WorldWideScience

Sample records for fracture mechanical evaluation

  1. Fracture mechanics evaluation of heavy welded structures

    Sprung, I.; Ericksson, C.W.; Zilberstein, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes some applications of nondestructive examination (NDE) and engineering fracture mechanics to evaluation of flaws in heavy welded structures. The paper discusses not only widely recognized linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analysis, but also methods of the elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM), such as COD, J-integral, and Failure Assessment Diagram. Examples are given to highlight the importance of interaction between specialists providing input and the specialists performing the analysis. The paper points out that the critical parameters for as-welded structures when calculated by these methods are conservative since they are based on two pessimistic assumptions: that the magnitude of residual stress is always at the yield strength level, and that the residual stress always acts in the same direction as the applied (mechanical) stress. The suggestion is made that it would be prudent to use the COD or the FAD design curves for a conservative design. The appendix examines a J-design curve modified to include residual stresses

  2. Fracture Mechanics

    Jang, Dong Il; Jeong, Gyeong Seop; Han, Min Gu

    1992-08-01

    This book introduces basic theory and analytical solution of fracture mechanics, linear fracture mechanics, non-linear fracture mechanics, dynamic fracture mechanics, environmental fracture and fatigue fracture, application on design fracture mechanics, application on analysis of structural safety, engineering approach method on fracture mechanics, stochastic fracture mechanics, numerical analysis code and fracture toughness test and fracture toughness data. It gives descriptions of fracture mechanics to theory and analysis from application of engineering.

  3. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    Tanaka, T.; Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y.

    1997-01-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years

  4. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    Tanaka, T. [Kansai Electric Power Company, Osaka (Japan); Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1997-04-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years.

  5. Fracture Mechanics

    Zehnder, Alan T

    2012-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a vast and growing field. This book develops the basic elements needed for both fracture research and engineering practice. The emphasis is on continuum mechanics models for energy flows and crack-tip stress- and deformation fields in elastic and elastic-plastic materials. In addition to a brief discussion of computational fracture methods, the text includes practical sections on fracture criteria, fracture toughness testing, and methods for measuring stress intensity factors and energy release rates. Class-tested at Cornell, this book is designed for students, researchers and practitioners interested in understanding and contributing to a diverse and vital field of knowledge. Alan Zehnder joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1988. Since then he has served in a number of leadership roles including Chair of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, and Director of the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.  He teaches applied mechanics and his research t...

  6. Fracture mechanics

    Perez, Nestor

    2017-01-01

    The second edition of this textbook includes a refined presentation of concepts in each chapter, additional examples; new problems and sections, such as conformal mapping and mechanical behavior of wood; while retaining all the features of the original book. The material included in this book is based upon the development of analytical and numerical procedures pertinent to particular fields of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and plastic fracture mechanics (PFM), including mixed-mode-loading interaction. The mathematical approach undertaken herein is coupled with a brief review of several fracture theories available in cited references, along with many color images and figures. Dynamic fracture mechanics is included through the field of fatigue and Charpy impact testing. Explains computational and engineering approaches for solving crack-related problems using straightforward mathematics that facilitate comprehension of the physical meaning of crack growth processes; Expands computational understandin...

  7. Evaluation of fracture mechanics analyses used in RPV integrity assessment regarding brittle fracture

    Moinereau, D.; Faidy, C.; Valeta, M.P.; Bhandari, S.; Guichard, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electricite de France has conducted during these last years some experimental and numerical research programmes in order to evaluate fracture mechanics analyses used in nuclear reactor pressure vessels structural integrity assessment, regarding the risk of brittle fracture. These programmes included cleavage fracture tests on large scale cladded specimens containing subclad flaws with their interpretations by 2D and 3D numerical computations, and validation of finite element codes for pressurized thermal shocks analyses. Four cladded specimens made of ferritic steel A508 C13 with stainless steel cladding, and containing shallow subclad flaws, have been tested in four point bending at very low temperature in order to obtain cleavage failure. The specimen failure was obtained in each case in base metal by cleavage fracture. These tests have been interpreted by two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite element computations using different fracture mechanics approaches (elastic analysis with specific plasticity corrections, elastic-plastic analysis, local approach to cleavage fracture). The failure of specimens are conservatively predicted by different analyses. The comparison between the elastic analyses and elastic-plastic analyses shows the conservatism of specific plasticity corrections used in French RPV elastic analyses. Numerous finite element calculations have also been performed between EDF, CEA and Framatome in order to compare and validate several fracture mechanics post processors implemented in finite element programmes used in pressurized thermal shock analyses. This work includes two-dimensional numerical computations on specimens with different geometries and loadings. The comparisons show a rather good agreement on main results, allowing to validate the finite element codes and their post-processors. (author). 11 refs, 24 figs, 3 tabs

  8. Evaluation of fracture mechanics analyses used in RPV integrity assessment regarding brittle fracture

    Moinereau, D [Electricite de France, Dept. MTC, Moret-sur-Loing (France); Faidy, C [Electricite de France, SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France); Valeta, M P [Commisariat a l` Energie Atomique, Dept. DMT, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bhandari, S; Guichard, D [Societe Franco-Americaine de Constructions Atomiques (FRAMATOME), 92 - Paris-La-Defense (France)

    1997-09-01

    Electricite de France has conducted during these last years some experimental and numerical research programmes in order to evaluate fracture mechanics analyses used in nuclear reactor pressure vessels structural integrity assessment, regarding the risk of brittle fracture. These programmes included cleavage fracture tests on large scale cladded specimens containing subclad flaws with their interpretations by 2D and 3D numerical computations, and validation of finite element codes for pressurized thermal shocks analyses. Four cladded specimens made of ferritic steel A508 C13 with stainless steel cladding, and containing shallow subclad flaws, have been tested in four point bending at very low temperature in order to obtain cleavage failure. The specimen failure was obtained in each case in base metal by cleavage fracture. These tests have been interpreted by two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite element computations using different fracture mechanics approaches (elastic analysis with specific plasticity corrections, elastic-plastic analysis, local approach to cleavage fracture). The failure of specimens are conservatively predicted by different analyses. The comparison between the elastic analyses and elastic-plastic analyses shows the conservatism of specific plasticity corrections used in French RPV elastic analyses. Numerous finite element calculations have also been performed between EDF, CEA and Framatome in order to compare and validate several fracture mechanics post processors implemented in finite element programmes used in pressurized thermal shock analyses. This work includes two-dimensional numerical computations on specimens with different geometries and loadings. The comparisons show a rather good agreement on main results, allowing to validate the finite element codes and their post-processors. (author). 11 refs, 24 figs, 3 tabs.

  9. Fracture mechanics

    Miannay, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    This book entitle ''Fracture Mechanics'', the first one of the monograph ''Materiologie'' is geared to design engineers, material engineers, non destructive inspectors and safety experts. This book covers fracture mechanics in isotropic homogeneous continuum. Only the monotonic static loading is considered. This book intended to be a reference with the current state of the art gives the fundamental of the issues under concern and avoids the developments too complicated or not yet mastered for not making reading cumbersome. The subject matter is organized as going from an easy to a more complicated level and thus follows the chronological evolution in the field. Similarly the microscopic scale is considered before the macroscopic scale, the physical understanding of phenomena linked to the experimental observation of the material preceded the understanding of the macroscopic behaviour of structures. In this latter field the relatively recent contribution of finite element computations with some analogy with the experimental observation is determining. However more sensitive analysis is not skipped

  10. The use of fracture mechanics for the evaluation of NDE flaw acceptance standards

    Alicino, A; Capurro, E; Ansaldo, Sp; Corvi, A [Ansaldo SpA, Genoa (Italy)

    1988-12-31

    This document deals with the use of fracture mechanics criteria to evaluate the Non Destructive Examination (NDE) flaw acceptance standards. The communication discusses the general schemes and the guidelines of the activity carried out. (TEC).

  11. Fracture mechanics evaluation for the cast duplex stainless steel after thermal aging

    Urata, Shigeru [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore, we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years. (author)

  12. NDE and fracture mechanics evaluation of bottom-head weld indications in a BWR reactor pressure vessel

    Brickstad, B [Swedish Plant Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1988-12-31

    This document deals with the Non Destructive Examination (NDE) and the fracture mechanics evaluation of bottom head welds in a BWR. The NDE equipment is presented, together with the geometry of evaluated flaw regions. After the fracture mechanics evaluation, it appeared that the plant results fulfilled the usual conditions, and the plant was allowed to operate one more year. (TEC).

  13. Fracture mechanical materials characterisation

    Wallin, K.; Planman, T.; Nevalainen, M.

    1998-01-01

    The experimental fracture mechanics development has been focused on the determination of reliable lower-bound fracture toughness estimates from small and miniature specimens, in particular considering the statistical aspects and loading rate effects of fracture mechanical material properties. Additionally, materials aspects in fracture assessment of surface cracks, with emphasis on the transferability of fracture toughness data to structures with surface flaws have been investigated. Further a modified crack-arrest fracture toughness test method, to increase the effectiveness of testing, has been developed. (orig.)

  14. Fracture mechanical evaluation of high temperature structure and creep-fatigue defect assessment

    Park, Chang Gyu; Kim, Jong Bum; Lee, Jae Han

    2004-02-01

    This study proposed the evaluation procedure of high temperature structures from the viewpoint of fracture mechanics on the cylindrical structure applicable to the KALIMER, which is developed by KAERI. For the evaluation of structural integrity, linear and non-linear fracture mechanics parameters were analyzed. Parameters used in creep defect growth applicable to high temperature structure of liquid metal reactor and the evaluation codes with these parameters were analyzed. The evaluation methods of defect initiation and defect growth which were established in R5/R6 code(UK), JNC method (Japan) and RCC-MR A16(France) code were analyzed respectively. The evaluation procedure of leak before break applicable to KALIMER was preliminarily developed and proposed. As an application example of defect growth, the creep-fatigue defect growth on circumferential throughwall defect in high temperature cylindrical structure was evaluated by RCC-MR A16 and this application technology was established.

  15. Fracture Mechanics of Concrete

    Ulfkjær, Jens Peder

    Chapter 1 Chapter l contains the introduction to this thesis. The scope of the thesis is partly to investigate different numerical and analytical models based on fracture mechanical ideas, which are able to predict size effects, and partly to perform an experimental investigation on high-strength......Chapter 1 Chapter l contains the introduction to this thesis. The scope of the thesis is partly to investigate different numerical and analytical models based on fracture mechanical ideas, which are able to predict size effects, and partly to perform an experimental investigation on high......-strength concrete. Chapter 2 A description of the factors which influence the strength and cracking of concrete and high strength concrete is made. Then basic linear fracture mechanics is outlined followed by a description and evaluation of the models used to describe concrete fracture in tension. The chapter ends...... and the goveming equations are explicit and simple. These properties of the model make it a very powerful tool, which is applicable for the designing engineer. The method is also extended to reinforced concrete, where the results look very promising. The large experimental investigation on high-strength concrete...

  16. Fracture mechanics and fatigue evaluation of nuclear reactor components

    Mattar Neto, Miguel; Andrade, Arnaldo H.P. de; Maneschy, Eduardo

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study available in the available literature for evaluation the environmental effects on the lifetime of nuclear power plant components. The author's motivation is to provide some technical tools to identify what research development could be done in this area

  17. Fracture mechanics evaluation of cast duplex stainless steel after thermal aging

    Tujikura, Y.; Urata, S.

    1999-01-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel, which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance and weldability, has conventionally been used. Cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix, and thermal aging after long-term service is known to decrease fracture toughness. Therefore, we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secure, even when such through-wall crack length is assumed to be as large as the fatigue crack length grown for a service period of up to 60 years. (orig.)

  18. Fracture mechanics evaluation of cast duplex stainless steel after thermal aging

    Tujikura, Y.; Urata, S. [Kansai Electr. Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan). General Office of Nucl. and Fossil Power Production

    1999-07-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel, which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance and weldability, has conventionally been used. Cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix, and thermal aging after long-term service is known to decrease fracture toughness. Therefore, we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secure, even when such through-wall crack length is assumed to be as large as the fatigue crack length grown for a service period of up to 60 years. (orig.)

  19. The COD concept and its application to fracture mechanical evaluation of cracked components

    Kockelmann, H.

    1984-01-01

    Based on a comprehensive literature study, this report critically evaluates the current state of experiences with the COD concept in fracture mechanics. First the concept is explained and the procedure of materials testing with a view to fracture mechanics is discussed in detail with emphasis on: The definition of crack shape modification; the procedure to detect crack modification, with subsequent comparison; the determination of material characteristics; the impact on the characteristics of the crack tip opening and the dispersion of results. The correlation between crack tip opening characteristics and notch impact strength is explained, and the methods applied for analysis of the streses affecting the structural components are shown. The design-based and failure threshold curves and the treatment of real crack geometries are also discussed. Problems still to be solved are shown. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Fracture mechanics safety approaches

    Roos, E.; Schuler, X.; Eisele, U.

    2004-01-01

    Component integrity assessments require the knowledge of reliable fracture toughness parameters characterising the initiation of the failure process in the whole relevant temperature range. From a large number of fracture mechanics tests a statistically based procedure was derived allowing to quantify the initiation of fracture toughness as a function of temperature as a closed function as well as the temperature dependence of the cleavage instability parameters. Alternatively to the direct experimental determination one also can use a correlation between fracture toughness and notch impact energy. (orig.)

  1. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis for leak-before-break evaluation of light water reactor's piping

    Yoshimura, Shinobu; Yagawa, Genki; Akiba, Hiroshi; Fujioka, Terutaka.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics (PFM) analyses for quantitative evaluation of the likelihood of Leak-Before-Break (LBB) of Light Water Reactor's (LWR's) piping. The PFM analyses in general assume probabilistic distributions of initial crack size, applied stress cycles, crack growth laws, fracture criteria, leakage detection capability, defect inspection capability and so on. Referring to the deterministic procedure for LBB evaluation, most appropriate PFM models and data for LBB evaluation are discussed. Here the LBB index is newly proposed in order to quantitatively evaluate the likelihood of LBB. Through intensive sensitivity analyses, it is clarified that the LBB is more likely to occur for larger diameter pipe; the performance of leakage detection significantly affects the LBB likelihood; the LBB likelihood increases with plant's aging even conservatively assuming leak detection capability; the R6 method (Category 1, Option 1) for fracture criterion gives very conservative results; and In-Service Inspection (ISI) reduces the increase rate of failure probability than the failure probability itself. (author)

  2. Mechanical properties of fracture zones

    Leijon, B.

    1993-05-01

    Available data on mechanical characteristics of fracture zones are compiled and discussed. The aim is to improve the basis for adequate representation of fracture zones in geomechanical models. The sources of data researched are primarily borehole investigations and case studies in rock engineering, involving observations of fracture zones subjected to artificial load change. Boreholes only yield local information about the components of fracture zones, i.e. intact rock, fractures and various low-strength materials. Difficulties are therefore encountered in evaluating morphological and mechanical properties of fracture zones from borehole data. Although often thought of as macroscopically planar features, available field data consistently show that fracture zones are characterized by geometrical irregularities such as thickness variations, surface undulation and jogs. These irregularities prevail on all scales. As a result, fracture zones are on all scales characterized by large, in-plane variation of strength- and deformational properties. This has important mechanical consequences in terms of non-uniform stress transfer and complex mechanisms of shear deformation. Field evidence for these findings, in particular results from the underground research laboratory in Canada and from studies of induced fault slip in deep mines, is summarized and discussed. 79 refs

  3. Twenty years of fracture mechanics and flaw evaluation applications in the ASME Nuclear Code

    Riccardella, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents a retrospective on the development and applications of fracture mechanics-based toughness requirements and flaw evaluation methodology in Sections III and XI of the ASME Code. Section III developments range from the rules and requirements for thick section Class 1 pressure vessels to thinner section components in other Classes. Section XI applications include flaw acceptance standards and evaluation methodology for various components ranging from pressure vessels to thins section piping of carbon and austenitic steels. The experience gained in operating plant applications of these rules and procedures are also discussed

  4. Elevated temperature fracture mechanics

    Tomkins, B.

    1979-01-01

    The application of fracture mechanics concepts to cracks at elevated temperatures is examined. Particular consideration is given to the characterisation of crack tip stress-strain fields and parameters controlling crack extension under static and cyclic loads. (author)

  5. Why ductile fracture mechanics

    Ritchie, R.O.

    1983-01-01

    Until recently, the engineering application of fracture mechanics has been specific to a description of macroscopic fracture behavior in components and structural parts which remain nominally elastic under loading. While this approach, termed linear elastic fracture mechanics, has been found to be invaluable for the continuum analysis of crack growth in brittle and high strength materials, it is clearly inappropriate for characterizing failure in lower strength ductile alloys where extensive inelastic deformation precedes and accompanies crack initiation and subsequent propagation. Accordingly, much effort has been devoted in recent years toward the development of nonlinear or ductile fracture mechanics methodology to characterize fracture behavior under elastic/plastic conditions; an effort which has been principally motivated by problems in nuclear industry. In this paper, the concepts of ductile (elastic/plastic) fracture mechanics are introduced and applied to the problem of both stationary and nonstationary cracks. Specifically, the limitations inherent in this approach are defined, together with a description of the microstructural considerations and applications relevant to the failure of ductile materials by fracture, fatigue, and creep

  6. Integrity evaluation of power plant components by fracture mechanics and related techniques

    Mukherjee, B.; Vanderglas, M.L.; Davies, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    Power plant components can be subject to unexpected failures with serious consequences, unless careful attention is paid to minute crack defects and their possible growth. The Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics approach to structural integrity evaluation, as it appears in the ASME Code, is discussed. Projects related to material data generation and the development of structural analysis methods to make the above method usable are described. Several integrity-related questions outside the scope of the Code guidelines are documented, concluding with comments on possible future developments

  7. Classical fracture mechanics methods

    Schwalbe, K.H.; Heerens, J.; Landes, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive Structural Integrity is a reference work which covers all activities involved in the assurance of structural integrity. It provides engineers and scientists with an unparalleled depth of knowledge in the disciplines involved. The new online Volume 11 is dedicated to the mechanical characteristics of materials. This paper contains the chapter 11.02 of this volume and is structured as follows: Test techniques; Analysis; Fracture behavior; Fracture toughness tests for nonmetals

  8. The use of fracture mechanics methodologies for NDT results evaluation and comparison

    Reale, S.

    1995-01-01

    In the general frame of analysing the interactions amongst the information from non destructive evaluation (NDE) and the methodologies to assess the integrity of a defective structure (such as fracture mechanics), the aim of the paper is to analyse and compare, in terms of indices related to safety margins, NDE results from round robin testing trials to acheive assessments of capabilities and limitations.A structural integrity/fracture mechanics approach for evaluating and comparing results from non destructive techniques is presented. Safety factors can be associated to flaws detected and characterized by inspections (estimated flaws) and to flaws actually present (reference flaws). The mismatch between safety factors associated to estimated flaws and safety factors associated to reference flaws can be used to assess capabilities and limitations of procedures and techniques in use for inspections.As an example, to show how the above procedure is applied and its potential as a method of data evaluation and comparison, the NDE results produced by the PISC (project for the inspection of steel components) activity have been considered. (orig.)

  9. Probabilistic application of fracture mechanics

    Dufresne, J.

    1981-04-01

    The different methods used to evaluate the rupture probability of a pressure vessel are reviewed. Data collection and processing of all parameters necessary for fracture mechanics evaluation are presented with particular attention to the size distribution of defects in actual vessels. Physical process is followed during crack growth and unstable propagation, using LEFM (Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanism) and plastic instability. Results show that the final failure probability for a PWR pressure vessel is 3.5 10 -8 , and is due essentially to LOCAs for any break size. The weakest point is the internal side of the belt line

  10. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics

    Simpson, L.A.

    1978-07-01

    The application of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) to crack stability in brittle structures is now well understood and widely applied. However, in many structural materials, crack propagation is accompanied by considerable crack-tip plasticity which invalidates the use of LEFM. Thus, present day research in fracture mechanics is aimed at developing parameters for predicting crack propagation under elastic-plastic conditions. These include critical crack-opening-displacement methods, the J integral and R-curve techniques. This report provides an introduction to these concepts and gives some examples of their applications. (author)

  11. Fracture mechanics and microstructures

    Gee, M.G.; Morrell, R.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of microstructure on defects in ceramics, and the consequences of their presence for the application of fracture mechanics theories are reviewed. The complexities of microstructures, especially the multiphase nature, the crystallographic anisotropy and the resultant anisotropic physical properties, and the variation of microstructure and surface finish from point to point in real components, all lead to considerable uncertainties in the actual performance of any particular component. It is concluded that although the concepts of fracture mechanics have been and will continue to be most useful for the qualitative explanation of fracture phenomena, the usefulness as a predictive tool with respect to most existing types of material is limited by the interrelation between material microstructure and mechanical properties. At present, the only method of eliminating components with unsatisfactory mechanical properties is to proof-test them, despite the fact that proof-testing itself is limited in ability to cope with changes to the component in service. The aim of the manufacturer must be to improve quality and consistency within individual components, from component to component, and from batch to batch. The aim of the fracture specialist must be to study longer-term properties to improve the accuracy of behaviour predictions with a stronger data base. Materials development needs to concentrate on obtaining defect-free materials that can be translated into more-reliable products, using our present understanding of the influence of microstructure on strength and toughness

  12. Fracture mechanics and parapsychology

    Cherepanov, G. P.

    2010-08-01

    The problem of postcritical deformation of materials beyond the ultimate strength is considered a division of fracture mechanics. A simple example is used to show the relationship between this problem and parapsychology, which studies phenomena and processes where the causality principle fails. It is shown that the concept of postcritical deformation leads to problems with no solution

  13. Mechanical evaluation of hip pads to protect against fracture of elderly femurs in falls.

    Tadano, Shigeru; Nakatsuchi, Hiroki; Goto, Naoko; Fujisaki, Kazuhiro; Nakatsuchi, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    Hip fracture in the aged easily occurs by falls and may cause these persons to become bedridden. Hip pads are effective in protecting hip fracture as they directly deflect and absorb the impact forces by falls. It is necessary for the material and the structure of hip pads to be designed to realize both high impact absorption and compliance (comfort during wearing). In this report, an impact testing system was developed to test the impact absorbing performance of hip pad with air cushions designed by the research group. The impact absorbing performance was evaluated by the impact load, collision time, and maximum load. To confirm the effectiveness in protecting against hip fracture, an impact force was applied to the greater trochanter of the human femur and the degree of fracture was measured by X-ray examination. As a result, the hip pad with air cushions had a high impact absorbing performance and was sufficiently effective to protect against hip fracture.

  14. Fracture mechanics evaluation of feedwater line failure at Surry-2: Final report

    Zahoor, A.; Gamble, R.M.

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to perform a fracture mechanics evaluation of a failure that occurred in an elbow of the 18-inch suction line to the ''A'' main feed pump at Surry Power Station, Unit 2. The failure occurred during a pressure transient subsequent to a reactor trip, which was initiated by a low-low steam generator level protection signal. Analyses were performed to characterize the crack formation and growth sequence at the estimated failure pressure (550 psi) and normal operating pressure (367 psi); this work included predicting the longitudinal throughwall crack lengths for initial wall breakthrough and failure. A sensitivity study also was performed to assess the effect on the results of variations in several conditions that generally influence failure

  15. Fracture mechanics evaluation of feedwater line failure at Surry-2: Final report

    Zahoor, A.; Gamble, R.M.

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to perform a fracture mechanics evaluation of a failure that occurred in an elbow of the 18-inch suction line to the ''A'' main feed pump at Surry Power Station, Unit 2. The failure occurred during a pressure transient subsequent to a reactor trip, which was initiated by a low-low steam generator level protection signal. Analyses were performed to characterize the crack formation and growth sequence at the estimated failure pressure (550 psi) and normal operating pressure (367 psi); this work included predicting the longitudinal throughwall crack lengths for initial wall breakthrough and failure. A sensitivity study also was performed to assess the effect on the results of variations in several conditions that generally influence failure.

  16. Mechanics of Hydraulic Fractures

    Detournay, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic fractures represent a particular class of tensile fractures that propagate in solid media under pre-existing compressive stresses as a result of internal pressurization by an injected viscous fluid. The main application of engineered hydraulic fractures is the stimulation of oil and gas wells to increase production. Several physical processes affect the propagation of these fractures, including the flow of viscous fluid, creation of solid surfaces, and leak-off of fracturing fluid. The interplay and the competition between these processes lead to multiple length scales and timescales in the system, which reveal the shifting influence of the far-field stress, viscous dissipation, fracture energy, and leak-off as the fracture propagates.

  17. Fracture mechanics analysis and evaluation for the RPV of the Chinese Qinshan 300 MW NPP and PTS

    He Yinbiao; Isozaki, Toshikuni

    2000-03-01

    One of the most severe accident conditions of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in service is the loss of coolant accident (LOCA). Cold safety injection water is pumped into the downcomer of the RPV through inlet nozzles, while the internal pressure may remain at high level. Such an accident is called pressurized thermal shock (PTS) transient according to 10 CFR 50.61 definition. This paper illustrates the fracture mechanics analysis for the existing RPV of the Chinese Qinshan 300 MW nuclear power plant (NPP) under the postulated PTS transients that include SB-LOCA, LB-LOCA of Qinshan NPP and Rancho Seco transients. 3-D models with the flaw depth range a/w=0.05∼0.9 (a: flaw depth; w: wall thickness) were used to probe what kind of flaw and what kind of transient are most dangerous for the RPV in the end of life (EOF). Both the elastic and elastic-plastic material models were used in the stress analysis and fracture mechanics analysis. The different types of flaw and the influence of the stainless steel cladding on the fracture analysis were investigated for different PTS transients. comparing with the material initiation crack toughness K IC , the fracture evaluation for the RPV in question under PTS transients are performed in this paper. (author)

  18. Ductile fracture evaluation of ductile cast iron and forged steel by nonlinear-fracture-mechanics. Pt. 1. Tensile test by large scaled test pieces with surface crack

    Kosaki, Akio; Ajima, Tatsuro; Inohara, Yasuto

    1999-01-01

    The ductile fracture tests of Ductile Cast Iron and Forged Steel under a tensile stress condition were conducted using large-scaled flat test specimens with a surface crack and were evaluated by the J-integral values, in order to propose an evaluation method of initiation of ductile fracture of a cask body with crack by nonlinear-fracture-mechanics. Following results were obtained. 1) 1 -strain relations of Ductile Cast Iron and Forged Steel under the tensile stress condition were obtained, which is necessary for the development of J-integral design curves for evaluating the initiation of ductile fracture of the cask body. 2) In case of Ductile Cast Iron, the experimental J-integral values obtained from strain-gauges showed a good agreement with the linear-elastic-theory by Raju and Newman at room temperature, in both elastic and plastic regions. But, at 70degC in plastic region, the experimental i-integral values showed middle values between those predicted by the linear-elastic-theory and by the non- linear-elastic- theory (based on the fully plastic solution by Yagawa et al.). 3) In case of Forged Steel at both -25degC and room temperature, the experimental i-integral values obtained from strain-gauges showed a good agreement with those predicted by the linear-elastic-theory by Raju and Newman, in the elastic region. In the plastic region, however, the experimental i-integral values fell apart from the curve predicted by the linear-elastic-theory by Raju and Newman, and also approached to those by the non-linear-elastic-theory with increasing strain.(author)

  19. Fracture Mechanics of Concrete

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    the international workshop on concrete fracture, organised by A Carpinteri, at Torino ... The next question is how to bring the size effect into codes of practice on the ... analysis of the recent collapse of the World Trade Center in New York by Z P ...

  20. Economic evaluation of maintenance strategies for steam generator tubes using probabilistic fracture mechanics and financial method

    Sagisaka, Mitsuyuki; Isobe, Yoshihiro; Yoshimura, Shinobu; Yagawa, Genki

    2004-01-01

    As an application of probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) and a financial method, risk-benefit analyses were performed for the purpose of optimizing maintenance activities of steam generator (SG) tubes used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Parameters such as in-service inspection (ISI) detection accuracy, ISI interval, sampling inspection, replacement of SGs and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) allowance operation were selected for sensitivity analyses. In the analysis of the operation introducing maintenance criteria, the effect of quantitative accuracy of the inspection was also taken into account. Although the analyses were mainly conducted for SG tubes made of Inconel 600 mill anneal (MA) materials, the analyses were also performed for SCC-resistant materials with making assumptions on their crack initiation probabilities and crack propagation laws. To justify whether or not it is worth while implementing the selected maintenance strategies in terms of an economic point of view, net present value (NPV) was calculated as an index which is one of the most fundamental financial indices for decision-making based on the discounted cash flow (DCF) method. (author)

  1. A study on the evaluation for dynamic fracture mechanics parameters of viscoelastic materials by impact bending

    Sim, Jae Ki; Cho, Kyu Jac

    1988-01-01

    In this paper We derived simple formulas for the dynamic strain intensity factor by means of the Timoshenko's beam theory including the influence of rotary inertia and shear deformation on the three-point viscoelastic bend specimen. Also the contact force between the specimen and the impactor is estimated by appling the nonlinear integral equation and the Hertz's theory to the local deformation near the contact point. The results obtained from this study are as follow : 1. Analysis results of this paper, base on Timoshenko's beam theory, were more accuracy than that of Euler-Bernouli beam theory and it can be confirmed by comparsion the results with experimental results. 2. Hertz's contact thepry is static one, but it is proved that by the solution of dynamic strain intensity factor it can be applied for the case of dynamic one. 3. It is founded that the fracture mechanics paraments are overestimatimated if the effects of rotary inertia and transverse shear deformation of specimen are negleted. (Author)

  2. Concepts for benchmark problem development for fracture mechanics application in safety evaluation of nuclear piping in subcreep service

    Reich, M.; Esztergar, E.P.; Erdogan, F.; Gray, T.G.F.; Spence, J.

    1979-01-01

    This report provides basic concepts and a review of the problem areas associated with the development of analytical and experimental programs for a systematic evaluation and comparison of the currently available fracture mechanics theories. The basis for such an evaluation is conceived as a series of benchmark problems which are accurately specified examples of geometry, loading, and environmental conditions, characteristic of large diameter thin wall piping systems in nuclear service. Starting from the simplest test coupons for cracked plate specimens, the program is to be designed in such a way that the range of validity and relative merit of the competing assessment methods can be evaluated and the results applied to increasingly more complex test configurations and ultimately to real piping systems. (Auth.)

  3. A fracture mechanics method of evaluating structural integrity of a reactor vessel due to thermal shock effects following LOCA condition

    Ramani, D.T.

    1977-01-01

    The importance of knowledge of structural integrity of a reactor vessel due to thermal shock effects, is related to safety and operational requirements in assessing the adequacy and flawless functioing of the nuclear power systems. Followig a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) condition the integrity of the reactor vessel due to a sudden thermal shock induced by actuation of emergency core cooling system (ECCS), must be maintained to ensure safe and orderly shutdown of the reactor and its components. The paper encompasses criteria underlaying a fracture mechanics method of analysis to evaluate structural integrity of a typical 950 MWe PWR vessel as a result of very drastic changes in thermal and mechanical stress levels in the reactor vessel wall. The main object of this investigation therefore consists in assessing the capability of a PWR vessel to withstand the most critical thermal shock without inpairing its ability to conserve vital coolant owing to probable crack propagation. (Auth.)

  4. Fracture mechanics model of fragmentation

    Glenn, L.A.; Gommerstadt, B.Y.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    A model of the fragmentation process is developed, based on the theory of linear elastic fracture mechanics, which predicts the average fragment size as a function of strain rate and material properties. This approach permits a unification of previous results, yielding Griffith's solution in the low-strain-rate limit and Grady's solution at high strain rates

  5. Age-related mechanical strength evolution of trabecular bone under fatigue damage for both genders: Fracture risk evaluation.

    Ben Kahla, Rabeb; Barkaoui, Abdelwahed; Merzouki, Tarek

    2018-05-04

    Bone tissue is a living composite material, providing mechanical and homeostatic functions, and able to constantly adapt its microstructure to changes in long term loading. This adaptation is conducted by a physiological process, known as "bone remodeling". This latter is manifested by interactions between osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and can be influenced by many local factors, via effects on bone cell differentiation and proliferation. In the current work, age and gender effects on damage rate evolution, throughout life, have been investigated using a mechanobiological finite element modeling. To achieve the aim, a mathematical model has been developed, coupling both cell activities and mechanical behavior of trabecular bone, under cyclic loadings. A series of computational simulations (ABAQUS/UMAT) has been performed on a 3D human proximal femur, allowing to investigate the effects of mechanical and biological parameters on mechanical strength of trabecular bone, in order to evaluate the fracture risk resulting from fatigue damage. The obtained results revealed that mechanical stimulus amplitude affects bone resorption and formation rates, and indicated that age and gender are major factors in bone response to the applied loadings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fracture mechanics of ceramics. Vol. 7

    Bradt, R.C.; Evans, A.G.; Hasselman, D.P.; Lange, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    This volume, together with volume 8, constitutes the proceedings of an international symposium on the fracture mechanics of ceramics. The topics discussed in this volume include the toughening of ceramics by whisker reinforcement; the mechanical properties of SiCwhisker-reinforced TZP; the fracture of brittle rock and oil shale under dynamic explosive loading; impact damage models of ceramic coatings used in gas turbine and diesel engines; the use of exploratory data analysis for the safety evaluation of structural ceramics; and proof testing methods for the reliability of structural ceramics used in gas turbines

  7. Fracture Toughness Evaluation of a Ni2MnGa Alloy Through Micro Indentation Under Magneto-Mechanical Loading

    Goanţă, Viorel; Ciocanel, Constantin

    2017-12-01

    propagated cracks, and appropriate equations (introduced in the paper), and the fracture toughness was evaluated as a function of the magneto-mechanical loading experienced by the material. The influence of the magneto-mechanical loading on the growth of already nucleated cracks has also been evaluated.

  8. CT evaluation of acetabular fractures

    Piazza, P; Girelli, G; Coran, F; Lutman, M

    1986-01-01

    The paper deals with sixteen cases of acetabular fractures studied with CT. After a short description of the normal CT findings, the different kind of fractures are reported. The usefulness of CT examination in evaluating acetabular fractures and their complications is confirmed both in conservative treatment and surgical approach.

  9. Fracture mechanics. With an introduction to micromechanics

    Gross, D.

    2006-01-01

    Concerned with the fundamental concepts and methods of fracture mechanics and micromechanics, Fracture Mechanics primarily focuses on the mechanical description of the fracture process; however, material specific aspects are also discussed. The presentation of continuum mechanical and phenomenological foundations is followed by an introduction into classical failure hypotheses. A major part of the book is devoted to linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Further subjects are creep fracture, dynamic fracture mechanics, damage mechanics, probabilistic fracture mechanics, failure of thin films and fracture of piezoelectric materials. The book also contains an extensive introduction into micromechanics. Self-contained and well-illustrated, this text serves as a graduate-level text and reference

  10. Numerical methods in dynamic fracture mechanics

    Beskos, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    A review of numerical methods for the solution of dynamic problems of fracture mechanics is presented. Finite difference, finite element and boundary element methods as applied to linear elastic or viscoelastic and non-linear elastoplastic or elastoviscoplastic dynamic fracture mechanics problems are described and critically evaluated. Both cases of stationary cracks and rapidly propagating cracks of simple I, II, III or mixed modes are considered. Harmonically varying with time or general transient dynamic disturbances in the form of external loading or incident waves are taken into account. Determination of the dynamic stress intensity factor for stationary cracks or moving cracks with known velocity history as well as determination of the crack-tip propagation history for given dynamic fracture toughness versus crack velocity relation are described and illustrated by means of certain representative examples. Finally, a brief assessment of the present state of knowledge is made and research needs are identified

  11. Development of an evaluation method for fracture mechanical tests on small samples based on a cohesive zone model

    Mahler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The safety and reliability of nuclear power plants of the fourth generation is an important issue. It is based on a reliable interpretation of the components for which, among other fracture mechanical material properties are required. The existing irradiation in the power plants significantly affects the material properties which therefore need to be determined on irradiated material. Often only small amounts of irradiated material are available for characterization. In that case it is not possible to manufacture sufficiently large specimens, which are necessary for fracture mechanical testing in agreement with the standard. Small specimens must be used. From this follows the idea of this study, in which the fracture toughness can be predicted with the developed method based on tests of small specimens. For this purpose, the fracture process including the crack growth is described with a continuum mechanical approach using the finite element method and the cohesive zone model. The experiments on small specimens are used for parameter identification of the cohesive zone model. The two parameters of the cohesive zone model are determined by tensile tests on notched specimens (cohesive stress) and by parameter fitting to the fracture behavior of smalls specimens (cohesive energy). To account the different triaxialities of the specimens, the cohesive stress is used depending on the triaxiality. After parameter identification a large specimen can be simulated with the cohesive zone parameters derived from small specimens. The predicted fracture toughness of this big specimen fulfills the size requirements in the standard (ASTM E1820 or ASTM E399) in contrast to the small specimen. This method can be used for ductile and brittle material behavior and was validated in this work. In summary, this method offers the possibility to determine the fracture toughness indirectly based on small specimen testing. Main advantage is the low required specimen volume. Thereby massively

  12. Mechanical dispersion in fractured crystalline rock systems

    Lafleur, D.W.; Raven, K.G.

    1986-12-01

    This report compiles and evaluates the hydrogeologic parameters describing the flow of groundwater and transport of solutes in fractured crystalline rocks. This report describes the processes of mechanical dispersion in fractured crystalline rocks, and compiles and evaluates the dispersion parameters determined from both laboratory and field tracer experiments. The compiled data show that extrapolation of the reliable test results performed over intermediate scales (10's of m and 10's to 100's of hours) to larger spatial and temporal scales required for performance assessment of a nuclear waste repository in crystalline rock is not justified. The reliable measures of longitudinal dispersivity of fractured crystalline rock are found to range between 0.4 and 7.8 m

  13. Evaluation of fracture toughness and mechanical properties of ternary thiol-ene-methacrylate systems as resin matrix for dental restorative composites.

    Beigi, Saeed; Yeganeh, Hamid; Atai, Mohammad

    2013-07-01

    Study and evaluation of fracture toughness, flexural and dynamic mechanical properties, and crosslink density of ternary thiol-ene-methacrylate systems and comparison with corresponding conventional methacrylate system were considered in the present study. Urethane tetra allyl ether monomer (UTAE) was synthesized as ene monomer. Different formulations were prepared based on combination of UTAE, BisGMA/TEGDMA and a tetrathiol monomer (PETMP). The photocuring reaction was conducted under visible light using BD/CQ combination as photoinitiator system. Mechanical properties were evaluated via measuring flexural strength, flexural modulus and fracture toughness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to study the morphology of the fractured specimen's cross section. Viscoelastic properties of the samples were also determined by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The same study was performed on a conventional methacrylate system. The data were analyzed and compared by ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (significance level=0.05). The results showed improvement in fracture toughness of the specimens containing thiol-ene moieties. DMTA revealed a lower glass transition temperature and more homogenous structure for thiol-ene containing specimens in comparison to the system containing merely methacrylate monomer. The flexural modulus and flexural strength of the specimens with higher thiol-ene content were lower than the neat methacrylate system. The SEM micrographs of the fractured surface of specimens with higher methacrylate content were smooth and mirror-like (shiny) which represent brittle fracture. The thiol-ene-methacrylate system can be used as resin matrix of dental composites with enhanced fracture toughness in comparison to the methacrylate analogous. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Conclusions regarding fracture mechanics testing and evaluation of small specimens - As evidenced by the finnish contribution to the IAEA CRP3 programme

    Wallin, K; Valo, M; Rintamaa, R; Torronen, K [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Ahlstrand, R [Imatran Voima Oy (IVO), Helsinki (Finland)

    1994-12-31

    An extensive mechanical property evaluation has been carried out on various specimens (a Japanese steel plate (JRQ), a French forging material (FFA) and a Japanese forging material (JFL)) in the as-received and irradiated conditions. The mechanical properties measured at different temperatures include Charpy-V notch and instrumented pre-cracked Charpy data and static and dynamic elastic-plastic fracture toughness based on the J-integral, with various specimen size and geometry. Test analysis lead to conclusions regarding the use of small specimen fracture mechanical tests for investigating irradiation effects: CVN{sub pc} and RCT type specimens are suitable for determining the materials fracture toughness even in the ductile/brittle transition region provided the elastic-plastic parameter K{sub JC} is applied together with a statistical size correction. These two specimen types yield equivalent results for the fracture toughness transition shift. Charpy-V appears not to be suitable for estimating the static fracture toughness transition shift. 8 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Deformation and fracture mechanics of engineering materials

    Hertzberg, Richard W; Vinci, Richard Paul; Hertzberg, Jason L

    2012-01-01

    "Hertzberg's 5th edition of Deformation & Fracture Mechanics of Engineering Materials offers several new features including a greater number and variety of homework problems using more computational software...

  16. Fracture Mechanics: Inspirations from Nature

    David Taylor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In Nature there are many examples of materials performing structural functions. Nature requires materials which are stiff and strong to provide support against various forces, including self-weight, the dynamic forces involved in movement, and external loads such as wind or the actions of a predator. These materials and structures have evolved over millions of years; the science of Biomimetics seeks to understand Nature and, as a result, to find inspiration for the creation of better engineering solutions. There has been relatively little fundamental research work in this area from a fracture mechanics point of view. Natural materials are quite brittle and, as a result, they have evolved several interesting strategies for preventing failure by crack propagation. Fatigue is also a major problem for many animals and plants. In this paper, several examples will be given of recent work in the Bioengineering Research Centre at Trinity College Dublin, investigating fracture and fatigue in such diverse materials as bamboo, the legs and wings of insects, and living cells.

  17. Theoretical aspects of fracture mechanics

    Atkinson, C.; Craster, R. V.

    1995-03-01

    In this review we try to cover various topics in fracture mechanics in which mathematical analysis can be used both to aid numerical methods and cast light on key features of the stress field. The dominant singular near crack tip stress field can often be parametrized in terms of three parameters K(sub I), K(sub II) and K(sub III) designating three fracture modes each having an angular variation entirely specified for the stress tensor and displacement vector. These results and contact zone models for removing the interpenetration anomaly are described. Generalizations of the above results to viscoelastic media are described. For homogeneous media with constant Poisson's ratio the angular variation of singular crack tip stresses and displacements are shown to be the same for all time and the same inverse square root singularity as occurs in the elastic medium case is found (this being true for a time varying Poisson ratio too). Only the stress intensity factor varies through time dependence of loads and relaxation properties of the medium. For cracks against bimaterial interfaces both the stress singularity and angular form evolve with time as a function of the time dependent properties of the bimaterial. Similar behavior is identified for sharp notches in viscoelastic plates. The near crack tip behavior in material with non-linear stress strain laws is also identified and stress singularities classified in terms of the hardening exponent for power law hardening materials. Again for interface cracks the near crack tip behavior requires careful analysis and it is shown that more than one singular term may be present in the near crack tip stress field. A variety of theory and applications is presented for inhomogeneous elastic media, coupled thermoelasticity etc. Methods based on reciprocal theorems and dual functions which can also aid in getting awkward singular stress behavior from numerical solutions are also reviewed. Finally theoretical calculations of fiber

  18. Finnie's notes on fracture mechanics fundamental and practical lessons

    Dharan, C K H; Finnie, Iain

    2016-01-01

    This textbook consists primarily of notes by Iain Finnie who taught a popular course on fracture mechanics at the University of California at Berkeley. It presents a comprehensive and detailed exposition of fracture, the fundamentals of fracture mechanics and procedures for the safe design of engineering components made from metal alloys, brittle materials like glasses and ceramics, and composites. Interesting and practical problems are listed at the end of most chapters to give the student practice in applying the theory. A solutions manual is provided to the instructor. The text presents a unified perspective of fracture with a strong fundamental foundation and practical applications. In addition to its role as a text, this reference would be invaluable for the practicing engineer who is involved in the design and evaluation of components that are fracture critical. This book also: Presents details of derivations of the basic equations of fracture mechanics and the historical context of the development of f...

  19. Radiographic evaluation of maxillofacial fractures

    Litwan, M.; Fliegel, C.

    1986-01-01

    The course and configuration of typical maxillofacial fractures (type Le Fort I-III) and lateral maxillary fractures including the zygomatic arch were reconstructed in detail by application of barium paste on a bony skull and radiogrpahs in standard projections were performed and evaluated. It was obvious from the resulting radiographs that for most maxillofacial fractures a half axial or Water's view was most helpful. Lateral views only give additional information when there is a considerable degree of dislocation of fragments. Comparison with a prediatric skull of 8 years of age demonstrated that fractures of the zygomatic arch in this age group cannot be demonstrated by the typical submento-vertical view, but are shown on a Towne projection. The radiographic appearance of important maxillofacial fractures is demonstrated. The necessity of further studies in cases where reconstructive surgery appears necessary is discussed and CT rather then conventional tomography is advocated. (orig.) [de

  20. Recent trends in fracture and damage mechanics

    Zybell, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of topics in fracture and damage mechanics. It presents historical perspectives as well as recent innovative developments, presented by peer reviewed contributions from internationally acknowledged authors.  The volume deals with the modeling of fracture and damage in smart materials, current industrial applications of fracture mechanics, and it explores advances in fracture testing methods. In addition, readers will discover trends in the field of local approach to fracture and approaches using analytical mechanics. Scholars in the fields of materials science, engineering and computational science will value this volume which is dedicated to Meinhard Kuna on the occasion of his 65th birthday in 2015. This book incorporates the proceedings of an international symposium that was organized to honor Meinhard Kuna’s contributions to the field of theoretical and applied fracture and damage mechanics.

  1. Intermetallic alloys: Deformation, mechanical and fracture behaviour

    Dogan, B.

    1988-01-01

    The state of the art in intermetallic alloys development with particular emphasis on deformation, mechanical and fracture behaviour is documented. This review paper is prepared to lay the ground stones for a future work on mechanical property characterization and fracture behaviour of intermetallic alloys at GKSS. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of mechanical hardness and fracture toughness of Co and Al co-doped ZnO

    Siddheswaran, R.; Mangalaraja, R.V.; Avila, Ricardo E.; Manikandan, D.; Esther Jeyanthi, C.; Ananthakumar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Combustion synthesized nanocrystalline Co and Al co-doped ZnO powders [(Zn 1−x−y Co x Al y O; x=0.04, 0.03, 0.02; y=0.01, 0.02, 0.03)] were fabricated into cylindrical discs by uni-axial pressing and sintered intentionally at 1000 °C for 2 h to assess the mechanical performance. The crystallinity of the pure and doped ZnO was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The microstructures of the sintered samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the density, porosity, grain size and its distribution. Grains of 0.5–3 μm were observed for the samples sintered at 1000 °C. The mechanical properties such as micro-hardness, fracture toughness and strain hardening co-efficient were investigated by the Vickers indentation method. It was found that the crack mode observed during the indentation on the samples belongs to median cracks under a load of 19.6 N. Also, the hardness was enhanced with increasing mol% of Co, while the trend was reversed with the increase of Al content. In addition, the strain hardening coefficient and fracture toughness were calculated using the indentation data.

  3. Fracture mechanics of piezoelectric and ferroelectric solids

    Fang, Daining

    2013-01-01

    Fracture Mechanics of Piezoelectric and Ferroelectric Solids presents a systematic and comprehensive coverage of the fracture mechanics of piezoelectric/ferroelectric materials, which includes the theoretical analysis, numerical computations and experimental observations. The main emphasis is placed on the mechanics description of various crack problems such static, dynamic and interface fractures as well as the physical explanations for the mechanism of electrically induced fracture. The book is intended for postgraduate students, researchers and engineers in the fields of solid mechanics, applied physics, material science and mechanical engineering. Dr. Daining Fang is a professor at the School of Aerospace, Tsinghua University, China; Dr. Jinxi Liu is a professor at the Department of Engineering Mechanics, Shijiazhuang Railway Institute, China.

  4. Physical fracture properties (fracture surfaces as information sources; crackgrowth and fracture mechanisms; exemples of cracks)

    Meny, Lucienne.

    1979-06-01

    Fracture surfaces are considered as a useful source of informations: an introduction to fractography is presented; the fracture surface may be observed through X ray microanalysis, and other physical methods such as Auger electron spectroscopy or secundary ion emission. The mechanisms of macroscopic and microscopic crackgrowth and fracture are described, in the case of unstable fracture (cleavage, ductile with shear, intergranular brittleness) and of progressive crack propagation (creep, fatigue). Exemples of cracks are presented in the last chapter [fr

  5. Fracture mechanisms and fracture control in composite structures

    Kim, Wone-Chul

    Four basic failure modes--delamination, delamination buckling of composite sandwich panels, first-ply failure in cross-ply laminates, and compression failure--are analyzed using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and the J-integral method. Structural failures, including those at the micromechanical level, are investigated with the aid of the models developed, and the critical strains for crack propagation for each mode are obtained. In the structural fracture analyses area, the fracture control schemes for delamination in a composite rib stiffener and delamination buckling in composite sandwich panels subjected to in-plane compression are determined. The critical fracture strains were predicted with the aid of LEFM for delamination and the J-integral method for delamination buckling. The use of toughened matrix systems has been recommended for improved damage tolerant design for delamination crack propagation. An experimental study was conducted to determine the onset of delamination buckling in composite sandwich panel containing flaws. The critical fracture loads computed using the proposed theoretical model and a numerical computational scheme closely followed the experimental measurements made on sandwich panel specimens of graphite/epoxy faceskins and aluminum honeycomb core with varying faceskin thicknesses and core sizes. Micromechanical models of fracture in composites are explored to predict transverse cracking of cross-ply laminates and compression fracture of unidirectional composites. A modified shear lag model which takes into account the important role of interlaminar shear zones between the 0 degree and 90 degree piles in cross-ply laminate is proposed and criteria for transverse cracking have been developed. For compressive failure of unidirectional composites, pre-existing defects play an important role. Using anisotropic elasticity, the stress state around a defect under a remotely applied compressive load is obtained. The experimentally

  6. Use of fracture mechanics in engineering problems

    Carter, C S

    1965-02-26

    If an engineering material containing a crack is subjected to a slowly increasing load, applied so that the crack tends to open, a small zone of plastic yielding develops at the crack tip. This zone increases in size with increasing load, and has the effect of resisting the tendency of the crack to extend. The basic concepts of fracture mechanics are outlined and the significance of crack toughness as measured by KDcU and KD1cU which relate the applied stress and crack size for unstable fracture prior to general yielding is discussed. The methods available for crack-toughness evaluation are indicated, and the mathematical expressions describing KDcU and KD1cU for a variety of geometrical situations are quoted. This approach to the design of fracture- resistant structures has been used in a number of fields in the U.S. and could be of value to the British steam turbine, aerospace, and pressure-vessel industries for design, inspection, and material selection. (64 refs.)

  7. Fluid driven fracture mechanics in highly anisotropic shale: a laboratory study with application to hydraulic fracturing

    Gehne, Stephan; Benson, Philip; Koor, Nick; Enfield, Mark

    2017-04-01

    direction of σ1. Conversely, the crack plane develops perpendicular to the bedding plane, if the bedding plane is orientated normal to σ1. Fracture initiation pressures are higher in the Divider orientation ( 24MPa) than in the Short-Transverse orientation ( 14MPa) showing a tensile strength anisotropy ( 42%) comparable to ambient tensile strength results. We then use X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) 3D-images to evaluate the evolved fracture network in terms of fracture pattern, aperture and post-test water permeability. For both fracture orientations, very fine, axial fractures evolve over the entire length of the sample. For the fracturing in the Divider orientation, it has been observed, that in some cases, secondary fractures are branching of the main fracture. Test data from fluid driven fracturing experiments suggest that fracture pattern, fracture propagation trajectories and fracturing fluid pressure (initiation and propagation pressure) are predominantly controlled by the interaction between the anisotropic mechanical properties of the shale and the anisotropic stress environment. The orientation of inherent rock anisotropy relative to the principal stress directions seems to be the main control on fracture orientation and required fracturing pressure.

  8. Test techniques for fracture mechanics testing

    Schwalbe, K.H.

    1980-01-01

    Test methods for fracture mechanics tests are described. Two groups of techniques are distinguished: Those for measurement of stable crack growth and those for determination of the loading parameters. (orig.) [de

  9. Mechanical Behaviour of Materials Volume II Fracture Mechanics and Damage

    François, Dominique; Zaoui, André

    2013-01-01

    Designing new structural materials, extending lifetimes and guarding against fracture in service are among the preoccupations of engineers, and to deal with these they need to have command of the mechanics of material behaviour. This ought to reflect in the training of students. In this respect, the first volume of this work deals with elastic, elastoplastic, elastoviscoplastic and viscoelastic behaviours; this second volume continues with fracture mechanics and damage, and with contact mechanics, friction and wear. As in Volume I, the treatment links the active mechanisms on the microscopic scale and the laws of macroscopic behaviour. Chapter I is an introduction to the various damage phenomena. Chapter II gives the essential of fracture mechanics. Chapter III is devoted to brittle fracture, chapter IV to ductile fracture and chapter V to the brittle-ductile transition. Chapter VI is a survey of fatigue damage. Chapter VII is devoted to hydogen embrittlement and to environment assisted cracking, chapter VIII...

  10. Fracture evaluation tests

    Robinson, G.C.

    1991-01-01

    In this report period, efforts have concentrated on defining the requirements for shallow-flaw beam testing. Analyses have been made to envelope the significant parameters for both deep- and shallow-flaw beams for three-point loading; that is, load to initiation of a frangible flaw, load to plastic collapse, LLD, and CMOD. An assessment was made of facilities capable of performing the tests identified by the parametric analyses discussed above. Two testing machines were identified for performing the scoped test series, the first a 550-kip Instron machine assigned to the Pressure Vessel Technology Section located in Building 9204-1 at the Y-12 Plant and the second a 220-kip MTS machine assigned to a mechanical testing group located at the K-25 Site. An existing bend test fixture previously used in the HSST clad plate test series is being modified for use in testing beams under other sponsorship but will be available for shared usage with the HSST shallow-flaw beam testing activities. To prevent the shared usage from having an adverse impact on the logistics of the HSST Program, the decision was made to procure a bend test fixture tailored specifically to serve the shallow flaw beam test series. A specification was prepared and procurement initiated. A survey is in progress for determining sources and costs of displacement-measuring instrumentation from both foreign and domestic sources. It appears that existing direct current displacement transducers available to the HSST Program may be adequate for the LLD measurements. These devices will be employed in the shakedown tests that are planned. A safety and environmental survey assessment for the beam testing conforming to the revised DOE rules has been prepared and approved

  11. Probabilistic finite elements for fracture mechanics

    Besterfield, Glen

    1988-01-01

    The probabilistic finite element method (PFEM) is developed for probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM). A finite element which has the near crack-tip singular strain embedded in the element is used. Probabilistic distributions, such as expectation, covariance and correlation stress intensity factors, are calculated for random load, random material and random crack length. The method is computationally quite efficient and can be expected to determine the probability of fracture or reliability.

  12. Interdisciplinary seminar on nondestructive testing and fracture mechanics. Lectures

    1998-01-01

    The proceedings volume contains 17 lectures presented at a DGZfP seminar held in Berlin/Germany, 2-3 November 1998. Fracture mechanics data are of interest with respect to determining maximum permissible limits for non-destructive materials evaluation, and as quantitative NDE test results indicating existing materials flaws in a system component, delivering information for assessement of remaining service life and safety risks. The topics of lectures are: Quality concepts for welded joints; NDE for service life assessment of engine components, shown for evaluation of engine pales and disks; NDE and crack detection at pressurized gas cylinders; fracture mechanics requirements for NDE in nuclear installations, discussion of practical examples (T. Seidenkranz); failure of off-shore constructions seen in the light of a novel fracture mechanics technical code. (orig./CB) [de

  13. Mechanical properties and fracture of titanium hydrides

    Koketsu, Hideyuki; Taniyama, Yoshihiro; Yonezu, Akio; Cho, Hideo; Ogawa, Takeshi; Takemoto, Mikio; Nakayama, Gen

    2006-01-01

    Titanium hydrides tend to suffer fracture when their thicknesses reach a critical thickness. Morphology and mechanical property of the hydrides are, however, not well known. The study aims to reveal the hydride morphology and fracture types of the hydrides. Chevron shaped plate hydrides were found to be produced on the surface of pure titanium (Grade 1) and Grade 7 titanium absorbing hydrogen. There were tree types of fracture of the hydrides, i.e., crack in hydride layer, exfoliation of the layer and shear-type fracture of the hydride plates, during the growth of the hydrides and deformation. We next estimated the true stress-strain curves of the hydrides on Grade 1 and 7 titanium using the dual Vickers indentation method, and the critical strain causing the Mode-I fine crack by indentation. Fracture strength and strain of the hydrides in Grade 1 titanium were estimated as 566 MPa and 4.5%, respectively. Those of the hydride in Grade 7 titanium were 498 MPa and 16%. Though the fracture strains estimated from the plastic instability of true stress-strain curves were approximately the half of those estimated by finite element method, the titanium hydrides were estimated to possess some extent of toughness or plastic deformation capability. (author)

  14. Geometry, mechanics and transmissivity of rock fractures

    Lanaro, F.

    2001-04-01

    This thesis work investigates methods and tools for characterising, testing and modelling the behaviour of rock fractures. Using a 3D-laser-scanning technique, the topography of the surfaces and their position with respect to one another are measured. From the fracture topography, fracture roughness, angularity and aperture are quantified; the major features used for characterisation. The standard deviations for the asperity heights, surface slopes and aperture are determined. These statistical parameters usually increase/decrease according to power laws of the sampling size, and sometimes reach a sill beyond which they become constant. Also the number of contact spots with a certain area decreases according to a power-law function of the area. These power-law relations reveal the self affine fractal nature of roughness and aperture. Roughness is 'persistent' while aperture varies between 'persistent' and 'anti-persistent' probably depending on the degree of match of the fracture walls. The fractal models for roughness, aperture and contact area are used to develop a constitutive model, based on contact mechanics, for describing the fracture normal and shear deformability. The experimental testing results of normal deformability are simulated well by the model whereas fracture shear deformability is not as well modelled. The model predicts well fracture dilation but is too stiff compared to rock samples. A mathematical description of the aperture pattern during shearing is also formulated. The mean value and covariance of the aperture in shearing is calculated and verifies reported observations. The aperture map of samples is inserted in a numerical program for flow calculation. The 'integral transform method' is used for solving the Reynolds' equation; it transforms the fracture transmissivity pattern into a frequency-based function. This closely resembles the power laws that describe fractals. This function can be described directly from the fractal properties of

  15. Fracture mechanics of collagen fibrils

    Svensson, Rene B; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within...... fibrils is limited. The presence of covalent enzymatic cross-links between collagen molecules is an important factor that has been shown to influence mechanical behavior of the tendons. To improve our understanding of how molecular bonds translate into tendon mechanics, we used an atomic force microscopy...... technique to measure the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils loaded to failure. Fibrils from human patellar tendons, rat-tail tendons (RTTs), NaBH₄ reduced RTTs, and tail tendons of Zucker diabetic fat rats were tested. We found a characteristic three-phase stress-strain behavior in the human...

  16. Draft fracture mechanics code case for American Society of Mechanical Engineers NUPACK rules

    McConnell, P.; Sorenson, K.; Nickell, R.; Saegusa, T.

    2004-01-01

    The containment boundaries of most spent-fuel casks certified for use in the United States by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are constructed with stainless steel, a material that is ductile in an engineering sense at all temperatures and for which, therefore, fracture mechanics principles are not relevant for the containment application. Ferritic materials may fail in a nonductile manner at sufficiently low temperatures, so fracture mechanics principles may be applied to preclude nonductile fracture. Because of the need to transport and store spent nuclear fuel safely in all types of climatic conditions, these vessels have regulatory lowest service temperatures that range down to -40 C (-40 F) for transport application. Such low service temperatures represent a severe challenge in terms of fracture toughness to many ferritic materials. Linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics principles provide a methodology for evaluating ferritic materials under such conditions

  17. Role of fracture mechanics in modern technology

    Sih, G.C.

