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Sample records for fracture fillings developed

  1. Fracture behavior of silica nanoparticle filled epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittanet, Peerapan

    This dissertation involves the addition of silica nanoparticles to a lightly crosslinked, model epoxy resin and investigates the effect of nanosilica content and particle size on glass transition temperature (Tg), coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), Young's modulus (E), yield stress, and fracture toughness. This study aims to understand the influence of silica nanoparticle size, bimodal particle size distribution and silica content on the toughening behavior. The toughening mechanisms were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and transmission optical microscopy (TOM). The approach identifies toughening mechanisms and develops a toughening model from unimodal-particle size systems first, then extends these concepts to various mixtures micron- and nanometer-size particles in a similar model epoxy. The experimental results revealed that the addition of nanosilica did not have a significant effect on Tg or the yield stress of epoxy resin, i.e. the yield stress and Tg remained constant regardless of nanosilica particle size. As expected, the addition of nanosilica had a significant impact on CTE, modulus and fracture toughness. The CTE values of nanosilica-filled epoxies were found to decrease with increasing nanosilica content, which can be attributed to the much lower CTE of the nanosilica fillers. Interestingly, the decreases in CTE showed strong particle size dependence. The Young's modulus was also found to significantly improve with addition of nanosilica and increase with increasing filler content. However, the particle size did not exhibit any effect on the Young's modulus. Finally, the fracture toughness and fracture energy showed significant improvements with the addition of nanosilica, and increased with increasing filler content. The effect of particle size on fracture toughness was negligible. Observation of the fracture surfaces using SEM and TOM showed evidence of debonding of nanosilica particles

  2. Resistance to vertical fracture of MTA-filled roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Ma'aita, Ahmad M; Qualtrough, Alison J E; Watts, David C

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the effect of MTA root canal fillings on the resistance to vertical root fracture (VRF) over different time intervals. Freshly extracted anterior human teeth with single canals and minimal curvatures were decoronated, instrumented to size 50/.05 ProTaper file, irrigated with 1%NaOCl and randomly allocated to one of three groups (n = 36): (i) filled with MTA, (ii) filled with gutta-percha and sealer and (iii) unfilled roots used as a negative control. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups (n = 12) according to the storage time of 48 h, 1 and 6 months at 37°C in synthetic tissue fluid (STF). Following the storage periods, filled roots were mounted in acrylic supports, and the periodontal ligament was simulated using elastomeric impression material. Vertical loading was carried out with a ball-ended steel cylinder fitted on a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. The maximum force at fracture (F-max) and the fracture mode were recorded for each root. Data were statistically analysed using two-way anova and Bonferroni post hoc tests. The mean F-max was significantly higher in the MTA subgroups after 1 and 6 months compared with all other subgroups. Two modes of fracture were identified: split and comminuted. The mean F-max values recorded with the latter were significantly higher compared with the former (P MTA/1 month and MTA/6 month groups. MTA increases the resistance to VRF of endodontically treated teeth and influences the mode of fracture after 1 and 6 month of storage in STF compared with gutta-percha and sealer. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. High energy gas fracture experiments in liquid-filled boreholes: potential geothermal application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuderman, J.F.; Chu, T.Y.; Jung, J.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1986-07-01

    High Energy Gas Fracturing is a tailored pulse fracturing technique which uses propellants to obtain controlled fracture initiation and extension. Borehole pressurization rates can be tailored, by suitable choice of propellants, to produce four or eight fractures radiating from the wellbore. High Energy Gas Fracture (HEGF) research is conducted at DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS) in a tunnel complex where experiments can be done under realistic in situ stress conditions (1400 psi (9.7 MPa) overburden stress). Pressure measurements are made in the test borehole during all fracturing experiments. Experiments are mined back to provide direct observation of fracturing obtained. The initial objective of HEGF research was to develop multiple fracturing technology for application in gas well stimulation. HEGF research at NTS and in Devonian shale demonstration tests has resulted in a completed technology for multiple fracturing in uncased, liquid-free wellbores. Current resarch is directed toward extending the technique to liquid-filled boreholes for application in geothermal in addition to gas and oil wells. For liquid-free boreholes, multiple fracturing is specified in terms of pressure risetime required for a given borehole diameter. Propellants are mixed to achieve the desired risetime using a semiempirical mixing equation. The same techniques were successfully applied to fracturing in liquid-filled wellbores. However, the addition of liquid in the borehole results in a significantly more complicated fracturing behavior. Hydrodynamic effects are significant. Multiple fractures are initiated but only some propagated. Multiple- and hydraulic-type fracturing and wellbore crushing have been observed in the same experiment. The potential of using HEGB for geothermal well stimulation has been demonstrated through the present experiments. 18 refs., 40 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Slow Waves in Fractures Filled with Viscous Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korneev, Valeri

    2008-01-08

    Stoneley guided waves in a fluid-filled fracture generally have larger amplitudes than other waves, and therefore, their properties need to be incorporated in more realistic models. In this study, a fracture is modeled as an infinite layer of viscous fluid bounded by two elastic half-spaces with identical parameters. For small fracture thickness, I obtain a simple dispersion equation for wave-propagation velocity. This velocity is much smaller than the velocity of a fluid wave in a Biot-type solution, in which fracture walls are assumed to be rigid. At seismic prospecting frequencies and realistic fracture thicknesses, the Stoneley guided wave has wavelengths on the order of several meters and an attenuation Q factor exceeding 10, which indicates the possibility of resonance excitation in fluid-bearing rocks. The velocity and attenuation of Stoneley guided waves are distinctly different at low frequencies for water and oil. The predominant role of fractures in fluid flow at field scales is supported by permeability data showing an increase of several orders of magnitude when compared to values obtained at laboratory scales. These data suggest that Stoneley guided waves should be taken into account in theories describing seismic wave propagation in fluid-saturated rocks.

  5. Fracture resistance of premolar teeth restored with different filling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Worschech, Claudia Cia; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Lovadino, José Roberto

    2005-08-15

    The aim of this study is to verify the fracture resistance of premolars with large mesiocclusodistal (MOD) preparations with composite resin using different incremental techniques when subjected to an occlusal load. Forty maxillary premolar teeth were randomly divided into four groups (n=10). Class II MOD cavities were prepared in all specimens with parallel walls and no approximal boxes. The resulting isthmus width was 1/3 the distance between the cusp tips and (3/4) the height of the crown. Teeth in group I, the control group, were not restored. Specimens in group II were restored in three incremental vertical layers. Group III specimens were restored in three horizontal layers, and finally, specimens in group IV were restored in oblique layers. With exception of the placement technique, specimens in groups II, III and IV were restored using the Single Bond adhesive system and P60 composite resin following manufacturer's recommendations. A 4 mm diameter steel sphere contacted the buccal and lingual cusps of the tested teeth at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture occurred. The values obtained in this study were subjected to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and a Tukey-Kramer test. Only group I (non-restored) obtained a minor means of fracture resistance. No significant differences among groups II, III, and IV were found. This study shows on large MOD cavities the incremental filling techniques do not influence the fracture resistance of premolar teeth restored with composite resin.

  6. Fe-oxide fracture fillings as a palæo-redox indicator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Christiansen, Bo C.; Baker, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that all the examined fracture fillings contained Fe-oxides. Based on their structure and form, three genetic types of Fe-oxides were identified: (I) coarse-grained (~ 100 nm) hydrothermal hematite; (II) very fine-grained (~ 10 nm) amorphous Fe-oxides that precipitated during drilling; (III...... would corrode in the presence of oxygen. In this study, Fe-oxides from fractures in granite drill-cores and from drilling debris were investigated and a method developed to trace the low-temperature, oxidising conditions whichmay have been caused by prior deglaciations.X-ray diffraction and...

  7. Numerical methods for wave propagation in solids containing faults and fluid-filled fractures

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This thesis develops numerical methods for the simulation of wave propagation in solids containing faults and fluid-filled fractures. These techniques have applications in earthquake hazard analysis, seismic imaging of reservoirs, and volcano seismology. A central component of this work is the coupling of mechanical systems. This aspect involves the coupling of both ordinary differential equations (ODE)(s) and partial differential equations (PDE)(s) along curved interfaces.  All of these prob...

  8. Uncoupling the Impact of Fracture Properties and Composition on Sensory Perception of Emulsion-Filled Gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devezeaux de Lavergne, Marine; Strijbosch, V.M.G.; Broek, Van den A.W.M.; Velde, Van de Fred; Stieger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the effect of fracture properties and composition of emulsion-filled gels on dynamic texture perception. Twelve emulsion-filled gels varying in fracture stress (High/Low) and strain (High/Low) were prepared from three binary gel mixtures. Mechanical properti

  9. Cusp deflection, infraction and fracture in endodontically treated teeth filled with three temporary filling materials (in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Eskandarizade

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: the aim of this study was to compare cusp deflection, infraction and fracture in teeth filled with three temporary filling materials. Materials & method: Forty five extracted human premolar teeth were chosen. After root canal therapy and mesio-occluso-distal cavity preparation, samples were randomly divided into three groups , each contained 15 teeth and filled with three temporary filling materials: Cavisol (Golchai-Iran, Coltosol F (Coltene,Swiss and Coltene (Ariadent,Iran. Teeth were kept in normal saline at room temperature and every day the intercuspal distance was measured under stereomicroscope for 20 days. Infractions as well as fractures were also noted. Data were analyzed in SPSS 17 using Repeated measurement ANOVA test to evaluate the intercuspal distance and expansion of each sample every day. Results: Intercuspal distance increased in all three groups but was significantly more in Coltosol F group. On the days 10 and 16 two teeth filled with Coltosol F had cusp fracture. Conclusion: Temporary filling materials have hygroscopic expansion and cause cusp deflection which may lead to cusp fracture, so it is recommended to use them in short period of time.

  10. Failure Mode of the Water-filled Fractures under Hydraulic Pressure in Karst Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xin; Lu, Hao; Huang, Houxu; Hao, Yiqing; Xia, Yuanpu

    2017-06-01

    Water-filled fractures continue to grow after the excavation of karst tunnels, and the hydraulic pressure in these fractures changes along with such growth. This paper simplifies the fractures in the surrounding rock as flat ellipses and then identifies the critical hydraulic pressure values required for the occurrence of tensile-shear and compression-shear failures in water-filled fractures in the case of plane stress. The occurrence of tensile-shear fracture requires a larger critical hydraulic pressure than compression-shear failure in the same fracture. This paper examines the effects of fracture strike and lateral pressure coefficient on critical hydraulic pressure, and identifies compression-shear failure as the main failure mode of water-filled fractures. This paper also analyses the hydraulic pressure distribution in fractures with different extensions, and reveals that hydraulic pressure decreases along with the continuous growth of fractures and cannot completely fill a newly formed fracture with water. Fracture growth may be interrupted under the effect of hydraulic tensile shear.

  11. Failure Mode of the Water-filled Fractures under Hydraulic Pressure in Karst Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Water-filled fractures continue to grow after the excavation of karst tunnels, and the hydraulic pressure in these fractures changes along with such growth. This paper simplifies the fractures in the surrounding rock as flat ellipses and then identifies the critical hydraulic pressure values required for the occurrence of tensile-shear and compression-shear failures in water-filled fractures in the case of plane stress. The occurrence of tensile-shear fracture requires a larger critical hydraulic pressure than compression-shear failure in the same fracture. This paper examines the effects of fracture strike and lateral pressure coefficient on critical hydraulic pressure, and identifies compression-shear failure as the main failure mode of water-filled fractures. This paper also analyses the hydraulic pressure distribution in fractures with different extensions, and reveals that hydraulic pressure decreases along with the continuous growth of fractures and cannot completely fill a newly formed fracture with water. Fracture growth may be interrupted under the effect of hydraulic tensile shear.

  12. Micromorphology of pedogenically derived fracture fills in Bandelier Tuff, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davenport, D.W.; Wilcox, B.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Allen, B.L. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Fractures in the Bandelier Tuff are potential paths for water movement and transport of contaminants from waste disposal sites and other contaminated areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM. Contaminants transported in this way could ultimately be found in Los Alamos drinking water or in the Rio Grande, which flows through heavily populated areas in both the USA and Mexico. We conducted this study to determine (i) the morphology and origin of soil-like material in the fractures, and (ii) the likelihood of significant water movement through the fractures. We examined thin sections of fracture fills, soils, and tuffs to obtain fabric and mineralogical data, and collected field data on soil horizons, color, texture, structure, clay films, and root abundance. Fracture fills consist of clay, CaCO{sub 3}, or combinations of the two with minor inclusions of tuff and sand grains. Clay consists of thick, highly oriented argillans aligned parallel to fracture walls, and of discrete books in fracture interiors. Carbonate consists of massive microcrystalline calcite, which completely fills some fractures, and laminae or infillings between clay laminae or books in clay-dominated fractures. The potential creation of new macropores by a variety of processes, however, including seismic activity and biological disturbance, could allow rapid water movement and contaminant transport. 44 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Fingerprinting the temperature and fluid source of fracture-filling calcite in geothermal systems using clumped isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, John M.; Davies, Amelia; Faithfull, John; Holdsworth, Chris; Newton, Michael; Williamson, Sam; John, Cedric

    2017-04-01

    Geothermal energy production relies on maintaining open fractures within the rock through which fluids can flow, but precipitation of minerals in fractures can modify and reduce fluid flow. Most geothermal fluids are rich in dissolved material, and readily precipitate minerals such as calcite within fracture systems. Such mineral deposition can be a key limiting factor in viable geothermal energy production. We need to better understand the relationship between fluid temperatures, mineral precipitation, and fracture filling in such systems. Clumped isotopes offer a new way of characterising the temperature and fluid source of fracture-filling calcite. This technique is based on the thermodynamic relationship between carbonate mineral growth temperature and the abundance of chemical bonding ("clumping") between 13C and 18O isotopes (expressed as Δ47) within single carbonate ions (e.g. Eiler, 2007). In the gas phase, isotopic exchange between CO2 molecules and water is continuous and so CO2 gas will record the ambient fluid temperature. When the CO2 is trapped in a solid mineral phase, the isotope ratio is fixed. As a result, clumped isotopes will record the temperature of crystallisation, enabling the application of clumped isotope palaeothermometry to a range of geological problems. Samples from active geothermal fields (the Kawerau geothermal field, New Zealand (McNamara et al., 2017)) and analogues to basaltic geothermal systems in Western Scotland have been analysed with clumped isotopes. We present petrography, δ13C and δ18O, and clumped isotope data from these samples to show how clumped isotopes can fingerprint the temperature and fluid source of fracture-filling calcite in geothermal systems. Having this understanding of fracture filling conditions can lead to focused development of remediation measures. References Eiler, J. M., 2007. EPSL 262(3-4), 309-327. McNamara, D. D., Lister, A., Prior, D. J., 2016. JVGR 323, 38-52.

  14. Origin and implications of fluid inclusions from filled fractures, Oriskany Sandstone, Allegheny Plateau, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basilone, T.; Anderson, T.; Burruss, R.C.

    1984-12-01

    Two cores from the Lower Devonian Oriskany Sandstone underlying the Allegheny Plateau in south-central Somerset County, Pennsylvania, contain fractures that may either be filled with epigenetic minerals or unfilled. The 1 Sipe core, taken from an unproductive well drilled on the crest of an anticlinal structure, is characterized by numerous discontinuous vertical fractures. The 1 Romesburg core, taken from a productive well drilled on the flank of an anticlinal structure, contains numerous fractures that lie parallel with bedding planes. The walls of these fractures consist of smooth slickensided surfaces. Quartz and ferroan-calcite crystals filling fractures contain numerous hydrocarbon-bearing fluid inclusions. The distribution of these fluid inclusions within most minerals allowed a determination to be made regarding the relative times of migration of fluid hydrocarbon phases in the subsurface with respect to the paragenetic sequence of mineralization events. Analysis of fluid inclusions indicates that fractures were opened at 22,000 ft (6700 m) and remained open throughout an extended period of uplift. Furthermore, inclusions contain hydrocarbon-rich fluids that are comparable to reservoir hydrocarbons in the nearby Shamrock field. This relationship implies that hydrocarbons that currently exist in reservoirs were conducted along fractures that were once open. Fractures crosscut diagenetic features, indicating that diagenesis, for the most part, preceded fracture events. Although they differ in origin and orientation, fractures characterizing Oriskany strata were healed by a consistent sequence of epigenetic minerals.

  15. Research on Microscopic Characteristics of Carbonate Reservoir Fracture fillings Based on Microscopic Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of hole and seepage of carbonate rocks depend on the structural components of carbonate rocks and the combination relationship with these structural components under multi-scale. The quality of filling in reservoir fracture is an important part of fracture description. In this paper, the method of microscopic infrared spectral imaging was used, and the spectra cubic database was established by means of spectral imaging experiment. Each single band image which characterizes the related substances was extracted and the microcosmic characters of the filling in carbonate reservoirs fracture from Wumishan formation in Renqiu oilfield were studied. The spatial distribution maps of different chemical composition and groups in the core sample were obtained. The distribution of different hydrocarbon in the fracture of the reservoir and the connectivity of the pores etc. were better revealed

  16. Numerical Simulation of P-Wave Propagation in Rock Mass with Granular Material-Filled Fractures Using Hybrid Continuum-Discrete Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Y. L.; Zhao, Z. Y.; Zhou, H. Y.; Wu, W.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a cohesive fracture model is applied to model P-wave propagation through fractured rock mass using hybrid continuum-discrete element method, i.e. Universal Distinct Element Code (UDEC). First, a cohesive fracture model together with the background of UDEC is presented. The cohesive fracture model considers progressive failure of rock fracture rather than an abrupt damage through simultaneously taking into account the elastic, plastic and damage mechanisms as well as a modified failure function. Then, a series of laboratory tests from the literature on P-wave propagation through rock mass containing single fracture and two parallel fractures are introduced and the numerical models used to simulate these laboratory tests are described. After that, all the laboratory tests are simulated and presented. The results show that the proposed model, particularly the cohesive fracture model, can capture very well the wave propagation characteristics in rock mass with non-welded and welded fractures with and without filling materials. In the meantime, in order to identify the significance of fracture on wave propagation, filling materials with different particle sizes and the fracture thickness are discussed. Both factors are found to be crucial for wave attenuation. The simulations also show that the frequency of transmission wave is lowered after propagating through fractures. In addition, the developed numerical scheme is applied to two-dimensional wave propagation in the rock mass.

  17. Chlorine/Bromine Ratios in Fracture-filling Aqueous Alteration Products in Nakhla Olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, S. R.; Rao, M. N.; Dreibus, G.; McKay, D. S.; Waenke, H.; Wentworth, S.; Newville, M.; Trainor, T.; Flynn, G. J.

    2002-01-01

    The Cl/Br ratios in fracture-filling materials in veins in Nakhla olivine was determined using x-ray microprobe (Br) and EDX (Cl) techniques. The Cl/Br ratio of 55 (standard deviation: 13) shows that the secondary altered material is pristine, extraterrestrial and akin to the Martian soil. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Fe-oxide fracture fillings as a palæo-redox indicator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Christiansen, Bo C.; Baker, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    would corrode in the presence of oxygen. In this study, Fe-oxides from fractures in granite drill-cores and from drilling debris were investigated and a method developed to trace the low-temperature, oxidising conditions whichmay have been caused by prior deglaciations.X-ray diffraction and......Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that all the examined fracture fillings contained Fe-oxides. Based on their structure and form, three genetic types of Fe-oxides were identified: (I) coarse-grained (~ 100 nm) hydrothermal hematite; (II) very fine-grained (~ 10 nm) amorphous Fe-oxides that precipitated during drilling; (III......) Intermediate grain-size crystalline Fe-oxides, that are interpreted to have formed naturally at low-temperatures (~ 10 °C). Fe isotope composition of the Fe-oxides was determined by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using a 58Fe-54Fe double-spike. d56Fe of the Fe-oxides ranges...

  19. Fracture strength of different soldered and welded orthodontic joining configurations with and without filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Bailly, Jacqueline; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf; Fuhrmann, Robert Andreas Werner

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05) and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05). In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N). Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (pfracture strength means were observed for laser welding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N). Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (pfracture strength of welded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band.

  20. Fracture strength of different soldered and welded orthodontic joining configurations with and without filling material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Johannes Bock

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength of different joints made by conventional brazing, TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. Five standardized joining configurations of orthodontic wire in spring hard quality were used: round, cross, 3 mm length, 9 mm length and 7 mm to orthodontic band. The joints were made by five different methods: brazing, tungsten inert gas (TIG and laser welding with and without filling material. For the original orthodontic wire and for each kind of joint configuration or connecting method 10 specimens were carefully produced, totalizing 240. The fracture strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005. Data were analyzed by ANOVA (p=0.05 and Bonferroni post hoc test (p=0.05. In all cases, brazing joints were ruptured on a low level of fracture strength (186-407 N. Significant differences between brazing and TIG or laser welding (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test were found in each joint configuration. The highest fracture strength means were observed for laser welding with filling material and 3 mm joint length (998 N. Using filling materials, there was a clear tendency to higher mean values of fracture strength in TIG and laser welding. However, statistically significant differences were found only in the 9-mm long joints (p<0.05, Bonferroni post hoc test. In conclusion, the fracture strength of welded joints was positively influenced by the additional use of filling material. TIG welding was comparable to laser welding except for the impossibility of joining orthodontic wire with orthodontic band.

  1. Interactions of trace elements with fracture filling minerals from the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landstroem, O. [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Tullborg, E.L. [Terralogica AB (Sweden)

    1995-06-01

    This report focuses on the distribution of stable elements and natural radionuclides (e.g. REEs, Th, Ra, Sr and Cs) in natural fracture systems. They have been redistributed by natural processes in the past; mobilization, transport and deposition of which the latter is manifested as `enrichments` of the elements in fracture fillings. Fillings dominated by Fe-oxyhydroxide, calcite and clay minerals show the highest concentrations. Precipitates from different fractures show large variations in concentration levels of trace elements, REE patterns, and activity and activity ratios of natural radionuclides, reflecting variations in physical, chemical and hydrological properties of the fractures. The incorporation of REEs, Sr, Th and U in calcite is significant. The precipitation rate influences the amount of Sr incorporated and probably other elements as well. Clay minerals have high sorption capacity and are important in the retention of Cs and Sr as well as of REEs, Th, U and Ra. The importance of clay minerals in radionuclide retention is emphasized by the results from this study, even small amounts of clay minerals in fractures and fracture zones can significantly influence the radionuclide migration. Accurate determination of quantities and types of clay minerals is therefore very important for radionuclide migration modelling. 58 refs, 14 figs, 12 tabs.

  2. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Restored With Bulk Fill, Bulk Fill Flowable, Fiber-reinforced, and Conventional Resin Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalay, C; Yazici, A R; Horuztepe, A; Nagas, E; Ertan, A; Ozgunaltay, G

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with different types of restorative resins. Seventy-two sound maxillary premolar teeth were randomly divided into six groups (n=12). The teeth in the first group were left intact and tested as unprepared negative control (group I) specimens. The teeth in the remaining five groups were prepared with MOD cavities and endodontically treated. The teeth in one of the five groups (positive control group II) were unrestored. The rest of the prepared cavities were restored as follows: group III: bulk fill resin composite/Filtek Bulk Fill (3M ESPE); group IV: bulk fill flowable resin composite + nanohybrid/SureFil SDR Flow + Ceram.X Mono (Dentsply); group V: fiber-reinforced composite + posterior resin composite/GC everX posterior + G-aenial posterior (GC Corp.); and group VI: nanohybrid resin composite/Tetric N-Ceram (Ivoclar/Vivadent). Each restorative material was used with its respective adhesive system. The restored teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C and were then thermocycled (5-55°C, 1000×). Specimens were subjected to a compressive load until fracture at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance followed by the post hoc Tukey honestly significantly different test (p0.05). The lowest values were obtained in the positive control group (group II); these values were significantly lower than those of the other groups (pcomposite were not different from those restored with conventional nanohybrid resin composite.

  3. Veneers, rinds, and fracture fills: Relatively late alteration of sedimentary rocks at Meridiani Planum, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Andrew H.; Jolliff, Brad L.; Farrand, William H.; Bell, James F., III; Clark, Benton C.; Gellert, Ralf; Golombek, M. P.; Grotzinger, John P.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; McLennan, Scott M.; Morris, Richard; Squyres, Steven W.; Sullivan, Robert; Tosca, Nicholas J.; Yen, Albert; Learner, Zoe

    2008-05-01

    Veneers and thicker rinds that coat outcrop surfaces and partially cemented fracture fills formed perpendicular to bedding document relatively late stage alteration of ancient sedimentary rocks at Meridiani Planum, Mars. The chemistry of submillimeter thick, buff-colored veneers reflects multiple processes at work since the establishment of the current plains surface. Veneer composition is dominated by the mixing of silicate-rich dust and sulfate-rich outcrop surface, but it has also been influenced by mineral precipitation, including NaCl, and possibly by limited physical or chemical weathering of sulfate minerals. Competing processes of chemical alteration (perhaps mediated by thin films of water or water vapor beneath blanketing soils) and sandblasting of exposed outcrop surfaces determine the current distribution of veneers. Dark-toned rinds several millimeters thick reflect more extensive surface alteration but also indicate combined dust admixture, halite precipitation, and possible minor sulfate removal. Cemented fracture fills that are differentially resistant to erosion occur along the margins of linear fracture systems possibly related to impact. These appear to reflect limited groundwater activity along the margins of fractures, cementing mechanically introduced fill derived principally from outcrop rocks. The limited thickness and spatial distribution of these three features suggest that aqueous activity has been rare and transient or has operated at exceedingly low rates during the protracted interval since outcropping Meridiani strata were exposed on the plains surface.

  4. Fracture strength of root filled premolar teeth restored with silorane and methacrylate-based resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, N A; Maghaireh, G A; Bagheri, R; Abu Holy, A

    2015-06-01

    To compare fracture characteristics of root-filled teeth with variable cavity design restored with a low shrinkage silorane and methacrylate-based resin composite. 77 extracted maxillary premolars were divided randomly into seven groups: (Group 1) intact teeth; (Groups 2-4) MOD plus endodontic access with the buccopalatal width of the occlusal isthmus equals one third of the intercuspal width; (Groups 5-7) MOD plus endodontic access with the buccopalatal width of the occlusal isthmus equals one half of the intercuspal width. Groups 2 and 5 were left unrestored, Groups 3 and 6 were restored with a silorane-based resin composite (Filtek P90) and Groups 4 and 7 with a methacrylate-based resin composite (Z250). Teeth were loaded in a universal testing machine; load and fracture patterns were recorded and compared statistically using 2-way ANOVA and t-test for pairwise comparisons and 1-way ANOVA with Dunnett test for multiple comparisons. Unrestored teeth became progressively weaker with more extensive preparations, Group 5 (unfilled ½) showed the lowest fracture load among the groups (71±22N, Presin composite have no superior strengthening effect over the conventional methacrylate-based resin composite in restoration of root filled teeth. Both materials showed similar fracture patterns. Root filled teeth are considerably weakened via restorative and endodontic procedures. A direct adhesive restoration will aid in preserving tooth structure as far as it provides enough strength. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Hematite-Rich Fracture Fill at Meridiani Planum, Mars: Implications for Fluid Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Albert; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Morris, Richard V.; Gellert, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been operating at the surface of Mars for over 2100 sols and has driven a distance of approximately 20 km. Throughout the traverse, outcrop rocks with margins and fracture fill resistant to erosion have been imaged and analyzed in detail by the Moessbauer (MB) spectrometer and the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS). A recent APXS analysis of an outcrop block excavated by a young impact crater shows a coating with the highest concentration of iron measured by either rover, not including the iron-nickel meteorites. Texturally, this sample (referred to as "Chocolate Hills -Aloya") appears as a cemented collection of partially fragmented \\blueberries." With the exception of an elevated sulfur content, the elemental chemistry of this particular sample is entirely consistent with other analyses of hematite spherules at Merdiani Planum. As a result, it is difficult to determine whether this coating, which may have been filling a fracture in outcrop rocks prior to disruption by the impact, was simply an agglomeration of spherules or a result of a more complicated aqueous process. In contrast, a number of other fracture-filling exposures and erosion-resistant rinds have been analyzed by the APXS and MB instruments showing significant concentrations of iron in the form of hematite without the texture of spherule fragments. In one of these samples, a broken piece of fracture fill within Victoria crater referred to as "Dorsal," showed over 50% of the iron in hematite, the highest Mn concentration of any sample measured by the rovers, and elevated levels of Cl and Br. While the Fe:Mn ratio of the Dorsal analyses are comparable to that of Gusev and Meridiani basalts, it is clear that chemistry of this sample cannot be completely explained by a simple mixing of outcrop and blueberry compositions

  6. Petrological mineralogical and geochemical characterization of the granitoids and fracture fillings developed in Ratones Mines (Spain); Caracterizacion petrologica, mineralogica, geoquimica y evaluacion del comportamiento geoquimico de las REE en la fase solida (granitoides y rellenos fisurales) del sistema de interaccion agua-roca delentorno de la Mina Ratones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buil Gutierrez, B. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    The petrological, mineralogical and geochemical characterisation of the granitoids and fracture fillings developed in the Ratones Mine (Caceres, Spain) has been done in order to understand rock-water interaction processes which control water geochemical parameters. Special interest has been devoted to the analysis and interpretation of REE patterns in the solid phase (granitoids and fracture fillings) because they constitute geochemical tracers in water-rock interaction process. Moreover, REE are considered as actinide analogues. In order to characterise the solid phase (granitoids and fracture fillings) several investigation scales (system, outcrop, whole rock, mineral and geochemical components) have been considered and different types of samples have been analysed. These factors control the methodological approach used in this investigation. The analytical methods we have used in this investigation are microscope, qualitative and semi-quantitative methods (XRD, SEM,EDAX) and quantitative methods (ICP-MS, XRF, EM, LAM-IC-MS). The bulk of the granitoids located around the Ratones Mine Belongs to the alkaline feldspar granite-sienogranite lihotype and they show a peraluminous and subalkaline pattern. From the mineralogical point of view, they are composed by quartz, K-feldspar (Or>90%), showing sericitation, moscovitization and turmolinization altherations, alkaline plagioclase (An-=-3%), usually altered to sericite, saussirite and less frequently affected by moscovitization processes, Fe-Al biotite, frequently affected by chloritization processes and sometimes replaced by muscovite, and finally muscovite (>2% celadonite and <4% paragonite) both of primary and secondary origin. The differences observed between the different lithotypes are related with the modal proportion of the principal minerals,with the presence or absence of certain accessory minerals ( turmaline, cordierite), with specific textural patterns, grain size and also with the richness in specific

  7. Vertical root fracture resistance of simulated immature permanent teeth filled with MTA using different vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askerbeyli-Örs, Sevinc; Deniz-Sungur, Derya

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of the study is to evaluate the resistance vertical root fracture (VRF) of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) filled-immature permanent roots by using three different vehicles. Material and Methods Forty-extracted human single-rooted mandibular premolars were selected and the root length was standardized to the length of 9 mm. For simulation of immature tooth apices, peeso reamers were introduced into the root canals and the prepared roots were assigned into three experimental groups according the used vehicle (distilled water-DW, prophylene glycol-PG, chlorhexidine-CHX) and control group (n=10). To simulate a periodontal membrane, the apical 7 mm of all roots was covered with wax to obtain a 0.2- to 0.3-mm-thick layer before embedding the roots into acrylic cylinders. A vertical force was applied (1mm/min) using a universal testing machine and the maximum load (F-max) that fracture occurred and the fracture mode (splint or comminuted) was recorded. Data were presented as mean and standard deviations. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U Test was used for multiple comparisons. Results There were significant differences between fracture strength of experimental groups with that of control group (p0.05). In all groups, split fracture was the most common fracture mode. Conclusions MTA increases resistance of immature permanent teeth to VRF. Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that mixing MTA with CHX or PG as the vehicle do not alter VRF resistance of simulated immature permanent roots. Key words:Immature teeth, MTA, vehicle, vertical root fracture. PMID:28210431

  8. In vitro fracture resistance of root-filled teeth using new-generation dentine bonding adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hürmüzlü, F; Serper, A; Siso, S H; Er, K

    2003-11-01

    To compare the fracture resistance of root-filled premolar teeth restored with new-generation dentine bonding adhesives. Sixty extracted single-rooted human maxillary premolar teeth were used. Access cavities were prepared, and the roots were instrumented with K-files to an apical size 50 using a step-back technique. Root fillings were accomplished using gutta percha (Sure-Endo, Seoul, Korea) and AH Plus root canal sealer (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany) using the lateral condensation technique. The teeth were then randomly divided into six groups of 10 teeth each. A mesiodistocclusal (MOD) cavity was prepared in the teeth to the level of the canal orifices so that the thickness of the buccal wall of the teeth measured 2 mm at the occlusal surface and 3 mm at the cemento-enamel junction. Preparations were restored using the following adhesive systems: Etch & Prime 3.0 (Degussa AG, Hanau, Germany), Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Osaka, Japan), Prompt L-Pop (ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), Panavia F (Kuraray, Osaka, Japan), Optibond Plus (Kerr, Orange, CA, USA) and Admira Bond (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany); all preparations except those of the Panavia F and Admira Bond groups were further restored with resin composites. The Panavia F group was restored with amalgam and the Admira Bond group with Ormocer (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany). The teeth were mounted in a Universal Testing Machine (Hounsfield, Surrey, UK), and the buccal walls were subjected to a slowly increasing compressive force until fracture occurred. The force of fracture of the walls of each tooth was recorded and the results in the various groups were compared. Statistical analysis of the data was accomplished using one-way anova. There was no significant difference in the fracture resistance of any of the test groups. In this laboratory study, the type of dentine bonding agents had no influence in the fracture resistance of teeth.

  9. Esperance: Multiple episodes of aqueous alteration involving fracture fills and coatings at Matijevic Hill, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Benton C.; Morris, Richard V.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Farrand, William H.; Gellert, Ralf; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Squyres, Steven W.; Mittelfehldt, David W.; Ming, Douglas W.; Yen, Albert S.

    2016-01-01

    In the search for evidence of past aqueous activity by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, fracture-filling veins and rock coatings are prime candidates for exploration. At one location within a segment of remaining rim material surrounding Endeavour Crater, a set of “boxwork” fractures in an outcrop called Esperance are filled by a bright, hydrated, and highly siliceous (SiO2 ~ 66 wt%) material, which has overall a montmorillonite-like chemical composition. This material is partially covered by patches of a thin, dark coating that is sulfate-rich (SO3 ~ 21 wt%) but also contains significant levels of Si, Fe, Ca, and Mg. The simultaneous presence of abundant S, Si, and Fe indicates significant mineralogical complexity within the coating. This combination of vein and coating compositions is unlike previous analyses on Mars. Both materials are heterogeneously eroded, presumably by eolian abrasion. The evidence indicates at least two separate episodes of solute precipitation from aqueous fluids at this location, possibly widely separated in time. In addition to the implications for multiple episodes of alteration at the surface of the planet, aqueous chemical environments such as these would have been habitable at the time of their formation and are also favorable for preservation of organic material.

  10. Fracture resistance of immature teeth filled with mineral trioxide aggregate, bioaggregate, and biodentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Emre; Bayram, Huda Melike

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate fracture resistance of teeth with immature apices treated with coronal placement of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), bioaggregate (BA), and Biodentine. Materials and Methods: Forty-one freshly extracted, single-rooted human premolar teeth were used for the study. At first, the root length was standardized to 9 mm. The crown-down technique was used for the preparation of the root canals using the rotary ProTaper system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) of F3 (30). Peeso reamer no. 6 was stepped out from the apex to simulate an incompletely formed root. The prepared roots were randomly assigned to one control (n = 5) and three experimental (n = 12) groups, as described below. Group 1: White MTA (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil) was prepared as per the manufacturer's instructions and compacted into the root canal using MAP system (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and condensed by pluggers (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil). Group 2: The canals were filled with DiaRoot-BA (DiaDent Group International, Canada). Group 3: Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur des Fosses, France) solution was mixed with the capsule powder and condensed using pluggers. Instron was used to determine the maximum horizontal load to fracture the tooth, placing the tip 3 mm incisal to the cementoenamel junction. Mean values of the fracture strength were compared by ANOVA followed by a post hoc test. P biodentine experimental groups. Conclusion: All the three materials tested, may be used as effective strengthening agents for immature teeth. PMID:27095900

  11. Geophysical Identification of Filled Sinkholes and Buried Fractures in Glaciated Karst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, P. J.

    2006-05-01

    Karst aquifers are highly susceptible to contamination, with numerous points of entry for contaminants through recharge features such as sinkholes, swallow holes and soil pipes. These recharge features may be filled or obscured at the surface, requiring the use of geophysical techniques or remote sensing for their identification. This problem is particularly acute in recently glaciated terrain, where surface topography is often unrelated to underlying active karst features, as illustrated by three Illinois examples in this study. Approximately 10 km south of Rockford, IL, a network-type cave of interconnected solutionally-enlarged fractures extends over an area of approximately 1 ha, beneath a low Ordovician dolomite ridge covered with approximately 5 m of glacial till and outwash. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) profiles along the ridge top, utilizing 50 and 100 MHz antennas, showed strong diffractions over unsaturated caves and karst conduits. A trough-like feature approximately 20 m wide and 3 m deep was also identified in GPR profiles approximately 20 m west of the mapped cave passages. It probably represents an elongate filled sinkhole, similar to those observed along the wall of a quarry less than 1 km west of the cave. GPR profiles and two-dimensional electrical resistivity imaging identified clay-filled sinkholes 2-3 m wide and about 3 m deep in Bourbonnais, IL, 100 km south of Chicago, where 1 to 4 meters of loess and till overlie karstic Silurian dolomite. Penetrometer surveys revealed deeply weathered bedrock zones containing vertical clay-filled caves beneath the filled sinkholes. Surface water infiltration estimates are being made for these features, utilizing the geophysically-derived geometries, along with hydraulic conductivity and gradient data. EM conductivity profiles were combined with resistivity soundings at landfill in southern Illinois near St. Louis, where approximately 5 m of till overlies karstic limestone. Linear high conductivity

  12. Major factors controlling fracture development in the Middle Permian Lucaogou Formation tight oil reservoir, Junggar Basin, NW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Zhu, Deyu; Luo, Qun; Liu, Luofu; Liu, Dongdong; Yan, Lin; Zhang, Yunzhao

    2017-09-01

    Natural fractures in seven wells from the Middle Permian Lucaogou Formation in the Junggar Basin were evaluated in light of regional structural evolution, tight reservoir geochemistry (including TOC and mineral composition), carbon and oxygen isotopes of calcite-filled fractures, and acoustic emission (AE). Factors controlling the development of natural fractures were analyzed using qualitative and/or semi-quantitative techniques, with results showing that tectonic factors are the primary control on fracture development in the Middle Permian Lucaogou Formation of the Junggar Basin. Analyses of calcite, dolomite, and TOC show positive correlations with the number of fractures, while deltaic lithofacies appear to be the most favorable for fracture development. Mineral content was found to be a major control on tectonic fracture development, while TOC content and sedimentary facies mainly control bedding fractures. Carbon and oxygen isotopes vary greatly in calcite-filled fractures (δ13C ranges from 0.87‰ to 7.98‰, while δ18O ranges from -12.63‰ to -5.65‰), indicating that fracture development increases with intensified tectonic activity or enhanced diagenetic alteration. By analyzing the cross-cutting relationships of fractures in core, as well as four Kaiser Effect points in the acoustic emission curve, we observed four stages of tectonic fracture development. First-stage fractures are extensional, and were generated in the late Triassic, with calcite fracture fills formed between 36.51 °C and 56.89 °C. Second-stage fractures are shear fractures caused by extrusion stress from the southwest to the northeast, generated by the rapid uplift of the Tianshan in the Middle and Late Jurassic; calcite fracture fills formed between 62.91 °C and 69.88 °C. Third-stage fractures are NNW-trending shear fractures that resulted from north-south extrusion and thrusting in a foreland depression along the front of the Early Cretaceous Bogda Mountains. Calcite fracture

  13. Intelligent fracture creation for shale gas development

    KAUST Repository

    Douglas, Craig C.

    2011-05-14

    Shale gas represents a major fraction of the proven reserves of natural gas in the United States and a collection of other countries. Higher gas prices and the need for cleaner fuels provides motivation for commercializing shale gas deposits even though the cost is substantially higher than traditional gas deposits. Recent advances in horizontal drilling and multistage hydraulic fracturing, which dramatically lower costs of developing shale gas fields, are key to renewed interest in shale gas deposits. Hydraulically induced fractures are quite complex in shale gas reservoirs. Massive, multistage, multiple cluster treatments lead to fractures that interact with existing fractures (whether natural or induced earlier). A dynamic approach to the fracturing process so that the resulting network of reservoirs is known during the drilling and fracturing process is economically enticing. The process needs to be automatic and done in faster than real-time in order to be useful to the drilling crews.

  14. Discrete fracture network code development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dershowitz, W.; Doe, T.; Shuttle, D.; Eiben, T.; Fox, A.; Emsley, S.; Ahlstrom, E. [Golder Associates Inc., Redmond, Washington (United States)

    1999-02-01

    This report presents the results of fracture flow model development and application performed by Golder Associates Inc. during the fiscal year 1998. The primary objective of the Golder Associates work scope was to provide theoretical and modelling support to the JNC performance assessment effort in fiscal year 2000. In addition, Golder Associates provided technical support to JNC for the Aespoe project. Major efforts for performance assessment support included extensive flow and transport simulations, analysis of pathway simplification, research on excavation damage zone effects, software verification and cross-verification, and analysis of confidence bounds on Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, a Fickian diffusion algorithm was implemented for Laplace Transform Galerkin solute transport. Support for the Aespoe project included predictive modelling of sorbing tracer transport in the TRUE-1 rock block, analysis of 1 km geochemical transport pathways for Task 5', and data analysis and experimental design for the TRUE Block Scale experiment. Technical information about Golder Associates support to JNC is provided in the appendices to this report. (author)

  15. Effect of different filling materials in combination with intraradicular posts on the resistance to fracture of weakened roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, G M; Paulillo, L A M S; Pimenta, L A F; De Lima, F A P

    2003-06-01

    The preservation and restoration of severely weakened pulpless teeth is a difficult and relatively unpredictable procedure. This study evaluated the resistance to fracture of experimentally weakened bovine roots internally reconstructed with different filling materials in combination with prefabricated post compared with restored roots that were relatively intact. The roots of 75 mandibular bovine incisors with similar bulks were selected. Of these, 60 were internally prepared to standardized dimensions, thereby simulating weakness. All roots were filled with different restorative materials. The specimens were submitted to the fracture resistance testing with the application of a tangential compressive loading at an angle of 135 degrees in relation to the long axes of the roots. Results indicated statistically significant differences in relation to the root conditions. Weakened roots were less resistant to fracture than were controls. The roots restored with the resin cement demonstrated the lowest fracture resistance values, but statistically significant differences were observed only when compared with those restored by the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, polyacid-modified resin composite and resin composite behaved similarly without statistically significant differences among them. None of the materials evaluated were capable of achieving the fracture resistance recorded for unweakened controls.

  16. Quasi-static tensile deformation and fracture behavior of a highly particle-filled composite using digital image correlation method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Polymer bonded explosives (PBXs) are highly particle-filled composite materials.This paper experimentally studies the tensile deformation and fracture behavior of a PBX simulation by using the semi-circular bending (SCB) test.The deformation and fracture process of a pre-notched SCB sample with a random speckle pattern is recorded by a charge coupled device camera.The displacement and strain fields on the observed surface during the loading process are obtained by using the digital image correlation method....

  17. Comparison of Resilon and Gutta-Percha Filling Materials on Root Canal Fracture Resistance Following Restoring with Quartz Fiber Posts

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrvarzfar, P.; Rezvani, Y.; Jalalian, E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Bacterial leakage and root fractures are the most important reasons of root canal treatment failure. Due to the lack of adhesion of gutta percha to the canal walls, Resilon has been introduced as a root-filling material able to bond to the root walls. Metal posts may predispose the tooth walls to oblique and vertical fracture which usually leads to tooth loss; whereas, fiber posts may reinforce the remaining tooth structure. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of Re...

  18. Fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth filled with Biodentine and white mineral trioxide aggregate - an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaghy, Amr M; Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth filled with Biodentine (BD) and white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) as pulp space barriers for regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs). Sixty extracted human maxillary anterior teeth were divided into four groups of 15 teeth each. Positive control teeth received no treatment. The remaining teeth were prepared until a size 6 Peeso (1.7 mm) could be passed 1 mm beyond the apex. Then, an engineering twist drill of 3 mm diameter was used to extend the preparation of the canal 3 mm below CEJ. The root canals were irrigated and disinfected according to AAE considerations for REPs. The canals were filled with either BD or WMTA. The negative control canals were left unfilled. The coronal access cavities were restored with glass ionomer followed by composite resin. The teeth were placed in phosphate-buffered saline solution and stored for 12 months. Each specimen was then subjected to fracture testing using a universal testing machine. The peak load to fracture and the fracture resistance were recorded, and the data were analysed statistically. The positive control group had the highest fracture resistance and differed significantly (P  0.05). Considering the risk of cervical root fracture for pulpless infected immature teeth treated with REPs, after 12 months, there was no difference between WMTA and BD regarding the resistance to root fracture. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Vertical fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with four sets of obturation and filling materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mastaneh Javaheri

    2012-06-01

    Conclusions: Composite-resin restorations may recover significantly more fracture resistance than those bonded with amalgam. Resilon-Epiphany may have slightly but not significantly superior results in terms of fracture resistance.

  20. Medico-legal aspects of vertical root fractures in root filled teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosen, E; Tsesis, I; Tamse, A

    2012-01-01

    To analyse the medico-legal aspects of vertical root fracture (VRF) following root canal treatment (RCT).......To analyse the medico-legal aspects of vertical root fracture (VRF) following root canal treatment (RCT)....

  1. Dynamic tensile deformation and fracture of a highly particle-filled composite using SHPB and high-speed DIC method

    OpenAIRE

    Huang F; Guo B.; Chen P; Zhou Z

    2012-01-01

    In this work, various tensile tests, including Brazilian disc test (BDT), flattened Brazilian disc (FBD) test and semi-circular bending (SCB) test, were carried out on a highly particle-filled composite by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). With the consideration of low strength and low wave impedance of the materials, a quartz crystal transducer was embedded in SHPB to measure the loading forces. A high-speed camera was used to capture the deformation and fracture process of materi...

  2. Low-frequency guided waves in a fluid-filled borehole: Simultaneous effects of generation and scattering due to multiple fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Shohei; Ghose, Ranajit

    2017-03-01

    Low-frequency, axially-symmetric guided waves which propagate along a fluid-filled borehole (tube waves) are studied in order to characterize the hydraulic fractures intersecting the borehole. We formulate a new equation for the total tube wavefield, which includes simultaneous effects of (1) tube-wave scattering (reflection and transmission) due to wave propagation across hydraulic fractures, and (2) tube-wave generation due to incident plane P waves. The fracture is represented by the nonwelded interface boundary conditions. We use an appropriate form of the representation theorem in order to correctly handle the multiple scattering due to nonwelded interfaces. Our approach can implement any model that has so far been developed. We consider a recent model which includes simultaneous effects of fluid viscosity, dynamic fluid flow, and fracture compliance. The derived equation offers a number of important insights. We recognize that the effective generation amplitude contains the simultaneous effect of both tube-wave generation and scattering. This leads to a new physical understanding indicating that the tube waves are scattered immediately after generation. We show that this scattering is nonlinear with respect to interface compliance. This physical mechanism can be implicitly accounted for by considering more realistic boundary conditions. We also illustrate the application of the new equation in order to predict the complex signature of the total tube wavefield, including generation and scattering at multiple hydraulic fractures. A new formulation for focusing analyses is also derived in order to image and characterize the hydraulic fractures. The obtained results and discussions are important for interpretation, modeling, and imaging using low-frequency guided waves, in the presence of multiple fractures along a cylindrical inclusion.

  3. Fragility fracture: recent developments in risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspray, Terry J

    2015-02-01

    More than half of older women who sustain a fragility fracture do not have osteoporosis by World Health Organization (WHO) bone mineral density (BMD) criteria; and, while BMD has been used to assess fracture risk for over 30 years, a range of other skeletal and nonskeletal clinical risk factors (CRFs) for fracture have been recognized. More than 30 assessment tools using CRFs have been developed, some predicting fracture risk and others low BMD alone. Recent systematic reviews have reported that many tools have not been validated against fracture incidence, and that the complexity of tools and the number of CRFs included do not ensure best performance with poor assessment of (internal or comparative) validity. Internationally, FRAX® is the most commonly recommended tool, in addition to QFracture in the UK, The Canadian Association of Radiologists and Osteoporosis Canada (CAROC) tool in Canada and Garvan in Australia. All tools estimate standard 10-year risk of major osteoporotic and 10-year risk of hip fracture: FRAX® is able to estimate fracture risk either with or without BMD, but CAROC and Garvan both require BMD and QFracture does not. The best evidence for the utility of these tools is in case finding but there may be future prospects for the use of 10-year fracture risk as a common currency with reference to the benefits of treatment, whether pharmacological or lifestyle. The use of this metric is important in supporting health economic analyses. However, further calibration studies will be needed to prove that the tools are robust and that their estimates can be used in supporting treatment decisions, independent of BMD.

  4. ChemCam investigation of resistant fracture-fill cements at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveille, R. J.; Wiens, R. C.; Anderson, R. B.; Berger, G.; Bridges, J.; Clark, B. C.; Cousin, A.; Edgar, L. A.; Fabre, C.; Forni, O.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Kah, L. C.; Lanza, N.; Lasue, J.; Le Mouelic, S.; Leshin, L. A.; Mangold, N.; Maurice, S.; McLennan, S. M.; Meslin, P.; Mezzacappa, A.; Newsom, H. E.; Ollila, A.; Schröder, S.; Siebach, K. L.; Thompson, L.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    ChemCam is a remote sensing instrument on the Curiosity rover and it is capable of providing rapid geochemical analyses of targets up to 7m away. It can also provide detailed, high spatial resolution (sub-mm), three-dimensional chemical data. Here, we describe Remote Microscopic Imager (RMI) mosaics and detailed LIBS analyses, including rasters and depth profiles of distinctive fracture-filling isopachous cements. In addition, APXS analyses and Mastcam colour images provide additional information and geological context. These resistant features generally appear as centimeter-thick, sub-parallel raised ridges, often sub-vertical and generally composed of two to four layers. Major, minor and trace element data reveal that the cements have a distinct composition compared to the host sedimentary rock and at least two generations of cements can be identified based on composition. At McGrath, a tilted, three-layer vein was investigated by performing a 20-point line raster across the exposed layers (on edge) as well as depth profiles by firing 150 laser shots at a single point. Both of these analyses show that the two outer layers have a similar composition, while the center layer is distinctly different, revealing a cement stratigraphy. In particular, the outer layers show elevated MgO (14-18 wt. %) and possibly elevated Li compared to the middle layer. These compositions suggest that two generations of cements formed from two fluids of different composition or that the precipitating fluid's composition evolved over time, and that Mg-rich phyllosilicates may occur in the cements. Additional rasters and depth profiles were also performed on similar targets. These vein-like features record aqueous processes likely related to early and shallow diagenesis in a habitable lacustrine/fluvial sedimentary environment in Yellowknife Bay. Diagenetic features, such as these Mg-rich veins, as well as Ca-sulfate veins, concretions, and nodules may be common on Mars, as they are found

  5. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated roots filled with resilon and guttapercha - A comparative in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh R Shetty

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare in vitro the fracture resistance of endodontically treated roots filled with Resilon and Gutta-percha. Methodology: Eighty extracted single canal teeth were selected and randomly assigned to five groups of sixteen teeth each. Teeth were sectioned using a diamond disc so as to obtain a root length of 14±1 mm. Roots were instrumented using .04 taper Profile rotary system to an apical size of 40 and obturated using .04 taper single cone (size 40 as follows: Group 1: Resilon .04 taper cone and Epiphany Self etching sealer, Group 2: .04 taper gutta-percha cone and AH Plus sealer ,Group 3: .04 taper gutta-percha cone and Roeko Seal Automix sealer, Group 4: .04 taper gutta-percha cone and Zinc oxide Eugenol sealer , Group 5: .04 taper gutta-percha cone without the use of a sealer. Following obturation, teeth were mounted in Poly Vinyl Chloride jigs using self cure acrylic resin such that 9mm of the root remained exposed. Fracture resistance testing was done using Instron testing machine using a vertical load applied perpendicular to the root surface. Statistical analysis was done using ANOVA, Tukey HSD and Student′s ′t′ test. Results: Very highly significant difference was observed between the groups (P=.001. Resilon with Epiphany group demonstrated highest mean fracture resistance value and gutta-percha without sealer displayed the least, comparative results were highly significant. Resilon compared to gutta-percha with Roeko Seal Automix (P=.037 and Zinc Oxide Eugenolsealers (P=.029 showed statistically significant difference. AH plus group showed significantly higher value compared to gutta-percha without sealer. Conclusions: Filling the root canals with Resilon increased the in vitro fracture resistance of endodontically treated roots compared to standard gutta-percha techniques. Adhesive sealers are more beneficial in increasing the fracture resistance of

  6. Root canal filling: fracture strength of fiber-reinforced composite-restored roots and finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippe, Marília Pivetta; Santini, Manuela Favarin; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of root canal filling techniques on root fracture resistance and to analyze, by finite element analysis (FEA), the expansion of the endodontic sealer in two different root canal techniques. Thirty single-rooted human teeth were instrumented with rotary files to a standardized working length of 14 mm. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin using plastic cylinders as molds, and allocated into 3 groups (n=10): G(lateral) - lateral condensation; G(single-cone) - single cone; G(tagger) - Tagger's hybrid technique. The root canals were prepared to a length of 11 mm with the #3 preparation bur of a tapered glass fiber-reinforced composite post system. All roots received glass fiber posts, which were adhesively cemented and a composite resin core was built. All groups were subjected to a fracture strength test (1 mm/min, 45°). Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA with a significance level of 5%. FEA was performed using two models: one simulated lateral condensation and Tagger's hybrid technique, and the other one simulated the single-cone technique. The second model was designed with an amount of gutta-percha two times smaller and a sealer layer two times thicker than the first model. The results were analyzed using von Mises stress criteria. One-way ANOVA indicated that the root canal filling technique affected the fracture strength (p=0.004). The G(lateral) and G(tagger) produced similar fracture strength values, while G(single-cone) showed the lowest values. The FEA showed that the single-cone model generated higher stress in the root canal walls. Sealer thickness seems to influence the fracture strength of restored endodontically treated teeth.

  7. Effects of geometry and temperature on mode I interlaminar fracture of filled polypropylene–elastomer nanocomposite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bishnu P Panda; Smita Mohanty; S K Nayak

    2014-08-01

    In this study, organically modified Na-MMT clay was used for the preparation of blend nanocomposites containing different ratios of polypropylene (PP) and ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) elastomer in a twin screw extruder. Maleic-grafted PP (MAPP) was used as compatibilizer for making PP hydrophilic. Surface modification of Na–MMT was made by using amino propyl trimethoxy silane (APS) and trimethyl amine as coupling agent with surface grafting catalyst, respectively. A fracture mechanics approach has been adopted by mode I test and the effects of specimen geometry have been investigated. Increase in interlaminar fracture energy value, c, was observed as the crack propagated through the composite, i.e. a rising ‘R-curve’ for both blend and nanocomposites. Deep fracture studies were carried out at different temperatures (–60 °C to 60 °C) using Izod impact and SENT tests. Fracture energy, fracture stress and brittle ductile transition were determined from crack initiation and propagation process, which showed significant improvement in impact and fracture energy at positive temperature. The wide-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed increased -spacing of clay layers, indicating enhanced compatibility between PP and clay with the addition of maleated polypropylene (MAPP). Morphology/impact property relationships and an explanation of the toughening mechanisms were made by comparing the impact properties with scanning electron micrographs (SEMs) of fracture surfaces. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) photomicrographs illustrated the intercalated and partially exfoliated structures of the hybrids with clay, MAPP and elastomer.

  8. Ongoing Model Development Analyzing Glass Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molnar, G.; Bojtar, I.; Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Present subject deals with an ongoing experimental and numerical analysis of inplane loaded glass plates. The main goal of the investigation is to develop a hybrid – discrete and finite element – model which could follow the fracture process in annealed and in tempered glass. Measurements...

  9. Ongoing Model Development Analyzing Glass Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molnar, G.; Bojtar, I.; Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Present subject deals with an ongoing experimental and numerical analysis of inplane loaded glass plates. The main goal of the investigation is to develop a hybrid – discrete and finite element – model which could follow the fracture process in annealed and in tempered glass. Measurements...... an overview of the structure of the research and a summary of current status archived so far....

  10. Compressive and Fracture Properties of Syntactic Foam Filled with Hollow Plastic Bead(HPC)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The compressive mechanical properties of syntactic foams reinforced by hollow plastic beads were studied by the quasi-static compression test. The failure mechanism of syntactic foams was also investigated by macroscopic and microscopic observation on the fractured specimens. The experimental results show that the density of syntactic foams is still the key factor affecting their mechanical properties. The macroscopic and microscopic observation on the fractured specimens indicates that the main failure mode is the elastic-plastic collapse caused by shear.

  11. Mineralogy and geochemistry of rocks and fracture fillings from Forsmark and Oskarshamn: Compilation of data for SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, Henrik; Sandstroem, Bjoern [Isochron GeoConsulting HB, Goeteborg (Sweden); Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)

    2006-11-15

    This report is a compilation of the so far available data for the safety assessment SR-Can carried out by SKB. The data consists of mineralogy, geochemistry, porosity, density and redox properties for both dominating rock types and fracture fillings at the Forsmark and Oskarshamn candidate areas. In addition to the compilation of existing information, the aim has been to identify missing data and to clarify some conception of e.g. deformation zones. The objective of the report is to present the available data requested for the modelling of the chemical stability of the two sites. The report includes no interpretation of the data.

  12. In vitro evaluation of the fracture resistance and microleakage of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to teeth with composite fillings after cyclic loading

    OpenAIRE

    Sadighpour, Leyla; Geramipanah, Farideh; Allahyari, Somayeh; Fallahi Sichani, Babak; Kharazi Fard, Mohamd Javad

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE There is insufficient data regarding the durability of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to existing composite fillings. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the fracture resistance and microleakage of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to teeth with existing composite fillings. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty maxillary central incisors were divided into three groups (for each group, n=10): intact teeth (NP), teeth with class III composite fillings (C3) and teeth with class IV cav...

  13. Microstructural analysis of calcite-filled fractures inherited from basement structures, southern Ontario, Canada: long term instability of the craton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Jennifer; Schneider, David

    2016-04-01

    grains of the wall rock. Some veins show minor displacement, including the mm-scale with fractured and displaced fossil fragments, and cm-scale offsets at the outcrop. The calcite veins show evidence of low temperature deformation (~200°C) through undulous extinction, bulging grain boundaries, tension gashes structures, and extensive lamellar twinning. The width and density of twinning (twin planes/mm) provides information regarding the temperature of deformation. The calcite crystals show two populations of twinning: type I (>10 μm), and type II (tabular twinning) with an average thickness of 35 μm, and a maximum thickness of 81 μm. Twinning can only accommodate a limited amount of strain such that the calcite lamellar twinning is often kinked, broken and offset, suggesting reactivation of the calcite-filled fractures. U-Pb calcite ages from calcitic veins in the Ordovician units within the Ottawa graben are c. 400 Ma and within Devonian units at the edge of the Michigan Basin in Canada are c. 110 Ma. Additional geochronology on the calcite from southern Ontario will help resolve the timing of fracture reactivation and is an important factor in consideration of the location of a deep geological repository for Canada's nuclear waste.

  14. Dynamic tensile deformation and fracture of a highly particle-filled composite using SHPB and high-speed DIC method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang F.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, various tensile tests, including Brazilian disc test (BDT, flattened Brazilian disc (FBD test and semi-circular bending (SCB test, were carried out on a highly particle-filled composite by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB. With the consideration of low strength and low wave impedance of the materials, a quartz crystal transducer was embedded in SHPB to measure the loading forces. A high-speed camera was used to capture the deformation and fracture process of materials. Digital image correlation (DIC method was used to process these digital images to obtain the dynamic deformation information. Based on the measured strain fields, the crack growth path was determined and the failure mechanism of samples was analyzed. Combining SHPB and DIC method, the indirect tensile stress strain plots of disc samples were obtained, and the dynamic fracture toughness of materials was measured using both FBD and SCB tests. The results show that the tensile failure strength and fracture toughness increases with the increase of strain rates, exhibiting strain rate dependence. The high-speed DIC method combined with SHPB is effective to study the dynamic tensile behaviour of brittle materials with low strengths.

  15. Dynamic tensile deformation and fracture of a highly particle-filled composite using SHPB and high-speed DIC method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Z.; Chen, P.; Guo, B.; Huang, F.

