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Sample records for fracture energy-fracture stress

  1. Low energy fractures of the acetabulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakos, N; Pearce, R; Bircher, M D

    2014-05-01

    Acetabular fractures due to high energy injuries are common and well documented; those secondary to low energy mechanisms are less well described. We undertook a retrospective study of the acetabular fracture referrals to our unit to evaluate the proportion of injuries resulting from a low energy mechanism. A total of 573 acetabular fractures were evaluated from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2008. The plain radiography and computed tomography of those sustaining a low energy fracture were assessed and the fracture patterns classified. Of the 573 acetabular fractures, 71 (12.4%) were recorded as being a result of a low energy mechanism. The male-to-female ratio was 2.4:1 and the mean patient age was 67.0 years (standard deviation: 19.1 years). There was a significantly higher number of fractures (pfracture studies. Our results demonstrate that low energy fractures make up a considerable proportion of acetabular fractures with a distinctly different fracture pattern distribution. With the continued predicted rise in the incidence of osteoporosis, life expectancy and an aging population, it is likely that this type of fracture will become increasingly more common, posing difficult management decisions and leading to procedures that are technically more challenging.

  2. Tibiofibula Transposition in High-Energy Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R. Loughenbury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of failed attempts at closed reduction of high-energy tibial fractures with an associated fibula fracture. The first case was a 39-year-old male involved in high-speed motorbike collision, while the second was a 14-year-old male who injured his leg following a fall of three metres. Emergency medical services at the scenes of the accidents reported a 90-degree valgus deformity of the injured limb and both limbs were realigned on scene and stabilized. Adequate alignment of the tibia could not be achieved by manipulation under sedation or anaesthesia. Open reduction and exposure of the fracture sites revealed that the distal fibula fragment was “transposed” and entrapped in the medulla of the proximal tibial fragment. Reduction required simulation of the mechanism of injury in order to disengage the fragments and allow reduction. Tibiofibula transposition is a rare complication of high-energy lower limb fractures which has not previously been reported and may prevent adequate closed reduction. Impaction of the distal fibula within the tibial medulla occurs as the limb is realigned by paramedic staff before transfer to hospital. We recommend that when this complication is identified the patient is transferred to the operating room for open reduction and stabilization of the fracture.

  3. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF LOW ENERGY FRACTURES IN REPUBLIC OF ARMENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saakyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Until present no data was available inArmeniain respect of incidence of low energy fractures that are typical of osteoporotic locations which consequently did not allow to evaluate the scope of this problem across the country.Purpose of the study – to identify the incidence of low energy fractures in proximal femur, in distal forearm, in proximal humerus and in distal tibia across population ofArmenia aged 50 years and older.Materials and methods. An observing population study was performed in two regions of Armenia during 2011-2013 where the frequency of selected locations in cases of moderate trauma was identified. During 2011-2012 the information was collected based on traumatology service records adding in 2013 other sources including primary level of healthcare due to observed infrequent applications for medical help in cases of trauma. Results. In 2013 the incidence of proximal femur fractures in men was reported as 136 cases per 100 000 of population aged 50 years and older, in women – 201 cases per 100 000. At the same time only 57.7% of patients with proximal femur fractures were admitted to hospital. Distal forearm fractures incidence in men and women was observed correspondingly 56/100 000 and 176/100 000 cases, proximal humerus fractures – 39/100 000 and 86/100 000 cases and distal tibia fractures – 39/100 000 and 86/100 000 cases. The predicted annual number of proximal femur fracture in Armenia amounts to 2067 cases, distal forearm fractures – 1205, proximal humerus fractures – 640.Conclusion. Epidemiological data that was collected for the first time on low energy fractures incidence confirmed the acute osteoporosis issue inArmenia and revealed the problems in organization of medical care for the group of senior patients with injuries.

  4. Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection after High Energy Fracture Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0588 TITLE: Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection after High- Energy Fracture Surgery...High- Energy Fracture Surgery 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0588 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert V. O’Toole, MD...14 4 1. INTRODUCTION: The overall scope of this project is to address the treatment of high- energy military fractures, which has

  5. Patients with rett syndrome sustain low-energy fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roende, Gitte; Ravn, Kirstine; Fuglsang, Kathrine

    2011-01-01

    We present the first case-control study addressing both fracture occurrence and fracture mechanisms in Rett syndrome (RTT). Two previous studies have shown increased fracture risk in RTT. This was also our hypothesis regarding the Danish RTT population. Therefore, we investigated risk factors...

  6. Depression after low-energy fracture in older women predicts future falls: a prospective observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Falls are one of the main causes of fractures in elderly people and after a recent fracture, the risk of another fall is increased, resulting in subsequent fracture. Therefore, risk factors for future falls should be determined. We prospectively investigated the relationship between depression and the incidence of falls in post-menopausal women after a low-energy fracture. Methods At baseline, 181 women aged 60 years and older who presented with a recent low-energy fracture were evaluated at the fracture and osteoporosis outpatient clinics of two hospitals. As well as clinical evaluation and bone mineral density tests, the presence of depression (measured using the Edinburgh Depression Scale, EDS, depression cut-off > 11) and risk factors for falling were assessed. During two years of follow-up, the incidence of falls was registered annually by means of detailed questionnaires and interviews. Results Seventy-nine (44%) of the women sustained at least one fall during follow-up. Of these, 28% (n = 22) suffered from depression at baseline compared to 10% (n = 10) of the 102 women who did not sustain a fall during follow-up (Χ2 = 8.76, df = 1, p = .003). Multiple logistic regression showed that the presence of depression and co-morbidity at baseline were independently related to falls (OR = 4.13, 95% CI = 1.58-10.80; OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.11-4.56, respectively) during follow-up. Conclusions The presence of depression in women aged 60 years and older with recent low-energy fractures is an important risk factor for future falls. We propose that clinicians treating patients with recent low-energy fractures should anticipate not only on skeletal-related risk factors for fractures, but also on fall-related risk factors including depression. PMID:22060677

  7. Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress fractures Overview Stress fractures are tiny cracks in a bone. They're caused by repetitive force, often from overuse — such as repeatedly jumping up and down or running long distances. Stress fractures can also arise from normal use of ...

  8. Incidence of low- and high-energy fractures in persons with and without HIV-infection: a Danish population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit E; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To compare fracture risk in persons with and without HIV-infection and to examine the influence of HAART initiation on risk of fracture. DESIGN:: Population-based nationwide cohort study using Danish registries. METHODS:: Outcome measures were time to first fracture at any site, time....../HCV-coinfected patients had increased risk of low-energy fracture, IRR of 1.6 (95% CI; 1.4-1.8) and 3.8 (95% CI; 3.0-4.9). However, only HIV/HCV-coinfected patients had increased risk of high-energy fracture, IRR of 2.4 (95 %CI; 2.0-2.9). Among HIV-monoinfected patients the risk of low-energy fracture was only...

  9. Bone mineral density and bone markers in patients with a recent low-energy fracture: effect of 1 y of treatment with calcium and vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hitz, Mette F; Jensen, Jens-Erik B; Eskildsen, Peter C

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-energy fractures of the hip, forearm, shoulder, and spine are known consequences of osteoporosis. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the effect of 1 y of treatment with calcium and vitamin D on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone markers in patients with a recent low-energy fracture. DESIGN...... significantly related to physical performance. CONCLUSIONS: A 1-y intervention with calcium and vitamin D reduced bone turnover, significantly increased BMD in patients younger than 70 y, and decreased bone loss in older patients. The effect of treatment was related to physical performance.......: In a double-blinded design, patients with fracture of the hip (lower-extremity fracture, or LEF) or upper extremity (UEF) were randomly assigned to receive 3000 mg calcium carbonate + 1400 IU cholecalciferol or placebo (200 IU cholecalciferol). BMD of the hip (HBMD) and lumbar spine (LBMD) were evaluated...

  10. Bone mineral density and bone markers in patients with a recent low-energy fracture: effect of 1 y of treatment with calcium and vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hitz, Mette F; Jensen, Jens-Erik B; Eskildsen, Peter C

    2007-01-01

    : In a double-blinded design, patients with fracture of the hip (lower-extremity fracture, or LEF) or upper extremity (UEF) were randomly assigned to receive 3000 mg calcium carbonate + 1400 IU cholecalciferol or placebo (200 IU cholecalciferol). BMD of the hip (HBMD) and lumbar spine (LBMD) were evaluated......BACKGROUND: Low-energy fractures of the hip, forearm, shoulder, and spine are known consequences of osteoporosis. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the effect of 1 y of treatment with calcium and vitamin D on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone markers in patients with a recent low-energy fracture. DESIGN...... significantly related to physical performance. CONCLUSIONS: A 1-y intervention with calcium and vitamin D reduced bone turnover, significantly increased BMD in patients younger than 70 y, and decreased bone loss in older patients. The effect of treatment was related to physical performance....

  11. Can long-term bisphosphonate use causes low-energy fractures? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandinoğlu, T; Akarsu, S; Karadeniz, M; Tekin, L; Arıbal, S; Kıralp, M Z

    2014-02-01

    Bisphosphonates are inorganic pyrophosphate analog which accumulate on the bone surface, cause osteoclast apoptosis, and inhibit bone resorption. The nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates continue to be the drug of choice for the treatment of osteoporosis in both men and women. Although histomorphometric studies including bone biopsies have not shown any evidence of microcracks, recent studies have revealed that potent bisphosphonates are responsible for the oversuppression of bone turnover leading to microdamages, reduced bone strength, and increased fracture risk. There are individual cases reporting atypical femoral fractures and severely suppressed bone turnover along with long-term (≥ 5 years) use of biphosphonates. In this study, we report on a 74-year-old woman with a history of continuous alendronate use for nearly 16 years who presented to the emergency department with right proximal humerus and left femur fracture.

  12. Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection After High Energy Fracture Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a...completion of the OXYGEN study in a reasonable time. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Supplemental perioperative oxygen, surgical site infection, fracture fixation...Conclusion…………………………………………………………… 11 6. Publications, Abstracts, and Presentations……….….……………. 12 7. Inventions , Patents and Licenses…………………………………… 12

  13. Metatarsal stress fractures - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 13. Safran MR, Zachazewski J, Stone DA. Metatarsal stress fracture. In: Safran MR, Zachazewski J, Stone DA, ...

  14. Calcaneal stress fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jason M; Vidt, Louis G; Gehl, Richard S; Montgomery, Travis

    2005-01-01

    The majority of plantar heel pain is diagnosed as plantar fasciitis or heel spur syndrome. When historic or physical findings are unusual or when routine treatment proves ineffective, one should consider an atypical cause of heel pain. Stress fractures of the calcaneus are a frequently unrecognized source of heel pain. In some cases they can continue to go unrecognized because the symptoms of calcaneal stress fractures sometimes improves with treatments aimed at plantar fasciitis. Calcaneal stress fractures can occur in any population of adults and even children and are common among active people, such as athletes, sports enthusiasts, and military personnel. It is likely that the number of diagnosed calcaneal stress fractures will rise among practitioners with an increased recognition of their possibility.

  15. -Lesser known stress fractures-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybier, M; Hamze, B; Champsaur, P; Parlier, C

    1997-01-01

    Stress fractures of the tibia may disclose a longitudinal orientation which is obvious at bone scanning; a mild periostosis may appear on plain films; CT demonstrates a radially-oriented fracture in one aspect of the diaphyseal cortex. A cortical dissection-like vertically oriented insufficiency fracture may involve the medial aspect of the femoral shaft underlying the lesser trochanter; the fracture is concentric to the femoral cortex at CT. Insufficiency fractures of the sacrum may be misdiagnosed on plain films; bone scanning displays a typical H-shaped increased uptake which is a specific pattern. Insufficiency fractures of the pubis may appear as tumoral bone destruction; however no soft tissue mass is present at CT which in addition demonstrates normal fat tissue abutting the osseous lesion.

  16. Stress fractures in athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschberger, R.; Henning, A.; Graff, K.H.

    1984-01-01

    The early exclusion of the presence of a stress fracture may be decisive for the success of an athlete. Scintigraphy with a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical is suitable for the early detection of stress lesions. Of 30 athletes, fractures were demonstrated in 17 whereas in 6 they were excluded. We found most fractures in the tarsal bones such as os naviculare pedis, ossa cuneiformia and talus. The type of sport engaged in appears to be an important factor in determining the location of the fracture. Scintiphotos were taken in several views using region of interest techniques and two phase-scintigraphy. This method is considered to be useful for localization and follow-up of skeletal stress lesions as well as for differential diagnosis. (orig.) [de

  17. Stress fractures in athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirschberger, R.; Henning, A.; Graff, K.H.

    1984-12-01

    The early exclusion of the presence of a stress fracture may be decisive for the success of an athlete. Scintigraphy with a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical is suitable for the early detection of stress lesions. Of 30 athletes, fractures were demonstrated in 17 whereas in 6 they were excluded. We found most fractures in the tarsal bones such as os naviculare pedis, ossa cuneiformia and talus. The type of sport engaged in appears to be an important factor in determining the location of the fracture. Scintiphotos were taken in several views using region of interest techniques and two phase-scintigraphy. This method is considered to be useful for localization and follow-up of skeletal stress lesions as well as for differential diagnosis.

  18. STRESS FRACTURES IN SPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đivo Ban

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Children and adolescents today, all before starting with regular sports activities and involvement in semi-professional and top professional sport, so it increases the num- ber of discovered stress fractures in this age. This type of injury can occur as a consequence of action one strong force, or the many repeated small force strength, to be exact, when the load (stress transcend ability reparations bones. Stress fractures are recorded and described up to the lower limbs. Research has been confirmed that the bones of lower leg are mostly made in injury, and with the el- derly and with the population of children and young adolescents. Occur in many sports, something to them is greater when the frequency of running and often are present in the female population. According to the results of numerous investigations, mistakes in the training are the most common cause of the emergence of stress fracture. In a direct comparison with complemented these injuries is the condition of muscles, so it is important that at the sa- me time carry out exercises strengthen muscles and stretching. Typical clinical signs of stress fractures are localized painful sensitivity to palpa- tion and runoff in a small number of cases. The basic diagnostic procedure is a medical check, it is the small, radiology and scintigraphyc diagnostics (most accurate and mag- netic resonance imaging. Treatment is usually without surgery and conservative, with rest and reducing stress, and its activity athlete breaks mainly between four and eight weeks. Only the very need surgical treatment The most important thing is that attention is focused on the proper prevention and to take all that it ever occurred to stress fractures that athletes ramble of the courts and the competition (better education of sports workers, separation of groups with increa- sed risk of the formation of an injury, adaptation activities age and abilities of athletes, adequate sports equipment, high-quality sports

  19. Stress fractures and bone pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groshar, D.; Even-Sapir, E.; Lam, M.; Israel, O.; Front, D.

    1984-01-01

    Stress fractures result from an unusual repetitive physical activity causing absorption of bone in excess of repair and bone formation. This leads to the weakening of the bone and subsequently to a fracture. It is a benign condition that if recognized in time does not need any treatment besides rest. However, if diagnosis is not made and physical activity continues it may result in severe injury to the bone and a frank fracture may result. Pain is the typical clinical feature and bone scintigraphy, being more sensitive than radiography, is done to establish early diagnosis. The presence of asymptomatic sites of abnormal bone uptake typical of stress fracture in which pain appeared only about 2 weeks after scintigraphy, drew the authors' attention to the question of how close is the relationship between stress fractures and bone pain. Sixty-four military recruits diagnosed as suffering from stress fracture were investigated in order to correlate sites with abnormal uptake of Tc-99m MDP on bone scintigraphy with sites of local pain. In 37 (58%) subjects multiple sites of abnormal uptake were recognised. Of 123 sites of abnormal uptake, 31 (25%) were asymptomatic. In three patients bone pain appeared at the site of the abnormal uptake two weeks after scintigraphy. Bone scintigraphy appears to be more sensitive than bone pain in the diagnosis of stress fractures. The osteoblastic activity which manifests itself by abnormal uptake appears in some cases earlier than the pain caused by the fracture. Present findings may suggest that under certain circumstances, in a population prone to stress fracture, bone scan should be considered as a screening method

  20. Computed tomography of stress fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murcia, M.; Brennan, R.E.; Edeiken, J.

    1982-01-01

    An athletic young female developed gradual onset of pain in the right leg. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid periosteal reaction in the tibia compatible with stress fracture. She stopped sport activites but her pain continued. Follow-up radiographs of the tibia revealed changes suspicious for osteoid osteoma. Computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated periosteal reaction, but in addition, lucent fracture lines in the tibial cortex were evident. CT obviated the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures in this patient. In selected cases CT may be useful to confirm the diagnosis of stress fracture when plain radiographic or routine tomographic studies are not diagnostic. (orig.)

  1. Stress fractures in military training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jofre, M.J.; Sierralta, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    During military training, the incidence of overuse injuries like stress fractures increase. The aim of the study was to investigate the utility of bone scan in a military population with clinical suspected stress fractures or periostitis. Material and methods: A three-year retrospective analysis was made on patients who were clinically diagnosed with stress fractures at the Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department. Thirty-seven patients were studied (mean age 23. +/- 8 y.o; 31 males), 28 cases of which (76%) had tibial stress syndrome. Other localizations were lumbar spine, femoral, fibular, tarsal or metatarsal. Bone scintigraphy was performed injecting 1036 MBq of Tc99m-MDP i.v. Whole body images and lateral projections of lower extremities were done. Results: Bone scan in tibial syndrome was positive for 23 cases (82%), 65% of them were bilateral and 13% also had femoral injuries. X-rays were done in 10 cases and were all negative. In other localizations, the bone scans were negative, but demonstrated other degenerative lesions. All stress fractures were conservatively treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatories and suspension of physical activity. Conclusions: Bone scan is a reliable confirmatory tool for tibial stress syndrome diagnosis. In addition, it helps to determine both the severity and extension of the injury as well as support the indication of rest in the military population

  2. Case 24: Stress Fracture of the Tibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Stress fractures in athletes . Int J Sports Med 1987;8: 221-226 2 Krause GR, Thompson JR. March Fracture of the Tibia. Radiology 1943;41:580-5 3 Bruce... stress fracture. Fig. 2: Axial CT showing the periosteal reaction. Female athletes have the greater tendency of acquiring tibial stress ...H Jones, Stephen B. Baker, Julie Gilchrist, Dexter Kimsey, Daniel M. Sosin: Prevention of Lower Extremity Stress Fractures in Athletes and Soldiers

  3. Pedicular stress fracture in the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, V.F.H.; Htoo, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    Spondylolisthesis with or without spondylolysis is common in the lumbar spine. Associated fracture in the pedicle ('pediculolysis') is unusual. The margins of pedicular stress fractures, like spondylolysis, usually appear sclerotic. A patient with a pedicular stress fracture with minimal marginal sclerosis suggesting an injury of recent onset is presented here. There was associated bilateral spondylolysis. The findings in this patient suggest that established pediculolysis probably represents a stress fracture that has failed to heal. (authors)

  4. Pedicular stress fracture in the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, V.F.H.; Htoo, M.M. [Singapore General Hospital, Singapore, (Singapore). Department of Diagnostic Radiology

    1997-08-01

    Spondylolisthesis with or without spondylolysis is common in the lumbar spine. Associated fracture in the pedicle (`pediculolysis`) is unusual. The margins of pedicular stress fractures, like spondylolysis, usually appear sclerotic. A patient with a pedicular stress fracture with minimal marginal sclerosis suggesting an injury of recent onset is presented here. There was associated bilateral spondylolysis. The findings in this patient suggest that established pediculolysis probably represents a stress fracture that has failed to heal. (authors). 10 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Treatment of Medial Malleolar Stress Fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of medial malleolar stress fractures varies from 0.6%-4.1% of all stress fractures. These fractures occur almost entirely in athletes and runners, and more frequently in skeletally mature patients aged 20-40 years. Treatment depends on the result of diagnostic imaging, displacement of

  6. Distinguishing stress fractures from pathologic fractures: a multimodality approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Laura M.; Kamel, Ihab R.; Kawamoto, Satomi; Bluemke, David A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Frassica, Frank J.

    2005-01-01

    Whereas stress fractures occur in normal or metabolically weakened bones, pathologic fractures occur at the site of a bone tumor. Unfortunately, stress fractures may share imaging features with pathologic fractures on plain radiography, and therefore other modalities are commonly utilized to distinguish these entities. Additional cross-sectional imaging with CT or MRI as well as scintigraphy and PET scanning is often performed for further evaluation. For the detailed assessment of a fracture site, CT offers a high-resolution view of the bone cortex and periosteum which aids the diagnosis of a pathologic fracture. The character of underlying bone marrow patterns of destruction can also be ascertained along with evidence of a soft tissue mass. MRI, however, is a more sensitive technique for the detection of underlying bone marrow lesions at a fracture site. In addition, the surrounding soft tissues, including possible involvement of adjacent muscle, can be well evaluated with MRI. While bone scintigraphy and FDG-PET are not specific, they offer a whole-body screen for metastases in the case of a suspected malignant pathologic fracture. In this review, we present select examples of fractures that underscore imaging features that help distinguish stress fractures from pathologic fractures, since accurate differentiation of these entities is paramount. (orig.)

  7. The c.29T>C polymorphism of the transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFB1) gene, bone mineral density and the occurrence of low-energy fractures in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krela-Kaźmierczak, I; Michalak, M; Wawrzyniak, A; Szymczak, A; Eder, P; Łykowska-Szuber, L; Kaczmarek-Ryś, M; Drwęska-Matelska, N; Skrzypczak-Zielińska, M; Linke, K; Słomski, R

    2017-12-01

    Gastrointestinal tract conditions are frequently associated with low bone mineral density and increased risk of fractures due to osteoporosis, the latter concerning particularly inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. One of the candidate genes involved in osteoporosis is the transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFB1) whose polymorphisms may be responsible for the development of this disease. The aim of this study was to analyse the frequency of TGFB1 polymorphic variants and determine the association between the c.29T>C TGFB1 polymorphism, and bone mineral density and fractures in IBD patients. The study subjects included 198 IBD patients [100 suffering from Crohn's disease (CD) and 98 from ulcerative colitis (UC)] and 41 healthy volunteers as a control group. Densitometric bone measurements were obtained using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The TGFB1 genotyping was conducted using restriction fragments length polymorphism. We conducted an analysis of genotype distribution's concordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. We found statistically significant differences in lumbar spine (L2-L4) and femoral neck BMD and T-scores between CD, UC and control subgroups. The distribution of TGFB1 polymorphic variants among CD and UC patients was concordant with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There were no statistically significant differences in densitometric parameters (lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD, T-score, and Z-score) between carriers of different TGFB1 polymorphisms among IBD (CD and UC) patients nor among controls. We have found no statistically significant differences in the prevalence of low-energy fractures between groups of different TGFB1 polymorphic variant carriers. The allele dose effect, recessive effect and dominant effect analysis did not show an association between low-energy fractures and the TGFB1 polymorphisms among CD and UC patients. We have not observed an association between the c.29T>C TGFB1 polymorphic variant and the bone mineral density

  8. Stress fracture of the femoral neck in a child (stress fracture)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coldwell, D.; Gross, G.W.; Boal, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    Femoral neck stress fracture is extremely rare in childhood. We report a case of femoral neck stress fracture in an 11-year-old girl. Differentials diagnosis and a brief review of the literature follow. (orig.)

  9. Stress fractures of the femora in soldiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meurman, K.O.A.; Somer, K.; Lamminen, A.

    1981-01-01

    Amongst 936 stress fractures found in soldiers, there were 58 in the femora (6%); of these 31 were in the neck and 27 in the shaft. Two were bilateral, and two patients had other stress fractures. Three displacements were found in the necks. In the shaft, 20 fractures were proximal, four were in the middle third and three in the distal third. In the latter group, it is necessary to differentiate from a sarcoma. CT is a new aid in this respect. Sport in highly motivated individuals appears to contribute particularly to fractures of the shaft. The symptoms from these fractures are relatively mild. (orig.) [de

  10. Longitudinal stress fracture of the tibia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J.M.; Onatibia, A.; Galardi, A.; Laso, C.

    1997-01-01

    We present two cases of lengthwise stress fracture in tibia. This is an atypical and uncommon presentation. We describe the major clinical and radiological findings, stressing the enormous importance of CT in the correct diagnosis. (Author) 6 refs

  11. Intrinsic mechanical behavior of femoral cortical bone in young, osteoporotic and bisphosphonate-treated individuals in low- and high energy fracture conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Schaible, Eric; Gludovatz, Bernd; Schmidt, Felix N.; Riedel, Christoph; Krause, Matthias; Vettorazzi, Eik; Acevedo, Claire; Hahn, Michael; Püschel, Klaus; Tang, Simon; Amling, Michael; Ritchie, Robert O.; Busse, Björn

    2016-02-01

    Bisphosphonates are a common treatment to reduce osteoporotic fractures. This treatment induces osseous structural and compositional changes accompanied by positive effects on osteoblasts and osteocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that restored osseous cell behavior, which resembles characteristics of younger, healthy cortical bone, leads to improved bone quality. Microarchitecture and mechanical properties of young, treatment-naïve osteoporosis, and bisphosphonate-treated cases were investigated in femoral cortices. Tissue strength was measured using three-point bending. Collagen fibril-level deformation was assessed in non-traumatic and traumatic fracture states using synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at low and high strain rates. The lower modulus, strength and fibril deformation measured at low strain rates reflects susceptibility for osteoporotic low-energy fragility fractures. Independent of age, disease and treatment status, SAXS revealed reduced fibril plasticity at high strain rates, characteristic of traumatic fracture. The significantly reduced mechanical integrity in osteoporosis may originate from porosity and alterations to the intra/extrafibrillar structure, while the fibril deformation under treatment indicates improved nano-scale characteristics. In conclusion, losses in strength and fibril deformation at low strain rates correlate with the occurrence of fragility fractures in osteoporosis, while improvements in structural and mechanical properties following bisphosphonate treatment may foster resistance to fracture during physiological strain rates.

  12. Stress fractures. A review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troussier, B.; Drevet, J.G.; Lelong, C.; Juvin, R.; Phelip, X.

    1988-04-07

    Stress fractures result from increased bone remodelling induced by intense, unusual and repeated physical activity. They occur mainly in young individuals who are either servicemen or athletes, and are usually located in the tibias, calcaneums, metatarsals and femurs. Stress fractures should be distinguished from fractures due to bone loss, which are fractures of weakened bones occurring after a moderate or even negligeable injury in adults over 50 years of age, mainly in the bones of the pelvic girdle and lower leg. The diagnosis of stress fracture is suggested by the history and unremarkable physical findings, and confirmed by roentgenologic and scintigraphic investigations. The early, marked, localized increase in bone uptake demonstrated by isotopic scans is suggestive. Roentgenologic changes are delayed and inconspicuous, explaining diagnostic mistakes. Prompt therapy consists in refraining from weightbearing and represents the most effective means for preventing the only possible complication, ie, true fracture.

  13. Stress fractures in the lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Ferco H.; Jonge, Milko C. de; Maas, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Stress fractures are fatigue injuries of bone usually caused by changes in training regimen in the population of military recruits and both professional and recreational athletes. Raised levels of sporting activity in today's population and refined imaging technologies have caused a rise in reported incidence of stress fractures in the past decades, now making up more than 10% of cases in a typical sports medicine practice. Background information (including etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation and treatment and prevention) as well as state of the art imaging of stress fractures will be discussed to increase awareness amongst radiologists, providing the tools to play an important role in diagnosis and prognosis of stress fractures. Specific fracture sites in the lower extremity will be addressed, covering the far majority of stress fracture incidence. Proper communication between treating physician, physical therapist and radiologist is needed to obtain a high index of suspicion for this easily overlooked entity. Radiographs are not reliable for detection of stress fractures and radiologist should not falsely be comforted by them, which could result in delayed diagnosis and possibly permanent consequences for the patient. Although radiographs are mandatory to rule out differentials, they should be followed through when negative, preferably by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as this technique has proven to be superior to bone scintigraphy. CT can be beneficial in a limited number of patients, but should not be used routinely

  14. Stress fractures in the lower extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Ferco H. [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jonge, Milko C. de [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: m.maas@amc.uva.nl

    2007-04-15

    Stress fractures are fatigue injuries of bone usually caused by changes in training regimen in the population of military recruits and both professional and recreational athletes. Raised levels of sporting activity in today's population and refined imaging technologies have caused a rise in reported incidence of stress fractures in the past decades, now making up more than 10% of cases in a typical sports medicine practice. Background information (including etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation and treatment and prevention) as well as state of the art imaging of stress fractures will be discussed to increase awareness amongst radiologists, providing the tools to play an important role in diagnosis and prognosis of stress fractures. Specific fracture sites in the lower extremity will be addressed, covering the far majority of stress fracture incidence. Proper communication between treating physician, physical therapist and radiologist is needed to obtain a high index of suspicion for this easily overlooked entity. Radiographs are not reliable for detection of stress fractures and radiologist should not falsely be comforted by them, which could result in delayed diagnosis and possibly permanent consequences for the patient. Although radiographs are mandatory to rule out differentials, they should be followed through when negative, preferably by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as this technique has proven to be superior to bone scintigraphy. CT can be beneficial in a limited number of patients, but should not be used routinely.

  15. Biomechanical Factors in Tibial Stress Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA. Background and Purpose. A stress fracture in the high performance collegiate athlete presents a difficult problem...et al. (1987) noted that varus malalignment (genu & tibial) was often present in athletes with stress fractures. This patient exhibits significant...force and neural potentiation in athletes . Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 22:2, S69, April, 1990. Ebbeling, C. J., Hamill, J., Freedson

  16. Biomechanical Factors in Tibial Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Selected structural characteristics of female ruimers with and without lower extremity stress fractures. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 34...potentiation in athletes . Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 22:2, S69, April, 1990. Ebbeling, C. J., Hamill, J., Freedson, P. S., Rowland, T. W...Pollard, C. D., McKewon, K. A. Kinetic variables in subjects with previous lower extremity stress fractures. Medicine and Science in Sports and

  17. Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head

  18. STRESS FRACTURE PREVALENCE IN ELITE FIGURE SKATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Dubravcic-Simunjak

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Figure skating is a physically demanding sport that requires a unique combination of artistic ability, speed, agility, flexibility and power. During the last decades not only the competitive schedule has become tougher, but after introduction of the new judging system in 2003, also more emphasis is put on difficult technical elements, jumps, steps and spins (ISU Rules, 2006. More studies about possible increasing prevalence of stress fractures in figure skaters and contributing factors are lacking (Dubravcic-Simunjak et al., 2003; Moran, 2000; Pecina et al., 1990. Therefore the aim of this study was to obtain data about the current stress fracture cumulative risk among elite junior and senior figure skaters, as well as possible factors that may contribute to stress fracture incidence. An anonymous questionnaire, divided into 5 sections, inquired about the prevalence of stress fracture were mailed and distributed to all 62 International Skating Union (ISU members by the ISU headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland. The guidelines of the Helsinki declaration 2004 were followed. From the 644 skaters who received the questionnaire, 412 completed ones were returned from 110 female juniors (78 single skaters, 12 pair skaters and 20 ice dancers and 135 female seniors (97 single skaters, 16 pair skaters and 22 ice dancers and from 79 male juniors (47 single skaters, 12 pair skaters and 20 ice dancers and 88 male seniors (50 single skaters, 16 pair skaters and 22 ice dancers, coming from different ISU members. The response rate was 62% in females and 67% in males. The median age for female skaters was 16 years and for males 18 years (range 12-25 years. All participants started to skate between 3 and 6 years of age and started to compete in national and international competitions when they were between 5 and 7 years old. At the time of this analysis, they had been skating between 9 and 20 years.In females 41 (16.7%, and in males 25 (13.8% figure skaters

  19. Bilateral calcaneal stress fractures: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imerci, Ahmet; Incesu, Mustafa; Bozoglan, Muhammet; Canbek, Umut; Ursavas, Hüseyin Tamer

    2012-01-01

    The majority of plantar heel pain is diagnosed as plantar fasciitis or heel spur syndrome. When history or physical findings are unusual or when routine treatment proves ineffective, one should consider an atypical cause of heel pain. Stress fractures of the calcaneus are a frequently unrecognized source of heel pain. In a normal populatıon, the possibility of calcaneal stress fractures must be borne in mind with patients who have bilateral heel pain. When a stress fracture is considered, clinicans have different imaging options. First of all, x-rays must be used to evaluate for any visible osseous pathology. If plain films are inconclusive, the clinician can proceed with a bone scan or Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In the literature, calcaneal stress fractures are mostly reported in soldiers or athletes, but our case is one of a 44-year-old housewife with bilateral heel pain treated as Achilles tendinitis and plantar faciitis for a long time. Her final diagnosis was bilateral calcaneal fracture by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

  20. [Stress fractures of the distal fibula in an osteoporotic woman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Frederik; Heerfordt, Ida Marie

    2014-08-04

    We report a case of an 81-year-old osteoporotic woman, who suffered stress fractures of the distal fibula on both sides within a two-year period. The risk factors for stress fractures are reviewed and the importance of a high index of suspicion for stress fractures is emphasized. When a stress fracture is suspected it should lead to plain radiography and treatment with protected weight-bearing with crutches or a brace.

  1. Effect of Stress State on Fracture Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arpan

    2018-02-01

    Present article comprehensively explores the influence of specimen thickness on the quantitative estimates of different ductile fractographic features in two dimensions, correlating tensile properties of a reactor pressure vessel steel tested under ambient temperature where the initial crystallographic texture, inclusion content, and their distribution are kept unaltered. It has been investigated that the changes in tensile fracture morphology of these steels are directly attributable to the resulting stress-state history under tension for given specimen dimensions.

  2. Role of MRI in hip fractures, including stress fractures, occult fractures, avulsion fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nachtrab, O.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.N.; Lalam, R.; Tins, B.; Tyrrell, P.N.M.; Singh, J.

    2012-01-01

    MR imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and management of hip fractures in all age groups, in a large spectrum of patient groups spanning the elderly and sporting population. It allows a confident exclusion of fracture, differentiation of bony from soft tissue injury and an early confident detection of fractures. There is a spectrum of MR findings which in part is dictated by the type and cause of the fracture which the radiologist needs to be familiar with. Judicious but prompt utilisation of MR in patients with suspected hip fractures has a positive therapeutic impact with healthcare cost benefits as well as social care benefits.

  3. Acoustic Emission Based Surveillance System for Prediction of Stress Fractures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akkus, Ozan

    2004-01-01

    ... in damage activity a priori to fracture. The hypothesis of our study is that the onset of stress fractures can be predicted by monitoring the evolution of microdamage activity using acoustic emissions...

  4. Acoustic Emission Based Surveillance System for Prediction of Stress Fractures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akkus, Ozan; Wasserman, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    ... in damage activity a priori to fracture. The hypothesis of our study is that the onset of stress fractures can be predicted by monitoring the evolution of microdamage activity using acoustic emissions...

  5. Upper extremity and rib stress fractures in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, B.S.; Price, C.T.; Campbell, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    Stress fractures in children are rare compared with the incidence in [ults. This report describes an 11-year-old girl with stress fractures of the acromion, clavicle, and first rib on the left and contralateral fractures of the first and second ribs. It was eventually discovered that these fractures were caused by a nervous tic consisting of repetitive, vigorous shrugging and translation of the shoulders. (orig.)

  6. Atypical stress-avulsion fracture of the Lisfranc joint complex.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Barry J

    2014-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic erythematosus have been associated with metatarsal stress fractures. Stress fractures of the Lisfranc joint complex are uncommon injuries but have been reported to occur most frequently in ballet dancers. We present a case of an avulsion fracture of the Lisfranc joint complex that occurred spontaneously. We have reviewed the association between systemic conditions and metatarsal fractures and proposed a series of hypothetical pathological events that may have contributed to this unusual injury.

  7. Stress Fractures of the Pelvis and Legs in Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Steve B.; Deren, Matthew E.; Matson, Andrew; Fadale, Paul D.; Monchik, Keith O.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Stress fractures are common injuries in athletes, often difficult to diagnose. A stress fracture is a fatigue-induced fracture of bone caused by repeated applications of stress over time. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed articles published from 1974 to January 2012. Results: Intrinsic and extrinsic factors may predict the risk of stress fractures in athletes, including bone health, training, nutrition, and biomechanical factors. Based on their location, stress fractures may be categorized as low- or high-risk, depending on the likelihood of the injury developing into a complete fracture. Treatment for these injuries varies substantially and must account for the risk level of the fractured bone, the stage of fracture development, and the needs of the patient. High-risk fractures include the anterior tibia, lateral femoral neck, patella, medial malleolus, and femoral head. Low-risk fractures include the posteromedial tibia, fibula, medial femoral shaft, and pelvis. Magnetic resonance is the imaging test of choice for diagnosis. Conclusions: These injuries can lead to substantial lost time from participation. Treatment will vary by fracture location, but most stress fractures will heal with rest and modified weightbearing. Some may require more aggressive intervention, such as prolonged nonweightbearing movement or surgery. Contributing factors should also be addressed prior to return to sports. PMID:24427386

  8. Stress fluctuations in fracture networks from theoretical and numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, P.; Darcel, C.; Mas Ivars, D.; Le Goc, R.

    2017-12-01

    We analyze the spatial fluctuations of stress in a simple tridimensional model constituted by a population of disc-shaped fractures embedded in an elastic matrix with uniform and isotropic properties. The fluctuations arise from the classical stress enhancement at fracture tips and stress shadowing around fracture centers that are amplified or decreased by the interactions between close-by fractures. The distribution of local stresses is calculated at the elementary mesh scale with the 3DEC numerical program based on the distinct element method. As expected, the stress distributions vary with fracture density, the larger is the density, the wider is the distribution. For freely slipping fractures, it is mainly controlled by the percolation parameter p (i.e., the total volume of spheres surrounding fractures). For stresses smaller than the remote deviatoric stress, the distribution depends only on for the range of density that has been studied. For large stresses, the distribution decreases exponentially when increasing stress, with a characteristic stress that increases with entailing a widening of the stress distribution. We extend the analysis to fractures with plane resistance defined by an elastic shear stiffness ks and a slip Coulomb threshold. A consequence of the fracture plane resistance is to lower the stress perturbation in the surrounding matrix by a factor that depends on the ratio between ks and a fracture-matrix stiffness km mainly dependent on the ratio between Young modulus and fracture size. km is also the ratio between the remote shear stress and the displacement across the fracture plane in the case of freely slipping fractures. A complete analytical derivation of the expressions of the stress perturbations and of the fracture displacements is obtained and checked with numerical simulations. In the limit ks >> km, the stress perturbation tends to 0 and the stress state is spatially uniform. The analysis allows us to quantify the intensity of the

  9. Jogger's fracture and other stress fractures of the lumbo-sacral spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abel, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The posterior rings of the lower lumbo-sacral vertebrae are subject to stress fractures at any part - pedicle, pars, or lamina. The site of fracture is apparently determined by the axis of weight bearing. The three illustrative clinical examples cited include a jogger with a laminar fracture, a ballet dancer with pedicle fractures, and a nine-year-old boy with fractures of pars and lamina. Chronic low back pain is the typical complaint with stress fractures of the lower lumbo-sacral spine. Special imaging techniques are usually needed to demonstrate these lesions, including vertebral arch views, multi-directional tomography, and computed tomography (CT). (orig.)

  10. Emergence of Anomalous Transport in Stressed Rough Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, P. K.; Brown, S.; Alves da Silva, J.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid flow and tracer transport in fractured rock controls many natural and engineered processes in the geosciences, and therefore has been extensively studied. Geologic fractures, however, are always under significant overburden stress. While confining stress has been shown to impact fluid flow through rough-walled fractures in a fundamental way, studies of anomalous tracer transport at the scale of individual fractures have so far ignored the potential role of confining stress.Here, we report the emergence of anomalous (non-Fickian) transport through a rough-walled fracture as a result of increasing the normal stress on the fracture. We generate fracture surfaces with fractal roughness, and solve the elastic contact problem between the two surfaces to obtain the 3D fracture geometry for increasing levels of normal stress. We then simulate fluid flow and particle transport through the stressed rough fracture. We observe a transition from Fickian to anomalous transport as the normal stress on the fracture increases.We show that the origin of this anomalous transport behavior can be traced to the self-organization of the flow field into a heterogeneous structure dominated by preferential channels and stagnation zones, as a result of the larger number of contacts in a highly stressed fracture. We also propose a spatial Markov model that reproduces the transport behavior at the scale of the entire fracture with only three physical parameters. Our results point to a heretofore unrecognized link between geomechanics and anomalous particle transport in fractured media. Finally, we show preliminary laboratory experiment results that confirm our findings. (a) Magnitude of the volumetric flux at each discretization grid block at low stress. (b) Magnitude of the volumetric flux for a highly stressed fracture. Values are normalized with the mean volumetric flux.

  11. Trochanteric Stress Fracture in a Female Window Cleaner

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Bong-Jin; Song, Jyewon

    2016-01-01

    Stress fractures may occur at various sites in the femur including the head, neck, shaft, supracondylar and condylar regions. To the best of our knowledge, stress fracture occurring in the trochanteric region has not been previously reported. We report here a case of trochanteric stress fracture in a 53-year-old female window cleaner treated with hip nailing without adverse consequences. Careful consideration of this entity is needed when evaluating patients who have repetitive jumping up and...

  12. Stress fracture of the ulna in an adolescent baton twirler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fines, Bonnie P.; Stacy, Scott G. [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago Hospitals, IL (United States)

    2002-02-01

    Upper extremity stress fractures are rare, with the majority of those reported occurring in the ulna. The location of the fracture is influenced by the type of activity and mechanism of injury with which it is associated. We report the first case of a mid-ulnar stress fracture in a baton twirler due to chronic torsional stress. This patient was referred to our Orthopedic Oncology clinic with a preliminary diagnosis of osteoid osteoma. (orig.)

  13. Anomalous Transport in Natural Fracture Networks Induced by Tectonic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, P. K.; Lei, Q.; Lee, S.; Dentz, M.; Juanes, R.

    2017-12-01

    Fluid flow and transport in fractured rock controls many natural and engineered processes in the subsurface. However, characterizing flow and transport through fractured media is challenging due to the high uncertainty and large heterogeneity associated with fractured rock properties. In addition to these "static" challenges, geologic fractures are always under significant overburden stress, and changes in the stress state can lead to changes in the fracture's ability to conduct fluids. While confining stress has been shown to impact fluid flow through fractures in a fundamental way, the impact of confining stress on transportthrough fractured rock remains poorly understood. The link between anomalous (non-Fickian) transport and confining stress has been shown, only recently, at the level of a single rough fracture [1]. Here, we investigate the impact of geologic (tectonic) stress on flow and tracer transport through natural fracture networks. We model geomechanical effects in 2D fractured rock by means of a finite-discrete element method (FEMDEM) [2], which can capture the deformation of matrix blocks, reactivation of pre-existing fractures, and propagation of new cracks, upon changes in the stress field. We apply the model to a fracture network extracted from the geological map of an actual rock outcrop to obtain the aperture field at different stress conditions. We then simulate fluid flow and particle transport through the stressed fracture networks. We observe that anomalous transport emerges in response to confining stress on the fracture network, and show that the stress state is a powerful determinant of transport behavior: (1) An anisotropic stress state induces preferential flow paths through shear dilation; (2) An increase in geologic stress increases aperture heterogeneity that induces late-time tailing of particle breakthrough curves. Finally, we develop an effective transport model that captures the anomalous transport through the stressed fracture

  14. NextGen Stress & Fracture for Lightweight Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The dream in stress and fracture analysis has always been to be able to simulate cracks initiating and then propagating in a stress field in a metal or composite...

  15. Stress Fracture and Nonunion of Coronoid Process in a Gymnast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Hetling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gymnasts have high mechanical loading forces of up to 14 times body weight. Overuse lesions are typical in wrists and stress fractures in the olecranon, while isolated fractures of the coronoid process are uncommon. We present a case of retraumatized nonunion stress fracture of the ulnar coronoid process. Case Description. A 19-year-old gymnast presented with elbow pain after training. Imaging confirmed an old fracture of the coronoid process. We describe a 6-month multiphase return to competition rehabilitation program, which allowed him to compete pain-freely. Literature Review. Acute and overuse injuries in gymnasts are known but no nonunion of the coronoid process has been described before. Only one case of stress fracture of coronoid process in a gymnast was reported. Purpose and Clinical Relevance. We could successfully and conservatively return to sport a reactivated nonunion of a stress fracture of the coronoid process.

  16. CANDIDATE GENE ANALYSIS IN ISRAELI SOLDIERS WITH STRESS FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Yanovich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the association of polymorphisms within candidate genes which we hypothesized may contribute to stress fracture predisposition, a case-control, cross- sectional study design was employed. Genotyping 268 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms- SNPs within 17 genes in 385 Israeli young male and female recruits (182 with and 203 without stress fractures. Twenty-five polymorphisms within 9 genes (NR3C1, ANKH, VDR, ROR2, CALCR, IL6, COL1A2, CBG, and LRP4 showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05 in the distribution between stress fracture cases and non stress fracture controls. Seventeen genetic variants were associated with an increased stress fracture risk, and eight variants with a decreased stress fracture risk. None of the SNP associations remained significant after correcting for multiple comparisons (false discovery rate- FDR. Our findings suggest that genes may be involved in stress fracture pathogenesis. Specifically, the CALCR and the VDR genes are intriguing candidates. The putative involvement of these genes in stress fracture predisposition requires analysis of more cases and controls and sequencing the relevant genomic regions, in order to define the specific gene mutations

  17. [Stress fracture of the ulna in a table tennis player].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufek, P; Ostendorf, U; Thormählen, F

    1999-06-01

    This case report describes a stress fracture of the ulna in a 26-year-old professional table-tennis player. X-ray films remained negative so that the diagnostic is based on MRT. This stress fracture is caused by changing the intensity of training and changing the table-tennis-racket.

  18. High-Risk Stress Fractures: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnis, Kelly C; Ramey, Lindsay N

    2016-03-01

    Stress fractures are common overuse injuries in athletes. They occur during periods of increased training without adequate rest, disrupting normal bone reparative mechanisms. There are a host of intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including biochemical and biomechanical, that put athletes at risk. In most stress fractures, the diagnosis is primarily clinical, with imaging indicated at times, and management focused on symptom-free relative rest with advancement of activity as tolerated. Overall, stress fractures in athletes have an excellent prognosis for return to sport, with little risk of complication. There is a subset of injuries that have a greater risk of fracture progression, delayed healing, and nonunion and are generally more challenging to treat with nonoperative care. Specific locations of high-risk stress fracture include the femoral neck (tension side), patella, anterior tibia, medial malleolus, talus, tarsal navicular, proximal fifth metatarsal, and great toe sesamoids. These sites share a characteristic region of high tensile load and low blood flow. High-risk stress fractures require a more aggressive approach to evaluation, with imaging often necessary, to confirm early and accurate diagnosis and initiate immediate treatment. Treatment consists of nonweight-bearing immobilization, often with a prolonged period away from sport, and a more methodic and careful reintroduction to athletic activity. These stress fractures may require surgical intervention. A high index of suspicion is essential to avoid delayed diagnosis and optimize outcomes in this subset of stress fractures. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Bilateral femoral neck stress fractures in a fire academy student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Russell C; Salzman, Garrett A; Yacoubian, Stephan V; Yacoubian, Shahan V

    2010-10-11

    Unilateral femoral neck stress fractures are well documented in active patients; however, the risk of a subsequent contralateral stress fracture remains unknown in patients who continue to be active. This article describes a 24-year-old male fire academy student who sustained a left femoral neck stress fracture, followed approximately 11 months later by a right femoral neck stress fracture, both of which went on to completely displace. A review of the index radiographs of each hip from outside institutions revealed femoral neck stress fractures that went undiagnosed until they displaced. The patient was referred to our institution and underwent closed reduction and internal fixation using cannulated screws in both cases. A full endocrine evaluation was performed in the following weeks and proved unremarkable. Although it is difficult to extrapolate the results from 1 patient beyond the case studied, there is cause for concern in patients who remain active following femoral neck stress fractures. Our case highlights the significance of obtaining a complete and thorough medical history on physical examination and appropriately counseling patients regarding activity level. Until further research explores this possible relationship, physicians evaluating patients with a history of a stress fracture are encouraged to be vigilant of subsequent contralateral fractures and educate patients of this potentially avoidable injury. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Postpartum Sacral Stress Fracture: An Atypical Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Speziali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sacral stress fractures are common in elderly people. However, sacral stress fracture should be always screened in the differential diagnoses of low back pain during the postpartum period. We present a case of sacral fracture in a thirty-six-year-old woman with low back pain and severe right buttock pain two days after cesarean section delivery of a 3.9 Kg baby. The diagnosis was confirmed by MRI and CT scan, while X-ray was unable to detect the fracture. Contribution of mechanical factors during the cesarean section is not a reasonable cause of sacral fracture. Pregnancy and lactation could be risk factors for sacral stress fracture even in atraumatic delivery such as cesarean section. Our patient had no risk factors for osteoporosis except for pregnancy and lactation. Transient or focal osteoporosis is challenging to assess and it cannot be ruled out even if serum test and mineral density are within the normal range.