    1987-01-01

    The conference served as a forum not only for reviewing past concepts and technologies but it provided an opportunity for many of the designers, engineers and scientists to come forth with more advanced ideas so that fracture mechanics application can be broadened and employed more effectively to avoid unexpected failures that are annoying, costly and destructive of credibility of the engineering community in general

  18. Fractures and Rock Mechanics, Phase 1

    Krogsbøll, Anette; Jakobsen, Finn; Madsen, Lena

    1997-01-01

    The main objective of the project is to combine geological descriptions of fractures, chalk types and rock mechanical properties in order to investigate whether the chosen outcrops can be used as analogues to reservoir chalks. This report deals with 1) geological descriptions of outcrop locality...

  19. Fractures and Rock Mechanics, Phase 1

    Havmøller, Ole; Krogsbøll, Anette

    1997-01-01

    The main objectives of the project are to combine geological description of fractures, chalk types and rock mechanical properties, and to investigate whether the chosen outcrops can be used as analogues to reservoir chalks. Five chalk types, representing two outcrop localities: Stevns...

  20. Japanese round robin analysis for probabilistic fracture mechanics

    Yagawa, G.; Yoshimura, S.; Handa, N.

    1991-01-01

    Recently attention is focused on the probabilistic fracture mechanics, a branch of fracture mechanics with probability theory for a rational mean to assess the strength of components and structures. In particular, the probabilistic fracture mechanics is recognized as the powerful means for quantitative investigation of significance of factors and rational evaluation of life on problems involving a number of uncertainties, such as degradation of material strength, accuracy and frequency of inspection. Comparison with reference experiments are generally employed to assure the analytical accuracy. However, accuracy and reliability of analytical methods in the probabilistic fracture mechanics are hardly verified by experiments. Therefore, it is strongly needed to verify the probabilistic fracture mechanics through the round robin analysis. This paper describes results from the round robin analysis of flat plate with semi-elliptic cracks on the surface, conducted by the PFM Working Group of LE Subcommittee of the Japan Welding Society under the contract of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and participated by Tokyo University, Yokohama National University, the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Corporation, Tokyo Electric Power Co. Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki Heavy Industry Co. and Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co. (author)

  1. An evaluation of fracture toughness of bituminous coal

    Pathan, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    The role of fracture mechanics in the design of rock structures is vitally important. However, because of the complexities of rock structures and lack of understanding of the fundamentals of the failure mechanism, it has become customary to use the engineering properties approach in the design of stable rock structures. Recently considerable attention has been given and attempts are being made to apply the fracture mechanics approach to the design of safe mining structures. In mining engineering the fracture mechanics may be applied to calculate the formation of fracture zones around mine opening, thus estimating support requirements and formulating guide lines for the selection of mine roadway support system. The research work presented here is concerned with the evaluation of fracture toughness of coal under laboratory conditions. Diametral compression test method is used to determine the fracture toughness parameter of coal in the opening model failure. The effect of crack length and dimensionless crack length on the fracture toughness was studied also. A laboratory investigation of fracture toughness of coal in tensile mode failure has led to the conclusion that fracture toughness could be treated as a material property. (author)

  2. Fracture Mechanisms in Steel Castings

    Stradomski Z.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigations were inspired with the problem of cracking of steel castings during the production process. A single mechanism of decohesion - the intergranular one - occurs in the case of hot cracking, while a variety of structural factors is decisive for hot cracking initiation, depending on chemical composition of the cast steel. The low-carbon and low-alloyed steel castings crack due to the presence of the type II sulphides, the cause of cracking of the high-carbon tool cast steels is the net of secondary cementite and/or ledeburite precipitated along the boundaries of solidified grains. Also the brittle phosphor and carbide eutectics precipitated in the final stage solidification are responsible for cracking of castings made of Hadfield steel. The examination of mechanical properties at 1050°C revealed low or very low strength of high-carbon cast steels.

  3. Mechanical transport in two-dimensional networks of fractures

    Endo, H.K.

    1984-04-01

    The objectives of this research are to evaluate directional mechanical transport parameters for anisotropic fracture systems, and to determine if fracture systems behave like equivalent porous media. The tracer experiments used to measure directional tortuosity, longitudinal geometric dispersivity, and hydraulic effective porosity are conducted with a uniform flow field and measurements are made from the fluid flowing within a test section where linear length of travel is constant. Since fluid flow and mechanical transport are coupled processes, the directional variations of specific discharge and hydraulic effective porosity are measured in regions with constant hydraulic gradients to evaluate porous medium equivalence for the two processes, respectively. If the fracture region behaves like an equivalent porous medium, the system has the following stable properties: (1) specific discharge is uniform in any direction and can be predicted from a permeability tensor; and (2) hydraulic effective porosity is directionally stable. Fracture systems with two parallel sets of continuous fractures satisfy criterion 1. However, in these systems hydraulic effective porosity is directionally dependent, and thus, criterion 2 is violated. Thus, for some fracture systems, fluid flow can be predicted using porous media assumptions, but it may not be possible to predict transport using porous media assumptions. Two discontinuous fracture systems were studied which satisfied both criteria. Hydraulic effective porosity for both systems has a value between rock effective porosity and total porosity. A length-density analysis (LDS) of Canadian fracture data shows that porous media equivalence for fluid flow and transport is likely when systems have narrow aperture distributions. 54 references, 90 figures, 7 tables

  4. Statistical fracture mechanics approach to the strength of brittle rock

    Ratigan, J.L.

    1981-06-01

    Statistical fracture mechanics concepts used in the past for rock are critically reviewed and modifications are proposed which are warranted by (1) increased understanding of fracture provided by modern fracture mechanics and (2) laboratory test data both from the literature and from this research. Over 600 direct and indirect tension tests have been performed on three different rock types; Stripa Granite, Sierra White Granite and Carrara Marble. In several instances assumptions which are common in the literature were found to be invalid. A three parameter statistical fracture mechanics model with Mode I critical strain energy release rate as the variant is presented. Methodologies for evaluating the parameters in this model as well as the more commonly employed two parameter models are discussed. The experimental results and analysis of this research indicate that surfacially distributed flaws, rather than volumetrically distributed flaws are responsible for rupture in many testing situations. For several of the rock types tested, anisotropy (both in apparent tensile strength and size effect) precludes the use of contemporary statistical fracture mechanics models

  5. Fracture mechanisms in lead zirconate titanate ceramics

    Freiman, S.W.; Chuck, L.; Mecholsky, J.J.; Shelleman, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) ceramics can be formed over a wide range of PbTiO 3 /PbZrO 3 ratios and exist in a number of crystal structures. This study involved the use of various fracture mechanics techniques to determine critical fracture toughness, K /SUB IC/ , as a function of composition, microstructure, temperature, and electrical and thermal history. The results of these experiments indicate that variations in K /SUB IC/ are related to phase transformations in the material as well as to other toughening mechanisms such as twinning and microcracking. In addition, the strength and fracture toughness of selected PZT ceramics were determined using specimens in which a crack was introduced by a Vicker's hardness indentor. The variation of K /SUB IC/ with composition and microstructure was related to the extent of twin-crack interaction. Comparison of the plot of strength as a function of indentation load with that predicted from indentation fracture models indicates the presence of internal stresses which contribute to failure. The magnitude of these internal stresses has been correlated with electrical properties of the ceramic. Fractographic analysis was used to determine the magnitude of internal stresses in specimens failing from ''natural flaws.''

  6. Evaluation of different fracture-mechanical J-integral initiation values with regard to their usability in the safety assessment of components

    Eisele, U.; Roos, E.

    1991-01-01

    Determining fracture-mechanical material characteristic values on the basis of the J-integral is described and stipulated in a variety of standards and guidelines. The individual specifications differ in terms of procedure when determining the characteristic values and, therefore, also in terms of the meaningfulness of the results. This paper presents the different procedures, suggested in the course of the development of test methods in the field of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, used to characterize crack initiation behaviour with regard to their features as material characteristic values and their usability in the safety assessment of components. (orig.)

  7. Integration of NDE Reliability and Fracture Mechanics

    Becker, F. L.; Doctor, S. R.; Heas!er, P. G.; Morris, C. J.; Pitman, S. G.; Selby, G. P.; Simonen, F. A.

    1981-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting a four-phase program for measuring and evaluating the effectiveness and reliability of in-service inspection (lSI} performed on the primary system piping welds of commercial light water reactors (LWRs). Phase I of the program is complete. A survey was made of the state of practice for ultrasonic rsr of LWR primary system piping welds. Fracture mechanics calculations were made to establish required nondestrutive testing sensitivities. In general, it was found that fatigue flaws less than 25% of wall thickness would not grow to failure within an inspection interval of 10 years. However, in some cases failure could occur considerably faster. Statistical methods for predicting and measuring the effectiveness and reliability of lSI were developed and will be applied in the "Round Robin Inspections" of Phase II. Methods were also developed for the production of flaws typical of those found in service. Samples fabricated by these methods wilI be used in Phase II to test inspection effectiveness and reliability. Measurements were made of the influence of flaw characteristics {i.e., roughness, tightness, and orientation) on inspection reliability. These measurernents, as well as the predictions of a statistical model for inspection reliability, indicate that current reporting and recording sensitivities are inadequate.

  8. Fatigue and fracture mechanics in pressure vessels and piping. PVP-Volume 304

    Mehta, H.S.; Wilkowski, G.; Takezono, S.; Bloom, J.; Yoon, K.; Aoki, S.; Rahman, S.; Nakamura, T.; Brust, F.; Yoshimura, S.

    1995-01-01

    Fracture mechanics and fatigue evaluations are an important part of the structural integrity analyses to assure safe operation of pressure vessels and piping components during their service life. The paper presented in this volume illustrate the application of fatigue and fracture mechanics techniques to assess the structural integrity of a wide variety of Pressure Vessels and Piping components. The papers are organized in six sections: (1) fatigue and fracture--vessels; (2) fatigue and fracture--piping; (3) fatigue and fracture--material property evaluations; (4) constraint effects in fracture mechanics; (5) probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses; and (6) user's experience with failure assessment diagrams. Separate abstracts were prepared for most of the papers in this book

  9. Cracking mechanism of shale cracks during fracturing

    Zhao, X. J.; Zhan, Q.; Fan, H.; Zhao, H. B.; An, F. J.

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we set up a model for calculating the shale fracture pressure on the basis of Huang’s model by the theory of elastic-plastic mechanics, rock mechanics and the application of the maximum tensile stress criterion, which takes into account such factors as the crustal stress field, chemical field, temperature field, tectonic stress field, the porosity of shale and seepage of drilling fluid and so on. Combined with the experimental data of field fracturing and the experimental results of three axis compression of shale core with different water contents, the results show that the error between the present study and the measured value is 3.85%, so the present study can provide technical support for drilling engineering.

  10. Tibial Fractures in Alpine Skiing and Snowboarding in Finland: A Retrospective Study on Fracture Types and Injury Mechanisms in 363 Patients.

    Stenroos, A; Pakarinen, H; Jalkanen, J; Mälkiä, T; Handolin, L

    2016-09-01

    Alpine skiing and snowboarding share the hazards of accidents accounting for tibial fractures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture patterns and mechanisms of injury of tibial fractures taking place in downhill skiing and snowboarding. All patients with tibial fracture due to alpine skiing or snowboarding accident treated in four trauma centers next to the largest ski resorts in Finland were analyzed between 2006 and 2012. The hospital records were retrospectively reviewed for data collection: equipment used (skis or snowboard), age, gender, and mechanism of injury. Fractures were classified according to AO-classification. There were 342 skiing and 30 snowboarding related tibial fractures in 363 patients. Tibial shaft fracture was the most common fracture among skiers (n = 215, 63%), followed by proximal tibial fractures (n = 92, 27%). Snowboarders were most likely to suffer from proximal tibial fracture (13, 43%) or tibial shaft fracture (11, 37%). Snowboarders were also more likely than skiers to suffer complex AO type C fractures (23% vs 9%, p jumping (46%). The most important finding was the relatively high number of the tibial plateau fractures among adult skiers. The fracture patterns between snowboarding and skiing were different; the most common fracture type in skiers was spiral tibial shaft fracture compared to proximal tibial fractures in snowboarders. Children had more simple fractures than adults. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2016.

  11. A proposal for evaluation method of crack growth due to cyclic overload for piping materials based on an elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameter

    Yamaguchi, Yoshihito; Katsuyama, Jinya; Onizawa, Kunio; Li, Yinsheng; Sugino, Hideharu

    2011-01-01

    The magnitude of Niigata-ken Chuetsu-Oki earthquake in 2007 was beyond the assumed one provided in seismic design. Therefore it becomes an important issue to evaluate the crack growth behaviors due to the cyclic overload like large earthquake. Fatigue crack growth is usually evaluated by Paris's law using the range of stress intensity factor (ΔK). However, ΔK is inappropriate in a loading condition beyond small scale yielding. In this study, the crack growth behaviors for piping materials were investigated based on an elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameter, J-integral. It was indicated that the crack growth due to the cyclic overload beyond small scale yielding could be the sum of fatigue and ductile crack growth. The retardation effect of excessive loading on the crack growth was observed after the loading. The modified Wheeler model using J-integral has been proposed for the prediction of retardation effect. Finally, an evaluation method for crack growth behaviors due to the cyclic overload is suggested. (author)

  12. The fracture properties and toughening mechanisms of bone and dentin

    Koester, Kurt John

    The mechanical properties of bone and dentin and in particular their fracture properties, are the subject of intense research. The relevance of these properties is increasing as our population ages and fracture incidence impacts the lives of a greater portion of the population. A robust framework is needed to understand the fracture properties of bone and dentin to guide researchers as they attempt to characterize the effects of aging, disease, and pharmaceutical treatments on the properties of these mineralized tissues. In the present work, this framework is provided and applied to human bone, human dentin, and animal bone. In situ electron microscopy was also used to identify the salient toughening mechanisms in bone and dentin. It was found that bone and dentin are extrinsically toughened materials and consequently their fracture properties are best characterized utilizing a crack-growth resistance approach. A description of the different mechanical measurements commonly employed when using small animal models (rats and mice) to evaluate the influence of drug therapies on bone fragility is provided. A study where these properties were measured for a large population of wild-type rats and mice was also conducted. Given my findings, it was determined that for the most complete understanding of small animal bone it was necessary to measure strength and toughness. Strength measurements probe the flaw distribution and toughness measurements to evaluate the resistance to facture in the presence of a single dominant worst-case flaw.

  13. Integration of fracture mechanics and NDE

    Njo, D.H.; McDonald, N.R.; Nichols, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper addresses issues concerning the effective assessment of the structural integrity of safety related components, principally the primary system, in operating nuclear power plants. The failure mode of greatest safety concern is fracture and this is usually assessed by fracture mechanics (FM) procedures. These require the choice and application of an appropriate analytical method based on a knowledge of the materials, loading and environmental conditions, and characteristics of such defects as have been identified by non destructive examination (NDE). The paper focuses on capabilities and limitations of the NDE procedures, FM methods and other input information which must be taken into account in practical circumstances as well as some problems encountered. It concludes that an integral approach requiring mutual understanding, dialogue and cooperation among the materials, FM and NDE experts is essential for effective and reliable structural integrity assessments

  14. Development of a boundary element based program system for fracture mechanical evaluation of cracked structures; Entwicklung eines randelementbasierten Programmsystems zur bruchmechanischen Bewertung rissbehafteter Strukturen

    Weber, Wilhelm

    2010-07-01

    Cracks, which trace back to damaging during the manufacturing process, are often the origin of the failure of structures. The collapse of safety-relevant parts results in perilous situations for human beings. Therefore, the fracture mechanical assessment of these structures becomes more important in the dimensioning process. For this purpose numerical tools are required. In presence of cyclic loading conditions fatigue crack propagation is very critical, because crack growth occurs for lower stresses compared to static loadings. Due to the non-linear nature of crack growth an incremental procedure has to be applied for the simulation of crack propagation. Each increment starts with a complete stress analysis including the determination of the fracture mechanical parameters along the crack front. Then, the 3D crack growth criterion is evaluated for the calculation of the crack extension and the kink angle. Finally, the discretization is adjusted to the new crack geometry for the next incremental loop. For the stress analysis the boundary element method (BEM) in terms of the collocation technique is applied. The BEM has been proven as an efficient numerical tool for stress concentration problems. Moreover, the modification of the mesh during the simulation of crack propagation is easier by using boundary elements compared to volume orientated methods. By the application of the adaptive cross approximation the numerical complexity of the stress analysis is reduced significantly. In the framework of the dual discontinuity method the discontinuities of the displacements and the tractions are used directly as primary variables at the crack. Therewith 3D crack surface contact using a penalty formulation is taken into account for the forst time within this work. The simulation of crack growth is implemented in the framework of a predictor-corrector-scheme. This method ensures high accuracy with respect to the location and shape of the numerically determined crack fronts

  15. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics study of thermal shock cracking

    Hirano, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Nakazawa, H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes thermal shock experiments conducted on a nuclear pressure vessel steel (A533 Grade B Class 1), an AISI304 steel and a tool steel (JIS SKD62) using both a new thermal shock test facility and method. Analysis of their quasi-static thermal stress intensity factors is performed on the basis of linear-elastic fracture mechanics; and a thermal shock fracture toughness value, Ksub(tsc) is evaluated. Then elastic-plastic fracture toughness tests are carried out in the same high temperature range of the thermal shock experiment, and a relation between the stretched zone width, SZW, formed as a result of the fatigue precrack tip plastic blunting and the J-integral is clarified. An elastic-plastic thermal shock fracture toughness value, Jsub(tsc), is evaluated from a critical value of the stretched zone width, SZWsub(tsc), at the initiation of the thermal shock cracking by using the relation between SZW and J. The Jsub(tsc) value is compared with an elastic-plastic fracture toughness value, Jsub(Ic), and the difference between these Jsub(tsc) and Jsub(Ic) values is discussed on the basis of fractography. (author)

  16. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part I. Ductility and fracture toughness

    Margolin, B., E-mail: mail@crism.ru; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Minkin, A.; Potapova, V.; Smirnov, V.

    2016-11-15

    The radiation swelling effect on the fracture properties of irradiated austenitic steels under static loading has been studied and analyzed from the mechanical and physical viewpoints. Experimental data on the stress-strain curves, fracture strain, fracture toughness and fracture mechanisms have been represented for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various swelling. Some phenomena in mechanical behaviour of irradiated austenitic steels have been revealed and explained as follows: a sharp decrease of fracture toughness with swelling growth; untypical large increase of fracture toughness with decrease of the test temperature; some increase of fracture toughness after preliminary cyclic loading. Role of channel deformation and channel fracture has been clarified in the properties of irradiated austenitic steel and different tendencies to channel deformation have been shown and explained for the same austenitic steel irradiated at different temperatures and neutron doses.

  17. Probabilistic fracture mechanics in the integrity evaluation of components; Mecanica de fractura probabilista en la evaluacion de la integridad de componentes

    Franco Nava, Jose Manuel; Torres Toledano, Jose Gerardo; Sanchez Sanchez, Ramon [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1996-12-31

    Because of the importance of fracture mechanics in applications to pressure vessels, piping and other components used in thermal power plants, the Mechanical Engineering Unit of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) has been developing activities in this field since some years ago. In this paper, the process for the analysis of probabilistic fracture mechanics is described. As an example, an application to the calculation of fault probability in piping systems, is presented. [Espanol] Dada la importancia de la mecanica de fractura en aplicaciones de recipientes a presion, tuberias y otros componentes utilizados en centrales termicas, la Unidad de Ingenieria Mecanica del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) ha venido desarrollando actividades en este campo desde hace algunos anos. En el presente trabajo, se describe el proceso para el analisis de mecanica de fractura probabilista. Como ejemplo se presenta una aplicacion al calculo de probabilidad de falla en tuberias.

  18. Probabilistic fracture mechanics in the integrity evaluation of components; Mecanica de fractura probabilista en la evaluacion de la integridad de componentes

    Franco Nava, Jose Manuel; Torres Toledano, Jose Gerardo; Sanchez Sanchez, Ramon [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1997-12-31

    Because of the importance of fracture mechanics in applications to pressure vessels, piping and other components used in thermal power plants, the Mechanical Engineering Unit of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) has been developing activities in this field since some years ago. In this paper, the process for the analysis of probabilistic fracture mechanics is described. As an example, an application to the calculation of fault probability in piping systems, is presented. [Espanol] Dada la importancia de la mecanica de fractura en aplicaciones de recipientes a presion, tuberias y otros componentes utilizados en centrales termicas, la Unidad de Ingenieria Mecanica del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) ha venido desarrollando actividades en este campo desde hace algunos anos. En el presente trabajo, se describe el proceso para el analisis de mecanica de fractura probabilista. Como ejemplo se presenta una aplicacion al calculo de probabilidad de falla en tuberias.

  19. Mechanical Integrity of Canisters Using a Fracture Mechanics Approach

    Koyama, Tomofumi; Guoxiang Zhang; Lanru Jing [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Land and Water Resources Engineering

    2006-07-15

    This report presents the methods and results of a research project about numerical modeling of mechanical integrity of cast-iron canisters for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Sweden, using combined boundary element (BEM) and finite element (FEM) methods. The objectives of the project are: 1) to investigate the possibility of initiation and growth of fractures in the cast-iron canisters under the mechanical loading conditions defined in the premises of canister design by Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB); 2) to investigate the maximum bearing capacity of the cast iron canisters under uniformly distributed and gradually increasing boundary pressure until plastic failure. Achievement of the two objectives may provide some quantitative evidence for the mechanical integrity and overall safety of the cast-iron canisters that are needed for the final safety assessment of the geological repository of the radioactive waste repository in Sweden. The geometrical dimension, distribution and magnitudes of loads and Material properties of the canisters and possible fractures were provided by the latest investigations of SKB. The results of the BEM simulations, using the commercial code BEASY, indicate that under the currently defined loading conditions the possibility of initiation of new fractures or growth of existing fractures (defects) are very small, due to the reasons that: 1) the canisters are under mainly compressive stresses; 2) the induced tensile stress regions are too small in both dimension and magnitude to create new fractures or to induce growth of existing fractures, besides the fact that the toughness of the fractures in the cast iron canisters are much higher that the stress intensity factors in the fracture tips. The results of the FEM simulation show a approximately 75 MPa maximum pressure beyond which plastic collapse of the cast-iron canisters may occur, using an elastoplastic Material model. This figure is smaller compared

  20. Introduction into technical application of fracture mechanics. 3. rev. ed.

    Heckel, K.

    1991-01-01

    Technical components made out of metal material are liable to be defective. Cracks are the most dangerous defects. Based on fracture mechanics methods were developed which permit to estimate the proveness of cracks to intrate fracture. The present book is restricted to the standardised methods of fracture mechanics. Theoretical foundations of various concepts aspect under the fracture mechanics are given. Experimental methods of determining material characteristics of fracture mechanics are explained in detail as a profound knowledge of testing criteria is necessary in order to be able to a characteristic to a component. This book contains the latest level of standardised methods of fracture mechanics. It is meant for advanced students and engineers working in practice. Some fully calculated examples are used as an introduction into the thinking of fracture mechanics. (orig./MM) [de

  1. Use of fracture mechanics in the US industry

    Landes, J.D. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung

    2001-07-01

    The modern fracture mechanics technology began in the US in the 1960's. It was developed in response to failure problems that could not be explained by current technology. Some segments of the US industry were quick to embrace this new technology. The period of 1960 to middle 1980's marked a time of active fracture mechanics research in the US industry. From this various codes and assessment procedures have been developed to apply the fracture mechanics approach to evaluate the safety and reliability of critical structural components. This report discusses the US industry use of fracture mechanics. It considers the historical developments, some of the fracture mechanics tools that are available and present practices. Several different industry segments that have used the fracture mechanics approach are considered. These include aerospace, military, power generation, petrochemical and pipelines, metal producers, and construction/transportation. Their current use of the fracture mechanics methods involves the implementation of codes and procedures, the development of software packages, the use of outside consulting groups and some in-house research efforts. (orig.) [German] Die Entwicklung der modernen Bruchmechanik in den USA begann in den 1960er Jahren im Zusammenhang mit einer Reihe von Versagensfaellen, die auf konventionelle Weise nicht erklaert werden konnten. Die neuen Ansaetze wurden von einigen Branchen schnell aufgegriffen und weiterentwickelt. Die Periode von 1960 bis in die Mitte der 1980er Jahre markiert eine Zeit intensiver Forschungsarbeit in der amerikanischen Industrie. Eine Reihe von Codes und Vorschriften zur Bewertung der Sicherheit und Zuverlaessigkeit gefaehrdeter Strukturen hat ihren Ursprung in dieser Zeit. Der vorliegende Aufsatz thematisiert die Anwendung bruchmechanischer Methoden in der Industrie der USA anhand historischer Aspekte, des heute verfuegbaren Instrumentariums der Bauteilbewertung und der gaengigen Praxis bei der

  2. Micro- and macroapproaches in fracture mechanics for interpreting brittle fracture and fatigue crack growth

    Ekobori, T.; Konosu, S.; Ekobori, A.

    1980-01-01

    Classified are models of the crack growth mechanism, and in the framework of the fracture mechanics suggested are combined micro- and macroapproaches to interpreting the criterion of the brittle fracture and fatigue crack growth as fracture typical examples, when temporal processes are important or unimportant. Under the brittle fracture conditions the crack propagation criterion is shown to be brought with the high accuracy to a form analogous to one of the crack propagation in a linear fracture mechanics although it is expressed with micro- and macrostructures. Obtained is a good agreement between theoretical and experimental data

  3. Fracture mechanics of ceramics. Vol. 8. Microstructure, methods, design, and fatigue

    Bradt, R.C.; Evans, A.G.; Hasselman, D.P.H.; Lange, F.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents information on the following topics: fracture mechanics and microstructures; non-lubricated sliding wear of Al 2 O 3 , PSZ and SiC; mixed-mode fracture of ceramics; some fracture properties of alumina-containing electrical porcelains; transformation toughening in the Al 2 O 3 -Cr 2 O 3 /ZrO 2 -HfO 2 system; strength toughness relationships for transformation toughened ceramics; tensile strength and notch sensitivity of Mg-PSZ; fracture mechanisms in lead zirconate titanate ceramics; loading-unloading techniques for determining fracture parameters of brittle materials utilizing four-point bend, chevron-notched specimens; application of the potential drop technique to the fracture mechanics of ceramics; ceramics-to-metal bonding from a fracture mechanics perspective; observed changes in fracture strength following laser irradiation and ion beam mixing of Ni overlayers on sintered alpha-SiC; crack growth in single-crystal silicon; a fracture mechanics and non-destructive evaluation investigation of the subcritical-fracture process in rock; slow crack growth in sintered silicon nitride; uniaxial tensile fatigue testing of sintered silicon carbide under cyclic temperature change; and effect of surface corrosion on glass fracture

  4. Probabilistic fracture mechanics applied for lbb case study: international benchmark

    Radu, V.

    2015-01-01

    An application of probabilistic fracture mechanics to evaluate the structural integrity for a case study chosen from experimental Mock-ups of FP7 STYLE project is described. The reliability model for probabilistic structural integrity, focused on the assessment of TWC in the pipe weld under complex loading (bending moment and residual stress) has been setup. The basic model is the model of fracture for through-wall cracked pipe under elastic-plastic conditions. The corresponding structural reliability approach is developed with the probabilities of failure associated with maximum load for crack initiation, net-section collapse but also the evaluation the instability loads. The probabilities of failure for a through-wall crack in a pipe subject to pure bending are evaluated by using crude Monte Carlo simulations. The results from the international benchmark are presented for the mentioned case in the context of ageing and lifetime management of pressure boundary/pressure circuit component. (authors)

  5. Development of Numerical Analysis Techniques Based on Damage Mechanics and Fracture Mechanics

    Chang, Yoon Suk; Lee, Dock Jin; Choi, Shin Beom; Kim, Sun Hye; Cho, Doo Ho; Lee, Hyun Boo

    2010-04-01

    The scatter of measured fracture toughness data and transferability problems among different crack configurations as well as geometry and loading conditions are major obstacles for application of fracture mechanics. To address these issues, recently, concerns on the local approach employing reliable micro-mechanical damage models are being increased again in connection with a progress of computational technology. In the present research, as part of development of fracture mechanical evaluation model for material degradation of reactor pressure boundary, several investigations on fracture behaviors were carried out. Especially, a numerical scheme to determine key parameters consisting both cleavage and ductile fracture estimate models was changed efficiently by incorporating a genetic algorithm. Also, with regard to the well-known master curve, newly reported methods such as bimodal master curve, randomly inhomogeneous master curve and single point estimation were reviewed to deal with homogeneous and inhomogeneous material characteristics. A series of preliminary finite element analyses was conducted to examine the element size effect on micro-mechanical models. Then, a new thickness correction equation was derived from parametric three-dimensional numerical simulations, which was founded on the current test standard, ASTM E1921, but could lead to get more realistic fracture toughness values. As a result, promising modified master curves as well as fracture toughness diagrams to convert data between pre-cracked V-notched and compact tension specimens were generated. Moreover, a user-subroutine in relation to GTN(Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman) model was made by adopting Hill's 48 yield potential theory. By applying GTN model combined with the subroutine to small punch specimens, the effect of inhomogeneous properties on fracture behaviors of miniature specimens was confirmed. Therefore, it is anticipated that the aforementioned enhanced research results can be utilized

  6. Microscale fracture mechanisms of a Cr3C2-NiCr HVOF coating

    Robertson, Andrew L.; White, Ken W.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal spray coatings, often composed of heterogeneous, multiphase microstructures, may, consequently, exhibit complex fracture behavior. For such coating structures, conventional mechanical evaluation methods fail to isolate the contribution of microstructural features to the overall fracture behavior. For this reason, this study employed focused ion beam machined (FIB) microcantilever beams and FIB sectioning methods to study the fracture mechanisms important at the scale of the heterogeneous Cr 3 C 2 -NiCr thermal spray coating. We found three fracture modes, namely, intergranular matrix fracture, matrix/carbide interfacial fracture, and carbide cleavage. By comparison, microindentation-induced cracks, the frequency of crack deflection around carbides is significantly more prevalent at this much larger crack dimension. This mechanistic variation provides some insight into the specific role and limitations of the microcantilever beam technique for fracture characterization of composite microstructures.

  7. Three-dimensional effects in fracture mechanics

    Benitez, F.G.

    1991-01-01

    An overall view of the pioneering theories and works, which enlighten the three-dimensional nature of fracture mechanics during the last years is given. the main aim is not an exhaustive reviewing but the displaying of the last developments on this scientific field in a natural way. This work attempts to envisage the limits of disregarding the three-dimensional behaviour in theories, analyses and experiments. Moreover, it tries to draw attention on the scant fervour, although increasing, this three-dimensional nature of fracture has among the scientific community. Finally, a constructive discussion is presented on the use of two-dimensional solutions in the analysis of geometries which bear a three-dimensional configuration. the static two-dimensional solutions and its applications fields are reviewed. also, the static three-dimensional solutions, wherein a comparative analysis with elastoplastic and elastostatic solutions are presented. to end up, the dynamic three-dimensional solutions are compared to the asymptotic two-dimensional ones under the practical applications point of view. (author)

  8. Impact of Injury Mechanisms on Patterns and Management of Facial Fractures.

    Greathouse, S Travis; Adkinson, Joshua M; Garza, Ramon; Gilstrap, Jarom; Miller, Nathan F; Eid, Sherrine M; Murphy, Robert X

    2015-07-01

    Mechanisms causing facial fractures have evolved over time and may be predictive of the types of injuries sustained. The objective of this study is to examine the impact of mechanisms of injury on the type and management of facial fractures at our Level 1 Trauma Center. The authors performed an Institutional Review Board-approved review of our network's trauma registry from 2006 to 2010, documenting age, sex, mechanism, Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Scale, facial fracture patterns (nasal, maxillary/malar, orbital, mandible), and reconstructions. Mechanism rates were compared using a Pearson χ2 test. The database identified 23,318 patients, including 1686 patients with facial fractures and a subset of 1505 patients sustaining 2094 fractures by motor vehicle collision (MVC), fall, or assault. Nasal fractures were the most common injuries sustained by all mechanisms. MVCs were most likely to cause nasal and malar/maxillary fractures (P management. Age and number of fractures sustained were associated with operative intervention. Although there is a statistically significant correlation between mechanism of injury and type of facial fracture sustained, none of the mechanisms evaluated herein are statistically associated with surgical intervention. Clinical Question/Level of Evidence: Therapeutic, III.

  9. Fracture mechanics performance of UF6 containers

    Gonzalez, M.E.; Iorio, A.F.; Crespi, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    The main purpose of this work was to determine the fracture mechanics performance of UF 6 transport cylinders type ANSI N14.1.30B, which was made from ASTM A 516 Grade 70 steel. It was assumed an internal surface axial crack subjected to stresses due to service, proof and transport accident loads. The KUMAR-GERMAN-SHIH elastoplastic methodology gave adequate results for crack depth estimation. The results validate the leak-before-break criteria for service and proof conditions but not for accident ones. In the last case a non-destructive examination must be done in order to assure the absence of defects larger than one third of the cylinder wall thickness. (Author)

  10. Numerical modelling in non linear fracture mechanics

    Viggo Tvergaard

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Some numerical studies of crack propagation are based on using constitutive models that accountfor damage evolution in the material. When a critical damage value has been reached in a materialpoint, it is natural to assume that this point has no more carrying capacity, as is done numerically in the elementvanish technique. In the present review this procedure is illustrated for micromechanically based materialmodels, such as a ductile failure model that accounts for the nucleation and growth of voids to coalescence, and a model for intergranular creep failure with diffusive growth of grain boundary cavities leading to micro-crack formation. The procedure is also illustrated for low cycle fatigue, based on continuum damage mechanics. In addition, the possibility of crack growth predictions for elastic-plastic solids using cohesive zone models to represent the fracture process is discussed.

  11. Investigation of Mechanical Properties and Fracture Simulation of Solution-Treated AA 5754

    Kumar, Pankaj; Singh, Akhilendra

    2017-10-01

    In this work, mechanical properties and fracture toughness of as-received and solution-treated aluminum alloy 5754 (AA 5754) are experimentally evaluated. Solution heat treatment of the alloy is performed at 530 °C for 2 h, and then, quenching is done in water. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, impact toughness, hardness, fatigue life, brittle fracture toughness (K_{Ic} ) and ductile fracture toughness (J_{Ic} ) are evaluated for as-received and solution-treated alloy. Extended finite element method has been used for the simulation of tensile and fracture behavior of material. Heaviside function and asymptotic crack tip enrichment functions are used for modelling of the crack in the geometry. Ramberg-Osgood material model coupled with fracture energy is used to simulate the crack propagation. Fracture surfaces obtained from various mechanical tests are characterized by scanning electron microscopy.

  12. Development of probabilistic fracture mechanics code PASCAL and user's manual

    Shibata, Katsuyuki; Onizawa, Kunio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Li, Yinsheng; Kato, Daisuke [Fuji Research Institute Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    As a part of the aging and structural integrity research for LWR components, a new PFM (Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics) code PASCAL (PFM Analysis of Structural Components in Aging LWR) has been developed since FY1996. This code evaluates the failure probability of an aged reactor pressure vessel subjected to transient loading such as PTS (Pressurized Thermal Shock). The development of the code has been aimed to improve the accuracy and reliability of analysis by introducing new analysis methodologies and algorithms considering the recent development in the fracture mechanics methodologies and computer performance. The code has some new functions in optimized sampling and cell dividing procedure in stratified Monte Carlo simulation, elastic-plastic fracture criterion of R6 method, extension analysis models in semi-elliptical crack, evaluation of effect of thermal annealing and etc. In addition, an input data generator of temperature and stress distribution time histories was also prepared in the code. Functions and performance of the code have been confirmed based on the verification analyses and some case studies on the influence parameters. The present phase of the development will be completed in FY2000. Thus this report provides the user's manual and theoretical background of the code. (author)

  13. Evaluation of permeable fractures in rock aquifers

    Bok Lee, Hang

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the practical usefulness and fundamental applicability of a self-potential (SP) method for identifying the permeable fractures were evaluated by a comparison of SP methods with other geophysical logging methods and hydraulic tests. At a 10 m-shallow borehole in the study site, the candidates of permeable fractures crossing the borehole were first determined by conventional geophysical methods such as an acoustic borehole televiwer, temperature, electrical conductivity and gamma-gamma loggings, which was compared to the analysis by the SP method. Constant pressure injection and recovery tests were conducted for verification of the hydraulic properties of the fractures identified by various logging methods. The acoustic borehole televiwer and gamma-gamma loggings detected the open space or weathering zone within the borehole, but they cannot prove the possibility of a groundwater flow through the detected fractures. The temperature and electrical conductivity loggings had limitations to detect the fractured zones where groundwater in the borehole flows out to the surrounding rock aquifers. Comparison of results from different methods showed that there is a best correlation between the distribution of hydraulic conductivity and the variation of the SP signals, and the SP logging can estimate accurately the hydraulic activity as well as the location of permeable fractures. Based on the results, the SP method is recommended for determining the hydraulically-active fractures rather than other conventional geophysical loggings. This self-potential method can be effectively applied in the initial stage of a site investigation which selects the optimal location and evaluates the hydrogeological property of fractures in target sites for the underground structure including the geothermal reservoir and radioactive waste disposal.

  14. Fracture mechanics of concrete : Will applications start to emerge?

    Van Mier, J.G.M.

    1995-01-01

    Fracture mechanics of concrete has developed into an active field of research in the past decades. It promises a rational solution technique to structural problems in reinforced concrete in the limit state. Numerical tools have been developed on the basis of fracture mechanics theories. The question

  15. Dependence of fracture mechanical and fluid flow properties on fracture roughness and sample size

    Tsang, Y.W.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    A parameter study has been carried out to investigate the interdependence of mechanical and fluid flow properties of fractures with fracture roughness and sample size. A rough fracture can be defined mathematically in terms of its aperture density distribution. Correlations were found between the shapes of the aperture density distribution function and the specific fractures of the stress-strain behavior and fluid flow characteristics. Well-matched fractures had peaked aperture distributions that resulted in very nonlinear stress-strain behavior. With an increasing degree of mismatching between the top and bottom of a fracture, the aperture density distribution broadened and the nonlinearity of the stress-strain behavior became less accentuated. The different aperture density distributions also gave rise to qualitatively different fluid flow behavior. Findings from this investigation make it possible to estimate the stress-strain and fluid flow behavior when the roughness characteristics of the fracture are known and, conversely, to estimate the fracture roughness from an examination of the hydraulic and mechanical data. Results from this study showed that both the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the fracture are controlled by the large-scale roughness of the joint surface. This suggests that when the stress-flow behavior of a fracture is being investigated, the size of the rock sample should be larger than the typical wave length of the roughness undulations

  16. Complexity: a new paradigm for fracture mechanics

    S. Puzzi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The so-called Complexity Sciences are a topic of fast growing interest inside the scientific community. Actually, researchers did not come to a definition of complexity, since it manifests itself in so many different ways [1]. This field itself is not a single discipline, but rather a heterogeneous amalgam of different techniques of mathematics and science. In fact, under the label of Complexity Sciences we comprehend a large variety of approaches: nonlinear dynamics, deterministic chaos theory, nonequilibrium thermodynamics, fractal geometry, intermediate asymptotics, complete and incomplete similarity, renormalization group theory, catastrophe theory, self-organized criticality, neural networks, cellular automata, fuzzy logic, etc. Aim of this paper is at providing insight into the role of complexity in the field of Materials Science and Fracture Mechanics [2-3]. The presented examples will be concerned with the snap-back instabilities in the structural behaviour of composite structures (Carpinteri [4-6], the occurrence of fractal patterns and selfsimilarity in material damage and deformation of heterogeneous materials, and the apparent scaling on the nominal mechanical properties of disordered materials (Carpinteri [7,8]. Further examples will deal with criticality in the acoustic emissions of damaged structures and with scaling in the time-to-failure (Carpinteri et al. [9]. Eventually, results on the transition towards chaos in the dynamics of cracked beams will be reported (Carpinteri and Pugno [10,11].

  17. [Mechanics analysis of fracture of orthodontic wires].

    Wang, Yeping; Sun, Xiaoye; Zhang, Longqi

    2003-03-01

    Fracture problem of orthodontic wires was discussed in this paper. The calculation formulae of bending stress and tensile stress were obtained. All main factors that affect bending stress and tensile stress of orthodontic wires were analyzed and discussed. It was concluded that the main causes of fracture of orthodontic wires were fatigue and static disruption. Some improving proposals for preventing fracture of orthodontic wires were put forward.

  18. Fracture mechanics behaviour of neutron irradiated Alloy A-286

    Mills, W.J.; James, L.A.

    The effect of fast-neutron irradiation on the fatigue-crack propagation and fracture toughness behaviour of Alloy A-286 was characterized using fracture mechanics techniques. The fracture toughness was found to decrease continuously with increasing irradiation damage at both 24 deg. C and 427 deg. C. In the unirradiated and low fluence conditions, specimens displayed appreciable plasticity prior to fracture, and equivalent Ksub(Ic) values were determined from Jsub(Ic) fracture toughness results. At high irradiation exposure levels, specimens exhibited a brittle Ksub(Ic) fracture mode. The 427 deg. C fracture toughness fell from 129 MPa√m in the unirradiated condition to 35 MPa√m at an exposure of 16.2 dpa (total fluence of 5.2x10 22 n/cm 2 ). Room temperature fracture toughness values were consistently 40 to 60 percent higher than the 427 deg. C values. Electron fractography revealed that the reduction in fracture resistance was attributed to a fracture mechanism transition from ductile microvoid coalescence to channel fracture. Fatigue-crack propagation tests were conducted at 427 deg. C on specimens irradiated at 2.4 dpa and 16.2 dpa. Crack growth rates at the lower exposure level were comparable to those in unirradiated material, while those at the higher exposure were slightly higher than in unirradiated material. (author)

  19. OCA-P, PWR Vessel Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics

    Cheverton, R.D.; Ball, D.G.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: OCA-P is a probabilistic fracture-mechanics code prepared specifically for evaluating the integrity of pressurized-water reactor vessels subjected to overcooling-accident loading conditions. Based on linear-elastic fracture mechanics, it has two- and limited three-dimensional flaw capability, and can treat cladding as a discrete region. Both deterministic and probabilistic analyses can be performed. For deterministic analysis, it is possible to conduct a search for critical values of the fluence and the nil-ductility reference temperature corresponding to incipient initiation of the initial flaw. The probabilistic portion of OCA-P is based on Monte Carlo techniques, and simulated parameters include fluence, flaw depth, fracture toughness, nil-ductility reference temperature, and concentrations of copper, nickel, and phosphorous. Plotting capabilities include the construction of critical-crack-depth diagrams (deterministic analysis) and a variety of histograms (probabilistic analysis). 2 - Method of solution: OAC-P accepts as input the reactor primary- system pressure and the reactor pressure-vessel downcomer coolant temperature, as functions of time in the specified transient. Then, the wall temperatures and stresses are calculated as a function of time and radial position in the wall, and the fracture-mechanics analysis is performed to obtain the stress intensity factors as a function of crack depth and time in the transient. In a deterministic analysis, values of the static crack initiation toughness and the crack arrest toughness are also calculated for all crack depths and times in the transient. A comparison of these values permits an evaluation of flaw behavior. For a probabilistic analysis, OCA-P generates a large number of reactor pressure vessels, each with a different combination of the various values of the parameters involved in the analysis of flaw behavior. For each of these vessels, a deterministic fracture

  20. comparison of elastic-plastic FE method and engineering method for RPV fracture mechanics analysis

    Sun Yingxue; Zheng Bin; Zhang Fenggang

    2009-01-01

    This paper described the FE analysis of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics for a crack in RPV belt line using ABAQUS code. It calculated and evaluated the stress intensity factor and J integral of crack under PTS transients. The result is also compared with that by engineering analysis method. It shows that the results using engineering analysis method is a little larger than the results using FE analysis of 3D elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, thus the engineering analysis method is conservative than the elastic-plastic fracture mechanics method. (authors)

  1. Evaluation of waste disposal by shale fracturing

    Weeren, H.O.

    1976-02-01

    The shale fracturing process is evaluated as a means for permanent disposal of radioactive intermediate level liquid waste generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The estimated capital operating and development costs of a proposed disposal facility are compared with equivalent estimated costs for alternative methods of waste fixation

  2. Subcritical fracture propagation in rocks: An examination using the methods of fracture mechanics and non-destructive testing. Ph.D. Thesis

    Swanson, P. L.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of tensile rock fracture is presented with an emphasis on characterizing time dependent crack growth using the methods of fracture mechanics. Subcritical fracture experiments were performed in moist air on glass and five different rock types at crack velocities using the double torsion technique. The experimental results suggest that subcritical fracture resistance in polycrystals is dominated by microstructural effects. Evidence for gross violations of the assumptions of linear elastic fracture mechanics and double torsion theory was found in the tests on rocks. In an effort to obtain a better understanding of the physical breakdown processes associated with rock fracture, a series of nondestructive evaluation tests were performed during subcritical fracture experiments on glass and granite. Comparison of the observed process zone shape with that expected on the basis of a critical normal principal tensile stress criterion shows that the zone is much more elongated in the crack propagation direction than predicted by the continuum based microcracking model alone.

  3. Concepts and possibilities of fracture mechanics for fracture safety assessment

    Blauel, J.

    1980-01-01

    In very tough materials for pressure vessels and pipelines of nuclear plants, cracking begins in a stable manner and only after macroscopic plastic deformations and crack blunting. It is possible to describe this elasto-plastic fracture behaviour and to quantify the safety margin compared to the assessment criteria based on linear elastic stressing and initiation by the concept of the J integral, the crack peak width and the crack resistance Jsub(R) curve. The numerous problems of details still open and the partly very limited validity range should not prevent the further investigation into the great possibilities of this concept and making greater use of the interpretation of large scale tests. (orig./RW) [de

  4. Fracture mechanics parameters for glasses: A compilation and correlation

    Freiman, S.W.; Baker, T.L.; Wachtmann, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes a computerized fracture mechanics data base and associated computer programs which permit extension and modification of data base as well as selection, plotting and curve fitting. Some preliminary results of correlations of fracture energy, gamma, with composition and elastic modulus are presented

  5. Sedimentary facies control on mechanical and fracture stratigraphy in turbidites

    Ogata, Kei; Storti, Fabrizio; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Tinterri, Roberto; Bedogni, Enrico; Fetter, Marcos; Gomes, Leonardo; Hatushika, Raphael

    2017-01-01

    Natural fracture networks exert a first-order control on the exploitation of resources such as aquifers, hydrocarbons, and geothermal reservoirs, and on environmental issues like underground gas storage and waste disposal. Fractures and the mechanical stratigraphy of layered sequences have been

  6. Fracture mechanics and statistical mechanics of reinforced elastomeric blends

    Heinrich, Gert; Kaliske, Michael; Klüppel, Manfred; Schneider, Konrad; Vilgis, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Elastomers are found in many applications ranging from technology to daily life applications for example in tires, drive systems, sealings and print rollers. Dynamical operation conditions put extremely high demands on the performance and stability of these materials and their elastic and flow properties can be easily adjusted by simple manipulations on their elastic and viscous properties. However, the required service life suffers often from material damage as a result of wear processes such as abrasion and wear fatigue, mostly caused by crack formation and propagation. This book covers interdisciplinary research between physics, physical chemistry, material sciences and engineering of elastomers within the range from nanometres to millimetres and connects these aspects with the constitutive material properties. The different chapters describe reliable lifetime and durability predictions based on new fracture mechanical testing concepts and advanced material-theoretical methods which are finally implemented...

  7. Selection of pipeline steels with an engineering fracture mechanical analysis

    Stenbacka, N [Swedish State Power Board, Vaellingby

    1985-01-01

    Selection of pipeline steels is discussed on the basis of two mutually independent failure mechanisms: elastic fracture and plastic collapse. The presentation is restricted to axial flaws. A formal analysis shows that brittle fracture in modern pipelines has no high priority in design, since steels used today have a high fracture toughness. Instead, a case of practical concern is tha plastic collapse mode, where failure is flow stress controlled. Conditions governing this design case are specified. In conjunction with this, criterions for material selection with regard to fracture toughness is presented.

  8. Fracture mechanics as judgement criterion in reference publications

    Bartholome, G.

    1976-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is applied in particular in ship and aeroplane construction, in astronautics, and in nuclear engineering. Around 1950, the high quality demands in nuclear engineering led to the first regulation for brittle-fracture-safe operation of thick-walled nuclear pressure vessels. These regulations are based on the brittle-fracture-plan (NDT concept). For reactor engineering this plan is applied in a simplified way, the so-called modified PORSE-diagram. The permissible operational stresses must be out of the range of brittle fracture margin which is defined by the NDT temperature extension limit. (RW) [de

  9. Yield fracture mechanics. Report colloquium of the DFG

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains 17 lectures, which were given at the Report Colloquium of the DFG at Bonn on November 5th 1992. The main points of yield fracture mechanics were: Theory, experiment technique, transferability, material and structure. (MM) [de

  10. Fracture Mechanics Prediction of Fatigue Life of Aluminum Highway Bridges

    Rom, Søren; Agerskov, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Fracture mechanics prediction of the fatigue life of aluminum highway bridges under random loading is studied. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined from fracture mechanics analyses and the results obtained have been compared with results from experimental investigations. The fati......Fracture mechanics prediction of the fatigue life of aluminum highway bridges under random loading is studied. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined from fracture mechanics analyses and the results obtained have been compared with results from experimental investigations...... against fatigue in aluminum bridges, may give results which are unconservative. Furthermore, it was in both investigations found that the validity of the results obtained from Miner's rule will depend on the distribution of the load history in tension and compression....

  11. Associations of early premenopausal fractures with subsequent fractures vary by sites and mechanisms of fractures.

    Honkanen, R; Tuppurainen, M; Kroger, H; Alhava, E; Puntila, E

    1997-04-01

    In a retrospective population-based study we assessed whether and how self-reported former fractures sustained at the ages of 20-34 are associated with subsequent fractures sustained at the ages of 35-57. The 12,162 women who responded to fracture questions of the baseline postal enquiry (in 1989) of the Kuopio Osteoporosis Study, Finland formed the study population. They reported 589 former and 2092 subsequent fractures. The hazard ratio (HR), with 95% confidence interval (CI), of a subsequent fracture was 1.9 (1.6-2.3) in women with the history of a former fracture compared with women without such a history. A former low-energy wrist fracture was related to subsequent low-energy wrist [HR = 3.7 (2.0-6.8)] and high-energy nonwrist [HR = 2.4 (1.3-4.4)] fractures, whereas former high-energy nonwrist fractures were related only to subsequent high-energy nonwrist [HR = 2.8 (1.9-4.1)] but not to low-energy wrist [HR = 0.7 (0.3-1.8)] fractures. The analysis of bone mineral density (BMD) data of a subsample of premenopausal women who underwent dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) during 1989-91 revealed that those with a wrist fracture due to a fall on the same level at the age of 20-34 recorded 6.5% lower spinal (P = 0.140) and 10.5% lower femoral (P = 0.026) BMD than nonfractured women, whereas the corresponding differences for women with a former nonwrist fracture due to high-energy trauma were -1.8% (P = 0.721) and -2.4% (P = 0. 616), respectively. Our results suggest that an early premenopausal, low-energy wrist fracture is an indicator of low peak BMD which predisposes to subsequent fractures in general, whereas early high-energy fractures are mainly indicators of other and more specific extraskeletal factors which mainly predispose to same types of subsequent fractures only.

  12. Hot ductility and fracture mechanisms of a structural steel

    Calvo, J.; Cabrera, J. M.; Prado, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The hot ductility of a structural steel produced from scrap recycling has been studied to determine the origin of the transverse cracks in the corners that appeared in some billets. Samples extracted both from a billet with transverse cracks and from a billet with no external damage were tested. To evaluate the influence of residual elements and inclusions, the steel was compared to another one impurity free. Reduction in area of the samples tensile tested to the fracture was taken as a measure of the hot ductility. The tests were carried out at temperatures ranging from 1000 degree centigree to 650 degree centigree and at a strain rate of 1.10-3 s-1. The fracture surfaces of the tested samples were observed by scanning electron microscopy in order to determine the embrittling mechanisms that could be acting. The steel with residuals and impurities exhibited lower ductility values for a wider temperature range than the clean steel. The embrittling mechanisms also changed as compared to the impurity free steel. (Author)

  13. Clastic patterned ground in Lomonosov crater, Mars: examining fracture controlled formation mechanisms

    Barrett, Alexander M.; Balme, Matthew R.; Patel, Manish R.; Hagermann, Axel

    2017-10-01

    The area surrounding Lomonosov crater on Mars has a high density of seemingly organised boulder patterns. These form seemingly sorted polygons and stripes within kilometre scale blockfields, patches of boulder strewn ground which are common across the Martian high latitudes. Several hypotheses have been suggested to explain the formation of clastic patterned ground on Mars. It has been proposed that these structures could have formed through freeze-thaw sorting, or conversely by the interaction of boulders with underlying fracture polygons. In this investigation a series of sites were examined to evaluate whether boulder patterns appear to be controlled by the distribution of underlying fractures and test the fracture control hypotheses for their formation. It was decided to focus on this suite of mechanisms as they are characterised by a clear morphological relationship, namely the presence of an underlying fracture network which can easily be evaluated over a large area. It was found that in the majority of examples at these sites did not exhibit fracture control. Although fractures were present at many sites there were very few sites where the fracture network appeared to be controlling the boulder distribution. In general these were not the sites with the best examples of organization, suggesting that the fracture control mechanisms are not the dominant geomorphic process organising the boulders in this area.

  14. Evaluation of bone surrogates for indirect and direct ballistic fractures.

    Bir, Cynthia; Andrecovich, Chris; DeMaio, Marlene; Dougherty, Paul J

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism of injury for fractures to long bones has been studied for both direct ballistic loading as well as indirect. However, the majority of these studies have been conducted on both post-mortem human subjects (PMHS) and animal surrogates which have constraints in terms of storage, preparation and testing. The identification of a validated bone surrogate for use in forensic, medical and engineering testing would provide the ability to investigate ballistic loading without these constraints. Two specific bone surrogates, Sawbones and Synbone, were evaluated in comparison to PMHS for both direct and indirect ballistic loading. For the direct loading, the mean velocity to produce fracture was 121 ± 19 m/s for the PMHS, which was statistically different from the Sawbones (140 ± 7 m/s) and Synbone (146 ± 3 m/s). The average distance to fracture in the indirect loading was .70 cm for the PMHS. The Synbone had a statistically similar average distance to fracture (.61 cm, p=0.54) however the Sawbones average distance to fracture was statistically different (.41 cm, pballistic testing was not identified and future work is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fracture toughness evaluation of Eurofer'97 by testing small specimens

    Serrano, M.; Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Eurofer'97 is the structural reference material that will be tested in the ITER modules. Its metallurgical properties have been well characterized during the last years. However, more investigations related with the fracture toughness of this material are necessary because this property is one of the most important to design structural components and to study their integrity assessment. In the case of structural materials for fusion reactor the small specimen technology (SSTT) are being actively developed to investigate the fracture toughness among other mechanical properties. The use of small specimens is due to the small available irradiation volume of IFMIF and also due to the high fluence expected in the fusion reactor. The aim of this paper is to determine the fracture toughness of the Eurofer'97 steel by testing small specimens of different geometry in the ductile to brittle transition region, with the application of the Master Curve methodology, and to evaluate this method to assess the decrease in fracture toughness due to neutron irradiation. The tests and data analysis have been performed following the Master Curve approach included in the ASTM Standard E1921-05. Specimen size effect and comparison of the fracture toughness results with data available in the literature are also considered. (author)

  16. In vitro mechanical evaluation of a novel pin-sleeve system for external fixation of distal limb fractures in horses: a proof of concept study.

    Brianza, Stefano; Brighenti, Vittoria; Boure, Ludovic; Sprenger, Victor; Pearce, Simon; Schwieger, Karsten

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a novel pin-sleeve cast (PSC) system for external fixation of distal limb fractures in horses and to compare it with the transfixation pin cast (TPC) system. Experimental. One bone substitute each was used for the TPC and PSC systems. The PSC was tested in 4 configurations characterized by different pin preloads. Specimens were loaded in axial compression in the elastic range. Variables compared statistically were: bone substitute axial displacement and axial strain measured above implants with strain gauges. Pin preload was correlated with the variables investigated. Load to failure and a fatigue tests supplemented the investigation. The PSC configuration with the highest pin preload showed a significantly lower axial displacement compared with the TPC. No significant differences were observed between all other PSC configurations and the TPC. All PSC systems had a significant decrease in recorded strain compared with the TPC system. Pin axial preload inversely correlated with axial displacement but had no effect on axial strain. In the failure test, the PSC encountered plastic deformation earlier than the TPC. In the fatigue test, the PSC ran >200,000 cycles. Preliminary in vitro tests showed that the PSC system significantly reduced peri-implant strain while concurrently having comparable axial displacement to the TPC system. The PSC system has the potential to reduce the risk of pin loosening in horses.

  17. Application of simulation techniques in the probabilistic fracture mechanics

    De Ruyter van Steveninck, J.L.

    1995-03-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation is applied on a model of the fracture mechanics in order to assess the applicability of this simulation technique in the probabilistic fracture mechanics. By means of the fracture mechanics model the brittle fracture of a steel container or pipe with defects can be predicted. By means of the Monte Carlo simulation also the uncertainty regarding failures can be determined. Based on the variations in the toughness of the fracture and the defect dimensions the distribution of the chance of failure is determined. Also attention is paid to the impact of dependency between uncertain variables. Furthermore, the influence of the applied distributions of the uncertain variables and non-destructive survey on the chance of failure is analyzed. The Monte Carlo simulation results agree quite well with the results of other methods from the probabilistic fracture mechanics. If an analytic expression can be found for the chance of failure, it is possible to determine the variation of the chance of failure, next to an estimation of the chance of failure. It also appears that the dependency between the uncertain variables has a large impact on the chance of failure. It is also concluded from the simulation that the chance of failure strongly depends on the crack depth, and therefore of the distribution of the crack depth. 15 figs., 7 tabs., 12 refs

  18. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics of compact bone

    Yan, Jiahau

    Bone is a composite composed mainly of organics, minerals and water. Most studies on the fracture toughness of bone have been conducted at room temperature. Considering that the body temperature of animals is higher than room temperature, and that bone has a high volumetric percentage of organics (generally, 35--50%), the effect of temperature on fracture toughness of bone should be studied. Single-edged V-shaped notched (SEVN) specimens were prepared to measure the fracture toughness of bovine femur and manatee rib in water at 0, 10, 23, 37 and 50°C. The fracture toughness of bovine femur and manatee rib were found to decrease from 7.0 to 4.3 MPa·m1/2 and from 5.5 to 4.1 MPa·m1/2, respectively, over a temperature range of 50°C. The decreases were attributed to inability of the organics to sustain greater stresses at higher temperatures. We studied the effects of water and organics on fracture toughness of bone using water-free and organics-free SEVN specimens at 23°C. Water-free and organics-free specimens were obtained by placing fresh bone specimen in a furnace at different temperatures. Water and organics significantly affected the fracture toughness of bone. Fracture toughness of the water-free specimens was 44.7% (bovine femur) and 32.4% (manatee rib) less than that of fresh-bone specimens. Fracture toughness of the organics-free specimens was 92.7% (bovine femur) and 91.5% (manatee rib) less than that of fresh bone specimens. Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) is widely used to study bone. However, bone often has small to moderate scale yielding during testing. We used J integral, an elastic-plastic fracture-mechanics parameter, to study the fracture process of bone. The J integral of bovine femur increased from 6.3 KJ/mm2 at 23°C to 6.7 KJ/mm2 at 37°C. Although the fracture toughness of bovine bone decreases as the temperature increases, the J integral results show a contrary trend. The energy spent in advancing the crack beyond the linear

  19. Uncertainty analysis on probabilistic fracture mechanics assessment methodology

    Rastogi, Rohit; Vinod, Gopika; Chandra, Vikas; Bhasin, Vivek; Babar, A.K.; Rao, V.V.S.S.; Vaze, K.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Venkat-Raj, V.