    2012-08-01

    In this work, various tensile tests, including Brazilian disc test (BDT), flattened Brazilian disc (FBD) test and semi-circular bending (SCB) test, were carried out on a highly particle-filled composite by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). With the consideration of low strength and low wave impedance of the materials, a quartz crystal transducer was embedded in SHPB to measure the loading forces. A high-speed camera was used to capture the deformation and fracture process of materials. Digital image correlation (DIC) method was used to process these digital images to obtain the dynamic deformation information. Based on the measured strain fields, the crack growth path was determined and the failure mechanism of samples was analyzed. Combining SHPB and DIC method, the indirect tensile stress strain plots of disc samples were obtained, and the dynamic fracture toughness of materials was measured using both FBD and SCB tests. The results show that the tensile failure strength and fracture toughness increases with the increase of strain rates, exhibiting strain rate dependence. The high-speed DIC method combined with SHPB is effective to study the dynamic tensile behaviour of brittle materials with low strengths.

  16. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Maxillary Premolars Restored by Various Direct Filling Materials: An In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mincik, Jozef; Timkova, Silvia; Urban, Renata

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the effect of various restorative materials on fracture resistance in maxillary premolars. Premolars (n = 64) with no restorations or cracks were selected. MOD cavities were prepared considering the buccolingual width to be equal to half of the intercuspal distance. The specimens were randomly divided into 8 groups, 8 specimens each: group A intact teeth, group B unfilled cavity, group C composite made by oblique layering technique, group D composite with 2 mm cusp coverage, group E bulk-filled posterior composite, group F glass-ionomer, group G amalgam, and group H composite with proximal boxes. The specimens were subjected to an axial compression load with the mean values of fracture resistance in group A: 1289 N, group B: 181.75 N, group C: 445.38 N, group D: 645.88 N, group E: 355.13 N, group F: 352.00 N, group G: 191.38 N, and group H: 572.00 N. There was no significant difference between groups B and G, between C and D, E, and F, and between group D and H. All other measurements were statistically significant. We conclude that composite restoration with cusp coverage is the most ideal nonprosthetic solution for endodontically treated teeth. Cusp coverage increases the fracture resistance compared to the conventional cavity design. PMID:27656212

  17. Deformation and fracture of emulsion-filled gels: Effect of oil content and deformation speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala, G.; Vliet, van T.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Aken, van G.A.; Velde, van de F.

    2009-01-01

    The large deformation properties of gelatine, ¿-carrageenan and whey protein isolate (WPI) gels filled with bound and unbound oil droplets were studied as a function of compression speed. The rheological properties of the gel matrices controlled the compression speed-dependency of the gels containin

  18. The rheological behavior of fracture-filling cherts: example of Barite Valley dikes, Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ledevin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A 100 m-thick complex of near-vertical carbonaceous chert dikes marks the transition from the Mendon to Mapepe Formations (3260 Ma in the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa. Fracturing was intense in this area, as shown by the profusion and width of the dikes (ca. 1 m on average and by the abundance of completely shattered rocks. The dike-and-sill organization of the fracture network and the upward narrowing of some of the large veins indicate that at least part of the fluid originated at depth and migrated upward in this hydrothermal plumbing system. Abundant angular fragments of silicified country rock are suspended and uniformly distributed within the larger dikes. Jigsaw-fit structures and confined bursting textures indicate that hydraulic fracturing was at the origin of the veins. The confinement of the dike system beneath an impact spherule bed suggests that the hydrothermal circulations were triggered by the impact and located at the external margin of a large crater. From the geometry of the dikes and the petrography of the cherts, we infer that the fluid that invaded the fractures was thixotropic. On one hand, the injection of black chert into extremely fine fractures is evidence for low viscosity at the time of injection; on the other hand, the lack of closure of larger veins and the suspension of large fragments in a chert matrix provide evidence of high viscosity soon thereafter. The inference is that the viscosity of the injected fluid increased from low to high as the fluid velocity decreased. Such rheological behavior is characteristic of media composed of solid and colloidal particles suspended in a liquid. The presence of abundant clay-sized, rounded particles of silica, carbonaceous matter and clay minerals, the high proportion of siliceous matrix and the capacity of colloidal silica to form cohesive 3-D networks through gelation, account for the viscosity increase and thixotropic behavior of the fluid that filled the

  19. [Development of novel self-healing and antibacterial resin composite containing microcapsules filled with polymerizable healing monomer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junling; Zhang, Qiang; Zhu, Ting; Ge, Jianhua; Zhou, Chuanjian

    2015-08-01

    To develop novel self- healing and antibacterial resin composite containing microcapsules filled with polymerizable healing monomer, and to measure its properties for further clinical application. Microcapsules filled with healing monomer of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate were synthesized according to methods introduced in the previous research. Microcapsules were added into novel resin composite containing nano-antibacterial silica fillers grafted with long chain alkyl quaternary ammonium at mass fractions of 0, 2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5% or 10.0%. A commercial resin composite (Tetric N-Ceram) was used as control. Flexural test was used to measure resin composite flexural strength and elastic modulus. The single edge V-notched beam method was used to measure fracture toughness and self-healing efficiency. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to examine the fractured surface of selected specimen for investigation of fracture mechanisms. The flexural strength and elastic modulus of the resin composite were (96.4 ± 14.3) MPa and (6.2 ± 1.1) GPa respectively after incorporation of microcapsules up to 7.5%, and no significant difference was found between the experimental group and the control group [(99.1 ± 11.9) MPa and (6.1 ± 1.1) GPa] (P>0.05). The self-healing efficiency of (66.8 ± 7.0)% and (79.3 ± 9.7)% were achieved for resin composite with microcapsule mass fractions at 7.5% and 10.0%. SEM image showed that irregular films covered the fractured surface. Conclusions This novel self-healing and antibacterial resin composite containing microcapsules filled with polymerizable healing monomer exhibited a promising self- healing ability, which enabled itself well up for combating bulk fracture and secondary caries in clinical application.

  20. Development of diamond powder filled carbon fibre pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glitza, K. W.; Mättig, P.; Sanny, B.; Schmitt, U.; Siegfanz, A.; Srinivasan, M.

    2017-08-01

    For the High Luminosity (HL) phase of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) pixel detectors have to meet new and unprecedented challenges for electronics, read-out band widths and also mechanical support and cooling. Traditionally the mechanical support structures (staves) are built from carbon based materials, embedding a metallic cooling pipe through which the cooling liquid, typically CO2, is circulated. In this paper the development and use of a carbon pipe is discussed. Compared to the metallic pipes carbon pipes have potentially advantages like lightness, low radio activation and no CTE mismatch. Their disadvantage of lower transversal thermal conductivity can be mitigated by filling the fabric with diamond powder (DP). The paper reports about the production process of carbon pipes with DP filled epoxy and cyanate ester resin. It discusses that this process leads with reasonable efficiency to pipes that meet the requirements of pressure stability up to 200 bars and leak tightness of 10-6mbarLs-1 for use in HL-LHC staves. The remaining problems and an outlook on potential improvements and further work are presented.

  1. Development and Application of Wood Flour-Filled Polylactic Acid Composite Filament for 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yubo; Wang, Honglei; Li, Zelong; Li, Peng; Shi, Sheldon Q

    2017-03-24

    This paper presents the development of wood flour (WF)-filled polylactic acid (PLA) composite filaments for a fused deposition modeling (FDM) process with the aim of application to 3D printing. The composite filament consists of wood flour (5 wt %) in a PLA matrix. The detailed formulation and characterization of the composite filament were investigated experimentally, including tensile properties, microstructure, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The feedstock filaments of this composite were produced and used successfully in an assembled FDM 3D printer. The research concludes that compared with pure PLA filament, adding WF changed the microstructure of material fracture surface, the initial deformation resistance of the composite was enhanced, the starting thermal degradation temperature of the composite decreased slightly, and there were no effects on the melting temperature. The WF/PLA composite filament is suitable to be printed by the FDM process.

  2. Use of fracture filling mineral assemblages for characterizing water-rock interactions during exhumation of an accretionary complex: An example from the Shimanto Belt, southern Kyushu Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Takuya; Yoshida, Hidekazu; Metcalfe, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Various fracture filling minerals and secondary minerals in fracture walls were formed by fluid-rock interaction during the exhumation of the Palaeogene Shimanto Belt of Kyushu, Japan, which is located in an accretionary complex. Each mineral formed under favourable geological conditions and can be used to estimate the conditions of accretion and formation of the related rock sequences. Petrographic observations, mineralogical and geochemical analyses were made on fracture filling minerals and secondary minerals from boreholes of ca. 140 m depth, drilled in the Shimanto Belt. Results reveal that the secondary minerals were formed in three major stages distinguished by the sequential textural relationships of the minerals and the interpreted environment of mineral formation. Filling mineral assemblages show that the studied rock formation has been subducted to a depth of several km and the temperature reached was ca. 200-300 °C. After the subduction, the rock formation was uplifted and surface acidic water penetrated up to 80 m beneath the present ground surface. The acid water dissolved calcite fracture filling minerals to form the present groundwater flow-paths, which allowed recent wall rock alteration to occur. The results shown here imply that filling mineral assemblages can be an effective tool to evaluate the environmental changes during exhumation of an accretionary complex.

  3. A Thermoelastic Hydraulic Fracture Design Tool for Geothermal Reservoir Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad Ghassemi

    2003-06-30

    Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Thus, knowledge of conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fracture are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. At times, the practice aims to create a number of parallel fractures connecting a pair of wells. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have set out to develop advanced thermo-mechanical models for design of artificial fractures and rock fracture research in geothermal reservoirs. These models consider the significant hydraulic and thermo-mechanical processes and their interaction with the in-situ stress state. Wellbore failure and fracture initiation is studied using a model that fully couples poro-mechanical and thermo-mechanical effects. The fracture propagation model is based on a complex variable and regular displacement discontinuity formulations. In the complex variable approach the displacement discontinuities are

  4. DEVELOPMENT AND VERIFICATION OF NEW SOLID DENTAL FILLING TEMPORARY MATERIALS CONTAINING ZINC. FORMULA DEVELOPMENT STAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytko-Polończyk, Jolanta; Antosik, Agata; Zajac, Magdalena; Szlósarczyk, Marek; Krywult, Agnieszka; Jachowicz, Renata; Opoka, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Caries is the most popular problem affecting teeth and this is the reason why so many temporary dental filling materials are being developed. An example of such filling is zinc oxide paste mixed with eugenol, Thymodentin and Coltosol F®. Zinc-oxide eugenol is used in dentistry because of its multiplied values: it improves heeling of the pulp by dentine bridge formation; has antiseptic properties; is hygroscopic. Because of these advantages compouds of zinc oxide are used as temporary fillings, especially in deep caries lesions when treatment is oriented on support of vital pulp. Temporary dental fillings based on zinc oxide are prepared ex tempone by simple mixing powder (Thymodentin) and eugenol liqiud together or a ready to use paste Coltosol F®. Quantitative composition depends mainly on experience of person who is preparing it, therefore, exact qualitative composition of dental fillings is not replicable. The main goal of the study was to develop appropriate dental fillings in solid form containing set amount of zinc oxide. Within the study, the influence of preparation method on solid dental fillings properties like mechanical properties and zinc ions release were examined.

  5. Recent developments in inorganically filled carbon nanotubes: successes and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujjal K Gautam, Pedro M F J Costa, Yoshio Bando, Xiaosheng Fang, Liang Li, Masataka Imura and Dmitri Golberg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are a unique class of nanomaterials that can be imagined as rolled graphene sheets. The inner hollow of a CNT provides an extremely small, one-dimensional space for storage of materials. In the last decade, enormous effort has been spent to produce filled CNTs that combine the properties of both the host CNT and the guest filling material. CNTs filled with various inorganic materials such as metals, alloys, semiconductors and insulators have been obtained using different synthesis approaches including capillary filling and chemical vapor deposition. Recently, several potential applications have emerged for these materials, such as the measurement of temperature at the nanoscale, nano-spot welding, and the storage and delivery of extremely small quantities of materials. A clear distinction between this class of materials and other nanostructures is the existence of an enormous interfacial area between the CNT and the filling matter. Theoretical investigations have shown that the lattice mismatch and strong exchange interaction of CNTs with the guest material across the interface should result in reordering of the guest crystal structure and passivation of the surface dangling bonds and thus yielding new and interesting physical properties. Despite preliminary successes, there remain many challenges in realizing applications of CNTs filled with inorganic materials, such as a comprehensive understanding of their growth and physical properties and control of their structural parameters. In this article, we overview research on filled CNT nanomaterials with special emphasis on recent progress and key achievements. We also discuss the future scope and the key challenges emerging out of a decade of intensive research on these fascinating materials.

  6. Fracture development in shale and its relationship to gas accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlong Ding

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shale with high quartz, feldspar and carbonate, will have low Poisson’s ratio, high Young’s modulus and high brittleness. As a result, the shale is conducive to produce natural and induced fractures under external forces. In general, there is a good correlation between fracture development in shale and the volume of brittle minerals present. Shale with high TOC or abnormally high pressure has well-developed fractures. Shale fracture development also shows a positive correlation with total gas accumulation and free gas volume, i.e., the better shale fractures are developed, the greater the gas accumulation and therefore the higher the gas production. Fractures provide migration conduits and accumulation spaces for natural gas and formation water, which are favorable for the volumetric increase of free natural gas. Wider fractures in shale result in gas loss. In North America, there is a high success ratio of shale gas exploration and high gas production from high-angle fracture zones in shale. Good natural gas shows or low yield producers in the Lower Paleozoic marine organic matter-rich rocks in the Sichuan Basin are closely related to the degree of fracture development in brittle shales.

  7. Fracture development within a stratovolcano: The Karaha-Telaga Bodas geothermal field, Java volcanic arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemcok, M.; Moore, J.N.; Allis, R.; McCulloch, J.

    2004-01-01

    Karaha-Telaga Bodas, a vapour-dominated geothermal system located in an active volcano in western Java, is penetrated by more than two dozen deep geothermal wells reaching depths of 3 km. Detailed paragenetic and fluid-inclusion studies from over 1000 natural fractures define the liquid-dominated, transitional and vapour-dominated stages in the evolution of this system. The liquid-dominated stage was initiated by ashallow magma intrusion into the base of the volcanic cone. Lava and pyroclastic flows capped a geothermal system. The uppermost andesite flows were only weakly fractured due to the insulating effect of the intervening altered pyroclastics, which absorbed the deformation. Shear and tensile fractures that developed were filled with carbonates at shallow depths, and by quartz, epidote and actinolite at depths and temperatures over 1 km and 300??C. The system underwent numerous cycles of overpressuring, documented by subhorizontal tensile fractures, anastomosing tensile fracture patterns and implosion breccias. The development of the liquidsystem was interrupted by a catastrophic drop in fluid pressures. As the fluids boiled in response to this pressure drop, chalcedony and quartz were selectively deposited in fractures that had the largest apertures and steep dips. The orientations of these fractures indicate that the escaping overpressured fluids used the shortest possible paths to the surface. Vapour-dominated conditions were initiated at this time within a vertical chimney overlying the still hot intrusion. As pressures declined, these conditions spread outward to form the marginal vapour-dominated region encountered in the drill holes. Downward migration of the chimney, accompanied by growth of the marginal vapour-dominated regime, occurred as the intrusion cooled and the brittle-ductile transition migrated to greater depths. As the liquids boiled off, condensate that formed at the top of the vapour-dominated zone percolated downward and low

  8. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Frauk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2001-08-15

    Research continues on characterizing and modeling the behavior of naturally fractured reservoir systems. Work has progressed on developing techniques for estimating fracture properties from seismic and well log data, developing naturally fractured wellbore models, and developing a model to characterize the transfer of fluid from the matrix to the fracture system for use in the naturally fractured reservoir simulator.

  9. Development of a portable gas-filled ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, K. Y.; Cha, S. M.; Gwak, M. S. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    A new portable gas-filled ionization chamber has been designed and constructed at the Physics Department of Sung Kyun Kwan University. To overcome the maximum count rate of ∼ 10{sup 5} particles per second of a conventional ionization chamber, which utilizes a Frisch grid, and to enhance the portability of a detector, we adopted the design of multiple electrodes and modified it from the original designs by Kimura et al. and Chae et al. The new design utilizes a stack of multiple electrodes installed perpendicular to the optical beam axis. This configuration provides a fast response time for the detector, which is essential for high-rate counting. The device has been tested with a {sup 241}Am (t{sub 1/2} = 432.2 years) radioactive α source, which mainly emits 5.486-MeV (branching ratio of 85%) and 5.443-MeV (branching ratio of 13%) α particles. An energy resolution of 6.3% was achieved.

  10. Zeolitic alteration and fracture fillings in silicic tuffs at a potential nuclear waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broxton, D.E.; Carlos, B.A.

    1986-12-31

    This paper describes the distribution and chemistry of zeolites in tuffs and in fractures at Yucca Mountain. Samples used in this study were collected from continuously-cored exploratory drill holes. A variety of analytical techniques, including optical petrography, x-ray powder diffraction, electron microanalysis, and x-ray fluorescence, were used to characterize the distribution and chemistry of zeolites in these samples.

  11. Thermal evolution, fluid flow, and fracture development related to the structuration of the South Pyrenean Foreland Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crognier, N.; Hoareau, G.; Aubourg, C.; Branellec, M.; Dubois, M.; Lahfid, A.; Lacroix, B.; Labaume, P.; Suarez-Ruiz, I.

    2015-12-01

    The E-W trending South Pyrenean Foreland Basin, formed during the upper Cretaceous and the early Miocene due to the collision between Iberian and European plates, is filled by marine to continental deposits affected by a set of successive southvergent thrusts. In order to constrain the links between fracture development, thermal regime, and fluid flow in the basin, we estimated temperatures of formation and C-O isotope signatures of fracture-filling minerals (veins), maximum paleo-temperatures of sediments, and the timing and orientation of major fracture sets. The isotopic composition of 150 veins and sediment samples has been measured. Peak temperatures of 100 bulk rocks and veins have been estimated, using Raman spectroscopy, vitrinite reflectance, fluid inclusion microthermometry and mass-47 clumped isotopes. The orientation of ~5000 joints and veins has been used to link major tectonic events to fracture development. Most primary fluid inclusions show moderate salinities (~2.5 wt%), compatible with connate or evolved meteoric waters. Fluids were generally in thermal and isotopic equilibrium with host sediments, suggesting a low fluid-rock ratio, and thus a limited impact of fractures on fluid-flow. Peak temperatures (T max) decrease southward, from ~240°C in Cretaceous to Eocene sediments close to the axial zone, to ~60°C. In a same location dominant compaction joints were mineralized close to T max, ~40°C higher than tectonic shear veins. All fracture orientations were likely controlled by Pyrenean shortening. Genetic relationships between fracture sets are currently under investigation. Finally, temperatures of 240°C measured in Eocene sediments cannot be explained by balanced cross sections using geothermal gradient expected in foreland basins (20-25°C/km). 1D thermal modeling is being performed to explain this thermal anomaly, which could result from high heat flow following mid-Cretaceous extension, the ingress of hot fluids, or undocumented tectonic

  12. The development of in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques in hydrogen environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL; Tan, Ting [ORNL; Liu, Ken C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Fracture behavior and fracture toughness are of great interest regarding reliability of hydrogen pipelines and storage tanks, however, many conventional fracture testing techniques are difficult to be realized under the presence of hydrogen, in addition to the inherited specimen size effect. Thus it is desired to develop novel in situ fracture toughness evaluation techniques to study the fracture behavior of structural materials in hydrogen environments. In this study, a torsional fixture was developed to utilize an emerging fracture testing technique, Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT). The in situ testing results indicated that the exposure to H2 significantly reduces the fracture toughness of 4340 high strength steels by up to 50 percent. Furthermore, SNTT tests conducted in air demonstrated a significant fracture toughness reduction in samples subject to simulated welding heat treatment using Gleeble, which illustrated the effect of welding on the fracture toughness of this material.

  13. Geochemical signatures of fluid paleo-transfer in fracture filling calcite from low permeability rock masses: examples taken from Bure's and Tournemire's site in France and northern Switzerland; Signatures geochimiques de paleocirculations aqueuses dans la calcite de remplissage de fracture de massifs argileux peu permeables et de leurs encaissants: exemples pris sur les sites de Bure, Tournemire et Suisse du nord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecocq, D

    2002-12-15

    Fractures in rock masses represent preferential path for fluid transfer and, as such, are the most efficient way for migration of radionuclides at a regional scale. The impact of fracturing on hydrogeological system is a major challenge for underground radioactive waste storage projects. In this context, geochemistry of fracture-filling calcite is used to better understand physical and chemical properties of palaeo-fluids. A new methodology has been developed to analyze Mg, Mn, Fe, Sr and Rare Earth Elements REE (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Dy and Yb) in calcite by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. Analyses of calcite crystals have been performed in fractures from Jurassic clays and limestones in France (Bure and Tournemire sites) and northern Switzerland (Mt Terri's tunnel and deep borehole). On each case, several geochemical signatures are observed, according to REE partitioning and Mn and Fe concentrations. In the Bure site, a dependence of calcite geochemistry from fracture host rock has been evidenced. On the other hand, speciation of REE in solution equilibrated with clayey or calcareous rocks at circum-neutral pH (7 to 8) is not significantly influenced by the media: speciation is dominated by carbonate species in both cases and phosphate complexes can modify heavy REE availability in relatively to light REE. These results point out that in fractures in clays, calcite crystallizes at equilibrium with a fluid expulsed during diagenesis from clay minerals, recording the effect of clays and accessory phases. In limestone fractures, calcite records a later event related to the past functioning of the present aquifer, and the fluid has reached equilibrium with the rock minerals. In secondary filling calcite from Toarcian Argilites faults close to Tournemire's tunnel, three successive generations of calcite are observed in an extensive fault, and a fourth in a compressive one. In Aalenian Opalinus Clays veins, comparison between existing isotopic data and Mn, Fe

  14. Critique on the Conceptual Developments of Innovative Practices with Lightweight Fills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitral Wijeyesekera Devapriya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conceptual developments are underpinned by the intellectual process of constant reviewing and developing innovative research ideas into realistic design. There exists no one quick fix, fit for purpose solution to ensure stability of structures being constructed on a wide range of demanding ground conditions and variety of project constraints. Routine highway design and construction technology conformingly adopt only conventional fill methods and thus fail even to address adequately the less favoured conditions in challenging situations: a high initial construction cost arising from a full replacement of existing unfavourable soil conditions or an unsustainable construction design leading to a condition of rapid disintegration requiring regular expensive and disruptive highway maintenance activity. Undulating road embankment surfaces result from the transference of heavy self-weight of the embankment fill on yielding and non-uniform subgrade such as in peat soils. The Manitoba Water Services Board [1] specifies four classes of fills (viz; common, compacted common, compacted select granular backfill and unshrinkable backfill for backfilling of pipeline trenches. Both conventional and alternatively sustainable backfills are discussed in this paper with new and appropriate technology opening doors with other tangible benefits for innovative and cost saving outcomes for differing construction scenarios.

  15. Fracture development around deep underground excavations: Insights from FDEM modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Lisjak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past twenty years, there has been a growing interest in the development of numerical models that can realistically capture the progressive failure of rock masses. In particular, the investigation of damage development around underground excavations represents a key issue in several rock engineering applications, including tunnelling, mining, drilling, hydroelectric power generation, and the deep geological disposal of nuclear waste. The goal of this paper is to show the effectiveness of a hybrid finite-discrete element method (FDEM code to simulate the fracturing mechanisms associated with the excavation of underground openings in brittle rock formations. A brief review of the current state-of-the-art modelling approaches is initially provided, including the description of selecting continuum- and discontinuum-based techniques. Then, the influence of a number of factors, including mechanical and in situ stress anisotropy, as well as excavation geometry, on the simulated damage is analysed for three different geomechanical scenarios. Firstly, the fracture nucleation and growth process under isotropic rock mass conditions is simulated for a circular shaft. Secondly, the influence of mechanical anisotropy on the development of an excavation damaged zone (EDZ around a tunnel excavated in a layered rock formation is considered. Finally, the interaction mechanisms between two large caverns of an underground hydroelectric power station are investigated, with particular emphasis on the rock mass response sensitivity to the pillar width and excavation sequence. Overall, the numerical results indicate that FDEM simulations can provide unique geomechanical insights in cases where an explicit consideration of fracture and fragmentation processes is of paramount importance.

  16. [In vitro evaluation of fracture resistance of teeth with incomplete root development and intracanal reinforcement with different materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrales Salgado, Ricardo; Carvajal Cabrales, Katherine; Pupo Marrugo, Stella; Hernández González, Daniel Fernando; Gracia Bárcenas, José Luis

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of teeth with incomplete root development and intracanal reinforcement with adhesives materials. 50 human central and lateral incisors were instrumented and prepared to simulate an immature tooth and filled apically with MTA. The samples were divided into four experimental groups and one control group. Group 1: resin composite Filtek P90; Group 2: glass Ionomer Vitremer; Group 3: resin composite Filtek Z350 XT; Group 4: glass Ionomer Ketac N 100; Group 5: negative control (instrumented but not reinforced). After, the fracture test was performed using a fracture universal testing machine (Instron). The maximum values of resistance before catastrophic fracture were collected and analyzed by Anova (p = 0.05). The results show a significant difference between the groups compared (p = 0.02). A significant difference was found between group 1 (847.73 N) and group 5 (474.77 N) (p = 0.02) applying the Bonferroni test. Despite the limitations of the study, the conclusion is that micro-hybrid composite resins are ideal materials to strengthen teeth with incomplete root development endodontically treated.

  17. Influence of pore pressure to the development of a hydraulic fracture in poroelastic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Golovin, Sergey V

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the influence of the pore pressure to the development of a hydraulically-driven fracture in a poroelastic medium. We present a novel numerical model for propagation of a planar hydraulic fracture and prove its correctness by demonstration of the numerical convergence and by comparison with known solutions. The advantage of the algorithm is that it does not require the distinguishing of the fracture's tips and reconstruction of the numerical mesh according to the fracture propagation. Next, we perform a thorough analysis of the interplay of fluid filtration and redistribution of stresses near the fracture. We demonstrate that the fracture length decreases with the increase of the Biot's number (the parameter that determines the contribution of the pore pressure to the stress) and explain this effect by analysing the near-fracture pore pressure, rock deformation and stresses. We conclude, that the correct account for the fluid exchange between the fracture and the rock should be bas...

  18. Development of fractures in soft rock surrounding a roadway and their control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xuehua; Yao Qiangling; Man Jiankang; Chen Chaoqun; He Lihui

    2011-01-01

    As the excavation of roadway,new fractures will be formed and the pre-existing fractures extend with the redistribution of stress in surrounding rocks.Eventually,fracture zone and bed separation are formed in rocks because of the developed fractures.Therefore,mastering the fracture evolution of surrounding rocks is very important to maintain the stability of roadway.The surrounding rocks of main haulage roadway in a certain coal mine is so broken and loose that the supporting is very difficult.Based on comprehensive analysis of the engineering geological conditions,a sight instrument was used to observe the fractures of internal surrounding rocks.Four indices,i.e.,the width of fracture zone W,the number of fractures n,the width of fractures d and rock fracture designation RFD,are put forward to evaluate the fracture development.According to the evolution rules of the soft rock roadway from this paper,control principles by stages and by regions are presented through the research.At the same time,the best time of grouting reinforcement is determined on the basis of fracture saturation.Field practice shows that the roadway can satisfy normal production during service periods by suitable first support and grouting reinforcement.

  19. Development of a Gas Filled Magnet spectrometer within the FIPPS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebboubi, A.; Kessedjian, G.; Faust, H.; Blanc, A.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Materna, T.; Méplan, O.; Sage, C.; Serot, O.

    2016-06-01

    The Fission Product Prompt γ -ray Spectrometer, FIPPS, is under development to enable prompt γ -ray spectroscopy correlated with fission fragment identification. This will open new possibilities in the study of fission and of nuclear structure of neutron rich nuclei. FIPPS will consist of an array of γ and neutron detectors coupled with a fission fragment filter. The chosen solution for the filter is a Gas Filled Magnet (GFM). Both experimental and modeling work was performed in order to extract the key parameters of such a device and design the future GFM of the FIPPS project. Experiments performed with a GFM behind the LOHENGRIN spectrometer demonstrated the capability of additional beam purification.

  20. Sorption behavior of U(VI), 234U(VI) and 238U(VI) onto fracture-filling clays in Beishan granite, Gansu: Application to selecting the site of high-level radwaste repository in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN; Maozhong; LUO; Xingzhang; WANG; Ju; JIN; Yuanxin; WAN

    2005-01-01

    The first results of sorption experiments of U(VI), 234U(VI) and 238U(VI) onto original (unpurified) fracture-filling clays from No.1 monzonitic granite intrusion, Beishan area, Gansu Province, China are reported. The monzonitic granite intrusion is a potential location for a high-level radwaste (HLW) repository in China. The present experimental results show that the maximum U(VI) sorption reached 92% at near-neutral Ph and the distribution coefficient (Kd) was 1226 Ml/g. A high sorption capacity of the fracture-filling clays in host rock on radioactive elements is necessary for HLW deep geological disposal repository. No preferential sorption of 234U onto the clays was found. Finally, the sorption of U(VI) onto the clays was also modeled using a surface complexation model.

  1. Numerical development of a new correlation between biaxial fracture strain and material fracture toughness for small punch test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Dutta, B. K.; Chattopadhyay, J.

    2017-04-01

    The miniaturized specimens are used to determine mechanical properties of the materials, such as yield stress, ultimate stress, fracture toughness etc. Use of such specimens is essential whenever limited quantity of material is available for testing, such as aged/irradiated materials. The miniaturized small punch test (SPT) is a technique which is widely used to determine change in mechanical properties of the materials. Various empirical correlations are proposed in the literature to determine the value of fracture toughness (JIC) using this technique. bi-axial fracture strain is determined using SPT tests. This parameter is then used to determine JIC using available empirical correlations. The correlations between JIC and biaxial fracture strain quoted in the literature are based on experimental data acquired for large number of materials. There are number of such correlations available in the literature, which are generally not in agreement with each other. In the present work, an attempt has been made to determine the correlation between biaxial fracture strain (εqf) and crack initiation toughness (Ji) numerically. About one hundred materials are digitally generated by varying yield stress, ultimate stress, hardening coefficient and Gurson parameters. Such set of each material is then used to analyze a SPT specimen and a standard TPB specimen. Analysis of SPT specimen generated biaxial fracture strain (εqf) and analysis of TPB specimen generated value of Ji. A graph is then plotted between these two parameters for all the digitally generated materials. The best fit straight line determines the correlation. It has been also observed that it is possible to have variation in Ji for the same value of biaxial fracture strain (εqf) within a limit. Such variation in the value of Ji has been also ascertained using the graph. Experimental SPT data acquired earlier for three materials were then used to get Ji by using newly developed correlation. A reasonable

  2. Development of a Gas Filled Magnet spectrometer coupled with the Lohengrin spectrometer for fission study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Materna T.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The accurate knowledge of the fission of actinides is necessary for studies of innovative nuclear reactor concepts. The fission yields have a direct influence on the evaluation of the fuel inventory or the reactor residual power after shutdown. A collaboration between the ILL, LPSC and CEA has developed a measurement program on fission fragment distributions at ILL in order to measure the isotopic and isomeric yields. The method is illustrated using the 233U(n,f98Y reaction. However, the extracted beam from the Lohengrin spectrometer is not isobaric ions which limits the low yield measurements. Presently, the coupling of the Lohengrin spectrometer with a Gas Filled Magnet (GFM is studied at the ILL in order to define and validate the enhanced purification of the extracted beam. This work will present the results of the spectrometer characterisation, along with a comparison with a dedicated Monte Carlo simulation especially developed for this purpose.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES AND PRODUCTION MODELS FOR EXPLOITING NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael L. Wiggins; Raymon L. Brown; Faruk Civan; Richard G. Hughes

    2002-12-31

    For many years, geoscientists and engineers have undertaken research to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Geoscientists have focused on understanding the process of fracturing and the subsequent measurement and description of fracture characteristics. Engineers have concentrated on the fluid flow behavior in the fracture-porous media system and the development of models to predict the hydrocarbon production from these complex systems. This research attempts to integrate these two complementary views to develop a quantitative reservoir characterization methodology and flow performance model for naturally fractured reservoirs. The research has focused on estimating naturally fractured reservoir properties from seismic data, predicting fracture characteristics from well logs, and developing a naturally fractured reservoir simulator. It is important to develop techniques that can be applied to estimate the important parameters in predicting the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. This project proposes a method to relate seismic properties to the elastic compliance and permeability of the reservoir based upon a sugar cube model. In addition, methods are presented to use conventional well logs to estimate localized fracture information for reservoir characterization purposes. The ability to estimate fracture information from conventional well logs is very important in older wells where data are often limited. Finally, a desktop naturally fractured reservoir simulator has been developed for the purpose of predicting the performance of these complex reservoirs. The simulator incorporates vertical and horizontal wellbore models, methods to handle matrix to fracture fluid transfer, and fracture permeability tensors. This research project has developed methods to characterize and study the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs that integrate geoscience and engineering data. This is an important step in developing exploitation strategies for

  4. Self-organizing mechanism for development of space-filling neuronal dendrites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Sugimura

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurons develop distinctive dendritic morphologies to receive and process information. Previous experiments showed that competitive dendro-dendritic interactions play critical roles in shaping dendrites of the space-filling type, which uniformly cover their receptive field. We incorporated this finding in constructing a new mathematical model, in which reaction dynamics of two chemicals (activator and suppressor are coupled to neuronal dendrite growth. Our numerical analysis determined the conditions for dendritic branching and suggested that the self-organizing property of the proposed system can underlie dendritogenesis. Furthermore, we found a clear correlation between dendrite shape and the distribution of the activator, thus providing a morphological criterion to predict the in vivo distribution of the hypothetical molecular complexes responsible for dendrite elongation and branching.

  5. Development of a 3D Filling Model of Low-Pressure Die-Cast Aluminum Alloy Wheels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jianglan; Maijer, Daan; Cockcroft, Steve; Reilly, Carl

    2013-12-01

    A two-phase computational fluid dynamics model of the low-pressure die-cast process for the production of A356 aluminum alloy wheels has been developed to predict the flow conditions during die filling. The filling model represents a 36-deg section of a production wheel, and was developed within the commercial finite-volume package, ANSYS CFX, assuming isothermal conditions. To fully understand the behavior of the free surface, a novel technique was developed to approximate the vent resistances as they impact on the development of a backpressure within the die cavity. The filling model was first validated against experimental data, and then was used to investigate the effects of venting conditions and pressure curves during die filling. It was found that vent resistance and vent location strongly affected die filling time, free surface topography, and air entrainment for a given pressure fill-curve. With regard to the pressure curve, the model revealed a strong relation between the pressure curve and the flow behavior in the hub, which is an area prone to defect formation.

  6. Developing fracture density models using terrestrial laser scan data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollyea, R.; Fairley, J. P.; Podgorney, R. K.; McLing, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    Characterizing fracture heterogeneity for subsurface flow and transport modeling has been of interest to the hydrogeologic community for many years. Currently, stochastic continuum and discrete fracture representations have come to be accepted as two of the most commonly used tools for incorporating fracture heterogeneity into subsurface flow and transport models. In this research, ground-based lidar data are used to model the surface roughness of vertical basalt exposures in the East Snake River Plain, Idaho (ESRP) as a surrogate for fracture density. The surface roughness is modeled by discretizing the dataset over a regular grid and fitting a regression plane to each gridblock. The standard deviation of distance from the block data to the regression plane is then assumed to represent a measure of roughness for each gridblock. Two-dimensional plots of surface roughness from ESRP exposures indicate discrete fractures can be quantitatively differentiated from unfractured rock at 0.25- meter resolution. This methodology may have broad applications for characterizing fracture heterogeneity. One application, demonstrated here, is to capture high resolution (low noise) covariance statistics for building stochastic property sets to be used in large scale flow simulations. Additional applications may include using surface roughness datasets as training images for multiple-point geostatistics analysis and for constraining discrete fracture models.

  7. Development of an Advanced Hydraulic Fracture Mapping System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norm Warpinski; Steve Wolhart; Larry Griffin; Eric Davis

    2007-01-31

    The project to develop an advanced hydraulic fracture mapping system consisted of both hardware and analysis components in an effort to build, field, and analyze combined data from tiltmeter and microseismic arrays. The hardware sections of the project included: (1) the building of new tiltmeter housings with feedthroughs for use in conjunction with a microseismic array, (2) the development of a means to use separate telemetry systems for the tilt and microseismic arrays, and (3) the selection and fabrication of an accelerometer sensor system to improve signal-to-noise ratios. The analysis sections of the project included a joint inversion for analysis and interpretation of combined tiltmeter and microseismic data and improved methods for extracting slippage planes and other reservoir information from the microseisms. In addition, testing was performed at various steps in the process to assess the data quality and problems/issues that arose during various parts of the project. A prototype array was successfully tested and a full array is now being fabricated for industrial use.

  8. Development and Evaluation of a Cloud-Gap-Filled MODIS Daily Snow-Cover Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Riggs, George A.; Foster, James L.; Kumar, Sujay V.

    2010-01-01

    The utility of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow-cover products is limited by cloud cover which causes gaps in the daily snow-cover map products. We describe a cloud-gap-filled (CGF) daily snowcover map using a simple algorithm to track cloud persistence, to account for the uncertainty created by the age of the snow observation. Developed from the 0.050 resolution climate-modeling grid daily snow-cover product, MOD10C1, each grid cell of the CGF map provides a cloud-persistence count (CPC) that tells whether the current or a prior day was used to make the snow decision. Percentage of grid cells "observable" is shown to increase dramatically when prior days are considered. The effectiveness of the CGF product is evaluated by conducting a suite of data assimilation experiments using the community Noah land surface model in the NASA Land Information System (LIS) framework. The Noah model forecasts of snow conditions, such as snow-water equivalent (SWE), are updated based on the observations of snow cover which are obtained either from the MOD1 OC1 standard product or the new CGF product. The assimilation integrations using the CGF maps provide domain averaged bias improvement of -11 %, whereas such improvement using the standard MOD1 OC1 maps is -3%. These improvements suggest that the Noah model underestimates SWE and snow depth fields, and that the assimilation integrations contribute to correcting this systematic error. We conclude that the gap-filling strategy is an effective approach for increasing cloud-free observations of snow cover.

  9. Development and characterization of epoxy syntactic foam filled with epoxy hollow spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on the development and characterization of epoxy syntactic foam filled with epoxy hollow spheres (ESF/EHoS. The epoxy syntactic foam (ESF was produced by embedding epoxy hollow spheres (EHoS into a mixture of epoxy-hardener and 3% KOH solution. An innovative approach and simple procedure was implemented in the preparation of the EHoS where expanded polystyrene (EPS beads were used as initiation material. The EPS beads were coated with the epoxy resin and these coated EPS beads were later cured and post-cured at high temperature which will also shrink the EPS beads thus producing a hollow structure. The physical and compressive properties of the developed ESF were characterized. The progressive collapse of the syntactic foam was monitored in real-time with respect to percentage of strain during a compression test. Results also indicated that the (ESF/EHoS showed similar deformation pattern with other types of syntactic foams which exhibited the common three regions of deformations.

  10. Recent Developments in Multiscale and Multiphase Modelling of the Hydraulic Fracturing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently hydraulic fracturing of rocks has received much attention not only for its economic importance but also for its potential environmental impact. The hydraulically fracturing technique has been widely used in the oil (EOR and gas (EGR industries, especially in the USA, to extract more oil/gas through the deep rock formations. Also there have been increasing interests in utilising the hydraulic fracturing technique in geological storage of CO2 in recent years. In all cases, the design and implementation of the hydraulic fracturing process play a central role, highlighting the significance of research and development of this technique. However, the uncertainty behind the fracking mechanism has triggered public debates regarding the possible effect of this technique on human health and the environment. This has presented new challenges in the study of the hydraulic fracturing process. This paper describes the hydraulic fracturing mechanism and provides an overview of past and recent developments of the research performed towards better understandings of the hydraulic fracturing and its potential impacts, with particular emphasis on the development of modelling techniques and their implementation on the hydraulic fracturing.

  11. Rheology of Emulsion-Filled Gels Applied to the Development of Food Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana M. Geremias-Andrade

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Emulsion-filled gels are classified as soft solid materials and are complex colloids formed by matrices of polymeric gels into which emulsion droplets are incorporated. Several structural aspects of these gels have been studied in the past few years, including their applications in food, which is the focus of this review. Knowledge of the rheological behavior of emulsion-filled gels is extremely important because it can measure interferences promoted by droplets or particle inclusion on the textural properties of the gelled systems. Dynamic oscillatory tests, more specifically, small amplitude oscillatory shear, creep-recovery tests, and large deformation experiments, are discussed in this review as techniques present in the literature to characterize rheological behavior of emulsion-filled gels. Moreover, the correlation of mechanical properties with sensory aspects of emulsion-filled gels appearing in recent studies is discussed, demonstrating the applicability of these parameters in understanding mastication processes.

  12. Filling schemes at submicron scale: Development of submicron sized plasmonic colour filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekharan, Ranjith; Balaur, Eugeniu; Minovich, Alexander; Collins, Sean; James, Timothy D.; Djalalian-Assl, Amir; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Tomljenovic-Hanic, Snjezana; Kandasamy, Sasikaran; Skafidas, Efstratios; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Mulvaney, Paul; Roberts, Ann; Prawer, Steven

    2014-09-01

    The pixel size imposes a fundamental limit on the amount of information that can be displayed or recorded on a sensor. Thus, there is strong motivation to reduce the pixel size down to the nanometre scale. Nanometre colour pixels cannot be fabricated by simply downscaling current pixels due to colour cross talk and diffraction caused by dyes or pigments used as colour filters. Colour filters based on plasmonic effects can overcome these difficulties. Although different plasmonic colour filters have been demonstrated at the micron scale, there have been no attempts so far to reduce the filter size to the submicron scale. Here, we present for the first time a submicron plasmonic colour filter design together with a new challenge - pixel boundary errors at the submicron scale. We present simple but powerful filling schemes to produce submicron colour filters, which are free from pixel boundary errors and colour cross- talk, are polarization independent and angle insensitive, and based on LCD compatible aluminium technology. These results lay the basis for the development of submicron pixels in displays, RGB-spatial light modulators, liquid crystal over silicon, Google glasses and pico-projectors.

  13. Effects of fracture reactivation and diagenesis on fracture network evolution: Cambrian Eriboll Formation, NW Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, J. N.; Eichhubl, P.; Xu, G.; Ahn, H.; Fall, A.; Hargrove, P.; Laubach, S.; Ukar, E.

    2011-12-01

    The Cambrian Eriboll Formation quartzarenites contain abundant fractures with varying degrees of quartz cement infill. Fractures exist that are entirely sealed; are locally sealed by bridging cements but preserve pore space among bridges; are mostly open but lined with veneers of cement; or are devoid of cement. Fracture propagation in the Eriboll Formation is highly sensitive to the presence of pre-existing fractures. Fracture reactivation occurs in opening mode as individual fractures repeatedly open and are filled or bridged by syn-kinematic cements. As well, reactivation occurs in shear as opening of one fracture orientation coincides with shear displacement along pre-existing fractures of different orientations. The tendency for pre-existing fractures to slip varies in part by the extent of cement infill, yet we observe shear and opening-mode reactivation even among sealed fractures. Paleotemperature analysis of fluid inclusions within fracture cements suggests some fractures now in outcrop formed deep in the subsurface. Fractures within the Eriboll Formation may therefore affect later fracture propagation throughout geologic time. With progressive strain, fault zones develop within fracture networks by a sequence of opening-mode fracture formation, fracture reactivation and linkage, fragmentation, cataclasis, and the formation of slip surfaces. Cataclasite within fault zones is commonly more thoroughly cemented than fractures in the damage zone or outside the fault zone. This variance of cement abundance is likely the result of (1) continued exposure of freshly broken quartz surfaces within cataclasite, promoting quartz precipitation, and (2) possibly more interconnected pathways for mass transfer within the fault zone. Enhanced cementation of cataclasite results in strengthening or diagenetic strain hardening of the evolving fault zone. Further slip is accommodated by shear localization along discrete slip surfaces. With further linkage of fault segments

  14. Development of a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorenson, K.B.; Salzbrenner, R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque NM (United States)); Nickell, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    An effort has been undertaken to develop a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for structural components of nuclear material transportation casks. The need for such a criterion was twofold. First, new generation cask designs have proposed the use of ferritic steels and other materials to replace the austenitic stainless steel commonly used for structural components in transport casks. Unlike austenitic stainless steel which fails in a high-energy absorbing, ductile tearing mode, it is possible for these candidate materials to fail via brittle fracture when subjected to certain combinations of elevated loading rates and low temperatures. Second, there is no established brittle fracture criterion accepted by the regulatory community that covers a broad range of structural materials. Although the existing IAEA Safety Series no.37 addressed brittle fracture, its the guidance was dated and pertained only to ferritic steels. Consultant's Services Meetings held under the auspices of the IAEA have resulted in a recommended brittle fracture criterion. The brittle fracture criterion is based on linear elastic fracture mechanics, and is the result of a consensus of experts from six participating IAEA-member countries. The brittle fracture criterion allows three approaches to determine the fracture toughness of the structural material. The three approaches present the opportunity to balance material testing requirements and the conservatism of the material's fracture toughness which must be used to demonstrate resistance to brittle fracture. This work has resulted in a revised Appendix IX to Safety Series no.37 which will be released as an IAEA Technical Document within the coming year. (author).

  15. Development of a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorenson, Ken B.; Salzbrenner, Richard [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nickell, Robert E. [Applied Science and Technology, Inc., Poway, CA (United States)

    1992-01-01

    An effort has been undertaken to develop a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for structural components of nuclear material transportation casks. The need for such a criterion was twofold. First, new generation cask designs have proposed the use of ferritic steels and other materials to replace the austenitic stainless steel commonly used for structural components in transport casks. Unlike austenitic stainless steel which fails in a high-energy absorbing, ductile tearing mode, it is possible for these candidate materials to fail via brittle fracture when subjected to certain combinations of elevated loading rates and low temperatures. Second, there is no established brittle fracture criterion accepted by the regulatory community that covers a broad range of structural materials. Although the existing IAEA Safety Series {number sign}37 addressed brittle fracture, its the guidance was dated and pertained only to ferritic steels. Consultant's Services Meetings held under the auspices of the IAEA have resulted in a recommended brittle fracture criterion. The brittle fracture criterion is based on linear elastic fracture mechanics, and is the result of a consensus of experts from six participating IAEA-member countries. The brittle fracture criterion allows three approaches to determine the fracture toughness of the structural material. The three approaches present the opportunity to balance material testing requirements and the conservatism of the material's fracture toughness which must be used to demonstrate resistance to brittle fracture. This work has resulted in a revised Appendix IX to Safety Series {number sign}37 which will be released as an IAEA Technical Document within the coming year.

  16. A nonequilibrium model for reactive contaminant transport through fractured porous media: Model development and semianalytical solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nitin; Ojha, C. S. P.; Sharma, P. K.

    2012-10-01

    In this study a conceptual model that accounts for the effects of nonequilibrium contaminant transport in a fractured porous media is developed. Present model accounts for both physical and sorption nonequilibrium. Analytical solution was developed using the Laplace transform technique, which was then numerically inverted to obtain solute concentration in the fracture matrix system. The semianalytical solution developed here can incorporate both semi-infinite and finite fracture matrix extent. In addition, the model can account for flexible boundary conditions and nonzero initial condition in the fracture matrix system. The present semianalytical solution was validated against the existing analytical solutions for the fracture matrix system. In order to differentiate between various sorption/transport mechanism different cases of sorption and mass transfer were analyzed by comparing the breakthrough curves and temporal moments. It was found that significant differences in the signature of sorption and mass transfer exists. Applicability of the developed model was evaluated by simulating the published experimental data of Calcium and Strontium transport in a single fracture. The present model simulated the experimental data reasonably well in comparison to the model based on equilibrium sorption assumption in fracture matrix system, and multi rate mass transfer model.

  17. Development of Fracture Mechanics Maps for Composite Materials. Volume 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    Garber. "Tensile Stress-Strain Behavior oi Graphite/Epoxy Laminates", NASA CR 3592, 1982. 42. G. Caprino , J.C. Halpin and L. Nicolais, "Fracture...2336. 84. C. Caprino , "On the Prediction of Residual Strength for Notched Laminate". Journal Materials Science, Vol. 18, 1983, pp. 2269-2273. 8j. D.L

  18. Three dimensional numerical modeling for investigation of fracture zone filled with water by borehole radar; Borehole radar ni yoru gansui hasaitai kenshutsu no sanjigen suchi modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanada, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Ashida, Y. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Hasegawa, K.; Yabuuchi, S. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    Water bearing fracture zones existing in rock mass largely influence the underground water flow and dynamic property of rock mass. The detailed survey of the location and size of water bearing fracture zones is an important task in the fields such as civil engineering, environment and disaster prevention. Electromagnetic waves of high frequency zones can be grasped as a wave phenomenon, and the record obtained in the actual measurement is wave forms of time series. In the exploration using borehole radar, this water bearing fracture zone becomes the reflection surface, and also becomes a factor of damping in the transmitted wave. By examining changes which these give to the observed wave forms, therefore, water bearing fracture zones can be detected. This study made three dimensional numerical modeling using the time domain finite difference method, and obtained the same output as the observed wave form obtained using borehole radar. By using this program and changing each of the parameters such as frequency and resistivity in the homogeneous medium, changes of the wave forms were observed. Further, examples were shown of modeling of detection of water bearing fracture zones. 5 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Development of a Korean Fracture Risk Score (KFRS for Predicting Osteoporotic Fracture Risk: Analysis of Data from the Korean National Health Insurance Service.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Young Kim

    Full Text Available Asian-specific prediction models for estimating individual risk of osteoporotic fractures are rare. We developed a Korean fracture risk prediction model using clinical risk factors and assessed validity of the final model.A total of 718,306 Korean men and women aged 50-90 years were followed for 7 years in a national system-based cohort study. In total, 50% of the subjects were assigned randomly to the development dataset and 50% were assigned to the validation dataset. Clinical risk factors for osteoporotic fracture were assessed at the biennial health check. Data on osteoporotic fractures during the follow-up period were identified by ICD-10 codes and the nationwide database of the National Health Insurance Service (NHIS.During the follow-up period, 19,840 osteoporotic fractures were reported (4,889 in men and 14,951 in women in the development dataset. The assessment tool called the Korean Fracture Risk Score (KFRS is comprised of a set of nine variables, including age, body mass index, recent fragility fracture, current smoking, high alcohol intake, lack of regular exercise, recent use of oral glucocorticoid, rheumatoid arthritis, and other causes of secondary osteoporosis. The KFRS predicted osteoporotic fractures over the 7 years. This score was validated using an independent dataset. A close relationship with overall fracture rate was observed when we compared the mean predicted scores after applying the KFRS with the observed risks after 7 years within each 10th of predicted risk.We developed a Korean specific prediction model for osteoporotic fractures. The KFRS was able to predict risk of fracture in the primary population without bone mineral density testing and is therefore suitable for use in both clinical setting and self-assessment. The website is available at http://www.nhis.or.kr.

  20. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture-Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0013 TITLE: DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY 5b. GRANT...Rodent research has led to many advances in SCI treatment, but successful clinical translation remains limited. Here we describe a large animal model

  1. Development of an Animal Model of Thoracolumbar Burst Fracture Induced Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0013 TITLE: DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE- INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY...2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DEVELOPMENT OF AN ANIMAL MODEL OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURE-INDUCED ACUTE SPINAL CORD INJURY 5b...controlled spinal cord impactor for use in large animal models of SCI in order to more reliably recreate the human injury. A custom designed spinal cord

  2. Development and operation of a pixel segmented liquid-filled linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, J.; Franco, L.; Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Pazos, A.; Pena, J.; Lobato, R.; Mosquera, J.; Pombar, M.; Sendón, J.

    2005-04-01

    A liquid isooctane (C8H18) filled ionization linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance has been designed, built and tested. The detector consists of 128 pixels, each of them with an area of 1.7 mm × 1.7 mm and a gap of 0.5 mm. The small pixel size makes the detector ideal for high gradient beam profiles such as those present in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and radiosurgery. As the read-out electronics we use the X-ray Data Acquisition System with the Xchip developed by the CCLRC. Studies concerning the collection efficiency dependence on the polarization voltage and on the dose rate have been made in order to optimize the device operation. In the first tests, we have studied dose rate and energy dependences. Dose rate dependence was found to be lower than 2.1% up to 5 Gy min-1, and energy dependence lower than 2.5% up to 20 cm depth in solid water. Output factors and penumbras for several rectangular fields have been measured with the linear array and were compared with the results obtained with a 0.125 cm3 air ionization chamber and radiographic film, respectively. Finally, we have acquired profiles for an IMRT field and for a virtual wedge. These profiles have also been compared with radiographic film measurements. All the comparisons show a good correspondence. The device has proved its capability to verify on-line therapy beams with good spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio.

  3. Development and operation of a pixel segmented liquid-filled linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, J [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Franco, L [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Gomez, F [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Iglesias, A [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pazos, A [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pena, J [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Lobato, R [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago (Spain); Mosquera, J [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago (Spain); Pombar, M [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago (Spain); Sendon, J [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago (Spain)

    2005-04-21

    A liquid isooctane (C{sub 8}H{sub 18}) filled ionization linear array for radiotherapy quality assurance has been designed, built and tested. The detector consists of 128 pixels, each of them with an area of 1.7 mm x 1.7 mm and a gap of 0.5 mm. The small pixel size makes the detector ideal for high gradient beam profiles such as those present in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and radiosurgery. As the read-out electronics we use the X-ray Data Acquisition System with the Xchip developed by the CCLRC. Studies concerning the collection efficiency dependence on the polarization voltage and on the dose rate have been made in order to optimize the device operation. In the first tests, we have studied dose rate and energy dependences. Dose rate dependence was found to be lower than 2.1% up to 5 Gy min{sup -1}, and energy dependence lower than 2.5% up to 20 cm depth in solid water. Output factors and penumbras for several rectangular fields have been measured with the linear array and were compared with the results obtained with a 0.125 cm{sup 3} air ionization chamber and radiographic film, respectively. Finally, we have acquired profiles for an IMRT field and for a virtual wedge. These profiles have also been compared with radiographic film measurements. All the comparisons show a good correspondence. The device has proved its capability to verify on-line therapy beams with good spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio.

  4. Design and development of liquid filled polymeric fibers with flexure rate viscoelastic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottardo, L., E-mail: laura.gottardo@empa.ch, E-mail: rudolf.hufenus@empa.ch; Hufenus, R., E-mail: laura.gottardo@empa.ch, E-mail: rudolf.hufenus@empa.ch; Heuberger, M., E-mail: manfred.heuberger@empa.ch [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Lerchenfeldstrasse 5, 9014-CH St. Gallen (Switzerland); Dressler, M., E-mail: dressler@ecs.umass.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The design and development of a novel category of bi-component polymeric fibers, made of a polymeric sheath and a liquid core is described. To understand and to analyze the flow of molten polymer and liquid within a spin pack, we built a macroscale analogon where co-flow of polymer and liquid is investigated systematically. The macroscale analogon is composed of a glass cylinder with a finite length and a coaxial capillary. The inner fluid flows in the capillary and at its outlet meets the outer fluid flowing inside the glass cylinder. The fluids are pumped into the setup using pressurized bottles with controlled flow rates. A high-speed camera is placed in front of the glass cylinder to record the transient and the steady flow of the two phases and the morphology of their interface during co-flow. We systematically analyzed the combination of various fluids and different injection channel geometries, and used these findings to design a customized spin pack. Extrusion trials with molten polymers and specific liquids resulted in the production of liquid filled polymeric fibers (LFF) with different amounts of liquid from 3% to 33%vol. and diameters from 150μm to 1mm. Fiber morphology has been investigated with the help of optical microscopy and computer tomography, in order to analyze both surface and core morphology. Mechanical characterization of fibers has been carried out with special care to the damping capacity of such fibers using two different methods: two point bending tests to evaluate the energy dissipation of fibers upon bending at low frequency values (0.005-0.5Hz), and analysis of vibration reduction to determine the quality factor at the resonance frequency of the 1{sup st} and 3{sup rd} vibration mode.

  5. Fate of developing tooth buds located in relation to mandibular fractures in three infancy cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Matsusue, Yumiko; Murakami, Kazuhiro; Horita, Satoshi; Matsubara, Yuri; Kuraki, Miho; Kurihara, Miyako; Imai, Yuichiro; Sugiura, Tsutomu; Kirita, Tadaaki

    2010-08-01

    The fate of developing tooth buds located in relation to mandibular fractures was investigated in three infancy cases. Three infants, 2 girls and a boy, aged from 1 year and 5-months old to 2 years and 6-months old, were treated for dislocated mandibular fracture in the symphyseal region by manual reduction and fixation with a thermoforming splint and circumferential wiring under general anesthesia. Fracture healing was uneventful in all cases. A few years later, no obvious deformity of the jaw or malocclusion was observed; however, malformation of the crown was found in one of the permanent teeth on the fracture line in the first case. In the second case, no abnormality was observed in one of the permanent teeth on the fracture line, but the effect on the other tooth could not be evaluated due to abnormality of the tooth probably not related to the injury. In the third case, root formation was arrested in one of the permanent teeth on the fracture line and the tooth was lost early after eruption. The development of tooth buds on the fracture line is not predictable and therefore, should be monitored by regular follow up.

  6. Development of an injectable pseudo-bone thermo-gel for application in small bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondiah, Pariksha J; Choonara, Yahya E; Kondiah, Pierre P D; Kumar, Pradeep; Marimuthu, Thashree; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2017-03-30

    A pseudo-bone thermo-gel was synthesized and evaluated for its physicochemical, mechanical and rheological properties, with its application to treat small bone fractures. The pseudo-bone thermo-gel was proven to have thermo-responsive properties, behaving as a solution in temperatures below 25°C, and forming a gelling technology when maintained at physiological conditions. Poly propylene fumerate (PPF), Pluronic F127 and PEG-PCL-PEG were strategically blended, obtaining a thermo-responsive delivery system, to mimic the mechanical properties of bone with sufficient matrix hardness and resilience. A Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) class II drug, simvastatin, was loaded in the pseudo-bone thermo-gel, selected for its bone healing properties. In vitro release analysis was undertaken on a series of experimental formulations, with the ideal formulations obtaining its maximum controlled drug release profile up to 14days. Ex vivo studies were undertaken on an induced 4mm diameter butterfly-fractured osteoporotic human clavicle bone samples. X-ray, ultrasound as well as textural analysis, undertaken on the fractured bones before and after treatment displayed significant bone filling, matrix hardening and matrix resilience properties. These characteristics of the pseudo-bone thermo-gel thus proved significant potential for application in small bone fractures.

  7. Development of site-specific locking plates for acetabular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Zhang, Li-Hai; Zhang, Ying-Ze; He, Chun-Qing; Zhang, Li-Cheng; Wang, Yan; Tang, Pei-Fu

    2013-05-01

    Site-specific locking plates have gained popularity for the treatment of fractures. However, the clinical use of a site-specific locking plate for acetabular fractures remains untested due to production limits. To design a universal site-specific locking plate for acetabular fractures, the 3-dimensional (3D) photographic records of 171 pelvises were retrospectively studied to generate a universal posterior innominate bone surface. Using 3D photographical processing software, the 3D coordinate system was reset according to bony landmarks and was scaled based on the acetabular diameter to allow a direct comparison between surfaces. The measured surface was separated into measurement units. At each measurement unit, the authors calculated the average z-axis values in all samples and obtained the 3D coordinate values of the point cloud that could be reconstructed into the universal surface. A plate was subsequently designed in 3D photographical processing software, and the orientation and distribution of locking screws was included. To manufacture a plate, the data were entered into Unigraphics NX version 6.0 software (Siemens PLM Software, Co, Ltd, Plano, Texas) and a CNC digital milling machine (FANUC Co, Ltd, Yamanashi, Japan). The resulting locking plate fit excellently with the reduced bone surface intraoperatively. Plate contouring was avoided intraoperatively. Universal 3.5-mm locking screws locked successfully into the plate, and their orientations were consistent with the design. No screw yielded to acetabular penetration. This method of designing a site-specific acetabular locking plate is practical, and the plates are suitable for clinical use. These site-specific locking plates may be an option for the treatment of acetabular fractures, particularly in elderly patients.