  1. Postpartum Sacral Stress Fracture: An Atypical Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Speziali, Andrea; Tei, Matteo Maria; Placella, Giacomo; Chillemi, Marco; Cerulli, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    Sacral stress fractures are common in elderly people. However, sacral stress fracture should be always screened in the differential diagnoses of low back pain during the postpartum period. We present a case of sacral fracture in a thirty-six-year-old woman with low back pain and severe right buttock pain two days after cesarean section delivery of a 3.9 Kg baby. The diagnosis was confirmed by MRI and CT scan, while X-ray was unable to detect the fracture. Contribution of mechanical factors d...

  2. Predictors of Stress Fracture Susceptibility in Young Female Recruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-02

    in U.S. Army Combat Medic Advanced individual training. Mil Med. 2000;165:647-652. 15. Hulkko A, Orava S. Stress fractures in athletes . Int J Sports ...379. 24. Miller C, Major N, Toth A. Pelvic stress injuries in the athlete : management and prevention. Sports Med. 2003;33:1003-1012. 25. Myburgh...recruits than has been reported in civilian athletes or male military recruits. Pelvic stress fractures are relatively rare in civilian male and female

  3. Bilateral pedicle stress fracture in a patient with osteoporotic compression fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Yoshihiro; Hirata, Soichiro; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    A case of bilateral pedicle stress fracture of L4 in a patient with osteoporotic compression fracture of L5 and without a history of major trauma or surgery is reported, and the literature is reviewed. Bilateral pedicle fracture is a rare entity and few cases have been reported in the literature. All reported cases had some underlying causative factors like previous spine surgery or stress related activities. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, only one case of bilateral pedicle stress fracture without a history of trauma, previous spine surgery, or stress-related activities has been reported. A 77-year-old woman presented with severe low back pain and radiating pain in the right leg that was exacerbated after standing and walking. Plain radiograph showed pathological fracture at L5 level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the compression of dural sac at L5 level. CT scan taken 3 months after admission revealed bilateral pedicle fractures through L4. The patient was treated with decompressive laminectomies of L4, followed by posterior spinal fusion with rigid pedicle screw fixation and autogenous bone graft mixed with hydroxyapatite. The patient achieved pain relief and returned to normal activity. Stress fracture of the pedicle within the proximal vertebra of an osteoporotic compression fracture of lumbar spine is an uncommon entity. It may, however, be an additional source of symptoms in patients with osteoporosis who present with further back pain. Surgeons caring for this group of patients should be aware of this condition. PMID:19005693

  4. Quantification of Fracture Interaction Using Stress Intensity Factor Variation Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Robin N.; Paluszny, Adriana; Zimmerman, Robert W.

    2017-10-01

    Accurate and flexible models of fracture interaction are sought after in the fields of mechanics and geology. Stress intensity factors (SIFs) quantify the energy concentrated at the fracture tips and are perturbed from their isolated values when two fractures are close to one another. Using a three-dimensional finite element fracture mechanics code to simulate static fractures in tension and compression, interaction effects are examined. SIF perturbations are characterized by introducing three interaction measures: the circumferential and maximum SIF perturbation provide the "magnitude" of the effect of interaction, and the amplification to shielding ratio quantifies the balance between increased and decreased SIFs along the tip. These measures are used to demonstrate the change in interaction with fracture separation and to find the separation at which interaction becomes negligible. Interaction maps are constructed by plotting the values of the interaction measures for a static fracture as a second fracture is moved around it. These maps are presented for several common fracture orientations in tension. They explore interaction by highlighting regions in which growth is more likely to occur and where fractures will grow into nonplanar geometries. Interaction maps can be applied to fracture networks with multiple discontinuities to analyze the effect of geometric variations on fracture interaction.

  5. Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle in Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Joyner, Patrick W.; Almekinders, Louis C.; Parekh, Selene G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle are a common problem encountered by athletes of all levels and ages. These injuries can be difficult to diagnose and may be initially evaluated by all levels of medical personnel. Clinical suspicion should be raised with certain history and physical examination findings. Evidence Acquisition: Scientific and review articles were searched through PubMed (1930-2012) with search terms including stress fractures and 1 of the following: foot ankle, medial malleolus, lateral malleolus, calcaneus, talus, metatarsal, cuboid, cuneiform, sesamoid, or athlete. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle can be divided into low and high risk based upon their propensity to heal without complication. A wide variety of nonoperative strategies are employed based on the duration of symptoms, type of fracture, and patient factors, such as activity type, desire to return to sport, and compliance. Operative management has proven superior in several high-risk types of stress fractures. Evidence on pharmacotherapy and physiologic therapy such as bone stimulators is evolving. Conclusion: A high index of suspicion for stress fractures is appropriate in many high-risk groups of athletes with lower extremity pain. Proper and timely work-up and treatment is successful in returning these athletes to sport in many cases. Low-risk stress fracture generally requires only activity modification while high-risk stress fracture necessitates more aggressive intervention. The specific treatment of these injuries varies with the location of the stress fracture and the goals of the patient. PMID:25364480

  6. Navicular stress fractures treated with minimally invasive fixation

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, Korula Mani; Paterson, Roger S

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stress fractures of the naviculum bone are uncommon injuries occurring predominantly in athletes. These fractures are usually treated nonoperatively with a nonweight bearing cast for a minimum of 6 weeks followed by rehabilitation. Further, there is a paucity of literature on the long term clinical followup of these patients. These fractures do not heal predictably with conservative management, which does not inspire great compliance and their clinical outcome is variable. We repo...

  7. Unusual exercise-related stress fractures. Two case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink-Bennett, D.M.; Benson, M.T.

    1984-08-01

    We describe two unusual exercise-related stress fractures, one in the sacroiliac joint of a long distance runner, the other in the body of the scapulae of an above-knee amputee. Each were detected on a 2-hour delay bone scan. To our knowledge, neither have been described scintigraphically. The bilateral scapular fracture is an unreported entity, and the fractured SI joint is a very uncommon site for an overuse injury.

  8. Clinical evaluation of stress fractures using bone scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Atsuhiko; Tanohata, Kazunori; Otake, Toru; Hashizume, Toshiyuki (Kanto Rosai Hospital, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)); Kobayashi, Yozi; Nakazima, Hiroyuki

    1984-05-01

    Clinical evaluation of stress fractures were performed in 58 athletes using bone scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-MDP. Stress fractures of the tibia were most often seen in the males with running type sports. They occurred more often in the proximal tibia and on the right side. Stress fractures of the fibula were most often seen in females with jumping type sports, such as volley ball. They occurred more often in the distal fibula and on the right side. Tarsal bone fractures were seen most often rugby players. Metatarsal fractures occurred in the third fourth and fifth metatarsals. No lesion was seen in the first and second metatarsals. We feel that stress fractures of the femur can be differentiated from osteosarcoma by small loculated radionuclide accumulation as well as symptoms, course and tomographic and CT findings. Bilateral involvement was seen in two cases in patellae and calcanei. Most of the other fractures were seen on the right side. Negative radiographs were seen in 36% of the patients and occurred most commonly in the tarsal bones excluding calcaneus. Bone scintigrams were positive in all cases and were most useful in fractures of the tarsal bones excluding calcaneus.

  9. Clinical evaluation of stress fractures using bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Atsuhiko; Tanohata, Kazunori; Otake, Toru; Hashizume, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Yozi; Nakazima, Hiroyuki.

    1984-01-01

    Clinical evaluation of stress fractures were performed in 58 athletes using bone scintigraphy with sup(99m)Tc-MDP. Stress fractures of the tibia were most often seen in the males with running type sports. They occurred more often in the proximal tibia and on the right side. Stress fractures of the fibula were most often seen in females with jumping type sports, such as volley ball. They occurred more often in the distal fibula and on the right side. Tarsal bone fractures were seen most often rugby players. Metatarsal fractures occurred in the third fourth and fifth metatarsals. No lesion was seen in the first and second metatarsals. We feel that stress fractures of the femur can be differentiated from osteosarcoma by small loculated radionuclide accumulation as well as symptome, course and tomographic and CT finding. Bilateral involvement was seen in two cases in patellae and calcanei. Most of the other fractures were seen on the right side. Negative radiographs were seen in 36% of the patients and occurred most commonly in the tarsal bones excluding calcaneus. Bone scintigrams were positive in all cases and were most useful in fractures of the tarsal bones excluding calcaneus. (author)

  10. Medial supracondylar stress fracture in an adolescent pitcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Fronek, Jan [Scripps Healthcare, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-01-15

    We report the occurrence of a medial supracondylar stress fracture in an adolescent pitcher. To our knowledge, this fracture has not been described in the literature, and awareness of this entity allows initiation of therapy and precludes further unnecessary work-up. The radiographic, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging appearances are reviewed and the mechanism of injury is discussed. (orig.)

  11. Stress fracture development classified by bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwas, S.T.; Elkanovich, R.; Frank, G.; Aharonson, Z.

    1985-01-01

    There is no consensus on classifying stress fractures (SF) appearing on bone scans. The authors present a system of classification based on grading the severity and development of bone lesions by visual inspection, according to three main scintigraphic criteria: focality and size, intensity of uptake compare to adjacent bone, and local medular extension. Four grades of development (I-IV) were ranked, ranging from ill defined slightly increased cortical uptake to well defined regions with markedly increased uptake extending transversely bicortically. 310 male subjects aged 19-2, suffering several weeks from leg pains occurring during intensive physical training underwent bone scans of the pelvis and lower extremities using Tc-99-m-MDP. 76% of the scans were positive with 354 lesions, of which 88% were in th4e mild (I-II) grades and 12% in the moderate (III) and severe (IV) grades. Post-treatment scans were obtained in 65 cases having 78 lesions during 1- to 6-month intervals. Complete resolution was found after 1-2 months in 36% of the mild lesions but in only 12% of the moderate and severe ones, and after 3-6 months in 55% of the mild lesions and 15% of the severe ones. 75% of the moderate and severe lesions showed residual uptake in various stages throughout the follow-up period. Early recognition and treatment of mild SF lesions in this study prevented protracted disability and progression of the lesions and facilitated complete healing

  12. 3-D description of fracture surfaces and stress-sensitivity analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.Q.; Jioa, D.; Meng, Y.F.; Fan, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Three kinds of reservoir cores (limestone, sandstone, and shale with natural fractures) were used to study the effect of morphology of fracture surfaces on stress sensitivity. The cores, obtained from the reservoirs with depths of 2170 to 2300 m, have fractures which are mated on a large scale, but unmated on a fine scale. A specially designed photoelectric scanner with a computer was used to describe the topography of the fracture surfaces. Then, theoretical analysis of the fracture closure was carried out based on the fracture topography generated. The scanning results show that the asperity has almost normal distributions for all three types of samples. For the tested samples, the fracture closure predicted by the elastic-contact theory is different from the laboratory measurements because plastic deformation of the aspirates plays an important role under the testing range of normal stresses. In this work, the traditionally used elastic-contact theory has been modified to better predict the stress sensitivity of reservoir fractures. Analysis shows that the standard deviation of the probability density function of asperity distribution has a great effect on the fracture closure rate.

  13. MR semiology of stress fractures; Semiologie IRM des fractures de fatigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, B.; Cordoliani, Y.S.; Naudinat, E.; Sylvestre, A.; Pharaboz, C. [Hopital des Armees Begin, 94 - Saint-Mande (France)

    1995-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance imaging can contribute to stress fractures diagnosis when it makes obvious the fracture line which signal is variable in function of site lesion. The importance of inflammatory reactions must not call the diagnosis in question again. 5 figs., 8 refs.

  14. A curious case of stress fracture in a transsexual athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Tom; Grant, Michael; Chandran, Prakash

    2016-03-31

    Femoral neck stress fractures in young healthy individuals are rare and occur in those who take part in physical training with repetitive loading and those with osteoporosis. Bone density is related to sex hormone status, which is artificially manipulated during gender reassignment. Conflicting evidence currently exists on the effect of cross sex hormone treatment on bone density, with no literature suggesting a link between hormone treatment in gender reassignment and stress fractures. Our aim is to highlight the potential risk of stress fractures amongst transsexual patients receiving cross sex hormones as part of gender reassignment. The patient presented with groin pain after competing in a running event. Despite a number of risk factors, there was a delay in diagnosis, which could have led to complications compromising outcome. Femoral neck stress fractures should be considered in the differential diagnosis of transsexual patients receiving hormone treatment with non-specific groin/thigh pain following exercise. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Do Capacity Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffman, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    A convenience sample based on availability of tibial stress fracture cases a% local Sports Medicine Clinics will be selected over 4 years until forty subjects (20 male, 20 female) have been treated...

  16. Do Capacitively Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffman, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A convenience sample based on availability of tibial stress fracture cases at local Sports Medicine Clinics will be selected over 2-3 years until forty subjects (20 male, 20 female) have been treated...

  17. Do Capacitively Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffman, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    A convenience sample based on availability of tibial stress fracture cases at local Sports Medicine Clinics will be selected over 2-3 years until forty subjects (20 male, 20 female) have been treated...

  18. Case report: bilateral ischial stress fractures in an elite tennis player

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, A.W.; Connell, D.A. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    A case report of bilateral ischial stress fractures in an elite tennis player initially mimicking hamstring pathology is described. This is an unusual site of stress fracture. Typical sites of stress fracture are well documented; however, awareness of less common sites of stress-related bone injury can aid early diagnosis and treatment before overt fracture occurs. (orig.)

  19. Do Capacity Coupled Electric Fields Accelerate Tibial Stress Fracture Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    USA Corresponding author Belinda R. Beck, Ph.D. Griffith University School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre Q...accelerate tibial stress fracture healing? Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise , 31(5, Suppl. 1): 2006 2. Beck B.R., Bergman G., Arendt E...Predicting Recovery from Tibial Stress Fracture Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise , 31(5, Suppl. 1): 2007 (submitted) 15 Presentations

  20. Impact of normal stress on multiphase flow through rough fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves da Silva Junior, J.; Kang, P. K.; Yang, Z.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid flow and transport through geologic fractures plays a key role in several areas such as groundwater hydrology, geothermal energy, oil and gas production, CO2 sequestration and nuclear waste disposal. High-permeability zones associated with fracture corridors often serve as fast fluid conduits for both single and multiphase flow in otherwise low-permeability media. When multiphase flow occurs, the presence of one phase interferes with the flow of the other phase, resulting in complex displacement patterns through the fracture, and macroscopic descriptors (such as fracture-scale capillary pressure and relative permeability) that depend on the phase concentration of both phases. Here, we investigate the impact of normal stress on single and multiphase flow through rough-walled fractures: (1) we generate synthetic aperture fields that honor the fractal roughness structure observed in real fractures; (2) we model the effect of normal stress on the fracture aperture geometry by solving the contact problem between fracture walls; and (3) we use invasion percolation with trapping to model immiscible fluid displacement and then compute relative permeability numerically for each stress scenario. Our results indicate that normal stress increases the amount of contact area in the fracture wall, which results in an increase of the tortuosity of the available path for fluid displacement. Increasing normal stress results in low relative permeability for the wetting phase due to a decrease of the available path for fluid flow, and therefore a small amount of non-wetting fluid has a large impact on the flow of the wetting fluid. We find that the relative permeability of the non-wetting fluid shows less variation with stress than the wetting fluid, and that both fluids exhibit strong phase interference at intermediate saturations. Finally, we show early results from our experimental work currently underway to validate the modeling results.

  1. Stress fracture of the second proximal phalanx of the foot in teenage athletes: Unrecognized location of stress fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Yamaguchi

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Although a rare injury, it is important that clinicians be aware of this type of stress fracture, as a timely diagnosis can avoid the need for surgical treatment and allow an early return to play.

  2. Influence of fracture extension on in-situ stress in tight reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongping; Wei, Xu; Zhang, Ye; Xing, Libo; Xu, Jianjun

    2018-01-01

    Currently, hydraulic fracturing is an important way to develop low permeability reservoirs. The fractures produced during the fracturing process are the main influencing factors of changing in-situ stress. In this paper, the influence of fracture extension on in-situ stress is studied by establishing a mathematical model to describe the relationship between fracture length and in-situ stress. The results show that the growth rate gradually decreases after the fracture reaches a certain length with the increase of fracturing time; the continuous extension of the fracture is the main factor to change the in-situ stress. In order to reduce the impact on the subsequent fracture extension due to the changing of in-situ stress, controlling fracturing time and fracture length without affecting the stimulated reservoir effect is an important way. The results presented in this study can effectively reduce the impact of changing of in-situ stress on subsequent fracturing construction.

  3. Stress generation and hierarchical fracturing in reactive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamtveit, B.; Iyer, K.; Royne, A.; Malthe-Sorenssen, A.; Mathiesen, J.; Feder, J.

    2007-12-01

    Hierarchical fracture patterns are the result of a slowly driven fracturing process that successively divides the rocks into smaller domains. In quasi-2D systems, such fracture patterns are characterized by four sided domains, and T-junctions where new fractures stop at right angles to pre-existing fractures. We describe fracturing of mm to dm thick enstatite layers in a dunite matrix from the Leka ophiolite complex in Norway. The fracturing process is driven by expansion of the dunite matrix during serpentinization. The cumulative distributions of fracture lengths show a scaling behavior that lies between a log - normal and power law (fractal) distribution. This is consistent with a simple fragmentation model in which domains are divided according to a 'top hat' distribution of new fracture positions within unfractured domains. Reaction-assisted hierarchical fracturing is also likely to be responsible for other (3-D) structures commonly observed in serpentinized ultramafic rocks, including the mesh-textures observed in individual olivine grains, and the high abundance of rectangular domains at a wide range of scales. Spectacular examples of 3-D hierarchical fracture patterns also form during the weathering of basaltic intrusions (dolerites). Incipient chemical weathering of dolerites in the Karoo Basin in South Africa occurs around water- filled fractures, originally produced by thermal contraction or by externally imposed stresses. This chemical weathering causes local expansion of the rock matrix and generates elastic stresses. On a mm to cm scale, these stresses lead to mechanical layer-by-layer spalling, producing the characteristic spheroidal weathering patterns. However, our field observations and computer simulations demonstrate that in confined environments, the spalling process alone is unable to relieve the elastic stresses. In such cases, chemical weathering drives a much larger scale hierarchical fracturing process in which fresh dolerite undergoes a

  4. Stress fracture of the medial clavicle secondary to nervous tic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, K.; Sugiura, H.; Suzuki, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The clinical and radiological characteristics of swelling in the region of the medial clavicle may suggest the presence of a neoplastic or inflammatory lesion. This report describes a 27-year-old man with a painful tumor-like lesion over the medial clavicle, which was found to be a stress fracture caused by a nervous tic resulting from mental stress. (orig.)

  5. Stress fracture of the medial clavicle secondary to nervous tic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, K.; Sugiura, H.; Suzuki, Y. [Department of Orthopaedics, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, 1-1 Kanokoden, Chikusa, 464-8681, Nagoya (Japan)

    2004-09-01

    The clinical and radiological characteristics of swelling in the region of the medial clavicle may suggest the presence of a neoplastic or inflammatory lesion. This report describes a 27-year-old man with a painful tumor-like lesion over the medial clavicle, which was found to be a stress fracture caused by a nervous tic resulting from mental stress. (orig.)

  6. Bone lesions from overload: shin splint and stress fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Una Gorospe; Jon Andoni; Isla Gallego, Concepcion; Santana Borbones, Aranzazu; Perera Romero, Carmen; Allende Riera, Ana J

    2005-01-01

    There are many stress injuries in the lower extremities due to exercise, and the case we present is an example of two injuries which may present in children or young adults who train excessively. The patient complains of pain and tightness on exercise. The underlying pathology is probably rupture of insertion fibres of the tibial and soleus (Sharpey's fibres) muscles. Probably, there is also periostitis and myositis. Stress fractures and shin splints are often present at the same time in different stages, and both are typical pathologies due to excessive training. Scintigraphy allows identification and early management of shin splints and stress fractures (au)

  7. Taking a holistic approach to managing difficult stress fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L; Best, Thomas M

    2016-09-09

    Stress fractures and other bony stress injuries occur along a spectrum of severity which can impact treatment and prognosis. When treating these injuries, it should be borne in mind that no two stress fractures behave exactly alike. Given that they are not a consistent injury, standardized treatment protocols can be challenging to develop. Treatment should be individualized to the patient or athlete, the causative activity, the anatomical site, and the severity of the injury. A holistic approach to the treatment of the most difficult stress fractures should be taken by orthopedists and sports medicine specialists. This approach is necessary to obtain optimal outcomes, minimize loss of fitness and time away from sports participation, and decrease the risk of recurrence.

  8. Femoral neck stress fractures (fnsf) in military recruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeed, N.U.; Naqvi, A.N.; Majeed, H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify patterns of Femoral Neck Stress Fractures (FNSF), its presentation and outcome of its treatment in PMA (Pakistan Military Academy) cadets. These findings would help suggest guidelines for their appropriate management. Study design: Case Series Place and duration of study: CMH Abbottabad and CMH Rawalpindi from May 2005 to January 2008. Materials and Methods: Twenty cases (20 hips in 18 patients) of FNSF were included in the study. Only male cadets from Pakistan Military Academy (PMA) were included. Diagnosis was made clinically and was confirmed by radiographs or bone scan. Incomplete fractures were managed conservatively where as complete fractures were fixed surgically. Results: All compression fractures healed conservatively where as tension fractures needed surgical fixation in all the cases, except one where fracture remained incomplete. Rest of tension fractures converted from incomplete fractures to complete fractures and hence needed surgical stabilization. There was no problem of avascular necrosis of femoral head (AVNFH) in any patient. Conclusion: FNSF are uncommon injuries with potentially serious complications and are difficult to diagnose clinically. When diagnosed early and managed appropriately, they carry good prognosis. (author)

  9. Postpartum osteoporosis associated with proximal tibial stress fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemetson, I.A.; Anderson, S.E. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of Bern, Inselspital, 3010, Bern (Switzerland); Popp, A.; Lippuner, K. [Department of Osteology, University Hospital of Bern, Inselspital, 3010, Bern (Switzerland); Ballmer, F. [Knee and Sports Medicine Unit, Lindenhofspital Bern, 3012, Bern (Switzerland)

    2004-02-01

    A 33-year-old woman presented with acute nonspecific knee pain, 6 months postpartum. MR imaging, computed tomography and radiography were performed and a proximal tibia plateau insufficiency fracture was detected. Bone densitometry demonstrated mild postpartum osteoporosis. To our knowledge these findings have not been described in this location and in this clinical setting. The etiology of the atraumatic fracture of the tibia is presumed to be due to a low bone mineral density. The bone loss was probably due to pregnancy, lactation and postpartum hormonal changes. There were no other inciting causes and the patient was normocalcemic. We discuss the presence of a postpartum stress fracture in a hitherto undescribed site in a patient who had lactated following an uncomplicated pregnancy and had no other identifiable cause for a stress fracture. (orig.)

  10. Postpartum osteoporosis associated with proximal tibial stress fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemetson, I.A.; Anderson, S.E.; Popp, A.; Lippuner, K.; Ballmer, F.

    2004-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman presented with acute nonspecific knee pain, 6 months postpartum. MR imaging, computed tomography and radiography were performed and a proximal tibia plateau insufficiency fracture was detected. Bone densitometry demonstrated mild postpartum osteoporosis. To our knowledge these findings have not been described in this location and in this clinical setting. The etiology of the atraumatic fracture of the tibia is presumed to be due to a low bone mineral density. The bone loss was probably due to pregnancy, lactation and postpartum hormonal changes. There were no other inciting causes and the patient was normocalcemic. We discuss the presence of a postpartum stress fracture in a hitherto undescribed site in a patient who had lactated following an uncomplicated pregnancy and had no other identifiable cause for a stress fracture. (orig.)

  11. Analysis of fracture patterns and local stress field variations in fractured reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert, Hagen; Drews, Michael; Fremgen, Dominik; Wellmann, J. Florian

    2010-05-01

    A meaningful qualitative evaluation of permeabilities in fractured reservoirs in geothermal or hydrocarbon industry requires the spatial description of the existing discontinuity pattern within the area of interest and an analysis how these fractures might behave under given stress fields. This combined information can then be used for better estimating preferred fluid pathway directions within the reservoir, which is of particular interest for defining potential drilling sites. A description of the spatial fracture pattern mainly includes the orientation of rock discontinuities, spacing relationships between single fractures and their lateral extent. We have examined and quantified fracture patterns in several outcrops of granite at the Costa Brava, Spain, and in the Black Forest, Germany, for describing reservoir characteristics. For our analysis of fracture patterns we have used photogrammetric methods to create high-resolution georeferenced digital 3D images of outcrop walls. The advantage of this approach, compared to conventional methods for fracture analysis, is that it provides a better 3D description of the fracture geometry as the entity of position, extent and orientation of single fractures with respect to their surrounding neighbors is conserved. Hence for instance, the method allows generating fracture density maps, which can be used for a better description of the spatial distribution of discontinuities in a given outcrop. Using photogrammetric techniques also has the advantage to acquire very large data sets providing statistically sound results. To assess whether the recorded discontinuities might act as fluid pathways information on the stress field is needed. A 3D model of the regional tectonic structure was created and the geometry of the faults was put into a mechanical 3D Boundary Element (BE) Model. The model takes into account the elastic material properties of the geological units and the orientation of single fault segments. The

  12. BISPHOSPHONATE INDUCED STRESS FRACTURE OF BILATERAL FEMUR: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saidapur

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a common problem affecting people after 4 - 5 decade of life. There are various treatment options available for Osteoporosis and Bisphosphonates are widely used. Bisphosphonates work by blocking osteoclast mediated bone resorption and can be given in oral and injectable forms. R ecent studies have brought to light the risk of sub trochanteric stress fracture secondary to bisphosphonate therapy. Here we are presenting a case with bilateral sub trochanteric fracture following prolonged bisphosphonate therapy

  13. Stress Fracture of the Proximal Fibula in Military Recruits

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Seoung Hwan; Chu, In Tak

    2009-01-01

    Background We wanted to report on stress fracture of the proximal fibula and to suggest the pathomechanism of this fracture. Methods Between April 2004 through April 2005, the military recruits who complained of leg pain during the 6 weeks basic training in the Republic of Korea Marine Corps education and training group were evaluated according to their clinical manifestations and plain radiographs. Results Twelve recruits of 635 recruits who complained leg pain were diagnosed as having fibul...

  14. STRESS FRACTURE OF THE ULNA IN A BREAK-DANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsu Chen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Break dancing is a popular activity in teenagers and is associated with severe trauma to bones and tissues. We report the first known case of a break dancer with an ulnar stress fracture. Such injuries occur in a variety of sports due to substantial stress on the ulna and repetitive excessive rotation of the forearm. In this study we describe a patient who experienced an ulnar stress fracture during break dancing training. The diagnosis was established by history and physical examination. Initial radiographic findings were negative. However, radiographs taken 3 months after initial presented revealed callus formation over the ulnar shaft. This suggested that readjustment is required in break dancing training protocols. It is important to increase awareness of this injury among physicians to expedite the diagnosis and to prevent the possibility of conversion to an overt fracture in the future

  15. Postpartum Unilateral Sacral Stress Fracture Mimicking Lumbar Radiculopathy: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Bağçacı

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Postpartum sacral stress fracture is a very rare clinical entity. Because of the ambiguous clinical and radiological findings, it is often diagnosed late. A case of a postpartal 25-year-old female patient presented with acute onset of low back pain radiating to the right extremity, mimicking lumbar radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging of sacrum revealed a non-displaced stress fracture of the right sacral ala. The 25-hydroxy vitamine D level of the patient was very low; dual energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements were in the normal range. The patient is completely cured as a result of conservative treatment. As a result, sacrum stress fracture should be kept in mind in the presence of back pain during pregnancy and postpartum period.

  16. Crown fracture: Failure load, stress distribution, and fractographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Roberto E; Soares, Paulo V; Versluis, Antheunis; de O Júnior, Osmir Batista; Ambrosano, Gláucia M B; Nunes, Isabella Ferola

    2015-09-01

    The outcomes from load-to-failure tests may not be applicable to clinical situations. The purpose of this study was to critically evaluate the efficacy of load-to-failure tests in the investigation of the fracture load and pattern of metal-free crowns. Four groups were formed from 128 bovine roots restored with metal posts, resin cores, and feldspathic, leucite, or lithium disilicate ceramic systems or polymer crowns. Each group was divided into 4 (n=8) according to the cement: zinc phosphate, self-adhesive resin, autopolymerizing resin, and glass ionomer. Mean fracture loads from compressive tests were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Finite element and fractographic analyses were performed and associated with the fracture load and pattern. Significantly higher fracture load values were obtained for the lithium disilicate ceramic, but finite element and fractographic analyses showed that the cement effect could not be determined. The finite element analysis showed the cement likely affected the fracture pattern, confirmed that stresses in the cements were little affected by the crown materials, and found that the stressed conditions were lowest in the lithium disilicate compared with other crowns for all cement combinations. The stressed conditions in the crowns depended more on the adhesive properties than on the elastic modulus of the cement materials. The level of the stressed condition in the crowns at the occlusal surface was about the same or higher than along their cement interface, consistent with the fractography, which indicated fractures starting at the load point. Higher stress levels in the crowns corresponded with a lower number of catastrophic fractures, and higher stresses in the cements seemed to reduce the number of catastrophic fracture patterns. The highest stressed conditions occurred along the occlusal surface for crown materials with a low elastic modulus or in combination with adhesive cements. The method used was not appropriate

  17. Estimation of the controlling stress in creep fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, J.; Ferguson, F.R.

    1975-01-01

    The implementation of correct criterion in creep design, has been shown to be of fundamental significance in the assessment of component life. The present report considers the problem of the means whereby the criterion may be derived for a particular metal without the availability of sophisticated complex-stress testing equipment and procedures such as the combined tension and torsion tests on thin walled tubular specimens employed in the earlier fundamental researches on the subject. By investigating a wide spectrum of engineering metals it was established that for homogeneous stress conditions two criteria appeared to be sufficient to cover all the metals studied for complex-stress creep fracture, either the maximum principal stress or the octahedral shear stress criterion. Further, it was found that those metals which developed random and continuous cracking during creep were controlled with respect to fracture time by the maximum principal stress, while metals which showed virtually no cracking were governed by the octahedral shear stress or second order invariant. The physical nature of the final fracture (transcrystalline or inter-crystalline), contrary to considerable current concepts, was found to be unrelated to which criterion was operative. Having reduced the possible fracture criteria to two, it only remained to develop a simple test method exploiting this finding to achieve the precise identification for a particular metal. Seven metals including aluminium, copper, titanium, cast iron and three steels have been investigated in the present report at temperatures where creep conditions are operative. The results have shown that the method leads to sufficiently accurate prediction of the complex stress creep fracture criterion for the metals studied

  18. Stress Fracture of the Ulna in an Elite Ice Dancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Tornese

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress fracture of the ulna is a rare overuse injury often arising from repetitive excessive forearm rotation. Here we report the first case of ulnar stress fracture in a female ice dancer. Diagnosis was made by history and physical examination, with the aid of imaging studies (plain x-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, and biomechanical analysis of forearm pronation and supination. Following identification and modification of the causal technical element, the ice dancer was able to continue training and competing without cessation of activity. Treatment was with a 30-day course of capacitively coupled bone stimulation to promote fracture healing, confirmed on radiography and magnetic resonance imaging. Such injuries to ice dancers may be prevented at the planning stage of technical elements in the dance program if coaches place more attention on the potentially deleterious effects of difficult positions the lifted dancer must sustain to reward points on the technical elements score.

  19. Influence of Bone Remodeling Inhibition on the Development of Experimental Stress Fractures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schaffler, Mitchell B

    2005-01-01

    .... Using a bisphosphonate (BIS) to suppress remodeling in the rabbit tibial stress fracture model, we found that antiresorptive therapy reduced the intensity of the stress fracture response in this model...

  20. An Unusual Stress Fracture in an Archer with Hypophosphatasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Yavuz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 45-year-old male archer with stress fracture in his left ulna on the background of adult type of hypophosphatasia. The patient presented to several medical centers for pain around the left elbow and received medical treatment upon diagnosis of tenosynovitis. History of the patient revealed that he had had diagnosis of hypophosphatasia ten years ago and underwent percutaneous screwing for stress fracture on both of his femoral necks. Upon finding nondisplaced stress fracture on proximal metaphysis of the ulna on X-ray, the patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in order to exclude pathological causes. No additional pathology was observed in MRI scanning. The patient’s sportive activities were restricted for 6 weeks and he received conservative management with arm slings. Adult type of hypophosphatasia is a disease manifesting with widespread osteoporosis and presenting with low serum level of alkali phosphatase (ALP. Stress fracture should definitely be considered in the patients with history of hypophosphatasia and refractory extremity pain.

  1. Update on stress fractures in female athletes: epidemiology, treatment, and prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yin-Ting; Tenforde, Adam S.; Fredericson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Stress fractures are a common type of overuse injury in athletes. Females have unique risk factors such as the female athlete triad that contribute to stress fracture injuries. We review the current literature on risk factors for stress fractures, including the role of sports participation and nutrition factors. Discussion of the management of stress fractures is focused on radiographic criteria and anatomic location and how these contribute to return to play guidelines. We outline the curren...

  2. A case of cuboid bone stress fracture in a senior high school rugby athlete

    OpenAIRE

    Tetsuo Hagino; Satoshi Ochiai; Yoshiyuki Watanabe; Shinya Senga; Yoshihiro Takayama; Hirotaka Haro

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of cuboid bone stress fracture in a 17-year-old rugby athlete. Cuboid bone stress fractures are rare in athletes. When an athlete with no history of trauma presents with pain on the lateral side of the foot and no abnormality on plain radiograph, cuboid bone stress fracture should be suspected and magnetic resonance imaging should be conducted.

  3. Identifying sex-specific risk factors for stress fractures in adolescent runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Adam S; Sayres, Lauren C; McCurdy, Mary Liz; Sainani, Kristin L; Fredericson, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Adolescent females and males participating in running represent a population at high risk of stress fracture. Few investigators have evaluated risk factors for prospective stress fracture in this population. To better characterize risk factors for and incidence of stress fractures in this population, we collected baseline risk factor data on 748 competitive high school runners (442 girls and 306 boys) using an online survey. We then followed them prospectively for the development of stress fractures for a mean ± SD of 2.3 ± 1.2 total seasons of cross-country and track and field; follow-up data were available for 428 girls and 273 boys. We identified prospective stress fractures in 5.4% of girls (n = 23) and 4.0% of boys (n = 11). Tibial stress fractures were most common in girls, and the metatarsus was most frequently fractured in boys. Multivariate regression identified four independent risk factors for stress fractures in girls: prior fracture, body mass index dance. For boys, prior fracture and increased number of seasons were associated with an increased rate of stress fractures, whereas prior participation in basketball was associated with a decreased risk of stress fractures. Prior fracture represents the most robust predictor of stress fractures in both sexes. Low body mass index, late menarche, and prior participation in gymnastics and dance are identifiable risk factors for stress fractures in girls. Participation in basketball appears protective in boys and may represent a modifiable risk factor for stress fractures. These findings may help guide future translational research and clinical care in the management and prevention of stress fractures in young runners.

  4. Stress fracture in posterior aspect of the tibia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Tae Yong; Jung, Hyun Woo; Park, Chung Hun; Chun, Kyung Ah; Koo, Bong Sig; Lee, Sang Yong

    1999-01-01

    To determine correlation between stress fracture of the posterior tibia and flexor digitorum longus muscle injury caused by athletic or sporting activity during adolescence. Eleven cases diagnosed as stress fracture after X-ray and MR imaging of the lower leg were reviewed. With regard to each fracture, the following features were noted : age, sex, and athletic or sporting activity of the patient, and site. Using MR imaging techniques, axial and sagittal T1 and T2 weighted imaged were obtained in all cases and T1-Gd DTPA images in seven. The activities undertaken were running (n=3), football (n=2), ballet (n=2), taekwando (n=1), badminton (n=1), field hockey (n=1), and basketball (n=1). MR images revealed localized cortical thickness (n=11), linear intramedullary callus showing a low signal on T1 and T2 weighted images (n=9), marrow hyperemia (n=7), and flexor digitorum longus muscle injury showing a high signal on T1-Gd DTPA and T2 weighted image (n=7). Stress fracture of the posterior tibia might be induced by flexor digitorum longus muscle activity induced by athletic or sporting activities during adolescence

  5. Sequential Proximal Tibial Stress Fractures associated with Prolonged usage of Methotrexate and Corticosteroids: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan TJL

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stress fractures of the proximal tibia metaphysis are rare in the elderly. We present a case of a 65-year old male who developed sequential proximal tibia stress fractures associated with prolonged usage of methotrexate and prednisolone within a span of 18 months. Magnetic Resonance Imaging revealed an incomplete stress fracture involving the medial proximal tibial region. The patient was treated with stemmed total knee arthroplasty (TKA bilaterally. Stress fractures should be considered in patients with atypical knee pain who have a history of methotrexate and prednisolone usage. TKA is an effective treatment in stress fractures of the proximal tibia.

  6. Optimization of Multi-Cluster Fracturing Model under the Action of Induced Stress in Horizontal Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanyong Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Volume fracturing in shale gas forms complex fracture networks and increases stimulated reservoir volume through large-scale fracturing operation with plug-perforation technology. However, some perforation clusters are stimulated unevenly after fracturing. This study aims to solve this problem by analyzing the shortcomings of the conventional fracturing model and developing a coupled model based on the 2D fracture motion equation, energy conservation law, linear elastic mechanics, and stress superposition principle. First, a multi-fracture in-situ stress model was built by studying the induced stress produced by the fracture initiation to deduce the multi-fracture induced stress impact factor on the basis of the stress superposition principle. Then, the classical Perkins–Kern–Nordgren model was utilized with the crustal stress model. Finally, a precise fracturing design method was used to optimize perforation and fracturing parameters under the new model. Results demonstrate that the interference effect among fractures is the major factor causing the non-uniform propagation of each fracture. Compression on the main horizontal stress increases the net pressure. Therefore, both the degree of operation difficulty and the complexity of fracture geometry are improved. After applying the optimal design, the production is increased by 20%, and the cost is reduced by 15%.

  7. Stress fracture of the anterior process of the calcaneus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketomi, Shuji; Uchiyama, Eiji; Iwaso, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    Stress fracture of the anterior process of the calcaneus is rare. We present a case of a 14-year-old female basketball player who suffered a stress fracture of the anterior process of the calcaneus that was not associated with a calcaneonavicular coalition. After conservative treatment failed, drilling of the fracture site was required to facilitate healing. A possible cause of this rare type of stress fracture seemed to be a long anterior process of the calcaneus. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case study.

  8. Stress- and Chemistry-Mediated Permeability Enhancement/Degradation in Stimulated Critically-Stressed Fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derek Elsworth; Abraham S. Grader; Chris Marone; Phillip Halleck; Peter Rose; Igor Faoro; Joshua Taron; André Niemeijer; Hideaki Yasuhara

    2009-03-30

    This work has investigated the interactions between stress and chemistry in controlling the evolution of permeability in stimulated fractured reservoirs through an integrated program of experimentation and modeling. Flow-through experiments on natural and artificial fractures in Coso diorite have examined the evolution of permeability under paths of mean and deviatoric stresses, including the role of dissolution and precipitation. Models accommodating these behaviors have examined the importance of incorporating the complex couplings between stress and chemistry in examining the evolution of permeability in EGS reservoirs. This document reports the findings of experiment [1,2] and analysis [3,4], in four sequential chapters.

  9. Acetabular stress fractures in military endurance athletes and recruits: incidence and MRI and scintigraphic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, T.R. [Portsmouth Naval Medical Center, Radiology Department, Charette Health Care Center, Portsmouth, VA (United States); Puckett, M.L.; Shin, A.Y.; Gorman, J.D. [Naval Medical Center San Diego, Radiology Department, San Diego, CA (United States); Denison, G. [US Naval Hospital Guam (United States)

    2002-05-01

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence and the MRI and scintigraphic appearance of acetabular stress (fatigue) fractures in military endurance athletes and recruits. Design and patients: One hundred and seventy-eight active duty military endurance trainees with a history of activity-related hip pain were evaluated by both MRI and bone scan over a 2-year period. Patients in the study ranged in age from 17 to 45 years. They had hip pain related to activity and had plain radiographs of the hip and pelvis that were interpreted as normal or equivocal. The study was originally designed to evaluate the MRI and scintigraphic appearance of femoral neck stress fractures. Patients had scintigraphy and a limited MRI examination (coronal imaging only) within 48 h of the bone scan. Twelve patients demonstrated imaging findings compatible with acetabular stress fractures. Results: Stress fractures are common in endurance athletes and in military populations; however, stress fracture of the acetabulum is uncommon. Twelve of 178 patients (6.7%) in our study had imaging findings consistent with acetabular stress fractures. Two patterns were identified. Seven of the 12 (58%) patients had acetabular roof stress fractures. In this group, two cases of bilateral acetabular roof stress fractures were identified, one with a synchronous tensile sided femoral neck stress fracture. The remaining five of 12 (42%) patients had anterior column stress fractures, rarely occurring in isolation, and almost always occurring with inferior pubic ramus stress fracture (4 of 5, or 80%). One case of bilateral anterior column stress fractures was identified without additional sites of injury. Conclusions: Stress fractures are commonplace in military populations, especially endurance trainees. Acetabular stress fractures are rare and therefore unrecognized, but do occur and may be a cause for activity-related hip pain in a small percentage of military endurance athletes and recruits. (orig.)

  10. Expected Time to Return to Athletic Participation After Stress Fracture in Division I Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L; Jamieson, Marissa; Everson, Sonsecharae; Siegel, Courtney

    2017-12-01

    Few studies have documented expected time to return to athletic participation after stress fractures in elite athletes. Time to return to athletic participation after stress fractures would vary by site and severity of stress fracture. Retrospective cohort study. Level 3. All stress fractures diagnosed in a single Division I collegiate men's and women's track and field/cross-country team were recorded over a 3-year period. Site and severity of injury were graded based on Kaeding-Miller classification system for stress fractures. Time to return to full unrestricted athletic participation was recorded for each athlete and correlated with patient sex and site and severity grade of injury. Fifty-seven stress fractures were diagnosed in 38 athletes (mean age, 20.48 years; range, 18-23 years). Ten athletes sustained recurrent or multiple stress fractures. Thirty-seven injuries occurred in women and 20 in men. Thirty-three stress fractures occurred in the tibia, 10 occurred in the second through fourth metatarsals, 3 occurred in the fifth metatarsal, 6 in the tarsal bones (2 navicular), 2 in the femur, and 5 in the pelvis. There were 31 grade II stress fractures, 11 grade III stress fractures, and 2 grade V stress fractures (in the same patient). Mean time to return to unrestricted sport participation was 12.9 ± 5.2 weeks (range, 6-27 weeks). No significant differences in time to return were noted based on injury location or whether stress fracture was grade II or III. The expected time to return to full unrestricted athletic participation after diagnosis of a stress fracture is 12 to 13 weeks for all injury sites. Athletes with grade V (nonunion) stress fractures may require more time to return to sport.

  11. Acetabular stress fractures in military endurance athletes and recruits: incidence and MRI and scintigraphic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, T.R.; Puckett, M.L.; Shin, A.Y.; Gorman, J.D.; Denison, G.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence and the MRI and scintigraphic appearance of acetabular stress (fatigue) fractures in military endurance athletes and recruits. Design and patients: One hundred and seventy-eight active duty military endurance trainees with a history of activity-related hip pain were evaluated by both MRI and bone scan over a 2-year period. Patients in the study ranged in age from 17 to 45 years. They had hip pain related to activity and had plain radiographs of the hip and pelvis that were interpreted as normal or equivocal. The study was originally designed to evaluate the MRI and scintigraphic appearance of femoral neck stress fractures. Patients had scintigraphy and a limited MRI examination (coronal imaging only) within 48 h of the bone scan. Twelve patients demonstrated imaging findings compatible with acetabular stress fractures. Results: Stress fractures are common in endurance athletes and in military populations; however, stress fracture of the acetabulum is uncommon. Twelve of 178 patients (6.7%) in our study had imaging findings consistent with acetabular stress fractures. Two patterns were identified. Seven of the 12 (58%) patients had acetabular roof stress fractures. In this group, two cases of bilateral acetabular roof stress fractures were identified, one with a synchronous tensile sided femoral neck stress fracture. The remaining five of 12 (42%) patients had anterior column stress fractures, rarely occurring in isolation, and almost always occurring with inferior pubic ramus stress fracture (4 of 5, or 80%). One case of bilateral anterior column stress fractures was identified without additional sites of injury. Conclusions: Stress fractures are commonplace in military populations, especially endurance trainees. Acetabular stress fractures are rare and therefore unrecognized, but do occur and may be a cause for activity-related hip pain in a small percentage of military endurance athletes and recruits. (orig.)

  12. Biomechanical Factors in the Etiology of Tibial Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    because we initially advertised this study as a tibial stress fracture study and not as a running injury study. We have since changed this advertising ...1-0515. Appendix B Advertisement Flyer 1 ATTENTION FEMALE RUNNERS We are looking for Female Distance Runners who...Newsletter, Fall, 1990. Hamill, J., Clarkson, P. M., Holt, K. G., Freedson, P. S. Muscle Soreness. Nike Sport Research Review, December/March, 1991

  13. Sacral Stress Fracture following the Bone Union of Lumbar Spondylolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuro Sasaji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While 22 articles have reported on sacral stress fractures, it is a rare injury and its etiology is not well known. We present the case of a 16-year-old male who presented with low back pain in 2015. He was a high school soccer player with a previous history of a bilateral L5 lumbar spondylolysis in 2014. The patient refrained from soccer and wore a brace for six months. Two months after restarting soccer, he again complained of low back pain. After 1 year, a lumbar spine computed tomography revealed the bone union of the spondylolysis. At his first visit to our hospital, his general and neurological conditions were normal and laboratory data were within the normal range. Sacral coronal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the left sacral ala revealed an oblique lineal signal void surrounding bone marrow edema. Based on his symptoms, sports history, and MRI, he was diagnosed with a sacral stress fracture. He again refrained from soccer; his low back pain soon improved, and, after 1 year, the abnormal signal change had disappeared on sacral MRI. Recurrent low back pain case caused by a sacral stress fracture occurring after the bone union of lumbar spondylolysis is uncommon.