    1999-01-01

    Fracture Mechanics has found a profound usage in the area of design of components and assessing fitness for purpose/residual life estimation of an operating component. Since defect size and material properties are statistically distributed, various probabilistic approaches have been employed for the computation of fracture probability. Monte Carlo Simulation is one such procedure towards the analysis of fracture probability. This paper deals with uncertainty analysis using the Monte Carlo Simulation methods. These methods were developed based on the R6 failure assessment procedure, which has been widely used in analysing the integrity of structures. The application of this method is illustrated with a case study. (author)

  20. Coupled Flow and Mechanics in Porous and Fractured Media*

    Martinez, M. J.; Newell, P.; Bishop, J.

    2012-12-01

    Numerical models describing subsurface flow through deformable porous materials are important for understanding and enabling energy security and climate security. Some applications of current interest come from such diverse areas as geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, hydro-fracturing for stimulation of hydrocarbon reservoirs, and modeling electrochemistry-induced swelling of fluid-filled porous electrodes. Induced stress fields in any of these applications can lead to structural failure and fracture. The ultimate goal of this research is to model evolving faults and fracture networks and flow within the networks while coupling to flow and mechanics within the intact porous structure. We report here on a new computational capability for coupling of multiphase porous flow with geomechanics including assessment of over-pressure-induced structural damage. The geomechanics is coupled to the flow via the variation in the fluid pore pressures, whereas the flow problem is coupled to mechanics by the concomitant material strains which alter the pore volume (porosity field) and hence the permeability field. For linear elastic solid mechanics a monolithic coupling strategy is utilized. For nonlinear elastic/plastic and fractured media, a segregated coupling is presented. To facilitate coupling with disparate flow and mechanics time scales, the coupling strategy allows for different time steps in the flow solve compared to the mechanics solve. If time steps are synchronized, the controller allows user-specified intra-time-step iterations. The iterative coupling is dynamically controlled based on a norm measuring the degree of variation in the deformed porosity. The model is applied for evaluation of the integrity of jointed caprock systems during CO2 sequestration operations. Creation or reactivation of joints can lead to enhanced pathways for leakage. Similarly, over-pressures can induce flow along faults. Fluid flow rates in fractures are strongly dependent on the

  1. A systematic review and economic evaluation of bisphosphonates for the prevention of fragility fractures.

    Davis, S.; Martyn-St James, M.; Sanderson, J.; Stevens, J.; Goka, E.; Rawdin, A.; Sadler, S.; Wong, R.; Campbell, F.; Stevenson, M.; Strong, M.; Selby, P.; Gittoes, N.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fragility fractures are fractures that result from mechanical forces that would not ordinarily result in fracture. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of bisphosphonates [alendronic acid (Fosamax(®) and Fosamax(®) Once Weekly, Merck Sharp & Dohme Ltd), risedronic acid (Actonel(®) and Actonel Once a Week(®), Warner Chilcott UK Ltd), ibandronic acid (Bonviva(®), Roche Products Ltd) and zoledronic acid (Aclasta(®), Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd)] for the p...

  2. Mechanical and mathematical models of multi-stage horizontal fracturing strings and their application

    Zhanghua Lian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Multi-stage SRV fracturing in horizontal wells is a new technology developed at home and abroad in recent years to effectively develop shale gas or low-permeability reservoirs, but on the other hand makes the mechanical environment of fracturing strings more complicated at the same time. In view of this, based on the loading features of tubing strings during the multi-stage fracturing of a horizontal well, mechanical models were established for three working cases of multiple packer setting, open differential-pressure sliding sleeve, and open ball-injection sliding sleeve under a hold-down packer. Moreover, mathematical models were respectively built for the above three cases. According to the Lame formula and Von Mises stress calculation formula for the thick-walled cylinder in the theory of elastic mechanics, a mathematical model was also established to calculate the equivalent stress for tubing string safety evaluation when the fracturing string was under the combined action of inner pressure, external squeezing force and axial stress, and another mathematical model was built for the mechanical strength and safety evaluation of multi-stage fracturing strings. In addition, a practical software was developed for the mechanical safety evaluation of horizontal well multi-stage fracturing strings according to the mathematical model developed for the mechanical calculation of the multi-packer string in horizontal wells. The research results were applied and verified in a gas well of Tahe Oilfield in the Tarim Basin with excellent effects, providing a theoretical basis and a simple and reliable technical means for optimal design and safety evaluation of safe operational parameters of multi-stage fracturing strings in horizontal wells.

  3. Application of fracture mechanics to fatigue in pressure vessels

    Ghavami, K.

    1982-01-01

    The methods of application of fracture mechanics to predict fatigue crack propagation in welded structures and pressure vessels are described with the following objectives: i) To identify the effect of different variables such as crack tip plasticity, free surface, finite plate thickness, stress concentration and type of the structure, on the magnitude of stress intensity factor K in Welded joint. ii) To demonstrate the use of fracture mechanics for analysing fatigue crack propagation data. iii) To show how a law of fatigue crack propagation based on fracure mechanics, may be used to predict fatigue behavior of welded structures such as pressure vessel. (Author) [pt

  4. Fracture toughness evaluation of steels through master curve approach using Charpy impact specimens

    Chatterjee, S.; Sriharsha, H.K.; Shah, Priti Kotak

    2007-01-01

    The master curve approach can be used for the evaluation of fracture toughness of all steels which exhibit a transition between brittle to ductile mode of fracture with increasing temperature, and to monitor the extent of embrittlement caused by metallurgical damage mechanisms. This paper details the procedure followed to evaluate the fracture toughness of a typical ferritic steel used as material for pressure vessels. The potential of master curve approach to overcome the inherent limitations of the estimation of fracture toughness using ASME Code reference toughness is also illustrated. (author)

  5. Pipe fracture evaluations for leak-rate detection: Probabilistic models

    Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.

    1993-01-01

    This is the second in series of three papers generated from studies on nuclear pipe fracture evaluations for leak-rate detection. This paper focuses on the development of novel probabilistic models for stochastic performance evaluation of degraded nuclear piping systems. It was accomplished here in three distinct stages. First, a statistical analysis was conducted to characterize various input variables for thermo-hydraulic analysis and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, such as material properties of pipe, crack morphology variables, and location of cracks found in nuclear piping. Second, a new stochastic model was developed to evaluate performance of degraded piping systems. It is based on accurate deterministic models for thermo-hydraulic and fracture mechanics analyses described in the first paper, statistical characterization of various input variables, and state-of-the-art methods of modem structural reliability theory. From this model. the conditional probability of failure as a function of leak-rate detection capability of the piping systems can be predicted. Third, a numerical example was presented to illustrate the proposed model for piping reliability analyses. Results clearly showed that the model provides satisfactory estimates of conditional failure probability with much less computational effort when compared with those obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. The probabilistic model developed in this paper will be applied to various piping in boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor plants for leak-rate detection applications

  6. Primer: Fracture mechanics in the nuclear power industry

    Wessel, E.T.; Server, W.L.; Kennedy, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    This Primer is intended to familiarize utility engineers with the fracture mechanics technology and to provide the basis for a working knowledge of the subject. It is directed towards all the engineering disciplines that are involved either directly or indirectly with the structural reliability of electrical power generation equipment and systems. These engineering disciplines include such areas as: design and stress analysis, metallurgy and materials, nondestructive inspection and quality control, structural analysis and reliability engineering, chemical engineering and water chemistry control, and architectural engineering. This Primer does not provide a comprehensive, in-depth treatment of all the detailed aspects involved in fracture mechanics. It does, however, provide sufficient information and a common vocabulary that should enable engineers to: read and converse intelligently about the subject, understand and utilize ASME Codes and Regulatory Guides involving fracture mechanics, absorb technical information presented and discussed at various technical meetings, and begin to apply this technology towards actual engineering problems encountered in the course of their work. Example problems are provided to further enhance an understanding of fracture mechanics. Also, Appendix A describes fracture mechanics computer codes available through EPRI to analyze rotors, reactor pressure vessels and piping

  7. Thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of fractured rock mass

    Coste, F.

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to model Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical behavior of fractured rock mass regarding a nuclear waste re-depository. For this, a methodology of modeling was proposed and was applied to a real underground site (EDF site at Nouvelle Romanche). This methodology consists, in a first step, to determine hydraulic and mechanical REV. Beyond the greatest of these REV, development of a finite element code allows to model all the fractures in an explicit manner. The homogenized mechanical properties are determined in drained and undrained boundary conditions by simulating triaxial tests that represent rock mass subject to loading. These simulations allow to study the evolution of hydraulic and mechanical properties as a function of stress state. Drained and undrained boundary conditions enable to discuss the validity of assimilation of a fractured rock mass to a porous medium. The simulations lead to a better understanding of the behavior of the fractured rock masses and allow to show the dominant role of the shear behavior of the fractures on the hydraulic and mechanical homogenized properties. From a thermal point of view, as long as conduction is dominant, thermal properties of the rock mass are almost the same as those the intact rock. (author)

  8. The hydro-mechanical modeling of the fractured media; Modelisation hydromecanique des milieux fractures

    Kadiri, I

    2002-10-15

    The hydro-mechanical modeling of the fractured media is quite complex. Simplifications are necessary for the modeling of such media, but, not always justified, Only permeable fractures are often considered. The rest of the network is approximated by an equivalent continuous medium. Even if we suppose that this approach is validated, the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the fractures and of the continuous medium are seldom known. Calibrations are necessary for the determination of these properties. Until now, one does not know very well the nature of measurements which must be carried out in order to carry on a modeling in discontinuous medium, nor elements of enough robust validation for this kind of modeling. For a better understanding of the hydro-mechanical phenomena in fractured media, two different sites have been selected for the work. The first is the site of Grimsel in Switzerland in which an underground laboratory is located at approximately 400 m of depth. The FEBEX experiment aims at the in-situ study of the consecutive phenomena due to the installation of a heat source representative of radioactive waste in the last 17 meters of the FEBEX tunnel in the laboratory of Grimsel. Only, the modeling of the hydro-mechanical of the excavation was model. The modeling of the Febex enabled us to establish a methodology of calibration of the hydraulic properties in the discontinuous media. However, this kind of study on such complex sites does not make possible to answer all the questions which arise on the hydro-mechanical behavior of the fractured media. We thus carried out modeling on an other site, smaller than the fist one and more accessible. The experimental site of Coaraze, in the Maritime Alps, is mainly constituted of limestone and fractures. Then the variation of water pressure along fractures is governed by the opening/closure sequence of a water gate. Normal displacement as well as the pore pressure along these fractures are recorded, and then

  9. Evaluation of Fibular Fracture Type vs Location of Tibial Fixation of Pilon Fractures.

    Busel, Gennadiy A; Watson, J Tracy; Israel, Heidi

    2017-06-01

    Comminuted fibular fractures can occur with pilon fractures as a result of valgus stress. Transverse fibular fractures can occur with varus deformation. No definitive guide for determining the proper location of tibial fixation exists. The purpose of this study was to identify optimal plate location for fixation of pilon fractures based on the orientation of the fibular fracture. One hundred two patients with 103 pilon fractures were identified who were definitively treated at our institution from 2004 to 2013. Pilon fractures were classified using the AO/OTA classification and included 43-A through 43-C fractures. Inclusion criteria were age of at least 18 years, associated fibular fracture, and definitive tibial plating. Patients were grouped based on the fibular component fracture type (comminuted vs transverse), and the location of plate fixation (medial vs lateral) was noted. Radiographic outcomes were assessed for mechanical failures. Forty fractures were a result of varus force as evidenced by transverse fracture of the fibula and 63 were due to valgus force with a comminuted fibula. For the transverse fibula group, 14.3% mechanical complications were noted for medially placed plate vs 80% for lateral plating ( P = .006). For the comminuted fibular group, 36.4% of medially placed plates demonstrated mechanical complications vs 16.7% for laterally based plates ( P = .156). Time to weight bearing as tolerated was also noted to be significant between groups plated medially and laterally for the comminuted group ( P = .013). Correctly assessing the fibular component for pilon fractures provides valuable information regarding deforming forces. To limit mechanical complications, tibial plates should be applied in such a way as to resist the original deforming forces. Level of Evidence Level III, comparative study.

  10. Microscale fracture mechanisms of a Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr HVOF coating

    Robertson, Andrew L., E-mail: Andrew.robertson99987@gmail.com; White, Ken W.

    2017-03-14

    Thermal spray coatings, often composed of heterogeneous, multiphase microstructures, may, consequently, exhibit complex fracture behavior. For such coating structures, conventional mechanical evaluation methods fail to isolate the contribution of microstructural features to the overall fracture behavior. For this reason, this study employed focused ion beam machined (FIB) microcantilever beams and FIB sectioning methods to study the fracture mechanisms important at the scale of the heterogeneous Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr thermal spray coating. We found three fracture modes, namely, intergranular matrix fracture, matrix/carbide interfacial fracture, and carbide cleavage. By comparison, microindentation-induced cracks, the frequency of crack deflection around carbides is significantly more prevalent at this much larger crack dimension. This mechanistic variation provides some insight into the specific role and limitations of the microcantilever beam technique for fracture characterization of composite microstructures.

  11. The hydro-mechanical modeling of the fractured media

    Kadiri, I.

    2002-10-01

    The hydro-mechanical modeling of the fractured media is quite complex. Simplifications are necessary for the modeling of such media, but, not always justified, Only permeable fractures are often considered. The rest of the network is approximated by an equivalent continuous medium. Even if we suppose that this approach is validated, the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the fractures and of the continuous medium are seldom known. Calibrations are necessary for the determination of these properties. Until now, one does not know very well the nature of measurements which must be carried out in order to carry on a modeling in discontinuous medium, nor elements of enough robust validation for this kind of modeling. For a better understanding of the hydro-mechanical phenomena in fractured media, two different sites have been selected for the work. The first is the site of Grimsel in Switzerland in which an underground laboratory is located at approximately 400 m of depth. The FEBEX experiment aims at the in-situ study of the consecutive phenomena due to the installation of a heat source representative of radioactive waste in the last 17 meters of the FEBEX tunnel in the laboratory of Grimsel. Only, the modeling of the hydro-mechanical of the excavation was model. The modeling of the Febex enabled us to establish a methodology of calibration of the hydraulic properties in the discontinuous media. However, this kind of study on such complex sites does not make possible to answer all the questions which arise on the hydro-mechanical behavior of the fractured media. We thus carried out modeling on an other site, smaller than the fist one and more accessible. The experimental site of Coaraze, in the Maritime Alps, is mainly constituted of limestone and fractures. Then the variation of water pressure along fractures is governed by the opening/closure sequence of a water gate. Normal displacement as well as the pore pressure along these fractures are recorded, and then

  12. Early Age Fracture Mechanics and Cracking of Concrete

    Østergaard, Lennart

    2003-01-01

    . The reasons are the increased autogenous deformation, the high rate of heat evolution and a higher brittleness of these concretes. Due to these adverse mechanisms the interest in the full description of the behavior of early age concrete has increased dramatically in the last two or three decades. Almost all...... the fictitious crack model and the aim has been experimentally to determine the fracture mechanical properties related to this model. The results provide interesting and important insight into the development of the fracture properties in early age. It is found that the characteristic length has moments of low...... values in early age, which means that the cracking sensibility is higher at those time points. The possible influence of time-dependent effects in the fracture mechanical properties on the cracking behavior in early age has also been investigated. The reason for this has been the known fact...

  13. The application of fracture mechanics on nodular cast iron

    Kussmaul, K.; Blind, D.; Kockelmann, H.; Roos, E.; Eisele, U.

    1987-01-01

    A series of studies on predominantly thick-walled castings was the first attempt at a characterization of the material of ferritization-annealed ductile cast iron under aspects of fracture mechanics according to today's state of fracture-mechanics research and testing. As in static and dynamic tensile testing, ferritic cast iron meeting specifications was found to be tough down -40 0 C and below in fracture mechanical testing without substantial reduction of the corresponding characteristics at room temperature; this is true for a temperature range where the lowest point of impact notch work has been reached already. Impact-type stresses with and without notching resulted in enhanced deformation resistance and deformability in the longitudinal samples taken from tubes. (orig./DG) [de

  14. Relating Cohesive Zone Model to Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics

    Wang, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The conditions required for a cohesive zone model (CZM) to predict a failure load of a cracked structure similar to that obtained by a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analysis are investigated in this paper. This study clarifies why many different phenomenological cohesive laws can produce similar fracture predictions. Analytical results for five cohesive zone models are obtained, using five different cohesive laws that have the same cohesive work rate (CWR-area under the traction-separation curve) but different maximum tractions. The effect of the maximum traction on the predicted cohesive zone length and the remote applied load at fracture is presented. Similar to the small scale yielding condition for an LEFM analysis to be valid. the cohesive zone length also needs to be much smaller than the crack length. This is a necessary condition for a CZM to obtain a fracture prediction equivalent to an LEFM result.

  15. Computational aspects of nonlinear fracture mechanics

    Brocks, W.; Cornec, A.; Scheider, I.

    2003-01-01

    The following contribution will essentially restrict to the application of the von Mises theory of incremental plasticity to cracked specimens and components. In particular, the classical parameters of EPFM, J and CTOD, as well as subsequently proposed parameters such as energy dissipation rate and crack-tip opening angle (CTOA) and the related computational aspects will be discussed. Some remarks follow on the 'local approach to fracture' which is based on continuum field quantities, namely stresses and strains, and the damage models of Gurson (1977) and Rousselier (1987), which have now found increasing application, will be briefly addressed in Section 3.03.4. The numerical modeling of decohesion and separation phenomena by 'cohesive elements' will be presented in Section 3.03.5. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of WWER-1000 vessel materials fracture toughness

    Grinik, Eh.U.; Revka, V.N.; Chirko, L.I.; Chajkovskij, Yu.V.

    2007-01-01

    The lifetime of WWER-1000-type reactor vessels is finally conditioned by the fracture toughness (crack growth resistance) of RPV materials. Up to now in line with the regulations the fracture toughness is characterized by the critical temperature of brittleness determined by the results of the Charpy specimen impact testing. Such approach is typical for all countries operating the water pressure reactors. However, regulatory approach is known from the western specialists not always to characterize adequately the crack growth resistance of the vessel materials and in some cases to underestimate their characteristics in the reference state that leads to unreasonably high conservatism. Excessive conservatism may lead to the invalid restrictions in the operating modes and the service life of the reactor vessel. Therefore there appeared the necessity to apply another approaches based on the state-of-the-art experimental methods of the fracture mechanics and allowing evaluating the fracture toughness parameters sufficiently. The paper presents the results of the comparison of the regulatory approach and the Master curve approach from the point of view of the adequate determination of the vessel material crack growth resistance parameters. Analysis of the experimental data of the surveillance specimens illustrated the potential possibility of applying the new statistical method for the WWER-1000- type reactor vessel lifetime extension

  17. ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics code OCA-P

    Cheverton, R.D.; Ball, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    The computer code OCA-P was developed at the request of the USNRC for the purpose of helping to evaluate the integrity of PWR pressure vessels during overcooling accidents (OCA's). The code can be used for both deterministic and probabilistic fracture-mechanics calculations, and consists essentially of OCA-II and a Monte Carlo routine similar to that developed by Strosnider et al. In the probabilistic mode OCA-P generates a large number of vessels (10 6 more or less), each with a different combination of the various values of the different parameters involved in the analysis of flaw behavior. For each of these vessels a deterministic fracture-mechanics analysis is performed (calculation of K/sub I/, K/sub Ic/, K/sub Ia/) to determine whether vessel failure takes place. The conditional probability of failure is simply the number of vessels that fail divided by the number of vessels generated. OCA-II is used for the deterministic analysis. Basic input to OCA-II includes, among other things, the primry-system pressure transient and the temperature transient for the coolant in the reactor-vessel downcomer. With this and additional information available OCA-II performs a one-dimensional thermal analysis to obtain the temperature distribution in the wall as a function of time and then a one-dimensional linear-elastic stress analysis. OCA-P has been checked against similar codes and is presently being used in the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock Program for specific PWR plants

  18. Applications of probabilistic fracture mechanics to FBR components

    Yagawa, Genki; Yoshimura, Shinobu; Takenaka, Makoto; Hojo, Kiminobu; Kaguchi, Hitoshi.

    1991-01-01

    A probabilistic fracture mechanics code PCCF which could analyze half-elliptical crack behavior in a plate under creep-fatigue condition using nonlinear fracture mechanics parameters was developed. The effects of bending stress level on failure probability was studied using the PCCF as test analyses. As the results, failure mode was leakage not break in all cases analyzed in this study. It is shown that leak probability is sensitive to stress level and increase rapidly around yield stress of materials. (J.P.N.)

  19. Dynamic fracture mechanics with electromagnetic force and its application to fracture toughness and testing

    Yagawa, G.; Yoshimura, S.

    1986-01-01

    This study is concerned with the application of the electromagnetic force to the determination of the dynamic fracture toughness of materials. Taken is an edge-cracked specimen which carries a transient electric current I and is simply supported in a uniform and steady magnetic field B. As a result of their interaction, the dynamic electromagnetic force occurs in the whole body of the specimen, which is then deformed to fracture in the opening mode of cracking. For the evaluation of dynamic fracture toughness, the extended J integral with the effects of the electromagnetic force and inertia is calculated using the dynamic finite-element method. To determine the dynamic crack-initiation point in the experiment, the electric potential method is used in the case of brittle fracture, and the electric potential and the J-R curve methods in the case of ductile fracture, respectively. Using these techniques, the dynamic fracture toughness values of nuclear pressure vessel steel A508 class 3 are evaluated over a wide temperature range. (author)

  20. Fracture mechanism of coronal teenage dentin

    Panfilov, P. E.; Kabanova, A. V.; Borodin, I. N.; Guo, J.; Zang, Z.

    2017-10-01

    The structure of coronal teenage dentin and the development of cracks in it are studied on microand nanolevels. The material is found to fail according to a ductile mechanism on a microlelvel and according to a ductile-brittle mechanism on a nanoscale. This behavior is similar to the failure of a polyethylene film and rubber, when significant elastic and irreversible deformation precedes crack growth. The viscoelastic behavior can be considered as the reaction of dentin to an applied mechanical load.

  1. Fracture mechanics based life assessment in petrochemical plants

    Norasiah Ab Kasim; Abd Nassir Ibrahim; Ab Razak Hamzah; Shukri Mohd

    2004-01-01

    The increasing use of thick walled pressure vessels in petrochemical plants operating at high pressure under severe service conditions could lead to catastrophic failure. In the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), initial efforts are underway to apply fracture mechanics approach for assessment of significance of defects detected during periodic in service inspection (ISI) of industrial plants. This paper outlines the integrity management strategy based on fracture mechanics and proposes a new procedure for life assessment of petrochemical plants based on ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, BSI PD 6493:1991, BSI 6539:1994, BSI Standard 7910:1999 and API 579:2000. Essential relevant data required for the assessment is listed. Several methods available for determination of fracture toughness are reviewed with limitations in their application to petrochemical plants. A new non destructive method for determination of fracture toughness based on hardness testing and normalized key roughness curve is given. Results of fracture mechanics based life assessment conducted for 100 mm thick ammonia converter of Ni r o steel and 70 mm thick plat forming reactor vessel of ASTM A 38 7 grade B steel in operational fertilizer and petroleum refining plants are presented. (Author)

  2. Rheology and Fracture Mechanics of Foods

    Vliet, van T.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of food play an important role during manufacturing, storage, handling, and last but not least, during consumption. For an adequate understanding of the mechanical properties of liquid, liquid-like, soft solid, and solid foods, a basic understanding of relevant aspects of

  3. Comparative study of fracture mechanical test methods for concrete

    Østergaard, Lennart; Olesen, John Forbes

    2004-01-01

    and the interpretation, i.e. the analysis needed to extract the stress-crack opening relationship, the fracture energy etc. Experiments are carried out with each test configuration using mature, high performance concrete. The results show that the UTT is a highly complicated test, which only under very well controlled...... circumstances will yield the true fracture mechanical properties. It is also shown that both the three point bending test and the WST are well-suited substitutes for the uniaxial tension test.......This paper describes and compares three different fracture mechanical test methods; the uniaxial tension test (UTT), the three point bending test (TPBT) and the wedge splitting test (WST). Potentials and problems with the test methods will be described with regard to the experiment...

  4. Finite elements in fracture mechanics theory, numerics, applications

    Kuna, Meinhard

    2013-01-01

    Fracture mechanics has established itself as an important discipline of growing interest to those working to assess the safety, reliability and service life of engineering structures and materials. In order to calculate the loading situation at cracks and defects, nowadays numerical techniques like finite element method (FEM) have become indispensable tools for a broad range of applications. The present monograph provides an introduction to the essential concepts of fracture mechanics, its main goal being to procure the special techniques for FEM analysis of crack problems, which have to date only been mastered by experts. All kinds of static, dynamic and fatigue fracture problems are treated in two- and three-dimensional elastic and plastic structural components. The usage of the various solution techniques is demonstrated by means of sample problems selected from practical engineering case studies. The primary target group includes graduate students, researchers in academia and engineers in practice.

  5. Fracture mechanics analyses of ceramic/veneer interface under mixed-mode loading.

    Wang, Gaoqi; Zhang, Song; Bian, Cuirong; Kong, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Few studies have focused on the interface fracture performance of zirconia/veneer bilayered structure, which plays an important role in dental all-ceramic restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture mechanics performance of zirconia/veneer interface in a wide range of mode-mixities (at phase angles ranging from 0° to 90°), and to examine the effect of mechanical properties of the materials and the interface on the fracture initiation and crack path of an interfacial crack. A modified sandwich test configuration with an oblique interfacial crack was proposed and calibrated to choose the appropriate geometry dimensions by means of finite element analysis. The specimens with different interface inclination angles were tested to failure under three-point bending configuration. Interface fracture parameters were obtained with finite element analyses. Based on the interfacial fracture mechanics, three fracture criteria for crack kinking were used to predict crack initiation and propagation. In addition, the effects of residual stresses due to coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between zirconia and veneer on the crack behavior were evaluated. The crack initiation and propagation were well predicted by the three fracture criteria. For specimens at phase angle of 0, the cracks propagated in the interface; whereas for all the other specimens the cracks kinked into the veneer. Compressive residual stresses in the veneer can improve the toughness of the interface structure. The results suggest that, in zirconia/veneer bilayered structure the veneer is weaker than the interface, which can be used to explain the clinical phenomenon that veneer chipping rate is larger than interface delamination rate. Consequently, a veneer material with larger fracture toughness is needed to decrease the failure rate of all-ceramic restorations. And the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch of the substrates can be larger to produce larger compressive

  6. The fluid mechanics of channel fracturing flows: experiment

    Rashedi, Ahmadreza; Tucker, Zachery; Ovarlez, Guillaume; Hormozi, Sarah

    2017-11-01

    We show our preliminary experimental results on the role of fluid mechanics in channel fracturing flows, particularly yield stress fracturing fluids. Recent trends in the oil industry have included the use of cyclic pumping of a proppant slurry interspersed with a yield stress fracturing fluid, which is found to increase wells productivity, if particles disperse in a certain fashion. Our experimental study aims to investigate the physical mechanisms responsible for dispersing the particles (proppant) within a yield stress carrier fluid, and to measure the dispersion of proppant slugs in various fracturing regimes. To this end we have designed and built a unique experimental setup that resembles a fracture configuration coupled with a particle image/tracking velocimetry setup operating at micro to macro dimensions. Moreover, we have designed optically engineered suspensions of complex fluids with tunable yield stress and consistency, well controlled density match-mismatch properties and refractive indices for both X-rays and visible lights. We present our experimental system and preliminary results. NSF (Grant No. CBET-1554044- CAREER), ACS PRF (Grant No. 55661-DNI9).

  7. Evaluation of elastic-plastic fracture of toughness and fracture resistance of carbon steel STS42

    Kobayashi, Hideo; Nakamura, Haruo; Kashiwagi, Kohmei

    1987-01-01

    The elastic-plastic fracture toughness (J Ic ) and fracture resistance (J-R curve) of a carbon steel, STS42, used for piping in a nuclear reactor were evaluated according to the several evaluating methods recommended or proposed so far, to discuss their applicability and utility. The results obtained are as follows: (1) In evaluating J Ic , the multiple specimen method recommended by the Japan Society for Mechanical Engineers (JSME standard S001) gives the most reliable results by using smaller sized specimens. (2) The single-specimen methods by using the compliance technique, adopted in the ASTM standards (E813, E813 modified, Tentative test procedure for determining the plain strain J-R curve), do not give an accurate J-R curve or J Ic , due to an error in the calculated crack length. (3) In evaluating the J-R curve, it is necessary to account for crack extension in calculating the J-integral. (4) According to the above results, a new standard method for determining the J-R curve including the J Ic test method should be poprosed. (author)

  8. Approximative determination of failure probabilities in probabilistic fracture mechanics

    Riesch-Oppermann, H.; Brueckner, A.

    1987-01-01

    The possibility of using FORM in probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) is investigated. After a short review of the method and a description of some specific problems occurring in PFM applications, results obtained with FORM for the failure probabilities in a typical PFM problem (fatigue crack growth) are compared with those determined by a Monte Carlo simulation. (orig./HP)

  9. Fracture mechanics applied to the machining of brittle materials

    Hiatt, G.D.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research has begun on incorporating fracture mechanics into a model of the orthogonal cutting of brittle materials. Residual stresses are calculated for the machined material by a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian finite element models and then used in the calculation of stress intensity factors by the Green`s Function Method.

  10. Comparative analysis of deterministic and probabilistic fracture mechanical assessment tools

    Heckmann, Klaus [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Koeln (Germany); Saifi, Qais [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2016-11-15

    Uncertainties in material properties, manufacturing processes, loading conditions and damage mechanisms complicate the quantification of structural reliability. Probabilistic structure mechanical computing codes serve as tools for assessing leak- and break probabilities of nuclear piping components. Probabilistic fracture mechanical tools were compared in different benchmark activities, usually revealing minor, but systematic discrepancies between results of different codes. In this joint paper, probabilistic fracture mechanical codes are compared. Crack initiation, crack growth and the influence of in-service inspections are analyzed. Example cases for stress corrosion cracking and fatigue in LWR conditions are analyzed. The evolution of annual failure probabilities during simulated operation time is investigated, in order to identify the reasons for differences in the results of different codes. The comparison of the tools is used for further improvements of the codes applied by the partners.

  11. Combining NDE and fracture mechanics by artifical intelligence expert systems techniques

    Mucciardi, A.N.; Riccardella, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a PC-based expert system for non-destructive evaluation. Software tools from the expert systems subfield of artificial intelligence are being used to combine both NDE and fracture mechanics algorithms into one, unified package. The system incorporates elements of computer-enhanced ultrasonic signal processing, featuring artificial intelligence learning capability, state-of-the-art fracture mechanics analytical tools, and all relevant metallurgical and design data necessary to emulate the decisions of the panel(s) of experts typically involved in generating and dispositioning NDE data

  12. Validation of a fracture mechanics approach to nuclear transportation cask design through a drop test program

    Sorenson, K.B.

    1986-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), under contract to the Department of Energy, is conducting a research program to develop and validate a fracture mechanics approach to cask design. A series of drop tests of a transportation cask is planned for the summer of 1986 as the method for benchmarking and, thereby, validating the fracture mechanics approach. This paper presents the drop test plan and background leading to the development of the test plan including structural analyses, material characterization, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques necessary for defining the test plan properly

  13. Unique Mechanism of Chance Fracture in a Young Adult Male

    Aaron Birch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the first description of the Chance fracture in 1948, there have been few case reports ofunique mechanisms causing this classical flexion-extension injury to the spine in motor vehicleaccidents, sports injury, and falls. To our knowledge, this injury has not been reported from a fall withthe mechanistic forces acting laterally on the spine and with spinal support in place. We present a21-year-old male who slid down a flight of stairs onto his side wearing a heavy mountaineering stylebackpack, subsequently sustaining a Chance fracture of his first lumbar vertebrae.

  14. Fracture behavior and deformation mechanisms under fast neutron irradiation

    Boutard, J.L.; Dupouy, J.M.

    1980-09-01

    We have established the out-of-pile and in-pile deformation mechanism maps of a 316 stainless steel irradiated in a fast reactor. The knowledge of the dominating deformation mechanism either in post irradiation creep experiments or during the in-pile steady state operating conditions allows to rationalize the apparent discrepancy between the very low out-of-pile ductility and the rather high plastic diametral strains which are obtained in the fast reactor environment without fracture

  15. Application of Fracture-Mechanics Approach to Gas Pipelines

    Gajdoš, Lubomír; Šperl, Martin

    VII, č. 73 (2011), s. 480-487 ISSN 2010-376X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/10/2052; GA ČR(CZ) GPP105/10/P555 Grant - others:GAMPO(CZ) FT-TA5/076 Program:FT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : axial crack * fracture-mechanics * J integral * pipeline wall Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  16. Fracture processes and mechanisms of crack growth resistance in human enamel

    Bajaj, Devendra; Park, Saejin; Quinn, George D.; Arola, Dwayne

    2010-07-01

    Human enamel has a complex micro-structure that varies with distance from the tooth’s outer surface. But contributions from the microstructure to the fracture toughness and the mechanisms of crack growth resistance have not been explored in detail. In this investigation the apparent fracture toughness of human enamel and the mechanisms of crack growth resistance were evaluated using the indentation fracture approach and an incremental crack growth technique. Indentation cracks were introduced on polished surfaces of enamel at selected distances from the occlusal surface. In addition, an incremental crack growth approach using compact tension specimens was used to quantify the crack growth resistance as a Junction of distance from the occlusal surface. There were significant differences in the apparent toughness estimated using the two approaches, which was attributed to the active crack length and corresponding scale of the toughening mechanisms.

  17. Dynamic fracture toughness and evaluation of fracture in a ferritic nodular cast iron for casks

    Yasunaka, T.; Nakano, K.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of loading rate and temperature on fracture toughness of a ferritic nodular cast iron obtained from a thick-walled cylindrical casting has been investigated. Based upon this result, the cast iron is evaluated as a material for casks. (1) In the ductile fracture region, fracture toughness increases with increases in loading rate. (2) Ductile-brittle transition temperature is linearly related to the logarithm of stress intensity rate. (3) In the ductile fracture region, converted plain strain fracture toughness divided by yield stress can be adopted as a material constant which is independent of loading rate and temperature. From the result of a static fracture toughness test, the evaluation of fracture in high loading rate can be made. (4) In the ductile fracture region of the material investigated, the maximum allowable flaw depth exceeded the minimum detectable flaw size by a nondestructive inspection. Ferritic nodular cast iron can be used as a material for casks in the ductile fracture region at least. (J.P.N.)

  18. Fracture mechanics of thin wall cylindrical pressure vessels: an interim review

    Kurtz, R.J.; Olson, N.J.

    1977-08-01

    The report is a result of activities in the LMFBR Fuel Rod Transient Performance Program sponsored by the LMFBR Branch of the Division of Project Management, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. One of the objectives is to develop predictions relative to the length, direction, and rate of growth of cladding rips subsequent to (or concurrent with) the initial cladding breach during unprotected transients. To provide a basis for evaluation, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories has reviewed most available fracture mechanics assessments relative to thin-wall cylindrical pressure vessels. The purpose of the report is to review the various fracture mechanics models and to describe the pertinent fracture parameters. It is intended to provide a formal basis for assessing future analytical predictions of fracture behavior of materials exposed to transient LMFBR thermal and mechanical loading conditions. In addition, the report is expected to provide reference material for evaluating or developing experimental programs required to properly address the problem of predicting fracture behavior of materials during transient events

  19. Evaluation and Management of Proximal Humerus Fractures

    Ekaterina Khmelnitskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Proximal humerus fractures are common injuries, especially among older osteoporotic women. Restoration of function requires a thorough understanding of the neurovascular, musculotendinous, and bony anatomy. This paper addresses the relevant anatomy and highlights various management options, including indication for arthroplasty. In the vast majority of cases, proximal humerus fractures may be treated nonoperatively. In the case of displaced fractures, when surgical intervention may be pursued, numerous constructs have been investigated. Of these, the proximal humerus locking plate is the most widely used. Arthroplasty is generally reserved for comminuted 4-part fractures, head-split fractures, or fractures with significant underlying arthritic changes. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is reserved for patients with a deficient rotator cuff, or highly comminuted tuberosities.

  20. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis of reactor vessels with low upper-shelf fracture toughness

    Yoon, K.K.

    1993-01-01

    A class of submerged-arc welds used in fabricating early reactor vessels has relatively high copper contents. Studies have shown that when such vessels are irradiated, the copper contributes to lowering the Charpy upper-shelf energy level. To address this concern, 10CFR50, Appendix G requires a fracture mechanics analysis to demonstrate an adequate margin of safety for continued service. The B and W Owners Group (B and WOG) has been accumulating J-resistance fracture toughness data for these weld metals. Based on a mathematical model derived from this B and WOG data base, the first Appendix G analysis was performed. Another important issue affecting reactor vessel integrity is pressurized thermal shock (PIS) transients. In the early 1980s, probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses were performed on a reactor vessel to determine the probability of failure under postulated accident scenarios. Results of such analyses were used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to establish the screening criteria for assessing reactor vessel integrity under PTS transient loads. This paper addresses the effect of low upper-shelf toughness on the probability of failure of reactor vessels under PTS loads. Probabilistic fracture mechanics codes were modified to include the low upper-shelf toughness model used in a reference and a series of analyses was performed using plant-specific material conditions and realistic PTS scenarios. The results indicate that low upper-shelf toughness has an insignificant effect on the probability of reactor vessel failures. This is mostly due to PTS transients being susceptible to crack initiation at low temperatures and not affected by upper-shelf fracture toughness

  1. Evaluation of viscoplastic fracture criteria and analysis methods

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Keeney-Walker, J.; Dexter, R.J.; O'Donoghue, P.E.; Schwartz, C.W.

    1988-01-01

    The role of nonlinear rate-dependent effects in the interpretation of crack run-arrest events in ductile materials is being investigated by the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) program through development and applications of viscoplastic-dynamic finite element analysis techniques. This paper describes a portion of these studies wherein various viscoplastic constitutive models and several proposed nonlinear fracture criteria are being installed in general purpose (ADINA) and special purpose (VISCRK) finite element computer programs. The formulations of the Bodner-Partom, the Perzyna, and the Robinson constitutive models installed in the HSST computer programs are summarized. This is followed by a description of three integral functions that are candidate fracture parameters. The capabilities of these nonlinear techniques re compared and evaluated through applications to one of the HSST wide-plate crack-arrest tests. Results are presented from benchmark viscoplastic-dynamic wide-plate analyses performed using the ADINA and VISCRK computer programs. Finally, plans are summarized for additional computational and experimental studies to assess the utility of viscoplastic analysis techniques in constructing a transferable inelastic fracture mechanics model for ductile steels. (author)

  2. Development of an evaluation method for fracture mechanical tests on small samples based on a cohesive zone model; Entwicklung einer Auswertemethode fuer bruchmechanische Versuche an kleinen Proben auf der Basis eines Kohaesivzonenmodells

    Mahler, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The safety and reliability of nuclear power plants of the fourth generation is an important issue. It is based on a reliable interpretation of the components for which, among other fracture mechanical material properties are required. The existing irradiation in the power plants significantly affects the material properties which therefore need to be determined on irradiated material. Often only small amounts of irradiated material are available for characterization. In that case it is not possible to manufacture sufficiently large specimens, which are necessary for fracture mechanical testing in agreement with the standard. Small specimens must be used. From this follows the idea of this study, in which the fracture toughness can be predicted with the developed method based on tests of small specimens. For this purpose, the fracture process including the crack growth is described with a continuum mechanical approach using the finite element method and the cohesive zone model. The experiments on small specimens are used for parameter identification of the cohesive zone model. The two parameters of the cohesive zone model are determined by tensile tests on notched specimens (cohesive stress) and by parameter fitting to the fracture behavior of smalls specimens (cohesive energy). To account the different triaxialities of the specimens, the cohesive stress is used depending on the triaxiality. After parameter identification a large specimen can be simulated with the cohesive zone parameters derived from small specimens. The predicted fracture toughness of this big specimen fulfills the size requirements in the standard (ASTM E1820 or ASTM E399) in contrast to the small specimen. This method can be used for ductile and brittle material behavior and was validated in this work. In summary, this method offers the possibility to determine the fracture toughness indirectly based on small specimen testing. Main advantage is the low required specimen volume. Thereby massively

  3. Integration of nondestructive examination reliability and fracture mechanics

    Doctor, S.R.; Bates, D.J.; Charlot, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    The primary pressure boundaries (pressure vessels and piping) of nuclear power plants are in-service inspected (ISI) according to the rules of ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. Ultrasonic techniques are normally used for these inspections, which are periodically performed on a sampling of welds. The Integration of Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability and Fracture Mechanics (FM) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established to determine the reliability of current ISI techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this NRC program are to: 1) determine the reliability of ultrasonic ISI performed on commercial light-water reactor primary systems; 2) using probabilistic FM analysis, determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety and determine the level of inspection reliability required to ensure a suitably low failure probability; 3) evaluate the degree of reliability improvement that could be achieved using improved and advanced NDE techniques; and 4) based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties, formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code, Section XI, and Regulatory Requirements needed to ensure suitably low failure probabilities

  4. The application of post yield fracture methodology to the evaluation of large structures

    Landes, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    The objective of this work is to determine how to use small specimens test results to measure fracture toughness values for application to the evaluation of large structural components. Linear elastic fracture mechanics concepts based on the crack tip stress intensity factor, K, have been extended into the post yield regime by the use of elastic-plastic characterizing parameters such as J integral and COD. One of the primary applications of this technology is the determination of fracture toughness values from small specimens tests taken primarily in the post yield regime which can be used to evaluate structures operating in an essentially linear elastic regime. The fracture toughness values may be either conservative or unconservative depending on the fracture mode; extreme care must be taken in interpretting these results. (orig.)

  5. The mechanical benefit of medial support screws in locking plating of proximal humerus fractures.

    Wen Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical advantages of medial support screws (MSSs in the locking proximal humeral plate for treating proximal humerus fractures. METHODS: Thirty synthetic left humeri were randomly divided into 3 subgroups to establish two-part surgical neck fracture models of proximal humerus. All fractures were fixed with a locking proximal humerus plate. Group A was fixed with medial cortical support and no MSSs; Group B was fixed with 3 MSSs but without medial cortical support; Group C was fixed with neither medial cortical support nor MSSs. Axial compression, torsional stiffness, shear stiffness, and failure tests were performed. RESULTS: Constructs with medial support from cortical bone showed statistically higher axial and shear stiffness than other subgroups examined (P<0.0001. When the proximal humerus was not supported by medial cortical bone, locking plating with medial support screws exhibited higher axial and torsional stiffness than locking plating without medial support screws (P ≤ 0.0207. Specimens with medial cortical bone failed primarily by fracture of the humeral shaft or humeral head. Specimens without medial cortical bone support failed primarily by significant plate bending at the fracture site followed by humeral head collapse or humeral head fracture. CONCLUSIONS: Anatomic reduction with medial cortical support was the stiffest construct after a simulated two-part fracture. Significant biomechanical benefits of MSSs in locking plating of proximal humerus fractures were identified. The reconstruction of the medial column support for proximal humerus fractures helps to enhance mechanical stability of the humeral head and prevent implant failure.

  6. Evaluation of regional fracture properties for groundwater ...

    lia district, West Bengal (India) were studied to find out the spatial pattern and consistency of such fracture ... Fracture networks have the potentiality to ... Regional scale groundwater development is important in ..... tory well sites, spatial distribution of hydrologi- ... in hard rocks: A case study from Sunnfjord, Western. Norway ...

  7. Comprehensive evaluation of fracture critical bridges.

    2014-02-01

    Two-girder steel bridges are classified as fracture critical bridges based on the definition given in the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications. In a fracture critical bridge a failure of a tension member leads to collapse of the bridge. However, ...

  8. Fracture mechanical analysis of operational damaged piping

    Azodi, D.

    1987-01-01

    A series of crack arrest experiments by means of transverse wedge-loaded compact specimen was simulated numerically to verify the dynamic J-integral formulation, for applications in brittle and ductile regions as well as for two- and three-dimensional geometries. The transverse wedge-loaded compact crack arrest test is a widely used small scale test to evaluate the crack arrest toughness of nuclear pressure vessel steels. In this test method the crack attains a high velocity after initiation, then decelerates to a low velocity prior to arrest. The opening displacement remains constant during the crack propagation. Crack extension and the opening displacement behaviour were measured using a sensitive time scale. Regarding material toughness two entirely different kind of steels, HFX 760 (brittle) and 20 MnMoNi 55 (ductile) were considered. The testing temperature was the room temperature. The numerical analyses were performed by an extended version of the finite element code ADINA. Crack propagation was simulated by 'node shift and fixity release' procedure. Discussions in this report are, among others, directed to the: Numerical stability of different J-integral contours during the fast crack propagation and comparison between the static approach, dynamic finite element analyses and experimental results for crack initiation toughness and arrest toughness. The numerical simulation results and experimental data were in close agreement. The achieved results confirm that the dynamic J-integral formulation is able to describe the rapid crack propagation and the crack arrest in steel components sufficiently. (orig.) [de

  9. Occult fractures of the knee: tomographic evaluation

    Apple, J.S.; Martinez, S.; Allen, N.B.; Caldwell, D.S.; Rice, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Seven adults with painful effusions of the knee were examined for occult fractures using pluridirectional tomograph in the coronal and lateral planes. Six patients (ages 50 to 82 years) were osteopenic and gave histories ranging from none to mild trauma; one 26-year-old man was not osteopenic and had severe trauma. In all cases, routine radiographs were interpreted as negative, but tomography demonstrated a fracture. Five fractures were subchondral. Bone scans in 2 patients were positive. The authors conclude that osteopenic patients with a painful effusion of the knee should be considered to have an occult fracture. While bone scans may be helpful, tomography is recommended as the procedure of choice to define the location and extent of the fracture

  10. Cyclic Fracture Toughness of Railway Axle and Mechanisms of its Fatigue Fracture

    Sorochak Andriy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The main regularities in fatigue fracture of the railway axle material - the OSL steel - are found in this paper. Micromechanisms of fatigue crack propagation are described and systematized, and a physical-mechanical interpretation of the relief morphology at different stages of crack propagation is proposed for fatigue cracks in specimens cut out of the surface, internal and central layers of the axle.

  11. OCA-P, a deterministic and probabilistic fracture-mechanics code for application to pressure vessels

    Cheverton, R.D.; Ball, D.G.

    1984-05-01

    The OCA-P code is a probabilistic fracture-mechanics code that was prepared specifically for evaluating the integrity of pressurized-water reactor vessels when subjected to overcooling-accident loading conditions. The code has two-dimensional- and some three-dimensional-flaw capability; it is based on linear-elastic fracture mechanics; and it can treat cladding as a discrete region. Both deterministic and probabilistic analyses can be performed. For the former analysis, it is possible to conduct a search for critical values of the fluence and the nil-ductility reference temperature corresponding to incipient initiation of the initial flaw. The probabilistic portion of OCA-P is based on Monte Carlo techniques, and simulated parameters include fluence, flaw depth, fracture toughness, nil-ductility reference temperature, and concentrations of copper, nickel, and phosphorous. Plotting capabilities include the construction of critical-crack-depth diagrams (deterministic analysis) and various histograms (probabilistic analysis)

  12. Fracture mechanism of a dispersion-hardened molybdenum alloy with strong structural interfaces

    Vasil'ev, A.D.; Malashenko, I.S.; Moiseev, V.F.; Pechkovskij, Eh.P.; Sul'zhenko, V.K.; Trefilov, V.I.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Ehlektrosvarki)

    1978-01-01

    Fracture mechanism in the two-phase Mo-15wt.%Nb-3.5 vol.% TiN alloy known to be of ''brittle matrix-strong interfaces'' type has been investigated depending on tensile test temperature. Several temperature intervals of fracture have been found, each of them having its own peculiarities. A scheme is suggested for fracture mechanism changes in dispersion-hardened alloys with strong interfaces. At low test temperatures brittle cleavage fracture takes place. With temperature increase fracture mechanisms change in the following way: brittle intergranular fracture; fracture of ''microvoid coalescence'' type; fracture typical for reinforced materials with ductile matrix; intergran laru fracture. Particles of strengthening phase have been shown to play different roles depending on the test temperature in the fracture of the alloys studied

  13. Acoustic emission from zirconium alloys during mechanical and fracture testing

    Coleman, C.E.

    1986-10-01

    The application of acoustic emission during the mechanical and fracture testing of zirconium alloys is reviewed. Acoustic emission is successful in following delayed hydride cracking quantitatively. It is especially useful when great sensitivity is required. Application to fatigue, tensile deformation and stress corrosion cracking appears promising but requires more work to separate phenomena before it can be used quantitatively. This report is based on an invited review for the American Society of Non-Destructive Testing Handbook: Volume 5, Acoustic Emission Testing

  14. Special fracture mechanics specimens for multilayer plastic pipes testing

    Hutař, Pavel; Šestáková, Lucie; Knésl, Zdeněk; Nezbedová, E.; Náhlík, Luboš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 8 (2009), s. 785-792 ISSN 0142-9418 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/0279; GA ČR GC101/09/J027 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Multilayer plastic pipes * C-type specimen * K-calibration * Fracture toughness * Slow crack growth * Non-homogenous specimens Subject RIV: JL - Material s Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.667, year: 2009

  15. State-of-the-art report on piping fracture mechanics

    Wilkowski, G.M.; Olson, R.J.; Scott, P.M. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This report is an in-depth summary of the state-of-the-art in nuclear piping fracture mechanics. It represents the culmination of 20 years of work done primarily in the US, but also attempts to include important aspects from other international efforts. Although the focus of this work was for the nuclear industry, the technology is also applicable in many cases to fossil plants, petrochemical/refinery plants, and the oil and gas industry. In compiling this detailed summary report, all of the equations and details of the analysis procedure or experimental results are not necessarily included. Rather, the report describes the important aspects and limitations, tells the reader where he can go for further information, and more importantly, describes the accuracy of the models. Nevertheless, the report still contains over 150 equations and over 400 references. The main sections of this report describe: (1) the evolution of piping fracture mechanics history relative to the developments of the nuclear industry, (2) technical developments in stress analyses, material property aspects, and fracture mechanics analyses, (3) unresolved issues and technically evolving areas, and (4) a summary of conclusions of major developments to date.

  16. State-of-the-art report on piping fracture mechanics

    Wilkowski, G.M.; Olson, R.J.; Scott, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    This report is an in-depth summary of the state-of-the-art in nuclear piping fracture mechanics. It represents the culmination of 20 years of work done primarily in the US, but also attempts to include important aspects from other international efforts. Although the focus of this work was for the nuclear industry, the technology is also applicable in many cases to fossil plants, petrochemical/refinery plants, and the oil and gas industry. In compiling this detailed summary report, all of the equations and details of the analysis procedure or experimental results are not necessarily included. Rather, the report describes the important aspects and limitations, tells the reader where he can go for further information, and more importantly, describes the accuracy of the models. Nevertheless, the report still contains over 150 equations and over 400 references. The main sections of this report describe: (1) the evolution of piping fracture mechanics history relative to the developments of the nuclear industry, (2) technical developments in stress analyses, material property aspects, and fracture mechanics analyses, (3) unresolved issues and technically evolving areas, and (4) a summary of conclusions of major developments to date

  17. A unified approach to elastic-plastic fracture mechanics

    Neale, B.K.; Townley, C.H.A.

    1976-01-01

    To assess the integrity of a cracked structure, using materials data obtained from simple laboratory tests, it is essential to define materials properties which are independent of the shape and the size of the specimen and of the loading system applied to it. In those situations where either the specimen or the structure fails after significant yielding has taken place, there is considerable speculation about the materials parameters which are relevant. By extending the Griffith equation for the stability of a perfectly elastic cracked body, the authors derive a fracture criterion which is applicable in the post yield regime. Comparisons are made with procedures based on the J-contour integral, equivalent energy, and crack opening displacements and with the post yield fracture mechanics of Heald, Spink and Worthington, and Dowling and Townley. For certain materials, it is shown that the factor controlling crack initiation is the fracture toughness Ksub(1c), irrespective of the amount of prior plastic damage, and hence independent of the shape and size of the specimen tested. Load carrying capacity in the post yield regime cannot, however, be derived directly from a knowledge of fracture toughness; the ultimate tensile strength of the material is also relevant

  18. Results of fracture mechanics tests on PNC SUS 304 plate

    Mills, W.J.; James, L.A.; Blackburn, L.D.

    1985-08-01

    PNC provided SUS 304 plate to be irradiated in FFTF at about 400 0 C to a target fluence of 5 x 10 21 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). The actual irradiation included two basically different exposure levels to assure that information would be available for the exposure of interest. After irradiation, tensile properties, fatigue-crack growth rates and J-integral fracture toughness response were determined. These same properties were also measured for the unirradiated material so radiation damage effects could be characterized. This report presents the results of this program. It is expected that these results would be applicable for detailed fracture analysis of reactor components. Recent advances in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics enable reasonably accurate predictions of failure conditions for flawed stainless steel components. Extensive research has focused on the development of J-integral-based engineering approach for assessing the load carrying capacity of low-strength, high-toughness structural materials. Furthermore, Kanninen, et al., have demonstrated that J-integral concepts can accurately predict the fracture response for full-scale cracked structures manufactured from Type 304 stainless steel

  19. A New Method for Fracturing Wells Reservoir Evaluation in Fractured Gas Reservoir

    Jianchun Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural fracture is a geological phenomenon widely distributed in tight formation, and fractured gas reservoir stimulation effect mainly depends on the communication of natural fractures. Therefore it is necessary to carry out the evaluation of this reservoir and to find out the optimal natural fractures development wells. By analyzing the interactions and nonlinear relationships of the parameters, it establishes three-level index system of reservoir evaluation and proposes a new method for gas well reservoir evaluation model in fractured gas reservoir on the basis of fuzzy logic theory and multilevel gray correlation. For this method, the Gaussian membership functions to quantify the degree of every factor in the decision-making system and the multilevel gray relation to determine the weight of each parameter on stimulation effect. Finally through fuzzy arithmetic operator between multilevel weights and fuzzy evaluation matrix, score, rank, the reservoir quality, and predicted production will be gotten. Result of this new method shows that the evaluation of the production coincidence rate reaches 80%, which provides a new way for fractured gas reservoir evaluation.

  20. Evaluation of Fracture Resistance in Root Canal-Treated Teeth ...

    2018-06-11

    Jun 11, 2018 ... Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of different coronal restoration techniques on fracture ... Therefore, the application of horizontal fiber posts in. MOD cavities has .... Table 1: Median and 25% and 75% quartile values of the groups n ..... restorations on fracture resistance and failure mode of.

  1. 35. Conference of the DVM Working Group on Fracture Processes: Advances in fracture and damage mechanics - simulation methods of fracture mechanics

    2003-01-01

    Subjects of the meeting were: Simulation of fatigue crack growth in real strucures using FEA (M. Fulland, Paderborn); Modelling of ductile crack growth (W. Brocks, Geesthacht); Advances in non-local modelling of ductile damage (F. Reusch et al., Berlin, Dortmund); Fracture mechanics of ceramics (D. Munz, Karlsruhe); From materials testing to vehicle crash testing (J.G. Blauel, Freiburg); Analytical simulation of crack growth in thin-walled structures (U. Zerbst, Geesthacht); The influence of intrinsic stresses on fatigue crack growth (C. Dalle Donne etc., Cologne, Dortmund, Pisa, and M. Sander, Paderborn); Fracture mechanical strength calculation in case of mixed mode loads on cracks (H.A. Richard, Paderborn); Numeric simulation of intrinsic stresses during welding (C. Veneziano, Freiburg); New research fields of the Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffmechanik (P. Gumbsch, Head of the Institute, Freiburg); Modern developments and advances in fracture and damage mechanics; Numeric and experimental simulation of crack propagation and damage processes; Exemplary damage cases; Fracture mechanics in product development; Failure characteristics of lightweight constructional materials and joints [de

  2. Study on the mechanism of seepage flow in the grouting for multiple fractured model

    Nishigaki, Makoto; Mikake, Shin-ichiro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of study is to improve the grouting method for fractured rock masses. In this paper, the results on the fundamental phenomenon for grasping the properties of grouting injection and seepage flow are discussed. The case of grouting stage is studied about the multiple hydraulic fractured apertures in the injected borehole. So the theory on the mechanism is constructed, and experiment is executed in order to verify the availability of the theory. From the results, it is shown that Bernoulli's law is able to prove the behavior of the grouting. And the theoretical evaluation is executed on the experiential procedure of the grouting. (author)

  3. Measurement of residual stresses using fracture mechanics weight functions

    Fan, Y.

    2000-01-01

    A residual stress measurement method has been developed to quantify through-the-thickness residual stresses. Accurate measurement of residual stresses is crucial for many engineering structures. Fabrication processes such as welding and machining generate residual stresses that are difficult to predict. Residual stresses affect the integrity of structures through promoting failures due to brittle fracture, fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, and wear. In this work, the weight function theory of fracture mechanics is used to measure residual stresses. The weight function theory is an important development in computational fracture mechanics. Stress intensity factors for arbitrary stress distribution on the crack faces can be accurately and efficiently computed for predicting crack growth. This paper demonstrates that the weight functions are equally useful in measuring residual stresses. In this method, an artificial crack is created by a thin cut in a structure containing residual stresses. The cut relieves the residual stresses normal to the crack-face and allows the relieved residual stresses to deform the structure. Strain gages placed adjacent to the cut measure the relieved strains corresponding to incrementally increasing depths of the cut. The weight functions of the cracked body relate the measured strains to the residual stresses normal to the cut within the structure. The procedure details, such as numerical integration of the singular functions in applying the weight function method, will be discussed

  4. Measurement of residual stresses using fracture mechanics weight functions

    Fan, Y.

    2001-01-01

    A residual stress measurement method has been developed to quantify through-the-thickness residual stresses. Accurate measurement of residual stresses is crucial for many engineering structures. Fabrication processes such as welding and machining generate residual stresses that are difficult to predict. Residual stresses affect the integrity of structures through promoting failures due to brittle fracture, fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, and wear. In this work, the weight function theory of fracture mechanics is used to measure residual stresses. The weight function theory is an important development in computational fracture mechanics. Stress intensity factors for arbitrary stress distribution on the crack faces can be accurately and efficiently computed for predicting crack growth. This paper demonstrates that the weight functions are equally useful in measuring residual stresses. In this method, an artificial crack is created by a thin cut in a structure containing residual stresses. The cut relieves the residual stresses normal to the crack-face and allows the relieved residual stresses to deform the structure. Strain gages placed adjacent to the cut measure the relieved strains corresponding to incrementally increasing depths of the cut. The weight functions of the cracked body relate the measured strains to the residual stresses normal to the cut within the structure. The procedure details, such as numerical integration of the singular functions in applying the weight function method, will be discussed. (author)

  5. Fracture mechanics of polymer mortar made with recycled raw materials

    Jurumenha,Marco Antonio Godoy; Reis,João Marciano Laredo dos

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to show that industrial residues could be used in construction applications so that production costs as well as environmental protection can be improved. The fracture properties of polymer mortar manufactured with recycled materials are investigated to evaluate the materials behaviour to crack propagation. The residues used in this work were spent sand from foundry industry as aggregate, unsaturated polyester resin from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) as matrix and po...