  8. Developments for transactinide chemistry experiments behind the gas-filled separator TASCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Even, Julia

    2011-12-13

    Topic of this thesis is the development of experiments behind the gas-filled separator TASCA (TransActinide Separator and Chemistry Apparatus) to study the chemical properties of the transactinide elements. In the first part of the thesis, the electrodepositions of short-lived isotopes of ruthenium and osmium on gold electrodes were studied as model experiments for hassium. From literature it is known that the deposition potential of single atoms differs significantly from the potential predicted by the Nernst equation. This shift of the potential depends on the adsorption enthalpy of therndeposited element on the electrode material. If the adsorption on the electrode-material is favoured over the adsorption on a surface made of the same element as the deposited atom, the electrode potential is shifted to higher potentials. This phenomenon is called underpotential deposition. Possibilities to automatize an electro chemistry experiment behind the gas-filled separator were explored for later studies with transactinide elements. The second part of this thesis is about the in-situ synthesis of transition-metal-carbonyl complexes with nuclear reaction products. Fission products of uranium-235 and californium-249 were produced at the TRIGA Mainz reactor and thermalized in a carbon-monoxide containing atmosphere. The formed volatile metal-carbonyl complexes could be transported in a gas-stream. Furthermore, short-lived isotopes of tungsten, rhenium, osmium, and iridium were synthesised at the linear accelerator UNILAC at GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. The recoiling fusion products were separated from the primary beam and the transfer products in the gas-filled separator TASCA. The fusion products were stopped in the focal plane of TASCA in a recoil transfer chamber. This chamber contained a carbon-monoxide - helium gas mixture. The formed metal-carbonyl complexes could be transported in a gas stream to various experimental setups. All

  9. Fracture Blisters After Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halawi, Mohamad J

    2015-08-01

    Fracture blisters are tense vesicles that arise on markedly swollen skin overlying traumatized soft tissue. While this relatively uncommon complication has been well described in the trauma literature, this article reports for the first time a case of fracture blisters after primary total knee arthroplasty. The fracture blisters developed within 36 hours of surgery and were associated with profound swelling and erythema. There was no evidence of vascular injury, compartment syndrome, iatrogenic fracture, or deep venous thrombosis. The patient was treated with leg elevation, loosely applied nonadhesive dressings, and a short course of oral antibiotics after skin desquamation. Blood-filled blisters required longer time to reepithelialization than fluid-filled blisters. Knee stiffness developed because of pain and fear of participation with physical therapy, but the patient was able to resume intensive rehabilitation after resolution of the blisters. Patient factors, surgical factors, and review of the literature are discussed.

  10. Simulated evolution of fractures and fracture networks subject to thermal cooling: A coupled discrete element and heat conduction model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hai; Plummer, Mitchell; Podgorney, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Advancement of EGS requires improved prediction of fracture development and growth during reservoir stimulation and long-term operation. This, in turn, requires better understanding of the dynamics of the strongly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes within fractured rocks. We have developed a physically based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by using a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) to model mechanical rock deformation and fracture propagation induced by thermal stress and fluid pressure changes. We also developed a network model to simulate fluid flow and heat transport in both fractures and porous rock. In this paper, we describe results of simulations in which the DEM model and network flow & heat transport model are coupled together to provide realistic simulation of the changes of apertures and permeability of fractures and fracture networks induced by thermal cooling and fluid pressure changes within fractures. Various processes, such as Stokes flow in low velocity pores, convection-dominated heat transport in fractures, heat exchange between fluid-filled fractures and solid rock, heat conduction through low-permeability matrices and associated mechanical deformations are all incorporated into the coupled model. The effects of confining stresses, developing thermal stress and injection pressure on the permeability evolution of fracture and fracture networks are systematically investigated. Results are summarized in terms of implications for the development and evolution of fracture distribution during hydrofracturing and thermal stimulation for EGS.

  11. Modeling fracture porosity evolution in dolostone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Julia F. W.; Lander, Robert H.; Reed, Robert M.; Laubach, Stephen E.

    2010-09-01

    Opening-mode fractures in dolostones buried to depths of ˜1-5 km contain synkinematic dolomite cement, the amount and internal structure of which has a systematic relationship to fracture size. Narrow fractures (cement or cement with a crack-seal texture that indicates multiple incremental openings. Wider fractures can preserve considerable effective porosity, but anomalously thick dolomite cement bridges are commonly present in fractures that are otherwise lined with a thin veneer of cement. Dolomite bridges resemble quartz bridges that are common in fractured sandstones. We developed a geometric crystal growth model for synkinematic dolomite fracture fill in fractured dolostones, where periodic incremental fracture-opening events are introduced with concurrent cement growth. We assumed constant temperature and supersaturation with respect to dolomite. A key assumption in the model is that rapid dolomite accumulation within bridges is governed by high cement-growth rates on repeatedly broken grain surfaces during the process of crack seal. Slower cement-growth rates occur on euhedral crystals. This assumption is made on the basis of a comparison with quartz cement growth in fractured sandstones. Simulations with different fracture-opening rates mimic bridge and lining cement morphologies, including characteristic rhombic shapes of dolomite bridges.

  12. Development of a new software for analyzing 3-D fracture network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Jeong-Gi; Noh, Young-Hwan; Choi, Yosoon

    2014-05-01

    A new software is presented to analyze fracture network in 3-D. Recently, we completed the software package based on information given in EGU2013. The software consists of several modules that play roles in management of borehole data, stochastic modelling of fracture network, construction of analysis domain, visualization of fracture geometry in 3-D, calculation of equivalent pipes and production of cross-section diagrams. Intel Parallel Studio XE 2013, Visual Studio.NET 2010 and the open source VTK library were utilized as development tools to efficiently implement the modules and the graphical user interface of the software. A case study was performed to analyze 3-D fracture network system at the Upper Devonian Grosmont Formation in Alberta, Canada. The results have suggested that the developed software is effective in modelling and visualizing 3-D fracture network system, and can provide useful information to tackle the geomechanical problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviours of the fractured rock masses. This presentation describes the concept and details of the development and implementation of the software.

  13. High-energy gas-fracturing development. Quarterly report, October-December 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuderman, J.F.

    1983-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and optimize the High Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF) technique to produce multiple fractures around a wellbore in order to stimulate natural-gas production in Devonian shale. The HEGF technique uses a wellbore charge of a propellant tailored to produce pressure loading in the borehole that avoids crushing yet produces multiple fractures radiating from the wellbore. The multiple-fracture regime has been characterized and releated to parameters such as borehole size, pressure risetime, and surface-wave velocity. Pressure risetimes and peak pressures, measured for different propellants in boreholes to specify a propellant for a desired peak pressure and pressure risetime. Semiempirical models, using results from previous experiments, successfully relate stress, acceleration, and fracture radii in surrounding rock to peak pressure and pressure risetime. A finite-element model also has been developed which predicts fracture type and direction of fractures as a function of pressure loading, in situ stress, and material properties. A full-scale HEGF system has been developed for application in gas-well-stimulation experiments in Devonian shale. During this quarter, a proof test of the full-scale HEGF was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The designed pressure pulse of 0.5 ms risetime was achieved, and the tamp remained in place during the test. The borehole was successfully cleared posttest. Multiple fracturing was verified with a downhole TV camera. The test of the full-scale hardware and its operational capability was successful. As a result, the HEGF system is ready for application in gas-well-stimulation experiments in Devonian shale. Tests were conducted to determine worst-case accident scenarios to establish sensitivity to shock and fire. There appears to be no risk of initiation resulting from shock or breakage of the propellant-canister segments.

  14. Process development for 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) with high fracture toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hoelzer, David T.; Lee, Yong Bok; Kang, Suk Hoon; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-06-01

    This article is to summarize the process development and key characterization results for the newly-developed Fe-9Cr based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) with high fracture toughness. One of the major drawbacks from pursuing ultra-high strength in the past development of NFAs is poor fracture toughness at high temperatures although a high fracture toughness is essential to prevent cracking during manufacturing and to mitigate or delay irradiation-induced embrittlement in irradiation environments. A study on fracture mechanism using the NFA 14YWT found that the low-energy grain boundary decohesion in fracture process at a high temperature (>200 °C) resulted in low fracture toughness. Lately, efforts have been devoted to explore an integrated process to enhance grain bonding. Two base materials were produced through mechanical milling and hot extrusion and designated as 9YWTV-PM1 and 9YWTV-PM2. Isothermal annealing (IA) and controlled rolling (CR) treatments in two phase region were used to enhance diffusion across the interfaces and boundaries. The PM2 alloy after CR treatments showed high fracture toughness (KJQ) at represented temperatures: 240-280 MPa √m at room temperature and 160-220 MPa √m at 500 °C, which indicates that the goal of 100 MPa √m over possible nuclear application temperature range has been well achieved. Furthermore, it is also confirmed by comparison that the CR treatments on 9YWTV-PM2 result in high fracture toughness similar to or higher than those of the conventional ferritic-martensitic steels such as HT9 and NF616.

  15. Evaluation of regional fracture properties for groundwater development using hydrolithostructural domain approach in variably fractured hard rocks of Purulia district, West Bengal, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tapas Acharya; Rajesh Prasad; S Chakrabarti

    2014-04-01

    Estimation of geohydrologic properties of fractured aquifers in hard crystalline and/or metamorphosed country rocks is a challenge due to the complex nature of secondary porosity that is caused by differential fracturing. Hydrologic potentiality of such aquifers may be assessed if the geological controls governing the spatial distribution of these fracture systems are computed using a software-based model. As an exemplar, the Precambrian metamorphics exposed in and around the Balarampur town of Purulia district, West Bengal (India) were studied to find out the spatial pattern and consistency of such fracture systems. Surfer and Statistica softwares were used to characterize these rock masses in terms of hydrological, structural and lithological domains. The technique is based on the use of hydraulically significant fracture properties to generate representative modal and coefficient of variance () of fracture datasets of each domain. The is interpreted to obtain the spatial variability of hydraulically significant fracture properties that, in turn, define and identify the corresponding hydrolithostructural domains. The groundwater flow estimated from such a technique is verified with the routine hydrological studies to validate the procedure. It is suggested that the hydrolithostructural domain approach is a useful alternative for evaluation of fracture properties and aquifer potentiality, and development of a regional groundwater model thereof.

  16. 塔河油田奥陶系缝洞型储层小型缝洞及其充填物测井识别%Identification of small fracture-vugs and their fillings through log interpretation in fractured-vuggy Ordovician reservoirs in Tahe oilfield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田飞; 金强; 李阳; 张宏方; 张文博

    2012-01-01

    recognize the types of fillings, including clastics, breccias and chemical fillings. The results of recognition are fairly good compared with that from core observation and image log interpretation. The vug recognition rate is above 81%, fracture recognition rate is larger than 82 %, and cave fills recognition rate is over 84%. The method can meet the basic requirements for identification of small vugs and fractures. The application of the method to 117 wells in Tahe oilfield proves to be quite encouraging and the results also show the potential of the method for identification of caverns and fractures with a height over 0. 5 meters and their fillings. It provides a new approach for fine study of reservoir space of paleokarstic reservoirs.

  17. Method development for determining the hydraulic conductivity of fractured porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, Kenneth L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-09-30

    Plausible, but unvalidated, theoretical model constructs for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of fractured porous media are currently used in Performance Assessment (PA) modeling for cracked saltstone and concrete (Flach 2011). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has expressed concern about the lack of model support for these assumed Moisture Characteristic Curves (MCC) data, as noted in Requests for Additional Information (RAIs) PA-8 and SP-4 (Savannah River Remediation, LLC, 2011). The objective of this task was to advance PA model support by developing an experimental method for determining the hydraulic conductivity of fractured cementitious materials under unsaturated conditions, and to demonstrate the technique on fractured saltstone samples. The task was requested through Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-SSF-TTR-2012-0016 and conducted in accordance with Task Technical & Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-TR-2012-00090. Preliminary method development previously conducted by Kohn et al. (2012) identified transient outflow extraction as the most promising method for characterizing the unsaturated properties of fractured porous media. While the research conducted by Kohn et al. (2012) focused on fractured media analogs such as stacked glass slides, the current task focused directly on fractured saltstone. For this task, four sample types with differing fracture geometries were considered: 1) intact saltstone, 2) intact saltstone with a single saw cut, smooth surface fracture, 3) micro-fractured saltstone (induced by oven drying), and 4) micro-fractured saltstone with a single, fully-penetrating, rough-surface fracture. Each sample type was tested initially for saturated hydraulic conductivity following method ASTM D 5084 using a flexible wall permeameter. Samples were subsequently tested using the transient outflow extraction method to determine cumulative outflow as a function of time and applied pressure. Of the four sample types tested, two yielded

  18. Design and Development of a Horizontal Form/Fill/Seal Machine for an Automated Combat Ration Manufacturing Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    be fully met. 5.1.7 Machine shall be equipped with pressure-form, thermoform , plug-assist hardware and able to pressure form and thermoform packages ...form/fill/seal machine was specified and developed (based on the Tiromat 3000) to provide MRE pouch packaging rates of 100 per minute and for...data acquisition system and the existing Tiromat sensors. Cycle (production) rates, quality of packages and control of product slosh were improved

  19. Design and fabrication of a data logger for atmospheric pressure, temperature and relative humidity for gas-filled detector development

    CERN Document Server

    Sahu, S; Rudra, Sharmili; Biswas, S; Mohanty, B; Sahu, P K

    2015-01-01

    A novel instrument has been developed to monitor and record the ambient pa- rameters such as temperature, atmospheric pressure and relative humidity. These parameters are very essential for understanding the characteristics such as gain of gas filled detectors like Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and Multi Wire Propor- tional Counter (MWPC). In this article the details of the design, fabrication and operation processes of the device has been presented.

  20. Development of Numerical Analysis Techniques Based on Damage Mechanics and Fracture Mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yoon Suk; Lee, Dock Jin; Choi, Shin Beom; Kim, Sun Hye; Cho, Doo Ho; Lee, Hyun Boo [Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    The scatter of measured fracture toughness data and transferability problems among different crack configurations as well as geometry and loading conditions are major obstacles for application of fracture mechanics. To address these issues, recently, concerns on the local approach employing reliable micro-mechanical damage models are being increased again in connection with a progress of computational technology. In the present research, as part of development of fracture mechanical evaluation model for material degradation of reactor pressure boundary, several investigations on fracture behaviors were carried out. Especially, a numerical scheme to determine key parameters consisting both cleavage and ductile fracture estimate models was changed efficiently by incorporating a genetic algorithm. Also, with regard to the well-known master curve, newly reported methods such as bimodal master curve, randomly inhomogeneous master curve and single point estimation were reviewed to deal with homogeneous and inhomogeneous material characteristics. A series of preliminary finite element analyses was conducted to examine the element size effect on micro-mechanical models. Then, a new thickness correction equation was derived from parametric three-dimensional numerical simulations, which was founded on the current test standard, ASTM E1921, but could lead to get more realistic fracture toughness values. As a result, promising modified master curves as well as fracture toughness diagrams to convert data between pre-cracked V-notched and compact tension specimens were generated. Moreover, a user-subroutine in relation to GTN(Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman) model was made by adopting Hill's 48 yield potential theory. By applying GTN model combined with the subroutine to small punch specimens, the effect of inhomogeneous properties on fracture behaviors of miniature specimens was confirmed. Therefore, it is anticipated that the aforementioned enhanced research results can be

  1. Incidence of hip fracture in Barranquilla, Colombia, and the development of a Colombian FRAX model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaller-Raad, J J; Jaller-Char, J J; Lechuga-Ortiz, J A; Navarro-Lechuga, E; Johansson, H; Kanis, J A

    2013-07-01

    A FRAX model for Colombia was released June 30, 2010. This article describes the data used to develop the Colombian FRAX model and illustrates its features compared to other countries. Hip fracture cases aged 50 years or more who were referred to all hospitals serving the city of Barranquilla were identified prospectively over a 3-year period (2004-2006). Age- and sex-stratified hip fracture incidence rates were computed using the 2005 census. Present and future numbers of hip fracture cases in Colombia were calculated from the age- and sex-specific incidence and the national population demography. Mortality rates for 1999 were extracted from nationwide databases and used to estimate hip fracture probabilities. For other major fractures (clinical vertebral, forearm, and humerus), incidence rates were imputed, using Swedish ratios for hip to other major osteoporotic fracture, and used to construct the FRAX model. Incidence of hip fracture increased with age, more markedly in women than in men. Over all ages, the female to male ratio was 1.7. By extrapolation, there were estimated to be 7,902 new hip fracture cases (2,673 men, 5,229 women) in Colombia in 2010, which was predicted to increase to 22,720 cases (7,568 men, 15,152 women) in 2035. The 10-year probability of hip or major fracture was increased in patients with a clinical risk factor, lower BMI, female gender, a higher age, and a decreased BMD T score. The remaining lifetime probability of hip fracture at the age of 50 years was 2.5 and 4.7 % in men and women, respectively, which were lower than rates in a Mexican population (3.8 and 8.5 %, respectively) and comparable with estimates for Venezuela (2.4 and 7.5 %, respectively). The FRAX tool is the first country-specific fracture-prediction model available in Colombia. It is based on the original FRAX methodology, which has been externally validated in several independent cohorts. Despite some limitations, the strengths make the Colombian FRAX tool a good

  2. Scientific results from the deepened Lopra-1 borehole, Faroe Islands: A reconnaissance study of fluid inclusions in fracture-filling quartz and calcite from the Lopra-1/1A well, Faroe Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konnerup-Madsen, Jens

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Fracture-filling calcite and quartz from the Lopra-1/1A well (at 2380 m and 3543 m depth contains both aqueous low-salinity fluid inclusions and hydrocarbon-dominated fluid inclusions. Microthermometry indicates that the aqueous fluids contain 0.2 to 1.4 equivalent weight% NaCl and occasionally contain traces of hydrocarbons. Homogenisation to liquid occurred between 90°C and 150°C. Modelling based on these fluid inclusion observations indicates that during burial the basaltic section was subjected to temperatures of 160°C and 170°C, occasional pressures of 600–700 bars and the simultaneous percolation of aqueous and hydrocarbon fluids. These fluid conditions may also be relevant to the formation of zeolite observed in the Lopra-1/1A well.

  3. Development of a fixation device for robot assisted fracture reduction of femoral shaft fractures: a biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Spickschen, T S; Oszwald, M; Westphal, R; Krettek, C; Wahl, F; Gosling, T

    2010-01-01

    Robot assisted fracture reduction of femoral shaft fractures provides precise alignment while reducing the amount of intraoperative imaging. The connection between the robot and the fracture fragment should allow conventional intramedullary nailing, be minimally invasive and provide interim fracture stability. In our study we tested three different reduction tools: a conventional External Fixator, a Reposition-Plate and a Three-Point-Device with two variations (a 40 degrees and a 90 degrees version). We measured relative movements between the tools and the bone fragments in all translation and rotation planes. The Three-Point-Device 90 degrees showed the smallest average relative displacement and was the only device able to withstand the maximum applied load of 70 Nm without failure of any bone fragment. The Three-Point-Device 90 degrees complies with all the stipulated requirements and is a suitable interface for robot assisted fracture reduction of femoral shaft fractures.

  4. Development and evaluation of aerogel-filled BMI sandwich panels for thermal barrier applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dineshkumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study details a fabrication methodology envisaged to manufacture Glass/BMI honeycomb core aerogel-filled sandwich panels. Silica aerogel granules are used as core fillers to provide thermal insulation properties with little weight increase. Experimental heat transfer studies are conducted on these panels to study the temperature distribution between their two surfaces. Numerical studies are also carried out to validate the results. Despite exhibiting good thermal shielding capabilities, the Glass/BMI sandwich panels are found to oxidise at 180 ºC if exposed directly to heat. In order to increase the temperature bearing capacity and the operating temperature range for these panels, a way of coating them from outside with high temperature spray paint was tried. With a silicone-based coating, the temperature sustainability of these sandwich panels is found to increase to 350 ºC. This proved the effectiveness of the formed manufacturing process, selected high temperature coating, the coating method as well as the envisaged sandwich panel concept.

  5. Development of Y-branch Joint for 275kV XLPE and Fluid Filled Cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takeshi; Yamashita, Makoto; Sakamaki, Masatoshi

    When a new UHV substation is built in an urban region, generally, an existing underground transmission line shall be diverted and drawn into the new substation. Compared with above mentioned construction method, enormous cost reduction of switching facilities and cable construction is expected with applying a Y-Branch Joint (YJ) which is able to be a 3-way joint. The YJ has already been applied for 154kV class circuit, however, it has not been investigated for 275kV class circuit. Since both XLPE and Fluid-Filled cable are presently used in 275kV class underground cable line, an universal design YJ for both cables have been investigated. The YJ was applied a compact design which was based on our sophisticated electrical stress control technology for 500kV prefabricated type joint. Furthermore, the design was based on its prefabricated assembling technology. The YJ was verified its electrical and mechanical performance as 275kV cable joint by completion of its assembling test and a long term electrical test.

  6. Characteristics of fracture development and gas extraction of a lower protected seam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海锋

    2009-01-01

    To ensure the mining safety of working face in the protective seam and meanwhile extract pressure-relief gas of the lower protected seam and eliminate its outburst risk,the present study researched into fracture development of floor coal-rock mass of the protective seam and migration rule of pressure-relief gas from a protected seam so as to obtain an effective pressure- relief gas extraction method.The results show that after the upper protective seam was mined,mining-induced fracturing floor coal-rock mas...

  7. Development of RWHet to Simulate Contaminant Transport in Fractured Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong; LaBolle, Eric; Reeves, Donald M; Russell, Charles

    2012-07-01

    Accurate simulation of matrix diffusion in regional-scale dual-porosity and dual-permeability media is a critical issue for the DOE Underground Test Area (UGTA) program, given the prevalence of fractured geologic media on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Contaminant transport through regional-scale fractured media is typically quantified by particle-tracking based Lagrangian solvers through the inclusion of dual-domain mass transfer algorithms that probabilistically determine particle transfer between fractures and unfractured matrix blocks. UGTA applications include a wide variety of fracture aperture and spacing, effective diffusion coefficients ranging four orders of magnitude, and extreme end member retardation values. This report incorporates the current dual-domain mass transfer algorithms into the well-known particle tracking code RWHet [LaBolle, 2006], and then tests and evaluates the updated code. We also develop and test a direct numerical simulation (DNS) approach to replace the classical transfer probability method in characterizing particle dynamics across the fracture/matrix interface. The final goal of this work is to implement the algorithm identified as most efficient and effective into RWHet, so that an accurate and computationally efficient software suite can be built for dual-porosity/dual-permeability applications. RWHet is a mature Lagrangian transport simulator with a substantial user-base that has undergone significant development and model validation. In this report, we also substantially tested the capability of RWHet in simulating passive and reactive tracer transport through regional-scale, heterogeneous media. Four dual-domain mass transfer methodologies were considered in this work. We first developed the empirical transfer probability approach proposed by Liu et al. [2000], and coded it into RWHet. The particle transfer probability from one continuum to the other is proportional to the ratio of the mass entering the other

  8. Development of experimental verification techniques for non-linear deformation and fracture on the nanometer scale.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, Neville Reid; Bahr, David F.

    2005-11-01

    This work covers three distinct aspects of deformation and fracture during indentations. In particular, we develop an approach to verification of nanoindentation induced film fracture in hard film/soft substrate systems; we examine the ability to perform these experiments in harsh environments; we investigate the methods by which the resulting deformation from indentation can be quantified and correlated to computational simulations, and we examine the onset of plasticity during indentation testing. First, nanoindentation was utilized to induce fracture of brittle thin oxide films on compliant substrates. During the indentation, a load is applied and the penetration depth is continuously measured. A sudden discontinuity, indicative of film fracture, was observed upon the loading portion of the load-depth curve. The mechanical properties of thermally grown oxide films on various substrates were calculated using two different numerical methods. The first method utilized a plate bending approach by modeling the thin film as an axisymmetric circular plate on a compliant foundation. The second method measured the applied energy for fracture. The crack extension force and applied stress intensity at fracture was then determined from the energy measurements. Secondly, slip steps form on the free surface around indentations in most crystalline materials when dislocations reach the free surface. Analysis of these slip steps provides information about the deformation taking place in the material. Techniques have now been developed to allow for accurate and consistent measurement of slip steps and the effects of crystal orientation and tip geometry are characterized. These techniques will be described and compared to results from dislocation dynamics simulations.

  9. Predicting dissolution patterns in variable aperture fractures: 1. Development and evaluation of an enhanced depth-averaged computational model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detwiler, R L; Rajaram, H

    2006-04-21

    Water-rock interactions within variable-aperture fractures can lead to dissolution of fracture surfaces and local alteration of fracture apertures, potentially transforming the transport properties of the fracture over time. Because fractures often provide dominant pathways for subsurface flow and transport, developing models that effectively quantify the role of dissolution on changing transport properties over a range of scales is critical to understanding potential impacts of natural and anthropogenic processes. Dissolution of fracture surfaces is controlled by surface-reaction kinetics and transport of reactants and products to and from the fracture surfaces. We present development and evaluation of a depth-averaged model of fracture flow and reactive transport that explicitly calculates local dissolution-induced alterations in fracture apertures. The model incorporates an effective mass transfer relationship that implicitly represents the transition from reaction-limited dissolution to transport-limited dissolution. We evaluate the model through direct comparison to previously reported physical experiments in transparent analog fractures fabricated by mating an inert, transparent rough surface with a smooth single crystal of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), which allowed direct measurement of fracture aperture during dissolution experiments using well-established light transmission techniques [Detwiler, et al., 2003]. Comparison of experiments and simulations at different flow rates demonstrate the relative impact of the dimensionless Peclet and Damkohler numbers on fracture dissolution and the ability of the computational model to simulate dissolution. Despite some discrepancies in the small-scale details of dissolution patterns, the simulations predict the evolution of large-scale features quite well for the different experimental conditions. This suggests that our depth-averaged approach to simulating fracture dissolution provides a useful approach for

  10. Risks to Water Resources from Shale Gas Development and Hydraulic Fracturing in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengosh, Avner; Jackson, Robert B.; Warner, Nathaniel; Darrah, Thomas H.; Kondash, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    The rise of shale gas development through horizontal drilling and high volume hydraulic fracturing has expanded oil and gas exploration in the USA. The rapid rate of shale gas exploration has triggered an intense public debate regarding the potential environmental and human health effects. A review of the updated literature has identified four potential risks for impacts on water resources: (1) stray gas contamination of shallow aquifers near shale gas sites; (2) contamination of surface water and shallow groundwater from spills, leaks, and disposal of inadequately treated wastewater or hydraulic fracturing fluids; (3) accumulation of toxic and radioactive residues in soil or stream sediments near disposal or spill sites; and (4) over-extraction of water resources for drilling and hydraulic fracturing that could induce water shortages and conflicts with other water users, particularly in water-scarce areas. As part of a long-term research on the potential water contamination associated with shale gas development, new geochemical and isotopic techniques have been developed for delineating the origin of gases and contaminants in water resource. In particular, multiple geochemical and isotopic (carbon isotopes in hydrocarbons, noble gas, strontium, boron, radium isotopes) tracers have been utilized to distinguish between naturally occurring dissolved gas and salts in water and contamination directly induced from shale gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing operations.

  11. Mathematical algorithm development and parametric studies with the GEOFRAC three-dimensional stochastic model of natural rock fracture systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Violeta M.; Sousa, Rita; Murrihy, Brian; Einstein, Herbert H.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents results from research conducted at MIT during 2010-2012 on modeling of natural rock fracture systems with the GEOFRAC three-dimensional stochastic model. Following a background summary of discrete fracture network models and a brief introduction of GEOFRAC, the paper provides a thorough description of the newly developed mathematical and computer algorithms for fracture intensity, aperture, and intersection representation, which have been implemented in MATLAB. The new methods optimize, in particular, the representation of fracture intensity in terms of cumulative fracture area per unit volume, P32, via the Poisson-Voronoi Tessellation of planes into polygonal fracture shapes. In addition, fracture apertures now can be represented probabilistically or deterministically whereas the newly implemented intersection algorithms allow for computing discrete pathways of interconnected fractures. In conclusion, results from a statistical parametric study, which was conducted with the enhanced GEOFRAC model and the new MATLAB-based Monte Carlo simulation program FRACSIM, demonstrate how fracture intensity, size, and orientations influence fracture connectivity.

  12. Dependence of the mechanical fracture energy of the polymeric composite material from the mixture of filler fractions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    E M Nurullaev; A S Ermilov

    2015-01-01

    ...) with regard to the basic formulation parameters. By means of the developed computer program the authors calculated the mechanical fracture energy of the polymer binder of the 3D cross-linked plasticized elastomer filled with multifractional silica...

  13. Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Reeves

    2005-01-31

    In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

  14. Development of Compartment Syndrome Negatively Impacts Length of Stay and Cost After Tibia Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Alexander M; Manoli, Arthur; Konda, Sanjit R; Egol, Kenneth A

    2015-07-01

    To quantify the impact of compartment syndrome in the setting of tibial shaft fracture on hospital length of stay (LOS) and total hospital charges. Retrospective case-control study. All New York State hospital admissions from 2001 to 2011, as recorded by the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database. Thirty three thousand six hundred twenty-nine inpatients with isolated open or closed fractures of the tibia and/or fibula (AO/OTA 41-43). Six hundred ninety-two patients developed a compartment syndrome in the setting of tibia fracture. All patients were filtered to ensure none had other complications or medical comorbidities that would increase LOS or total hospital charges. Fasciotomy and delayed closure in patients who developed a compartment syndrome. Hospital LOS (days) and total inflation-adjusted hospital charges. A total of 33,629 patients with tibial shaft fracture were included in the study. There were 32,937 patients who did not develop a compartment syndrome. For this group, the mean LOS was 6 days, and the mean inflation-adjusted hospital charges were $34,000. Patients who developed compartment syndrome remained in-house for an average of 14 days with average charges totaling $79,000. These differences were highly significant for both lengths of stay and hospital charges (P compartment syndrome, there is also a significant economic impact to the healthcare system. Compartment syndrome after a tibial fracture more than doubles LOS and total hospital charges. These findings highlight the need for a standardized care algorithm aimed toward efficiently and adequately treating acute compartment syndrome. Such an algorithm would optimize cost of care and presumably decrease LOS. Economic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  15. Modeling and analysis of chill and fill processes for the cryogenic storage and transfer engineering development unit tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A.; Cartagena, W.; Majumdar, A. K.; LeClair, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    NASA's future missions may require long-term storage and transfer of cryogenic propellants. The Engineering Development Unit (EDU), a NASA in-house effort supported by both Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Glenn Research Center, is a cryogenic fluid management (CFM) test article that primarily serves as a manufacturing pathfinder and a risk reduction task for a future CFM payload. The EDU test article comprises a flight-like tank, internal components, insulation, and attachment struts. The EDU is designed to perform integrated passive thermal control performance testing with liquid hydrogen (LH2) in a test-like vacuum environment. A series of tests, with LH2 as a testing fluid, was conducted at Test Stand 300 at MSFC during the summer of 2014. The objective of this effort was to develop a thermal/fluid model for evaluating the thermodynamic behavior of the EDU tank during the chill and fill processes. The Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program, an MSFC in-house general-purpose computer program for flow network analysis, was utilized to model and simulate the chill and fill portion of the testing. The model contained the LH2 supply source, feed system, EDU tank, and vent system. The test setup, modeling description, and comparison of model predictions with the test data are presented.

  16. ARES I-X USS Fracture Analysis Loads Spectra Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Curtis; Mackey, Alden

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the development of a set of bounding load spectra for the ARES I-X launch vehicle. These load spectra are used in the determination of the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) of the welds in the ARES I-X upper stage simulator (USS).

  17. Development of span 80-tween 80 based fluid-filled organogels as a matrix for drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charulata Bhattacharya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Organogels are defined as 3-dimensional networked structures which immobilize apolar solvents within them. These gelled formulations are gaining importance because of their ease of preparation and inherent stability with improved shelf life as compared to the ointments. Aim: Development of span 80-tween 80 mixture based organogels for the first time by fluid-filled fiber mechanism. Materials and Methods: Span 80 and tween 80 were used as surfactant and co-surfactant, respectively. The surfactant mixtures were dissolved in oil followed by the addition of water which led to the formation of organogels at specific compositions. The formulations were analyzed by microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, time-dependent stability test and accelerated thermal stability test by thermocycling method. Ciprofloxacin, a fourth-generation fluoroquinolone, was incorporated within the organogels. The antimicrobial activity of the drug loaded organogels and in vitro drug release from the gels was also determined. Results and Conclusions: Microscopic results indicated that the gels contained clusters of water-filled spherical structures. XRD study indicated the amorphous nature of the organogels. The release of the drug was found to be diffusion controlled and showed marked antimicrobial property. In short, the prepared organogels were found to be stable enough to be used as pharmaceutical formulation.

  18. The choice of antibiotic in open fractures in a teaching hospital in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonge, T O; Salawu, S A; Adebisi, A T; Fashina, A N

    2002-06-01

    Open fracture wounds may be contaminated, and the use of an appropriate antibiotic in the early stages of management reduces the risk of osteomyelitis developing. Environmental factors influence both the type of micro-organisms that are isolated from these wounds and the antibiotics that are chosen to manage the wounds. Before this study, the choice of antibiotic in the management of open fractures in our hospital was based on tradition and 'best guess' antibiotics. In a prospective study of 52 open fractures seen in the accident and emergency unit of University College Hospital, Ibadan, between January and June 2000, the positive bacterial culture yield was more than 70%. Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest microbial isolate, accounting for 37.5% of total isolates. The antibiotic sensitivity pattern revealed high efficacies for pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone against the isolated micro-organisms. In comparative costs, these antibiotics are cheaper than the combination of the 'best guess' antibiotics that were used previously. On the strength of this finding, we have suggested a change in the antibiotic policy of the hospital with regard to the antibiotic regimen to be used to complement the surgical management of open fractures.

  19. CO2-Brine-Iron-bearing Clay Mineral Interactions: Surface Area Changes and Fracture-Filling Potentials in Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Y.; Hu, Y.

    2011-12-01

    flat basal surface (96-120 h). The cracking and detachment of the biotite surface layer increased the surface area in contact with solution and accelerated biotite dissolution. In control experiments with water under the same temperature and pressure, neither macroscopic fibrous illite nor cracks were observed. On the other hand, on the edge surfaces or fractured surfaces of biotite, significant amounts of Al-substituted goethite and kaolinite were formed, which can be further investigated as caprock self-healing potentials of iron-bearing clay minerals. This study provides important fundamental information for a better understanding of porosity and permeability changes owing to the clay mineral's surface morphological evolution by geochemical reactions, and this also helps designing a more accurate reactive transport models under GCS conditions.

  20. Fundamental Studies on Development of Environment Friendly Vegetable Oil Filled Transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinke, Masami; Miyazato, Kenji; Tada, Toshiharu; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Nakagami, Yoshitake; Shimizu, Rumiko; Kosaka, Masaaki; Wada, Motoo

    In order to develop the environment-friendly transformer, the rapeseed ester oil which is vegetable oil was selected as the new insulating oil and various characteristics of rapeseed ester oil were investigated experimentally. These results showed that the basic characteristics of rapeseed ester oil surpasses as compared with mineral oil.

  1. Filling the gap: Developing health economics competencies for baccalaureate nursing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Maia; Kwasky, Andrea; Spetz, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    The need for greater involvement of the nursing profession in cost containment efforts has been documented extensively. More thorough education of nurses in the subject of health economics (HE) is one of the factors that could contribute toward achievement of that goal. The project's main contribution is the development of the unique list of essential HE competencies for baccalaureate nursing students. The proposed competencies were developed and validated using the protocol by Lynn (1986) for two-stage content validation of psychometric instruments. An additional validation step that included a nationwide survey of nurse administrators was conducted to measure the value they place on the health economics-related skills and knowledge of their employees. A set of six HE competencies was developed. Their validity was unanimously approved by the panel of five experts and additionally supported by the survey results (with individual competencies' approval rates of 67% or higher). The incorporation of economic thinking into the nationwide standards of baccalaureate nursing education, and professional nursing competencies, will enhance the capacity of the nursing workforce to lead essential change in the delivery of high-value affordable health care nationwide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of RWHet to Simulate Contaminant Transport in Fractured Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong; LaBolle, Eric; Reeves, Donald M; Russell, Charles

    2012-07-01

    Accurate simulation of matrix diffusion in regional-scale dual-porosity and dual-permeability media is a critical issue for the DOE Underground Test Area (UGTA) program, given the prevalence of fractured geologic media on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Contaminant transport through regional-scale fractured media is typically quantified by particle-tracking based Lagrangian solvers through the inclusion of dual-domain mass transfer algorithms that probabilistically determine particle transfer between fractures and unfractured matrix blocks. UGTA applications include a wide variety of fracture aperture and spacing, effective diffusion coefficients ranging four orders of magnitude, and extreme end member retardation values. This report incorporates the current dual-domain mass transfer algorithms into the well-known particle tracking code RWHet [LaBolle, 2006], and then tests and evaluates the updated code. We also develop and test a direct numerical simulation (DNS) approach to replace the classical transfer probability method in characterizing particle dynamics across the fracture/matrix interface. The final goal of this work is to implement the algorithm identified as most efficient and effective into RWHet, so that an accurate and computationally efficient software suite can be built for dual-porosity/dual-permeability applications. RWHet is a mature Lagrangian transport simulator with a substantial user-base that has undergone significant development and model validation. In this report, we also substantially tested the capability of RWHet in simulating passive and reactive tracer transport through regional-scale, heterogeneous media. Four dual-domain mass transfer methodologies were considered in this work. We first developed the empirical transfer probability approach proposed by Liu et al. [2000], and coded it into RWHet. The particle transfer probability from one continuum to the other is proportional to the ratio of the mass entering the other

  3. Development of probabilistic fracture mechanics code PASCAL and user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Katsuyuki; Onizawa, Kunio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Li, Yinsheng; Kato, Daisuke [Fuji Research Institute Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    As a part of the aging and structural integrity research for LWR components, a new PFM (Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics) code PASCAL (PFM Analysis of Structural Components in Aging LWR) has been developed since FY1996. This code evaluates the failure probability of an aged reactor pressure vessel subjected to transient loading such as PTS (Pressurized Thermal Shock). The development of the code has been aimed to improve the accuracy and reliability of analysis by introducing new analysis methodologies and algorithms considering the recent development in the fracture mechanics methodologies and computer performance. The code has some new functions in optimized sampling and cell dividing procedure in stratified Monte Carlo simulation, elastic-plastic fracture criterion of R6 method, extension analysis models in semi-elliptical crack, evaluation of effect of thermal annealing and etc. In addition, an input data generator of temperature and stress distribution time histories was also prepared in the code. Functions and performance of the code have been confirmed based on the verification analyses and some case studies on the influence parameters. The present phase of the development will be completed in FY2000. Thus this report provides the user's manual and theoretical background of the code. (author)

  4. FIssion Product Prompt γ-ray spectrometer: Development of an instrumented gas-filled magnetic spectrometer at the ILL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, A.; Chebboubi, A.; Faust, H.; Jentschel, M.; Kessedjian, G.; Köster, U.; Materna, T.; Panebianco, S.; Sage, C.; Urban, W.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate thermal neutron-induced fission data are important for applications in reactor physics as well as for fundamental nuclear physics. FIPPS is the new FIssion Product Prompt γ-ray Spectrometer being developed at the Institut Laue Langevin for neutron-induced fission studies. FIPPS is based on the combination of a large Germanium detector array surrounding a fission target, a Time-Of-Flight detector and a Gas-Filled Magnet (GFM) to identify mass, nuclear charge and kinetic energy of one of the fission fragments. The GFM will be instrumented with a Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) for individual 3D tracking of the fragments. A conceptual design study of the new spectrometer is presented.

  5. Characteristics of low polymerization shrinkage flowable resin composites in newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Keiko; Nomoto, Rie; Tsubota, Yuji; Tsuchikawa, Masuji; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2017-06-23

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate polymerization shrinkage and other physical properties of newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique, with the brand name BULK BASE (BBS). Polymerization shrinkage was measured according to ISO/FDIS 17304. BBS showed the significantly lowest polymerization shrinkage and significantly higher depth of cure than conventional flowable resin composites (p<0.05). The Knoop hardness, flexural strength and elastic modulus of that were significantly lower than conventional flowable resin composites (p<0.05). BBS had the significantly greatest filler content (p<0.05). SEM images of the surface showed failure of fillers. The lowest polymerization shrinkage was due to the incorporation of a new type of low shrinkage monomer, which has urethane moieties. There were no clear correlations between inorganic filler contents and polymerization shrinkage, flexural strength and elastic modulus. In conclusion, the low polymerization shrinkage of BBS will be useful for cavity treatment in dental clinics.

  6. FIssion Product Prompt γ-ray spectrometer: Development of an instrumented gas-filled magnetic spectrometer at the ILL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanc, A., E-mail: blanc@ill.fr [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Chebboubi, A.; Faust, H.; Jentschel, M. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Kessedjian, G. [LPSC CNRS/IN2P3, UJF Grenoble 1, INPG, Grenoble (France); Köster, U. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Materna, T.; Panebianco, S. [DSM/IRFU/SPhN, CEA Saclay (France); Sage, C. [LPSC CNRS/IN2P3, UJF Grenoble 1, INPG, Grenoble (France); Urban, W. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    2013-12-15

    Accurate thermal neutron-induced fission data are important for applications in reactor physics as well as for fundamental nuclear physics. FIPPS is the new FIssion Product Prompt γ-ray Spectrometer being developed at the Institut Laue Langevin for neutron-induced fission studies. FIPPS is based on the combination of a large Germanium detector array surrounding a fission target, a Time-Of-Flight detector and a Gas-Filled Magnet (GFM) to identify mass, nuclear charge and kinetic energy of one of the fission fragments. The GFM will be instrumented with a Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) for individual 3D tracking of the fragments. A conceptual design study of the new spectrometer is presented.

  7. Filling the gap in CKD: The health care workforce and faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Bryan N

    2011-02-01

    Given limited resources, adding another chronic illness to the panoply of chronic disease care is problematic. Nevertheless, chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing in recognition and prevalence across the world, and a management strategy for this growing population is necessary. A diverse group of health care professionals interacts with patients with CKD and their family members, including nurses, nurse practitioners, dieticians, social workers, pharmacists, physicians, physical therapists, physician assistants, and public health workers. All these individuals have the opportunity to reinforce CKD management. This potentially would bring a broader health care workforce to bear on CKD, reducing the impact of the nephrology workforce shortage. To realize such a strategy, it is necessary to bolster CKD awareness and knowledge in the diverse health care workforce. A faculty development program that extends CKD awareness to existing health care workers also has the possibility of migrating into the learner curriculum in health professional schools. This approach would expand CKD education, creating a skilled diverse health care workforce. Copyright © 2011 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermocline Storage Filled with Structured Ceramics. Numerical Consistency of the Developed Numerical Model and First Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motte, Fabrice; Bugler-Lamb, Samuel L.; Falcoz, Quentin

    2015-07-01

    The attraction of solar energy is greatly enhanced by the possibility of it being used during times of reduced or non-existent solar flux, such as weather induced intermittences or the darkness of the night. Therefore optimizing thermal storage for use in solar energy plants is crucial for the success of this sustainable energy source. Here we present a study of a structured bed filler dedicated to Thermocline type thermal storage, believed to outweigh the financial and thermal benefits of other systems currently in use such as packed bed Thermocline tanks. Several criterions such as Thermocline thickness and Thermocline centering are defined with the purpose of facilitating the assessment of the efficiency of the tank to complement the standard concepts of power output. A numerical model is developed that reduces to two dimensions the modeling of such a tank. The structure within the tank is designed to be built using simple bricks harboring rectangular channels through which the solar heat transfer and storage fluid will flow. The model is scrutinized and tested for physical robustness, and the results are presented in this paper. The consistency of the model is achieved within particular ranges for each physical variable.

  9. Fracture Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zehnder, Alan T

    2012-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a vast and growing field. This book develops the basic elements needed for both fracture research and engineering practice. The emphasis is on continuum mechanics models for energy flows and crack-tip stress- and deformation fields in elastic and elastic-plastic materials. In addition to a brief discussion of computational fracture methods, the text includes practical sections on fracture criteria, fracture toughness testing, and methods for measuring stress intensity factors and energy release rates. Class-tested at Cornell, this book is designed for students, researchers and practitioners interested in understanding and contributing to a diverse and vital field of knowledge. Alan Zehnder joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1988. Since then he has served in a number of leadership roles including Chair of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, and Director of the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.  He teaches applied mechanics and his research t...

  10. Detection and Characterization of Natural and Induced Fractures for the Development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toksoz, M. Nafi [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences

    2013-04-06

    The objective of this 3-year project is to use various geophysical methods for reservoir and fracture characterization. The targeted field is the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Geothermal Field in Utah operated by ENEL North America (ENA). Our effort has been focused on 1) understanding the regional and local geological settings around the geothermal field; 2) collecting and assembling various geophysical data sets including heat flow, gravity, magnetotelluric (MT) and seismic surface and body wave data; 3) installing the local temporary seismic network around the geothermal site; 4) imaging the regional and local seismic velocity structure around the geothermal field using seismic travel time tomography; and (5) determining the fracture direction using the shear-wave splitting analysis and focal mechanism analysis. Various geophysical data sets indicate that beneath the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Geothermal Field, there is a strong anomaly of low seismic velocity, low gravity, high heat flow and high electrical conductivity. These suggest that there is a heat source in the crust beneath the geothermal field. The high-temperature body is on average 150 °C – 200 °C hotter than the surrounding rock. The local seismic velocity and attenuation tomography gives a detailed velocity and attenuation model around the geothermal site, which shows that the major geothermal development target is a high velocity body near surface, composed mainly of monzonite. The major fracture direction points to NNE. The detailed velocity model along with the fracture direction will be helpful for guiding the geothermal development in the Cove Fort area.

  11. Development and delivery of patient treatment in the Trondheim Hip Fracture Trial. A new geriatric in-hospital pathway for elderly patients with hip fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saltvedt Ingvild

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hip fractures are common among frail elderly persons and often have serious consequences on function, mobility and mortality. Traditional treatment of these patients is performed in orthopedic departments without additional geriatric assessment. However, studies have shown that interdisciplinary geriatric treatment may be beneficial compared to traditional treatment. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether treatment of these patients in a Department of Geriatrics (DG during the entire hospital stay gives additional benefits as compared to conventional treatment in a Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (DOS. Findings A new clinical pathway for in-hospital treatment of hip fracture patients was developed. In this pathway patients were treated pre-and postoperatively in DG. Comprehensive geriatric assessment was performed as an interdisciplinary, multidimensional, systematic assessment of all patients focusing on each patient’s capabilities and limitations as recommended in guidelines and systematic reviews. Identification and treatment of co-morbidities, pain relief, hydration, oxygenation, nutrition, elimination, prevention and management of delirium, assessment of falls and osteoporosis were emphasized. Discharge planning started as early as possible. Initiation of rehabilitation with focus on early mobilisation and development of individual plans was initiated in hospital and continued after discharge from hospital. Fracture specific treatment was based upon standard treatment for the hospital, expert opinions and a review of the literature. Conclusion A new treatment program for old hip fracture patients was developed, introduced and run in the DG, the potential benefits of which being compared with traditional care of hip fracture patients in the DOS in a randomised clinical trial.

  12. Development and validation of a prognostic index for fracture risk in older men undergoing prostate cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Steed, Tisheeka R.; Soulos, Pamela R.; Dearing, Natalie; Concato, John; Tinetti, Mary E.; Gross, Cary P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Men treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer have an increased risk for fractures. Given uncertainty as to whether specific clinical factors can identify men at increased risk, we sought to develop a prognostic index for risk of fracture in this population. Materials and methods We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify men who received ADT or RT after being diagnosed with localized prostate cancer in 2007-2009. Cox proportional hazards models tested the association of potential risk factors with fracture. In a derivation group, hazard ratios were used to assign points for factors independently related to fracture. The prognostic index was then applied to a validation group. Results The sample of 5,824 men had a median age of 73.0 years; 82.9% were white and 8.6% had a fracture within 2 years of treatment for prostate cancer. The Cox model identified 8 variables (age, race, hormone treatment, Elixhauser score, anxiety, Parkinson's, fall-inducing medications and disability status) independently associated with fracture. In the derivation cohort, 4.3% of the sample experienced a fracture in the low-risk group, 8.9% in the intermediate group, and 19.2% in the high-risk group (C statistic, 0.749). The index was applied to the validation cohort (C statistic, 0.782). Conclusion The prognostic index can help to identify patients at increased risk for fracture. This underscores the importance of identifying risk factors for fracture, given the substantial variation in fracture risk in men treated with ADT or RT. PMID:25240918

  13. Development and validation of a prognostic index for fracture risk in older men undergoing prostate cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Steed, Tisheeka R; Soulos, Pamela R; Dearing, Natalie; Concato, John; Tinetti, Mary E; Gross, Cary P

    2014-10-01

    Men treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) or radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer have an increased risk for fractures. Given uncertainty as to whether specific clinical factors can identify men at increased risk, we sought to develop a prognostic index for risk of fracture in this population. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database to identify men who received ADT or RT after being diagnosed with localized prostate cancer in 2007-2009. Cox proportional hazards models tested the association of potential risk factors with fracture. In a derivation group, hazard ratios were used to assign points for factors independently related to fracture. The prognostic index was then applied to a validation group. The sample of 5824 men had a median age of 73.0 years; 82.9% were white and 8.6% had a fracture within 2 years of treatment for prostate cancer. The Cox model identified 8 variables (age, race, hormone treatment, Elixhauser score, anxiety, Parkinson's, fall-inducing medications and disability status) independently associated with fracture. In the derivation cohort, 4.3% of the sample experienced a fracture in the low-risk group, 8.9% in the intermediate group, and 19.2% in the high-risk group (C statistic, 0.749). The index was applied to the validation cohort (C statistic, 0.782). The prognostic index can help to identify patients at increased risk for fracture. This underscores the importance of identifying risk factors for fracture, given the substantial variation in fracture risk in men treated with ADT or RT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of the T+M coupled flow–geomechanical simulator to describe fracture propagation and coupled flow–thermal–geomechanical processes in tight/shale gas systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George J.

    2013-10-01

    We developed a hydraulic fracturing simulator by coupling a flow simulator to a geomechanics code, namely T+M simulator. Modeling of the vertical fracture development involves continuous updating of the boundary conditions and of the data connectivity, based on the finite element method for geomechanics. The T+M simulator can model the initial fracture development during the hydraulic fracturing operations, after which the domain description changes from single continuum to double or multiple continua in order to rigorously model both flow and geomechanics for fracture-rock matrix systems. The T+H simulator provides two-way coupling between fluid-heat flow and geomechanics, accounting for thermoporomechanics, treats nonlinear permeability and geomechanical moduli explicitly, and dynamically tracks changes in the fracture(s) and in the pore volume. We also fully accounts for leak-off in all directions during hydraulic fracturing. We first validate the T+M simulator, matching numerical solutions with the analytical solutions for poromechanical effects, static fractures, and fracture propagations. Then, from numerical simulation of various cases of the planar fracture propagation, shear failure can limit the vertical fracture propagation of tensile failure, because of leak-off into the reservoirs. Slow injection causes more leak-off, compared with fast injection, when the same amount of fluid is injected. Changes in initial total stress and contributions of shear effective stress to tensile failure can also affect formation of the fractured areas, and the geomechanical responses are still well-posed.

  15. Fracture Analysis of the Ribeirao Preto Basalts, SP: Application for Developing a Conceptual Hydrogeological Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélia João Fernandes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of the physical geology and geochemistry of the Ribeirão Preto basalts was part of a hydrogeologicalresearch, which aimed to investigate the recharge of the Guarani Aquifer System (SAG through the basalts of the SerraGeral Aquifer (ASG, a project shortly named FRATASG. In addition to the hydrogeological research, a detailed geologicalinvestigation was conducted to develop a conceptual model of groundwater fl ow in complex aquifers, as is the case ofthe fractured basalts of the ASG. Therefore, this study included a thorough structural survey and analysis of horizontaland subvertical fractures, which resulted in the identifi cation of four tectonic events. It was concluded that the verticalgroundwater flow is important up to 10 m in depth and, secondarily, up to 25 m. Horizontal fl ow, more evident up to thedepth of 50 m, predominates and occurs along sub-horizontal fractures, which occur mainly at the contact between basalts2 and 3 and in its vicinity. Because the great majority of subvertical fractures do not propagate into the vesicular layers,which occur at the basalt contacts, it is suggested that these layers act as regional hydraulic barriers, and greatly hamperthe recharge of the SAG through the ASG. As a consequence, groundwater flow in the basalt stack is of stratabound type,as it occurs mainly along the basalt contacts. Based on diagnostic features of the fl ow, it is proposed in this study that the vertical flow,which crosses the basalt stack reaching the SAG, is local and probably occurs along NE structures.

  16. Investigating and modelling the development of septic sewage in filled sewers under static conditions: a lab-scale feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Robert T; Saul, Adrian J; Edyvean, Robert G J

    2007-12-15

    This paper describes a lab-scale study of the physical and bio-chemical processes associated with the development of septic conditions in sewer pipes filled with static sewage. The study has concentrated on the uptake of oxygen (OUR) and the subsequent changes in chemical oxygen demand (COD), sulphate, sulphide and nitrate concentration and the formation of volatile fatty acids (VFA). OUR of raw sewage ranged from 2 to 13 mg L(-1) h(-1). Apparent nitrate uptake and sulphide generation rates in static sewage varied between 0.2-0.7 mgNO(3) L(-1) h(-1) and 0.02-0.05 mgH(2)S-S L(-1) h(-1), respectively. A logistic function was used to simulate the sulphide generation process in static sewage. It was found that total COD (COD(total)) influenced the apparent sulphide generation rate while nitrate concentrations greater than 4 mg L(-1) controlled the onset of sulphide production in experiments without added sediment phase. Introducing a sediment phase appeared to accelerate hydrolysis and fermentation processes as evidenced by 5-14 times greater dissolved COD generation rates in the bulk water phase.

  17. Imaging hydraulic fractures by microseismic migration for downhole monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ye; Zhang, Haijiang

    2016-12-01

    It has been a challenge to accurately characterize fracture zones created by hydraulic fracturing from microseismic event locations. This is because generally detected events are not complete due to the associated low signal to noise ratio and some fracturing stages may not produce microseismic events even if fractures are well developed. As a result, spatial distribution of microseismic events may not well represent fractured zones by hydraulic fracturing. Here, we propose a new way to characterize the fractured zones by reverse time migration (RTM) of microseismic waveforms from some events. This is based on the fact that fractures filled with proppants and other fluids can act as strong scatterers for seismic waves. Therefore, for multi-stage hydraulic fracturing, recorded waveforms from microseismic events induced in a more recent stage may be scattered by fractured zones from previous stages. Through RTM of microseismic waveforms in the current stage, we can determine fractured zones created in previous stages by imaging area of strong scattering. We test the feasibility of this method using synthetic models with different configurations of microseismic event locations and borehole sensor positions for a 2D downhole microseismic monitoring system. Synthetic tests show that with a few events fractured zones can be directly imaged and thus the stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) can be estimated. Compared to the conventional location-based SRV estimation method, the proposed new method does not depend on the completeness of detected events and only a limited number of detected and located events are necessary for characterizing fracture distribution. For simplicity, the 2D model is used for illustrating the concept of microseismic RTM for imaging the fracture zone but the method can be adapted to real cases in the future.

  18. The Influence of Fold and Fracture Development on Reservoir Behavior of the Lisburne Group of Northern Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, W.K.; Hanks, C.L.; Whalen, M.T.; Jensen, J.; Atkinson, P.K.; Brinton, J.S.

    2001-01-09

    The objectives of this study were to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults, (2) The influence of folding and lithostratigraphy on fracture patterns, (3) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics, and (4) The influence of lithostratigraphy and deformation on fluid flow.

  19. Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions and Their Impact on Radionuclide Transport: Development of efficient particle-tracking methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajaram, Harihar [University of Colorado, Boulder; Brutz, Michael [University of Colorado, Boulder; Klein, Dylan R [University of Colorado, Boulder; Mallikamas, Wasin [University of Colorado, Boulder

    2014-09-18

    Matrix Diffusion and Adsorption within a rock matrix are important mechanisms for retarding transport of radionuclides in fractured rock. Due to computational limitations and difficulties in characterizing complex subsurface systems, diffusive exchange between a fracture network and surrounding rock matrix is often modeled using simplified conceptual representations. There is significant uncertainty in “effective” parameters used in these models, such as the “effective matrix diffusivity”. Often, these parameters are estimated by fitting sparse breakthrough data, and estimated values fall outside meaningful ranges, because simplified interpretive models do not consider complex three-dimensional flow. There is limited understanding of the relationship between the effective parameters and rock mass characteristics including network structure and matrix properties. There is also evidence for an apparent scale-dependence in “effective matrix diffusion” coefficients. These observations raise questions on whether fracture-matrix interaction parameters estimated from small-scale tracer tests can be used for predicting radionuclide fate and transport at the scale of DOE field sites. High-resolution three-dimensional Discrete-Fracture-Network-Matrix (DFNM) models based on well-defined local scale transport equations can help to address some of these questions. Due to tremendous advances in computational technology over the last 10 years, DFNM modeling in relatively large domains is now feasible. The overarching objective of our research is to use DFNM modeling to improve fundamental understanding of how effective parameters in conceptual models are related to fracture network structure and matrix properties. An advanced three-dimensional DFNM model is being developed, which combines upscaled particle-tracking algorithms for fracture-matrix interaction and a parallel fracture-network flow simulator. The particle-tracking algorithms allow complexity in flow fields

  20. Development and implementation of a fluid flow code to evaluate block hydraulic behaviors of the fractured rock masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Jeong-Gi; Han, Jisu; Lee, Dahye; Cho, Taechin

    2017-04-01

    A computer program code was developed to estimate the hydraulic head distribution through the 2-D DFN(discrete fracture network) blocks considering hydraulic aperture of the individual fractures, and to determine flow quantity, directional block hydraulic conductivity and principal hydraulic conductivity tensor according to fracture geometry such as orientation, frequency and size of the fracture network systems. The generated stochastic DFN system is assumed to have a network structure in which the equivalent flow pipe composed linear fractures is complexly connected. DFN systems often include individual or group of sub-network that are isolated from a network that can act as fluid flow passages from one flow boundary to another, and the fluid flow is completely blocked due to lack of connectivity. Fractures that are completely or partially isolated in the DFN system do not contribute to the overall fluid flow through the DFN system and add to the burden of numerical computation. This sometimes leads to numerical instability and failure to provide a solution. In this study, geometric and mathematical routines were designed and implemented to classify and eliminate such sub-networks. The developed program code can calculate the total head at each node connected to the flow path with various aperture as well as hydraulic conductivity of the individual flow pipe using the SOR method. Numerical experiments have been carried out to explore the applicability of the developed program code. A total of 108 stochastic 2-D DFN blocks of 20 m×20 m with various hydraulic aperture were prepared using two joint sets with fixed input parameters of fracture orientation, frequency and size distribution. The hydraulic anisotropy and the chance for equivalent continuum behavior of the DFN system were found to depend on the variability of fracture aperture.

  1. Tribological performance evaluation of tungsten carbide-based cermets and development of a fracture mechanics wear model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagat, R.B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Applied Research Lab.; Conway, J.C. Jr. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Applied Research Lab.; Amateau, M.F. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Applied Research Lab.; Brezler, R.A. III [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States). Applied Research Lab.

    1996-12-15

    Tungsten carbide tools may exhibit sudden brittle fracture at high stresses such as are encountered in shear and slitter knives. This has limited the use of tungsten carbide tools to certain applications in spite of their high hardness and wear resistance. The objective of this investigation is to evaluate the tribological performance of selected cermets and develop a fracture mechanics wear model. Six compositions of WC-Co materials (Co ranging from 4 to 30% by weight) with or without TiC, NbC, TaC, or Mo{sub 2}C were selected for relating wear modes of these tool materials to pertinent mechanical properties such as fracture toughness and hardness. The influence of mechanical properties such as Young`s modulus, hardness, fracture toughness, modulus of rupture, and Weibull modulus on wear rates and wear modes of the selected materials is presented and discussed. The major mechanisms of wear in WC-Co materials are discussed as they apply to the development of suitable relationships between wear and mechanical properties. The wear process is by the transfer of steel from the ring to the cemented carbide block specimens, initiation of mode I cracks normal to the mating surface, propagation of mode II cracks parallel to the wear surfaces and the subsequent separation of platelets with adhered WC and Co particles through adhesive forces with the steel ring. The wear rates of the cermets do not show a consistent relationship with mode I or mode II fracture toughness, but a general trend of decreasing wear rate with hardness is seen. This suggests that the tribological performance of these cermets depends on certain specific functions of pertinent parameters including fracture toughness, hardness, applied load, coefficient of friction and microstructural characteristics. A fracture mechanics-based wear model has been developed to relate the steady state wear rate (W{sub ss}) to hardness, mode II fracture toughness, coefficient of friction, and applied load. (orig./MM)

  2. Development of shrinkage and fracture parameters in selected fine-grained cement-based composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucharczyková Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes results of a pilot study aimed at the evaluation of an experimental investigation focused on determination of the material characteristics development of selected fine-grained cement-based composites during their ageing. The composition of composites being investigated differed only in a water to cement (w/c ratio and in amount of superplasticizer. Quite extensive experiments were performed with the aim to determine shrinkage, dynamic a static modulus of elasticity and fracture properties on test specimens exposed to free drying during the whole time of its ageing (including the early stage of setting and hardening. The article presents especially results (including their statistical evaluation of shrinkage and fracture parameters development within 90 days of composites’ ageing. Experimental results show the dependence of the investigated characteristics on the value of w/c ratio. The most visible effect was observed in the case of shrinkage development. The curing conditions were reflected especially in high variability of the test results.