  14. Does pulsed low intensity ultrasound allow early return to normal activities when treating stress fractures? A review of one tarsal navicular and eight tibial stress fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, J C; Brindle, T; Nyland, J; Caborn, D N; Johnson, D L

    1999-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy of daily pulsed low intensity ultrasound (LIUS) with early return to activities for the treatment of lower extremity stress fractures. Eight patients (2 males, 6 females) with radiographic and bone scan confirmed tibial stress fractures participated in this study. Additionally, a case report of a tarsal navicular stress fracture is described. All patients except one were involved in athletics. Prior to the study, subjects completed a 5 question, 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) regarding pain level (10 = extreme pain, 1 = no pain) and were assessed for functional performance. Subjects received 20-minute LIUS treatments 5 times a week for 4 weeks. Subjects maintained all functional activities during the treatment period. Seven patients with posterior-medial stress fractures participated without a brace. Subjects were re-tested after 4 weeks of treatment. Mann-Whitney U tests (VAS data) and paired t-tests (functional tests) assessed statistical significance (psports was prescribed for the patients with the tibial stress fractures. The patient with the anterior tibial stress fracture underwent tibial intramedullary nailing at the conclusion of a season of play. In this uncontrolled experience, treatment of tibial stress fractures with daily pulsed LIUS was effective in pain relief and early return to vigorous activity without bracing for the patients with posterior-medial stress fractures.

  15. Patients with rett syndrome sustain low-energy fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roende, Gitte; Ravn, Kirstine; Fuglsang, Kathrine

    2011-01-01

    associated with low-energy trauma and the association to methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) mutations. A total of 61 female patients with RTT and 122 healthy controls matched according to age and pubertal/menopause status were examined by questionnaires, bone biochemical markers in blood, and clinical...

  16. Use of Pulsing Electromagnetic Fields for the Treatment of Pelvic Stress Fractures Among Female Soldiers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, D

    1995-01-01

    .... Pulsing electromagnetic fields (PEMFs)have been shown to speed the healing of non-union fractures and we have used them successfully to treat stress fractures in the lower limbs. All women at Ft...

  17. Navicular stress fractures treated with minimally invasive fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korula Mani Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Early intervention with minimally invasive surgery has significantly less morbidity and a reliable early return to active sports and is therefore the best option in high-performance athletes. Materials and Methods: Nine athletes with ten stress fractures of the navicular treated at our institution between April 1991 and October 2000. The mean age of the patients was 22.8 years (range 18-50 years. All patients were treated by minimally invasive screw fixation and early weight bearing mobilization without a cast. The average followup was 7 years (range 2-11 years. Results: Seven of the nine patients returned to their pre-fracture level of sporting activity at an average of 5 months (range 3-9 months. One patient returned to full sporting activity following a delay of 2 years due to an associated tibial stress fracture and one patient had an unsatisfactory result. Long term review at an average of 7 years showed that six of these eight patients who returned to sports remained symptom free with two patients experiencing minimal intermittent discomfort after prolonged activity. Conclusions: We recommend percutaneous screw fixation as a reliable, low morbidity procedure allowing early return to full sporting activity without long term complications or recurrences.

  18. Stress fracture of the ulna in an elite ice dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornese, Davide; Curci, Domenico; Nardo, Alice; Cuccia, Alessandra; Pozzi, Grazia

    2015-03-01

    Stress fracture of the ulna is a rare overuse injury often arising from repetitive excessive forearm rotation. Here we report the first case of ulnar stress fracture in a female ice dancer. Diagnosis was made by history and physical examination, with the aid of imaging studies (plain x-ray, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging), and biomechanical analysis of forearm pronation and supination. Following identification and modification of the causal technical element, the ice dancer was able to continue training and competing without cessation of activity. Treatment was with a 30-day course of capacitively coupled bone stimulation to promote fracture healing, confirmed on radiography and magnetic resonance imaging. Such injuries to ice dancers may be prevented at the planning stage of technical elements in the dance program if coaches place more attention on the potentially deleterious effects of difficult positions the lifted dancer must sustain to reward points on the technical elements score. Key pointsThe technical elements in ice dancing can overload joints and bones due to the positions held by the skaters.To project a competition program as much as possible safe regarding overuse injury prevention an accurate knowledge of physiological parameters of the ice dancer and of ISU rules is necessary.

  19. 3D modeling of hydraulic fracturing and stress perturbations during fluid injection

    OpenAIRE

    Roche Vincent; van der Baan Mirko; Preisig Giona

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracture growth is simulated in homogeneous granite with a fully coupled hydromechanical discrete element method. Three models are considered namely an intact rock and two models with pre existing fractures connected or disconnected to the incipient hydraulic fracture plane. In all scenarios the hydraulic fracture grows in a plane with a mostly circular front despite anisotropic stresses. In the intact rock and disconnected models a hydraulic fracture propagates normal to the minimu...

  20. Lower limb stress fractures in sport: Optimising their management and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Greg A J; Wood, Alexander M

    2017-03-18

    Stress fractures in sport are becoming increasing more common, comprising up to 10% of all of sporting injuries. Around 90% of such injuries are located in the lower limb. This articles aims to define the optimal management of lower limb stress fractures in the athlete, with a view to maximise return rates and minimise return times to sport. Treatment planning of this condition is specific to the location of the injury. However, there remains a clear division of stress fractures by "high" and "low" risk. "Low risk" stress fractures are those with a low probability of fracture propagation, delayed union, or non-union, and so can be managed reliably with rest and exercise limitation. These include stress fractures of the Postero-Medial Tibial Diaphysis, Metatarsal Shafts, Distal Fibula, Medial Femoral Neck, Femoral Shaft and Calcaneus. "High risk" stress fractures, in contrast, have increased rates of fracture propagation, displacement, delayed and non-union, and so require immediate cessation of activity, with orthopaedic referral, to assess the need for surgical intervention. These include stress fractures of the Anterior Tibial Diaphysis, Fifth Metatarsal Base, Medial Malleolus, Lateral Femoral Neck, Tarsal Navicular and Great Toe Sesamoids. In order to establish the optimal methods for managing these injuries, we present and review the current evidence which guides the treatment of stress fractures in athletes. From this, we note an increased role for surgical management of certain high risk stress fractures to improve return times and rates to sport. Following this, key recommendations are provided for the management of the common stress fracture types seen in the athlete. Five case reports are also presented to illustrate the application of sport-focussed lower limb stress fracture treatment in the clinical setting.

  1. Lower limb stress fractures in sport: Optimising their management and outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Greg A J; Wood, Alexander M

    2017-01-01

    Stress fractures in sport are becoming increasing more common, comprising up to 10% of all of sporting injuries. Around 90% of such injuries are located in the lower limb. This articles aims to define the optimal management of lower limb stress fractures in the athlete, with a view to maximise return rates and minimise return times to sport. Treatment planning of this condition is specific to the location of the injury. However, there remains a clear division of stress fractures by “high” and “low” risk. “Low risk” stress fractures are those with a low probability of fracture propagation, delayed union, or non-union, and so can be managed reliably with rest and exercise limitation. These include stress fractures of the Postero-Medial Tibial Diaphysis, Metatarsal Shafts, Distal Fibula, Medial Femoral Neck, Femoral Shaft and Calcaneus. “High risk” stress fractures, in contrast, have increased rates of fracture propagation, displacement, delayed and non-union, and so require immediate cessation of activity, with orthopaedic referral, to assess the need for surgical intervention. These include stress fractures of the Anterior Tibial Diaphysis, Fifth Metatarsal Base, Medial Malleolus, Lateral Femoral Neck, Tarsal Navicular and Great Toe Sesamoids. In order to establish the optimal methods for managing these injuries, we present and review the current evidence which guides the treatment of stress fractures in athletes. From this, we note an increased role for surgical management of certain high risk stress fractures to improve return times and rates to sport. Following this, key recommendations are provided for the management of the common stress fracture types seen in the athlete. Five case reports are also presented to illustrate the application of sport-focussed lower limb stress fracture treatment in the clinical setting. PMID:28361017

  2. Risk factors for stress fracture among young female cross-country runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Jennifer L; Bachrach, Laura K; Procter-Gray, Elizabeth; Nieves, Jeri; Greendale, Gail A; Sowers, Maryfran; Brown, Byron W; Matheson, Kim A; Crawford, Sybil L; Cobb, Kristin L

    2007-09-01

    To identify risk factors for stress fracture among young female distance runners. Participants were 127 competitive female distance runners, aged 18-26, who provided at least some follow-up data in a randomized trial among 150 runners of the effects of oral contraceptives on bone health. After completing a baseline questionnaire and undergoing bone densitometry, they were followed an average of 1.85 yr. Eighteen participants had at least one stress fracture during follow-up. Baseline characteristics associated (Paffect risk. The results of this and other studies indicate that risk factors for stress fracture among young female runners include previous stress fractures, lower bone mass, and, although not statistically significant in this study, menstrual irregularity. More study is needed of the associations between stress fracture and age, calcium intake, and age at menarche. Given the importance of stress fractures to runners, identifying preventive measures is of high priority.

  3. Stress fractures of ankle and wrist in childhood: nature and frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestreich, Alan E. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Bhojwani, Nicholas [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Stress fractures of many etiologies are found not infrequently in various tarsal bones but are less commonly recognized in carpal bones. To assess the distribution of tarsal and carpal stress fractures. During the last three decades, the senior author collected locations of tarsal and carpal bone stress fracture callus seen on plain radiographs. 527 children with tarsal and carpal stress fractures were identified (88 children had multiple bones involved). The totals were: calcaneus 244, cuboid 188, talus 121, navicular 24, cuneiforms 23, capitate 18, lunate 1, and scaphoid 1. Stress fractures were more frequently seen once we became aware each particular bone could be involved. Tarsal and carpal stress fractures in children are not rare. Careful perusal of these bones is urged in all susceptible children with limping or wrist pain. (orig.)

  4. Stress fractures of ankle and wrist in childhood: nature and frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oestreich, Alan E.; Bhojwani, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Stress fractures of many etiologies are found not infrequently in various tarsal bones but are less commonly recognized in carpal bones. To assess the distribution of tarsal and carpal stress fractures. During the last three decades, the senior author collected locations of tarsal and carpal bone stress fracture callus seen on plain radiographs. 527 children with tarsal and carpal stress fractures were identified (88 children had multiple bones involved). The totals were: calcaneus 244, cuboid 188, talus 121, navicular 24, cuneiforms 23, capitate 18, lunate 1, and scaphoid 1. Stress fractures were more frequently seen once we became aware each particular bone could be involved. Tarsal and carpal stress fractures in children are not rare. Careful perusal of these bones is urged in all susceptible children with limping or wrist pain. (orig.)

  5. Significant forefoot varus deformity resulting in progressive stress fractures of all lesser metatarsal bones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vlies, Cornelis H.; Ponsen, Kees J.; Besselaar, Philip P.; Goslings, J. Carel

    2008-01-01

    Stress fractures may occur in any bone, but appear most frequently in the metatarsal bones. Consecutive stress fractures of all lesser metatarsals in a short period are rare, and only a few cases have been described in the literature. We report an unusual case of a young man with consecutive stress

  6. Is in situ stress important to groundwater flow in shallow fractured rock aquifers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, L.; Aydin, A.; Simmons, C. T.; Love, A. J.

    2011-03-01

    SummaryIn situ stress affects the permeability tensor of fractured rock masses at depth but its effect on shallow to near-surface fractured rock aquifers has received little attention. This is partly because stress-related effects on groundwater flow at shallow depths are difficult to identify and characterise due to the complex interactions between all of the inherent properties of a fractured rock aquifer. These properties include the factors that dominantly control groundwater flow: fracture network density, geometry, connectivity and infill. Furthermore, surface processes such as weathering, erosion and unloading alter the original hydraulic nature (connectivity, transmissivity) of fractured rock masses resulting in higher degrees of spatial heterogeneity within shallow flow systems. These processes and interactions often mask the influence of in situ stress fields on fracture network permeability and groundwater flow. In this study, an integrated analysis of local area fracture networks, borehole geophysical logs, borehole groundwater yields and hydromechanical models demonstrate that in situ stress does affect groundwater flow in shallow (fractured rock aquifers by altering fracture hydraulic aperture distributions, fracture network connectivity and groundwater flow rates via fracture deformation processes. In particular, a comparison between representative models of deformed (stressed state) and undeformed (zero stress state) fracture networks showed that below 100 m depth, groundwater flow rates could decrease several fold under the influence of the contemporary stress field. This prediction was highly consistent with the field observations. In contrast, groundwater flow modelling of shallow fractured rock aquifers is typically conducted under the assumption that permeability is independent of the state of stress. A key finding of this study is that in situ stress may be a more important control on both local and regional scale shallow groundwater flow

  7. Modified maximum tangential stress criterion for fracture behavior of zirconia/veneer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsayar, M M; Park, P

    2016-06-01

    The veneering porcelain sintered on zirconia is widely used in dental prostheses, but repeated mechanical loadings may cause a fracture such as edge chipping or delamination. In order to predict the crack initiation angle and fracture toughness of zirconia/veneer bi-layered components subjected to mixed mode loadings, the accuracy of a new and traditional fracture criteria are investigated. A modified maximum tangential stress criterion considering the effect of T-stress and critical distance theory is introduced, and compared to three traditional fracture criteria. Comparisons to the recently published fracture test data show that the traditional fracture criteria are not able to properly predict the fracture initiation conditions in zirconia/veneer bi-material joints. The modified maximum tangential stress criterion provides more accurate predictions of the experimental results than the traditional fracture criteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A case of cuboid bone stress fracture in a senior high school rugby athlete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo Hagino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of cuboid bone stress fracture in a 17-year-old rugby athlete. Cuboid bone stress fractures are rare in athletes. When an athlete with no history of trauma presents with pain on the lateral side of the foot and no abnormality on plain radiograph, cuboid bone stress fracture should be suspected and magnetic resonance imaging should be conducted.

  9. Bilateral Tibial Stress Fractures in a Young Man Associated with Idiopathic Osteoporosis - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin Özyürek

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Stress fractures are defined as a partial or complete fracture of bone due to an inability to endure a non-violent stress. Two factors have been proposed to explain the aetiology of stress fractures: muscle fatigue, and direct muscle action. We want to point to third factor with our case report: Osteoporosis. (From the World of Osteoporosis 2010;16:58-60

  10. Tibial stress fractures in racing Standardbreds: 13 cases (1989-1993)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggles, A.J.; Moore, R.M.; Bertone, A.L.; Schneider, R.K.; Bailey, M.Q.

    1996-01-01

    To determine clinical signs, radiographic and scintigraphic findings, and performance outcome of racing Standardbreds with tibial stress fractures. Retrospective case series. 13 racing Standardbreds with tibial stress fractures. Information concerning clinical signs, diagnostic evaluation, and recommendations was obtained by review of the medical records. Performance information before and after diagnosis of the fracture was collected from racing records, and follow-up information was obtained from the owners or trainers by use of a telephone questionnaire. Horses with tibial stress fractures were moderately lame, and diagnosis was made by nuclear scintigraphy and radiography. Fractures were more likely to occur in 2-year-old horses than in older horses. The fracture location was unique for Standardbreds; 11 of 13 developed stress fractures in the mid-diaphysis of the tibia, whereas fractures in Thoroughbreds are usually in the proximal caudal or caudolateral cortex. Fractures occurred in young horses that had raced or were in advanced race training. All horses were treated with rest alone, and 10 of 13 horses raced after injury. The horses that raced after injury were able to return to a level of performance that was equal to or better than the level raced before injury. 8 of 10 horses established a lifetime-best winning time after injury. Tibial stress fractures are a cause of lameness in young racing Standardbreds. Diagnosis is aided by nuclear scintigraphy. The prognosis for return to previous level of performance after a tibial stress fracture is good

  11. Analysis of stress fractures in athletes based on our clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Jun; Sato, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Tsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2011-01-18

    To analyze stress fractures in athletes based on experience from our sports medicine clinic. We investigated the association between stress fractures and age, sex, sports level, sports activity, and skeletal site in athletes seen at our sports medicine clinic between September 1991 and April 2009. Stress fractures of the pars interarticularis were excluded from this analysis. During this period (18 years and 8 mo), 14276 patients (9215 males and 5061 females) consulted our clinic because of sports-related injuries, and 263 patients (1.8%) [171 males (1.9%) and 92 females (1.8%)] sustained stress fractures. The average age of the patients with stress fractures was 20.2 years (range 10-46 years); 112 patients (42.6%) were 15-19 years of age and 90 (34.2%) were 20-24 years of age. Altogether, 90 patients (34.2%) were active at a high recreational level and 173 (65.8%) at a competitive level. The highest proportion of stress fractures was seen in basketball athletes (21.3%), followed by baseball (13.7%), track and field (11.4%), rowing (9.5%), soccer (8.4%), aerobics (5.3%), and classical ballet (4.9%). The most common sites of stress fractures in these patients were the tibia (44.1%), followed by the rib (14.1%), metatarsal bone (12.9%), ulnar olecranon (8.7%) and pelvis (8.4%). The sites of the stress fractures varied from sport to sport. The ulnar olecranon was the most common stress fracture site in baseball players, and the rib was the most common in rowers. Basketball and classical ballet athletes predominantly sustained stress fractures of the tibia and metatarsal bone. Track and field and soccer athletes predominantly sustained stress fractures of the tibia and pubic bone. Aerobics athletes predominantly sustained stress fractures of the tibia. Middle and long distance female runners who sustained multiple stress fractures had the female athlete triad. The results of this analysis showed that stress fractures were seen in high-level young athletes, with similar

  12. Incidence and Time to Return to Training for Stress Fractures during Military Basic Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Wood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, little is known about the length of time required to rehabilitate patients from stress fractures and their return to preinjury level of physical activity. Previous studies have looked at the return to sport in athletes, in a general population, where rehabilitation is not as controlled as within a captive military population. In this study, a longitudinal prospective epidemiological database was assessed to determine the incidence of stress fractures and the time taken to rehabilitate recruits to preinjury stage of training. Findings demonstrated a background prevalence of 5% stress fractures in Royal Marine training; femoral and tibial stress fractures take 21.1 weeks to return to training with metatarsal stress fractures being the most common injury taking 12.2 weeks. Rehabilitation from stress fractures accounts for 814 weeks of recruit rehabilitation time per annum. Stress fracture incidence is still common in military training; despite this stress fracture recovery times remain constant and represent a significant interruption in training. It takes on average 5 weeks after exercise specific training has restarted to reenter training at a preinjury level, regardless of which bone has a stress fracture. Further research into their prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation is required to help reduce these burdens.

  13. Analysis of stress fractures in athletes based on our clinical experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Jun; Sato, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Tsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To analyze stress fractures in athletes based on experience from our sports medicine clinic. METHODS: We investigated the association between stress fractures and age, sex, sports level, sports activity, and skeletal site in athletes seen at our sports medicine clinic between September 1991 and April 2009. Stress fractures of the pars interarticularis were excluded from this analysis. RESULTS: During this period (18 years and 8 mo), 14276 patients (9215 males and 5061 females) consulted our clinic because of sports-related injuries, and 263 patients (1.8%) [171 males (1.9%) and 92 females (1.8%)] sustained stress fractures. The average age of the patients with stress fractures was 20.2 years (range 10-46 years); 112 patients (42.6%) were 15-19 years of age and 90 (34.2%) were 20-24 years of age. Altogether, 90 patients (34.2%) were active at a high recreational level and 173 (65.8%) at a competitive level. The highest proportion of stress fractures was seen in basketball athletes (21.3%), followed by baseball (13.7%), track and field (11.4%), rowing (9.5%), soccer (8.4%), aerobics (5.3%), and classical ballet (4.9%). The most common sites of stress fractures in these patients were the tibia (44.1%), followed by the rib (14.1%), metatarsal bone (12.9%), ulnar olecranon (8.7%) and pelvis (8.4%). The sites of the stress fractures varied from sport to sport. The ulnar olecranon was the most common stress fracture site in baseball players, and the rib was the most common in rowers. Basketball and classical ballet athletes predominantly sustained stress fractures of the tibia and metatarsal bone. Track and field and soccer athletes predominantly sustained stress fractures of the tibia and pubic bone. Aerobics athletes predominantly sustained stress fractures of the tibia. Middle and long distance female runners who sustained multiple stress fractures had the female athlete triad. CONCLUSION: The results of this analysis showed that stress fractures were seen in high

  14. Sport related stress fracture of the clavicle with non-union: Case report and review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Demitri; Kastanos, Konstantinos

    2008-01-01

    Stress fractures are relatively uncommon sports injuries and when they do occur, are mostly found in the lower limb. Stress fractures of the clavicle are particularly rare, having been described in a number of non-sport related pathologies, such as nervous tics and post radical neck dissection. In sport, there have only been seven cases reported in the literature. We report on a clavicle stress fracture in a 47-year-old male, partaking in recreational weight lifting activities. This is the first reported case of a non-union stress fracture of the clavicle. The patient underwent an open reduction and internal fixation and made a full recovery. PMID:21264151

  15. Stress fracture of the ulna associated with bisphosphonate therapy and use of walking aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, G S H; Grace, C S H; Koh, K W B; Kelvin, K W B; Chong, T W; Wei, C T; Tan, B Y; Yeow, T B

    2014-08-01

    We report a case of a stress fracture of the ulna secondary to long-term bisphosphonate therapy and walking cane. Physicians need to have a high index of suspicion of stress fractures occurring in patients complaining of chronic upper limb pain if they are on bisphosphonate therapy and are using walking aids. Stress fractures of the upper extremities are rare and are usually associated with athletes; however, a few recent case reports have shown an association between stress fractures of the upper extremities and the use of walking aids. The association between increased incidence of upper extremity stress fractures and the use of both bisphosphonates and walking aids in patients has not been well studied, with only one previously reported case. Here, we report a case of a complete stress fracture of the ulna in a 77-year-old female, premorbidly ambulant with walking cane, on long-term bisphosphonates without any pre-existing medical conditions which could result in secondary causes of bone loss. Investigations did not reveal any causes of pathological fracture. This fracture is attributed to the use of long-term bisphosphonate therapy in conjunction with the use of a walking cane. This case highlights the importance of entertaining the possibility of such fractures occurring in any patient who is on bisphosphonate therapy presenting with stress fractures of the upper extremity.

  16. Stress fractures of the hind limb in 2 Thoroughbreds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, A.

    1994-01-01

    Stress factures are a common arthopaedic injury in human and equine athletes (McBryde 1985; Mackey et al. 1987). Although often presenting as acute lameness in the horse they are the accumulation of a long period of bone remodelling and eventual failure (Jones and Harris 1989). Gamma scintigraphy has been useful in the diagnosis of stress fractures in humans (Prather et al. 1977) and horses (Devous and Twardock 1984) and is more sensitive than radiography due to its ability to detect functional changes in bone metabolism (Matin 1988). Gamma scintigraphy may be performed in the horse using a hand held probe (Pilsworth 1989) or a gamma camera (Ueltshi 1977). The following cases were both investigated using a gamma camera and dedicated computer system (Elscint UK, Colonial Business Park, Watford, UK)

  17. Compression Fracture of CFRP Laminates Containing Stress Intensifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Christian; Schütt, Martin; Liebig, Wilfried V; Philipkowski, Timo; Kürten, Jonas; Schulte, Karl; Fiedler, Bodo

    2017-09-05

    For brittle fracture behaviour of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) under compression, several approaches exist, which describe different mechanisms during failure, especially at stress intensifications. The failure process is not only initiated by the buckling fibres, but a shear driven fibre compressive failure beneficiaries or initiates the formation of fibres into a kink-band. Starting from this kink-band further damage can be detected, which leads to the final failure. The subject of this work is an experimental investigation on the influence of ply thickness and stacking sequence in quasi-isotropic CFRP laminates containing stress intensifications under compression loading. Different effects that influence the compression failure and the role the stacking sequence has on damage development and the resulting compressive strength are identified and discussed. The influence of stress intensifications is investigated in detail at a hole in open hole compression (OHC) tests. A proposed interrupted test approach allows identifying the mechanisms of damage initiation and propagation from the free edge of the hole by causing a distinct damage state and examine it at a precise instant of time during fracture process. Compression after impact (CAI) tests are executed in order to compare the OHC results to a different type of stress intensifications. Unnotched compression tests are carried out for comparison as a reference. With this approach, a more detailed description of the failure mechanisms during the sudden compression failure of CFRP is achieved. By microscopic examination of single plies from various specimens, the different effects that influence the compression failure are identified. First damage of fibres occurs always in 0°-ply. Fibre shear failure leads to local microbuckling and the formation and growth of a kink-band as final failure mechanisms. The formation of a kink-band and finally steady state kinking is shifted to higher compressive strains

  18. Visualization of stress fractures of the foot using PET-MRI: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crönlein, Moritz; Rauscher, Isabel; Beer, Ambros J; Schwaiger, Markus; Schäffeler, Christoph; Beirer, Marc; Huber, Stephan; Sandmann, Gunther H; Biberthaler, Peter; Eiber, Matthias; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig

    2015-12-23

    Diagnosis and treatment of stress fractures still remains to be a clinical and radiological challenge. Therapeutic options vary from conservative treatment to surgical treatment without a clear treatment concept. Recently the combination of PET and MRI has been introduced, aiming a superior diagnostic accuracy in clinical practice. Therefore the aim of our study was to analyse whether PET-MRI would be a feasible technique to recognize stress fractures of the foot and to analyse if our conservative treatment plan leads to a good clinical outcome. Therefore, 20 patients with suspected stress fractures of the foot and ankle underwent plain radiography and (18)F-Fluoride PET-MRI. Two blinded readers assessed in consensus both imaging techniques for the presence of stress fracture, stress reaction or osteoarthritis. Patients with stress fractures or stress reactions in the foot and ankle area underwent our conservative treatment plan, with immobilization in a VACO®ped cast for 6 weeks under partial weight bearing on forearm crutches. The benefit of our conservative therapeutic concept was evaluated by the patients on the basis of VAS and FAOS scoring systems before and after treatment. 8 out of 20 patients underwent conservative treatment after diagnosis of either a stress fracture or a stress reaction of the foot and ankle area. PET-MRI identified four stress fractures and seven stress reactions. In all cases, no pathological findings were present on plain X-ray. FAOS and VAS significantly improved according to the patients' records. PET-MRI seems to be a useful modality to diagnose stress fractures and stress reactions of the foot and ankle area, especially when conventional modalities, such as plain radiographs fail. Conservative management is a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of stress fractures. To rule out the benefits compared to a surgical treatment plan, further studies are needed.

  19. Unusual stress fracture in an adolescent baseball pitcher affecting the trochlear groove of the olecranon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, Joseph J.; Block, John J.; Kan, J.H.; Hannah, Gene A.

    2008-01-01

    Stress fractures of the proximal ulna are known to occur in throwing athletes. Most cases extend to involve the olecranon, and cases limited to the trochlear groove are rare. In this report we present a 17-year-old elite baseball pitcher with a stress fracture of the trochlear groove of the proximal ulna. Diagnosis was made by demonstration of characteristic signal changes on MRI of the elbow. The fracture occurred at the cortical notch, also known as the pseudodefect of the trochlear groove. This case suggests that the cortical notch serves as an area of weakness predisposing pitchers to development of a stress fracture. (orig.)

  20. Polyaxial stress-dependent permeability of a three-dimensional fractured rock layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qinghua; Wang, Xiaoguang; Xiang, Jiansheng; Latham, John-Paul

    2017-12-01

    A study about the influence of polyaxial (true-triaxial) stresses on the permeability of a three-dimensional (3D) fractured rock layer is presented. The 3D fracture system is constructed by extruding a two-dimensional (2D) outcrop pattern of a limestone bed that exhibits a ladder structure consisting of a "through-going" joint set abutted by later-stage short fractures. Geomechanical behaviour of the 3D fractured rock in response to in-situ stresses is modelled by the finite-discrete element method, which can capture the deformation of matrix blocks, variation of stress fields, reactivation of pre-existing rough fractures and propagation of new cracks. A series of numerical simulations is designed to load the fractured rock using various polyaxial in-situ stresses and the stress-dependent flow properties are further calculated. The fractured layer tends to exhibit stronger flow localisation and higher equivalent permeability as the far-field stress ratio is increased and the stress field is rotated such that fractures are preferentially oriented for shearing. The shear dilation of pre-existing fractures has dominant effects on flow localisation in the system, while the propagation of new fractures has minor impacts. The role of the overburden stress suggests that the conventional 2D analysis that neglects the effect of the out-of-plane stress (perpendicular to the bedding interface) may provide indicative approximations but not fully capture the polyaxial stress-dependent fracture network behaviour. The results of this study have important implications for understanding the heterogeneous flow of geological fluids (e.g. groundwater, petroleum) in subsurface and upscaling permeability for large-scale assessments.

  1. Short-term effects of teriparatide versus placebo on bone biomarkers, structure, and fracture healing in women with lower-extremity stress fractures: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen A. Almirol

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: In this randomized, pilot study, brief administration of TPTD showed anabolic effects that TPTD may help hasten fracture healing in premenopausal women with lower-extremity stress fractures. Larger prospective studies are warranted to determine the effects of TPTD treatment on stress fracture healing in premenopausal women.

  2. Stress-Induced Fracturing of Reservoir Rocks: Acoustic Monitoring and μCT Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Srutarshi; Stroisz, Anna M.; Fjær, Erling; Stenebråten, Jørn F.; Lund, Hans K.; Sønstebø, Eyvind F.

    2015-11-01

    Stress-induced fracturing in reservoir rocks is an important issue for the petroleum industry. While productivity can be enhanced by a controlled fracturing operation, it can trigger borehole instability problems by reactivating existing fractures/faults in a reservoir. However, safe fracturing can improve the quality of operations during CO2 storage, geothermal installation and gas production at and from the reservoir rocks. Therefore, understanding the fracturing behavior of different types of reservoir rocks is a basic need for planning field operations toward these activities. In our study, stress-induced fracturing of rock samples has been monitored by acoustic emission (AE) and post-experiment computer tomography (CT) scans. We have used hollow cylinder cores of sandstones and chalks, which are representatives of reservoir rocks. The fracture-triggering stress has been measured for different rocks and compared with theoretical estimates. The population of AE events shows the location of main fracture arms which is in a good agreement with post-test CT image analysis, and the fracture patterns inside the samples are visualized through 3D image reconstructions. The amplitudes and energies of acoustic events clearly indicate initiation and propagation of the main fractures. Time evolution of the radial strain measured in the fracturing tests will later be compared to model predictions of fracture size.

  3. STRESS FRACTURE OF THE FIRST RIB IN A HIGH SCHOOL WEIGHT LIFTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Fujioka

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A 17-year-old boy, who played a weight lifting in high school, sustained stress fracture of the first rib without any causes. We successfully treated first rib stress fracture with limitation of using the upper extremity and with using low-intensity pulsed ultrasound

  4. Bilateral stress fractures of the distal fibula in a woman with osteoporosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazimoglu, Cemal; Karapinar, Hasan; Sener, Muhittin; Bozkurt, Attila

    2009-01-01

    Bilateral stress fractures of the fibula are very rare. We present an unusual case report of a 54-year-old osteoporotic woman with bilateral stress fractures involving the distal fibula. After conservative treatment, she made a good recovery with full motion and was free of pain.

  5. Exercise-induced rib stress fractures: influence of reduced bone mineral density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Anders; Kanstrup, Inge-Lis; Christiansen, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Exercise-induced rib stress fractures have been reported frequently in elite rowers during the past decade. The etiology of rib stress fractures is unclear, but low bone mineral density (BMD) has been suggested to be a potential risk factor for stress fractures in weight-bearing bones. The present...... study investigated BMD in seven Danish national team rowers with previous rib stress fracture (RSF) and 7 controls (C) matched for gender, age, height, weight and training experience. Total body scan and specific scans of the lumbar spine (L2-L4), femoral neck and distal radius were performed using...... density may be a potential risk factor for the development of exercise-induced rib stress fractures in elite rowers....

  6. Review of possible correlations between in situ stress and PFL fracture transmissivity data at Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Derek (University of Alberta (United States)); Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB (Sweden))

    2011-11-15

    In laboratory samples, the fracture transmissivity decreases significantly as the confining stress increases. While these experimental relationships are widely accepted and validated on laboratory samples, it is unknown if such relationships exist in situ or if these relationships can be scaled from the centimetre-scale laboratory tests to the metre-scale of in situ fractures. The purpose of this work is to assess the relationship between the structural-hydraulic data gathered in deep, cored boreholes at Forsmark and the in situ stress state acting on the these fractures. In conclusion, there does not appear to be sufficient evidence from these analyses to support the notion that the magnitude of the flow along the fractures at Forsmark is solely controlled by the in situ stress acting on the fracture. This should not be surprising because the majority of the fractures formed more than 1 billion years ago and the current in situ stress state has only been active for the past 12 million years. It is more likely that the transmissivity values are controlled by fracture roughness, open channels within the fracture, fracture stiffness and fracture infilling material

  7. Novel stress radiography technique for avulsion fracture of the lateral malleolus in children: a report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Y

    2016-04-01

    This study reports a novel stress radiography technique to evaluate an avulsion fracture at the lateral malleolus in children. Radiographs in the stress anteroposterior view or the Haraguchi calcaneofibular ligament or anterior tarofibular ligament (ATFL) projection could not detect any fracture; only manual inversion stress radiography in the Haraguchi ATFL projection could identify the avulsion fracture.

  8. Radiological findings and healing patterns of incomplete stress fractures of the pars interarticularis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, Andrew J.; Campbell, Robert S.D.; Mayor, Peter E.; Rees, Dai

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to retrospectively record the CT and MRI features and healing patterns of acute, incomplete stress fractures of the pars interarticularis. The CT scans of 156 adolescents referred with suspected pars interarticularis stress fractures were reviewed. Patients with incomplete (grade 2) pars fractures were included in the study. Fractures were assessed on CT according to vertebral level, location of cortical involvement and direction of fracture propagation. MRI was also performed in 72 of the 156 cases. MRI images of incomplete fractures were assessed for the presence of marrow oedema and cortical integrity. Fracture healing patterns were characterised on follow-up CT imaging. Twenty-five incomplete fractures were identified in 23 patients on CT. All fractures involved the inferior or infero-medial cortex of the pars and propagated superiorly or superolaterally. Ninety-two percent of incomplete fractures demonstrated either complete or partial healing on follow-up imaging. Two (8%) cases progressed to complete fractures. Thirteen incomplete fractures in 11 patients confirmed on CT also had MRI, and 92% demonstrated oedema in the pars. Ten out of thirteen fractures (77%) showed a break in the infero-medial cortex with intact supero-lateral cortex, which correlated with the CT findings. MRI incorrectly graded one case as a complete (grade 3) fracture, and 2 cases as (grade 1) stress reaction. Six fractures had follow-up MRI, 67% showed partial or complete cortical healing, and the same number showed persistent marrow oedema. Incomplete fracture of the pars interarticularis represents a stage of the evolution of a complete stress fracture. The direction of fracture propagation is consistent, and complete healing can be achieved in most cases with appropriate clinical management. CT best demonstrates fracture size and extent, and is the most appropriate modality for follow-up. MRI is limited in its ability to fully depict the cortical integrity of

  9. Radiological findings and healing patterns of incomplete stress fractures of the pars interarticularis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Andrew J.; Campbell, Robert S.D. [Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Teaching Hospitals, Department of Medical Imaging, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mayor, Peter E. [Leighton Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Crewe, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Rees, Dai [Robert Jones and Agnes-Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    The objective was to retrospectively record the CT and MRI features and healing patterns of acute, incomplete stress fractures of the pars interarticularis. The CT scans of 156 adolescents referred with suspected pars interarticularis stress fractures were reviewed. Patients with incomplete (grade 2) pars fractures were included in the study. Fractures were assessed on CT according to vertebral level, location of cortical involvement and direction of fracture propagation. MRI was also performed in 72 of the 156 cases. MRI images of incomplete fractures were assessed for the presence of marrow oedema and cortical integrity. Fracture healing patterns were characterised on follow-up CT imaging. Twenty-five incomplete fractures were identified in 23 patients on CT. All fractures involved the inferior or infero-medial cortex of the pars and propagated superiorly or superolaterally. Ninety-two percent of incomplete fractures demonstrated either complete or partial healing on follow-up imaging. Two (8%) cases progressed to complete fractures. Thirteen incomplete fractures in 11 patients confirmed on CT also had MRI, and 92% demonstrated oedema in the pars. Ten out of thirteen fractures (77%) showed a break in the infero-medial cortex with intact supero-lateral cortex, which correlated with the CT findings. MRI incorrectly graded one case as a complete (grade 3) fracture, and 2 cases as (grade 1) stress reaction. Six fractures had follow-up MRI, 67% showed partial or complete cortical healing, and the same number showed persistent marrow oedema. Incomplete fracture of the pars interarticularis represents a stage of the evolution of a complete stress fracture. The direction of fracture propagation is consistent, and complete healing can be achieved in most cases with appropriate clinical management. CT best demonstrates fracture size and extent, and is the most appropriate modality for follow-up. MRI is limited in its ability to fully depict the cortical integrity of

  10. Fracture toughness and stress relief response of irradiated Type 347/348 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggag, F.M.

    1985-01-01

    A test program has experimentally determined: (1) The fracture toughness of Type 347/348 stainless steel (SS) specimens with high values of irradiation fluence (2.3 to 4.8 x 10 22 n/cm 2 , E > 1.0 MeV) and experiencing different levels of irradiation creep (0.0, 0.6, 1.1, 1.8%), (2) the effect of thermal stress relief on fracture toughness recovery for the highly irradiated material, and (3) the mechanisms associated with fracture toughness recovery due to thermal stress relief. The postirradiation fracture toughness tests and tensile tests were conducted at 427 0 C

  11. Dynamic Response in Transient Stress-Field Behavior Induced by Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Andrew

    Hydraulic fracturing is a technique which is used to exploit geologic features and subsurface properties in an effort to increase production in low-permeability formations. The process of hydraulic fracturing provides a greater surface contact area between the producing formation and the wellbore and thus increases the amount of recoverable hydrocarbons from within the reservoir. The use of this stimulation technique has brought on massive applause from the industry due to its widespread success and effectiveness, however the dynamic processes that take part in the development of hydraulic fractures is a relatively new area of research with respect to the massive scale operations that are seen today. The process of hydraulic fracturing relies upon understanding and exploiting the in-situ stress distribution throughout the area of study. These in-situ stress conditions are responsible for directing fracture orientation and propagation paths throughout the period of injection. The relative magnitude of these principle stresses is key in developing a successful stimulation plan. In horizontal well plan development the interpretation of stress within the reservoir is required for determining the azimuth of the horizontal well path. These horizontal laterals are typically oriented in a manner such that the well path lies parallel to the minimum horizontal stress. This allows for vertical fractures to develop transversely to the wellbore, or normal to the least principle stress without the theoretical possibility of fractures overlapping, creating the most efficient use of the fluid energy during injection. The orientation and magnitude of these in-situ stress fields however can be dynamic, controlled by the subsequent fracture propagation and redistribution of the surrounding stresses. That is, that as the fracture propagates throughout the reservoir, the relative stress fields surrounding the fractures may see a shift and deviate from their original direction or

  12. The Young's Modulus, Fracture Stress, and Fracture Strain of Gellan Hydrogels Filled with Whey Protein Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Cherry Wing Yu; Ikeda, Shinya

    2017-05-01

    Texture modifying abilities of whey protein microparticles are expected to be dependent on pH during heat-induced aggregation of whey protein in the microparticulation process. Therefore, whey protein microparticles were prepared at either pH 5.5 or 6.8 and their effects on small and large deformation properties of gellan gels containing whey protein microparticles as fillers were investigated. The majority of whey protein microparticles had diameters around 2 μm. Atomic force microscopy images showed that whey protein microparticles prepared at pH 6.8 partially collapsed and flatted by air-drying, while those prepared at pH 5.5 did not. The Young's modulus of filled gels adjusted to pH 5.5 decreased by the addition of whey protein microparticles, while those of filled gels adjusted to pH 6.8 increased with increasing volume fraction of filler particles. These results suggest that filler particles were weakly bonded to gel matrices at pH 5.5 but strongly at pH 6.8. Whey protein microparticles prepared at pH 5.5 showed more enhanced increases in the Young's modulus than those prepared at pH 6.8 at volume fractions between 0.2 and 0.4, indicating that microparticles prepared at pH 5.5 were mechanically stronger. The fracture stress of filled gels showed trends somewhat similar to those of the Young's modulus, while their fracture strains decreased by the addition of whey protein microparticles in all examined conditions, indicating that the primary effect of these filler particles was to enhance the brittleness of filled gels. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  13. A geometrically based method for predicting stress-induced fracture aperture and flow in discrete fracture networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Bertotti, Giovanni; Nick, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    a geometrically based method for calculating the shear-induced hydraulic aperture, that is, an aperture of up to 0.5 mm (0.02 in.) that can result from shear displacement along irregular fracture walls. The geometrically based method does not require numerical simulations, but it can instead be directly applied...... to DFNs using the fracture orientation and spacing distributions in combination with an estimate of the regional stress tensor and orientation. The frequency distribution of hydraulic aperture from the geometrically based method is compared with finite-element models constructed from five real fracture...... networks, digitized from outcropping pavements. These networks cover a wide range of possible geometries and spatial distributions. The geometrically based method predicts the average hydraulic aperture and equivalent permeability of fractured porous media with error margins of less than 5%....

  14. High Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D is Associated with Low Incidence of Stress Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Sera were drawn in 2002-2009 from 600 women who were subsequently diagnosed with stress fracture of the tibia or fibula , and 600 matched controls, who...stress fractures of the tibia and fibula in women with serum 25(OH)D concentration < 20 ng/ml, compared to those with 40 ng/ml. A target for...study consisted of 1,200 Navy female recruits, including 600 cases and 600 controls. Incident cases of stress fracture of the tibia or fibula that

  15. Bilateral tibial stress fracture in a young man due to hypercalciuric osteoporosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofluoglu, Demet; Ofluoglu, Onder; Akyuz, Gulseren

    2006-03-01

    Osteoporosis is commonly thought of as a disease of postmenopausal women, and older men have a lower risk of fracture than women. A stress fracture is an overuse injury and an important cause of disability in the athletic population. Presented here is a 30-year-old healthy man with pain on the anterior surface of the bilateral tibia. He did not communicate any trauma or overuse activity. The neurologic and locomotor system examinations were normal. Radiological examinations revealed tibial stress fractures in both left and right tibia and he had low bone mineral density. Routine hematological tests, bone resorption and formation markers were normal, except for hypercalciuria. After analyzing the results of these tests, the patient was diagnosed with bilateral tibial stress fractures due to hypercalciuric secondary osteoporosis. Osteoporosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of atraumatic insufficiency fractures, especially in young healthy adults.

  16. Subtrochanteric stress fractures in patients on oral bisphosphonate therapy: an emerging problem.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Colin G

    2012-01-31

    The emergence of a new variant of subtrochanteric stress fractures of the femur, affecting patients on oral bisphosphonate therapy, has only recently been described. This fracture is often preceded by pain and distinctive radiographic changes (lateral cortical thickening), and associated with a characteristic fracture pattern (transverse fracture line and medial cortical spike). A retrospective review (2007-2009) was carried out for patients who were taking oral bisphosphonates and who sustained a subtrochanteric fracture after a low velocity injury. Eleven fractures were found in 10 patients matching the inclusion criteria outlined. All were females, and taking bisphosphonates for a mean of 43 years. Five of the 10 patients mentioned prodromal symptoms, for an average of 9.4 months before the fracture. Although all fractures were deemed low velocity, 5 of 11 were even atraumatic. Two patients had previously sustained contralateral subtrochanteric fractures. Plain radiographs of two patients showed lateral cortical thickening on the contralateral unfractured femur; the bisphosphonate therapy was stopped and close surveillance was started. Patients taking oral bisphosphonates may be at risk of a new variant of stress fracture of the proximal femur. Awareness of the symptoms is the key to ensure that appropriate investigations are undertaken.

  17. Acetabular roof stress fracture: a rare cause of hip pain in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    People who are more susceptible to experience this fracture are athletes, soldiers and dancers. We present the case of an 11 year old girl with a roof acetabular stress fracture for which the diagnosis and follow-ups were possible by the means of MRI. The treatment was keeping the child at a complete rest. Failure to abide ...

  18. Stress analysis of implant-bone fixation at different fracture angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzawati, B.; Daud, R.; Afendi, M.; Majid, MS Abdul; Zain, N. A. M.; Bajuri, Y.

    2017-10-01

    Internal fixation is a mechanism purposed to maintain and protect the reduction of a fracture. Understanding of the fixation stability is necessary to determine parameters influence the mechanical stability and the risk of implant failure. A static structural analysis on a bone fracture fixation was developed to simulate and analyse the biomechanics of a diaphysis shaft fracture with a compression plate and conventional screws. This study aims to determine a critical area of the implant to be fractured based on different implant material and angle of fracture (i.e. 0°, 30° and 45°). Several factors were shown to influence stability to implant after surgical. The stainless steel, (S. S) and Titanium, (Ti) screws experienced the highest stress at 30° fracture angle. The fracture angle had a most significant effect on the conventional screw as compared to the compression plate. The stress was significantly higher in S.S material as compared to Ti material, with concentrated on the 4th screw for all range of fracture angle. It was also noted that the screws closest to the intense concentration stress areas on the compression plate experienced increasing amounts of stress. The highest was observed at the screw thread-head junction.

  19. [Calcium and bone metabolism across women's life stages. Stress fracture in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagishita, Kazuyoshi

    Stress fractures are common overuse injuries in athletes, especially in long-distance runner, jumping sports and gymnastics in female athletes. The pathology of stress fracture mainly includes repeated biomechanical loading, which leads to bone micro-damage and failure of bone structure. Female athlete triad(FAT), which includes low energy availability with or without an eating disorder, functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, and osteoporosis, is a serious healthcare concern in female athletes. For prevention and treatment of stress fracture, management of biomechanical factors modifying the load applied to a bone is important, and especially in female athletes, management for FAT is one of the important factors. This report outlines the current knowledge on the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of stress fracture, relating to FAT in female athletes.

  20. Influence of Bone Remodeling Inhibition on the Development of Experimental Stress Fractures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schaffler, Mitchell B; Boyd, Robert D

    2004-01-01

    .... These experiments tested the hypothesis by pharmacological inhibition of bone remodeling will diminish the severity of the stress fracture and slow the accumulation of microdamage with resulting from chronic loading. Bisphosphonate (BIS...

  1. Determinants of Stress Fracture and Bone Mass in Elite Military Cadets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cosman, Felicia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this 4-year prospective cohort study of 891 cadets at the United States Military Academy at West Point was to examine the determinants of stress fractures and the acquisition of peak bone...

  2. Discrete fracture in quasi-brittle materials under compressive and tensile stress states

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Klerck, PA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for modelling discrete fracture in geomaterials under tensile and compressive stress fields has been developed based on a Mohr-Coulomb failure surface in compression and three independent anisotropic rotating crack models in tension...

  3. Manubrial stress fractures diagnosed on MRI: report of two cases and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Jonathan C.; Demertzis, Jennifer L. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    In contrast to widely-reported sternal insufficiency fractures, stress fractures of the sternum from overuse are extremely rare. Of the 5 cases of sternal stress fracture published in the English-language medical literature, 3 were in the sternal body and only 2 were in the manubrium. We describe two cases of manubrial stress fracture related to golf and weightlifting, and present the first report of the MR findings of this injury. In each of these cases, the onset of pain was atraumatic, insidious, and associated with increased frequency of athletic activity. Imaging was obtained because of clinical diagnostic uncertainty. On MRI, each patient had a sagittally oriented stress fracture of the lateral manubrium adjacent to the first rib synchondrosis. Both patients had resolution of pain after a period of rest, with subsequent successful return to their respective activities. One patient had a follow-up MRI, which showed resolution of the manubrial marrow edema and fracture line. Based on the sternal anatomy and MR findings, we hypothesize that this rare injury might be caused by repetitive torque of the muscle forces on the first costal cartilage and manubrium, and propose that MRI might be an effective means of diagnosing manubrial stress fracture. (orig.)