  6. Practical application of fracture mechanics with consideration of multiaxiality of stress state to degraded nuclear piping

    Kussmaul, K.; Blind, D.; Herter, K.H.; Eisele, U.; Schuler, X.

    1995-01-01

    Within the scope of a research project nuclear piping components (T-branches and elbows) with dimensions like the primary coolant lines of PWR plants were investigated. In addition to the experimental full scale tests, extensive numerical calculations by means of the finite element method (FEM) as well as fracture mechanics analyses were performed. The applicability of these methods was verified by comparison with the experimental results. The calculation of fracture mechanics parameters as well as the calculated component stress enabled a statement on crack initiation. The failure behavior could be evaluated by means of the multiaxiality of stress state in the ligament (gradient of the quotient of the multiaxiality of stress state q). With respect to practical application on other pressurized components it is shown how to use the procedure (e.g. in a LBB analysis). A quantitative assessment with regard to crack initiation is possible by comparison of the effective crack initiation value J ieff with the calculated component stress. If the multiaxiality of stress state and the q gradient in the ligament of the fracture ligament of the fracture mechanics specimen and the pressurized component to be evaluated is comparable a quantitative assessment is possible as for crack extension and maximum load. If there is no comparability of the gradients a qualitative assessment is possible for the failure behavior

  7. Technical report on micro-mechanical versus conventional modelling in non-linear fracture mechanics

    2001-07-01

    While conventional fracture mechanics is capable of predicting crack growth behaviour if sufficient experimental observations are available, micro-mechanical modelling can both increase the accuracy of these predictions and model phenomena that are inaccessible by the conventional theory such as the ductile-cleavage temperature transition. A common argument against micro-mechanical modelling is that it is too complicated for use in routine engineering applications. This is both a computational and an educational problem. That micro-mechanical modelling is unnecessarily complicated is certainly true in many situations. The on-going development of micro-mechanical models, computational algorithms and computer speed will however most probably diminish the computational problem rather rapidly. Compare for instance the rate of development of computational methods for structural analysis. Meanwhile micro-mechanical modelling may serve as a tool by which more simplified engineering methods can be validated. The process of receiving a wide acceptance of the new methods is probably much slower. This involves many steps. First the research community must be in reasonable agreement on the methods and their use. Then the methods have to be implemented into computer software and into code procedures. The development and acceptance of conventional fracture mechanics may serve as an historical example of the time required before a new methodology has received a wide usage. The CSNI Working Group on Integrity and Ageing (IAGE) decided to carry out a report on micro-mechanical modeling to promote this promising and valuable technique. The report presents a comparison with non-linear fracture mechanics and highlights key aspects that could lead to a better knowledge and accurate predictions. Content: - 1. Introduction; - 2. Concepts of non-linear fracture mechanics with point crack tip modelling; - 3. Micro-mechanical models for cleavage fracture; - 4, Micro-mechanical modelling of

  8. Evaluation of fatigue crack growth and fracture resistance of SA350 LF2 material

    Singh, P.K.; Dubey, J.S.; Chakrabarty, J.K.; Vaze, K.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to evaluate the tensile and fracture mechanics properties of the SA350 LF2 carbon steel material used as the Header material in the primary heat transport (PHT) system piping of the Indian pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR). Tensile, fatigue crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been carried out on specimens machined from the Header of the actual PHT pipes. The effect of temperature on tensile properties has been discussed. The effect of temperature and notch orientation on fracture resistance behavior of the material and fatigue crack growth rate dependence on the notch orientation and stress ratio has also been discussed. (author)

  9. Mechanical design optimization of bioabsorbable fixation devices for bone fractures.

    Lovald, Scott T; Khraishi, Tariq; Wagner, Jon; Baack, Bret

    2009-03-01

    Bioabsorbable bone plates can eliminate the necessity for a permanent implant when used to fixate fractures of the human mandible. They are currently not in widespread use because of the low strength of the materials and the requisite large volume of the resulting bone plate. The aim of the current study was to discover a minimally invasive bioabsorbable bone plate design that can provide the same mechanical stability as a standard titanium bone plate. A finite element model of a mandible with a fracture in the body region is subjected to bite loads that are common to patients postsurgery. The model is used first to determine benchmark stress and strain values for a titanium plate. These values are then set as the limits within which the bioabsorbable bone plate must comply. The model is then modified to consider a bone plate made of the polymer poly-L/DL-lactide 70/30. An optimization routine is run to determine the smallest volume of bioabsorbable bone plate that can perform and a titanium bone plate when fixating fractures of this considered type. Two design parameters are varied for the bone plate design during the optimization analysis. The analysis determined that a strut style poly-L-lactide-co-DL-lactide plate of 690 mm2 can provide as much mechanical stability as a similar titanium design structure of 172 mm2. The model has determined a bioabsorbable bone plate design that is as strong as a titanium plate when fixating fractures of the load-bearing mandible. This is an intriguing outcome, considering that the polymer material has only 6% of the stiffness of titanium.

  10. Effects of chemical alteration on fracture mechanical properties in hydrothermal systems

    Callahan, O. A.; Eichhubl, P.; Olson, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    Fault and fracture networks often control the distribution of fluids and heat in hydrothermal and epithermal systems, and in related geothermal and mineral resources. Additional chemical influences on conduit evolution are well documented, with dissolution and precipitation of mineral species potentially changing the permeability of fault-facture networks. Less well understood are the impacts of chemical alteration on the mechanical properties governing fracture growth and fracture network geometry. We use double-torsion (DT) load relaxation tests under ambient air conditions to measure the mode-I fracture toughness (KIC) and subcritical fracture growth index (SCI) of variably altered rock samples obtained from outcrop in Dixie Valley, NV. Samples from southern Dixie Valley include 1) weakly altered granite, characterized by minor sericite in plagioclase, albitization and vacuolization of feldspars, and incomplete replacement of biotite with chlorite, and 2) granite from an area of locally intense propylitic alteration with chlorite-calcite-hematite-epidote assemblages. We also evaluated samples of completely silicified gabbro obtained from the Dixie Comstock epithermal gold deposit. In the weakly altered granite KIC and SCI are 1.3 ±0.2 MPam1/2 (n=8) and 59 ±25 (n=29), respectively. In the propylitic assemblage KIC is reduced to 0.6 ±0.1 MPam1/2 (n=11), and the SCI increased to 75 ±36 (n = 33). In both cases, the altered materials have lower fracture toughness and higher SCI than is reported for common geomechanical standards such as Westerly Granite (KIC ~1.7 MPam1/2; SCI ~48). Preliminary analysis of the silicified gabbro shows a significant increase in fracture toughness, 3.6 ±0.4 MPam1/2 (n=2), and SCI, 102 ±45 (n=19), compared to published values for gabbro (2.9 MPam1/2 and SCI = 32). These results suggest that mineralogical and textural changes associated with different alteration assemblages may result in spatially variable rates of fracture

  11. Mechanical Evaluation of Polymer Composite Hip Protectors

    Jose Daniel Diniz Melo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hip fractures often result in serious health implications, particularly in the geriatric population, and have been related to long-term morbidity and death. In most cases, these fractures are caused by impact loads in the area of the greater trochanter, which are produced in a fall. This work is aimed at developing hip protectors using composite materials and evaluating their effectiveness in preventing hip fractures under high impact energy (120 J. The hip protectors were developed with an inner layer of energy absorbing soft material and an outer rigid shell of fiberglass-reinforced polymer composite. According to the experimental results, all tested configurations proved to be effective at reducing the impact load to below the average fracture threshold of proximal femur. Furthermore, an addition of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA to the impacted area of the composite shell proved to be beneficial to increase impact strength of the hip protectors. Thus, composite hip protectors proved to be a viable alternative for a mechanically efficient and cost-effective solution to prevent hip fractures.

  12. The effect of inferomedial screw on postoperative shoulder function and mechanical alignment in proximal humerus fractures.

    Erdoğan, Murat; Desteli, Engin Eren; İmren, Yunus; Üztürk, Ali; Kılıç, Mesut; Sezgin, Hicabi

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical and radiologic results of locking plate fixation with or without inferomedial screw (IMS) in surgically treated proximal humerus fractures. Thirty-six patients with displaced proximal humerus fractures from two centers were operated using locking plate. All of the fractures were classified according to the Neer classification. In 18 of the cases, an additional IMS running through the medial curvature of the surgical neck was used. There was no significant difference among both groups in terms of height, gender, weight, and mechanism of injury. The fractures were evaluated according to the radiographic and functional findings during follow-up period of 14 months in average (range 8-32 months). At the end of first year, shoulder radiographs were received and shoulder examinations were performed using ASES scores. Humeral head-shaft angles were measured by true AP projections. Head-shaft angle measurements were categorized as varus if 145. Mean time for fracture healing was 18 weeks. Complete union was achieved in 35 patients by the end of 6 months. In one of the 18 displaced proximal humerus fractures of IMS (+) group, the head-shaft angle was measured to be <125, whereas six patients had varus deviation in IMS (-) group at follow-up (p < 0.05). Mean ASES scores of IMS (+) group and IMS (-) group were 58.21 ± 5.82 and 38.61 ± 3.44, respectively (p < 0.001). Use of inferomedial screw running through the medial curvature of surgical neck prevents varus deformity and improves functional outcome after surgical treatment for proximal humerus fractures.

  13. Evaluation of fracture mode for local wall-thinned pipes

    Herman, Irwan; Suzuki, Tomohisa; Sato, Yasumoto; Meshii, Toshiyuki

    2007-01-01

    In this study, by referring to our burst pressure tests results, firstly, the effects of flaw length δ z and pipe size (mean radius R) on burst pressure p f were investigated by using Finite Element Method (FEM). Then, fracture mode evaluation was made by using history data of strain ratio ε z /ε θ along with load increment. Furthermore, the effect of flaw depth t 1 on fracture mode was studied and finally, the evaluation method of fracture mode for local wall-thinned pipes was introduced. (author)

  14. Fracture Mechanics Assessment for Different Notch Sizes Using Finite Element Analysis Based on Ductile Failure Simulation

    Bae, Keun Hyung; Jeon, Jun Young; Han, Jae Jun; Nam, Hyun Suk; Lee, Dae Young; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    In this study, notch defects are evaluated using fracture mechanics. To understand the effects of notch defects, FE analysis is conducted to predict the limit load and J-integral for middle-cracked and single-edge cracked plates with various sizes of notch under tension and bending. As the radius of the notch increases, the energy release rate also increases, although the limit load remains constant. The values of fracture toughness(J{sub IC}) of SM490A are determined for various notch radii through FE simulation instead of conducting an experiment. As the radius of the notch increases, the energy release rate also increases, together with a more significant increase in fracture toughness. To conclude, as the notch radius increases, the resistance to crack propagation also increases.

  15. The Role of Multi-wall Carbon Nanotubes on Fracture Mechanism of Epoxy Nanocomposite

    M. Hooshiar Sadegian

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the role of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs on fracture mechanism of epoxy nanocomposites, a series of tensile standard specimens reinforced with different carbon nanotube contents (0, 0.3, 0.6 and 1 wt% were produced. The fracture surfaces of the produced nanocomposites were evaluated using scanning electron microscope (SEM. The results show that the surface fracture of epoxy nanocomposites comprised of three regions, i.e. mirror, transition and final propagation zones. The extension of all zones depends strongly on curing agent as well asMWCNTs content. The mirror zone is disappeared as curing agent and MWCNTs content increases, while the transition zone depends on the nucleation rate of secondary microcrack. The pattern of final propagation zone becomes coarser as MWCNTs are added to epoxy system.

  16. Metallurgical characteristics and fracture mechanical properties of unirradiated Kori-1 RPV weld: Linde 80, WF-233

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, B. S.; Oh, Y. J.; Chi, S. H.; Kim, J. H.; Park, D. G.; Yoon, J. H.; Oh, J. M.

    2000-07-01

    The fracture toughness transition properties of the low upper shelf weld, Linde 80 WF-233, of Kori-1 RPV were evaluated by the master curve method, which is designated by ASTM E 1921, 'Standard test method for determination of reference temperature, T o , for ferritic steels in the transition range'. The reference temperature, T o =-83 deg C, was determined by PCVN specimens at -90 deg C. This value is similar to that of other high copper welds. The initial RT NDT was conservatively estimated as -26 deg F from the current fracture toughness results. From the studies on the chemistry and microstructure, the fracture mechanical properties of WF-233 weld is convincingly not worse than WF-70 and 72W welds

  17. Fracture toughness of intermetallics using a micro-mechanical probe

    Gerberich, W.W.; Venkataraman, S.K.; Hoehn, J.W.; Marsh, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    A novel technique for determining the fracture toughness of brittle intermetallics is presented, wherein very small samples are used and multiple tests are easily conducted on a flat polished surface. The fracture toughness of single crystal NiAl and polycrystalline Al 3 Sc are evaluated with this continuous microscratch technique at scratch rates ranging from 0.5 to greater than 100 μm s - . For comparison, small compact tension samples of (100) NiAl are evaluated at applied stress intensity rates ranging from 1.5 to 5,400 MPa-m 1/2 s -1 . Good comparison of microscratch toughness to compact tension K Ic values are obtained in this study for (001) NiAl, 10.6 vs. 10.0 MPa-m 1/2 , from the literature for (001) , 13.5 vs. 12.2 MPa-m 1/2 , and from the literature for polycrystalline Al 3 Sc, 3.5 vs. 3.1 MPa-m 1/2 . Also, the fracture toughness of both NiAl and Al 3 Sc are found to be strongly dependent on strain rate at room temperature with toughness dropping by an order of magnitude over a decade increase in rate. Possible reasons and implications to improving low temperature brittleness are discussed

  18. An efficient hydro-mechanical model for coupled multi-porosity and discrete fracture porous media

    Yan, Xia; Huang, Zhaoqin; Yao, Jun; Li, Yang; Fan, Dongyan; Zhang, Kai

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a numerical model is developed for coupled analysis of deforming fractured porous media with multiscale fractures. In this model, the macro-fractures are modeled explicitly by the embedded discrete fracture model, and the supporting effects of fluid and fillings in these fractures are represented explicitly in the geomechanics model. On the other hand, matrix and micro-fractures are modeled by a multi-porosity model, which aims to accurately describe the transient matrix-fracture fluid exchange process. A stabilized extended finite element method scheme is developed based on the polynomial pressure projection technique to address the displacement oscillation along macro-fracture boundaries. After that, the mixed space discretization and modified fixed stress sequential implicit methods based on non-matching grids are applied to solve the coupling model. Finally, we demonstrate the accuracy and application of the proposed method to capture the coupled hydro-mechanical impacts of multiscale fractures on fractured porous media.

  19. A variationally coupled FE-BE method for elasticity and fracture mechanics

    Lu, Y. Y.; Belytschko, T.; Liu, W. K.

    1991-01-01

    A new method for coupling finite element and boundary element subdomains in elasticity and fracture mechanics problems is described. The essential feature of this new method is that a single variational statement is obtained for the entire domain, and in this process the terms associated with tractions on the interfaces between the subdomains are eliminated. This provides the additional advantage that the ambiguities associated with the matching of discontinuous tractions are circumvented. The method leads to a direct procedure for obtaining the discrete equations for the coupled problem without any intermediate steps. In order to evaluate this method and compare it with previous methods, a patch test for coupled procedures has been devised. Evaluation of this variationally coupled method and other methods, such as stiffness coupling and constraint traction matching coupling, shows that this method is substantially superior. Solutions for a series of fracture mechanics problems are also reported to illustrate the effectiveness of this method.

  20. Clinical evaluation of stress fractures using bone scintigraphy

    Furuta, Atsuhiko; Tanohata, Kazunori; Otake, Toru; Hashizume, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Yozi; Nakazima, Hiroyuki.

    1984-01-01

    Clinical evaluation of stress fractures were performed in 58 athletes using bone scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-MDP. Stress fractures of the tibia were most often seen in the males with running type sports. They occurred more often in the proximal tibia and on the right side. Stress fractures of the fibula were most often seen in females with jumping type sports, such as volley ball. They occurred more often in the distal fibula and on the right side. Tarsal bone fractures were seen most often rugby players. Metatarsal fractures occurred in the third fourth and fifth metatarsals. No lesion was seen in the first and second metatarsals. We feel that stress fractures of the femur can be differentiated from osteosarcoma by small loculated radionuclide accumulation as well as symptome, course and tomographic and CT finding. Bilateral involvement was seen in two cases in patellae and calcanei. Most of the other fractures were seen on the right side. Negative radiographs were seen in 36% of the patients and occurred most commonly in the tarsal bones excluding calcaneus. Bone scintigrams were positive in all cases and were most useful in fractures of the tarsal bones excluding calcaneus. (author)

  1. Clinical evaluation of stress fractures using bone scintigraphy

    Furuta, Atsuhiko; Tanohata, Kazunori; Otake, Toru; Hashizume, Toshiyuki (Kanto Rosai Hospital, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)); Kobayashi, Yozi; Nakazima, Hiroyuki

    1984-05-01

    Clinical evaluation of stress fractures were performed in 58 athletes using bone scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-MDP. Stress fractures of the tibia were most often seen in the males with running type sports. They occurred more often in the proximal tibia and on the right side. Stress fractures of the fibula were most often seen in females with jumping type sports, such as volley ball. They occurred more often in the distal fibula and on the right side. Tarsal bone fractures were seen most often rugby players. Metatarsal fractures occurred in the third fourth and fifth metatarsals. No lesion was seen in the first and second metatarsals. We feel that stress fractures of the femur can be differentiated from osteosarcoma by small loculated radionuclide accumulation as well as symptoms, course and tomographic and CT findings. Bilateral involvement was seen in two cases in patellae and calcanei. Most of the other fractures were seen on the right side. Negative radiographs were seen in 36% of the patients and occurred most commonly in the tarsal bones excluding calcaneus. Bone scintigrams were positive in all cases and were most useful in fractures of the tarsal bones excluding calcaneus.

  2. Computed tomography evaluation of petrous bone fractures ...

    Background: Petrous bone trauma is the sequel of blunt head injury and can have life threatening complications resulting in immediate mortality. Early detection and good knowledge of the Computed Tomography (CT) findings ensure prompt treatment of both fractures and complications. Objective: To document the ...

  3. (Environmental and geophysical modeling, fracture mechanics, and boundary element methods)

    Gray, L.J.

    1990-11-09

    Technical discussions at the various sites visited centered on application of boundary integral methods for environmental modeling, seismic analysis, and computational fracture mechanics in composite and smart'' materials. The traveler also attended the International Association for Boundary Element Methods Conference at Rome, Italy. While many aspects of boundary element theory and applications were discussed in the papers, the dominant topic was the analysis and application of hypersingular equations. This has been the focus of recent work by the author, and thus the conference was highly relevant to research at ORNL.

  4. Defect vectors and path integrals in fracture mechanics

    Roche, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Several criteria have been proposed in Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics. One of the most interesting ones is the J 1 criterion where J 1 is a path integral surrounding the crack tip. Other path integrals (or surface integrals in 3D problems) can be used. But all these integrals are introduced on an elastic basis, though they are applied in plasticity. This paper shows that it is possible to introduce these integrals without any reference to the elastic behavior of the material. The method is based on the 'defect vector theory' which is an extension of the energy-momentum tensor theory. (orig.)

  5. Forecasts on service life by fracture mechanics methods

    Munz, D.

    1985-01-01

    The service life of many component parts can frequently be divided into the stages up to the formation of a crack and of crack propagation. This holds good of fatigue crack, stress corrosion crack, and also in many cases of creep. But often the crack propagation stage is the only one of interest for service life forecasts if cracks must be reckoned with already on putting parts into service. Cracks in welding constructions are typical examples. Crack- and -fracture mechanics deal with the laws underlying crack propagation and provide quantitative information on crack propagation behaviour. (orig./DG) [de

  6. Evaluation of piping fracture analysis method by benchmark study, 1

    Takahashi, Yukio; Kashima, Koichi; Kuwabara, Kazuo

    1987-01-01

    Importance of strength evaluation methods for cracked piping is growing with the progress of the rationalization of the nuclear piping system based on the leak-before-break concept. As an analytical tool, finite element method is principally used. To obtain the reliable solutions by the finite element programs, it is important to grasp the influences of various factors on the solutions. In this study, benchmark analysis is carried out for a stainless steel pipe with a circumferential through-wall crack subjected to four-point bending loading. Eight solutions obtained by using five finite element programs are compared with each other. Good agreement is obtained between the solutions on the deformation characteristics as well as fracture mechanics parameters. It is found through this study that the influence of the difference in the solution technique is generally small. (author)

  7. Fatigue fracture of steel after mechanical and ultrasonic strengthening

    Stotskij, I.M.

    1978-01-01

    Fatigue fracture surfaces of samples after mechanical and ultrasonic strengthening have been studied metallographically and by electron fractography. Studied was the 40Kh steel hardened from 850 deg and then tempered at 180 deg or at 550 deg C. The ultrasound power was 25 kWt, the frequency was 20 kHz, the sample rotation velocity was 39.5 m/min. Mechanical and ultrasonic treatment was found to cause structural changes (formation of a white layer) and deformation of the material under the layer. The fatigue cracks were extending beyond the white layer; their propagation involved generation and coalescence of microcracks on account of segregation of carbides. It is concluded that mechanical and ultrasonic treatment should be used for increasing the fatigue strength of low and average strength materials rather than hardened or low-tempered ones

  8. Proximal Humerus Fractures: Evaluation and Management in the Elderly Patient

    Grawe, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Proximal humerus fractures are common in the elderly. The evaluation and management of these injuries is often controversial. The purpose of this study is to review recent evidence and provide updated recommendations for treating proximal humerus fractures in the elderly. Methods: A literature review of peer-reviewed publications related to the evaluation and management of proximal humerus fractures in the elderly was performed. There was a focus on randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews published within the last 5 years. Results: The incidence of proximal humerus fractures is increasing. It is a common osteoporotic fracture. Bone density is a predictor of reduction quality and can be readily assessed with anteroposterior views of the shoulder. Social independence is a predictor of outcome, whereas age is not. Many fractures are minimally displaced and respond acceptably to nonoperative management. Displaced and severe fractures are most frequently treated operatively with intramedullary nails, locking plates, percutaneous techniques, or arthroplasty. Discussion: Evidence from randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews is insufficient to recommend a treatment; however, most techniques have acceptable or good outcomes. Evaluation should include an assessment of the patient’s bone quality, social independence, and surgical risk factors. With internal fixation, special attention should be paid to medial comminution, varus angulation, and restoration of the calcar. With arthroplasty, attention should be paid to anatomic restoration of the tuberosities and proper placement of the prosthesis. Conclusion: A majority of minimally displaced fractures can be treated conservatively with early physical therapy. Treatment for displaced fractures should consider the patient’s level of independence, bone quality, and surgical risk factors. Fixation with percutaneous techniques, intramedullary nails, locking plates, and arthroplasty are all

  9. Advances in Imaging Approaches to Fracture Risk Evaluation

    Manhard, Mary Kate; Nyman, Jeffry S.; Does, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Fragility fractures are a growing problem worldwide, and current methods for diagnosing osteoporosis do not always identify individuals who require treatment to prevent a fracture and may misidentify those not a risk. Traditionally, fracture risk is assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, which provides measurements of areal bone mineral density (BMD) at sites prone to fracture. Recent advances in imaging show promise in adding new information that could improve the prediction of fracture risk in the clinic. As reviewed herein, advances in quantitative computed tomography (QCT) predict hip and vertebral body strength; high resolution HR-peripheral QCT (HR-pQCT) and micro-magnetic resonance imaging (μMRI) assess the micro-architecture of trabecular bone; quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measures the modulus or tissue stiffness of cortical bone; and quantitative ultra-short echo time MRI methods quantify the concentrations of bound water and pore water in cortical bone, which reflect a variety of mechanical properties of bone. Each of these technologies provides unique characteristics of bone and may improve fracture risk diagnoses and reduce prevalence of fractures by helping to guide treatment decisions. PMID:27816505

  10. Fracture mechanisms in multilayer phosphorene assemblies: from brittle to ductile.

    Liu, Ning; Hong, Jiawang; Zeng, Xiaowei; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2017-05-24

    The outstanding mechanical performance of nacre has stimulated numerous studies on the design of artificial nacres. Phosphorene, a new two-dimensional (2D) material, has a crystalline in-plane structure and non-bonded interaction between adjacent flakes. Therefore, multi-layer phosphorene assemblies (MLPs), in which phosphorene flakes are piled up in a staggered manner, may exhibit outstanding mechanical performance, especially exceptional toughness. Therefore, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the dependence of the mechanical properties on the overlap distance between adjacent phosphorene layers and the number of phosphorene flakes per layer. The results indicate that when the flake number is equal to 1, a transition of fracture patterns is observed by increasing the overlap distance, from a ductile failure controlled by interfacial friction to a brittle failure dominated by the breakage of covalent bonds inside phosphorene flakes. Moreover, the failure pattern can be tuned by changing the number of flakes in each phosphorene layer. The results imply that the ultimate strength follows a power law with the exponent -0.5 in terms of the flake number, which is in good agreement with our analytical model. Furthermore, the flake number in each phosphorene layer is optimized as 2 when the temperature is 1 K in order to potentially achieve both high toughness and strength. Moreover, our results regarding the relations between mechanical performance and overlap distance can be explained well using a shear-lag model. However, it should be pointed out that increasing the temperature of MLPs could cause the transition of fracture patterns from ductile to brittle. Therefore, the optimal flake number depends heavily on temperature to achieve both its outstanding strength and toughness. Overall, our findings unveil the fundamental mechanism at the nanoscale for MLPs as well as provide a method to design phosphorene-based structures with targeted properties

  11. Application of fracture mechanics to weldments; Bruchmechanische Bewertung von Schweissverbindungen

    Zerbst, U.; Kocak, M. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung; Huebner, P. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Weldments have been a major topic of engineering fracture mechanics research for many years as it shows up in the immense number of scientific papers published recently. Part of this generated knowledge has already been implemented in some industrial codes and standards. The focussing on weldments has its own reason in the utmost importance of this class of components in many industrial fields, but also in its susceptibility to the formation of defects during manufacturing and cracks in service, which promotes the danger of component failure. The present report is addressed to designers and material testers to provide updated information on the present state-of-the-art of fracture mechanics application to weldments. (orig.) [German] Schweissverbindungen bilden seit vielen Jahren einen Schwerpunkt der anwendungsnahen bruchmechanischen Forschung, was seinen Niederschlag in einer nahezu unuebersehbaren Fuelle an wissenschaftlichen Publikationen findet. Ein Teil der Ergebnisse hat bereits Eingang in industrienahe bruchmechanische Bewertungsvorschriften gefunden. Die Konzentration auf Schweissverbindungen hat ihre Ursache in der immensen Bedeutung dieser Bauteilklasse fuer viele Gebiete der Volkswirtschaft, aber auch in ihrer besonderen Anfaelligkeit zur Rissbildung in der Fertigung und im Betrieb und damit hinsichtlich der Gefahr von Bauteilversagen. Der vorliegende Beitrag wendet sich an Konstrukteure und Werkstoffpruefer, die einen Einblick in den gegenwaertigen Stand der Ingenieurbruchmechanik an Schweissverbindungen gewinnen wollen. (orig.)

  12. PSYCHIATRIC EVALUATION OF LIMB FRACTURE PATIENTS

    CHAUDHURY, S; JOHN, TR; KUMAR, A; SINGH, HARCHARAN

    2002-01-01

    The study included 70 consecutive patients with fracture of the lower and upper limbs each and an equal number of age and sex matched normal control subjects. All the subjects were screened using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST), Carroll Rating Scale for Depression (CRSD), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Impact of Events Scale (IES), Fatigue Scale (FS) and the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ). Probable “Psychiatric cases” identifi...

  13. Fracturing Fluid Leak-off for Deep Volcanic Rock in Zhungeer Basin: Mechanism and Control Method

    Huang Bo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The deep volcanic reservoir in Zhungeer Basin is buried in over 4000m depth, which is characterized by complex lithology (breccia, andesite, basalt, etc., high elastic modulus and massive natural fractures. During hydraulic fracturing, hydraulic fracture will propagate and natural fractures will be triggered by the increasing net pressure. However, the extension of fractures, especially natural fractures, would aggravate the leak-off effect of fracturing fluid, and consequently decrease the fracturing success rate. 4 out of 12 fracturing wells in the field have failed to add enough proppants due to fluid loss. In order to increase the success rate and efficiency of hydraulic fracturing for deep volcanic reservoir, based on theoretical and experimental method, the mechanism of fracturing fluid leak-off is deeply studied. We propose a dualistic proppant scheme and employ the fluid loss reducer to control the fluid leak-off in macro-fractures and micro-fractures respectively. The proposed technique remarkably improved the success rate in deep volcanic rock fracturing. It bears important theoretical value and practical significance to improve the hydraulic fracturing design for deep volcanic reservoir.

  14. CT for diagnosing fractures of the undersurface of the talus and mechanism of injury

    Okamoto, Hideaki; Shibata, Yoshimori; Nishi, Genzaburo; Tago, Kyoji; Tsuchiya, Daiji; Chiba, Takehiro; Okumura, Hisashi; Ikeda, Takeshi; Wada, Ikuo

    2000-01-01

    Talus fractures whose fracture lines extend to the subtalar joint, except fractures of the neck and the body of the talus, are defined as fractures of the lower portion of the talus. It is difficult to make a correctly diagnosis of inferior fractures of the talus by plain radiography or tomography alone. The author encountered 12 cases of inferior fractures of the talus between 1989 and 1997, and CT imaging in 2 directions, in the horizontal and frontal plane, was useful in making the diagnosis. The correct diagnosis rate was 100%, and differentiation of the site and extent of the fractures was possible. Based on the CT findings, the fractures were classified into 8 types (fractures of the lateral process of the talus, fractures of the medial tubercle, fractures of the posterior process, and combinations of the above, and comminuted fractures). The mechanism of the injuries was also investigated, and the fractures of the lateral process of the talus seemed to have been caused by excessive eversion force on the ankle joint, with the lateral process becoming trapped between the fibula and the calcaneus. Medial tubercle fractures also seemed to be caused by forcible inversion of the ankle, with the tip of the medial malleous impacting and the medial tubercle being trapped between it and the sustentaculum tali. The comminuted fractures seem to have been caused by axial compression added to various of external forces. (K.H.)

  15. CT for diagnosing fractures of the undersurface of the talus and mechanism of injury

    Okamoto, Hideaki; Shibata, Yoshimori; Nishi, Genzaburo; Tago, Kyoji; Tsuchiya, Daiji; Chiba, Takehiro; Okumura, Hisashi [Aichiken Koseiren Kainan Hospital, Yatomi (Japan); Ikeda, Takeshi; Wada, Ikuo

    2000-02-01

    Talus fractures whose fracture lines extend to the subtalar joint, except fractures of the neck and the body of the talus, are defined as fractures of the lower portion of the talus. It is difficult to make a correctly diagnosis of inferior fractures of the talus by plain radiography or tomography alone. The author encountered 12 cases of inferior fractures of the talus between 1989 and 1997, and CT imaging in 2 directions, in the horizontal and frontal plane, was useful in making the diagnosis. The correct diagnosis rate was 100%, and differentiation of the site and extent of the fractures was possible. Based on the CT findings, the fractures were classified into 8 types (fractures of the lateral process of the talus, fractures of the medial tubercle, fractures of the posterior process, and combinations of the above, and comminuted fractures). The mechanism of the injuries was also investigated, and the fractures of the lateral process of the talus seemed to have been caused by excessive eversion force on the ankle joint, with the lateral process becoming trapped between the fibula and the calcaneus. Medial tubercle fractures also seemed to be caused by forcible inversion of the ankle, with the tip of the medial malleous impacting and the medial tubercle being trapped between it and the sustentaculum tali. The comminuted fractures seem to have been caused by axial compression added to various of external forces. (K.H.)

  16. Fracture mechanics of piezoelectric solids with interface cracks

    Govorukha, Volodymyr; Loboda, Volodymyr; Lapusta, Yuri

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive study of cracks situated at the interface of two piezoelectric materials. It discusses different electric boundary conditions along the crack faces, in particular the cases of electrically permeable, impermeable, partially permeable, and conducting cracks. The book also elaborates on a new technique for the determination of electromechanical fields at the tips of interface cracks in finite sized piezoceramic bodies of arbitrary shape under different load types. It solves scientific problems of solid mechanics in connection with the investigation of electromechanical fields in piezoceramic bodies with interface cracks, and develops calculation models and solution methods for plane fracture mechanical problems for piecewise homogeneous piezoceramic bodies with cracks at the interfaces. It discusses the “open” crack model, which leads to a physically unrealistic oscillating singularity at the crack tips, and the contact zone model for in-plane straight interface cracks betw...

  17. Fractures of the distal radius in children: A retrospective evaluation

    Selma Yazıcı

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study designed to evaluate the resultsof treatment, closed reduction and percutaneous wires, ofthe distal radius fractures in children.Materials and methods: A retrospective analysis wascarried out in children aged between 5-15 years who presentedwith a displaced fracture of the distal radius to ourhospital. They were initially treated with closed reductionand cast immobilization. If the fractures redisplaced treatedby percutaneous Kirschner (K- wire with scope undera general anaesthesia.Results: Totally 104 patients, who have distal radius fractureswere treated by closed reduction and immobilizationin a plaster cast. 13 patient who have distal radiusfractures were treated by closed reduction under generalanaesthesia and fixed by percutaneous Kirschner (K-wire. Patients with impaired the alignment of the fracturein late period were usually completely displaced fractures.(n=5, 4,3%, in early period, completely displaced fractures(n=5, 4,3% are superior to partial displaced fractures(n=2, 1,7%.Conclusion: In our study, when children with distal radiusfracture first come, they were treated by closed reductionand immobilization in a plaster cast. We thought that inredisplaced fractures patients were suitable for the closedreduction with percutaneous wire treatment.

  18. A three-dimensional coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical model for deformable fractured geothermal systems

    Salimzadeh, Saeed; Paluszny, Adriana; Nick, Hamidreza M.

    2018-01-01

    A fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) finite element model is presented for fractured geothermal reservoirs. Fractures are modelled as surface discontinuities within a three-dimensional matrix. Non-isothermal flow through the rock matrix and fractures are defined and coupled to a mec......A fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) finite element model is presented for fractured geothermal reservoirs. Fractures are modelled as surface discontinuities within a three-dimensional matrix. Non-isothermal flow through the rock matrix and fractures are defined and coupled....... The model has been validated against several analytical solutions, and applied to study the effects of the deformable fractures on the injection of cold water in fractured geothermal systems. Results show that the creation of flow channelling due to the thermal volumetric contraction of the rock matrix...

  19. Comparisons of non-destructive examination standards in the framework of fracture mechanics approach

    Reale, S.; Corvi, A.

    1993-01-01

    One of the aims of the various Engineering Standards related to Non-destructive Examination (NDE) is to identify and limit some characteristics of defects in a structure, since the degree of damage of a structure can be associated with these defect characteristics. One way that the damage level can be evaluated is by means of Fracture Mechanics. The objective of the present paper is to compare and identify the differences in the flaw acceptance criteria of national NDE Standards so as to suggest some guidelines for a future common European Standard. This paper examines the Standards adopted in France (RCC-MR), Germany (DIN), Italy (ASME) and the UK (BSI). It concentrates on both ultrasonic and radiographic inspection methods. The flaw acceptance criteria in these standards relating to non-destructive tests performed on a component during manufacturing are compared and evaluated by the Fracture Mechanics CEGB R6 procedure. General guidelines and results supporting the significance of the Fracture Mechanics approach are given. (Author)

  20. NASGRO(registered trademark): Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Software

    Forman, Royce; Shivakumar, V.; Mettu, Sambi; Beek, Joachim; Williams, Leonard; Yeh, Feng; McClung, Craig; Cardinal, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASGRO, which is a fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analysis software package that is used to reduce risk of fracture in Space Shuttles. The contents include: 1) Consequences of Fracture; 2) NASA Fracture Control Requirements; 3) NASGRO Reduces Risk; 4) NASGRO Use Inside NASA; 5) NASGRO Components: Crack Growth Module; 6) NASGRO Components:Material Property Module; 7) Typical NASGRO analysis: Crack growth or component life calculation; and 8) NASGRO Sample Application: Orbiter feedline flowliner crack analysis.

  1. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Phillips, Dawn R.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan

    2010-01-01

    Fracture mechanics analyses of subsurface defects within the joggle regions of the Space Shuttle wing-leading-edge RCC panels are performed. A 2D plane strain idealized joggle finite element model is developed to study the fracture behavior of the panels for three distinct loading conditions - lift-off and ascent, on-orbit, and entry. For lift-off and ascent, an estimated bounding aerodynamic pressure load is used for the analyses, while for on-orbit and entry, thermo-mechanical analyses are performed using the extreme cold and hot temperatures experienced by the panels. In addition, a best estimate for the material stress-free temperature is used in the thermo-mechanical analyses. In the finite element models, the substrate and coating are modeled separately as two distinct materials. Subsurface defects are introduced at the coating-substrate interface and within the substrate. The objective of the fracture mechanics analyses is to evaluate the defect driving forces, which are characterized by the strain energy release rates, and determine if defects can become unstable for each of the loading conditions.

  2. Formation evaluation of fractured basement, Cambay Basin, India

    Gupta, Saurabh Datta; Farooqui, M Y; Chatterjee, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Unconventional reservoirs such as fractured basalts, shale gas and tight sand are currently playing an important role in producing a significant amount of hydrocarbon. The Deccan Trap basaltic rocks form the basement of the Cambay Basin, India, and hold commercially producible hydrocarbon. In this study two wells drilled through fractured basalts are chosen for evaluating the lithology, porosity and oil saturation of the reservoir sections. Well logs, such as gamma ray, high resolution resistivity, litho density, compensated neutron and elemental capture spectroscopy, have been used in cross-plotting techniques for lithology and mineral identification. Formation micro imagery log data have been analysed to quantify the fractures and porosity in the fractured reservoirs for a well in the south Ahmedabad block of the Cambay Basin. The results of the analysis of two wells are presented and discussed and they are found to be in good agreement with geological and production data. (paper)

  3. A CLINICAL STUDY ON SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF TIBIAL PLATEAU FRACTURES - FUNCTIONAL AND RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION

    Bhavani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tremendous advance in mechanization and fastness of travel have been accompanied by steep increase in number and severity of fractures and those of tibial plateau are no exception. Knee being one of the major weight bearing joints of the body, fractures around it will be of paramount importance. AIM OF STUDY: This study is to analyze the functional outcome of CRIF or ORIF with or without bone grafting in tibial plateau fractures in adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 30 cases of tibial plateau fractures treated by various modalities were studied from 1 - 8 - 2012 to 31 - 1 - 2014 at our institution and followed for a minimum of 6 months. Fractures were evaluated using Modified Rasmussen’s Clinical, Radiological grading system. RESULTS : The selected patients were evaluated thoroughly and after the relevant investigations, were taken for surgery. The fractures were classified as per the SCHATZKER’S types and operated accordingly with CRIF with Percutaneous cannulated cancellous screws, ORIF with buttress plate/LCP with or without bone grafting. Immobilization of fractures continued for 3 weeks by POP slab. Early range of motion was then started. Weight bearing up to 6 - 8 weeks was not allowed. The full weight bearing deferred until 12 weeks or complete fracture union . The knee range of motion was excellent to very good, gait and weight bearing after complete union was satisfactory, knee stiffness in 3 cases , wound dehiscence and infection in 1 case and non - union in none of our cases was noted. CONCLUSION: Functional outcome is better in operatively treated tibial plateau fractures in adults, because it gives excellent anatomical reduction and rigid fixation to restore articular congruity and early motion thereby preventing knee stiffness.

  4. Fracture toughness evaluation of small notched specimen in consideration of notch effect and loading rate

    Lee, Baik Woo; Kwon, Dong Il; Jang, Jae Il

    2000-01-01

    Notch effect and loading rate dependency on fracture toughness were considered when evaluating fracture toughness of small notched specimens using the instrumented impact test. Notch effect was analyzed into stress redistribution effect and stress relaxation with a viewpoint of stress triaxiality. Stress redistribution effect was corrected by introducing effective crack length, which was the sum of actual crack length and plastic zone size. Stress relaxation effect was also corrected using elastic stress concentration factor, which would decrease if plastic deformation occurred. As a result, corrected fracture toughness of the notched specimen was very consistent with the reference fracture toughness obtained using precracked specimen. In addition, limiting notch root radius, below which fracture toughness was independent of notch radius, was observed and discussed. Loading rate dependency on fracture toughness, which was obtained from the static three point bending test and the instrumented impact test, was also discussed with stress field in plastic zone ahead of a notch and fracture based on stress control mechanism. (author)

  5. Hydro-thermo-mechanical response of a fractured rock block

    Kelkar, S.; Zyvoloski, G.

    1990-01-01

    Hydro-thermo-mechanical effects in fractured rocks are important in many engineering applications and geophysical processes. Modeling these effects is made difficult by the fact that the governing equations are nonlinear and coupled, and the problems to be solved are three dimensional. In this paper we describe a numerical code developed for this purpose. The code is finite element based to allow for complicated geometries, and the time differencing is implicit, allowing for large time steps. The use of state-of-the-art equation solvers has resulted in a practical code. The code is capable of fully three dimensional simulations, however, in this paper we consider only the case of two dimensional heat and mass flow coupled to one dimensional deformation. Partial verification of the code is obtained by comparison with published semianalytical results. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the effects of matrix expansion, due to pore pressure and heating, on fracture opening due to fluid injection. 16 refs., 11 figs

  6. Wear resistance and fracture mechanics of WC-Co composites

    Kaytbay, Saleh; El-Hadek, Medhat

    2014-01-01

    Manufacturing of WC-Co composites using the electroless precipitation method at different sintering temperatures of 1 100, 1 250, 1 350 and 1 500 C was successfully achieved. The chemical composition of the investigated materials was 90 wt.% WC with 10 wt.% Co, and 80 wt.% WC with 20 wt.% Co. The specific density, densification, and Vickers microhardness measurements were found to increase with increased sintering temperature for both the WC-Co compositions. The composites of tungsten carbide with 10 wt.% Co had a higher specific density and Vickers microhardness measurements than those for the composites of tungsten carbide with 20 wt.% Co. Composites with WC-10 wt.% Co had better wear resistance. The stress-strain and transverse rupture strength increased monotonically with the increase in sintering temperatures, agreeing with the material hardness and wear resistance behavior. Fractographical scanning electron microscopy analysis of the fracture surface demonstrated a rough characteristic conical shape failure in the direction of the maximum shear stress. A proposed mechanism for the formation of the conical fracture surface under compression testing is presented. (orig.)

  7. Anterior process calcaneal fractures: a systematic evaluation of associated conditions

    Petrover, David [NYU Hospital for Joint Disease, Radiology Department, New York, NY (United States); Hopital Beaujon, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Schweitzer, Mark E. [NYU Hospital for Joint Disease, Radiology Department, New York, NY (United States); Laredo, J.D. [Hopital Lariboisiere, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France)

    2007-07-15

    The objective was to evaluate the association, by MRI, of anterior calcaneal process fractures with tarsal coalitions, ankle sprains, and bifurcate ligament abnormalities. A retrospective review of 1,479 foot and ankle MR images was performed, over a period of 5 years, for isolated anterior process fractures of the calcaneus. Fifteen 1.5-T MR examinations were systematically evaluated by two radiologists in consensus. Marrow edema patterns, presence of a calcaneonavicular coalition, as well as bifurcate and anterior talofibular ligaments, were evaluated. There were 15 fractures of the anterior calcaneal process with an incidence of 1%. The average patient age was 51 years (range 25-82). Twelve patients were women and 3 were men. The majority of the fractures (14 out of 15) presented as an edema pattern on T2-weighted images, either diffuse (9 out of 15), or vertical (5 out of 15). One case did not show marrow edema, but rather a hypointense line. Nine patients (60%) demonstrated calcaneonavicular coalition and anterior calcaneal process fracture. In 6 patients (50%) the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) was thickened. Three patients did not have axial images, and were classified as non-conclusive for the ATFL evaluation. The bifurcate ligament was thickened with hyperintense signal demonstrating a sprain in 9 out of 13 (69%). Only 2 patients (16.5%) had an anterior calcaneal process fracture without any associated abnormality. We believe that there is a probable association of anterior process fractures and calcaneonavicular coalitions. We also feel, based on our results and the prior literature that there is likely also an association with both ATFL injuries and bifurcate ligament injuries. (orig.)

  8. Anterior process calcaneal fractures: a systematic evaluation of associated conditions

    Petrover, David; Schweitzer, Mark E.; Laredo, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the association, by MRI, of anterior calcaneal process fractures with tarsal coalitions, ankle sprains, and bifurcate ligament abnormalities. A retrospective review of 1,479 foot and ankle MR images was performed, over a period of 5 years, for isolated anterior process fractures of the calcaneus. Fifteen 1.5-T MR examinations were systematically evaluated by two radiologists in consensus. Marrow edema patterns, presence of a calcaneonavicular coalition, as well as bifurcate and anterior talofibular ligaments, were evaluated. There were 15 fractures of the anterior calcaneal process with an incidence of 1%. The average patient age was 51 years (range 25-82). Twelve patients were women and 3 were men. The majority of the fractures (14 out of 15) presented as an edema pattern on T2-weighted images, either diffuse (9 out of 15), or vertical (5 out of 15). One case did not show marrow edema, but rather a hypointense line. Nine patients (60%) demonstrated calcaneonavicular coalition and anterior calcaneal process fracture. In 6 patients (50%) the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) was thickened. Three patients did not have axial images, and were classified as non-conclusive for the ATFL evaluation. The bifurcate ligament was thickened with hyperintense signal demonstrating a sprain in 9 out of 13 (69%). Only 2 patients (16.5%) had an anterior calcaneal process fracture without any associated abnormality. We believe that there is a probable association of anterior process fractures and calcaneonavicular coalitions. We also feel, based on our results and the prior literature that there is likely also an association with both ATFL injuries and bifurcate ligament injuries. (orig.)

  9. Reliability of Source Mechanisms for a Hydraulic Fracturing Dataset

    Eyre, T.; Van der Baan, M.

    2016-12-01

    Non-double-couple components have been inferred for induced seismicity due to fluid injection, yet these components are often poorly constrained due to the acquisition geometry. Likewise non-double-couple components in microseismic recordings are not uncommon. Microseismic source mechanisms provide an insight into the fracturing behaviour of a hydraulically stimulated reservoir. However, source inversion in a hydraulic fracturing environment is complicated by the likelihood of volumetric contributions to the source due to the presence of high pressure fluids, which greatly increases the possible solution space and therefore the non-uniqueness of the solutions. Microseismic data is usually recorded on either 2D surface or borehole arrays of sensors. In many cases, surface arrays appear to constrain source mechanisms with high shear components, whereas borehole arrays tend to constrain more variable mechanisms including those with high tensile components. The abilities of each geometry to constrain the true source mechanisms are therefore called into question.The ability to distinguish between shear and tensile source mechanisms with different acquisition geometries is investigated using synthetic data. For both inversions, both P- and S- wave amplitudes recorded on three component sensors need to be included to obtain reliable solutions. Surface arrays appear to give more reliable solutions due to a greater sampling of the focal sphere, but in reality tend to record signals with a low signal to noise ratio. Borehole arrays can produce acceptable results, however the reliability is much more affected by relative source-receiver locations and source orientation, with biases produced in many of the solutions. Therefore more care must be taken when interpreting results.These findings are taken into account when interpreting a microseismic dataset of 470 events recorded by two vertical borehole arrays monitoring a horizontal treatment well. Source locations and

  10. Fracture mechanics of hydroxyapatite single crystals under geometric confinement.

    Libonati, Flavia; Nair, Arun K; Vergani, Laura; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-04-01

    Geometric confinement to the nanoscale, a concept that refers to the characteristic dimensions of structural features of materials at this length scale, has been shown to control the mechanical behavior of many biological materials or their building blocks, and such effects have also been suggested to play a crucial role in enhancing the strength and toughness of bone. Here we study the effect of geometric confinement on the fracture mechanism of hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals that form the mineralized phase in bone. We report a series of molecular simulations of HAP crystals with an edge crack on the (001) plane under tensile loading, and we systematically vary the sample height whilst keeping the sample and the crack length constant. We find that by decreasing the sample height the stress concentration at the tip of the crack disappears for samples with a height smaller than 4.15nm, below which the material shows a different failure mode characterized by a more ductile mechanism with much larger failure strains, and the strength approaching that of a flaw-less crystal. This study directly confirms an earlier suggestion of a flaw-tolerant state that appears under geometric confinement and may explain the mechanical stability of the reinforcing HAP platelets in bone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nonlinear Fracture Mechanics and Plasticity of the Split Cylinder Test

    Olesen, John Forbes; Østergaard, Lennart; Stang, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    properties. This implies that the linear elastic interpretation of the ultimate splitting force in term of the uniaxial tensile strength of the material is only valid for special situations, e.g. for very large cylinders. Furthermore, the numerical analysis suggests that the split cylinder test is not well...... models are presented, a simple semi-analytical model based on analytical solutions for the crack propagation in a rectangular prismatic body, and a finite element model including plasticity in bulk material as well as crack propagation in interface elements. A numerical study applying these models...... demonstrates the influence of varying geometry or constitutive properties. For a split cylinder test in load control it is shown how the ultimate load is either plasticity dominated or fracture mechanics dominated. The transition between the two modes is related to changes in geometry or constitutive...

  12. Application of fracture-mechanics principles to austenitic steels

    Schwalbe, K.H.; Cornec, A.; Baustian, K.

    1996-01-01

    Recent experimental and analytical work mainly carried out at GKSS and TH Darmstadt is used to check the usefulness of fracture mechanics methods as developed for more conventional materials, such as ferritic steels and aluminium alloys. Finite element calculations serve for quantifying J validity limits; they are a function of constraint conditions and strain hardening properties. Crack growth studies show the ability of the J-integral, the modified J-integral, J(M), and of the crack tip opening displacement, CTOD delta(5), to generate unique, i.e. size-independent, R-curves. It is also shown that the delta(5)-type CTOD technique yields values close to the standardised CTOD. Finally, the Engineering Treatment Model is used to estimate delta(5) and J as driving force parameters. Special attention is given to the power law representation of actual stress/strain curves. (author)

  13. Evaluation of hot hardness, creep, fatigue and fracture properties of zirconia ceramics by an indentation technique

    Kutty, T.R.G.; Ganguly, C.; Upadhyaya, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    Zirconia ceramics have wide range engineering applications at room and elevated temperatures. For understanding the mechanical behaviour, the indentation technique was adapted for quick evaluation of hot hardness, creep, fatigue and fracture properties. A Vicker's diamond indentor with 10 N load was employed for hot hardness and creep measurement up to 1300 deg. The fatigue data were evaluated at room temperature by repeated indentation with a constant load (10-2500N) at the same location for a dwell time of 5s until it resulted in the formation of a lateral chip on the sample surface. Thus, the number of cycles for chip formation at a specific indentation load was obtained. The fracture toughness was evaluated at room temperature with a load of 300N using a Vicker's diamond indentor. The results of hot hardness, creep, fatigue, and fracture data ol 3Y-TZP and Mg-PSZ are discussed along with their microstructural features. (authors)

  14. Radioisotopic and Radiological Evaluation in Patient with Stress Fracture

    Ko, Kwang Seop; Kim, Jai Young; Kang, Sung Koo; Kim, So Yon; Lee, Gwon Jun

    1987-01-01

    The stress fracture is a disease caused by and abnormal stress to the normal bone with constant, repeated pull. Early detection of stress fracture plays an important role in treatment and prevention of its complication. Bone scintigraphy was performed to evaluate 18 patients with stress fracture of the lower extremities from May, 1985 to April, 1987, in the Department of Internal Medicine of National Police Hospital. The results were as follows: 1) Seventeen of the 18 cases showed positive bone scans at the initial study performed from 1 week to 5 months after the onset of symptom. 2) Ten of the 18 patients had findings of stress fracture at the initial X-ray film. Two out of 8 negative case revealed positive findings in the follow-up studies. 3) The bone scans in the 2 cases taken 5 months after the onset of symptom; the one showed only slightly increased radio uptake, the other showed no abnormal findings. In conclusion, bone scanning is a more sensitive indicator of early stress fracture than radiologic study, The healing phase is characterized by a gradual decline in radioactivity at the fracture site in concordance with subsidence of symptom.

  15. Effect of hydro mechanical coupling on natural fracture network formation in sedimentary basins

    Ouraga, Zady; Guy, Nicolas; Pouya, Amade

    2018-05-01

    In sedimentary basin context, numerous phenomena, depending on the geological time span, can result in natural fracture network formation. In this paper, fracture network and dynamic fracture spacing triggered by significant sedimentation rate are studied considering mode I fracture propagation using a coupled hydro-mechanical numerical methods. The focus is put on synthetic geological structure under a constant sedimentation rate on its top. This model contains vertical fracture network initially closed and homogeneously distributed. The fractures are modelled with cohesive zone model undergoing damage and the flow is described by Poiseuille's law. The effect of the behaviour of the rock is studied and the analysis leads to a pattern of fracture network and fracture spacing in the geological layer.

  16. Development of probabilistic fracture mechanics code PASCAL and user's manual

    Shibata, Katsuyuki; Onizawa, Kunio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Li, Yinsheng; Kato, Daisuke [Fuji Research Institute Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    As a part of the aging and structural integrity research for LWR components, a new PFM (Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics) code PASCAL (PFM Analysis of Structural Components in Aging LWR) has been developed since FY1996. This code evaluates the failure probability of an aged reactor pressure vessel subjected to transient loading such as PTS (Pressurized Thermal Shock). The development of the code has been aimed to improve the accuracy and reliability of analysis by introducing new analysis methodologies and algorithms considering the recent development in the fracture mechanics methodologies and computer performance. The code has some new functions in optimized sampling and cell dividing procedure in stratified Monte Carlo simulation, elastic-plastic fracture criterion of R6 method, extension analysis models in semi-elliptical crack, evaluation of effect of thermal annealing and etc. In addition, an input data generator of temperature and stress distribution time histories was also prepared in the code. Functions and performance of the code have been confirmed based on the verification analyses and some case studies on the influence parameters. The present phase of the development will be completed in FY2000. Thus this report provides the user's manual and theoretical background of the code. (author)

  17. Plastic fracture mechanics prediction of fracture instability in a circumferentially cracked pipe in bending - 1. J-integral analysis

    Zahoor, A.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1981-11-01

    A method of evaluating the J-integral for a circumferentially cracked pipe in bending is proposed. The method allows a J-resistance curve to be evaluated directly from the load-displacement record obtained in a pipe fracture experiment. It permits an analysis for fracture instability in a circumferential crack growth using a J-resistance curve and the tearing modulus parameter. The influence of the system compliance on fracture instability is discussed in conjunction with the latter application. The importance of using a J-resistance curve that is consistent with the type of constraint for a given application is emphasized. The possibility of a pipe fracture emanating from a stress corrosion crack in the heat-affected zones of girth-welds in Type 304 stainless steel pipes was investigated. The J-resistance curve was employed. A pipe fracture experiment was performed using a spring-loaded four-point bending system that simulated an 8.8-m long section of unsupported 102-mm-dia pipe. An initial through-wall crack of length equal to 104 mm was used. Fracture instability was predicted to occur between 15.2 and 22.1 mm of stable crack growth at each tip. In the actual experiment, the onset of fracture instability occurred beyond maximum load at an average stable crack growth of 11.7 to 19 mm at each tip. 24 refs.

  18. Plastic fracture mechanics prediction of fracture instability in a circumferentially cracked pipe in bending - 1. J-integral analysis

    Zahoor, A.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    A method of evaluating the J-integral for a circumferentially cracked pipe in bending is proposed. The method allows a J-resistance curve to be evaluated directly from the load-displacement record obtained in a pipe fracture experiment. It permits an analysis for fracture instability in a circumferential crack growth using a J-resistance curve and the tearing modulus parameter. The influence of the system compliance on fracture instability is discussed in conjunction with the latter application. The importance of using a J-resistance curve that is consistent with the type of constraint for a given application is emphasized. The possibility of a pipe fracture emanating from a stress corrosion crack in the heat-affected zones of girth-welds in Type 304 stainless steel pipes was investigated. The J-resistance curve was employed. A pipe fracture experiment was performed using a spring-loaded four-point bending system that simulated an 8.8-m long section of unsupported 102-mm-dia pipe. An initial through-wall crack of length equal to 104 mm was used. Fracture instability was predicted to occur between 15.2 and 22.1 mm of stable crack growth at each tip. In the actual experiment, the onset of fracture instability occurred beyond maximum load at an average stable crack growth of 11.7 to 19 mm at each tip. 24 refs

  19. The effect of multiaxial stress state on creep behavior and fracture mechanism of P92 steel

    Chang, Yuan; Xu, Hong, E-mail: xuhong@ncepu.edu.cn; Ni, Yongzhong; Lan, Xiang; Li, Hongyuan

    2015-06-11

    The creep experiments on plain and double U-typed notched specimens were conducted on P92 steel at 650 °C. The notch strengthening effect was found in the notched specimens. Fracture appearance observed by scanning electron microscopy revealed that dimpled fracture for relatively blunt notched specimen, and dimpled fracture doubled with intergranular brittle fracture for relatively sharp notched specimen, which meant that fracture mechanism of P92 steel altered due to the presence of the notch. Meanwhile, based on Norton–Bailey and Kachanov–Robotnov constitutive models, a modified model was proposed. Finite element simulations were carried out to investigate the effect of multiaxial stress state on the creep behavior, fracture mechanism and damage evolvement of P92 steel. The simulation results agreed well with the fracture behaviors observed experimentally.

  20. Effective Hydro-Mechanical Properties of Fluid-Saturated Fracture Networks

    Pollmann, N.; Vinci, C.; Renner, J.; Steeb, H.

    2015-12-01

    Consideration of hydro-mechanical processes is essential for the characterization of liquid-resources as well as for many engineering applications. Furthermore, the modeling of seismic waves in fractured porous media finds application not only in geophysical exploration but also reservoir management. Fractures exhibit high-aspect-ratio geometries, i.e. they constitute thin and long hydraulic conduits. Motivated by this peculiar geometry, the investigation of the hydro-mechanically coupled processes is performed by means of a hybrid-dimensional modeling approach. The effective material behavior of domains including complex fracture patterns in a porous rock is assessed by investigating the fluid pressure and the solid displacement of the skeleton saturated by compressible fluids. Classical balance equations are combined with a Poiseuille-type flow in the dimensionally reduced fracture. In the porous surrounding rock, the classical Biot-theory is applied. For simple geometries, our findings show that two main fluid-flow processes occur, leak-off from fractures to the surrounding rock and fracture flow within and between the connected fractures. The separation of critical frequencies of the two flow processes is not straightforward, in particular for systems containing a large number of fractures. Our aim is to model three dimensional hydro-mechanically coupled processes within complex fracture patterns and in particular determine the frequency-dependent attenuation characteristics. Furthermore, the effect of asperities of the fracture surfaces on the fracture stiffness and on the hydraulic conductivity will be added to the approach.