  3. Integrated Methods for Site Characterization and Conceptual Model Development for a Contaminated Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. D.; Kastrinos, J. R.; Haeni, F. P.

    2005-12-01

    A multi-disciplined and team-based approach was used to integrate geophysical, hydrologic, and chemical data to characterize lithology, fractures, and hydraulic properties of fractured crystalline bedrock and to determine the nature and extent of ground-water contamination from a landfill and former chemical-waste disposal pits at the University of Connecticut. Detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in domestic bedrock wells in the mid-1980s led to this investigation, in which a team comprised of hydrologists, engineers, geophysicists, geologists, chemists, toxicologists, and community-involvement personnel collected, analyzed, and evaluated data; developed and refined a conceptual model of the ground-water flow and contaminant distribution at the site; and evaluated alternatives and implemented a final remediation plan. The characterization phase began in 1999 and the remediation phase is currently ongoing. An integrated and iterative approach of using multiple methods in phases was important for corroborating the interpretation of individual methods and essential for guiding the design and implementation of additional testing at the site. The use of geophysical data early in the investigation allowed the study team to obtain detailed subsurface information using a minimum of boreholes. Surface geophysical methods were used to target potential discharge of contaminants from the landfill for further investigation. Borehole geophysical methods were used to investigate the anomalies identified by surface geophysical methods, the location and orientation of fractures that intersect and surround each well, the direction and magnitude of ambient flow in the wells, and the transmissive fractures that could provide pathways for contaminant migration. Borehole geophysical and hydraulic data were used to design discrete-zone monitoring systems for the collection of hydraulic head and chemical data and to prevent cross contamination through the boreholes. The results

  4. Fracture mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Nestor

    2017-01-01

    The second edition of this textbook includes a refined presentation of concepts in each chapter, additional examples; new problems and sections, such as conformal mapping and mechanical behavior of wood; while retaining all the features of the original book. The material included in this book is based upon the development of analytical and numerical procedures pertinent to particular fields of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and plastic fracture mechanics (PFM), including mixed-mode-loading interaction. The mathematical approach undertaken herein is coupled with a brief review of several fracture theories available in cited references, along with many color images and figures. Dynamic fracture mechanics is included through the field of fatigue and Charpy impact testing. Explains computational and engineering approaches for solving crack-related problems using straightforward mathematics that facilitate comprehension of the physical meaning of crack growth processes; Expands computational understandin...

  5. Fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, John L., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The application of fracture mechanics to the design of ceramic structures will require the precise measurement of crack growth and fracture resistance of these materials over their entire range of anticipated service temperatures and standardized test methods for making such measurements. The development of a standard test for measuring the plane strain fracture toughness is sought. Stress intensity factor coefficients were determined for three varieties of chevron-notch specimens, and fracture toughness measurements were made on silicon nitrides, silicon carbides, and aluminum oxides to assess the performance of each specimen variety. It was determined that silicon nitride and silicon carbides have flat crack growth resistance curves, but aluminum oxide does not. Additionally, batch-to-batch differences were noticed for the aluminum oxide. Experiments are continuing to explain the rising crack growth resistance and batch-to-batch variations for the aluminum oxide.

  6. Developing an Innovative Field Expedient Fracture Toughness Testing Protocol for Concrete Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Liu, Ken C [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2008-09-01

    The Spiral Notch Torsion Fracture Toughness Test (SNTT) was developed recently to determine the intrinsic fracture toughness (KIC) of structural materials. The SNTT system operates by applying pure torsion to uniform cylindrical specimens with a notch line that spirals around the specimen at a 45 pitch. KIC values are obtained with the aid of a three-dimensional finite-element computer code, TOR3D-KIC. The SNTT method is uniquely suitable for testing a wide variety of materials used extensively in pressure vessel and piping structural components and weldments. Application of the method to metallic, ceramic, and graphite materials has been demonstrated. One important characteristic of SNTT is that neither a fatigue precrack or a deep notch are required for the evaluation of brittle materials, which significantly reduces the sample size requirement. In this paper we report results for a Portland cement-based mortar to demonstrate applicability of the SNTT method to cementitious materials. The estimated KIC of the tested mortar samples with compressive strength of 34.45 MPa was found to be 0.19 MPa m.

  7. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  8. Development and testing of a fracture energy-based model of explosive asteroid deflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerkamp, James A.

    While asteroid deflection has been studied for the past half century, efforts have generally been directed towards methods that attempt to minimize disruption of the rock body. In order to widen the base of research, a fracture energy-based model of asteroid fragmentation was developed and applied to both asteroid scale and lab testable scale cases. Modeling of the orbital case suggests the capability to deflect a 100 meter diameter asteroid on a 10 year timescale. The model's predicted energy transfer is then compared to laboratory testing using a ballistic pendulum. The results of this testing suggest that the model as described overestimates the efficiency of energy transfer into momentum. However, further approaches are suggested that might improve model accuracy as well as energy transfer efficiency.

  9. High acid invertase activity for a prolonged period in developing seeds/podwall of wild chickpea is detrimental to seed filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harinderjeet; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Kaur, Narinder; Sandhu, Jeet Singh

    2012-10-01

    In the present study factors responsible for low seed biomass in wild Cicer species has been investigated. Cicer judaicum and chickpea cultivar PBG-1 were investigated to compare activities of some enzymes involved in carbon metabolism in podwall and seeds during crop development. Seed filling duration in wild species was about 15 days shorter than that of cultivated varieties due to rapid loss of moisture content and hence resulted in earlier maturity and reduced seed biomass. Longer seed filling duration appeared to be an important factor responsible for greater biomass of chickpea seeds. Because of absence of phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase from 25-35 days after flowering and low sucrose synthase activities, the podwall of C. judaicum is not in a position to contribute significantly to the sink filling capacity of seeds. High acid invertase, low sucrose synthase activities during seed storage phase cause detrimental effect on seed filling and resulting in highly reduced sink strength and productivity of wild species. Successful transfer of stress tolerance from wild Cicer species to chickpea cultivars need to prevent the transfer of these observed unfavourable biochemical factors so that the productivity of chickpea crop remains unaffected during utilization of wild Cicer species in chickpea improvement.

  10. Research program to develop and validate conceptual models for flow and transport through unsaturated, fractured rock; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.J.; Tidwell, V.C.

    1991-09-01

    As part of the Yucca Mountain Project, our research program to develop and validate conceptual models for flow and transport through unsaturated fractured rock integrates fundamental physical experimentation with conceptual model formulation and mathematical modeling. Our research is directed toward developing and validating macroscopic, continuum-based models and supporting effective property models because of their widespread utility within the context of this project. Success relative to the development and validation of effective property models is predicted on a firm understanding of the basic physics governing flow through fractured media, specifically in the areas of unsaturated flow and transport in a single fracture and fracture-matrix interaction.

  11. CT examinations of healing fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nutz, V.; Uexkuell-Gueldenband, V. v.

    1988-10-01

    The CT appearances of healing fractures were studied following tibial osteotomy in a dog. Traditional radiological investigations and CT were carried out until healing was complete; CT showed callus on the ninth day, whereas radiographs only showed it after 19 days. After 32 days, callus filled nearly the entire medullary cavity. Similar observations were made in several human situations. CT demonstrates interposed material in the fracture very clearly, even if there is marked callus formation within the fracture.

  12. Fracture detection, mapping, and analysis of naturally fractured gas reservoirs using seismic technology. Final report, November 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    Many basins in the Rocky Mountains contain naturally fractured gas reservoirs. Production from these reservoirs is controlled primarily by the shape, orientation and concentration of the natural fractures. The detection of gas filled fractures prior to drilling can, therefore, greatly benefit the field development of the reservoirs. The objective of this project was to test and verify specific seismic methods to detect and characterize fractures in a naturally fractured reservoir. The Upper Green River tight gas reservoir in the Uinta Basin, Northeast Utah was chosen for the project as a suitable reservoir to test the seismic technologies. Knowledge of the structural and stratigraphic geologic setting, the fracture azimuths, and estimates of the local in-situ stress field, were used to guide the acquisition and processing of approximately ten miles of nine-component seismic reflection data and a nine-component Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP). Three sources (compressional P-wave, inline shear S-wave, and cross-line, shear S-wave) were each recorded by 3-component (3C) geophones, to yield a nine-component data set. Evidence of fractures from cores, borehole image logs, outcrop studies, and production data, were integrated with the geophysical data to develop an understanding of how the seismic data relate to the fracture network, individual well production, and ultimately the preferred flow direction in the reservoir. The multi-disciplinary approach employed in this project is viewed as essential to the overall reservoir characterization, due to the interdependency of the above factors.

  13. Effect of Natural Fractures on Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, Y.; Wang, Y.; Shi, G.

    2012-12-01

    Hydraulic Fracturing has been used successfully in the oil and gas industry to enhance oil and gas production in the past few decades. Recent years have seen the great development of tight gas, coal bed methane and shale gas. Natural fractures are believed to play an important role in the hydraulic fracturing of such formations. Whether natural fractures can benefit the fracture propagation and enhance final production needs to be studied. Various methods have been used to study the effect of natural fractures on hydraulic fracturing. Discontinuous Deformation Analysis (DDA) is a numerical method which belongs to the family of discrete element methods. In this paper, DDA is coupled with a fluid pipe network model to simulate the pressure response in the formation during hydraulic fracturing. The focus is to study the effect of natural fractures on hydraulic fracturing. In particular, the effect of rock joint properties, joint orientations and rock properties on fracture initiation and propagation will be analyzed. The result shows that DDA is a promising tool to study such complex behavior of rocks. Finally, the advantages of disadvantages of our current model and future research directions will be discussed.

  14. The Influence of Fold and Fracture Development on Reservoir Behavior of the Lisburne Group of Northern Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Wesley K.; Hanks, Catherine L.; Whalen, Michael T.; Jensen1, Jerry; Shackleton, J. Ryan; Jadamec, Margarete A.; McGee, Michelle M.; Karpov1, Alexandre V.

    2001-07-23

    The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The lisburne is detachment folded where it is exposed throughout the northeastern Brooks Range, but is relatively underformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study are to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults, (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns, (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow, and (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics.

  15. New development of hydraulic fracturing technique for in-situ stress measurement at great depth of mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In-situ stress measurement using the hydraulic fracturing technique was made at Wanfu Coal Mine in Shandong Province,China.To solve problems caused by great measuring depth and extra thick overburden soil layers in the mine,a series of improved techniques were developed for the traditional hydraulic fracturing technique and equipment to increase their pressure-enduring ability and to ensure safe and flexible removal of the sealing packers with other experimental apparatus.Successful in-situ stress measurement at 37 points within 7 boreholes,which were mostly over 1000 m deep,was completed.Through the measurement,detailed in

  16. Compression fracture in the middle of a chronic instrumented fusion that developed into pseudarthrosis after balloon kyphoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirris, Stephen M; Kimes, Sherri M

    2014-06-01

    There are only 2 documented cases of vertebral compression fractures occurring within a solid lumbar fusion mass: one within the fusion mass after hardware removal and the other within the levels of the existing instrumentation 1 year postoperatively. The authors report a case of fracture occurring in a chronic (> 30 years) solid instrumented fusion mass in a patient who underwent kyphoplasty. The pain did not improve after the kyphoplasty procedure, and the patient developed a posterior cleft in the fusion mass postoperatively. The patient, a 46-year-old woman, had undergone a T4-L4 instrumented fusion with placement of a Harrington rod when she was 12 years old. Adjacent-segment breakdown developed, and her fusion was extended to the pelvis, with pedicle screws placed up to L-3 to capture the existing fusion mass. Almost 2 years after fusion extension, she fell down the stairs and suffered an L-2 compression fracture, which is when kyphoplasty was performed without pain relief, and she then developed a cleft in the posterior fusion mass that was previously intact. She refused further surgical options. This case report is meant to alert surgeons of this possibility and allow them to consider the rare occurrence of fracture within the fusion mass when planning extension of chronic spinal fusions.

  17. Development of joints and shear fractures in the Kuqa depression and its implication to regional stress field switching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Zhongpei; WANG; Qingchen

    2004-01-01

    The superimposed basin must have undergone the changes of regional stress field. Study on the nature and switch of regional stress field of superimposed basin is very useful to understanding its stress state and tectonic events during its formation and evolution. As sensitive markers of small stress changes, joint and shear fracture, characterized by consistency of orientation over wide area, can be used to reconstruct paleostress state and its evolution. Detailed observations and analysis on the orientations, geometrical patterns, sequences of joints and shear fractures and their chronological relation to faults and folds show that, the NEE-SWW systematic joints and NNW-SSE systematic joints developed in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic strata are much more prominent than NW-SE systematic joints and shear fractures with different orientations. And the NWW-SEE and NW-SE systematic joints formed later than NEE-SWW systematic joints but earlier than shear fractures with different orientations. According to the relationships between joint and shear fractures and stress, the NEE-SWW systematic joints are inferred to result from lateral weak extension caused by the late Cretaceous regional uplift, while the NNW-SSE and NW-SE systematic joints are interpreted as syn-tectonic deformation relating to strong N-S compression in the Neogene. But some conjugate shear fractures occur probably due to sinistral strike-slip faulting in the Kuqa depression. At the beginning of the Neogene, the stress field changed and the maximal principal stress σ1 switched from vertical to horizontal.

  18. 4D synchrotron X-ray imaging to understand porosity development in shales during exposure to hydraulic fracturing fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, A. M.; Bargar, J.; Kohli, A. H.; Harrison, A. L.; Jew, A. D.; Lim, J. H.; Liu, Y.; Maher, K.; Zoback, M. D.; Brown, G. E.

    2016-12-01

    Unconventional (shale) reservoirs have emerged as the most important source of petroleum resources in the United States and represent a two-fold decrease in greenhouse gas emissions compared to coal. Despite recent progress, hydraulic fracturing operations present substantial technical, economic, and environmental challenges, including inefficient recovery, wastewater production and disposal, contaminant and greenhouse gas pollution, and induced seismicity. A relatively unexplored facet of hydraulic fracturing operations is the fluid-rock interface, where hydraulic fracturing fluid (HFF) contacts shale along faults and fractures. Widely used, water-based fracturing fluids contain oxidants and acid, which react strongly with shale minerals. Consequently, fluid injection and soaking induces a host of fluid-rock interactions, most notably the dissolution of carbonates and sulfides, producing enhanced or "secondary" porosity networks, as well as mineral precipitation. The competition between these mechanisms determines how HFF affects reactive surface area and permeability of the shale matrix. The resultant microstructural and chemical changes may also create capillary barriers that can trap hydrocarbons and water. A mechanistic understanding of the microstructure and chemistry of the shale-HFF interface is needed to design new methodologies and fracturing fluids. Shales were imaged using synchrotron micro-X-ray computed tomography before, during, and after exposure to HFF to characterize changes to the initial 3D structure. CT reconstructions reveal how the secondary porosity networks advance into the shale matrix. Shale samples span a range of lithologies from siliceous to calcareous to organic-rich. By testing shales of different lithologies, we have obtained insights into the mineralogic controls on secondary pore network development and the morphologies at the shale-HFF interface and the ultimate composition of produced water from different facies. These results

  19. Development of a Weibull model of cleavage fracture toughness for shallow flaws in reactor pressure vessel material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, B.R.; Williams, P.T.; McAfee, W.J.; Pugh, C.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2001-07-01

    A primary objective of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) -sponsored Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is to develop and validate technology applicable to quantitative assessments of fracture prevention margins in nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) containing flaws and subjected to service-induced material toughness degradation. This paper describes an experimental/analytical program for the development of a Weibull statistical model of cleavage fracture toughness for applications to shallow surface-breaking and embedded flaws in RPV materials subjected to multi-axial loading conditions. The experimental part includes both material characterization testing and larger fracture toughness experiments conducted using a special-purpose cruciform beam specimen developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for applying biaxial loads to shallow cracks. Test materials (pressure vessel steels) included plate product forms (conforming to ASTM A533 Grade B Class 1 specifications) and shell segments procured from a pressurized-water reactor vessel intended for a nuclear power plant. Results from tests performed on cruciform specimens demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower-transition temperature region. A local approach methodology based on a three-parameter Weibull model was developed to correlate these experimentally-observed biaxial effects on fracture toughness. The Weibull model, combined with a new hydrostatic stress criterion in place of the more commonly used maximum principal stress in the kernel of the Weibull stress integral definition, is shown to provide a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states for 2-dimensional flaws located in the A533-B plate material. The Weibull stress density was introduced as a matrice for identifying regions along a semi-elliptical flaw front that have a higher probability of cleavage initiation. Cumulative

  20. Technology development and application of asepsis cool-filling desserts%无菌冷罐装含乳甜点的技术开发和应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡姝敏; 朱雅玲

    2013-01-01

    Abstracts:The technology development and application of asepsis cool-filling desserts that fit for China were studied.By studying technical characters of asepsis cool-filling desserts and relative hydrocolloids application character,the technology (parameter),technology flow and hydrocolloids were confirmed,and the hydrocolloids were composed for functional system applied for asepsis cool-filling desserts to produce desserts that have very good texture and sensory organ property,including neutrosphere chocolate dessert and acidic pudding dessert.%研究了适合我国现有生产条件和市场发展状况的无菌冷灌装甜点的技术与应用.通过研究无菌冷灌装甜点的工艺特征及相关胶体应用特征,选择适合的亲水胶体,通过科学实验设计和生产验证,完成了利用超高温灭菌和无菌罐装技术生产不同质构的含乳甜点的工艺流程和稳定体系的设计.

  1. Clinical Risk Factors for the Presence and Development of Vertebral Fractures in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, Fiona; Spoorenberg, Anneke; van der Slik, Boukje P. G.; van der Veer, Eveline; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Bootsma, Hendrika; Bos, Reinhard; Wink, Freke R.; Arends, Suzanne

    IntroductionTo investigate the prevalence and incidence of radiographic vertebral fractures and the association with patient characteristics, clinical assessments, and medication use in a large prospective cohort of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in daily clinical practice.

  2. Exploitation of the TRIP Effect for the Development of Formable, Fracture and Fatigue Resistant Steels for Automotive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidemenopoulos, Gregory N.

    The present paper summarizes recent and on-going work on the exploitation of TRansformation-Induced Plasticity (TRIP) in an effort to develop automotive steels which would possess high-strength combined with high formability while these steels could also exhibit high fracture and fatigue resistance. Especially for the automotive industry, the driving force for these developments is the vehicle weight reduction, which could eventually lead to lower fuel consumption combined with reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

  3. High pressure gas flow, storage, and displacement in fractured rock-Experimental setup development and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi Mosleh, M; Turner, M; Sedighi, M; Vardon, P J

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design, development, and application of a laboratory setup for the experimental investigations of gas flow and reactions in a fractured rock. The laboratory facility comprises (i) a high pressure manometric sorption apparatus, where equilibrium and kinetic phenomena of adsorption and desorption can be examined, (ii) a high pressure triaxial core flooding system where the chemical reactive transport properties or processes can be explored, and (iii) an ancillary system including pure and mixed gas supply and analysis units. Underground conditions, in terms of pore pressure, confining pressure, and temperature, can be replicated using the triaxial core flooding system developed for depths up to 2 km. Core flooding experiments can be conducted under a range of gas injection pressures up to 20 MPa and temperatures up to 338 K. Details of the design considerations and the specification for the critical measuring instruments are described. The newly developed laboratory facility has been applied to study the adsorption of N2, CH4, and CO2 relevant to applications in carbon sequestration in coal and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Under a wide range of pressures, the flow of helium in a core sample was studied and the evolution of absolute permeability at different effective stress conditions has been investigated. A comprehensive set of high resolution data has been produced on anthracite coal samples from the South Wales coalfield, using the developed apparatus. The results of the applications provide improved insight into the high pressure flow and reaction of various gas species in the coal samples from the South Wales coalfield.

  4. High pressure gas flow, storage, and displacement in fractured rock—Experimental setup development and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi Mosleh, M.; Turner, M.; Sedighi, M.; Vardon, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design, development, and application of a laboratory setup for the experimental investigations of gas flow and reactions in a fractured rock. The laboratory facility comprises (i) a high pressure manometric sorption apparatus, where equilibrium and kinetic phenomena of adsorption and desorption can be examined, (ii) a high pressure triaxial core flooding system where the chemical reactive transport properties or processes can be explored, and (iii) an ancillary system including pure and mixed gas supply and analysis units. Underground conditions, in terms of pore pressure, confining pressure, and temperature, can be replicated using the triaxial core flooding system developed for depths up to 2 km. Core flooding experiments can be conducted under a range of gas injection pressures up to 20 MPa and temperatures up to 338 K. Details of the design considerations and the specification for the critical measuring instruments are described. The newly developed laboratory facility has been applied to study the adsorption of N2, CH4, and CO2 relevant to applications in carbon sequestration in coal and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Under a wide range of pressures, the flow of helium in a core sample was studied and the evolution of absolute permeability at different effective stress conditions has been investigated. A comprehensive set of high resolution data has been produced on anthracite coal samples from the South Wales coalfield, using the developed apparatus. The results of the applications provide improved insight into the high pressure flow and reaction of various gas species in the coal samples from the South Wales coalfield.

  5. PREDICTION OF FATIGUE LIFE FOR WELDED T-JOINTS OF CONCRETE-FILLED CIRCULAR HOLLOW SECTIONS BASED ON FRACTURE MECHANICS%基于断裂力学的圆钢管混凝土T型焊接节点疲劳寿命预测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童乐为; 顾敏; 朱俊; 王柯

    2013-01-01

    该文应用线弹性断裂力学基本原理预测圆钢管混凝土桁架焊接T型节点的疲劳寿命.首先,进行了一些节点的疲劳试验,作为验证节点疲劳寿命预测是否可靠的参考数据;其次,建立了基于断裂力学的疲劳寿命数值模拟的模型和流程框图,采用ANSYS软件编制了APDL宏命令,实现了节点疲劳寿命的计算;最后,分析了节点疲劳裂纹的扩展特性.研究结果表明:断裂力学数值模型能较好地预测这种复杂的钢混组合节点的疲劳寿命;在正常的焊接质量条件下,不同的初始裂纹尺度对节点疲劳扩展寿命的影响不大;裂纹在长度方向的扩展速度大于在深度方向的扩展速度;裂纹深度在达到1/2主管壁厚之前,裂纹沿深度方向的扩展非常缓慢,大部分的疲劳寿命消耗在此阶段,之后裂纹沿深度方向的扩展较快.%The basic theory of linear elastic fracture mechanics was used to predict the fatigue life of welded T-joints in concrete-filled steel circular hollow section trusses. Firstly, some fatigue tests of the joints was carried out, which would be reference data for the validation of fatigue life prediction. Secondly, a model and a flowchart were set up for the numerical simulation of fatigue life based on fracture mechanics. APDL macro commands were developed by means of the software ANSYS, and then the prediction of fatigue life of the joints was implemented. Finally, the behavior of fatigue crack propagation was investigated. It is concluded that the numerical model based on fracture mechanics can better predict the fatigue life of complicated steel-concrete composite joints. The different size of an initial crack does not cause a significant influence in the condition of normal welding quality. The rate of crack propagation in length is faster than that in depth. Before the depth of a crack come to a half of the chord thickness, the crack propagates quite slowly in depth and a large

  6. Development of Intelligent Setting System for Fracture Based on X-Ray Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, W.; Zhang, L. Y.; Liu, S. J.; Yu, Z. G.

    2006-10-01

    In order to achieve micro-wound, intelligence and high efficiency for fracture setting, intelligent setting system for fracture is proposed in accordance with biomechanics and fracture therapy theory. In the comprehensive medical system based on C-shape-arm X-machine, image processing and analysis is the core, programmable logical controller and stepping motor are important driving parts controlling mechanical parts. Six degree of freedom dynamics sensor ensures to control accurately force and moment. On the foundation of analyzing X-ray image peculiarities, method of processing and analysis is put forward, combining time domain with frequency domain. After mining domain knowledge in depth, setting actions is quantized into three non-continuous steps and is parameterized into two angles and one distance aiming at femoral-neck fracture. Objective features are extracted by virtue of three power polymerization curved surface fitting. Master-slave reference frame is advanced to solve a question that basic standard for parameters calculation is difficult to be determined. At the same time, four-groupsixteen-frame algorithm is put forward to solve a problem that the load value is unable to be calculated and applied precisely in the process of treatment of delayed union and non-union of fracture. Clinic experience proved that the system can help orthopedist to correctly and reliably complete fracture setting. And the system has many advantages such as micro-wound, low medical cost and low infection ratio, in comparison with traditional operation setting and manipulator setting.

  7. Development of Intelligent Setting System for Fracture Based on X-Ray Image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, W [Hebei University, the College of Electronic and Information Engineering, Baoding, 071002 (China); Zhang, L Y [Harbin University of Science and Technology, Measurement Control Technology and Communications Engineering College, Harbin, 150040 (China); Liu, S J [Harbin Institute of Technology, School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Harbin, 150001 (China); Yu, Z G [Harbin Fifth Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Harbin, 150040 (China)

    2006-10-15

    In order to achieve micro-wound, intelligence and high efficiency for fracture setting, intelligent setting system for fracture is proposed in accordance with biomechanics and fracture therapy theory. In the comprehensive medical system based on C-shape-arm X-machine, image processing and analysis is the core, programmable logical controller and stepping motor are important driving parts controlling mechanical parts. Six degree of freedom dynamics sensor ensures to control accurately force and moment. On the foundation of analyzing X-ray image peculiarities, method of processing and analysis is put forward, combining time domain with frequency domain. After mining domain knowledge in depth, setting actions is quantized into three non-continuous steps and is parameterized into two angles and one distance aiming at femoral-neck fracture. Objective features are extracted by virtue of three power polymerization curved surface fitting. Master-slave reference frame is advanced to solve a question that basic standard for parameters calculation is difficult to be determined. At the same time, four-groupsixteen-frame algorithm is put forward to solve a problem that the load value is unable to be calculated and applied precisely in the process of treatment of delayed union and non-union of fracture. Clinic experience proved that the system can help orthopedist to correctly and reliably complete fracture setting. And the system has many advantages such as micro-wound, low medical cost and low infection ratio, in comparison with traditional operation setting and manipulator setting.

  8. Filling of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reece D. Gately

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The reliable production of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is a relatively new development, and due to their unique structure, there has been much interest in filling their hollow interiors. In this review, we provide an overview of the most common approaches for filling these carbon nanostructures. We highlight that filled carbon nanostructures are an emerging material for biomedical applications.

  9. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for

  10. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for

  11. Development of fracture mechanics data for two hydrazine APU turbine wheel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curbishley, G.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of high temperature, high pressure ammonia were measured on the fracture mechanics and fatigue properties of Astroloy and Rene' 41 turbine wheel materials. Also, the influence of protective coatings on these properties was investigated. Specimens of forged bar stock were subjected to LCF and HCF tests at 950 K (1250 F) and 3.4 MN/sq m (500 psig) pressure, in ammonia containing about 1.5 percent H2O. Aluminized samples (Chromizing Company's Al-870) and gold plated test bars were compared with uncoated specimens. Comparison tests were also run in air at 950 K (1250 F), but at ambient pressures. K sub IE and K sub TH were determined on surface flawed specimens in both the air and ammonia in both uncoated and gold plated conditions. Gold plated specimens exhibited better properties than uncoated samples, and aluminized test bars generally had lower properties. The fatigue properties of specimens tested in ammonia were higher than those tested in air, yet the K sub TH values of ammonia tested samples were lower than those tested in air. However, insufficient specimens were tested to develop significant design data.

  12. Fugitive Emissions from Conventional and Hydraulically Fractured Natural Gas Developments in Western Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, E. E.; Risk, D. A.; Lavoie, M.; Marshall, A. D.; Baillie, J.; Williams, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Presently, fugitive emissions released into the atmosphere during the completion and production of oil and gas wells are poorly regulated within Canada. Some possible upstream sources of these emissions include flowback during well completions, liquid unloading, chemical injection pumps, and equipment leaks. The environmental benefits of combusting natural gas compared to oil or coal are negated if methane leakages surpass 3.2% of total production, so it is important to have a thorough understanding of these fugitive emissions. This study compares atmospheric leakage pathways of methane and other fugitive gases in both conventional and unconventional oil and gas developments in Western Canada to help fill this knowledge gap. Over 5000 kilometers of mobile survey campaigns were completed in carefully selected developments in the Montney shale play in British Columbia, and in conventional oil fields in Alberta. These sites are developed by more than 25 different operators. High precision laser and UV fluorescence gas analyzers were used to gather geolocated trace gas concentrations at a frequency of 1 Hz while driving. These data were processed with an adaptive technique to compensate for fluctuations in background concentrations for each gas. The residual excess concentrations were compositionally fingerprinted on the basis of the expected gas ratios for potential emission sites in order to definitively attribute anomalies to infrastructural leak sources. Preliminary results from the mobile surveys of both conventional and unconventional oil and gas sites are presented here. Pathways of methane and other fugitive gases are mapped to their respective sources, identifying common causes of emissions leaks across the oil and gas industry. This is the first bottom-up study of fugitive emissions from Canadian energy developments to produce publicly available data. These findings are significant to operators interested in lowering emissions for economic benefit, as well as

  13. Predicting Rib Fracture Risk With Whole-Body Finite Element Models: Development and Preliminary Evaluation of a Probabilistic Analytical Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Jason L.; Kent, Richard W.; Mroz, Krystoffer; Pipkorn, Bengt; Bostrom, Ola; Segui-Gomez, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to develop a strain-based probabilistic method to predict rib fracture risk with whole-body finite element (FE) models, and to describe a method to combine the results with collision exposure information to predict injury risk and potential intervention effectiveness in the field. An age-adjusted ultimate strain distribution was used to estimate local rib fracture probabilities within an FE model. These local probabilities were combined to predict injury risk and severity within the whole ribcage. The ultimate strain distribution was developed from a literature dataset of 133 tests. Frontal collision simulations were performed with the THUMS (Total HUman Model for Safety) model with four levels of delta-V and two restraints: a standard 3-point belt and a progressive 3.5–7 kN force-limited, pretensioned (FL+PT) belt. The results of three simulations (29 km/h standard, 48 km/h standard, and 48 km/h FL+PT) were compared to matched cadaver sled tests. The numbers of fractures predicted for the comparison cases were consistent with those observed experimentally. Combining these results with field exposure informantion (ΔV, NASS-CDS 1992–2002) suggests a 8.9% probability of incurring AIS3+ rib fractures for a 60 year-old restrained by a standard belt in a tow-away frontal collision with this restraint, vehicle, and occupant configuration, compared to 4.6% for the FL+PT belt. This is the first study to describe a probabilistic framework to predict rib fracture risk based on strains observed in human-body FE models. Using this analytical framework, future efforts may incorporate additional subject or collision factors for multi-variable probabilistic injury prediction. PMID:23169122

  14. Development of a Patient-Specific Finite Element Model for Predicting Implant Failure in Pelvic Ring Fracture Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höch, Andreas; Peldschus, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The main purpose of this study is to develop an efficient technique for generating FE models of pelvic ring fractures that is capable of predicting possible failure regions of osteosynthesis with acceptable accuracy. Methods. Patient-specific FE models of two patients with osteoporotic pelvic fractures were generated. A validated FE model of an uninjured pelvis from our previous study was used as a master model. Then, fracture morphologies and implant positions defined by a trauma surgeon in the preoperative CT were manually introduced as 3D splines to the master model. Four loading cases were used as boundary conditions. Regions of high stresses in the models were compared with actual locations of implant breakages and loosening identified from follow-up X-rays. Results. Model predictions and the actual clinical outcomes matched well. For Patient A, zones of increased tension and maximum stress coincided well with the actual locations of implant loosening. For Patient B, the model predicted accurately the loosening of the implant in the anterior region. Conclusion. Since a significant reduction in time and labour was achieved in our mesh generation technique, it can be considered as a viable option to be implemented as a part of the clinical routine to aid presurgical planning and postsurgical management of pelvic ring fracture patients. PMID:28255332

  15. The formation of open fractures in cohesive materials, results of scaled analogue and numerical modelling on fault zone porosity development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urai J.L.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We compare analogue and numerical models of dilatational fractures at low confining stress. These structures form an effective conduit for fluid flow in the field, but are difficult to model since they form in cohesive materials at low stresses. We use a truly cohesive powder for the analogue models and a Discrete Element Model (DEM with brittle-elastic bonds for the numerical modelling. We show that despite variations in the model type, small differences in the location of initial fractures and the way these structures link-up to control the evolution of the model, the observed structures are robust. Three structural zones develop where different fault types dominate. In 3D numerical models we show an increase of the porosity on the fault zone with increasing deformation. The progradation direction is shown to be controlled by the position of the fracture. The combination of analogue models with cohesive powder and DEMs with internal cohesion is an excellent tool to study the evolution of open fractures.

  16. Development of a Patient-Specific Finite Element Model for Predicting Implant Failure in Pelvic Ring Fracture Fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickie Shim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The main purpose of this study is to develop an efficient technique for generating FE models of pelvic ring fractures that is capable of predicting possible failure regions of osteosynthesis with acceptable accuracy. Methods. Patient-specific FE models of two patients with osteoporotic pelvic fractures were generated. A validated FE model of an uninjured pelvis from our previous study was used as a master model. Then, fracture morphologies and implant positions defined by a trauma surgeon in the preoperative CT were manually introduced as 3D splines to the master model. Four loading cases were used as boundary conditions. Regions of high stresses in the models were compared with actual locations of implant breakages and loosening identified from follow-up X-rays. Results. Model predictions and the actual clinical outcomes matched well. For Patient A, zones of increased tension and maximum stress coincided well with the actual locations of implant loosening. For Patient B, the model predicted accurately the loosening of the implant in the anterior region. Conclusion. Since a significant reduction in time and labour was achieved in our mesh generation technique, it can be considered as a viable option to be implemented as a part of the clinical routine to aid presurgical planning and postsurgical management of pelvic ring fracture patients.

  17. Development of carbon nanotube and graphite filled polyphenylene sulfide based bipolar plates for all-vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglar, Burak; Fischer, Peter; Kauranen, Pertti; Karttunen, Mikko; Elsner, Peter

    2014-06-01

    In this study, synthetic graphite and carbon nanotube (CNT) filled polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) based bipolar plates are produced by using co-rotating twin-screw extruder and injection molding. Graphite is the main conductive filler and CNTs are used as bridging filler between graphite particles. To improve the dispersion of the fillers and the flow behavior of the composite, titanate coupling agent (KR-TTS) is used. The concentration effect of CNTs and coupling agent on the properties of bipolar plates are examined. At 72.5 wt.% total conductive filler concentration, by addition of 2.5 wt.% CNT and 3 wt.% KR-TTS; through-plane and in-plane electrical conductivities increase from 1.42 S cm-1 to 20 S cm-1 and 6.4 S cm-1 to 57.3 S cm-1 respectively compared to sample without CNTs and additive. Extruder torque value and apparent viscosity of samples decrease significantly with coupling agent and as a result; the flow behavior is positively affected. Flexural strength is improved 15% by addition of 1.25 wt.% CNT. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) analysis shows nucleating effect of conductive fillers on PPS matrix. Corrosion measurements, cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge tests are performed to examine the electrochemical stability and the performance of produced bipolar plates in all-vanadium redox flow battery.

  18. Getting a prescription filled

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are located inside of a grocery or large "chain" store. It is best to fill all prescriptions ... be used for long-term medicines and medical supplies. The website should have clear directions for filling ...

  19. Protecting tree roots and subterranean infrastructure in urban areas by developing self-compacting flowable fills with root growth impeding properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felde, Vincent; Simon, Jana; Kimm-Friedenberg, Stefan; Peth, Stephan; Middendorf, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    In urban areas, the installation of cables and disposal lines is still done by open building method. Here, a ditch is being excavated, pipes and lines are laid and subsequently it is filled with and covered by bulk material (e.g. sand or gravel), which is then compacted. Due to the often times limited space that the roots have in the ground and the better supply of water and oxygen in the poorly compacted bulk material, these refilled ditches are areas of preferential root growth of urban trees. The entangling of the pipes and supply lines by these roots leads to severe damage of the tree when maintenance work on the lines is carried out and roots have to be cut. In order to reduce this competition between urban trees and urban subterranean infrastructure, the development of a self-compacting flowable fill with root growth resistance is mandatory. Physico-chemical properties, such as a very high pH-value and a low cation-exchange-capacity, a low root-penetrability, a high packing density and a low porosity, with a poorly connected pore system that impedes gas and water exchange are the characteristic aspects of this flowable fills that could help avoid undesired root penetration into supply lines. The flowable fills are supposed to sheath pipes and lines void-free and without any tension, in order to restrain the root growth in these areas. Trees are of crucial importance for urban ecosystems and are comprising 3% of the total stock of trees in the Federal Republic of Germany, which is why it is fundamental to conserve them. This work therefore targets not only at enabling a balanced coexistence of urban trees and subterranean infrastructure, but also at avoiding costly re-opening of ditches, tree harming cutting of roots and time consuming maintenance work. Further positive side effects are reduced costs for network providers and local municipalities, as well as reduced noise and dust emissions for passersby and local residents. To guarantee the root growth

  20. Development of experimental verification techniques for non-linear deformation and fracture.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, Neville Reid; Bahr, David F. (Washington State University, Pullman, WA)

    2003-12-01

    This project covers three distinct features of thin film fracture and deformation in which the current experimental technique of nanoindentation demonstrates limitations. The first feature is film fracture, which can be generated either by nanoindentation or bulge testing thin films. Examples of both tests will be shown, in particular oxide films on metallic or semiconductor substrates. Nanoindentations were made into oxide films on aluminum and titanium substrates for two cases; one where the metal was a bulk (effectively single crystal) material and the other where the metal was a 1 pm thick film grown on a silica or silicon substrate. In both cases indentation was used to produce discontinuous loading curves, which indicate film fracture after plastic deformation of the metal. The oxides on bulk metals fractures occurred at reproducible loads, and the tensile stress in the films at fracture were approximately 10 and 15 GPa for the aluminum and titanium oxides respectively. Similarly, bulge tests of piezoelectric oxide films have been carried out and demonstrate film fracture at stresses of only 100's of MPa, suggesting the importance of defects and film thickness in evaluating film strength. The second feature of concern is film adhesion. Several qualitative and quantitative tests exist today that measure the adhesion properties of thin films. A relatively new technique that uses stressed overlayers to measure adhesion has been proposed and extensively studied. Delamination of thin films manifests itself in the form of either telephone cord or straight buckles. The buckles are used to calculate the interfacial fracture toughness of the film-substrate system. Nanoindentation can be utilized if more energy is needed to initiate buckling of the film system. Finally, deformation in metallic systems can lead to non-linear deformation due to 'bursts' of dislocation activity during nanoindentation. An experimental study to examine the structure of

  1. Hip Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Hip fracture By Mayo Clinic Staff A hip fracture is a serious injury, with complications that can be life-threatening. The risk of hip fracture rises with age. Older people are at a ...

  2. [Fractures of carpal bones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lögters, T; Windolf, J

    2016-10-01

    Fractures of the carpal bones are uncommon. On standard radiographs fractures are often not recognized and a computed tomography (CT) scan is the diagnostic method of choice. The aim of treatment is to restore pain-free and full functioning of the hand. A distinction is made between stable and unstable carpal fractures. Stable non-displaced fractures can be treated conservatively. Unstable and displaced fractures have an increased risk of arthritis and non-union and should be stabilized by screws or k‑wires. If treated adequately, fractures of the carpal bones have a good prognosis. Unstable and dislocated fractures have an increased risk for non-union. The subsequent development of carpal collapse with arthrosis is a severe consequence of non-union, which has a heterogeneous prognosis.

  3. 一种多功能软管式充氧桥的研制%Research and development of a new oxygen filling device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫涛; 侯羿; 李海英; 蒋勇; 武涧松; 周丁华

    2012-01-01

    目的:为医疗卫生机构相关人员研制一种免工具装卸、适用于各种常见规格氧气瓶的新型、安全及快速充氧连接装置.方法:将目前常见的硬质、不可形变的充氧桥改为软性可形变设计,增加多种规格接头和一体化手轮的设计.结果:多功能软管式充氧桥能够有效规避充氧过程中可能出现的充氧桥折断、氧气泄露及伤人等风险.一体化手轮设计可实现免工具安装、拆卸;多规格接头可满足绝大多数氧气贮存瓶的安全、快速再充氧需求.在充氧过程中可以根据需要随时调整待充氧气瓶的高度和位置,能够有效降低医务人员的工作强度.结论:多功能软管式充氧桥结构设计合理,安全便捷,通用性强,能够显著提高医疗工作效率,具有较好的应用前景和推广价值.%Objective: To develop a rapid oxygen filling device for the personnel of the military, local medical and health institutions, which is tool-free handling, and can be adapted to a variety of specifications of oxygen cylinder and new security. Methods: It will turn into soft deformable design from common hard non-deformation oxygenation bridge and design a variety of specifications of joint and the integration of the handwheel based on actual demand. Results: A multi-function and hose connection oxygen filling bridge can effectively avoid risks which may arise in the course of the oxygen filling such as oxygen filling bridge broken, oxygen leakage, wounding and so on. The design of the integration of the handwheel can realize tool-free installation, disassembly. A variety of specifications of joint can meet the security of most of the oxygen storage bottles and the demand of rapid re-oxygen filling, and adjust the height and position of the charge oxygen bottles according to actural needs and effectively reduce the intensity of medical staff in the course of oxygen-filling. Conclusion: A multi-function and hose connection oxygen

  4. THE INFLUENCE OF FOLD AND FRACTURE DEVELOPMENT ON RESERVOIR BEHAVIOR OF THE LISBURNE GROUP OF NORTHERN ALASKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Michael T. Whalen; Jerry Jensen; Paul K. Atkinson; Joseph S. Brinton

    2000-05-01

    The Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The Lisburne is detachment folded where it is exposed throughout the northeastern Brooks Range, but is relatively undeformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study are to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults. (2) The influence of folding and lithostratigraphy on fracture patterns. (3) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics. (4) The influence of lithostratigraphy and deformation on fluid flow. The results of field work during the summer of 1999 offer some preliminary insights: The Lisburne Limestone displays a range of symmetrical detachment fold geometries throughout the northeastern Brooks Range. The variation in fold geometry suggests a generalized progression in fold geometry with increasing shortening: Straight-limbed, narrow-crested folds at low shortening, box folds at intermediate shortening, and folds with a large height-to-width ratio and thickened hinges at high shortening. This sequence is interpreted to represent a progressive change in the dominant shortening mechanism from flexural-slip at low shortening to bulk strain at higher shortening. Structural variations in bed thickness occur throughout this progression. Parasitic folding accommodates structural thickening at low shortening and is gradually succeeded by penetrative strain as shortening increases. The amount of structural thickening at low to intermediate shortening may be inversely related to the local amount of structural thickening of the Kayak Shale, the incompetent unit that underlies the Lisburne. The Lisburne Limestone displays a different structural style in the south, across the boundary between the northeastern Brooks Range and the main axis of the Brooks Range fold

  5. Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe recent progress made in developing neutron imaging based particle imaging velocimetry techniques for visualizing and quantifying flow structure through a high pressure flow cell with high temperature capability (up to 350 degrees C). This experimental capability has great potential for improving the understanding of flow through fractured systems in applications such as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, flow structure measurement can be used to develop and validate single phase flow models used for simulation, experimentally identify critical transition regions and their dependence on fracture features such as surface roughness, and study multiphase fluid behavior within fractured systems. The developed method involves the controlled injection of a high contrast fluid into a water flow stream to produce droplets that can be tracked using neutron radiography. A description of the experimental setup will be provided along with an overview of the algorithms used to automatically track droplets and relate them to the velocity gradient in the flow stream. Experimental results will be reported along with volume of fluids based simulation techniques used to model observed flow.

  6. Particle Imaging Velocimetry Technique Development for Laboratory Measurement of Fracture Flow Inside a Pressure Vessel Using Neutron Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe recent progress made in developing neutron imaging based particle imaging velocimetry techniques for visualizing and quantifying flow structure through a high pressure flow cell with high temperature capability (up to 350 degrees C). This experimental capability has great potential for improving the understanding of flow through fractured systems in applications such as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). For example, flow structure measurement can be used to develop and validate single phase flow models used for simulation, experimentally identify critical transition regions and their dependence on fracture features such as surface roughness, and study multiphase fluid behavior within fractured systems. The developed method involves the controlled injection of a high contrast fluid into a water flow stream to produce droplets that can be tracked using neutron radiography. A description of the experimental setup will be provided along with an overview of the algorithms used to automatically track droplets and relate them to the velocity gradient in the flow stream. Experimental results will be reported along with volume of fluids based simulation techniques used to model observed flow.

  7. Chondrocytes transdifferentiate into osteoblasts in endochondral bone during development, postnatal growth and fracture healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; von der Mark, Klaus; Henry, Stephen; Norton, William; Adams, Henry; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    2014-12-01

    One of the crucial steps in endochondral bone formation is the replacement of a cartilage matrix produced by chondrocytes with bone trabeculae made by osteoblasts. However, the precise sources of osteoblasts responsible for trabecular bone formation have not been fully defined. To investigate whether cells derived from hypertrophic chondrocytes contribute to the osteoblast pool in trabecular bones, we genetically labeled either hypertrophic chondrocytes by Col10a1-Cre or chondrocytes by tamoxifen-induced Agc1-CreERT2 using EGFP, LacZ or Tomato expression. Both Cre drivers were specifically active in chondrocytic cells and not in perichondrium, in periosteum or in any of the osteoblast lineage cells. These in vivo experiments allowed us to follow the fate of cells labeled in Col10a1-Cre or Agc1-CreERT2 -expressing chondrocytes. After the labeling of chondrocytes, both during prenatal development and after birth, abundant labeled non-chondrocytic cells were present in the primary spongiosa. These cells were distributed throughout trabeculae surfaces and later were present in the endosteum, and embedded within the bone matrix. Co-expression studies using osteoblast markers indicated that a proportion of the non-chondrocytic cells derived from chondrocytes labeled by Col10a1-Cre or by Agc1-CreERT2 were functional osteoblasts. Hence, our results show that both chondrocytes prior to initial ossification and growth plate chondrocytes before or after birth have the capacity to undergo transdifferentiation to become osteoblasts. The osteoblasts derived from Col10a1-expressing hypertrophic chondrocytes represent about sixty percent of all mature osteoblasts in endochondral bones of one month old mice. A similar process of chondrocyte to osteoblast transdifferentiation was involved during bone fracture healing in adult mice. Thus, in addition to cells in the periosteum chondrocytes represent a major source of osteoblasts contributing to endochondral bone formation in vivo.

  8. Development of a new code to solve hydro-mechanical coupling, shear failure and tensile failure due to hydraulic fracturing operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    María Gómez Castro, Berta; De Simone, Silvia; Carrera, Jesús

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, there are still some unsolved relevant questions which must be faced if we want to proceed to the hydraulic fracturing in a safe way. How much will the fracture propagate? This is one of the most important questions that have to be solved in order to avoid the formation of pathways leading to aquifer targets and atmospheric release. Will the fracture failure provoke a microseismic event? Probably this is the biggest fear that people have in fracking. The aim of this work (developed as a part of the EU - FracRisk project) is to understand the hydro-mechanical coupling that controls the shear of existing fractures and their propagation during a hydraulic fracturing operation, in order to identify the key parameters that dominate these processes and answer the mentioned questions. This investigation focuses on the development of a new C++ code which simulates hydro-mechanical coupling, shear movement and propagation of a fracture. The framework employed, called Kratos, uses the Finite Element Method and the fractures are represented with an interface element which is zero thickness. This means that both sides of the element lie together in the initial configuration (it seems a 1D element in a 2D domain, and a 2D element in a 3D domain) and separate as the adjacent matrix elements deform. Since we are working in hard, fragile rocks, we can assume an elastic matrix and impose irreversible displacements in fractures when rock failure occurs. The formulation used to simulate shear and tensile failures is based on the analytical solution proposed by Okada, 1992 and it is part of an iterative process. In conclusion, the objective of this work is to employ the new code developed to analyze the main uncertainties related with the hydro-mechanical behavior of fractures derived from the hydraulic fracturing operations.

  9. Contesting Technologies in the Networked Society: A Case Study of Hydraulic Fracturing and Shale Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopke, Jill E.

    In this dissertation, I study the network structure and content of a transnational movement against hydraulic fracturing and shale development, Global Frackdown. I apply a relational perspective to the study of role of digital technologies in transnational political organizing. I examine the structure of the social movement through analysis of hyperlinking patterns and qualitative analysis of the content of the ties in one strand of the movement. I explicate three actor types: coordinator, broker, and hyper-local. This research intervenes in the paradigm that considers international actors as the key nodes to understanding transnational advocacy networks. I argue this focus on the international scale obscures the role of globally minded local groups in mediating global issues back to the hyper-local scale. While international NGOs play a coordinating role, local groups with a global worldview can connect transnational movements to the hyper-local scale by networking with groups that are too small to appear in a transnational network. I also examine the movement's messaging on the social media platform Twitter. Findings show that Global Frackdown tweeters engage in framing practices of: movement convergence and solidarity, declarative and targeted engagement, prefabricated messaging, and multilingual tweeting. The episodic, loosely-coordinated and often personalized, transnational framing practices of Global Frackdown tweeters support core organizers' goal of promoting the globalness of activism to ban fracking. Global Frackdown activists use Twitter as a tool to advance the movement and to bolster its moral authority, as well as to forge linkages between localized groups on a transnational scale. Lastly, I study the relative prominence of negative messaging about shale development in relation to pro-shale messaging on Twitter across five hashtags (#fracking, #globalfrackdown, #natgas, #shale, and #shalegas). I analyze the top actors tweeting using the #fracking

  10. Can serpentinization induce fracturing? Fluid pathway development and the volume increase enigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plümper, Oliver; Jamtveit, Bjørn; Røyne, Anja

    2013-04-01

    Serpentinization of ultramafic rocks has first-order effects on global element cycles, the rheology of the oceanic lithosphere, plays a key role in plate tectonics by lubricating subduction zones and has been linked to the origin of life due to the creation of abiogenic hydrocarbons. In addition, the capability of ultramafic rocks to safely store enormous amounts of carbon dioxide through mineral reactions may provide a unique solution to fight global warming. However, all the aforementioned processes are reliant on the creation and maintenance of fluid pathways to alter an originally impermeable rock. Although the forces that move tectonic plates can produce these fluid pathways by mechanical fracturing, there is ample evidence that serpentinization reactions can 'eat' their way through a rock. This process is facilitated by solid volume changes during mineral reactions that cause expansion, fracturing the rock to generate fluid pathways. Natural observations of serpentinization/carbonation in ultramafic rocks indicate that the associated positive solid volume change alone exerts enough stress on the surrounding rock to build up a fracture network and that the influence of external tectonic forces is not necessary. Through various feedbacks these systems can either become self-sustaining, when an interconnected fracture network is formed, or self-limiting due to fluid pathway obstruction. However, extensively serpentinized outcrops suggest that although crystal growth in newly opened spaces would reduce permeability, serpentinization is not always self-limiting as porosity generation can occur concomitantly, maintaining or even increasing permeability. This is consistent with theory and demonstrates that fluids transported through fracture networks can alter vast amounts of originally impermeable rock. Nevertheless, whether serpentinization can actually generate these fracture networks is still a matter of debate and only a few scientific investigations have

  11. Mechanisms of Plastic and Fracture Instabilities for Alloy Development of Fusion Materials. Final Project Report for period July 15, 1998 - July 14, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoniem, N. M.

    2003-07-14

    The main objective of this research was to develop new computational tools for the simulation and analysis of plasticity and fracture mechanisms of fusion materials, and to assist in planning and assessment of corresponding radiation experiments.

  12. Filling the Gaps in a Fragmented Health Care System: Development of the Health and Welfare Information Portal (ZWIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robben, Sarah Hm; Huisjes, Mirjam; van Achterberg, Theo; Zuidema, Sytse U; Olde Rikkert, Marcel Gm; Schers, Henk J; Heinen, Maud M; Melis, René Jf

    2012-09-19

    Current health care systems are not optimally designed to meet the needs of our aging populations. First, the fragmentation of care often results in discontinuity of care that can undermine the quality of care provided. Second, patient involvement in care decisions is not sufficiently facilitated. To describe the development and the content of a program aimed at: (1) facilitating self-management and shared decision making by frail older people and informal caregivers, and (2) reducing fragmentation of care by improving collaboration among professionals involved in the care of frail older people through a combined multidisciplinary electronic health record (EHR) and personal health record (PHR). We used intervention mapping to systematically develop our program in six consecutive steps. Throughout this development, the target populations (ie, professionals, frail older people, and informal caregivers) were involved extensively through their participation in semi-structured interviews and working groups. We developed the Health and Welfare Information Portal (ZWIP), a personal, Internet-based conference table for multidisciplinary communication and information exchange for frail older people, their informal caregivers, and professionals. Further, we selected and developed methods for implementation of the program, which included an interdisciplinary educational course for professionals involved in the care of frail older people, and planned the evaluation of the program. This paper describes the successful development and the content of the ZWIP as well as the strategies developed for its implementation. Throughout the development, representatives of future users were involved extensively. Future studies will establish the effects of the ZWIP on self-management and shared decision making by frail older people as well as on collaboration among the professionals involved.

  13. [Historical review of the treatment of fractures. Contribution of the Belgian surgery to the origin and development of osteosynthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianne, Y; Hinsenkamp, M

    2011-01-01

    The word osteosynthesis was proposed by A. Lambotte in 1904. His definition, given in 1908, is still valid today: "Osteo-synthesis is the artificial contention of the bone fragments of fractures, by special devices acting directly on bones, exposed or not, with the aim to strongly fix them in their original position". The authors review the methods of contention before the invention of osteosynthesis and later the developments of bone fixation techniques. They insist in particular on the durable innovations of various pioneers including A. Lambotte, R. Danis, R. Hoffmann and G. Küntscher. The School of Brussels has been implicated in the developments and conceptualisation of osteo-synthesis.

  14. Experimental and Numerical Studies on Development of Fracture Process Zone (FPZ) in Rocks under Cyclic and Static Loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghamgosar, M.; Erarslan, N.

    2016-03-01

    The development of fracture process zones (FPZ) in the Cracked Chevron Notched Brazilian Disc (CCNBD) monsonite and Brisbane tuff specimens was investigated to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of brittle rocks under static and various cyclic loadings. An FPZ is a region that involves different types of damage around the pre-existing and/or stress-induced crack tips in engineering materials. This highly damaged area includes micro- and meso-cracks, which emerge prior to the main fracture growth or extension and ultimately coalescence to macrofractures, leading to the failure. The experiments and numerical simulations were designed for this study to investigate the following features of FPZ in rocks: (1) ligament connections and (2) microcracking and its coalescence in FPZ. A Computed Tomography (CT) scan technique was also used to investigate the FPZ behaviour in selected rock specimens. The CT scan results showed that the fracturing velocity is entirely dependent on the appropriate amount of fracture energy absorbed in rock specimens due to the change of frequency and amplitudes of the dynamic loading. Extended Finite Element Method (XFEM) was used to compute the displacements, tensile stress distribution and plastic energy dissipation around the propagating crack tip in FPZ. One of the most important observations, the shape of FPZ and its extension around the crack tip, was made using numerical and experimental results, which supported the CT scan results. When the static rupture and the cyclic rupture were compared, the main differences are twofold: (1) the number of fragments produced is much greater under cyclic loading than under static loading, and (2) intergranular cracks are formed due to particle breakage under cyclic loading compared with smooth and bright cracks along cleavage planes under static loading.

  15. Development of a simple maintenance method for condition assessment of oil filled XLPE terminations. Diagnostic testing, oil, humidity and asset management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liland, Knut Brede

    2011-02-15

    Development of a simple method for condition assessment of oil filled XLPE terminations An on-site/off-line prototype method for measuring water content at different positions inside oil filled high voltage cable terminations has been developed. The method consists of: 1) Measurement rod with relative humidity and temperature sensors in addition to a conductivity sensor for measuring free water in the bottom of the termination, 2) Characterisation database for three oils for converting relative humidity and temperature to absolute humidity, 3) Wireless unit for data transfer from the measurement rod to a computer and 4) Procedure for doing the measurements. The method proved to be a powerful and very simple tool in estimating the humidity and level of the oil in the termination and also detecting free water. The method was compared with more traditional and time consuming methods taking oil samples from the terminations. The agreement between the laboratory and the on-site measurements were very good. In only 10-15 minutes it was possible to diagnose the condition of the termination with respect to humidity. During the project more fundamental work studying from a provoked leakage of water into a transparent cable termination were performed by master student Geir Birkenes (NTNU) supervised by Frank Mauseth (NTNU) and Sverre Hvidsten (SINTEF Energy Research). The behavior of water droplets during leakage was visually studied and the development of the relative humidity from installed relative humidity sensors in the zero field regions below the cone was monitored on-line. Partial discharge activity (pd) was also monitored and proved that such installations are very robust. PD is not a very good method for detecting water leakage and water content in such devices due to the intermittent and in general very low discharge levels. (Author)

  16. Fluid systems and fracture development during syn-depositional fold growth: An example from the Pico del Aguila anticline, Sierras Exteriores, southern Pyrenees, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Huyghe, Damien; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Lacombe, Olivier; Emmanuel, Laurent; Mouthereau, Frédéric; Ouanhnon, Laure

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports an integrated, spatio-temporal analysis of the fracture-controlled paleo-fluid system in the Pico del Aguila anticline, a N-S trending fold located in the Sierras Exteriores, the southern front of the Spanish Pyrenees. Eight fracture sets (joints or faults) are recognized throughout the fold and are separated into a fracture sequence that is defined using field relationships and the remarkable temporal constraints offered by the syn-tectonic sedimentary deposits. This fracture sequence records a complex Paleocene to Early Oligocene structural evolution, including map-view, clockwise rotation and tilting of the fold axis. The geochemical analysis of calcite cements from the different mineralized fracture/vein sets reveals a compartmentalized fluid system during most of fold development. This initial paleofluid system was later perturbed when bending-related fractures associated with foreland flexure and outer arc extension triggered small-scale, vertical fluid migration. Fractures developed in shallow strata facilitated downward migration of surficial fluids that controlled the paleo-fluid system in the Late Priabonian/Stampian continental deposits. The study of the Pico del Aguila anticline depicts for the first time the evolution of a fluid system in a shallow, syn-depositional compressional setting, and results further strengthen the statement that fluids migrate vertically across stratigraphic boundaries take place during fold hinge-related deformation.

  17. Experiments and sensitivity analyses for heat transfer in a meter-scale regularly fractured granite model with water flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei LU; Yan-yong XIANG

    2012-01-01

    Experiments of saturated water flow and heat transfer were conducted for a meter-scale model of regularly fractured granite.The fractured rock model (height 1502.5 mm,width 904 mm,and thickness 300 mm),embedded with two vertical and two horizontal fractures of pre-set apertures,was constructed using 18 pieces of intact granite.The granite was taken from a site currently being investigated for a high-level nuclear waste repository in China.The experiments involved different heat source temperatures and vertical water fluxes in the embedded fractures either open or filled with sand.A finite difference scheme and computer code for calculation of water flow and heat transfer in regularly fractured rocks was developed,verified against both the experimental data and calculations from the TOUGH2 code,and employed for parametric sensitivity analyses.The experiments revealed that,among other things,the temperature distribution was influenced by water flow in the fractures,especially the water flow in the vertical fracture adjacent to the heat source,and that the heat conduction between the neighboring rock blocks in the model with sand-filled fractures was enhanced by the sand,with larger range of influence of the heat source and longer time for approaching asymptotic steady-state than those of the model with open fractures.The temperatures from the experiments were in general slightly smaller than those from the numerical calculations,probably due to the fact that a certain amount of outward heat transfer at the model perimeter was unavoidable in the experiments.The parametric sensitivity analyses indicated that the temperature distribution was highly sensitive to water flow in the fractures,and the water temperature in the vertical fracture adjacent to the heat source was rather insensitive to water flow in other fractures.