  4. Risk Stratification of Stress Fractures and Prediction of Return to Duty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    are collaborating with local sports medicine physicians, coaches, and athletic trainers to continue recruiting effectively (Task 3, objective 3). We...recruiting women within three weeks of a stress fracture diagnosis will require great persistence and communication with the local athletic community...1 AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-15-C-0024 TITLE: Risk Stratification of Stress Fractures and Prediction of Return-to-Duty PRINCIPAL

  5. Stress fracture of hamate's hook: case report with emphasis to the imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Leonardo Fontenelle de; Vianna, Evandro Miguelote; Domingues, Romulo; Domingues, Romeu Cortes; Metsavaht, Leonardo

    2007-01-01

    Stress fractures of the hook of the hamate are related to sports that use devices such as golf clubs, rackets and baseball bats. Because usually there is no history of obvious trauma, the diagnosis necessitates better knowledge of the lesion and high index of suspicion. The authors report a case of stress fracture of the hook of the hamate in a golf player with diagnosis and follow-up done with magnetic resonance and multislice computer tomography. (author)

  6. Stress fractures of the rib arising from the manufactory assembly line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, Toru; Iwasaki, Masayuki

    2007-01-01

    We investigated stress injuries of the rib arising from the assembly line. The patients, all males, were 20 in number and divided into two groups; those with stress fracture (n=13) and those with ''pre-fracture'' (n=7). The former group with the average age of 37 years was involved by a single fracture in 10 patients and multiple fractures in 3, ranging from 5th to 8th ribs, with the affected side on the right in 9 and the left in 4. All 13 fractures occurred in the posterior half of the rib, in which 5 were located in its lateral portion, 5 in the middle, and 3 in the posterior. The latter group with the average age of 32 years were involved on the right side in 4 and the left in 3. The working pattern causing rib injuries was either repeated raising of the upper extremity or forward pushing of the shoulder girdle. The symptom was back pain, and aggravated especially in elevation of the arm, deep breathing and sneezing. Local tenderness over the fracture site was noted in all cases. X-ray findings at initial examination revealed fractures in most cases and 3D-CT was employed in 9 questionable cases to assess fracture conditions. In the ''pre-fracture'' group, although the fracture was not recognized on X-ray, the diagnosis was made as an impending fracture based on the localized tenderness on the rib. As to treatment, bust band fixation and work load reduction were performed. Stress fractures of the rib have been occasionally reported in sports medicine, but not so much in industrial medicine. This specific injury has been treated in literature as muscle strain because of the absence of apparent trauma. It is important to recognize the underlying pathology to make the correct diagnosis. In the early stage of rib fractures, 3D-CT was more useful than X-ray in making diagnosis and assessing the bony union. As to the pathomechanism of this condition, it was postulated that repeated raising or forward pushing of the arm applying excessive traction to the origin of the

  7. Operative strategy for different types of thoracolumbar stress fractures in ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, WenSheng; Zheng, MinQian

    2014-12-01

    There are no accurate guidelines on the operative treatment of ankylosing spondylitis (AS)-related thoracolumbar stress fractures. For this reason, we categorized such bone fractures into 2 types: vertebral body type and intervertebral space type, according to the damage mechanism, cross-section spot, and iconography, and devised a targeted surgical plan based on the characteristics of each fracture type. To investigate the types and surgical treatment of thoracolumbar stress fractures in AS. Thoracolumbar stress fractures are complications of AS. The patients with AS have a higher fracture risk that is approximately 3.5 times than the healthy. As the mechanism of injury, clinical manifestations, imaging characteristics, and principles of treatment of these fractures differ from those of general spinal fractures, the surgical approach is different from that of AS kyphosis orthopedic surgery. In this study, we summarize the clinical data of 11 AS patients with thoracolumbar fractures and discuss the clinical efficacy of the surgical approach based on the mechanism of injury and radiographic features. We reviewed the data of 11 patients who underwent surgery for AS-related thoracolumbar stress fractures. Five patients with vertebral body-type fractures underwent vertebral wedge osteotomy through the pedicle and posterior internal fixation, whereas 6 patients with intervertebral space-type fractures underwent anterior spinal decompression with strut grafting and posterior internal fixation. The follow-up period was 2-4 years. After surgery, all kyphosis deformities were corrected, low back pain was relieved immediately, and scores on the visual analog scale improved by >70%. At the final follow-up, kyphosis correction had no significant loss. In the radiographic images, neither nonunion signs of pseudarthrosis plane nor neurologic or infectious complications were observed. Choosing an anterior or posterior surgical approach based on the type of AS

  8. Identification of natural fractures and in situ stress at Rantau Dedap geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyanto, Andika; Sapiie, Benyamin; Idham Abdullah, Chalid; Permana Sidik, Ridwan

    2017-12-01

    Rantau Dedap Area is a geothermal field which is located in Great Sumatra Fault (GSF). The fault and fracture are main factor in the permeability of the geothermal system. However, not all faults and fractures have capability of to flow the fluids. Borehole image log is depiction of the borehole conditions, it is used to identify the natural fractures and drilling induced fracture. Both of them are used to identify the direction of the fracture, direction of maximum horizontal stress (SHmax), and geomechanics parameters. The natural fractures are the results of responses to stress on a rock and permeability which controlling factor in research area. Breakouts is found in this field as a trace of drilling induced fracture due to in situ stress work. Natural fractures are strongly clustered with true strike trending which first, second, and third major direction are N170°E – N180°E (N-S), N60°E – N70°E (NE-SW), and N310°E – N320°E (NW-SE), while the dominant dip is 80° –90°. Based on borehole breakout analysis, maximum horizontal stress orientation is identified in N162°E – N204°E (N-S) and N242°E (NE-SW) direction. It’s constantly similar with regional stress which is affected by GSF. Several parameters have been identified and analyzed are SHmax, SHmin, and Sy. It can be concluded that Rantau Dedap Geothermal Field is affected by strike-slip regime. The determination of in situ stress and natural fractures are important to study the pattern of permeability which is related to the fault in reservoir of this field.

  9. Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee associated with tibial plateau and femoral condyle insufficiency stress fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narvaez, J.A.; Narvaez, J.; Lama, E.De; Sanchez, A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the association between spontaneous osteonecrosis and insufficiency stress fractures of the knee. To determine whether insufficiency stress fracture is associated with spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee, we retrospectively reviewed the medical charts and imaging studies of all patients with spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee, studied by MR imaging, seen in a tertiary hospital over an 8-year period. Four women (age range 66-84 years) presented spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee associated with insufficiency stress fracture of the medial tibial plateau. One of these patients also presented a concomitant insufficiency stress fracture of the medial femoral condyle. Radiographs were diagnostic of spontaneous osteonecrosis of the medial femoral condyle in three cases, and insufficiency stress fracture of the medial tibial plateau was detected in one case. Magnetic resonance imaging allows the diagnosis of both conditions in all four cases. Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee may be associated with insufficiency stress fracture of the medial femoral condyle and the medial tibial plateau. This association provides additional arguments in favor of the traumatic etiology of spontaneous osteonecrosis of knee. (orig.)

  10. Hamate hook stress fracture in a professional bowler: Case report of an unusual causal sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How Kit, N; Malherbe, M; Hulet, C

    2017-02-01

    Stress fracture of the hook of the hamate is uncommon and is usually seen in sports involving a club, racquet or bat (i.e., golf, tennis or baseball). It is caused by direct blunt trauma. We report an unusual case of stress fracture with non-union in a 23-year-old professional bowler, probably caused by endogenous constraints, 1 year after the start of symptoms. Treatment consisted of surgical resection of the hook of the hamate. Multimodal imaging of this fracture is reviewed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Fracture Toughness Prediction under Compressive Residual Stress by Using a Stress-Distribution T-Scaling Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Meshii

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The improvement in the fracture toughness Jc of a material in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature region due to compressive residual stress (CRS was considered in this study. A straightforward fracture prediction was performed for a specimen with mechanical CRS by using the T-scaling method, which was originally proposed to scale the fracture stress distributions between different temperatures. The method was validated for a 780-MPa-class high-strength steel and 0.45% carbon steel. The results showed that the scaled stress distributions at fracture loads without and with CRS are the same, and that Jc improvement was caused by the loss in the one-to-one correspondence between J and the crack-tip stress distribution. The proposed method is advantageous in possibly predicting fracture loads for specimens with CRS by using only the stress–strain relationship, and by performing elastic-plastic finite element analysis, i.e., without performing fracture toughness testing on specimens without CRS.

  12. Surgical treatment of refractory tibial stress fractures in elite dancers: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Ryan G; Dhotar, Herman S; Rose, Donald J; Egol, Kenneth

    2009-06-01

    Treatment of tibial stress fractures in elite dancers is centered on rest and activity modification. Surgical intervention in refractory cases has important implications affecting the dancers' careers. Refractory tibial stress fractures in dancers can be treated successfully with drilling and bone grafting or intramedullary nailing. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between 1992 and 2006, 1757 dancers were evaluated at a dance medicine clinic; 24 dancers (1.4%) had 31 tibial stress fractures. Of that subset, 7 (29.2%) elite dancers with 8 tibial stress fractures were treated operatively with either intramedullary nailing or drilling and bone grafting. Six of the patients were followed up closely until they were able to return to dance. One patient was available only for follow-up phone interview. Data concerning their preoperative treatment regimens, operative procedures, clinical union, radiographic union, and time until return to dance were recorded and analyzed. The mean age of the surgical patients at the time of stress fracture was 22.6 years. The mean duration of preoperative symptoms before surgical intervention was 25.8 months. Four of the dancers were male and 3 were female. All had failed nonoperative treatment regimens. Five patients (5 tibias) underwent drilling and bone grafting of the lesion, and 2 patients (3 tibias) with completed fractures or multiple refractory stress fractures underwent intramedullary nailing. Clinical union was achieved at a mean of 6 weeks and radiographic union at 5.1 months. Return to full dance activity was at an average of 6.5 months postoperatively. Surgical intervention for tibial stress fractures in dancers who have not responded to nonoperative management allowed for resolution of symptoms and return to dancing with minimal morbidity.

  13. kISMET: Stress and fracture characterization in a deep mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, C. M.; Dobson, P. F.; Daley, T. M.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Cook, P. J.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Rutqvist, J.; Siler, D.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.; Wu, Y.; Guglielmi, Y.; Ulrich, C.; Marchesini, P.; Wang, H. F.; Haimson, B. C.; Sone, H.; Vigilante, P.; Roggenthen, W.; Doe, T.; Lee, M.; Mattson, E.; Huang, H.; Johnson, T. C.; Morris, J.; White, J. A.; Johnson, P. A.; Coblentz, D. D.; Heise, J.

    2016-12-01

    We are developing a community facility called kISMET (permeability (k) and Induced Seismicity Management for Energy Technologies) at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. The purpose of kISMET is to investigate stress and the effects of rock fabric on hydraulic fracturing. Although findings from kISMET may have broad applications that inform stress and fracturing in anisotropic rock, results will be most applicable to improving control of hydraulic fracturing for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) in crystalline rock. At the kISMET site on the 4850 ft (1480 m depth) level of SURF, we have drilled and cored an array of nearly vertical boreholes in Precambrian phyllite. The array consists of four 50-m deep monitoring boreholes surrounding one 100-m deep borehole forming a 6 m-wide five-spot pattern at a depth of 1530 m. Previous investigations of the stress field at SURF suggest that the principal stress s1 is nearly vertical. By aligning the kISMET boreholes approximately with σ1, fractures created in the center borehole should in theory be perpendicular to σ3, the least principal horizontal stress. But the phyllite at kISMET has a strong fabric (foliation) that could influence fracturing. Stress measurements and stimulation using hydraulic fracturing will be carried out in the center borehole using a straddle packer and high-pressure pump. We will use an impression packer and image logs after stress testing and stimulation to determine fracture orientation and extent at the center borehole. In order to study the control of stress, rock fabric, and stimulation approach on size, aperture, and orientation of hydraulic fractures, we will carefully monitor the stress measurements and stimulation. For example, we will use continuous active source seismic (CASSM) in two of the monitoring boreholes to measure changes in seismic-wave velocity as water fills the fracture. Second, near real-time electrical resistance tomography (ERT) will be used in

  14. Quantitative analysis of scintigraphic findings in tibial stress fractures in Thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Martínez, Alejandro; Seiler, Gabriela; Mai, Wilfried; Bolt, David M; Mudge, Margaret; Dukti, Sarah A; Hubert, Jeremy D

    2008-07-01

    To develop a quantitative method of interpreting tibial scintigrams of Thoroughbred racehorses with tibial stress fractures that may facilitate diagnosis of fractures and to provide prognostic information regarding future performance of affected horses. 35 Thoroughbred racehorses. Static bone-phase scintigrams of tibial stress fractures were quantitatively analyzed by use of ratios of the mean radionuclide counts per pixel in a region of interest (ROI) drawn around the area of increased uptake of radiopharmaceutical to mean counts per pixel in a second ROI drawn around an apparently normal area of the tibial diaphysis. In horses with unilateral fractures, ratios for the contralateral tibia were determined by use of 2 ROIs drawn at the same positions as the ROIs in the fractured tibia. Ratios were compared between fractured versus apparently normal tibias, between horses that returned to racing versus those that did not, and among horses with various grades of lameness. The association between ratios for fractured tibias and intervals between diagnosis and return to racing was also assessed. Mean ratio of ROIs in apparently normal tibias was 1.35 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21 to 1.50); that in tibias with stress fractures was 3.55 (95% CI, 2.50 to 4.60). These ratios were significantly different. None of the associations between ratios for fractured tibias and grades of lameness or performance outcomes were significant. Tibial stress fracture scintigrams can be quantitatively analyzed. A prospective study with a controlled rehabilitation period is necessary to evaluate the possible applications of this method.

  15. Marrow changes in anorexia nervosa masking the presence of stress fractures on MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tins, B.; Cassar-Pullicino, V. [Department of Radiology, RJAH Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Oswestry (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-15

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) usually have abnormal bone and bone marrow metabolism resulting in osteopenia and serous bone marrow change. There is an increased risk of stress/insufficiency fractures and these can be the first presentation of AN. This case report describes a patient with previously undiagnosed AN who presented with foot pain. The serous bone marrow changes of AN were found to mask the MR imaging features of stress fractures, as both had low T1w and high T2w and STIR signal intensities. Contrast enhancement was not helpful but actually masked fractures. Scintigraphy was helpful. The radiologist might be the first clinician to raise the possibility of AN and should be aware of the difficulties in diagnosing stress fractures in bones with underlying serous bone marrow change. In this severe case of AN even the heel fat pad and the fat pad in Kager's triangle had undergone serous change.

  16. Marrow changes in anorexia nervosa masking the presence of stress fractures on MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tins, B.; Cassar-Pullicino, V.

    2006-01-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) usually have abnormal bone and bone marrow metabolism resulting in osteopenia and serous bone marrow change. There is an increased risk of stress/insufficiency fractures and these can be the first presentation of AN. This case report describes a patient with previously undiagnosed AN who presented with foot pain. The serous bone marrow changes of AN were found to mask the MR imaging features of stress fractures, as both had low T1w and high T2w and STIR signal intensities. Contrast enhancement was not helpful but actually masked fractures. Scintigraphy was helpful. The radiologist might be the first clinician to raise the possibility of AN and should be aware of the difficulties in diagnosing stress fractures in bones with underlying serous bone marrow change. In this severe case of AN even the heel fat pad and the fat pad in Kager's triangle had undergone serous change

  17. Stress dependence of permeability of intact and fractured shale cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noort, Reinier; Yarushina, Viktoriya

    2016-04-01

    Whether a shale acts as a caprock, source rock, or reservoir, understanding fluid flow through shale is of major importance for understanding fluid flow in geological systems. Because of the low permeability of shale, flow is thought to be largely confined to fractures and similar features. In fracking operations, fractures are induced specifically to allow for hydrocarbon exploration. We have constructed an experimental setup to measure core permeabilities, using constant flow or a transient pulse. In this setup, we have measured the permeability of intact and fractured shale core samples, using either water or supercritical CO2 as the transporting fluid. Our measurements show decreasing permeability with increasing confining pressure, mainly due to time-dependent creep. Furthermore, our measurements show that for a simple splitting fracture, time-dependent creep will also eliminate any significant effect of this fracture on permeability. This effect of confinement on fracture permeability can have important implications regarding the effects of fracturing on shale permeability, and hence for operations depending on that.

  18. Subchondral stress fracture of femoral head in a healthy adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Subchondral fracture of the femoral head is an uncommon entity and usually occurs as an insufficiency fracture associated with poor bone quality or as a fatigue fracture in young military recruits. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute hip pain in young patients along with transient osteoporosis and avascular necrosis of the hip. We report a case of acute onset hip pain in an asymptomatic healthy adult in which the diagnosis was made by magnetic resonance imaging and the patient responded well to conservative treatment.

  19. Stress fracture and premenstrual syndrome in Japanese adolescent athletes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takashi; Imoto, Yoko; Nagasawa, Hiroyo; Takeshita, Atsuko; Shiina, Masami

    2016-10-18

    To investigate the relationship between the occurrence of stress fracture and premenstrual syndrome (PMS)/premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) in Japanese adolescent athletes. Cross-sectional study. Osaka, Japan. A school-based survey on menstruation and school life was conducted using a sample of 1818 Japanese female students who belonged to two public high schools in Japan. Among them, we recruited 394 athletes who had regular menstrual cycles (25-38 days) and completed a questionnaire about their premenstrual symptoms and their competitive career. Premenstrual symptoms and the occurrence of stress fracture. The prevalences of moderate-to-severe PMS and PMDD were 8.9% and 1.3%, respectively, which were the same as in collegiate athletes in a previous study. Premenstrual symptoms disturbed 'Work efficiency or productivity, home responsibilities', 'Relationships with coworkers or family' and 'Athletic performance in training or competition' more severely than menstrual pain (p=0.031, p=0.004 and pathletes (16.8%) reported having experienced a stress fracture. The severity of 'Overeating or food cravings', 'Physical symptoms' and 'Performance in training or competition' in athletes with previous stress fractures were much higher than in those without a history of stress fractures (p=0.015, p=0.008 and p=0.006, respectively). In terms of premenstrual symptoms, 'Physical symptoms' was associated with an increased risk of stress fractures in athletes (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.62). The results from this study indicated that premenstrual symptoms may affect athletic performance and has the risk of stress fractures in adolescent athletes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Bilateral stress fractures of femoral neck in non-athletes: a report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naik Monappa A

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Femoral neck stress fractures (FNSFs are rare, constituting only 5% of all stress fractures in young adults. These fractures are usually seen in athletes, military recruits and patients with underlying metabolic diseases. The treatment of FNSFs is still controversial because of the inherent complications associated with the treatment procedure. We came across 4 cases of bilateral FNSFs in non-athletic individuals who were manual labourers with-out underlying bony disorders. Two patients with FNSFs and coxa vara deformity on both sides were managed by subtrochanteric valgus osteotomy and dynamic hip screw fixation. One of the remaining two patients was treated by cannulated cancellous screw fixation on one side and sub-trochanteric valgus osteotomy on the other side. The fourth patient received subtrochanteric valgus osteotomy on one side and bipolar hemiarthroplasty on the other side after failed cannulated screw fixation. All the fractures healed without any complications. No evidence of avascular ne-crosis or arthritis was noted in our series. Subtrochanteric valgus osteotomy restores normal neck-shaft angle in pa-tients suffering from FNSFs combined with coxa vara deformity. Moreover, it helps to bring the forces acting around the hip to normal biomechanical levels, leading to fracture union and better results. Replacement arthroplasty is recommended to patients who fail to achieve bony union after fixation. Key words: Fractures, stress; Femoral neck fractures; Coxa vara; Osteotomy

  1. 16-Detector multislice CT in the detection of stress fractures: a comparison with skeletal scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groves, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital NHS Trust, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: drashleygroves@hotmail.com; Cheow, H.K. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrooke' s Hospital NHS Trust, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Balan, K.K. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrooke' s Hospital NHS Trust, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Housden, B.A. [Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital NHS Trust, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bearcroft, P.W.P. [Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital NHS Trust, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Dixon, A.K. [Department of Radiology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital NHS Trust, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2005-10-01

    AIMS: To test the hypothesis that the improved resolution afforded by 16-detector computed tomography (CT) would translate to better stress fracture detection when compared with skeletal scintigraphy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-three cases of suspected stress fractures in 26 patients were investigated using skeletal scintigraphy and 16-detector CT performed on the same day. Planar images of the lower limbs were taken 3 h post-injection of 400 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-methylene diphosphonate ({sup 99m}Tc-MDP). {sup 99m}Tc-MDP uptake was quantified at suspected fracture sites. CT was performed using a 16-detector multisection machine employing 0.75 mm detectors and images reconstructed in 0.5 mm increments. Examinations were reported independently and discordant results were compared at follow-up. RESULTS: At initial reporting scintigraphy identified fractures in 13 of the 33 cases and CT identified four of the 33. In one case, on review of the CT images, a fracture was present in the distal fibula that was not initially identified. This resulted in eight scintigraphic-positive CT-negative discordant cases. The {sup 99m}Tc-MDP uptake was significantly lower in the discordant fracture group compared with the concordant group (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Despite technological advances in CT, scintigraphy appeared to detect more stress fractures. As such, multidetector CT should not be used as a routine initial investigation in stress fracture detection. The potential use of {sup 99m}Tc-MDP quantification at fracture sites is of interest and may be worth further investigation.

  2. Proximal ulna stress fracture and stress reaction of the proximal radius associated with the use of crutches: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatanarasimha, Nanda; Kamath, Sridhar; Kambouroglou, G; Ostlere, Simon J

    2009-09-01

    We report a case of complete stress fracture of the ulna and stress reaction of the radius resulting from the use of crutches in an overweight patient with severe lower extremity arthritis. Plain radiograph showed an undisplaced complete fracture of the proximal metaphysis of the ulna. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to exclude a pathological cause in view of the unusual fracture site, which confirmed the plain radiographic findings and additionally demonstrated a stress reaction in the proximal radius. There are three cases of stress fracture of the ulnar diaphysis resulting from the use of crutches reported previously in the English literature and a further case of bilaterally symmetrical ulnar diaphysial fracture reported in the Danish literature. We report the first case of ulnar metaphysis stress fracture with concomitant stress reaction of the radius.

  3. 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy in the diagnosis of stress fracture of the metatarsal bones mimicking oligoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jauković Ljiljana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stress fractures are the injuries of soft tissues and bones caused by intensive and repeated stress on a bone. Repeated submaximal stress disturbs the balance between the processes of bone production and resorption that results in fracture. Case report. We presented a case of a patient with stress fracture of metatarsal bone. The patient was diagnosed and treated as having reactive oligoarthritis caused by Chlamydia trachomatis and administered antibiotics. Initial plain radiography was negative for bone fracture. Tc-99m bone scintigraphy suggested stress fracture of the second metatarsal. Plain radiography was became positive three weeks later, showing callus formation in the proximal part of the second metatarsal. Conclusion. Bone scintigraphy is a diagnostic test of choice in early diagnosis of stress fracture, and it is important to apply it timely in order to include the entire therapy and prevent complications, as well as to let a patient return to previous daily activites.

  4. Influence of shear and deviatoric stress on the evolution of permeability in fractured rock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faoro, Igor; Niemeijer, André|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370832132; Marone, Chris; Elsworth, Derek

    The evolution of permeability in fractured rock as a function of effective normal stress, shear displacement, and damage remains a complex issue. In this contribution, we report on experiments in which rock surfaces were subject to direct shear under controlled pore pressure and true triaxial stress

  5. Consistent stress-strain ductile fracture model as applied to two grades of beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priddy, T.G.; Benzley, S.E.; Ford, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    Published yield and ultimate biaxial stress and strain data for two grades of beryllium are correlated with a more complete method of characterizing macroscopic strain at fracture initiation in ductile materials. Results are compared with those obtained from an exponential, mean stress dependent, model. Simple statistical methods are employed to illustrate the degree of correlation for each method with the experimental data

  6. Increased sclerostin associated with stress fracture of the third metacarpal bone in the Thoroughbred racehorse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, E.; Henson, F.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The exact aetiology and pathogenesis of microdamage-induced long bone fractures remain unknown. These fractures are likely to be the result of inadequate bone remodelling in response to damage. This study aims to identify an association of osteocyte apoptosis, the presence of osteocytic osteolysis, and any alterations in sclerostin expression with a fracture of the third metacarpal (Mc-III) bone of Thoroughbred racehorses. Methods A total of 30 Mc-III bones were obtained; ten bones were fractured during racing, ten were from the contralateral limb, and ten were from control horses. Each Mc-III bone was divided into a fracture site, condyle, condylar groove, and sagittal ridge. Microcracks and diffuse microdamage were quantified. Apoptotic osteocytes were measured using TUNEL staining. Cathepsin K, matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13), HtrA1, and sclerostin expression were analyzed. Results In the fracture group, microdamage was elevated 38.9% (sd 2.6) compared with controls. There was no difference in the osteocyte number and the percentage of apoptotic cells between contralateral limb and unraced control; however, there were significantly fewer apoptotic cells in fractured samples (p fractured samples, sclerostin expression was significantly higher (p fractured during racing. In this study, this is not associated with osteocyte apoptosis or osteocytic osteolysis. The finding of increased sclerostin in the region of the fracture suggests that this protein may be playing a key role in the regulation of bone microdamage during stress adaptation. Cite this article: N. Hopper, E. Singer, F. Henson. Increased sclerostin associated with stress fracture of the third metacarpal bone in the Thoroughbred racehorse. Bone Joint Res 2018;7:94–102. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.71.BJR-2016-0202.R4. PMID:29363519

  7. Use of Noninvasive Bone Structural Measurements to Evaluate Stress Fracture Susceptibility Among Female Recruits in U.S. Marine Corps Basic Training: Individual Profiles of Stress Fracture Susceptibility Among Female Recruits in U.S. Marine Corps Basic Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shaffer, Rick

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to derive predictive models of stress fracture susceptibility in female military recruits by administering a questionnaire highlighting exercise and health habits prior...

  8. Fracture resistance and stress distribution of simulated immature teeth after apexification with mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito-Júnior, M; Pereira, R D; Veríssimo, C; Soares, C J; Faria-e-Silva, A L; Camilo, C C; Sousa-Neto, M D

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of adhesive restorations on fracture resistance and stress distribution in teeth with simulated immature apices and apical plugs of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Sixty bovine incisors were sectioned 8 mm above and 12 mm below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). The root canal was enlarged using a diamond bur, resulting in remaining root canal walls with 0.1-0.2 mm of thickness. A 5-mm apical plug of MTA was placed and the teeth were restored according to the following groups: GP--the root canal was filled with gutta-percha and endodontic sealer; CR--the root canal was filled with light-cured composite resin inserted incrementally; FP--a fibre post was cemented into the root canal; and RFP--the fibre post was relined with composite resin prior to the cementation into the root canal. A load was applied on the crown of all teeth at 135° to their long axis until fracture. Data was analysed by one-way anova and SNK tests (α = 0.05), whilst the fracture pattern was evaluated according to the position of the fracture. Stress distributions in the restored teeth were verified by finite element analysis. Teeth restored with fibre posts and relined fibre posts were associated with the highest fracture resistance, whilst the GP group had the lowest values. GP and RC groups had similar fracture resistance values (P = 0.109). All fractures types involved the cervical and middle thirds of roots. The GP model had high levels of stress concentration in the cervical and middle thirds of roots. No difference was found amongst the stress concentration in the RC, FP and RFP models. Restorative protocols alter the fracture resistance and stress distribution of immature teeth after placement of MTA apical plugs. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Bilateral pedicle stress fractures in a female athlete: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvataneni, Hari K; Nicholas, Stephen J; McCance, Sean E

    2004-01-15

    Clinical case report of bilateral stress fractures of the pedicle in a female athlete presenting with back pain. To report this unusual case and surgical treatment and to review the relevant literature. Low back pain is a frequent complaint in athletes, with the majority of cases being related to muscular or soft tissue etiology. Spondylolysis, or pars fracture, is the most common injury of the neural arch. Stress fracture of the pedicle is a much less common occurrence. Bilateral pedicle fractures in an otherwise healthy athlete has not been previously reported in the orthopedic literature. A 19-year-old female athlete presented with low back pain limiting sports and daily activities. Radiographic workup revealed bilateral stress fractures of the pedicles of the L5 vertebra. Circumferential fusion of the L5-S1 segment was performed after failure of conservative treatment. Anterior interbody structural allograft and a vertical mesh cage were combined with instrumented posterolateral fusion using segmental pedicle screws and autogenous iliac crest bone graft. The patient achieved complete pain relief, solid fusion, and return to normal function. In this uncommon case of bilateral stress fractures of the pedicle, circumferential fusion assures full immobilization of the injured motion segment and assures a high probability of successful healing.

  10. Delayed healing of a navicular stress fracture, following limited weight-bearing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Matthew; Fulcher, Mark

    2014-03-11

    This report describes a 21-year-old man, a semiprofessional football (soccer) player, with a navicular stress fracture. It highlights the difficulty in diagnosing the condition and the complications arising from inadequate management. The case discusses the optimal management of these stress fractures and the detrimental role of weight-bearing recovery. The diagnosis of navicular stress fractures is challenging, and a high index of suspicion is required. The available literature indicates that limited weightbearing is not an appropriate treatment for navicular stress injuries. Non-weight-bearing (NWB) cast immobilisation for 6-8 weeks appears to be the gold standard treatment; however, open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF) has similar success rates and an equal return-to-play time but should also be followed by a period of NWB. NWB cast immobilisation for 6 weeks remains a good second option at any time following failed limited weight-bearing activity.

  11. The impact of in-situ stress and outcrop-based fracture geometry on hydraulic aperture and upscaled permeability in fractured reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Bertotti, Giovanni; Nick, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    and diagenetic processes that control aperture. In the absence of cement bridges and high pore pressure, fractures in the subsurface are generally considered to be closed. However, experimental work, outcrop analyses and subsurface data show that some fractures remain open, and that aperture varies even along...... explicitly, we quantify equivalent permeability, i.e. combined matrix and stress-dependent fracture flow. Fracture networks extracted from a large outcropping pavement form the basis of these models. The results show that the angle between fracture strike and σ 1 has a controlling impact on aperture...

  12. Efficacy of Calcium and Vitamin D Supplementation for the Prevention of Stress Fractures in Female Naval Recruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    stress fractures in female track-and-field athletes : A retrospective analysis. Clin J Sport Med 1995; 5:229-235. 15 Figure 1...Macera C, Trone D, Shaffer R, Brodine S. Epidemiology of stress fracture and lower-extremity overuse injury in female recruits. Med Sci Sports Exerc...Rauh M, Brodine S, Trone D, Macera C. Predictors of stress fracture susceptibility in young female recruits. Am J Sports Med 2005;(Sept 16):1-8. (25

  13. Stress fractures of the humerus, radius, and tibia in horses: clinical features and radiographic and/or scintigraphic appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackey, V.S.; Trout, D.R.; Meagher, D.M.; Hornof, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    The medical records, radiographic and nuclear scintigraphic findings of 26 racing horses with 27 stress fracture episodes of the humerus, radius, or tibia were reviewed. The purposes of this study were to describe the radiographic and/or scintigraphic features of stress fractures of the humerus, radius, or tibia, and to evaluate the signalment and history of horses in which stress fracture occurred. Stress fractures of the three long bones examined were primarily seen in 2- and 3-year-old male Thoroughbred horses; commonly, the onset of lameness was immediately following training gallops or racing. There were 13 humeral stress fracture episodes in 12 horses. Ten were in the proximal caudolateral cortex, and three were in the distal craniomedial cortex. Radical stress fractures were seen in three horses, all in the midshaft radius. Tibial stress fractures were diagnosed in 11 horses. They were located in the proximal lateral tibia in six horses, the distal caudolateral tibia in three horses, and the midshaft tibia in three horses. Fifteen stress fractures were diagnosed with radiography alone, one was diagnosed with scintigraphy alone, nine were diagnosed with radiographs and scintigraphy, and, in two horses, radiographs were negative, but the scintigraphic findings were consistent with stress fracture

  14. Talar body fatigue stress fractures: three cases observed in elite female gymnasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, F. [National Institute of Sports Medicine of the Italian Olympic Committee, Rome (Italy); Dragoni, S. [National Institute of Sports Medicine of the Italian Olympic Committee, Rome (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Medicina dello Sport, Rome (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    To introduce and emphasize the clinical and radiological findings of three talar body fatigue stress fractures in competitive athletes. Clinical and radiographic skeletal records of 24,562 athletes taken between 1962 and 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. Among these, 6851 files related to acute foot and ankle injuries or chronic post-traumatic sequelae were found. There were 925 (3.76%) stress fatigue fractures selected from the whole collection. Among these there were three cases (0.32%) of talar body stress fractures diagnosed in elite female gymnasts 15 - 17 years old. The negative first radiograph become positive 4-6 weeks later. Scintigraphy was positive at an early stage and consistent for the diagnosis. CT and MRI gave positive results 1-2 weeks after the beginning of symptoms which were always greatly diagnostic. The sports medicine literature lacks reports of talar body fatigue stress fractures. The poor initial sensitivity of radiography makes it problematic to establish an early diagnosis. A wise combination of scintigraphy, CT and MRI has therefore to be relied upon. Familiarity with this rare location for a stress fracture may prevent delayed diagnosis and long-lasting damage, both of which are important factors in competitive athletes. (orig.)

  15. Talar body fatigue stress fractures: three cases observed in elite female gymnasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, F.; Dragoni, S.

    2005-01-01

    To introduce and emphasize the clinical and radiological findings of three talar body fatigue stress fractures in competitive athletes. Clinical and radiographic skeletal records of 24,562 athletes taken between 1962 and 2002 were retrospectively reviewed. Among these, 6851 files related to acute foot and ankle injuries or chronic post-traumatic sequelae were found. There were 925 (3.76%) stress fatigue fractures selected from the whole collection. Among these there were three cases (0.32%) of talar body stress fractures diagnosed in elite female gymnasts 15 - 17 years old. The negative first radiograph become positive 4-6 weeks later. Scintigraphy was positive at an early stage and consistent for the diagnosis. CT and MRI gave positive results 1-2 weeks after the beginning of symptoms which were always greatly diagnostic. The sports medicine literature lacks reports of talar body fatigue stress fractures. The poor initial sensitivity of radiography makes it problematic to establish an early diagnosis. A wise combination of scintigraphy, CT and MRI has therefore to be relied upon. Familiarity with this rare location for a stress fracture may prevent delayed diagnosis and long-lasting damage, both of which are important factors in competitive athletes. (orig.)

  16. Natural Fractures Characterization and In Situ Stresses Inference in a Carbonate Reservoir—An Integrated Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shafiei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we characterized the natural fracture systems and inferred the state of in situ stress field through an integrated study in a very complex and heterogeneous fractured carbonate reservoir. Relative magnitudes and orientations of the in-situ principal stresses in a naturally fractured carbonate heavy oil field were estimated with a combination of available data (World Stress Map, geological and geotectonic evidence, outcrop studies and techniques (core analysis, borehole image logs and Side View Seismic Location. The estimates made here using various tools and data including routine core analysis and image logs are confirmatory to estimates made by the World Stress Map and geotectonic facts. NE-SW and NW-SE found to be the dominant orientations for maximum and minimum horizontal stresses in the study area. In addition, three dominant orientations were identified for vertical and sub-vertical fractures atop the crestal region of the anticlinal structure. Image logs found useful in recognition and delineation of natural fractures. The results implemented in a real field development and proved practical in optimal well placement, drilling and production practices. Such integrated studies can be instrumental in any E&P projects and related projects such as geological CO2 sequestration site characterization.

  17. Surgical Management of Proximal Interphalangeal Joint Repetitive Stress Epiphyseal Fracture Nonunion in Elite Sport Climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Yasser; Lutter, Chris; Schoeffl, Isabelle; Schoeffl, Volker; Flohe, Sascha

    2017-11-14

    Repetitive stress fracture of the middle phalanx epiphysis is an injury specific to elite adolescent sport climbers. As sport climbing becomes increasingly popular in younger age groups, an increased number of these injuries have been reported in recent years. To date, treatment of these fractures has been nonsurgical, with strict rest and physiotherapy prescribed until fracture union. However, when these patients present in a delayed fashion with an established nonunion, nonsurgical treatment may fail, leading to disabling chronic pain and/or digital deformity in some cases. In this article, we present 2 cases of surgical treatment for finger middle phalanx repetitive stress epiphyseal fracture nonunion, using a percutaneous spot drilling epiphysiodesis technique. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Stress fractures at the base of the second metatarsal in ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, M J; Hamilton, W G; Munyak, J; DeFranco, M J

    1996-02-01

    Stress fractures are a frequent injury in ballet companies and the most common location is at the base of the second metatarsal. While previous reports have focused on risk factors for this injury (overtraining, delayed menarche, poor nutrition), there is no published series describing the natural history and outcome following this fracture. We reviewed the office records of the senior author and identified 51 professional dancers (64 fractures) who sustained a stress fracture at the base of the second metatarsal. History of a previous stress fracture in the lower extremity was seen in 19 patients and delayed menarche in the women was common. The clinical presentation was insidious onset of midfoot pain an average of 2.5 weeks prior to seeking medical care. The initial radiographs of the foot were positive in 19 patients, questionable in 3 patients, and negative in 42 patients. The usual location of the fracture was at the proximal metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction (three fractures extended into the tarsometatarsal joint). Treatment consisted of a short leg walking cast for 6 patients, and a wooden shoe and symptomatic treatment for the remainder. At follow-up, 14% of patients still had occasional pain or stiffness in the midfoot with dancing. The patients returned to performance at an average of 6.2 weeks following diagnosis. No patients required bone grafting for persistent symptoms. There were eight refractures (at the same site) occurring an average of 4.3 years, all of which healed with conservative care. Stress fractures at the base of the second metatarsal are common in ballet dancers and can usually be treated with symptomatically. The results of this study are discussed in terms of risk factors, the use of a posterior-anterior view of the foot to eliminate overlap at Lisfranc's joint, and our present treatment regimen.

  19. Use of Pulsing Electromagnetic Fields for the Treatment of Pelvic Stress Fractures Among Female Soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-11

    activities. Pulsing electromagnetic fields ( PEMFs )have been shown to speed the healing of non-union fractures and we have used them successfully to...and then randomized into actual PEMF and placebo PEMF groups and treated for one hour per day until they return to duty. Changes in the bone scan are...musculoskeletal groups. Results to date indicate that pelvic stress fractures are being misdiagnosed. If these results are confirmed, treatments for

  20. On the failure analysis of bondlines: Stress or energy based fracture criteria?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anyfantis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    that characterizes a given bondline, both its cohesive strength and fracture toughness material parameters must be experimentally defined. Based on these properties, failure analysis of the bondline can be done either through stress- or energy-based criteria. The aim of this work is to investigate the effectiveness...... experimentation programme. Fracture initiation and propagation of the bondlines was numerically simulated by cohesive zone models. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  1. 16-Detector multislice CT in the detection of stress fractures: a comparison with skeletal scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groves, A.M.; Cheow, H.K.; Balan, K.K.; Housden, B.A.; Bearcroft, P.W.P.; Dixon, A.K.

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: To test the hypothesis that the improved resolution afforded by 16-detector computed tomography (CT) would translate to better stress fracture detection when compared with skeletal scintigraphy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-three cases of suspected stress fractures in 26 patients were investigated using skeletal scintigraphy and 16-detector CT performed on the same day. Planar images of the lower limbs were taken 3 h post-injection of 400 MBq 99m Tc-methylene diphosphonate ( 99m Tc-MDP). 99m Tc-MDP uptake was quantified at suspected fracture sites. CT was performed using a 16-detector multisection machine employing 0.75 mm detectors and images reconstructed in 0.5 mm increments. Examinations were reported independently and discordant results were compared at follow-up. RESULTS: At initial reporting scintigraphy identified fractures in 13 of the 33 cases and CT identified four of the 33. In one case, on review of the CT images, a fracture was present in the distal fibula that was not initially identified. This resulted in eight scintigraphic-positive CT-negative discordant cases. The 99m Tc-MDP uptake was significantly lower in the discordant fracture group compared with the concordant group (p 99m Tc-MDP quantification at fracture sites is of interest and may be worth further investigation

  2. Interplay between tectonics and topography: Topographic stress controls on bedrock fractures and surface processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, S.; Perron, J. T.; Martel, S. J.; Holbrook, W. S.; St Clair, J. T.; Singha, K.

    2016-12-01

    The interaction of tectonics, topography, and surface processes influences the evolution of landscapes in tectonically active regions. Though tectonic controls on topography have been extensively studied, the influence of topography on tectonics has been examined less. Theoretical studies have suggested that topography can perturb the tectonic and gravitational stress fields in landscapes, which can influence bedrock fracture patterns and in turn influence erosion. This hypothesis implies that there could be a feedback between topographic stress and landscape evolution such that topographically induced bedrock fractures influence and are influenced by surface processes in evolving topography. In this work, we explore the predictions of a three-dimensional topographic stress model and illustrate how different topographic forms and tectonic settings could influence bedrock fracture patterns. We show that the stress field is most sensitive to topographic perturbations if the most compressive horizontal tectonic stress is oriented perpendicular to the long axis of elongated landforms such as ridges and valleys, and that topographic stress perturbations are most pronounced beneath landforms with higher mean curvatures, such as channel junctions and ridge crests. The shape of a predicted fracture-rich zone in the subsurface depends mainly on the orientation of landforms relative to the most compressive horizontal tectonic stress direction and a dimensionless ratio that expresses the relative magnitudes of topographic stresses associated with tectonics and topographic relief. Variations in this dimensionless ratio can also change the predicted orientations of potential opening-mode fracture planes beneath ridges and valleys. We use these model results to illustrate how topographic perturbations of three-dimensional tectonic and gravitational stresses could influence landscape evolution by altering the rates and spatial heterogeneity of surface processes such as

  3. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Characteristics of Single Fracture Stress-Seepage Coupling considering Microroughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengtong Di

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the results of the test among the joint roughness coefficient (JRC of rock fracture, mechanical aperture, and hydraulic aperture proposed by Barton, this paper deduces and proposes a permeability coefficient formula of single fracture stress-seepage coupling considering microroughness by the introduction of effect variables considering the microparticle size and structural morphology of facture surface. Quasi-sandstone fracture of different particle size is made by the laboratory test, and the respective modification is made on the coupled shear-seepage test system of JAW-600 rock. Under this condition, the laboratory test of stress-seepage coupling of fracture of different particle size is carried out. The test results show that, for the different particle-sized fracture surface of the same JRC, the permeability coefficient is different, which means the smaller particle size, the smaller permeability coefficient, and the larger particle size, the larger permeability coefficient; with the increase of cranny hydraulic pressure, the permeability coefficient increases exponentially, and under the same cranny hydraulic pressure, there is relation of power function between the permeability coefficient and normal stress. Meanwhile, according to the theoretical formula, the microroughness coefficient of the fractures with different particle size is obtained by the calculation, and its accuracy and validity are verified by experiments. The theoretical verification values are in good agreement with the measured values.

  4. Stress fractures of the ribs in elite competitive rowers: a report of nine cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragoni, S.; Giombini, A.; Ripani, M.; Di Cesare, A.; Magliani, G.

    2007-01-01

    The objective was to report the clinical and imaging patterns of nine cases of stress fractures of the rib diagnosed in Italian Olympic rowers. Nine patients with stress fractures of the rib detected from 103 (8.7%) Italian team rowers competing between May 2000 and May 2006 were identified based on the database of a sports medicine institute. All athletes were male. They were aged between 17 and 31 years (mean: 24.4). Patient weight, fracture location, rowing side and imaging methods employed were noted. The diagnosis was made based on history, clinical examination and Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy. Eight of the 9 fractures were located anterolaterally between the fourth and ninth rib. In 1 of the 5 athletes with standard radiographs, a fracture line was visible and in 4 there was callus formation. In 2 athletes sonography was performed, which detected discontinuity of the rib surface and callus formation (1 case each). Stress fractures of the ribs are relatively common in competitive rowers. They are characterized by increasing lateral chest pain and typical scintigraphic, radiographic and sonographic findings. (orig.)

  5. Lag screw fixation of dorsal cortical stress fractures of the third metacarpal bone in 116 racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalim, S L; McIlwraith, C W; Goodman, N L; Anderson, G A

    2010-10-01

    The effectiveness and best method to manage dorsal cortical stress fractures is not clear. This study was performed to evaluate the success of lag screw fixation of such fractures in a population of Thoroughbred racehorses. Lag screw fixation of dorsal cortical stress fractures is an effective surgical procedure allowing racehorses to return to their preoperative level of performance. The records of 116 racehorses (103 Thoroughbreds) admitted to Equine Medical Centre, California between 1986 and 2008 were assessed. Information obtained from medical records included subject details, limb(s) affected, fracture configuration, length of screw used in repair and presence of concurrent surgical procedures performed. Racing performance was evaluated relative to these factors using Fisher's exact test and nonparametric methods with a level of significance of Phorses, 83% raced preoperatively and 83% raced post operatively, with 63% having ≥5 starts. There was no statistically significant association between age, gender, limb affected, fracture configuration or presence of concurrent surgery and likelihood of racing post operatively or of having 5 or more starts. The mean earnings per start and the performance index for the 3 races following surgery were lower compared to the 3 races prior to surgery; however, 29 and 45% of horses either improved or did not change their earnings per start and performance index, respectively. Data show that lag screw fixation is successful at restoring ability to race in horses suffering from dorsal cortical stress fractures. © 2010 EVJ Ltd.

  6. Anterior tension band plating for anterior tibial stress fractures in high-performance female athletes: a report of 4 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borens, Olivier; Sen, Milan K.; Huang, Russel C.; Richmond, Jeffrey; Kloen, Peter; Jupiter, Jesse B.; Helfet, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Stress fracture of the anterior tibial cortex is an extremely challenging fracture to treat, especially in the high-performance female athlete who requires rapid return to competition. Previous reports have not addressed treating these fractures in the world-class athlete with anterior plating. We

  7. Clavicular stress fracture in a cricket fast bowler: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Read Jeremy AF

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Whilst rare, stress fractures of the clavicle have been described in other sports. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a stress fracture of the clavicle occurring in a cricket fast bowler. Case presentation A 23-year-old professional cricket fast bowler presented with activity related shoulder pain. Imaging demonstrated a stress fracture of the lateral third of the clavicle. This healed with rest and rehabilitation allowing a full return to professional sport. Conclusion This injury is treated with activity modification and technique adaptation. In a professional sportsman, this needs to be recognised early so that return to play can be as quick as possible.

  8. Atypical femoral neck stress fracture in a marathon runner: a case report and literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Femoral neck stress fractures are relatively rare and may present as sports-related injuries. The presentation is variable, and prompt diagnosis facilitates the earliest return to pre-morbid functional activity levels. Delayed detection may precipitate femoral non-union or avascular necrosis, resulting in long-term functional deficit. AIMS: We present the case of a basicervical femoral neck stress fracture occurring in a 23-year-old marathon runner. The pathophysiology and practical management issues related to this unusual injury pattern are discussed. CONCLUSION: The growing interest in amateur athletic activities should raise the index of suspicion for stress fractures of the femoral neck in healthy adults with atypical hip pain. Increased levels of patient education and physician awareness can reduce the incidence of long-term morbidity in cases of this unusual sports-related injury.