  1. Rheological Characteristics of Cement Grout and its Effect on Mechanical Properties of a Rock Fracture

    Liu, Quansheng; Lei, Guangfeng; Peng, Xingxin; Lu, Chaobo; Wei, Lai

    2018-02-01

    Grouting reinforcement, which has an obvious strengthening effect on fractured rock mass, has been widely used in various fields in geotechnical engineering. The rheological properties of grout will greatly affect its diffusion radius in rock fractures, and the water-cement ratio is an important factor in determining the grouting flow patterns. The relationship between shear stress and shear rate which could reflect the grout rheological properties, the effects of water-cement ratio, and temperature on the rheological properties of grouting was studied in the laboratory. Besides, a new method for producing fractured rock specimens was proposed and solved the problem of producing natural fractured rock specimens. To investigate the influences of grouting on mechanical properties of a rock fracture, the fractured rock specimens made using the new method were reinforced by grouting on the independent designed grouting platform, and then normal and tangential mechanical tests were carried out on fractured rock specimens. The results showed that the mechanical properties of fractured rock mass are significantly improved by grouting, the peak shear strength and residual strength of rock fractures are greatly improved, and the resistance to deformation is enhanced after grouting. Normal forces affect the tangential behavior of the rock fracture, and the tangential stress strength increases with normal forces. The strength and stability of fractured rock mass are increased by grouting reinforcement.

  2. Fracture propagation in sandstone and slate – Laboratory experiments, acoustic emissions and fracture mechanics

    Ferdinand Stoeckhert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fracturing of highly anisotropic rocks is a problem often encountered in the stimulation of unconventional hydrocarbon or geothermal reservoirs by hydraulic fracturing. Fracture propagation in isotropic material is well understood but strictly isotropic rocks are rarely found in nature. This study aims at the examination of fracture initiation and propagation processes in a highly anisotropic rock, specifically slate. We performed a series of tensile fracturing laboratory experiments under uniaxial as well as triaxial loading. Cubic specimens with edge lengths of 150 mm and a central borehole with a diameter of 13 mm were prepared from Fredeburg slate. An experiment using the rather isotropic Bebertal sandstone as a rather isotropic rock was also performed for comparison. Tensile fractures were generated using the sleeve fracturing technique, in which a polymer tube placed inside the borehole is pressurized to generate tensile fractures emanating from the borehole. In the uniaxial test series, the loading was varied in order to observe the transition from strength-dominated fracture propagation at low loading magnitudes to stress-dominated fracture propagation at high loading magnitudes.

  3. Mechanisms Underlying Stress Fracture and the Influence of Sex and Race/Ethnicity

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0652 TITLE: Mechanisms Underlying Stress Fracture and the Influence of Sex and Race/Ethnicity PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0652 Mechanisms Underlying Stress Fracture and the Influence of Sex and Race/Ethnicity 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...to stress fracture risk. In particular, in Study 1, we will perform advanced skeletal imaging along with gait-assessments in subjects with history of

  4. Multiscale Stochastic Fracture Mechanics of Composites Informed by In-situ XCT Tests

    2016-02-02

    interfacial fracture ) in CFRP was recently found in the fuselages of Dreamliner 787, and two types of cracks were found in the rib feet brackets...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0003 Multiscale Stochastic Fracture Mechanics of Composites Informed by In-situ XCT Tests Zhenjun Yang UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER...Multiscale Stochastic Fracture Mechanics of Composites Informed by In-situ XCT Tests 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER EOARD 12-2100 5b. GRANT NUMBER F8655-12-1

  5. From fracture mechanics to damage mechanics: how to model structural deterioration

    Nicolet, S.; Lorentz, E.; Barbier, G.

    1998-01-01

    Modelling of structural deteriorations of thermo-mechanical origin is highly enhanced when using damage mechanics. Indeed, the latter offers both a fine description of the material behaviour and an ability to deal with any loading conditions, moving away the current limits of fracture mechanics. But new difficulties can arise, depending on the examined problem: if forecasts of rack initiation are well mastered, the study of crack propagation remains more complex and needs sophisticated modelizations, which are nevertheless on the point of being well understood too. (authors)

  6. Fracture mechanics of polymer mortar made with recycled raw materials

    Marco Antonio Godoy Jurumenha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to show that industrial residues could be used in construction applications so that production costs as well as environmental protection can be improved. The fracture properties of polymer mortar manufactured with recycled materials are investigated to evaluate the materials behaviour to crack propagation. The residues used in this work were spent sand from foundry industry as aggregate, unsaturated polyester resin from polyethylene terephthalate (PET as matrix and polyester textile fibres from garment industry, producing an unique composite material fully from recycled components with low cost. The substitution of fresh by used foundry sand and the insertions of textile fibres contribute to a less brittle behaviour of polymer mortar.

  7. Evaluation of fracture behavior of SA-516 steel welds using acoustic emission analysis

    Na, Eui Gyun; Ono, Kanji; Lee, Dong Whan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the AE characteristics for the basemetal, PWHT (Post-Weld Heat Treatment) and weldment specimens of SA-516 steel during fracture testing. Four-point bending and AE tests were conducted simultaneously. AE signals were emitted in the process of plastic deformation. AE signal strength and amplitude of the weldment was the strongest, followed by PWHT specimen and basemetal. More AE signals were emitted from the weldment samples because of the oxides, and discontinuous mechanical properties. AE signal strength and amplitude for the basemetal or PWHT specimen decreased remarkably compared to the weldment because of lower strength. Pre-cracked specimens emitted even lower event counts than the corresponding blunt notched specimens. Dimple fracture from void coalescence mechanism is associated with low-level AE signal strength for the basemetal or PWHT. Tearing mode and dimple formation were shown on the fracture surfaces of the weldment, but only a small fraction produced detectable AE

  8. Implications of recent developments in the plastic fracture mechanics field to the PCI stress corrosion problem

    Smith, E.

    1980-01-01

    Fractographic observations on irradiated Zircaloy cladding stress corrosion fracture surfaces are considered against the background of recent developments in the plastic fracture mechanics field. Dimples have been observed on the fracture surfaces of failed cladding, even though the cracks in metallographic sections are tight, i.e., crack propagation is associated with a low crack tip opening angle. This result is interpreted as providing evidence for an environmentally assisted ductile mode of fracture. The presence of this fracture mode forms the basis of an argument, which adds further support for the view that power ramp stress corrosion cladding failures are caused by stress concentrations that produce stress gradients in the cladding. (orig.)

  9. Additional Stress And Fracture Mechanics Analyses Of Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Nozzles

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  10. Fracture-mechanical results of non-destructive testing - function, goals, methods

    Herter, K.H.; Kockelmann, H.; Schuler, X.; Waidele, H.

    2004-01-01

    Non-destructive testing provides data for fracture-mechanical analyses, e.g. defect size and orientation. On the other hand, fracture-mechanical analyses may help to define criteria for non-destructive testing, e.g. sensitivity, inspection intervals and inspection sites. The criteria applied differ as a function of the safety relevance of a component. (orig.) [de

  11. Fracture toughness evaluation using circumferential notched tensile specimens by the tensile test and ANSYS software

    Meydanlik, N. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Trakya University, Edirne (Turkey)

    2013-07-01

    Fracture toughness (K{sub Ic} ) is the most important parameter that defines mechanical behaviour of the materials using machine design. Since, fracture tests are both difficult and time consuming, the researchers have been investigating for the easier evaluation of K{sub Ic} for many years. In this work; K{sub Ic} values have been obtained by using ANSYS software based on the experimental values evaluated in the previous studies. It was shown that there is no significant difference between the experimental ones and the ones obtained by ANSYS. This procedure can provide an important advantage on obtaining of the K{sub IC} values. Key words: Fracture toughness (K{sub Ic} ), circumferential notched tensile specimens, ANSYS.

  12. Mechanical test and fractal analysis on anisotropic fracture of cortical bone

    Yin, Dagang [State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Chen, Bin, E-mail: bchen@cqu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Ye, Wei [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Gou, Jihua [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Fan, Jinghong [Division of Mechanical Engineering, Alfred University, Alfred, NY 14802 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The mechanical properties of the cortical bone of fresh bovine femora along three different directions are tested through four-point bending experiments. • SEM observation shows that the roughness of the fracture surfaces of the three different directions of the bone are remarkably different. • The fractal dimensions of the different fracture surfaces of the bone are calculated by box-counting method in MATLAB. • The fracture energies of the different fracture directions are calculated based on their fractal models. - Abstract: The mechanical properties of the cortical bone of fresh bovine femora along three different directions are tested through four-point bending experiments. It is indicated that the fracture energy along the transversal direction of the bone is distinctly larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture surfaces of the three different directions are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is shown that the roughness of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is obviously larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. It is also revealed that the osteons in the bone are perpendicular to the fracture surface of the transversal direction and parallel to the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. Based on these experimental results, the fractal dimensions of the fracture surfaces of different directions are calculated by box-counting method in MATLAB. The calculated results show that the fractal dimension of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture energies of different directions are also calculated based on their fractal models. It is denoted that the fracture energy of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The calculated results are in

  13. Mechanical test and fractal analysis on anisotropic fracture of cortical bone

    Yin, Dagang; Chen, Bin; Ye, Wei; Gou, Jihua; Fan, Jinghong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The mechanical properties of the cortical bone of fresh bovine femora along three different directions are tested through four-point bending experiments. • SEM observation shows that the roughness of the fracture surfaces of the three different directions of the bone are remarkably different. • The fractal dimensions of the different fracture surfaces of the bone are calculated by box-counting method in MATLAB. • The fracture energies of the different fracture directions are calculated based on their fractal models. - Abstract: The mechanical properties of the cortical bone of fresh bovine femora along three different directions are tested through four-point bending experiments. It is indicated that the fracture energy along the transversal direction of the bone is distinctly larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture surfaces of the three different directions are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is shown that the roughness of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is obviously larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. It is also revealed that the osteons in the bone are perpendicular to the fracture surface of the transversal direction and parallel to the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. Based on these experimental results, the fractal dimensions of the fracture surfaces of different directions are calculated by box-counting method in MATLAB. The calculated results show that the fractal dimension of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture energies of different directions are also calculated based on their fractal models. It is denoted that the fracture energy of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The calculated results are in

  14. Undercut tolerances in industry from a fracture mechanic perspective

    Steimbreger Ceferino

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue is an important damage mechanism that particularly affects welded components, since they are likely to present residual stresses, inhomogeneities and stress raisers. Assessment of cyclic load effects on welds has concerned both industries and scientist for decades; unexpected failure must be prevented and at the same time, structures must withstand design loads with minimum requirements of material. All these facts together with economic issues have lead to the creation of normative that rule designing and construction of welded components. Particularly, toe undercuts are generally found in large structures, and large scatter and disagreement exists towards their significance and effects. Documents usually limit only their depth without considering radius, width or length, and there is currently no explanation to that fact. Understanding the damaging process will also help to set less conservative tolerances, with consequent cost reduction due to less demanding inspection. The present paper deals with a fracture mechanic approach that uses the Resistance Curve concept to predict fatigue limit of welded components with undercuts. Results revealed that depth is the most influencing variable, and it can be used as the limiting parameter in design regulations. Moreover, good correlation was obtained with FAT values normally assigned to this kind of defect.

  15. Hydrogen embrittlement of titanium tested with fracture mechanics specimens

    Aho-Mantila, I.; Rahko, P.

    1990-11-01

    Titanium is one of the possible canister materials for spent nuclear fuel. The aim of this study is to determine whether the hydrogen embrittlement of titanium could be a possible deterioration mechanism of titanium canisters. This experimental study was preceded by a literature review and an experimental study on crack nucleation. Tests in this study were carried out with hydrogen charged fracture mechanics specimens. The studied hydrogen contents were as received, 100 ppm, 200 ppm, 500 ppm and 700 ppm and the types of the studied titanium were ASTM Grades 2 and 12. Test methods were slow tensile test (0.027 mm/h) and fatigue test (stress ratio 0.7 or 0.8 and frequency 5 Hz). According to the literature titanium may be embrittled by hydrogen at slow strain rates and cracking may occur under sustained load. In this study no evidence of hydrogen embrittlement was noticed in slow strain rate tension with bulk hydrogen contents up to 700 ppm. The fatigue tests of titanium Grades 2 and 12 containing 700 ppm hydrogen showed even slower crack growth compared to the as received condition. Very high hydrogen contents well in eccess of 700 ppm on the surface of titanium can, however, facilitate surface crack nucleation and crack growth, as shown in the previous study

  16. Evaluation of material fracture energy by its heat content

    Frolov, G.A.; Pasichnyj, V.V.; Polezhaev, Yu.V.; Frolov, A.A.; Choba, A.V.

    1986-01-01

    Based on published and experimental data it is shown that there is a simple relationship between the heat of evaporation and heat content. This allows in some instances the evaluation of a rate of material fracture by its content. Experimental and theoretical data for quartz glass ceramics, and glass-reinforced plastic are presented

  17. Long-term cumulative survival and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos Implants: focus on the abutment neck fractures.

    Shim, Hye Won; Yang, Byoung-Eun

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the cumulative survival rate (CSR) and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos® implants. This was a retrospective clinical study that analyzed 450 single Ankylos® implants installed in 275 patients between December 2005 and December 2012. The main outcomes were survival results CSR and implant failure) and mechanical complications (screw loosening, fracture, and cumulative fracture rate [CFR]). The main outcomes were analyzed according to age, sex, implant length or diameter, bone graft, arch, and position. The 8-year CSR was 96.9%. Thirteen (2.9%) implants failed because of early osseointegration failure in 3, marginal bone loss in 6, and abutment fracture in 4. Screw loosening occurred in 10 implants (2.2%), and 10 abutment fractures occurred. All abutment fractures were located in the neck, and concurrent screw fractures were observed. The CSR and rate of screw loosening did not differ significantly according to factors. The CFR was higher in middle-aged patients (5.3% vs 0.0% in younger and older patients); for teeth in a molar position (5.8% vs 0.0% for premolar or 1.1% for anterior position); and for larger-diameter implants (4.5% for 4.5 mm and 6.7% for 5.5 mm diameter vs 0.5% for 3.5 mm diameter) (all Pabutment fractures (2.2%) were observed and some fractures resulted in implant failures. Middle-aged patients, the molar position, and a large implant diameter were associated with a high incidence of abutment fracture.

  18. Implementation of nondestructive testing and mechanical performance approaches to assess low temperature fracture properties of asphalt binders

    Salman Hakimzadeh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, three different asphalt binders were studied to assess their fracture behavior at low temperatures. Fracture properties of asphalt materials were obtained through conducting the compact tension [C(T] and indirect tensile [ID(T] strength tests. Mechanical fracture tests were followed by performing acoustic emissions test to determine the “embrittlement temperature” of binders which was used in evaluation of thermally induced microdamages in binders. Results showed that both nondestructive and mechanical testing approaches could successfully capture low-temperature cracking behavior of asphalt materials. It was also observed that using GTR as the binder modifier significantly improved thermal cracking resistance of PG64-22 binder. The overall trends of AE test results were consistent with those of mechanical tests. Keywords: Thermal cracking, Indirect tensile strength test, Compact tension test, Nondestructive approach, Acoustic emission test, Embrittlement temperature

  19. Techniques developed to evaluate the fracture toughness offast breeder reactor duct

    Huang, F.H.; Wire, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    Large changes in strength and ductility of metals after irradiation are known to occur. The fracture toughness of irradiated metals, which is related to the combined strength and ductility of a material, may be significantly reduced and the potential for unstable crack extension increased. Therefore, the resistance of cladding and duct materials to fracture after exposure to fast neutron environments is of concern. Existing Type 316 stainless steel irradiated ducts are relatively thin and since this material retains substantial ductility, even after irradiation, the fracture behavior of the duct material cannot be analyzed by linear elastic fracture mechanics techniques. Instead, the multispecimen R-curve method and J-integral analysis were used to develop an experimental approach to evaluate the fracture toughness of thin breeder reactor duct materials irradiated at elevated temperatures. Alloy A-286 was chosen for these experiments because the alloy exhibits elastic/plastic behavior and the fracture toughness data of thicker (12 mm) specimens were available for comparison. Technical problems associated with specimen buckling and remote handling were treated in this work. The results are discussed in terms of thickness criterion for plane strain

  20. Fracture properties evaluation of stainless steel piping for LBB applications

    Kim, Y.J.; Seok, C.S.; Chang, Y.S.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the material properties of SA312 TP316 and SA312 TP304 stainless steels and their associated welds manufactured for shutdown cooling line and safety injection line of nuclear generating stations. A total of 82 tensile tests and 58 fracture toughness tests on specimens taken from actual pipes were performed and the effect of various parameters such as the pipe size, the specimen orientation, the test temperature and the welding procedure on the material properties are discussed. Test results show that the effect of the test temperature on the fracture toughness was significant while the effects of the pipe size and the specimen orientation on the fracture toughness were negligible. The material properties of the GTAW weld metal was in general higher than those of the base metal

  1. Fracture properties evaluation of stainless steel piping for LBB applications

    Kim, Y.J.; Seok, C.S.; Chang, Y.S. [Sung Kyun Kwan Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the material properties of SA312 TP316 and SA312 TP304 stainless steels and their associated welds manufactured for shutdown cooling line and safety injection line of nuclear generating stations. A total of 82 tensile tests and 58 fracture toughness tests on specimens taken from actual pipes were performed and the effect of various parameters such as the pipe size, the specimen orientation, the test temperature and the welding procedure on the material properties are discussed. Test results show that the effect of the test temperature on the fracture toughness was significant while the effects of the pipe size and the specimen orientation on the fracture toughness were negligible. The material properties of the GTAW weld metal was in general higher than those of the base metal.

  2. An investigation of the mechanical and hydrologic behavior of tuff fractures under saturated conditions

    Voss, C.F.; Shotwell, L.R.

    1990-04-01

    The mechanical and hydrologic behavior of natural fractures in a partially welded tuff rock were investigated. Tuff cores, each containing part of the same natural fracture oriented subparallel to the core axis, were subjected a range of stress and hydraulic gradients while simultaneously monitoring changes in the fracture aperture and volumetric flow rate. The fractures were tested in three configurations: intact, mated, and offset. Fracture deformation was nonlinear over the stress range tested with permanent deformation and hysteresis occurring with each loading cycle. The offset samples had larger permanent deformation and significantly reduced normal stiffness at lower stress levels. The cubic flow law appears to be valid for the relatively undisturbed tuff fractures at the scale tested. The cubic law did not explain the observed hydraulic behavior of the offset fractures. 6 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Dependence of mechanical characteristics from composition and structure and optimization of mechanical fracture energy of polymer composite material based on high-molecular rubbers

    E. Nurullaev

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available By means of numerical experiment the authors investigate dependence of conventional rupturing stress and mechanical fracture energy at uniaxial tension from fractional composition of dispersed filler, plasticizer volume fraction in polymer binder, effective density of transverse bonds, applied to development of covering for different purposes and with advanced service life in temperature range from 223 to 323 K. They compare mechanical characteristics of polymer composite materials (PCMs based on high- and low-molecular rubbers. It was shown that rupturing stress of high-molecular rubber-based PCM is of a higher magnitude than the stress of low-molecular rubber-based one at almost invariable rupturing deformation. Numerical simulation by variation of composition parameters and molecular structure enables evaluation of its maximum fracture energy which is 1000 times higher than mechanical fracture energy of similar composites based on low-molecular rubbers.

  4. Comparison between Visa-II and OCA-P for probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis focusing on analysis method

    Hirano, M.; Watanabe, N.; Tatewaki, I.; Akiba, H.

    1995-01-01

    Probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analyses have been widely applied to evaluate the failure probabilities of PWR reactor pressure vessels subjected to pressurized thermal shock. In this study, a comparison between the VISA-II and OCA-P codes for PFM analyses was performed to clarify the differences in the numerical processes. For this purpose, the benchmark problems proposed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Electric Power Research Institute were applied. It is also discussed the algorithm to evaluate the deviations from the means of RT NDT and fracture toughness, and the numerical treatment of initial flaw depth as the major differences in these codes. 4 refs., 9 figs

  5. Study of occurrence, demography and pathomorphology of ankle and foot fractures and evaluation of the treatment outcome of calcaneal fractures

    Sarfraz, A.H.; Masood, F.

    2014-01-01

    This study highlights which injury has greatest burden, how frequent are the injuries of foot and ankle areas, which is an extremely neglected specialty in orthopedics and also the importance of proper diagnosis, classification of fractures, appropriate pre-operative planning and timely conservative as well as surgical intervention of ankle and foot fractures that resulted in a satisfactory outcome Despite the fact, foot and ankle is the most important locomotor unit of our lower limb, there have been few studies addressing the problem and treatment outcome of such fractures. Objective: To determine the occurrence, demography and pathomorphology of ankle and foot fractures, also evaluation of treatment outcome of calcaneal fractures. Methodology: This was a longitudinal interventional study which dealt with acute traumatic ankle and foot fracture patients coming to Accident and Emergency Department of MHL, DOST unit 1, with inclusion and exclusion criteria clearly defined. Results: Total 100 patients were included in the study. Mean age of patients was 35.71+-13.60 years. Minimum age of patients was 14 and maximum age of patients was 70 years respectively. Gender distribution of patients shows that 15 patients were female and the remaining 85 patients were male. Male patients were greater in number as compared to female patients ie. M: F, 6:1. Mechanism of the injury showed that there were 48 patients who suffered from RTA , 37 patients had trauma due to fall from height, 6 patients had industrial injuries, 5 patients had Fire Arm Injury, and 2 patients had injuries due to domestic activity, 1 had trauma due to sports activity and 1 had injury due to agricultural work. There were 41 patients with fractures of calcaneum and out of which 5 had bilateral fracture calcaneum. They were classified according to CT based Sanders classification. Out of these 22 patients were of Sanders type III, 12 patients were of Sander type II, 5 patients were of Sander type IV, 2

  6. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    Li Songjie; Zhang Zuogui; Akiyama, Eiji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki; Zhang Boping

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  7. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    Li Songjie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China); Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Zuogui [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Akiyama, Eiji [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: AKIYAMA.Eiji@nims.go.jp; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki [Structural Metals Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhang Boping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, No. 30 Xueyuan Road, Hidian Zone, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  8. Investigation of translaminar fracture in fibrereinforced composite laminates---applicability of linear elastic fracture mechanics and cohesive-zone model

    Hou, Fang

    With the extensive application of fiber-reinforced composite laminates in industry, research on the fracture mechanisms of this type of materials have drawn more and more attentions. A variety of fracture theories and models have been developed. Among them, the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and cohesive-zone model (CZM) are two widely-accepted fracture models, which have already shown applicability in the fracture analysis of fiber-reinforced composite laminates. However, there remain challenges which prevent further applications of the two fracture models, such as the experimental measurement of fracture resistance. This dissertation primarily focused on the study of the applicability of LEFM and CZM for the fracture analysis of translaminar fracture in fibre-reinforced composite laminates. The research for each fracture model consisted of two sections: the analytical characterization of crack-tip fields and the experimental measurement of fracture resistance parameters. In the study of LEFM, an experimental investigation based on full-field crack-tip displacement measurements was carried out as a way to characterize the subcritical and steady-state crack advances in translaminar fracture of fiber-reinforced composite laminates. Here, the fiber-reinforced composite laminates were approximated as anisotropic solids. The experimental investigation relied on the LEFM theory with a modification with respect to the material anisotropy. Firstly, the full-field crack-tip displacement fields were measured by Digital Image Correlation (DIC). Then two methods, separately based on the stress intensity approach and the energy approach, were developed to measure the crack-tip field parameters from crack-tip displacement fields. The studied crack-tip field parameters included the stress intensity factor, energy release rate and effective crack length. Moreover, the crack-growth resistance curves (R-curves) were constructed with the measured crack-tip field parameters

  9. Isolated posterior malleolus fracture: A rare injury mechanism ...

    Sprain of the ankle is undoubtedly a common injury during athletic activity, and the sprain can be also associated with fracture of the ankle. Isolated posterior malleolus fracture is a very rare condition, which is usually missed. Here, we are presenting a 37 years old female patient, who suffered injury secondary pressing on ...

  10. Testing smooth and notched samples for identification of brittle material fracture mechanism

    Barinov, S.M.; Ivanov, V.S.

    1987-01-01

    Mechanical tests of cermet made of LaCrO 3 and Cr powder mixture in 3:2 mass ratio were conducted in LaCrO 3 -Cr system. Powder mixtures were exposed to static pressing and sintering (sintered cermets) or to high-speed pressing with following thermal treatment (high-speed pressing cermets). It is shown, that nonlinear deformation strength at deformation of brittle material smooth and notched samples allows to evaluate properly correlation of microplasticity and microcracking at brittle powder materials fracture

  11. Use of adjoint methods in the probabilistic finite element approach to fracture mechanics

    Liu, Wing Kam; Besterfield, Glen; Lawrence, Mark; Belytschko, Ted

    1988-01-01

    The adjoint method approach to probabilistic finite element methods (PFEM) is presented. When the number of objective functions is small compared to the number of random variables, the adjoint method is far superior to the direct method in evaluating the objective function derivatives with respect to the random variables. The PFEM is extended to probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) using an element which has the near crack-tip singular strain field embedded. Since only two objective functions (i.e., mode I and II stress intensity factors) are needed for PFM, the adjoint method is well suited.

  12. Spartan Release Engagement Mechanism (REM) stress and fracture analysis

    Marlowe, D. S.; West, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The revised stress and fracture analysis of the Spartan REM hardware for current load conditions and mass properties is presented. The stress analysis was performed using a NASTRAN math model of the Spartan REM adapter, base, and payload. Appendix A contains the material properties, loads, and stress analysis of the hardware. The computer output and model description are in Appendix B. Factors of safety used in the stress analysis were 1.4 on tested items and 2.0 on all other items. Fracture analysis of the items considered fracture critical was accomplished using the MSFC Crack Growth Analysis code. Loads and stresses were obtaind from the stress analysis. The fracture analysis notes are located in Appendix A and the computer output in Appendix B. All items analyzed met design and fracture criteria.

  13. Clinical diagnostic evaluation for scaphoid fractures: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Mallee, Wouter H.; Henny, Erik P.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Kamminga, Sjoerd P.; van Enst, Wynanda A.; Kloen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    To provide an overview of available clinical evaluation tests for scaphoid fractures and to compare their diagnostic accuracies. PWe performed a systematic review of all studies assessing diagnostic characteristics of clinical evaluation in scaphoid fractures by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane,

  14. Sandia National Laboratories cask drop test programme: a demonstration of fracture mechanics principles for the prevention of brittle fracture

    McConnell, P.; Sorenson, K.B.

    1995-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories recently completed a cask drop test programme. The aims of the programme were (1) to demonstrate the applicability of a fracture mechanics-based methodology for ensuring cask integrity, and (2) to assess the viability of using a ferritic materials for cask containment. The programme consisted of four phases: (i) materials characterisation; (ii) non-destructive examination of the cask; (iii) finite element analyses of the drop events; and (iv) a series of drop tests of a ductile iron cask. The first three phases of the programme provided information for fracture mechanics analyses and predictions for the drop test phase. The drop tests were nominally based upon the IAEA 9 m drop height hypothetical accident scenario although one drop test was from 18 m. All tests were performed in the side drop orientation at a temperature of -29 o C. A circumferential, mid-axis flaw was introduced into the cask body for each drop test. Flaw depth ranged from 19 to 76 mm. Steel saddles were welded to the side wall of the cask to enhance the stresses imposed upon the cask in the region of the introduced flaw. The programme demonstrated the applicability of a fracture mechanics methodology for predicting the conditions under which brittle fracture may occur and thereby the utility of fracture mechanics design for ensuring cask structural integrity by ensuring an appropriate margin of safety. Positive assessments of ductile iron for cask containment and the quality of the casting process for producing ductile iron casks were made. The results of this programme have provided data to support IAEA efforts to develop brittle fracture acceptance criteria for cask containment. (author)

  15. Defect forces, defect couples and path integrals in fracture mechanics

    Roche, R.L.

    1979-07-01

    In this work, it is shown that the path integrals can be introduced without any reference to the material behavior. The method is based on the definition in a continuous medium of a set of vectors and couples having the dimension of a force or a moment. More precisely, definitions are given of volume defect forces, surface defect forces, volume defect couples, and surface defect couples. This is done with the help of the stress working variation of a particule moving through the solid. The most important result is: the resultant of all the defect forces included in a volume V is the J integral on the surface surrounding V and the moment resultant is the L integral. So these integrals are defined without any assumption on the material constitutive equation. Another result is the material form of the virtual work principle - defect forces are acting like conventional forces in the conventional principles of virtual work. This lead to the introduction of the energy momentum tensor and of the associated couple stress. Application of this method is made to fracture mechanics in studying the defect forces distribution around a crack [fr

  16. Probalistic Finite Elements (PFEM) structural dynamics and fracture mechanics

    Liu, Wing-Kam; Belytschko, Ted; Mani, A.; Besterfield, G.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop computationally efficient methodologies for assessing the effects of randomness in loads, material properties, and other aspects of a problem by a finite element analysis. The resulting group of methods is called probabilistic finite elements (PFEM). The overall objective of this work is to develop methodologies whereby the lifetime of a component can be predicted, accounting for the variability in the material and geometry of the component, the loads, and other aspects of the environment; and the range of response expected in a particular scenario can be presented to the analyst in addition to the response itself. Emphasis has been placed on methods which are not statistical in character; that is, they do not involve Monte Carlo simulations. The reason for this choice of direction is that Monte Carlo simulations of complex nonlinear response require a tremendous amount of computation. The focus of efforts so far has been on nonlinear structural dynamics. However, in the continuation of this project, emphasis will be shifted to probabilistic fracture mechanics so that the effect of randomness in crack geometry and material properties can be studied interactively with the effect of random load and environment.

  17. Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Interface Crack Problems - A Review

    Krueger, Ronald; Shivakumar, Kunigal; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in fracture mechanics analyses of the interfacial crack problem are reviewed. The intent of the review is to renew the awareness of the oscillatory singularity at the crack tip of a bimaterial interface and the problems that occur when calculating mode mixity using numerical methods such as the finite element method in conjunction with the virtual crack closure technique. Established approaches to overcome the nonconvergence issue of the individual mode strain energy release rates are reviewed. In the recent literature many attempts to overcome the nonconvergence issue have been developed. Among the many approaches found only a few methods hold the promise of providing practical solutions. These are the resin interlayer method, the method that chooses the crack tip element size greater than the oscillation zone, the crack tip element method that is based on plate theory and the crack surface displacement extrapolation method. Each of the methods is validated on a very limited set of simple interface crack problems. However, their utility for a wide range of interfacial crack problems is yet to be established.

  18. A calculational round robin in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics

    Larsson, L.H.

    1983-01-01

    Eighteen organisations participated in this elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) numerical analysis round robin which treated the same three-point bend problem as a similar round robin conducted by ASTM four years earlier. The work involved the calculation of overall deformation, J, CTOD and crack profile using plane strain elastic-plastic finite element analysis for a monotonically increasing load up to a maximum deformation which was far beyond the elastic regime. It was found that all of the elastic solutions were accurate to within a few per cent. In the elastic-plastic regime, however, there was a large scatter of the results, increasing with increasing plastic deformation and roughly of the same order as in the ASTM round robin which contained ten solutions. No significant progress has taken place in the state of the art of numerical EPFM analysis over the four-year interval. The reasons for this scatter and tentative conclusions on the most suitable numerical analysis methods in EPFM are discussed. (author)

  19. In situ grain fracture mechanics during uniaxial compaction of granular solids

    Hurley, R. C.; Lind, J.; Pagan, D. C.; Akin, M. C.; Herbold, E. B.

    2018-03-01

    Grain fracture and crushing are known to influence the macroscopic mechanical behavior of granular materials and be influenced by factors such as grain composition, morphology, and microstructure. In this paper, we investigate grain fracture and crushing by combining synchrotron x-ray computed tomography and three-dimensional x-ray diffraction to study two granular samples undergoing uniaxial compaction. Our measurements provide details of grain kinematics, contacts, average intra-granular stresses, inter-particle forces, and intra-grain crystal and fracture plane orientations. Our analyses elucidate the complex nature of fracture and crushing, showing that: (1) the average stress states of grains prior to fracture vary widely in their relation to global and local trends; (2) fractured grains experience inter-particle forces and stored energies that are statistically higher than intact grains prior to fracture; (3) fracture plane orientations are primarily controlled by average intra-granular stress and contact fabric rather than the orientation of the crystal lattice; (4) the creation of new surfaces during fracture accounts for a very small portion of the energy dissipated during compaction; (5) mixing brittle and ductile grain materials alters the grain-scale fracture response. The results highlight an application of combined x-ray measurements for non-destructive in situ analysis of granular solids and provide details about grain fracture that have important implications for theory and modeling.

  20. Fracturing mechanics before valve-in-valve therapy of small aortic bioprosthetic heart valves.

    Johansen, Peter; Engholt, Henrik; Tang, Mariann; Nybo, Rasmus F; Rasmussen, Per D; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik

    2017-10-13

    Patients with degraded bioprosthetic heart valves (BHV) who are not candidates for valve replacement may benefit from transcatheter valve-in-valve (VIV) therapy. However, in smaller-sized surgical BHV the resultant orifice may become too narrow. To overcome this, the valve frame can be fractured by a high-pressure balloon prior to VIV. However, knowledge on fracture pressures and mechanics are prerequisites. The aim of this study was to identify the fracture pressures needed in BHV, and to describe the fracture mechanics. Commonly used BHV of small sizes were mounted on a high-pressure balloon situated in a biplane fluoroscopic system with a high-speed camera. The instant of fracture was captured along with the balloon pressure. The valves were inspected for material protrusion and later dissected for fracture zone investigation and description. The valves with a polymer frame fractured at a lower pressure (8-10 atm) than those with a metal stent (19-26 atm). None of the fractured valves had elements protruding. VIV procedures in small-sized BHV may be performed after prior fracture of the valve frame by high-pressure balloon dilatation. This study provides tentative guidelines for expected balloon sizes and pressures for valve fracturing.

  1. J-integral evaluation and stability analysis in the unstable ductile fracture

    Miyoshi, Toshiro; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Shiratori, Masaki.

    1984-01-01

    Concerning unstable ductile fracture, which is an important problem on the structural stability of line pipes, nuclear reactor piping and so on, the research on fracture mechanics parameters which control the beginning of the stable growth and unstable growth of cracks attracts interest. At present, as the parameters, the T-modulus based on J-integral crack tip opening angle, crack opening angle averaged over crack developing part, plastic work coefficient and so on have been proposed. The research on the effectiveness and inter-relation of these parameters is divided into generation phase and application phase, and by these researches, it was reported that all T-modulus, CTOA and COA took almost constant values in relation to crack development, except initial transition period. In order to decide which parameter is most appropriate, the detailed analysis is required. In this study, the analysis of unstable ductile fracture of a central crack test piece and a small tensile test piece was carried out by finite element method, and the evaluation of J-integral in relation to crack development, J-integral resistance value when COA is assumed to be a constant, the form of an unstable fracture occurring point and the compliance dependence were examined. The method of analysis, the evaluation of J-integral, J-integral resistance value, unstable fracture occurring point and stability diagram are described. (Kako, I.)

  2. Proceedings of the Joint IAEA/CSNI Specialists' Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing

    1993-10-01

    This report provides the proceedings of a Specialists' Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing that was held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on October 23-25, 1992. The meeting was jointly sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. In particular, the International Working Group (IWG) on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (LMNPP) was the IAEA sponsor, and the Principal Working Group 3 (PWG-3) (Primary System Component Integrity) of the Committee for the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) was the NEA's sponsor. This meeting was preceded by two prior international activities that were designed to examine the state-of-the-art in fracture analysis capabilities and emphasized applications to the safety evaluation of nuclear power facilities. The first of those two activities was an IAEA Specialists' Meeting on Fracture Mechanics Verification by Large-Scale Testing that was held at the Staatliche Materialprufungsanstalt (MPA) in Stuttgart, Germany, on May 25-27, 1988; the proceedings of that meeting were published 1991.1 The second activity was the CSNI/PWG-3's Fracture Assessment Group's Project FALSIRE (Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments). The proceedings of the FALSIRE workshop that was held in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A., on May 8-10, 1990, was recently published by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Those previous activities identified capabilities and shortcomings of various fracture analysis methods based on analyses of six available large-scale experiments. Different modes of fracture behavior, which ranged from brittle to ductile, were considered. In addition, geometry, size, constraint and multiaxial effects were considered. While generally good predictive capabilities were demonstrated for brittle fracture, issues were identified relative to predicting fracture behavior at higher

  3. Understanding cracking failures of coatings: A fracture mechanics approach

    Kim, Sung-Ryong

    A fracture mechanics analysis of coating (paint) cracking was developed. A strain energy release rate (G(sub c)) expression due to the formation of a new crack in a coating was derived for bending and tension loadings in terms of the moduli, thicknesses, Poisson's ratios, load, residual strain, etc. Four-point bending and instrumented impact tests were used to determine the in-situ fracture toughness of coatings as functions of increasing baking (drying) time. The system used was a thin coating layer on a thick substrate layer. The substrates included steel, aluminum, polycarbonate, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS), and Noryl. The coatings included newly developed automotive paints. The four-point bending configuration promoted nice transversed multiple coating cracks on both steel and polymeric substrates. The crosslinked type automotive coatings on steel substrates showed big cracks without microcracks. When theoretical predictions for energy release rate were compared to experimental data for coating/steel substrate samples with multiple cracking, the agreement was good. Crosslinked type coatings on polymeric substrates showed more cracks than theory predicted and the G(sub c)'s were high. Solvent evaporation type coatings on polymeric substrates showed clean multiple cracking and the G(sub c)'s were higher than those obtained by tension analysis of tension experiments with the same substrates. All the polymeric samples showed surface embrittlement after long baking times using four-point bending tests. The most apparent surface embrittlement was observed in the acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) substrate system. The impact properties of coatings as a function of baking time were also investigated. These experiments were performed using an instrumented impact tester. There was a rapid decrease in G(sub c) at short baking times and convergence to a constant value at long baking times. The surface embrittlement conditions and an embrittlement toughness

  4. Application of probabilistic fracture mechanics to reactor pressure vessel safety assessment

    Venturini, V.; Pitner, P.

    1995-06-01

    Among all the components of a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) nuclear power plant, the reactor vessel is of major importance for safety. The integrity of this structure must be guaranteed in all circumstances, even in the case of the most severe accidents, and its mechanical state can be decisive for the lifetime of the plant. The brittle rupture would be the most important of all potential hazards if the irradiation effects were not consistent with predictions. The interest of having a reliable and precise method of evaluating the available safety margins and the integrity of this component led Electricite de France (EDF) to carry out a probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. The probabilistic model developed by integration of the uncertainties in the usual fracture mechanics equations is presented. A special focus is made on the problem of coupling thermo-mechanical finite element calculations and reliability analysis. The use of a finite element code can be associated with prohibitive computation times when it is invoked numerous times during simulations sequences or complex iterative procedures. The response surface method is used. It provides an approximation of the response from a reduced number of original data. The global approach is illustrated on an example corresponding to a specific accidental transient. A validation of the obtained results is also carried out through the comparison with an equivalent model without coupling. (author)

  5. Plastic fracture mechanics prediction of fracture instability in a circumferentially cracked pipe in bending--1. J-integral analysis

    Zahoor, A.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1980-01-01

    A method of evaluating the J-integral for a circumferentially cracked pipe in bending is proposed. The method allows a J-resistance curve to be evaluated directly from the load-displacement record obtained in a pipe fracture experiment. This method also permits an analysis for fracture instability in a circumferential crack growth using a J-resistance curve and the tearing modulus parameter. The importance of using a J-resistance curve that is consistent with the type of constraint for a given application is emphasized. 18 refs

  6. Evaluating the Relationship between Rib Fractures and the Probability of Abdominal Trauma; a Brief Report

    Vahid Monsef Kasmaei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trauma is one of the most important causes of death in patients under 40 years of age and the third common cause of death regardless of age. Rib cage damages are one of the major reasons for death in the early minutes post-trauma. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the frequency of intra-abdominal injury in the patients with rib fracture who were referred to emergency department. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 60 patients with rib fractures who were admitted to the emergency department of Poorsina Hospital, Rasht, Iran, from March 2011 to March2012. A checklist was filled out for all the patients including age, sex, trauma mechanism, side and site of fracture, the number of broken ribs, the results of abdominal ultrasonography, the need for laparotomy and mortality. The collected data were classified based on descriptive statistics and analyzed using SPSS 16. Results: 60 patients with the mean age of 47.26±13.71 years were admitted to the emergency department during this time (81.7% male. The most common mechanism of trauma was car accident [22(36.7%]. Among these 60 patients, 71 rib fractures in 3 levels of chest (upper, middle, lower were detected and 50 (83.3% in the same area. Mean number of fractured ribs was 2.85±2.2 (minimum: 1, maximum 10. In 3 (5% patients, fracture was on both sides. The results of abdominal ultrasonography in 7 (11.7% patients were positive. The number of fractured ribs (p=0.017 and the area of the fracture (p=0.048 showed a significant correlation with the presence of intra-abdominal free fluid. The fracture of more than 2 ribs directly correlated with the possibility of intra-abdominal hemorrhage (p<0.0001. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, it seems that the number and area of the fractured ribs directly and significantly correlate with the probability of abdominal trauma based on the results of abdominal ultrasonography.

  7. Evaluation of the conservativeness of the methodology for estimating earthquake-induced movements of fractures intersecting canisters

    La Pointe, Paul R.; Cladouhos, Trenton T.; Outters, Nils; Follin, Sven

    2000-04-01

    This study evaluates the parameter sensitivity and the conservativeness of the methodology outlined in TR 99-03. Sensitivity analysis focuses on understanding how variability in input parameter values impacts the calculated fracture displacements. These studies clarify what parameters play the greatest role in fracture movements, and help define critical values of these parameters in terms of canister failures. The thresholds or intervals of values that lead to a certain level of canister failure calculated in this study could be useful for evaluating future candidate sites. Key parameters include: 1. magnitude/frequency of earthquakes; 2. the distance of the earthquake from the canisters; 3. the size and aspect ratio of fractures intersecting canisters; and 4. the orientation of the fractures. The results of this study show that distance and earthquake magnitude are the most important factors, followed by fracture size. Fracture orientation is much less important. Regression relations were developed to predict induced fracture slip as a function of distance and either earthquake magnitude or slip on the earthquake fault. These regression relations were validated by using them to estimate the number of canister failures due to single damaging earthquakes at Aberg, and comparing these estimates with those presented in TR 99-03. The methodology described in TR 99-03 employs several conservative simplifications in order to devise a numerically feasible method to estimate fracture movements due to earthquakes outside of the repository over the next 100,000 years. These simplifications include: 1. fractures are assumed to be frictionless and cohesionless; 2. all energy transmitted to the fracture by the earthquake is assumed to produce elastic deformation of the fracture; no energy is diverted into fracture propagation; and 3. shielding effects of other fractures between the earthquake and the fracture are neglected. The numerical modeling effectively assumes that the

  8. Evaluation of the conservativeness of the methodology for estimating earthquake-induced movements of fractures intersecting canisters

    La Pointe, Paul R.; Cladouhos, Trenton T. [Golder Associates Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Outters, Nils; Follin, Sven [Golder Grundteknik KB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    This study evaluates the parameter sensitivity and the conservativeness of the methodology outlined in TR 99-03. Sensitivity analysis focuses on understanding how variability in input parameter values impacts the calculated fracture displacements. These studies clarify what parameters play the greatest role in fracture movements, and help define critical values of these parameters in terms of canister failures. The thresholds or intervals of values that lead to a certain level of canister failure calculated in this study could be useful for evaluating future candidate sites. Key parameters include: 1. magnitude/frequency of earthquakes; 2. the distance of the earthquake from the canisters; 3. the size and aspect ratio of fractures intersecting canisters; and 4. the orientation of the fractures. The results of this study show that distance and earthquake magnitude are the most important factors, followed by fracture size. Fracture orientation is much less important. Regression relations were developed to predict induced fracture slip as a function of distance and either earthquake magnitude or slip on the earthquake fault. These regression relations were validated by using them to estimate the number of canister failures due to single damaging earthquakes at Aberg, and comparing these estimates with those presented in TR 99-03. The methodology described in TR 99-03 employs several conservative simplifications in order to devise a numerically feasible method to estimate fracture movements due to earthquakes outside of the repository over the next 100,000 years. These simplifications include: 1. fractures are assumed to be frictionless and cohesionless; 2. all energy transmitted to the fracture by the earthquake is assumed to produce elastic deformation of the fracture; no energy is diverted into fracture propagation; and 3. shielding effects of other fractures between the earthquake and the fracture are neglected. The numerical modeling effectively assumes that the

  9. Pisiform fractures

    Fleege, M.A.; Jebson, P.J.; Renfrew, D.L.; El-Khoury, G.Y.; Steyers, C.M. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Fractures of the pisiform are often missed due to improper radiographic evaluation and a tendency to focus on other, more obvious injuries. Delayed diagnosis may result in disabling sequelae. A high index of clinical suspicion and appropriate radiographic examination will establish the correct diagnosis. Ten patients with pisiform fracture are presented. The anatomy, mechanism of injury, clinical presentation, radiographic features, and evaluation of this injury are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Failure conditions from push out tests of a steel-concrete joint: fracture mechanics approach

    Klusák, Jan; Seitl, Stanislav; De Corte, W.; Helincks, P.; Boel, V.; De Schutter, G.

    488-489, - (2012), s. 710-713 ISSN 1013-9826. [International Conference on Fracture and Damage Mechanics - FDM 2011 /10./. Dubrovník, 19.09.2011-21.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/2049 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Push out test * generalized linear elastic fracture mechanics * bi-material notch Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  11. User's manual and analysis methodology of probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis code PASCAL Ver.2 for reactor pressure vessel (Contract research)

    Osakabe, Kazuya; Onizawa, Kunio; Shibata, Katsuyuki; Kato, Daisuke

    2006-09-01

    As a part of the aging structural integrity research for LWR components, the probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis code PASCAL (PFM Analysis of Structural Components in Aging LWR) has been developed in JAEA. This code evaluates the conditional probabilities of crack initiation and fracture of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under transient conditions such as pressurized thermal shock (PTS). The development of the code has been aimed to improve the accuracy and reliability of analysis by introducing new analysis methodologies and algorithms considering the recent development in the fracture mechanics and computer performance. PASCAL Ver.1 has functions of optimized sampling in the stratified Monte Carlo simulation, elastic-plastic fracture criterion of the R6 method, crack growth analysis models for a semi-elliptical crack, recovery of fracture toughness due to thermal annealing and so on. Since then, under the contract between the Ministry of Economy, Trading and Industry of Japan and JAEA, we have continued to develop and introduce new functions into PASCAL Ver.2 such as the evaluation method for an embedded crack, K I database for a semi-elliptical crack considering stress discontinuity at the base/cladding interface, PTS transient database, and others. A generalized analysis method is proposed on the basis of the development of PASCAL Ver.2 and results of sensitivity analyses. Graphical user interface (GUI) including a generalized method as default values has been also developed for PASCAL Ver.2. This report provides the user's manual and theoretical background of PASCAL Ver.2. (author)

  12. The elasto plastic fracture mechanics in ductile metal sheets

    Khan, M.A.; Malik, M.N.; Naeem, A.; Haq, A.U.; Atkins, A.G.

    1999-01-01

    The crack initiation of propagation in ductile metal sheets are caused by various micro and macro changes taking place due to material properties, applied loads, shape of the indenter (tool geometry) and the environmental conditions. These microstructural failures are directly related to the atomic bonding, crystal lattices, grain boundary status, material flaws in matrix, inhomogeneities and anisotropy in the metal sheets. The Elasto-Plastic related energy based equations are applied to these Rigid Plastic materials to determine the onset of fracture in metal forming. The combined stress and strain criterion of a critical plastic work per unit volume is no more considered as a universal ductile fracture criterion, rather a critical plastic work per unit volume dependence on all sort of stresses (hydrostatic) are the required features for the sheet metal failure (fracture). In this present study, crack initiation and propagation are related empirically with fracture toughness and the application of the theory in industry to save energy. (author)

  13. Moisture desorption in mechanically masticated fuels: effects of particle fracturing and fuelbed compaction

    Jesse K. Kreye; J.Morgan Varner; Eric E. Knapp

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical mastication is increasingly used as a wildland fuel treatment, reducing standing trees and shrubs to compacted fuelbeds of fractured woody fuels. One major shortcoming in our understanding of these fuelbeds is how particle fracturing influences moisture gain or loss, a primary determinant of fire behaviour. To better understand fuel moisture dynamics, we...

  14. FRACTURE MECHANICS UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS IN THE RELIABILITY ASSESSMENT OF THE REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL: (2D SUBJECTED TO INTERNAL PRESSURE

    Entin Hartini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT FRACTURE MECHANICS UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS IN THE RELIABILITY ASSESSMENT OF THE REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL: (2D SUBJECTED TO INTERNAL PRESSURE. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV is a pressure boundary in the PWR type reactor which serves to confine radioactive material during chain reaction process. The integrity of the RPV must be guaranteed either  in a normal operation or accident conditions. In analyzing the integrity of RPV, especially related to the crack behavior which can introduce break to the reactor pressure vessel, a fracture mechanic approach should be taken for this assessment. The uncertainty of input used in the assessment, such as mechanical properties and physical environment, becomes a reason that the assessment is not sufficient if it is perfomed only by deterministic approach. Therefore, the uncertainty approach should be applied. The aim of this study is to analize the uncertainty of fracture mechanics calculations in evaluating the reliability of PWR`s reactor pressure vessel. Random character of input quantity was generated using probabilistic principles and theories. Fracture mechanics analysis is solved by Finite Element Method (FEM with  MSC MARC software, while uncertainty input analysis is done based on probability density function with Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS using python script. The output of MSC MARC is a J-integral value, which is converted into stress intensity factor for evaluating the reliability of RPV’s 2D. From the result of the calculation, it can be concluded that the SIF from  probabilistic method, reached the limit value of  fracture toughness earlier than SIF from  deterministic method.  The SIF generated by the probabilistic method is 105.240 MPa m0.5. Meanwhile, the SIF generated by deterministic method is 100.876 MPa m0.5. Keywords: Uncertainty analysis, fracture mechanics, LHS, FEM, reactor pressure vessels   ABSTRAK ANALISIS KETIDAKPASTIAN FRACTURE MECHANIC PADA EVALUASI KEANDALAN

  15. An extension of fracture mechanics/technology to larger and smaller cracks/defects

    Abé, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Fracture mechanics/technology is a key science and technology for the design and integrity assessment of the engineering structures. However, the conventional fracture mechanics has mostly targeted a limited size of cracks/defects, say of from several hundred microns to several tens of centimeters. The author and his group has tried to extend that limited size and establish a new version of fracture technology for very large cracks used in geothermal energy extraction and for very small cracks/defects or damage often appearing in the combination of mechanical and electronic components of engineering structures. Those new versions are reviewed in this paper. PMID:19907123

  16. Thermo-hydro-mechanical simulation of a 3D fractured porous rock: preliminary study of coupled matrix-fracture hydraulics

    Canamon, I.; Javier Elorza, F.; Ababou, R.

    2007-01-01

    We present a problem involving the modeling of coupled flow and elastic strain in a 3D fractured porous rock, which requires prior homogenization (up-scaling) of the fractured medium into an equivalent Darcian anisotropic continuum. The governing equations form a system of PDE's (Partial Differential Equations) and, depending on the case being considered, this system may involve two different types of 'couplings' (in a real system, both couplings (1) and (2) generally take place): 1) Hydraulic coupling in a single (no exchange) or in a dual matrix-fracture continuum (exchange); 2) Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical interactions between fluid flow, pressure, elastic stress, strain, and temperature. We present here a preliminary model and simulation results with FEMLAB R , for the hydraulic problem with anisotropic heterogeneous coefficients. The model is based on data collected at an instrumented granitic site (FEBEX project) for studying a hypothetical nuclear waste repository at the Grimsel Test Site in the Swiss Alps. (authors)

  17. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part II. Fatigue crack growth rate

    Margolin, B., E-mail: margolinbz@yandex.ru; Minkin, A.; Smirnov, V.; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Potapova, V.

    2016-11-15

    The experimental data on the fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) have been obtained for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various radiation swelling. The performed study of the fracture mechanisms for cracked specimens under cyclic loading has explained why radiation swelling affects weakly FCGR unlike its effect on fracture toughness. Mechanical modeling of fatigue crack growth has been carried out and the dependencies for prediction of FCGR in irradiated austenitic steel with and with no swelling are proposed and verified with the obtained experimental results. As input data for these dependencies, FCGR for unirradiated steel and the tensile mechanical properties for unirradiated and irradiated steels are used.

  18. Mechanics of the Delayed Fracture of Viscoelastic Bodies with Cracks: Theory and Experiment (Review)

    Kaminsky, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies on the deformation and delayed fracture of viscoelastic bodies due to slow subcritical crack growth are reviewed. The focus of this review is on studies of subcritical growth of cracks with well-developed fracture process zones, the conditions that lead to their critical development, and all stages of slow crack growth from initiation to the onset of catastrophic growth. Models, criteria, and methods used to study the delayed fracture of viscoelastic bodies with through and internal cracks are analyzed. Experimental studies of the fracture process zones in polymers using physical and mechanical methods as well as theoretical studies of these zones using fracture mesomechanics models that take into account the structural and rheological features of polymers are reviewed. Particular attention is given to crack growth in anisotropic media, the effect of the aging of viscoelastic materials on their delayed fracture, safe external loads that do not cause cracks to propagate, the mechanism of multiple-flaw fracture of viscoelastic bodies with several cracks and, especially, processes causing cracks to coalesce into a main crack, which may result in a break of the body. Methods and results of solving two- and three-dimensional problems of the mechanics of delayed fracture of aging and non-aging viscoelastic bodies with cracks under constant and variable external loads, wedging, and biaxial loads are given

  19. Acetabular Fracture

    Chad Correa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 77-year-old female presented to her primary care physician (PCP with right hip pain after a mechanical fall. She did not lose consciousness or have any other traumatic injuries. She was unable to ambulate post-fall, so X-rays were ordered by her PCP. Her X-rays were concerning for a right acetabular fracture (see purple arrows, so the patient was referred to the emergency department where a computed tomography (CT scan was ordered. Significant findings: The non-contrast CT images show a minimally displaced comminuted fracture of the right acetabulum involving the acetabular roof, medial and anterior walls (red arrows, with associated obturator muscle hematoma (blue oval. Discussion: Acetabular fractures are quite rare. There are 37 pelvic fractures per 100,000 people in the United States annually, and only 10% of these involve the acetabulum. They occur more frequently in the elderly totaling an estimated 4,000 per year. High-energy trauma is the primary cause of acetabular fractures in younger individuals and these fractures are commonly associated with other fractures and pelvic ring disruptions. Fractures secondary to moderate or minimal trauma are increasingly of concern in patients of advanced age.1 Classification of acetabular fractures can be challenging. However, the approach can be simplified by remembering the three basic types of acetabular fractures (column, transverse, and wall and their corresponding radiologic views. First, column fractures should be evaluated with coronally oriented CT images. This type of fracture demonstrates a coronal fracture line running caudad to craniad, essentially breaking the acetabulum into two halves: a front half and a back half. Secondly, transverse fractures should be evaluated by sagittally oriented CT images. By definition, a transverse fracture separates the acetabulum into superior and inferior halves with the fracture line extending from anterior to posterior

  20. Proceedings of the 1985 pressure vessels and piping conference. Volume PVP-98-8. Fracture, fatigue and advanced mechanics

    Short, W.E.; Zamrik, S.Y.

    1985-01-01

    State-of-the-art engineering practices in pressure vessel and piping technology are the result of continual efforts in the evaluation of problems which have been experienced and the development of appropriate design and analysis methods for those applications. The resulting advances in technology benefit industry with properly engineered, safe, cost-effective pressure vessels and piping systems. To this end, advanced study continues in specialized areas of mechanical engineering such as fracture mechanics, experimental stress analysis, high pressure applications and related material considerations, as well as advanced techniques for evaluation of commonly encountered design problems. This volume is comprised of current technical papers on various aspects of fracture, fatigue and advanced mechanics as related to the design and analysis of pressure vessels and piping

  1. Tensile properties and fracture mechanism of IN-100 superalloy in high temperature range

    Milan T. Jovanović

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tensile properties and fracture mechanism of a polycrystalline IN-100 superalloy have been investigated in the range from room temperature to 900°C. Optical microscopy (OM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM applying replica technique were used for microstructural investigation, whereas scanning electron microscopy (SEM was utilized for fracture study. High temperature tensile tests were carried out in vacuumed chamber. Results show that strength increases up to 700°C, and then sharply decreases with further increase in temperature. Elongation increases very slowly (6-7.5% till 500°C, then decreases to 4.5% at 900°C. Change in elongation may be ascribed to a change of fracture mechanism. Appearance of a great number of microvoids prevails up to 500°C resulting in a slow increase of elongation, whereas above this temperature elongation decrease is correlated with intergranular crystallographic fracture and fracture of carbides.

  2. Continuum and micro-mechanics treatment of constraint in fracture

    Dodds, R.H. Jr.; Shih, C.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the fundamental concepts of the J-Q description of crack-tip fields, the fracture toughness locus and micromechanics approaches to predict the variability of macroscopic fracture toughness with constraint under elastic-plastic conditions. While these concepts derived from plane-strain considerations, initial applications in fully 3-D geometries are very promising. Computational results are presented for a surface cracked plate containing a 6:1 semi-elliptical, a=t/4 flaw subjected to remote uniaxial and biaxial tension. Crack-tip stress fields consistent with the J-Q theory are demonstrated to exist at each location along the crack front. The micromechanics model employs the J-Q description of crack-front stresses to interpret fracture toughness values measured on laboratory specimens for fracture assessment of the surface cracked plate. The computational results suggest only a minor effect of the biaxial loading on the crack tip stress fields and, consequently, on the propensity for fracture relative to the uniaxial loading. 45 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs

  3. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Evaluation of the Impact of Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Couplings in Bentonite and Near-Field Rock Barriers on a Nuclear Waste Repository in a Sparsely Fractured Hard Rock. Report of BMT1C/WP2

    Jing, L.

    2005-02-01

    This report presents the works performed for the third, also the last, phase (BMT1C) of BMT1 of the DECOVALEX III project for the period of 1999-2002. The works of BMT1 is divided into three phases: BMT1A, BMT1B and BMT1C. The BMT1A concerns with calibration of the computer codes with a reference Thermal (T), Hydrological (H) and Mechanical (M) experiment at Kamaishi Mine, Japan. The objective is to validate the numerical approaches, computer codes and material models, so that the teams simulating tools are at a comparable level of maturity and sophistication. The BMT1B uses the calibrated codes to perform scoping calculations, considering varying degrees of THM coupling and varying permeability values of the surrounding rock for a reference generic repository design without fractures. The aim is to identify the coupling mechanisms of importance for construction, performance and safety of the repository. BMT1C concerns with scoping calculations with different coupling combinations for the case where a horizontal fracture intersects the deposition hole and a vertical fracture zone divides two adjacent deposition tunnel/hole system. A hydrostatic condition is applied along the vertical fracture as a hydraulic boundary condition. In addition, the SKI/KTH team performed an additional calculation case of a highly fractured rock mass with two orthogonal sets of fractures with a spacing of 0.5 m. The chosen measures for evaluating the long term safety and performance of the repository are the maximal temperature created by the thermal loading from the emplaced wastes, the time for resaturation of the buffer, the maximal swelling stress developed in the buffer, the structural integrity of the rock mass and the permeability evolution in the rock mass. The analyses fro BMT1C were conducted by four research teams: SKI/KTH (Sweden), CNSC (Canada), IRSN/CEA(France) and JNC (Japan), using FEM approach with different computer codes. From the results, it is clear that the

  4. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Evaluation of the Impact of Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Couplings in Bentonite and Near-Field Rock Barriers on a Nuclear Waste Repository in a Sparsely Fractured Hard Rock. Report of BMT1C/WP2

    Jing, L. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Engineering Geology; Nguyen, T.S. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, ON (Canada)] (eds.)

