 220,101 observations of 104,449 unique objects. The amount of multiple observations of one target makes it ideal for statistically analyzing the surface inhomogeneity of asteroid surfaces. Information from the SDSS MOC4 database (below an error threshold determined from standard error propagation techniques and the interquartile range) is combined with information from the classification in Carvano et al. (2010) to analyze asteroid surface heterogeneity based on taxonomic class. Individual observations are grouped by asteroid, and asteroids are grouped by class. The standard deviation of each normalized SDSS color (i.e. u-r, g-r, r-i, r-z) for each asteroid with multiple observations is calculated. The mean of the standard deviations is then computed for a given class. Comparison of the size of the average standard deviation to the size of the error determines the extent of true variance within a normalized color in a class. The effect of phase angles on SDSS data, as discussed in Carvano et al. (2015), are considered. Additionally, implications for space weathering and evolutionary relationships between taxonomic classes are explored.

  12. Discrete fracture modelling of the Finnsjoen rock mass: Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geier, J.E.; Axelsson, C.L.; Haessler, L.; Benabderrahmane, A.

    1992-04-01

    A discrete fracture network (DFN) model of the Finnsjoen site was derived from field data, and used to predict block-scale flow and transport properties. The DFN model was based on a compound Poisson process, with stochastic fracture zones, and individual fracture concentrated around the fracture zones. This formulation was used to represent the multitude of fracture zones at the site which could be observed on lineament maps and in boreholes, but were not the focus of detailed characterization efforts. Due to a shortage of data for fracture geometry at depth, distributions of fracture orientation and size were assumed to be uniform throughout the site. Transmissivity within individual fracture planes was assumed to vary according to a fractal model. Constant-head packer tests were simulated with the model, and the observed transient responses were compared with actual tests in terms of distributions of interpreted transmissivity and flow dimension, to partially validate the model. Both simulated and actual tests showed a range of flow dimension from sublinear to spherical, indicating local variations in the connectivity of the fracture population. A methodology was developed for estimation of an effective stochastic continuum from the DFN model, but this was only partly demonstrated. Directional conductivities for 40 m block were estimated using the DFN model. These show extremely poor correlation with results of multiple packer tests in the same blocks, indicating possible limitation of small-scale packer tests for predicting block-scale properties. Estimates are given of effective flow porosity and flow wetted surface, based on the block-scale flow fields calculated by the DFN model, and probabilistic models for the relationships among local fracture transmissivity, void space, and specific surface. The database for constructing these models is extremely limited. A review is given of the existing database for single fracture hydrologic properties. (127 refs

  13. Statistics and thermodynamics of fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1984-01-01

    A probabilistic model of the fracture processes unifying the phenomenological study of long term strength of materials, fracture mechanics and statistical approaches to fracture is briefly outlined. The general framework of irreversible thermodynamics is employed to model the deterministic side of the failure phenomenon. The stochastic calculus is used to account for thg failure mechanisms controlled by chance; particularly, the random roughness of fracture surfaces.

  14. Assimilation of Freeze-Thaw Observations into the NASA Catchment Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, L.; Reichle, R. H.; De Lannoy, G. J.; Kimball, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    The land surface freeze/thaw (F/T) state plays a key role in the hydrological and carbon cycles and thus affects water and energy exchanges and net primary productivity at the land surface. To support the level 4 soil moisture and carbon products (value-added, i.e. using a combination of remote sensing data and modeling) for the planned NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, an F/T assimilation algorithm is developed for the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) modeling and assimilation framework. The algorithm includes a newly developed observation operator that diagnoses the landscape F/T state in the GEOS-5 Catchment land surface model. A rule-based approach that incorporates model and observational errors is developed and used for assimilating the categorical F/T measurements into the land surface model (F/T analysis). An Observing System Simulation Experiment is conducted using synthetically generated measurements of the F/T state for a region in North America (90-110oW longitude, 45-55oN latitude). The synthetic 'truth' is generated using the NASA Catchment land surface model forced with surface meteorological fields from the Modern-Era Retrospective Reanalysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). To generate synthetic measurements, the true categorical F/T state is corrupted with a prescribed amount of F/T classification error. The assimilation experiment employs the same Catchment model except that forcing errors (relative to truth) are introduced via the application of meteorological forcing fields from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS). The effect of the F/T analysis and classification error on land surface temperature and soil temperature predictions is examined in this research.

  15. Observations of flow path interactions with surface structures during initial soil development stage using irrigation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, Steffen; Biemelt, Detlef; Badorreck, Annika; Gerke, Horst H.

    2010-05-01

    Structures and processes are dynamically linked especially during initial stages of soil and ecosystem development. Here we assume that soil pore structures and micro topography determine the flow paths and water fluxes as well as further structure changes. Reports about flow path developments at the soil surface are still limited because of an insufficient knowledge of the changing micro topography at the surface. The objective of this presentation is to evaluate methods for parameterisation of surface micro topography for analysing interactions between infiltration and surface runoff. Complex irrigation experiments were carried out at an experimental site in the neighbourhood of the artificially created water catchment "Chicken Creek". The irrigation rates between 160 mm/h and 250 mm/h were held constant over a time period of 20 minutes. The incoming intensities were measured as well as the raindrop-velocity and -size distributions. The surface runoff was continuously registered, soil samples were taken, and soil water potential heads were monitored using tensiometers. Surface and subsurface flow paths were identified using different tracers. The soil surface structures were recorded using a high resolution digital camera before, during, and after irrigation. Micro topography was surveyed using close-range photogrammetry. With this experimental design both, flow paths on the surface and in the soil as well as structure and texture changes could be observed simultaneously. In 2D vertical cross-sections, the effect of initial sediment deposition structure on infiltration and runoff was observed. Image analysis of surface pictures allowed identifying structural and soil textural changes during the runoff process. Similar structural changes related to surface flow paths were found with the photogrammetric surface analysis. We found evidence for the importance of the initial structures on the flow paths as well as a significant influence of the system development

  16. Simultaneous inversion of multiple land surface parameters from MODIS optical-thermal observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Han; Liang, Shunlin; Xiao, Zhiqiang; Shi, Hanyu

    2017-06-01

    Land surface parameters from remote sensing observations are critical in monitoring and modeling of global climate change and biogeochemical cycles. Current methods for estimating land surface variables usually focus on individual parameters separately even from the same satellite observations, resulting in inconsistent products. Moreover, no efforts have been made to generate global products from integrated observations from the optical to Thermal InfraRed (TIR) spectrum. Particularly, Middle InfraRed (MIR) observations have received little attention due to the complexity of the radiometric signal, which contains both reflected and emitted radiation. In this paper, we propose a unified algorithm for simultaneously retrieving six land surface parameters - Leaf Area Index (LAI), Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FAPAR), land surface albedo, Land Surface Emissivity (LSE), Land Surface Temperature (LST), and Upwelling Longwave radiation (LWUP) by exploiting MODIS visible-to-TIR observations. We incorporate a unified physical radiative transfer model into a data assimilation framework. The MODIS visible-to-TIR time series datasets include the daily surface reflectance product and MIR-to-TIR surface radiance, which are atmospherically corrected from the MODIS data using the Moderate Resolution Transmittance program (MODTRAN, ver. 5.0). LAI was first estimated using a data assimilation method that combines MODIS daily reflectance data and a LAI phenology model, and then the LAI was input to the unified radiative transfer model to simulate spectral surface reflectance and surface emissivity for calculating surface broadband albedo and emissivity, and FAPAR. LST was estimated from the MIR-TIR surface radiance data and the simulated emissivity, using an iterative optimization procedure. Lastly, LWUP was estimated using the LST and surface emissivity. The retrieved six parameters were extensively validated across six representative sites with

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy of 2-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Articular Involvement and Fracture Pattern of Posterior Malleolar Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Diederik T; de Muinck Keizer, Robert-Jan O; Doornberg, Job N; Sierevelt, Inger N; Stufkens, Sjoerd A; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J; van Dijk, C Niek

    2016-01-01

    Up to 44% of ankle fractures have involvement of the posterior tibial margin. Fracture size and morphology are important factors to guide treatment of these fragments, but reliability of plain radiography in estimating size is low. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the accuracy of 2-dimensional computed tomography (2DCT) in the assessment of posterior malleolar fractures. Additionally, the diagnostic accuracy of 2DCT and its value in preoperative planning was evaluated. Thirty-one patients with 31 ankle fractures including a posterior malleolar fragment were selected. Preoperative CT scans were analyzed by 50 observers from 23 countries. Quantitative 3-dimensional CT (Q3DCT) reconstructions were used as a reference standard. Articular involvement of the posterior fragment was overestimated on 2DCT by factors 1.6, 1.4, and 2.2 for Haraguchi types I, II, and III, respectively. Interobserver agreement on operative management ("to fix, or not to fix?") was substantial (κ = 0.69) for Haraguchi type I fractures, fair (κ = 0.23) for type II fractures, and poor (κ = 0.09) for type III fractures. 2DCT images led to a change in treatment of the posterior malleolus in 23% of all fractures. Surgeons would operatively treat type I fractures in 63%, type II fractures in 67%, and type III fractures in 22%. Surgeons overestimated true articular involvement of posterior malleolar fractures on 2DCT scans. 2DCT showed some additional value in estimating the involved articular surface when compared to plain radiographs; however, this seemed not yet sufficient to accurately read the fractures. Analysis of the CT images showed a significant influence on choice of treatment in 23% with a shift toward operative treatment in 12% of cases compared to evaluating plain lateral radiographs alone. Level III, comparative study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Observations of Near-Surface Heat-Flux and Temperature Profiles Through the Early Evening Transition over Contrasting Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Derek D.; Nadeau, Daniel F.; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Pardyjak, Eric R.

    2016-06-01

    Near-surface turbulence data from the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) program are used to study countergradient heat fluxes through the early evening transition. Two sites, subjected to similar large-scale forcing, but with vastly different surface and sub-surface characteristics, are considered. The Playa site is situated at the interior of a large dry lakebed desert with high sub-surface soil moisture, shallow water table, and devoid of vegetation. The Sagebrush site is located in a desert steppe region with sparse vegetation and little soil moisture. Countergradient sensible heat fluxes are observed during the transition at both sites. The transition process is both site and height dependent. At the Sagebrush site, the countergradient flux at 5 m and below occurs when the sign change of the sensible heat flux precedes the local temperature gradient sign change. For 10 m and above, the countergradient flux occurs when the sign change of the sensible heat flux follows the local temperature gradient sign change. At the Playa site, the countergradient flux at all tower levels occurs when the sign change of the sensible heat flux follows the local temperature gradient sign change. The phenomenon is explained in terms of the mean temperature and heat-flux evolution. The temperature gradient sign reversal is a top-down process while the flux reversal occurs nearly simultaneously at all heights. The differing countergradient behaviour is primarily due to the different subsurface thermal characteristics at the two sites. The combined high volumetric heat capacity and high thermal conductivity at the Playa site lead to small vertical temperature gradients that affect the relative magnitude of terms in the heat-flux tendency equation. A critical ratio of the gradient production to buoyant production of sensible heat flux is suggested so as to predict the countergradient behaviour.

  19. Land surface skin temperature climatology: benefitting from the strengths of satellite observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Menglin; Dickinson, Robert E

    2010-01-01

    Surface skin temperature observations (T skin ), as obtained by satellite remote sensing, provide useful climatological information of high spatial resolution and global coverage that enhances the traditional ground observations of surface air temperature (T air ) and so, reveal new information about land surface characteristics. This letter analyzes nine years of moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) skin temperature observations to present monthly skin temperature diurnal, seasonal, and inter-annual variations at a 0.05 deg. latitude/longitude grid over the global land surface and combines these measurements with other MODIS-based variables in an effort to understand the physical mechanisms responsible for T skin variations. In particular, skin temperature variations are found to be closely related to vegetation cover, clouds, and water vapor, but to differ from 2 m surface T air in terms of both physical meaning and magnitude. Therefore, the two temperatures (T skin and T air ) are complementary in their contribution of valuable information to the study of climate change.

  20. WhatsApp Messenger is useful and reproducible in the assessment of tibial plateau fractures: inter- and intra-observer agreement study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Vincenzo; Koch, Hilton Augusto; Mendes, Carlos Henrique; Bergamin, André; de Souza, Felipe Serrão; do Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the inter- and intra-observer agreement in the initial diagnosis and classification by means of plain radiographs and CT scans of tibial plateau fractures photographed and sent via WhatsApp Messenger. The increasing popularity of smartphones has driven the development of technology for data transmission and imaging and generated a growing interest in the use of these devices as diagnostic tools. The emergence of WhatsApp Messenger technology, which is available for various platforms used by smartphones, has led to an improvement in the quality and resolution of images sent and received. The images (plain radiographs and CT scans) were obtained from 13 cases of tibial plateau fractures using the iPhone 5 (Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA, USA) and were sent to six observers via the WhatsApp Messenger application. The observers were asked to determine the standard deviation and type of injury, the classification according to the Schatzker and the Luo classifications schemes, and whether the CT scan changed the classification. The six observers independently assessed the images on two separate occasions, 15 days apart. The inter- and intra-observer agreement for both periods of the study ranged from excellent to perfect (0.75WhatsApp Messenger. The authors now propose the systematic use of the application to facilitate faster documentation and obtaining the opinion of an experienced consultant when not on call. Finally, we think the use of the WhatsApp Messenger as an adjuvant tool could be broadened to other clinical centres to assess its viability in other skeletal and non-skeletal trauma situations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Morphology Analysis of Cu Film Fractures in Sandwiched Methylmethacrylate Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Fidani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of Cu were evaporated on solid plates of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA. A polymerization process was made to realize sandwiched structure to protect the Cu films. Fracturing of the metal film surface was observed with several morphologies showing two different fracture systems. Surface film morphology was analysed in terms of the distribution area of the islands and contour fractal dimension. The island areas showed a maximum corresponding to 42 nm of the Cu thickness, it was also the threshold to observe the second fracture system. The fractures pattern resulted to be scale invariant with fractal dimensions between 1.55 and 1.7. The minimum fractal dimension also occurred at the film thickness corresponding to the maximum island area. The reported effects can be understood on the basis of different thermal expansion coefficients of the two materials and their thermally induced adhesion.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.2.6518

  2. Intrinsic Charge Trapping Observed as Surface Potential Variations in diF-TES-ADT Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Benjamin C; McAfee, Terry; Conrad, Brad R; Loth, Marsha A; Anthony, John E; Ade, Harald W; Dougherty, Daniel B

    2016-08-24

    Spatial variations in surface potential are measured with Kelvin probe force microscopy for thin films of 2,8-difluoro-5,11-bis(triethylsilylethynyl)anthradithiophenes (diF-TES-ADT) grown on SiO2 and silane-treated SiO2 substrates by organic molecular beam deposition. The variations are observed both between and within grains of the polycrystalline organic film and are quantitatively different than electrostatic variations on the substrate surfaces. The skewness of surface potential distributions is larger on SiO2 than on HMDS-treated substrates. This observation is attributed to the impact of substrate functionalization on minimizing intrinsic crystallographic defects in the organic film that can trap charge.

  3. Assimilation of satellite observed snow albedo in a land surface model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malik, M.J.; van der Velde, R.; Vekerdy, Z.; Su, Zhongbo

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of assimilating satellite-observed snow albedo on the Noah land surface model (LSM)-simulated fluxes and snow properties. A direct insertion technique is developed to assimilate snow albedo into Noah and is applied to three intensive study areas in North Park

  4. Role of subsurface physics in the assimilation of surface soil moisture observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil moisture controls the exchange of water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere and exhibits memory that may be useful for climate prediction at monthly time scales. Though spatially distributed observations of soil moisture are increasingly becoming available from remotely sense...

  5. Comparing optimized CO emission estimates using MOPITT or NOAA surface network observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooghiemstra, P.B.; Krol, M.C.; Bergamaschi, P.; Laat, de A.T.J.; Werf, van der G.R.; Novelli, P.C.; Deeter, M.N.; Aben, I.; Rockmann, T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares two global inversions to estimate carbon monoxide (CO) emissions for 2004. Either surface flask observations from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA/ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) or CO total columns from the

  6. Water level observations from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for improving estimates of surface water-groundwater interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandini, Filippo; Butts, Michael; Vammen Jacobsen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    . However, traditional river gauging stations are normally spaced too far apart to capture spatial patterns in the water surface, while spaceborne observations have limited spatial and temporal resolution. UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) can retrieve river water level measurements, providing: i) high...