  18. Development of a method evaluation of deformation and fracture characteristics using small specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, D. l.; Ahn, J. H.; Ju, J. B.; Choi, Y.; Lee, B. W. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    In this study, the flow properties of various structural steels were estimated by analyzing the indentation load-depth curve obtained by ball indentation and the pile-up or sink-in phenomenon around indentation. The constraint factor {psi} was then related to the work-hardening characteristics of material. For various steels such as SA508, TMCP, SM50, SA213, SA106, and AISI1025, the results of indentation test were compared to those of tensile test, which shows that the present analysis can predict successfully the plastic flow properties of structural steels. In this study, in order to obtain more reliable fracture characteristics based on fracture mechanics, the pre-crack is introduced to SP specimen and acoustic emission is used to determine the crack initiation point. Using the load at crack initiation point, the fracture toughnesses of SA 508 Cl.3 steel, STS 304 stainless steel, SM 50 steel and TMCP steel were calculated successfully. 58 refs., 22 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  19. The clayey fissural fillings associated with N100º-110ºE fractures at the El Berrocal uranium mine (Sierra de Gredos, Spain: characterization, genesis and retention capacity of radioactive and other elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez del Villar, L.

    1993-08-01

    Full Text Available The clayey fissural fillings (18O data obtained from the quartz vein and the 2++ phosphate precipitation. The high organic C content in the clay fractions could be due to present biological activity in the clayey fissural filling or to organic acids transported from the topographic surface by the percolating water. In this last case, organie-clay complexes would probbly be formed.En relación con los procesos de migración/retención de los radionucleidos naturales en un medio granítico fisurado se han estudiado los rellenos fisurales arcillosos (18O obtenidos del cuarzo filoniano y de la fracción 2++. El alto contenido en C orgánico de la fracción arcilla de las muestras puede explicarse por la actividad bacteriana actual observada en los rellenos fisurales, o por la presencia de ácidos orgánicos, transportados por las aguas percolantes desde la superficie topográfica. En este último caso, han podido formarse complejos orgánico-arcillosos.

  20. Importance of fracture mechanics for materials development. Safety analysis of steel structures using fracture mechanics methods. Bedeutung der Bruchmechanik fuer die Werkstoffentwicklung. Sicherheitsanalyse von Bauwerken aus Stahl mit Hilfe bruchmechanischer Methoden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, W. (Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany, F.R.). Lehrstuhl und Inst. fuer Eisenhuettenkunde)

    1991-01-01

    Following a brief description of the safety analysis procedure, the article deals with the fracture mechanics behaviour of cracked components and material test pieces. A component is assessed by comparing the loads (stress applied, maximum stress intensity, etc.) and the material characteristics (proof stress, fracture toughness, critical J-integral, etc.). Quantifying the toughness of materials is a particularly important aspect. It can be further improved by material development (increased purity, less segregation, finer grain). Generally valid equations cannot be expected but reliable estimates of the relationships are possible. (orig.).

  1. Zebrafish assessment of cognitive improvement and anxiolysis: filling the gap between in vitro and rodent models for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Edward D

    2011-01-01

    Zebrafish can provide a valuable animal model to screen potential cognitive enhancing and anxiolytic drugs. They are economical and can provide a relatively quick indication of possible functional efficacy. In as much as they have a complex nervous system and elaborate behavioral repertoire, zebrafish can provide a good intermediate model between in vitro receptor and cell-based assays and classic mammalian models for drug screening. In addition, the variety of molecular tools available in zebrafish makes them outstanding models for helping to determine the neuromolecular mechanisms for psychoactive drugs. However, to use zebrafish as a translational model we must have validated, sensitive and efficient behavioral tests. In a series of studies, our lab has developed tests of cognitive function and stress response, which are sensitive to drug effects in a similar manner as rodent models and humans for cognitive enhancement and alleviating stress response. In particular, the three-chamber task for learning and memory was shown to be sensitive to the cognitive enhancing effects of nicotine and has been useful in helping to determine neural mechanisms crucial for nicotinic-induced cognitive enhancement. The novel tank diving test was shown to be a valid and efficient test of stress response. It is sensitive to the reduction in stress-related behaviors due to the amxiolytic drugs diazepam and buspirone but not chlordiazepoxide. Nicotine also causes stress alleviating effects which can be interpreted as anxiolytic effects. Zebrafish models of behavioral pharmacology can be useful to efficiently screen test compounds for drug development and can be useful in helping to determine the mechanisms crucial for new therapeutic treatments of neurobehavioral impairments.

  2. Development and Implementation of Team-Based Panel Management Tools: Filling the Gap between Patient and Population Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Brook; Lawrence, Renée H; Drawz, Paul; Carter, Cameron; Shumaker, Amy Hirsch; Kern, Elizabeth F

    2016-08-01

    Effective team-based models of care, such as the Patient-Centered Medical Home, require electronic tools to support proactive population management strategies that emphasize care coordination and quality improvement. Despite the spread of electronic health records (EHRs) and vendors marketing population health tools, clinical practices still may lack the ability to have: (1) local control over types of data collected/reports generated, (2) timely data (eg, up-to-date data, not several months old), and accordingly (3) the ability to efficiently monitor and improve patient outcomes. This article describes a quality improvement project at the hospital system level to develop and implement a flexible panel management (PM) tool to improve care of subpopulations of patients (eg, panels of patients with diabetes) by clinical teams. An in-depth case analysis approach is used to explore barriers and facilitators in building a PM registry tool for team-based management needs using standard data elements (eg, laboratory values, pharmacy records) found in EHRs. Also described are factors that may contribute to sustainability; to date the tool has been adapted to 6 disease-focused subpopulations encompassing more than 200,000 patients. Two key lessons emerged from this initiative: (1) though challenging, team-based clinical end users and information technology needed to work together consistently to refine the product, and (2) locally developed population management tools can provide efficient data tracking for frontline clinical teams and leadership. The preliminary work identified critical gaps that were successfully addressed by building local PM registry tools from EHR-derived data and offers lessons learned for others engaged in similar work. (Population Health Management 2016;19:232-239).

  3. Water-filled telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, E

    2014-01-01

    In this short note we discuss the case of the thought experiments on water-filled telescopes and their realizations during 18th and 19th century. The story of those instruments shows that the scientific progress occurs in a curious way, since there was no stringent reason for the construction of a water-filled telescope.

  4. Gas-Filled Capillary Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a 1-D, quasi-steady-state numerical model for a gas-filled capillary discharge that is designed to aid in selecting the optimum capillary radius in order to guide a laser beam with the required intensity through the capillary. The model also includes the option for an external solenoid B-field around the capillary, which increases the depth of the parabolic density channel in the capillary, thereby allowing for propagation of smaller laser beam waists. The model has been used to select the parameters for gas-filled capillaries to be utilized during the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration — Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) experiment.

  5. Mineralogy and fracture development characteristics of marine shale-gas reservoirs: A case study of Lower Silurian strata in southeastern margin of Sichuan Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Ling; JIANG Zai-xing; GUO Feng

    2015-01-01

    Mineral contents and fractures of shale from well Yuye-1 and outcrops were examined mainly based on systematic description of the cores and outcrops, and data from experimental analyses. The data enabled us to thoroughly explore the mineralogy and developmental features of shale of the Lower Silurian Longmaxi Formation in the study area. The results show that, the Lower Silurian Longmaxi Shale (SLS) in the southeastern margin of Sichuan Basin, China, is primarily characterized by a high content of brittle minerals and a relatively low content of clay minerals. The total content of brittle minerals is approximately 57%, including 27% quartz, 12.2% feldspar, 11.2% carbonate and 2.4% pyrite. The total content of clay minerals reaches 41.6%, composed of illite (23.8%), mixed-layer of illite and smectite (I/S) (10.8%) and chlorite (7.0%). The SLS accommodates the widespread development of various types of fractures, including tectonic fractures, diagenetic fractures, inter-layer fractures and slip fractures. The developmental level of the fracture in the SLS is mainly influenced by faults, lithology, mineral contents and total organic carbon content (TOC) in study area.

  6. [Atlas fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schären, S; Jeanneret, B

    1999-05-01

    Fractures of the atlas account for 1-2% of all vertebral fractures. We divide atlas fractures into 5 groups: isolated fractures of the anterior arch of the atlas, isolated fractures of the posterior arch, combined fractures of the anterior and posterior arch (so-called Jefferson fractures), isolated fractures of the lateral mass and fractures of the transverse process. Isolated fractures of the anterior or posterior arch are benign and are treated conservatively with a soft collar until the neck pain has disappeared. Jefferson fractures are divided into stable and unstable fracture depending on the integrity of the transverse ligament. Stable Jefferson fractures are treated conservatively with good outcome while unstable Jefferson fractures are probably best treated operatively with a posterior atlanto-axial or occipito-axial stabilization and fusion. The authors preferred treatment modality is the immediate open reduction of the dislocated lateral masses combined with a stabilization in the reduced position using a transarticular screw fixation C1/C2 according to Magerl. This has the advantage of saving the atlanto-occipital joints and offering an immediate stability which makes immobilization in an halo or Minerva cast superfluous. In late instabilities C1/2 with incongruency of the lateral masses occurring after primary conservative treatment, an occipito-cervical fusion is indicated. Isolated fractures of the lateral masses are very rare and may, if the lateral mass is totally destroyed, be a reason for an occipito-cervical fusion. Fractures of the transverse processes may be the cause for a thrombosis of the vertebral artery. No treatment is necessary for the fracture itself.

  7. The roles of fluid transport and surface reaction in reaction-induced fracturing, with implications for the development of mesh textures in serpentinites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Atsushi

    2016-09-01

    The distinct element method was used to simulate chemical-mechanical-hydraulic processes that occur during serpentinization (volume-increasing hydration) within the oceanic lithosphere. The proposed model considers water transported in two ways: advective flow along fractures and through matrices. Variations in fracture pattern and system evolution were examined using two nondimensional parameters: the ratios of the rates of flow in fracture ( Ψ F) and matrix ( Ψ M) to the surface reaction rate. In cases of fixed Ψ F and Ψ M with sufficiently low reaction rates, the fracture pattern is not dependent on the surface reaction rate. Otherwise, the fracture pattern varies systematically as a function of Ψ F and Ψ M. At low Ψ F (≤1) and low Ψ M (≤1), the reaction proceeds from the boundaries inward and forms fine fractures layer by layer. At high Ψ F (≥10,000) and low Ψ M (≤10), the reaction proceeds from the boundaries inward and forms polygonal fracture networks. As Ψ M increases (>100), the reaction tends to proceed homogeneously from the boundaries without fracturing. A comparison of natural and simulated textures reveals that the following conditions are necessary to develop mesh textures during serpentinization in the oceanic lithosphere. (1) The surface reaction rate must be similar to or higher than the fluid flow rate in the matrix (or than the diffusive transport of water), and much lower than the fluid flow rate along fractures. (2) Original olivine grain boundaries act as pathways for fluid transport; these pathways may result from thermal or tectonic stress-induced cracking prior to serpentinization.

  8. Development of a data-driven forecasting tool for hydraulically fractured, horizontal wells in tight-gas sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulga, B.; Artun, E.; Ertekin, T.

    2017-06-01

    Tight-gas sand reservoirs are considered to be one of the major unconventional resources. Due to the strong heterogeneity and very low permeability of the formation, and the complexity of well trajectories with multiple hydraulic fractures; there are challenges associated with performance forecasting and optimum exploitation of these resources using conventional modeling approaches. In this study, it is aimed to develop a data-driven forecasting tool for tight-gas sands, which are based on artificial neural networks that can complement the physics-driven modeling approach, namely numerical-simulation models. The tool is designed to predict the horizontal-well performance as a proxy to the numerical model, once the initial conditions, operational parameters, reservoir/hydraulic-fracture characteristics are provided. The data-driven model, that the forecasting tool is based on, is validated with blind cases by estimating the cumulative gas production after 10 years with an average error of 3.2%. A graphical-user-interface application is developed that allows the practicing engineer to use the developed tool in a practical manner by visualizing estimated performance for a given reservoir within a fraction of a second. Practicality of the tool is demonstrated with a case study for the Williams Fork Formation by assessing the performance of various well designs and by incorporating known uncertainties through Monte Carlo simulation. P10, P50 and P90 estimates of the horizontal-well performance are quickly obtained within acceptable accuracy levels.

  9. Modeling of Immiscible, Two-Phase Flows in a Natural Rock Fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H

    2009-01-01

    One potential method of geologically sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) is to inject the gas into brine-filled, subsurface formations. Within these low-permeability rocks, fractures exist that can act as natural fluid conduits. Understanding how a less viscous fluid moves when injected into an initially saturated rock fracture is important for the prediction of CO2 transport within fractured rocks. Our study examined experimentally and numerically the motion of immiscible fluids as they were transported through models of a fracture in Berea sandstone. The natural fracture geometry was initially scanned using micro-computerized tomography (CT) at a fine volume-pixel (voxel) resolution by Karpyn et al. [1]. This CT scanned fracture was converted into a numerical mesh for two-phase flow calculations using the finite-volume solver FLUENT® and the volume-of-fluid method. Additionally, a translucent experimental model was constructed using stereolithography. The numerical model was shown to agree well with experiments for the case of a constant rate injection of air into the initially water-saturated fracture. The invading air moved intermittently, quickly invading large-aperture regions of the fracture. Relative permeability curves were developed to describe the fluid motion. These permeability curves can be used in reservoir-scale discrete fracture models for predictions of fluid motion within fractured geological formations. The numerical model was then changed to better mimic the subsurface conditions at which CO2 will move into brine saturated fractures. The different fluid properties of the modeled subsurface fluids were shown to increase the amount of volume the less-viscous invading gas would occupy while traversing the fracture.

  10. Root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed.......The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed....

  11. Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress fractures Overview Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by repetitive force, often from overuse — such as repeatedly jumping up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of ...

  12. Fracture mechanics models developed for piping reliability assessment in light water reactors: piping reliability project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, D.O.; Lim, E.Y.; Dedhia, D.D.; Woo, H.H.; Chou, C.K.

    1982-06-01

    The efforts concentrated on modifications of the stratified Monte Carlo code called PRAISE (Piping Reliability Analysis Including Seismic Events) to make it more widely applicable to probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis of nuclear reactor piping. Pipe failures are considered to occur as the result of crack-like defects introduced during fabrication, that escape detection during inspections. The code modifications allow the following factors in addition to those considered in earlier work to be treated: other materials, failure criteria and subcritical crack growth characteristic; welding residual and vibratory stresses; and longitudinal welds (the original version considered only circumferential welds). The fracture mechanics background for the code modifications is included, and details of the modifications themselves provided. Additionally, an updated version of the PRAISE user's manual is included. The revised code, known as PRAISE-B was then applied to a variety of piping problems, including various size lines subject to stress corrosion cracking and vibratory stresses. Analyses including residual stresses and longitudinal welds were also performed.

  13. Application of innovative technologies to fractured Devonian shale reservoir exploration and development activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.P.; Frantz, J.H.; MacDonald, R.J.; Merriam, G.W.; Zyglowicz, P. [Schlumberger Data and Consulting Services, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Ground-truth measurements collected from two Upper Devonian Shale wells located within the Athens gas field in Pennsylvania were used to better understand the gas production mechanism and gas potential of a reservoir in western New York. Both test wells are located adjacent to the Tyrone Mount Union lineament, an area of natural fractures that provide a conduit for natural gas production. The wells were completed open hole without any stimulation. Gas-in-place was estimated by running geophysical logs, gas sample analysis and rotary sidewall core examinations, thereby determining the geologic, reservoir and fluid flow characteristics. The gas-in-place was found to be very lean in organic content and mostly thermogenic with some traces of biogenic origin. It is produced from a dual porosity system via fractures and, to a lesser extent, from the matrix. The lean organic content suggests this is only a limited source of gas, with little adsorption taking place near the test well. The Great Lakes Energy Company drilled the two test wells and provided initial shut-in pressures, open flows, production data and flowing pressures. Gas sample analysis was used to determine reservoir and geologic factors such as net pay thickness, permeability and porosity. The PROMAT reservoir analysis tool was used to determine the drainage area and the original gas-in-place of the two wells. 2 refs., 11 tabs., 15 figs.

  14. Glass ceramic of high hardness and fracture toughness developed from iron-rich wastes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weixin HAN

    2009-01-01

    A study has been carried out on the feasibility of using high iron content wastes, gen-erated during steel making, as a raw material for the production of glass ceramic. The iron-rich wastes were mixed and melted in different proportions with soda-lime glass cullet and sand. The devitrification of the parent glasses produced from the different mixtures was investigated using differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of the glass-ceramic were assessed by hardness and indentation fracture toughness measurement. A glass ce-ramic with mixture of 60 wt pct iron-rich wastes, 25 wt pct sand, and 15 wt pct glass cullet exhibited the best combination of properties, namely, hardness 7.9 GPa and fracture toughness 3.75 MPa.m1/2, for the sake of containing magnetite in marked dendritic morphology. These new hard glass ceramics are candidate materials for wear resistant tiles and paving for heavy industrial floors.

  15. Development of Color Filled PP Material for Tank Cover%彩色填充PP油箱护罩料的研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖利群

    2017-01-01

    Five kinds of mineral fillers such as talc,calcium carbonate,barium sulfate,kaolin and wollastonite,were selected to fill PP,the color changes of the PP filled premix after mixing with the high speed mixer were contrasted. The yellow filled PP materials were obtained by extrusion granulation,the melt flow rate,mechanical properties,color,surface gloss and thermal weight loss analysis were tested. The results show that after mixing by a high speed mixer for 10 min,when the filler is talc,calcium carbonate,barium sulfate,the color of premix is basically the same as before mixing ;when the filler is kaolin and wollastonite,the color of premix becomes darker and darker. When the filler is barium sulfate,the melt flow property and mechanical properties of the material are more in line with the technical specifications of the filled PP material for general mechanical tank cover,the melt flow rate is 37 g/10 min,the tensile strength is 23.6 MPa,the izod and notched izod impact strength are 81.4 kJ/m2 and 9.7 kJ/m2, the heat distortion temperature is 109℃ . The material has a bright color when the filler is calcium carbonate and barium sulfate,and the color is closest to the standard color plate. The material has the best surface gloss when the filler is barium sulfate. Compared with talc,calcium carbonate,barium sulfate,when the filler is barium sulfate,the thermal stability of filled PP material is slightly better. Developed yellow filled PP material has been applied to the general mechanical tank cover.%选用滑石粉、碳酸钙、硫酸钡、高岭土、硅灰石五种矿物填料,对比本色填充聚丙烯(PP)预混料经高速混合机混合前后的颜色变化,再经挤出造粒制得黄色填充PP材料,对比测试熔体流动速率(MFR)、力学性能、颜色、表面光泽度及热稳定性.结果表明,经高速混合机混合10 min后,填料为滑石粉、碳酸钙、硫酸钡时预混料颜色基本与混合前保持一致,填料为高岭土、硅灰

  16. Filling a Conical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Kyle; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2016-11-01

    Root canal treatment involves the removal of infected tissue inside the tooth's canal system and filling the space with a dense sealing agent to prevent further infection. A good root canal treatment happens when the canals are filled homogeneously and tightly down to the root apex. Such a tooth is able to provide valuable service for an entire lifetime. However, there are some examples of poorly performed root canals where the anterior and posterior routes are not filled completely. Small packets of air can be trapped in narrow access cavities when restoring with resin composites. Such teeth can cause trouble even after many years and lead the conditions like acute bone infection or abscesses. In this study, the filling of dead-end conical cavities with various liquids is reported. The first case studies included conical cavity models with different angles and lengths to visualize the filling process. In this investigation, the rate and completeness at which a variety of liquids fill the cavity were observed to find ideal conditions for the process. Then, a 3D printed model of the scaled representation of a molar with prepared post spaces was used to simulate the root canal treatment. The results of this study can be used to gain a better understanding of the restoration for endodontically treated teeth.

  17. High-energy gas fracturing in cased and perforated wellbores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuderman, J.F.

    1986-06-01

    A propellant-based technology, High-Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF), has been applied to fracturing through perforations in cased boreholes. HEGF is a tailored-pulse fracturing technique originally developed by Sandia National Laboratories for application in uncased, liquid-free gas wells in Appalachian Devonian shales. Because most oil and gas wells are liquid filled as well as cased and perforated, the potential impact of present research is significantly broader. A number of commercial tailored-pulse fracturing services, using a variety of explosives or propellants, are currently available. Present research provides valuable insight into phenomena that occur in those stimulations. The use of propellants that deflagrate or burn rather than detonate, as do high-order explosives, permits controlled buildup of pressure in the wellbore. The key to successful stimulation in cased and perforated wellbores is to control the pressure buildup of the combustion gases to maximize fracturing without destroying the casing. Eight experiments using cased and perforated wellbore were conducted in a tunnel complex at the Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site, which provides a realistic in situ stress environment (4 to 10 MPa (600 to 1500 psi)) and provides access for mineback to directly observe fracturing obtained. Primary variables in the experiments include propellant burn rate and amount of propellant used, presence or absence of liquid in the wellbore, in situ stress orientation, and perforation diameter, density, and phasing. In general, the presence of liquid in the borehole results in a much faster pressure risetime and a lower peak pressure for the same propellant charge. Fracture surfaces proceed outward along lines of perforations as determined by phasing, then gradually turn toward the hydraulic fracture direction. 8 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Dynamic fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, A. S.; Ramulu, M.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic fracture and crack propagation concepts for ductile materials are reviewed. The equations for calculating dynamic stress integrity and the dynamic energy release rate in order to study dynamic crack propagation are provided. The stress intensity factor versus crack velocity relation is investigated. The uses of optical experimental techniques and finite element methods for fracture analyses are described. The fracture criteria for a rapidly propagating crack under mixed mode conditions are discussed; crack extension and fracture criteria under combined tension and shear loading are based on maximum circumferential stress or energy criteria such as strain energy density. The development and use of a Dugdale model and finite element models to represent crack and fracture dynamics are examined.

  19. The Influence of fold and fracture development on reservoir behavior of the Lisburne Group of northern Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Jerry Jensen: Michael T. Whalen; Paul Atkinson; Joseph Brinton; Thang Bui; Margarete Jadamec; Alexandre Karpov; John Lorenz; Michelle M. McGee; T.M. Parris; Ryan Shackleton

    2004-07-01

    The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The Lisburne is folded and thrust faulted where it is exposed throughout the Brooks Range, but is relatively undeformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study were to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of folds and their truncation by thrust faults. (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns. (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow. (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics. Symmetrical detachment folds characterize the Lisburne in the northeastern Brooks Range. In contrast, Lisburne in the main axis of the Brooks Range is deformed into imbricate thrust sheets with asymmetrical hangingwall anticlines and footwall synclines. The Continental Divide thrust front separates these different structural styles in the Lisburne and also marks the southern boundary of the northeastern Brooks Range. Field studies were conducted for this project during 1999 to 2001 in various locations in the northeastern Brooks Range and in the vicinity of Porcupine Lake, immediately south of the Continental Divide thrust front. Results are summarized below for the four main subject areas of the study.

  20. Particle-based simulation of hydraulic fracture and fluid/heat flow in geothermal reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Peter; Wang, Yucang; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando

    2013-06-01

    Realizing the potential of geothermal energy as a cheap, green, sustainable resource to provide for the planet's future energy demands that a key geophysical problem be solved first: how to develop and maintain a network of multiple fluid flow pathways for the time required to deplete the heat within a given region. We present the key components for micro-scale particle-based numerical modeling of hydraulic fracture, and fluid and heat flow in geothermal reservoirs. They are based on the latest developments of ESyS-Particle - the coupling of the Lattice Solid Model (LSM) to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of complex solids with the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) applied to the nonlinear dynamics of coupled fluid and heat flow in the complex solid-fluid system. The coupled LSM/LBM can be used to simulate development of fracture systems in discontinuous media, elastic stress release, fluid injection and the consequent slip at joint surfaces, and hydraulic fracturing; heat exchange between hot rocks and water within flow pathways created through hydraulic fracturing; and fluid flow through complex, narrow, compact and gouge-or powder-filled fracture and joint systems. We demonstrate the coupled LSM/LBM to simulate the fundamental processes listed above, which are all components for the generation and sustainability of the hot-fractured rock geothermal energy fracture systems required to exploit this new green-energy resource.

  1. Groundwater degassing in fractured rock: Modelling and data comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarsjoe, J.; Destouni, G. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Water Resources Engineering

    1998-11-01

    Dissolved gas may be released from deep groundwater in the vicinity of open boreholes and drifts, where the water pressures are relatively low. Degassing of groundwater may influence observations of hydraulic conditions made in drifts, interpretation of experiments performed close to drifts, and buffer mass and backfill performance, particularly during emplacement and repository closure. Under certain conditions, considerable fracture inflow and transmissivity reductions have been observed during degassing experiments in the field and in the laboratory; such reductions affect the outcome and interpretation of both hydraulic and tracer tests. We develop models for the estimation of the resulting degree of fracture gas saturation and the associated transmissivity reduction due to groundwater degassing in fractured rock. Derived expressions for bubble trapping probability show that fracture aperture variability and correlation length influence the conditions for capillary bubble trapping and gas accumulation. The laboratory observations of bubble trapping in an Aespoe fracture replica are consistent with the prediction of a relatively high probability of bubble trapping in this fracture. The prediction was based on the measured aperture distribution of the Aespoe fracture and the applied hydraulic gradient. Results also show that the conceptualisation of gas and water occupancy in a fracture greatly influences model predictions of gas saturation and relative transmissivity. Images from laboratory degassing experiments indicate that tight apertures are completely filled with water, whereas both gas and water exist in wider apertures under degassing conditions; implementation of this relation in our model resulted in the best agreement between predictions and laboratory observations. Model predictions for conditions similar to those prevailing in field for single fractures at great depths indicate that degassing effects in boreholes should generally be small, unless the

  2. Toughening Mechanisms in Silica-Filled Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Binay S.

    Epoxies are widely used as underfill resins throughout the microelectronics industry to mechanically couple and protect various components of flip-chip assemblies. Generally rigid materials largely surround underfill resins. Improving the mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy resins to better match those of their rigid counterparts can help extend the service lifetime of flip-chip assemblies. Recently, researchers have demonstrated that silica nanoparticles are effective toughening agents for lightly-crosslinked epoxies. Improvements in the fracture toughness of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites have primarily been attributed to two toughening mechanisms: particle debonding with subsequent void growth and matrix shear banding. Various attempts have been made to model the contribution of these toughening mechanisms to the overall fracture energy observed in silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites. However, disparities still exist between experimental and modeled fracture energy results. In this dissertation, the thermal, rheological and mechanical behavior of eight different types of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites was investigated. Each nanocomposite consisted of up to 10 vol% of silica nanoparticles with particle sizes ranging from 20 nm to 200 nm, with a variety of surface treatments and particle structures. Fractographical analysis was conducted with new experimental approaches in order to accurately identify morphological evidence for each proposed toughening mechanism. Overall, three major insights into the fracture behavior of real world silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites were established. First, microcracking was observed as an essential toughening mechanism in silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites. Microcracking was observed on the surface and subsurface of fractured samples in each type of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposite. The additional toughening contribution of microcracking to overall fracture energy yielded excellent agreement between experimental

  3. Determination of in-situ fracture apertures from digital borehole images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Maria C.; Stephansson, O. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Engineering Geology

    1998-09-01

    Imaging methods applied to borehole investigations have become common for mapping and characterisation of the rock mass. Today we have access to detailed information about the rock, but we lack some methods for analysis. In this study we develop a methodology for measurements of in-situ fracture geometry, from optical borehole images (BIP-system). We focus on the detailed information about fracture geometry, available thanks to the high image resolution. We have decided to perform the measurements using digital image processing, to avoid bias from the human analyst, and we present on-going work on the image processing methodology. Our method is based on iterative intensity thresholding. We work on grey-scale images, of open fractures that fully intersect the borehole. The fracture trace comes out as a dark sinusoidal in the borehole image. First, the darkest pixels in the image are extracted. Then the pixels, which are immediate neighbours to the first set, are included, under the condition that they are darker than a somewhat lower threshold. The including of neighbours is repeated until the fracture trace is filled. The resulting sinusoidal fracture trace is then used for finding an approximation of the fracture plane. The fracture plane orientation is used for determination of true aperture from the apparent aperture seen in the image. After this, fracture aperture statistics can be determined. The method works well for images of open fractures of simple geometry (sine wave). It needs to be improved to handle more complex geometry, e.g. crossing fracture traces. Today, some minor interaction from the analyst is needed, but slight modifications will minimise this 4 refs, 4 figs

  4. Fracture patterns in synclinal folds, Miaofengshan, Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X. Z.; Liao, Z.; Reches, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The anticlinal bends are of interest for the oil/gas exploration and drilling designs as they are structural traps associated with high intensity of natural fractures due to bending curvature extension. However, some petroliferous areas with proven oil reserves were identified in synclinal structures, e.g. Songliao, Ordos and Bohai Bay Basins, northeast China, Bonaparte Basin, Australia, and Santa Maria Valley field, California. We analyze the fractures in synclines that are expected to carry curvature related fractures similarly to anticlines. The analysis is conducted on a 500m long and ~300 tall exposure of a folded sequence of dolomite and limestone layers at Miaofengshan, Beijing. Two general fracture groups are recognized: (1) layer crossing joints that are sub-parallel to the syncline axial surface; and (2) a distinct system of extension veins, which are joints filled with secondary calcite, that was found only in two layers of 0.8 and 2.2 m thick. These veins are layer-bound, they are up to 5 cm wide, and their width tapers toward the top and bottom of the host layers. Most of them are oriented normal to the bedding surfaces and radially with respect to the syncline shape. We recognized two phases of secondary mineralization that indicate layer-parallel extension of 5% or more. Apparently, these veins developed by bending extension of the most brittle layers whereas the more ductile layers above and below extended quasi-continuously. The analysis suggests that synclinal fracturing should be considered as possible mechanism for exploration of unconventional.

  5. Fracture Energy-Based Brittleness Index Development and Brittleness Quantification by Pre-peak Strength Parameters in Rock Uniaxial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, H.; Taheri, A.; Chanda, E. K.

    2016-12-01

    Brittleness is a fundamental mechanical rock property critical to many civil engineering works, mining development projects and mineral exploration operations. However, rock brittleness is a concept yet to be investigated as there is not any unique criterion available, widely accepted by rock engineering community able to describe rock brittleness quantitatively. In this study, new brittleness indices were developed based on fracture strain energy quantities obtained from the complete stress-strain characteristics of rocks. In doing so, different rocks having unconfined compressive strength values ranging from 7 to 215 MPa were examined in a series of quasi-static uniaxial compression tests after properly implementing lateral-strain control in a closed-loop system to apply axial load to rock specimen. This testing method was essential to capture post-peak regime of the rocks since a combination of class I-II or class II behaviour featured post-peak stress-strain behaviour. Further analysis on the post-peak strain localisation, stress-strain characteristics and the fracture pattern causing class I-II and class II behaviour were undertaken by analysing the development of field of strains in the rocks via three-dimensional digital image correlation. Analysis of the results demonstrated that pre-peak stress-strain brittleness indices proposed solely based on pre-peak stress-strain behaviour do not show any correlation with any of pre-peak rock mechanical parameters. On the other hand, the proposed brittleness indices based on pre-peak and post-peak stress-strain relations were found to competently describe an unambiguous brittleness scale against rock deformation and strength parameters such as the elastic modulus, the crack damage stress and the peak stress relevant to represent failure process.

  6. [Acetabular fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gänsslen, A; Oestern, H J

    2011-12-01

    Treatment of acetabular fractures requires extensive knowledge of the bony anatomy, the amount of possible exposure of the bone with the selected approaches and fracture type-dependent indications of operative treatment. Classification of the fracture with detailed analysis of the fracture morphology is the basis for decision making and planning. The primary treatment aim is the anatomic reconstruction of the acetabulum which results in optimal long-term results.The basis of this overview is the presentation of standard treatment concepts in acetabular fracture surgery. Beside characteristics of the acetabular bony anatomy, biomechanical and pathomechanical principles and the relevant radiological anatomy, the treatment options, both conservative and operative and basic principles of the indications for standard surgical approaches will be discussed.The special fracture type is discussed in detail regarding incidence, injury mechanism, concomitant injuries, options for conservative and operative treatment, quality of operative reduction and long-term results.Furthermore, epidemiological data on typical postoperative complications are evaluated.

  7. Fracture Toughness and Processing Routes Relations in Commercial Titanium Alloys for Developing Alternative Alloys for Ti-6Al-4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    cross head speed of 0.3 mm/ min in air. The dynamic fracture toughness tests will be carried out using a computer aided instrumented Charpy impact...both static and dynamic fracture toughness tests . The static fracture toughness tests will be carried out using an Instron type testing machine at a... testing system, CAI system, at an impact speed of over 1.0 m/ sec in air. The crack initiation point will be detected using compliance changing rate

  8. Risk profile of patients developing nonunion of the clavicle and outcome of treatment-analysis of fifty five nonunions in seven hundred and twenty nine consecutive fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ban, Ilija; Troelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The most common complication following treatment of a clavicle fracture is nonunion. Most nonunions are symptomatic and treatment is mostly operative. The aim of this study was to describe risk profiles of patients developing nonunion and what outcome is observed following operative...... treatment of clavicle nonunions. METHODS: In a consecutive series of 729 clavicle fractures we retrospectively identified 55 that developed nonunion (49 diaphysial and six lateral). All were treated operatively by reconstruction with (n = 28) or without (n = 27) autologous bone graft. Assessment...... was anatomic site, fracture complexity, female gender, smoking habits and initial treatment. A total of eight post-operative complications were found. Remission of symptoms was reported by 29 of the 33. Outright satisfaction with current shoulder condition was reported by 24. The overall median DASH was 8...

  9. Sports fractures.

    OpenAIRE

    DeCoster, T. A.; Stevens, M. A.; Albright, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    Fractures occur in athletes and dramatically influence performance during competitive and recreational activities. Fractures occur in athletes as the result of repetitive stress, acute sports-related trauma and trauma outside of athletics. The literature provides general guidelines for treatment as well as a variety of statistics on the epidemiology of fractures by sport and level of participation. Athletes are healthy and motivated patients, and have high expectations regarding their level o...

  10. Research Progress of Staged Vertical and Horizontal Fracturing Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lei

    2012-01-01

    The United States carried out the first hydraulic fracturing in 1947 after 60 years of development, and has made amazing development in fracturing technology from fundamental research to t practice, with the number of fracturing wells rising year by year.

  11. Hamate fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabia Condés, J M; Ibañez Martínez, L; Sánchez Carrasco, M A; Carrillo Julia, F J; Salmerón Martínez, E L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present our experience in the treatment of the fractures of the hamate and to make a review of the literature on this topic. We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients treated in our clinic between 2005-2012 suffering from fractures of the hamate. Six cases were fractures of the body and four were fractures of the hamate. Five cases were of associated injuries. Diagnostic delay ranged from 30 days to 2 years. Patient follow-up ranged from 1 to 10 years. Patient satisfaction was evaluated using the DASH questionnaire. Five patients with a fracture of the body underwent surgery, and one was treated conservatively. Two patients with fracture of the hook of the hamate were treated with immobilization, and two more patients had the fragment removed. The grip strength and the digital clip were reduced in 2 cases. Flexion and extension of the wrist was limited in 3 cases. The mobility of the fingers was normal in all the cases, except in one. The results obtained from the DASH questionnaire were normal in all the cases, except in one case of fracture of the hamate, and in two cases of fracture of the body. The surgical treatment should reduce the dislocation and stabilize the injuries with osteosynthesis. The fractures of the hamate are usually diagnosed late, and the most recommended treatment is removal of the fragment, although it cannot be deduced from this study. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Colles Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez León, Belisario; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Our expertise is the study of more than 2,000 cases of Colles' fractures. Colles name should in this case to synthesize the type of fractures of the lower end of the radius. There have been various proposed classifications according to the different fracture lines can be demonstrated radiologically in the region of the wrist. We believe that these ratings should only be retained if the concept of the articular fracture or not in the classical sense, since it has great value in the functional ...

  13. Fluid systems and fracture development during syn-depositional fold growth: example from the Pico del Aguilla anticline, Sierras Exteriores, Southern Pyrenees, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Huyghe, Damien; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Lacombe, Olivier; Emmanuel, Laurent; Mouthereau, Frédéric; Ouanhon, Laure

    2014-05-01

    This study presents a reconstruction of fold-fracture-fluid evolution at the Pico del Aguila Anticline, located on the southwestern front of the Jaca piggy-back basin, Southern Pyrenees, Spain. The kinematic evolution of the Pico del Aguila anticline is related to the successive development of N-S ramps and reactivation of E-W striking basement thrusts that occurred coevally with sedimentation in the foreland basin. Consequently, this anticline offers an ideal frame to assess the evolution of the fluid system during the syn-depositional deformation at the front of a fold-thrust belt. Eight fracture sets (joints or faults) observed at fold-scale compose the fracture sequence defined by field and micro-scale chronological relationships. This fracture sequence reflects the Middle Eocene to Early Oligocene tectonic events and the progressive rotation of some fracture sets from NE-SW to E-W witnesses the clockwise rotation that occurred during folding. ∂18O and ∂13C values from vein cements suggest a fluid system buffered by host rocks in most cases. Fluid inclusion microthermometry measurements indicate a fluid entrapment temperature <50°C, supporting that the fluid system reflects strata burial during the main part of strata history. Small-scale vertical migrations from reservoir to reservoir are triggered by fractures related to strata-curvature, both during foreland flexure/forebulge and fold development. After folding, fractures developing in shallow sub-continental to continental strata triggered downward migration of surficial fluids, likely of meteoric origin. This phenomenon is poorly developed in early marine deposits but strongly influenced the fluid system recorded in the late continental deposits. The case study of the Pico del Aguila supports recent finding that fold-fluid systems seem to exhibit a common behavior during folding, with development of curvature-related joints triggering vertical migration of fluids from a reservoir to another. It also

  14. UNDERSTANDING HARD ROCK HYDROGEOLOGY THROUGH AN EXPERIMENTAL HYDROGEOLOGICAL PARK IN SOUTH INDIA: Site development and investigations on the major role of the fractured zone in crystalline aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S.; Guiheneuf, N.; Boisson, A.; Marechal, J.; Chandra, S.; Dewandel, B.; Perrin, J.

    2012-12-01

    In water stressed south India most of the groundwater used for irrigation is pumped from crystalline rocks aquifers. In those structures groundwater flow dominantly occur in a shallow higher-permeability zone that overlies a deeper lower-permeability zone hosting little flow. The fractured zone of the weathering profile plays an important role for groundwater. In order to understand clearly this impact on water availability and quality changes the Experimental Hydrogeological Park at Choutuppal, Andhra Pradesh, India is developed in the framework of the SORE H+ network. Several hydraulic tests (injection, flowmeter profiles, single-packer tests…) and geophysical measurements (ERT, Borehole logging…) are carried out on the site in order to characterize the depth-dependence of hydrodynamic parameters in the Indian Archean granite. Specific investigation on a borewell through packer tests demonstrate that the most conductive part of the aquifer corresponds to the upper part of the fractured layer, located just below the saprolite bottom, between 15 meters and 20 meters depth. There is no highly conductive fracture beyond 20 meters depth and no indication for any conductive fracture beyond 25 meters depth. Packer tests show that the upper part of the fractured layer (15-20 m depth) is characterized by a good vertical connectivity. On the contrary, the tests carried out below 20 m depth show no vertical connectivity at all. The geometry of the fracture network and associated hydrodynamic parameters are in agreement with the conceptual model of hard-rock aquifers that derive its properties from weathering processes. The general existence of such a highly conductive structure at the top of the fractured zone has a great impact on water prospection and exploitation in such crystalline aquifers.

  15. Gravity-Driven Hydraulic Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanovich, L. N.; Garagash, D.; Murdoch, L. C.; Robinowitz, M.

    2014-12-01

    This study is motived by a new method for disposing of nuclear waste by injecting it as a dense slurry into a hydraulic fracture that grows downward to great enough depth to permanently isolate the waste. Disposing of nuclear waste using gravity-driven hydraulic fractures is mechanically similar to the upward growth of dikes filled with low density magma. A fundamental question in both applications is how the injected fluid controls the propagation dynamics and fracture geometry (depth and breadth) in three dimensions. Analog experiments in gelatin [e.g., Heimpel and Olson, 1994; Taisne and Tait, 2009] show that fracture breadth (the short horizontal dimension) remains nearly stationary when the process in the fracture "head" (where breadth is controlled) is dominated by solid toughness, whereas viscous fluid dissipation is dominant in the fracture tail. We model propagation of the resulting gravity-driven (buoyant or sinking), finger-like fracture of stationary breadth with slowly varying opening along the crack length. The elastic response to fluid loading in a horizontal cross-section is local and can be treated similar to the classical Perkins-Kern-Nordgren (PKN) model of hydraulic fracturing. The propagation condition for a finger-like crack is based on balancing the global energy release rate due to a unit crack extension with the rock fracture toughness. It allows us to relate the net fluid pressure at the tip to the fracture breadth and rock toughness. Unlike the PKN fracture, where breadth is known a priori, the final breadth of a finger-like fracture is a result of processes in the fracture head. Because the head is much more open than the tail, viscous pressure drop in the head can be neglected leading to a 3D analog of Weertman's hydrostatic pulse. This requires relaxing the local elasticity assumption of the PKN model in the fracture head. As a result, we resolve the breadth, and then match the viscosity-dominated tail with the 3-D, toughness

  16. Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Doug [Baker-Hughes Oilfield Operation Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Leggett, Jim [Baker-Hughes Oilfield Operation Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-07-29

    The Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager project has a goal to develop a wireline ultrasonic imager that is capable of operating in temperatures up to 300°C (572°F) and depths up to 10 km (32,808 ft). This will address one of the critical needs in any EGS development of understanding the hydraulic flow paths in the reservoir. The ultrasonic imaging is well known in the oil and gas industry as one of the best methods for fracture evaluation; providing both high resolution and complete azimuthal coverage of the borehole. This enables fracture detection and characterization, both natural and induced, providing information as to their location, dip direction and dip magnitude. All of these factors are critical to fully understand the fracture system to enable the optimization of the thermal drainage through injectors and producers in a geothermal resource.

  17. The Pennsylvania Experience with Hydraulic Fracturing for Shale Gas Development: Relatively Infrequent Water Quality Incidents with Lots of Public Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S. L.; Li, Z.; Yoxtheimer, D.; Vidic, R.

    2015-12-01

    New techniques of hydraulic fracturing - "fracking" - have changed the United States over the last 10 years into a leading producer of natural gas extraction from shale. The first such gas well in Pennsylvania was drilled and completed using high-volume hydraulic fracturing in 2004. By late 2014, more than 8500 of these gas wells had been drilled in the Marcellus Shale gas field in Pennsylvania alone. Almost 1000 public complaints about groundwater quality were logged by the PA Department of Environmental Protection (PA DEP) between 2008 and 2012. Only a fraction of these were attributed to unconventional gas development. The most common problem was gas migration into drinking water, but contamination incidents also included spills, seepage, or leaks of fracking fluids, brine salts, or very occasionally, radioactive species. Many problems of gas migration were from a few counties in the northeastern part of the state. However, sometimes one gas well contaminated multiple water wells. For example, one gas well was reported by the state regulator to have contaminated 18 water wells with methane near Dimock PA. It can be argued that such problems at a relatively small fraction of gas wells initiated pockets of pushback against fracking worldwide. This resistance to fracking has grown even though fracking has been in use in the U.S.A. since the 1940s. We have worked as part of an NSF-funded project (the Shale Network) to share water quality data and publish it online using the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System. Sharing data has led to collaborative investigation of specific contamination incidents to understand how problems can occur, and to efforts to quantify the frequency of impacts. The Shale Network efforts have also highlighted the need for more transparency with water quality data in the arena related to the energy-water nexus. As more data are released, new techniques of data analysis will allow better understanding of how to tune best practices to be

  18. Development and validation of a population-based prediction scale for osteoporotic fracture in the region of Valencia, Spain: the ESOSVAL-R study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fluixá Carlos

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Today, while there are effective drugs that reduce the risk of osteoporotic fracture, yet there are no broadly accepted criteria that can be used to estimate risks and decide who should receive treatment. One of the actual priorities of clinical research is to develop a set of simple and readily-available clinical data that can be used in routine clinical practice to identify patients at high risk of bone fracture, and to establish thresholds for therapeutic interventions. Such a tool would have high impact on healthcare policies. The main objective of the ESOSVAL-R is to develop a risk prediction scale of osteoporotic fracture in adult population using data from the Region of Valencia, Spain. Methods/Design Study design: An observational, longitudinal, prospective cohort study, undertaken in the Region of Valencia, with an initial follow-up period of five years; Subjects: 14,500 men and women over the age of 50, residing in the Region and receiving healthcare from centers where the ABUCASIS electronic clinical records system is implanted; Sources of data: The ABUCASIS electronic clinical record system, complemented with hospital morbidity registers, hospital Accidents & Emergency records and the Regional Ministry of Health's mortality register; Measurement of results: Incident osteoporotic fracture (in the hip and/or major osteoporotic fracture during the study's follow-up period. Independent variables include clinical data and complementary examinations; Analysis: 1 Descriptive analysis of the cohorts' baseline data; 2 Upon completion of the follow-up period, analysis of the strength of association between the risk factors and the incidence of osteoporotic fracture using Cox's proportional hazards model; 3 Development and validation of a model to predict risk of osteoporotic fracture; the validated model will serve to develop a simplified scale that can be used during routine clinical visits. Discussion The ESOSVAL-R study

  19. Osteoblast precursors, but not mature osteoblasts, move into developing and fractured bones along with invading blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Christa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Selig, Martin K; Torrekens, Sophie; Roth, Sanford I; Mackem, Susan; Carmeliet, Geert; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2010-08-17

    During endochondral bone development, the first osteoblasts differentiate in the perichondrium surrounding avascular cartilaginous rudiments; the source of trabecular osteoblasts inside the later bone is, however, unknown. Here, we generated tamoxifen-inducible transgenic mice bred to Rosa26R-LacZ reporter mice to follow the fates of stage-selective subsets of osteoblast lineage cells. Pulse-chase studies showed that osterix-expressing osteoblast precursors, labeled in the perichondrium prior to vascular invasion of the cartilage, give rise to trabecular osteoblasts, osteocytes, and stromal cells inside the developing bone. Throughout the translocation, some precursors were found to intimately associate with invading blood vessels, in pericyte-like fashion. A similar coinvasion occurs during endochondral healing of bone fractures. In contrast, perichondrial mature osteoblasts did not exhibit perivascular localization and remained in the outer cortex of developing bones. These findings reveal the specific involvement of immature osteoblast precursors in the coupled vascular and osteogenic transformation essential to endochondral bone development and repair.

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF FOLD AND FRACTURE DEVELOPMENT ON RESERVOIR BEHAVIOR OF THE LISBURNE GROUP OF NORTHERN ALASKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Jerry Jensen; Michael T. Whalen

    2002-01-01

    The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The Lisburne is detachment folded where it is exposed throughout the northeastern Brooks Range, but is relatively undeformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study are to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults. (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns. (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow. (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics. The Lisburne in the main axis of the Brooks Range is characteristically deformed into imbricate thrust sheets with asymmetrical hanging wall anticlines and footwall synclines. In contrast, the Lisburne in the northeastern Brooks Range is characterized by symmetrical detachment folds. The focus of our 2000 field studies was at the boundary between these structural styles in the vicinity of Porcupine Lake, in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The northern edge of thrust-truncated folds in Lisburne is marked by a local range front that likely represents an eastward continuation of the central Brooks Range front. This is bounded to the north by a gently dipping panel of Lisburne with local asymmetrical folds. The leading edge of the flat panel is thrust over Permian to Cretaceous rocks in a synclinal depression. These younger rocks overlie symmetrically detachment-folded Lisburne, as is extensively exposed to the north. Six partial sections were measured in the Lisburne of the flat panel and local range front. The Lisburne here is about 700 m thick and is interpreted to consist primarily of the Wachsmuth and Alapah Limestones, with only a thin veneer of Wahoo Limestone. The Wachsmuth (200 m) is gradational between the underlying Missippian Kayak Shale and the overlying Mississippian Alapah, and

  1. A project in two parts: Developing fire histories for the eastern U.S. and creating a climate-based continental fire frequency model to fill data gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Guyette; Michael Stambaugh; Daniel. Dey

    2011-01-01

    Tree-ring dated fire scars provide long-term records of fire frequency, giving land managers valuable baseline information about the fire regimes that existed prior to Euro-American settlement. However, for the East, fire history data prove difficult to acquire because the generally moister climate of the region causes rapid decay of wood. In an endeavor to fill data...

  2. The development of a comprehensive multidisciplinary care pathway for patients with a hip fracture : design and results of a clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flikweert, Elvira R; Izaks, Gerbrand J; Knobben, Bas A S; Stevens, Martin; Wendt, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hip fractures frequently occur in older persons and severely decrease life expectancy and independence. Several care pathways have been developed to lower the risk of negative outcomes but most pathways are limited to only one aspect of care. The aim of this study was therefore to develo

  3. Microstructure Filled Hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, A. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thomas, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reese, T. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-24

    We propose replacing the gas fill in a hohlraum with a low average density, variable uniformity 3D printed structure. This creates a bimodal hohlraum which acts like a vacuum hohlraum initially during the picket, but could protect the capsule from glint or direct illumination, and then once expanded, homogenizes to behave like a variable z gas-fill during peak portion of the drive. This is motivated by a two main aims: 1) reduction of the Au bubble velocity to improve inner beam propagation, and 2) the introduction of a low density, high-Z, x-ray converter to improve x-ray production in the hohlraum and uniformity of the radiation field seen by the capsule.

  4. Complications of Dermal Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Ahmad Salati

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Dermal fillers have globally become sought after drugs due to the desire of aging population to regain the youthful looks without any surgical operations. But like other procedures, dermal filling can become complicated. Besides the profitability have introduced the factor of malpractice which can bring in misery rather than beauty and youthful body contours. This article briefly reviews the common adverse effects of dermal fillers.

  5. A 3-Dimensional discrete fracture network generator to examine fracture-matrix interaction using TOUGH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Kazumasa; Yongkoo, Seol

    2003-04-09

    Water fluxes in unsaturated, fractured rock involve the physical processes occurring at fracture-matrix interfaces within fracture networks. Modeling these water fluxes using a discrete fracture network model is a complicated effort. Existing preprocessors for TOUGH2 are not suitable to generate grids for fracture networks with various orientations and inclinations. There are several 3-D discrete-fracture-network simulators for flow and transport, but most of them do not capture fracture-matrix interaction. We have developed a new 3-D discrete-fracture-network mesh generator, FRACMESH, to provide TOUGH2 with information about the fracture network configuration and fracture-matrix interactions. FRACMESH transforms a discrete fracture network into a 3 dimensional uniform mesh, in which fractures are considered as elements with unique rock material properties and connected to surrounding matrix elements. Using FRACMESH, individual fractures may have uniform or random aperture distributions to consider heterogeneity. Fracture element volumes and interfacial areas are calculated from fracture geometry within individual elements. By using FRACMESH and TOUGH2, fractures with various inclinations and orientations, and fracture-matrix interaction, can be incorporated. In this paper, results of flow and transport simulations in a fractured rock block utilizing FRACMESH are presented.

  6. Hydraulic fracture propagation modeling and data-based fracture identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing

    Successful shale gas and tight oil production is enabled by the engineering innovation of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Hydraulically induced fractures will most likely deviate from the bi-wing planar pattern and generate complex fracture networks due to mechanical interactions and reservoir heterogeneity, both of which render the conventional fracture simulators insufficient to characterize the fractured reservoir. Moreover, in reservoirs with ultra-low permeability, the natural fractures are widely distributed, which will result in hydraulic fractures branching and merging at the interface and consequently lead to the creation of more complex fracture networks. Thus, developing a reliable hydraulic fracturing simulator, including both mechanical interaction and fluid flow, is critical in maximizing hydrocarbon recovery and optimizing fracture/well design and completion strategy in multistage horizontal wells. A novel fully coupled reservoir flow and geomechanics model based on the dual-lattice system is developed to simulate multiple nonplanar fractures' propagation in both homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoirs with or without pre-existing natural fractures. Initiation, growth, and coalescence of the microcracks will lead to the generation of macroscopic fractures, which is explicitly mimicked by failure and removal of bonds between particles from the discrete element network. This physics-based modeling approach leads to realistic fracture patterns without using the empirical rock failure and fracture propagation criteria required in conventional continuum methods. Based on this model, a sensitivity study is performed to investigate the effects of perforation spacing, in-situ stress anisotropy, rock properties (Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and compressive strength), fluid properties, and natural fracture properties on hydraulic fracture propagation. In addition, since reservoirs are buried thousands of feet below the surface, the

  7. Assessment of dome-fill technology and potential fill materials for the Hanford single-shell tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, J.D.; Shade, J.W.; Somasundaram, S.

    1992-05-01

    This study is part of a task that will identify dome-fill materials to stabilize and prevent the collapse of the structures of 149 single- shell tanks (SSTs). The SSTs were built at the Hanford Site in Washington State and used between 1944 and 1980 to store radioactive and other hazardous wastes. In addition to identifying suitable fill materials, this task will develop the technology and methods required to fill the tanks with the selected material. To date, basalt is the only candidate fill material with any testing conducted for its suitability as a dome-fill material. Sufficient data do not exist to select or eliminate basalt as a candidate material. This report documents a review of past dome-fill work at the Hanford Site and of other pertinent literature to establish a baseline for the dome-fill technology. In addition, the report identifies existing dome-fill technology, preliminary performance criteria for dome-fill technology development, potential testing strategies, and potential fill materials. As a part of this study, potential fill materials are qualitatively evaluated and a list of preliminary candidate fill materials is identified. Future work will further screen these materials. The dome-fill task work will ultimately contribute to the development of a final waste form package and the safe isolation of wastes from the Hanford Site SSTs.

  8. A tool for computing time-dependent permeability reduction of fractured volcanic conduit margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Jamie; Wadsworth, Fabian; Heap, Michael; Baud, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    Laterally-oriented fractures within volcanic conduit margins are thought to play an important role in tempering eruption explosivity by allowing magmatic volatiles to outgas. The permeability of a fractured conduit margin - the equivalent permeability - can be modelled as the sum of permeability contributions of the edifice host rock and the fracture(s) within it. We present here a flexible MATLAB® tool which computes the time-dependent equivalent permeability of a volcanic conduit margin containing ash-filled fractures. The tool is designed so that the end-user can define a wide range of input parameters to yield equivalent permeability estimates for their application. The time-dependence of the equivalent permeability is incorporated by considering permeability decrease as a function of porosity loss in the ash-filled fractures due to viscous sintering (after Russell and Quane, 2005), which is in turn dependent on the depth and temperature of each fracture and the crystal-content of the magma (all user-defined variables). The initial viscosity of the granular material filling the fracture is dependent on the water content (Hess and Dingwell, 1996), which is computed assuming equilibrium depth-dependent water content (Liu et al., 2005). Crystallinity is subsequently accounted for by employing the particle-suspension rheological model of Mueller et al. (2010). The user then defines the number of fractures, their widths, and their depths, and the lengthscale of interest (e.g. the length of the conduit). Using these data, the combined influence of transient fractures on the equivalent permeability of the conduit margin is then calculated by adapting a parallel-plate flow model (developed by Baud et al., 2012 for porous sandstones), for host rock permeabilities from 10-11 to 10-22 m2. The calculated values of porosity and equivalent permeability with time for each host rock permeability is then output in text and worksheet file formats. We introduce two dimensionless

  9. Method development and strategy for the characterization of complexly faulted and fractured rhyolitic tuffs, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasaki, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Galloway, D. [Geological Survey, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    1991-06-01

    The planned high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, would exist in unsaturated, fractured welded tuff. One possible contaminant pathway to the accessible environment is transport by groundwater infiltrating to the water table and flowing through the saturated zone. Therefore, an effort to characterize the hydrology of the saturated zone is being undertaken in parallel with that of the unsaturated zone. As a part of the saturated zone investigation, there wells-UE-25c{number_sign}1, UE-25c{number_sign}2, and UE-25c{number_sign}3 (hereafter called the c-holes)-were drilled to study hydraulic and transport properties of rock formations underlying the planned waste repository. The location of the c-holes is such that the formations penetrated in the unsaturated zone occur at similar depths and with similar thicknesses as at the planned repository site. In characterizing a highly heterogeneous flow system, several issues emerge. (1) The characterization strategy should allow for the virtual impossibility to enumerate and characterize all heterogeneities. (2) The methodology to characterize the heterogeneous flow system at the scale of the well tests needs to be established. (3) Tools need to be developed for scaling up the information obtained at the well-test scale to the larger scale of the site. In the present paper, the characterization strategy and the methods under development are discussed with the focus on the design and analysis of the field experiments at the c-holes.

  10. Application of a moment tensor inversion code developed for mining-induced seismicity to fracture monitoring of civil engineering materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzer, Lindsay; Mhamdi, Lassaad; Schumacher, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A moment tensor inversion (MTI) code originally developed to compute source mechanisms from mining-induced seismicity data is now being used in the laboratory in a civil engineering research environment. Quantitative seismology methods designed for geological environments are being tested with the aim of developing techniques to assess and monitor fracture processes in structural concrete members such as bridge girders. In this paper, we highlight aspects of the MTI_Toolbox programme that make it applicable to performing inversions on acoustic emission (AE) data recorded by networks of uniaxial sensors. The influence of the configuration of a seismic network on the conditioning of the least-squares system and subsequent moment tensor results for a real, 3-D network are compared to a hypothetical 2-D version of the same network. This comparative analysis is undertaken for different cases: for networks consisting entirely of triaxial or uniaxial sensors; for both P and S-waves, and for P-waves only. The aim is to guide the optimal design of sensor configurations where only uniaxial sensors can be installed. Finally, the findings of recent laboratory experiments where the MTI_Toolbox has been applied to a concrete beam test are presented and discussed.

  11. Developing Fatigue Pre-crack Procedure to Evaluate Fracture Toughness of Pipeline Steels Using Spiral Notch Torsion Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Tan, Ting [ORNL; Jiang, Hao [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2012-10-01

    The spiral notch torsion test (SNTT) has been utilized to investigate the crack growth behavior of X52 steel base and welded materials used for hydrogen infrastructures. The X52 steel materials are received from a welded pipe using friction stir welding techniques. Finite element models were established to study the crack growth behavior of steel SNTT steel samples, which were assumed to be isotropic material. A series SNTT models were set up to cover various crack penetration cases, of which the ratios between crack depth to diameter (a/D ratio) ranging from 0.10 to 0.45. The evolution of compliance and energy release rates in the SNTT method have been investigated with different cases, including different geometries and materials. Indices of characteristic compliance and energy release rates have been proposed. Good agreement has been achieved between predictions from different cases in the same trend. These work shed lights on a successful protocol for SNTT application in wide range of structural materials. The further effort needed for compliance function development is to extend the current developed compliance function to the deep crack penetration arena, in the range of 0.55 to 0.85 to effectively determine fracture toughness for extremely tough materials.

  12. Contraction stresses of composite resin filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegdahl, T; Gjerdet, N R

    1977-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resin filling materials and the tensile stresses developed when the shrinkage is restrained were measured in an in vitro experiment. This allows an estimation to be made of the forces exerted upon the enamel walls of cavities filled with the resin in the acid etch technique. The results indicate that the stresses acting on the enamel are low compared to the tensile strength of the enamel.

  13. Relationship of electrical resistance end morphological changes thigh rats after modeling of open fracture (experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlova T.M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to the development of industry, increasing number of vehicles on the roads rate of traumatic injuries among adult population causing disability and mortality is still high in all countries of the world. Among all fractures of long bones open diaphyseal fractures ranges from 28% to 53%. Objective. To study the relationship of electrical resistance and morphological features of the femur of white male rats after modeling the open fracture. Methods. Studies were conducted on white male rats aged about 3 months. Digital multimeter UT70B was used to measure the electrical resistance of bones in experimental animals after 1 and 3 hours of experimental modeling of opened bone fracture. Histological and electron microscopic studies were performed to evaluate bone structure. Results. 1 hour after modeling an open bone fracture it was detected the presence of empty lacunae or gaps filled with detritus. 3 hours after the experiment cellular density in the first studied area was reduced 4.1 times, in the second area - 3.2 times comparing with the control. Conclusion. These histological examination and study of the electrical resistance of bone fragments after re-fracture (with or without coagulation fragments indicate similar changes in direction of the bone. Electrical resistance after testing in the clinical setting can be used for testing the bone fragments after an open fracture to assess viability. We have developed a technique for evaluation the electrical resistance making it possible to predict the viability of bone tissue with opened diaphyseal fractures of extremities on early stages. Citation: Pavlova TM, Berezka MI. [Relationship of electrical resistance end morphological changes thigh rats after mod-eling of open fracture (experimental study]. Morphologia. 2016;10(2:31-9. Ukrainian.