  9. Bilateral stress fracture of femoral neck in non-athlete - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubiratan Stefani de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bilateral stress fracture of femoral neck in healthy young patients is an extremely rare entity, whose diagnostic and treatment represent a major challenge. Patients with history of hip pain, even non-athletes or military recruits, should be analyzed to achieve an early diagnosis and prevent possible complications from the surgical treatment. This report describes a 43-year-old male patient, non-athlete, without previous diseases, who developed bilateral stress fracture of femoral neck without displacement. He had a late diagnosis; bilateral osteosynthesis was made using cannulated screws. Although the diagnosis was delayed in this case, the study highlights the importance of the diagnosis of stress fracture, regardless of the activity level of the patients, for the success of the treatment.

  10. Rockfall triggering by cyclic thermal stressing of exfoliation fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Brian D.; Stock, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Exfoliation of rock deteriorates cliffs through the formation and subsequent opening of fractures, which in turn can lead to potentially hazardous rockfalls. Although a number of mechanisms are known to trigger rockfalls, many rockfalls occur during periods when likely triggers such as precipitation, seismic activity and freezing conditions are absent. It has been suggested that these enigmatic rockfalls may occur due to solar heating of rock surfaces, which can cause outward expansion. Here we use data from 3.5 years of field monitoring of an exfoliating granite cliff in Yosemite National Park in California, USA, to assess the magnitude and temporal pattern of thermally induced rock deformation. From a thermodynamic analysis, we find that daily, seasonal and annual temperature variations are sufficient to drive cyclic and cumulative opening of fractures. Application of fracture theory suggests that these changes can lead to further fracture propagation and the consequent detachment of rock. Our data indicate that the warmest times of the day and year are particularly conducive to triggering rockfalls, and that cyclic thermal forcing may enhance the efficacy of other, more typical rockfall triggers.

  11. A new coal-permeability model: Internal swelling stress and fracture-matrix interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a new coal-permeability model for uniaxial strain and constant confining stress conditions. The model is unique in that it explicitly considers fracture-matrix interaction during coal deformation processes and is based on a newly proposed internal-swelling stress concept. This concept is used to account for the impact of matrix swelling (or shrinkage) on fracture-aperture changes resulting from partial separation of matrix blocks by fractures that do not completely cut through the whole matrix. The proposed permeability model is evaluated with data from three Valencia Canyon coalbed wells in the San Juan Basin, where increased permeability has been observed during CH{sub 4} gas production, as well as with published data from laboratory tests. Model results are generally in good agreement with observed permeability changes. The importance of fracture-matrix interaction in determining coal permeability, demonstrated in this work using relatively simple stress conditions, underscores the need for a dual-continuum (fracture and matrix) mechanical approach to rigorously capture coal-deformation processes under complex stress conditions, as well as the coupled flow and transport processes in coal seams.

  12. Labor-related sacral stress fracture presenting as lower limb radicular pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein, Ran; Burstein, Gideon; Shabshin, Nogah

    2009-06-01

    In contrast to radicular pain during pregnancy, the incidence of postpartum radicular pain is rare. Sacral stress fractures are unusual but important causes for low-back and buttock pain and even postpartum radicular pain. To date, only 10 postpartum sacral stress fractures have been reported in the literature, with two descriptions of radicular pain as the presenting symptom. A 36-year-old woman, 7 days after her second delivery, presented with symptoms of spontaneous acute claudicating in conjunction with a left-leg radicular pain for 5 days. Imaging studies revealed a left sacral stress fracture. Bone mineral density was normal. The patient reported no pelvic, back, or radicular pain during the pregnancy, and had no history of menstrual irregularities, previous fracture, eating disorder, trauma or endocrine or metabolic diseases. No smoking or use of anticoagulation drugs was reported. Her obstetric and labor history showed no other risk factors. Epidural analgesia was used. Treatment consisted of toe-touch walking with crutches for 2 months, followed by full weight bearing, which resolved nearly all her symptoms. Clinicians should consider sacral fracture as a diagnostic possibility in postpartum and pregnant patients with lower back and/or buttock pain with or without radicular pain. Bone scintigraphy and computed tomography are considered harmful for the fetus. Magnetic resonance imaging, which is more suitable for pregnancy, is more sensitive than bone scintigraphy in revealing stress injuries of the bone. Physical examination and proper radiologic evaluation are the main keys for revealing the pathology.

  13. Mechanisms Underlying Stress Fracture and the Influence of Sex and Race/Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0652 TITLE: Mechanisms Underlying Stress Fracture and the Influence of Sex and Race/Ethnicity PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0652 Mechanisms Underlying Stress Fracture and the Influence of Sex and Race/Ethnicity 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...Email addresses: mbouxsei@bidmc.harvard.edu; scaksa@mgh.harvard.edu; serudolph@mgh.harvard.edu ; kpopp@mgh.harvard.edu E-Mail: 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7

  14. Increased sclerostin associated with stress fracture of the third metacarpal bone in the Thoroughbred racehorse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, N; Singer, E; Henson, F

    2018-01-01

    The exact aetiology and pathogenesis of microdamage-induced long bone fractures remain unknown. These fractures are likely to be the result of inadequate bone remodelling in response to damage. This study aims to identify an association of osteocyte apoptosis, the presence of osteocytic osteolysis, and any alterations in sclerostin expression with a fracture of the third metacarpal (Mc-III) bone of Thoroughbred racehorses. A total of 30 Mc-III bones were obtained; ten bones were fractured during racing, ten were from the contralateral limb, and ten were from control horses. Each Mc-III bone was divided into a fracture site, condyle, condylar groove, and sagittal ridge. Microcracks and diffuse microdamage were quantified. Apoptotic osteocytes were measured using TUNEL staining. Cathepsin K, matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13), HtrA1, and sclerostin expression were analyzed. In the fracture group, microdamage was elevated 38.9% (sd 2.6) compared with controls. There was no difference in the osteocyte number and the percentage of apoptotic cells between contralateral limb and unraced control; however, there were significantly fewer apoptotic cells in fractured samples (p fractured samples, sclerostin expression was significantly higher (p bones that have fractured during racing. In this study, this is not associated with osteocyte apoptosis or osteocytic osteolysis. The finding of increased sclerostin in the region of the fracture suggests that this protein may be playing a key role in the regulation of bone microdamage during stress adaptation. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2018;7:94-102. © 2018 Hopper et al.

  15. Stress Fractures of the Distal Femur Involving Small Nonossifying Fibromas in Young Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Michael; Gilley, Jasen; Nicholas, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Small nonossifying fibromas (ie, fibrocortical defects) are incidental findings commonly seen on radiographs of young patients evaluated for extremity pain or sport-related trauma. Although pathological fractures have been reported in larger lesions, the subcentimeter, intracortical defects are not generally thought to predispose to pathological fractures. The authors report on 2 young athletes who presented with knee pain after initiating conditioning exercise programs (cross-training). Both were diagnosed with transverse metaphyseal stress fractures involving fibrous cortical defects of the distal femur. Initial radiographs were interpreted without evidence of fractures. However, subsequent magnetic resonance imaging was informative, suggesting that magnetic resonance imaging may have value in identifying potential stress reactions in young athletes. In addition, subsequent plain radiographs of both patients showed subperiosteal new bone formation in these nondisplaced fractures, suggesting that serial radiographs and close clinical follow-up are warranted for patients with persistent symptoms. The authors propose that, in the appropriate clinical setting, the presence of a small nonossifying fibroma may be a clinical indication that further evaluation is needed when plain radiographs show normal findings, as the defect could be an unrecognized area of fracture initiation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1197-e1200.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Excess Stress Fractures, Musculoskeletal Injuries, and Health Care Utilization Among Unfit and Overweight Female Army Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Margot R; Garvin, Nadia U; Boivin, Michael R; Cowan, David N

    2017-02-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are prevalent among military trainees and certain occupations. Fitness and body mass index (BMI) have been associated with musculoskeletal conditions, including stress fractures. The incidence of, and excess health care utilization for, stress fracture and non-stress fracture overuse musculoskeletal injuries during the first 6 months of service is higher among unfit female recruits. Those who exceeded body fat limits are at a greater risk of incident stress fractures, injuries, or health care utilization compared with weight-qualified recruits. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. All applicants to the United States Army were required to take a preaccession fitness test during the study period (February 2005-September 2006). The test included a 5-minute step test scored as pass or fail. BMI was recorded at application. There were 2 distinct comparisons made in this study: (1) between weight-qualified physically fit and unfit women and (2) between weight-qualified physically fit women and those who exceeded body fat limits. We compared the incidence of, and excess health care utilization for, musculoskeletal injuries, including stress fractures and physical therapy visits, during the first 183 days of military service. Among the weight-qualified women, unfit participants had a higher non-stress fracture injury incidence and related excess health care utilization rate compared with fit women, with rate ratios of 1.32 (95% CI, 1.14-1.53) and 1.18 (95% CI, 1.10-1.27), respectively. Among fit women, compared with the weight-qualified participants, those exceeding body fat limits had higher rate ratios for non-stress fracture injury incidence and related excess health care utilization of 1.27 (95% CI, 1.07-1.50) and 1.20 (95% CI, 1.11-1.31), respectively. Weight-qualified women who were unfit had a higher incidence of stress fractures and related excess health care utilization compared with fit women, with rate ratios of 1.62 (95% CI, 1

  17. Effective Stress Approximation using Geomechanical Formulation of Fracturing Technology (GFFT) in Petroleum Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghi, A.; Asef, M.; Kharrat, R.

    2010-12-01

    Recently, rock mechanics and geophysics contribution in petroleum industry has been significantly increased. Wellbore stability analysis in horizontal wells, sand production problem while extracting hydrocarbon from sandstone reservoirs, land subsidence due to production induced reservoir compaction, reservoir management, casing shearing are samples of these contributions. In this context, determination of the magnitude and orientation of the in-situ stresses is an essential parameter. This paper is presenting new method to estimate the magnitude of in-situ stresses based on fracturing technology data. Accordingly, kirsch equations for the circular cavities and fracturing technology models in permeable formations have been used to develop an innovative Geomechanical Formulation (GFFT). GFFT introduces a direct reasonable relation between the reservoir stresses and the breakdown pressure of fracture, while the concept of effective stress was employed. Thus, this complex formula contains functions of some rock mechanic parameters such as poison ratio, Biot’s coefficient, Young’s modulus, rock tensile strength, depth of reservoir and breakdown/reservoir pressure difference. Hence, this approach yields a direct method to estimate maximum and minimum effective/insitu stresses in an oil field and improves minimum in-situ stress estimation compared to previous studies. In case of hydraulic fracturing; a new stress analysis method is developed based on well known Darcy equations for fluid flow in porous media which improves in-situ stress estimation using reservoir parameters such as permeability, and injection flow rate. The accuracy of the method would be verified using reservoir data of a case history. The concepts discussed in this research would eventually suggest an alternative methodology with sufficient accuracy to derive in-situ stresses in hydrocarbon reservoirs, while no extra experimental work is accomplished for this purpose.

  18. Prediction of tectonic stresses and fracture networks with geomechanical reservoir models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henk, A.; Fischer, K. [TU Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften

    2014-09-15

    This project evaluates the potential of geomechanical Finite Element (FE) models for the prediction of in situ stresses and fracture networks in faulted reservoirs. Modeling focuses on spatial variations of the in situ stress distribution resulting from faults and contrasts in mechanical rock properties. In a first methodological part, a workflow is developed for building such geomechanical reservoir models and calibrating them to field data. In the second part, this workflow was applied successfully to an intensively faulted gas reservoir in the North German Basin. A truly field-scale geomechanical model covering more than 400km{sup 2} was built and calibrated. It includes a mechanical stratigraphy as well as a network of 86 faults. The latter are implemented as distinct planes of weakness and allow the fault-specific evaluation of shear and normal stresses. A so-called static model describes the recent state of the reservoir and, thus, after calibration its results reveal the present-day in situ stress distribution. Further geodynamic modeling work considers the major stages in the tectonic history of the reservoir and provides insights in the paleo stress distribution. These results are compared to fracture data and hydraulic fault behavior observed today. The outcome of this project confirms the potential of geomechanical FE models for robust stress and fracture predictions. The workflow is generally applicable and can be used for modeling of any stress-sensitive reservoir.

  19. Prediction of tectonic stresses and fracture networks with geomechanical reservoir models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henk, A.; Fischer, K.

    2014-09-01

    This project evaluates the potential of geomechanical Finite Element (FE) models for the prediction of in situ stresses and fracture networks in faulted reservoirs. Modeling focuses on spatial variations of the in situ stress distribution resulting from faults and contrasts in mechanical rock properties. In a first methodological part, a workflow is developed for building such geomechanical reservoir models and calibrating them to field data. In the second part, this workflow was applied successfully to an intensively faulted gas reservoir in the North German Basin. A truly field-scale geomechanical model covering more than 400km 2 was built and calibrated. It includes a mechanical stratigraphy as well as a network of 86 faults. The latter are implemented as distinct planes of weakness and allow the fault-specific evaluation of shear and normal stresses. A so-called static model describes the recent state of the reservoir and, thus, after calibration its results reveal the present-day in situ stress distribution. Further geodynamic modeling work considers the major stages in the tectonic history of the reservoir and provides insights in the paleo stress distribution. These results are compared to fracture data and hydraulic fault behavior observed today. The outcome of this project confirms the potential of geomechanical FE models for robust stress and fracture predictions. The workflow is generally applicable and can be used for modeling of any stress-sensitive reservoir.

  20. Unilateral Pedicle Stress Fracture in a Long-Term Hemodialysis Patient with Isthmic Spondylolisthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishi Maruo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most unilateral pedicle stress fractures occur on the contralateral side of patients with unilateral spondylolysis. However, there are few reports of unilateral pedicle stress fractures in patients with bilateral spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. We report a unique case of unilateral pedicle stress fracture in a long-term hemodialysis patient with isthmic spondylolisthesis. A 65-year-old man who had undergone hemodialysis presented with lower back pain that had persisted for several years. The patient experienced severe right lower extremity pain with no history of trauma. Computed tomography revealed unilateral pedicle fracture with bilateral L5 spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis with progression of scoliosis. The patient underwent Gill laminectomy of L5 with pedicle screw fixation at L4-S1 and interbody fusion at L5-S1. The patient’s leg pain ceased immediately, and he began walking without leg pain. In our present patient, development of scoliosis caused by destructive spondyloarthropathy may have contributed to a unilateral pedicle fracture.

  1. Pore Pressure and Stress Distributions Around a Hydraulic Fracture in Heterogeneous Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qian; Ghassemi, Ahmad

    2017-12-01

    One of the most significant characteristics of unconventional petroleum bearing formations is their heterogeneity, which affects the stress distribution, hydraulic fracture propagation and also fluid flow. This study focuses on the stress and pore pressure redistributions during hydraulic stimulation in a heterogeneous poroelastic rock. Lognormal random distributions of Young's modulus and permeability are generated to simulate the heterogeneous distributions of material properties. A 3D fully coupled poroelastic model based on the finite element method is presented utilizing a displacement-pressure formulation. In order to verify the model, numerical results are compared with analytical solutions showing excellent agreements. The effects of heterogeneities on stress and pore pressure distributions around a penny-shaped fracture in poroelastic rock are then analyzed. Results indicate that the stress and pore pressure distributions are more complex in a heterogeneous reservoir than in a homogeneous one. The spatial extent of stress reorientation during hydraulic stimulations is a function of time and is continuously changing due to the diffusion of pore pressure in the heterogeneous system. In contrast to the stress distributions in homogeneous media, irregular distributions of stresses and pore pressure are observed. Due to the change of material properties, shear stresses and nonuniform deformations are generated. The induced shear stresses in heterogeneous rock cause the initial horizontal principal stresses to rotate out of horizontal planes.

  2. [Stress fractures of the tarsal navicular bone. Causality, diagnosis, therapy, prophylaxis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanic, G M; Juranitsch, T; Myerson, M S; Trnka, H J

    2003-12-01

    Stress fractures of the tarsal navicular bone are a challenge in diagnosis and therapy. First and foremost you have to think about this fracture. The origin of the injury can be detected in a wrong or too heavy strain of the bone especially in long distance runners and recruits. The MRI is the diagnostic tool of first choice. Therapy of displaced or comminuted fractures as well as pseudarthrosis is best done with surgical procedures like direct screw fixation or interposition of autologous bone depending on the circumstances and the age of injury. Conservative treatment with a plaster of Paris is useful in non-displaced and non-comminuted fractures. Prophylaxis with technical aids and a changing habits is recommended.

  3. The inclusion of weld residual stress in fracture margin assessments of embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, T.L.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Analyses were performed to determine the impact of weld residual stresses in a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) on (1) the generation of pressure temperature (P-T) curves required for maintaining specified fracture prevention margins during nuclear plant startup and shutdown, and (2) the conditional probability of vessel failure due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) loading. The through wall residual stress distribution in an axially oriented weld was derived using measurements taken from a shell segment of a canceled RPV and finite element thermal stress analyses. The P-T curve derived from the best estimate load analysis and a t / 8 deep flaw, based on K Ic , was less limiting than the one derived from the current methodology prescribed in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The inclusion of the weld residual stresses increased the conditional probability of cleavage fracture due to PTS loading by a factor ranging from 2 to 4

  4. Sufficient criterion of fracture in the case with a complex stress state and non-proportional deformation of the material in the pre-fracture zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, V. M.; Kurguzov, V. D.

    2010-12-01

    A general case of proportional loading with a complex stress state of the material in the pre-fracture zone, which is typical for polycrystalline solids with plastic deformation, is considered. A sufficient criterion of fracture is proposed for the case of a complex stress state with non-proportional deformation of the material in the pre-fracture zone. Critical parameters of fracture (pre-fracture zone length and load) for cracks propagating in quasi-brittle materials are obtained with the use of a modified Leonov-Panasyuk-Dugdale model. The pre-fracture zone width is determined by solving the problem of the plasticity theory in the vicinity of the crack tip. The proposed modification of the Leonov-Panasyuk-Dugdale model makes it possible to estimate the critical opening of the crack and the critical displacement of the crack flanks. Inequalities that describe different mechanisms of material fracture under proportional loading (predominantly shear fracture mechanism and fracture mechanism through cleavage) are derived.

  5. [Bilateral stress fracture of the mid-tibial shaft in a professional dancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomčovčík, L; Tomčovčíková, A

    2011-01-01

    Stress fractures of the anterior cortex of the mid-tibial shaft in dancers are rare, with a 1.4 % incidence in injured eli- te dancers. Treatment can be difficult and long-lasting and can seriously influence the dancer's career. The authors pre- sent the case of a 26-year-old professional dancer of a folk dance ensemble who suffered rare simultaneous bilateral mid-tibial shaft stress fractures. A conservative method of treatment with avoiding exercise and dancing activities resulted in the resolution of symptoms and healing of the fractures after 6 months. The patient finished his dancing career because of the necessity of a prolonged therapy interfering with his dancing activities. Current options of the treatment are also presented.

  6. Heat induced fracturing of rock in an existing uniaxial stress field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, J.; Stephansson, O.; Bjarnason, B.; Hakami, H.; Herdocia, A.; Mattila, U.; Singh, U.

    1986-01-01

    This study was initiated under the premise that it may be possible to determine the state of stress in the earth's crust by heat induced fracturing of the rock surrounding a borehole. The theory involved is superficially simple, involving the superposition of the stress field around a borehole due to the existing virgin stresses and the uniform stress field of thermally loaded rock as induced by a heater. Since the heat stress field is uniform, varying only in magnitude and gradient as a function of heater input, fracturing should be controlled by the non-uniform virgin stress field. To determine if the method was, in fact, feasible, a series of laboratory test were conducted. These tests consisted of physically loading center drilled cubes of rock, 0.3 m on a side, uniaxially from 0 to 25 MPa. The blocks were then thermally loaded with a nominally rated 3.7 kW heater until failure occurred. Results from these laboratory tests were then compared to analytical studies of the problem, i.e., finite element and discrete theoretical analysis. Overall, results were such that the method is likely eliminated as a stress measurement technique. The immediate development of a thermal compressive zone on the borehole wall overlaps the tensile zone created by the uniaxial stress field, forcing the failure is thus controlled largely by the power input of the heater, being retarded by the small compressive stresses genrated by the uniaxial stress field. This small retardation effect is of such low magnitude that the retardation effect is of such low magnitude that the fracture time is relatively insensitive to the local virgin stress field. (authors)

  7. Prevention of brittle fracture of steel structures by controlling the local stress and strain fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moyseychik Evgeniy Alekseevich

    Full Text Available In the article the author offers a classification of the methods to increase the cold resistance of steel structural shapes with a focus on the regulation of local fields of internal stresses and strains to prevent brittle fracture of steel structures. The need of a computer thermography is highlighted not only for visualization of temperature fields on the surface, but also to control the fields of residual stresses and strains in a controlled element.

  8. Rib stress fractures among rowers: a systematic review on return to sports, risk factors and prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Ailly, Philip N.; Sluiter, Judith K.; Kuijer, Paul P.

    2016-01-01

    Rib stress fractures (RSFs) are injuries frequently sustained by elite rowers with an injury rate of 8-16% over the course of a rowing career, resulting in negative effects on training and performance. For clinical management, the aim of this review was to describe time to return to sports,

  9. Experiments and fracture modeling of high-strength pipelines for high and low stress triaxialities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walters, C.L.; Kofiani, K.; Nonn, A.; Wierzbicki, T.; Kalwa, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides results from a comprehensive study on mechanical characterization of high-strength pipeline steel, grade X100 using experimental and numerical methods. The material was characterized for anisotropic plasticity, fracture initiation for various states of stress, (pre-cracked)

  10. [Stress fractures in disabled athletes' preparation for the paralympic games in Athens, 2004: an assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboute, E; Druvert, J C; Pailler, D; Piera, J-B

    2008-03-01

    To identify stress fracture frequency and the associated risk factors in disabled female athletes preparing the Paralympic Games in Athens in 2004. The study is focused on four athletes (including one with a vision impairment) among the 31 women selected to participate in the Paralympic Games. The medical records of selected athletes not having been able to participate in the Games due to a stress fracture were analyzed. One case of stress fracture to the first metatarsal was reported of one below-knee amputee and an additional case to the second metatarsal of one hemiplegic athlete. Two of three athletes with physical disability were unable to participate in the Games because of stress fracture occurring during the preparatory phase. Among four athletes selected to take part in the Paralympic Games. If morphological predispositions are inherent to the sportswomen, the main favouring factor to be retained is their running asymmetry. Training programmes must therefore take this characteristic into account and must not offer heavy-load repetitive exercise (such as endurance or jogging) at the expense of technique. Over-intense training exposes the disabled athlete to this type of pathology and is likely to affect his chances of competing.

  11. PUBIS STRESS FRACTURE IN A 15-YEAR-OLD SOCCER PLAYER

    OpenAIRE

    Bertolini, Fabr?cio Melo; Vieira, Rodrigo Barreiros; Oliveira, Lucas Henrique Araujo de; Lasmar, Rodrigo Pace; Junior, Otaviano de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    This case report presents a 15-year-old football player who was diagnosed with a pubis stress fracture and underwent conservative treatment with satisfactory results. After a review of the literature, the clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment are described. The importance of this paper comes from the rarity of finding reports about this kind of injury in the literature.

  12. PUBIS STRESS FRACTURE IN A 15-YEAR-OLD SOCCER PLAYER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Fabrício Melo; Vieira, Rodrigo Barreiros; Oliveira, Lucas Henrique Araujo de; Lasmar, Rodrigo Pace; Junior, Otaviano de Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    This case report presents a 15-year-old football player who was diagnosed with a pubis stress fracture and underwent conservative treatment with satisfactory results. After a review of the literature, the clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment are described. The importance of this paper comes from the rarity of finding reports about this kind of injury in the literature.

  13. Stress Fracture of the Pubic Ramus in a Female Long Distance Runner: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seçkin Şenışık

    2017-06-01

    Stress fractures of the pelvis should be included in the differential diagnosis of female distance runners who have prolonged groin pain increasing with exercise. Detailed medical history, physical examination, blood tests, and radiological images are keys to reach certain diagnosis. Treatment plan should include risk factor analysis and progressive training programs.

  14. Sternal stress fracture in a gymnast: A case report and literature review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    history of pain at rest suggested a fracture rather than bony bruis- ing or a stress reaction. The absence of morning stiffness, which is an important symptom of costochondritis, made the diagnosis of costochondritis unlikely. In addition, the absence of ecchymosis and swelling excluded conditions like the Tietze's syndrome.

  15. Residual stress state in pipe cut ring specimens for fracture toughness testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damjanovic, Darko [J.J. Strossmayer Univ. of Osijek, Slavonski Brod (Croatia). Mechanical Engineering Faculty; Kozak, Drazan [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Dept. for Mechanical Design; Marsoner, Stefan [Materials Center, Leoben (Austria).; Gubeljak, Nenad [Maribor Univ. (Slovenia). Chair of Mechanics

    2017-07-01

    Thin-walled pipes are not suitable for measuring fracture toughness parameters of vital importance because longitudinal crack failure is the most common failure mode in pipes. This is due to the impossibility to manufacture standard specimens for measuring fracture toughness, such as SENB or CT specimens, from the thin wall of the pipe. Previous works noticed this problem, but until now, a good and convenient solution has not been found or developed. To overcome this problem, very good alternative solution was proposed, the so-called pipe ring notched bend specimen (PRNB) [1-5]. Until now, only the idealized geometry PRNB specimen is analyzed, i. e., a specimen which is not cut out from an actual pipe but produced from steel plate. Based on that, residual stresses are neglected along with the imperfections in geometry (elliptical and eccentricity). The aim of this research is to estimate the residual stress state(s) in real pipes used in the boiler industry produced by hot rolling technique. These types of pipes are delivered only in normalized condition, but not stress relieved. Therefore, there are residual stresses present due to the manufacturing technique, but also due to uneven cooling after the production process. Within this paper, residual stresses are estimated by three methods: the incremental hole drilling method (IHMD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the splitting method (SM). Knowing the residual stress state in the ring specimen, it is possible to assess their impact on fracture toughness measured on the corresponding PRNB specimen(s).

  16. Crack growth and fracture behaviour of stress corrosion cracks of turbine generator steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger; Vahle.

    1989-01-01

    The object of this investigation was the quantifying of the behaviour of cracks which were induced during service under corrosive media. To investigate the influence of stress corrosion crack configurations on stress intensity factor, six different test materials from 2 and 3.5% NiCrMoV and 2% Cr/1% Ni steels were chosen. The stress corrosion cracks were induced at wedge loaded compact tension specimens in a corrosive media in the laboratory. Fracture mechanics tests as well as fatigue crack growth tests were performed at these specimens. All stress corrosion cracks have an intercrystalline path and a crack length longer than 1 mm; they are multiple and have branched cracks tips. The fracture mechanics tests at these stress corrosion cracks induced in the laboratory and during service of components show that their stress intensity factor is 30 to 70% smaller than the stress intensity factor calculated for single straight cracks too. Theoretical calculations arrived to the same results. Crack initiation and growth behaviour under cyclic loading starting from these stress corrosion cracks results in that the load or the stress intensity range ΔK has to be increased three times larger than the ΔK-threshold value to induce crack initiation. The crack growth velocity influenced by multiple crack tips and multiple growing cracks from these crack tips is much lower than the crack growth velocity of a normal fatigue crack (one crack tip). (orig./MM) With 32 figs

  17. Effects of shot-peening residual stresses on the fracture and crack-growth properties of D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elber, W.

    1974-01-01

    The fracture strength and cyclic crack-growth properties of surface-flawed, shot-peened D6AC steel plate were investigated. For short crack lengths (up to 1.5 mm) simple linear elastic fracture mechanics - based only on applied loading - did not predict the fracture strengths. Also, Paris' Law for cyclic crack growth did not correlate the crack-growth behavior. To investigate the effect of shot-peening, additional fracture and crack-growth tests were performed on material which was precompressed to remove the residual stresses left by the shot-peening. Both tests and analysis show that shot-peening residual stresses influence the fracture and crack-growth properties of the material. This report presents the analytical method of compensating for residual stresses and the fracture and cyclic crack-growth test results and predictions.

  18. The effects of shot-peening residual stresses on the fracture and crack growth properties of D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elber, W.

    1973-01-01

    The fracture strength and cyclic crack-growth properties of surface-flawed, shot-peened D6AC steel plate were investigated. For short crack lengths (up to 1.5mm) simple linear elastic fracture mechanics - based only on applied loading - did not predict the fracture strengths. Also, Paris' Law for cyclic crack growth did not correlate the crack-growth behavior. To investigate the effect of shot-peening, additional fracture and crack-growth tests were performed on material which was precompressed to remove the residual stresses left by the shot-peening. Both tests and analysis show that the shot-peening residual stresses influence the fracture and crack-growth properties of the material. The analytical method of compensating for residual stresses and the fracture and cyclic crack-growth test results and predictions are presented.

  19. Dependency of the injection induced seismicity b-value on the stress state of existing fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukuhira, Y.; Fehler, M. C.; Ito, T.; Asanuma, H.; Häring, M. O.

    2017-12-01

    The Gutenberg-Richter distribution of earthquake is a power law relationship and it holds for laboratory scale earthquakes (acoustic emission) to subduction zone earthquakes as well as induced seismicity. The gradient of the power law is known as the b-value, which can be considered the ratio of the number of the larger earthquakes to small ones. Larger earthquakes are often observed in low b-value regions, or alternatively a b-value reduction has been observed before some main shocks. Some authors have argued that b-value is negatively correlated with differential stress level. Therefore, a b-value anomaly found in time-space analysis may be used for detection of an area of stress concentration and used for earthquake prediction or hazard risk assessment. In the field of induced seismicity where b-value reduction has also been observed, the physical mechanism of b-value reduction has not been understood well. Since induced seismicity related with fluid injection usually occurs at depths around 1000 5000 m, a significant tectonic mechanism to cause a stress concentration during a short time of hydraulic stimulation might not be expected. We used borehole analysis and focal mechanism information to investigate the stress state on the existing fractures that caused induced seismicity. Then we divide the catalog into the groups with varying normalized shear stress threshold and estimated the b-value. We found that b-value for the events that occurred along higher shear stress fractures were significantly lower (figure 1a) than those from the moderate/lower shear stress fractures (figure 1b). Thus, b-value dependency on the shear stress can be observed for induced seismicity on a reservoir scale. Therefore, we propose that the reason for the observed b-value reductions in induced seismicity on a reservoir scale is the events that occur along higher shear stress fractures. Supposing that the earthquakes occurs along well-orientated fractures, the b-value dependence on

  20. Are Elite Female Soccer Athletes at Risk for Disordered Eating Attitudes, Menstrual Dysfunction, and Stress Fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Heidi; Hunt, Devyani; McKeon, Kathryn; Simpson, Scott; Meyer, E Blair; Yemm, Ted; Brophy, Robert

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of stress fractures, menstrual dysfunction and disordered eating attitudes in elite female soccer athletes. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Female soccer athletes were recruited from a national level youth soccer club, an NCAA Division I university team, and a women's professional team. Two hundred twenty female soccer athletes with a mean age of 16.4 ± 4 years and BMI of 20.8 ± 2 kg/m(2) completed the study, representing all athletes from the included teams. One-time surveys completed by the athletes. Height and weight were recorded, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated for each athlete. Athletes reported age of menarche, history of missing 3 or more menses within a 12-month period and stress fracture. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) was used to assess the athlete's body perception and attitudes toward eating. Of the 220 soccer athletes, 3 athletes (1.6%) had a low BMI for their age, and 19 (8.6%) reported stress fractures of the lower extremity. Among athletes who had reached menarche, the average onset was 13 + 1 year; menstrual dysfunction were present in 21 (19.3%). On the EAT-26, 1 player scored in the high risk range (>20) and 17 (7.7%) scored in the intermediate risk range (10-19) for eating disorders. Athletes with an EAT-26 score ≥ 10 points had a significantly higher prevalence of menstrual dysfunction in the past year compared to athletes with an EAT-26 score of less than 10 (P = .02). Elite female soccer athletes are susceptible to stress fractures and menstrual dysfunction and have delayed onset of menarche despite normal BMI and appropriate body perception and attitudes towards eating. Further studies are needed to better understand stress fracture risk in female soccer athletes and in other team sports to determine how these findings relate to long-term bone health in this population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Displacement and stress fields around rock fractures opened by irregular overpressure variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigekazu eKusumoto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Many rock fractures are entirely driven open by fluids such as ground water, geothermal water, gas, oil, and magma. These are a subset of extension fractures (mode I cracks; e.g., dikes, mineral veins and joints referred to as hydrofractures. Field measurements show that many hydrofractures have great variations in aperture. However, most analytical solutions for fracture displacement and stress fields assume the loading to be either constant or with a linear variation. While these solutions have been widely used, it is clear that a fracture hosted by heterogeneous and anisotropic rock is normally subject to loading that is neither constant nor with a linear variation. Here we present new general solutions for the displacement and stress fields around hydrofractures, modelled as two-dimensional elastic cracks, opened by irregular overpressure variations given by the Fourier cosine series. Each solution has two terms. The first term gives the displacement and stress fields due to the average overpressure acting inside the crack; it is given by the initial term of the Fourier coefficients expressing the overpressure variation. The second term gives the displacement and stress fields caused by the overpressure variation; it is given by general terms of the Fourier coefficients and solved through numerical integration. Our numerical examples show that the crack aperture variation closely reflects the overpressure variation. Also, that the general displacement and stress fields close to the crack follow the overpressure variation but tend to be more uniform far from the crack. The present solutions can be used to estimate the displacement and stress fields around any fluid-driven crack, that is, any hydrofracture, as well as its aperture, provided the variation in overpressure can be described by Fourier series. The solutions add to our understanding of local stresses, displacements, and fluid transport associated with hydrofractures in the crust.

  2. The influence of elastic modulus of inlay materials on stress distribution and fracture of premolars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Akf; Xavier, Ta; Noritomi, Py; Saavedra, G; Borges, Als

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence the width of the occlusal isthmus and inlay material had on the stress distribution, displacement, and fracture resistance of upper human premolars. For this in vitro test, 35 intact upper premolars (UPM) were selected and five were kept intact for the control group (group I). The remaining 30 were divided into two experimental groups (n=15) according to the width of isthmus: conservative (CP) and extensive preparation (EP), one third and more than two thirds of cuspal distance, respectively. Five teeth from each experimental group were left without restoration for negative controls (CPnc and EPnc), and the remaining 10 in each group were subdivided according to the inlay material (resin or ceramic): group CPr, CP + indirect resin; group CPc, CP + ceramic; group EPr, EP + indirect resin; and group EPc, EP + ceramic. The cemented inlays were loaded in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The fractured specimens were analyzed with stereomicroscopy, and the values of the fracture resistance evaluated by analysis of variance and Tukey test. For the finite element analyses, an average UPM for each group was modeled in Rhinoceros CAD software and imported to Ansys 13.0. An average of 320,000 tetrahedral elements and 540,000 nodes for the seven models were performed using the same experimental simulation setup for each. The models were constrained on the base, and a displacement of 0.02 mm was applied to keep a linear behavior for the analysis. A von Mises stress and total displacement fields were used for the coherence test and the maximum principal stress fields were used for mechanical behavior comparisons. Group I (161.73 ± 22.94) showed a significantly higher mean value than the other experimental groups (EPc: 103.55 ± 15.84; CPc: 94.38 ± 12.35; CPr: 90.31 ± 6.10; EPr: 65.42 ± 10.15; CPnc: 65.46 ± 5.37; EPnc: 58.08 ± 9.62). The stress distribution was

  3. Intrapartum sacral stress fracture due to pregnancy-related osteoporosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztürk, Gülcan; Külcü, Duygu Geler; Aydoğ, Ece

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) and hip pain frequently occur during pregnancy and postpartum period. Although pelvic and mechanic lesions of the soft tissues are most responsible for the etiology, sacral fracture is also one of the rare causes. A 32-year-old primigravid patient presented with LBP and right hip pain which started 3 days after vaginal delivery. Although direct radiographic examination was normal, magnetic resonance imaging of the sacrum revealed sacral stress fracture. Lumbar spine and femoral bone mineral density showed osteoporosis as a risk factor. There were no other risk factors such as trauma, excessive weight gain, and strenuous physical activity. It is considered that the patient had sacral fatigue and insufficiency fracture in intrapartum period. The patient's symptoms subsided in 3 months after physical therapy and rest. In conclusion, sacral fractures during pregnancy and postpartum period, especially resulting from childbirth, are very rare. To date, there are two cases in the literature. In cases who even do not have risk factors related to vaginal delivery such as high birth weight infant and the use of forceps, exc., sacral fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of LBP and hip pain started soon after child birth. Pregnancy-related osteoporosis may lead to fracture during vaginal delivery.

  4. On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress- orstrain-controlled?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalla, R.K.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-02-01

    Despite substantial clinical interest in the fracture resistance of human dentin, there is little mechanistic information in archival literature that can be usefully used to model such fracture. In fact, although the fracture event indent in, akin to other mineralized tissues like bone, is widely believed to be locally strain-controlled, there has never been any scientific proof to support this belief. The present study seeks to address this issue through the use of a novel set of in vitro experiments in Hanks' balanced salt solution involving a double-notched bend test geometry, which is designed to discern whether the critical failure events involved in the onset of fracture are locally stress- or strain-controlled. Such experiments are further used to characterize the notion of ''plasticity'' in dentin and the interaction of cracks with the salient microstructural features. It is observed that fracture in dentin is indeed locally strain-controlled and that the presence of dentinal tubules does not substantially affect this process of crack initiation and growth. The results presented are believed to be critical steps in the development of a micromechanical model for the fracture of human dentin that takes into consideration the influence of both the microstructure and the local failure mode.

  5. Photoelastic stress analysis assisted evaluation of fracture toughness in hydrothermally aged epoxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pitarresi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work has investigated the fracture toughness of a model DGEBA epoxy system subject to Hidro-Thermal aging. A Photoelastic Stress Analysis technique has been implemented, showing the evolution of stresses arising throughout the water uptake process due to the non-uniform swelling of the material. Gravimetric and Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analyses have further complemented the characterization, showing the onset of plasticization effects with aging. The correlation of all previous characterizations has allowed to conclude that an increase of KIC fracture toughness is obtained at the fully saturated condition. In particular Photoelasticity has also revealed the onset of relevant swelling induced stresses during the first stages of water absorption, leading to an increase of fracture toughness due to compressive stresses settling near the crack tip. A stress free condition is instead reestablished at the later stages of absorption, suggesting that the increased toughness of the saturated material is an effect of the modifications induced by aging on the polymer structure.

  6. Estimation of In Situ Stresses with Hydro-Fracturing Tests and a Statistical Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hikweon; Ong, See Hong

    2018-03-01

    At great depths, where borehole-based field stress measurements such as hydraulic fracturing are challenging due to difficult downhole conditions or prohibitive costs, in situ stresses can be indirectly estimated using wellbore failures such as borehole breakouts and/or drilling-induced tensile failures detected by an image log. As part of such efforts, a statistical method has been developed in which borehole breakouts detected on an image log are used for this purpose (Song et al. in Proceedings on the 7th international symposium on in situ rock stress, 2016; Song and Chang in J Geophys Res Solid Earth 122:4033-4052, 2017). The method employs a grid-searching algorithm in which the least and maximum horizontal principal stresses ( S h and S H) are varied, and the corresponding simulated depth-related breakout width distribution as a function of the breakout angle ( θ B = 90° - half of breakout width) is compared to that observed along the borehole to determine a set of S h and S H having the lowest misfit between them. An important advantage of the method is that S h and S H can be estimated simultaneously in vertical wells. To validate the statistical approach, the method is applied to a vertical hole where a set of field hydraulic fracturing tests have been carried out. The stress estimations using the proposed method were found to be in good agreement with the results interpreted from the hydraulic fracturing test measurements.

  7. Thermal/moisture-related stresses and fracture behaviour in solid wood members during forced drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn

    with a drying history that was generated, to verify a model that was used to simulate disc samples of the same type. The stresses were analyzed so as to clarify whether and when critical stress stateswere encountered during the drying process. The reversibility of the mechano-sorptive strains, i...... of wood without injury to the timber itself. When solid wood products are dried from a green condition down to an average moisture content level close to the service life conditions of the final product, significant moisture-induced stresses and related fracturing can occur. The drying stresses arise......, in particular the stress and cracking that takeplace during kiln-drying. Both experimental and numerical work was carried out so as to obtain knowledge regarding stress, strain, mechano-sorption and crackbehaviours in wood during drying.The investigations aimed also at revealing how drying damagecan best...

  8. Epidemiology of stress fracture injuries among US high school athletes, 2005-2006 through 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changstrom, Bradley G; Brou, Lina; Khodaee, Morteza; Braund, Cortney; Comstock, R Dawn

    2015-01-01

    High school athletes in the United States sustain millions of injuries annually, approximately 10% of which are fractures. However, there is no clear estimate of the number of stress fractures sustained by high school athletes annually despite reports that stress fractures account for 0.7% to 20% of injuries seen in sports medicine clinics. This suggests a high utilization of resources for a potentially preventable injury. In addition, stress fractures have been associated with low energy availability and disordered eating in young athletes, highlighting the importance of early recognition and intervention. To investigate stress fracture rates and patterns in a large national sample of US high school athletes. Descriptive epidemiologic study. Data from High School RIO (Reporting Information Online), a national sports injury surveillance study, were analyzed to describe rates and patterns of stress fracture injury sustained from 2005-2006 through 2012-2013, across sports and by sex. From 2005-2006 through 2012-2013, a total of 51,773 injuries were sustained during 25,268,873 athlete-exposures, of which 389 (0.8%) were stress fractures, resulting in an overall stress fracture rate of 1.54 per 100,000 athlete-exposures. Rates per 100,000 athlete-exposures were highest in girls' cross country (10.62), girls' gymnastics (7.43), and boys' cross country (5.42). In sex-comparable sports, girls sustained more stress fractures (63.3%) than did boys (36.7%) and had higher rates of stress fracture (2.22 vs 1.27; rate ratio, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.38-2.23). The most commonly injured sites were the lower leg (40.3% of all stress fractures), foot (34.9%), and lower back/lumbar spine/pelvis (15.2%). Management was nonsurgical in 98.7% of the cases, and 65.3% of injuries resulted in ≥3 weeks of time loss, medical disqualification, or an end to the season before athletes could return to play. Although a rare injury, stress fractures cause considerable morbidity for high school athletes

  9. Spontaneous Subtrochanteric Femoral Stress Fracture Related to Alendronate : A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul CC Chew

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous atypical fractures of the femur have been reported in patients on long-term antiresorptive bisphosphonate therapy. Here, we report a case of subtrochanteric stress fracture in a seventy-year-old female patient on long-term alendronate therapy, and accompanying management challenges. Potential measures to prevent this complication of antiresorptive treatment for osteoporosis include the following: setting strict criteria for prescribing antiresorptive therapy, limiting the duration of continuous antiresorptive therapy, and increasing the use of bone anabolic agents.

  10. Fracture strength of porous ceramics: stress concentration vs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we have reviewed recently published strength-porosity data of porous ceramics, and compared these data with those computed from both the minimum contact solid area (MCA) and the pore stress concentration effect (SCE) models. We observed that the theoretical data (MCA model) matched better the ...

  11. Tension Band Plating for Chronic Anterior Tibial Stress Fractures in High-Performance Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbeda, Robert M; Sculco, Peter K; Urch, Ekaterina Y; Lazaro, Lionel E; Borens, Olivier; Williams, Riley J; Lorich, Dean G; Wellman, David S; Helfet, David L

    2015-07-01

    Anterior tibial stress fractures are associated with high rates of delayed union and nonunion, which can be particularly devastating to a professional athlete who requires rapid return to competition. Current surgical treatment strategies include intramedullary nailing, which has satisfactory rates of fracture union but an associated risk of anterior knee pain. Anterior tension band plating is a biomechanically sound alternative treatment for these fractures. Tension band plating of chronic anterior tibial stress fractures leads to rapid healing and return to physical activity and avoids the anterior knee pain associated with intramedullary nailing. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Between 2001 and 2013, there were 13 chronic anterior tibial stress fractures in 12 professional or collegiate athletes who underwent tension band plating after failing nonoperative management. Patient charts were retrospectively reviewed for demographics, injury history, and surgical details. Radiographs were used to assess time to osseous union. Follow-up notes and phone interviews were used to determine follow-up time, return to training time, and whether the patient was able to return to competition. Cases included 13 stress fractures in 12 patients (9 females, 3 males). Five patients were track-and-field athletes, 4 patients played basketball, 2 patients played volleyball, and 1 was a ballet dancer. Five patients were Division I collegiate athletes and 7 were professional or Olympic athletes. Average age at time of surgery was 23.6 years (range, 20-32 years). Osseous union occurred on average at 9.6 weeks (range, 5.3-16.9 weeks) after surgery. Patients returned to training on average at 11.1 weeks (range, 5.7-20 weeks). Ninety-two percent (12/13) eventually returned to preinjury competition levels. Thirty-eight percent (5/13) underwent removal of hardware for plate prominence. There was no incidence of infection or nonunion. Anterior tension band plating for chronic tibial stress

  12. Relationships among in-situ stress, fractures and faults, and fluid flow: Monterey formation, Santa Maria Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, T.; Barton, C.A.; Zoback, M.D.

    1997-01-01

    We used borehole televiewer (BHTV) data from four wells within the onshore and offshore Santa Maria basin, California, to investigate the relationships among fracture distribution, orientation, and variation with depth and in-situ stress. Our analysis of stress-induced well-bore breakouts shows a uniform northeast maximum horizontal stress (SH max) orientation in each well. This direction is consistent with the SH max direction determined from well-bore breakouts in other wells in this region, the northwest trend of active fold axes, and kinematic inversion of nearby earthquake focal plane mechanisms. In contrast to the uniformity of the stress field, fracture orientation, dip, and frequency vary considerably from well to well and within each well. With depth, fractures can be divided into distinct subsets on the basis of fracture frequency and orientation, which correlate with changes of lithology and physical properties. Although factors such as tectonic history, diagenesis, and structural variations obviously have influenced fracture distribution, integration of the in-situ stress and fracture data sets indicates that many of the fractures, faults, and bedding planes are active, small-scale strike-slip and reverse faults in the current northeast-trending transpressive stress field. In fact, we observed local breakout rotations in the wells, providing kinematic evidence for recent shear motion along fracture and bedding-parallel planes. Only in the onshore well do steeply dipping fractures strike parallel to SHmax. Drill-stem tests from two of the offshore wells indicate that formation permeability is greatly enhanced in sections of the wells where fractures are favorably oriented for shear failure in the modern stress field. Thus, relatively small-scale active faults provide important conduits along which fluids migrate.

  13. A Scaphoid Stress Fracture in a Female Collegiate-Level Shot-Putter and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. Kohring

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Scaphoid stress fractures are rare injuries that have been described in young, high-level athletes who exhibit repetitive loading with the wrist in extension. We present a case of an occult scaphoid stress fracture in a 22-year-old female Division I collegiate shot-putter. She was successfully treated with immobilization in a thumb spica splint for 6 weeks. Loaded wrist extension activities can predispose certain high-level athletes to sustain scaphoid stress fractures, and a high index of suspicion in this patient population may aid prompt diagnosis and management of this rare injury.