    2005-02-15

    This report presents the works performed for the third, also the last, phase (BMT1C) of BMT1 of the DECOVALEX III project for the period of 1999-2002. The works of BMT1 is divided into three phases: BMT1A, BMT1B and BMT1C. The BMT1A concerns with calibration of the computer codes with a reference Thermal (T), Hydrological (H) and Mechanical (M) experiment at Kamaishi Mine, Japan. The objective is to validate the numerical approaches, computer codes and material models, so that the teams simulating tools are at a comparable level of maturity and sophistication. The BMT1B uses the calibrated codes to perform scoping calculations, considering varying degrees of THM coupling and varying permeability values of the surrounding rock for a reference generic repository design without fractures. The aim is to identify the coupling mechanisms of importance for construction, performance and safety of the repository. BMT1C concerns with scoping calculations with different coupling combinations for the case where a horizontal fracture intersects the deposition hole and a vertical fracture zone divides two adjacent deposition tunnel/hole system. A hydrostatic condition is applied along the vertical fracture as a hydraulic boundary condition. In addition, the SKI/KTH team performed an additional calculation case of a highly fractured rock mass with two orthogonal sets of fractures with a spacing of 0.5 m. The chosen measures for evaluating the long term safety and performance of the repository are the maximal temperature created by the thermal loading from the emplaced wastes, the time for resaturation of the buffer, the maximal swelling stress developed in the buffer, the structural integrity of the rock mass and the permeability evolution in the rock mass. The analyses fro BMT1C were conducted by four research teams: SKI/KTH (Sweden), CNSC (Canada), IRSN/CEA(France) and JNC (Japan), using FEM approach with different computer codes. From the results, it is clear that the

  5. Progress in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics and its applications

    Paris, P.C.; Zahalak, G.I.

    1980-01-01

    This paper surveys recent developments in the application of J-Integral methods to problems of elastic-plastic fracture. The analytical and experimental development of the J-Integral concept over the last ten years is reviewed briefly. Tearing instability theory is presented in general terms, and specific applications of the theory are discussed. Principles of fracture-proof design are shown to follow naturally from the tearing instability theory. These principles are illustrated first for simple structures, and then generalized to more complex configurations and loading conditions. Examples include multiple member tension structures, beams, frames, nuclear reactor pressure vessel nozzles and piping, and beams on elastic foundations. It is concluded that J-integral based methods offer the best immediate opportunity for the development of sound analytical techniques for treating important practical problems of elastic-plastic fracture

  6. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of the Slip-Side Joggle Regions of Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Phillips, Dawn R.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle wing-leading edge consists of panels that are made of reinforced carbon-carbon. Coating spallation was observed near the slip-side region of the panels that experience extreme heating. To understand this phenomenon, a root-cause investigation was conducted. As part of that investigation, fracture mechanics analyses of the slip-side joggle regions of the hot panels were conducted. This paper presents an overview of the fracture mechanics analyses.

  7. Generalized linear elastic fracture mechanics: an application to a crack touching the bimaterial interface

    Náhlík, Luboš; Šestáková, L.; Hutař, Pavel; Knésl, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 452-453, - (2011), s. 445-448 ISSN 1013-9826 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB200410803; GA ČR GA101/09/1821 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : generalized stress intensity factor * bimaterial interface * composite materials * strain energy density factor * fracture criterion * generalized linear elastic fracture mechanics Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  8. Probabilistic pipe fracture evaluations for leak-rate-detection applications

    Rahman, S.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D.; Wilkowski, G.

    1995-04-01

    Regulatory Guide 1.45, open-quotes Reactor Coolant Pressure Boundary Leakage Detection Systems,close quotes was published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1973, and provides guidance on leak detection methods and system requirements for Light Water Reactors. Additionally, leak detection limits are specified in plant Technical Specifications and are different for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). These leak detection limits are also used in leak-before-break evaluations performed in accordance with Draft Standard Review Plan, Section 3.6.3, open-quotes Leak Before Break Evaluation Proceduresclose quotes where a margin of 10 on the leak detection limit is used in determining the crack size considered in subsequent fracture analyses. This study was requested by the NRC to: (1) evaluate the conditional failure probability for BWR and PWR piping for pipes that were leaking at the allowable leak detection limit, and (2) evaluate the margin of 10 to determine if it was unnecessarily large. A probabilistic approach was undertaken to conduct fracture evaluations of circumferentially cracked pipes for leak-rate-detection applications. Sixteen nuclear piping systems in BWR and PWR plants were analyzed to evaluate conditional failure probability and effects of crack-morphology variability on the current margins used in leak rate detection for leak-before-break

  9. Mechanical properties and fracture behaviour of defective phosphorene nanotubes under uniaxial tension

    Liu, Ping; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2017-12-01

    The easy formation of vacancy defects and the asymmetry in the two sublayers of phosphorene nanotubes (PNTs) may result in brand new mechanical properties and failure behaviour. Herein, we investigate the mechanical properties and fracture behaviour of defective PNTs under uniaxial tension using molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulation results show that atomic vacancies cause local stress concentration and thus significantly reduce the fracture strength and fracture strain of PNTs. More specifically, a 1% defect concentration is able to reduce the fracture strength and fracture strain by as much as 50% and 66%, respectively. Interestingly, the reduction in the mechanical properties is found to depend on the defect location: a defect located in the outer sublayer has a stronger effect than one located in the inner layer, especially for PNTs with a small diameter. Temperature is also found to strongly influence the mechanical properties of both defect-free and defective PNTs. When the temperature is increased from 0 K to 400 K, the fracture strength and fracture strain of defective PNTs with a defect concentration of 1% are reduced further by 71% and 61%, respectively. These findings are of great importance for the structural design of PNTs as building blocks in nanodevices.

  10. Mechanical properties and fracture behavior of single-layer phosphorene at finite temperatures

    Sha, Zhen-Dong; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Ding, Zhiwei; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Jiang, Jin-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene, a new two-dimensional (2D) material beyond graphene, has attracted great attention in recent years due to its superior physical and electrical properties. However, compared to graphene and other 2D materials, phosphorene has a relatively low Young’s modulus and fracture strength, which may limit its applications due to possible structure failures. For the mechanical reliability of future phosphorene-based nanodevices, it is necessary to have a deep understanding of the mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of phosphorene. Previous studies on the mechanical properties of phosphorene were based on first principles calculations at 0 K. In this work, we employ molecular dynamics simulations to explore the mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of phosphorene at finite temperatures. It is found that temperature has a significant effect on the mechanical properties of phosphorene. The fracture strength and strain reduce by more than 65% when the temperature increases from 0 K to 450 K. Moreover, the fracture strength and strain in the zigzag direction is more sensitive to the temperature rise than that in the armchair direction. More interestingly, the failure crack propagates preferably along the groove in the puckered structure when uniaxial tension is applied in the armchair direction. In contrast, when the uniaxial tension is applied in the zigzag direction, multiple cracks are observed with rough fracture surfaces. Our present work provides useful information about the mechanical properties and failure behaviors of phosphorene at finite temperatures. (paper)

  11. A study on probabilistic fracture mechanics for nuclear pressure vessels and piping

    Yagawa, Genki; Yoshimura, Shinobu

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes some recent research activities on probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) for nuclear pressure vessels and piping (PV and P) performed by the RC111 research committee of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) under a subcontract of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). To establish standard procedures for evaluating failure probabilities of nuclear PV and P, we have set up the following three kinds of PFM round-robin problems on: (a) primary piping under normal operating conditions, (b) aged reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under normal and upset operating conditions, and (c) aged RPV under pressurised thermal shock (PTS) events. The basic problems of the last one are chosen from some US benchmark problems such as EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) and US NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) joint PTS benchmark problems. This paper summarizes some sensitivity studies on the three kinds of problems mainly varying material properties such as flow stress, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth rate, Cu content. Employed in this study are the PFM computer codes developed in Japan and USA. Failure probabilities of nuclear PV and P are quantitatively discussed in detail. (author)

  12. Mean load effect on fatigue of welded joints using structural stress and fracture mechanics approach

    Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Cheol; Jin, Tae Eun; Dong, P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to ensure the structural integrity of nuclear welded structures during design life, the fatigue life has to be evaluated by fatigue analysis procedures presented in technical codes such as ASME B and PV Code Section III. However, existing fatigue analysis procedures do not explicitly consider the presence of welded joints. A new fatigue analysis procedure based on a structural stress/fracture mechanics approach has been recently developed in order to reduce conservatism by erasing uncertainty in the analysis procedure. A recent review of fatigue crack growth data under various mean loading conditions using the structural stress/fracture mechanics approach, does not consider the mean loading effect, revealed some significant discrepancies in fatigue crack growth curves according to the mean loading conditions. In this paper, we propose the use of the stress intensity factor range ΔK characterized with loading ratio R effects in terms of the structural stress. We demonstrate the effectiveness in characterizing fatigue crack growth and S-N behavior using the well-known data. It was identified that the S-N data under high mean loading could be consolidated in a master S-N curve for welded joints

  13. Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Space Shuttle External Tank Thermal Protection System Polyurethane Foam Insulation Materials

    McGill, Preston; Wells, Doug; Morgan, Kristin

    2006-01-01

    Experimental evaluation of the basic fracture properties of Thermal Protection System (TPS) polyurethane foam insulation materials was conducted to validate the methodology used in estimating critical defect sizes in TPS applications on the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank. The polyurethane foam found on the External Tank (ET) is manufactured by mixing liquid constituents and allowing them to react and expand upwards - a process which creates component cells that are generally elongated in the foam rise direction and gives rise to mechanical anisotropy. Similarly, the application of successive foam layers to the ET produces cohesive foam interfaces (knitlines) which may lead to local variations in mechanical properties. This study reports the fracture toughness of BX-265, NCFI 24-124, and PDL-1034 closed-cell polyurethane foam as a function of ambient and cryogenic temperatures and knitline/cellular orientation at ambient pressure.

  14. Dynamic Mechanical Properties and Fracture Surface Morphologies of Core-Shell Rubber (CSR) Toughened Epoxy at Liquid Nitrogen (Ln2) Temperatures

    Wang, J.; Magee, D.; Schneider, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties and fracture surface morphologies were evaluated for a commercial epoxy resin toughened with two types of core-shell rubber (CSR) toughening agents (Kane Ace(Registered TradeMark) MX130 and MX960). The impact resistance (R) was evaluated by the resulting breaking energy measured in Charpy impact tests conducted on an instrumented drop tower. The resulting fracture surface morphologies were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Fractographic observations of the CSR toughened epoxy tested at ambient temperature, showed a fracture as characterized by slender dendrite textures with large voids. The increasing number of dendrites and decreasing size of scale-like texture with more CSR particles corresponded with increased R. As the temperature decreased to Liquid Nitrogen (LN 2), the fracture surfaces showed a fracture characterized by a rough, torn texture containing many river markings and deep furrows.

  15. Atomistic investigations on the mechanical properties and fracture mechanisms of indium phosphide nanowires.

    Pial, Turash Haque; Rakib, Tawfiqur; Mojumder, Satyajit; Motalab, Mohammad; Akanda, M A Salam

    2018-03-28

    The mechanical properties of indium phosphide (InP) nanowires are an emerging issue due to the promising applications of these nanowires in nanoelectromechanical and microelectromechanical devices. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations of zincblende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) crystal structured InP nanowires (NWs) are presented under uniaxial tension at varying sizes and temperatures. It is observed that the tensile strengths of both types of NWs show inverse relationships with temperature, but are independent of the size of the nanowires. Moreover, applied load causes brittle fracture by nucleating cleavage on ZB and WZ NWs. When the tensile load is applied along the [001] direction, the direction of the cleavage planes of ZB NWs changes with temperature. It is found that the {111} planes are the cleavage planes at lower temperatures; on the other hand, the {110} cleavage planes are activated at elevated temperatures. In the case of WZ NWs, fracture of the material is observed to occur by cleaving along the (0001) plane irrespective of temperature when the tensile load is applied along the [0001] direction. Furthermore, the WZ NWs of InP show considerably higher strength than their ZB counterparts. Finally, the impact of strain rate on the failure behavior of InP NWs is also studied, and higher fracture strengths and strains at higher strain rates are found. With increasing strain rate, the number of cleavages also increases in the NWs. This paper also provides in-depth understanding of the failure behavior of InP NWs, which will aid the design of efficient InP NWs-based devices.

  16. Tensile Fracture Behavior and Failure Mechanism of Additively-Manufactured AISI 4140 Low Alloy Steel by Laser Engineered Net Shaping

    Hoyeol Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available AISI 4140 powder was directly deposited on AISI 4140 wrought substrate using laser engineered net shaping (LENS to investigate the compatibility of a LENS-deposited part with the substrate. Tensile testing at room temperature was performed to evaluate the interface bond performance and fracture behavior of the test specimens. All the samples failed within the as-deposited zone, indicating that the interfacial bond is stronger than the interlayer bond inside the deposit. The fracture surfaces were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy disperse X-ray spectrometry (EDS. Results show that the tensile fracture failure of the as-deposited part is primarily affected by lack-of-fusion defects, carbide precipitation, and oxide particles inclusions, which causes premature failure of the deposit by deteriorating the mechanical properties and structural integrity.

  17. Simulation of crack propagation in fiber-reinforced concrete by fracture mechanics

    Zhang Jun; Li, Victor C.

    2004-01-01

    Mode I crack propagation in fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) is simulated by a fracture mechanics approach. A superposition method is applied to calculate the crack tip stress intensity factor. The model relies on the fracture toughness of hardened cement paste (K IC ) and the crack bridging law, so-called stress-crack width (σ-δ) relationship of the material, as the fundamental material parameters for model input. As two examples, experimental data from steel FRC beams under three-point bending load are analyzed with the present fracture mechanics model. A good agreement has been found between model predictions and experimental results in terms of flexural stress-crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) diagrams. These analyses and comparisons confirm that the structural performance of concrete and FRC elements, such as beams in bending, can be predicted by the simple fracture mechanics model as long as the related material properties, K IC and (σ-δ) relationship, are known

  18. STAFAN, Fluid Flow, Mechanical Stress in Fractured Rock of Nuclear Waste Repository

    Huyakorn, P.; Golis, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: STAFAN (Stress And Flow Analysis) is a two-dimensional, finite-element code designed to model fluid flow and the interaction of fluid pressure and mechanical stresses in a fractured rock surrounding a nuclear waste repository. STAFAN considers flow behavior of a deformable fractured system with fracture-porous matrix interactions, the coupling effects of fluid pressure and mechanical stresses in a medium containing discrete joints, and the inelastic response of the individual joints of the rock mass subject to the combined fluid pressure and mechanical loading. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: STAFAN does not presently contain thermal coupling, and it is unable to simulate inelastic deformation of the rock mass and variably saturated or two-phase flow in the fractured porous medium system

  19. A systematic review and economic evaluation of bisphosphonates for the prevention of fragility fractures.

    Davis, Sarah; Martyn-St James, Marrissa; Sanderson, Jean; Stevens, John; Goka, Edward; Rawdin, Andrew; Sadler, Susi; Wong, Ruth; Campbell, Fiona; Stevenson, Matt; Strong, Mark; Selby, Peter; Gittoes, Neil

    2016-10-01

    Fragility fractures are fractures that result from mechanical forces that would not ordinarily result in fracture. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of bisphosphonates [alendronic acid (Fosamax ® and Fosamax ® Once Weekly, Merck Sharp & Dohme Ltd), risedronic acid (Actonel ® and Actonel Once a Week ® , Warner Chilcott UK Ltd), ibandronic acid (Bonviva ® , Roche Products Ltd) and zoledronic acid (Aclasta ® , Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd)] for the prevention of fragility fracture and to assess their cost-effectiveness at varying levels of fracture risk. For the clinical effectiveness review, six electronic databases and two trial registries were searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science and BIOSIS Previews, Clinicaltrials.gov and World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. Searches were limited by date from 2008 until September 2014. A systematic review and network meta-analysis (NMA) of effectiveness studies were conducted. A review of published economic analyses was undertaken and a de novo health economic model was constructed. Discrete event simulation was used to estimate lifetime costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) for each bisphosphonate treatment strategy and a strategy of no treatment for a simulated cohort of patients with heterogeneous characteristics. The model was populated with effectiveness evidence from the systematic review and NMA. All other parameters were estimated from published sources. A NHS and Personal Social Services perspective was taken, and costs and benefits were discounted at 3.5% per annum. Fracture risk was estimated from patient characteristics using the QFracture ® (QFracture-2012 open source revision 38, Clinrisk Ltd, Leeds, UK) and FRAX ® (web version 3.9, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK) tools. The relationship between fracture risk and incremental net benefit (INB) was

  20. The application of probabilistic fracture analysis to residual life evaluation of embrittled reactor vessels

    Dickson, T.L.; Simonen, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis is a major element of the comprehensive probabilistic methodology on which current NRC regulatory requirements for pressurized water reactor vessel integrity evaluation are based. Computer codes such as OCA-P and VISA-11 perform probabilistic fracture analyses to estimate the increase in vessel failure probability that occurs as the vessel material accumulates radiation damage over the operating life of the vessel. The results of such analyses, when compared with limits of acceptable failure probabilities, provide an estimation of the residual life of a vessel. Such codes can be applied to evaluate the potential benefits of plant-specific mitigating actions designed to reduce the probability of failure of a reactor vessel

  1. The application of probabilistic fracture analysis to residual life evaluation of embrittled reactor vessels

    Dickson, T.L.; Simonen, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis is a major element of comprehensive probabilistic methodology on which current NRC regulatory requirements for pressurized water reactor vessel integrity evaluation are based. Computer codes such as OCA-P and VISA-II perform probabilistic fracture analyses to estimate the increase in vessel failure probability that occurs as the vessel material accumulates radiation damage over the operating life of the vessel. The results of such analyses, when compared with limits of acceptable failure probabilities, provide an estimation of the residual life of a vessel. Such codes can be applied to evaluate the potential benefits of plant-specific mitigating actions designed to reduce the probability of failure of a reactor vessel. 10 refs

  2. Probabilistic pipe fracture evaluations for applications to leak-rate detection

    Rahman, S; Wilkowski, G; Ghadiali, N [Battelle Columbus Labs., OH (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Stochastic pipe fracture evaluations are conducted for applications to leak-rate detection. A state-of-the-art review was first conducted to evaluate the adequacy of current deterministic models for thermo-hydraulic and elastic-plastic fracture analyses. Then a new probabilistic model was developed with the above deterministic models for structural reliability analysis of cracked piping systems and statistical characterization of crack morphology parameters, material properties of pipe, and crack location. The proposed models are then applied for computing conditional probability of failure for various nuclear piping systems in BWR and PWR plants. The PRAISE code was not used, and the probabilistic model is based on modern methods of stochastic mechanics, computationally far superior to Monte Carlo and Stratified Sampling methods used in PRAISE. 10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Probabilistic pipe fracture evaluations for applications to leak-rate detection

    Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.

    1992-01-01

    Stochastic pipe fracture evaluations are conducted for applications to leak-rate detection. A state-of-the-art review was first conducted to evaluate the adequacy of current deterministic models for thermo-hydraulic and elastic-plastic fracture analyses. Then a new probabilistic model was developed with the above deterministic models for structural reliability analysis of cracked piping systems and statistical characterization of crack morphology parameters, material properties of pipe, and crack location. The proposed models are then applied for computing conditional probability of failure for various nuclear piping systems in BWR and PWR plants. The PRAISE code was not used, and the probabilistic model is based on modern methods of stochastic mechanics, computationally far superior to Monte Carlo and Stratified Sampling methods used in PRAISE. 10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  4. Uncertainty analysis for probabilistic pipe fracture evaluations in LBB applications

    Rahman, S.; Ghadiali, N.; Wilkowski, G.

    1997-01-01

    During the NRC's Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds Program at Battelle, a probabilistic methodology was developed to conduct fracture evaluations of circumferentially cracked pipes for application to leak-rate detection. Later, in the IPIRG-2 program, several parameters that may affect leak-before-break and other pipe flaw evaluations were identified. This paper presents new results from several uncertainty analyses to evaluate the effects of normal operating stresses, normal plus safe-shutdown earthquake stresses, off-centered cracks, restraint of pressure-induced bending, and dynamic and cyclic loading rates on the conditional failure probability of pipes. systems in BWR and PWR. For each parameter, the sensitivity to conditional probability of failure and hence, its importance on probabilistic leak-before-break evaluations were determined

  5. Uncertainty analysis for probabilistic pipe fracture evaluations in LBB applications

    Rahman, S.; Ghadiali, N.; Wilkowski, G.

    1997-04-01

    During the NRC`s Short Cracks in Piping and Piping Welds Program at Battelle, a probabilistic methodology was developed to conduct fracture evaluations of circumferentially cracked pipes for application to leak-rate detection. Later, in the IPIRG-2 program, several parameters that may affect leak-before-break and other pipe flaw evaluations were identified. This paper presents new results from several uncertainty analyses to evaluate the effects of normal operating stresses, normal plus safe-shutdown earthquake stresses, off-centered cracks, restraint of pressure-induced bending, and dynamic and cyclic loading rates on the conditional failure probability of pipes. systems in BWR and PWR. For each parameter, the sensitivity to conditional probability of failure and hence, its importance on probabilistic leak-before-break evaluations were determined.

  6. Fracture network evaluation program (FraNEP): A software for analyzing 2D fracture trace-line maps

    Zeeb, Conny; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Bons, Paul D.; Virgo, Simon; Blum, Philipp

    2013-10-01

    Fractures, such as joints, faults and veins, strongly influence the transport of fluids through rocks by either enhancing or inhibiting flow. Techniques used for the automatic detection of lineaments from satellite images and aerial photographs, LIDAR technologies and borehole televiewers significantly enhanced data acquisition. The analysis of such data is often performed manually or with different analysis software. Here we present a novel program for the analysis of 2D fracture networks called FraNEP (Fracture Network Evaluation Program). The program was developed using Visual Basic for Applications in Microsoft Excel™ and combines features from different existing software and characterization techniques. The main novelty of FraNEP is the possibility to analyse trace-line maps of fracture networks applying the (1) scanline sampling, (2) window sampling or (3) circular scanline and window method, without the need of switching programs. Additionally, binning problems are avoided by using cumulative distributions, rather than probability density functions. FraNEP is a time-efficient tool for the characterisation of fracture network parameters, such as density, intensity and mean length. Furthermore, fracture strikes can be visualized using rose diagrams and a fitting routine evaluates the distribution of fracture lengths. As an example of its application, we use FraNEP to analyse a case study of lineament data from a satellite image of the Oman Mountains.

  7. Probabilistic fracture mechanics applied for DHC assessment in the cool-down transients for CANDU pressure tubes

    Radu, Vasile, E-mail: vasile.radu@nuclear.ro [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, 1st Campului Street, 115400 Mioveni, Arges, P.O. Box 78, Mioveni (Romania); Roth, Maria [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, 1st Campului Street, 115400 Mioveni, Arges, P.O. Box 78, Mioveni (Romania)

    2012-12-15

    For CANDU pressure tubes made from Zr-2.5%Nb alloy, the mechanism called delayed hydride cracking (DHC) is widely recognized as main mechanism responsible for crack initiation and propagation in the pipe wall. Generation of some blunt flaws at the inner pressure tube surface during refueling by fuel bundle bearing pad or by debris fretting, combined with hydrogen/deuterium up-take (20-40 ppm) from normal corrosion process with coolant, may lead to crack initiation and growth. The process is governed by hydrogen hysteresis of terminal solid solubility limits in Zirconium and the diffusion of hydrogen atoms in the stress gradient near to a stress spot (flaw). Creep and irradiation growth under normal operating conditions promote the specific mechanisms for Zirconium alloys, which result in circumferential expansion, accompanied by wall thinning and length increasing. These complicate damage mechanisms in the case of CANDU pressure tubes that are also are affected by irradiation environment in the reactor core. The structural integrity assessment of CANDU fuel channels is based on the technical requirements and methodology stated in the Canadian Standard N285.8. Usually it works with fracture mechanics principles in a deterministic manner. However, there are inherent uncertainties from the in-service inspection, which are associated with those from material properties determination; therefore a necessary conservatism in deterministic evaluation should be used. Probabilistic approach, based on fracture mechanics principle and appropriate limit state functions defined as fracture criteria, appears as a promising complementary way to evaluate structural integrity of CANDU pressure tubes. To perform this, one has to account for the uncertainties that are associated with the main parameters for pressure tube assessment, such as: flaws distribution and sizing, initial hydrogen concentration, fracture toughness, DHC rate and dimensional changes induced by long term

  8. A Rock Mechanics and Coupled Hydro mechanical Analysis of Geological Repository of High Level Nuclear Waste in Fractured Rocks

    Min, Kibok

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a few case studies on fractured hard rock based on geological data from Sweden, Korea is one of a few countries where crystalline rock is the most promising rock formation as a candidate site of geological repository of high level nuclear waste. Despite the progress made in the area of rock mechanics and coupled hydro mechanics, extensive site specific study on multiple candidate sites is essential in order to choose the optimal site. For many countries concerned about the safe isolation of nuclear wastes from the biosphere, disposal in a deep geological formation is considered an attractive option. In geological repository, thermal loading continuously disturbs the repository system in addition to disturbances a recent development in rock mechanics and coupled hydro mechanical study using DFN(Discrete Fracture Network) - DEM(Discrete Element Method) approach mainly applied in hard, crystalline rock containing numerous fracture which are main sources of deformation and groundwater flow

  9. Pseudoarthrosis following proximal humeral fractures: A possible mechanism

    Rooney, P.J.; Cockshott, W.P.

    1986-01-01

    A small series of four patients with pseudarthrosis of the proximal humeral shaft is reported. These patients all had restricted movement of the shoulder joint prior to the trauma, three as a result of rheumatoid arthritis and one due a surgical fusion of the glenohumeral joint. It is suggested that pseudarthrosis is more likely under these circumstances and that pursuit of union of the fracture in such patients may not always be necessary.

  10. Future trends in fracture mechanics: theory and applications

    Hosbons, R.R.

    1978-05-01

    A brief description of the current methods available for the analysis of fracture in ductile materials is given. Crack-opening displacement, R-curves and J-integrals are discussed and their future incorporation into structural codes assessed. The current areas of research which will probably influence code making bodies are also described. Emphasis is made on J-integral theory and a description of its limitations and extensions. Numerical techniques for calculating J for complicated structure are outlined. (author)

  11. Fracture mechanical treatment of bridging stresses in ceramics

    Fett, T.; Munz, D.

    1993-12-01

    Failure of ceramic materials often starts from cracks which can originate at pores, inclusions or can be generated during surface treatment. Fracture occurs when the stress intensity factor of the most serious crack in a component reaches a critical value K lc , the fracture toughness of the material. In case of ideal brittle materials the fracture toughness is independent of the crack extension and, consequently, identical with the stress intensity factor K l0 necessary for the onset of stable crack growth. It is a well-known fact that failure of several ceramics is influenced by an increasing crack-growth resistance curve. Several effects are responsible for this behaviour. Crack-border interactions in the wake of the advancing crack, residual stress fields in the crack region of transformation-toughened ceramics, the generation of a micro-crack zone ahead the crack tip and crack branching. The effect of increasing crack resistance has consequences on many properties of ceramic materials. In this report the authors discuss the some aspects of R-curve behaviour as the representation by stress intensity factors or energies and the influence on the compliance using the bridging stress model. (orig.) [de

  12. Calculation of stress intensity factors using the UNCLE finite element system and their application in fracture mechanics

    Pearce, J.H.B.

    1978-02-01

    The behaviour of crack-like defects in loaded structures is in many cases characterised by the stress intensity factor, K, which describes the spatial distribution around the crack tip. Analytical evaluation of K for generalised loading and geometry would be extremely complex. A finite element approach is described which utilises the existing UNCLE system of the UKAEA. The interpretation of the results for a fracture mechanics analysis is briefly reviewed. (author)

  13. Evaluation of scale effects on hydraulic characteristics of fractured rock using fracture network model

    Ijiri, Yuji; Sawada, Atsushi; Uchida, Masahiro; Ishiguro, Katsuhiko; Umeki, Hiroyuki; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Ohnishi, Yuzo

    2001-01-01

    It is important to take into account scale effects on fracture geometry if the modeling scale is much larger than the in-situ observation scale. The scale effect on fracture trace length, which is the most scale dependent parameter, is investigated using fracture maps obtained at various scales in tunnel and dam sites. We found that the distribution of fracture trace length follows negative power law distribution in regardless of locations and rock types. The hydraulic characteristics of fractured rock is also investigated by numerical analysis of discrete fracture network (DFN) model where power law distribution of fracture radius is adopted. We found that as the exponent of power law distribution become larger, the hydraulic conductivity of DFN model increases and the travel time in DFN model decreases. (author)

  14. Experimental Evaluation of Actinide Transport in a Fractured Granodiorite

    Dittrich, Timothy M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-03-16

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate and evaluate new experimental methods for quantifying the potential for actinide transport in deep fractured crystalline rock formations. We selected a fractured granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland as a model system because field experiments have already been conducted with uranium and additional field experiments using other actinides are planned at the site. Thus, working on this system provides a unique opportunity to compare lab experiment results with fieldscale observations. Rock cores drilled from the GTS were shipped to Los Alamos National Laboratory, characterized by x-ray diffraction and microscopy, and used in batch sorption and column breakthrough experiments. Solutions with pH 6.8 and 8.8 were tested. Solutions were switched to radionuclide-free synthetic Grimsel groundwater after near-steady actinide/colloid breakthrough occurred in column experiments. We are currently evaluating actinide adsorption/desorption rates as a function of water chemistry (initial focus on pH), with future testing planned to evaluate the influence of carbonate concentrations, flow rates, and mineralogy in solutions and suspensions with bentonite colloids. (auth)

  15. Mechanical strength and analysis of fracture of titanium joining submitted to laser and tig welding

    Ana Cláudia Gabrielli Piveta

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the tensile strength and fracture mechanism of tungsten inert gas (TIG welds in cylindrical rods of commercially pure titanium (cp Ti with those of laser welds and intact samples. Thirty dumbbell-shaped samples were developed by using brass rods as patterns. The samples were invested in casings, subjected to thermal cycles, and positioned in a plasma arc welding machine under argon atmosphere and vacuum, and titanium was injected under vacuum/pressure. The samples were X-rayed to detect possible welding flaws and randomly assigned to three groups to test the tensile strength and the fracture mechanism: intact, laser welding, and TIG welding. The tensile test results were investigated using ANOVA, which indicated that the samples were statistically similar. The fracture analysis showed that the cpTi samples subjected to laser welding exhibited brittle fracture and those subjected to TIG welding exhibited mixed brittle/ductile fracture with a predominance of ductile fracture with the presence of microcavities and cleavage areas. Intact samples presented the characteristic straightening in the fracture areas, indicating the ductility of the material.

  16. To evaluate the efficacy of biodegradable plating system for fixation of maxillofacial fractures: A prospective study

    Bali, Rishi K.; Sharma, Parveen; Jindal, Shalu; Gaba, Shivani

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of biodegradable plating system for fixation of maxillofacial fractures and to study the morbidity associated with the use of biodegradable plates and screws. Materials and Methods: This prospective study consisted of 10 patients with maxillofacial fractures requiring open reduction and internal fixation. Fractures with infection, comminuted and pathological fractures were excluded. All were plated with biodegradable system (Inio...

  17. Mechanical behavior and essential work of fracture of starch-based blown films

    Nottez, M.; Chaki, S.; Soulestin, J.; Lacrampe, M. F.; Krawczak, P.

    2015-05-01

    A fracture mechanics approach (Essential Work of Fracture, EWF) was applied to assess the toughness of novel partly starch-grafted polyolefin blown films, compared to that of a neat polyethylene reference. Tests were performed on double-end notched samples. The digital image correlation method was used to monitor the deformation field around the notch. Regular tensile and tear tests were also carried out. The specific essential work of fracture is a characteristic which is much more sensitive to materials structural modifications than the tensile or tear properties.

  18. Low evaluation rate for osteoporosis among patients presenting with a rib fracture.

    Kim, Whang; Gong, Hyun Sik; Lee, Seung Hoo; Park, Jin Woo; Kim, Kahyun; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2017-12-01

    This study in a regional hospital setting found a low evaluation rate for osteoporosis among patients presenting with a rib fracture. Increased emphasis or education for osteoporosis evaluation may be necessary in case of rib fractures. Rib fractures from a low-energy trauma are common in the elderly, and a history of rib fracture has been reported to increase the risk for a subsequent osteoporotic fracture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how many of the patients presenting with an isolated rib fracture were being evaluated for osteoporosis and the risk for a subsequent fracture. We retrospectively reviewed all patients aged 50 years or older who were diagnosed with a rib fracture between January 2011 and April 2016 at a regional tertiary care university hospital near Seoul, South Korea. We excluded those who had been treated for osteoporosis or those with other concomitant fractures or fractures from a motor vehicle accident or cancer. We evaluated the frequency of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan examinations in these patients. There were 231 patients with isolated rib fractures (132 men and 99 women). The mean age was 65 years. Rib fractures were most commonly diagnosed at the emergency department and most of the patients were referred to the department of thoracic surgery for follow-up evaluations. Of these 231 patients, 29 (12%) had DXA examinations after the injury, and only 9 (4%) of them did so within 6 months. Physicians specializing in orthopedic surgery, family medicine, internal medicine, rehabilitation medicine, and emergency medicine were ordering the examination. This study in a regional hospital setting found a low evaluation rate for osteoporosis among patients presenting with a rib fracture. This study suggests that increased emphasis or education for osteoporosis evaluation may be necessary for physicians who are often referred to for care of rib fractures.

  19. State of the Art Report on Fracture Mechanics (Fracture in the Creep Range). Volume 3: Appendices H - M

    Ellison, E.G.; Musicco, G.G.; Pineau, A.

    1988-01-01

    A CEC State of the Art Report on Fracture Mechanics for Fast Breeder Reactors (Fracture below the Creep Range) has recently been published by Bhandari and coworkers (1984). There has also been a compilation of Creep Crack Growth Data from Germany, France and the U.K. for 304 and 316 stainles steel by Lloyd et al (1984). The present Report provides considerably more data and analytical techniques taken from Worldwide sources on creep crack initiation and propagation. Since the subject is moving quickly there is an emphasis on the most recent work; indeed research studies as yet unpublished are also included. The total Report is in 3 volumes. Volume 3 contains the most important and up-to-date information in some detail in Appendices H to M; this provides a sound base for the Report and for future workers

  20. State of the Art Report on Fracture Mechanics (Fracture in the Creep Range). Volume 2: Appendices A - G

    Ellison, E.G.; Musicco, G.G.; Pineau, A.

    1988-01-01

    A CEC State of the Art Report on Fracture Mechanics for Fast Breeder Reactors (Fracture below the Creep Range) has recently been published by Bhandari and coworkers (1984). There has also been a compilation of Creep Crack Growth Data from Germany, France and the U.K. for 304 and 316 stainles steel by Lloyd et al (1984). The present Report provides considerably more data and analytical techniques taken from Worldwide sources on creep crack initiation and propagation. Since the subject is moving quickly there is an emphasis on the most recent work; indeed research studies as yet unpublished are also included. The total Report is in 3 volumes. Volume 2 contains the most important and up-to-date information in some detail in Appendices A to G; this provides a sound base for the Report and for future workers

  1. Fracture probability evaluation of a LWR pressure vessel

    Grandemange, J.; Pellissier-Tanon, A.; Quero, J.; Carnino, A.; Dufresne, J.

    1978-01-01

    Fracture probability evaluation, of a LWR pressure vessel have been performed in the past, using statistical data from conventional plant. A more accurate evaluation has been requested in 1976 from the SCSIN to the CEA. With this object, a joint collaboration agreement has been signed between CEA, EURATOM/ISPRA and FRAMATOME. The whole program proceeding from this agreement is managed by a joint board including the three partners. The basic objective of this program is to develop a method which integrates, or makes it possible to integrate at a later stage, the greatest number of significant parameters. Also, in order to prepare the practical applications, a special effort is being made to collect the data corresponding to these parameters. Parallel basic research program have been launched in order to clarify our knowledge on some important parts of the main factors contributing to the evaluation. The results of this research will be progressively introduced into the method or will help checking its validity

  2. Application of Fracture Mechanics to Specify the Proof Load Factor for Clamp Band Systems of Launch Vehicles

    Singaravelu, J.; Sundaresan, S.; Nageswara Rao, B.

    2013-04-01

    This article presents a methodology for evaluation of the proof load factor (PLF) for clamp band system (CBS) made of M250 Maraging steel following fracture mechanics principles.CBS is most widely used as a structural element and as a separation system. Using Taguchi's design of experiments and the response surface method (RSM) the compact tension specimens were tested to establish an empirical relation for the failure load ( P max) in terms of the ultimate strength, width, thickness, and initial crack length. The test results of P max closely matched with the developed RSM empirical relation. Crack growth rates of the maraging steel in different environments were examined. Fracture strength (σf) of center surface cracks and through-crack tension specimens are evaluated utilizing the fracture toughness ( K IC). Stress induced in merman band at flight loading conditions is evaluated to estimate the higher load factor and PLF. Statistical safety factor and reliability assessments were made for the specified flaw sizes useful in the development of fracture control plan for CBS of launch vehicles.

  3. Stability-based classification for ankle fracture management and the syndesmosis injury in ankle fractures due to a supination external rotation mechanism of injury.

    Pakarinen, Harri

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this thesis was to confirm the utility of stability-based ankle fracture classification in choosing between non-operative and operative treatment of ankle fractures, to determine how many ankle fractures are amenable to non-operative treatment, to assess the roles of the exploration and anatomical repair of the AITFL in the outcome of patients with SER ankle fractures, to establish the sensitivities, specificities and interobserver reliabilities of the hook and intraoperative stress tests for diagnosing syndesmosis instability in SER ankle fractures, and to determine whether transfixation of unstable syndesmosis is necessary in SER ankle fractures. The utility of stability based fracture classification to choose between non-operative and operative treatment was assessed in a retrospective study (1) of 253 ankle fractures in skeletally mature patients, 160 of whom were included in the study to obtain an epidemiological profile in a population of 130,000. Outcome was assessed after a minimum follow-up of two years. The role of AITFL repairs was assessed in a retrospective study (2) of 288 patients with Lauge-Hansen SE4 ankle fractures; the AITFL was explored and repaired in one group (n=165), and a similar operative method was used but the AITFL was not explored in another group (n=123). Outcome was measured with a minimum follow-up of two years. Interobserver reliability of clinical syndesomosis tests (study 3) and the role of syndesmosis transfixation (study 4) were assessed in a prospective study of 140 patients with Lauge-Hansen SE4 ankle fractures. The stability of the distal tibiofibular joint was evaluated by the hook and ER stress tests. Clinical tests were carried out by the main surgeon and assistant, separately, after which a 7.5-Nm standardized ER stress test for both ankles was performed; if it was positive, the patient was randomized to either syndesmosis transfixation (13 patients) or no fixation (11 patients) treatment groups. The

  4. Experimental and theoretical fracture mechanics applied to volcanic conduits and domes

    Sammonds, P.; Matthews, C.; Kilburn, C.; Smith, R.; Tuffen, H.; Meredith, P.

    2008-12-01

    We present an integrated modelling and experimental approach to magma deformation and fracture, which we attempt to validate against field observations of seismicity. The importance of fracture processes in magma ascent dynamics and lava dome growth and collapse are apparent from the associated seismicity. Our laboratory experiments have shown that brittle fracture of magma can occur at high temperature and stress conditions prevalent in the shallow volcanic system. Here, we use a fracture mechanics approach to model seismicity preceding volcanic eruptions. Starting with the fracture mechanics concept of a crack in an elastic body, we model crack growth around the volcanic conduit through the processes of crack interactions, leading either to the propagation and linkage of cracks, or crack avoidance and the inhibition of crack propagation. The nature of that interaction is governed by the temperature and plasticity of the magma. We find that fracture mechanics rules can account for the style of seismicity preceding eruptions. We have derived the changes in seismic b-value predicted by the model and interpret these in terms of the style of fracturing, fluid flow and heat transport. We compare our model with results from our laboratory experiments where we have deformed lava at high temperatures under triaxial stresses. These experiments were conducted in dry and water saturated conditions at effective pressures up to 10 MPa, temperatures up to 1000°C and strain rates from 10-4 s-1 to 10-6 s-1. The behaviour of these magmas was largely brittle under these conditions. We monitored the acoustic emission emitted and calculate the change in micro-seismic b-value with deformation. These we find are in accord with volcano seismicity and our fracture mechanics model.

  5. Fracture mechanical analysis of strengthened concrete tension members with one crack

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A concrete tension member strengthened 2 with fiber reinforced polymer plates on two sides 3 is analyzed with non-linear fracture mechanics. The 4 analysis of the strengthened tension member incorpo5 rates cohesive properties for both concrete and inter6 face between concrete and strengthening...... the structural classification parameters, is inves13 tigated in a non-dimensional analysis, and found to 14 depend strongly on the ratio between interfacial and 15 concrete fracture energies....

  6. User's manuals of probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis code for aged piping, PASCAL-SP

    Itoh, Hiroto; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Onizawa, Kunio; Kato, Daisuke; Osakabe, Kazuya

    2010-03-01

    As a part of research on the material degradation and structural integrity assessment for aged LWR components, a PFM (Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics) analysis code PASCAL-SP (PFM Analysis of Structural Components in Aging LWR - Stress Corrosion Cracking at Welded Joints of Piping) has been developed. This code evaluates the failure probabilities at welded joints of aged piping by a Monte Carlo method. PASCAL-SP treats stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fatigue crack growth in piping, according to the approaches of NISA and JSME FFS Code. The development of the code has been aimed to improve the accuracy and reliability of analysis by introducing new analysis methodologies and algorithms considering the latest knowledge in the SCC assessment and fracture criteria of piping. In addition, the accuracy of flaw detection and sizing at in-service inspection and residual stress distribution were modeled based on experimental data and introduced into PASCAL-SP. This code has been developed for a cross-check use by the regulatory body in Japan. In addition to this, this code can also be used for a research purpose by researchers in academia and industries. This report provides the user's manual and theoretical background of the code. (author)

  7. FAVOR: A new fracture mechanics code for reactor pressure vessels subjected to pressurized thermal shock

    Dickson, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis which is a major element of the comprehensive probabilistic methodology endorsed by the NRC for evaluation of the integrity of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) pressure vessels subjected to pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) transients. It is anticipated that there will be an increasing need for an improved and validated PTS PFM code which is accepted by the NRC and utilities, as more plants approach the PTS screening criteria and are required to perform plant-specific analyses. The NRC funded Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratories is currently developing the FAVOR (Fracture Analysis of Vessels: Oak Ridge) PTS PFM code, which is intended to meet this need. The FAVOR code incorporates the most important features of both OCA-P and VISA-II and contains some new capabilities such as PFM global modeling methodology, the capability to approximate the effects of thermal streaming on circumferential flaws located inside a plume region created by fluid and thermal stratification, a library of stress intensity factor influence coefficients, generated by the NQA-1 certified ABAQUS computer code, for an adequate range of two and three dimensional inside surface flaws, the flexibility to generate a variety of output reports, and user friendliness

  8. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics for nuclear pressure vessels: a preliminary appraisal

    Hahn, G.T.; Broek, D.; Marschall, C.W.; Rosenfield, A.R.; Rybicki, E.F.; Schmueser, D.W.; Stonesifer, R.B.; Kanninen, M.F.

    1978-01-01

    A research program directed at assessing the margin of safety of flawed nuclear pressure vessels near and beyond general yielding is described. The program has the general objective of developing an elastic-plastic fracture mechanics methodology. The approach is based on the use of finite element models together with experimental results to identify criteria appropriate for the onset of crack extension and for stable crack growth. A number of criteria beyond the conventional LEFM R curve are being evaluated. These include the critical values of the J-integral, its derivative, the crack tip opening angle, the average crack opening angle, a generalized energy release rate, its components and a crack tip force. The optimum fracture criterion for nuclear vessels is being determined by systematic measurements of load extension curves, strain distribution, crack opening displacement, stable crack growth and instability on 'toughness scaled' model materials. Computations have been performed for center cracked panels of a model material (2219-T87 aluminium) for full shear failure. (author)

  9. Survey on application of probabilistic fracture mechanics approach to nuclear piping

    Kashima, Koichi

    1987-01-01

    Probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) approach is newly developed as one of the tools to evaluate the structural integrity of nuclear components. This report describes the current status of PFM studies for pressure vessel and piping system in light water reactors and focuses on the investigations of the piping failure probability which have been undertaken by USNRC. USNRC reevaluates the double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) of rector coolant piping as a design basis event for nuclear power plant by using the PFM approach. For PWR piping systems designed by Westinghouse, two causes of pipe break are considered: pipe failure due to the crack growth and pipe failure indirectly caused by failure of component supports due to an earthquake. PFM approach shows that the probability of DEGB from either cause is very low and that the effect of earthquake on pipe failure can be neglected. (author)

  10. Correlation between high resolution sequence stratigraphy and mechanical stratigraphy for enhanced fracture characteristic prediction

    Al Kharusi, Laiyyan M.

    Sequence stratigraphy relates changes in vertical and lateral facies distribution to relative changes in sea level. These relative changes in carbonates effect early diagenesis, types of pores, cementation and dissolution patterns. As a result, in carbonates, relative changes in sea level significantly impact the lithology, porosity, diagenesis, bed and bounding surfaces which are all factors that control fracture patterns. This study explores these relationships by integrating stratigraphy with fracture analysis and petrophysical properties. A special focus is given to the relationship between mechanical boundaries and sequence stratigraphic boundaries in three different settings: (1) Mississippian strata in Sheep Mountain Anticline, Wyoming, (2) Mississippian limestones in St. Louis, Missouri, and (3) Pennsylvanian limestones intermixed with elastics in the Paradox Basin, Utah. The analysis of these sections demonstrate that a fracture hierarchy exists in relation to the sequence stratigraphic hierarchy. The majority of fractures (80%) terminate at genetic unit boundaries or the internal flooding surface that separates the transgressive from regressive hemicycle. Fractures (20%) that do not terminate at genetic unit boundaries or their internal flooding surface terminate at lower order sequence stratigraphic boundaries or their internal flooding surfaces. Secondly, the fracture spacing relates well to bed thickness in mechanical units no greater than 0.5m in thickness but with increasing bed thickness a scatter from the linear trend is observed. In the Paradox Basin the influence of strain on fracture density is illustrated by two sections measured in different strain regimes. The folded strata at Raplee Anticline has higher fracture densities than the flat-lying beds at the Honaker Trail. Cemented low porosity rocks in the Paradox Basin do not show a correlation between fracture pattern and porosity. However velocity and rock stiffness moduli's display a slight

  11. PASCAL, Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics Analysis of Structural Components in Aging LWR

    Shibata, Katsuyuki; Onizawa, Kunio; Li, Yinsheng; Kato, Daisuke

    2005-01-01

    A - Description of program or function: PASCAL (PFM analysis of Structural Components in Aging LWR) is a PFM (Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics) code for evaluating the failure probability of aged pressure components. PASCAL has been developed as a part of the JAERI's research program on aging and structural integrity of LWR components, in order to respond to the increasing need of the probabilistic methodology in the regulation and inspection of nuclear components with the objective to provide a rational tool for the evaluation of the reliability and integrity of structural components. In order to improve the accuracy and reliability of the analysis code, some new fracture mechanics models or computational techniques are introduced considering the recent progress in the state of the art and performance of PC. Thus some new analysis models and original methodologies were introduced in PASCAL such as the elastic-plastic fracture criterion based on R6 method, a new crack extension model of semi-elliptical crack evaluation and so on. Moreover a function to evaluate the effect of embrittlement recovery by annealing of irradiated RPV is also introduced in the code based on the USNRC R.G. 1.162(1996). The code has been verified through various failure analysis results and international PTS round robin analysis ICAS which had been organized by the Principal Working Group 3 of OECD/NEA/CSNI. In order to attain a high usability, PASCAL Ver.1 with GUI provides an exclusive FEM pre-processor Pre-PASCAL for generating the input load transient data, a GUI system for generating the input data for PASCAL main processor of main solver and post-processor for output data. - Pre-PASCAL: Pre-PASCAL is an exclusive 3-D FEM pre-processor for generating the input transient data provided with 3 RPV mesh models and two simple specimen mesh models, i.e. CT and CCP. Almost the same input data format with that of PASCAL main processor is used. Output data of temperature and stress distribution

  12. An Effective Modal Approach to the Dynamic Evaluation of Fracture Toughness of Quasi-Brittle Materials

    Ferreira, L. E. T.; Vareda, L. V.; Hanai, J. B.; Sousa, J. L. A. O.; Silva, A. I.

    2017-05-01

    A modal dynamic analysis is used as the tool to evaluate the fracture toughness of concrete from the results of notched-through beam tests. The dimensionless functions describing the relation between the frequencies and specimen geometry used for identifying the variation in the natural frequency as a function of crack depth is first determined for a 150 × 150 × 500-mm notched-through specimen. The frequency decrease resulting from the propagating crack is modeled through a modal/fracture mechanics approach, leading to determination of an effective crack length. This length, obtained numerically, is used to evaluate the fracture toughness of concrete, the critical crack mouth opening displacements, and the brittleness index proposed. The methodology is applied to tests performed on high-strength concrete specimens. The frequency response for each specimen is evaluated before and after each crack propagation step. The methodology is then validated by comparison with results from the application of other methodologies described in the literature and suggested by RILEM.

  13. Evaluation results of using sole Ilizarov fixator in Pilon fractures

    Ahmad Reza Mirbolook

    2014-02-01

    Conclusion: According to the results obtained and comparing them with the results of other treatments ,one can claim that this treating approach is better than the others for pilon fractures,particularly for type 3c pilon fractures.

  14. Two-parameter fracture mechanics: Theory and applications

    O'Dowd, N.P.; Shih, C.F.

    1993-02-01

    A family of self-similar fields provides the two parameters required to characterize the full range of high- and low-triaxiality crack tip states. The two parameters, J and Q, have distinct roles: J sets the size scale of the process zone over which large stresses and strains develop, while Q scales the near-tip stress distribution relative to a high triaxiality reference stress state. An immediate consequence of the theory is this: it is the toughness values over a range of crack tip constraint that fully characterize the material's fracture resistance. It is shown that Q provides a common scale for interpreting cleavage fracture and ductile tearing data thus allowing both failure modes to be incorporated in a single toughness locus. The evolution of Q, as plasticity progresses from small scale yielding to fully yielded conditions, has been quantified for several crack geometries and for a wide range of material strain hardening properties. An indicator of the robustness of the J-Q fields is introduced; Q as a field parameter and as a pointwise measure of stress level is discussed

  15. Numerical Analysis and Experimental Study of Hard Roofs in Fully Mechanized Mining Faces under Sleeve Fracturing

    Zhitao Zheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sudden falls of large-area hard roofs in a mined area release a large amount of elastic energy, generate dynamic loads, and cause disasters such as impact ground pressure and gas outbursts. To address these problems, in this study, the sleeve fracturing method (SFM was applied to weaken a hard roof. The numerical simulation software FLAC3D was used to develop three models based on an analysis of the SFM working mechanism. These models were applied to an analysis of the fracturing effects of various factors such as the borehole diameter, hole spacing, and sleeve pressure. Finally, the results of a simulation were validated using experiments with similar models. Our research indicated the following: (1 The crack propagation directions in the models were affected by the maximum principal stress and hole spacing. When the borehole diameter was fixed, the fracturing pressure increased with increasing hole spacing. In contrast, when the fracturing pressure was fixed, the fracturing range increased with increasing borehole diameter; (2 The most ideal fracturing effect was found at a fracturing pressure of 17.6 MPa in the model with a borehole diameter of 40 mm and hole spacing of 400 mm. The results showed that it is possible to regulate the falls of hard roofs using the SFM. This research may provide a theoretical basis for controlling hard roofs in mining.

  16. Thermo-hydro-mechanical simulation of a 3D fractured porous rock: preliminary study of coupled matrix-fracture hydraulics

    Canamon, I.; Javier Elorza, F. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Dept. de Matematica Aplicada y Metodos Informaticas, ETSI Minas (UPM) (Spain); Ababou, R. [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse (IMFT), 31 (France)

    2007-07-01

    We present a problem involving the modeling of coupled flow and elastic strain in a 3D fractured porous rock, which requires prior homogenization (up-scaling) of the fractured medium into an equivalent Darcian anisotropic continuum. The governing equations form a system of PDE's (Partial Differential Equations) and, depending on the case being considered, this system may involve two different types of 'couplings' (in a real system, both couplings (1) and (2) generally take place): 1) Hydraulic coupling in a single (no exchange) or in a dual matrix-fracture continuum (exchange); 2) Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical interactions between fluid flow, pressure, elastic stress, strain, and temperature. We present here a preliminary model and simulation results with FEMLAB{sup R}, for the hydraulic problem with anisotropic heterogeneous coefficients. The model is based on data collected at an instrumented granitic site (FEBEX project) for studying a hypothetical nuclear waste repository at the Grimsel Test Site in the Swiss Alps. (authors)

  17. Development of Deterministic and Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics Analysis Code PROFAS-RV for Reactor Pressure Vessel - Progress of the Work

    Kim, Jong Min; Lee, Bong Sang [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, a deterministic/probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis program for reactor pressure vessel, PROFAS-RV, is developed. This program can evaluate failure probability of RPV using recent radiation embrittlement model of 10CFR50.61a and stress intensity factor calculation method of RCC-MRx code as well as the required basic functions of PFM program. Applications of some new radiation embrittlement model, material database, calculation method of stress intensity factors, and others which can improve fracture mechanics assessment of RPV are introduced. The purpose of this study is to develop a probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis program for RPV considering above modification and application of newly developed models and calculation methods. In this paper, it deals with the development progress of the PFM analysis program for RPV, PROFAS-RV. The PROFAS-RV is being tested with other codes, and it is expected to revise and upgrade by reflecting the latest model and calculation method continuously. These efforts can minimize the uncertainty of the integrity evaluation for the reactor pressure vessel.

  18. Anatomical predisposition of the ankle joint for lateral sprain or lateral malleolar fracture evaluated by radiographic measurements.

    Lee, Kyoung Min; Chung, Chin Youb; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Lee, SeungYeol; Kim, Tae Gyun; Choi, Young; Jung, Ki Jin; Kim, Yeon Ho; Koo, Seung Bum; Park, Moon Seok

    2015-01-01

    Injury mechanism and the amount of force are important factors determining whether a fracture or sprain occurs at the time of an ankle inversion injury. However, the anatomical differences between the ankle fracture and sprain have not been investigated sufficiently. This study was performed to investigate whether an anatomical predisposition of the ankle joint results in a lateral malleolar fracture or lateral ankle sprain. Two groups of consecutive patients, one with lateral malleolar fracture (274 patients, mean age 49.0 years) and the other with lateral ankle sprain (400 patients, mean age 38.4 years), were evaluated. Ankle radiographs were examined for 7 measures: distal tibial articular surface (DTAS) angle, bimalleolar tilt (BT), medial malleolar relative length (MMRL), lateral malleolar relative length (LMRL), medial malleolar slip angle (MMSA), anterior inclination of tibia (AI), and fibular position (FP). After an interobserver reliability test, the radiographic measurements were compared between the 2 groups. Linear regression analysis was performed to correct for age and sex effects between the groups. The fracture group and the sprain group showed significant differences in BT (P = .001), MMSA (P sprain groups showed a significant difference in BT (P = .001), MMRL (P ankle sprain group. Further 3-dimensional assessment of the bony structure and subsequent biomechanical studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of injury according to the various types of ankle fractures and ankle sprain. Level III, retrospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Evaluation of hip fracture risk in relation to fall direction.

    Nankaku, Manabu; Kanzaki, Hideto; Tsuboyama, Tadao; Nakamura, Takashi

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate hip fracture risk in relation to fall direction, and to elucidate factors that influence the impact force in falls on the hip. Eight healthy volunteers performed deliberate falls in three directions (lateral, posterolateral and posterior) on a force platform covered by a mattress of 13 cm thickness. Fall descent motions and impact postures were examined by a three-dimensional analyzer. The maximum ground force reaction, velocity of the greater trochanter at impact, and activity of quadriceps and gluteus medius were measured. In all trials of lateral and posterolateral falls, but not of posterior falls, the subjects hit their greater trochanter directly on the mattress. The impact forces were between 2,000 N and 4,000 N. Posterolateral falls showed significantly higher velocity at impact than did posterior falls. The height and the lower limb length exhibited positive correlations with the impact force in all directions of fall. In the lateral fall, there was a positive correlation between the activity of quadriceps and the impact force. In view of the impact point, force, and velocity, the posterolateral fall seemed to carry the highest risk of hip fracture.

  20. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis of reactor vessel for pressurized thermal shock: the effect of residual stress and fracture toughness

    Jung, Sung Gyu; Jin, Tae Eun; Jhung, Myung Jo; Choi, Young Hwan

    2003-01-01

    The structural integrity of the reactor vessel with the approaching end of life must be assured for pressurized thermal shock. The regulation specifies the screening criteria for this and requires that specific analysis be performed for the reactor vessel which is anticipated to exceed the screening criteria at the end of plant life. In case the screening criteria is exceeded by the deterministic analysis, probabilistic analysis must be performed to show that failure probability is within the limit. In this study, probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis of the reactor vessel for pressurized thermal shock is performed and the effects of residual stress and master curve on the failure probability are investigated

  1. Variate generation for probabilistic fracture mechanics and fitness-for-service studies

    Walker, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is conducting studies in Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics. These studies are being conducted as part of a fitness-for-service programme in support of CANDU reactors. The Monte Carlo analyses, which form part of the Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics studies, require that variates can be sampled from probability density functions. Accurate pseudo-random numbers are necessary for accurate variate generation. This report details the principles of variate generation, and describes the production and testing of pseudo-random numbers. A new algorithm has been produced for the correct performance of the lattice test for the independence of pseudo-random numbers. Two new pseudo-random number generators have been produced. These generators have excellent randomness properties and can be made fully machine-independent. Versions, in FORTRAN, for VAX and CDC computers are given. Accurate and efficient algorithms for the generation of variates from the specialized probability density functions of Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics are given. 38 refs

  2. Coupled hydrological-mechanical effects due to excavation of underground openings in unsaturated fractured rocks

    Montazer, P.

    1985-01-01

    One of the effects of excavating an underground opening in fractured rocks is a modification of the state of the stress in the rock mass in the vicinity of the opening. This effect causes changes in the geometry of the cross sections of the fracture planes, which in turn results in modification of the hydrologic properties of the fractures of the rock mass. The significance of the orientation of the fractures and their stiffness on the extent of the modification of the hydrologic properties as a result of excavation of underground openings is demonstrated. A conceptual model is presented to illustrate the complexity of the coupled hydrological-mechanical phenomena in the unsaturated zone. This conceptual model is used to develop an investigative program to assess the extent of the effect at a proposed repository site for storing high-level nuclear wastes

  3. Hydraulic and mechanical properties of natural fractures in low-permeability rock

    Pyrack-Nolte, L.J.; Myer, L.R.; Cook, N.G.W.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive laboratory study of the mechanical displacement, permeability, and void geometry of single rock fractures in a quartz monzonite are summarized and analyzed. A metal-injection technique was developed that provided quantitative data on the precise geometry of the void spaces between the fracture surfaces and the areas of contact at different stresses. At effective stresses of less than 20 MPa fluid flow was proportional to the mean fracture aperture raised to a power greater than 3. As stress was increased, contact area was increased and void spaces become interconnected by small tortuous channels that constitute the principal impediment to fluid flow. At effective stresses higher than 20 MPa, the mean fracture aperture continued to diminish with increasing stress, but this had little effect on flow because the small tortuous flow channels deformed little with increasing stress

  4. Prediction of retained residual stresses in laboratory fracture mechanics specimens extracted from welded components

    Hurlston, R.G.; Sherry, A.H.; James, P.; Sharples, J.K.