  14. Resilient but not sustainable? Public perceptions of shale gas development via hydraulic fracturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrick Evensen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex energy development, such as associated with extraction and processing of shale gas, may affect the future sustainability and resilience of the small, often rural communities where development occurs. A difficulty for understanding the connection between sustainability, resilience, and shale gas development (hereafter "SGD" is that definitions of sustainability and resilience are often muddled and unclear. Nevertheless, the ways in which development could affect sustainability and resilience have been discussed and contested in academic literature. Little is known, however, about the general public's thoughts on how SGD relates to sustainability and resilience. Despite the overlap and conflation of these two concepts, research indicates some differences between characterizations of the two. While acknowledging difficulties in defining the terms, we included questions on a few broad attributes of the two concepts in a survey (n = 1202 of a random sample of residents in the Marcellus Shale region of NY and PA, to explore the relationship between support for / opposition to SGD and perceived importance of community sustainability and resilience. Our survey revealed that beliefs about the importance of sustainability, as measured by three items that clearly pool together as a single factor, are associated with opposition to SGD; beliefs about the importance of resilience, measured by four clearly connected items, are associated with support for SGD. This finding is particularly intriguing and relevant for communication and policy about sustainability and resilience in connection with energy development, because of the common conflation of the two terms.

  15. Subduction of fracture zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi; Leeman, William

    2013-04-01

    Since Wilson proposed in 1965 the existence of a new class of faults on the ocean floor, namely transform faults, the geodynamic effects and importance of fracture zone subduction is still little studied. It is known that oceanic plates are characterized by numerous fracture zones, and some of them have the potential to transport into subduction zones large volumes of water-rich serpentinite, providing a fertile water source for magma generated in subduction-related arc volcanoes. In most previous geodynamic studies, subducting plates are considered to be homogeneous, and there is no clear indication how the subduction of a fracture zone influences the melting pattern in the mantle wedge and the slab-derived fluids distribution in the subarc mantle. Here we show that subduction of serpentinized fracture zones plays a significant role in distribution of melt and fluids in the mantle wedge above the slab. Using high-resolution tree-dimensional coupled petrological-termomechanical simulations of subduction, we show that fluids, including melts and water, vary dramatically in the region where a serpentinized fracture zone enters into subduction. Our models show that substantial hydration and partial melting tend to concentrate where fracture zones are being subducted, creating favorable conditions for partially molten hydrous plumes to develop. These results are consistent with the along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes in several regions, as the Aleutian Arc, the Cascades, the Southern Mexican Volcanic Arc, and the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone.

  16. Development of and tests with the NMR technique to detect water bearing fractures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyer, R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available the results of these simulations and presents field data from both surface and underground measurements collected with a new NMR instrument developed for shallow investigations. Signal amplitudes of <100 nV are normally expected, but noise levels are often a...

  17. Diagenesis in porosity evolution of opening-mode fractures, Middle Triassic to Lower Jurassic La Boca Formation, NE Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubach, Stephen E.; Ward, Meghan E.

    2006-06-01

    Opening-mode fractures (joints) in Middle Triassic to Lower Jurassic La Boca Formation sandstones, northeastern Mexico, have patterns of fracture porosity, mineral-fill structures, and size distributions not previously described from outcrop. Patterns match those found in cores from many basins. We used aperture measurements along lines of observation (scanlines), fracture-trace maps, petrography, high-resolution scanning-electron-microscope-(SEM)-based cathodoluminescence, and fluid inclusions to characterize fracture populations. Open fractures are lined by quartz that precipitated while fractures were opening, whereas sealed fractures additionally contain calcite deposited after fractures ceased opening. Large fractures and arrays of contemporaneous microfractures have consistent power-law aperture-size scaling over approximately three orders of magnitude. Our results imply that open fractures and fracture sizes depend on diagenetic state. The interplay of fracture mechanics and diagenetic history is a determinant on effective porosity within fractures and, thus, open fracture persistence, connectivity, and fluid flow.

  18. Gas-filled separators - An overview

    CERN Document Server

    Leino, M

    2003-01-01

    Gas-filled recoil separators have been used in nuclear physics studies since the early fifties. Most notably, they have found use in the separation of evaporation residues of heavy and very heavy elements from unwanted background. Gas-filled separators, alone or coupled to a detector array, offer an efficient, fast, compact and relatively inexpensive solution for nuclear structure studies. A new application is the use of a gas-filled device as a pre-separator in the study of chemical properties of the heaviest elements. Other uses include systematic study of fusion evaporation cross sections and accelerator mass spectrometry. In this contribution, an overview on gas-filled recoil separators, their characteristics, fields of application and possible future developments is given.

  19. Discrete modeling of hydraulic fracturing processes in a complex pre-existing fracture network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.; Rutqvist, J.; Nakagawa, S.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and stimulation of fracture networks are widely used by the energy industry (e.g., shale gas extraction, enhanced geothermal systems) to increase permeability of geological formations. Numerous analytical and numerical models have been developed to help understand and predict the behavior of hydraulically induced fractures. However, many existing models assume simple fracturing scenarios with highly idealized fracture geometries (e.g., propagation of a single fracture with assumed shapes in a homogeneous medium). Modeling hydraulic fracture propagation in the presence of natural fractures and homogeneities can be very challenging because of the complex interactions between fluid, rock matrix, and rock interfaces, as well as the interactions between propagating fractures and pre-existing natural fractures. In this study, the TOUGH-RBSN code for coupled hydro-mechanical modeling is utilized to simulate hydraulic fracture propagation and its interaction with pre-existing fracture networks. The simulation tool combines TOUGH2, a simulator of subsurface multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach, with the implementation of a lattice modeling approach for geomechanical and fracture-damage behavior, named Rigid-Body-Spring Network (RBSN). The discrete fracture network (DFN) approach is facilitated in the Voronoi discretization via a fully automated modeling procedure. The numerical program is verified through a simple simulation for single fracture propagation, in which the resulting fracture geometry is compared to an analytical solution for given fracture length and aperture. Subsequently, predictive simulations are conducted for planned laboratory experiments using rock-analogue (soda-lime glass) samples containing a designed, pre-existing fracture network. The results of a preliminary simulation demonstrate selective fracturing and fluid infiltration along the pre-existing fractures, with additional fracturing in part

  20. Bone development and its relation to fracture repair. The role of mesenchymal osteoblasts and surface osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Shapiro

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Bone development occurs by two mechanisms: intramembranous bone formation and endochondral bone formation. Bone tissue forms by eventual differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells into either mesenchymal osteoblasts (MOBL, which synthesize woven bone in random orientation, or surface osteoblasts (SOBL, which synthesize bone on surfaces in a well oriented lamellar array. Bone repair uses the same formation patterns as bone development but the specific mechanism of repair is determined by the biomechanical environment provided. Bone synthesis and maintenance are highly dependent on the blood supply of bone and on cell-cell communication via the lacunar-canalicular system. Recent investigations highlight the molecular cascades leading to cell differentiation, the components of the structural proteins such as the various collagens, and tissue vascularization. The patterning of bone matrix from an initial woven to an eventual lamellar orientation is essential for bone to develop its maximum strength. This review demonstrates the repetitive nature of woven to lamellar bone formation as mediated by MOBLs and SOBLs in both normal vertebrate bones and bone repair. Repair, using endochondral, primary, direct and distraction osteogenesis mechanisms, is reviewed along with the associated molecular, vascular, and biophysical features.

  1. Development of a Titanium Plate for Mandibular Angle Fractures with a Bone Defect in the Lower Border: Finite Element Analysis and Mechanical Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Rangel Goulart

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to develop a plate to treat mandibular angle fractures using the finite element method and mechanical testing. Material and Methods: A three-dimensional model of a fractured mandible was generated using Rhinoceros 4.0 software. The models were exported to ANSYS®, in which a static application of displacement (3 mm was performed in the first molar region. Three groups were assessed according to the method of internal fixation (2 mm system: two non-locking plates; two locking plates and a new design locking plate. The computational model was transferred to an in vitro experiment with polyurethane mandibles. Each group contained five samples and was subjected to a linear loading test in a universal testing machine. Results: A balanced distribution of stress was associated with the new plate design. This plate modified the mechanical behavior of the fractured region, with less displacement between the fractured segments. In the mechanical test, the group with two locking plates exhibited greater resistance to the 3 mm displacement, with a statistically significant difference when compared with the new plate group (ANOVA, P = 0.016. Conclusions: The new plate exhibited a more balanced distribution of stress. However, the group with two locking plates exhibited greater mechanical resistance.

  2. Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdoch, L. [FRx Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Siegrist, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Vesper, S. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    Many contaminated areas consist of a source area and a plume. In the source area, the contaminant moves vertically downward from a release point through the vadose zone to an underlying saturated region. Where contaminants are organic liquids, NAPL may accumulate on the water table, or it may continue to migrate downward through the saturated region. Early developments of permeable barrier technology have focused on intercepting horizontally moving plumes with vertical structures, such as trenches, filled with reactive material capable of immobilizing or degrading dissolved contaminants. This focus resulted in part from a need to economically treat the potentially large volumes of contaminated water in a plume, and in part from the availability of construction technology to create the vertical structures that could house reactive compounds. Contaminant source areas, however, have thus far remained largely excluded from the application of permeable barrier technology. One reason for this is the lack of conventional construction methods for creating suitable horizontal structures that would place reactive materials in the path of downward-moving contaminants. Methods of hydraulic fracturing have been widely used to create flat-lying to gently dipping layers of granular material in unconsolidated sediments. Most applications thus far have involved filling fractures with coarse-grained sand to create permeable layers that will increase the discharge of wells recovering contaminated water or vapor. However, it is possible to fill fractures with other compounds that alter the chemical composition of the subsurface. One early application involved development and field testing micro-encapsulated sodium percarbonate, a solid compound that releases oxygen and can create aerobic conditions suitable for biodegradation in the subsurface for several months.

  3. Managing periprosthetic femoral stem fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Aaron G

    2006-06-01

    Periprosthetic fractures can be difficult to manage. The classification system developed in Vancouver is simple and useful in determining appropriate treatment. It takes into account the site of the fracture, the stability of the implant, and the surrounding bone stock, which are the important elements of the fracture and hip that determines treatment. Understanding this classification system should allow the practitioner to choose the appropriate treatment. In addition to fracture management skills, understanding how to perform a host of hip revision technique may also be required.

  4. Infection in periprosthetic hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Fracture around the acetabulum and femur in total hip arthroplasty is a possible complication, sometimes with difficult surgical solution, namely when a sepsis is present. Periprosthetic hip fractures were classified according to a modified Vancouver classification. We treated 112 patients (67 men and 45 women) with periprosthetic hip fractures: 105 femoral fractures (94%) and seven acetabular fractures (6%). Mean follow-up was 10.6 years. For Type A (seven cases - 7%), B1 (10 cases - 10%) or C (13 cases - 12%) fractures around well fixed femoral stems we only fixed the fractures. For Type B2 (17 cases - 16%), B3 (46 cases - 44%) and D (12 cases - 11%, with associated fractures, not contemplated in the Vancouver classification) we used an uncemented long femoral stem, fixation with metallic cables and cancellous bone allografts to fill the femoral bone loss. We observed a deep infection in three patients (2.7%), three early hip dislocations treated by closed reductions, two cases with asymptomatic trochanteric non-union and one femoral refracture. In the three infection cases we performed two-stage revision with cementless hip prosthesis, using an antibiotic-loaded cement hip spacer (three to eight months), a six weeks period of parenteral antibiotics and we performed articular aspiration before revision surgery. Until now, we did not observe any re-infection. It is very important to make an early diagnosis, isolate micro-organisms and ensure their antibiotic susceptibility. The surgery solution depends on the well fixed implants and periprosthetic osteolysis and articular instability.

  5. Methane Emissions from Hydraulically Fractured Natural Gas Developments in Northeastern British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, E. E.; Risk, D. A.; Fougère, C. R.; Lavoie, M.; Marshall, A. D.; Werring, J.

    2016-12-01

    If we are to attain the recent North American goals to reduce methane (CH4) emissions, we must understand emission patterns across developments of different types. In this study we quantified the incidence of CH4 emissions from unconventional natural gas infrastructure accessing the Montney play in British Columbia, Canada. We used mobile surveying to collect CH4 and CO2 measurements over 11,000 km of survey campaigns. Our routes brought us past more than 1600 unique well pads and facilities, and we repeated the six routes 7-10 times during summer (2015) and winter (2016) to explore temporal variability. Well pads and facilities were considered probable emission sources only if they were upwind by 500 m or less from the survey vehicle, and on-road concentrations were in excess of local background. In the summer campaigns we found that 47% of individual active production wells emitted CH4-rich plumes, and most of them emitted persistently across repeat surveys. Older infrastructure tended to emit more frequently (per unit), with comparable severity to younger infrastructure in terms of measured excess concentrations on-road. About 26% of abandoned wells were also found to be emitting. Extrapolating our emission incidence values across all abandoned oil and gas infrastructure in the BC portion of the Montney, we estimate that there are more than 550 abandoned wells in this area that could be emitting CH4-rich plumes. The results of this study suggest that analyzing emitting infrastructure by ages and operational differences can help delineate emission trends. Considering the recent industry downturn, our results also highlight the importance of focusing emission reduction efforts on abandoned and suspended infrastructure, as well as active. This is the first bottom-up monitoring study of fugitive emissions in the Canadian energy sector, and the results can be used to inform policy development to reduce energy-related emissions.

  6. Tension-filled Governance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celik, Tim Holst

    Since the crisis-engrossed 1970s, and especially the 1990s, ‘governance’ has become a dominant concern and concept; notably, within particularly political science, a certain diagnosis explicitly or implicitly focused on a shift ‘from government to governance’ has become increasingly popular....... This study examines the governance phenomenon of the post-1970/1990s period from a state-situated and historically informed perspective. Specifically, taking initial analytical departure in an approach of the early 1970s associated with James O’Connor, Jürgen Habermas and Claus Offe focused...... on the statesituated tension-filled functional relationship between legitimation and accumulation, the study both historically and theoretically reworks this approach and reapplies it for the post-1970s/1990s governance period. It asks whether and to what extent governance has served as a distinctive post- 1970s/1990s...

  7. Preparing for faster filling

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Following the programmed technical stop last week, operators focussed on preparing the machine for faster filling, which includes multibunch injection and a faster pre-cycle phase.   The LHC1 screen shot during the first multibunch injection operation. The LHC operational schedule incorporates a technical stop for preventive maintenance roughly every six weeks of stable operation, during which several interventions on the various machines are carried out. Last week these included the replacement of a faulty magnet in the SPS pre-accelerator, which required the subsequent re-setting of the system of particle extraction and transfer to the LHC. At the end of last week, all the machines were handed back for operation and work could start on accommodating all the changes made into the complex systems in order for normal operation to be resumed. These ‘recovery’ operations continued through the weekend and into this week. At the beginning of this week, operators succeeded in pro...

  8. 髁突颈部骨折对下颌骨生长发育的影响%Effect of condylar neck fractures on growth and development of mandible.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱房勇; 兰柳萍; 胡瑜; 李松

    2009-01-01

    Condylar neck is one of the most predilection sites of mandibular fractures. The treatment target of fractures is not only limited to the healing of fractures, but more to the change and mechanism in growth and development of mandible after fractures. This article reviewed the study of the effect of condylar neck fractures on the development of mandible.%髁突颈部是下颌骨骨折的好发部位之一.对于髁突颈部骨折的治疗目标不仅局限于骨折的愈合,而更多地考虑到在骨折发生后下颌骨的生长发育.本文就髁突颈部骨折对下颌骨生长发育影响的研究进展做一综述.

  9. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  10. Development of skull fracture criterion based on real-world head trauma simulations using finite element head model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Debasis; Deck, Caroline; Yoganandan, Narayan; Willinger, Rémy

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance an existing finite element (FE) head model with composite modeling and a new constitutive law for the skull. The response of the state-of-the-art FE head model was validated in the time domain using data from 15 temporo-parietal impact experiments, conducted with postmortem human surrogates. The new model predicted skull fractures observed in these tests. Further, 70 well-documented head trauma cases were reconstructed. The 15 experiments and 70 real-world head trauma cases were combined to derive skull fracture injury risk curves. The skull internal energy was found to be the best candidate to predict skull failure based on an in depth statistical analysis of different mechanical parameters (force, skull internal energy), head kinematic-based parameter, the head injury criterion (HIC), and skull fracture correlate (SFC). The proposed tolerance limit for 50% risk of skull fracture was associated with 453mJ of internal energy. Statistical analyses were extended for individual impact locations (frontal, occipital and temporo-parietal) and separate injury risk curves were obtained. The 50% risk of skull fracture for each location: frontal: 481mJ, occipital: 457mJ, temporo-parietal: 456mJ of skull internal energy.

  11. Time to first fracture affects sweetness of gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala, G.; Stieger, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the breakdown behaviour on sweetness intensity of gelled model foods. Emulsion-filled gelatine/agar gels varying mainly in fracture strain (eF) were used. The fracture strain was modified by changing either the ratio between gelatine and agar

  12. Bilateral acetabular fracture without trauma

    OpenAIRE

    De Rosa, M. A.; G. Maccauro; D’Arienzo, M.

    1999-01-01

     In the absence of trauma fracture of the acetabulum is an extremely rare injury. We describe a 70 year old man who spontaneously developed fractures in both acetabulae due to bony insufficiency. It was successfully treated by bilateral total hip replacement.

  13. Polymer liquids fracture like solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qian; Hassager, Ole

    2017-01-01

    While fracture in brittle solids has been studied for centuries until today, there are few studies on fracture in polymer liquids. Recent developments in experimental techniques, especially the combination of controlled filament stretching rheometry and high speed imaging, have opened new windows...

  14. Fracture mechanics in pavement design

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Denneman, E

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available effects. Examples of the use of fracture mechanics providing an alternative to these conventional design parameters are given in the paper. The paper shows that although much further development is required before fracture mechanics can be relied upon...

  15. OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

    2004-05-01

    A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

  16. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Boning [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Herbold, Eric B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Homel, Michael A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Regueiro, Richard A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density and packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.

  17. In situ experiments of geothermal well stimulation using gas fracturing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.Y.; Warpinski, N.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1988-07-01

    The results of an experimental study of gas fracturing technology for geothermal well stimulation demonstrated that multiple fractures could be created to link water-filled boreholes with existing fractures. The resulting fracture network and fracture interconnections were characterized by mineback as well as flow tests. Commercial oil field fracturing tools were used successfully in these experiments. Simple scaling laws for gas fracturing and a brief discussion of the application of this technique to actual geothermal well stimulation are presented. 10 refs., 42 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Application of fractured aquifer characterization techniques in the development of a wellfield protection plan, Springdale, south central New Brunswick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desroches, A.J.; Butler, K.E. [University of New Brunswick (Canada)], email: aaron.desroches@unb.ca; Pelkey, S.; Banks, V. [GEMTEC Ltd (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    There is a fractured sandstone and mudstone aquifer underlying the Springdale wellfield near Sussex, New Brunswick, Canada. The aim of this paper is to present work carried out to characterize the bedrock fracture network and assess drawdown magnitude around the production wells in order to build a wellfield protection plan. An integrated hydrogeological and borehole geophysical study was performed and borehole logging methods were used to determine bedrock fractures. Results confirmed that groundwater flow conditions were anisotropic and drawdowns of 1.31m and 1.23 m were found respectively in the pumping well and 592 meters away to the southeast, while observation wells located southwest and northeast had minimal drawdown. This paper provided a better understanding of the groundwater flow system's anisotropic conditions which will help in building a hydrogeological model.

  19. Computer simulation for centrifugal mold filling of precision titanium castings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Computer simulation codes were developed based on a proposed mathematical model for centrifugal mold filling processes and previous computer software for 3D mold filling and solidification of castings (CASM-3D for Windows). Sample simulations were implemented for mold filling processes of precision titanium castings under gravity and different centrifugal casting techniques. The computation results show that the alloy melt has a much stronger mold filling ability for thin section castings under a centrifugal force field than that only under the gravity. A "return back" mold filling manner is showed to be a reasonable technique for centrifugal casting processes, especially for thin section precision castings.

  20. Galeazzi fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atesok, Kivanc I; Jupiter, Jesse B; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2011-10-01

    Galeazzi fracture is a fracture of the radial diaphysis with disruption at the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Typically, the mechanism of injury is forceful axial loading and torsion of the forearm. Diagnosis is established on radiographic evaluation. Underdiagnosis is common because disruption of the ligamentous restraints of the DRUJ may be overlooked. Nonsurgical management with anatomic reduction and immobilization in a long-arm cast has been successful in children. In adults, nonsurgical treatment typically fails because of deforming forces acting on the distal radius and DRUJ. Open reduction and internal fixation is the preferred surgical option. Anatomic reduction and rigid fixation should be followed by intraoperative assessment of the DRUJ. Further intraoperative interventions are based on the reducibility and postreduction stability of the DRUJ. Misdiagnosis or inadequate management of Galeazzi fracture may result in disabling complications, such as DRUJ instability, malunion, limited forearm range of motion, chronic wrist pain, and osteoarthritis.

  1. Dynamic fracture development in response to extreme summer temperatures: 27/7/2014, Långören Island, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leith, Kerry; Perras, Matthew; Siren, Topias; Rantanen, Tuomas; Heinonen, Suvi; Loew, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Long periods of exceptionally high temperatures in Finland and California during the summer of 2014 were associated with the formation of large 'exfoliation' or 'sheeting' fractures in bedrock surfaces. Videos taken at both locations show sharp fractures forming along the edge of thin (15,000 years ago), hinting at the rarity of the recent events on the otherwise undamaged surface. In order to uncover the mechanisms driving this remarkable event, we installed a unique low-cost monitoring system to track the behavior of the new Långören Island fracture through the summer of 2016. This included a local meteorological station, Arduino-based rock temperature profiles, acoustic emission measurements, and a 3G-enabled all-in-one PC for live data communication. Coupled with GPR data, field mapping, and a local DEM derived from a 'Go-Pro on a stick' structure from motion capture, we generate a unique insight into the conditions at the time of the 2014 event, and potential active micro-fracturing during a hot period in 2016. Our models suggest rock surface temperatures approached 40°C during 2014, almost ten degrees above the peak air temperature. The mid- to late-afternoon timing of fracturing was associated with peak thermal stress in the upper 1 m of bedrock, consistent with 2016 observations, where measured surface temperatures of around 35°C generate a thermal front that coincides with a series of acoustic emission events on a sensor installed in a borehole near the crest of the fracture.

  2. Local approaches for the fracture assessment of notched components: the research work developed by Professor Paolo Lazzarin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Berto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Brittle failure of components weakened by cracks or sharp and blunt V-notches is a topic of active and continuous research. It is attractive for all researchers who face the problem of fracture of materials under different loading conditions and deals with a large number of applications in different engineering fields, not only with the mechanical one. This topic is significant in all the cases where intrinsic defects of the material or geometrical discontinuities give rise to localized stress concentration which, in brittle materials, may generate a crack leading to catastrophic failure or to a shortening of the assessed structural life. Whereas cracks are viewed as unpleasant entities in most engineering materials, U- and V-notches of different acuities are sometimes deliberately introduced in design and manufacturing of structural components. Dealing with brittle failure of notched components and summarising some recent experimental results reported in the literature, the main aim of the present contribution is to present a review of the research work developed by Professor Paolo Lazzarin. The approach based on the volume strain energy density (SED, which has been recently applied to assess the brittle failure of a large number of materials. The main features of the SED approach are outlined in the paper and its peculiarities and advantages accurately underlined. Some examples of applications are reported, as well. The present contribution is based on the author’s experience over about 15 years and the contents of his personal library. This work is in honor and memory of Prof. Paolo Lazzarin who suddenly passed away in September 2014.

  3. Fracture Blisters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uebbing, Claire M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fracture blisters are a relatively uncommon complication of fractures in locations of the body, such as the ankle, wrist elbow and foot, where skin adheres tightly to bone with little subcutaneous fat cushioning. The blister that results resembles that of a second degree burn.These blisters significantly alter treatment, making it difficult to splint or cast and often overlying ideal surgical incision sites. Review of the literature reveals no consensus on management; however, most authors agree on early treatment prior to blister formation or delay until blister resolution before attempting surgical correction or stabilization. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1;131-133.

  4. Development of a Hybrid Piezo Natural Rubber Piezoelectricity and Piezoresistivity Sensor with Magnetic Clusters Made by Electric and Magnetic Field Assistance and Filling with Magnetic Compound Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Shimada

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelements used in robotics require large elasticity and extensibility to be installed in an artificial robot skin. However, the piezoelements used until recently are vulnerable to large forces because of the thin solid materials employed. To resolve this issue, we utilized a natural rubber and applied our proposed new method of aiding with magnetic and electric fields as well as filling with magnetic compound fluid (MCF and doping. We have verified the piezoproperties of the resulting MCF rubber. The effect of the created magnetic clusters is featured in a new two types of multilayered structures of the piezoelement. By measuring the piezoelectricity response to pressure, the synergetic effects of the magnetic clusters, the doping and the electric polymerization on the piezoelectric effect were clarified. In addition, by examining the relation between the piezoelectricity and the piezoresistivity created in the MCF piezo element, we propose a hybrid piezoelement.

  5. Development of a Hybrid Piezo Natural Rubber Piezoelectricity and Piezoresistivity Sensor with Magnetic Clusters Made by Electric and Magnetic Field Assistance and Filling with Magnetic Compound Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kunio; Saga, Norihiko

    2017-02-10

    Piezoelements used in robotics require large elasticity and extensibility to be installed in an artificial robot skin. However, the piezoelements used until recently are vulnerable to large forces because of the thin solid materials employed. To resolve this issue, we utilized a natural rubber and applied our proposed new method of aiding with magnetic and electric fields as well as filling with magnetic compound fluid (MCF) and doping. We have verified the piezoproperties of the resulting MCF rubber. The effect of the created magnetic clusters is featured in a new two types of multilayered structures of the piezoelement. By measuring the piezoelectricity response to pressure, the synergetic effects of the magnetic clusters, the doping and the electric polymerization on the piezoelectric effect were clarified. In addition, by examining the relation between the piezoelectricity and the piezoresistivity created in the MCF piezo element, we propose a hybrid piezoelement.

  6. Development of a Hybrid Piezo Natural Rubber Piezoelectricity and Piezoresistivity Sensor with Magnetic Clusters Made by Electric and Magnetic Field Assistance and Filling with Magnetic Compound Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kunio; Saga, Norihiko

    2017-01-01

    Piezoelements used in robotics require large elasticity and extensibility to be installed in an artificial robot skin. However, the piezoelements used until recently are vulnerable to large forces because of the thin solid materials employed. To resolve this issue, we utilized a natural rubber and applied our proposed new method of aiding with magnetic and electric fields as well as filling with magnetic compound fluid (MCF) and doping. We have verified the piezoproperties of the resulting MCF rubber. The effect of the created magnetic clusters is featured in a new two types of multilayered structures of the piezoelement. By measuring the piezoelectricity response to pressure, the synergetic effects of the magnetic clusters, the doping and the electric polymerization on the piezoelectric effect were clarified. In addition, by examining the relation between the piezoelectricity and the piezoresistivity created in the MCF piezo element, we propose a hybrid piezoelement. PMID:28208625

  7. Mechanical Behavior and Fracture Toughness Evaluation of Multiphase Polymer Nanocomposites Using Impact and J-Integral via Locus Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishnu P. Panda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture behaviors of fibrillar silicate clay (MMT filled thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO containing polypropylene (PP blended with ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM were systematically investigated using impact test method and J-integral by locus method. Drastic increase in impact strength is observed for all developed compositions and generally shows higher value for the selected phases containing dispersed nanoclay in PP matrix. A fracture mechanics approach has been adopted by mode I test, and the effects of specimen geometry have been investigated. Increase in interlaminar fracture energy value, Gc, and J-integral value, Jc, is marked as the crack propagated through the composite; that is, a rising “R-curve” is observed. Toughness measurements revealed that the fracture toughness increased with increasing clay content reaching maximum at 3 wt% of clay than pure PP. Moreover, enhancement of fracture toughness was more remarkable than that of stiffness. The fracture surfaces taken from different specimens were observed for exploring the fracture mechanisms using transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed a strong particle-matrix adhesion.

  8. Development of a Prediction Model for Stress Fracture During an Intensive Physical Training Program: The Royal Marines Commandos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Santos, Maria T.; Davey, Trish; Leyland, Kirsten M.; Allsopp, Adrian J.; Lanham-New, Susan A.; Judge, Andrew; Arden, Nigel K.; Fallowfield, Joanne L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Stress fractures (SFs) are one of the more severe overuse injuries in military training, and therefore, knowledge of potential risk factors is needed to assist in developing mitigating strategies. Purpose: To develop a prediction model for risk of SF in Royal Marines (RM) recruits during an arduous military training program. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: RM recruits (N = 1082; age range, 16-33 years) who enrolled between September 2009 and July 2010 were prospectively followed through the 32-week RM training program. SF diagnosis was confirmed from a positive radiograph or magnetic resonance imaging scan. Potential risk factors assessed at week 1 included recruit characteristics, anthropometric assessment, dietary supplement use, lifestyle habits, fitness assessment, blood samples, 25(OH)D, bone strength as measured by heel broadband ultrasound attention, history of physical activity, and previous and current food intake. A logistic least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression with 10-fold cross-validation was used to select potential predictors among 47 candidate variables. Model performance was assessed using measures of discrimination (c-index) and calibration. Bootstrapping was used for internal validation of the developed model and to quantify optimism. Results: A total of 86 (8%) volunteer recruits presented at least 1 SF during training. Twelve variables were identified as the most important risk factors of SF. Variables strongly associated with SF were age, body weight, pretraining weightbearing exercise, pretraining cycling, and childhood intake of milk and milk products. The c-index for the prediction model, which represents the model performance in future volunteers, was 0.73 (optimism-corrected c-index, 0.68). Although 25(OH)D and VO2max had only a borderline statistically significant association with SF, the inclusion of these factors improved the performance of the model. Conclusion

  9. [Humeral shaft fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schittko, A

    2004-08-01

    Since Lorenz Böhler postulated in his 1964 summary with the title "Against the operative treatment of fresh humeral shaft fractures" that the operative treatment is the exception in the therapy of humeral fractures times have changed. In the last years a conservative treatment of a humeral fracture is the exception and only used after straight indications. The operative therapy nowadays is the gold standard because of the development of new intramedullar and rotation stable implants in addition to the classical osteosynthesis with the plate. But even the external fixator for primary stabilisation in polytrauma patients or as rescue procedure after complications should be in repertory of every orthopedic surgeon. Attention should be put on the avoidance of primary and the correct treatment of secondary nerval lesions, esp. of the radial nerve. Here we are tending to the operative revision of the nerve in indistinct cases. In the treatment of the seldom humeral shaft fracture of the child conservative treatment is to prefer; in complications a resolute shift to a final operative stabilisation of the fracture is necessary.

  10. Development of an Ultrasonic Phased Array System for Wellbore Integrity Evaluation and Near-Wellbore Fracture Network Mapping of Injection and Production Wells in Geothermal Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almansouri, Hani [Purdue University; Foster, Benjamin [Purdue University; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Polsky, Yarom [ORNL; Bouman, Charlie [Purdue University

    2016-01-01

    This paper documents our progress developing an ultrasound phased array system in combination with a model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm to inspect the health of and characterize the composition of the near-wellbore region for geothermal reservoirs. The main goal for this system is to provide a near-wellbore in-situ characterization capability that will significantly improve wellbore integrity evaluation and near well-bore fracture network mapping. A more detailed image of the fracture network near the wellbore in particular will enable the selection of optimal locations for stimulation along the wellbore, provide critical data that can be used to improve stimulation design, and provide a means for measuring evolution of the fracture network to support long term management of reservoir operations. Development of such a measurement capability supports current hydrothermal operations as well as the successful demonstration of Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). The paper will include the design of the phased array system, the performance specifications, and characterization methodology. In addition, we will describe the MBIR forward model derived for the phased array system and the propagation of compressional waves through a pseudo-homogenous medium.

  11. Subtrochanteric fractures in bisphosphonate-naive patients: results from the HORIZON-recurrent fracture trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Jonathan D; Lyles, Kenneth; Boonen, Steven; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen; Hyldstrup, Lars; Nordsletten, Lars; Pieper, Carl; Recknor, Chris; Su, Guoqin; Bucci-Rechtweg, Christina; Magaziner, Jay

    2011-12-01

    Our purpose was to characterize the risks of osteoporosis-related subtrochanteric fractures in bisphosphonate-naive individuals. Baseline characteristics of patients enrolled in the HORIZON-Recurrent Fracture Trial with a study-qualifying hip fracture were examined, comparing those who sustained incident subtrochanteric fractures with those sustaining other hip fractures. Subjects were bisphosphonate-naive or had a bisphosphonate washout period of 6-24 months and subsequently received an annual infusion of zoledronic acid 5 mg or placebo after low-trauma hip-fracture repair. In total, 2,127 men and women were included. Of the qualifying hip fractures, 5.2% were subtrochanteric, 54.8% femoral neck, 33.0% intertrochanteric, and 7.1% other (generally complex fractures of mixed type). Significant baseline (pre-hip fracture) differences were seen between index hip-fracture types, with the percentage of patients with extreme mobility problems being twofold higher in patients with index subtrochanteric fracture (9.9%) compared to other patients. The distribution of hip-fracture types was similar between the treatment groups at baseline. No patients with index subtrochanteric fractures and six patients with other qualifying hip fractures reported prior bisphosphonate use. Only one further subtrochanteric fracture occurred in each treatment group over an average 2-year patient follow-up. Subtrochanteric fractures are not uncommon in bisphosphonate-naive patients. Extreme difficulties with mobility may be a unique risk factor predisposing to development of incident subtrochanteric fractures rather than other types of hip fracture. In patients with recent hip fracture who received zoledronic acid therapy, the incidence of new subtrochanteric fractures was too small to draw any meaningful conclusions.

  12. Complications of mandibular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweig, Barry E

    2009-03-01

    Before any definitive treatment of mandibular fractures, the patient needs to be evaluated for more potentially life-threatening injuries. Complications can and do occur with treatment of mandibular fractures and can occur during any of the phases of treatment. The development of an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is vital in achieving optimal success and decreasing complications. Knowledge of the anatomy and the principles of bone healing is also an important factor in preventing complications. To limit long-term untoward effects, complications should be recognized early and the appropriate treatment should be started before a minor complication becomes a complex one that is more difficult to manage.

  13. Hand Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is ... serve as a framework. This framework supports the muscles that make the wrist ... When one of these hand bones is broken (fractured), it can prevent you ...

  14. Fracture source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The fracture properties of many different types of fibers are covered in a timely new book that will prove to be a tremendous source of information and references for researchers in the wide and diverse field of fibers and composites, says Bill Clegg.

  15. Rib Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Commentary Recent News Scientists Working on Solar-Powered Prosthetic Limbs Exercise a Great Prescription to Help Older Hearts Bavencio Approved for Rare Skin Cancer Older Mothers May Raise Better-Behaved Kids, Study ... or a collapsed lung (pneumothorax—see Traumatic Pneumothorax ). An injury that fractures the lower ribs sometimes also damages the liver (see Liver ...

  16. [Thoracolumbar fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freslon, M; Bouaka, D; Coipeau, P; Defossez, G; Leclercq, N; Nebout, J; Marteau, E; Poilbout, N; Prebet, R

    2008-06-01

    Thoracolumbar fractures are frequent and the functional outcomes are sometimes severe. This multicentric study, including five medical centers, was performed to evaluate the long-term outcomes of the patients. One hundred and thirty six patients with thoracolumbar fracture (T11 to L2) was evaluated with a minimal follow-up of two years. Every one had a clinical exam with a score of Oswestry and an X-Ray study (before and after treatment and at revision). Most of them presented compression fractures, the most often at L1 level. On X-rays, a gain was noted on the vertebral kyphosis immediately after surgery, but there is a loss of correction over time whatever the treatment. The clinical outcomes for the patients were great, with an Oswestry average score of 6,4. A correlation was noted between this functional score and vertebral kyphosis. So, an anterior column strengthening (isolated or performed during the surgery) could improve these functional outcomes. Moreover, the Thoraco Lumbar Injury Severity Score (TLISS) seems to be a simple organigram to determine the most appropriate treatment of these fractures, with particular attention to the distraction mechanism or posterior ligamentous complex lesions. However, RMI before surgery is necessary to evaluate these lesions.

  17. Analysis of Fracturing Network Evolution Behaviors in Random Naturally Fractured Rock Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Li, X.; Zhang, B.

    2016-11-01

    Shale gas has been discovered in the Upper Triassic Yanchang Formation, Ordos Basin, China. Due to the weak tectonic activities in the shale plays, core observations indicate abundant random non-tectonic micro-fractures in the producing shales. The role of micro-fractures in hydraulic fracturing for shale gas development is currently poorly understood yet potentially critical. In a series of scaled true triaxial laboratory experiments, we investigate the interaction of propagating fracturing network with natural fractures. The influence of dominating factors was studied and analyzed, with an emphasis on non-tectonic fracture density, injection rate, and stress ratio. A new index of P-SRV is proposed to evaluate the fracturing effectiveness. From the test results, three types of fracturing network geometry of radial random net-fractures, partly vertical fracture with random branches, and vertical main fracture with multiple branches were observed. It is suggested from qualitative and quantitative analysis that great micro-fracture density and injection rate tend to maximum the fracturing network; however, it tends to decrease the fracturing network with the increase in horizontal stress ratio. The function fitting results further proved that the injection rate has the most obvious influence on fracturing effectiveness.

  18. Development and validation of a generic finite element vehicle buck model for the analysis of driver rib fractures in real life nearside oblique frontal crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraeus, Johan; Lindquist, Mats

    2016-10-01

    Frontal crashes still account for approximately half of all fatalities in passenger cars, despite several decades of crash-related research. For serious injuries in this crash mode, several authors have listed the thorax as the most important. Computer simulation provides an effective tool to study crashes and evaluate injury mechanisms, and using stochastic input data, whole populations of crashes can be studied. The aim of this study was to develop a generic buck model and to validate this model on a population of real-life frontal crashes in terms of the risk of rib fracture. The study was conducted in four phases. In the first phase, real-life validation data were derived by analyzing NASS/CDS data to find the relationship between injury risk and crash parameters. In addition, available statistical distributions for the parameters were collected. In the second phase, a generic parameterized finite element (FE) model of a vehicle interior was developed based on laser scans from the A2MAC1 database. In the third phase, model parameters that could not be found in the literature were estimated using reverse engineering based on NCAP tests. Finally, in the fourth phase, the stochastic FE model was used to simulate a population of real-life crashes, and the result was compared to the validation data from phase one. The stochastic FE simulation model overestimates the risk of rib fracture, more for young occupants and less for senior occupants. However, if the effect of underestimation of rib fractures in the NASS/CDS material is accounted for using statistical simulations, the risk of rib fracture based on the stochastic FE model matches the risk based on the NASS/CDS data for senior occupants. The current version of the stochastic model can be used to evaluate new safety measures using a population of frontal crashes for senior occupants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Monitoring metal-fill in a lost foam casting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Mohamed; Arulanantham, Jeanison Pradeep; Dinwiddie, Ralph; Walford, Graham; Vondra, Fred

    2006-10-01

    The lost foam casting (LFC) process is emerging as a reliable casting method. The metal-fill profile in LFC plays an important role among several factors that affect casting quality. The metal-fill profile is in turn affected by several factors. Several casting defects may result due to an improper metal-fill process. Hence, it becomes essential to characterize and control, if possible, the metal-fill process in LFC. This research presents instrumentation and a technique to monitor and characterize the metal-fill process. The characterization included the determination of the position of the metal front and the profile in which the metal fills up the foam pattern. The instrumentation included capacitive sensors. Each sensor is comprised of two electrodes whose capacitive coupling changes as the metal fills the foam pattern. Foundry tests were conducted to obtain the sensors' responses to the metal fill. Two such sensors were used in the foundry tests. Data representing the responses of these sensors during the metal-fill process were collected using a data acquisition system. A number of finite element electrostatic simulations were carried out to study the metal-fill process under conditions similar to those experienced in foundry tests. An artificial neural network was trained using the simulation data as inputs and the corresponding metal-fill profiles as outputs. The neural network was then used to infer the profile of the metal-fill during foundry tests. The results were verified by comparing the metal-fill profile inferred from the neural network to the actual metal-fill profile captured by an infrared camera used during the foundry tests. The match up between the inferred profiles and the infrared camera measurements was satisfactory, indicating that the developed technique provides a reliable and cost effective method to monitor the metal-fill profile in LFC.

  20. Development of novel self-healing and antibacterial resin composite containing microcapsules filled with polymerizable healing monomer%含聚合单体微胶囊的牙科新型自修复抗菌复合树脂合成初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴峻岭; 张强; 朱婷; 葛建华; 周传健

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop novel self-healing and antibacterial resin composite containing microcapsules filled with polymerizable healing monomer,and to measure its properties for further clinical application.Methods Microcapsules filled with healing monomer of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate were synthesized according to methods introduced in the previous research.Microcapsules were added into novel resin composite containing nano-antibacterial silica fillers grafted with long chain alkyl quaternary ammonium at mass fractions of 0,2.5%,5.0%,7.5% or 10.0%.A commercial resin composite(Tetric N-Ceram) was used as control.Flexural test was used to measure resin composite flexural strength and elastic modulus.The single edge Ⅴ-notched beam method was used to measure fracture toughness and self-healing efficiency.Scanning electron microscope(SEM) was used to examine the fractured surface of selected specimen for investigation of fracture mechanisms.Results The flexural strength and elastic modulus of the resin composite were (96.4 ± 14.3) MPa and (6.2 ± 1.1) GPa respectively after incorporation of microcapsules up to 7.5%,and no significant difference was found between the experimental group and the control group[(99.1±1 1.9) MPa and (6.1±1.1) GPa] (P>0.05).The self-healing efficiency of (66.8±7.0)% and (79.3±9.7)% were achieved for resin composite with microcapsule mass fractions at 7.5% and 10.0%.SEM image showed that irregular films covered the fractured surface.Conclusions This novel self-healing and antibacterial resin composite containing microcapsules filled with polymerizable healing monomer exhibited a promising self-healing ability,which enabled itself well up for combating bulk fracture and secondary caries in clinical application.%目的 合成含聚合单体微胶囊的牙科新型自修复抗菌复合树脂,并探讨相关性能,为其进一步临床应用提供参考.方法 制备含聚合单体三乙二醇二甲基丙

  1. Review of Hydraulic Fracturing for Preconditioning in Cave Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Q.; Suorineni, F. T.; Oh, J.

    2016-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has been used in cave mining for preconditioning the orebody following its successful application in the oil and gas industries. In this paper, the state of the art of hydraulic fracturing as a preconditioning method in cave mining is presented. Procedures are provided on how to implement prescribed hydraulic fracturing by which effective preconditioning can be realized in any in situ stress condition. Preconditioning is effective in cave mining when an additional fracture set is introduced into the rock mass. Previous studies on cave mining hydraulic fracturing focused on field applications, hydraulic fracture growth measurement and the interaction between hydraulic fractures and natural fractures. The review in this paper reveals that the orientation of the current cave mining hydraulic fractures is dictated by and is perpendicular to the minimum in situ stress orientation. In some geotechnical conditions, these orientation-uncontrollable hydraulic fractures have limited preconditioning efficiency because they do not necessarily result in reduced fragmentation sizes and a blocky orebody through the introduction of an additional fracture set. This implies that if the minimum in situ stress orientation is vertical and favors the creation of horizontal hydraulic fractures, in a rock mass that is already dominated by horizontal joints, no additional fracture set is added to that rock mass to increase its blockiness to enable it cave. Therefore, two approaches that have the potential to create orientation-controllable hydraulic fractures in cave mining with the potential to introduce additional fracture set as desired are proposed to fill this gap. These approaches take advantage of directional hydraulic fracturing and the stress shadow effect, which can re-orientate the hydraulic fracture propagation trajectory against its theoretical predicted direction. Proppants are suggested to be introduced into the cave mining industry to enhance the

  2. Development of confined concrete filled tubular(CCFT)columns%约束钢管混凝土柱的开发研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖岩; 何文辉; 毛小勇

    2004-01-01

    本文提出了一种更适合抗震设计的新型钢管混凝土体系--约束钢管混凝土柱体系.它建立在清楚的力学概念基础上,其设计着眼于在可能出现塑性铰的部位附加横向约束以控制钢管的局部屈曲和更有效地约束混凝土.这一新型钢管混凝土柱体系兼具了钢管混凝土及套管混凝土柱两者的优点,克服了传统钢管混凝土柱的抗震缺陷,为抗震地区的高层结构和桥梁设计提供了理想的选择.在本研究的第一阶段,作者们对FRP约束的圆钢管柱和钢板约束的方钢管柱进行了模拟地震力的加载试验.其结果验证了约束钢管混凝土柱的良好抗震性能.%This paper introduces an innovative concrete filled steeltubular (CFT)column system, named as confined CFT or CCFT,for improved seismic design of steel and concrete composite structures.The CCFT column system combines the advantages of conventional CFT column and tubed column systems and overcomes the defects in earthquake resistant behavior of the conventional concrete filled steel tubes. The design concept is based on fundamental mechanics,aimed at controlling the local buckling of the steel tube and confining the concrete in the potential plastic hinge regions of a CFT column.To achieve this,several efficient details of transverse confinement were proposed. In this study,carbon fiber reinforced plastic(CFRP)and welded steel plates as additional confinement for CCFT columns were examined experimentally.From the results of simulated seismic loading tests,it is validated that the new type of CFT column system can provide excellent seismic performance.

  3. Investigating the warming and cooling rates of human cadavers by development of a gel-filled model to validate core temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, M J; Rooney, P; Kearney, J N

    2007-01-01

    Tissue Services (within NHS Blood and Transplant) plans to bring deceased donors to its state of the art retrieval suite at its new centre in Speke, Liverpool in air-conditioned transport at circa 20 degrees C but without dedicated active cooling. The aim of this study was to determine how quickly a refrigerated body would warm at different ambient temperatures using a gel-filled model. Two models of a human body were prepared consisting of neoprene wetsuits filled with approximately 7 or 18 l of a viscous solution, which once set has similar properties to ballistics gel. This gel consisted of 47.5% distilled water, 47.5% glycerol and 5% agar. Final "dummy" weights were 7.4 and 18.6 kg respectively, representing "virtual" weights of approximately 40 kg and 70 kg. A K-class thermocouple probe was then inserted into a "rectal" position within each model and the models were cooled to a series of different core temperatures: 5 degrees C, 10 degrees C and 15 degrees C and then were placed in an orbital incubator set at 20 degrees C or 30 degrees C ambient temperature. The rate of temperature increase, in the dummy, was measured, until the model's core temperature was close to the ambient temperature. This was done in triplicate for each size model and ambient temperature. Data indicate that increase in core temperature depends on the size of the model and the initial core temperature. For an equivalent donor weight of 70 kg and background temperature of 20 degrees C, core temperature rises from 5 degrees C to 9.2 degrees C; 10 degrees C to 13.3 degrees C and 15 degrees C to 15.5 degrees C after 2 h. The final core temperatures after 2 h are likely to retard bacterial growth, movement or contamination during transport. Cooling rate data indicated that a 70 kg donor equivalent cooled from 37 degrees C to 15 degrees C within 6 h in a cold room at 4 degrees C. This work has shown that a body can be transported without refrigeration and not cause further tissue deterioration

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Injectable Brushite Filled-Poly (Methyl Methacrylate Bone Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas C. Rodriguez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Powder-liquid poly (methyl methacrylate (PMMA bone cements are widely utilized for augmentation of bone fractures and fixation of orthopedic implants. These cements typically have an abundance of beneficial qualities, however their lack of bioactivity allows for continued development. To enhance osseointegration and bioactivity, calcium phosphate cements prepared with hydroxyapatite, brushite or tricalcium phosphates have been introduced with rather unsuccessful results due to increased cement viscosity, poor handling and reduced mechanical performance. This has limited the use of such cements in applications requiring delivery through small cannulas and in load bearing. The goal of this study is to design an alternative cement system that can better accommodate calcium-phosphate additives while preserving cement rheological properties and performance. In the present work, a number of brushite-filled two-solution bone cements were prepared and characterized by studying their complex viscosity-versus-test frequency, extrusion stress, clumping tendency during injection through a syringe, extent of fill of a machined void in cortical bone analog specimens, and compressive strength. The addition of brushite into the two-solution cement formulations investigated did not affect the pseudoplastic behavior and handling properties of the materials as demonstrated by rheological experiments. Extrusion stress was observed to vary with brushite concentration with values lower or in the range of control PMMA-based cements. The materials were observed to completely fill pre-formed voids in bone analog specimens. Cement compressive strength was observed to decrease with increasing concentration of fillers; however, the materials exhibited high enough strength for consideration in load bearing applications. The results indicated that partially substituting the PMMA phase of the two-solution cement with brushite at a 40% by mass concentration provided the best

  5. Geomechanical Simulation of Fluid-Driven Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhnenko, R.; Nikolskiy, D.; Mogilevskaya, S.; Labuz, J.

    2012-11-30

    The project supported graduate students working on experimental and numerical modeling of rock fracture, with the following objectives: (a) perform laboratory testing of fluid-saturated rock; (b) develop predictive models for simulation of fracture; and (c) establish educational frameworks for geologic sequestration issues related to rock fracture. These objectives were achieved through (i) using a novel apparatus to produce faulting in a fluid-saturated rock; (ii) modeling fracture with a boundary element method; and (iii) developing curricula for training geoengineers in experimental mechanics, numerical modeling of fracture, and poroelasticity.

  6. Development of Flow and Heat Transfer During Filling a Pipeline with Water at the Pipe Wall Temperature Below the Freezing Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanin, É. L.; Smirnov, Yu. A.; Lebedev, M. E.

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents the technique of computing flow and heat transfer of water in a pipeline whose initial temperature is lower than the freezing point of water. A feature of the method is the possibility of calculating the process from the moment of pouring water into a pipe on the inner surface of whose wall a layer of ice is being formed. The system of equations describing the process involves nonstationary energy equations for the water flow, ice layer, and for the pipe wall. It is solved for each section of the pipeline passed by water in a small time interval in the process of filling the pipe and further flow. The Beginning computer program has been created and implemented in the Visual Basic language for numerical analysis of the process. The calculations made with the aid of this program allow one to estimate the possibility of appearance of an ice plug in the pipeline at the given temperature, water flow rate, pipeline diameter, and conditions of external heat transfer of water flow in the pipeline.

  7. Comparative Analysis of Hydraulic Fracturing Wastewater Practices in Unconventional Shale Development: Newspaper Coverage of Stakeholder Concerns and Social License to Operate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Gehman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article we review prior literature regarding the concept of social license to operate, and related concepts, including corporate social responsibility, sustainable development, stakeholder management and cumulative effects. Informed by these concepts, we search for newspaper articles published in North American provinces and states where the Barnett, Duvernay, Marcellus and Montney shale plays are located. Using these data, we tabulate coverage of stakeholder concerns related to hydraulic fracturing and wastewater practices, and compare the extent to which these concerns vary over place and time. Our vocabulary analyses identify differences in the types and quantities of newspaper coverage devoted to concerns regarding hydraulic fracturing activities in general and wastewater practices in particular. We interpret these differences as suggesting that obtaining a social license to operate is likely not a one size fits all proposition. By understanding which stakeholder concerns are most salient in particular places and times, oil and gas operators and regulators can better tailor their strategies and policies to address local concerns. In other words, the findings from this study indicate that conventional understandings of risk as a technical or economic problem may not be adequate for dealing with unconventional resource challenges such as hydraulic fracturing. Operators and regulators may also need to manage social and cultural risks.

  8. Physical chemistry of glass fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalske, T.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Since silica glass is a brittle material, its susceptibility to fracture often limits its use in technological applications. Previous studies have demonstrated that the fracture resistance of silica glass is decreased greatly by the presence of chemically reactive species such as water. By studying the effect of controlled amounts of reactive gases on the fracture rate in silica glass, the authors have developed chemical kinetics based models to describe the molecular level processes that lead to stress corrosion fracture of glass. A key aspect of our chemical kinetics based model is the measurement of the stress dependence for the hydrolysis of siloxane bonds. The authors derive the stress dependence for hydrolysis from reaction rate studies that are conducted on strained cyclosiloxane model compounds. The chemical kinetic parameter derived from model compounds is used to successfully predict the fracture behavior of bulk silica glass and the mechanical fatigue of high-strength silica glass fibers in various reactive chemical environments.

  9. Seismic Waves in Rocks with Fluids and Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J G

    2006-02-06

    Seismic wave propagation through the earth is often strongly affected by the presence of fractures. When these fractures are filled with fluids (oil, gas, water, CO{sub 2}, etc.), the type and state of the fluid (liquid or gas) can make a large difference in the response of the seismic waves. This paper will summarize some early work of the author on methods of deconstructing the effects of fractures, and any fluids within these fractures, on seismic wave propagation as observed in reflection seismic data. Methods to be explored here include Thomsen's anisotropy parameters for wave moveout (since fractures often induce elastic anisotropy), and some very convenient fracture parameters introduced by Sayers and Kachanov that permit a relatively simple deconstruction of the elastic behavior in terms of fracture parameters (whenever this is appropriate).

  10. Analysis of the hydraulic data from the MI fracture zone at the Grimsel Rock Laboratory, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davey, A.; Karasaki, K.; Long, J.C.S.; Landsfeld, M.; Mensch, A.; Martel, S.J.

    1989-10-01

    One of the major problems in analyzing flow and transport in fractured rock is that the flow may be largely confined to a poorly connected network of fractures. In order to overcome some of this problem, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has been developing a new type of fracture hydrology model called an equivalent discontinuum model. In this model the authors represent the discontinuous nature of the problem through flow on a partially filled lattice. A key component in constructing an equivalent discontinuum model from this lattice is removing some of the conductive elements such that the system is partially connected in the same manner as the fracture network. This is done through a statistical inverse technique called simulated annealing. The fracture network model is annealed by continually modifying a base model, or template such that the modified systems behave more and more like the observed system. In order to see how the simulated annealing algorithm works, the authors have developed a series of synthetic real cases. In these cases, the real system is completely known so that the results of annealing to steady state data can be evaluated absolutely. The effect of the starting configuration has been studied by varying the percent of conducting elements in the initial configuration. Results have shown that the final configurations converge to about the same percentage of conducting elements. An example using Nagra field data from the Migration Experiment (MI) at Grimsel Rock Laboratory in Switzerland is also analyzed. 24 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Medication safety: Filling your prescription

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicines. Also learn what each medicine looks like. Filling Your Prescriptions Your health plan may require you to use certain pharmacies. ... standards. The website should have clear directions for filling or ... seeing you. Make sure your health plan will cover the cost of using the ...

  12. The Chemistry of Modern Dental Filling Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, John W.; Anstice, H. Mary

    1999-01-01

    Discusses materials used by dentists to restore teeth after decay has been removed. Shows how dental-material science is an interdisciplinary field in which chemistry plays a major part. Reviews the many developments polymer chemistry has contributed to the field of dental fillings. (CCM)

  13. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.

    2014-04-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [The developmental history of the dental filling materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yi

    2008-10-01

    Caries may cause substantial defects in the hard tissue of teeth. The dental filling for defects is an effective method to resume teeth complete form and masticatory function as well as aesthetic effects. The filling material is artificial restorative material to fill the dental defects. Tracing back the developing process of dental filling materials, we can see the advancement of stomotology of human beings. There was a revolutionary change in the filling materials from filling dental cavity with Chinese medicinal herbs to silver paste, from establishing the composition and proportion standardization of the silver amalgam filling materials to the application of new macromolecule compound resin. This is a continuous improvement and renewal in the idea and technology of dental filling treatment so that perfects the dental filling method and enables the retention of more healthy dental tissue. In addition, it pushes the development of dental aesthetics, adhesives and technology. With the improvement of people's health standard, aesthetic demands and environmental awareness, compound resin restorative materials has become clinically preferred dental filling materials of doctors and patients in clinic.

  15. Discrete fracture modeling of multiphase flow and hydrocarbon production in fractured shale or low permeability reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Y.; Settgast, R. R.; Fu, P.; Tompson, A. F. B.; Morris, J.; Ryerson, F. J.

    2016-12-01

    It has long been recognized that multiphase flow and transport in fractured porous media is very important for various subsurface applications. Hydrocarbon fluid flow and production from hydraulically fractured shale reservoirs is an important and complicated example of multiphase flow in fractured formations. The combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing is able to create extensive fracture networks in low permeability shale rocks, leading to increased formation permeability and enhanced hydrocarbon production. However, unconventional wells experience a much faster production decline than conventional hydrocarbon recovery. Maintaining sustainable and economically viable shale gas/oil production requires additional wells and re-fracturing. Excessive fracturing fluid loss during hydraulic fracturing operations may also drive up operation costs and raise potential environmental concerns. Understanding and modeling processes that contribute to decreasing productivity and fracturing fluid loss represent a critical component for unconventional hydrocarbon recovery analysis. Towards this effort we develop a discrete fracture model (DFM) in GEOS (LLNL multi-physics computational code) to simulate multiphase flow and transfer in hydraulically fractured reservoirs. The DFM model is able to explicitly account for both individual fractures and their surrounding rocks, therefore allowing for an accurate prediction of impacts of fracture-matrix interactions on hydrocarbon production. We apply the DFM model to simulate three-phase (water, oil, and gas) flow behaviors in fractured shale rocks as a result of different hydraulic stimulation scenarios. Numerical results show that multiphase flow behaviors at the fracture-matrix interface play a major role in controlling both hydrocarbon production and fracturing fluid recovery rates. The DFM model developed in this study will be coupled with the existing hydro-fracture model to provide a fully integrated

  16. Development of an Injectable Salmon Fibrinogen-Thrombin Matrix to Enhance Healing of Compound Fractures of Extremities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    protein for tooth enamel . Teeth and bones are related structures but have distinct components and cellular components Surgical results- animal...A fibrin adhesive seal for the repair of osteochondral fracture fragments. Clin Orthop Relat Res, 1984(182): p. 258-63. 33. Kim, S.S. and B.S. Kim...needle, and held in place while the needle was 158 retracted. The catheter was secured in place using tissue adhesive and transparent adhesive 159

  17. Evaluation of Flowable Fill Surface Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    criteria was used to develop performance curves for conventional USAF cementitious capping materials ( rapid -setting concrete). The failure criteria...greater than 2 in. deep across 50 percent of the spall length. Similar performance curves could be developed for rapid -setting flowable fill as a...structural performance of Rapid Set Concrete Mix®. ERDC/GSL TR-16- 20. Vicksburg, MS: U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center. ERDC/GSL TR-16-33

  18. Injection through fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    Tracer tests are conducted in geothermal reservoirs as an aid in forecasting thermal breakthrough of reinjection water. To interpret tracer tests, mathematical models have been developed based on the various transport mechanisms in these highly fractured reservoirs. These tracer flow models have been applied to interpret field tests. The resulting matches between the model and field data were excellent and the model parameters were used to estimate reservoir properties. However, model fitting is an indirect process and the model's ability to estimate reservoir properties cannot be judged solely on the quality of the match between field data and model predictions. The model's accuracy in determining reservoir characteristics must be independently verified in a closely controlled environment. In this study, the closely controlled laboratory environment was chosen to test the validity and accuracy of tracer flow models developed specifically for flow in fractured rocks. The laboratory tracer tests were performed by flowing potassium iodide (KI) through artificially fractured core samples. The tracer test results were then analyzed with several models to determine which best fit the measured data. A Matrix Diffusion model was found to provide the best match of the tracer experiments. The core properties, as estimated by the Matrix Diffusion model parameters generated from the indirect matching process, were then determined. These calculated core parameters were compared to the measured core properties and were found to be in agreement. This verifies the use of the Matrix Diffusion flow model in estimating fracture widths from tracer tests.

  19. Characterization of reservoir fractures using conventional geophysical logging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paitoon Laongsakul

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In hydrocarbon exploration fractures play an important role as possible pathways for the hydrocarbon flow and bythis enhancing the overall formation’s permeability. Advanced logging methods for fracture analysis, like the boreholeacoustic televiewer and Formation Microscanner (FMS are available, but these are additional and expensive tools. However,open and with water or hydrocarbon filled fractures are also sensitive to electrical and other conventional logging methods.For this study conventional logging data (electric, seismic, etc were available plus additional fracture information from FMS.Taking into account the borehole environment the results show that the micro-spherically focused log indicates fractures byshowing low resistivity spikes opposite open fractures, and high resistivity spikes opposite sealed ones. Compressional andshear wave velocities are reduced when passing trough the fracture zone, which are assumed to be more or less perpendicularto borehole axis. The photoelectric absorption curve exhibit a very sharp peak in front of a fracture filled with bariteloaded mud cake. The density log shows low density spikes that are not seen by the neutron log, usually where fractures,large vugs, or caverns exist. Borehole breakouts can cause a similar effect on the logging response than fractures, but fracturesare often present when this occurs. The fracture index calculation by using threshold and input weight was calculatedand there was in general a good agreement with the fracture data from FMS especially in fracture zones, which mainlycontribute to the hydraulic system of the reservoir. Finally, the overall results from this study using one well are promising,however further research in the combination of different tools for fracture identification is recommended as well as the useof core for further validation.