  14. Reference point indentation is not indicative of whole mouse bone measures of stress intensity fracture toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriero, Alessandra; Bruse, Jan L; Oldknow, Karla J; Millán, José Luis; Farquharson, Colin; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2014-12-01

    Bone fragility is a concern for aged and diseased bone. Measuring bone toughness and understanding fracture properties of the bone are critical for predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease and for preclinical testing of therapies. A reference point indentation technique (BioDent) has recently been developed to determine bone's resistance to fracture in a minimally invasive way by measuring the indentation distance increase (IDI) between the first and last indentations over cyclic indentations in the same position. In this study, we investigate the relationship between fracture toughness KC and reference point indentation parameters (i.e. IDI, total indentation distance (TID) and creep indentation distance (CID)) in bones from 38 mice from six types (C57Bl/6, Balb, oim/oim, oim/+, Phospho1(-/-) and Phospho1 wild type counterpart). These mice bone are models of healthy and diseased bone spanning a range of fracture toughness from very brittle (oim/oim) to ductile (Phospho1(-/-)). Left femora were dissected, notched and tested in 3-point bending until complete failure. Contralateral femora were dissected and indented in 10 sites of their anterior and posterior shaft surface over 10 indentation cycles. IDI, TID and CID were measured. Results from this study suggest that reference point indentation parameters are not indicative of stress intensity fracture toughness in mouse bone. In particular, the IDI values at the anterior mid-diaphysis across mouse types overlapped, making it difficult to discern differences between mouse types, despite having extreme differences in stress intensity based toughness measures. When more locations of indentation were considered, the normalised IDIs could distinguish between mouse types. Future studies should investigate the relationship of the reference point indentation parameters for mouse bone in other material properties of the bone tissue in order to determine their use for measuring bone quality. Copyright © 2014

  15. Revisiting fracture gradient: Comments on “A new approaching method to estimate fracture gradient by correcting Matthew–Kelly and Eaton's stress ratio”

    KAUST Repository

    Hakiki, Farizal

    2017-07-25

    A study performed by Marbun et al. [1] claimed that “A new methodology to predict fracture pressure from former calculations, Matthew–Kelly and Eaton are proposed.” Also, Marbun et al.\\'s paper stated that “A new value of Poisson\\'s and a stress ratio of the formation were generated and the accuracy of fracture gradient was improved.” We found those all statements are incorrect and some misleading concepts are revealed. An attempt to expose the method of fracture gradient determination from industry practice also appears to solidify that our arguments are acceptable to against improper Marbun et al.\\'s claims.

  16. Numerical Investigation of the Time-Dependent and the Proppant Dominated Stress Shadow Effects in a Transverse Multiple Fracture System and Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a numerical study is conducted to investigate the stress shadow effects (stress reorientation and change during hydraulic fracturing in a transverse multiple fracture system. A numerical model is used for the numerical study. It is a 3D model and can simulate the fracture operation from injection begin to full closure (fracture contact. Therefore, there is no need to assume the fracture geometry for the investigation of the stress shadow effects (unlike previous studies. In the numerical study, the first and second operations in a fictive transverse multiple fracture system are simulated, meanwhile the stress shadow effects and their influences on the propagation and proppant placement of the second fracture are investigated. According to the results, the following conclusions are discerned: (1 most proppants are located in the lower part of the reservoir, even below the perforation; (2 the stress shadow effects are time-dependent and proppant dominated; (3 the stress shadow effects affect the fracture propagation and the proppant placement of the second fracture, and also the fracture conductivity of the first fracture; (4 the time-dependent stress shadow effects can be divided into four phases, fracture enlargement, closure without proppant contact, closure with proppant contact and full closure; and (5 the superposition effect of the stress shadow in a transverse multiple fracture system exists. According to the conclusions, some optimizations are recommended.

  17. Calcaneal stress fracture: an adverse event following total hip and total knee arthroplasty: a report of five cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Takaaki; Miki, Takahito; Nishiyama, Akihiro

    2014-01-15

    Stress fractures have been reported to occur in the pubis, femoral neck, proximal part of the tibia, and fabella during the postoperative period following total knee or total hip arthroplasty. However, to our knowledge, calcaneal stress fractures after total hip or total knee arthroplasty have not been reported in the English-language literature. Most orthopaedic surgeons are not familiar with calcaneal stress fractures that may occur in elderly patients after a total knee or total hip arthroplasty. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical features, imaging findings, and bone mineral content of the proximal part of the femur and the distal end of the radius in five patients who had a calcaneal stress fracture after a total knee or total hip arthroplasty. All patients were women with a mean age of 76.8 years. All fractures occurred in the calcaneus on the same side as the arthroplasty. The fracture appeared at a mean of 10.2 weeks postoperatively. All patients reported heel pain on walking. Swelling and local heat were found in four and three patients, respectively. Pain was elicited by squeezing the calcaneus in all patients. Early radiographs had normal findings in two patients, and an irregular sclerotic line appeared later in the radiographs of all patients. All fractures were treated conservatively. Four fractures healed uneventfully, but one fracture displaced. All patients had osteoporosis. Calcaneal stress fractures during the postoperative period following total knee or total hip arthroplasty may not be as rare as previously thought. Because clinical symptoms of the fracture appear insidiously and radiographic findings are absent or subtle in the early stage, a high index of suspicion is needed for orthopaedic surgeons to make the correct diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging or repeated radiographs may be necessary to make the correct diagnosis when no abnormality is apparent on the initial radiograph.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF IN-SITU STRESS AND PERMEABILITY IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2002-12-31

    We have extended a three-dimensional finite difference elastic wave propagation model previously developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Earth Resources Laboratory (ERL) for modeling and analyzing the effect of fractures on seismic waves. The code has been translated into C language and parallelized [using message passing interface (MPI)] to allow for larger models to be run on Linux PC computer clusters. We have also obtained another 3-D code from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, which we will use for verification of our ERL code results and also to run discrete fracture models. Testing of both codes is underway. We are working on a new finite difference model of borehole wave propagation for stressed formations. This code includes coordinate stretching to provide stable, variable grid sizes that will allow us to model the thin fluid annulus layers in borehole problems, especially for acoustic logging while drilling (LWD) applications. We are also extending our analysis routines for the inversion of flexural wave dispersion measurements for in situ stress estimates. Initial results on synthetic and limited field data are promising for a method to invert cross dipole data for the rotation angle and stress state simultaneously. A meeting is being scheduled between MIT and Shell Oil Company scientists to look at data from a fractured carbonate reservoir that may be made available to the project. The Focus/Disco seismic processing system from Paradigm Geophysical has been installed at ERL for field data analysis and as a platform for new analysis modules. We have begun to evaluate the flow properties of discrete fracture distributions through a simple 2D numerical model. Initial results illustrate how fluid flow pathways are very sensitive to variations in the geometry and apertures of fracture network.

  19. Negative magnetic resonance imaging in three cases of anterior tibial cortex stress fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Ralph; Moghal, M.; Newton, J.L.; Jones, N. [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Sport and Exercise Medicine, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Oxford (United Kingdom); Teh, J. [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-12-15

    Anterior mid-tibial cortex stress fractures (ATCSF) are uncommon and notoriously challenging to treat. They are termed high risk due to their predilection to prolonged recovery, nonunion and complete fracture. Early diagnosis is essential to avoid progression and reduce fracture complications. Imaging plays a key role in confirming the diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is accepted as the gold standard modality due to its high accuracy and nonionizing properties. This report describes three cases of ATCSFs in recreational athletes who had positive radiographic findings with no significant MRI changes. Two athletes had multiple striations within their tibias. Despite the radiographic findings, their severity of symptoms were low with mild or no tenderness on examination. Clinicians should be mindful that the ATCSFs may not present with typical acute stress fracture symptoms. We recommend that plain radiographs should be used as the first line investigation when suspecting ATCSFs. Clinicians should be aware that despite MRI being considered the gold standard imaging modality, we report three cases where the MRI was unremarkable, whilst radiographs and computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis. We urge clinicians to continue to use radiographs as the first line imaging modality for ATCSFs and not to directly rely on MRI. Those who opt directly for MRI may be falsely reassured causing a delay in diagnosis. (orig.)

  20. Negative magnetic resonance imaging in three cases of anterior tibial cortex stress fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Ralph; Moghal, M.; Newton, J.L.; Jones, N.; Teh, J.

    2017-01-01

    Anterior mid-tibial cortex stress fractures (ATCSF) are uncommon and notoriously challenging to treat. They are termed high risk due to their predilection to prolonged recovery, nonunion and complete fracture. Early diagnosis is essential to avoid progression and reduce fracture complications. Imaging plays a key role in confirming the diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is accepted as the gold standard modality due to its high accuracy and nonionizing properties. This report describes three cases of ATCSFs in recreational athletes who had positive radiographic findings with no significant MRI changes. Two athletes had multiple striations within their tibias. Despite the radiographic findings, their severity of symptoms were low with mild or no tenderness on examination. Clinicians should be mindful that the ATCSFs may not present with typical acute stress fracture symptoms. We recommend that plain radiographs should be used as the first line investigation when suspecting ATCSFs. Clinicians should be aware that despite MRI being considered the gold standard imaging modality, we report three cases where the MRI was unremarkable, whilst radiographs and computed tomography confirmed the diagnosis. We urge clinicians to continue to use radiographs as the first line imaging modality for ATCSFs and not to directly rely on MRI. Those who opt directly for MRI may be falsely reassured causing a delay in diagnosis. (orig.)

  1. Proximal base stress fracture of the second metatarsal in a Highland dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Hannah Isabella; O'Donnell, Barry; Hopper, Graeme Philip; Chang, Winston

    2013-06-26

    A 15-year-old female Highland dancer presented to the accident and emergency department with an ankle inversion injury on a background of several weeks of pain in the right foot. A radiograph of the right foot demonstrated a stress fracture at the base of the second metatarsal. She was treated conservatively with a below knee removable supportive walking boot with a rocker bottom sole. She re-presented to the accident and emergency department 3 weeks later with pins and needles in the right foot; she was given crutches to use along side the supportive walking boot. Radiographs 12 weeks after the first presentation showed healing of the stress fracture. The patient was now asymptomatic of the injury. She was unable to fully train for 12 weeks due to the injury. Conservative management was successful in this patient.

  2. A case of bilateral stress fractures in an old woman: three years of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Dell'Omo, Dario; Gambini, Francesco; Di Rollo, Federica; Guido, Giulio

    2014-05-01

    In elderly patients frequent episodes of joint pain of lower limbs exacerbated by stress and resistant to treatment occur frequently. This paper reports a case of a long lasting bilateral atraumatic knee pain with a final diagnosis of bilateral stress fractures of proximal tibia in osteoporotic postmenopausal woman. The distinctive trait of this case is that the fracture has set in bilaterally and associated with an isthmic L4-L5 spondylolisthesis in a patient afflicted by a decline in mood. This particular clinical picture has delayed the diagnosis and the suitable treatment for 3 years. Therapy for this type of patients must aim in the acute phase at pain relief and only after must be settled in a long term antiosteoporotic therapy. We choose clodronate acyd for pain relief and after strontium ranelate for osteoporosis prevention.

  3. Evidence of Deep Water Penetration in Silica during Stress Corrosion Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Lechenault, F.; Rountree, C. L.; Cousin, F.; Bouchaud, J.-P.; Ponson, L.; Bouchaud, E.

    2011-01-01

    We measure the thickness of the heavy water layer trapped under the stress corrosion fracture surface of silica using neutron reflectivity experiments. We show that the penetration depth is 65-85 \\aa ngstr\\"{o}ms, suggesting the presence of a damaged zone of $\\approx$ 100 \\aa ngstr\\"{o}ms extending ahead of the crack tip during its propagation. This estimate of the size of the damaged zone is compatible with other recent results.

  4. Bone strength estimates relative to vertical ground reaction force discriminates women runners with stress fracture history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Kristin L; McDermott, William; Hughes, Julie M; Baxter, Stephanie A; Stovitz, Steven D; Petit, Moira A

    2017-01-01

    To determine differences in bone geometry, estimates of bone strength, muscle size and bone strength relative to load, in women runners with and without a history of stress fracture. We recruited 32 competitive distance runners aged 18-35, with (SFX, n=16) or without (NSFX, n=16) a history of stress fracture for this case-control study. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) was used to assess volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD, mg/mm 3 ), total (ToA) and cortical (CtA) bone areas (mm 2 ), and estimated compressive bone strength (bone strength index; BSI, mg/mm 4 ) at the distal tibia. ToA, CtA, cortical vBMD, and estimated strength (section modulus; Zp, mm 3 and strength strain index; SSIp, mm 3 ) were measured at six cortical sites along the tibia. Mean active peak vertical (pkZ) ground reaction forces (GRFs), assessed from a fatigue run on an instrumented treadmill, were used in conjunction with pQCT measurements to estimate bone strength relative to load (mm 2 /N∗kg -1 ) at all cortical sites. SSIp and Zp were 9-11% lower in the SFX group at mid-shaft of the tibia, while ToA and vBMD did not differ between groups at any measurement site. The SFX group had 11-17% lower bone strength relative to mean pkZ GRFs (phistory of stress fracture. Bone strength relative to load is also lower in this same region suggesting that strength deficits in the middle 1/3 of the tibia and altered gait biomechanics may predispose an individual to stress fracture. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Investigation of Polyaxial Stress-Dependent Permeability of Three-Dimensional Fractured Rocks using TOUGH-DPUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L.; Tang, X.; Lei, Q.; Liu, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Discontinuities, such as joints, faults and bedding planes, widely exist in crustal rocks, and often dominate hydro-mechanical processes in the subsurface. The understanding of the nontrivial effect of natural fractures on hydrological properties of rock masses is important for many engineering applications (e.g. petroleum recovery, groundwater management and geothermal production). In this work, we study the influence of polyaxial (ture-triaxial) stresses on the permeability of a three-dimensional (3D) fractured rock using a fully-coupled TOUGH-DPUM numerical model. The geomechanical behavior of the 3D fractured rock in response to in-situ stresses is modeled by a certain of discontinuous partition of unity methods (DPUM), which can capture the deformation of matrix blocks, variation of stress field, shear and opening of pre-existing fractures, and propagation of new cracks; the fluid flow through the fractured porous media is modeled by TOUGH2, which can capture the flow dynamics in both fractures and porous matrix. Simulation of fully-coupled hydro-mechanical processes is achieved by conservatively linking the solid and fluid fields during the iterative computation. A series of numerical simulations is designed to load the fractured rock using various polyaxial in-situ stresses and the stress-dependent flow permeability is further calculated.

  6. Stress fractures of the base of the metatarsal bones in young trainee ballet dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisetti, Walter; De Bartolomeo, Omar; Tagliabue, Lorenzo; Camerucci, Emanuela; Calori, Giorgio Maria

    2009-01-01

    Classical ballet is an art form requiring extraordinary physical activity, characterised by rigorous training. These can lead to many overuse injuries arising from repetitive minor trauma. The purpose of this paper is to report our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of stress fractures at the base of the second and third metatarsal bones in young ballet dancers. We considered 150 trainee ballet dancers from the Ballet Schools of "Teatro Alla Scala" of Milan from 2005 to 2007. Nineteen of them presented with stress fractures of the base of the metatarsal bones. We treated 18 dancers with external shockwave therapy (ESWT) and one with pulsed electromagnetic fields (EMF) and low-intensity ultrasound (US); all patients were recommended rest. In all cases good results were obtained. The best approach to metatarsal stress fractures is to diagnose them early through clinical examination and then through X-ray and MRI. ESWT gave good results, with a relatively short time of rest from the patients’ activities and a return to dancing without pain. PMID:19415273

  7. Stress fractures of the base of the metatarsal bones in young trainee ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisetti, Walter; Perugia, Dario; De Bartolomeo, Omar; Tagliabue, Lorenzo; Camerucci, Emanuela; Calori, Giorgio Maria

    2010-02-01

    Classical ballet is an art form requiring extraordinary physical activity, characterised by rigorous training. These can lead to many overuse injuries arising from repetitive minor trauma. The purpose of this paper is to report our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of stress fractures at the base of the second and third metatarsal bones in young ballet dancers. We considered 150 trainee ballet dancers from the Ballet Schools of "Teatro Alla Scala" of Milan from 2005 to 2007. Nineteen of them presented with stress fractures of the base of the metatarsal bones. We treated 18 dancers with external shockwave therapy (ESWT) and one with pulsed electromagnetic fields (EMF) and low-intensity ultrasound (US); all patients were recommended rest. In all cases good results were obtained. The best approach to metatarsal stress fractures is to diagnose them early through clinical examination and then through X-ray and MRI. ESWT gave good results, with a relatively short time of rest from the patients' activities and a return to dancing without pain.

  8. A model of three-dimensional topographic stresses with implications for bedrock fractures, surface processes, and landscape evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, S.; Perron, J. T.; Martel, S. J.; Holbrook, W. S.; St. Clair, J.

    2017-04-01

    Bedrock fractures influence the rates of surface processes that drive landscape evolution and are in turn influenced by landforms that perturb ambient tectonic and gravitational stress fields. In this modeling study, we examine how three-dimensional topography and tectonic stress regimes influence elastic stress fields and bedrock fracture patterns beneath Earth's surface. We illustrate general effects of landform orientation and of tectonic stress magnitude and anisotropy using boundary element models of stresses beneath synthetic elongated ridges with different aspect ratios. We then examine the more detailed effects of landform shape using natural landscapes in Colorado and South Carolina. We show that the stress field is most sensitive to topographic perturbations if the most compressive horizontal tectonic stress is oriented perpendicular to the long axis of elongated landforms such as ridges and valleys and that topographic stress perturbations are most pronounced beneath landforms with higher mean curvatures, such as channel junctions and ridge crests. The shape of a predicted fracture-rich zone in the subsurface depends mainly on the orientation of landforms relative to the most compressive horizontal tectonic stress direction and a dimensionless ratio that expresses the relative magnitudes of topographic stresses associated with horizontal tectonic compression and topographic relief. Variations in this dimensionless ratio can also change the predicted orientations of potential opening-mode fracture planes. We use these model results to illustrate how topographic perturbations of three-dimensional tectonic and gravitational stresses could influence landscape evolution by altering the rates and spatial heterogeneity of surface processes and groundwater flow.

  9. Bilateral subtrochanteric stress fractures in a Dambali mystic dancer--a unique complication of a Sufi ritual. Case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzaffar, Nasir; Hussain, Iftikhar; Ahmad, Nawaz; Moosa, Mohammad; Shah, Nissar

    2013-01-01

    Stress fractures are commonly seen among soldiers and athletes with the usual sites being the tibia, fibula or the metatarsals. Clinical examination may not be very helpful in such cases unless a high degree of suspicion is directed towards the pathology. We present a case of bilateral synchronous subtrochanteric stress fractures in a Sufi mystic dancer who presented with mild leg pain. The patient responded well to rest and conservative management.

  10. Stress trajectory and advanced hydraulic-fracture simulations for the Eastern Gas Shales Project. Final report, April 30, 1981-July 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Advani, S.H.; Lee, J.K.

    1983-01-01

    A summary review of hydraulic fracture modeling is given. Advanced hydraulic fracture model formulations and simulation, using the finite element method, are presented. The numerical examples include the determination of fracture width, height, length, and stress intensity factors with the effects of frac fluid properties, layered strata, in situ stresses, and joints. Future model extensions are also recommended. 66 references, 23 figures.

  11. Influence of chemistry and climate on large induced large scale stresses in anisotropically fractured carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, R.; Cornet, F.

    2012-04-01

    We will explore a simple model coupling for carbonate rocks the fracture density and orientation, the water chemistry and transport, the dissolution reactions and the expected irreversible rock deformation. Adding elasticity and boundary conditions, plus an estimation of the water source composition in the formation, we will estimate orders of magnitudes of the stress changes that can be expected from these processes in sedimentary basins over long times. We will in particular examine whether such intrinsic deformation mechanism can give a hint to explain the observed anisotropic stresses, in orientation and magnitude, in zones above the C.O.X. argillite formation in the Paris Basin, where the horizontal stress anisotropy has been shown to be important, whereas stress decoupling from the deep crustal roots should be effective, and no strong anisotropy would be expected in the absence of active deformation mechanism. In the Paris basin, the analysis of log cores shows that fractures and joints, up to meter-long ones, are common anisotropic features present in the carbonate rocks. Dissolution of calcite along these oriented features removes material with an a priori oriented flux reflecting this structural anisotropy, resulting in a non-isotropic deformation associated to this dissolution. We will present a simple model where dissolution and transport of dissolved calcite is associated with the deformation of the carbonate rock. Estimating the reaction constants, the chemical composition variation of the meteoric water, the rock permeability and the fracture density from observations around the Bure underground laboratory, we will estimate the order of magnitude of the deformations expected from these types of mechanisms. Such estimates have already been performed for dissolution along stylolites, e.g. by Clark, 1966; Renard et al., 2004; Schmittbuhl et al., 2004; Koehn et al., 2007. We will adapt these to reflect the anisotropic feature of the fractures present in

  12. Intergranular fracture stress and phosphorus grain boundary segregation of a Mn-Ni-Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naudin, C.; Frund, J.M.; Pineau, A.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steel A508 class 3 which is a low alloyed steel is not usually sensitive to reversible temper embrittlement when properly heat treated. However heterogeneous zones may be present in particular near the inner side of the vessel. These zones result from the segregation of the alloying elements (C, Mn, Ni, Mo) and impurities (S, P) taking place during solidification of the material. They are called segregated zones (or ghost lines). They can reach 2 mm thick along the radius and 30 mm long through the circumferential direction. Their susceptibility to reversible temper embrittlement is mainly due to grain boundary phosphorus segregation triggering brittle intergranular fracture when the material is tested at low temperature. In this material like in other steels the influence of some other alloying elements (Mo, Mn...) is clearly significant and should also be taken into account. But phosphorus effect has proved to be predominant. The aim of the present study is therefore to find out a quantitative relationship between grain boundary phosphorus segregation and critical intergranular fracture stress. A synthetic steel with a chemical composition representative of an average segregated zone was prepared for the present study. A number of heat treatments were applied to reach different embrittlement conditions. Then brittle fracture properties were obtained by performing cryogenic fracture tests on notched tensile specimens while the corresponding grain boundary phosphorus levels were measured by Auger electron spectroscopy. Systematic fractographic observations were carried out. Moreover an attempt to determine the influence of temperature on the critical intergranular fracture stress was made

  13. Intergranular fracture stress and phosphorus grain boundary segregation of a Mn-Ni-Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naudin, C.; Frund, J.M. [EDF, Moret sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Pineau, A. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Evry (France). Centre des Materiaux

    1999-04-09

    Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steel A508 class 3 which is a low alloyed steel is not usually sensitive to reversible temper embrittlement when properly heat treated. However heterogeneous zones may be present in particular near the inner side of the vessel. These zones result from the segregation of the alloying elements (C, Mn, Ni, Mo) and impurities (S, P) taking place during solidification of the material. They are called segregated zones (or ghost lines). They can reach 2 mm thick along the radius and 30 mm long through the circumferential direction. Their susceptibility to reversible temper embrittlement is mainly due to grain boundary phosphorus segregation triggering brittle intergranular fracture when the material is tested at low temperature. In this material like in other steels the influence of some other alloying elements (Mo, Mn...) is clearly significant and should also be taken into account. But phosphorus effect has proved to be predominant. The aim of the present study is therefore to find out a quantitative relationship between grain boundary phosphorus segregation and critical intergranular fracture stress. A synthetic steel with a chemical composition representative of an average segregated zone was prepared for the present study. A number of heat treatments were applied to reach different embrittlement conditions. Then brittle fracture properties were obtained by performing cryogenic fracture tests on notched tensile specimens while the corresponding grain boundary phosphorus levels were measured by Auger electron spectroscopy. Systematic fractographic observations were carried out. Moreover an attempt to determine the influence of temperature on the critical intergranular fracture stress was made.

  14. Femoral Neck Stress Fractures in Children Younger Than 10 Years of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Matthew J; Hogue, Grant D; Heyworth, Benton E; Ackerman, Kathryn; Quinn, Bridget; Yen, Yi-Meng

    2017-03-01

    Femoral neck stress fractures are rare in healthy children, with only 9 cases previously reported. The present article reviews our institutional experience with femoral neck stress fractures in children younger than 10 years of age, to highlight the unique features of this condition. We undertook a retrospective review of clinical records of patients who had been treated at our institution for an idiopathic femoral neck stress fracture between 2000 and 2014. To focus on children rather than adolescents, the World Health Organization's definition of adolescent as a person between 10 and 19 years of age was used; we thereby limited our analysis to patients younger than 10 years of age. The study included 6 patients (3 males, 3 females) treated for an idiopathic femoral neck stress fracture, with a mean age at diagnosis of 7.7 years (range, 5.2 to 8.9 y). All patients presented with a limp, which worsened with activity and had persisted for a mean of 5 weeks (range, 2 to 9 wk). None of the patients had experienced an increase in activity level or sporting volume before symptom onset. On examination, 3 patients experienced pain with terminal hip flexion and 3 patients demonstrated pain-free hip range of motion. Plain radiography demonstrated inferior femoral neck cortical disruption, suggesting a compression-type stress fracture mechanism. The diagnosis was confirmed by cross-sectional imaging in all cases. All patients were initially treated with 6 to 8 weeks of non-weight-bearing followed by 4 to 6 weeks of partial weight-bearing, leading to complete healing in 4 patients. Two patients demonstrated incomplete healing and were managed with spica casting for an additional 6 weeks. Our case series illustrates the unique features of this rare condition in children, with a history and examination profile distinct from those of adolescents and adults. Compliance with weight-bearing restrictions is difficult in this population and hip spica casting may be required to permit

  15. Additional Stress And Fracture Mechanics Analyses Of Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  16. Stress fractures of the metacarpal bones in adolescent tennis players: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balius, Ramon; Pedret, Carles; Estruch, Assun; Hernández, Gemma; Ruiz-Cotorro, Angel; Mota, Javier

    2010-06-01

    There are 12 reported cases of metacarpal stress fractures in athletes, with only 4 of them involving the second metacarpal. The authors describe stress fracture of the second metacarpal bone in teenaged tennis players and the relationship with sport intensity and type of grip used. They also demonstrate that magnetic resonance imaging is the diagnostic study of choice to differentiate this entity from the most common cause of pain in this region of the hand in tennis players-the carpal boss. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Seven adolescent tennis players (mean age, 16.5 years; 6 female, 1 male) with dorsal hand pain produced by playing tennis were examined by radiographs and initial magnetic resonance imaging. In 2 cases, bone scintigraphy was performed. In the first 2 cases, the presumptive diagnosis was a carpal boss, but with this experience, the diagnostic evaluation of the last 5 cases was oriented toward a stress reaction at this level. Radiologic follow-up was performed. The authors also evaluated the grip type used by each tennis player. Clinical evaluation and imaging studies resulted in a diagnosis of stress injury of the second metatarsal in 6 of 7 cases, with the seventh case involving the third metacarpal. Initial imaging was positive in 3 cases, revealing an increased signal in the marrow without hairline crack and cortical thickening of the shaft or simply an increased signal in the marrow. In all cases, there was a history of recent increase in the sport training load. Six of the 7 tennis players were using a semi-Western or Western grip. Stress fractures of the second metacarpal are characteristic of adolescent tennis players and are associated with an increased intensity of tennis play and may be associated with use of the semi-Western or Western grip. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most useful tool for obtaining a definitive diagnosis.

  17. A geometrically based method for predicting stress-induced fracture aperture and flow in discrete fracture networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Bertotti, Giovanni; Nick, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of fluid flow in naturally fractured reservoirs is often done through modeling and upscaling of discrete fracture networks (DFNs). The two-dimensional fracture geometry required for DFNs is obtained from subsurface and outcropping analog data. However, these data provide little information...... networks, digitized from outcropping pavements. These networks cover a wide range of possible geometries and spatial distributions. The geometrically based method predicts the average hydraulic aperture and equivalent permeability of fractured porous media with error margins of less than 5%....

  18. Mean load effect on fatigue of welded joints using structural stress and fracture mechanics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Cheol; Jin, Tae Eun; Dong, P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to ensure the structural integrity of nuclear welded structures during design life, the fatigue life has to be evaluated by fatigue analysis procedures presented in technical codes such as ASME B and PV Code Section III. However, existing fatigue analysis procedures do not explicitly consider the presence of welded joints. A new fatigue analysis procedure based on a structural stress/fracture mechanics approach has been recently developed in order to reduce conservatism by erasing uncertainty in the analysis procedure. A recent review of fatigue crack growth data under various mean loading conditions using the structural stress/fracture mechanics approach, does not consider the mean loading effect, revealed some significant discrepancies in fatigue crack growth curves according to the mean loading conditions. In this paper, we propose the use of the stress intensity factor range ΔK characterized with loading ratio R effects in terms of the structural stress. We demonstrate the effectiveness in characterizing fatigue crack growth and S-N behavior using the well-known data. It was identified that the S-N data under high mean loading could be consolidated in a master S-N curve for welded joints

  19. Fracture mechanics study on stress corrosion cracking behavior under corrosive environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tomoyuki; Tohgo, Keiichiro; Shimamura, Yoshinobu; Ishizuka, Naohiro; Takanashi, Masahiro; Itabashi, Yu; Nakayama, Gen; Sakakibara, Yohei; Hirano, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with applicability of non-linear fracture mechanics to crack growth by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under large-scale yielding and in a plastically deformed area. Crack growth test by compact tension specimen is carried out to evaluate crack growth rate under small-scale and large-scale yielding conditions. To evaluate the crack growth behavior from a crack initiated in a plastically deformed area, crack growth test is also carried out for a very short pre-crack in a plastically deformed four-point bending specimen. Conventional stress intensity factor (K) and equivalent stress intensity factor (K J ) defined by J integral are used as fracture mechanics parameters which characterize the crack growth rate. On da/dt-K diagram, a data band shows wide scatter, especially the crack growth rate in a plastically deformed area is higher than that under small-scale yielding condition. On the other hand, da/dt-K J diagram exhibits narrower scatter on a data band than da/dt-K diagram. The equivalent stress intensity factor is appropriate for characterization of crack growth rate by SCC under small-scale yielding through large scale yielding conditions and in a plastically deformed area. (author)

  20. Relationship between in-situ stress and fractures and faults in the Monterey Formation, Santa Maria Basin, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkbeiner, T.; Barton, C.A.; Zoback, M.D. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

    1996-01-01

    Borehole televiewer (BHTV) data from four wells within the on- and offshore Santa Maria Basin were utilized to investigate the relationship between fracture distribution, orientation, and variation with depth and in situ stress. Analysis of stress-induced wellbore breakouts in each well shows a uniform NE-SW maximum horizontal stress (S[sub Hmax]) orientation with depth. This is consistent with the regional S[sub Hmax] direction throughout the entire seismogenic part of the crust as determined from other wellbore breakout data, NW-SE trends of active fold axes and results of kinematic stress-inversion of earthquake focal plane mechanisms. In marked contrast to the uniform stress field, analysis of fractures indicates that their orientation, dip, and frequency vary considerably within each well and laterally among them. With depth, fractures can be generally divided into distinct subsets on the basis of fracture frequency and predominant strike and dip directions. These subsets correlate with changes of lithology and physical properties indicating that factors such as tectonic history, diagenesis and structural variations may have strongly influenced the initiation and propagation of fractures. Only in the onshore well do steeply-dipping fractures strike parallel to S[sub Hmax] and are interpreted as Mode I extension fractures. In the three offshore wells, the fracture strike is mainly oblique or orthogonal to S[sub Hmax] suggesting that they may be distributed strike-slip or reverse faults. We believe currently active faults in the NE-SW transpressional deformation regime play a crucial role for fluid migration by providing permeability enhanced flow paths. Drill stem tests conducted in two of the offshore wells indicate that formation permeability is greatly enhanced in sections of the well where fractures strike predominantly perpendicular to S[sub Hmax] and dip at moderate to steep angles.

  1. Relationship between in-situ stress and fractures and faults in the Monterey Formation, Santa Maria Basin, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkbeiner, T.; Barton, C.A.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Borehole televiewer (BHTV) data from four wells within the on- and offshore Santa Maria Basin were utilized to investigate the relationship between fracture distribution, orientation, and variation with depth and in situ stress. Analysis of stress-induced wellbore breakouts in each well shows a uniform NE-SW maximum horizontal stress (S{sub Hmax}) orientation with depth. This is consistent with the regional S{sub Hmax} direction throughout the entire seismogenic part of the crust as determined from other wellbore breakout data, NW-SE trends of active fold axes and results of kinematic stress-inversion of earthquake focal plane mechanisms. In marked contrast to the uniform stress field, analysis of fractures indicates that their orientation, dip, and frequency vary considerably within each well and laterally among them. With depth, fractures can be generally divided into distinct subsets on the basis of fracture frequency and predominant strike and dip directions. These subsets correlate with changes of lithology and physical properties indicating that factors such as tectonic history, diagenesis and structural variations may have strongly influenced the initiation and propagation of fractures. Only in the onshore well do steeply-dipping fractures strike parallel to S{sub Hmax} and are interpreted as Mode I extension fractures. In the three offshore wells, the fracture strike is mainly oblique or orthogonal to S{sub Hmax} suggesting that they may be distributed strike-slip or reverse faults. We believe currently active faults in the NE-SW transpressional deformation regime play a crucial role for fluid migration by providing permeability enhanced flow paths. Drill stem tests conducted in two of the offshore wells indicate that formation permeability is greatly enhanced in sections of the well where fractures strike predominantly perpendicular to S{sub Hmax} and dip at moderate to steep angles.

  2. Treatment of stress fracture of the olecranon in throwing athletes with internal fixation through a small incision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujioka Hiroyuki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study is a report of retrospective case series of stress fracture of the olecranon. Six patients presented posterior elbow pain in throwing in baseball and softball, but fracture was not diagnosed in radiographs. We detected stress fracture of the olecranon using computed tomographic (CT scan and treated the patient with internal fixation with a headless cannulated double threaded screw through a small skin incision. All patients returned to competitive level without elbow complaints after the operation. When throwing athletes present with unusual posterior elbow pain and no significant findings on radiographs, a CT scan examination should be performed. We recommend surgical treatment of internal fixation with a screw through a small skin incision, as a good option for stress fracture of the olecranon in order to allow early return to sports activity in competitive athletes.

  3. Hedgehog signaling mediates woven bone formation and vascularization during stress fracture healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmers, Nikolas H; McKenzie, Jennifer A; Shen, Tony S; Long, Fanxin; Silva, Matthew J

    2015-12-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is critical in developmental osteogenesis, and recent studies suggest it may also play a role in regulating osteogenic gene expression in the post-natal setting. However, there is a void of studies directly assessing the effect of Hh inhibition on post-natal osteogenesis. This study utilized a cyclic loading-induced ulnar stress fracture model to evaluate the hypothesis that Hh signaling contributes to osteogenesis and angiogenesis during stress fracture healing. Immediately prior to loading, adult rats were given GDC-0449 (Vismodegib - a selective Hh pathway inhibitor; 50mg/kg orally twice daily), or vehicle. Hh signaling was upregulated in response to stress fracture at 3 days (Ptch1, Gli1 expression), and was markedly inhibited by GDC-0449 at 1 day and 3 days in the loaded and non-loaded ulnae. GDC-0449 did not affect Hh ligand expression (Shh, Ihh, Dhh) at 1 day, but decreased Shh expression by 37% at 3 days. GDC-0449 decreased woven bone volume (-37%) and mineral density (-17%) at 7 days. Dynamic histomorphometry revealed that the 7 day callus was composed predominantly of woven bone in both groups. The observed reduction in woven bone occurred concomitantly with decreased expression of Alpl and Ibsp, but was not associated with differences in early cellular proliferation (as determined by callus PCNA staining at 3 days), osteoblastic differentiation (Osx expression at 1 day and 3 days), chondrogenic gene expression (Acan, Sox9, and Col2α1 expression at 1 day and 3 days), or bone resorption metrics (callus TRAP staining at 3 days, Rankl and Opg expression at 1 day and 3 days). To evaluate angiogenesis, vWF immunohistochemistry showed that GDC-0449 reduced fracture callus blood vessel density by 55% at 3 days, which was associated with increased Hif1α gene expression (+30%). Dynamic histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that GDC-0449 also inhibited lamellar bone formation. Lamellar bone analysis of the loaded limb (directly adjacent

  4. Negative magnetic resonance imaging in femoral neck stress fracture with joint effusion: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Nobutoshi; Okuyama, Koichiro; Kamo, Keiji; Chiba, Mitsuho [Akita Rosai Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Odate, Akita (Japan); Shimada, Yoichi [Akita University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Akita (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Femoral neck stress fracture (FNSF) is well documented in the orthopedic literature and is generally associated with strenuous activities such as long-distance running and military training. The diagnostic yield of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for FNSF was reported to be 100 %, and early MRI is recommended when this fracture is suspected. We encountered a 16-year-old male long-distance runner with FNSF in whom the left femoral neck showed no signal changes on MRI although an effusion was detected in the left hip joint. One month later, roentgenograms revealed periosteal callus and oblique consolidation of the left femoral neck, confirming the diagnosis of compression FNSF. Because FNSF with a normal bone marrow signal on MRI is very rare, this patient is presented here. (orig.)

  5. On the expected relationships among apparent stress, static stress drop, effective shear fracture energy, and efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, N.M.; Wong, T.-F.; Hickman, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    We consider expected relationships between apparent stress ??a and static stress drop ????s using a standard energy balance and find ??a = ????s (0.5 - ??), where ?? is stress overshoot. A simple implementation of this balance is to assume overshoot is constant; then apparent stress should vary linearly with stress drop, consistent with spectral theories (Brune, 1970) and dynamic crack models (Madariaga, 1976). Normalizing this expression by the static stress drop defines an efficiency ??sw = ??sa/????s as follows from Savage and Wood (1971). We use this measure of efficiency to analyze data from one of a number of observational studies that find apparent stress to increase with seismic moment, namely earthquakes recorded in the Cajon Pass borehole by Abercrombie (1995). Increases in apparent stress with event size could reflect an increase in seismic efficiency; however, ??sw for the Cajon earthquakes shows no such increase and is approximately constant over the entire moment range. Thus, apparent stress and stress drop co-vary, as expected from the energy balance at constant overshoot. The median value of ??sw for the Cajon earthquakes is four times lower than ??sw for laboratory events. Thus, these Cajon-recorded earthquakes have relatively low and approximately constant efficiency. As the energy balance requires ??sw = 0.5 - ??, overshoot can be estimated directly from the Savage-Wood efficiency; overshoot is positive for Cajon Pass earthquakes. Variations in apparent stress with seismic moment for these earthquakes result primarily from systematic variations in static stress drop with seismic moment and do not require a relative decrease in sliding resistance with increasing event size (dynamic weakening). Based on the comparison of field and lab determinations of the Savage-Wood efficiency, we suggest the criterion ??sw > 0.3 as a test for dynamic weakening in excess of that seen in the lab.

  6. Fabrication and Probabilistic Fracture Strength Prediction of High-Aspect-Ratio Single Crystal Silicon Carbide Microspecimens With Stress Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Evans, Laura J.; Jadaan, Osama M.; Sharpe, William N., Jr.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Trapp, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    Single crystal silicon carbide micro-sized tensile specimens were fabricated with deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) in order to investigate the effect of stress concentration on the room-temperature fracture strength. The fracture strength was defined as the level of stress at the highest stressed location in the structure at the instant of specimen rupture. Specimens with an elliptical hole, a circular hole, and without a hole (and hence with no stress concentration) were made. The average fracture strength of specimens with a higher stress concentration was larger than the average fracture strength of specimens with a lower stress concentration. Average strength of elliptical-hole, circular-hole, and without-hole specimens was 1.53, 1.26, and 0.66 GPa, respectively. Significant scatter in strength was observed with the Weibull modulus ranging between 2 and 6. No fractographic examination was performed but it was assumed that the strength controlling flaws originated from etching grooves along the specimen side-walls. The increase of observed fracture strength with increasing stress concentration was compared to predictions made with the Weibull stress-integral formulation by using the NASA CARES/Life code. In the analysis isotropic material and fracture behavior was assumed - hence it was not a completely rigorous analysis. However, even with these assumptions good correlation was achieved for the circular-hole specimen data when using the specimen data without stress concentration as a baseline. Strength was over predicted for the elliptical-hole specimen data. Significant specimen-to-specimen dimensional variation existed in the elliptical-hole specimens due to variations in the nickel mask used in the etching. To simulate the additional effect of the dimensional variability on the probabilistic strength response for the single crystal specimens the ANSYS Probabilistic Design System (PDS) was used with CARES/Life.

  7. Implications of Effective Fluid-Stress in Fractured Networks: Induced Seismicity during Fluid Injection and/or Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    General effective-stress rules have been derived previously for physical properties of isotropic porous rocks, including fluid-flow and transport properties of inhomogeneous porous rocks. Elastic properties of earth systems under stress can be both anisotropic and highly sensitive to small changes in the confining stress. Fractured media are particularly sensitive to confining stress, and to the orientations of the fractures themselves. The fracture-influence parameters that determine the increase in rock compliance, or equivalently the reduction in rock stiffness, due to the presence of individual fractures can be shown to depend on an effective-stress coefficient having the form (1-B), where B is Skempton's second coefficient from soil mechanics. Skempton's coefficient B can be measured directly, or it can be estimated from other known quantities, including the system drained bulk modulus, pore-fluid bulk modulus, porosity, and average grain modulus. Recent work on effective stress for fractured porous media, with implications for both transport of fluids and also possible connections to induced seismicity will also be discussed.

  8. Two-View Gravity Stress Imaging Protocol for Nondisplaced Type II Supination External Rotation Ankle Fractures: Introducing the Gravity Stress Cross-Table Lateral View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffeli, Troy J; Collier, Rachel C; Gervais, Samuel J

    Assessing ankle stability in nondisplaced Lauge-Hansen supination external rotation type II injuries requires stress imaging. Gravity stress mortise imaging is routinely used as an alternative to manual stress imaging to assess deltoid integrity with the goal of differentiating type II from type IV injuries in cases without a posterior or medial fracture. A type II injury with a nondisplaced fibula fracture is typically treated with cast immobilization, and a type IV injury is considered unstable and often requires operative repair. The present case series (two patients) highlights a standardized 2-view gravity stress imaging protocol and introduces the gravity stress cross-table lateral view. The gravity stress cross-table lateral view provides a more thorough evaluation of the posterior malleolus owing to the slight external rotation and posteriorly directed stress. External rotation also creates less bony overlap between the tibia and fibula, allowing for better visualization of the fibula fracture. Gravity stress imaging confirmed medial-sided injury in both cases, confirming the presence of supination external rotation type IV or bimalleolar equivalent fractures. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed, and both patients achieved radiographic union. No further treatment was required at 21 and 33 months postoperatively. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Do stress fractures induce hypertrophy of the grafted fibula? A report of three cases received free vascularized fibular graft treatment for tibial defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yong; Sun, Hong-Tao; Fan, Yue-Guang; Li, Fei-Meng; Lin, Zhou-Sheng

    2016-06-01

    The presence of large segmental defects of the diaphyseal bone is challenging for orthopedic surgeons. Free vascularized fibular grafting (FVFG) is considered to be a reliable reconstructive procedure. Stress fractures are a common complication following this surgery, and hypertrophy is the main physiological change of the grafted fibula. The exact mechanism of hypertrophy is not completely known. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have examined the possible relationship between stress fractures and hypertrophy. We herein report three cases of patients underwent FVFG. Two of them developed stress fractures and significant hypertrophy, while the remaining patient developed neither stress fractures nor significant hypertrophy. This phenomenon indicates that a relationship may exist between stress fractures and hypertrophy of the grafted fibula, specifically, that the presence of a stress fracture may initiate the process of hypertrophy.

  10. The Epidemiology of Stress Fractures in Collegiate Student-Athletes, 2004-2005 Through 2013-2014 Academic Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzone, Katherine H; Ackerman, Kathryn E; Roos, Karen G; Dompier, Thomas P; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2017-10-01

    Stress fractures are injuries caused by cumulative, repetitive stress that leads to abnormal bone remodeling. Specific populations, including female athletes and endurance athletes, are at higher risk than the general athletic population. Whereas more than 460 000 individuals participate in collegiate athletics in the United States, no large study has been conducted to determine the incidence of stress fractures in collegiate athletes.   To assess the incidence of stress fractures in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) athletes and investigate rates and patterns overall and by sport.   Descriptive epidemiology study.   National Collegiate Athletic Association institutions.   National Collegiate Athletic Association athletes.   Data were analyzed from the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program for the academic years 2004-2005 through 2013-2014. We calculated rates and rate ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).   A total of 671 stress fractures were reported over 11 778 145 athlete-exposures (AEs) for an overall injury rate of 5.70 per 100 000 AEs. The sports with the highest rates of stress fractures were women's cross-country ( 28.59/100  000 AEs), women's gymnastics ( 25.58/100  000 AEs), and women's outdoor track ( 22.26/100  000 AEs). Among sex-comparable sports (baseball/softball, basketball, cross-country, ice hockey, lacrosse, soccer, swimming and diving, tennis, indoor track, and outdoor track), stress fracture rates were higher in women (9.13/100 000 AEs) than in men (4.44/100 000 AEs; RR = 2.06; 95% CI = 1.71, 2.47). Overall, stress fracture rates for these NCAA athletes were higher in the preseason (7.30/100 000 AEs) than in the regular season (5.12/100 000 AEs; RR = 1.43; 95% CI = 1.22, 1.67). The metatarsals (n = 254, 37.9%), tibia (n = 147, 21.9%), and lower back/lumbar spine/pelvis (n = 81, 12.1%) were the most common locations of injury. Overall, 21.5% (n = 144) of stress fractures were

  11. Fracture Prediction for High-strength Steel Sheet Subjected to Draw-bending Using Forming Limit Stress Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, C.; Hakoyama, T.; Kuwabara, T.; Fukiharu, H.

    2016-08-01

    A fracture criterion for sheet metals subjected to draw-bending is investigated using the concept of the forming limit stress criterion. The test material used is a 1.0-mm-thick high- strength steel sheet with a tensile strength of 590MPa. The specimen undergoes bendingunbending under tension when passing over the die profile. The drawing speed was set to 5-100 mm • s-1. The magnitude of true stress σDB when a specimen fractured has been precisely determined. Moreover, multiaxial tube expansion tests of the test material are performed to measure the forming limit stress σPT of the test material under plane-strain tension. It is found that σDB is larger than σPT by 2.8-6.3%. Therefore, it is concluded that the forming limit stress criterion is effective as a fracture criterion in draw-bending.