  7. Experimental observations of surface electrostatic wave on KT-5B tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shiyao; Han Shensheng

    1991-01-01

    Shear Alfven waves have been successfully excited in KT-5B small tokamak by means of the one turn longitudinal loop antenna located in the shadow area. The measured antenna loadings show their rich structure, and the loadings are also found to be sensitive to the plasma current. Preliminary evidence of surface electrostatic wave was observed

  8. In-situ observations of catalyst dynamics during surface-bound carbon nanotube nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, S; Sharma, R; Du, G

    2007-01-01

    We present atomic-scale, video-rate environmental transmission electron microscopy and in situ time-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of surface-bound catalytic chemical vapor deposition of single-walled carbon nanotubes and nanofibers. We observe that transition metal catalyst...

  9. Estimating Global Impervious Surface based on Social-economic Data and Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Z.; Zhang, K.; Xue, X.; Hong, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Impervious surface areas around the globe are expanding and significantly altering the surface energy balance, hydrology cycle and ecosystem services. Many studies have underlined the importance of impervious surface, r from hydrological modeling to contaminant transport monitoring and urban development estimation. Therefore accurate estimation of the global impervious surface is important for both physical and social sciences. Given the limited coverage of high spatial resolution imagery and ground survey, using satellite remote sensing and geospatial data to estimate global impervious areas is a practical approach. Based on the previous work of area-weighted imperviousness for north branch of the Chicago River provided by HDR, this study developed a method to determine the percentage of impervious surface using latest global land cover categories from multi-source satellite observations, population density and gross domestic product (GDP) data. Percent impervious surface at 30-meter resolution were mapped. We found that 1.33% of the CONUS (105,814 km2) and 0.475% of the land surface (640,370km2) are impervious surfaces. To test the utility and practicality of the proposed method, National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 2011 percent developed imperviousness for the conterminous United States was used to evaluate our results. The average difference between the derived imperviousness from our method and the NLCD data across CONUS is 1.14%, while difference between our results and the NLCD data are within ±1% over 81.63% of the CONUS. The distribution of global impervious surface map indicates that impervious surfaces are primarily concentrated in China, India, Japan, USA and Europe where are highly populated and/or developed. This study proposes a straightforward way of mapping global imperviousness, which can provide useful information for hydrologic modeling and other applications.

  10. Three-dimensional evaluation of postoperative swelling in treatment of zygomatic bone fractures using two different cooling therapy methods: a randomized, observer-blind, prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment and complications in patients with zygomatic bone fractures can lead to a significant degree of tissue trauma resulting in common postoperative symptoms and types of pain, facial swelling and functional impairment. Beneficial effects of local cold treatment on postoperative swelling, edema, pain, inflammation, and hemorrhage, as well as the reduction of metabolism, bleeding and hematomas, have been described. The aim of this study was to compare postoperative cooling therapy applied through the use of cooling compresses with the water-circulating cooling face mask manufactured by Hilotherm in terms of beneficial impact on postoperative facial swelling, pain, eye motility, diplopia, neurological complaints and patient satisfaction. Methods Forty-two patients were selected for treatment of unilateral zygomatic bone fractures and were divided randomly to one of two treatments: either a Hilotherm cooling face mask or conventional cooling compresses. Cooling was initiated as soon as possible after surgery until postoperative day 3 and was applied continuously for 12 hours daily. Facial swelling was quantified through a three-dimensional optical scanning technique. Furthermore, pain, neurological complaints, eye motility, diplopia and patient satisfaction were observed for each patient. Results Patients receiving a cooling therapy by Hilotherm demonstrated significantly less facial swelling, less pain, reduced limitation of eye motility and diplopia, fewer neurological complaints and were more satisfied compared to patients receiving conventional cooling therapy. Conclusions Hilotherapy is more efficient in managing postoperative swelling and pain after treatment of unilateral zygomatic bone fractures than conventional cooling. Trial registration German Clinical Trials Register ID: DRKS00004846 PMID:23895539

  11. Venus surface peeking through the atmosphere - gaining a global perspective on the surface composition through near infrared observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbert, J.; Dyar, M. D.; Maturilli, A.; D'Amore, M.; Ferrari, S.; Mueller, N. T.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2017-12-01

    Venus is the most Earth-like of the terrestrial planets, though very little is known about its surface composition. Thanks to recent advances in laboratory spectroscopy and spectral analysis techniques, this is about to change. Although the atmosphere prohibits observations of the surface with traditional imaging techniques over much of the EM spectral range, five transparent windows between 0.86 µm and 1.18 µm occur in the atmosphere's CO2 spectrum. New high temperature laboratory spectra from the Planetary Spectroscopy Laboratory at DLR show that spectra in these windows are highly diagnostic for surface mineralogy [1]. The Venus Emissivity Mapper (VEM) [2] builds on these recent advances. It is proposed for NASA's Venus Origins Explorer where a radar will provided the needed high-resolution altimetry and ESA's EnVision would provide stereo topography instead. VEM is the first flight instrument specially designed to focus solely on mapping Venus' surface using the windows around 1 µm. Operating in situ from Venus orbit, VEM will provide a global map of composition as well as redox state of the surface, enabling a comprehensive picture of surface-atmosphere interaction on Venus. VEM will return a complex data set containing surface, atmospheric, cloud, and scattering information. Total planned data volume for a typical mission scenario exceeds 1TB. Classical analysis techniques have been successfully used for VIRTIS on Venus Express [3-5] and could be employed with the VEM data. However, application of machine learning approaches to this rich dataset is vastly more efficient, as has already been confirmed with laboratory data. Binary classifiers [6] demonstrate that at current best estimate errors, basalt spectra are confidently discriminated from basaltic andesites, andesites, and rhyolite/granite. Applying the approach of self-organizing maps to the increasingly large set of laboratory measurements allows searching for additional mineralogical indicators

  12. Influence of Fracture Width on Sealability in High-Strength and Ultra-Low-Permeability Concrete in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko Kaneko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available For cementitious composites and materials, the sealing of fractures can occur in water by the precipitation of calcium compounds. In this study, the sealing behavior in a macro-fractured high-strength and ultra-low-permeability concrete (HSULPC specimen was investigated in simulated seawater using micro-focus X-ray computed tomography (CT. In particular, the influence of fracture width (0.10 and 0.25 mm on fracture sealing was investigated. Precipitation occurred mainly at the outermost parts of the fractured surface of the specimen for both fracture widths. While significant sealing was observed for the fracture width of 0.10 mm, sealing was not attained for the fracture width of 0.25 mm within the observation period (49 days. Examination of the sealed regions on the macro-fracture was performed using a three-dimensional image registration technique and applying image subtraction between the CT images of the HSULPC specimen before and after maintaining the specimen in simulated seawater. The temporal change of the sealing deposits for the fracture width of 0.10 mm was much larger than that for the fracture width of 0.25 mm. Therefore, it is concluded that the sealability of the fracture in the HSULPC is affected by the fracture width.

  13. Geometry, mechanics and transmissivity of rock fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanaro, F.

    2001-04-01

    This thesis work investigates methods and tools for characterising, testing and modelling the behaviour of rock fractures. Using a 3D-laser-scanning technique, the topography of the surfaces and their position with respect to one another are measured. From the fracture topography, fracture roughness, angularity and aperture are quantified; the major features used for characterisation. The standard deviations for the asperity heights, surface slopes and aperture are determined. These statistical parameters usually increase/decrease according to power laws of the sampling size, and sometimes reach a sill beyond which they become constant. Also the number of contact spots with a certain area decreases according to a power-law function of the area. These power-law relations reveal the self affine fractal nature of roughness and aperture. Roughness is 'persistent' while aperture varies between 'persistent' and 'anti-persistent' probably depending on the degree of match of the fracture walls. The fractal models for roughness, aperture and contact area are used to develop a constitutive model, based on contact mechanics, for describing the fracture normal and shear deformability. The experimental testing results of normal deformability are simulated well by the model whereas fracture shear deformability is not as well modelled. The model predicts well fracture dilation but is too stiff compared to rock samples. A mathematical description of the aperture pattern during shearing is also formulated. The mean value and covariance of the aperture in shearing is calculated and verifies reported observations. The aperture map of samples is inserted in a numerical program for flow calculation. The 'integral transform method' is used for solving the Reynolds' equation; it transforms the fracture transmissivity pattern into a frequency-based function. This closely resembles the power laws that describe fractals. This function can be described directly from the fractal properties of

  14. Hip Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hip fractures in people of all ages. In older adults, a hip fracture is most often a result of a fall from a standing height. In people with very weak bones, a hip fracture can occur simply by standing on the leg and twisting. Risk factors The rate of hip fractures increases substantially with ...

  15. Coupled atmosphere and land-surface assimilation of surface observations with a single column model and ensemble data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostkier-Edelstein, Dorita; Hacker, Joshua P.; Snyder, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Numerical weather prediction and data assimilation models are composed of coupled atmosphere and land-surface (LS) components. If possible, the assimilation procedure should be coupled so that observed information in one module is used to correct fields in the coupled module. There have been some attempts in this direction using optimal interpolation, nudging and 2/3DVAR data assimilation techniques. Aside from satellite remote sensed observations, reference height in-situ observations of temperature and moisture have been used in these studies. Among other problems, difficulties in coupled atmosphere and LS assimilation arise as a result of the different time scales characteristic of each component and the unsteady correlation between these components under varying flow conditions. Ensemble data-assimilation techniques rely on flow dependent observations-model covariances. Provided that correlations and covariances between land and atmosphere can be adequately simulated and sampled, ensemble data assimilation should enable appropriate assimilation of observations simultaneously into the atmospheric and LS states. Our aim is to explore assimilation of reference height in-situ temperature and moisture observations into the coupled atmosphere-LS modules(simultaneously) in NCAR's WRF-ARW model using the NCAR's DART ensemble data-assimilation system. Observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) are performed using the single column model (SCM) version of WRF. Numerical experiments during a warm season are centered on an atmospheric and soil column in the South Great Plains. Synthetic observations are derived from "truth" WRF-SCM runs for a given date,initialized and forced using North American Regional Reanalyses (NARR). WRF-SCM atmospheric and LS ensembles are created by mixing the atmospheric and soil NARR profile centered on a given date with that from another day (randomly chosen from the same season) with weights drawn from a logit-normal distribution. Three

  16. Deriving surface soil moisture from reflected GNSS signal observations from a grassland site in southwestern France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work assesses the estimation of surface volumetric soil moisture (VSM using the global navigation satellite system interferometric reflectometry (GNSS-IR technique. Year-round observations were acquired from a grassland site in southwestern France using an antenna consecutively placed at two contrasting heights above the ground surface (3.3 and 29.4 m. The VSM retrievals are compared with two independent reference datasets: in situ observations of soil moisture, and numerical simulations of soil moisture and vegetation biomass from the ISBA (Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere land surface model. Scaled VSM estimates can be retrieved throughout the year removing vegetation effects by the separation of growth and senescence periods and by the filtering of the GNSS-IR observations that are most affected by vegetation. Antenna height has no significant impact on the quality of VSM estimates. Comparisons between the VSM GNSS-IR retrievals and the in situ VSM observations at a depth of 5 cm show good agreement (R2 =  0.86 and RMSE  =  0.04 m3 m−3. It is shown that the signal is sensitive to the grass litter water content and that this effect triggers differences between VSM retrievals and in situ VSM observations at depths of 1 and 5 cm, especially during light rainfall events.

  17. Deriving surface soil moisture from reflected GNSS signal observations from a grassland site in southwestern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sibo; Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Darrozes, José; Roussel, Nicolas; Frappart, Frédéric; Bouhours, Gilles

    2018-03-01

    This work assesses the estimation of surface volumetric soil moisture (VSM) using the global navigation satellite system interferometric reflectometry (GNSS-IR) technique. Year-round observations were acquired from a grassland site in southwestern France using an antenna consecutively placed at two contrasting heights above the ground surface (3.3 and 29.4 m). The VSM retrievals are compared with two independent reference datasets: in situ observations of soil moisture, and numerical simulations of soil moisture and vegetation biomass from the ISBA (Interactions between Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere) land surface model. Scaled VSM estimates can be retrieved throughout the year removing vegetation effects by the separation of growth and senescence periods and by the filtering of the GNSS-IR observations that are most affected by vegetation. Antenna height has no significant impact on the quality of VSM estimates. Comparisons between the VSM GNSS-IR retrievals and the in situ VSM observations at a depth of 5 cm show good agreement (R2 = 0.86 and RMSE = 0.04 m3 m-3). It is shown that the signal is sensitive to the grass litter water content and that this effect triggers differences between VSM retrievals and in situ VSM observations at depths of 1 and 5 cm, especially during light rainfall events.

  18. Continental-scale water fluxes from continuous GPS observations of Earth surface loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsa, A. A.; Agnew, D. C.; Cayan, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    After more than a decade of observing annual oscillations of Earth's surface from seasonal snow and water loading, continuous GPS is now being used to model time-varying terrestrial water fluxes on the local and regional scale. Although the largest signal is typically due to the seasonal hydrological cycle, GPS can also measure subtle surface deformation caused by sustained wet and dry periods, and to estimate the spatial distribution of the underlying terrestrial water storage changes. The next frontier is expanding this analysis to the continental scale and paving the way for incorporating GPS models into the National Climate Assessment and into the observational infrastructure for national water resource management. This will require reconciling GPS observations with predictions from hydrological models and with remote sensing observations from a suite of satellite instruments (e.g. GRACE, SMAP, SWOT). The elastic Earth response which transforms surface loads into vertical and horizontal displacements is also responsible for the contamination of loading observations by tectonic and anthropogenic transients, and we discuss these and other challenges to this new application of GPS.

  19. Batman-cracks. Observations and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvadurai, A. P. S.; Busschen, A. Ten; Ernst, L. J.

    1991-05-01

    To ensure mechanical strength of fiber reinforced plastics (FRP), good adhesion between fibers and the matrix is considered to be an essential requirement. An efficient test of fiber-matrix interface characterization is the fragmentation test which provides information about the interface slip mechanism. This test consists of the longitudinal loading of a single fiber which is embedded in a matrix specimen. At critical loads the fiber experiences fragmentation. This fragmentation will terminate depending upon the shear-slip strength of the fiber-matrix adhesion, which is inversely proportional to average fragment lengths. Depending upon interface strength characteristics either bond or slip matrix fracture can occur at the onset of fiber fracture. Certain particular features of matrix fracture are observed at the locations of fiber fracture in situations where there is sufficient interface bond strength. These refer to the development of fractures with a complex surface topography. The experimental procedure involved in the fragmentation tests is discussed and the boundary element technique to examine the development of multiple matrix fractures at the fiber fracture locations is examined. The mechanics of matrix fracture is examined. When bond integrity is maintained, a fiber fracture results in a matrix fracture. The matrix fracture topography in a fragmentation test is complex; however, simplified conoidal fracture patterns can be used to investigate the crack extension phenomena. Via a mixed-mode fracture criterion, the generation of a conoidal fracture pattern in the matrix is investigated. The numerical results compare favorably with observed experimental data derived from tests conducted on fragmentation test specimens consisting of a single glass fiber which is embedded in a polyester matrix.

  20. The Cryospheres of Mars and Ceres - What thermal observations tell us about near surface ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, T. N.; Li, J. Y.; Moullet, A.

    2017-12-01

    Mars and Ceres both have near surface water ice that forms a cryosphere at polar latitudes. Gamma ray and neutron observations have provided important constraints on the location and depths of the cryosphere for both planetary bodies, but these observations have very low spatial resolution [e.g. 1, 2]. Thermal observations, which are also sensitive to the presence of a near-surface cryosphere as demonstrated by several studies of Mars [e.g. 3, 4], provide additional constraints. Thermal observations can identify depth to the cryosphere (as long as it is within a few thermal skin depths) and water-ice stability. This presentation will compare both the similarities and the differences of these two planetary cryospheres, as well as the thermal observations from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) [5], the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) [6], and publically available Dawn Visible Infrared spectrometer (VIR) [7]. The KRC thermal model [8] will use these observed surface temperatures to constrain depths to near surface ice (i.e. the cyropshere). References: [1] Feldman et al., 2002, Science, 297(5578), 75-78. [2] Prettyman et al., 2017, Science, 355(6320), 55-59. [3] Titus et al., 2003, Science, 299(5609), 1048-1051 [4] Mellon et al., 2008, JGR, 113(E12), CiteID E00A25. [5] Christensen et al., 1998, Science, 279(5357), 1692. [6] Wootten A. et al. (2015) IAU General Assembly, Meeting #29, #2237199 [7] de Santis et al., 2011, Space Science Reviews, 163(1-4), 329-369. [8] Kieffer, 2013, JGR, 118, Issue 3, pp. 451-470.