  20. Statistical evaluation of metal fill widths for emulated metal fill in parasitic extraction methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    J-Me, Teh; Noh, Norlaili Mohd.; Aziz, Zalina Abdul

    2015-05-01

    In the chip industry today, the key goal of a chip development organization is to develop and market chips within a short time frame to gain foothold on market share. This paper proposes a design flow around the area of parasitic extraction to improve the design cycle time. The proposed design flow utilizes the usage of metal fill emulation as opposed to the current flow which performs metal fill insertion directly. By replacing metal fill structures with an emulation methodology in earlier iterations of the design flow, this is targeted to help reduce runtime in fill insertion stage. Statistical design of experiments methodology utilizing the randomized complete block design was used to select an appropriate emulated metal fill width to improve emulation accuracy. The experiment was conducted on test cases of different sizes, ranging from 1000 gates to 21000 gates. The metal width was varied from 1 x minimum metal width to 6 x minimum metal width. Two-way analysis of variance and Fisher's least significant difference test were used to analyze the interconnect net capacitance values of the different test cases. This paper presents the results of the statistical analysis for the 45 nm process technology. The recommended emulated metal fill width was found to be 4 x the minimum metal width.

  1. Fracturing and fluid paleo-circulations in geologic formations with low matrix permeability: the case of Tournemire argilites (Aveyron, France); Fracturation et paleocirculations de fluides dans les formations geologiques de faible permeabilite matricielle: le cas des argilites de Tournemire (Aveyron, France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, J

    2002-01-01

    Deep argillaceous formations have physical properties likely to favour the long-term radioactive waste disposal (very low intrinsic permeability, radioactive element retention). But, these properties may be changed by the existence of discontinuities in the host medium. It's why, the characterization of the processes of fluid migrations associated with the fracturing was necessary within the experimental research program, launched by the Institute for Nuclear Safety and Protection (IPSN), which study a thick Toarcian formation composed of clay-stones (argilites) located on the Tournemire area (Aveyron, France). In the first step, the micro-tectonic and kinematic analysis provided the chronology of deformation with the main steps of the setting and the evolution of the tectonic fractures network. The microstructural analysis of the filling fractures showed fractures was alternatively, during the tectonic events, tight, permeable or semi-permeable (or semi-tight). These 'hydraulic states' were controlled by the nature and architecture of the structures of deformation and by the petro-physics properties variations of the argilites in the core zone and damage zone of the fractures. Mechanisms involved in the permeability variations in the fractures were argued and some parameters, as the magnitudes of differential stress, were estimated by the dynamic analysis of the twinning of calcite crystals contained in the core zone of fractures. Besides, the twinning analysis provided several data about the contexts of deformation and the development of the fractures network in the argilites. (author)

  2. Locking plates in proximal humerus fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, P C; Helwig, P; Konrad, G; Südkamp, N P

    2007-12-01

    It is well known that proximal humerus fractures are among the three most frequent fracture types. Epidemiological invetsigations show that in people elder than 60 years the fracture of the proximal humerus is more frequent than fractures of the hip region (17). Over the last decades several techniques have been applied for treatment of proximal humerus fractures. Widely accepted is the initiation of a conservative treatment regimen for undisplaced fractures, however, the standard treatment for displaced fractures, especially three and four part fractures, is still the center of scientific debate. Many different implants have been tested and investigated, thus demonstrating lack of sufficient results. Over the last years the development of angle stable, locking implants started and clinical studies demonstrated encouraging results. In our clinic the locking proximal humerus plate and the PHILOS plate advanced to the implant of choice for treatment of displaced proximal humerus fractures. There are still cases of implant failure and humerus head necrosis, but most of these complications were caused by the fracture type and not an implant specific problem. However the overall results with these new implants are encouraging. Key words: locking plates, proximal humerus fracture, humerus, humerus fracture, PHILOS, PHP.

  3. Verification survey of geothermal exploration technology, etc. Report on the result of the developmental research on the development of the fracture type reservoir exploration method; Chinetsu tansa gijutsu nado kensho chosa. Danretsugata choryuso tansaho kaihatsu kenkyu kaihatsu seika sokatsu hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For the purpose of grasping fracture groups forming geothermal reservoirs with accuracy, the development of the fracture type reservoir exploration method has advanced the technical development of exploration methods of seismic wave use, electromagnetic induction use, and micro-earthquake use. This paper summarized main results of the development and problems to be solved in the future. In the development of the seismic wave use exploration method, the high accuracy reflection method using seismic wave, VSP and seismic tomography were adopted to the geothermal field, and technology effective for the exploration of fracture type reservoirs was developed. In the development of the electromagnetic induction use exploration method, the array CSMT method which can measure multiple stations along the traverse line at the same time was developed with the aim of grasping effectively and accurately fracture groups forming geothermal reservoirs as changes of resistivity in the shallow-deep underground. In the fracture group forming geothermal reservoirs, micro-earthquakes are generated by movement of thermal water and pressure variations. In the development of the micro-earthquake use exploration method, developed was the micro-earthquake data processing and analysis system (MEPAS). 179 refs., 117 figs., 28 tabs.

  4. How Deep is the Critical Zone: A Scientific Question with Potential Impact For Decision-makers in Areas of Shale-Gas Development and Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Citizens living in areas of shale-gas development such as the Marcellus gas play in Pennsylvania and surrounding states are cognizant of the possibility that drilling and production of natural gas -- including hydraulic fracturing -- may have environmental impacts on their water. The Critical Zone is defined as the zone from vegetation canopy to the lower limits of groundwater. This definition is nebulous in terms of the lower limit, and yet, defining the bottom of the Critical Zone is important if citizens are to embrace shale-gas development. This is because, although no peer-reviewed study has been presented that documents a case where hydraulic fracturing or formation fluids have migrated upwards from fracturing depths to drinking water resources, a few cases of such leakage have been alleged. On the other hand, many cases of methane migration into aquifers have been documented to occur and some have been attributed to shale-gas development. The Critical Zone science community has a role to play in understanding such contamination problems, how they unfold, and how they should be ameliorated. For example, one big effort of the Critical Zone science community is to promote sharing of data describing the environment. This data effort has been extended to provide data for citizens to understand water quality by a team known as the Shale Network. As scientists learn to publish data online, these efforts must also be made accessible to non-scientists. As citizens access the data, the demand for data will grow and all branches of government will eventually respond by providing more accessible data that will help the public and policy-makers make decisions.

  5. Fiscal 1996 verification survey of geothermal exploration technology. Development of the fracture type reservoir exploration method (development of the elastic wave use exploration method); 1996 nendo chinetsu tansa gijutsu nado kensho chosa. Danretsugata choryuso tansaho kaihatsu (danseiha riyo tansaho kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For the purpose of exploring accurately fracture groups greatly restricting the fluid flow of geothermal reservoirs, technical development was made for applying the elastic wave exploration technology such as the high precision reflection method, VSP, elastic wave tomography to the geothermal exploration. The Okiri area, Kagoshima prefecture was selected as a demonstrative field of a typical type where the steep and predominant fracture rules the geothermal reservoir, and experiments were conducted using the high precision reflection method and VSP. Fracture models were made, and the analysis results were studied by a survey using the array CSMT/MT method and by a comparison with existing data. Reformation of the underground receiving system used for VSP and elastic tomography is made for improvement of its viability, and was applied to the VSP experiment. The treatment/analysis system of the core analyzer was improved, and cores of the demonstrative field were analyzed/measured. Further, the exploration results, core analysis results and existing data were synthetically analyzed, and fracture models of the demonstrative field were constructed. Also, effectiveness and viability of the elastic wave use exploration method were studied. 90 refs., 418 figs., 24 tabs.

  6. Fiscal 1996 verification survey of geothermal exploration technology. Development of the fracture type reservoir exploration method (development of the elastic wave use exploration method); 1996 nendo chinetsu tansa gijutsu nado kensho chosa. Danretsugata choryuso tansaho kaihatsu (danseiha riyo tansaho kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For the purpose of exploring accurately fracture groups greatly restricting the fluid flow of geothermal reservoirs, technical development was made for applying the elastic wave exploration technology such as the high precision reflection method, VSP, elastic wave tomography to the geothermal exploration. The Okiri area, Kagoshima prefecture was selected as a demonstrative field of a typical type where the steep and predominant fracture rules the geothermal reservoir, and experiments were conducted using the high precision reflection method and VSP. Fracture models were made, and the analysis results were studied by a survey using the array CSMT/MT method and by a comparison with existing data. Reformation of the underground receiving system used for VSP and elastic tomography is made for improvement of its viability, and was applied to the VSP experiment. The treatment/analysis system of the core analyzer was improved, and cores of the demonstrative field were analyzed/measured. Further, the exploration results, core analysis results and existing data were synthetically analyzed, and fracture models of the demonstrative field were constructed. Also, effectiveness and viability of the elastic wave use exploration method were studied. 90 refs., 418 figs., 24 tabs.

  7. Vision-based level control for beverage-filling processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Dietmar; Braune, Ingolf

    1994-11-01

    This paper presents a vision-based on-line level control system which is used in beverage filling machines. Motivation for the development of this sensor system was the need for an intelligent filling valve, which can provide constant filling levels for all container/product combinations (i.e. juice, milk, beer, water, etc. in glass or PET bottles with various transparency and shape) by using a non-tactile and completely sterile measurement method. The sensor concept being presented in this paper is based on several CCD-cameras imaging the moving containers from the outside. The stationary lighting system illuminating the bottles is located within the filler circle. The field of view covers between 5 and 8 bottles depending on the bottle diameter and the filler partitioning. Each filling element's number is identified by the signals of an angular encoder. The electro-pneumatic filling valves can be opened and closed by computer control The cameras continuously monitor the final stages of the filling process, i.e. after the filling height has reached the upper half of the bottle. The sensor system measures the current filling height and derives the filling speed. Based on static a priori- knowledge and dynamic process knowledge the sensor system generates a best estimate of the particular time when the single valve is to be closed. After every new level measurement the system updates the closing time. The measurement process continues until the result of the next level calculation would be available after the estimated closing time would have been passed. The vision-based filling valve control enables the filling machine to adapt the filling time of each valve to the individual bottle shape. Herewith a standard deviation between 2 and 4 mm (depending on the slew rate in the bottle neck) can be accomplished, even at filling speed > 70.000 bottles per hour. 0

  8. Insufficiency fracture after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dong Ryul; Huh, Seung Jae [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Insufficiency fracture occurs when normal or physiological stress applied to weakened bone with demineralization and decreased elastic resistance. Recently, many studies reported the development of IF after radiation therapy (RT) in gynecological cancer, prostate cancer, anal cancer and rectal cancer. The RT-induced insufficiency fracture is a common complication during the follow-up using modern imaging studies. The clinical suspicion and knowledge the characteristic imaging patterns of insufficiency fracture is essential to differentiate it from metastatic bone lesions, because it sometimes cause severe pain, and it may be confused with bone metastasis.

  9. Fracture-correlated lineaments at Great Bay, southeastern New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, James R.; Clark, Stewart F.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis by remote-sensing techniques and observations of exposed bedrock structure were preliminary steps taken in a study to locate potential bedrock-fracture zones that may store and transmit ground water near Great Bay, N.H. To help correlate lineaments on the surface with fractures, structural measurements were made at exposed bedrock, largely along the shoreline of the bay, and analyzed to identify fracture trends and fracture characteristics. With these fracture data, lineament-filtering techniques, such as (1) buffer analysis around individual lineaments, (2) discrete-measurement analysis by domain, and (3) spacing-normalized analysis by domain, identified 'fracture-correlated lineaments.' Of the 927 lineaments identified in the study area (180 square kilometers), 406 (44 percent) were evaluated because they either were located within 305 meters of an outcrop with fracture data or intersected one of five 3,300-meter-square grid domain cells that encompassed the fracture data. Of the 406 lineaments, 190 (47 percent) are fracture correlated, although only 15 percent were correlated by more than one filtering technique. The large number of lineaments found in areas of thin glacial overburden and high densities of fractured outcrops suggests that filtering techniques are useful in these areas to selectively identify fracture-correlated lineaments. Fractures parallel to bedding in the Kittery Formation are open locally and often associated with vugs, with up to 1-centimeter aperture, and may provide appreciable secondary porosity in this rock unit. Discrete-measurement analysis by domain identified fracture-correlated lineaments with orientations parallel to these open and vug-filled fractures. Fracture-correlated lineaments related to closely spaced fractures were identified by the spacing-normalized analysis by domain. Analysis results may be used to indicate the potential bedrock pathways for ground-water-discharge points along the shoreline of Great Bay.

  10. Numerical recipes for mold filling simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothe, D.; Juric, D.; Lam, K.; Lally, B.

    1998-07-01

    Has the ability to simulate the filling of a mold progressed to a point where an appropriate numerical recipe achieves the desired results? If results are defined to be topological robustness, computational efficiency, quantitative accuracy, and predictability, all within a computational domain that faithfully represents complex three-dimensional foundry molds, then the answer unfortunately remains no. Significant interfacial flow algorithm developments have occurred over the last decade, however, that could bring this answer closer to maybe. These developments have been both evolutionary and revolutionary, will continue to transpire for the near future. Might they become useful numerical recipes for mold filling simulations? Quite possibly. Recent progress in algorithms for interface kinematics and dynamics, linear solution methods, computer science issues such as parallelization and object-oriented programming, high resolution Navier-Stokes (NS) solution methods, and unstructured mesh techniques, must all be pursued as possible paths toward higher fidelity mold filling simulations. A detailed exposition of these algorithmic developments is beyond the scope of this paper, hence the authors choose to focus here exclusively on algorithms for interface kinematics. These interface tracking algorithms are designed to model the movement of interfaces relative to a reference frame such as a fixed mesh. Current interface tracking algorithm choices are numerous, so is any one best suited for mold filling simulation? Although a clear winner is not (yet) apparent, pros and cons are given in the following brief, critical review. Highlighted are those outstanding interface tracking algorithm issues the authors feel can hamper the reliable modeling of today`s foundry mold filling processes.

  11. Development of Mini-Compact Tension Test Method for Determining Fracture Toughness Master Curves for Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, Mikhail A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Small specimens are playing the key role in evaluating properties of irradiated materials. The use of small specimens provides several advantages. Typically, only a small volume of material can be irradiated in a reactor at desirable conditions in terms of temperature, neutron flux, and neutron dose. A small volume of irradiated material may also allow for easier handling of specimens. Smaller specimens reduce the amount of radioactive material, minimizing personnel exposures and waste disposal. However, use of small specimens imposes a variety of challenges as well. These challenges are associated with proper accounting for size effects and transferability of small specimen data to the real structures of interest. Any fracture toughness specimen that can be made out of the broken halves of standard Charpy specimens may have exceptional utility for evaluation of reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) since it would allow one to determine and monitor directly actual fracture toughness instead of requiring indirect predictions using correlations established with impact data. The Charpy V-notch specimen is the most commonly used specimen geometry in surveillance programs. Validation of the mini compact tension specimen (mini-CT) geometry has been performed on previously well characterized Midland beltline Linde 80 (WF-70) weld in the unirradiated condition. It was shown that the fracture toughness transition temperature, To, measured by these Mini-CT specimens is almost the same as To value that was derived from various larger fracture toughness specimens. Moreover, an International collaborative program has been established to extend the assessment and validation efforts to irradiated Linde 80 weld metal. The program is underway and involves the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Central Research Institute for Electrical Power Industry (CRIEPI), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The irradiated Mini-CT specimens from broken halves of previously tested Charpy

  12. Removal of root filling materials.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duncan, H.F. Chong, B.S.

    2011-05-01

    Safe, successful and effective removal of root filling materials is an integral component of non-surgical root canal re-treatment. Access to the root canal system must be achieved in order to negotiate to the canal terminus so that deficiencies in the original treatment can be rectified. Since a range of materials have been advocated for filling root canals, different techniques are required for their removal. The management of commonly encountered root filling materials during non-surgical re-treatment, including the clinical procedures necessary for removal and the associated risks, are reviewed. As gutta-percha is the most widely used and accepted root filling material, there is a greater emphasis on its removal in this review.

  13. Gas-filled double glazing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goesele, K.; Schuele, W.; Lakatos, B.

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of the results of experiments the sonar and thermal properties of insulated double glazing filled with gas are tested. The sound insulation properties of double glazing can be improved by introducing a gas of a heavy specific weight, such as CO/sub 2/ or SF/sub 6/ into the hollow space. Even gases with a light specific weight produce an improvement in sound insulation; light gases diffuse outwards much more rapidly, however, and can thus be eliminated for practical purposes. The combination of a gas-filled space between the panes and the use of sufficiently heavy compound panes were tested. The thermal properties of insulated double glazing filled with specifically heavy gas gave favourable results with a lower heat transition coefficient. The use of gas to fill double glazing has a particularly favourable effect if the panes are given a heat-reflecting coating in synthetic frames.

  14. Evacuation from smoke filled corridors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, E.W.; Leur, P.H.E. van de; Oerle, N.J. van

    1998-01-01

    underpinning compartmentation requirements in the Dutch regulations is that people can and will go through 30 m of smoke filled space. The hypothesis leads to the requirement that corridors are divided in compartments with a maximum length of 30 meters.

  15. Rapid imbibition of water in fractures within unsaturated sedimentary rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C.-L.; Perfect, E.; Donnelly, B.; Bilheux, H. Z.; Tremsin, A. S.; McKay, L. D.; DiStefano, V. H.; Cai, J. C.; Santodonato, L. J.

    2015-03-01

    The spontaneous imbibition of water and other liquids into gas-filled fractures in variably-saturated porous media is important in a variety of engineering and geological contexts. However, surprisingly few studies have investigated this phenomenon. We present a theoretical framework for predicting the 1-dimensional movement of water into air-filled fractures within a porous medium based on early-time capillary dynamics and spreading over the rough surfaces of fracture faces. The theory permits estimation of sorptivity values for the matrix and fracture zone, as well as a dispersion parameter which quantifies the extent of spreading of the wetting front. Quantitative data on spontaneous imbibition of water in unsaturated Berea sandstone cores were acquired to evaluate the proposed model. The cores with different permeability classes ranging from 50 to 500 mD and were fractured using the Brazilian method. Spontaneous imbibition in the fractured cores was measured by dynamic neutron radiography at the Neutron Imaging Prototype Facility (beam line CG-1D, HFIR), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Water uptake into both the matrix and the fracture zone exhibited square-root-of-time behavior. The matrix sorptivities ranged from 2.9 to 4.6 mm s-0.5, and increased linearly as the permeability class increased. The sorptivities of the fracture zones ranged from 17.9 to 27.1 mm s-0.5, and increased linearly with increasing fracture aperture width. The dispersion coefficients ranged from 23.7 to 66.7 mm2 s-1 and increased linearly with increasing fracture aperture width and damage zone width. Both theory and observations indicate that fractures can significantly increase spontaneous imbibition in unsaturated sedimentary rock by capillary action and surface spreading on rough fracture faces. Fractures also increase the dispersion of the wetting front. Further research is needed to investigate this phenomenon in other natural and engineered porous media.

  16. Growth Plate Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the most widely used by doctors is the Salter-Harris system, described below. Type I Fractures These ... incidence of growth plate fractures peaks in adolescence. Salter-Harris classification of growth plate fractures. AAOS does ...

  17. Open reduction and internal fixation of proximal humerus fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosdowech, Darren S; Faber, Kenneth J; Athwal, George S

    2008-10-01

    Open reduction of proximal humeral fractures has the advantage of providing direct control over each fracture fragment and permitting anatomic reduction and fixation with advanced devices. Modern fixed-angle locking plates designed specifically for proximal humerus fractures have allowed the expansion of surgical indications permitting surgeons to address more complicated fractures. Advanced preoperative imaging and fluoroscopy allow a better understanding of fracture patterns and permit the surgeon to use this knowledge intraoperatively. Research is required to further validate fracture classification systems, to develop surgical guidelines for decision making, and to compare the outcomes of the various treatments options for proximal humerus fractures.

  18. Osteoporotic fractures: a brain or bone disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birge, Stanley J

    2008-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder that predisposes individuals to increased risk of fracture. However, most osteoporotic fractures occur in women who do not meet criteria for osteoporosis. Hence, bone density, by itself, is a relatively poor predictor of fracture. Age and age-related factors are now recognized as increasingly important in determining fracture risk. Osteoporotic fractures are associated with increased disability and mortality, suggesting that osteoporosis may be a clinical manifestation of an underlying disease process affecting multiple systems. The systems affected, the musculo-skeletal system and the central nervous system, are shared in many respects with the frailty syndrome. Vitamin D deficiency is a major contributor to the frailty syndrome, osteoporosis, and osteoporotic fractures. Its effects are mediated by the development of cerebrovascular disease, postural instability, muscle weakness, and bone fragility. Thus, osteoporotic fractures result from both a bone and brain disease.

  19. Anterior internal fixation to treat vertical unstable pelvic fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王世松; 张鹏程; 杜敦进; 杨泗华

    2002-01-01

    With the Chinese development of industry, agriculture and communication, various traffic and work related accidents are increasing, leading to an increase in pelvic fractures. Among the different kinds of fractures, pelvic fracture is the third largest cause of death.1 The treatment of pelvic fractures is a “hot spot” and a difficult point in orthopedic surgery. Since 1998 we have treated 20 patients with vertical unstable pelvic fracture using anterior internal fixation. Satisfactory results have been obtained.

  20. Simulation of complex fracture networks influenced by natural fractures in shale gas reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jinzhou

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available When hydraulic fractures intersect with natural fractures, the geometry and complexity of a fracture network are determined by the initiation and propagation pattern which is affected by a number of factors. Based on the fracture mechanics, the criterion for initiation and propagation of a fracture was introduced to analyze the tendency of a propagating angle and factors affecting propagating pressure. On this basis, a mathematic model with a complex fracture network was established to investigate how the fracture network form changes with different parameters, including rock mechanics, in-situ stress distribution, fracture properties, and frac treatment parameters. The solving process of this model was accelerated by classifying the calculation nodes on the extending direction of the fracture by equal pressure gradients, and solving the geometrical parameters prior to the iteration fitting flow distribution. With the initiation and propagation criterion as the bases for the propagation of branch fractures, this method decreased the iteration times through eliminating the fitting of the fracture length in conventional 3D fracture simulation. The simulation results indicated that the formation with abundant natural fractures and smaller in-situ stress difference is sufficient conditions for fracture network development. If the pressure in the hydraulic fractures can be kept at a high level by temporary sealing or diversion, the branch fractures will propagate further with minor curvature radius, thus enlarging the reservoir stimulation area. The simulated shape of fracture network can be well matched with the field microseismic mapping in data point range and distribution density, validating the accuracy of this model.

  1. Chopart fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaue, Kaj

    2004-09-01

    The Chopart articular space was described by François Chopart (1743-1795) as a practical space for amputations in cases of distal foot necrosis. It corresponds to the limit between the anatomical hind-foot and the mid-foot. The bones involved are the talus and the calcaneus proximally, and the navicular and the cuboid distally. This space thus holds two functionally distinct entities, the anterior part of the coxa pedis (an essential functional joint) and the calcaneo-cuboidal joint,which can be considered to be an "adaptive joint" within a normal foot. Trauma to this region may cause fractures and/or dislocations and, in high energy trauma,compartment syndromes. Principles of treatment are immediate reduction of dislocations and realignment of the medial and lateral column of the foot in length and orientation. Open reduction and internal fixation of talus and navicular fractures are often indicated to restore the "coxa pedis". Open reconstruction or fusion in correct length of the calcaneo-cuboidal joint is occasionally indicated. Salvage procedures in malunions include navicular osteotomies and calcaneo-cuboidal bone block fusions. Treatment of joint destructions, especially involving the talo-navicular joint, include triple arthrodesis.

  2. Reassessment of the Bahamas Fracture Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, M.M. (Geological Survey, Evergreen, CO (United States))

    1991-03-01

    The Bahamas Fracture Zone trends northwestward across south Florida and the Western Florida shelf, and it appears to connect with the Gilbertown-Pickens-Pollard portion of the circum-Gulf of Mexico fault system. Along the fracture zone's trend, seismic reflection data reveal normal displacement in the Late Jurassic section of a kilometer, on a down-to-the-west fault, 9 km east of the east end of Destin dome in the Apalachicola basin. This fault was active in Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous time during the gulf spreading event. The Middle Jurassic Louann Salt thins abruptly to the east across this fault. Toward the southeast, where the fracture zone crosses the Florida peninsula, gravity data have previously been interpreted to indicate coincidence of the Bahamas Fracture Zone with a hinge zone attended by relief on the Mohorovicic discontinuity. This interpretation is an artifact resulting from the use of erroneously low densities for the sedimentary fill of the South Florida basin. The inclusion of a nonexistent negative component for the basin's sedimentary fill necessitated the inclusion of an equally nonexistent positive contribution from relief on the Moho in order to match the observed anomaly. Although northwestward-trending faults do cross south Florida and the Western Florida shelf, the role of the Bahamas Fracture Zone as a boundary between continental and transitional or oceanic crust is insupportable.

  3. Fractures of the distal radius (Colles' fracture)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    João Carlos Belloti; João Baptista Gomes dos Santos; Álvaro Nagib Atallah; Walter Manna Albertoni; Flavio Faloppa

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Although Colles' fracture is a common clinical situation for the orthopedist, we did not find any information in the literature that would allow safe decision-making on the best treatment for each fracture type...

  4. Phase Field Fracture Mechanics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Brett Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    For this assignment, a newer technique of fracture mechanics using a phase field approach, will be examined and compared with experimental data for a bend test and a tension test. The software being used is Sierra Solid Mechanics, an implicit/explicit finite element code developed at Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The bend test experimental data was also obtained at Sandia Labs while the tension test data was found in a report online from Purdue University.

  5. When do fractured media become seismically anisotropic? Some implications on quantifying fracture properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, B. M.; Angus, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    Fractures are pervasive features within the Earth's crust and they have a significant influence on the multi-physical response of the subsurface. The presence of coherent fracture sets often leads to observable seismic anisotropy enabling seismic techniques to remotely locate and characterise fracture systems. In this study, we confirm the general scale-dependence of seismic anisotropy and provide new results specific to shear-wave splitting (SWS). We find that SWS develops under conditions when the ratio of wavelength to fracture size (λS / d) is greater than 3, where Rayleigh scattering from coherent fractures leads to an effective anisotropy such that effective medium model (EMM) theory is qualitatively valid. When 1 scattering, where no effective anisotropy develops and hence the SWS measurements are unstable. When λS / d scattering and begin to see behaviour similar to transverse isotropy. We find that seismic anisotropy is more sensitive to fracture density than fracture compliance ratio. More importantly, we observe that the transition from scattering to an effective anisotropic regime occurs over a propagation distance between 1 and 2 wavelengths depending on the fracture density and compliance ratio. The existence of a transition zone means that inversion of seismic anisotropy parameters based on EMM will be fundamentally biased. More importantly, we observe that linear slip EMM commonly used in inverting fracture properties is inconsistent with our results and leads to errors of approximately 400% in fracture spacing (equivalent to fracture density) and 60% in fracture compliance. Although EMM representations can yield reliable estimates of fracture orientation and spatial location, our results show that EMM representations will systematically fail in providing quantitatively accurate estimates of other physical fracture properties, such as fracture density and compliance. Thus more robust and accurate quantitative estimates of in situ fracture

  6. The Shear Mechanisms of Natural Fractures during the Hydraulic Stimulation of Shale Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaobin Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The shearing of natural fractures is important in the permeability enhancement of shale gas reservoirs during hydraulic fracturing treatment. In this work, the shearing mechanisms of natural fractures are analyzed using a newly proposed numerical model based on the displacement discontinuities method. The fluid-rock coupling system of the model is carefully designed to calculate the shearing of fractures. Both a single fracture and a complex fracture network are used to investigate the shear mechanisms. The investigation based on a single fracture shows that the non-ignorable shearing length of a natural fracture could be formed before the natural fracture is filled by pressurized fluid. Therefore, for the hydraulic fracturing treatment of the naturally fractured shale gas reservoirs, the shear strength of shale is generally more important than the tensile strength. The fluid-rock coupling propagation processes of a complex fracture network are simulated under different crustal stress conditions and the results agree well with those of the single fracture. The propagation processes of complex fracture network show that a smaller crustal stress difference is unfavorable to the shearing of natural fractures, but is favorable to the formation of complex fracture network.

  7. Landform transformation on the urban fringe of Bangkok: the need to review land-use planning processes with consideration of the flow of fill materials to developing areas

    OpenAIRE

    Hara, Y.; Thaitakoo, D.; Takeuchi,K.

    2008-01-01

    For large Asian cities situated on deltaic lowlands, landform transformation is essential for both agrarian and urban development. Understanding landform transformation processes and patterns is important for landscape planning in areas of mixed urban–rural land use on the periphery of these cities. We examined landform transformation processes and patterns in Bangkok at three scales: (1) meso-scale quantitative landform analysis on the urban fringe of Bangkok using aerial photograph interpre...

  8. McMC-based AVAZ direct inversion for fracture weaknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xinpeng; Zhang, Guangzhi; Chen, Huaizhen; Yin, Xingyao

    2017-03-01

    more stably, and it turns out that fracture-developed zones can be identified using the estimated fracture weaknesses.

  9. Development of DQM software infrastructure: storing and reading the monitoring information from the histograms filled by online client applications into relational tables.

    CERN Document Server

    Andrzejczak, Adam

    2015-01-01

    In CMS the online DQM stores the monitoring information from several heterogeneous data sources into histograms, which are later sent to the DQMGUI for visualization. System for the handling of monitoring data is crucial for operating the detector and realizing whether or not it is undergoing failures: in particular, relational databases are the current best option for hosting such data. In this context a new DQM plugin DQMDatabaseWriter was developed, it provides interface which can be used in other DQM modules to drop desired data into the relational database. In addition, a python script provides possibility to read and visualize already saved records.

  10. Form Filling with Self-Compacting Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars Nyholm

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a newly started Ph.D. project with the aim of simulating the form filling ability of Self-Compacting Concrete (SCC) taking into account the form geometry, reinforcement configuration, casting technique, and the rheological properties of the concrete. Comparative studies...... to be taken into account. Furthermore investigations will be carried out to verify and further develop models based on the composite theory describing the effect of mixture composition on the rheological properties and stability of fresh SCC....

  11. Natural fracture characterization using passive seismic illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nihei, K.T.

    2003-01-08

    The presence of natural fractures in reservoir rock can significantly enhance gas production, especially in tight gas formations. Any general knowledge of the existence, location, orientation, spatial density, and connectivity of natural fractures, as well as general reservoir structure, that can be obtained prior to active seismic acquisition and drilling can be exploited to identify key areas for subsequent higher resolution active seismic imaging. Current practices for estimating fracture properties before the acquisition of surface seismic data are usually based on the assumed geology and tectonics of the region, and empirical or fracture mechanics-based relationships between stratigraphic curvature and fracturing. The objective of this research is to investigate the potential of multicomponent surface sensor arrays, and passive seismic sources in the form of local earthquakes to identify and characterize potential fractured gas reservoirs located near seismically active regions. To assess the feasibility of passive seismic fracture detection and characterization, we have developed numerical codes for modeling elastic wave propagation in reservoir structures containing multiple, finite-length fractures. This article describes our efforts to determine the conditions for favorable excitation of fracture converted waves, and to develop an imaging method that can be used to locate and characterize fractures using multicomponent, passive seismic data recorded on a surface array.

  12. Coupled modeling of non-isothermal multiphase flow, solutetransport and reactive chemistry in porous and fractured media: 1. ModelDevelopment and Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

    1998-09-01

    Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport and chemical reactions can be used for the assessment of acid mine drainage remediation, mineral deposition, waste disposal sites, hydrothermal convection, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. Here they present a numerical simulation model, TOUGHREACT, which considers non-isothermal multi-component chemical transport in both liquid and gas phases. A wide range of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered. The model can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The model can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions is considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, cation exchange, and surface complexation. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can proceed either subject to local equilibrium or kinetic conditions. The coupled model employs a sequential iteration approach with reasonable computing efficiency. The development of the governing equations and numerical approach is presented along with the discussion of the model implementation and capabilities. The model is verified for a wide range of subsurface physical and chemical processes. The model is well suited for flow and reactive transport in variably saturated porous and fractured media. In the second of this two-part paper, three applications covering a variety of problems are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the model.

  13. Fracture of brittle solids

    CERN Document Server

    Lawn, Brian

    1993-01-01

    This is an advanced text for higher degree materials science students and researchers concerned with the strength of highly brittle covalent-ionic solids, principally ceramics. It is a reconstructed and greatly expanded edition of a book first published in 1975. The book presents a unified continuum, microstructural and atomistic treatment of modern day fracture mechanics from a materials perspective. Particular attention is directed to the basic elements of bonding and microstructure that govern the intrinsic toughness of ceramics. These elements hold the key to the future of ceramics as high-technology materials--to make brittle solids strong, we must first understand what makes them weak. The underlying theme of the book is the fundamental Griffith energy-balance concept of crack propagation. The early chapters develop fracture mechanics from the traditional continuum perspective, with attention to linear and nonlinear crack-tip fields, equilibrium and non-equilibrium crack states. It then describes the at...

  14. Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF): Recent advances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, S.N.; Fagan, J.E.

    1995-07-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1)Investigate fluid rheological behavior, dynamic fluid leak-off behavior, and proppant transport characteristics of various fracturing fluids used for stimulating oil and gas bearing formations. (2) Develop new information for characterizing the behavior of fracturing fluids under conditions more representative of the behavior in actual fractures. (3) Continue utilizing the advanced capabilities of the high pressure simulator (HPS) to perform near-term research and development activities and not to construct a large-scale simulator that was proposed originally. This paper describes equipment enhancements, data acquisition and instrumentation upgrades, R&D test results, and future research planned for the Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility.

  15. Paleovalley fills: Trunk vs. tributary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvale, E.P.; Archer, A.W.

    2007-01-01

    A late Mississippian-early Pennsylvanian eustatic sea level drop resulted in a complex lowstand drainage network being eroded across the Illinois Basin in the eastern United States. This drainage system was filled during the early part of the Pennsylvanian. Distinct differences can be recognized between the trunk and tributary paleovalley fills. Fills preserved within the trunk systems tend to be fluvially dominated and consist of bed-load deposits of coarse- to medium-grained sandstone and conglomerate. Conversely, the incised valleys of tributary systems tend to be filled with dark mudstone, thinly interbedded sandstones, and mudstones and siltstones. These finer grained facies exhibit marine influences manifested by tidal rhythmites, certain traces fossils, and macro- and microfauna. Examples of tributary and trunk systems, separated by no more than 7 km (4.3 mi) along strike, exhibit these styles of highly contrasting fills. Useful analogs for understanding this Pennsylvanian system include the Quaternary glacial sluiceways present in the lower Ohio, White, and Wabash river valleys of Indiana (United States) and the modern Amazon River (Brazil). Both the Amazon River and the Quaternary rivers of Indiana have (or had) trunk rivers that are (were) dominated by large quantities of bed load relative to their tributaries. The trunk valley systems of these analogs aggraded much more rapidly than their tributary valleys, which evolved into lakes because depositional rates along the trunk are (were) so high that the mouths of the tributaries have been dammed by bed-load deposits. These Holocene systems illustrate that sediment yields can significantly influence the nature of fill successions within incised valleys independent of rates of sea level changes or proximity to highstand coastlines. Copyright ?? 2007. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  16. QENS investigation of filled rubbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triolo, A.; Lechner, R.E.; Desmedt, A.; Pieper, J. [CNR - Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, sez. Messina, Via La Farina 237, 98123 Messina (Italy); Lo Celso, F.; Triolo, R. [Dip. Chimica Fisica, V. le delle Scienze, Parco d' Orleans, Padiglione 17, Universita di Palermo, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Negroni, F. [Pirelli Pneumatici S.p.A, V. le Sarca 222, 20126 Milano (Italy); Arrighi, V.; Qian, H. [Chemistry School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, EH14 4AS Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Frick, B. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble, Cedex 9 (France)

    2002-07-01

    The polymer segmental dynamics is investigated in a series of silica-filled rubbers. The presence of inert fillers in polymers greatly affects the mechanical and physical performance of the final materials. For example, silica has been proposed as a reinforcing agent of elastomers in tire production. Results from quasielastic neutron scattering and Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA) measurements are presented on styrene-ran-butadiene rubber filled with silica. A clear indication is obtained of the existence of a bimodal dynamics, which can be rationalized in terms of the relaxation of bulk rubber and the much slower relaxation of the rubber adsorbed on the filler surface. (orig.)

  17. QENS investigation of filled rubbers

    CERN Document Server

    Triolo, A; Desmedt, A; Pieper, J K; Lo Celso, F; Triolo, R; Negroni, F; Arrighi, V; Qian, H; Frick, B

    2002-01-01

    The polymer segmental dynamics is investigated in a series of silica-filled rubbers. The presence of inert fillers in polymers greatly affects the mechanical and physical performance of the final materials. For example, silica has been proposed as a reinforcing agent of elastomers in tire production. Results from quasielastic neutron scattering and Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA) measurements are presented on styrene-ran-butadiene rubber filled with silica. A clear indication is obtained of the existence of a bimodal dynamics, which can be rationalized in terms of the relaxation of bulk rubber and the much slower relaxation of the rubber adsorbed on the filler surface. (orig.)

  18. QENS investigation of filled rubbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triolo, A.; Lo Celso, F.; Negroni, F.; Arrighi, V.; Qian, H.; Lechner, R. E.; Desmedt, A.; Pieper, J.; Frick, B.; Triolo, R.

    The polymer segmental dynamics is investigated in a series of silica-filled rubbers. The presence of inert fillers in polymers greatly affects the mechanical and physical performance of the final materials. For example, silica has been proposed as a reinforcing agent of elastomers in tire production. Results from quasielastic neutron scattering and Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA) measurements are presented on styrene-ran-butadiene rubber filled with silica. A clear indication is obtained of the existence of a bimodal dynamics, which can be rationalized in terms of the relaxation of bulk rubber and the much slower relaxation of the rubber adsorbed on the filler surface.

  19. Fracture channel waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihei, Kurt T.; Yi, Weidong; Myer, Larry R.; Cook, Neville G. W.; Schoenberg, Michael

    1999-03-01

    The properties of guided waves which propagate between two parallel fractures are examined. Plane wave analysis is used to obtain a dispersion equation for the velocities of fracture channel waves. Analysis of this equation demonstrates that parallel fractures form an elastic waveguide that supports two symmetric and two antisymmetric dispersive Rayleigh channel waves, each with particle motions and velocities that are sensitive to the normal and tangential stiffnesses of the fractures. These fracture channel waves degenerate to shear waves when the fracture stiffnesses are large, to Rayleigh waves and Rayleigh-Lamb plate waves when the fracture stiffnesses are low, and to fracture interface waves when the fractures are either very closely spaced or widely separated. For intermediate fracture stiffnesses typical of fractured rock masses, fracture channel waves are dispersive and exhibit moderate to strong localization of guided wave energy between the fractures. The existence of these waves is examined using laboratory acoustic measurements on a fractured marble plate. This experiment confirms the distinct particle motion of the fundamental antisymmetric fracture channel wave (A0 mode) and demonstrates the ease with which a fracture channel wave can be generated and detected.

  20. Traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Siebenga (Jan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTraumatic spinal fractures have the lowest functional outcomes and the lowest rates of return to work after injury of all major organ systems.1 This thesis will cover traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures and not osteoporotic spine fractures because of the difference in fracture

  1. kISMET: Stress and fracture characterization in a deep mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, C. M.; Dobson, P. F.; Daley, T. M.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Cook, P. J.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Rutqvist, J.; Siler, D.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.; Wu, Y.; Guglielmi, Y.; Ulrich, C.; Marchesini, P.; Wang, H. F.; Haimson, B. C.; Sone, H.; Vigilante, P.; Roggenthen, W.; Doe, T.; Lee, M.; Mattson, E.; Huang, H.; Johnson, T. C.; Morris, J.; White, J. A.; Johnson, P. A.; Coblentz, D. D.; Heise, J.

    2016-12-01

    We are developing a community facility called kISMET (permeability (k) and Induced Seismicity Management for Energy Technologies) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. The purpose of kISMET is to investigate stress and the effects of rock fabric on hydraulic fracturing. Although findings from kISMET may have broad applications that inform stress and fracturing in anisotropic rock, results will be most applicable to improving control of hydraulic fracturing for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) in crystalline rock. At the kISMET site on the 4850 ft (1480 m depth) level of SURF, we have drilled and cored an array of nearly vertical boreholes in Precambrian phyllite. The array consists of four 50-m deep monitoring boreholes surrounding one 100-m deep borehole forming a 6 m-wide five-spot pattern at a depth of 1530 m. Previous investigations of the stress field at SURF suggest that the principal stress s1 is nearly vertical. By aligning the kISMET boreholes approximately with σ1, fractures created in the center borehole should in theory be perpendicular to σ3, the least principal horizontal stress. But the phyllite at kISMET has a strong fabric (foliation) that could influence fracturing. Stress measurements and stimulation using hydraulic fracturing will be carried out in the center borehole using a straddle packer and high-pressure pump. We will use an impression packer and image logs after stress testing and stimulation to determine fracture orientation and extent at the center borehole. In order to study the control of stress, rock fabric, and stimulation approach on size, aperture, and orientation of hydraulic fractures, we will carefully monitor the stress measurements and stimulation. For example, we will use continuous active source seismic (CASSM) in two of the monitoring boreholes to measure changes in seismic-wave velocity as water fills the fracture. Second, near real-time electrical resistance tomography (ERT) will be used in

  2. Assessment of fracture risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanis, John A. [WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: w.j.pontefract@sheffield.ac.uk; Johansson, Helena; Oden, Anders [WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX (United Kingdom); McCloskey, Eugene V. [WHO Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX (United Kingdom); Osteoporosis Centre, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Fractures are a common complication of osteoporosis. Although osteoporosis is defined by bone mineral density at the femoral neck, other sites and validated techniques can be used for fracture prediction. Several clinical risk factors contribute to fracture risk independently of BMD. These include age, prior fragility fracture, smoking, excess alcohol, family history of hip fracture, rheumatoid arthritis and the use of oral glucocorticoids. These risk factors in conjunction with BMD can be integrated to provide estimates of fracture probability using the FRAX tool. Fracture probability rather than BMD alone can be used to fashion strategies for the assessment and treatment of osteoporosis.

  3. FY 1995 report on verification of geothermal exploration technology. Development of fracture reservoir exploration technology (development of seismic exploration); 1995 nendo chinetsu tansa gijutsunado kensho chosa. Danretsugata choryuso tansaho kaihatsu (danseiha riyo tansaho kaihatsu) hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This report provides the development of new exploration technology using elastic waves, such as reflection seismic survey, VSP, and seismic tomography, for precisely characterizing subsurface fractures in geothermal reservoirs. In order to investigate and improve the effective data acquisition and analysis methods for detecting a fault type of fractures, an experiment of a seismic tomography method was conducted using wells drilled in the Ogiri geothermal field, Aira-gun, Kagoshima Prefecture. An experiment of propagation characteristics of piezo type underground seismic source in the volcanic field was also conducted as a trend survey of underground seismic sources. The fracture type in the model field was systematically analyzed by measuring the core samples obtained in the demonstration test field through remanence measurement, fluid inclusion measurement, and zircon measurement using test equipment, and by analyzing results obtained from cores and results of seismic tomography obtained from the wells. Based on these results, the effectiveness and practical application of exploration methods using elastic waves were investigated. 80 refs., 250 figs., 49 tabs.

  4. Mineralogical and microstructural investigations of fractures in Permian z2 potash seam and surrounding salt rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertineit, Michael; Grewe, Wiebke; Schramm, Michael; Hammer, Jörg; Blanke, Hartmut; Patzschke, Mario

    2017-04-01

    Fractures occur locally in the z2 potash seam (Kaliflöz Staßfurt). Most of them extend several centimeter to meter into the surrounding salt rocks. The fractures are distributed on all levels in an extremely deformed area of the Morsleben salt mine, Northern Germany. The sampling site is located within a NW-SE trending synclinal structure, which was reverse folded (Behlau & Mingerzahn 2001). The samples were taken between the -195 m and - 305 m level at the field of Marie shaft. In this area, more than 200 healed fractures were mapped. Most of them show opening widths of only a few millimeters to rarely 10 cm. The fractures in rock salt are filled with basically polyhalite, halite and carnallite. In the potash seam, the fractures are filled with kainite, halite and minor amounts of carnallite and polyhalite. In some cases the fracture infill changes depending on the type of surrounding rocks. There are two dominant orientations of the fractures, which can be interpreted as a conjugated system. The main orientation is NE-SW trending, the dip angles are steep (ca. 70°, dip direction NW and SE, respectively). Subsequent deformation of the filled fractures is documented by a strong grain shape fabric of kainite, undulatory extinction and subgrain formation in kainite, and several mineral transformations. Subgrain formation in halite occurred in both, the fracture infill and the surrounding salt rocks. The results correlate in parts with investigations which were carried out at the close-by rock salt mine Braunschweig-Lüneburg (Horn et al. 2016). The development of the fractures occurred during compression of clayey salt rocks. However, the results are only partly comparable due to different properties (composition, impurities) of the investigated stratigraphic units. Further investigations will focus on detailed microstructural and geochemical analyses of the fracture infill and surrounding salt rocks. Age dating of suitable minerals, e.g. polyhalite (Leitner et al

  5. Fluid driven fracture mechanics in highly anisotropic shale: a laboratory study with application to hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehne, Stephan; Benson, Philip; Koor, Nick; Enfield, Mark

    2017-04-01

    The finding of considerable volumes of hydrocarbon resources within tight sedimentary rock formations in the UK led to focused attention on the fundamental fracture properties of low permeability rock types and hydraulic fracturing. Despite much research in these fields, there remains a scarcity of available experimental data concerning the fracture mechanics of fluid driven fracturing and the fracture properties of anisotropic, low permeability rock types. In this study, hydraulic fracturing is simulated in a controlled laboratory environment to track fracture nucleation (location) and propagation (velocity) in space and time and assess how environmental factors and rock properties influence the fracture process and the developing fracture network. Here we report data on employing fluid overpressure to generate a permeable network of micro tensile fractures in a highly anisotropic shale ( 50% P-wave velocity anisotropy). Experiments are carried out in a triaxial deformation apparatus using cylindrical samples. The bedding planes are orientated either parallel or normal to the major principal stress direction (σ1). A newly developed technique, using a steel guide arrangement to direct pressurised fluid into a sealed section of an axially drilled conduit, allows the pore fluid to contact the rock directly and to initiate tensile fractures from the pre-defined zone inside the sample. Acoustic Emission location is used to record and map the nucleation and development of the micro-fracture network. Indirect tensile strength measurements at atmospheric pressure show a high tensile strength anisotropy ( 60%) of the shale. Depending on the relative bedding orientation within the stress field, we find that fluid induced fractures in the sample propagate in two of the three principal fracture orientations: Divider and Short-Transverse. The fracture progresses parallel to the bedding plane (Short-Transverse orientation) if the bedding plane is aligned (parallel) with the

  6. Anthropometric measurements of ankle mortise for evaluating mortise fracture reductions with an aim to develop contoured implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Patil

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankle injuries are unique as they are not only intra-articular of weight bearing joint, but also caused by a variety of mechanism, each resulting in different pattern with ankle fractures. The primary concern is residual instability of the joint as malalignment or residual displacement can adversely affect the biomechanical behaviour of ankle and resulting loss of function, due to non restoration of normal anatomy. Therefore essential of proper anatomical parameters for assessment of reduction and improved designs of implants used to get good results. Objectives: Measuring various radiological and Anatomical normal parameters of the ankle mortise. Material and Methods: Cadaveric 20 fibula and 27 tibia. Anteroposterior and 15○ internal rotation radiographs, of both Ankles in 20 adult individuals formed the material. Following parameters measured- a Tibiofibular clearspace b Tibiofibular overlap c Talocrural angle d Length of medial and lateral malleoli e Angles sustained on medial surface of medial malleoli and lateral surface of lateral malleoli. Results: a Tibiofibular clear space on Anteroposterior 2.4mm (±1.3mm in 15○ rotation 4.5mm (±1.2mm. b Tibiofibular overlap in Anteroposterior 11.2mm (±4.4mm in 15○ rotation 4.2mm (±1.7mm. c Talocrural angle in Anteroposterior 77.7mm (±3.2mm in 15○ rotation 79.9mm (±2.9mm. d Length of medial malleolus in Anteroposterior 15.3mm (±1.01mm in 15○ rotation 15.3mm (±0.8mm. e Length of lateral malleolus in Anteroposterior 27.35mm (±3.8mm in 15○ rotation 26.5mm (±5.1mm. Angles- Lateral bend of lateral malleolus was ranging 8○-21○ average being 16.2○. Medial bend of medial malleolus was ranging 10○-34○, average 19.5○. Conclusion: The unique measurement of angles on both surface of malleoli and other parameters definitely contribute for assessment of reduction and prognostic evaluations of ankle fracture, Designing, moulding and manufacturing of prebent plates for use

  7. Rock fracture image acquisition with both visible and ultraviolet illuminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixing; Hakami, Eva

    2006-02-01

    Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) have identified the need for a better understanding of radionuclide transport and retention processes in fractured rock since 1994. In the study, the first hard problem is to obtain rock fracture images of a good quality, since rock surface is very rough, and composed of complicated and multiple fractures, as a result, image acquisition is the first important. As a cooperation project between Sweden and China, we sampled a number of rock specimens for analyzing rock fracture network by visible and ultraviolet image technique, in the field. The samples are resin injected, in which way; opened fractures can be seen clearly by means of UV light illumination, and the rock surface information can be obtained by using visible optical illumination. We used different digital cameras and microscope to take images by two illuminations. From the same samples; we found that UV illumination image gives the clear information of fracture opening or closing, and the visible optical illumination gives the information of the rock surface (e.g. filling materials inside of fractures). By applying this technique, the minimum width of rock fracture 0.01 mm can be analyzed. This paper presents: (1) Rock fracture image acquiring techniques; (2) Rock fracture image acquisition by using UV light illumination and visible optical illumination; and (3) Conclusions. The studied method can be used both in the field and a laboratory.

  8. Flammability of Gas-Filled Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ushkov Valentin Anatol'evich

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The regularities of flame propagation on the horizontal surface of gas-filled polymers are considered depending on the concentration of oxygen in the oxidizer flow. The values of the coefficients in the expression describing relationship between the rate of flame propagation on the surface of foams and oxygen concentration are obtained. It was shown that with the mass content of reactive organophosphorus compounds reaching 4.0...5.9%, non-smoldering resole foam plastics with high performance characteristics are obtained. It was found that in order to obtain moderately combustible polyurethane foams based on oxyethylated phosphorus-containing polyols, the phosphorus concentration should not exceed 3 % of mass. To obtain flame-retardant urea-formaldehyde foam cellular plastics, the concentration of phosphorus should not exceed 0.3 % of mass. Physical-mechanical properties and flammability indices of developed gas-filled polymers based on reactive oligomers are presented.

  9. Conjectural Equilibrium in Water-filling Games

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Yi

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers a non-cooperative game in which competing users sharing a frequency-selective interference channel selfishly optimize their power allocation in order to improve their achievable rates. Previously, it was shown that a user having the knowledge of its opponents' channel state information can make foresighted decisions and substantially improve its performance compared with the case in which it deploys the conventional iterative water-filling algorithm, which does not exploit such knowledge. This paper discusses how a foresighted user can acquire this knowledge by modeling its experienced interference as a function of its own power allocation. To characterize the outcome of the multi-user interaction, the conjectural equilibrium is introduced, and the existence of this equilibrium for the investigated water-filling game is proved. Interestingly, both the Nash equilibrium and the Stackelberg equilibrium are shown to be special cases of the generalization of conjectural equilibrium. We develop...

  10. The Berkeley gas-filled separator

    CERN Document Server

    Ninov, V; McGrath, C A

    1998-01-01

    The BGS is being constructed at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL in Berkeley. The magnetic configuration of the BGS will allow a large angular acceptance and good suppression of primary beam particles. BGS operates as a mass spectrometer with a A/ Delta A approximately =200 and as a gas filled separator at pressures between 0.1-50 hPa. The reaction products recoiling off a thin target will be collected with efficiencies from 10-80at the focal plane. A Monte Carlo simulation program of the ion transport through the gas-filled magnets in combination of 3-dimensional TOSCA field maps has been developed and reproduces closely the experimental behavior of BGS. (9 refs).

  11. Well test analysis in fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasaki, K.

    1987-04-01

    The behavior of fracture systems under well test conditions and methods for analyzing well test data from fractured media are investigated. Several analytical models are developed to be used for analyzing well test data from fractured media. Numerical tools that may be used to simulate fluid flow in fractured media are also presented. Three types of composite models for constant flux tests are investigated. These models are based on the assumption that a fracture system under well test conditions may be represented by two concentric regions, one representing a small number of fractures that dominates flow near the well, and the other representing average conditions farther away from the well. Type curves are presented that can be used to find the flow parameters of these two regions and the extent of the inner concentric region. Several slug test models with different geometric conditions that may be present in fractured media are also investigated. A finite element model that can simulate transient fluid flow in fracture networks is used to study the behavior of various two-dimensional fracture systems under well test conditions. A mesh generator that can be used to model mass and heat flow in a fractured-porous media is presented.

  12. Unsteady Capillary Filling By Electrocapillarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, In Seok; Lee, Jung A.

    2016-11-01

    Unsteady filling of electrolyte solution inside a nanochannel by the electrocapillarity effect is studied. The filling rate is predicted as a function of the bulk concentration of the electrolyte, the surface potential (or surface charge density), and the cross sectional shape of the channel. Since the driving force of the flow is the electrocapillarity, it is first analyzed by using the solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. From the analysis, it is found that the results for many different cross sectional shapes can be unified with good accuracy if the hydraulic radius is adopted as the characteristic length scale of the problem. Especially in the case of constant surface potential, for both limits of κh -> 0 and κh -> ∞ , it can be shown theoretically that the electrocapillarity is independent of the cross sectional shape if the hydraulic radius is the same. In order to analyze the geometric effects more systematically, we consider the regular N-polygons with the same hydraulic radius and the rectangles of different aspect ratios. Washburn's approach is then adopted to predict the filling rate of electrolyte solution inside a nanaochannel. It is found that the average filling velocity decreases as N increases in the case of regular N-polygons with the same hydraulic radius. This is because of that the regular N-polygons of the same hydraulic radius share the same inscribing circle. This work has been supported by BK21+ program.

  13. Filling in the retinal image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimer, James; Piantanida, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    The optics of the eye form an image on a surface at the back of the eyeball called the retina. The retina contains the photoreceptors that sample the image and convert it into a neural signal. The spacing of the photoreceptors in the retina is not uniform and varies with retinal locus. The central retinal field, called the macula, is densely packed with photoreceptors. The packing density falls off rapidly as a function of retinal eccentricity with respect to the macular region and there are regions in which there are no photoreceptors at all. The retinal regions without photoreceptors are called blind spots or scotomas. The neural transformations which convert retinal image signals into percepts fills in the gaps and regularizes the inhomogeneities of the retinal photoreceptor sampling mosaic. The filling-in mechamism plays an important role in understanding visual performance. The filling-in mechanism is not well understood. A systematic collaborative research program at the Ames Research Center and SRI in Menlo Park, California, was designed to explore this mechanism. It was shown that the perceived fields which are in fact different from the image on the retina due to filling-in, control some aspects of performance and not others. Researchers have linked these mechanisms to putative mechanisms of color coding and color constancy.

  14. Space-filling polyhedral sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaland, Peter

    2016-06-21

    Solid sorbents, systems, and methods for pumping, storage, and purification of gases are disclosed. They derive from the dynamics of porous and free convection for specific gas/sorbent combinations and use space filling polyhedral microliths with facial aplanarities to produce sorbent arrays with interpenetrating interstitial manifolds of voids.

  15. Filling of charged cylindrical capillaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Siddhartha; Chanda, Sourayon; Eijkel, J.C.T.; Tas, N.R.; Chakraborty, Suman; Mitra, Sushanta K.

    2014-01-01

    We provide an analytical model to describe the filling dynamics of horizontal cylindrical capillaries having charged walls. The presence of surface charge leads to two distinct effects: It leads to a retarding electrical force on the liquid column and also causes a reduced viscous drag force because

  16. [Periprosthetic Acetabulum Fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, A J; Stuby, F; de Zwart, P M; Ochs, B G

    2016-12-01

    In contrast to periprosthetic fractures of the femur, periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are rare complications - both primary fractures and fractures in revision surgery. This topic is largely under-reported in the literature; there are a few case reports and no long term results. Due to an increase in life expectancy, the level of patients' activity and the number of primary joint replacements, one has to expect a rise in periprosthetic complications in general and periprosthetic acetabular fractures in particular. This kind of fracture can be intra-, peri- or postoperative. Intraoperative fractures are especially associated with insertion of cementless press-fit acetabular components or revision surgery. Postoperative periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are usually related to osteolysis, for example, due to polyethylene wear. There are also traumatic fractures and fractures missed intraoperatively that lead to some kind of insufficiency fracture. Periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum are treated conservatively if the implant is stable and the fracture is not dislocated. If surgery is needed, there are many possible different surgical techniques and challenging approaches. That is why periprosthetic fractures of the acetabulum should be treated by experts in pelvic surgery as well as revision arthroplasty and the features specific to the patient, fracture and prosthetic must always be considered. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Laser vision based adaptive fill control system for TIG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The variation of joint groove size during tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding will result in the non-uniform fill of deposited metal. To solve this problem, an adaptive fill control system was developed based on laser vision sensing. The system hardware consists of a modular development kit (MDK) as the real-time image capturing system, a computer as the controller, a D/A conversion card as the interface of controlled variable output, and a DC TIG welding system as the controlled device. The system software is developed and the developed feature extraction algorithm and control strategy are of good accuracy and robustness. Experimental results show that the system can implement adaptive fill of melting metal with high stability, reliability and accuracy. The groove is filled well and the quality of the weld formation satisfies the relevant industry criteria.

  18. Open Intramedullary Nailing for Segmental Long Bone Fractures: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidemiological reports have shown that a large number of ... KEYWORDS: Locked intramedullary nailing, open reduction, segmental fractures ... led to the development of various intramedullary nail instrument ... Trauma Association System, as complex fractures Type C.[27] ..... Financial support and sponsorship. Nil.

  19. Recent trends in fracture and damage mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zybell, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of topics in fracture and damage mechanics. It presents historical perspectives as well as recent innovative developments, presented by peer reviewed contributions from internationally acknowledged authors.  The volume deals with the modeling of fracture and damage in smart materials, current industrial applications of fracture mechanics, and it explores advances in fracture testing methods. In addition, readers will discover trends in the field of local approach to fracture and approaches using analytical mechanics. Scholars in the fields of materials science, engineering and computational science will value this volume which is dedicated to Meinhard Kuna on the occasion of his 65th birthday in 2015. This book incorporates the proceedings of an international symposium that was organized to honor Meinhard Kuna’s contributions to the field of theoretical and applied fracture and damage mechanics.

  20. Humerus shaft fractures - where are we today?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strohm, P C; Reising, K; Hammer, T

    2011-01-01

    Humeral shaft fractures account for about 1-3% of all fractures. These fractures are regarded as the domain of non-surgical management. This is certainly still the contemporary view but there is an obvious trend towards surgical stabilization. Surgical treatment of humeral shaft fractures has...... nonetheless been greatly facilitated by the development of new implants. In particular, a new generation of nails that general permit immediate mobilization have become available for improved management of longitudinal and multi-segmental fractures. Retrograde and antegrade nails have advantages...... and disadvantages and selection procedure is often based on the distal or proximal location of the fracture. Plates also offer an alternative for certain indications and have advantages at the proximal and distal shaft in particular. If there is primary lesion of the radial nerve, exploration is not very advisable...

  1. An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, Steve; Ershaghi, Iraj

    2006-06-30

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to over 10,000,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intended to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. In the first phase of the project, state of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic, interference tests and production logs were employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database were used in the construction of a new geologic model of the fracture network. An innovative fracture network reservoir simulator was developed to better understand and manage the aquifer’s role in pressure maintenance and water production. In the second phase of this project, simulation models were used to plan the redevelopment of the field using high angle wells. Correct placement of the wells is critical to intersect the best-developed fracture zones and to avoid producing large volumes of water from the water leg. Particula r attention was paid to those areas of the field that have not been adequately developed with the existing producers. In cooperation with the DOE and the PTTC, the new data and the new fracture simulation model were shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during Budget Periods I

  2. [Condylar fracture and temporomandibular joint ankylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi

    2016-03-01

    This article summarized the advances in treatment and research of temporomandibular joint surgery in the last 5 years which was presented in "The 2nd Condyle Fracture and Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis Symposium". The content includes 5 parts: non-surgical treatment of children condyle fracture and long-term follow-up, the improvement of operative approach for condyle fracture and key techniques, the importance and the method for the simultanesous reduction of disc in condylar fracture treatment, the development of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis similar to hypertrophic non-union and the improved safety and accuracy by applying digital surgery in joint surgery.