  12. Pace bowlers in cricket with history of lumbar stress fracture have increased risk of lower limb muscle strains, particularly calf strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, John; Farhart, Patrick; Kountouris, Alex; James, Trefor; Portus, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess whether a history of lumbar stress fracture in pace bowlers in cricket is a risk factor for lower limb muscle strains. Methods This was a prospective cohort risk factor study, conducted using injury data from contracted first class pace bowlers in Australia during seasons 1998–1999 to 2008–2009 inclusive. There were 205 pace bowlers, 33 of whom suffered a lumbar stress fracture when playing first class cricket. Risk ratios ([RR] with 95% confidence intervals[CI]) were calculated to compare the seasonal incidence of various injuries between bowlers with a prior history of lumbar stress fracture and those with no history of lumbar stress fracture. Results Risk of calf strain was strongly associated with prior lumbar stress fracture injury history (RR = 4.1; 95% CI: 2.4–7.1). Risks of both hamstring strain (RR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.03–2.1) and quadriceps strain (RR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1–3.5) were somewhat associated with history of lumbar stress fracture. Risk of groin strain was not associated with history of lumbar stress fracture (RR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.4–1.1). Other injuries showed little association with prior lumbar stress fracture, although knee cartilage injuries were more likely in the non-stress fracture group. Conclusion Bony hypertrophy associated with lumbar stress fracture healing may lead to subsequent lumbar nerve root impingement, making lower limb muscle strains more likely to occur. Confounders may be responsible for some of the findings. In particular, bowling speed is likely to be independently correlated with risk of lumbar stress fracture and risk of muscle strain. However, as the relationship between lumbar stress fracture history and calf strain was very strong, and that there is a strong theoretical basis for the connection, it is likely that this is a true association. PMID:24198555

  13. Pace bowlers in cricket with history of lumbar stress fracture have increased risk of lower limb muscle strains, particularly calf strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orchard, John; Farhart, Patrick; Kountouris, Alex; James, Trefor; Portus, Marc

    2010-01-01

    To assess whether a history of lumbar stress fracture in pace bowlers in cricket is a risk factor for lower limb muscle strains. This was a prospective cohort risk factor study, conducted using injury data from contracted first class pace bowlers in Australia during seasons 1998-1999 to 2008-2009 inclusive. There were 205 pace bowlers, 33 of whom suffered a lumbar stress fracture when playing first class cricket. Risk ratios ([RR] with 95% confidence intervals[CI]) were calculated to compare the seasonal incidence of various injuries between bowlers with a prior history of lumbar stress fracture and those with no history of lumbar stress fracture. Risk of calf strain was strongly associated with prior lumbar stress fracture injury history (RR = 4.1; 95% CI: 2.4-7.1). Risks of both hamstring strain (RR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.03-2.1) and quadriceps strain (RR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1-3.5) were somewhat associated with history of lumbar stress fracture. Risk of groin strain was not associated with history of lumbar stress fracture (RR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.4-1.1). Other injuries showed little association with prior lumbar stress fracture, although knee cartilage injuries were more likely in the non-stress fracture group. Bony hypertrophy associated with lumbar stress fracture healing may lead to subsequent lumbar nerve root impingement, making lower limb muscle strains more likely to occur. Confounders may be responsible for some of the findings. In particular, bowling speed is likely to be independently correlated with risk of lumbar stress fracture and risk of muscle strain. However, as the relationship between lumbar stress fracture history and calf strain was very strong, and that there is a strong theoretical basis for the connection, it is likely that this is a true association.

  14. Stress fracture of the thoracic spine in an elite rhythmic gymnast: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Subash C; Sakai, Toshinori; Hangai, Mika; Toyota, Akiko; Fukuta, Shoji; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Spondylolysis, a defect or stress fracture of the vertebral pars interarticularis, occurs most frequently in the lower lumbar spine and occasionally in the cervical spine, but is extremely rare in the thoracic spine. We report the case of a 17 year-old girl, an elite rhythmic gymnast, who reported with early-stage thoracic spondylolysis at T10 and T11 levels. Physicians should be aware that performance of unusual athletic movements, such as those by gymnasts, may lead to spondylolysis in rare locations.

  15. Three-dimensional elastic--plastic stress and strain analyses for fracture mechanics: complex geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, H.J.

    1975-11-01

    The report describes the continuation of research into capability for three-dimensional elastic-plastic stress and strain analysis for fracture mechanics. A computer program, MARC-3D, has been completed and was used to analyze a cylindrical pressure vessel with a nozzle insert. A method for generating crack tip elements was developed and a model was created for a cylindrical pressure vessel with a nozzle and an imbedded flaw at the inside nozzle corner. The MARC-3D program was again used to analyze this flawed model. Documentation for the use of the MARC-3D computer program has been included as an appendix.

  16. Internal oxidation and probabilistic fracture model of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinović, M. J.

    2017-11-01

    A probabilistic fracture model is applied to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking effect, assuming that the oxidized part of stainless steel sample plays an essential role in the crack initiation, propagation and the sample failure. The Weibull statistical distribution of time-to-failures, estimated through the correlation with the statistical distribution of oxide strengths, including both the surface oxide layer and oxidized grain boundaries, fully describe the experimental scatter obtained in the constant load time-to-failure tests. Large failure uncertainties in these type of tests originate from an intrinsic stochastic behavior of the oxide cracking due to subcritical crack propagation process.

  17. Scaphoid Stress Fracture in High-Level Gymnast: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Nakamoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of an 18-year-old high-level gymnast who sustained a stress fracture of the scaphoid associated with a distal radial epiphysiolysis. Clinical evaluation demonstrated decreased range of motion of the affected wrist and insidious pain on the snuffbox and tenderness on the distal radial physis. He was submitted to surgical treatment with scaphoid percutaneous fixation and radial styloid process in situ fixation. Clinical features improved, and he got back to competition 6 months after surgery without symptoms and with complete range of motion.

  18. Numerical Investigation of Influence of In-Situ Stress Ratio, Injection Rate and Fluid Viscosity on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Using a Distinct Element Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation is very useful for understanding the hydraulic fracturing mechanism. In this paper, we simulate the hydraulic fracturing using the distinct element approach, to investigate the effect of some critical parameters on hydraulic fracturing characteristics. The breakdown pressure obtained by the distinct element approach is consistent with the analytical solution. This indicates that the distinct element approach is feasible on modeling the hydraulic fracturing. We independently examine the influence of in-situ stress ratio, injection rate and fluid viscosity on hydraulic fracturing. We further emphasize the relationship between these three factors and their contributions to the hydraulic fracturing. With the increase of stress ratio, the fracture aperture increases almost linearly; with the increase of injection rate and fluid viscosity, the fracture aperture and breakdown pressure increase obviously. A low value of product of injection rate and fluid viscosity (i.e., Qμ will lead to narrow fracture aperture, low breakdown pressure, and complex or dispersional hydraulic fractures. A high value of Qμ would lead wide fracture aperture, high breakdown pressure, and simple hydraulic fractures (e.g., straight or wing shape. With low viscosity fluid, the hydraulic fracture geometry is not sensitive to stress ratio, and thus becomes a complex fracture network.

  19. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels and Stress Fractures in Military Personnel: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Dyda; Sodhi, Sukhmani; Tabasinejad, Rasam; Peterson, Devin; Ayeni, Olufemi R; Bhandari, Mohit; Farrokhyar, Forough

    2015-08-01

    Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels have been associated with stress fractures in various physically active populations such as the military. To examine the association between serum 25(OH)D levels and stress fractures in the military. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Relevant studies were identified through searching multiple databases and manually screening reference lists. Two reviewers independently selected the included studies by applying the eligibility criteria to the title, abstract, and/or full text of the articles yielded in the search. Two reviewers also independently conducted the methodological quality assessment and data extraction. A random-effects model was used to calculate the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI in serum 25(OH)D levels between stress fracture cases and controls. Nine observational studies on lower extremity stress fractures were eligible, and 1 was excluded due to inadequate data. A total of 2634 military personnel (age, 18-30 years; 44% male) with 761 cases (16% male) and 1873 controls (61% male) from 8 studies were included in the analysis. Three of the 8 studies measured serum 25(OH)D levels at the time of stress fracture diagnosis, and the 5 remaining studies measured serum 25(OH)D levels at the time of entry into basic training. The mean serum 25(OH)D level was lower in stress fracture cases than in controls at the time of entry into basic training (MD, -2.63 ng/mL; 95% CI, -5.80 to 0.54; P = .10; I(2) = 65%) and at the time of stress fracture diagnosis (MD, -2.26 ng/mL; 95% CI, -3.89 to -0.63; P = .007; I(2) = 42%). Despite the inherent limitations of the included studies, the study results suggest some association between low serum 25(OH)D levels and lower extremity stress fractures in military personnel. Given the rigorous training of military personnel, implementing strategies to ensure sufficient 25(OH)D levels may be beneficial for reducing the risk of stress fractures. © 2014 The Author(s).

  20. Effects of fluid dynamic stress on fracturing of cell-aggregated tissue during purification for islets of Langerhans transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintaku, H; Kawano, S; Okitsu, T; Matsumoto, S; Suzuki, T; Kanno, I; Kotera, H

    2008-01-01

    Among clinical treatments for type 1 diabetes mellitus, the transplantation of islets of Langerhans to the portal vein of the hepar is a commonly used treatment for glucose homeostasis. Islet purification using the density gradient of a solution in a centrifuge separator is required for safety and efficiency. In the purification, the number of tissues to be transplanted is reduced by removing the acinar tissue and gathering the islet from the digest of pancreas. However, the mechanical effects on the fracture of islets in the centrifuge due to fluid dynamic stress are a serious problem in the purification process. In this study, a preliminary experiment using a cylindrical rotating viscometer with a simple geometry is conducted in order to systematically clarify the effect of fluid dynamic stress on the fracture of islets. The effects of fluid dynamic stress on the islet configuration is quantitatively measured for various flow conditions, and a predictive fracture model is developed based on the experimental results. Furthermore, in the practical purification process in the COBE (Gambro BCT), which is widely used in clinical applications, we perform a numerical analysis of the fluid dynamic stress based on Navier-Stokes equations to estimate the stress conditions for islets. Using the fracture model and numerical analysis, the islet fracture characteristics using the COBE are successfully investigated. The results obtained in this study provide crucial information for the purification of islets by centrifuge in practical and clinical applications

  1. Weightbearing vs Gravity Stress Radiographs for Stability Evaluation of Supination-External Rotation Fractures of the Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Angela; Krause, Fabian; Weber, Martin

    2017-07-01

    Isolated lateral malleolar fractures may result from a supination-external rotation (SER) injury of the ankle. Stable fractures maintain tibiotalar congruence due to competent medial restraints and can be treated nonoperatively with excellent functional results and long-term prognosis. Stability might be assessed with either stress radiographs or weightbearing radiographs. A consecutive series of patients with closed SER fractures (presumed AO 44-B1) were prospectively enrolled from 2008 to 2015. Patients with clearly unstable fractures (medial clear space more than 7 mm) on the initial nonweightbearing radiograph were excluded and operated on. All other patients were examined with a gravity stress and a weightbearing anteroposterior radiograph. Borderline instability of the fracture was assumed when the medial clear space was 4 to 7 mm. Those were treated nonoperatively. Of 104 patients with isolated lateral malleolar fractures of the SER type, 14 patients were treated operatively because of clear instability (displacement) on the initial radiographs. Of the nonoperative patients, 44 patients demonstrated borderline instability on the gravity stress but stability on the weightbearing radiograph ("gravity borderline"); the remaining 46 were stable in both tests ("gravity stable"). At an average follow-up of 23 months, no significant differences were seen in the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot score (92 points gravity-borderline group vs 93 points gravity-unstable group), the Foot Functional Index score (11 vs 10 points), the Short Form 36 (SF-36) physical component (86 vs 85 points), and SF-36 mental component (84 vs 81 points). Radiographically, all fractures had healed with anatomic congruity of the ankle. Weightbearing radiographs provided a reliable basis to decide about stability and nonoperative treatment in isolated lateral malleolar fractures of the SER type with excellent clinical and radiographic outcome at short-term follow-up. Gravity

  2. kISMET: Stress analysis and intermediate-scale hydraulic fracturing at the Sanford Underground Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, P. F.; Oldenburg, C. M.; Wu, Y.; Cook, P. J.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.; Ulrich, C.; Siler, D. L.; Guglielmi, Y.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Rutqvist, J.; Daley, T. M.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Wang, H. F.; Lord, N.; Haimson, B. C.; Sone, H.; Vigilante, P.; Roggenthen, W.; Doe, T.; Lee, M.; Ingraham, M. D.; Huang, H.; Mattson, E.; Johnson, T. C.; Zhou, J.; Zoback, M. D.; Morris, J.; White, J. A.; Johnson, P. A.; Coblentz, D. D.; Heise, J.

    2017-12-01

    In 2015, we established a field test facility at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF), and in 2016 we carried out in situ hydraulic fracturing experiments to characterize the stress field, understand the effects of crystalline rock fabric on fracturing, and gain experience in monitoring using geophysical methods. The kISMET (permeability (k) and Induced Seismicity Management for Energy Technologies) project test site was established in the West Access Drift at the 4850 ft level, 1478 m below ground in phyllite of the Precambrian Poorman Formation. The kISMET team drilled and cored five near-vertical boreholes in a line on 3 m spacing, deviating the two outermost boreholes slightly to create a five-spot pattern around the test borehole centered in the test volume 40 m below the drift invert (floor) at a total depth of 1518 m. Laboratory measurements of core from the center test borehole showed P-wave velocity heterogeneity along each core indicating strong, fine-scale ( 1 cm or smaller) changes in the mechanical properties of the rock. Tensile strength ranges between 3‒7.5 MPa and 5‒12 MPa. Pre-fracturing numerical simulations with a discrete element code were carried out to predict fracture size and magnitude of microseismicity. Field measurements of the stress field were made using hydraulic fracturing, which produced remarkably uniformly oriented fractures suggesting rock fabric did not play a significant role in controlling fracture orientation. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and continuous active seismic source monitoring (CASSM) were deployed in the four monitoring boreholes, and passive seismic accelerometer-based measurements in the West Access Drift were carried out during the generation of a larger fracture (so-called stimulation test). ERT was not able to detect the fracture created, nor did the accelerometers in the drift, but microseismicity was detected for the first (deepest) hydraulic-fracturing stress measurement. Analytical

  3. Revisiting fracture gradient: Comments on “A new approaching method to estimate fracture gradient by correcting Matthew–Kelly and Eaton's stress ratio”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farizal Hakiki

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A study performed by Marbun et al. [1] claimed that “A new methodology to predict fracture pressure from former calculations, Matthew–Kelly and Eaton are proposed.” Also, Marbun et al.'s paper stated that “A new value of Poisson's and a stress ratio of the formation were generated and the accuracy of fracture gradient was improved.” We found those all statements are incorrect and some misleading concepts are revealed. An attempt to expose the method of fracture gradient determination from industry practice also appears to solidify that our arguments are acceptable to against improper Marbun et al.'s claims.

  4. Return to sport following stress fractures of the great toe sesamoids: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, G A J; Goffin, J S; Wood, A M

    2017-06-01

    This review aims to provide information on return rates and times to sport following stress fractures of the great toe sesamoids (SFGTSs). A systematic search of CINAHAL, Cochrane, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Medline, PEDro, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science was performed using the keywords 'stress', 'fractures', 'great', 'toe', 'sesamoid', 'athletes', 'sports', 'non-operative', 'conservative', 'operative' and 'return to sport'. Fourteen studies were included: three studies reported on the outcome of conservatively-managed SFGTSs; thirteen studies reported on the outcome of surgically-managed SFGTSs. The management principles were to attempt conservative management for 2-6 months using activity modification, analgesia, orthotics and physiotherapy; if symptoms persisted following this, surgical management was to be recommended, either with internal fixation or sesamoidectomy. The optimal treatment modalities for SFGTSs remain to be defined. Internal fixation shows the best return to full-level sport rates with low rates of complications. Future prospective studies should aim to establish the optimal treatment modalities for SFGTSs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  5. Return to sports after stress fractures of the tibial diaphysis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, G A J; Wood, A M

    2015-06-01

    This review aims to provide information on the time taken to resume sport following tibial diaphyseal stress fractures (TDSFs). A systematic search of Medline, EMBASE, CINHAL, Cochrane, Web of Science, PEDro, Sports Discus, Scopus and Google Scholar was performed using the keywords 'tibial', 'tibia', 'stress', 'fractures', 'athletes', 'sports', 'non-operative', 'conservative', 'operative' and 'return to sport'. Twenty-seven studies were included: 16 reported specifically on anterior TDSFs and 5 on posterior TDSFs. The general principles were to primarily attempt non-operative management for all TDSFs and to consider operative intervention for anterior TDSFs that remained symptomatic after 3-6 months. Anterior TDSFs showed a prolonged return to sport. The best time to return to sport and the optimal management modalities for TDSFs remain undefined. Management of TDSFs should include a full assessment of training methods, equipment and diet to modify pre-disposing factors. Future prospective studies should aim to establish the optimal treatment modalities for TDSFs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The effect of concentrated bone marrow aspirate in operative treatment of fifth metatarsal stress fractures; a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, Hanneke; Mallee, Wouter H.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Blankevoort, Leendert; Goedegebuure, Simon; Goslings, J. Carel; Kennedy, John G.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Fifth metatarsal (MT-V) stress fractures often exhibit delayed union and are high-risk fractures for non-union. Surgical treatment, currently considered as the gold standard, does not give optimal results, with a mean time to fracture union of 12-18 weeks. In recent studies, the use of bone marrow

  7. Effects of crustal stresses on fluid transport in fractured rock: Case studies from northeastern and southwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, R.H.; Savage, W.Z.

    2003-01-01

    The link between stress and hydrologic properties was examined at two sites that are distinguished by different rock types and different stress states. This investigation is based upon the analysis and interpretation of geophysical logs obtained in water wells at the two locations. At the northeast site (Newark Basin), the hydrologic characteristics of sedimentary rocks are dependent upon the relationship to the current regional stress field of two primary types of orthogonal features that serve as preferential pathways for fluid flow. Subhorizontal bedding-plane partings are highly transmissive near the surface and delineate transversely isotropic fluid flow at shallow depths. With increasing depth, the subhorizontal planes become less dominant and steeply dipping fractures become more influential hydrologically. These high-angle features define anisotropic flow pathways that are preferentially oriented along strike. At the southwest site (west Texas), extrusive rocks are subjected to topographically modified tectonic and gravitational stresses that vary spatially within a valley setting. The attendant changes in stress invariants cause fracture connectivity within the rock mass to systematically increase with depth along the valley flanks, but to remain relatively low in the central valley. The degree of fracture connectivity predicted within this valley configuration is consistent with variations in transmissivity determined at several well locations. In each of these cases, the idealized understanding of the hydrologic system is enhanced by considering the effects of regional and local stresses that act upon the fractured-rock aquifer.

  8. Pressure Transient Analysis and Flux Distribution for Multistage Fractured Horizontal Wells in Triple-Porosity Reservoir Media with Consideration of Stress-Sensitivity Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Triple-porosity model is usually adopted to describe reservoirs with multiscaled pore spaces, including matrix pores, natural fractures, and vugs. Multiple fractures created by hydraulic fracturing can effectively improve the connectivity between existing natural fractures and thus increase well deliverability. However, little work has been done on pressure transient behavior of multistage fractured horizontal wells in triple-porosity reservoirs. Based on source/sink function method, this paper presents a triple-porosity model to investigate the transient pressure dynamics and flux distribution for multistage fractured horizontal wells in fractured-vuggy reservoirs with consideration of stress-dependent natural fracture permeability. The model is semianalytically solved by discretizing hydraulic fractures and Pedrosa’s transformation, perturbation theory, and integration transformation method. Type curves of transient pressure dynamics are generated, and flux distribution among hydraulic fractures for a fractured horizontal well with constant production rate is also discussed. Parametric study shows that major influential parameters on transient pressure responses are parameters pertinent to reservoir properties, interporosity mass transfer, and hydraulic fractures. Analysis of flux distribution indicates that flux density gradually increases from the horizontal wellbore to fracture tips, and the flux contribution of outermost fractures is higher than that of inner fractures. The model can also be extended to optimize hydraulic fracture parameters.

  9. Conservative Management of a Femoral Neck Stress Fracture in a Female Athlete. A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsougrakis, Ilias; Apostolopoulos, Alexandros P; Tross, Samantha Z

    2016-01-01

    Femoral-neck stress fractures are relatively rare and may present as sports-related injuries. The presentation is variable, and prompt diagnosis facilitates the earliest return to pre-morbid functional activity levels. Delayed detection may precipitate femoral non-union or avascular necrosis, resulting in long-term functional deficit. We describe the clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic approach of a femoral-neck stress fracture that occurred in a 28-year-old female recreational runner. The pathophysiology and practical management issues related to this unusual injury pattern are discussed. The growing interest in amateur athletic activities should raise the index of suspicion for stress fractures of the femoral neck in healthy adults with atypical hip pain. In-creased levels of patient education and physician awareness can reduce the incidence of long-term morbidity in cases of this unusual sports-related injury. Moreover, measures to avoid stress fractures of the femoral neck should include proper nutrition, suitable training techniques, training intensity and appropriate foot wear. Close follow-up of athletes with a history of deep groin pain during exercise might, together with swift examination by magnetic resonance imaging or radionuclide scanning, be essential in preventing displacement of fractures and possible avascular necrosis of the femoral head as a consequence.

  10. Outcomes of posterior wall fractures of the acetabulum treated nonoperatively after diagnostic screening with dynamic stress examination under anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimshaw, Charles S; Moed, Berton R

    2010-12-01

    Dynamic stress fluoroscopy with the patient under general anesthesia has been advocated as a clinical measure of hip stability and congruity in patients with a posterior wall acetabular fracture. The purpose of this study was to establish the predictive value of the dynamic stress fluoroscopic examination for these fractures by evaluating clinical and radiographic outcomes after nonoperative treatment of fractures found to be stable with this examination. Twenty-one consecutive patients with an acute posterior wall fracture of the acetabulum who were shown to have a stable hip joint by dynamic stress fluoroscopy while they were under general anesthesia were treated nonoperatively. At the time of follow-up, the patients underwent clinical and/or radiographic evaluation. Clinical follow-up was performed for eighteen patients at a minimum of two years after injury, at which time the average modified Merle d'Aubigné score was very good, with no one having less than a good clinical outcome. Fifteen of these eighteen patients had radiographic evaluation at a minimum of two years, and all were found to have a congruent joint with a normal joint space and no evidence of posttraumatic arthritis. Hip joint stability determined with dynamic stress fluoroscopy with the patient under general anesthesia after a posterior wall acetabular fracture is predictive of hip joint congruity, an excellent radiographic outcome, and a good-to-excellent early clinical outcome after nonoperative treatment.

  11. Evolution of stress and strain during 3D folding: application to orthogonal fracture systems in folded turbidites, SW Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, J. E.; Schmalholz, S. M.; Lechmann, S. M.

    2009-04-01

    We present field data and numerical modeling results which show the evolution of stress and strain patterns during 3D folding resulting in an orthogonal fracture system. The field area is located near Almograve, SW Portugal. The area is part of the Mira Formation which itself is part of the South Portuguese Zone (SPZ). The structural development of the SPZ is characterized by southwest vergent folding and thrust displacement. The metamorphism in the SPZ increases from diagenetic conditions in the southwest to greenschist-facies conditions to the northeast. The Mira Formation is composed of turbiditic layers of Carboniferous age with low sandstone to shale ratio. The data was gathered at three outcrops which show structures similar to chocolate tablet structures in the folded sandstone layers. Chocolate tablet structures are generated under simultaneous extension in two directions and show two fracture systems of the same age which are perpendicular to each other. However, the Mira Formation is located in a convergent area. Also, the outcrops near Almograve show two fracture systems of different age. The fractures orthogonal to the fold axis and the bedding are crosscut by fractures parallel to the fold axis and orthogonal to the bedding. Our hypothesis for the evolution of the observed fracture systems is as follows; the older fractures which are now orthogonal to the fold axis and to the bedding plane were generated during compression while the layers were still approximately horizontal. They are parallel to σ1(i.e. mode 1 fractures). The second and younger fracture family was generated in a phase where there is local extension in the fold limbs. These fractures are orthogonal to the far-field σ1, parallel to the fold axis and perpendicular to the bedding. The shortening direction is constant during the entire folding process. We test our hypothesis with numerical modeling. We use 2D and 3D finite element codes with a mixed formulation for incompressible flow

  12. Radiographic absorptiometry for pre-screening of osteoporosis in patients with low energy fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Inge; Oturai, Peter Sandor; Jensen, Lars T

    2010-01-01

    osteoporosis (T-scores osteoporosis (p women (R = 0.7, p ....001). Using a RA cut-off value (T-score women ensuring 100% sensitivity for identifying women with osteoporosis, the positive predictive value was 46%. Up to 19% of DEXA-scans could be avoided in this setting. In our population the simple RA-BMD-method was cost-effective as a pre-screening tool...... for osteoporosis in women. However, the final diagnosis still relies on results from DEXA-scans....

  13. Influence of stress-induced deformations on observed water flow in fractures at the Climax granitic stock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, D.G.

    1987-06-01

    Three examples of stress-induced displacement influence on fracture-dominated hydrology were noted in drifts 1400 ft below surface in granite. Seepage into drifts was limited to portions of shears near a fault zone. No water entered the drifts from the fault itself, although its orientation relative to Basin and Range extension is favorable for fracture opening. Localization of seepage appears to result from excavation block motion that increased apertures of the shear zones in contrast to the fault where asperities had been destroyed by earlier shearing thus minimizing aperture increases. Seepage was also noted, in an adjoining drift, from a set of shallow-dip healed fractures that intersected the rib, and from vertical fractures that increased the crown. The restricted location of this seepage apparently was a result of shear opening of the joints that occurred because of cantilevered support of tabular rock between joints. Interpretation of paleostresses based on joint chronologies and orientations indicates that sets subjected to shear stresses at a time when normal stresses were low contained mineral infilling. Sets subjected to shear stresses at a time when the normal stresses were significant had minimal mineral infilling. 8 refs., 7 figs

  14. On the link between stress field and small-scale hydraulic fracture growth in anisotropic rock derived from microseismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gischig, Valentin Samuel; Doetsch, Joseph; Maurer, Hansruedi; Krietsch, Hannes; Amann, Florian; Evans, Keith Frederick; Nejati, Morteza; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Valley, Benoît; Obermann, Anne Christine; Wiemer, Stefan; Giardini, Domenico

    2018-01-01

    To characterize the stress field at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) underground rock laboratory, a series of hydrofracturing and overcoring tests were performed. Hydrofracturing was accompanied by seismic monitoring using a network of highly sensitive piezosensors and accelerometers that were able to record small seismic events associated with metre-sized fractures. Due to potential discrepancies between the hydrofracture orientation and stress field estimates from overcoring, it was essential to obtain high-precision hypocentre locations that reliably illuminate fracture growth. Absolute locations were improved using a transverse isotropic P-wave velocity model and by applying joint hypocentre determination that allowed for the computation of station corrections. We further exploited the high degree of waveform similarity of events by applying cluster analysis and relative relocation. Resulting clouds of absolute and relative located seismicity showed a consistent east-west strike and 70° dip for all hydrofractures. The fracture growth direction from microseismicity is consistent with the principal stress orientations from the overcoring stress tests, provided that an anisotropic elastic model for the rock mass is used in the data inversions. The σ1 stress is significantly larger than the other two principal stresses and has a reasonably well-defined orientation that is subparallel to the fracture plane; σ2 and σ3 are almost equal in magnitude and thus lie on a circle defined by the standard errors of the solutions. The poles of the microseismicity planes also lie on this circle towards the north. Analysis of P-wave polarizations suggested double-couple focal mechanisms with both thrust and normal faulting mechanisms present, whereas strike-slip and thrust mechanisms would be expected from the overcoring-derived stress solution. The reasons for these discrepancies can be explained by pressure leak-off, but possibly may also involve stress field rotation around the

  15. The concept of the average stress in the fracture process zone for the search of the crack path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.G. Matvienko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the average stress has been employed to propose the maximum average tangential stress (MATS criterion for predicting the direction of fracture angle. This criterion states that a crack grows when the maximum average tangential stress in the fracture process zone ahead of the crack tip reaches its critical value and the crack growth direction coincides with the direction of the maximum average tangential stress along a constant radius around the crack tip. The tangential stress is described by the singular and nonsingular (T-stress terms in the Williams series solution. To demonstrate the validity of the proposed MATS criterion, this criterion is directly applied to experiments reported in the literature for the mixed mode I/II crack growth behavior of Guiting limestone. The predicted directions of fracture angle are consistent with the experimental data. The concept of the average stress has been also employed to predict the surface crack path under rolling-sliding contact loading. The proposed model considers the size and orientation of the initial crack, normal and tangential loading due to rolling–sliding contact as well as the influence of fluid trapped inside the crack by a hydraulic pressure mechanism. The MATS criterion is directly applied to equivalent contact model for surface crack growth on a gear tooth flank.

  16. Stress analysis and optimization of Nd:YAG pulsed laser processing of notches for fracture splitting of a C70S6 connecting rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kou, Shuqing; Gao, Yan; Zhao, Yong; Lin, Baojun [Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2017-05-15

    The pulsed laser pre-processing of a notch as the fracture initiation source for the splitting process is the key mechanism of an advanced fracture splitting technology for C70S6 connecting rods. This study investigated the stress field of Nd:YAG pulsed laser grooving, which affects the rapid fracture initiation at the notch root and the controlled crack extension in the critical fracture splitting quality, to improve manufacturing quality. Thermal elastic-plastic incremental theory was applied to build the finite element analysis model of the stress field of pulsed laser grooving for fracture splitting based on the Rotary-Gauss body heat source. The corresponding numerical simulation of the stress field was conducted. The changes and distributions of the stress during pulsed laser grooving were examined, the influence rule of the primary technological parameters on the residual stress was analyzed, and the analysis results were validated by the corresponding cutting experiment. Results showed that the residual stress distribution was concentrated in the Heat-affected zone (HAZ) near the fracture splitting notch, which would cause micro-cracks in the HAZ. The stress state of the notch root in the fracture initiation direction was tensile stress, which was beneficial to the fracture initiation and the crack rapid extension in the subsequent fracture splitting process. However, the uneven distribution of the stress could lead to fracture splitting defects, and thus the residual stress should be lowered to a reasonable range. Decreasing the laser pulse power, increasing the processing speed, and lowering the pulse width can lower the residual stress. Along with the actual production, the reasonable main technological parameters were obtained.

  17. Electromagnetic Monitoring of Hydraulic Fracturing: Relationship to Permeability, Seismicity, and Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Stephan

    2017-09-01

    Hydraulic fracking is a geoengineering application designed to enhance subsurface permeability to maximize fluid and gas flow. Fracking is commonly used in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), tight shale gas, and coal seam gas (CSG) plays and in CO_2 storage scenarios. Common monitoring methods include microseismics and mapping small earthquakes with great resolution associated with fracture opening at reservoir depth. Recently, electromagnetic (EM) methods have been employed in the field to provide an alternative way of direct detection of fluids as they are pumped in the ground. Surface magnetotelluric (MT) measurements across EGS show subtle yet detectable changes during fracking derived from time-lapse MT deployments. Changes are directional and are predominantly aligned with current stress field, dictating preferential fracture orientation, supported by microseismic monitoring of frack-related earthquakes. Modeling studies prior to the injection are crucial for survey design and feasibility of monitoring fracks. In particular, knowledge of sediment thickness plays a fundamental role in resolving subtle changes. Numerical forward modeling studies clearly favor some form of downhole measurement to enhance sensitivity; however, these have yet to be conclusively demonstrated in the field. Nevertheless, real surface-based monitoring examples do not necessarily replicate the expected magnitude of change derived from forward modeling and are larger than expected in some cases from EGS and CSG systems. It appears the injected fluid volume alone cannot account for the surface change in resistivity, but connectedness of pore space is also significantly enhanced and nonlinear. Recent numerical studies emphasize the importance of percolation threshold of the fracture network on both electrical resistivity and permeability, which may play an important role in accounting for temporal changes in surface EM measurements during hydraulic fracking.

  18. Stress Concentration and Fracture at Inter-variant Boundaries in an Al-Li Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Roy; Tayon, Wes; Domack, Marcia; Wagner, John; Beaudoin, Armand

    2009-01-01

    Delamination fracture has limited the use of lightweight Al-Li alloys. Studies of secondary, delamination cracks in alloy 2090, L-T fracture toughness samples showed grain boundary failure between variants of the brass texture component. Although the adjacent texture variants, designated B(sub s1) and B(sub s2), behave similarly during rolling, their plastic responses to mechanical tests can be quite different. EBSD data from through-thickness scans were used to generate Taylor factor maps. When a combined boundary normal and shear tensor was used in the calculation, the delaminating grains showed the greatest Taylor Factor differences of any grain pairs. Kernel Average Misorientation (KAM) maps also showed damage accumulation on one side of the interface. Both of these are consistent with poor slip accommodation from a crystallographically softer grain to a harder one. Transmission electron microscopy was used to confirm the EBSD observations and to show the role of slip bands in the development of large, interfacial stress concentrations. A viewgraph presentation accompanies the provided abstract.

  19. On material choice and fracture susceptibility of restored teeth: an asymptotic stress analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Bill; Kotousov, Andrei; Melkoumian, Noune

    2006-12-01

    The ultimate success or failure of a restored tooth is largely dependent on clinical management. Clinicians may choose from a number of restorative materials, different clinical techniques and cavity preparation procedures. The purpose of this study was to specifically examine aspects of the material choice holding other factors constant. The current paper adopts a fundamental result in the linear theory of elasticity on the singular stress distribution in a bi-materials wedge to analyze the fracture susceptibility of different materials used for the restoration of a tooth. Comparable results are reported for amalgam, gold alloys and ceramic materials. It is shown that due to a wide variety of mechanical properties the application of resin-based composites could lead to improved or less fracture resistance of the restored tooth. This variety in the mechanical properties for resin-based composites could be partially responsible for the contradictory evidences reported by different clinical studies. The present work contributes evidence from an analytical model to assist the restorative dentist in selection of an appropriate restorative material and guide the manufacturing companies on the preferred physical properties of newer designed materials.

  20. Implications of Y-fluting microstructures in zircaloy stress-corrosion fracture and analogous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, T.M.; Garlick, A.

    1982-01-01

    Transgranular cleavage is an important mode of crack propagation during stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of Zircaloy in iodine vapour; and another characteristic feature is the presence of parallel closely spaced ridges. These are often referred to as Y-flutings because each ridge takes the form of an inverted Y when viewed along the direction of crack growth. The flutings are shown here to be formed by localised ductile parting of the Zircaloy near the tips of cleavage cracks; high mechanical constraints in those regions and the limited number of available slip systems result in the formation of a planar array of parallel tunnels. Upon final separation these appear as a pattern of parallel ridges on each fracture face. Striking similarities in morphology have been noted here between Y-flutings in Zircaloy and those produced during tests on unstable fluid interfaces: the direction of motion of the fluid interface can be determined from the Y-morphology and is in agreement with observations from Zircaloy SCC tests. It is further demonstrated that equations governing thermodynamic and kinetic instability of fluid interfaces can be adapted to relate the fluting spacing in Zircaloy to standard fracture mechanics parameters. (author)

  1. Role of Teriparatide in Accelerating Metatarsal Stress Fracture Healing: A Case Series and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Raghavan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone fractures are one of the leading causes of emergency room visits worldwide, with approximately 8 million bony fractures occurring annually in the US alone. Although the majority of fractures do not cause significant long-term morbidity and mortality, approximately 10% of these fractures result in impaired fracture healing, drastically affecting quality of life in affected patients. By increasing bone formation, teriparatide, an anabolic agent used in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis, has shown promise in accelerating the rate of fracture healing. We present two patients with impaired healing of metatarsal fractures who were subsequently treated with teriparatide. Both patients experienced successful bony union of the fracture after the use of teriparatide. These findings suggest that teriparatide may be useful in the clinical setting for the acceleration of fracture healing, especially in patients who are at risk for impaired fracture healing.

  2. Fractures in high-strength bolts due to hydrogen induced stress corrosion. Causes and corrective actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoche, Holger; Oechsner, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Delayed brittle fractures of high-strength bolts of the strength class 10.9 are presented, taking the example of three damage cases. The respective damage mechanisms could be attributed to hydrogen induced stress corrosion which was caused, in turn, by hydrogen absorption during operation. The examples were chosen with a particular focus on the material condition's susceptibility which explains the cause for the occurrence of the damage mechanism. However, in only one of the three cases the susceptibility was evident and could be explained by violations of normative specifications and an unfavorable material choice. Whereas in the two other examples, only slight or no deviations from the standards and/or regulations could be found. The influencing parameters that caused the damage, those that further promoted the damage, as well as possible corrective actions are discussed taking into account the three exemplary damage cases.

  3. Modeling of multi-phase microstructures in press hardened components: plastic deformation and fracture in different stress states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golling, S.; Östlund, R.; Oldenburg, M.

    2017-09-01

    Hot stamping or press hardening is an industrialized technique with the aim of improving material properties by heat treatment and forming of a component in a single production stage. Within the field of press hardening the method of tailored material properties evolved. Components with tailored material properties possess different mechanical properties in designated areas. This paper presents an approach for modeling the mechanical response of mixed microstructures under different stress states. A homogenization method is used to predict the hardening of the material; the strain decomposition provides the possibility of applying a fracture criterion per phase. To validate the modeling approach for different stress states a set of samples with different notch and hole geometries as well as microstructural composition are produced. The combination of a homogenization method and a fracture criterion show good agreement with experimental results. The homogenization method is suitable to predict the hardening of the material with good accuracy. Fracture for different microstructural compositions is well predicted over a range of stress triaxialities relevant for sheet metal applications. It is concluded that the use of a homogenization method combined with a fracture model can be used to predict the mechanical response of mixed microstructures for a range of different stress states.

  4. Investigating the Influence of Regional Stress on Fault and Fracture Permeability at Pahute Mesa, Nevada National Security Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Donald M. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Smith, Kenneth D. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Parashar, Rishi [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Reno, NV (United States); Collins, Cheryl [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States); Heintz, Kevin M. [Desert Research Inst. (DRI), Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2017-05-24

    Regional stress may exert considerable control on the permeability and hydraulic function (i.e., barrier to and/or conduit for fluid flow) of faults and fractures at Pahute Mesa, Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). In-situ measurements of the stress field are sparse in this area, and short period earthquake focal mechanisms are used to delineate principal horizontal stress orientations. Stress field inversion solutions to earthquake focal mechanisms indicate that Pahute Mesa is located within a transtensional faulting regime, represented by oblique slip on steeply dipping normal fault structures, with maximum horizontal stress ranging from N29°E to N63°E and average of N42°E. Average horizontal stress directions are in general agreement with large diameter borehole breakouts from Pahute Mesa analyzed in this study and with stress measurements from other locations on the NNSS.

  5. Results of screw fixation combined with cortical drilling for treatment of dorsal cortical stress fractures of the third metacarpal bone in 56 Thoroughbred racehorses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallap, B.L.; Bramlage, L.R.; Embertson, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate screw fixation with cortical drilling as a surgical treatment for dorsal cortical stress fractures of MCIII in the Thoroughbred racehorse. Details of age, sex, limb affected, fracture assessment, and post operative recommendations were obtained from medical records and radiographs. Fracture healing was assessed radiographically at the time of screw removal. Performance evaluation was determined from race records obtained from The Jockey Club Information System, Lexington, Kentucky. Fifty-six Thoroughbred racehorses were treated surgically for stress fracture of MCIII with screw fixation and cortical drilling. Stress fractures occurred primarily in the left front limb of the male 3-year-olds, in the dorsolateral cortex of the middle third of MCIII. Ninety-seven percent of the fractures travelled in a dorsodistal to palmaroproximal direction. Median period to screw removal was 2.0 months. Evaluation at time of screw removal revealed 98% of single stress fractures of the left front limb were healed radiographically. Median period to resume training was 2.75 months (single stress fractures); median period to race was 7.62 months. There was no statistically significant difference in earnings/start before and after surgical intervention. Of the 63 fractures treated, two recurred. There were no catastrophic failures, and no incisional infections

  6. MANAGEMENT OF EXTRIMITY FRACTURE IN EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Sukma Parahita

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Fracture injuries in the extremities are accounted for 40% of the incidence of fractures in the United States and causes high morbidity (physical suffering, lost time, and mental stress. High-energy fractures of the lower limbs can also cause life threatening condition like major vascular injury, crush syndrome, and compartment syndrome. Initial treatment in the emergency room is essential to save lives and to save the fractured extremities. Primary survey (securing the airway, breathing and circulation and the secondary survey will be able to quickly and accurately identify dangerous early complication of fractures, such as major arterial injury, crush syndrome and compartment syndrome. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  7. Fatigue surviving, fracture resistance, shear stress and finite element analysis of glass fiber posts with different diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandscher, Vinícius Felipe; Bergoli, César Dalmolin; de Oliveira, Ariele Freitas; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Souto Borges, Alexandre Luiz; Limberguer, Inácio da Fontoura; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the shear stress presented in glass fiber posts with parallel fiber (0°) and different coronal diameters under fatigue, fracture resistance and FEA. 160 glass-fiber posts (N=160) with eight different coronal diameters were used (DT=double tapered, number of the post=coronal diameter and W=Wider - fiber post with coronal diameter wider than the conventional): DT1.4; DT1.8W; DT1.6; DT2W; DT1.8; DT2.2W; DT2; DT2.2. Eighty posts were submitted to mechanical cycling (3×10(6) cycles; inclination: 45°; load: 50N; frequency: 4Hz; temperature: 37°C) to assess the surviving under intermittent loading and other eighty posts were submitted to fracture resistance testing (resistance [N] and shear-stress [MPa] values were obtained). The eight posts types were 3D modeled (Rhinoceros 4.0) and the shear-stress (MPa) evaluated using FEA (Ansys 13.0). One-way ANOVA showed statistically differences to fracture resistance (DT2.2W and DT2.2 showed higher values) and shear stress values (DT1.4 showed lower values). Only the DT1.4 fiber posts failed after mechanical cycling. FEA showed similar values of shear stress between the groups and these values were similar to those obtained by shear stress testing. The failure analysis showed that 95% of specimens failed by shear. Posts with parallel fiber (0°) may suffer fractures when an oblique shear load is applied on the structure; except the thinner group, greater coronal diameters promoted the same shear stresses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pace bowlers in cricket with history of lumbar stress fracture have increased risk of lower limb muscle strains, particularly calf strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Orchard

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available John Orchard1, Patrick Farhart2, Alex Kountouris3, Trefor James3, Marc Portus31School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Australia; 2Punjab Kings XI team, Indian Premier League, India; 3Cricket Australia, Melbourne, AustraliaObjective: To assess whether a history of lumbar stress fracture in pace bowlers in cricket is a risk factor for lower limb muscle strains.Methods: This was a prospective cohort risk factor study, conducted using injury data from contracted first class pace bowlers in Australia during seasons 1998–1999 to 2008–2009 inclusive. There were 205 pace bowlers, 33 of whom suffered a lumbar stress fracture when playing first class cricket. Risk ratios ([RR] with 95% confidence intervals[CI] were calculated to compare the seasonal incidence of various injuries between bowlers with a prior history of lumbar stress fracture and those with no history of lumbar stress fracture.Results: Risk of calf strain was strongly associated with prior lumbar stress fracture injury history (RR = 4.1; 95% CI: 2.4–7.1. Risks of both hamstring strain (RR = 1.5; 95% CI: 1.03–2.1 and quadriceps strain (RR = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1–3.5 were somewhat associated with history of lumbar stress fracture. Risk of groin strain was not associated with history of lumbar stress fracture (RR = 0.7; 95% CI: 0.4–1.1. Other injuries showed little association with prior lumbar stress fracture, although knee cartilage injuries were more likely in the non-stress fracture group.Conclusion: Bony hypertrophy associated with lumbar stress fracture healing may lead to subsequent lumbar nerve root impingement, making lower limb muscle strains more likely to occur. Confounders may be responsible for some of the findings. In particular, bowling speed is likely to be independently correlated with risk of lumbar stress fracture and risk of muscle strain. However, as the relationship between lumbar stress fracture history and calf strain was very strong, and that there is a

  9. Numerical Evaluation and Optimization of Multiple Hydraulically Fractured Parameters Using a Flow-Stress-Damage Coupled Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple-factor analysis and optimization play a critical role in the the ability to maximizethe stimulated reservoir volume (SRV and the success of economic shale gas production. In this paper, taking the typical continental naturally fractured silty laminae shale in China as anexample, response surface methodology (RSM was employed to optimize multiple hydraulic fracturing parameters to maximize the stimulated area in combination with numerical modeling based on the coupled flow-stress-damage (FSD approach. This paper demonstrates hydraulic fracturing effectiveness by defining two indicesnamelythe stimulated reservoir area (SRA and stimulated silty laminae area (SLA. Seven uncertain parameters, such as laminae thickness, spacing, dip angle, cohesion, internal friction angle (IFA, in situ stress difference (SD, and an operational parameter-injection rate (IR with a reasonable range based on silty Laminae Shale, Southeastern Ordos Basin, are used to fit a response of SRA and SLA as the objective function, and finally identity the optimum design under the parameters based on simultaneously maximizingSRA and SLA. In addition, asensitivity analysis of the influential factors is conducted for SRA and SLA. The aim of the study is to improve the artificial ability to control the fracturing network by means of multi-parameteroptimization. This work promises to provide insights into the effective exploitation of unconventional shale gas reservoirs via optimization of the fracturing design for continental shale, Southeastern Ordos Basin, China.

  10. Characteristics of the Foot Static Alignment and the Plantar Pressure Associated with Fifth Metatarsal Stress Fracture History in Male Soccer Players: a Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Sho; Fukubayashi, Toru; Hirose, Norikazu

    2017-12-01

    There is a large amount of information regarding risk factors for fifth metatarsal stress fractures; however, there are few studies involving large numbers of subjects. This study aimed to compare the static foot alignment and distribution of foot pressure of athletes with and without a history of fifth metatarsal stress fractures. The study participants comprised 335 collegiate male soccer players. Twenty-nine with a history of fifth metatarsal stress fractures were in the fracture group and 306 were in the control group (with subgroups as follows: 30 in the fracture foot group and 28 in the non-fracture group). We measured the foot length, arch height, weight-bearing leg-heel alignment, non-weight-bearing leg-heel alignment, forefoot angle relative to the rearfoot, forefoot angle relative to the horizontal axis, and foot pressure. The non-weight-bearing leg-heel alignment was significantly smaller and the forefoot angle relative to the rearfoot was significantly greater in the fracture foot group than in the control foot group (P = 0.049 and P = 0.038, respectively). With regard to plantar pressure, there were no significant differences among the groups. Midfield players had significantly higher rates of fifth metatarsal stress fracture in their histories, whereas defenders had significantly lower rates (chi-square = 13.2, P stress fractures according to the type of foot (kicking foot vs. pivoting foot) or the severity of ankle sprain. Playing the midfield position and having an everted rearfoot and inverted forefoot alignment were associated with fifth metatarsal stress fractures. This information may be helpful for preventing fifth metatarsal stress fracture recurrence. More detailed load evaluations and a prospective study are needed in the future.

  11. Incidence and risk factors for medial tibial stress syndrome and tibial stress fracture in high school runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Shigenori; Muneta, Takeshi; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2013-03-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) and tibial stress fracture (SF) are common lower leg disorders in runners. A prospective study was done to identify the incidence of MTSS and SF in high school runners and to determine risk factors. A total of 230 runners participating in high school running teams were evaluated. All runners aged 15 years as first grade of high school were involved in the study. They were followed up for 3 years. The measured items included height, weight, body mass index (BMI), range of hip and ankle motion, straight leg raising (SLR), intercondylar and intermalleolar interval, Q-angle, navicular drop test, hip abductor strength and physical conditioning. Each runner was followed for 3 years to report occurrence of MTSS and SF. A total number of 102 MTSS (0.29 athlete exposures) and 21 SF (0.06 athlete exposures) were identified. In females, BMI significantly increased the risk of MTSS after adjustment for the other variables in this study (adjusted odds ratio, 0.51; 95 % confidence interval, 0.31-0.86). Increased internal rotation of the hip significantly increased the risk of MTSS (adjusted odds ratio, 0.91; 95 % confidence interval, 0.85-0.99). In males, limited SLR also significantly increased the risk of SF with adjustment for the other variables in this study (adjusted odds ratio, 1.38; 95 % confidence interval, 1.04-1.83). A significant relationship was found between BMI, internal hip rotation angle and MTSS in females, and between limited SLR and SF in males. Prospective cohort study, Level II.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF IN-SITU STRESS AND PERMEABILITY IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; Nafi Toksoz

    2006-03-16

    Using a 3-D finite difference method with a rotated-staggered-grid (RSG) scheme we generated synthetic seismograms for a reservoir model consisting of three horizontal layers with the middle layer containing parallel, equally spaced fractures. By separating and analyzing the backscattered signals in the FK domain, we can obtain an estimate of the fracture spacing. The fracture spacing is estimated by taking one-half of the reciprocal of the dominant wavenumber of the backscattered energy in data acquired normal to the fractures. FK analysis for fracture spacing estimation was successfully applied to these model results, with particular focus on PS converted waves. The method was then tested on data from the Emilio Field. The estimated fracture spacing from the dominant wavenumber values in time windows at and below the reservoir level is 25-40m. A second approach for fracture spacing estimation is based on the observation that interference of forward and backscattered energy from fractures introduces notches in the frequency spectra of the scattered wavefield for data acquired normal to the fracture strike. The frequency of these notches is related to the spacing of the fractures. This Spectral Notch Method was also applied to the Emilio data, with the resulting range of fracture spacing estimates being 25-50m throughout the field. The dominant spacing fracture spacing estimate is about 30-40 m, which is very similar to the estimates obtained from the FK method.