  1. Preliminary SEM Observations on the Surface of Elastomeric Impression Materials after Immersion or Ozone Disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prombonas, Anthony; Yannikakis, Stavros; Karampotsos, Thanasis; Katsarou, Martha-Spyridoula; Drakoulis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surface integrity of dental elastomeric impression materials that are subjected to disinfection is of major importance for the quality of the final prosthetic restorations. Aim The aim of this qualitative Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) study was to reveal the effects of immersion or ozone disinfection on the surface of four dental elastomeric impression materials. Materials and Methods Four dental elastomeric impression material brands were used (two vinyl polysiloxane silicones, one polyether, and one vinyl polyether silicone). Total of 32 specimens were fabricated, eight from each impression material. Specimens were immersion (0.525% sodium hypochlorite solution or 0.3% benzalkonium chloride solution) or ozone disinfected or served as controls and examined with SEM. Results Surface degradation was observed on several speci-mens disinfected with 0.525% sodium hypochlorite solution. Similar wavy-wrinkling surface structures were observed in almost all specimens, when treated either with 0.3% benzalkonium chloride solution or ozone. Conclusion The SEM images obtained from this study revealed that both immersion disinfectants and ozone show similar impression material surface alterations. Ozone seems to be non-inferior as compared to immersion disinfectants, but superior as to environmental protection. PMID:28208993

  2. Surface Net Solar Radiation Estimated from Satellite Measurements: Comparisons with Tower Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanqing; Leighton, H. G.; Cess, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    A parameterization that relates the reflected solar flux at the top of the atmosphere to the net solar flux at the surface in terms of only the column water vapor amount and the solar zenith angle was tested against surface observations. Net surface fluxes deduced from coincidental collocated satellite-measured radiances and from measurements from towers in Boulder during summer and near Saskatoon in winter have mean differences of about 2 W/sq m, regardless of whether the sky is clear or cloudy. Furthermore, comparisons between the net fluxes deduced from the parameterization and from surface measurements showed equally good agreement when the data were partitioned into morning and afternoon observations. This is in contrast to results from an empirical clear-sky algorithm that is unable to account adequately for the effects of clouds and that shows, at Boulder, a distinct morning to afternoon variation, which is presumably due to the predominance of different cloud types throughout the day. It is also demonstrated that the parameterization may be applied to irradiances at the top of the atmosphere that have been temporally averaged by using the temporally averaged column water vapor amount and the temporally averaged cosine of the solar zenith angle. The good agreement between the results of the parameterization and surface measurements suggests that the algorithm is a useful tool for a variety of climate studies.

  3. Effect of Age of Self-Reported, Non-Surgical Menopause on Time to First Fracture and Bone Mineral Density in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Amy; Thomas, Fridtjof; Johnson, Karen C.; Jackson, Rebecca; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Ko, Marcia; Chen, Zhao; Curb, J David; Howard, Barbara V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Menopause is a risk factor for fracture, thus menopause age may affect bone mass and fracture rates. We compared Bone Mineral Density (BMD) and fracture rates among healthy postmenopausal women with varying ages of self-reported non-surgical menopause. Methods Hazard ratios for fracture and differences in BMD among 21,711 postmenopausal women from the Women’s Health Initiative Observational cohort without prior hysterectomy, oophorectomy, or hormone therapy, who reported age of menopause of menopausal age groups. After multivariable adjustments for known risk factors for fracture, women undergoing menopause menopause ≥50 years (HR=1.21, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.44; p=0.03). In a subset with BMD measurements (n=1,351), whole body BMD was lower in women who reported menopause menopause menopause menopause age may be a risk factor contributing to decreased BMD and increased fracture risk in healthy postmenopausal women. Our data suggest that menopause age should be taken into consideration, along with other osteoporotic risk factors, when estimating fracture risk in postmenopausal women. PMID:25803670

  4. Does the CT improve inter- and intra-observer agreement for the AO, Fernandez and Universal classification systems for distal radius fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arealis, Georgios; Galanopoulos, Ilias; Nikolaou, Vassilios S; Lacon, Andrew; Ashwood, Neil; Kitsis, Christos

    2014-10-01

    Distal radius fractures are very common upper limb injuries irrespective of the patient's age. The aim of our study is to evaluate the reliability of the three systems that are often used for their classification (AO - Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen/Association for the Study of Internal Fixation, Fernandez and Universal) and to assess the need for computed tomography (CT) scan to improve inter- and intra-observer agreement. Five orthopaedic surgeons and two hand surgeons classified radiographs and CT scans of 26 patients using the Fernandez, AO and Universal systems. All data were recorded using MS Excel and Kappa statistics were performed to determine inter- and intra-observer agreement and to evaluate the role of CT scan. Fair-to-moderate inter-observer agreement was noted with the use of X-rays for all classification systems. Intra-observer reproducibility did not improve with the addition of CT scans, especially for the senior hand surgeons. The agreement rates observed in the present study show that currently there is no classification system that is fully reproducible. Adequate experience is required for the assessment and treatment of these injuries. CT scan should be requested only by experienced hand surgeons in order to help guide treatment, as it does not significantly improve inter- and intra-observer agreement for all classification systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Observational constraints on Arctic boundary-layer clouds, surface moisture and sensible heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D. L.; Boisvert, L.; Klaus, D.; Dethloff, K.; Ganeshan, M.

    2016-12-01

    The dry, cold environment and dynamic surface variations make the Arctic a unique but difficult region for observations, especially in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Spaceborne platforms have been the key vantage point to capture basin-scale changes during the recent Arctic warming. Using the AIRS temperature, moisture and surface data, we found that the Arctic surface moisture flux (SMF) had increased by 7% during 2003-2013 (18 W/m2 equivalent in latent heat), mostly in spring and fall near the Arctic coastal seas where large sea ice reduction and sea surface temperature (SST) increase were observed. The increase in Arctic SMF correlated well with the increases in total atmospheric column water vapor and low-level clouds, when compared to CALIPSO cloud observations. It has been challenging for climate models to reliably determine Arctic cloud radiative forcing (CRF). Using the regional climate model HIRHAM5 and assuming a more efficient Bergeron-Findeisen process with generalized subgrid-scale variability for total water content, we were able to produce a cloud distribution that is more consistent with the CloudSat/CALIPSO observations. More importantly, the modified schemes decrease (increase) the cloud water (ice) content in mixed-phase clouds, which help to improve the modeled CRF and energy budget at the surface, because of the dominant role of the liquid water in CRF. Yet, the coupling between Arctic low clouds and the surface is complex and has strong impacts on ABL. Studying GPS/COSMIC radio occultation (RO) refractivity profiles in the Arctic coldest and driest months, we successfully derived ABL inversion height and surface-based inversion (SBI) frequency, and they were anti-correlated over the Arctic Ocean. For the late summer and early fall season, we further analyzed Japanese R/V Mirai ship measurements and found that the open-ocean surface sensible heat flux (SSHF) can explain 10 % of the ABL height variability, whereas mechanisms such as cloud

  6. Observation of surface-plasmon-polariton transmission through a silver film sputtered on a photorefractive substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jing; Li Yudong; Lu Wenqiang; Qi Jiwei; Cui Guoxin; Liu Hongbing; Xu Jingjun; Sun Qian

    2007-01-01

    The diffraction of holographic gratings in a photorefractive iron-doped lithium niobate (LiNbO 3 :Fe) crystal, on which surface a silver film was sputtered, was experimentally investigated. Besides the Bragg diffraction, an additional diffraction was observed. The experimental results present evidence of surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) transmission through the silver film on the photorefractive substrate. The excitation of SPPs is speculated to be due to the corrugations of the silver film, which are caused by the photorefractive and the converse piezoelectric effect in the LiNbO3:Fe sample

  7. Disordered electrical potential observed on the surface of SiO2 by electric field microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GarcIa, N; Yan Zang; Ballestar, A; Barzola-Quiquia, J; Bern, F; Esquinazi, P

    2010-01-01

    The electrical potential on the surface of ∼300 nm thick SiO 2 grown on single-crystalline Si substrates has been characterized at ambient conditions using electric field microscopy. Our results show an inhomogeneous potential distribution with fluctuations up to ∼0.4 V within regions of 1 μm. The potential fluctuations observed at the surface of these usual dielectric holders of graphene sheets should induce strong variations in the graphene charge densities and provide a simple explanation for some of the anomalous behaviors of the transport properties of graphene.

  8. Study of luminous phenomena observed on contaminated metallic surfaces submitted to high RF fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maissa, S.; Junquera, T.; Fouaidy, M.; Le Goff, A.; Bonin, B.; Luong, M.; Safa, H.; Tan, J.

    1995-01-01

    The RF field emission from a sample subjected to high RF fields in a copper cavity has been investigated. The study is focused on the luminous emissions occurring on the RF surface simultaneously with the electron emission. The optical apparatus attached to the cavity permits to observe the evolution of the emitters and the direct effects of the surface conditioning. Also, the parameters of the emitted radiation (intensity, glowing duration, spectral distribution) may provide additional informations on the field emission phenomena. Some results concerning samples intentionally contaminated with particles (metallic or dielectric) are presented. (K.A.)

  9. The use of radar and visual observations to characterize the surface structure of the planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.; Kobrick, M.; Jurgens, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of available topographic profiles and scattering parameters derived from earth-based S- and X-band radar observations of Mercury, in order to determine the nature and origin of regional surface variations and structures that are typical of the planet. Attention is given to the proposal that intercrater plains on Mercury formed from extensive volcanic flooding during bombardment, so that most craters were formed on a partially molten surface and were thus obliterated, together with previously formed tectonic features.

  10. Near-surface bulk densities of asteroids derived from dual-polarization radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkki, A.; Taylor, P. A.; Zambrano-Marin, L. F.; Howell, E. S.; Nolan, M. C.; Lejoly, C.; Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Aponte, B. A.

    2017-09-01

    We present a new method to constrain the near-surface bulk density and surface roughness of regolith on asteroid surfaces using planetary radar measurements. The number of radar observations has increased rapidly during the last five years, allowing us to compare and contrast the radar scattering properties of different small-body populations and compositional types. This provides us with new opportunities to investigate their near-surface physical properties such as the chemical composition, bulk density, porosity, or the structural roughness in the scale of centimeters to meters. Because the radar signal can penetrate into a planetary surface up to a few decimeters, radar can reveal information that is hidden from other ground-based methods, such as optical and infrared measurements. The near-surface structure of asteroids and comets in centimeter-to-meter scale is essential information for robotic and human space missions, impact threat mitigation, and understanding the history of these bodies as well as the formation of the whole Solar System.

  11. Observation of contact area of bubbles with heating surface in pool boiling of water under microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, K.; Kawamura, H.; Suzuki, M.; Takahashi, S.; Abe, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Burnout heat flux was measured in subcooled pool boiling of water under attached boiling bubbles on heating surface with bubble holding plate in ground experiment. A thin stainless flat plate was employed for heating surface. The experimental setup and the heating procedures were same as used in reduced gravity experiment performed by a parabolic flight of jet aircraft. Same burnout heat flux as in the reduced gravity was obtained by adjusting the clearance between the bubble holder and the heating surface. They were 100 ∝ 400 percent higher than the widely accepted existing theories. As extending heating time longer than the reduced gravity duration until burnout occurred, burnout heat flux decreased gradually and became a constant value calculated from the existing theories. In a result of observing contact area of boiling bubbles with transparent heating surface, the contact area was smaller in quick heating time than that in long time heating at same heat flux. The experimental results suggest in microgravity that liquid layer is remained between rapidly expanded bubbles and heating surface. In microgravity experiment by a drop shaft facility, contact area of bubbles with heating surface increased considerably at starting of microgravity. (orig.)

  12. Boiling radial flow in fractures of varying wall porosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnitt, Robb Allan

    2000-06-01

    The focus of this report is the coupling of conductive heat transfer and boiling convective heat transfer, with boiling flow in a rock fracture. A series of experiments observed differences in boiling regimes and behavior, and attempted to quantify a boiling convection coefficient. The experimental study involved boiling radial flow in a simulated fracture, bounded by a variety of materials. Nonporous and impermeable aluminum, highly porous and permeable Berea sandstone, and minimally porous and permeable graywacke from The Geysers geothermal field. On nonporous surfaces, the heat flux was not strongly coupled to injection rate into the fracture. However, for porous surfaces, heat flux, and associated values of excess temperature and a boiling convection coefficient exhibited variation with injection rate. Nucleation was shown to occur not upon the visible surface of porous materials, but a distance below the surface, within the matrix. The depth of boiling was a function of injection rate, thermal power supplied to the fracture, and the porosity and permeability of the rock. Although matrix boiling beyond fracture wall may apply only to a finite radius around the point of injection, higher values of heat flux and a boiling convection coefficient may be realized with boiling in a porous, rather than nonporous surface bounded fracture.

  13. Fatigue crack growth and fracture behavior of bainitic rail steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    "The microstructuremechanical properties relationships, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth and fracture surface morphology of J6 bainitic, manganese, and pearlitic rail steels were studied. Microstructuremechanical properties correlation ...

  14. How well will the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission observe global reservoirs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solander, Kurt C.; Reager, John T.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate observations of global reservoir storage are critical to understand the availability of managed water resources. By enabling estimates of surface water area and height for reservoir sizes exceeding 250 m2 at a maximum repeat orbit of up to 21 days, the NASA Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission (anticipated launch date 2020) is expected to greatly improve upon existing reservoir monitoring capabilities. It is thus essential that spatial and temporal measurement uncertainty for water bodies is known a priori to maximize the utility of SWOT observations as the data are acquired. In this study, we evaluate SWOT reservoir observations using a three-pronged approach that assesses temporal aliasing, errors due to specific reservoir spatial properties, and SWOT performance over actual reservoirs using a combination of in situ and simulated reservoir observations from the SWOTsim instrument simulator. Results indicate temporal errors to be less than 5% for the smallest reservoir sizes (100 km2). Surface area and height errors were found to be minimal (area SWOT, this study will be have important implications for future applications of SWOT reservoir measurements in global monitoring systems and models.

  15. Geological discrete-fracture network model (version 1) for the Olkiluoto site, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, A.; Buoro, A.; Dahlbo, K.; Wiren, L.

    2009-10-01

    striking approximately east-west. The subhorizontally-dipping fractures account for most (55% - 60%, depending on fracture domain) of the total observed fracture intensity at Olkiluoto. Fracture intensity shows a correlation with depth below the ground surface, with exponential functions used to describe the change in volumetric fracture intensity (P 32 ) with depth. Fracture intensity is greatest within the intermediate fracture domain and least in the lower fracture domain. Three alternative DFN models are presented, based on different weightings of the importance of individual datasets. In Case 1, the fracture orientation and intensity models are based solely on borehole data; this case is focused on correctly modelling intensity in the upper fracture domain. Case 2 is focused on producing a better match between simulated and observed fracture trace maps at surface outcrops. Finally in Case 3, the size model is modified so as to give greater weight to fracture traces observed in the ONKALO tunnel. Together, these three models provide an initial estimate of variability in geological DFN parameters. (orig.)

  16. A fracture mechanics assessment of surface cracks existing in protective layers of multi-layer composite pipes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hutař, Pavel; Náhlík, Luboš; Šestáková, Lucie; Ševčík, Martin; Knésl, Zdeněk; Nezbedová, E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 5 (2010), s. 1120-1125 ISSN 0263-8223 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/0279 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Protective layers * Multi-layer pipes damage * Fracture mechanics * Bi-material interface * Generalized stress intensity factor Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.028, year: 2010

  17. Characterization of fracture toughness of epoxy resin after hygrothermal aging

    KAUST Repository

    Quispe, Gustavo Q.

    2013-07-01

    Characterization of fracture toughness of epoxy resin after hygrothermal ageing Gustavo Quino Quispe The aim of this work is to characterize the e ects of hygrothermal aging in the plain strain fracture toughness of the epoxy system composed by cycloaliphatic epoxy resin and diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA). For this, after having been under hygrothermal aging in a climatic chamber, epoxy samples were studied using ASTM D5045 fracture toughness test, and micrography and roughness measurements of the fracture surface. It is reported a rapid decrease of GIc and KIc during the rst 2 days. Moreover, a numerical model [13] was used to simulate and see with more detail the water absorption in the aged samples. From that, it was observed the heterogeneous distribution of water. Accordingly, it was proposed that the results should be correlated with the water content at the vicinity of the crack tip. Consequently, it was possible to obtain, by quasi-static simulations, the ideal load-displacement curves of crack propagation in the heterogeneous samples. Finally, another contribution of this work is the study of the fracture surface, that gives a clue of the relationship among the fracture energy, the appearance of microcracks in the fracture surface, and the roughness (Ra).

  18. Lunar floor-fractured craters: Modes of dike and sill emplacement and implications of gas production and intrusion cooling on surface morphology and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lionel; Head, James W.