  3. Imaging of vertebral fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Panda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertebral fracture is a common clinical problem. Osteoporosis is the leading cause of non-traumatic vertebral fracture. Often, vertebral fractures are not clinically suspected due to nonspecific presentation and are overlooked during routine interpretation of radiologic investigations. Moreover, once detected, many a times the radiologist fails to convey to the clinician in a meaningful way. Hence, vertebral fractures are a constant cause of morbidity and mortality. Presence of vertebral fracture increases the chance of fracture in another vertebra and also increases the risk of subsequent hip fracture. Early detection can lead to immediate therapeutic intervention improving further the quality of life. So, in this review, we wish to present a comprehensive overview of vertebral fracture imaging along with an algorithm of evaluation of vertebral fractures.

  4. Well test analysis in fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasaki, K.

    1986-04-01

    In this study the behavior of fracture systems under well test conditions and methods for analyzing well test data from fractured media are investigated. Several analytical models are developed to be used for analyzing well test data from fractured media. Numerical tools that may be used to simulate fluid flow in fractured media are also presented. Three types of composite models for constant flux tests are investigated. Several slug test models with different geometric conditions that may be present in fractured media are also investigated. A finite element model that can simulate transient fluid flow in fracture networks is used to study the behavior of various two-dimensional fracture systems under well test conditions. A mesh generator that can be used to model mass and heat flow in a fractured-porous media is presented. This model develops an explicit solution in the porous matrix as well as in the discrete fractures. Because the model does not require the assumptions of the conventional double porosity approach, it may be used to simulate cases where double porosity models fail.

  5. Development of heat transfer coefficient model for external heated rotary kiln with low filling large particles%大颗粒低填充率外热式回转窑传热系数模型的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴静; 李选友; 陈宝明; 高玲; 王瑞雪; 赵改菊; 王成运

    2014-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficient is one of the most crucial parameters in thermal calculation and design for an externally heated rotary kiln. Suitably designed kiln dimensions, structure and operating parameters rely on the accuracy of the employed heat transfer coefficient. For an externally heated kiln, heat transfers from an outside source to inside particles through a wall. Generally, the filling ratio in an externally heated rotary kiln is low. So, the heat transfer mechanism for large particles with a low filling ratio in an externally heated rotary kiln is quite different from that in an internally heated rotary kiln, whose filling ratio is usually more than 15 percent. Despite the existence of some achievements in particles motion behavior and heat transfer mechanisms in an internally heated rotary kiln, so far, there is no reliable heat transfer model to describe the heat transfer process between the kiln’s surface and particles in an externally heated rotary kiln with low filling large particles. As a result, the main approach of heat transfer coefficient determination is still an experimental test. On the basis of heat transfer mechanism analysis, this paper regards the heat transfer process between the kiln’s surface and large particles as consisting of heat conduction between the kiln’s surface and gas film, heat convection between the gas film and particles, and heat radiation between the kiln’s surface and particles. Finally, a mathematical model is created for the prediction of the heat transfer coefficient between the kiln’s surface and large particles. To validate the developed model, a series of experimental tests are performed. Alumina spherical grains with a diameter of 6 mm are used as testing particles. When the filling ratio is 5 percent, the heat transfer coefficients are measured in the range of 220℃-420℃ at 20℃ surface temperature intervals, corresponding to the rotary speeds of 1r/min, 2r/min, and 3r/min, respectively. The

  6. Cavity filling water control below aerator devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱尚拓; 吴建华; 马飞; 徐建荣; 彭育; 汪振

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of high dam projects within China, the dragon-drop-tail spillway tunnel is introduced and widely used. In view of the high water head and the large flow velocity on the dragon-drop-tail section, aerator devices are usually placed for the cavitation damage control. For the device placed in its initial position, it is a serious concern to design a suitable flow regime of the cavity and to control the cavity filling water due to the large flow depth and the low Froude number through this aera-tor. In this study, the relationships between the geometries of the aerator device and the jet impact angle of the lower trajectory of the flow are theoretically analyzed with/without a local slope. Nine test cases with different geometries are designed, the effectiveness of the filling water control is experimentally investigated under different operation conditions, and two criteria of the local slope design are proposed. It is concluded that the cavity flow regime and the filling water can be improved if a small impact angle and some sui-table geometries of the local slope are designed.

  7. Identifying Fracture Types and Relative Ages Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilley, Lorie M.; Norman, David; Owens, Lara

    2008-06-30

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Understanding the life cycle of a fracture in a geothermal system is fundamental to the development of techniques for creating fractures. Recognizing the stage of a fracture, whether it is currently open and transmitting fluids; if it recently has closed; or if it is an ancient fracture would assist in targeting areas for further fracture stimulation. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will also assist in fracture stimulation selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures, and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. Our hypothesis is that fractures over their life cycle have different chemical signatures that we can see in fluid inclusion gas analysis and by using the new method of fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) the different stages of fractures, along with an estimate of fracture size can be identified during the well drilling process. We have shown with this study that it is possible to identify fracture locations using FIS and that different fractures have different chemical signatures however that signature is somewhat dependent upon rock type. Open, active fractures correlate with increase concentrations of CO2, N2, Ar, and to a lesser extent H2O. These fractures would be targets for further enhancement. The usefulness of this method is that it is low cost alternative to current well logging techniques and can be done as a well is being drilled.

  8. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Horner

    2004-04-29

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the

  9. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Horner

    2005-08-01

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the

  10. An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Horner

    2006-01-31

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the

  11. Implicit fracture modelling in FLAC3D: Assessing the behaviour of fractured shales, carbonates and other fractured rock types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osinga, S.; Pizzocolo, F.; Veer, E.F. van der; Heege, J.H. ter

    2016-01-01

    Fractured rocks play an important role in many types of petroleum and geo-energy operations. From fractured limestone reservoirs to unconventionals, understanding the geomechanical behaviour and the dynamically coupled (dual) permeability system is paramount for optimal development of these systems.

  12. Experimental and finite element analysis of fracture criterion in general yielding fracture mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D M Kulkarni; Ravi Prakash; A N Kumar

    2002-12-01

    Efforts made over the last three decades to understand the fracture behaviour of structural materials in elastic and elasto-plastic fracture mechanics are numerous, whereas investigations related to fracture behaviour of materials in thin sheets or general yielding fracture regimes are limited in number. Engineering simulative tests are being used to characterize formability and drawability of sheet metals. However, these tests do not assure consistency in quality of sheet metal products. The prevention of failure in stressed structural components currently requires fracture mechanics based design parameters like critical load, critical crack-tip opening displacement or fracture toughness. The present attempt would aim to fulfill this gap and generate more information thereby increased understanding on fracture behaviour of sheet metals. In the present investigation, using a recently developed technique for determining fracture criteria in sheet metals, results are generated on critical CTOD and fracture toughness. Finite element analysis was performed to support the results on various fracture parameters. The differences are within 1 to 4%. At the end it is concluded that magnitude of critical CTOD and/or critical load can be used as a fracture criterion for thin sheets.

  13. Fracture Criterion for Fracture Mechanics of Magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘灏; 杨文涛

    2003-01-01

    The applicability and limitation of some fracture criteria in the fracture mechanics of magnets are studied.It is shown that the magnetic field intensity factor can be used as a fracture criterion when the crack in a magnet is only affected by a magnetic field. For some magnetostrictive materials in which the components of magnetostriction strain do not satisfy the compatibility equation of deformation, the stress intensity factor can no longer be effectively applicable as a fracture criterion when the crack in a magnet is affected by a magnetic field and mechanical loads simultaneously.

  14. Fracture mineralogy of the Forsmark site. SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, Bjoern (Dept. of Earth Sciences, Univ. of Goeteborg (Sweden)); Tullborg, Eva-Lena (Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden)); Smellie, John (Conterra AB, Luleaa (Sweden)); MacKenzie, Angus B. (SUERC, Scottish Enterprise Technology Park, East Kilbride (United Kingdom)); Suksi, Juhani (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland))

    2008-08-15

    Detailed investigations of the fracture mineralogy and altered wall rock have been carried out as part of the site characterisation programme between 2003 and 2007 at Forsmark. The results have been published in a number of P-reports and in contributions to scientific journals. This report summarises and evaluates the data obtained during the detailed fracture mineralogical studies. The report includes descriptions of the identified fracture minerals and their chemical composition. A sequence of fracture mineralisations has been distinguished and provides information of the low to moderate temperature (brittle) geological and hydrogeological evolution at the site. Special focus has been paid to the chemical and stable isotopic composition of calcite to obtain palaeohydrogeological information. Chemical analyses of bulk fracture filling material have been carried out to identify possible sinks for certain elements and also to reveal the presence of minor phases rich in certain elements which have not been possible to detect by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Statistical analysis of the mineralogy in fractures outside deformation zones (i.e. within fracture domains FFM01, FFM02, FFM03 and FFM06) have been carried out concerning variation of fracture mineral distribution at depth and in different fracture domains. Uranium contents and uranium-series isotopes have been analysed on fracture coating material from hydraulically conductive fractures. Such analyses are also available from the groundwaters and the results are combined in order to reveal recent (< 1 Ma) removal/deposition of uranium in the fracture system. The redox conditions in the fracture system have been evaluated based on mineralogical and chemical indicators as well as Moessbauer analyses

  15. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2002-04-30

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful redevelopment and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the

  16. Recognizing and reporting vertebral fractures: reducing the risk of future osteoporotic fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentle, B.C. [Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Brown, J.P. [Laval Univ., Dept. of Medicine, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada); Khan, A. [McMaster Univ., Dept. of Medicine, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: blentle@shaw.ca (and others)

    2007-02-15

    Given the increasing evidence that vertebral fractures are underdiagnosed and not acted on, Osteoporosis Canada and the Canadian Association of Radiologists initiated a project to develop and publish a set of recommendations to promote and facilitate the diagnosis and reporting of vertebral fractures. The identification of spinal fractures is not uniform. More than 65% of vertebral fractures cause no symptoms. It is also apparent that vertebral fractures are inadequately recognized when the opportunity for diagnosis arises fortuitously. It is to patients' benefit that radiologists report vertebral fractures evident on a chest or other radiograph, no matter how incidental to the immediate clinical indication for the examination. The present recommendations can help to close the gap in care in recognizing and treating vertebral fractures, to prevent future fractures and thus reduce the burden of osteoporosis-related morbidity and mortality, as well as fracture-related costs to the health care system. Several studies indicate that a gap exists in regard to the diagnosis of vertebral fractures and the clinical response following such diagnosis. All recommendations presented here are based on consensus. These recommendations were developed by a multidisciplinary working group under the auspices of the Scientific Advisory Council of Osteoporosis Canada and the Canadian Association of Radiologists. Prevalent vertebral fractures have important clinical implications in terms of future fracture risk. Recognizing and reporting fractures incidental to radiologic examinations done for other reasons has the potential to reduce health care costs by initiating further steps in osteoporosis diagnosis and appropriate therapy. Physicians should be aware of the importance of vertebral fracture diagnosis in assessing future osteoporotic fracture risk. Vertebral fractures incidental to radiologic examinations done for other reasons should be identified and reported. Vertebral

  17. a Fractal Network Model for Fractured Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Li, Cuihong; Qiu, Shuxia; Sasmito, Agus Pulung

    2016-04-01

    The transport properties and mechanisms of fractured porous media are very important for oil and gas reservoir engineering, hydraulics, environmental science, chemical engineering, etc. In this paper, a fractal dual-porosity model is developed to estimate the equivalent hydraulic properties of fractured porous media, where a fractal tree-like network model is used to characterize the fracture system according to its fractal scaling laws and topological structures. The analytical expressions for the effective permeability of fracture system and fractured porous media, tortuosity, fracture density and fraction are derived. The proposed fractal model has been validated by comparisons with available experimental data and numerical simulation. It has been shown that fractal dimensions for fracture length and aperture have significant effect on the equivalent hydraulic properties of fractured porous media. The effective permeability of fracture system can be increased with the increase of fractal dimensions for fracture length and aperture, while it can be remarkably lowered by introducing tortuosity at large branching angle. Also, a scaling law between the fracture density and fractal dimension for fracture length has been found, where the scaling exponent depends on the fracture number. The present fractal dual-porosity model may shed light on the transport physics of fractured porous media and provide theoretical basis for oil and gas exploitation, underground water, nuclear waste disposal and geothermal energy extraction as well as chemical engineering, etc.

  18. Methodologies used for the multiscale characterization of fractured reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klint, K.E.S.; Gravesen, P.; Rosenbom, A. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark); Sanchez, F.; Molinelli, L. [CH2M-Hill Espana S.A., Parque Empresarial San Fernando Edificio Berlin, Madrid (Spain); Tsakiroglou, C.D. [Inst. of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes - Foundation for Research and Technology, Patras (Greece)

    2002-07-01

    The role of fractures as hydraulic highways for the spreading of pollutants in aquifers has been recognised during the last decade, and the need for the introduction of high quality fracture properties to hydraulic models has accordingly become more evident. The majority of fracture models need accurate input data concerning the orientation, the size distribution, the fracture density and the opening diameter (aperture) of fractures. In the present study a new integrated methodology is developed to characterise fractures and calculate properties that are used as input parameters in hydraulic models. The methodology is based on field-scale measurements of fractured outcrops, lab-scale treatment of fractured core samples, and SEM image analysis of 2-D sections of resin-impregnated single fractures. The most significant fracture characteristics are identified, classified and quantified at several different scales, so that information useful for the calculation of the hydraulic properties of fractured media is obtained. The methodology of characterization is demonstrated with its application to two contaminated fractured sites of very different geological settings. One is a fractured clayey till in Denmark and the other one is a fractured granite in Spain. (orig.)

  19. Pressure ulcer risk in hip fracture patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, RH; Rozendaal, M; Wouters-Wesseling, W; Buskens, E; Keller, P; Haalboom, JRE

    2004-01-01

    Hip fracture patients have a high risk of pressure ulcers (PU). We followed 121 hip fracture patients for the development of pressure ulcers and evaluated a risk assessment tool for sensitivity and specificity. More than half of the patients presented with PU, mostly stage I. Risk factors for PU wer

  20. Pressure ulcer risk in hip fracture patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, R. H.; Rozendaal, M; Wouters-Wesseling, W; Buskens, E.; Keller, P; Haalboom, JRE

    Hip fracture patients have a high risk of pressure ulcers (PU). We followed 121 hip fracture patients for the development of pressure ulcers and evaluated a risk assessment tool for sensitivity and specificity. More than half of the patients presented with PU, mostly stage I. Risk factors for PU

  1. Study on Antigravity Mold Filling by Conservative Scalar Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李日; 王友序; 杨根仓; 毛协民

    2003-01-01

    By SIMPLE method and Van-Leer scheme, a program on numerical simulation for 3D mold filling has been developed. The fluid flow field of gas and liquid is calculated in couples by a single phase N-S equation using SIMPLE method, and free surface control equation is handied by Van-Leer scheme. Then it is verified by an anti-gravity mold filling of thin wall plate. In order to demonstrate its ability to simulate 3D casting, an anti-gravity mould filling of a cube is computed by the program.

  2. Radio resource management using geometric water-filling

    CERN Document Server

    He, Peter; Zhou, Sheng; Niu, Zhisheng

    2014-01-01

    This brief introduces the fundamental theory and development of managing radio resources using a water-filling algorithm that can optimize system performance in wireless communication. Geometric Water-Filling (GWF) is a crucial underlying tool in emerging communication systems such as multiple input multiple output systems, cognitive radio systems, and green communication systems. Early chapters introduce emerging wireless technologies and provide a detailed analysis of water-filling. The brief investigates single user and multi-user issues of radio resource management, allocation of resources

  3. Veining Failure and Hydraulic Fracturing in Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mighani, S.; Sondergeld, C. H.; Rai, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    During the hydraulic fracturing, the pressurized fluid creates new fractures and reactivates existing natural fractures forming a highly conductive Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) around the borehole. We extend the previous work on Lyons sandstone and pyrophyllite to anisotropic shale from the Wolfcamp formation. We divide the rock anisotropy into two groups: a) conventional and b) unconventional (shaly) anisotropy. X-ray Computed Tomography (CT), compressional velocity anisotropy, and SEM analysis are used to identify three causes of anisotropy: bedding planes, clay lamination, and calcite veins. Calcite vein is a subsequently filled with calcite bonded weakly to the matrix. Velocity anisotropy and visual observations demonstrate the calcite filled veins to be mostly subparallel to the fabric direction. Brazilian tests are carried out to observe the fracture initiation and propagation under tension. High speed photography (frame rate 300,000 frame/sec) was used to capture the failure. Strain gauges and Acoustic Emission (AE) sensors recorded the deformation leading up to and during failure. SEM imaging and surface profilometry were employed to study the post-failure fracture system and failed surface topology. Fracture permeability was measured as a function of effective stress. Brazilian tests on small disks containing a centered single vein revealed the shear strength of the veins. We interpret the strain data and number, frequency, and amplitude of AE events which are correlated well with the observed fracture process zone, surface roughness, and permeability. The unpropped fracture has enhanced permeability by two orders of magnitude. The observed anisotropic tensile failure seems to have a universal trend with a minimum strength occurring at 15o orientation with respect to the loading axis. The veins at 15o orientation with respect to the loading axis were easily activated at 30% of the original failure load. The measured strength of the vein is as low as 6

  4. 岩层厚度对砂岩斜交构造裂缝发育的影响%The Constraints of Bed Thickness on the Development of Oblique Structural Fractures in the Sandstones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董有浦; 燕永锋; 肖安成; 吴磊; 徐波; 赵海峰; 李旭英

    2013-01-01

    Outcrop analogue study can significantly improve the understanding of fracture distribution and the relationship between development of fractures and impact factors.In this paper,we mainly investigate the constraints of bed thickness (BT) on the fractal dimension (FD) of oblique structural fractures in Fuyang,Zhejiang province.The primary fracture sets are oblique relative to the bedding,although one nearly parallel set is also present.The parallel fractures cut thick strata into small pieces and form a dense net work of fractures in the thick strata.The oblique fractures,which result from the local stress,are inferred to form during folding.In the literatures,it is often reported that the relationship between FD of extensional structural fractures and BT is linear.However,in the study area correlations between FD of shear structural fractures and BT are rather poorly linear.The fractal dimension is also very high in thick layers.The recognition of this region provides an important clue for seismic interpretation and seismic inversion.%露头观测可以帮助我们了解构造裂缝的分布特征,也可以直观分析其发育与其他构造的关系.通过扬子地块钱塘坳陷中、下泥盆统的两处实测剖面,对厚层-块状砂岩中构造裂缝的产状、性质和分形分布特征进行分析,发现研究区地层陡倾,褶皱变形强烈,砂岩中均发育大量的构造裂缝;主要构造裂缝是在局部应力场作用下发育的、并与地层面斜交的剪切裂缝,其发育受到地层面的限制;还发育少量与层面大致平行的裂缝,其延伸相对较长,将厚层切割为较薄的岩层.统计表明厚度较大的岩层中也发育了大量的构造裂缝,其分维数较大.这一认识为构造裂缝的地震解释及地震反演提供了重要的线索.

  5. 页岩气开采中压裂废液处理技术的发展及应用%Development and Application of the Treatment Technology of Fracturing Liquid Waste in Shale Gas Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王毅霖; 李婷; 张晓飞

    2012-01-01

    As the new resource of natural gases,the development of shale gas is increasingly enforced in recent years.This article widely conducts research for the environmental contaminating risks of site remediation,fracturing liquid waste management and other respects in the developing course of shale gas,and for the fracturing liquid waste management technology in force domestic and abroad.It also analyzes the management technologies including neutralization method,flocculence method,and oxygenization method.Technology tendency is also predicted in line with actual applying effect and industrial needs,which provides theoretical reference for the unconventional oil and gas resource development.%作为新型的天然气资源,近年来页岩气的开采力度不断增加.文章广泛调研页岩气开采过程中的场地修复、压裂废液处理等方面的环境污染风险,国内外现行压裂废液的处理工艺,系统分析了中和法、絮凝法和氧化法等处理工艺,并结合实际应用效果和企业需求对技术发展方向进行了预测,可为非常规油气资源开发领域提供理论参考.

  6. Strategies for Creating Prescribed Hydraulic Fractures in Cave Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Q.; Suorineni, F. T.; Oh, J.

    2017-04-01

    The cave mining method was traditionally applied to massive low-grade, weak orebodies at shallow depths (less than 500 m) that favour cave propagation under gravity. Currently, this method is being applied to stronger orebodies and is taking place at depths of up to 2000 m below the surface. To ensure continuous cave propagation, preconditioning of the orebody is essential in this latter caving environment to improve rock mass caveability and to decrease fragmentation sizes. Hydraulic fracturing was initiated in the oil industry and is now being used in the cave mining industry as a preconditioning method and for stalled caves reactivation. A limitation of conventional hydraulic fracturing in the cave mining industry is that the hydraulic fracture orientation is uncontrollable and is dictated by the minimum in situ stress orientation. The preconditioning effectiveness of orientation-uncontrollable hydraulic fractures is limited in some geotechnical conditions, and the concept of creating orientation-controllable hydraulic fractures, here termed prescribed hydraulic fractures, is proposed to fill this gap. In this paper, the feasibility of the proposed approaches to creating prescribed hydraulic fractures is presented based on previous studies and numerical modelling. The numerical modelling code reliability in simulating the hydraulic fracture propagation and reorientation process was validated by comparing with laboratory results in the reported literature. In addition, the sensitivity of the prescribed hydraulic fracturing to the in situ stress condition and rock mass properties is examined.

  7. Characterizing Fracture Spatial Patterns by Using Semivariograms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Semivariogram is applied to fracture data obtained from detailed scanline surveys of nine field sites in western New York, USA in order to investigate the spatial patterns of natural fractures. The length of the scanline is up to 36 m. How both fracture spacing and fracture length vary with distance is determined through semivariogram calculations. In this study, the authors developed a FORTRAN program to resample the fracture data from the scanline survey. By calculating experimental semivariogram, the authors found five different types of spatial patterns that can be described by linear, spherical, reversed spherical, polynomial I (for a0) models, of which the last three are newly proposed in this study. The well-structured semivariograms of fracture spacing and length indicate that both the location of the fractures and the length distribution within their structure domains are not random. The results of this study also suggest that semivariograms can provide useful information in terms of spatial correlation distance for fracture location and fracture length. These semivariograms can also be utilized to design more efficient sampling schemes for further surveys, as well as to define the limits of highly probable extrapolation of a structure domain.

  8. [Periprosthetic acetabular fractures in geriatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, S C; Rollmann, M F R; Histing, T; Holstein, J H; Pohlemann, T

    2017-02-01

    Periprosthetic acetabular fractures in geriatric patients are rare injuries; however, the incidence is increasing because of the current demographic developments. For diagnosis of periprosthetic acetabular fractures, conventional X‑ray images are regularly complemented by computed tomography (CT). For exclusion of loosening of the prosthesis more advanced techniques, such as single photon emission CT (SPECT/CT) are applied. In addition to classification of periprosthetic acetabular fractures by the traditional system of Letournel there are several other classification systems, which take into account the etiology of the fracture and the stability of the prosthesis. While, under certain circumstances conservative treatment of periprosthetic acetabular fractures is possible, operative treatment often requires extensive surgical procedures to restore the stability of the acetabulum as a support for the cup of the prosthesis. Besides the traditional techniques of acetabular osteosynthesis, special revision systems, augmentations and allografts are used for the reconstruction of periprosthetic acetabular fractures. To determine a therapeutic regimen patient-specific preconditions as well as fracture pattern and type of prosthesis need to be taken into account. In the literature there are several algorithms, which are aimed at supporting the attending physician in making the correct decision for the treatment of periprosthetic acetabular fractures. In cases of periprosthetic acetabular fractures even experienced surgeons are faced with great challenges. Thus, treatment should be carried out in specialized centers.

  9. Prophylactic Nailing of Incomplete Atypical Femoral Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Wug Oh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recent reports have described the occurrence of low-energy subtrochanteric and femoral shaft fractures associated with long-term bisphosphonate use. Although information regarding the surgical treatment of these atypical femoral fractures is increasing, it is unclear if the preventive operation is useful in incomplete fractures. This study examined the results of preventive intramedullary nailing for incomplete atypical femoral fractures. Material and Methods. A retrospective search was conducted for patients older than 50 years receiving bisphosphonate therapy, with incomplete, nondisplaced fractures in either the subtrochanteric or diaphyseal area of the femur. Seventeen patients with a total of 20 incomplete, non-displaced lesions were included. The mean duration of bisphosphonate use was 50.5 months. Eleven of the 17 (64.7% patients had complete or incomplete fractures on the contralateral femur. All were treated with prophylactic fixation of an intramedullary (IM nail. The minimum followup was 12 months. Results. All cases healed with a mean period of 14.3 weeks. Nineteen of the 20 cases healed with the dissolution of incomplete fractures of the lateral aspect. A complete fracture developed at the time of nailing in one patient, but it healed with callus bridging. Conclusion. IM nailing appears to be a reliable way of preventing the progress of incomplete atypical femoral fractures.

  10. High Resolution Geophysical Characterization of Fractures within a Granitic Pluton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Estaún, A.; Carbonell, R.

    2007-12-01

    The FEBEX underground gallery was excavated in the Aar Granite (Switzerland), a heterogeneous granite containing from very leucocratic facies to granodiorites. The geology of the gallery shows the existence of various sets of fractures with different attributes: geometry, kinematics, fracture infilling, etc. The study of the structural data, new observations on the FEBEX gallery itself and borehole televiewer data acquired in the newly drilled boreholes, have allowed to identify four sets of fractures. The first group of fractures has a typical distribution and characteristics of en echelon tension fractures and were formed in late magmatic stages, according with the paragenesis of the minerals that filled the craks. The main strike is around 300 (280-300). These fractures are deformed and displaced by the other group of faults. The second group corresponds to the lamprophyre dikes, of mantelic origin, with an orientation oblique to the tunnel, and slightly oblique to the first group of fractures (strike, 310-330). They were formed during an extension event well evidenced by their irregular margins and flame structures into the granite. The margins of these dikes show several reactivations as strike slip faults. Geophysical data has been acquired to characterized the fracture network of the surrounding volume within the FEBEX gallery. The geophysic data include new borehole logging such as Natural Gamma and Borehole Ground Penetrating radar. The processing and integration of these different data sets indicates that the GPR record can provide images of a third set of fractures, which are probably fluid filled. This set of fractures a subparallel to the tunnel axis and appear to intersect older boreholes which are nearly perpendicular to the axis of the FEBEX gallery.

  11. Tibia (Shinbone) Shaft Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... energy collisions, such as an automobile or motorcycle crash, are common causes of tibial sha fractures. In cases like these, the bone can be broken into several pieces (comminuted fracture). Sports injuries, such as a fall while skiing or running ...

  12. Fractures in anisotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Siyi

    Rocks may be composed of layers and contain fracture sets that cause the hydraulic, mechanical and seismic properties of a rock to be anisotropic. Coexisting fractures and layers in rock give rise to competing mechanisms of anisotropy. For example: (1) at low fracture stiffness, apparent shear-wave anisotropy induced by matrix layering can be masked or enhanced by the presence of a fracture, depending on the fracture orientation with respect to layering, and (2) compressional-wave guided modes generated by parallel fractures can also mask the presence of matrix layerings for particular fracture orientations and fracture specific stiffness. This report focuses on two anisotropic sources that are widely encountered in rock engineering: fractures (mechanical discontinuity) and matrix layering (impedance discontinuity), by investigating: (1) matrix property characterization, i.e., to determine elastic constants in anisotropic solids, (2) interface wave behavior in single-fractured anisotropic media, (3) compressional wave guided modes in parallel-fractured anisotropic media (single fracture orientation) and (4) the elastic response of orthogonal fracture networks. Elastic constants of a medium are required to understand and quantify wave propagation in anisotropic media but are affected by fractures and matrix properties. Experimental observations and analytical analysis demonstrate that behaviors of both fracture interface waves and compressional-wave guided modes for fractures in anisotropic media, are affected by fracture specific stiffness (controlled by external stresses), signal frequency and relative orientation between layerings in the matrix and fractures. A fractured layered medium exhibits: (1) fracture-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are weakly coupled; (2) isotropic behavior when fractures delay waves that are usually fast in a layered medium; and (3) matrix-dominated anisotropy when the fractures are closed and no longer delay the signal. The

  13. Sprains, Strains and Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Young Physicians Annual Scientific Meeting Webinars Careers in Podiatry APMA 2040 Student Profiles CPME REdRC Manage Your ... and fractures. Many fractures and sprains occur during sports. Football players are particularly vulnerable to foot and ...

  14. Hip fracture - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000168.htm Hip fracture - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hip fracture surgery is done to repair a break in ...

  15. Hip fracture surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neck fracture repair; Trochanteric fracture repair; Hip pinning surgery; Osteoarthritis - hip ... You may receive general anesthesia for this surgery. This means you ... spinal anesthesia . With this kind of anesthesia, medicine is ...

  16. Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000553.htm Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare To use the sharing features on ... that connect your ankle to your toes. A stress fracture is a break in the bone that ...

  17. Periprosthetic acetabular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benazzo, Francesco; Formagnana, Mario; Bargagliotti, Marco; Perticarini, Loris

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this article is to propose a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for the acetabular periprosthetic fractures. This article explores the current literature on the epidemiology, causes and classification of periprosthetic acetabular fractures. Integrating data with the experience of the authors, it offers a guide to diagnosis and possible therapeutic strategies. Intra-operative fractures can occur during rasping, reaming or implant impaction, and they must be treated immediately if the component(s) is (are) unstable. Post-operative fractures can be due to major trauma (acute fractures) or minor forces in bone osteolysis; it is possible to plan reconstruction and fixation according to fracture characteristics. Treatment choice depends upon fracture site and implant stability. Periprosthetic acetabular fractures are uncommon complications that can occur intra-operatively or post-operatively, and a reconstructive surgeon must be able to manage the procedure. Accurate planning and reconstruction implant are necessary to achieve good cup stability.

  18. Analysis of the association between bisphosphonate treatment survival in Danish hip fracture patients-a nationwide register-based open cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondo, L; Eiken, Pia Agnete; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Bisphosphonate (BP) users have decreased mortality, but this could be due to channeling bias. National healthcare data on hip fracture showed lower mortality in patients who were treated prior to fracture or began treatment after fracture. Reduced mortality after only one prescription filled points...... of a reduction in mortality in patients who filled only one prescription for a BP suggests that patient factors may account for a considerable part of the survival advantage observed with BPs....

  19. 75 FR 34476 - Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for Incidental Take and Wetland Fill Permits...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Wetland Fill Permits for Two Condominium Developments on the Fort Morgan Peninsula, Baldwin County, AL...) and place fill in wetlands on the Fort Morgan peninsula, Baldwin County, Alabama. The HCP analyzes the take of the Federally endangered Alabama beach mouse and fill in wetlands incidental to...

  20. Identifying osteoporotic vertebral fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Griffith, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis per se is not a harmful disease. It is the sequela of osteoporosis and most particularly the occurrence of osteoporotic fracture that makes osteoporosis a serious medical condition. All of the preventative measures, investigations, treatment and research into osteoporosis have one primary goal and that is to prevent the occurrence of osteoporotic fracture. Vertebral fracture is by far and away the most prevalent osteoporotic fracture. The significance and diagnosis of vertebral f...

  1. Aggravated neuromuscular symptoms of mercury exposure from dental amalgam fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbal, Ayla; Yılmaz, Hınç; Tutkun, Engin; Köş, Durdu Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Dental amalgam fillings are widely used all over the world. However, their mercury content can lead to various side effects and clinical problems. Acute or chronic mercury exposure can cause several side effects on the central nerve system, renal and hepatic functions, immune system, fetal development and it can play a role on exacerbation of neuromuscular diseases. In this case, we will present a patient with vacuolar myopathy whose symptoms were started and aggravated with her dental amalgam fillings.

  2. Completeness and data validity for the Danish Fracture Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Kirill; Fristed, Jakob V; Brix, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Fracture-related surgery is among the most common orthopaedic procedures. However, to our knowledge, register-based quality assessment of fracture-related surgery has not previously been conducted. The Danish Fracture Database (DFDB) has been developed for the purpose of web-based quality...

  3. San Juan Fracture Characterization Project: Status and current results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majer, E.L.; Daley, T.M.; Myer, L.R.; Nihei, K.; Queen, J.; Sinton, J.; Murphy, J.; Fortuna, M.; Lynn, H.B.; Imhoff, M.A.; Wilson, R.

    2001-02-26

    The overall objectives of this report are to extend current state-of-the-art 3-D imaging to extract the optimal information for fracture quantification and to develop next generation capability in fracture imaging for true 3-D imaging of the static and dynamic fracture properties.

  4. Analysis of thin fractures with GPR: from theory to practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, Diego; Zanzi, Luigi; Longoni, Laura; Papini, Monica

    2017-04-01

    Whenever we perform a GPR survey to investigate a rocky medium, being the ultimate purpose of the survey either to study the stability of a rock slope or to determine the soundness of a quarried rock block, we would like mainly to detect any fracture within the investigated medium and, possibly, to estimate the parameters of the fractures, namely thickness and filling material. In most of the practical cases, rock fracture thicknesses are very small when compared to the wavelength of the electromagnetic radiation generated by the GPR systems. In such cases, fractures are to be considered as thin beds, i.e. two interfaces whose distance is smaller than GPR resolving capability, and the reflected signal is the sum of the electromagnetic reverberation within the bed. According to this, fracture parameters are encoded in the thin bed complex response and in this work we propose a methodology based on deterministic deconvolution to process amplitude and phase information in the frequency domain to estimate fracture parameters. We first present some theoretical aspects related to thin bed response and a sensitivity analysis concerning fracture thickness and filling. Secondly, we deal with GPR datasets collected both during laboratory experiments and in the facilities of quarrying activities. In the lab tests fractures were simulated by placing materials with known electromagnetic parameters and controlled thickness in between two small marble blocks, whereas field GPR surveys were performed on bigger quarried ornamental stone blocks before they were submitted to the cutting process. We show that, with basic pre-processing and the choice of a proper deconvolving signal, results are encouraging although an ambiguity between thickness and filling estimates exists when no a-priori information is available. Results can be improved by performing CMP radar surveys that are able to provide additional information (i.e., variation of thin bed response versus offset) at the expense

  5. Fracture prevention in men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geusens, PP; Sambrook, P.N.; Lems, W.F.

    2009-01-01

    The lifetime risk of experiencing a fracture in 50-year-old men is lower (20%) than the risk in women (50%). Consequently, much less research has been carried out on osteoporosis and fracture risk in men. Differences in the risk and incidence of fractures between men and women are related to differe

  6. Imaging of insufficiency fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestan, Christian [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Waehringerstr. 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: christian.krestan@meduniwien.ac.at; Hojreh, Azadeh [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Waehringerstr. 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2009-09-15

    This review focuses on the occurrence, imaging and differential diagnosis of insufficiency fractures. Prevalence, the most common sites of insufficiency fractures and their clinical implications are discussed. Insufficiency fractures occur with normal stress exerted on weakened bone. Postmenopausal osteoporosis is the most common cause of insufficiency fractures. Other conditions which affect bone turnover include osteomalacia, hyperparathyroidism, chronic renal failure and high-dose glucocorticoid therapy. It is a challenge for the radiologist to detect and diagnose insufficiency fractures, and to differentiate them from other bone lesions. Radiographs are still the most widely used imaging method for identification of insufficiency fractures, but sensitivity is limited, depending on the location of the fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a very sensitive tool to visualize bone marrow abnormalities associated with insufficiency fractures. Thin section, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) depicts subtle fracture lines allowing direct visualization of cortical and trabecular bone. Bone scintigraphy still plays a role in detecting fractures, with good sensitivity but limited specificity. The most important differential diagnosis is underlying malignant disease leading to pathologic fractures. Bone densitometry and clinical history may also be helpful in confirming the diagnosis of insufficiency fractures.

  7. A numerical approach for pressure transient analysis of a vertical well with complex fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yizhao Wan; Yuewu Liu; Wenchao Liu; Guofeng Han; Congcong Niu

    2016-01-01

    A new well test model for a vertical fractured well is developed based on a discrete-fracture model in which the fractures are discretized as one dimensional (1-D) entities. The model overcomes the weakness of complex meshing, a large number of grids, and instability in conventional stripe-fracture models. Then, the discrete-fracture model is implemented using a hybrid element finite-element method. Triangular elements are used for matrix and line elements for the fractures. The finite element formulation is validated by comparing with the semi-analytical solution of a single ver-tical fractured well. The accuracy of the approach is shown through several examples with different fracture apertures, fracture conductivity, and fracture amount. Results from the discrete-fracture model agree reasonably well with the stripe-fracture model and the analytic solutions. The advantages of the discrete-fracture model are presented in mesh gen-eration, computational improvement, and abilities to handle complex fractures like wedge-shaped fractures and fractures with branches. Analytical results show that the number of grids in the discrete-fracture model is 10%less than stripe-fracture model, and computational efficiency increases by about 50%. The more fractures there are, the more the com-putational efficiency increases.

  8. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methodologies for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queen, John H. [Hi-Geophysical, Inc., Ponca, OK (United States)

    2016-05-09

    Executive Summary The overall objective of this work was the development of surface and borehole seismic methodologies using both compressional and shear waves for characterizing faults and fractures in Enhanced Geothermal Systems. We used both surface seismic and vertical seismic profile (VSP) methods. We adapted these methods to the unique conditions encountered in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) creation. These conditions include geological environments with volcanic cover, highly altered rocks, severe structure, extreme near surface velocity contrasts and lack of distinct velocity contrasts at depth. One of the objectives was the development of methods for identifying more appropriate seismic acquisition parameters for overcoming problems associated with these geological factors. Because temperatures up to 300º C are often encountered in these systems, another objective was the testing of VSP borehole tools capable of operating at depths in excess of 1,000 m and at temperatures in excess of 200º C. A final objective was the development of new processing and interpretation techniques based on scattering and time-frequency analysis, as well as the application of modern seismic migration imaging algorithms to seismic data acquired over geothermal areas. The use of surface seismic reflection data at Brady's Hot Springs was found useful in building a geological model, but only when combined with other extensive geological and geophysical data. The use of fine source and geophone spacing was critical in producing useful images. The surface seismic reflection data gave no information about the internal structure (extent, thickness and filling) of faults and fractures, and modeling suggests that they are unlikely to do so. Time-frequency analysis was applied to these data, but was not found to be significantly useful in their interpretation. Modeling does indicate that VSP and other seismic methods with sensors located at depth in wells will be the most

  9. Dynamic fracture of heterogeneous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, M.G.; Liu, C.; Addessio, F.L.; Williams, T.O.; Bennett, J.G.; Haberman, K.S.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to investigate the fundamental aspects of the process of dynamic fracture propagation in heterogeneous materials. The work focused on three important, but poorly understood, aspects of dynamic fracture for materials with a heterogeneous microstructure. These were: the appropriateness of using a single-parameter asymptotic analysis to describe dynamic crack-tip deformation fields, the temperature rises at the tip and on the flanks of a running crack, and the constitutive modeling of damage initiation and accumulation.

  10. Arthrofibrosis After Periarticular Fracture Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, Ian; Sems, Stephen Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Arthrofibrosis after periarticular fractures can create clinically significant impairments in both the upper and lower extremities. The shoulder, elbow, and knee are particularly susceptible to the condition. Many risk factors for the development of arthrofibrosis cannot be controlled by the patient or surgeon. Early postoperative motion should be promoted whenever possible. Manipulations under anesthesia are effective for a period of time in certain fracture patterns, and open or arthroscopic surgical debridements should be reserved for the patient for whom nonoperative modalities fail and who has a clinically significant deficit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Delayed fracture of silicon: Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T. J.; Knapp, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Bar specimens were cut from ingots of single crystal silicon, and acid etched prior to testing. Artificial surface flaws were introduced in specimens by indentation with a Knoop hardness tester. The specimens were loaded in four-point bending to 95 percent of the nominal fracture stress, while keeping the surface area, containing the flaw, wet with test liquids. No evidence of delayed fracture, and, therefore stress corrosion, of single crystal silicon was observed for liquid environments including water, acetone, and aqueous solutions of NaCl, NH4OH, and HNO3, when tested with a flaw parallel to a (110) surface. The fracture toughness was calculated.

  12. [Fractures of the elbow joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, T E; Dietz, S O; Burkhart, K J; Müller, L P; Rommens, P M

    2012-02-01

    Fractures around the elbow joint comprise fractures of the distal humerus, the radial head, the olecranon and the coronoid process. Combined lesions are particularly demanding for the surgeon. Accurate knowledge of the anatomy and of the biomechanics is an essential requirement for a specific diagnosis and therapy. A stable and painless movable elbow joint is essential for most of the activities of daily living. Risk factors for the development of posttraumatic elbow joint arthrosis are non-anatomically reconstructed joint surfaces, axial malalignment of the joint axis and untreated concomitant injuries. Modern angular stable and anatomically preshaped implants facilitate a biomechanically adequate osteosynthesis and avoid or decrease functional impairment. In consideration of an increasing number of osteoporotic elbow joint fractures, endoprosthetic replacement has gained significance.

  13. Fracture mechanics of PGX graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, F.H.; Vollman, R.E.; Cull, A.D.

    1981-03-01

    Fracture mechanics tests were performed on grade PGX graphite. A compact tension specimen configuration which yields consistent values of the opening mode critical stress intensity factor K/sub IC/, was designed. For the calculation of the fracture toughness and crack growth rate the concept of the effective crack length is used. It corresponds to the crack length of a machined notched specimen with the same compliance. Fracture toughness testing was performed in two environments, air and helium, both at room temperature. The critical stress intensity factor, K/sub IC/, is calculated based on the maximum load and the effective crack length. The fatigue crack growth test was performed in air only. A break-in period was observed for the machined notch to develop into a naturally occurring crack path. Half of the fatigue life was spent in this period.

  14. Numerical simulation of hydraulic fracturing using a three-dimensional fracture model coupled with an adaptive mesh fluid model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiang, G.L.; Vire, A.; Pavlidis, D.; Pain, C.

    2015-01-01

    A three-dimensional fracture model developed in the context of the combined finite-discrete element method is incorporated into a two-way fluid-solid coupling model. The fracture model is capable of simulating the whole fracturing process. It includes pre-peak hardening deformation, post-peak strain

  15. Arthroscopic-Assisted Intraosseous Balloon-Assisted Repositioning of a Tibial Plateau Fracture: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, O; Rau, M; Maenz, S; Bungartz, M; Matziolis, G

    2015-01-01

    This is the first description of an arthroscopic-assisted intraosseous balloon-assisted repositioning and defect filling of a tibial plateau fracture. The bone defect was filled with calcium phosphate cement in a liquid/paste form. The described technique was therefore introduced in order to allow an arthroscopic control of reposition and intra-articular cement escape during defect filling. X-rays showed an exact reposition without cement escape and the clinical outcome was satisfactory.

  16. XFEM modeling of hydraulic fracture in porous rocks with natural fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Liu, ZhanLi; Zeng, QingLei; Gao, Yue; Zhuang, Zhuo

    2017-08-01

    Hydraulic fracture (HF) in porous rocks is a complex multi-physics coupling process which involves fluid flow, diffusion and solid deformation. In this paper, the extended finite element method (XFEM) coupling with Biot theory is developed to study the HF in permeable rocks with natural fractures (NFs). In the recent XFEM based computational HF models, the fluid flow in fractures and interstitials of the porous media are mostly solved separately, which brings difficulties in dealing with complex fracture morphology. In our new model the fluid flow is solved in a unified framework by considering the fractures as a kind of special porous media and introducing Poiseuille-type flow inside them instead of Darcy-type flow. The most advantage is that it is very convenient to deal with fluid flow inside the complex fracture network, which is important in shale gas extraction. The weak formulation for the new coupled model is derived based on virtual work principle, which includes the XFEM formulation for multiple fractures and fractures intersection in porous media and finite element formulation for the unified fluid flow. Then the plane strain Kristianovic-Geertsma-de Klerk (KGD) model and the fluid flow inside the fracture network are simulated to validate the accuracy and applicability of this method. The numerical results show that large injection rate, low rock permeability and isotropic in-situ stresses tend to lead to a more uniform and productive fracture network.

  17. Reduced Fracture Finite Element Model Analysis of an Efficient Two-Scale Hybrid Embedded Fracture Model

    KAUST Repository

    Amir, Sahar Z.

    2017-06-09

    A Hybrid Embedded Fracture (HEF) model was developed to reduce various computational costs while maintaining physical accuracy (Amir and Sun, 2016). HEF splits the computations into fine scale and coarse scale. Fine scale solves analytically for the matrix-fracture flux exchange parameter. Coarse scale solves for the properties of the entire system. In literature, fractures were assumed to be either vertical or horizontal for simplification (Warren and Root, 1963). Matrix-fracture flux exchange parameter was given few equations built on that assumption (Kazemi, 1968; Lemonnier and Bourbiaux, 2010). However, such simplified cases do not apply directly for actual random fracture shapes, directions, orientations …etc. This paper shows that the HEF fine scale analytic solution (Amir and Sun, 2016) generates the flux exchange parameter found in literature for vertical and horizontal fracture cases. For other fracture cases, the flux exchange parameter changes according to the angle, slop, direction, … etc. This conclusion rises from the analysis of both: the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and the HEF schemes. The behavior of both schemes is analyzed with exactly similar fracture conditions and the results are shown and discussed. Then, a generalization is illustrated for any slightly compressible single-phase fluid within fractured porous media and its results are discussed.

  18. Fracture Detection and Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Norman E.; Iovenitti, Joseph L.

    1986-01-21

    Because the costs of drilling, completing, and testing a well can be extremely high, it is important to develop better tools and methods for locating high permeability zones prior to drilling, and to develop better tools and methods for identifying and characterizing major fracture zones during the drilling and well testing stages. At the recommendation of the LBL Industry Review Panel on Geothermal Reservoir Technology, we organized and convened a one-day workshop this past July to discuss various aspects of DOE's current and planned activities in fracture detection, to review the geothermal industry's near-term and long-term research needs, to determine the priority of those needs, to disseminate to industry the status of research in progress, and to discuss the possibility of future joint research between industry and DOE. In this paper we present a brief overview of the workshop from the perspective of those who participated in it and provided us with written comments to a questionnaire that was distributed.

  19. Fracture detection and mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Iovenitti, J.L.

    1986-03-01

    Because the costs of drilling, completing, and testing a well can be extremely high, it is important to develop better tools and methods for locating high permeability zones prior to drilling, and to develop better tools and methods for identifying and characterizing major fracture zones during the drilling and well testing stages. At the recommendation of the LBL Industry Review Panel on Geothermal Reservoir Technology, we organized and convened a one-day workshop this past July to discuss various aspects of DOE's current and planned activities in fracture detection, to review the geothermal industry's near-term and long-term research needs, to determine the priority of those needs, to disseminate to industry the status of research in progress, and to discuss the possibility of future joint research between industry and DOE. In this paper we present a brief overview of the workshop from the perspective of those who participated in it and provided us with written comments to a questionnaire that was distributed.

  20. Evaluation of ground-penetrating radar to detect free-phase hydrocarbons in fractured rocks - Results of numerical modeling and physical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J.W.; Buursink, M.L.; Haeni, F.P.; Versteeg, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    The suitability of common-offset ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to detect free-phase hydrocarbons in bedrock fractures was evaluated using numerical modeling and physical experiments. The results of one- and two-dimensional numerical modeling at 100 megahertz indicate that GPR reflection amplitudes are relatively insensitive to fracture apertures ranging from 1 to 4 mm. The numerical modeling and physical experiments indicate that differences in the fluids that fill fractures significantly affect the amplitude and the polarity of electromagnetic waves reflected by subhorizontal fractures. Air-filled and hydrocarbon-filled fractures generate low-amplitude reflections that are in-phase with the transmitted pulse. Water-filled fractures create reflections with greater amplitude and opposite polarity than those reflections created by air-filled or hydrocarbon-filled fractures. The results from the numerical modeling and physical experiments demonstrate it is possible to distinguish water-filled fracture reflections from air- or hydrocarbon-filled fracture reflections, nevertheless subsurface heterogeneity, antenna coupling changes, and other sources of noise will likely make it difficult to observe these changes in GPR field data. This indicates that the routine application of common-offset GPR reflection methods for detection of hydrocarbon-filled fractures will be problematic. Ideal cases will require appropriately processed, high-quality GPR data, ground-truth information, and detailed knowledge of subsurface physical properties. Conversely, the sensitivity of GPR methods to changes in subsurface physical properties as demonstrated by the numerical and experimental results suggests the potential of using GPR methods as a monitoring tool. GPR methods may be suited for monitoring pumping and tracer tests, changes in site hydrologic conditions, and remediation activities.The suitability of common-offset ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to detect free-phase hydrocarbons

  1. Proximal humerus fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Matthew C; Horn, Pamela L; Latshaw, James C

    2013-01-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are among the most common fractures associated with osteoporosis. With an aging population, incidence of these fractures will only increase. The proximal humerus not only forms the lateral portion of the shoulder articulation but also has significant associations with musculoskeletal and neurovascular structures. As a result, fractures of the proximal humerus can significantly impact not only the function of the shoulder joint, but the health and function of the entire upper extremity as well. Understanding of these fractures, the management options, and associated nursing care, can help reduce morbidity rate and improve functional outcomes.

  2. Stress fractures in runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Frank; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Provencher, Matthew T

    2012-04-01

    Stress fractures are a relatively common entity in athletes, in particular, runners. Physicians and health care providers should maintain a high index of suspicion for stress fractures in runners presenting with insidious onset of focal bone tenderness associated with recent changes in training intensity or regimen. It is particularly important to recognize “high-risk” fractures, as these are associated with an increased risk of complication. A patient with confirmed radiographic evidence of a high-risk stress fracture should be evaluated by an orthopedic surgeon. Runners may benefit from orthotics, cushioned sneakers, interval training, and vitamin/calcium supplementation as a means of stress fracture prevention.

  3. Role of MRI in hip fractures, including stress fractures, occult fractures, avulsion fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachtrab, O. [Department of Radiology, The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Gobowen, Oswestry Shropshire SY10 7AG (United Kingdom); Cassar-Pullicino, V.N., E-mail: Victor.Pullicino@rjah.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Gobowen, Oswestry Shropshire SY10 7AG (United Kingdom); Lalam, R.; Tins, B.; Tyrrell, P.N.M.; Singh, J. [Department of Radiology, The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Gobowen, Oswestry Shropshire SY10 7AG (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    MR imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and management of hip fractures in all age groups, in a large spectrum of patient groups spanning the elderly and sporting population. It allows a confident exclusion of fracture, differentiation of bony from soft tissue injury and an early confident detection of fractures. There is a spectrum of MR findings which in part is dictated by the type and cause of the fracture which the radiologist needs to be familiar with. Judicious but prompt utilisation of MR in patients with suspected hip fractures has a positive therapeutic impact with healthcare cost benefits as well as social care benefits.

  4. Fractures in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenager, E; Jensen, K

    1991-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 299 MS patients 22 have had fractures and of these 17 after onset of MS. The fractures most frequently involved the femoral neck and trochanter (41%). Three patients had had more than one fracture. Only 1 patient had osteoporosis. The percentage of fractures increased...... with increasing age and disease duration. Among 34 deceased MS patients 4 had had fractures. These findings are discussed in relation to physical and cognitive impairment in MS. A case-control study is recommended....

  5. Analysis on the risk factors of second fracture in osteoporosis-related fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Wen-dong; WANG Pei; MA Xin-long; GE Rui-ping; ZHOU Xian-hu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical characteristics and risk factors of refracture in patients suffering from osteoporosis-related fractures as well as effective interventions.Methods: From January 2006 to January 2008, both out-patients and in-patients in our hospital who were over 50 years old and suffered from osteoporosis-related fractures were selected for this research. They were divided into fracture group and refracture group. The refracture rate was followed up for 2 years, during which 11 patients developed refracture, thus were included in the refracture group.Therefore, 273 patients, 225 first-fracture cases, aged (67.7±8.5) years, and 48 refracture cases, aged (72.7-9.5) years,were included in this study. General data including age and sex, fracture types, femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD) T-scores tested by dual-energy X-rays absorptiometry (DEXA), Charlson index, time-frame between two fractures as well as mobility skill assessment were collected and analyzed by single-factor and multivariate statistical methods.Results: Females accounted for 70.2% of the fracture group and 77.1% of the refracture group. The most common refracture type was vertebral fracture for the first time and femoral neck fracture for the second time during the followup. The second fracture happened 3.7 years after the first one on average. The refracture rate was 2.12% within one year, and 4.66% within two years. Risk factors for a second fracture in osteoporotic fracture patients included age (>75years, HR=1.23, 95%CI 1.18-1.29; >85 years, HR=1.68, 95%CI 1.60-1.76), female sex (HR=1.36, 95%CI 1.32-1.40), prior vertebral fractures (HR=1.62, 95%CI 1.01-2.07), prior hip fractures (HR=1.27, 95%CI 0.89-2.42), BMD T-score<-3.5(HR=1.38, 95%CI 1.17-1.72) and weakened motor skills (HR=1.27,95%CI 1.09-1.40).Conclusions: The risks of second fracture among patients with initial brittle fracture are substantial. There is adequate time between the first and second fractures for

  6. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulkfill flowable material and a resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isufi, Almira; Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola Maria; Ioppolo, Pietro; Testarelli, Luca; Bedini, Rossella; Al-Sudani, Dina; Gambarini, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    To determine and compare the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth restored with a bulk fill flowable material (SDR) and a traditional resin composite. Thirty maxillary and 30 mandibular first molars were selected based on similar dimensions. After cleaning, shaping and filling of the root canals and adhesive procedures, specimens were assigned to 3 subgroups for each tooth type (n=10): Group A: control group, including intact teeth; Group B: access cavities were restored with a traditional resin composite (EsthetX; Dentsply-Italy, Rome, Italy); Group C: access cavities were restored with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR; Dentsply-Italy), except 1.5 mm layer of the occlusal surface that was restored with the same resin composite as Group B. The specimens were subjected to compressive force in a material static-testing machine until fracture occurred, the maximum fracture load of the specimens was measured (N) and the type of fracture was recorded as favorable or unfavorable. Data were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni tests (Presin composite and with a bulk fill flowable composite (SDR) was similar in both maxillary and mandibular molars and showed no significant decrease in fracture resistance compared to intact specimens. No significant difference was observed in the mechanical fracture resistance of endodontically treated molars restored with traditional resin composite restorations compared to bulk fill flowable composite restorations.

  7. Fracture and hydrology data from field studies at Stripa, Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gale, J.E.

    1981-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the basic fracture and hydrology data collected as part of the joint LBL-KBS fracture hydrology program at Stripa, Sweden. A detailed description of the fracture-core logging and hydrology borehole testing procedures is included as well as a description of how the fracture and hydrology data were coded and organized. Based on this coding a series of computer data files for the fracture and hydrology borehole data have been constructed and these are described in detail. The fracture data file for one borehole is presented as an example in an appendix along with all of the raw and some partially processed and analyzed fracture hydrology data files. A detailed description of how this data will be analyzed to develop a thorough understanding of the fracture system and hydrogeologic characteristics of the Stripa site is presented.

  8. Fractures and rock mechanics, Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Knowledge of fracture occurrence and orientation in chalk is important for optimum field development planning and evaluation of well-bore stability. The combined geological and geotechnical studies carried out under the EFP-96 and EFP-98 programmes have investigated the influence of fractures on rock mechanics properties for chalk. Data for quantifying the effect of natural fractures in chalk have been supplied by triaxial testing in normal scale and large scale on samples from three chalk types, namely from Valhall Tor and Tyra Maastrichtian and an outcrop locality at Hillerslev. >From the latter locality special big cylindrical specimens were sampled for the large scale triaxial testing (500x500 mm) in order to get at true representation of the natural fracturing in the Hillerslev chalk. By comparing test results from normal scale to large scale on fractured and non fractured specimens it was found that the stiffness of the chalk is dependent on scale while the shear strength generally seems to depend on fractures and not on scale. Furthermore the studies revealed, that fractures have a significant reducing effect on the shear strength, that characterisation by the Geological Strength Index, GSI, on fractured test specimens igve a very good prediction of shear, that shear failure and yield surface characteristics for fractued and intact chalk can be provided using GSI, that up-scaling influence the elastic deformation properties in the low stress regime and that fractures influence the compressibility in the elastic stress regime, but not in the plastic stress regime. Finally, the practical application of some of the results on reservoir chalk has been addressed, especially the up-scaling of strength and deformation properties from normal scale tests to reservoir conditions. The up-scaling laws are relevant for borehole stability problems but not for compaction. Generally, the observations in the study are relevant for quantifying the effect of fracturing and

  9. Interaction of backfilling techniques and MTA plugs with additives: Fracture strength and adaptation analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Zeliha; Küçükkaya Eren, Selen; Uzunoğlu, Emel; Görduysus, Melahat; Görduysus, Mehmet Ömer

    2017-08-25

    The aims were to evaluate the effects of different additives on the adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) plugs before and after different backfilling techniques and analyze the interference of filling procedures on the fracture resistance of simulated immature teeth. The apical parts of 60 teeth were filled with MTA mixed with distilled water (DW), propylene glycol (PG) or calcium chloride (CaCl2) and backfilled with cold lateral condensation (CLC) or warm vertical compaction (WVC). The specimens were subjected to adaptation analysis and fracture testing. CaCl2 addition resulted in poor marginal adaptation, while PG addition significantly decreased the fracture values (pMTA-CaCl2 plugs and decreased the fracture values of teeth with MTA-PG plugs (pMTA with DW can be recommended as apical plug when the remaining root canal space is going to be filled with either CLC or WVC techniques.

  10. Orbital fractures: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey M Joseph, Ioannis P GlavasDivision of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, New York University, New York, NY, USA; Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital, New York, NY, USAAbstract: This review of orbital fractures has three goals: 1 to understand the clinically relevant orbital anatomy with regard to periorbital trauma and orbital fractures, 2 to explain how to assess and examine a patient after periorbital trauma, and 3 to understand the medical and surgical management of orbital fractures. The article aims to summarize the evaluation and management of commonly encountered orbital fractures from the ophthalmologic perspective and to provide an overview for all practicing ophthalmologists and ophthalmologists in training.Keywords: orbit, trauma, fracture, orbital floor, medial wall, zygomatic, zygomatic complex, zmc fracture, zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures 

  11. Oblique Axis Body Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takai, Hirokazu; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Schmal, Hagen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Anderson type III odontoid fractures have traditionally been considered stable and treated conservatively. However, unstable cases with unfavorable results following conservative treatment have been reported. Methods. We present the cases of two patients who sustained minimally displaced...... Anderson type III fractures with a characteristic fracture pattern that we refer to as "oblique type axis body fracture." Results. The female patients aged 90 and 72 years, respectively, were both diagnosed with minimally displaced Anderson type III fractures. Both fractures had a characteristic "oblique...... type" fracture pattern. The first patient was treated conservatively with cervical spine immobilization in a semirigid collar. However, gross displacement was noted at the 6-week follow-up visit. The second patient was therefore treated operatively by C1-C3/4 posterior fusion and the course...

  12. Mode I fracture of sheet metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardoen, T.; Hachez, F.; Marchioni, B.; Blyth, P. H.; Atkins, A. G.

    2004-02-01

    The perceived wisdom about thin sheet fracture is that (i) the crack propagates under mixed mode I & III giving rise to a slant through-thickness fracture profile and (ii) the fracture toughness remains constant at low thickness and eventually decreases with increasing thickness. In the present study, fracture tests performed on thin DENT plates of various thicknesses made of stainless steel, mild steel, 6082-O and NS4 aluminium alloys, brass, bronze, lead, and zinc systematically exhibit (i) mode I "bath-tub", i.e. "cup & cup", fracture profiles with limited shear lips and significant localized necking (more than 50% thickness reduction), (ii) a fracture toughness that linearly increases with increasing thickness (in the range of 0.5- 5 mm). The different contributions to the work expended during fracture of these materials are separated based on dimensional considerations. The paper emphasises the two parts of the work spent in the fracture process zone: the necking work and the "fracture" work. Experiments show that, as expected, the work of necking per unit area linearly increases with thickness. For a typical thickness of 1 mm, both fracture and necking contributions have the same order of magnitude in most of the metals investigated. A model is developed in order to independently evaluate the work of necking, which successfully predicts the experimental values. Furthermore, it enables the fracture energy to be derived from tests performed with only one specimen thickness. In a second modelling step, the work of fractur