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of weld material fracture toughness properties is important for the structural integrity assessment of engineering components. However, welds can contain high levels of residual stress and these can be retained in fracture mechanics specimens, particularly when machined from non-stress relieved welds. Retained residual stresses can make the measurement of valid fracture toughness properties difficult. This paper describes the results of analytical work undertaken to investigate factors that can influence the magnitude and distribution of residual stresses retained in fracture mechanics specimen blanks extracted from as-welded ferritic and austenitic stainless steel plates. The results indicate that significant levels of residual stress can be retained in specimen blanks prior to notching, and that the magnitude and distribution of stress is dependent upon material properties, specimen geometry and size, and extraction location through the thickness of the weld. Finite element modelling is shown to provide a useful approach for estimating the level and distributions of retained residual stresses. A new stress partitioning approach has been developed to estimate retained stress levels and results compare favourably with FE analysis and available experimental data. The approach can help guide the selection of specimen geometry and machining strategies to minimise the level of residual stresses retained in fracture mechanics specimen blanks extracted from non stress-relieved welds and thus improve the measurement of weld fracture toughness properties. - Highlights: • A simplified method for generating realistic weld residual stresses has been developed. • It has been shown that significant levels of residual stress can be retained within laboratory fracture mechanics specimens. • The level and distribution is dependant upon material, specimen type, specimen size and extraction location. • A method has been developed to allow estimates of the

  5. Deformation Mechanisms and Fracture of Ni-Based Metallic Glasses

    Lesz S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The cracking of materials and fracture surface is of great practical and academic importance. Over the last few years the development of the fractography of crystalline alloys resulted in a useful tool for the prediction or failure analysis. Many attempts have been made to observe cracks using optical microscopy, X-ray topography and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Of these techniques, the resolution of optical microscopy and X-ray topography is too poor. By contrast, the resolution of TEM is high enough for detailed information to be obtained. However, in order to apply TEM observations, a thin foil specimen must be prepared, and it is usually extremely difficult to prepare such a specimen from a pre-selected region containing a crack.

  6. Evaluation of clinical use of indigenously developed delta plate in management of subcondylar fracture

    Anroop Anirudhan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Condylar fractures account for 25-35% of mandibular fractures and deserve a special consideration apart from rest of the mandible due to their anatomical differences and healing potential. Previous clinical and biomechanical studies have recommended using two miniplates for fixation of condyle fractures. Two miniplates require a certain size of the proximal condyle fragment and thus are applicable mainly in cases involving low fractures. The present study evaluates the clinical use of indigenously developed titanium delta-shaped miniplate in open reduction and internal fixation of subcondylar fracture.

  7. The Place of Ultrasonography in the Evaluation of Rib Fractures

    Fulya Bakılan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether ultrasonography is superior to chest x-ray in detecting rib fractures in patients with minor blunt chest trauma and chest pain. Materials and Methods: Ultrasonography findings of 32 patients with minor blunt chest trauma showing no evidence of a rib fracture on anteroposterior chest x-rays, were documented. Presence of cortical discontinuities, acoustic shadows, reverberation artifacts, and hematoma by ultrasonography was proposed as the diagnostic criteria for detecting the rib fracture. Results: Rib fracture was detected in 20 patients (62.5% according to ultrasonography results. A mildly displaced fracture was detected in 7 patients (35%, hematoma was detected in 3 patients (15% and multiple fractures (in 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th ribs were detected in 1 patient (5%. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that ultrasonography is superior to chest x-ray, in detecting rib fractures.

  8. Evaluating the fracture toughness and flexural strength of pressable dental ceramics: an in vitro study.

    Gurram, Ravi; Krishna, C H Vamsi; Reddy, K Mahendranadh; Reddy, G V K Mohan; Shastry, Y Mahadev

    2014-12-01

    The study was undertaken to evaluate the biaxial flexural strength, biaxial flexural strength after etching with 9 % HF acid and fracture toughness of three commonly used pressable all ceramic core materials. Ninety glass ceramic specimens were fabricated from three commercially available leucite based core ceramic material (1) Esthetic Empress, (2) Cergo, and (3) Performance Plus. Thirty discs of each material were divided into three groups of 10 discs each. Biaxial flexural strength (30 discs,) Biaxial flexural strength for samples treated with 9 % HF acid (30 discs) and fracture toughness (30 discs) were evaluated. Core material Performance Plus had the lowest biaxial strength of 124.89 MPa, Cergo had strength of 152.22 MPa and the highest value of 163.95 was reported for Esthetic Empress. For samples treated 9 % HF, Performance Plus had the lowest biaxial strength of 98.37 MPa, Cergo had strength of 117.42 MPa and the highest value of 143.74 was reported for Esthetic Empress. Core material Performance Plus had the lowest fracture toughness of 1.063 MPa, Cergo had strength of 1.112 MPa and the highest value of 1.225 was reported for Esthetic Empress. The results shows that Esthetic Empress had better mechanical properties compared to Cergo had Performance Plus in relation to the parameters tested.

  9. Fracture mechanical analysis of tungsten armor failure of a water-cooled divertor target

    Li, Muyuan; Werner, Ewald [Lehrstuhl für Werkstoffkunde und Werkstoffmechanik, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching (Germany); You, Jeong-Ha, E-mail: you@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • The FEM-based VCE method and XFEM were employed for computing K{sub I} (or J-integral) and predicting progressive cracking, respectively. • The most probable pattern of crack formation is radial cracking in the tungsten armor block. • The most probable site of cracking is the upper interfacial region of the tungsten armor block adjacent to the top position of the copper interlayer. • The initiation of a major crack becomes likely, only when the strength of tungsten armor block is significantly reduced from its original strength. - Abstract: The inherent brittleness of tungsten at low temperature and the embrittlement by neutron irradiation are its most critical weaknesses for fusion applications. In the current design of the ITER and DEMO divertor, the high heat flux loads during the operation impose a strong constraint on the structure–mechanical performance of the divertor. Thus, the combination of brittleness and the thermally induced stress fields due to the high heat flux loads raises a serious reliability issue in terms of the structural integrity of tungsten armor. In this study, quantitative estimates of the vulnerability of the tungsten monoblock armor cracking under stationary high heat flux loads are presented. A comparative fracture mechanical investigation has been carried out by means of two different types of computational approaches, namely, the extended finite element method (XFEM) and the finite element method (FEM)-based virtual crack tip extension (VCE) method. The fracture analysis indicates that the most probable pattern of crack formation is radial cracking in the tungsten armor starting from the interface to tube and the most probable site of cracking is the upper interfacial region of the tungsten armor adjacent to the top position of the copper interlayer. The strength threshold for crack initiation and the high heat flux load threshold for crack propagation are evaluated based on XFEM simulations and computations

  10. Failure probability assessment of wall-thinned nuclear pipes using probabilistic fracture mechanics

    Lee, Sang-Min; Chang, Yoon-Suk; Choi, Jae-Boong; Kim, Young-Jin

    2006-01-01

    The integrity of nuclear piping system has to be maintained during operation. In order to maintain the integrity, reliable assessment procedures including fracture mechanics analysis, etc., are required. Up to now, this has been performed using conventional deterministic approaches even though there are many uncertainties to hinder a rational evaluation. In this respect, probabilistic approaches are considered as an appropriate method for piping system evaluation. The objectives of this paper are to estimate the failure probabilities of wall-thinned pipes in nuclear secondary systems and to propose limited operating conditions under different types of loadings. To do this, a probabilistic assessment program using reliability index and simulation techniques was developed and applied to evaluate failure probabilities of wall-thinned pipes subjected to internal pressure, bending moment and combined loading of them. The sensitivity analysis results as well as prototypal integrity assessment results showed a promising applicability of the probabilistic assessment program, necessity of practical evaluation reflecting combined loading condition and operation considering limited condition

  11. Computational simulation for creep fracture properties taking microscopic mechanism into account

    Tabuchi, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    Relationship between creep crack growth rate and microscopic fracture mechanism i.e., wedge-type intergranular, transgranular and cavity-type intergranular crack growth, has been investigated. The growth rate of wedge-type and transgranular creep crack could be characterized by creep ductility. Creep damages formed ahead of the cavity-type crack tip accelerated the crack growth rate. Based on the experimental results, FEM code that simulates creep crack growth has been developed by taking the fracture mechanism into account. The effect of creep ductility and void formation ahead of the crack tip on creep crack growth behavior could be simulated. (author)

  12. Proceedings of the 20th meeting of the working group on fracture mechanisms

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains 41 contributions presented at the 20th meeting of the working group on fracture mechanisms. The contributions dealt with the following topics: 1.) mechanical and test fundamentals of crack initiating corrosion processes; 2.) crack formation in water and seawater; 3.) crack formation in the process industry; 4.) hydrogen-induced crack formation; 5.) stress and crack corrosion of rustproof cast alloys; 6.) corrosion-induced crack formation at high temperatures; 7.) experimental and numerical studies on fracture behaviour. 30 contributions were separately integrated in the data base 'ENERGY'. (MM) [de

  13. Investigation on fracture behavior and mechanisms of DGEBF toughened by CTBN

    Wang, Lulu; Tan, Yefa; Wang, Haitao; Gao, Li; Xiao, Chufan

    2018-05-01

    Carboxyl-terminated butadiene-co-acrylonitrile (CTBN) was used as the toughener to improve the mechanical performance and fracture toughness of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF) by prereacted approach. The results show that the chemical bonding interface was formed between DGEBF and CTBN particles in the prepolymerization reaction process, which remarkably enhances the fracture toughness of the composites. Based on the qualitative and quantitative analyses, it shows the main toughening mechanisms are the plastic shear banding effect resulted from the plastic deformation of the EP matrix and the plastic void expansion because of the debonding of CTBN particles from the EP matrix.

  14. An Overview of Innovative Strategies for Fracture Mechanics at NASA Langley Research Center

    Ransom, Jonathan B.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Ratcliffe, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Engineering fracture mechanics has played a vital role in the development and certification of virtually every aerospace vehicle that has been developed since the mid-20th century. NASA Langley Research Center s Durability, Damage Tolerance and Reliability Branch has contributed to the development and implementation of many fracture mechanics methods aimed at predicting and characterizing damage in both metallic and composite materials. This paper presents a selection of computational, analytical and experimental strategies that have been developed by the branch for assessing damage growth under monotonic and cyclic loading and for characterizing the damage tolerance of aerospace structures

  15. Evaluation of perfusion of the femoral head after femoral neck fracture using bone scintigraphy

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Ishido, Yasuhiro [Saiseikai Sendai Hospital, Kagoshima (Japan); Okano, Toshihiro [Ibusuki National Hospital, Kagoshima (Japan); Komiya, Setsuro [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    2002-09-01

    We treated 13 patients for femoral neck fracture. They consisted of 2 males and 11 females, and were classified according to Garden stage classification; Stage I, 3 cases; Stage II, 2 cases; Stage III, 2 cases; Stage IV, 4 cases. Two trochanteric fracture cases were used by control. We evaluated perfusion of the femoral head after femoral neck fracture using bone scintigraphy, which is considered useful for evaluation of perfusion of the femoral neck before operation. (author)

  16. Evaluation of perfusion of the femoral head after femoral neck fracture using bone scintigraphy

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Ishido, Yasuhiro; Okano, Toshihiro; Komiya, Setsuro

    2002-01-01

    We treated 13 patients for femoral neck fracture. They consisted of 2 males and 11 females, and were classified according to Garden stage classification; Stage I, 3 cases; Stage II, 2 cases; Stage III, 2 cases; Stage IV, 4 cases. Two trochanteric fracture cases were used by control. We evaluated perfusion of the femoral head after femoral neck fracture using bone scintigraphy, which is considered useful for evaluation of perfusion of the femoral neck before operation. (author)

  17. Evaluation of fracture toughness for metal/ceramics composite materials by means of miniaturized specimen technique

    Saito, Masahiro; Takahashi, Hideaki; Jeong, Hee-Don; Kawasaki, Akira; Watanabe, Ryuzo

    1991-01-01

    In order to evaluate fracture strength for Y 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 , 3 mol% Y 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 (PSZ)/SUS 304 composite materials, Macor as a machinable ceramics and comercially available ceramics (SiC, Si 3 N 4 , PSZ, Al 2 O 3 ), fracture toughness tests were carried out by use of RCT or bending specimens. On the other hand, the fracture strength of these materials was evaluated and inspected the correlation between fracture toughness and fracture stress of small punch (SP) or modified small punch (MSP) test data to predict the fracture toughness value by using miniaturized specimens. Characteristic of the MSP testing method is the ability to evaluate elastic modulus (Young's modulus), fracture strength, yield strength, fracture strain, and fracture energy, etc., with high accuracy and good reproducibility for brittle materials. For a series of metal/ ceramics composites which from ductile to brittle, this paper clarified clear the applicable range for SP and MSP testing methods, which suggested that the simultaneous use of SP and MSP test methods can evaluate the fracture strength of metal/ ceramics composites. (author)

  18. Rock fracture processes in chemically reactive environments

    Eichhubl, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rock fracture is traditionally viewed as a brittle process involving damage nucleation and growth in a zone ahead of a larger fracture, resulting in fracture propagation once a threshold loading stress is exceeded. It is now increasingly recognized that coupled chemical-mechanical processes influence fracture growth in wide range of subsurface conditions that include igneous, metamorphic, and geothermal systems, and diagenetically reactive sedimentary systems with possible applications to hydrocarbon extraction and CO2 sequestration. Fracture processes aided or driven by chemical change can affect the onset of fracture, fracture shape and branching characteristics, and fracture network geometry, thus influencing mechanical strength and flow properties of rock systems. We are investigating two fundamental modes of chemical-mechanical interactions associated with fracture growth: 1. Fracture propagation may be aided by chemical dissolution or hydration reactions at the fracture tip allowing fracture propagation under subcritical stress loading conditions. We are evaluating effects of environmental conditions on critical (fracture toughness KIc) and subcritical (subcritical index) fracture properties using double torsion fracture mechanics tests on shale and sandstone. Depending on rock composition, the presence of reactive aqueous fluids can increase or decrease KIc and/or subcritical index. 2. Fracture may be concurrent with distributed dissolution-precipitation reactions in the hostrock beyond the immediate vicinity of the fracture tip. Reconstructing the fracture opening history recorded in crack-seal fracture cement of deeply buried sandstone we find that fracture length growth and fracture opening can be decoupled, with a phase of initial length growth followed by a phase of dominant fracture opening. This suggests that mechanical crack-tip failure processes, possibly aided by chemical crack-tip weakening, and distributed solution-precipitation creep in the

  19. Rock mechanics in the disposal of radioactive wastes by hydraulic fracturing

    McClain, W C

    1968-01-01

    The ultimate capacity of a hydraulic-fracturing waste disposal facility is governed primarily by the integrity of the rocks overlying the injected wastes. The objective of this study is to analyze theoretically the stresses and strains generated by the injected wastes in an effort to understand the behavior of the system sufficiently well that the failure mechanism can be predicted and the capacity of the injection well estimated. The surface uplifts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's fracturing site were compared with theoretical curves obtained by assuming the uplifts to be inversely analogous to the subsidence which occurs over mining excavations. This analysis, based on assumptions of homogeneity, isotropy, and linear elasticity, provided considerable insight into the mechanics of the process. The most probable mechanism of failure of the rock appears to be by the formation of a vertical instead of a horizontal fracture. Fracture orientation is controlled primarily by the orientation of the principal stress field in the rock. Each successive waste injection slightly modifies this stress field toward a condition more favorable to the formation of a vertical fracture. (16 refs.)

  20. Crack-jump mechanism of microvein formation and its implications for stress cyclicity during extension fracturing

    Caputo, Riccardo; Hancock, Paul L.

    1998-11-01

    It is well accepted and documented that faulting is produced by the cyclic behaviour of a stress field. Some extension fractures, such as veins characterised by the crack-seal mechanism, have also been presumed to result from repeated stress cycles. In the present note, some commonly observed field phenomena and relationships such as hackle marks and vein and joint spacing, are employed to argue that a stress field can also display cyclic behaviour during extensional fracturing. Indeed, the requirement of critical stress conditions for the occurrence of extensional failure events does not accord with the presence of contemporaneously open nearby parallel fractures. Therefore, because after each fracture event there is stress release within the surrounding volume of rock, high density sets of parallel extensional fractures also strongly support the idea that rocks undergo stress cyclicity during jointing and veining. A comparison with seismological data from earthquakes with dipole mechanical solutions, confirms that this process presently occurs at depth in the Earth crust. Furthermore, in order to explain dense sets of hair-like closely spaced microveins, a crack-jump mechanism is introduced here as an alternative to the crack-seal mechanism. We also propose that as a consequence of medium-scale stress cyclicity during brittle deformation, the re-fracturing of a rock mass occurs in either one or the other of these two possible ways depending on the ratio between the elastic parameters of the sealing material and those of the host rock. The crack-jump mechanism occurs when the former is stronger.

  1. An experimental analysis of fracture mechanisms by acoustic ...

    Afin d'analyser le comportement mécanique globale de l'assemblage, des essais de traction .... named as Groups A, B and C (Tab. 5). Table.1: Mechanical properties of epoxy matrix Vicotex 914. Table.2: Mechanical properties of fibers T300. Young. 's modul us. E. Poisson's ratio. Ν shear modulus. G. Tensile strength yield.

  2. Mechanical properties of highly defective graphene: from brittle rupture to ductile fracture

    Xu, Lanqing; Wei, Ning; Zheng, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Defects are generally believed to deteriorate the superlative performance of graphene-based devices but may also be useful when carefully engineered to tailor the local properties and achieve new functionalities. Central to most defect-associated applications is the defect coverage and arrangement. In this work, we investigate, by molecular dynamics simulations, the mechanical properties and fracture dynamics of graphene sheets with randomly distributed vacancies or Stone–Wales defects under tensile deformations over a wide defect coverage range. With defects presented, an sp–sp 2 bonding network and an sp–sp 2 –sp 3 bonding network are observed in vacancy-defected and Stone–Wales-defected graphene, respectively. The ultimate strength degrades gradually with increasing defect coverage and saturates in the high-ratio regime, whereas the fracture strain presents an unusual descending–saturating–improving trend. In the dense vacancy defect situation, the fracture becomes more plastic and super-ductility is observed. Further fracture dynamics analysis reveals that the crack trapping by sp–sp 2 and sp–sp 2 –sp 3 rings and the crack-tip blunting account for the ductile fracture, whereas geometric rearrangement on the entire sheet for vacancy defects and geometric rearrangement on the specific defect sites for Stone–Wales defects account for their distinctive rules of the evolution of the fracture strain. (paper)

  3. Mechanical properties of highly defective graphene: from brittle rupture to ductile fracture.

    Xu, Lanqing; Wei, Ning; Zheng, Yongping

    2013-12-20

    Defects are generally believed to deteriorate the superlative performance of graphene-based devices but may also be useful when carefully engineered to tailor the local properties and achieve new functionalities. Central to most defect-associated applications is the defect coverage and arrangement. In this work, we investigate, by molecular dynamics simulations, the mechanical properties and fracture dynamics of graphene sheets with randomly distributed vacancies or Stone-Wales defects under tensile deformations over a wide defect coverage range. With defects presented, an sp-sp(2) bonding network and an sp-sp(2)-sp(3) bonding network are observed in vacancy-defected and Stone-Wales-defected graphene, respectively. The ultimate strength degrades gradually with increasing defect coverage and saturates in the high-ratio regime, whereas the fracture strain presents an unusual descending-saturating-improving trend. In the dense vacancy defect situation, the fracture becomes more plastic and super-ductility is observed. Further fracture dynamics analysis reveals that the crack trapping by sp-sp(2) and sp-sp(2)-sp(3) rings and the crack-tip blunting account for the ductile fracture, whereas geometric rearrangement on the entire sheet for vacancy defects and geometric rearrangement on the specific defect sites for Stone-Wales defects account for their distinctive rules of the evolution of the fracture strain.

  4. Effects of fibre content on mechanical properties and fracture ...

    Administrator

    cost. The most important factors that affect the short fibres reinforcement are ... made with conventional techniques, including single or twin screw extruding (Li et al 2005), wet ball-milling mixing (Song et al 2002) and high-speed mechanical.

  5. An experimental analysis of fracture mechanisms by acoustic ...

    This work is focused on the study of the evolution of damage mode and failure mechanisms of woven composite bolted assembly carbon fiber/epoxy. In the present paper three configurations are studied [0°,45°,0°,45°], [0°,45°,0°,45°]s and [0°,45°,0°,45,0°]s. In order to analyze a global mechanical behavior of the assembly, ...

  6. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis for the life extension estimate of the high flux isotope reactor vessel

    Chang, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    The state of the vessel steel embrittlement as a result of neutron irradiation can be measured by its increase in the nil ductility temperature (NDT). This temperature is sometimes referred to as the brittle-ductile transition temperature (DBT) for fracture. The life extension of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) vessel is calculated by using the method of fracture mechanics. A new method of fracture probability calculation is presented in this paper. The fracture probability as a result of the hydrostatic pressure test (hydrotest) is used to determine the life of the vessel. The hydrotest is performed in order to determine a safe vessel static pressure. It is then followed by using fracture mechanics to project the safe reactor operation time from the time of the satisfactory hydrostatic test. The life extension calculation provides the following information on the remaining life of the reactor as a function of the NDT increase: (1) the life of the vessel is determined by the probability of vessel fracture as a result of hydrotest at several hydrotest pressures and vessel embrittlement conditions, (2) the hydrotest time interval vs the NDT increase rate, and (3) the hydrotest pressure vs the NDT increase rate. It is understood that the use of a complete range of uncertainties of the NDT increase is equivalent to the entire range of radiation damage that can be experienced by the vessel steel. From the numerical values for the probabilities of the vessel fracture as a result of hydrotest, it is estimated that the reactor vessel life can be extended up to 50 EFPY (100 MW) with the minimum vessel operating temperature equal to 85 degrees F

  7. Evaluation of Fractured Basement Complex Rock Porosity by ...

    current resistivity sounding as complementary geophysical technique to Schlumberger vertical electrical sounding in characterizing fractured geologic systems. Previously, Schlumberger vertical electrical sounding was used to collect data.

  8. MRI evaluation and treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture

    Yamaguchi, Ken; Otani, Koji

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI findings and the prognosis of the fractured vertebral body in the patients with fresh osteoporotic compression vertebral fractures. Subjects were 8 cases, 11 vertebrae. All of the cases were treated with no bed rest and no corset. MRI and radiographs were taken within 1 week after injury. MRI signal intensity of the fractured vertebral body altered low on T1WI at acute phase. When the fractured vertebrae were enhanced at whole area with Gd-DTPA at acute phase, the vertebrae showed no progression of wedge deformity by follow up radiographs. On the other hand, when the fractured vertebrae were not enhanced at whole area, the vertebrae showed progression of wedge deformity. These findings suggests that vertebral fractures in osteoporosis should be taken MRI including GD-DTPA in acute phase after injury. When the fractured vertebrae are enhanced with Gd-DTPA in whole body at acute phase, the fracture may need no special treatment. In conclusion, Gd-DTPA enhanced MRI may be useful to determine the prognosis of the osteoporotic compression fracture. (author)

  9. High-temperature mechanical properties and fracture mechanisms of Al–Si piston alloy reinforced with in situ TiB{sub 2} particles

    Han, Gang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, 5 South Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Weizheng, E-mail: zhangwz@bit.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, 5 South Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Guohua; Feng, Zengjian; Wang, Yanjun [Shandong Binzhou Bohai Piston Co., Ltd., Binzhou 256602 (China)

    2015-05-01

    In order to assess the high-temperature performance of aluminum–silicon alloy reinforced with titanium diboride particles as potential piston material, the tensile behaviors and fracture mechanisms of in situ 4 wt% TiB{sub 2}/Al–Si composite were investigated in the temperature range 25–350 °C. The tensile results revealed that the composite exhibited higher modulus than the matrix alloy at all testing temperatures, but both the matrix alloy and the composite presented similar strength levels above 200 °C. The ductility of the composite was found to be lower than that of the unreinforced matrix alloy at 25 and 200 °C, but no obvious distinction was observed at 350 °C. The effects of temperature and the presence of TiB{sub 2} particles on tensile properties of the composite had been evaluated. Fractographic morphology studies were done using scanning electron microscope, which indicated that the fracture of the composite altered from brittle to ductile mode with temperature increasing. At 25 and 200 °C, fracture was dominated by cracked silicon particles and separated TiB{sub 2} particles, while decohesion at particle–matrix interface was prevalent at 350 °C. Analysis of the fracture surfaces also showed that regions of clustered TiB{sub 2} particles were found to be the locations prone to damage in the composite at both room and high temperatures.

  10. Computed tomographic evaluation of comminuted middle phalangeal fractures in the horse

    Rose, P.L.; Seeherman, H.; O'Callaghan, M.

    1997-01-01

    Comminuted fractures of the middle phalanx have been well described in the horse. Choice of treatment, surgical planning and prognosis have traditionally been based upon evaluation of radiographs. However, the complex nature of comminuted fractures makes radiographic interpretation difficult. Computed tomography (CT) allows the production of cross-sectional images with spatial separation of structures which are superimposed on survey radiographs. This allows accurate assessment of the number and direction of fracture lines within the bone. In this paper we report the use of CT in the evaluation of 6 comminuted middle phalangeal fractures. Computed tomography is potentially useful in deciding the type of treatment, surgical planning and determining the prognosis

  11. To evaluate the efficacy of biodegradable plating system for fixation of maxillofacial fractures: A prospective study.

    Bali, Rishi K; Sharma, Parveen; Jindal, Shalu; Gaba, Shivani

    2013-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of biodegradable plating system for fixation of maxillofacial fractures and to study the morbidity associated with the use of biodegradable plates and screws. This prospective study consisted of 10 patients with maxillofacial fractures requiring open reduction and internal fixation. Fractures with infection, comminuted and pathological fractures were excluded. All were plated with biodegradable system (Inion CPS) using standard plating principles and observed for a total period of 24 weeks. Characteristics of the fractures, ease of use of bioresorbable plate/screw system and post operative complications were assessed. Of total 10 patients, eight patients were of midface fracture and two pediatric patients with mandibular fracture, with nine male and one female. The mean age was 32.8 years. Out of 20 plates and 68 screws applied to the 10 fractures sites; there were three incidences of screw breakage with no other intraoperative difficulties. Paresthesia of the infraorbital nerve was present in two patients, and recovered completely in four weeks after surgery. Fracture reduction was considered to be satisfactory in all cases. One patient developed postsurgical infection and was managed with oral antibiotics and analgesics. Favorable healing can be observed through the use of biodegradable plates and screws to stabilize selected midface fractures in patients of all ages, as well as mandible fractures in early childhood, however further studies with more sample size are required.

  12. Forming limit and fracture mechanism of ferritic stainless steel sheets

    Xu Le; Barlat, Frederic; Ahn, Deok Chan; Bressan, Jose Divo

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Forming limit curves of two ferritic stainless steel sheets were well predicted. → Failure occurs by necking in uniaxial and plane strain tension for both materials. → Failure occurs by shearing in balanced biaxial tension for both materials. → Strain rate sensitivity does not affect the limit strains a lot for both materials. → Strain rate sensitivity likely influences the failure mode for both materials. - Abstract: In this work, the forming limit curves (FLCs) of two ferritic stainless steel sheets, AISI409L and AISI430, were predicted with the Marciniak-Kuczynski (MK) and Bressan-William-Hill (BWH) models, combined with the Yld2000-2d yield function and the Swift hardening law. Uniaxial tension, disk compression and hydraulic bulge tests were performed to determine the yield loci and hardening curves of both materials. Meanwhile, the strain rate sensitivity (SRS) coefficient was measured through uniaxial tension tests carried out at different strain rates. Out-of-plane stretching tests were conducted in sheet specimens to obtain the surface limit strains under different linear strain paths. Micrographs of the specimens fractured in different stress states were obtained by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The overall results show that the BWH model can predict the FLC better than the MK model, and that the SRS does not have much effect on the limit strains for both materials. The predicted FLCs and micrograph analysis both indicate that failure occurs by surface localized necking in uniaxial and plane strain tension states, whereas it occurs by localized shearing in the through thickness direction in balanced biaxial tension state.

  13. Correction of fatigue parameters of concrete using approximation of mechanical-Fracture parameters in time

    Šimonová, H.; Keršner, Z.; Seitl, Stanislav; Pryl, D.; Pukl, R.

    -, č. 1 (2012), s. 57-59 ISSN 1213-3116 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP104/11/0833 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : fatigue * concrete * correction * fracture parameters Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  14. Applications and limits of application of fracture mechanics methods in assessing the safety of components

    Stahlberg, R.

    1977-01-01

    On the basis of fracture mechanics calculations and experimental investigations, it is shown how cracks of different shape and location behave under given static and cyclic loads. In particular, component safety with regard to spontaneous failure and crack growth behaviour in different components are discussed. [de

  15. The relationship of microstructure and temperature to fracture mechanics parameters in reaction bonded silicon nitride

    Jennings, H.M.; Dalgleish, B.J.; Pratt, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The development of physical properties in reaction bonded silicon nitride has been investigated over a range of temperatures and correlated with microstructure. Fracture mechanics parameters, elastic moduli, strength and critical defect size have been determined. The nitrided microstructure is shown to be directly related to these observed properties and these basic relationships can be used to produce material with improved properties. (orig.) [de

  16. Statistical evaluation of fracture characteristics of RPV steels in the ductile-brittle transition temperature region

    Kang, Sung Sik; Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa

    1998-01-01

    The statistical analysis method was applied to the evaluation of fracture toughness in the ductile-brittle transition temperature region. Because cleavage fracture in steel is of a statistical nature, fracture toughness data or values show a similar statistical trend. Using the three-parameter Weibull distribution, a fracture toughness vs. temperature curve (K-curve) was directly generated from a set of fracture toughness data at a selected temperature. Charpy V-notch impact energy was also used to obtain the K-curve by a K IC -CVN (Charpy V-notch energy) correlation. Furthermore, this method was applied to evaluate the neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel(RPV) steel. Most of the fracture toughness data were within the 95 percent confidence limits. The prediction of a transition temperature shift by statistical analysis was compared with that from the experimental data. (author)

  17. FAVOR: A new fracture mechanics code for reactor pressure vessels subjected to pressurized thermal shock

    Dickson, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    Probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis is a major element of the comprehensive probabilistic methodology endorsed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for evaluation of the integrity of pressurized water reactor pressure vessels subjected to pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) transients. OCA-P and VISA-II are PTS PFM computer codes that are currently referenced in Regulatory Guide 1.154 as acceptable codes for performing plant-specific analyses. These codes perform PFM analyses to estimate the increase in vessel failure probability as the vessel accumulates radiation damage over the operating life of the vessel. Experience with the application of these codes in the last few years has provided insights into areas where they could be improved. As more plants approach the PTS screening criteria and are required to perform plant-specific analyses, there will be an increasing need for an improved and validated PTS PFM code that is accepted by the NRC and utilities. The NRC funded Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently developing the FAVOR (Fracture Analysis of Vessels: Oak Ridge) code, which is expected to meet this need. The FAVOR code incorporates the most important features of both OCA-P and VISA-II and contains some new capabilities such as (1) a PFM global modeling methodology; (2) the calculation of the axial stress component associated with coolant streaming beneath an inlet nozzle; (3) a library of stress intensity factor influence coefficients, generated by the NQA-1 certified ABAQUS computer code, for an appropriate range of two and three dimensional inner-surface flaws; (4) the flexibility to generate a variety of output reports; and (5) enhanced user friendliness

  18. Nonlinear fracture mechanics investigation on the ductility of reinforced concrete beams

    A. Carpinteri

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a numerical algorithm based on the finite element method is proposed for the prediction of the mechanical response of reinforced concrete (RC beams under bending loading. The main novelty of such an approach is the introduction of the Overlapping Crack Model, based on nonlinear fracture mechanics concepts, to describe concrete crushing. According to this model, the concrete dam- age in compression is represented by means of a fictitious interpenetration. The larger is the interpenetration, the lower are the transferred forces across the damaged zone. The well-known Cohesive Crack Model in tension and an elastic-perfectly plastic stress versus crack opening displacement relationship describing the steel reinforcement behavior are also integrated into the numerical algorithm. The application of the proposed Cohesive-Overlapping Crack Model to the assessment of the minimum reinforcement amount neces- sary to prevent unstable tensile crack propagation and to the evaluation of the rotational capacity of plastic hinges, permits to predict the size-scale effects evidenced by several experimental programs available in the literature. According to the obtained numerical results, new practical design formulae and diagrams are proposed for the improvement of the current code provisions which usually disregard the size effects.

  19. Hygrothermal effects on dynamic mechanical snalysis and fracture behavior of polymeric composites

    Michelle Leali Costa

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Polymer composites used above their glass transition temperatures Tg present a substantial degradation of physical properties; therefore a material's glass transition temperature and its change with moisture absorption are of practical importance. Little attention has been paid to the role of the adhesive bonding between the reinforcing fiber and matrix, particularly for BMI matrix. In this work the effect of moisture on the dynamic mechanical behavior and the fiber/matrix interface was investigated. Two systems were evaluated: carbon fabric/epoxy and carbon fabric/bismaleimide laminates. The results demonstrated that the moisture absorbed by the laminates causes either reversible or irreversible plasticization of the matrix. The humidity combined with the temperature effects may cause significant changes in the Tg matrix and toughness affecting the laminate strength. Moisture absorption was correlated to the fracture mode of the laminate demonstrating the deleterious effect of moisture on the interface. This leads to debonding between fiber and matrix. This behavior was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis.

  20. Mechanism and patterns of cervical spine fractures-dislocations in vertebral artery injury

    Pankaj Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify the fracture patterns and mechanism of injury, based on subaxial cervical spine injury classification system (SLIC, on non-contrast computed tomography (NCCT of cervical spine predictive of vertebral artery injury (VAI. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of 320 patients who were admitted with cervical spine injury in our level I regional trauma center over a period of two years (April 2010 to April 2012. Diagnosis of VAI was based on hyperintensity replacing the flow void on a T2-weighted axial image. NCCT images of the selected 43 patients with MRI diagnosis of VAI were then assessed for the pattern of injury. The cervical spinal injuries were classified into those involving the C1 and C2 and subaxial spine. For the latter, SLIC was used. Results: A total of 47 VAI were analyzed in 43 patients. Only one patient with VAI on MRI had no detectable abnormality on NCCT. C1 and C2 injuries were found in one and six patients respectively. In subaxial injuries, the most common mechanism of injury was distraction (37.5% with facet dislocation with or without fracture representing the most common pattern of injury (55%. C5 was the single most common affected vertebral level. Extension to foramen transversarium was present in 20 (42.5% cases. Conclusion: CT represents a robust screening tool for patients with VAI. VAI should be suspected in patients with facet dislocation with or without fractures, foramina transversarium fractures and C1-C3 fractures, especially type III odontoid fractures and distraction mechanism of injury.

  1. Interlocking Friction Governs the Mechanical Fracture of Bilayer MoS2.

    Jung, Gang Seob; Wang, Shanshan; Qin, Zhao; Martin-Martinez, Francisco J; Warner, Jamie H; Buehler, Markus J

    2018-04-24

    A molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) layered system is a two-dimensional (2D) material, which is expected to provide the next generation of electronic devices together with graphene and other 2D materials. Due to its significance for future electronics applications, gaining a deep insight into the fundamental mechanisms upon MoS 2 fracture is crucial to prevent mechanical failure toward reliable applications. Here, we report direct experimental observation and atomic modeling of the complex failure behaviors of bilayer MoS 2 originating from highly variable interlayer frictions, elucidated with in situ transmission electron microscopy and large-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations. Our results provide a systematic understanding of the effects that different stacking and loading conditions have on the failure mechanisms and crack-tip behaviors in the bilayer MoS 2 systems. Our findings unveil essential properties in fracture of this 2D material and provide mechanistic insight into its mechanical failure.

  2. Tissue-Level Mechanical Properties of Bone Contributing to Fracture Risk.

    Nyman, Jeffry S; Granke, Mathilde; Singleton, Robert C; Pharr, George M

    2016-08-01

    Tissue-level mechanical properties characterize mechanical behavior independently of microscopic porosity. Specifically, quasi-static nanoindentation provides measurements of modulus (stiffness) and hardness (resistance to yielding) of tissue at the length scale of the lamella, while dynamic nanoindentation assesses time-dependent behavior in the form of storage modulus (stiffness), loss modulus (dampening), and loss factor (ratio of the two). While these properties are useful in establishing how a gene, signaling pathway, or disease of interest affects bone tissue, they generally do not vary with aging after skeletal maturation or with osteoporosis. Heterogeneity in tissue-level mechanical properties or in compositional properties may contribute to fracture risk, but a consensus on whether the contribution is negative or positive has not emerged. In vivo indentation of bone tissue is now possible, and the mechanical resistance to microindentation has the potential for improving fracture risk assessment, though determinants are currently unknown.

  3. On the evaluation of steam assisted gravity drainage in naturally fractured oil reservoirs

    Seyed Morteza Tohidi Hosseini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD as a successful enhanced oil recovery (EOR process has been applied to extract heavy and extra heavy oils. Huge amount of global heavy oil resources exists in carbonate reservoirs which are mostly naturally fractured reservoirs. Unlike clastic reservoirs, few studies were carried out to determine the performance of SAGD in carbonate reservoirs. Even though SAGD is a highly promising technique, several uncertainties and unanswered questions still exist and they should be clarified for expansion of SAGD methods to world wide applications especially in naturally fractured reservoirs. In this communication, the effects of some operational and reservoir parameters on SAGD processes were investigated in a naturally fractured reservoir with oil wet rock using CMG-STARS thermal simulator. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of fracture properties including fracture orientation, fracture spacing and fracture permeability on the SAGD performance in naturally fractured reservoirs. Moreover, one operational parameter was also studied; one new well configuration, staggered well pair was evaluated. Results indicated that fracture orientation influences steam expansion and oil production from the horizontal well pairs. It was also found that horizontal fractures have unfavorable effects on oil production, while vertical fractures increase the production rate for the horizontal well. Moreover, an increase in fracture spacing results in more oil production, because in higher fracture spacing model, steam will have more time to diffuse into matrices and heat up the entire reservoir. Furthermore, an increase in fracture permeability results in process enhancement and ultimate recovery improvement. Besides, diagonal change in the location of injection wells (staggered model increases the recovery efficiency in long-term production plan.

  4. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics of Reactor Pressure Vessels with Populations of Flaws

    Spencer, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Backman, Marie [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Williams, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hoffman, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dickson, Terry [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bass, B. Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Klasky, Hilda [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report documents recent progress in developing a tool that uses the Grizzly and RAVEN codes to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses of reactor pressure vessels in light water reactor nuclear power plants. The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. Because of the central role of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a nuclear power plant, particular emphasis is being placed on developing capabilities to model fracture in embrittled RPVs to aid in the process surrounding decision making relating to life extension of existing plants. A typical RPV contains a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation at one or more of these flaws during a transient event. This report documents development and initial testing of a capability to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics of large populations of flaws in RPVs using reduced order models to compute fracture parameters. The work documented here builds on prior efforts to perform probabilistic analyses of a single flaw with uncertain parameters, as well as earlier work to develop deterministic capabilities to model the thermo-mechanical response of the RPV under transient events, and compute fracture mechanics parameters at locations of pre-defined flaws. The capabilities developed as part of this work provide a foundation for future work, which will develop a platform that provides the flexibility needed to consider scenarios that cannot be addressed with the tools used in current practice.

  5. The use of the J* integral for non-linear fracture mechanics

    Hellen, T.K.

    1976-09-01

    The Griffith energy balance criterion, first postulated over 50 years ago, is still the basis of linear elastic fracture mechanics. From this, accurate numerical methods for establishing stress intensity factors and energy release rates have been developed. One such method involves path independent contour integrals about the crack tip. An improved contour integral, designated J* is discussed, and shown to have distinct advantages over others in non-linear strain situations. A number of examples are shown including fractures in thermo-plastic and creep situations. (author)

  6. Evaluation of deformation and fracture characteristics of nuclear reactor materials using ball indentation test technique

    Byun, T. S.; Hong, J. H.; Lee, B. S.; Park, D. G.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, Y. J.; Yoon, J. H.; Chi, S. H.; Kuk, I. H.; Kwon, D. I.; Lee, J. H.

    1998-05-01

    The present report describes the automated ball indentation test techniques and the results of their applications. The ball indentation test technique is an innovative method for evaluating the key mechanical properties from the indentation load-depth data. In the 1st chapter, the existing technique for evaluating basic deformation (tensile) properties is described in detail, and also the application result of the technique is presented. The through-thickness variations of mechanical properties in SA 508 C1.3 reactor pressure vessel steels were measured using an automated ball indentation (ABI) technique. In the 2nd chapter, a method under development, which is similar to that in the 1st chapter, is new method is based on the theoretical solutions rather than experimental relationships. The result of the application showed that the stress-strain curves of various metals were successfully determined with the method. In the 3rd chapter, a new theoretical model was proposed to estimate the fracture toughness of ferritic steels in the transition temperature region. The key concept of the model is that the indention energy to a critical load is related to the fracture energy of the material. The theory was applied to the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) base and weld metals. (author). 24 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs

  7. Adult tibial intercondylar eminence fracture: evaluation with MR imaging

    Toye, Leon R.; Cummings, Dean P.; Armendariz, Gus

    2002-01-01

    Tibial intercondylar eminence (TIE) fractures are well described in the pediatric orthopedic literature. Adult TIEs are much less common, and limited literature exists on the subject. Adult knee hyperextension injuries commonly result in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury; however, with significant trauma, a TIE enters the differential diagnosis. Identification and classification of TIE fractures typically has been provided by radiography. The incidence of concomitant injuries with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with adult TIE fractures has not been determined. We present a case of an adult type III TIE fracture seen on radiography that only with further MR imaging revealed a concomitant lateral tibial plateau fracture. Utilization of MR imaging altered the surgeon's course of treatment and postoperative care. Radiographic and MR images and a review of the literature are provided. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of fracture toughness of ductile cast iron for casks

    Hide, Koh-ichiro; Arai, Taku; Takaku, Hiroshi; Shimazaki, Katsunori; Kusanagi, Hideo

    1988-01-01

    We studied the fracture toughness and tensile properties of ductile cast iron for casks, and tried to introduce a fatigue crack into partial cask model. Main results were shown as follows. (1) Fracture toughness were in the upper shelf area above -25deg C, and were in the transition area at -40 and -70deg C. (2) Increasing the value of K I , the fracture toughness decreased. (3) Increasing the specimen thickness, fracture toughness decreased. (4) Fracture toughness of an artificial flaw (ρ=0.1 mm) was the same as that of a fatigue crack at -40deg C. (5) Tensil properties were inferior at -196 and about 400deg C because of low temperature brittleness and blue brittleness. (6) Tensile properties in the middle of cask wall were inferior. (7) It seems to be possible to introduce a fatigue crack into a full size cask. (author)

  9. Experimental fracture healing: evaluation using radionuclide bone imaging: concise communication

    Gumerman, L.W.; Fogel, S.R.; Goodman, M.A.; Hanley, E.N. Jr.; Kappakas, G.S.; Rutkowski, R.; Levine, G.

    1978-01-01

    Radionuclide bone imaging was performed in a rabbit model to observe the course of fracture healing and to establish criteria for distinguishing nonunion and delayed healing from normal healing. Sequential gamma-camera images (with pinhole collimator) were collected and subjected to computer analysis. Five groups were established: (a) control--immobilization; (b) control--immobilization plus periosteal stripping; (c) simple fracture--osteotomy; (d) delayed union--osteotomy plus periosteal stripping; and (e) nonunion--osteotomy, periosteal stripping and polymethyl methacrylate interposed between fracture fragments. Histographic representation of absolute count rates along rabbit tibias followed a predictable pattern in the simple-fracture and delayed-union groups. They differed only in the time of appearance of phases. The non-union group demonstrated no recognizable sequential pattern. In this experimental model, serial bone scanning the quantitative data analysis has shown potential for indicating the course of healing in fractures and for serving as a guide to treatment

  10. Generalised fracture mechanics approach to the interfacial failure analysis of a bonded steel-concrete joint

    De Corte, W.; Helincks, P.; Boel, V.; Klusák, Jan; Seitl, Stanislav; De Schutter, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 42 (2017), s. 147-160 ISSN 1971-8993 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-18702S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Epoxy adhesive * Fracture mechanics * Interfacial properties * Numerical study * Push-out test * Steel-concrete joint Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis

  11. Rock mechanics issues and research needs in the disposal of wastes in hydraulic fractures

    Doe, T.W.; McClain, W.C.

    1984-07-01

    The proposed rock mechanics studies outlined in this document are designed to answer the basic questions concerning hydraulic fracturing for waste disposal. These questions are: (1) how can containment be assured for Oak Ridge or other sites; and (2) what is the capacity of a site. The suggested rock mechanics program consists of four major tasks: (1) numerical modeling, (2) laboratory testing, (3) field testing, and (4) monitoring. These tasks are described

  12. The mechanics of tessellations - bioinspired strategies for fracture resistance.

    Fratzl, Peter; Kolednik, Otmar; Fischer, F Dieter; Dean, Mason N

    2016-01-21

    Faced with a comparatively limited palette of minerals and organic polymers as building materials, evolution has arrived repeatedly on structural solutions that rely on clever geometric arrangements to avoid mechanical trade-offs in stiffness, strength and flexibility. In this tutorial review, we highlight the concept of tessellation, a structural motif that involves periodic soft and hard elements arranged in series and that appears in a vast array of invertebrate and vertebrate animal biomaterials. We start from basic mechanics principles on the effects of material heterogeneities in hypothetical structures, to derive common concepts from a diversity of natural examples of one-, two- and three-dimensional tilings/layerings. We show that the tessellation of a hard, continuous surface - its atomization into discrete elements connected by a softer phase - can theoretically result in maximization of material toughness, with little expense to stiffness or strength. Moreover, the arrangement of soft/flexible and hard/stiff elements into particular geometries can permit surprising functions, such as signal filtering or 'stretch and catch' responses, where the constrained flexibility of systems allows a built-in safety mechanism for ensuring that both compressive and tensile loads are managed well. Our analysis unites examples ranging from exoskeletal materials (fish scales, arthropod cuticle, turtle shell) to endoskeletal materials (bone, shark cartilage, sponge spicules) to attachment devices (mussel byssal threads), from both invertebrate and vertebrate animals, while spotlighting success and potential for bio-inspired manmade applications.

  13. Analysis of the applicability of fracture mechanics on the basis of large scale specimen testing

    Brumovsky, M.; Polachova, H.; Sulc, J.; Anikovskij, V.; Dragunov, Y.; Rivkin, E.; Filatov, V.

    1988-01-01

    The verification is dealt with of fracture mechanics calculations for WWER reactor pressure vessels by large scale model testing performed on the large testing machine ZZ 8000 (maximum load of 80 MN) in the Skoda Concern. The results of testing a large set of large scale test specimens with surface crack-type defects are presented. The nominal thickness of the specimens was 150 mm with defect depths between 15 and 100 mm, the testing temperature varying between -30 and +80 degC (i.e., in the temperature interval of T ko ±50 degC). Specimens with a scale of 1:8 and 1:12 were also tested, as well as standard (CT and TPB) specimens. Comparisons of results of testing and calculations suggest some conservatism of calculations (especially for small defects) based on Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics, according to the Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Codes which use the fracture mechanics values from J IC testing. On the basis of large scale tests the ''Defect Analysis Diagram'' was constructed and recommended for brittle fracture assessment of reactor pressure vessels. (author). 7 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs

  14. Flexible parallel implicit modelling of coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical processes in fractured rocks

    Cacace, Mauro; Jacquey, Antoine B.

    2017-09-01

    Theory and numerical implementation describing groundwater flow and the transport of heat and solute mass in fully saturated fractured rocks with elasto-plastic mechanical feedbacks are developed. In our formulation, fractures are considered as being of lower dimension than the hosting deformable porous rock and we consider their hydraulic and mechanical apertures as scaling parameters to ensure continuous exchange of fluid mass and energy within the fracture-solid matrix system. The coupled system of equations is implemented in a new simulator code that makes use of a Galerkin finite-element technique. The code builds on a flexible, object-oriented numerical framework (MOOSE, Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment) which provides an extensive scalable parallel and implicit coupling to solve for the multiphysics problem. The governing equations of groundwater flow, heat and mass transport, and rock deformation are solved in a weak sense (either by classical Newton-Raphson or by free Jacobian inexact Newton-Krylow schemes) on an underlying unstructured mesh. Nonlinear feedbacks among the active processes are enforced by considering evolving fluid and rock properties depending on the thermo-hydro-mechanical state of the system and the local structure, i.e. degree of connectivity, of the fracture system. A suite of applications is presented to illustrate the flexibility and capability of the new simulator to address problems of increasing complexity and occurring at different spatial (from centimetres to tens of kilometres) and temporal scales (from minutes to hundreds of years).

  15. Mechanical and fracture properties at impact loading of selected steels for nuclear power engineering

    Buchar, J.; Bilek, Z.

    1988-01-01

    The possibilities are briefly characterized of experimental research of mechanical and fracture properties of steels used in nuclear power engineering. Attention is paid to plastic deformation and the assessment of fracture formation during impact loading. The results are reported for steels 15Kh2MFA and 10GN2MFA. For steel 15Kh2MFA the effect was also studied of neutron radiation at different temperatures. From the theory developed for non-irradiated material 10GN2MFA, a prediction is made within the original model of the fracture stress value for steel 15Kh2MFA in both non-irradiated and irradiated states. The conclusion is arrived at that the existing methods of assessing steel properties at impact load allow obtaining knowledge of all significant effects during actual stress, this using only small specimens of the materials. (Z.M.). 4 figs., 8 refs

  16. Nontraumatic Fracture of the Femoral Condylar Prosthesis in a Total Knee Arthroplasty Leading to Mechanical Failure

    Girish N. Swamy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a case of fatigue fracture of the femoral component in a cruciate-retaining cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA. A 64-year-old man had undergone a primary TKA for osteoarthritis 10 years previously at another institution using the PFC-Sigma prosthesis. The patient recovered fully and was back to his regular activities. He presented with a history of sudden onset pain and locking of the left knee since the preceding three months. There was no history of trauma, and the patient was mobilizing with difficulty using crutches. Radiographs revealed fracture of the posterior condyle of the femoral prosthesis. Revision surgery was performed as an elective procedure revealing the broken prosthesis. The TC3RP-PFC revision prosthesis was used with a medial parapatellar approach. The patient recovered fully without any squeal. Mechanical failure of the knee arthroplasty prosthesis is rare, and nontraumatic fracture of the femoral metallic component has not been reported before.

  17. Nontraumatic fracture of the femoral condylar prosthesis in a total knee arthroplasty leading to mechanical failure.

    Swamy, Girish N; Quah, Conal; Bagouri, Elmunzar; Badhe, Nitin P

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a case of fatigue fracture of the femoral component in a cruciate-retaining cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A 64-year-old man had undergone a primary TKA for osteoarthritis 10 years previously at another institution using the PFC-Sigma prosthesis. The patient recovered fully and was back to his regular activities. He presented with a history of sudden onset pain and locking of the left knee since the preceding three months. There was no history of trauma, and the patient was mobilizing with difficulty using crutches. Radiographs revealed fracture of the posterior condyle of the femoral prosthesis. Revision surgery was performed as an elective procedure revealing the broken prosthesis. The TC3RP-PFC revision prosthesis was used with a medial parapatellar approach. The patient recovered fully without any squeal. Mechanical failure of the knee arthroplasty prosthesis is rare, and nontraumatic fracture of the femoral metallic component has not been reported before.

  18. Combined loading effects on the fracture mechanics behavior of line pipes

    Bravo, R.E.; Cravero, S.; Ernst, H.A. [Tenaris Group, Campana (Argentina). SIDERCA R and D Center

    2009-12-19

    For certain applications, pipelines may be submitted to biaxial loading situations. In these cases, it is not clear the influence of the biaxial loading on the fracture mechanics behavior of cracked pipelines. For further understanding of biaxial loading effects, this work presents a numerical simulation of ductile tearing in a circumferentially surface cracked pipe under biaxial loading using the computational cell methodology. The model was adjusted with experimental results obtained in laboratory using single edge cracked under tension (SENT) specimens. These specimens appear as the better alternative to conventional fracture specimens to characterize fracture toughness of cracked pipes. The negligible effect of biaxial loadings on resistance curves was demonstrated. To guarantee the similarities of stress and strains fields between SENT specimens and cracked pipes subjected to biaxial loading, a constraint study using the J-Q methodology and the h parameter was used. The constraint study gives information about the characteristics of the crack-tip conditions. (author)

  19. The association between type of spine fracture and the mechanism of trauma: A useful tool for identifying mechanism of trauma on legal medicine field.

    Aghakhani, Kamran; Kordrostami, Roya; Memarian, Azadeh; Asl, Nahid Dadashzadeh; Zavareh, Fatemeh Noorian

    2018-05-01

    Determining the association between mechanism of trauma, and the type of spine column fracture is a useful approach for exactly describing spine injury on forensic medicine field. We aimed to determine mechanism of trauma based on distribution of the transition of spinal column fractures. This cross-sectional survey was performed on 117 consecutive patients with the history of spinal trauma who were admitted to emergency ward of Rasoul-e-Akram Hospital in Tehran, Iran from April 2015 to March 2016. The baseline characteristics were collected by reviewing the hospital recorded files. With respect to mechanism of fracture, 63.2% of fractures were caused by falling, 30.8% by collisions with motor vehicles, and others caused by the violence. Regarding site of fracture, lumbosacral was affected in 47.9%, thoracic in 29.9%, and cervical in 13.7%. Regarding type of fracture, burst fracture was the most common type (71.8%) followed by compressive fracture (14.5%). The site of fracture was specifically associated with the mechanism of injury; the most common injuries induced by falling from height were found in lumbosacral and cervical sites, and the most frequent injuries by traffic accidents were found in thoracic site; also the injuries following violence were observed more in lumbar vertebrae. The burst fractures were more revealed in the patients affected by falling from height and by traffic accidents, and both burst and compressive fractures were more observed with the same result in the patients injured with violence (p = 0.003). The type of spine fracture due to trauma is closely associated with the mechanism of trauma that can be helpful in legal medicine to identify the mechanism of trauma in affected patients. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Subsurface Defects in Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Joggles Subjected to Thermo-Mechanical Loads

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Song, Kyongchan

    2011-01-01

    Coating spallation events have been observed along the slip-side joggle region of the Space Shuttle Orbiter wing-leading-edge panels. One potential contributor to the spallation event is a pressure build up within subsurface voids or defects due to volatiles or water vapor entrapped during fabrication, refurbishment, or normal operational use. The influence of entrapped pressure on the thermo-mechanical fracture-mechanics response of reinforced carbon-carbon with subsurface defects is studied. Plane-strain simulations with embedded subsurface defects are performed to characterize the fracture mechanics response for a given defect length when subjected to combined elevated-temperature and subsurface-defect pressure loadings to simulate the unvented defect condition. Various subsurface defect locations of a fixed-length substrate defect are examined for elevated temperature conditions. Fracture mechanics results suggest that entrapped pressure combined with local elevated temperatures have the potential to cause subsurface defect growth and possibly contribute to further material separation or even spallation. For this anomaly to occur, several unusual circumstances would be required making such an outcome unlikely but plausible.

  1. Fracture of the proximal tibia after revision total knee arthroplasty with an extensor mechanism allograft.

    Klein, Gregg R; Levine, Harlan B; Sporer, Scott M; Hartzband, Mark A

    2013-02-01

    Extensor mechanism reconstruction with an extensor mechanism allograft (EMA) remains one of the most reliable methods for treating the extensor mechanism deficient total knee arthroplasty. We report 3 patients who were treated with an EMA who sustained a proximal tibial shaft fracture. In all 3 cases, a short tibial component was present that ended close to the level of the distal extent of the bone block. When performing an EMA, it is important to recognize that the tibial bone block creates a stress riser and revision to a long-stemmed tibial component should be strongly considered to bypass this point to minimize the risk of fracture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Understanding Irreversible Degradation of Nb3Sn Wires with Fundamental Fracture Mechanics

    Zhai, Yuhu [PPPL; Calzolaio, Ciro [Univ of Geneva; Senatore, Carmine [Univ of Geneva

    2014-08-01

    Irreversible performance degradation of advanced Nb3Sn superconducting wires subjected to transverse or axial mechanical loading is a critical issue for the design of large-scale fusion and accelerator magnets such as ITER and LHC. Recent SULTAN tests indicate that most cable-in-conduit conductors for ITER coils made of Nb3Sn wires processed by various fabrication techniques show similar performance degradation under cyclic loading. The irreversible degradation due to filament fracture and local strain accumulation in Nb3Sn wires cannot be described by the existing strand scaling law. Fracture mechanic modeling combined with X-ray diffraction imaging of filament micro-crack formation inside the wires under mechanical loading may reveal exciting insights to the wire degradation mechanisms. We apply fundamental fracture mechanics with a singularity approach to study influence of wire filament microstructure of initial void size and distribution to local stress concentration and potential crack propagation. We report impact of the scale and density of the void structure on stress concentration in the composite wire materials for crack initiation. These initial defects result in an irreversible degradation of the critical current beyond certain applied stress. We also discuss options to minimize stress concentration in the design of the material microstructure for enhanced wire performance for future applications.

  3. Effect of the build orientation on the mechanical properties and fracture modes of SLM Ti–6Al–4V

    Simonelli, M., E-mail: M.Simonelli@lboro.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Tse, Y.Y. [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Tuck, C. [Additive Manufacturing and 3D Printing Research Group, Faculty of Engineering, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-20

    Recent research on the additive manufacturing (AM) of Ti alloys has shown that the mechanical properties of the parts are affected by the characteristic microstructure that originates from the AM process. To understand the effect of the microstructure on the tensile properties, selective laser melted (SLM) Ti–6Al–4V samples built in three different orientations were tensile tested. The investigated samples were near fully dense, in two distinct conditions, as-built and stress relieved. It was found that the build orientation affects the tensile properties, and in particular the ductility of the samples. The mechanical anisotropy of the parts was discussed in relation to the crystallographic texture, phase composition and the predominant fracture mechanisms. Fractography and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) results indicate that the predominant fracture mechanism is intergranular fracture present along the grain boundaries and thus provide and explain the typical fracture surface features observed in fracture AM Ti–6Al–4V.

  4. Effect of the build orientation on the mechanical properties and fracture modes of SLM Ti–6Al–4V

    Simonelli, M.; Tse, Y.Y.; Tuck, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research on the additive manufacturing (AM) of Ti alloys has shown that the mechanical properties of the parts are affected by the characteristic microstructure that originates from the AM process. To understand the effect of the microstructure on the tensile properties, selective laser melted (SLM) Ti–6Al–4V samples built in three different orientations were tensile tested. The investigated samples were near fully dense, in two distinct conditions, as-built and stress relieved. It was found that the build orientation affects the tensile properties, and in particular the ductility of the samples. The mechanical anisotropy of the parts was discussed in relation to the crystallographic texture, phase composition and the predominant fracture mechanisms. Fractography and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) results indicate that the predominant fracture mechanism is intergranular fracture present along the grain boundaries and thus provide and explain the typical fracture surface features observed in fracture AM Ti–6Al–4V

  5. The fracture mechanics of steam turbine electron beam welded rotors

    Coulon, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Increased steam turbine unit ratings presupposes that steelmakers are capable of manufacturing larger and larger rotor components. However, there are few steelmakers in the world capable of manufacturing monobloc rotors for high rated turbines, which limits the choice of supplier. Most nuclear turbine rotors have a composite arrangement and are made either by shrinking discs on a shaft or using elements welded together. Those in favour of welding have applied a classical socalled ''submerged'' method using a filler metal. However welding can also be performed by using an Electron Beam in a vacuum room without a filler metal. This technique has many advantages: mechanical characteristics of the joint are identical to those of the base material after tempering without heat affected zones. Moreover, parts are only very slightly deformed during welding. Two steam turbine rotors have been produced in this way. This paper described the destructive tests carried out in the four Electron Beam (EB) welds (two on each rotor)

  6. Laboratory mechanical parameters of composite resins and their relation to fractures and wear in clinical trials-A systematic review.