    2018-05-01

    within ∼300 m of the surface, and thus eruptions, rather than intrusions, would be very likely to occur; instead, dynamical considerations strongly favor the sub-crustal breccia lens as the location of the physical property contrast localizing lateral intrusion, at a depth of several kilometers. The end of lateral and vertical sill growth occurs when the internal magma pressure equals the external pressure (the intrusion just supports the weight of the overlying crust). Dynamical considerations lead to the conclusion that dike magma volumes are up to ∼1100 km3, and are generally insufficient to form FFCs on the lunar farside; the estimated magma volumes available for injection into sills on the lunar nearside (up to ∼800 km3) are comparable to the observed floor uplift in many smaller FFCs, and thus consistent with these FFCs forming from a single dike emplacement event. In contrast, the thickest intrusions in the largest craters imply volumes requiring multiple dike contributions; these are likely to be events well-separated in time, rather than injection of new magma into a recently-formed and still-cooling intrusion. We present a temporal sequence of 1) dike emplacement, 2) sill formation and surface deformation, 3) bubble rise, foam layer formation and collapse, 4) intrusion cooling, and a synthesis of predicted deformation sequence and eruption styles. Initial lateral injection of the sill at a depth well below the upper dike tip initiates upbowing of the overburden, leveraging deformation of the crater floor melt sheet above. This is followed by lateral spreading of the sill toward the edges of the crater floor, where crater wall and rim deposit overburden inhibit further lateral growth, and the sill grows vertically into a laccolith or bysmalith, uplifting the entire floor above the intrusion. Subsidiary dikes can be emplaced in the fractures at the uplift margins and will rise to the isostatic level of the initial dike tip; if these contain sufficient

  19. Limiter surface observation by infrared techniques, AES, and SEM in the JFT-2 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomay, Y.; Fujisawa, N.; Maeno, M.

    1979-01-01

    The surface characteristics of molybdenum rail-type limiters in the JFT-2 tokamak have been studied by means of infrared techniques, AES, and SEM. The maximum temperature of the limiter surface during the discharge was 550 0 C which is low enough to neglect the evaporation. The limiter surface was found to be eroded uniformly by exposure to the plasma, probably by ion sputtering. Microarcing with arc spots of 0.5-20 μm diameters was observed on the limiter exposed only to stable discharges. Since the arc current of microarcing is estimated to be 1-40 A, the return current can be supplied with electron flow to the nearby area of arc spots. Microarcing as well as ion sputtering may play important roles in limiter material injection into the plasma. (orig.)

  20. Global Model Comparison with NOAA Observed Surface Ozone to Understand Transport in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; McClure-Begley, A.; Tummon, F.; Tilmes, S.; Yudina, A.; Crepinsek, S.; Uttal, T.

    2016-12-01

    The Arctic region is rapidly gaining interest and support for scientific studies to help understand and characterize the processes, sources, and chemical composition of the Arctic environment. In order to understand the Arctic climate system and the changes that are occurring, it is imperative to know the behavior and impact of atmospheric constituents. As a secondary pollutant which impacts the oxidation capacity and radiative forcing of the atmosphere, ozone is an imperative species to characterize. Global atmospheric models help to confirm and understand the influence of long-distance transport on local ozone conditions. This analysis highlights the winter season when ozone conditions are not being driven by photochemical influence, and transport is the prevalent means of ozone variation. In order to ensure adequate representation of ozone conditions and source regions, model comparison verifies the ability of models to represent the behavior of ozone at the surface. Ozone mixing ratios observed from Barrow, Alaska and Summit, Greenland, are critical observations to provide fundamental knowledge of the behavior and trends of ground-level ozone in the Arctic. The observed surface ozone and wind data are compared against two different global climate-chemistry models to assess the ability for models to simulate surface ozone in the arctic region. The CCM SOCOL (Modeling tools for studies of Solar Climate Ozone Links) and Community Earth System Model (CESM1) CAM4-chem are compared to observational measurements. Comparisons between the model and observations are used as the first step in understanding of the long-range transport contribution to ozone variability in the boundary layer of the Arctic environment. An improvement in agreement between observations and chemistry-climate hind cast is found when the model is forced with reanalysis wind conditions.

  1. Stress generation and hierarchical fracturing in reactive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamtveit, B.; Iyer, K.; Royne, A.; Malthe-Sorenssen, A.; Mathiesen, J.; Feder, J.

    2007-12-01

    Hierarchical fracture patterns are the result of a slowly driven fracturing process that successively divides the rocks into smaller domains. In quasi-2D systems, such fracture patterns are characterized by four sided domains, and T-junctions where new fractures stop at right angles to pre-existing fractures. We describe fracturing of mm to dm thick enstatite layers in a dunite matrix from the Leka ophiolite complex in Norway. The fracturing process is driven by expansion of the dunite matrix during serpentinization. The cumulative distributions of fracture lengths show a scaling behavior that lies between a log - normal and power law (fractal) distribution. This is consistent with a simple fragmentation model in which domains are divided according to a 'top hat' distribution of new fracture positions within unfractured domains. Reaction-assisted hierarchical fracturing is also likely to be responsible for other (3-D) structures commonly observed in serpentinized ultramafic rocks, including the mesh-textures observed in individual olivine grains, and the high abundance of rectangular domains at a wide range of scales. Spectacular examples of 3-D hierarchical fracture patterns also form during the weathering of basaltic intrusions (dolerites). Incipient chemical weathering of dolerites in the Karoo Basin in South Africa occurs around water- filled fractures, originally produced by thermal contraction or by externally imposed stresses. This chemical weathering causes local expansion of the rock matrix and generates elastic stresses. On a mm to cm scale, these stresses lead to mechanical layer-by-layer spalling, producing the characteristic spheroidal weathering patterns. However, our field observations and computer simulations demonstrate that in confined environments, the spalling process alone is unable to relieve the elastic stresses. In such cases, chemical weathering drives a much larger scale hierarchical fracturing process in which fresh dolerite undergoes a

  2. Impacts of land cover transitions on surface temperature in China based on satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuzhen; Liang, Shunlin

    2018-02-01

    China has experienced intense land use and land cover changes during the past several decades, which have exerted significant influences on climate change. Previous studies exploring related climatic effects have focused mainly on one or two specific land use changes, or have considered all land use and land cover change types together without distinguishing their individual impacts, and few have examined the physical processes of the mechanism through which land use changes affect surface temperature. However, in this study, we considered satellite-derived data of multiple land cover changes and transitions in China. The objective was to obtain observational evidence of the climatic effects of land cover transitions in China by exploring how they affect surface temperature and to what degree they influence it through the modification of biophysical processes, with an emphasis on changes in surface albedo and evapotranspiration (ET). To achieve this goal, we quantified the changes in albedo, ET, and surface temperature in the transition areas, examined their correlations with temperature change, and calculated the contributions of different land use transitions to surface temperature change via changes in albedo and ET. Results suggested that land cover transitions from cropland to urban land increased land surface temperature (LST) during both daytime and nighttime by 0.18 and 0.01 K, respectively. Conversely, the transition of forest to cropland tended to decrease surface temperature by 0.53 K during the day and by 0.07 K at night, mainly through changes in surface albedo. Decreases in both daytime and nighttime LST were observed over regions of grassland to forest transition, corresponding to average values of 0.44 and 0.20 K, respectively, predominantly controlled by changes in ET. These results highlight the necessity to consider the individual climatic effects of different land cover transitions or conversions in climate research studies. This short

  3. Identification of modes of fracture in a 2618-T6 aluminum alloy using stereophotogrammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas Zamarripa, A., E-mail: a.salaszamarripa@gmail.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon. Av. Universidad S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 66451, Apartado Postal 076 Suc. ' F' San Nicolas de los Garza, N.L. (Mexico); Pinna, C.; Brown, M.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield. Sir Frederick Mappin Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Mata, M.P. Guerrero; Morales, M. Castillo; Beber-Solano, T.P. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon. Av. Universidad S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 66451, Apartado Postal 076 Suc. ' F' San Nicolas de los Garza, N.L. (Mexico)

    2011-12-15

    The identification and the development of a quantification technique of the modes of fracture in fatigue fracture surfaces of a 2618-T6 aluminum alloy were developed during this research. Fatigue tests at room and high temperature (230 Degree-Sign C) were carried out to be able to compare the microscopic fractographic features developed by this material under these testing conditions. The overall observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the fracture surfaces showed a mixture of transgranular and ductile intergranular fracture. The ductile intergranular fracture contribution appears to be more significant at room temperature than at 230 Degree-Sign C. A quantitative methodology was developed to identify and to measure the contribution of these microscopic fractographic features. The technique consisted of a combination of stereophotogrammetry and image analysis. Stereo-pairs were randomly taken along the crack paths and were then analyzed using the profile module of MeX software. The analysis involved the 3-D surface reconstruction, the trace of primary profile lines in both vertical and horizontal directions within the stereo-pair area, the measurements of the contribution of the modes of fracture in each profile, and finally, the calculation of the average contribution in each stereo-pair. The technique results confirmed a higher contribution of ductile intergranular fracture at room temperature than at 230 Degree-Sign C. Moreover, there was no indication of a direct relationship between this contribution and the strain amplitudes range applied during the fatigue testing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stereophotogrammetry and image analysis as a measuring tool of modes of fracture in fatigue fracture surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mixture of ductile intergranular and transgranular fracture was identified at room temperature and 230 Degree-Sign C testing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of a quantitative methodology to

  4. Reconstruction of Sub-Surface Velocities from Satellite Observations Using Iterative Self-Organizing Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Christopher; Charantonis, Anastase

    2017-04-01

    A new method based on modified self-organizing maps is presented for the reconstruction of deep ocean current velocities from surface information provided by satellites. This method takes advantage of local correlations in the data-space to improve the accuracy of the reconstructed deep velocities. No assumptions regarding the structure of the water column, nor the underlying dynamics of the flow field, are made. Using satellite observations of surface velocity, sea-surface height and sea-surface temperature, as well as observations of the deep current velocity from autonomous Argo floats to train the map, we are able to reconstruct realistic high-resolution velocity fields at a depth of 1000m. Validation reveals promising results, with a speed root mean squared error of approximately 2.8cm/s, more than a factor of two smaller than competing methods, and direction errors consistently smaller than 30 degrees. The shortcomings of this method will be discussed, as well as recent work to extend the method to produce a fully 3D reconstruction of the interior temperature and velocity fields.

  5. Full 2D observation of water surface elevation from SWOT under different flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domeneghetti, Alessio; Schumann, Guy; Rui, Wei; Durand, Michael; Pavelsky, Tamlin

    2016-04-01

    The upcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission is a joint project of NASA, Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES, France), the Canadian Space Agency, and the Space Agency of the UK that will provide a first global, high-resolution observation of ocean and terrestrial water surface heights. Characterized by an observation swath of 120 km and an orbit repeat interval of about 21 days, SWOT will provide unprecedented bi-dimensional observations of rivers wider than 50-100 m. Despite many research activities that have investigated potential uses of remotely sensed data from SWOT, potentials and limitations of the spatial observations provided by the satellite mission for flood modeling still remain poorly understood and investigated. In this study we present a first analysis of the spatial observation of water surface elevation that is expected from SWOT for a 140 km reach of the middle-lower portion of the Po River, in Northern Italy. The river stretch is characterized by a main channel varying from 200-500 m in width and a floodplain that can be as wide as 5 km and that is delimited by a system of major embankments. The reconstruction of the hydraulic behavior of the Po River is performed by means of a quasi-2d model built with detailed topographic and bathymetric information (LiDAR, 2 m resolution), while the simulation of the spatial observation sensed by SWOT is performed with a SWOT simulator that mimics the satellite sensor characteristics. Referring to water surface elevations associated with different flow conditions (maximum, minimum and average flow reproduced by means of the quasi-2d numerical model) this work provides a first characterization of the spatial observations provided by SWOT and highlights the strengths and limitations of the expected products. By referring to a real river reach the analysis provides a credible example of the type of spatial observations that will be available after launch of SWOT and offers a first

  6. Persistent aeolian activity at Endeavour crater, Meridiani Planum, Mars; new observations from orbit and the surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, Matthew; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Moersch, Jeffrey E.; Fenton, Lori K.; Michaels, Timothy I.; Bell, James F., III

    2015-05-01

    Aeolian-driven bedform activity is now known to occur in many regions of Mars, based on surface and orbital observation of contemporary martian ripple and dune mobility events. Many of these sites have only been monitored with sufficient resolution data for the last few Mars years, when the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) began acquiring images of Mars. One exception is the well-monitored Endeavour crater in Meridiani Planum, which was one of the first known sites of unambiguous dune activity (migration and deflation). However, those early detections used lower resolution images over longer temporal baselines (versus the HIRISE data now available), leaving some measurements poorly constrained. New orbital and surface observations of Endeavour show multiple spatial (cm, m, km) and temporal (seasons, Mars year) scales of aeolian-driven surface change, which confirms earlier reports. Dome dunes in the eastern portion of the crater persistently deflate, disseminating dark sand across lighter-toned regolith and/or eroded bright dust, and likely contribute to the crater interior's episodic decreases in orbital albedo measurements. Other dome dunes are detected with the highest migration rates (4-12 m per Mars year) and volumetric sand fluxes reported yet for Mars. Estimated dune construction times or "turnover times" here and elsewhere on Mars are significantly shorter than martian obliquity cycles, implying that it is not necessary to invoke paleoclimate wind regimes to explain current dune morphologies. Located on the crater rim, the Opportunity rover detected evidence for near- and far-field aeolian-driven activity, with observations of spherules/sand movement in the rover workspace, bedform albedo alteration, and dust-lifting events. Observations of intracrater dunes show periodic shifting dark streaks that significantly constrain local wind regimes (directionality and seasonality). Constraints on wind directions from surface and orbital images

  7. Interactive Computing and Processing of NASA Land Surface Observations Using Google Earth Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, Andrew; Burks, Jason; Bell, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Google's Earth Engine offers a "big data" approach to processing large volumes of NASA and other remote sensing products. h\\ps://earthengine.google.com/ Interfaces include a Javascript or Python-based API, useful for accessing and processing over large periods of record for Landsat and MODIS observations. Other data sets are frequently added, including weather and climate model data sets, etc. Demonstrations here focus on exploratory efforts to perform land surface change detection related to severe weather, and other disaster events.

  8. Comparison of land surface humidity between observations and CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert J. H.; Willett, Kate M.; Ciavarella, Andrew; Stott, Peter A.

    2017-08-01

    We compare the latest observational land surface humidity dataset, HadISDH, with the latest generation of climate models extracted from the CMIP5 archive and the ERA-Interim reanalysis over the period 1973 to present. The globally averaged behaviour of HadISDH and ERA-Interim are very similar in both humidity measures and air temperature, on decadal and interannual timescales. The global average relative humidity shows a gradual increase from 1973 to 2000, followed by a steep decline in recent years. The observed specific humidity shows a steady increase in the global average during the early period but in the later period it remains approximately constant. None of the CMIP5 models or experiments capture the observed behaviour of the relative or specific humidity over the entire study period. When using an atmosphere-only model, driven by observed sea surface temperatures and radiative forcing changes, the behaviour of regional average temperature and specific humidity are better captured, but there is little improvement in the relative humidity. Comparing the observed climatologies with those from historical model runs shows that the models are generally cooler everywhere, are drier and less saturated in the tropics and extra-tropics, and have comparable moisture levels but are more saturated in the high latitudes. The spatial pattern of linear trends is relatively similar between the models and HadISDH for temperature and specific humidity, but there are large differences for relative humidity, with less moistening shown in the models over the tropics and very little at high latitudes. The observed drying in mid-latitudes is present at a much lower magnitude in the CMIP5 models. Relationships between temperature and humidity anomalies (T-q and T-rh) show good agreement for specific humidity between models and observations, and between the models themselves, but much poorer for relative humidity. The T-q correlation from the models is more steeply positive than

  9. Topographic Effects on the Surface Emissivity of a Mountainous Area Observed by a Spaceborne Microwave Radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank S. Marzano

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A simulation study to understand the influence of topography on the surfaceemissivity observed by a satellite microwave radiometer is carried out. We analyze theeffects due to changes in observation angle, including the rotation of the polarization plane.A mountainous area in the Alps (Northern Italy is considered and the information on therelief extracted from a digital elevation model is exploited. The numerical simulation refersto a radiometric image, acquired by a conically-scanning radiometer similar to AMSR-E,i.e., flying at 705 km of altitude with an observation angle of 55°. To single out the impacton surface emissivity, scattering of the radiation due to the atmosphere or neighboringelevated surfaces is not considered. C and X bands, for which atmospheric effects arenegligible, and Ka band are analyzed. The results indicate that the changes in the localobservation angle tend to lower the apparent emissivity of a radiometric pixel with respectto the corresponding flat surface characteristics. The effect of the rotation of thepolarization plane enlarges (vertical polarization, or attenuates (horizontal polarizationthis decrease. By doing some simplifying assumptions for the radiometer antenna, theconclusion is that the microwave emissivity at vertical polarization is underestimated,whilst the opposite occurs for horizontal polarization, except for Ka band, for which bothunder- and overprediction may occur. A quantification of the differences with respect to aflat soil and an approximate evaluation of their impact on soil moisture retrieval areyielded.

  10. Adjusting altimetric sea surface height observations in coastal regions. Case study in the Greek Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mintourakis Ioannis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available When processing satellite altimetry data for Mean Sea Surface (MSS modelling in coastal environments many problems arise. The degradation of the accuracy of the Sea Surface Height (SSH observations close to the coastline and the usually irregular pattern and variability of the sea surface topography are the two dominant factors which have to be addressed. In the present paper, we study the statistical behavior of the SSH observations in relation to the range from the coastline for many satellite altimetry missions and we make an effort to minimize the effects of the ocean variability. Based on the above concepts we present a process strategy for the homogenization of multi satellite altimetry data that takes advantage ofweighted SSH observations and applies high degree polynomials for the adjustment and their uniffcation at a common epoch. At each step we present the contribution of each concept to MSS modelling and then we develop a MSS, a marine geoid model and a grid of gravity Free Air Anomalies (FAA for the area under study. Finally, we evaluate the accuracy of the resulting models by comparisons to state of the art global models and other available data such as GPS/leveling points, marine GPS SSH’s and marine gravity FAA’s, in order to investigate any progress achieved by the presented strategy

  11. Direct observation of surface-state thermal oscillations in SmB6 oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Brian; Stern, Alex; Efimkin, Dmitry K.; Fisk, Zachary; Xia, Jing

    2018-01-01

    SmB6 is a mixed valence Kondo insulator that exhibits a sharp increase in resistance following an activated behavior that levels off and saturates below 4 K. This behavior can be explained by the proposal of SmB6 representing a new state of matter, a topological Kondo insulator, in which a Kondo gap is developed, and topologically protected surface conduction dominates low-temperature transport. Exploiting its nonlinear dynamics, a tunable SmB6 oscillator device was recently demonstrated, where a small dc current generates large oscillating voltages at frequencies from a few Hz to hundreds of MHz. This behavior was explained by a theoretical model describing the thermal and electronic dynamics of coupled surface and bulk states. However, a crucial aspect of this model, the predicted temperature oscillation in the surface state, has not been experimentally observed to date. This is largely due to the technical difficulty of detecting an oscillating temperature of the very thin surface state. Here we report direct measurements of the time-dependent surface-state temperature in SmB6 with a RuO2 microthermometer. Our results agree quantitatively with the theoretically simulated temperature waveform, and hence support the validity of the oscillator model, which will provide accurate theoretical guidance for developing future SmB6 oscillators at higher frequencies.

  12. Surface Freshwater Storage Variations in the Orinoco Floodplains Using Multi-Satellite Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Frappart

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Variations in surface water extent and storage are poorly characterized from regional to global scales. In this study, a multi-satellite approach is proposed to estimate the water stored in the floodplains of the Orinoco Basin at a monthly time-scale using remotely-sensed observations of surface water from the Global Inundation Extent Multi-Satellite (GIEMS and stages from Envisat radar altimetry. Surface water storage variations over 2003–2007 exhibit large interannual variability and a strong seasonal signal, peaking during summer, and associated with the flood pulse. The volume of surface water storage in the Orinoco Basin was highly correlated with the river discharge at Ciudad Bolivar (R = 0.95, the closest station to the mouth where discharge was estimated, although discharge lagged one month behind storage. The correlation remained high (R = 0.73 after removing seasonal effects. Mean annual variations in surface water volume represented ~170 km3, contributing to ~45% of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE-derived total water storage variations and representing ~13% of the total volume of water that flowed out of the Orinoco Basin to the Atlantic Ocean.

  13. Observation of the spin-polarized surface state in a noncentrosymmetric superconductor BiPd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Madhab; Alidoust, Nasser; Hosen, M Mofazzel; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Dimitri, Klauss; Xu, Su-Yang; Dhakal, Nagendra; Sankar, Raman; Belopolski, Ilya; Sanchez, Daniel S; Chang, Tay-Rong; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Miyamoto, Koji; Okuda, Taichi; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun; Kaczorowski, Dariusz; Chou, Fangcheng; Hasan, M Zahid; Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    2016-11-07

    Recently, noncentrosymmetric superconductor BiPd has attracted considerable research interest due to the possibility of hosting topological superconductivity. Here we report a systematic high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and spin-resolved ARPES study of the normal state electronic and spin properties of BiPd. Our experimental results show the presence of a surface state at higher-binding energy with the location of Dirac point at around 700 meV below the Fermi level. The detailed photon energy, temperature-dependent and spin-resolved ARPES measurements complemented by our first-principles calculations demonstrate the existence of the spin-polarized surface states at high-binding energy. The absence of such spin-polarized surface states near the Fermi level negates the possibility of a topological superconducting behaviour on the surface. Our direct experimental observation of spin-polarized surface states in BiPd provides critical information that will guide the future search for topological superconductivity in noncentrosymmetric materials.

  14. Influence of aerosol and surface reflectance variability on hyperspectral observed radiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bassani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Current aerosol retrievals based on visible and near infrared remote-sensing, are prone to loss of accuracy, where the assumptions of the applied algorithm are violated. This happens mostly over land and it is related to misrepresentation of specific aerosol conditions or surface properties. New satellite missions, based on high spectral resolution instruments, such as PRISMA (Hyperspectral Precursor of the Application Mission, represent a valuable opportunity to improve the accuracy of τa550 retrievable from a remote-sensing system developing new atmospheric measurement techniques. This paper aims to address the potential of these new observing systems in more accurate retrieving τa550, specifically over land in heterogeneous and/or homogeneous areas composed by dark and bright targets. The study shows how the variation of the hyperspectral observed radiance can be addressed to recognise a variation of Δτa550 = 0.02. The goal has been achieved by using simulated radiances by combining two aerosol models (urban and continental and two reflecting surfaces: dark (represented by water and bright (represented by sand for the PRISMA instrument, considering the environmental contribution of the observed radiance, i.e., the adjacency effect. Results showed that, in the continental regime, the expected instrument sensitivity would allow for retrieval accuracy of the aerosol optical thickness at 550 nm of 0.02 or better, with a dark surface surrounded by dark areas. The study also showed that for the urban regime, the surface plays a more significant role, with a bright surface surrounded by dark areas providing favourable conditions for the aerosol load retrievals, and dark surfaces representing less suitable situations for inversion independently of the surroundings. However, over all, the results obtained provide evidence that high resolution observations of Earth spectrum between

  15. Long-term surface pCO2 trends from observations and models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry F. Tjiputra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We estimate regional long-term surface ocean pCO2 growth rates using all available underway and bottled biogeochemistry data collected over the past four decades. These observed regional trends are compared with those simulated by five state-of-the-art Earth system models over the historical period. Oceanic pCO2 growth rates faster than the atmospheric growth rates indicate decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake, while ocean pCO2 growth rates slower than the atmospheric growth rates indicate increasing atmospheric CO2 uptake. Aside from the western subpolar North Pacific and the subtropical North Atlantic, our analysis indicates that the current observation-based basin-scale trends may be underestimated, indicating that more observations are needed to determine the trends in these regions. Encouragingly, good agreement between the simulated and observed pCO2 trends is found when the simulated fields are subsampled with the observational coverage. In agreement with observations, we see that the simulated pCO2 trends are primarily associated with the increase in surface dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC associated with atmospheric carbon uptake, and in part by warming of the sea surface. Under the RCP8.5 future scenario, DIC continues to be the dominant driver of pCO2 trends, with little change in the relative contribution of SST. However, the changes in the hydrological cycle play an increasingly important role. For the contemporary (1970–2011 period, the simulated regional pCO2 trends are lower than the atmospheric growth rate over 90% of the ocean. However, by year 2100 more than 40% of the surface ocean area has a higher oceanic pCO2 trend than the atmosphere, implying a reduction in the atmospheric CO2 uptake rate. The fastest pCO2 growth rates are projected for the subpolar North Atlantic, while the high-latitude Southern Ocean and eastern equatorial Pacific have the weakest growth rates, remaining below the atmospheric pCO2 growth rate. Our work

  16. New Scheme for Validating Remote-Sensing Land Surface Temperature Products with Station Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenping Yu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Continuous land-surface temperature (LST observations from ground-based stations are an important reference dataset for validating remote-sensing LST products. However, a lack of evaluations of the representativeness of station observations limits the reliability of validation results. In this study, a new practical validation scheme is presented for validating remote-sensing LST products that includes a key step: assessing the spatial representativeness of ground-based LST measurements. Three indicators, namely, the dominant land-cover type (DLCT, relative bias (RB, and average structure scale (ASS, are established to quantify the representative levels of station observations based on the land-cover type (LCT and LST reference maps with high spatial resolution. We validated MODIS LSTs using station observations from the Heihe River Basin (HRB in China. The spatial representative evaluation steps show that the representativeness of observations greatly differs among stations and varies with different vegetation growth and other factors. Large differences in the validation results occur when using different representative level observations, which indicates a large potential for large error during the traditional T-based validation scheme. Comparisons show that the new validation scheme greatly improves the reliability of LST product validation through high-level representative observations.

  17. Surface current dynamics under sea breeze conditions observed by simultaneous HF radar, ADCP and drifter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentchev, Alexei; Forget, Philippe; Fraunié, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Ocean surface boundary layer dynamics off the southern coast of France in the NW Mediterranean is investigated by using velocity observations by high-frequency (HF) radars, surface drifting buoys and a downward-looking drifting acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). The analysis confirms that velocities measured by HF radars correspond to those observed by an ADCP at the effective depth z f = k -1, where k is wavenumber of the radio wave emitted by the radar. The radials provided by the radars were in a very good agreement with in situ measurements, with the relative errors of 1 and 9 % and root mean square (RMS) differences of 0.02 and 0.04 m/s for monostatic and bistatic radar, respectively. The total radar-based velocities appeared to be slightly underestimated in magnitude and somewhat biased in direction. At the end of the survey period, the difference in the surface current direction, based on HF radar and ADCP data, attained 10°. It was demonstrated that the surface boundary layer dynamics cannot be reconstructed successfully without taking into the account velocity variation with depth. A significant misalignment of ˜30° caused by the sea breeze was documented between the HF radar (HFR-derived) surface current and the background current. It was also found that the ocean response to a moderate wind forcing was confined to the 4-m-thick upper layer. The respective Ekman current attained the maximum value of 0.15 m/s, and the current rotation was found to be lagging the wind by approximately 40 min, with the current vector direction being 15-20° to the left of the wind. The range of velocity variability due to wind forcing was found comparable with the magnitude of the background current variability.

  18. Ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) and Superstorm Sandy (2012): Coupled model predictions and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Forecasting hurricane impacts of extreme winds and flooding requires accurate prediction of hurricane structure and storm-induced ocean surface waves days in advance. The waves are complex, especially near landfall when the hurricane winds and water depth varies significantly and the surface waves refract, shoal and dissipate. In this study, we examine the spatial structure, magnitude, and directional spectrum of hurricane-induced ocean waves using a high resolution, fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model and observations. The coupled model predictions of ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) over the Gulf of Mexico and Superstorm Sandy (2012) in the northeastern Atlantic and coastal region are evaluated with the NDBC buoy and satellite altimeter observations. Although there are characteristics that are general to ocean waves in both hurricanes as documented in previous studies, wave fields in Ike and Sandy possess unique properties due mostly to the distinct wind fields and coastal bathymetry in the two storms. Several processes are found to significantly modulate hurricane surface waves near landfall. First, the phase speed and group velocities decrease as the waves become shorter and steeper in shallow water, effectively increasing surface roughness and wind stress. Second, the bottom-induced refraction acts to turn the waves toward the coast, increasing the misalignment between the wind and waves. Third, as the hurricane translates over land, the left side of the storm center is characterized by offshore winds over very short fetch, which opposes incoming swell. Landfalling hurricanes produce broader wave spectra overall than that of the open ocean. The front-left quadrant is most complex, where the combination of windsea, swell propagating against the wind, increasing wind-wave stress, and interaction with the coastal topography requires a fully coupled model to meet these challenges in hurricane wave and surge prediction.

  19. Bioactive glass-chitosan composite coatings on PEEK: Effects of surface wettability and roughness on the interfacial fracture resistance and in vitro cell response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Guo, Fangwei; Chen, Jianwei; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Xiao, Ping

    2018-05-01

    To improve the osteointegration of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) spinal fusions, the 45S5 bioactive glass® (BG)-chitosan (CH) composite was used to coat the PEEK by a dip-coating method at room temperature. A robust bonding between the BG-CH composite coating and the PEEK was achieved by a combined surface treatment of sand blasting and acid etching. The effects of surface wettability and surface roughness on the adhesion of the BG-CH composite coating were characterized by fracture resistance (Gc), respectively, measured by four-point bending tests. Compared with the surface polar energy (wettability), the surface roughness (>3 μm) played a more important role for the increase in Gc values by means of crack shielding effect under the mixed mode stress. The maximum adhesion strength (σ) of the coatings on the modified PEEK measured by the tensile pull-off test was about 5.73 MPa. The in vitro biocompatibilities of PEEK, including cell adhesion, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bioactivity in the stimulated body fluid (SBF), were enhanced by the presence of BG-CH composite coatings, which also suggested that this composite coating method could provide an effective solution for the weak PEEK-bone integration.

  20. Development of Innovative Technology to Provide Low-Cost Surface Atmospheric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Paul; Steinson, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Accurate and reliable real-time monitoring and dissemination of observations of surface weather conditions is critical for a variety of societal applications. Applications that provide local and regional information about temperature, precipitation, moisture, and winds, for example, are important for agriculture, water resource monitoring, health, and monitoring of hazard weather conditions. In many regions in Africa (and other global locations), surface weather stations are sparsely located and/or of poor quality. Existing stations have often been sited incorrectly, not well-maintained, and have limited communications established at the site for real-time monitoring. The US National Weather Service (NWS) International Activities Office (IAO) in partnership with University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) has started an initiative to develop and deploy low-cost weather instrumentation in sparsely observed regions of the world. The goal is to provide observations for environmental monitoring, and early warning alert systems that can be deployed at weather services in developing countries. Instrumentation is being designed using innovative new technologies such as 3D printers, Raspberry Pi computing systems, and wireless communications. The initial effort is focused on designing a surface network using GIS-based tools, deploying an initial network in Zambia, and providing training to Zambia Meteorological Department (ZMD) staff. The presentation will provide an overview of the project concepts, design of the low cost instrumentation, and initial experiences deploying a surface network deployment in Zambia.

  1. Surface flow observations from a gauge-cam station on the Tiber river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauro, Flavia; Porfiri, Maurizio; Petroselli, Andrea; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the kinematic organization of natural water bodies is central to hydrology and environmental engineering practice. Reliable and continuous flow observations are essential to comprehend flood generation and propagation mechanisms, erosion dynamics, sediment transport, and drainage network evolution. In engineering practice, flood warning systems largely rely on real-time discharge measurements, and flow velocity monitoring is important for the design and management of hydraulic structures, such as reservoirs and hydropower plants. Traditionally, gauging stations have been equipped with water level meters, and stage-discharge relationships (rating curves) have been established through few direct discharge measurements. Only in rare instances, monitoring stations have integrated radar technology for local measurement of surface flow velocity. Establishing accurate rating curves depends on the availability of a comprehensive range of discharge values, including measurements recorded during extreme events. However, discharge values during high-flow events are often difficult or even impossible to obtain, thereby hampering the reliability of discharge predictions. Fully remote observations have been enabled in the past ten years through optics-based velocimetry techniques. Such methodologies enable the estimation of the surface flow velocity field over extended regions from the motion of naturally occurring debris or floaters dragged by the current. Resting on the potential demonstrated by such approaches, here, we present a novel permanent gauge-cam station for the observation of the flow velocity field in the Tiber river. This new station captures one-minute videos every 10 minutes over an area of up to 20.6 × 15.5m2. In a feasibility study, we demonstrate that experimental images analyzed via particle tracking velocimetry and particle image velocimetry can be used to obtain accurate surface flow velocity estimations in close agreement with radar records

  2. Application of Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope-Nanomanipulation System on Spheroplast Yeast Cells Surface Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rad, Maryam Alsadat; Ahmad, Mohd Ridzuan; Nakajima, Masahiro; Kojima, Seiji; Homma, Michio; Fukuda, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    The preparation and observations of spheroplast W303 cells are described with Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM). The spheroplasting conversion was successfully confirmed qualitatively, by the evaluation of the morphological change between the normal W303 cells and the spheroplast W303 cells, and quantitatively, by determining the spheroplast conversion percentage based on the OD 800 absorbance data. From the optical microscope observations as expected, the normal cells had an oval shape whereas spheroplast cells resemble a spherical shape. This was also confirmed under four different mediums, that is, yeast peptone-dextrose (YPD), sterile water, sorbitol-EDTA-sodium citrate buffer (SCE), and sorbitol-Tris-Hcl-CaCl 2 (CaS). It was also observed that the SCE and CaS mediums had a higher number of spheroplast cells as compared to the YPD and sterile water mediums. The OD 800 absorbance data also showed that the whole W303 cells were fully converted to the spheroplast cells after about 15 minutes. The observations of the normal and the spheroplast W303 cells were then performed under an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM). The normal cells showed a smooth cell surface whereas the spheroplast cells had a bleb-like surface after the loss of its integrity when removing the cell wall.