    Heintze, Siegward D; Ilie, Nicoleta; Hickel, Reinhard; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro; Rousson, Valentin

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate a range of mechanical parameters of composite resins and compare the data to the frequency of fractures and wear in clinical studies. Based on a search of PubMed and SCOPUS, clinical studies on posterior composite restorations were investigated with regard to bias by two independent reviewers using Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias in randomized trials. The target variables were chipping and/or fracture, loss of anatomical form (wear) and a combination of both (summary clinical index). These outcomes were modelled by time and material in a linear mixed effect model including random study and experiment effects. The laboratory data from one test institute were used: flexural strength, flexural modulus, compressive strength, and fracture toughness (all after 24-h storage in distilled water). For some materials flexural strength data after aging in water/saliva/ethanol were available. Besides calculating correlations between clinical and laboratory outcomes, we explored whether a model including a laboratory predictor dichotomized at a cut-off value better predicted a clinical outcome than a linear model. A total of 74 clinical experiments from 45 studies were included involving 31 materials for which laboratory data were also available. A weak positive correlation between fracture toughness and clinical fractures was found (Spearman rho=0.34, p=0.11) in addition to a moderate and statistically significant correlation between flexural strength and clinical wear (Spearman rho=0.46, p=0.01). When excluding those studies with "high" risk of bias (n=18), the correlations were generally weaker with no statistically significant correlation. For aging in ethanol, a very strong correlation was found between flexural strength decrease and clinical index, but this finding was based on only 7 materials (Spearman rho=0.96, p=0.0001). Prediction was not consistently improved with cutoff values. Correlations between clinical and laboratory

  7. Effect of crack closing and cyclic fracture toughness evaluation of structural alloys

    Romaniv, O.N.; Nikiforchin, G.N.; Andrusiv, B.N.

    1983-01-01

    Mechanisms of crack closing (CC), methods of its evalution as well as CC effect on cyclic fracture toughness of structural alloys are considered based on literature and experimental datas several CC mechanisms are suggested. It is noted that evaluation of fatigue crack closing is exercised, mainly, experimentally, though analytical methods of its determination are also suggested. Experimental Methods may be divided in two main groups. The first one comprises techniques based on direct determination of strains and displacements, the second one includes methods based on physical methods of investigations. High importance of CC effect accountancy in investigation of growth kinetics and machanism of corrosion-fatigue cracks in structural materials is noted. Besides, it should be taken into account that cyclic loading changes electrochemical conditions in the apex of corrosion crack

  8. Risk Factors and Clinical Evaluation of Superficial Femoral Artery Stent Fracture: Prote'ge'GPS Stent

    Lee, Da Un; Kim, Jae Kyu; Jung, Hye Doo; Huh, Tae Wook; Yim, Nam Yeol; Oh, Hyun jun; Choi, Soo Jin Na; Chang, Nam Kyu

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of superficial femoral artery stent fractures, the risk factors of stent fracture, and the relationship between fractures and clinical findings. Of the 38 patients who underwent treatment with Prote'ge'GPS stenting due to arterial occlusions on the superficial femoral artery, 17 also underwent a clinical analysis. Forty-three stents were inserted in the 17 superficial femoral arteries, ranging between 15 and 50 cm in length, with a mean treated length of 26.4 cm (15-50 cm). A fracture was evaluated by taking a PA and lateral simple radiography, as well as a follow-up evaluation accompanied with a CT angiography, DSA, and a color Doppler sonography. The examination involved the assessment of the difference between bone fractures due to length, placement, and frequency. Fractures occurred in 13 of 43 stents (30.2%). A total of 10 (71.4%) occurred in the upper third, compared to 4 (28.6%) in the lower third of the superficial femoral artery. In addition, 10 stents (71.4%) had a single strut fracture, whereas 4 (28.6%) had multiple strut fractures. A stent fracture occurred more frequently when the stents and lesions were longer (p=0.021, 0.012) and the stents were inserted near the joint. However, there was no significant relationship between stent numbers and the fractures (p=0.126). When the stents were inserted along the popliteal artery, a stent fracture occurred more frequently in the lower third of the artery. The stent fractures did not significantly influence the patency rate of the stented artery (p=0.44) Prote'ge'GPS stents in the superficial femoral artery revealed a considerable number of fractures and the fracture frequency showed a significant relationship with the length of stents and lesions. The closer stent insertion was to the joints, the more frequently fractures occurred. There were no evident significant relationships between the presence of stent fractures and the patency of the stented arteries

  9. Correlation of nodular austempered ductile iron (ADI) microstructural parameters and fatigue properties using an approach based on fracture mechanics

    Dias, Jose Felipe; Fonseca, Vinicius Rizzuti; Godefroid, Leonardo Barbosa; Ribeiro, Gabriel de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    An investigation has been accomplished to check the effect of temperature and austempering time on austempered ductile iron (ADI) properties by means of fracture toughness (K_C) and fatigue threshold (∆K_t_h) tests. The correlation of ADI microstructural parameters and ADI two mechanical parameters: KC and Kth, is evaluated. Three sets of samples have ben extracted from ADI casting Y blocks produced in industrial conditions.and austenitized at 900°C for 1.5 hour. The austempering process has been performed in the following ways: the first set was austenitized at 300 deg C for 4 hours, the second set at 360°C for 1.5 hour and the third at 360°C for 0.6 hour. These distinct austempering processes have been adopted in order to obtain distinct microstructures containing austenite with two different carbon rates and two ferritic cell sizes. The materials have been characterized by means of optical and electronic microscopy, X-ray diffraction and mechanical tests. All materials have presented equivalent fatigue crack propagation rates, fracture toughness in the range between 94 and 128 MPa·m"1"/"2 and ∆K_t_h in the range between 5,7 and 6,4 MPa·m"1"/"2. The experimental results have confirmed the effect of microstructural properties (austenitic volumetric rate, austenitic carbon rate, ferritic cell size, total matrix carbon content) on fracture toughness (K_C) and fatigue threshold (∆K_t_h). Further, it was found that following parameters: fracture toughness (K_C), fatigue threshold ((∆K_t_h) and impact strength are correlated with the total matrix carbon content and ferritic cell size. (author)

  10. Study on predicting residual life of elevator links by fracture mechanics approach

    Li Helin; Zhang Yi; Deng Zengjie [China National Petroleum Corp., Xi`an, Shaanxi (China). Tubular Goods Research Center; Jin Dazeng [Xi`an Jiaotong Univ., Xi`an, Shaanxi (China)

    1995-12-31

    On the basis of investigation, failure and fracture analysis of elevator links, residual life prediction of links using fracture mechanics approach is studied, and mechanical properties, fracture toughness value K{sub IC} and fatigue crack propagation rage da/dN of the steel for elevator links are determined. Using the relation between stress intensity factor K{sub I} and the strain-energy release rate, the two-dimensional conversion thickness finite element method has been used to calculate the stress intensity factors K{sub I} for dangerous sections in the ring part of links. Furthermore, the reliability of calculations of the finite element stress intensity factors K{sub I} for dangerous sections of elevator links and the residual life computation for links are verified by fatigue tests of actual links. Finally, the experimental verification of computed results by 150T link fractured at site indicates that the computed critical crack lengths and residual life tally well with those measured and meet the needs of oil drilling.

  11. Development of Fracture Toughness Evaluation Method for Composite Materials by Non-Destructive Testing Method

    Lee, Y. T.; Kim, K. S.

    1998-01-01

    Fracture process of continuous fiber reinforced composites is very complex because various fracture mechanisms such as matrix cracking, debonding, delamination and fiber breaking occur simultaneously during crack growth. If fibers cause crack bridging during crack growth, the stable crack growth and unstable crack growth appear repeatedly. Therefore, it is very difficult to exactly determine tile starting point of crack growth and the fracture toughness at the critical crack length in composites. In this research, fracture toughness test for CFRP was accomplished by using acoustic emission(AE) and recording of tile fracture process in real time by video-microscope. The starting point of crack growth, pop-in point and the point of unstable crack growth can be exactly determined. Each fracture mechanism can be classified by analyzing the fracture process through AE and video-microscope. The more reliable method is the fracture toughness measurement of composite materials was proposed by using the combination of R-curve method, AE and video microscope

  12. The Place of Ultrasonography in the Evaluation of Rib Fractures

    Fulya Bakılan; Gökhan Yüce; Ahmet Çağdaş Biçen; Tanju Keten

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether ultrasonography is superior to chest x-ray in detecting rib fractures in patients with minor blunt chest trauma and chest pain. Materials and Methods: Ultrasonography findings of 32 patients with minor blunt chest trauma showing no evidence of a rib fracture on anteroposterior chest x-rays, were documented. Presence of cortical discontinuities, acoustic shadows, reverberation artifacts, and hematoma by ultrasonography was...

  13. Multiple-slice spiral CT evaluation of occipital condyle fractures

    Wang Xifu; Zhang Guixiang; Li Kang'an; Zhao Jinglong; Wang Han; Feng Yan; Zheng Linfeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the MSCT findings of occipital condyle fracture (OCF) and improve its diagnostic accuracy. Methods: Nineteen patients with OCF, selected from 110 patients suffering high energy injuries at the craniocervical junction, were enrolled into the study. The MSCT appearances of OCFs were retrospectively analyzed by two experienced radiologists. OCF had four types: type Ⅰ was a comminuted fracture, type Ⅱ was a extension of basilar skull fracture, type Ⅲ was an avulsion fracture at the attachment site of alar ligament on occipital condyle, type Ⅳ was a fracture of mixed pattern consisting of two or more above fracture types. Results: In 19 patients, the left, right and bilateral OCFs were seen in 7, 11 cases, and 1 case, respectively. Type Ⅰ was found in one case, which was a comminution of the left occipital condyle. Type Ⅱ was found in 5 cases, which involved the middle and posterior parts of occipital condyles with 2 on the left and 3 on the right, Type Ⅲ was found in 12 cases which showed various degree of fragment displacement with 3 occurring on the left, 8 on the right, 1 involving bilateral sides, 6 involving articular surfaces and 7 accompanying by enlargement of alar ligaments. Type Ⅳ was found in one case, with coexistence of Type Ⅱ and type Ⅲ In addition, OCFs were accompanied by head and (or) cervical spine injuries in 14 cases, which included cranial fracture in 8 cases, epidural hematoma in 4 cases, subarachnoid hemorrhage in one case, cerebral contusion and laceration in one case, subfalcial hernia in one case, cervical spine fracture and dislocation in 9 cases, and so on. Conclusion: OCFs can be accurately diagnosed by MSCT, which is important for selection of treatment protocols. (authors)

  14. The finite element part of the LAMCAL program. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics applications

    Lamain, L.G.; Blanckenburg, J.F.G.

    1982-01-01

    The elastic-plastic FEM code described in this report is the third part of the Lamcal program of which the two other parts for mesh generating and plotting were presented previously. Also this part uses the dynamic core storage. All variables and problem defining data are stored in one common array-SPACE. If all three parts are used together, the same common-SPACE is reused in each part. The lay-out of the complete program is given. J-integral evaluation and plotting can be done immediately in the FE run or afterwards in a post processing run. Post processing is done within the FEM part with a reduced core space. Originally developed as a general code, the use of the present version is mainly focussed on research in the field of the fracture mechanics. Several J-integral routines are available as well as crack growth modelling by node release or stiffness reduction, energy calculations, crack tip elements, etc. In this report the theory is discussed and some sample problems are given. The theory is presented in two parts, the general FEM and the more specific EPFM theory. For the sample problems, a choice has been made to show the accuracy of the program under more or less severe loading conditions

  15. COMPARISON OF THE TRADITIONAL STRENGTH OF MATERIALS APPROACH TO DESIGN WITH THE FRACTURE MECHANICS APPROACH

    Z. Ceylan

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this activity is to show that the use of the traditional strength of materials approach to the drip shield and the waste package (WP) designs is bounding and appropriate when compared to the fracture mechanics approach. The scope of this activity is limited to determining the failure assessment diagrams for the two materials at issue: Ti-7 and Alloy 22. This calculation is intended for use in support of the license application design of the drip shield and the WP. This activity is associated with the drip shield and the WP designs. The activity evaluation for work package number P32 12234F2, included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 1, p. A-6), has determined that the development of this document is subject to ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' requirements. The control of the electronic management of data is accomplished in accordance with the methods specified in Reference 1, Section 10. AP-3.124, ''Design Calculations and Analysis'' (Ref. 2), is used to develop and document the calculation

  16. Ipsilateral simultaneous fracture of the trochlea involving the lateral end clavicle and distal end radius: a rare combination and a unique mechanism of injury

    Gupta RK

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Isolated trochlea fracture in adults is a rare surgical entity as compared to its capitellar counterpart. It has been only mentioned sporadically in the literature as case reports. Fracture of the trochlea is accompanied by other elbow injuries like elbow dislocation, capitellum fracture, ulnar fracture and extraarticular condylar fracture. Here we report a unique case of isolated displaced trochlea fracture associated with fractures of the lateral end clavicle and the distal end radius. We propose a unique mechanism for this rare combination of injuries: typical triad of injury, i.e. fracture of the distal end radius with trochlea and fracture of the lateral end of the clavicle. Nonoperative treatment is recommended for undisplaced humeral trochlea fractures; but for displaced ones, anatomical reduction and internal fixation are essential to maintain the congruous trochleacoronoid articulation and hence to maintain the intrinsic stability of the elbow. Key words: Isolated trochlea fracture; Clavicle; Radius fractures

  17. Investigations on the influence of the stress state on fracture-mechanical values

    Schmidt, P.

    1979-01-01

    Fracture toughness obtained from specimen can be applied to construction elements only when the same stress state exists. In standardised fracture-mechanical tests plain strain is realised. Using the stress intensity factor, a critical crack length or a critical load can be obtained. Above these values a crack propagates in an unstable way. The specimen are tested under uni-axial load. In this paper investigations have been made whether a biaxial load increases the stress state over the plain strain and whether consequently a decrease of the critical fracture toughness and a shift of the temperatures Tsub(g)sub(y) and Tsub(s) results which characterise the fracture behaviour of steel. In order to answer these questions the tests were made which induced due to their geometry an additional nominal stress parallel to the crack front in spite of uni-axial loading. The results were compared with those from specimen without an additional nominal stress and having in their cross section under same test conditions nearly the same plain strain. The fracture toughness of both specimen types were compared at temperatures between 142 K and 252 K and correlated to other material-characterising values. The tests were completed by stress analysis and by comparing the crack opening displacement. Due to the additional stress, Tsub(g)sub(y) was found to be 20 K higher than for the reference specimen. The fracture toughness decreases significantly in certain temperature ranges. The plastic stress concentration factor was comperatively higher and the remaining plastic crack opening decreases up to 25%. (orig.) [de

  18. Evaluation of essential work of fracture in a dual phase high strength steel sheet

    Gutierrez, D.; Perez, L. I.; Lara, A.; Casellas, D.; Prado, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Fracture toughness of advanced high strength steels (AHSS), can be used to optimize crash behavior of structural components. However it cannot be readily measured in metal sheet because of the sheet thickness. In this work, the Essential Work of Fracture (EWF) methodology is proposed to evaluate the fracture toughness of metal sheets. It has been successfully applied in polymers films and some metal sheets. However, their information about the applicability of this methodology to AHSS is relatively scarce. In the present work the fracture toughness of a Dual Phase (strength of 800 MPa) and drawing steel sheets has been measured by means of the EWF. The results show that the test requirements are met and also show the clear influence of notch radii on the measured values, specially for the AHSS grade. Thus, the EWF is postulated as a methodology to evaluate the fracture toughness in AHSS sheets. (Author) 18 refs.

  19. Benchmark on residual stress modeling in fracture mechanics assessment

    Marie, S.; Deschanels, H.; Chapuliot, S.; Le Delliou, P.

    2014-01-01

    In the frame of development in analytical defect assessment methods for the RSE-M and RCC-MRx codes, new work on the consideration of residual stresses is initiated by AREVA, CEA and EDF. The first step of this work is the realization of a database of F.E. reference cases. To validate assumptions and develop a good practice guideline for the consideration of residual stresses in finite element calculations, a benchmark between AREVA, CEA and EDF is going-on. A first application presented in this paper focuses on the analysis of the crack initiation of aged duplex stainless steel pipes submitted to an increasing pressure loading. Residual stresses are related to pipe fabrication process and act as shell bending condition. Two tests were performed: the first with an internal longitudinal semi-elliptical crack and the second with an external crack. The analysis first focuses on the ability to accurately estimate the measured pressure at the crack initiation of the two tests. For that purpose, the comparison of results obtained with different methods of taking into account the residual stresses (i.e. thermal fields or initial strain field). It then validates post-treatment procedures for J or G determination, and finally compares of the results obtained by the different partners. It is then shown that the numerical models can integrate properly the impact of residual stresses on the crack initiation pressure. Then, an excellent agreement is obtained between the different numerical evaluations of G provided by the participants to the benchmark so that best practice and reference F.E. solutions for residual stresses consideration can be provided based on that work. (authors)

  20. Retrospective evaluation and dating of non-accidental rib fractures in infants

    Sanchez, T.R.; Nguyen, H.; Palacios, W.; Doherty, M.; Coulter, K.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To describe the sequential appearance of healing rib fractures on initial and follow-up radiographs using published guidelines in approximating the age of rib fractures in infants with the aim of establishing a more objective method of dating rib fractures by measuring the thickness of the callous formation. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective analysis of initial and follow-up digital skeletal surveys of infants less than 12 months of age performed between January 2008 and January 2012 at the University of California Davis Children's Hospital. Six radiological features of rib fractures evaluating the appearance of the callous formation (C stage) and fracture line (F stage) were assessed. Patients with osteogenesis imperfecta, known vitamin D deficiency, and skeletal or metabolic dysplasia were not included in the study. Thereafter, callous thickness was measured and recorded for each stage. Results: Sixteen infants (age range 1–11 months, seven males and nine females) with 23 rib fractures were analysed. The thickness of the callous formation follows a predictable pattern advancing one stage after a 2-week follow-up with progressive callous thickening starting from stage 2, peaks at around stage 4, and then tapers and remodels until it almost disappears when the fracture is healed at stage 6. Conclusion: It appears that rib fractures in infants follow a predictable pattern of healing. Measuring the thickness of the callous formation is a more objective way of guiding the radiologist in estimating the age of the fracture

  1. An evaluation of flexible intramedullary nail fixation in femoral shaft fractures in paediatric age group.

    Kumar, Sanjay; Roy, Sandip Kumar; Jha, Amrish Kumar; Chatterjee, Debdutta; Banerjee, Debabrata; Garg, Anant Kumar

    2011-06-01

    Sixty-two femoral shaft fractures in 60 patients treated by elastic intramedullary nailing with mean age of the patients being 9.2 years (range 5 years to 12 years) and average follow-up of 15 months (range 7 months to 60 months) are evaluated. Twenty-eight fractures were fixed with titanium elastic nail while 34 fractures were fixed with Enders nail. There were 40 midshaft fractures, 18 proximal femoral and 4 were fractures of distal third. Fracture patterns were transverse in 35, short oblique in 14 cases and 13 were spiral fractures. Mean age of union in this series was 17 weeks (range 12 weeks to 28 weeks). Ten cases had complications, 5 had nail tip irritation, 3 varus or valgus malalignment and 2 had delayed union. In this series, we did not have any non-union, refracture, limb length discrepancy or any major infection. The result demonstrates 100% union rate irrespective of the age, weight and height of the patient. Regardless of the site of fracture and their pattern, it united every time with elastic nail fixation. We did not find and mismatch in the results of fractures stabilised with titanium elastic nail with that of elastic stainless steel nail.

  2. Evaluation of cervical spine fractures in adults in spiral computed tomography

    Siemianowicz, A.; Wawrzynek, W.; Koczy, B.; Kasprowska, S.; Siemianowicz, A.; Wawrzynek, W.; Pilch-Kowalczyk, J.; Kwasniewska, A.; Baron, J.

    2005-01-01

    Cervical spine injury as a frequent cause of disability is a very important diagnostic problem. The purpose of this study is to evaluate cervical spine fractures in adults in spiral computed tomography (CT) including multiplanar and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions. 62 patients (53 men and 9 women, aged 19-75) after cervical spine trauma, admitted to Emergency Room of Self-Financing Public District Hospital of Trauma Surgery at Piekary Slaskie were studied retrospectively. In all cases the spiral CT was performed using helical CT scanner - Hi Speed CT/e GE Medical System. Following settings were applied: slice thickness 2 or 3 mm; reconstruction 2 mm; pitch 1,3 and with automatic mAs selection. Multiplanar and three-dimensional reconstructions were performed. Patients aged 19-75, (mean age 40,2) were classified into 4 age groups; 19-24; 25-45; 46-65, and over 65 years old. The most common cause of cervical spine fracture was traffic accident (51,6%), fall (25,8%), sport accident (17,8%). Clinical symptoms were present in all patients. Neurological deficits in examination performed in Emergency Room (just after admission) were present in 27 patients (43,5%), tetraplegia predominated (59,25%). We often observed multilevel fractures and fractures of different parts of one vertebra. Fractures of C1 vertebra were observed in 7 patients,fractures of C2 in 20 patients, fractures of C3 in 12 patients, fractures of C4 in 12 patients, fractures of C5 in 24 patients, fractures of C6 in 16 patients, fractures of C7 in 8 patients. On levels C3-C7 in 16 cases we observed dislocation of bone parts into the vertebral canal with compression of spinal cord. In some cases not all fractures were visible on x-ray films. CT examination of the cervical spine can be the first and sufficient examination in high risk patients. (author)

  3. The application of fracture mechanics to the safety assessment of transport casks for radioactive materials

    Zencker, U.; Mueller, K.; Droste, B.; Roedel, R.; Voelzke, H.

    2004-01-01

    BAM is the German responsible authority for the mechanical and thermal design safety assessment of packages for the transport of radioactive materials. The assessment has to cover the brittle fracture safety proof of package components made of potentially brittle materials. This paper gives a survey of the regulatory and technical requirements for such an assessment according to BAM's new ''Guidelines for the Application of Ductile Cast Iron for Transport and Storage Casks for Radioactive Materials''. Based on these guidelines higher stresses than before can become permissible, but it is necessary to put more effort into the safety assessment procedure. The fundamentals of such a proof with the help of the methods of fracture mechanics are presented. The recommended procedure takes into account the guidelines of the IAEA Advisory Material which are based on the prevention of crack initiation. Examples of BAM's research and safety assessment practices are given. Recommendations for further developments towards package designs with higher acceptable stress levels will be concluded

  4. Fracture mechanics based design for radioactive material transport packagings -- Historical review

    Smith, J.A.; Salzbrenner, D.; Sorenson, K.; McConnell, P.

    1998-04-01

    The use of a fracture mechanics based design for the radioactive material transport (RAM) packagings has been the subject of extensive research for more than a decade. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has played an important role in the research and development of the application of this technology. Ductile iron has been internationally accepted as an exemplary material for the demonstration of a fracture mechanics based method of RAM packaging design and therefore is the subject of a large portion of the research discussed in this report. SNL's extensive research and development program, funded primarily by the U. S. Department of Energy's Office of Transportation, Energy Management and Analytical Services (EM-76) and in an auxiliary capacity, the office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, is summarized in this document along with a summary of the research conducted at other institutions throughout the world. In addition to the research and development work, code and standards development and regulatory positions are also discussed

  5. PECVD low-permittivity organosilicate glass coatings: Adhesion, fracture and mechanical properties

    Lin Youbo; Xiang Yong [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Tsui, Ting Y. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Nanotechnology Institute, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ont., N2L 3G1 (Canada); Vlassak, Joost J. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)], E-mail: vlassak@esag.harvard.edu

    2008-10-15

    The structure and mechanical behavior of organosilicate glass (OSG) coatings have been analyzed as a function of composition and UV irradiation time. A decrease in the OSG carbon content results in more networking bonds and increased connectivity; UV irradiation increases the connectivity by severing weak terminal bonds and stabilizes the network through local bond rearrangements. These structure modifications lead to a significant improvement in the stiffness, hardness, and fracture energy of these coatings. The networking bond density and mean connectivity number correlate well with the mechanical behavior of the OSG films, although network bond density weighted by bond energy is a more appropriate measure. The adhesion energy of silicon nitride to OSG is significantly higher than the cohesive energy of the OSG as a result of interface densification and crack-tip shielding. Subcritical fracture measurements in aqueous environments show that the detrimental effect of water on adhesion surpasses the effect of network connectivity.

  6. Mechanical Behavior and Fracture Properties of NiAl Intermetallic Alloy with Different Copper Contents

    Tao-Hsing Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The deformation behavior and fracture characteristics of NiAl intermetallic alloy containing 5~7 at% Cu are investigated at room temperature under strain rates ranging from 1 × 10−3 to 5 × 103 s−1. It is shown that the copper contents and strain rate both have a significant effect on the mechanical behavior of the NiAl alloy. Specifically, the flow stress increases with an increasing copper content and strain rate. Moreover, the ductility also improves as the copper content increases. The change in the mechanical response and fracture behavior of the NiAl alloy given a higher copper content is thought to be the result of the precipitation of β-phase (Ni,CuAl and γ'-phase (Ni,Cu3Al in the NiAl matrix.

  7. Acoustic Emission Methodology to Evaluate the Fracture Toughness in Heat Treated AISI D2 Tool Steel

    Mostafavi, Sajad; Fotouhi, Mohamad; Motasemi, Abed; Ahmadi, Mehdi; Sindi, Cevat Teymuri

    2012-10-01

    In this article, fracture toughness behavior of tool steel was investigated using Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring. Fracture toughness ( K IC) values of a specific tool steel was determined by applying various approaches based on conventional AE parameters, such as Acoustic Emission Cumulative Count (AECC), Acoustic Emission Energy Rate (AEER), and the combination of mechanical characteristics and AE information called sentry function. The critical fracture toughness values during crack propagation were achieved by means of relationship between the integral of the sentry function and cumulative fracture toughness (KICUM). Specimens were selected from AISI D2 cold-work tool steel and were heat treated at four different tempering conditions (300, 450, 525, and 575 °C). The results achieved through AE approaches were then compared with a methodology proposed by compact specimen testing according to ASTM standard E399. It was concluded that AE information was an efficient method to investigate fracture characteristics.

  8. A fracture mechanics model for iodine stress corrosion crack propagation in Zircaloy tubing

    Crescimanno, P.J.; Campbell, W.R.; Goldberg, I.

    1984-01-01

    A fracture mechanics model is presented for iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy tubing. The model utilizes a power law to relate crack extension velocity to stress intensity factor, a hyperbolic tangent function for the influence of iodine concentration, and an exponential function for the influence of temperature and material strength. Comparisons of predicted to measured failure times show that predicted times are within a factor of two of the measured times for a majority of the specimens considered

  9. A fracture mechanics study of tungsten failure under high heat flux loads

    Li, Muyuan

    2015-01-01

    The performance of fusion devices is highly dependent on plasma-facing components. Tungsten is the most promising candidate material for armors in plasma-facing components in ITER and DEMO. However, the brittleness of tungsten below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is very critical to the reliability of plasma-facing components. In this work, thermo-mechanical and fracture behaviors of tungsten are predicted numerically under fusion relevant thermal loadings.

  10. Probabilistic fracture mechanics of nuclear structural components. Consideration of transition from embedded crack to surface crack

    Yagawa, Genki; Yoshimura, Shinobu; Kanto, Yasuhiro

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) analysis of aged nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material. New interpolation formulas are first derived for both embedded elliptical surface cracks and semi-elliptical surface cracks. To investigate effects of transition from embedded crack to surface crack in PFM analyses, one of PFM round-robin problems set by JSME-RC111 committee, i.e. 'aged RPV under normal and upset operating conditions' is solved, employing the interpolation formulas. (author)

  11. Non–double-couple mechanisms of microearthquakes induced by hydraulic fracturing

    Šílený, Jan; Hill, D. P.; Eisner, L.; Cornet, F. H.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 114, B8 (2009), B08307/1-B08307/15 ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300120502; GA ČR GA205/09/0724 Grant - others:EC(XE) MTKI-CT-2004-517242 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : microearthquakes * source mechanisms * hydraulic fracturing Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 3.082, year: 2009

  12. The effect of crack propagation mechanism on the fractal dimension of fracture surfaces in steels

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Strnadel, B.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 3-4 (2008), s. 726-738 ISSN 0013-7944 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/0646; GA AV ČR IAA200410502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : low-alloyed steel * fracture surface * fractography Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.713, year: 2008

  13. Nuclear scintigraphic evaluation of third metacarpal and metatarsal bone fractures in three horses

    Markel, M.D.; Snyder, J.R.; Hornof, W.J.; Meagher, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear scintigraphy was used to evaluate healing of third metacarpal bone (MC III) fractures in 2 horses (horses 1 and 2) and a third metatarsal bone fracture in 1 horse (horse 3) after stabilization of each fracture with 2 broad dynamic compression plates. In horse 1, the fracture had uniform uptake of 99mTc methylene diphosphonate on days 1, 15, and 30 after surgery. The fracture healed, and the horse was discharged from the clinic on day 52. In horse 2, a 6-cm photopenic region (ie, area of low radioactivity) was seen over the diaphysis of MC III on day 3. The region persisted and became more distinct by day 32. The diaphysis of MC III sequestered, and horse 2 was euthanatized on day 44. In horse 3, vascularity was seen bridging the fracture on day 5, with a 3-cm photopenic region over the dorsal diaphysis of the third metatarsal bone. By days 18 and 32, uptake of 99mTc methylene diphosphonate in the region had increased, indicating vascularization of the site. the fracture healed, and horse 3 was discharged from the clinic on day 47. Our findings indicated that serial nuclear scintigraphy can be used to evaluate fracture vascularization after surgery in horses

  14. Effects of local mechanical and fracture properties on LBB behavior of a dissimilar metal welded joint in nuclear power plants

    Du, L.Y.; Wang, G.Z., E-mail: gzwang@ecust.edu.cn; Xuan, F.Z.; Tu, S.T.

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Effect of local mechanical and fracture properties on LBB behavior were investigated. • Considering local mechanical properties leads to slightly high LBB curve. • Use of fracture resistance of base or weld will produce non-conservative LBB result. • Local fracture properties of interface region cannot be ignored in LBB analysis. - Abstract: In this paper, three-dimensional finite element models with and without considering local mechanical properties were built for a dissimilar metal welded joint (DMWJ) connected the safe end to pipe-nozzle of a reactor pressure vessel. The inner circumferential surface cracks were postulated at the interface of A508 steel and buttering Alloy52Mb. Based on the elastic–plastic fracture mechanics theory of J-integral, the crack growth stability was analyzed. The effects of the local mechanical and fracture resistance properties on LBB behavior were investigated. The results show that considering local mechanical properties leads to slightly high LBB curve. For the A508/Alloy52Mb interface region cracks in the DMWJ, if the fracture resistance curve of base metal A508 or the buttering Alloy52Mb is used, the non-conservative (unsafe) LBB assessment result will be produced. With increasing the applied bending moment, the degree of un-conservatism in LBB behavior becomes large. Therefore, to obtain accurate LBB assessment results, the local fracture resistance properties of the interface region should be used.

  15. Evaluation of fracture strength of teeth restored with different types ...

    Evaluation of fracture strength of teeth restored with different types of posts luted with different luting ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice ... metal posts and glass‑fiber posts luted with resin‑based luting cement and glass ionomer cement.

  16. Tee-junction of LMFR secondary circuit involving thermal, thermomechanical and fracture mechanics assessment on a striping phenomenon

    Lee, H.-Y.; Kim, J.-B.; Yoo, B.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the thermomechanical and fracture mechanics evaluation procedure of thermal striping damage on the secondary piping of LMFR using Green's function method and standard FEM. The thermohydraulic loading conditions used in the present analysis are simplified sinusoidal thermal loads and the random type thermal loads. The thermomechanical fatigue damage was evaluated according to ASME code subsection NH. The results of fatigue analysis for the sinusoidal and random type load cases showed that fatigue failure would occur at a welded joint during 90 000 hours of operation. The assessment for the fracture behavior of the welded joint showed that the crack would be initiated at an early stage of the operation. The fatigue crack was evaluated to propagate up to 5 mm along the thickness direction during the first 940.7 and 42 698.9 hours of operation for the sinusoidal and the random loading cases, respectively. However, it was evaluated that the crack would be arrested because of the low level of the primary stresses. The fatigue and crack propagation analyses for the random type loads were performed by Green's function method. (author)

  17. The Particle Shape of WC Governing the Fracture Mechanism of Particle Reinforced Iron Matrix Composites.

    Li, Zulai; Wang, Pengfei; Shan, Quan; Jiang, Yehua; Wei, He; Tan, Jun

    2018-06-11

    In this work, tungsten carbide particles (WC p , spherical and irregular particles)-reinforced iron matrix composites were manufactured utilizing a liquid sintering technique. The mechanical properties and the fracture mechanism of WC p /iron matrix composites were investigated theoretically and experimentally. The crack schematic diagram and fracture simulation diagram of WC p /iron matrix composites were summarized, indicating that the micro-crack was initiated both from the interface for spherical and irregular WC p /iron matrix composites. However, irregular WC p had a tendency to form spherical WC p . The micro-cracks then expanded to a wide macro-crack at the interface, leading to a final failure of the composites. In comparison with the spherical WC p , the irregular WC p were prone to break due to the stress concentration resulting in being prone to generating brittle cracking. The study on the fracture mechanisms of WC p /iron matrix composites might provide a theoretical guidance for the design and engineering application of particle reinforced composites.

  18. Flexible parallel implicit modelling of coupled thermal–hydraulic–mechanical processes in fractured rocks

    M. Cacace

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Theory and numerical implementation describing groundwater flow and the transport of heat and solute mass in fully saturated fractured rocks with elasto-plastic mechanical feedbacks are developed. In our formulation, fractures are considered as being of lower dimension than the hosting deformable porous rock and we consider their hydraulic and mechanical apertures as scaling parameters to ensure continuous exchange of fluid mass and energy within the fracture–solid matrix system. The coupled system of equations is implemented in a new simulator code that makes use of a Galerkin finite-element technique. The code builds on a flexible, object-oriented numerical framework (MOOSE, Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment which provides an extensive scalable parallel and implicit coupling to solve for the multiphysics problem. The governing equations of groundwater flow, heat and mass transport, and rock deformation are solved in a weak sense (either by classical Newton–Raphson or by free Jacobian inexact Newton–Krylow schemes on an underlying unstructured mesh. Nonlinear feedbacks among the active processes are enforced by considering evolving fluid and rock properties depending on the thermo-hydro-mechanical state of the system and the local structure, i.e. degree of connectivity, of the fracture system. A suite of applications is presented to illustrate the flexibility and capability of the new simulator to address problems of increasing complexity and occurring at different spatial (from centimetres to tens of kilometres and temporal scales (from minutes to hundreds of years.

  19. Incorporation of Interfacial Intermetallic Morphology in Fracture Mechanism Map for Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Joints

    Huang, Z.; Kumar, P.; Dutta, I.; Sidhu, R.; Renavikar, M.; Mahajan, R.

    2014-01-01

    A fracture mechanism map (FMM) is a powerful tool which correlates the fracture behavior of a material to its microstructural characteristics in an explicit and convenient way. In the FMM for solder joints, an effective thickness of the interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) layer ( t eff) and the solder yield strength ( σ ys,eff) are used as abscissa and ordinate axes, respectively, as these two predominantly affect the fracture behavior of solder joints. Earlier, a definition of t eff, based on the uniform thickness of IMC ( t u) and the average height of the IMC scallops ( t s), was proposed and shown to aptly explain the fracture behavior of solder joints on Cu. This paper presents a more general definition of t eff that is more widely applicable to a range of metallizations, including Cu and electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG). Using this new definition of t eff, mode I FMM for SAC387/Cu joints has been updated and its validity was confirmed. A preliminary FMM for SAC387/Cu joints with ENIG metallization is also presented.

  20. An interbubble fracture mechanism of blister formation on helium-irradiated metals

    Evans, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes a new model of surface blister formation in which a blister is nucleated by the interbubble fracture of highly overpressurized helium bubbles. As in other gas-driven models, the internal release of helium then provides the driving force for blister lid deformation. The high pressures required for the suggested mode of fracture are a result of the difficulty, experienced by the bubbles in acquiring vacancies. By considering the bubble growth mechanisms, the critical conditions for interbubble fracture are shown to depend on the helium dose and energy, the bubble size, and their depth in the irradiated material. These parameters and other aspects of blister formation are discussed on the basis of the proposed model. One important result concerns the position of the fracture plane; because of the usual displacement of damage and helium peaks relative to depth, this plane can lie well beyond the helium peak. Thus, the disagreement inherent in previous gas models between helium range and measured blister lid thickness values can be resolved without recourse to lateral stress arguments. (Auth.)

  1. Decoupling damage mechanisms in acid-fractured gas/condensate reservoirs

    Bachman, R.C.; Walters, D.A. [Taurus Reservoir Solutions Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Settari, A. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada); Rahim, Z.; Ahmed, M.S. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2006-07-01

    The Khuff is a gas condensate field located 11,500 feet beneath the producing Ghawar oil field in Saudi Arabia. Wells are mainly acid fracture stimulated following drilling with excellent fracture conductivity and length properties. The wells experience a quick production loss however, after tie-in which eventually stabilizes after two to five months. In order to identify the source of productivity loss, such as near well liquid dropout, fracture conductivity loss, reservoir permeability loss due to increased effective stress, a study of a well in the Khuff field was conducted. The study reviewed basic geomechanical and reservoir properties and identified the mechanisms of production loss. The paper presented the methodology, data and preliminary analysis, relative permeability and results of the history matching. It was concluded that traditional production type curves in cases with changing skin may indicate that transient flow is occurring when boundary effects are felt. In addition, stress dependent fracture conductivity and reservoir permeability can be modeled with simpler pressure dependent functions for relatively low overall loss in reservoir pressure. 30 refs., 25 figs., 1 appendix.

  2. Evaluation of fracturing process of soft rocks at great depth by AE measurement and DEM simulation

    Aoki, Kenji; Mito, Yoshitada; Kurokawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroya; Niunoya, Sumio; Minami, Masayuki

    2007-01-01

    The authors developed the stress-based evaluation system of EDZ by AE monitoring and Distinct Element Method (DEM) simulation. In order to apply this system to the soft rock site, the authors try to grasp the relationship between AE parameters, stress change and rock fracturing process by performing the high stiffness tri-axial compression tests including AE measurements on the soft rock samples, and its simulations by DEM using bonded particle model. As the result, it is found that change in predominant AE frequency is effective to evaluate fracturing process in sedimentary soft rocks, and the relationship between stress change and fracturing process is also clarified. (author)

  3. FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES GARDEN I AND II: EVALUATION OF THE DEVIATION IN LATERAL VIEW.

    Leonhardt, Natália Zalc; Melo, Lucas da Ponte; Nordon, David Gonçalves; Silva, Fernando Brandão de Andrade E; Kojima, Kodi Edson; Silva, Jorge Santos

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the rate of deviation in the lateral radiographic incidence in patients with femoral neck fracture classified as non-diverted in the anteroposterior view (Garden I and II). Nineteen selected patients with femoral neck fractures classified as Garden I and II were retrospectively evaluated, estimating the degree of deviation in the lateral view. Fifteen cases (79%) presented deviations in lateral view, with a mean of 18.6 degrees (±15.5). Most fractures of the femoral neck classified as Garden I and II present some degree of posterior deviation in the X-ray lateral view. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Comparative Study.

  4. Coupled hydro-thermo-mechanical modeling of hydraulic fracturing in quasi-brittle rocks using BPM-DEM

    Ingrid Tomac

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved understanding of coupled hydro-thermo-mechanical (HTM hydraulic fracturing of quasi-brittle rock using the bonded particle model (BPM within the discrete element method (DEM. BPM has been recently extended by the authors to account for coupled convective–conductive heat flow and transport, and to enable full hydro-thermal fluid–solid coupled modeling. The application of the work is on enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs, and hydraulic fracturing of hot dry rock (HDR is studied in terms of the impact of temperature difference between rock and a flowing fracturing fluid. Micro-mechanical investigation of temperature and fracturing fluid effects on hydraulic fracturing damage in rocks is presented. It was found that fracture is shorter with pronounced secondary microcracking along the main fracture for the case when the convective–conductive thermal heat exchange is considered. First, the convection heat exchange during low-viscosity fluid infiltration in permeable rock around the wellbore causes significant rock cooling, where a finger-like fluid infiltration was observed. Second, fluid infiltration inhibits pressure rise during pumping and delays fracture initiation and propagation. Additionally, thermal damage occurs in the whole area around the wellbore due to rock cooling and cold fluid infiltration. The size of a damaged area around the wellbore increases with decreasing fluid dynamic viscosity. Fluid and rock compressibility ratio was found to have significant effect on the fracture propagation velocity.

  5. Nonunion of acetabular fractures: evaluation with interactive multiplanar CT

    Kuhlman, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.; Ney, D.R.; Brooker, A.F. Jr.; Magid, D.

    1989-01-01

    Nonunions involving fractures of the acetabulum are reportedly rare, with few citings and little discussion in the literature. It is possible that acetabular nonunions go undetected because imaging of the acetabulum is difficult by conventional radiography. We report two cases of fracture nonunion involving the weight-bearing surface of the acetabulum diagnosed with the aid of computed tomography (CT) and a newly developed interactive 2D/3D orthotool that uniquely processes and reformats routine CT data. The interactive 2D/3D orthotool is a sophisticated computer program that allows dynamic viewing of standard multiplanar reconstructions in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes as well as multiple oblique projections. The 2D/3D orthotool provides on screen correlation of two-dimensional multiplanar images with three-dimensional reconstructions of the pelvis. The authors found this capability ideally suited for studying fractures with off-axis orientation such as those through the acetabular dome, greatly facilitating the diagnosis of nonunion

  6. Mesh construction for the 2-dimensional computational fracture mechanics using the I-DEAS

    Kim, Jong Wook; Kim, Tae Wan; Park, Keun Bae

    2000-09-01

    Recently research activities have been reported regarding the generation of the input data for the crack problems at a minimum of effort utilizing the general characteristics of the finite element modeling technique. Several automatic FE mesh generation methods for the cracked structure of particular geometries and boundary conditions have been proposed by using commercial codes or developing in-house programs. In general, development of software to deal with special crack problem can maximize the efficiency and accuracy for a specific environment. However, applicable range of such scheme is usually very restricted and new program should be formed in each case. On the other hand, commercial codes can be used for the automatic mesh generation of variety of geometries, but with an additional effort to accomodate the singular element for the cracked-body analysis. In the present study, a procedure for the generation of input data for the optimized computational fracture mechanics is developed as a series of effort to establish the structural integrity evaluation procedure of SMART reactor vessel assembly. Input data for the finite element analysis are prepared using the commercial code I-DEAS. The midpoint nodes near the crack front are shifted at the quarter-points. The complete finite element model generated is given to another commercial finite element code ABAQUS for the stress analysis. The stress intensity factors are calculated using the J-integral method. To demonstrate the validation of the present procedure, double-edge crack in a plate subjected to uniform tension is solved, and the effects of mesh construction are discussed in detail. The structural integrity evaluation procedure through the 2-D crack modeling is then established

  7. Hydro-mechanical coupled simulation of hydraulic fracturing using the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM)

    Youn, Dong Joon

    This thesis presents the development and validation of an advanced hydro-mechanical coupled finite element program analyzing hydraulic fracture propagation within unconventional hydrocarbon formations under various conditions. The realistic modeling of hydraulic fracturing is necessarily required to improve the understanding and efficiency of the stimulation technique. Such modeling remains highly challenging, however, due to factors including the complexity of fracture propagation mechanisms, the coupled behavior of fracture displacement and fluid pressure, the interactions between pre-existing natural and initiated hydraulic fractures and the formation heterogeneity of the target reservoir. In this research, an eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) scheme is developed allowing for representation of single or multiple fracture propagations without any need for re-meshing. Also, the coupled flows through the fracture are considered in the program to account for their influence on stresses and deformations along the hydraulic fracture. In this research, a sequential coupling scheme is applied to estimate fracture aperture and fluid pressure with the XFEM. Later, the coupled XFEM program is used to estimate wellbore bottomhole pressure during fracture propagation, and the pressure variations are analyzed to determine the geometry and performance of the hydraulic fracturing as pressure leak-off test. Finally, material heterogeneity is included into the XFEM program to check the effect of random formation property distributions to the hydraulic fracture geometry. Random field theory is used to create the random realization of the material heterogeneity with the consideration of mean, standard deviation, and property correlation length. These analyses lead to probabilistic information on the response of unconventional reservoirs and offer a more scientific approach regarding risk management for the unconventional reservoir stimulation. The new stochastic approach

  8. Evaluation of sarcopenia in patients with distal radius fractures.

    Roh, Young Hak; Koh, Young Do; Noh, Jung Ho; Gong, Hyun Sik; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2017-12-01

    Sarcopenia is more prevalent in patients with distal radius fracture (DRF) than in age- and sex-matched controls. Lower appendicular mass index in men and weaker grip strength in both men and women increase the likelihood of DRF. Sarcopenia is a core component of physical frailty that predisposes older people to falls and negatively impacts the activities of daily living. The objectives of this study were to compare the prevalence of sarcopenia in patients with DRF with that in age- and sex-matched controls without DRF; and evaluate the association between sarcopenia and the occurrence of DRF. We prospectively recruited 132 patients over 50 years of age who sustained DRF due to fall and 132 age- and sex-matched controls without DRF. A definition of sarcopenia was based on the consensus of the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia. Sarcopenic components including appendicular lean body mass, grip strength, and gait speed were compared between the two groups. Other factors assessed for the occurrence of DRF were age, gender, body mass index (BMI), lumbar, and hip bone mineral density (BMD) values. A conditional logistic regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the associations between sarcopenia and the occurrence of DRF. A total of 39 (30%) of 132 DRF patients were sarcopenic, whereas 23 (17%) of the 132 controls were within the sarcopenic criteria (p = 0.048). The patient group had significantly lower lean body mass and weaker grip strength than those of the control group. However, there was no significant difference in gait speed between the two groups. According to regression analysis, lower appendicular mass index in men was associated with an increased incidence of DRF (odds ratio [OR] = 0.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.72, 0.95) while weaker grip strength and lower total hip BMD values were associated with the occurrence of DRF in both men (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.63, 0.92; and OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.64, 0.94, respectively) and women (OR

  9. Fracturing Fluid Leak-off for Deep Volcanic Rock in Zhungeer Basin: Mechanism and Control Method

    Huang Bo; Cheng Hao; He Yidong; Fu Yanming

    2017-01-01

    The deep volcanic reservoir in Zhungeer Basin is buried in over 4000m depth, which is characterized by complex lithology (breccia, andesite, basalt, etc.), high elastic modulus and massive natural fractures. During hydraulic fracturing, hydraulic fracture will propagate and natural fractures will be triggered by the increasing net pressure. However, the extension of fractures, especially natural fractures, would aggravate the leak-off effect of fracturing fluid, and consequently decrease the ...

  10. Evaluation of Varying Ductile Fracture Criteria for 42CrMo Steel by Compressions at Different Temperatures and Strain Rates

    Quan, Guo-zheng; Luo, Gui-chang; Mao, An; Liang, Jian-ting; Wu, Dong-sen

    2014-01-01

    Fracturing by ductile damage occurs quite naturally in metal forming processes, and ductile fracture of strain-softening alloy, here 42CrMo steel, cannot be evaluated through simple procedures such as tension testing. Under these circumstances, it is very significant and economical to find a way to evaluate the ductile fracture criteria (DFC) and identify the relationships between damage evolution and deformation conditions. Under the guidance of the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criteria, an inn...

  11. Correlating Scatter in Fatigue Life with Fracture Mechanisms in Forged Ti-6242Si Alloy

    Sinha, V.; Pilchak, A. L.; Jha, S. K.; Porter, W. J.; John, R.; Larsen, J. M.

    2018-04-01

    Unlike the quasi-static mechanical properties, such as strength and ductility, fatigue life can vary significantly (by an order of magnitude or more) for nominally identical material and test conditions in many materials, including Ti-alloys. This makes life prediction and management more challenging for components that are subjected to cyclic loading in service. The differences in fracture mechanisms can cause the scatter in fatigue life. In this study, the fatigue fracture mechanisms were investigated in a forged near- α titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.1Si, which had been tested under a condition that resulted in life variations by more than an order of magnitude. The crack-initiation and small crack growth processes, including their contributions to fatigue life variability, were elucidated via quantitative characterization of fatigue fracture surfaces. Combining the results from quantitative tilt fractography and electron backscatter diffraction, crystallography of crack-initiating and neighboring facets on the fracture surface was determined. Cracks initiated on the surface for both the shortest and the longest life specimens. The facet plane in the crack-initiating grain was aligned with the basal plane of a primary α grain for both the specimens. The facet planes in grains neighboring the crack-initiating grain were also closely aligned with the basal plane for the shortest life specimen, whereas the facet planes in the neighboring grains were significantly misoriented from the basal plane for the longest life specimen. The difference in the extent of cracking along the basal plane can explain the difference in fatigue life of specimens at the opposite ends of scatter band.

  12. Studying physical properties of deformed intact and fractured rocks by micro-scale hydro-mechanical-seismicity model

    Raziperchikolaee, Samin

    The pore pressure variation in an underground formation during hydraulic stimulation of low permeability formations or CO2 sequestration into saline aquifers can induce microseismicity due to fracture generation or pre-existing fracture activation. While the analysis of microseismic data mainly focuses on mapping the location of fractures, the seismic waves generated by the microseismic events also contain information for understanding of fracture mechanisms based on microseismic source analysis. We developed a micro-scale geomechanics, fluid-flow and seismic model that can predict transport and seismic source behavior during rock failure. This model features the incorporation of microseismic source analysis in fractured and intact rock transport properties during possible rock damage and failure. The modeling method considers comprehensive grains and cements interaction through a bonded-particle-model. As a result of grain deformation and microcrack development in the rock sample, forces and displacements in the grains involved in the bond breakage are measured to determine seismic moment tensor. In addition, geometric description of the complex pore structure is regenerated to predict fluid flow behavior of fractured samples. Numerical experiments are conducted for different intact and fractured digital rock samples, representing various mechanical behaviors of rocks and fracture surface properties, to consider their roles on seismic and transport properties of rocks during deformation. Studying rock deformation in detail provides an opportunity to understand the relationship between source mechanism of microseismic events and transport properties of damaged rocks to have a better characterizing of fluid flow behavior in subsurface formations.

  13. Prediction of forming limit in hydro-mechanical deep drawing of steel sheets using ductile fracture criterion

    Oh, S.-T.; Chang, H.-J.; Oh, K. H.; Han, H. N.

    2006-04-01

    It has been observed that the forming limit curve at fracture (FLCF) of steel sheets, with a relatively higher ductility limit have linear shapes, similar to those of a bulk forming process. In contrast, the FLCF of sheets with a relatively lower ductility limit have rather complex shapes approaching the forming limit curve at neck (FLCN) towards the equi-biaxial strain paths. In this study, the FLCFs of steel sheets were measured and compared with the fracture strains predicted from specific ductile fracture criteria, including a criterion suggested by the authors, which can accurately describe FLCFs with both linear and complex shapes. To predict the forming limit for hydro-mechanical deep drawing of steel sheets, the ductile fracture criteria were integrated into a finite element simulation. The simulation, results based on the criterion suggested by authors accurately predicted the experimetal, fracture limits of steel sheets for the hydro-mechanical deep drawing process.

  14. Computational implementation of the multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model for salt

    Koteras, J.R.; Munson, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    The Multi-Mechanism Deformation (M-D) model for creep in rock salt has been used in three-dimensional computations for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a potential waste, repository. These computational studies are relied upon to make key predictions about long-term behavior of the repository. Recently, the M-D model was extended to include creep-induced damage. The extended model, the Multi-Mechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, is considerably more complicated than the M-D model and required a different technology from that of the M-D model for a computational implementation

  15. Comparative evaluation of fracture and defect in reciproc and rotary files in severe curved root canals

    Mahdis Bagherian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Root canal instrumentation is an important phase in root canal therapy. Since success in endodontic treatment depends on file defect and fracture, the aim of this study was to compare the evaluation of defect and fracture in rotary and reciproc files in severe curved root canals. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study, 60 mesial canals of human closed apex molars with more than 30° canal curvature were randomly divided into two groups. In first group M-two rotary files number# 15, 20, and 25 and in second group R25 reciproc file were used for filing, respectively. A ×8 magnifier was applied to evaluate the defect or fracture presence in each side and if it were observed, a new file would be replaced. Therefore, the number of prepared canals with each file and fractured or defective files and the place of fracture in root canal were recorded. Kaplan Meier curve and log rank test were done by using SPSS v.22. Results: In rotary group, seven and two files were fractured and defected, respectively and four files were fractured and no defect was observed in reciproc group. Although the mean of the number of prepared canals until fracture or defect in rotary and reciproc groups was 3.3 and 7.06, respectively, there were no significant differences between two systems. All file’s fractures occurred in apical regions . Conclusion: The results showed that there was no significant difference in defects or fractures of rotary and reciproc systems. Reciproc instruments can be more effective than rotary ones because the root canal preparation in rotary instruments is longer than in reciproc system.

  16. Relevance of adjacent joint imaging in the evaluation of ankle fractures.

    Antoci, Valentin; Patel, Shaun P; Weaver, Michael J; Kwon, John Y

    2016-10-01

    Routinely obtaining adjacent joint radiographs when evaluating patients with ankle fractures may be of limited clinical utility and an unnecessary burden, particularly in the absence of clinical suspicion for concomitant injuries. One thousand, three hundred and seventy patients who sustained ankle fractures over a 5-year period presenting to two level 1 trauma centers were identified. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for demographics, physical examination findings, and radiographic information. Analyses included descriptive statistics along with sensitivity and predictive value calculations for the presence of adjacent joint fracture. Adjacent joint imaging (n=1045 radiographs) of either the knee or foot was obtained in 873 patients (63.7%). Of those, 75/761 patients (9.9%) demonstrated additional fractures proximal to the ankle joint, most commonly of the proximal fibula. Twenty-two of 284 (7.7%) demonstrated additional fractures distal to the ankle joint, most commonly of the metatarsals. Tenderness to palpation demonstrated sensitivities of 0.92 and 0.77 and positive predictive values of 0.94 and 0.89 for the presence of proximal and distal fractures, respectively. Additionally, 19/22 (86.4%) of patients sustaining foot fractures had their injury detectable on initial ankle X-rays. Overall, only 5.5% (75/1370) of patients sustained fractures proximal to the ankle and only 0.2% (3/1370) of patients had additional foot fractures not evident on initial ankle X-rays. The addition of adjacent joint imaging for the evaluation of patients sustaining ankle fractures is low yield. As such, patient history, physical examination, and clinical suspicion should direct the need for additional X-rays. Level IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Mechanical and Fracturing of Rockburst in Tunnel and Its Acoustic Emission Characteristics

    Xiangxin Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of acoustic emission (AE is associated with rock failure and rock fracturing. In order to investigate the influence of tectonic stress on rockburst in tunnel, a biaxial loading experiment system was used in this study. The excavation operation is undertaken at the center of samples to monitor the tunnel forming process in situ, and the different horizontal stresses can be studied by using the AE monitoring technique. The dynamical fracturing process of the tunnel model was summarized, and the timing parameters of AE signals in rockburst stages were obtained. The curves of AE energy and cumulative AE energy with time show a “step-like” rising trend before the occurrence of rockburst. The evolution of macro- and mesocracks is captured, and the mechanical conditions for a “V-shaped” rockburst pit are derived. As the horizontal stress increases, the effect of excavation unloading becomes more pronounced, and the damage caused by the rockburst intensifies. In the early stage of rockburst evolution, the fracturing type follows a model of tensile-shear mix model. A positive relationship between the ratio of shear fracturing type and the horizontal stress can be noted when the rock is about to burst, and the high intensity and the high energy released of from the rock-fracturing event have become evident. Thus, the results indicate that one should focus on monitoring both sides of the surrounding rock of the tunnel so as to extract the characteristics of the process of tunnel in tunnel. The applications of biaxial loading system and during an excavation operation provide a useful tool to simulate the rock burst in tunnel at an engineering site.

  18. Thermo-hydro-mechanical modelling of fractured rock masses application to radioactive wastes storage

    Vuillod, E.

    1995-01-01

    This work belongs to the Decovalex project (international cooperative project for the development of coupled models and their validation against experiments in nuclear waste isolation) of thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) modeling of fractured rock massifs inside which high level radioactive waste disposal sites are simulated. The mathematical laws controlling the behaviour of the environment are resolved analytically in the case of a continuous environment (definition of an equivalent environment) and numerically if the environment is discontinuous (modeling of joints behaviour). The coupled THM models strongly influence the behaviour of a model. Modeling performed with the UDEC code shows the importance of HM couplings depending on whether the calculations are made in permanent or transient regime, and the influence of the loading path in the case of TM modeling. The geometry of fractures also influences the behaviour of the model. Studying the connexity of a fractures network allows to determine its degree of homogeneity. The comparison between two methods, continuous environment and discontinuous environment, has been carried out by determining the permeability tensor and the stress-deformation relations on fractured test-samples. It shows the differences in behaviour between an homogenized environment and a discrete environment. Finally two exercises of THM modeling of radioactive waste disposal sites illustrate the researches carried out. A far field model has permitted to compare the results obtained with calculation codes using different logics. The second model, a near field one, focusses more on the importance played by fracturing on the behaviour of the massif. The high density of the reference network has required some mathematical developments, in order to determine the representative equivalent volume (continuous approaches), and some mathematical analyses, to correctly simplify the environment (discontinuous approaches). These methods and analyses are

  19. Biomechanical Evaluation of Standard Versus Extended Proximal Fixation Olecranon Plates for Fixation of Olecranon Fractures.

    Boden, Allison L; Daly, Charles A; Dalwadi, Poonam P; Boden, Stephanie A; Hutton, William C; Muppavarapu, Raghuveer C; Gottschalk, Michael B

    2018-01-01

    Small olecranon fractures present a significant challenge for fixation, which has resulted in development of plates with proximal extension. Olecranon-specific plates with proximal extensions are widely thought to offer superior fixation of small proximal fragments but have distinct disadvantages: larger dissection, increased hardware prominence, and the increased possibility of impingement. Previous biomechanical studies of olecranon fracture fixation have compared methods of fracture fixation, but to date there have been no studies defining olecranon plate fixation strength for standard versus extended olecranon plates. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the biomechanical utility of the extended plate for treatment of olecranon fractures. Sixteen matched pairs of fresh-frozen human cadaveric elbows were used. Of the 16, 8 matched pairs received a transverse osteotomy including 25% and 8 including 50% of the articular surface on the proximal fragment. One elbow from each pair was randomly assigned to a standard-length plate, and the other elbow in the pair received the extended-length plate, for fixation of the fracture. The ulnae were cyclically loaded and subsequently loaded to failure, with ultimate load, number of cycles, and gap formation recorded. There was no statistically significant difference between the standard and extended fixation plates in simple transverse fractures at either 25% or 50% from the proximal most portion of the articular surface of the olecranon. Standard fixation plates are sufficient for the fixation of small transverse fractures, but caution should be utilized particularly with comminution and nontransverse fracture patterns.

  20. A New Approach to the Modeling and Analysis of Fracture through Extension of Continuum Mechanics to the Nanoscale

    Sendova, T.; Walton, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the analysis of the partial differential equations arising from a new approach to modeling brittle fracture based on an extension of continuum mechanics to the nanoscale. It is shown that ascribing constant surface tension