  3. Dynamic surface tracking controller design for a constrained hypersonic vehicle based on disturbance observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The tracking control problem of a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle subjects to aerodynamic parameter uncertainty and input constraint is investigated by combining nonlinear disturbance observer and dynamic surface control. To design controller simply, a control-oriented model is firstly derived and divided into two subsystems, velocity subsystem and altitude subsystem based on the engineering backgrounds of flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle. In every subsystem, compounded disturbances are included to consider aerodynamic uncertainty and the effect of the flexible modes. Then, disturbance observer is not only used to handle the compounded disturbance but also to handle the input constraint, where the estimation error converges to a random small region through appropriately choosing the observer parameters. To sequel, the disturbance observer–based robust control scheme and the disturbance observer-based dynamic surface control scheme are developed for the velocity subsystem and altitude subsystem, respectively. Besides, novel filters are designed to alleviate the problem of “explosion of terms” induced by backstepping method. On the basis of Lyapunov stability theory, the presented control scheme can assure that tracking error converges to an arbitrarily small neighborhood around zero by rigorous theoretical analysis. At last, simulation result shows the effectiveness of the presented control method.

  4. Development of Innovative Technology to Provide Low-Cost Surface Atmospheric Observations in Data Sparse Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Paul; Steinson, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Accurate and reliable real-time monitoring and dissemination of observations of surface weather conditions is critical for a variety of societal applications. Applications that provide local and regional information about temperature, precipitation, moisture, and winds, for example, are important for agriculture, water resource monitoring, health, and monitoring of hazard weather conditions. In many regions of the World, surface weather stations are sparsely located and/or of poor quality. Existing stations have often been sited incorrectly, not well-maintained, and have limited communications established at the site for real-time monitoring. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR)/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), with support from USAID, has started an initiative to develop and deploy low-cost weather instrumentation in sparsely observed regions of the world. The project is focused on improving weather observations for environmental monitoring and early warning alert systems on a regional to global scale. Instrumentation that has been developed use innovative new technologies such as 3D printers, Raspberry Pi computing systems, and wireless communications. The goal of the project is to make the weather station designs, software, and processing tools an open community resource. The weather stations can be built locally by agencies, through educational institutions, and residential communities as a citizen effort to augment existing networks to improve detection of natural hazards for disaster risk reduction. The presentation will provide an overview of the open source weather station technology and evaluation of sensor observations for the initial networks that have been deployed in Africa.

  5. Observations and simulations of microplastic marine debris in the ocean surface boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukulka, T.; Brunner, K.; Proskurowski, G. K.; Lavender Law, K. L.

    2016-02-01

    Motivated by observations of buoyant microplastic marine debris (MPMD) in the ocean surface boundary layer (OSBL), this study applies a large eddy simulation model and a parametric one-dimensional column model to examine vertical distributions of MPMD. MPMD is widely distributed in vast regions of the subtropical gyres and has emerged as a major open ocean pollutant whose distribution is subject to upper ocean turbulence. The models capture wind-driven turbulence, Langmuir turbulence (LT), and enhanced turbulent kinetic energy input due to breaking waves (BW). Model results are only consistent with MPMD observations if LT effects are included. Neither BW nor shear-driven turbulence is capable of deeply submerging MPMD, suggesting that the observed vertical MPMD distributions are a characteristic signature of wave-driven LT. Thus, this study demonstrates that LT substantially increases turbulent transport in the OSBL, resulting in deep submergence of buoyant tracers. The parametric model is applied to eleven years of observations in the North Atlantic and North Pacific subtropical gyres to show that surface measurements substantially underestimate MPMD concentrations by a factor of three to thirteen.

  6. Hydraulic anisotropy characterization of pneumatic-fractured sediments using azimuthal self potential gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishart, D.N.; Slater, L.D.; Schnell, D.L.; Herman, G.C.

    2009-01-01

    The pneumatic fracturing technique is used to enhance the permeability and porosity of tight unconsolidated soils (e.g. clays), thereby improving the effectiveness of remediation treatments. Azimuthal self potential gradient (ASPG) surveys were performed on a compacted, unconsolidated clay block in order to evaluate their potential to delineate contaminant migration pathways in a mechanically-induced fracture network. Azimuthal resistivity (ARS) measurements were also made for comparative purposes. Following similar procedures to those used in the field, compressed kaolinite sediments were pneumatically fractured and the resulting fracture geometry characterized from strike analysis of visible fractures combined with strike data from optical borehole televiewer (BHTV) imaging. We subsequently injected a simulated treatment (electrolyte/dye) into the fractures. Both ASPG and ARS data exhibit anisotropic geoelectric signatures resulting from the fracturing. Self potentials observed during injection of electrolyte are consistent with electrokinetic theory and previous laboratory results on a fracture block model. Visual (polar plot) analysis and linear regression of cross plots show ASPG lobes are correlated with azimuths of high fracture strike density, evidence that the ASPG anisotropy is a proxy measure of hydraulic anisotropy created by the pneumatic fracturing. However, ARS data are uncorrelated with fracture strike maxima and resistivity anisotropy is probably dominated by enhanced surface conduction along azimuths of weak 'starter paths' formed from pulverization of the clay and increases in interfacial surface area. We find the magnitude of electrokinetic SP scales with the applied N2 gas pressure gradient (??PN2) for any particular hydraulically-active fracture set and that the positive lobe of the ASPG anomaly indicates the flow direction within the fracture network. These findings demonstrate the use of ASPG in characterizing the effectiveness of (1

  7. Is in situ stress important to groundwater flow in shallow fractured rock aquifers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, L.; Aydin, A.; Simmons, C. T.; Love, A. J.

    2011-03-01

    SummaryIn situ stress affects the permeability tensor of fractured rock masses at depth but its effect on shallow to near-surface fractured rock aquifers has received little attention. This is partly because stress-related effects on groundwater flow at shallow depths are difficult to identify and characterise due to the complex interactions between all of the inherent properties of a fractured rock aquifer. These properties include the factors that dominantly control groundwater flow: fracture network density, geometry, connectivity and infill. Furthermore, surface processes such as weathering, erosion and unloading alter the original hydraulic nature (connectivity, transmissivity) of fractured rock masses resulting in higher degrees of spatial heterogeneity within shallow flow systems. These processes and interactions often mask the influence of in situ stress fields on fracture network permeability and groundwater flow. In this study, an integrated analysis of local area fracture networks, borehole geophysical logs, borehole groundwater yields and hydromechanical models demonstrate that in situ stress does affect groundwater flow in shallow (fractured rock aquifers by altering fracture hydraulic aperture distributions, fracture network connectivity and groundwater flow rates via fracture deformation processes. In particular, a comparison between representative models of deformed (stressed state) and undeformed (zero stress state) fracture networks showed that below 100 m depth, groundwater flow rates could decrease several fold under the influence of the contemporary stress field. This prediction was highly consistent with the field observations. In contrast, groundwater flow modelling of shallow fractured rock aquifers is typically conducted under the assumption that permeability is independent of the state of stress. A key finding of this study is that in situ stress may be a more important control on both local and regional scale shallow groundwater flow

  8. Hydraulic anisotropy characterization of pneumatic-fractured sediments using azimuthal self potential gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishart, DeBonne N; Slater, Lee D; Schnell, Deborah L; Herman, Gregory C

    2009-01-26

    The pneumatic fracturing technique is used to enhance the permeability and porosity of tight unconsolidated soils (e.g. clays), thereby improving the effectiveness of remediation treatments. Azimuthal self potential gradient (ASPG) surveys were performed on a compacted, unconsolidated clay block in order to evaluate their potential to delineate contaminant migration pathways in a mechanically-induced fracture network. Azimuthal resistivity (ARS) measurements were also made for comparative purposes. Following similar procedures to those used in the field, compressed kaolinite sediments were pneumatically fractured and the resulting fracture geometry characterized from strike analysis of visible fractures combined with strike data from optical borehole televiewer (BHTV) imaging. We subsequently injected a simulated treatment (electrolyte/dye) into the fractures. Both ASPG and ARS data exhibit anisotropic geoelectric signatures resulting from the fracturing. Self potentials observed during injection of electrolyte are consistent with electrokinetic theory and previous laboratory results on a fracture block model. Visual (polar plot) analysis and linear regression of cross plots show ASPG lobes are correlated with azimuths of high fracture strike density, evidence that the ASPG anisotropy is a proxy measure of hydraulic anisotropy created by the pneumatic fracturing. However, ARS data are uncorrelated with fracture strike maxima and resistivity anisotropy is probably dominated by enhanced surface conduction along azimuths of weak 'starter paths' formed from pulverization of the clay and increases in interfacial surface area. We find the magnitude of electrokinetic SP scales with the applied N2 gas pressure gradient (DeltaPN2) for any particular hydraulically-active fracture set and that the positive lobe of the ASPG anomaly indicates the flow direction within the fracture network. These findings demonstrate the use of ASPG in characterizing the effectiveness of (1

  9. fracture criterion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fracture in metallic glasses. What are the connections between nano- and micro- mechanisms and toughness? Metallic glasses are schizophrenic in the fracture sense. PDF Create! 5 Trial www.nuance.com ...

  10. Hand Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thumb Arthritis Thumb Sprains Trigger Finger Tumors Wrist Fracture Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety ... Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Thumb Arthritis Trigger Finger Wrist Fracture Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety ...

  11. Wrist Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Wrist Fractures Email to a friend * required fields From * To * DESCRIPTION A wrist fracture is a medical term for a broken wrist. The wrist is made up of eight ...

  12. Assimilation of ocean sea-surface height observations of mesoscale eddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jeffrey B.; Grooms, Ian

    2017-12-01

    Mesoscale eddies are one of the dominant sources of variability in the world's oceans. With eddy-resolving global ocean models, it becomes important to assimilate observations of mesoscale eddies to correctly represent the state of the mesoscale. Here, we investigate strategies for assimilating a reduced number of sea-surface height observations by focusing on the coherent mesoscale eddies. The study is carried out in an idealized perfect-model framework using two-layer forced quasigeostrophic dynamics, which captures the dominant dynamics of ocean mesoscale eddies. We study errors in state-estimation as well as error growth in forecasts and find that as fewer observations are assimilated, assimilating at vortex locations results in reduced state estimation and forecast errors.

  13. The study of discharge cleaning in the JFT-2 tokamak with surface observation by AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomay, Yoshio; Tazima, Teruhiko; Fujisawa, Noboru; Suzuki, Norio; Konoshima, Shigeru

    1976-07-01

    Noticeable correlations were observed between the changes of discharge characteristics, wall conditions and typical mass peaks with discharge cleaning in the JFT-2 tokamak. Atomic composition of the vacuum wall surface observed by AES becomes constant with continuing discharge cleaning in the level except hydrogen and helium: 30-50% C, 20-30% Mo, 15-30% stainless steel elements and 10-15% O. The stable reproducible plasma with Z sub(eff)=4.5 was obtained in this wall condition. The limiter and vacuum wall materials (Mo and 304 stainless steel, respectively), carbon and oxygen were observed depositing on the wall in the thickness of about 300 A at the minimum inner radius of the vacuum chamber and 40 A nearly at the maximum after 2900 cleaning pulses. The mechanism determining the wall condition is also discussed. (auth.)

  14. The bursts of high energy events observed by the telescope array surface detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R. U.; Abe, M.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Fujii, T.; Fukushima, M.; Goto, T.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Honda, K.; Ikeda, D.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ito, H.; Ivanov, D.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kawata, K.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kishigami, S.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lan, J.; Lundquist, J. P.; Machida, K.; Martens, K.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Minamino, M.; Mukai, K.; Myers, I.; Nagasawa, K.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nonaka, T.; Nozato, A.; Ogio, S.; Ogura, J.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Okuda, T.; Ono, M.; Onogi, R.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, K.; Saito, Y.; Sakaki, N.; Sakurai, N.; Sampson, A. L.; Scott, L. M.; Sekino, K.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, H. S.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzawa, T.; Takamura, M.; Takeda, M.; Takeishi, R.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Urban, F.; Vasiloff, G.; Wong, T.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yashiro, K.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2017-08-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment is designed to detect air showers induced by ultra high energy cosmic rays. The TA ground Surface particle Detector (TASD) observed several short-time bursts of air shower like events. These bursts are not likely due to chance coincidence between single shower events. The expectation of chance coincidence is less than 10-4 for five-year's observation. We checked the correlation between these bursts of events and lightning data, and found evidence for correlations in timing and position. Some features of the burst events are similar to those of a normal cosmic ray air shower, and some are not. On this paper, we report the observed bursts of air shower like events and their correlation with lightning.

  15. Multi sensor validation and error characteristics of Arctic satellite sea surface temperature observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Jacob L.; Karagali, Ioanna; Tonbo, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    in the satellite products related to observation techniques, data processing and cloud masking. Temporal and spatial error scales are derived for all satellite products using the satellite versus in situ match-up dataset. Temporal error scales are typically between 1 and 2 days and the characteristic spatial error......Six of the operational global satellite sea surface temperature products from infrared and microwave sensors are validated in a consistent way in waters north of 60° N. The 15-month validation with drifting buoy in situ observations shows that data from the Advanced Along-Tracking Scanning...... Radiometer (AATSR) on-board the ENVISAT satellite and NAVOCEANO data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on-board the NOAA 18 satellite are superior in terms of bias and standard deviation. The observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) on-board the Aqua...

  16. Fracture mechanics of ceramics. Vol. 8. Microstructure, methods, design, and fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradt, R.C.; Evans, A.G.; Hasselman, D.P.H.; Lange, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents information on the following topics: fracture mechanics and microstructures; non-lubricated sliding wear of Al 2 O 3 , PSZ and SiC; mixed-mode fracture of ceramics; some fracture properties of alumina-containing electrical porcelains; transformation toughening in the Al 2 O 3 -Cr 2 O 3 /ZrO 2 -HfO 2 system; strength toughness relationships for transformation toughened ceramics; tensile strength and notch sensitivity of Mg-PSZ; fracture mechanisms in lead zirconate titanate ceramics; loading-unloading techniques for determining fracture parameters of brittle materials utilizing four-point bend, chevron-notched specimens; application of the potential drop technique to the fracture mechanics of ceramics; ceramics-to-metal bonding from a fracture mechanics perspective; observed changes in fracture strength following laser irradiation and ion beam mixing of Ni overlayers on sintered alpha-SiC; crack growth in single-crystal silicon; a fracture mechanics and non-destructive evaluation investigation of the subcritical-fracture process in rock; slow crack growth in sintered silicon nitride; uniaxial tensile fatigue testing of sintered silicon carbide under cyclic temperature change; and effect of surface corrosion on glass fracture

  17. Ultraviolet Characterization of Comet and Asteroid Surfaces as Observed by the Rosetta Alice Instrument (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feaga, L. M.; Holt, C. E.; Steffl, A.; Stern, S. A.; Bertaux, J. L.; Parker, J. W.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Feldman, P.; Keeney, B. A.; Knight, M. M.; Noonan, J.; Vervack, R. J., Jr.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    In 2016, Alice, NASA's lightweight and low-power far-ultraviolet (FUV) imaging spectrograph onboard ESA's comet-orbiting spacecraft Rosetta, completed a 2-year characterization of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (C-G), a bi-lobed Jupiter family comet with extreme seasons and diverse surface features. In addition to coma studies, Alice monitored the sunlit surface of C-G from 700-2050 Å to establish the FUV bidirectional reflectance properties and albedo of the surface, determine homogeneity, correlate spectral features with morphological regions, and infer the compositional makeup of the comet. The heliocentric distance coverage (3.7 AU from the Sun, through perihelion at 1.24 AU, and back out to 3.8 AU) over a period of 2 years and spatial resolution of the Alice data (e.g., 30 m by 150 m at the comet from a spacecraft distance of 30 km) resulted in the first resolved observations of a cometary nucleus in the FUV throughout much of its orbit. Upon arrival in 2014, initial characteristics and properties of the surface were derived for the northern hemisphere, revealing a dark, homogeneous, and blue-sloped surface in the FUV with an average geometric albedo of 5% at 1475 Å, consistent with a homogeneous layer of dust covering that hemisphere and similar to nucleus properties derived for this and other comets in the visible. Now, with a fully calibrated dataset, properties of the southern and northern hemispheres, before and after perihelion, have been quantified and preliminarily show minimal change in the comet's surface in the FUV through the apparition. Analyses are ongoing and we will highlight any detected variability. En-route to C-G, Alice made history during the flybys of asteroid (2867) Steins and (21) Lutetia obtaining the first global FUV reflectivity measurement and acquiring spatially resolved observations of an asteroid surface, respectively. The asteroid properties will be compared to those derived for C-G to demonstrate commonalities across small bodies

  18. Global observations and modeling of atmosphere–surface exchange of elemental mercury: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Reliable quantification of air–surface fluxes of elemental Hg vapor (Hg0 is crucial for understanding mercury (Hg global biogeochemical cycles. There have been extensive measurements and modeling efforts devoted to estimating the exchange fluxes between the atmosphere and various surfaces (e.g., soil, canopies, water, snow, etc. in the past three decades. However, large uncertainties remain due to the complexity of Hg0 bidirectional exchange, limitations of flux quantification techniques and challenges in model parameterization. In this study, we provide a critical review on the state of science in the atmosphere–surface exchange of Hg0. Specifically, the advancement of flux quantification techniques, mechanisms in driving the air–surface Hg exchange and modeling efforts are presented. Due to the semi-volatile nature of Hg0 and redox transformation of Hg in environmental media, Hg deposition and evasion are influenced by multiple environmental variables including seasonality, vegetative coverage and its life cycle, temperature, light, moisture, atmospheric turbulence and the presence of reactants (e.g., O3, radicals, etc.. However, the effects of these processes on flux have not been fundamentally and quantitatively determined, which limits the accuracy of flux modeling. We compile an up-to-date global observational flux database and discuss the implication of flux data on the global Hg budget. Mean Hg0 fluxes obtained by micrometeorological measurements do not appear to be significantly greater than the fluxes measured by dynamic flux chamber methods over unpolluted surfaces (p = 0.16, one-tailed, Mann–Whitney U test. The spatiotemporal coverage of existing Hg0 flux measurements is highly heterogeneous with large data gaps existing in multiple continents (Africa, South Asia, Middle East, South America and Australia. The magnitude of the evasion flux is strongly enhanced by human activities, particularly at contaminated sites. Hg0

  19. Observations of surface momentum exchange over the marginal ice zone and recommendations for its parametrisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Elvidge

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive aircraft observations are used to characterise surface roughness over the Arctic marginal ice zone (MIZ and consequently make recommendations for the parametrisation of surface momentum exchange in the MIZ. These observations were gathered in the Barents Sea and Fram Strait from two aircraft as part of the Aerosol–Cloud Coupling And Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA project. They represent a doubling of the total number of such aircraft observations currently available over the Arctic MIZ. The eddy covariance method is used to derive estimates of the 10 m neutral drag coefficient (CDN10 from turbulent wind velocity measurements, and a novel method using albedo and surface temperature is employed to derive ice fraction. Peak surface roughness is found at ice fractions in the range 0.6 to 0.8 (with a mean interquartile range in CDN10 of 1.25 to 2.85  ×  10−3. CDN10 as a function of ice fraction is found to be well approximated by the negatively skewed distribution provided by a leading parametrisation scheme (Lüpkes et al., 2012 tailored for sea-ice drag over the MIZ in which the two constituent components of drag – skin and form drag – are separately quantified. Current parametrisation schemes used in the weather and climate models are compared with our results and the majority are found to be physically unjustified and unrepresentative. The Lüpkes et al. (2012 scheme is recommended in a computationally simple form, with adjusted parameter settings. A good agreement holds for subsets of the data from different locations, despite differences in sea-ice conditions. Ice conditions in the Barents Sea, characterised by small, unconsolidated ice floes, are found to be associated with higher CDN10 values – especially at the higher ice fractions – than those of Fram Strait, where typically larger, smoother floes are observed. Consequently, the important influence of sea-ice morphology and floe size on

  20. Observations of surface momentum exchange over the marginal ice zone and recommendations for its parametrisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvidge, A. D.; Renfrew, I. A.; Weiss, A. I.; Brooks, I. M.; Lachlan-Cope, T. A.; King, J. C.

    2016-02-01

    Comprehensive aircraft observations are used to characterise surface roughness over the Arctic marginal ice zone (MIZ) and consequently make recommendations for the parametrisation of surface momentum exchange in the MIZ. These observations were gathered in the Barents Sea and Fram Strait from two aircraft as part of the Aerosol-Cloud Coupling And Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA) project. They represent a doubling of the total number of such aircraft observations currently available over the Arctic MIZ. The eddy covariance method is used to derive estimates of the 10 m neutral drag coefficient (CDN10) from turbulent wind velocity measurements, and a novel method using albedo and surface temperature is employed to derive ice fraction. Peak surface roughness is found at ice fractions in the range 0.6 to 0.8 (with a mean interquartile range in CDN10 of 1.25 to 2.85 × 10-3). CDN10 as a function of ice fraction is found to be well approximated by the negatively skewed distribution provided by a leading parametrisation scheme (Lüpkes et al., 2012) tailored for sea-ice drag over the MIZ in which the two constituent components of drag - skin and form drag - are separately quantified. Current parametrisation schemes used in the weather and climate models are compared with our results and the majority are found to be physically unjustified and unrepresentative. The Lüpkes et al. (2012) scheme is recommended in a computationally simple form, with adjusted parameter settings. A good agreement holds for subsets of the data from different locations, despite differences in sea-ice conditions. Ice conditions in the Barents Sea, characterised by small, unconsolidated ice floes, are found to be associated with higher CDN10 values - especially at the higher ice fractions - than those of Fram Strait, where typically larger, smoother floes are observed. Consequently, the important influence of sea-ice morphology and floe size on surface roughness is recognised, and

  1. Observations of surface momentum exchange over the marginal-ice-zone and recommendations for its parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvidge, A. D.; Renfrew, I. A.; Weiss, A. I.; Brooks, I. M.; Lachlan-Cope, T. A.; King, J. C.

    2015-10-01

    Comprehensive aircraft observations are used to characterise surface roughness over the Arctic marginal ice zone (MIZ) and consequently make recommendations for the parameterization of surface momentum exchange in the MIZ. These observations were gathered in the Barents Sea and Fram Strait from two aircraft as part of the Aerosol-Cloud Coupling And Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA) project. They represent a doubling of the total number of such aircraft observations currently available over the Arctic MIZ. The eddy covariance method is used to derive estimates of the 10 m neutral drag coefficient (CDN10) from turbulent wind velocity measurements, and a novel method using albedo and surface temperature is employed to derive ice fraction. Peak surface roughness is found at ice fractions in the range 0.6 to 0.8 (with a mean interquartile range in CDN10 of 1.25 to 2.85 × 10-3). CDN10 as a function of ice fraction is found to be well approximated by the negatively skewed distribution provided by a leading parameterization scheme (Lüpkes et al., 2012) tailored for sea ice drag over the MIZ in which the two constituent components of drag - skin and form drag - are separately quantified. Current parameterization schemes used in the weather and climate models are compared with our results and the majority are found to be physically unjustified and unrepresentative. The Lüpkes et al. (2012) scheme is recommended in a computationally simple form, with adjusted parameter settings. A good agreement is found to hold for subsets of the data from different locations despite differences in sea ice conditions. Ice conditions in the Barents Sea, characterised by small, unconsolidated ice floes, are found to be associated with higher CDN10 values - especially at the higher ice fractions - than those of Fram Strait, where typically larger, smoother floes are observed. Consequently, the important influence of sea ice morphology and floe size on surface roughness is

  2. Observation of surface features on an active landslide, and implications for understanding its history of movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Parise

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface features are produced as a result of internal deformation of active landslides, and are continuously created and destroyed by the movement. Observation of their presence and distribution, and surveying of their evolution may provide insights for the zonation of the mass movement in sectors characterized by different behaviour. The present study analyses and describes some example of surface features observed on an active mass movement, the Slumgullion earthflow, in the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado. The Slumgullion earthflow is one of the most famous and spectacular landslides in the world; it consists of a younger, active part which moves on and over an older, much larger, inactive part. Total length of the earthflow is 6.8 km, with an estimated volume of 170 × 10 6 m 3 . Its nearly constant rate of movement (ranging from about 2 m per year at the head, to a maximum of 6–7 m per year at its narrow and central part, to values between 1.3 and 2 m per year at the active toe, and the geological properties of moving material, are well suited for the observation of the development and evolution of surface features. In the last 11 years, repeated surveying at the Slumgullion site has been performed through recognition of surface features, measurements of their main characteristics, and detailed mapping. In this study, two sectors of the Slumgullion earthflow are analysed through comparison of the features observed in this time span, and evaluation of the changes occurred: they are the active toe and an area located at the left flank of the landslide. Choice of the sectors was dictated in the first case, by particular activity of movement and the nearby presence of elements at risk (highway located only 250 m downhill from the toe; and in the second case, by the presence of many surface features, mostly consisting of several generations of flank ridges. The active toe of the landslide is characterized by continuous movement

  3. Broad Band Data and Noise Observed with Surface Station and Borehole Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc, Suleyman; Ozel, Oguz; Safa Arslan, Mehmet; Behiye Akşahin, Bengi; Hatipoglu, Mustafa; Cagin Yalcintepe, Ragip; Ada, Samim; Meral Ozel, Nurcan

    2016-04-01

    Marmara region tectonically is very active and many destructive earthquakes happened in the past. North Anatolian Fault Zone crosses the Marmara region and it has three branches. The northern branch passes through Marmara Sea and expected future large earthquake will happen along this fault zone. There is a gap in seismic network in the Marmara region at offshore and onshore areas. We have started broadband borehole seismographic observations to obtain the detailed information about fault geometry and its stick-slip behavior beneath the western Marmara Sea, as a part of the MARsite collaborative Project, namely "New Directions in Seismic Hazard Assessment through Focused Earth Observation in the Marmara Supersite-MARsite". The target area western Marmara of Turkey. In the beginning of the project, we installed eight Broadband surface station around Marmara Sea in April 2014. Then, we added broadband sensor and broadband surface sensor at the same location in November 2014. In this study, we developed a Matlab application to calculate Power Spectral Density against the New Low Noise Model (NLNM) and New High Noise Model (NHNM) determined for one-hour segments of the data. Also we compared ambient noise of broadband borehole sensor and surface broadband sensor.

  4. Observation of inner surface of flame-tower type reactor for uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amamoto, Ippei; Terai, Takayuki; Umetsu, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    A fluorination reactor, which has been used to convert uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) into uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ), was completed after approximately 6000 hours operation at the uranium conversion facility in Japan. The observation of its inner surface was carried out to understand its corrosive condition and mechanism. The main wall of the reactor is made of Monel Alloy and its operational temperature is approximately 450degC at external surface under gaseous fluorine atmosphere. A sampling was undertaken from the most corrosive part of the reactor wall, and its analysis was carried out to obtain the data for the condition of appearance, thickness, macro and micro structure, etc. The results of observation are as follows: (1) The thickness decreased evenly (average 3.9 mm/year); (2) The chemical composition of corrosive products as coating was mainly nickel fluoride (NiF 2 ), which suggested that the corrosion mechanism could have been caused by the high temperature gas corrosion; (3) The total amount of coating was lower than that of a loss in thickness. For some reason, some of coating would seem to become extinct on the surface of the wall. The deterioration of coating, which formed a protector on the wall due to excess heating of the wall, the sand erosion effect by UF 4 , etc. have contributed to this state of condition. (author)

  5. Root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed.......The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed....

  6. In situ nanoscale observations of metatorbernite surfaces interacted with aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astilleros, José Manuel; Pinto, André Jorge; Gonçalves, Mário A; Sánchez-Pastor, Nuria; Fernández-Díaz, Lurdes

    2013-03-19

    Metatorbernite (Cu(UO(2))(2)(PO(4))(2)·8H(2)O) has been identified in contaminated sediments as a phase controlling the fate of U. Here, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to observe in situ the interaction between metatorbernite cleavage surfaces and flowing aqueous solutions (residence time = 1 min) with different pHs. In contact with deionized water the features of (001) surfaces barely modify. However, changes are remarkable both under acidic and basic conditions. In acidic solutions (pH = 2.5) metatorbernite surface develops a rough altered layer and large pits nucleate on it. The altered layer shows a low adhesion and is removed by the AFM tip during the scanning. The large pits spread rapidly, at few tens of nm/s, indicating a collapse of the structure. The combination of dissolution and the presence of defects in the metatorbernite structure can explain both the collapse process and the alteration of the surfaces under acidic conditions. Other mechanisms such as ion exchange reactions remain speculative. In NaOH solutions (pH = 11.5) metatorbernite dissolves by formation of etch pits bounded by steps parallel to [100], the direction of the most straight periodic bond chains (PBCs) in metatorbernite structure. These steps retreat at ∼0.15 nm/s. Under these conditions dissolution is promoted by the formation of stable uranyl carbonate complexes in solution.

  7. Diagnostics comparing sea surface temperature feedbacks from operational hurricane forecasts to observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian D. Lloyd

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the ability of recent versions of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Operational Hurricane Forecast Model (GHM to reproduce the observed relationship between hurricane intensity and hurricane-induced Sea Surface Temperature (SST cooling. The analysis was performed by taking a Lagrangian composite of all hurricanes in the North Atlantic from 1998–2009 in observations and 2005–2009 for the GHM. A marked improvement in the intensity-SST relationship for the GHM compared to observations was found between the years 2005 and 2006–2009 due to the introduction of warm-core eddies, a representation of the loop current, and changes to the drag coefficient parameterization for bulk turbulent flux computation. A Conceptual Hurricane Intensity Model illustrates the essential steady-state characteristics of the intensity-SST relationship and is explained by two coupled equations for the atmosphere and ocean. The conceptual model qualitatively matches observations and the 2006–2009 period in the GHM, and presents supporting evidence for the conclusion that weaker upper oceanic thermal stratification in the Gulf of Mexico, caused by the introduction of the loop current and warm core eddies, is crucial to explaining the observed SST-intensity pattern. The diagnostics proposed by the conceptual model offer an independent set of metrics for comparing operational hurricane forecast models to observations.

  8. Reconstructing solar magnetic fields from historical observations. II. Testing the surface flux transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, I. O. I.; Virtanen, I. I.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Yeates, A.; Mursula, K.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We aim to use the surface flux transport model to simulate the long-term evolution of the photospheric magnetic field from historical observations. In this work we study the accuracy of the model and its sensitivity to uncertainties in its main parameters and the input data. Methods: We tested the model by running simulations with different values of meridional circulation and supergranular diffusion parameters, and studied how the flux distribution inside active regions and the initial magnetic field affected the simulation. We compared the results to assess how sensitive the simulation is to uncertainties in meridional circulation speed, supergranular diffusion, and input data. We also compared the simulated magnetic field with observations. Results: We find that there is generally good agreement between simulations and observations. Although the model is not capable of replicating fine details of the magnetic field, the long-term evolution of the polar field is very similar in simulations and observations. Simulations typically yield a smoother evolution of polar fields than observations, which often include artificial variations due to observational limitations. We also find that the simulated field is fairly insensitive to uncertainties in model parameters or the input data. Due to the decay term included in the model the effects of the uncertainties are somewhat minor or temporary, lasting typically one solar cycle.

  9. Reconstructing solar magnetic fields from historical observations: Testing the surface flux transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Iiro; Virtanen, Ilpo; Pevtsov, Alexei; Yeates, Anthony; Mursula, Kalevi

    2017-04-01

    We aim to use the surface flux transport model to simulate the long-term evolution of the photospheric magnetic field from historical observations. In this work we study the accuracy of the model and its sensitivity to uncertainties in its main parameters and the input data. We test the model by running simulations with different values of meridional circulation and supergranular diffusion parameters, and study how the flux distribution inside active regions and the initial magnetic field affect the simulation. We compare the results to assess how sensitive the simulation is to uncertainties in meridional circulation speed, supergranular diffusion and input data. We also compare the simulated magnetic field with observations. We find that there is generally good agreement between simulations and observations. While the model is not capable of replicating fine details of the magnetic field, the long-term evolution of the polar field is very similar in simulations and observations. Simulations typically yield a smoother evolution of polar fields than observations, that often include artificial variations due to observational limitations. We also find that the simulated field is fairly insensitive to uncertainties in model parameters or the input data. Due to the decay term included in the model the effects of the uncertainties are rather minor or temporary, lasting typically one solar cycle.

  10. Assimilation of Gridded Terrestrial Water Storage Observations from GRACE into a Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, Manuela; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Reichle, Rolf H.; Rodell, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Observations of terrestrial water storage (TWS) from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission have a coarse resolution in time (monthly) and space (roughly 150,000 km(sup 2) at midlatitudes) and vertically integrate all water storage components over land, including soil moisture and groundwater. Data assimilation can be used to horizontally downscale and vertically partition GRACE-TWS observations. This work proposes a variant of existing ensemble-based GRACE-TWS data assimilation schemes. The new algorithm differs in how the analysis increments are computed and applied. Existing schemes correlate the uncertainty in the modeled monthly TWS estimates with errors in the soil moisture profile state variables at a single instant in the month and then apply the increment either at the end of the month or gradually throughout the month. The proposed new scheme first computes increments for each day of the month and then applies the average of those increments at the beginning of the month. The new scheme therefore better reflects submonthly variations in TWS errors. The new and existing schemes are investigated here using gridded GRACE-TWS observations. The assimilation results are validated at the monthly time scale, using in situ measurements of groundwater depth and soil moisture across the U.S. The new assimilation scheme yields improved (although not in a statistically significant sense) skill metrics for groundwater compared to the open-loop (no assimilation) simulations and compared to the existing assimilation schemes. A smaller impact is seen for surface and root-zone soil moisture, which have a shorter memory and receive smaller increments from TWS assimilation than groundwater. These results motivate future efforts to combine GRACE-TWS observations with observations that are more sensitive to surface soil moisture, such as L-band brightness temperature observations from Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) or Soil Moisture Active

  11. Implications of the "observer effect" on modelling a long-term pumping test with hydraulically conductive boreholes in a discrete fracture network system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, D.; Frampton, A.; Cvetkovic, V.

    2006-12-01

    The Onkalo underground research facility for rock characterisation for nuclear waste disposal is located at Olkiluoto island, just off the Finnish coast in the Baltic Sea. Prior to the start of the excavation of the Onkalo facility, an extensive amount of hydraulic data has been collected during various pumping experiments from a large number of boreholes placed throughout an area of approximately 10 km2, reaching depths of 1000 meters below sea level. In particular, the hydraulic borehole data includes classical measurements of pressure, but also new measurements of flow rate and flow direction in boreholes (so called flow-logging). These measurements indicate large variations in heterogeneity and are a clear reflection of the discrete nature of the system. Here we present results from an ongoing project which aims to explore and asses the implications of these new flow-logging measurements to site descriptive modelling and modelling at performance assessment scales. The main challange of the first phase of this project is to obtain a greater understanding of a strongly heterogenious and anisotropic groundwater system in which open boreholes are located; that is, a system in which the observation boreholes themselves create new hydraulic conductive features of the groundwater system. The results presented are from recent hydraulic flow modelling simulations with a combined continuous porous media and discrete fracture network approach using a commercial finite-element software. An advantage of this approach is we may adapt a continuum mesh on the regional scale, were only a few conductive features are known, together with a local scale discrete fracture network approach, where detailed site-investigation has revealed a large amount of conductive features. Current findings indicate the system is sensitive to certain combinations of hydraulic features, and we quantify the significance of including these variations in terms of their implications for reduction of

  12. Thermophysics of fractures on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfner, S.; Vincent, J.-B.; Blum, J.; Davidsson, B. J. R.; Sierks, H.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Deller, J.; Hofmann, M.; Hu, X.; Pajola, M.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P. L.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Rickman, H.; Keller, H. U.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Auger, A.-T.; Barucci, M. A.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Bertini, I.; Bodewits, D.; Cremonese, G.; Da Deppo, V.; Debei, S.; De Cecco, M.; Fornasier, S.; Fulle, M.; Gicquel, A.; Groussin, O.; Gutiérrez, P. J.; Gutiérrez-Marqués, P.; Güttler, C.; Hviid, S. F.; Ip, W.-H.; Jorda, L.; Knollenberg, J.; Kovacs, G.; Kramm, J.-R.; Kührt, E.; Küppers, M.; La Forgia, F.; Lazzarin, M.; Lopez-Moreno, J. J.; Marzari, F.; Michalik, H.; Moissl-Fraund, R.; Moreno, F.; Mottola, S.; Naletto, G.; Oklay, N.; Preusker, F.; Scholten, F.; Shi, X.; Thomas, N.; Toth, I.; Tubiana, C.; Zitzmann, S.

    2017-12-01

    Context. The camera OSIRIS on board Rosetta obtained high-resolution images of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P). Great parts of the nucleus surface are composed of fractured terrain. Aims: Fracture formation, evolution, and their potential relationship to physical processes that drive activity are not yet fully understood. Observed temperatures and gas production rates can be explained or interpreted with the presence of fractures by applying appropriate modelling methods. Methods: We followed a transient thermophysical model approach that includes radiative, conductive, and water-ice sublimation fluxes by considering a variety of heliocentric distances, illumination conditions, and thermophysical properties for a set of characteristic fracture geometries on the nucleus of 67P. We computed diurnal temperatures, heat fluxes, and outgassing behaviour in order to derive and distinguish the influence of the mentioned parameters on fractured terrain. Results: Our analysis confirms that fractures, as already indicated by former studies about concavities, deviate from flat-terrain topographies with equivalent properties, mostly through the effect of self-heating. Compared to flat terrain, illuminated cometary fractures are generally warmer, with smaller diurnal temperature fluctuations. Maximum sublimation rates reach higher peaks, and dust mantle quenching effects on sublimation rates are weaker. Consequently, the rough structure of the fractured terrain leads to significantly higher inferred surface thermal inertia values than for flat areas with identical physical properties, which might explain the range of measured thermal inertia on 67P. Conclusions: At 3.5 AU heliocentric distance, sublimation heat sinks in fractures converge to maximum values >50 W / m2 and trigger dust activity that can be related mainly to H2O. Fractures are likely to grow through the erosive interplay of alternating sublimation and thermal fatigue.

  13. Shoulder Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as shown on an x-ray. Selection of treatment depends upon the patient’s activity level, the location of the fracture and the severity of the fracture. Recovery Shoulder fractures may leave a patient with permanent shoulder stiffness, regardless of ...

  14. Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress fractures Overview Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by repetitive force, often from overuse — such as repeatedly jumping up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of ...

  15. Skull fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... follow bicycle safety recommendations. Do not drink and drive. Do not allow yourself to be driven by someone who may have been drinking alcohol or is otherwise impaired. Alternative Names Basilar skull fracture; Depressed skull fracture; Linear skull fracture Images Skull of an adult Skull ...

  16. Dating fractures in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliday, K.E., E-mail: kath.halliday@nuh.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Broderick, N.J.; Somers, J.M. [Department of Radiology, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Hawkes, R. [Department of Radiology, Paul O' Gorman Building, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    Aim: To document the timing of the appearance of the radiological features of fracture healing in a group of infants in which the date of injury was known and to assess the degree of interobserver agreement. Materials and methods: Three paediatric radiologists independently assessed 161 images of 37 long bone fractures in 31 patients aged 0-44 months. The following features were assessed: soft-tissue swelling, subperiosteal new bone formation (SPNBF), definition of fracture line, presence or absence of callus, whether callus was well or ill defined, and the presence of endosteal callus. Results: Agreement between observers was only moderate for all discriminators except SPNBF. SPNBF was invariably seen after 11 days but was uncommon before this time even in the very young. In one case SPNBF was seen at 4 days. Conclusion: With the exception of SPNBF, the criteria relied on to date fractures are either not reproducible or are poor discriminators of fracture age.

  17. Ellipso-Microscopic Observation of Titanium Surface under UV-Light Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushimi, K.; Kurauchi, K.; Nakanishi, T.; Hasegawa, Y.; Ueda, M.; Ohtsuka, T.

    2016-01-01

    The ellipso-microscopic observation of a titanium surface undergoing anodization in 0.05 mol dm -3 of H 2 SO 4 was conducted. During irradiation by ultra-violet (UV) light with a wavelength of 325 nm, the titanium surface allowed for the flow of a photo-induced current and showed up as a bright, patch-like image on an ellipso-microscopic view. The brightness and patch-pattern in the image changed with flowing photo-induced current. The changes in the brightness and the image corresponded to the formation and/or degradation of titanium oxide due to the photo-electrochemical reaction of the oxide. An in situ monitoring using the ellipso-microscope revealed that the film change was dependent on the irradiation light power, by UV-light increases the anodic current and results in the initiation of pitting at lower potentials as compared with the non-irradiated condition.

  18. Hyper fast radiative transfer for the physical retrieval of surface parameters from SEVIRI observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liuzzi, G; Masiello, G; Serio, C; Blasi, M G; Venafra, S

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the theoretical aspects of a fast scheme for the physical retrieval of surface temperature and emissivity from SEVIRI data, their implementation and some sample results obtained. The scheme is based on a Kalman Filter approach, which effectively exploits the temporal continuity in the observations of the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) platform, on which SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager) operates. Such scheme embodies in its core a physical retrieval algorithm, which employs an hyper fast radiative transfer code highly customized for this retrieval task. Radiative transfer and its customizations are described in detail. Fastness, accuracy and stability of the code are fully documented for a variety of surface features, showing a peculiar application to the massive Greek forest fires in August 2007. (paper)

  19. Photonic crystals possessing multiple Weyl points and the experimental observation of robust surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jie; Xiao, Meng; Chan, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Weyl points, as monopoles of Berry curvature in momentum space, have captured much attention recently in various branches of physics. Realizing topological materials that exhibit such nodal points is challenging and indeed, Weyl points have been found experimentally in transition metal arsenide and phosphide and gyroid photonic crystal whose structure is complex. If realizing even the simplest type of single Weyl nodes with a topological charge of 1 is difficult, then making a real crystal carrying higher topological charges may seem more challenging. Here we design, and fabricate using planar fabrication technology, a photonic crystal possessing single Weyl points (including type-II nodes) and multiple Weyl points with topological charges of 2 and 3. We characterize this photonic crystal and find nontrivial 2D bulk band gaps for a fixed kz and the associated surface modes. The robustness of these surface states against kz-preserving scattering is experimentally observed for the first time. PMID:27703140

  20. Observation of Zenneck-Like Waves over a Metasurface Designed for Launching HF Radar Surface Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Jangal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the 20th century a controversy has been continuously revived about the existence of the Zenneck Wave. This wave is a theoretical solution of Maxwell’s equations and might be propagated along the interface between the air and a dielectric medium. The expected weak attenuation at large distance explains the constant interest for this wave. Notably in the High Frequency band such a wave had been thought as a key point to reduce the high attenuation observed in High Frequency Surface Wave Radar. Despite many works on that topic and various experiments attempted during one century, there is still an alternation of statements between its existence and its nonexistence. We report here an experiment done during the optimisation of the transmitting antennas for Surface Wave Radars. Using an infrared method, we visualize a wave having the structure described by Zenneck above a metasurface located on a dielectric slab.

  1. A Method to Simulate the Observed Surface Properties of Proton Irradiated Silicon Strip Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00335524; Bhardwaj, A.; Dalal, R.; Eber, R.; Eichhorn, T.; Lalwani, K.; Messineo, A.; Printz, M.; Ranjan, K.

    2015-04-23

    During the scheduled high luminosity upgrade of LHC, the world's largest particle physics accelerator at CERN, the position sensitive silicon detectors installed in the vertex and tracking part of the CMS experiment will face more intense radiation environment than the present system was designed for. To upgrade the tracker to required performance level, extensive measurements and simulations studies have already been carried out. A defect model of Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD simulation package for the bulk properties of proton irradiated devices has been producing simulations closely matching with measurements of silicon strip detectors. However, the model does not provide expected behavior due to the fluence increased surface damage. The solution requires an approach that does not affect the accurate bulk properties produced by the proton model, but only adds to it the required radiation induced properties close to the surface. These include the observed position dependency of the strip detector's charge collec...

  2. Determination of surface parameters and fluxes for climate studies from space observation. Methods, results and problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, F.; Seguin, B.

    Climate being the result of many interconnected processes, it can hardly be understood without models which describe these various processes as quantitatively as possible and define the parameters which are relevant for climate studies. Among those, surface processes and therefore surface parameters are now recognized to be of great importance. Some examples are discussed in the first part, showing the great interest to measure the relevant parameters on a multi-year basis, over large areas with sufficiently dense array and on a stable basis, in order to monitor climate changes or to study the impact on climate of the modifications of some relevant parameters which are analysed. Since space observations from satellites fulfil these requirements, it is clear that they will become very soon a fundamental tool for climate studies. Unfortunately, as it is discussed in the second part, satellites do measure only spectral radiances at the top of the atmosphere and the determination of the relevant surface parameters (or fluxes) from these radiances still raises many problems which have to be solved, although many progresses have already been made. The aim of this paper is therefore to review and discuss these problems and the various ways they have been tackled until now. The first part is devoted to an overview of what needs to be measured and why, while the existing methods for determining the most important surface parameters from space observations are presented in the second part where a particular attention is given to the theoretical and experimental validations of these methods, their limits and the problems still to be solved.

  3. Observations of surface radiation and stratospheric processes at Thule Air Base, Greenland, during the IPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Muscari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ground-based measurements of atmospheric parameters have been carried out for more than 20 years at the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC station at Thule Air Base (76.5°N, 68.8°W, on the north-western coast of Greenland. Various instruments dedicated to the study of the lower and middle polar atmosphere are installed at Thule in the framework of a long standing collaboration among Danish, Italian, and US research institutes and universities. This effort aims at monitoring the composition, structure and dynamics of the polar stratosphere, and at studying the Arctic energy budget and the role played by different factors, such as aerosols, water vapour, and surface albedo. During the International Polar Year (IPY, in winter 2008-2009, an intensive measurement campaign was conducted at Thule within the framework of the IPY project “Ozone layer and UV radiation in a changing climate evaluated during IPY” (ORACLE-O3 which sought to improve our understanding of the complex mechanisms that lead to the Arctic stratospheric O3 depletion. The campaign involved a lidar system, measuring aerosol backscatter and depolarization ratios up to 35 km and atmospheric temperature profiles from 25 to 70 km altitude, a ground-based millimeter-wave spectrometer (GBMS used to derive stratospheric mixing ratio profiles of different chemical species involved in the stratospheric ozone depletion cycle, and then ground-based radiometers and a Cimel sunphotometer to study the Arctic radiative budget at the surface. The observations show that the surface radiation budget is mainly regulated by the longwave component throughout most of the year. Clouds have a significant impact contributing to enhance the role of longwave radiation. Besides clouds, water vapour seasonal changes produce the largest modification in the shortwave component at the surface, followed by changes in surface albedo and in aerosol amounts. For what concerns the

  4. A framework for global diurnally-resolved observations of Land Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, D.; Remedios, J.; Pinnock, S.

    2013-12-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is the radiative skin temperature of the land, and is one of the key parameters in the physics of land-surface processes on regional and global scales. Being a key boundary condition in land surface models, which determine the surface to atmosphere fluxes of heat, water and carbon; thus influencing cloud cover, precipitation and atmospheric chemistry predictions within Global models, the requirement for global diurnal observations of LST is well founded. Earth Observation satellites offer an opportunity to obtain global coverage of LST, with the appropriate exploitation of data from multiple instruments providing a capacity to resolve the diurnal cycle on a global scale. Here we present a framework for the production of global, diurnally resolved, data sets for LST which is a key request from users of LST data. We will show how the sampling of both geostationary and low earth orbit data sets could conceptually be employed to build combined, multi-sensor, pole-to-pole data sets. Although global averages already exist for individual instruments and merging of geostationary based LST is already being addressed operationally (Freitas, et al., 2013), there are still a number of important challenges to overcome. In this presentation, we will consider three of the issues still open in LST remote sensing: 1) the consistency amongst retrievals; 2) the clear-sky bias and its quantification; and 3) merging methods and the propagation of uncertainties. For example, the combined use of both geostationary earth orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) data, and both infra-red and microwave data are relatively unexplored but are necessary to make the most progress. Hence this study will suggest what is state-of-the-art and how considerable advances can be made, accounting also for re