  13. Integrated In Situ Stress Estimation by Hydraulic Fracturing, Borehole Observations and Numerical Analysis at the EXP-1 Borehole in Pohang, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanna; Xie, Linmao; Min, Ki-Bok; Bae, Seongho; Stephansson, Ove

    2017-12-01

    It is desirable to combine the stress measurement data produced by different methods to obtain a more reliable estimation of in situ stress. We present a regional case study of integrated in situ stress estimation by hydraulic fracturing, observations of borehole breakouts and drilling-induced fractures, and numerical modeling of a 1 km-deep borehole (EXP-1) in Pohang, South Korea. Prior to measuring the stress, World Stress Map (WSM) and modern field data in the Korean Peninsula are used to construct a best estimate stress model in this area. Then, new stress data from hydraulic fracturing and borehole observations is added to determine magnitude and orientation of horizontal stresses. Minimum horizontal principal stress is estimated from the shut-in pressure of the hydraulic fracturing measurement at a depth of about 700 m. The horizontal stress ratios ( S Hmax/ S hmin) derived from hydraulic fracturing, borehole breakout, and drilling-induced fractures are 1.4, 1.2, and 1.1-1.4, respectively, and the average orientations of the maximum horizontal stresses derived by field methods are N138°E, N122°E, and N136°E, respectively. The results of hydraulic fracturing and borehole observations are integrated with a result of numerical modeling to produce a final rock stress model. The results of the integration give in situ stress ratios of 1.3/1.0/0.8 ( S Hmax/ S V/ S hmin) with an average azimuth of S Hmax in the orientation range of N130°E-N136°E. It is found that the orientation of S Hmax is deviated by more than 40° clockwise compared to directions reported for the WSM in southeastern Korean peninsula.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF IN-SITU STRESS AND PERMEABILITY IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2004-07-19

    Expanded details and additional results are presented on two methods for estimating fracture orientation and density in subsurface reservoirs from scattered seismic wavefield signals. In the first, fracture density is estimated from the wavenumber spectra of the integrated amplitudes of the scattered waves as a function of offset in pre-stack data. Spectral peaks correctly identified the 50m, 35m, and 25m fracture spacings from numerical model data using a 40Hz source wavelet. The second method, referred to as the Transfer Function-Scattering Index Method, is based upon observations from 3D finite difference modeling that regularly spaced, discrete vertical fractures impart a ringing coda-type signature to any seismic energy that is transmitted through or reflected off of them. This coda energy is greatest when the acquisition direction is parallel to the fractures, the seismic wavelengths are tuned to the fracture spacing, and when the fractures have low stiffness. The method uses surface seismic reflection traces to derive a transfer function, which quantifies the change in an apparent source wavelet propagating through a fractured interval. The transfer function for an interval with low scattering will be more spike-like and temporally compact. The transfer function for an interval with high scattering will ring and be less temporally compact. A Scattering Index is developed based on a time lag weighting of the transfer function. When a 3D survey is acquired with a full range of azimuths, the Scattering Index allows the identification of subsurface areas with high fracturing and the orientation (or strike) of those fractures. The method was calibrated with model data and then applied to field data from a fractured reservoir giving results that agree with known field measurements. As an aid to understanding the scattered wavefield seen in finite difference models, a series of simple point scatterers was used to create synthetic seismic shot records collected over

  15. Iliotibial band release as an adjunct to the surgical management of patellar stress fracture in the athlete: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keeley Anthony

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stress fracture of the patella is rare. In this report, a case of patellar stress fracture occurring in an amateur athlete is presented, and an operative adjunct to the surgical management of this condition is proposed. A review of the English literature identified 21 previous cases of stress fracture of the patella, the majority in young athletes. None of these reports discussed treatment addressing the pathological process contributing to patellar stress fracture. The subject of this case report is a young male netballer who presented with a transverse stress fracture in the inferior third of his patella, on a background of patellofemoral overload. The patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation of his patella, combined with release of the iliotibial band. He returned to training after 6 weeks. The previous literature suggests that operative fixation is indicated for the treatment of displaced patellar stress fractures. Iliotibial band release, as a surgical adjunct to this treatment, may address the pathology of these fractures, and facilitate a return to sport at the highest level.

  16. Effect of far-field stresses and residual stresses incorporation in predicting fracture toughness of carbon nanotube reinforced yttria stabilized zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Neelima; Nisar, Ambreen; Mohapatra, Pratyasha; Rawat, Siddharth; Ariharan, S.; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-10-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is a potential thermal insulating ceramic for high temperature applications (>1000 °C). YSZ reinforced with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was processed via spark plasma sintering to produce dense, crack-free homogeneous sample and avoid any degradation of MWNTs when sintered using conventional routes. Despite porosity, the addition of MWNT has a profound effect in improving the damage tolerance of YSZ by allowing the retention of tetragonal phase. However, at some instances, the crack lengths in the MWNT reinforced YSZ matrices have been found to be longer than the standalone counterparts. Therefore, it becomes inappropriate to apply Anstis equation to calculate fracture toughness values. In this regard, a combined analytical cum numerical method is used to estimate the theoretical fracture toughness and quantitatively analyze the mechanics of matrix cracking in the reinforced composite matrices incorporating the effects of various factors (such as far-field stresses, volume fraction of MWNTs, change in the modulus and Poisson's ratio values along with the increase in porosity, and bridging and phase transformation mechanism) affecting the fracture toughness of YSZ-MWNT composites. The results suggest that the incorporation of far-field stresses cannot be ignored in estimating the theoretical fracture toughness of YSZ-MWNT composites.

  17. Characterization of In-Situ Stress and Permeability in Fractured Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2006-06-30

    Fracture orientation and spacing are important parameters in reservoir development. This project resulted in the development and testing of a new method for estimating fracture orientation and two new methods for estimating fracture spacing from seismic data. The methods developed were successfully applied to field data from fractured carbonate reservoirs. Specific results include: the development a new method for estimating fracture orientation from scattered energy in seismic data; the development of two new methods for estimating fracture spacing from scattered energy in seismic data; the successful testing of these methods on numerical model data and field data from two fractured carbonate reservoirs; and the validation of fracture orientation results with borehole data from the two fields. Researchers developed a new method for determining the reflection and scattering characteristics of seismic energy from subsurface fractured formations. The method is based upon observations made from 3D finite difference modeling of the reflected and scattered seismic energy over discrete systems of vertical fractures. Regularly spaced, discrete vertical fractures impart a ringing coda type signature to seismic energy that is transmitted through or reflected off of them. This signature varies in amplitude and coherence as a function of several parameters including: (1) the difference in angle between the orientation of the fractures and the acquisition direction, (2) the fracture spacing, (3) the wavelength of the illuminating seismic energy, and (4) the compliance, or stiffness, of the fractures. This coda energy is the most coherent when the acquisition direction is parallel to the strike of the fractures. It has the largest amplitude when the seismic wavelengths are tuned to the fracture spacing, and when the fractures have low stiffness. The method uses surface seismic reflection traces to derive a transfer function that quantifies the change in the apparent source

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with 3D T1 VIBE versus computer tomography in pars stress fracture of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, E.C.; Robertson, A.F.; Malara, F.A.; O' Shea, T.; Roebert, J.K.; Rotstein, A.H. [Victoria House Medical Imaging, Prahran, Victoria (Australia); Schneider, M.E. [Monash University, Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)

    2016-11-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE sequence to 128-slice computer tomography (CT) in pars stress fractures of the lumbar spine. 3-T MRI and CT of 24 patients involving 70 pars interarticularis were retrospectively reviewed by four blinded radiologists. The fracture morphology (complete, incomplete, or normal) was assessed on MRI and CT at different time points. Pars interarticularis bone marrow edema (present or absent) was also evaluated on MRI. In total, 14 complete fractures, 31 incomplete fractures and 25 normal pars were detected by CT. Bone marrow edema was seen in seven of the complete and 25 of the incomplete fractures. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI in detecting fractures (complete and incomplete) were 97.7, 92.3, and 95.7 %, respectively. MRI was 100 % accurate in detecting complete fractures. For incomplete fractures, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MRI were 96.7, 92.0, and 94.6 %, respectively. 3-T MRI with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE is 100 % accurate in diagnosing complete pars fractures and has excellent diagnostic ability in the detection and characterization of incomplete pars stress fractures compared to CT. MRI has the added advantages of detecting bone marrow edema and does not employ ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with 3D T1 VIBE versus computer tomography in pars stress fracture of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, E.C.; Robertson, A.F.; Malara, F.A.; O'Shea, T.; Roebert, J.K.; Rotstein, A.H.; Schneider, M.E.

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE sequence to 128-slice computer tomography (CT) in pars stress fractures of the lumbar spine. 3-T MRI and CT of 24 patients involving 70 pars interarticularis were retrospectively reviewed by four blinded radiologists. The fracture morphology (complete, incomplete, or normal) was assessed on MRI and CT at different time points. Pars interarticularis bone marrow edema (present or absent) was also evaluated on MRI. In total, 14 complete fractures, 31 incomplete fractures and 25 normal pars were detected by CT. Bone marrow edema was seen in seven of the complete and 25 of the incomplete fractures. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI in detecting fractures (complete and incomplete) were 97.7, 92.3, and 95.7 %, respectively. MRI was 100 % accurate in detecting complete fractures. For incomplete fractures, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MRI were 96.7, 92.0, and 94.6 %, respectively. 3-T MRI with thin-slice 3D T1 VIBE is 100 % accurate in diagnosing complete pars fractures and has excellent diagnostic ability in the detection and characterization of incomplete pars stress fractures compared to CT. MRI has the added advantages of detecting bone marrow edema and does not employ ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  20. Stress fracture of the proximal fibula in a young soccer player: a case report and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFiori, J P

    1999-07-01

    A 14-yr-old soccer player complained of a history of leg pain with activity that had been present for several weeks. There was no history of direct trauma. Tenderness was found over the lateral aspect of the leg, and radiographs showed an area of calcification along the shaft of the proximal fibula. Because of the unusual location of the findings and to exclude a tumor, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was obtained which confirmed the diagnosis of a proximal fibular stress fracture. The patient returned to full sport participation with a period of relative rest, splinting, and strengthening and flexibility training. This case describes an injury that has not been reported in young athletes and only rarely described in active adults. The literature regarding this injury is reviewed, and two injury patterns of proximal fibular stress fractures are described.

  1. Stress fractures of the ankle malleoli diagnosed by ultrasound: a report of 6 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, Stefano [CIM SA, Cabinet Imagerie Medicale, Geneve (Switzerland); Luong, Dien Hung [CIM SA, Cabinet Imagerie Medicale, Geneve (Switzerland); University of Montreal, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Montreal (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    To present the ultrasound appearance of stress fractures (SF) of the ankle malleoli. We present a retrospective review of 6 patients (4 women and 2 men, with an age range of 24-52 years, mean age of 39 years) in which ultrasound diagnosed, together with the clinical findings, an SF of the ankle malleoli. For all of these patients ultrasound was the first imaging technique applied because of a clinical suspicion of soft tissue injuries following excessive exertion. Patients were subsequently examined using standard radiographs and/or MRI. At ultrasound patients showed thickening of the periosteum in all patients, calcified bone callus was evident in 3 out of 6 patients. Cortical irregularities and subcutaneous oedema were found in all but one patient. Colour Doppler showed local hypervascular changes in all patients. Local compression with the transducers during real-time scanning increased pain in all cases. Ultrasound, together with the clinical findings, can diagnose an SF of the ankle malleoli. We suggest that sonologists should include malleolar SF in their differential diagnosis, particularly in the case of perimalleolar pain from over-solicitation. They must also include, as part of every ultrasound examination of the ankle, the evaluation of both malleoli and should be aware of the ultrasound appearance of malleolar SF. If the diagnosis remains uncertain, an MRI should be prescribed. (orig.)

  2. Addition of perfluorocarbons to alginate hydrogels significantly impacts molecular transport and fracture stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joseph C; Stoppel, Whitney L; Roberts, Susan C; Bhatia, Surita R

    2013-02-01

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are used in biomaterial formulations to increase oxygen (O(2) ) tension and create a homogeneous O(2) environment in three-dimensional tissue constructs. It is unclear how PFCs affect mechanical and transport properties of the scaffold, which are critical for robustness, intracellular signaling, protein transport, and overall device efficacy. In this study, we investigate composite alginate hydrogels containing a perfluorooctyl bromide (PFOB) emulsion stabilized with Pluronic(®) F68 (F68). We demonstrate that PFC addition significantly affects biomaterial properties and performance. Solution and hydrogel mechanical properties and transport of representative hydrophilic (riboflavin), hydrophobic (methyl and ethyl paraben), and protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA) solutes were compared in alginate/F68 composite hydrogels with or without PFOB. Our results indicate that mechanical properties of the alginate/F68/PFOB hydrogels are not significantly affected under small strains, but a significant decrease fracture stress is observed. The effective diffusivity D(eff) of hydrophobic small molecules decreases with PFOB emulsion addition, yet the D(eff) of hydrophilic small molecules remained unaffected. For BSA, the D(eff) increased and the loading capacity decreased with PFOB emulsion addition. Thus, a trade-off between the desired increased O(2) supply provided by PFCs and the mechanical weakening and change in transport of cellular signals must be carefully considered in the design of biomaterials containing PFCs. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Stress fractures of the ankle malleoli diagnosed by ultrasound: a report of 6 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, Stefano; Luong, Dien Hung

    2014-01-01

    To present the ultrasound appearance of stress fractures (SF) of the ankle malleoli. We present a retrospective review of 6 patients (4 women and 2 men, with an age range of 24-52 years, mean age of 39 years) in which ultrasound diagnosed, together with the clinical findings, an SF of the ankle malleoli. For all of these patients ultrasound was the first imaging technique applied because of a clinical suspicion of soft tissue injuries following excessive exertion. Patients were subsequently examined using standard radiographs and/or MRI. At ultrasound patients showed thickening of the periosteum in all patients, calcified bone callus was evident in 3 out of 6 patients. Cortical irregularities and subcutaneous oedema were found in all but one patient. Colour Doppler showed local hypervascular changes in all patients. Local compression with the transducers during real-time scanning increased pain in all cases. Ultrasound, together with the clinical findings, can diagnose an SF of the ankle malleoli. We suggest that sonologists should include malleolar SF in their differential diagnosis, particularly in the case of perimalleolar pain from over-solicitation. They must also include, as part of every ultrasound examination of the ankle, the evaluation of both malleoli and should be aware of the ultrasound appearance of malleolar SF. If the diagnosis remains uncertain, an MRI should be prescribed. (orig.)

  4. Multi-parameter crack tip stress state description for estimation of fracture process zone extent in silicate composite WST specimens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselý, V.; Sobek, J.; Šestáková, L.; Frantík, P.; Seitl, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 25 (2013), s. 69-78 ISSN 1971-8993 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP104/11/0833; GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/11/1551 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Near-crack tip fields * Williams series * higher-order terms * stress field approximation * wedge splitting test * fracture process zone Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  5. Analysis of stress fractures associated with lameness in Thoroughbred flat racehorses training on different track surfaces undergoing nuclear scintigraphic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, M C; Bonder, D; Boston, R C; Ross, M W

    2015-05-01

    There is limited information regarding the impact of training track surface on the occurrence of stress fractures. To evaluate the impact of training track surface on the proportion of long bone and pelvic stress fractures associated with lameness in Thoroughbred horses in flat race training undergoing nuclear scintigraphic examination. Retrospective study. Scintigraphic examinations of Thoroughbred flat racehorses were evaluated from 2 hospitals (hospital A [Toronto Equine Hospital], 2003-2009, and hospital B [George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania], 1994-2006). Horses admitted to hospital A trained at a single track, at which the main training surface changed from dirt to synthetic on 27 August 2006. Two distinct populations existed at hospital B: horses that trained on dirt (numerous trainers) and those that trained on turf (single trainer). All scintigraphic images were evaluated by a blinded reviewer. Fisher's exact test and logistic regression were used when appropriate, and significance was set at Pfractures detected in scintigraphic examinations from horses training on a synthetic surface (31.7%) in comparison to scintigraphic examinations from horses training on a dirt surface (23.0%) at an earlier point in time (P = 0.03). There was a greater proportion of hindlimb/pelvic and tibial stress fractures diagnosed in horses from the synthetic surface-trained group than from the dirt-trained group at hospital A (Pfractures diagnosed, but other factors, such as training philosophy, appear to be important. Future prospective investigations to fully elucidate the relationship between training track surface and the proportion of stress fractures and other nonfatal musculoskeletal injuries are warranted. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  6. Surgical versus conservative treatment for high-risk stress fractures of the lower leg (anterior tibial cortex, navicular and fifth metatarsal base): a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mallee, Wouter H.; Weel, Hanneke; van Dijk, C. Niek; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M.; Lin, Chung-Wei Christine

    2015-01-01

    To compare surgical and conservative treatment for high-risk stress fractures of the anterior tibial cortex, navicular and proximal fifth metatarsal. Systematic searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and PEDro were performed to identify relevant prospective and retrospective

  7. Effect of Heat Treatment, Pre-stress and Surface Hardening on Fracture Toughness of Micro-Alloyed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag Chaudhury, Joydeb

    2014-01-01

    Micro-alloyed steels are being increasingly accepted by industry in various fields of application and are available with a wide variety of microstructures. Extensive literature is available on their microstructure-property relationships. The superior mechanical properties of micro-alloyed steels are caused by fine-grained microstructures and precipitation of micro-alloying elements such as V, Ti and Nb that led to an improvement in yield strength, in the product of tensile strength and total elongation and in Charpy V-notch impact energy as well. The microstructural changes caused by heat treatment or residual stress state caused by surface hardening or mechanical means may influence the fracture toughness of these micro-alloyed steels. It is in this context that the present work begins with experimental determination of quasi-static initiation fracture toughness ( J 1c) of low carbon (0.19%) micro-alloyed steel in as-rolled condition without any heat treatment. The study further explores the effect of normalizing, shot-peening and cyaniding followed by shot-peening on fracture toughness of as-rolled steel under study. The normalizing heat treatment, shot-peening and cyaniding followed by shot-peening—each indicates a positive influence on initiation fracture toughness. Results, when compared, show that cyaniding followed by shot-peening have led to a 2.7 times increase in J 1c. Cyaniding followed by shot-peening may therefore be considered as having the most positive influence on initiation fracture toughness in as-rolled condition for the type of micro-alloyed steel under study. Although initiation fracture toughness is in general known to decrease with increase in yield strength in LEFM arena, the micro-alloyed steel under study when normalized displayed simultaneous improvement in yield strength and J 1c. All these observed effects of normalizing, shot-peening and cyaniding on initiation fracture toughness (elastic-plastic fracture mechanics) were explained

  8. Seismic monitoring of hydraulic fracturing: techniques for determining fluid flow paths and state of stress away from a wellbore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehler, M.; House, L.; Kaieda, H.

    1986-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has gained in popularity in recent years as a way to determine the orientations and magnitudes of tectonic stresses. By augmenting conventional hydraulic fracturing measurements with detection and mapping of the microearthquakes induced by fracturing, we can supplement and idependently confirm information obtained from conventional analysis. Important information obtained from seismic monitoring includes: the state of stress of the rock, orientation and spacing of the major joint sets, and measurements of rock elastic parameters at locations distant from the wellbore. While conventional well logging operations can provide information about several of these parameters, the zone of interrogation is usually limited to the immediate proximity of the borehole. The seismic waveforms of the microearthquakes contain a wealth of information about the rock in regions that are otherwise inaccessible for study. By reliably locating the hypocenters of many microearthquakes, we have inferred the joint patterns in the rock. We observed that microearthquake locations do not define a simple, thin, planar distribution, that the fault plane solutions are consistent with shear slippage, and that spectral analysis indicates that the source dimensions and slip along the faults are small. Hence we believe that the microearthquakes result from slip along preexisting joints, and not from tensile extension at the tip of the fracture. Orientations of the principal stresses can be estimated by using fault plane solutions of the larger microearthquakes. By using a joint earthquake location scheme, and/or calibrations with downhole detonators, rock velocities and heterogeneities thereof can be investigated in rock volumes that are far enough from the borehole to be representative of intrincis rock properties.

  9. A Study of Structural Stress Technique for Fracture Prediction of an Auto-Mobile Clutch Snap-Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ju Hee; Myeong, Man Sik; Oh, Chang Sik; Kim, Yun Jae

    2016-01-01

    The endurance reliability assessment of a highly complex mechanism is generally predicted by the fatigue life based on simple stress analysis. This study discusses various fatigue life assessment techniques for an automobile clutch snap ring. Finite element analyses were conducted to determine the structural stress on the snap ring. Structural stress that is insensitive in regards to the mesh size and type definition is presented in this study. The structural stress definition is consistent with elementary structural mechanics theory and provides an effective measure of a stress state that pertains to fatigue behavior of welded joints in the form of both membrane and bending components. Numerical procedures for both solid models and shell or plate element models are presented to demonstrate the mesh-size insensitivity when extracting the structural stress parameters. Conventional finite element models can be used with the structural stress calculations as a post-processing procedure. The two major implications from this research were: (a) structural stresses pertaining to fatigue behavior can be consistently calculated in a mesh-insensitive manner regardless of the types of finite element models; and (b) by comparing with the clutch snap-ring fatigue test data, we should predict the fatigue fractures of an automobile clutch snap ring using this method

  10. A Study of Structural Stress Technique for Fracture Prediction of an Auto-Mobile Clutch Snap-Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju Hee [Korea Military Academy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Myeong, Man Sik [Samsung Display, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Chang Sik [KINS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Sejong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The endurance reliability assessment of a highly complex mechanism is generally predicted by the fatigue life based on simple stress analysis. This study discusses various fatigue life assessment techniques for an automobile clutch snap ring. Finite element analyses were conducted to determine the structural stress on the snap ring. Structural stress that is insensitive in regards to the mesh size and type definition is presented in this study. The structural stress definition is consistent with elementary structural mechanics theory and provides an effective measure of a stress state that pertains to fatigue behavior of welded joints in the form of both membrane and bending components. Numerical procedures for both solid models and shell or plate element models are presented to demonstrate the mesh-size insensitivity when extracting the structural stress parameters. Conventional finite element models can be used with the structural stress calculations as a post-processing procedure. The two major implications from this research were: (a) structural stresses pertaining to fatigue behavior can be consistently calculated in a mesh-insensitive manner regardless of the types of finite element models; and (b) by comparing with the clutch snap-ring fatigue test data, we should predict the fatigue fractures of an automobile clutch snap ring using this method.

  11. Effect of Calcaneus Fracture Gap Without Step-Off on Stress Distribution Across the Subtalar Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, Brett; Joyce, Donald A; Werner, Frederick W; Iannolo, Maria

    2017-03-01

    Subtalar arthritis is a common consequence following calcaneal fracture, and its development is related to the severity of the fracture. Previous calcaneal fracture models have demonstrated altered contact characteristics when a step-off is created in the posterior facet articular surface. Changes in posterior facet contact characteristics have not been previously characterized for calcaneal fracture gap without step-off. The contact characteristics (peak pressure, area of contact, and centroid of pressure) of the posterior facet of the subtalar joint were determined in 6 cadaveric specimens. After creating a calcaneal fracture to simulate a Sanders type II fracture, the contact characteristics were determined with the posterior facet anatomically reduced followed by an incremental increase in fracture gap displacement of 2, 3, and 5 mm without a step-off of the articular surface. Peak pressure on the medial fragment was significantly less with a 5-mm gap compared to a 2- or 3-mm gap, or reduced. On the lateral fragment, the peak pressure was significantly increased with a 5-mm gap compared to a 2- or 3-mm gap. Contact area significantly changed with increased gap. In this study, there were no significant differences in contact characteristics between a <3-mm gap and an anatomically reduced fracture, conceding the study limitations including limiting axial loading to 50% of donor body weight. A small amount of articular incongruity without a step-off can be tolerated by the subtalar joint, in contrast to articular incongruity with a step-off present.

  12. An integrated workflow for stress and flow modelling using outcrop-derived discrete fracture networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Nick, Hamid; Bertotti, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Fluid flow in naturally fractured reservoirs is often controlled by subseismic-scale fracture networks. Although the fracture network can be partly sampled in the direct vicinity of wells, the inter-well scale network is poorly constrained in fractured reservoir models. Outcrop analogues can...... provide data for populating domains of the reservoir model where no direct measurements are available. However, extracting relevant statistics from large outcrops representative of inter-well scale fracture networks remains challenging. Recent advances in outcrop imaging provide high-resolution datasets...... that can cover areas of several hundred by several hundred meters, i.e. the domain between adjacent wells, but even then, data from the high-resolution models is often upscaled to reservoir flow grids, resulting in loss of accuracy. We present a workflow that uses photorealistic georeferenced outcrop...

  13. Rib stress fractures among rowers: a systematic review on return to sports, risk factors and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ailly, Philip N; Sluiter, Judith K; Kuijer, Paul P

    2016-06-01

    Rib stress fractures (RSFs) are injuries frequently sustained by elite rowers with an injury rate of 8-16% over the course of a rowing career, resulting in negative effects on training and performance. For clinical management, the aim of this review was to describe time to return to sports, summarize potentially preventive measures and appraise the evidence on risk factors. A search strategy was performed in PubMed, SportDiscus, Web of Science and Embase till June 1st 2015. All studies were graded on their quality. The search resulted in 124 studies, of which 17 were included: Ten reported on return to sports, 17 reported on risk factors and nine on preventive measures. For return to sports, nine studies mentioned a loss of training of 4-6 weeks. The shortest period was one week and the longest 16 weeks. For risk factors, insufficient or conflicting evidence was found for changes in the training program, incorrect rowing technique, female gender, low bone mineral density, inadequate equipment, and training type. For prevention, gradual changes in the training program, alertness on the part of coaches and clinicians, and supplementation of diet and hormones are suggested as effective measures. However, no effect studies have been found. The main outcome of this review on RSFs is that little evidence is available on return to sports, risk factors and preventive measures. Coaches and clinicians should carefully guide and assist rowers suffering from RSFs in off training and in the subsequent training period to regain their pre-injury level.

  14. Fracture Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zehnder, Alan T

    2012-01-01

    Fracture mechanics is a vast and growing field. This book develops the basic elements needed for both fracture research and engineering practice. The emphasis is on continuum mechanics models for energy flows and crack-tip stress- and deformation fields in elastic and elastic-plastic materials. In addition to a brief discussion of computational fracture methods, the text includes practical sections on fracture criteria, fracture toughness testing, and methods for measuring stress intensity factors and energy release rates. Class-tested at Cornell, this book is designed for students, researchers and practitioners interested in understanding and contributing to a diverse and vital field of knowledge. Alan Zehnder joined the faculty at Cornell University in 1988. Since then he has served in a number of leadership roles including Chair of the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, and Director of the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.  He teaches applied mechanics and his research t...

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF IN-SITU STRESS AND PERMEABILITY IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2005-02-04

    Numerical modeling and field data tests are presented on the Transfer Function/Scattering Index Method for estimating fracture orientation and density in subsurface reservoirs from the ''coda'' or scattered energy in the seismic trace. Azimuthal stacks indicate that scattered energy is enhanced along the fracture strike direction. A transfer function method is used to more effectively indicate fracture orientation. The transfer function method, which involves a comparison of the seismic signature above and below a reservoir interval, effectively eliminates overburden effects and acquisition imprints in the analysis. The transfer function signature is simplified into a scattering index attribute value that gives fracture orientation and spatial variations of the fracture density within a field. The method is applied to two field data sets, a 3-D Ocean Bottom Cable (OBC) seismic data set from an offshore fractured carbonate reservoir in the Adriatic Sea and a 3-D seismic data set from an onshore fractured carbonate field in the Middle East. Scattering index values are computed in both fields at the reservoir level, and the results are compared to borehole breakout data and Formation MicroImager (FMI) logs in nearby wells. In both cases the scattering index results are in very good agreement with the well data. Field data tests and well validation will continue. In the area of technology transfer, we have made presentations of our results to industry groups at MIT technical review meetings, international technical conferences, industry workshops, and numerous exploration and production company visits.

  16. Water Stress from High-Volume Hydraulic Fracturing Potentially Threatens Aquatic Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Arkansas, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entrekin, Sally; Trainor, Anne; Saiers, James; Patterson, Lauren; Maloney, Kelly; Fargione, Joseph; Kiesecker, Joseph; Baruch-Mordo, Sharon; Konschnik, Katherine; Wiseman, Hannah; Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Ryan, Joseph N

    2018-02-20

    Demand for high-volume, short duration water withdrawals could create water stress to aquatic organisms in Fayetteville Shale streams sourced for hydraulic fracturing fluids. We estimated potential water stress using permitted water withdrawal volumes and actual water withdrawals compared to monthly median, low, and high streamflows. Risk for biological stress was considered at 20% of long-term median and 10% of high- and low-flow thresholds. Future well build-out projections estimated potential for continued stress. Most water was permitted from small, free-flowing streams and "frack" ponds (dammed streams). Permitted 12-h pumping volumes exceeded median streamflow at 50% of withdrawal sites in June, when flows were low. Daily water usage, from operator disclosures, compared to median streamflow showed possible water stress in 7-51% of catchments from June-November, respectively. If 100% of produced water was recycled, per-well water use declined by 25%, reducing threshold exceedance by 10%. Future water stress was predicted to occur in fewer catchments important for drinking water and species of conservation concern due to the decline in new well installations and increased use of recycled water. Accessible and precise withdrawal and streamflow data are critical moving forward to assess and mitigate water stress in streams that experience high-volume withdrawals.

  17. Water stress from high-volume hydraulic fracturing potentially threatens aquatic biodiversity and ecosystem services in Arkansas, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entrekin, Sally; Trainor, Anne; Saiers, James; Patterson, Lauren; Maloney, Kelly O.; Fargione, Joseph; Kiesecker, Joseph M.; Baruch-Mordo, Sharon; Konschnik, Katherine E.; Wiseman, Hannah; Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2018-01-01

    Demand for high-volume, short duration water withdrawals could create water stress to aquatic organisms in Fayetteville Shale streams sourced for hydraulic fracturing fluids. We estimated potential water stress using permitted water withdrawal volumes and actual water withdrawals compared to monthly median, low, and high streamflows. Risk for biological stress was considered at 20% of long-term median and 10% of high- and low-flow thresholds. Future well build-out projections estimated potential for continued stress. Most water was permitted from small, free-flowing streams and “frack” ponds (dammed streams). Permitted 12-h pumping volumes exceeded median streamflow at 50% of withdrawal sites in June, when flows were low. Daily water usage, from operator disclosures, compared to median streamflow showed possible water stress in 7–51% of catchments from June–November, respectively. If 100% of produced water was recycled, per-well water use declined by 25%, reducing threshold exceedance by 10%. Future water stress was predicted to occur in fewer catchments important for drinking water and species of conservation concern due to the decline in new well installations and increased use of recycled water. Accessible and precise withdrawal and streamflow data are critical moving forward to assess and mitigate water stress in streams that experience high-volume withdrawals.

  18. Stress fracture healing: fatigue loading of the rat ulna induces upregulation in expression of osteogenic and angiogenic genes that mimic the intramembranous portion of fracture repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Gregory R; Towler, Dwight A; Silva, Matthew J

    2009-02-01

    Woven bone is formed in response to fatigue-induced stress fractures and is associated with increased local angiogenesis. The molecular mechanisms that regulate this woven bone formation are unknown. Our objective was to measure the temporal and spatial expression of osteo- and angiogenic genes in woven bone formation in response to increasing levels of fatigue-induced damage. We used the rat forelimb compression model to produce four discrete levels of fatigue damage in the right ulna of 115 male Fischer rats. Rats were killed at 0 (1 h), 1, 3 and 7 days after loading. Using qRT-PCR, we quantified gene expression associated with osteogenesis (BMP2, Msx2, Runx2, Osx, BSP, Osc), cell proliferation (Hist4), and angiogenesis (VEGF, PECAM-1) from the central half of the ulna. The spatial distribution of BMP2, BSP and PCNA was assessed by immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization in transverse histological sections 1, 4, and 7 mm distal to the ulnar mid-diaphysis. One hour after loading, BMP2 was significantly upregulated in neurovascular structures in the medial ulnar periosteum. Expression of angiogenic markers (VEGF, PECAM-1) increased significantly between Day 0 and 1 and, as with BMP2 expression, remained upregulated through Day 7. While Osx and BSP were upregulated on Day 1, the other osteogenic genes (Msx2, Runx2, Osx, BSP and Osc) were induced on Day 3 in association with the initiation of periosteal woven bone formation and continued through Day 7. The magnitude of osteogenic gene expression, particularly matrix genes (BSP, Osc) was significantly proportional the level of fatigue damage. The woven bone response to fatigue injury is remarkably similar to the "intramembranous" portion of fracture repair - rapid formation of periosteal woven bone characterized by early BMP2 expression, cell proliferation, and upregulation of osteogenic genes. We speculate that woven bone repair of fatigue damage may be an abbreviated fracture response without the requirement

  19. Effect of Random Natural Fractures on Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Geometry in Fractured Carbonate Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Shijie; Zhao, Haiyang; Wang, Lei; Li, Wei; Geng, Yudi; Tao, Shan; Zhang, Guangqing; Chen, Mian

    2018-02-01

    Natural fractures have a significant influence on the propagation geometry of hydraulic fractures in fractured reservoirs. True triaxial volumetric fracturing experiments, in which random natural fractures are created by placing cement blocks of different dimensions in a cuboid mold and filling the mold with additional cement to create the final test specimen, were used to study the factors that influence the hydraulic fracture propagation geometry. These factors include the presence of natural fractures around the wellbore, the dimension and volumetric density of random natural fractures and the horizontal differential stress. The results show that volumetric fractures preferentially formed when natural fractures occurred around the wellbore, the natural fractures are medium to long and have a volumetric density of 6-9%, and the stress difference is less than 11 MPa. The volumetric fracture geometries are mainly major multi-branch fractures with fracture networks or major multi-branch fractures (2-4 fractures). The angles between the major fractures and the maximum horizontal in situ stress are 30°-45°, and fracture networks are located at the intersections of major multi-branch fractures. Short natural fractures rarely led to the formation of fracture networks. Thus, the interaction between hydraulic fractures and short natural fractures has little engineering significance. The conclusions are important for field applications and for gaining a deeper understanding of the formation process of volumetric fractures.

  20. Patients with eating disorders. A high-risk group for fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Peter; Emborg, Charlotte; Støving, René K

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To analyze fracture risk and bone mineral density in patients with eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders). DESIGN: Clinical overview. FINDINGS: Bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased in patients with anorexia nervosa....... In patients with bulimia nervosa, bone mineral is only marginally decreased and fracture risk marginally increased. In patients with other eating disorders (eating disorders not otherwise specified), bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased. CONCLUSIONS: Fracture risk is increased...... in patients with eating disorders. An eating disorder should be suspected in severely underweight young individuals (primarily girls) presenting with fractures, especially low-energy fractures....

  1. Patients with eating disorders - a high-risk group for fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, P.; Emborg, C.; Støving, R.K.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To analyze fracture risk and bone mineral density in patients with eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders). DESIGN: Clinical overview. FINDINGS: Bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased in patients with anorexia nervosa....... In patients with bulimia nervosa, bone mineral is only marginally decreased and fracture risk marginally increased. In patients with other eating disorders (eating disorders not otherwise specified), bone mineral density is decreased and fracture risk increased. CONCLUSIONS: Fracture risk is increased...... in patients with eating disorders. An eating disorder should be suspected in severely underweight young individuals (primarily girls) presenting with fractures, especially low-energy fractures....

  2. Crack initiation criteria for singular stress concentrations, Part IV: Applications to fracture of coated structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knésl, Zdeněk; Náhlík, Luboš; Bareš, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2008), s. 263-270 ISSN 1802-1484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/07/1284; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB200410803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Fracture mechanics * bi-material body * thin layers * fracture of coated structures Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  3. Case of femoral diaphyseal stress fracture after long-term risedronate administration diagnosed by iliac bone biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai T

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Takashi Nagai, Keizo Sakamoto, Koji Ishikawa, Emi Saito, Takuma Kuroda, Katsunori Inagaki Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Showa University School of Medicine, Shinagwa-ku, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Bisphosphonate excessively inhibits bone resorption and results in pathological fracture of the femur or ilium. The subject of this study was administered risedronate for 7 years; we suspected an easy fracture of the femoral diaphysis. In this study, we report the results of this patient's bone biopsy and bone morphometric analysis. A 76-year-old female patient presented with right femoral pain. Bone mineral density of the anteroposterior surface of the 2nd to 4th lumbar vertebrae (L2-L4 was decreased and levels of bone turnover markers were high. Therefore, we initiated treatment with risedronate. As she continued the medication, urinary levels of cross-linked N-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen and alkaline phosphatase (bone-type isozyme were found to be within the normal ranges. After 7 years of administration, the patient experienced pain when she put weight on the right femur and right femoral pain while walking. Plain radiographic examination revealed polypoid stress fracture-like lesions on the right femoral diaphysis and on the slightly distal-lateral cortical bone. Similar lesions were observed on magnetic resonance imaging and bone scintigraphy. We suspected severely suppressed bone turnover. Bone biopsy was obtained after labeling with tetracycline, and bone morphometric analysis was performed. On microscopic examination, slight double tetracycline labeling was observed. The trabeculae were narrow, and the numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts were decreased. Further, rates of bone calcification and bone formation were slow. Hence, we diagnosed fracture as a result of low turnover osteopathy. Risedronate was withdrawn, and Vitamin D3 was administered to improve the bone turnover. At 6 months, abnormal signals on magnetic resonance

  4. Rib stress fracture in a male adaptive rower from the arms and shoulders sport class: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoljanovic, Tomislav; Bojanic, Ivan; Pollock, Courtney L; Radonic, Radovan

    2011-10-15

    Adaptive rowing is rowing or sculling for rowers with a physical disability. It debuted at the Paralympic Games in 2008. In order to ensure an equitable playing field, rowers with similar levels of physical function and disability are classified into different sport classes for competition. Rowers with an inability to use a sliding seat and impaired trunk function resulting in an inability to perform trunk forward and backward lean via hip flexion/extension are assigned to the Arms and Shoulders (AS) class. AS rowers have to use a chest strap set immediately below the chest in order to localize any trunk movement in AS class. Conditions created by adaptations of rowing equipment and technique within the AS class create unique stresses on the upper thoracic region. The following case report demonstrates how etiology and management of a rib stress fracture in an AS rower differs in comparison to able-body rowers. Of significant importance were the limitations imposed on the rower's ability to maintain rowing-specific fitness, due to the nature of the rib stress fracture and requirement to decrease force transmission through the ribs for several weeks. The rower's gradual return to full training was further impacted by obligatory use of the chest strap, which directly applied pressure over the injured area. Protective orthosis for the chest was designed and applied in order to dissipate pressure of the chest strap over the thorax during rowing (most importantly at the catch position) both on the ergometer and in the boat.

  5. The scaling of stress distribution under small scale yielding by T-scaling method and application to prediction of the temperature dependence on fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Kenichi; Hamada, Takeshi; Meshii, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for scaling the crack tip stress distribution under small scale yielding condition was proposed and named as T-scaling method. This method enables to identify the different stress distributions for materials with different tensile properties but identical load in terms of K or J. Then by assuming that the temperature dependence of a material is represented as the stress-strain relationship temperature dependence, a method to predict the fracture load at an arbitrary temperature from the already known fracture load at a reference temperature was proposed. This method combined the T-scaling method and the knowledge “fracture stress for slip induced cleavage fracture is temperature independent.” Once the fracture load is predicted, fracture toughness J c at the temperature under consideration can be evaluated by running elastic-plastic finite element analysis. Finally, the above-mentioned framework to predict the J c temperature dependency of a material in the ductile-to-brittle temperature distribution was validated for 0.55% carbon steel JIS S55C. The proposed framework seems to have a possibility to solve the problem the master curve is facing in the relatively higher temperature region, by requiring only tensile tests. (author)

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF IN-SITU STRESS AND PERMEABILITY IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2005-08-01

    During the past six months we have adapted our 3-D elastic, anisotropic finite difference code by implementing the rotated staggered grid (RSG) method to more accurately represent large contrasts of elastic moduli between the fractures and surrounding formation, and applying the perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition to minimize boundary reflections. Two approaches for estimating fracture spacing from scattered seismic energy were developed. The first relates notches in the amplitude spectra of the scattered wavefield to the dominant fracture spacing that caused the scattering. The second uses conventional FK filtering to isolate the backscattered signals and then recovers an estimate of the fracture spacing from the dominant wavelength of those signals. Both methods were tested on synthetic data and then applied to the Emilio field data. The spectral notch method estimated the Emilio fracture spacing to be about 30 to 40 m, while the FK method found fracture spacing of about 48 to 53 m. We continue to work on two field data sets from fractured carbonate reservoirs provided by our industry sponsors--the offshore Emilio Field data (provided by ENIAGIP), and an onshore reservoir from the Middle East (provided by Shell). Calibration data in the form of well logs and previous fracture studies are available for both data sets. In previous reports we showed the spatial distribution fractures in the Emilio Field based on our calculated scattering index values. To improve these results we performed a map migration of all the scattering indices. The results of this migration process show a very strong correlation between the spatial distribution and orientation of our estimated fracture distribution and the fault system in the field. We observe that the scattering index clusters tend to congregate around the fault zones, particularly near multiple faults and at fault tips. We have also processed a swath of data from the second data set (the onshore

  7. Stress fracture of the second metatarsal and sprain of lisfranc joint in a pre-professional ballet dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriz, Peter; Rafferty, Jason; Evangelista, Peter; Van Valkenburg, Scott; DiGiovanni, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    We present the case of a 14-year-old pre-professional ballerina that demonstrates common features of two conditions affecting the midfoot that are often missed or subject to delay in diagnosis in such young athletes: 1. stress fractures at the base of the second metatarsal, and 2. sprain of the Lisfranc joint complex. While these represent potentially career-altering injuries in the professional dancer, this case demonstrates that a high index of clinical suspicion, careful physical exam, appropriate radiographic assessment, and prompt treatment are essential to achieving the best possible outcome.

  8. Evaluation Of Finite Element Mesh Arrangements And Stress Intensity Factor Calculation Methods For Opening Mode Fracture Of Cracked-Cemented Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid R. Nikraz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture mechanics is a branch of mechanics, which deals with the cracked body. Every construction material that currently in use inevitably is not flawless. The pre-existing crack may grow to cause structure failure due to low stress, which acts to a structure. Stress intensity factor (K is a single parameter in fracture mechanics, which can be used to examine if a crack, would propagate in a cracked structure under particular loading condition. Finite element method is used to analyze the cracked body to provide the displacements data around the crack tip (at quarter point elements due to load prescribed, for stress intensity factor determination. Two methods of stress intensity factor calculation, Quarter Point Displacement Technique (QPDT and Displacement Correlation Technique (DCT, were evaluated. A series of standard fracture testing were undertaken to provide the fracture load data (Pf, which coupled with the stress intensity factor analytical formula to calculate fracture toughness. The results showed that under a particular mesh arrangement, the result of finite element analysis could deviate from the analytical formula calculation result. The QPDT method is suitable for compact tension specimen but DCT seemed to be not. For cracked beam analysis, the QPDT and DCT calculations were in good agreement with the analytical formula as long as coupled with the appropriate mesh arrangement around the crack tip.

  9. Participation in ball sports may represent a prehabilitation strategy to prevent future stress fractures and promote bone health in young athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Adam Sebastian; Sainani, Kristin Lynn; Carter Sayres, Lauren; Milgrom, Charles; Fredericson, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Sports participation has many benefits for the young athlete, including improved bone health. However, a subset of athletes may attain suboptimal bone health and be at increased risk for stress fractures. This risk is greater for female than for male athletes. In healthy children, high-impact physical activity has been shown to improve bone health during growth and development. We offer our perspective on the importance of promoting high-impact, multidirectional loading activities, including ball sports, as a method of enhancing bone quality and fracture prevention based on collective research. Ball sports have been associated with greater bone mineral density and enhanced bone geometric properties compared with participation in repetitive, low-impact sports such as distance running or nonimpact sports such as swimming. Runners and infantry who participated in ball sports during childhood were at decreased risk of future stress fractures. Gender-specific differences, including the coexistence of female athlete triad, may negate the benefits of previous ball sports on fracture prevention. Ball sports involve multidirectional loading with high ground reaction forces that may result in stiffer and more fracture-resistant bones. Encouraging young athletes to participate in ball sports may optimize bone health in the setting of adequate nutrition and in female athletes, eumenorrhea. Future research to determine timing, frequency, and type of loading activity could result in a primary prevention program for stress fracture injuries and improved life-long bone health. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Site characterization and validation - measurement of flowrate, solute velocities and aperture variation in natural fractures as a function of normal and shear stress, stage 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, J.; MacLeod, R.; LeMessurier, P.

    1990-04-01

    Laboratory tests have been completed on natural fracture planes in three, 200 mm diameter, cores, to determine the effect of changes in normal and shear stress on fracture permeability and porosity. In each core, a single fracture plane was oriented parallel to the core axis and the flow and tracer tests were completed under linear flow boundary conditions. At the completion of the full stressflow test cycle, the fracture plane was impregnated with resin and, after the resin had hardened, the fracture plane was sectioned and the structure of the pore space characterized. The test data showed that there is linear relationship between the logarithm of flowrate and the logarithm of normal stress. For shear tests on the two main samples, which were conducted at shear stresses less than the peak shear strength, the flowrates decreased slightly with increase in shear displacement. The porosities determined from the resin data and the fluid velocities determined from the tracer tests show that the volume of fluid in the fracture plane is much greater than that predicted using equivalent smooth parallel plate model. (authors)

  11. Further application of the cleavage fracture stress model for estimating the T{sub 0} of highly embrittled ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreenivasan, P.R.

    2016-02-15

    The semi-empirical cleavage fracture stress model (CFS), based on the microscopic cleavage fracture stress, s{sub f}, for estimating the ASTM E1921 reference temperature (T{sub 0}) of ferritic steels from instrumented impact testing of unprecracked Charpy V-notch specimens is further confirmed by test results for additional steels, including steels highly embrittled by thermal aging or irradiation. In addition to the ferrite-pearlite, bainitic or tempered martensitic steels (which was examined earlier), acicular or polygonal ferrite, precipitation-strengthened or additional simulated heat affected zone steels are also evaluated. The upper limit for the applicability of the present CFS model seems to be T{sub 41J} ∝160 to 170 C or T{sub 0} or T{sub Qcfs} (T{sub 0} estimate from the present CFS model) ∝100 to 120 C. This is not a clear-cut boundary, but indicative of an area of caution where generation and evaluation of further data are required. However, the present work demonstrates the applicability of the present CFS model even to substantially embrittled steels. The earlier doubts expressed about T{sub Qcfs} becoming unduly non-conservative for highly embrittled steels has not been fully substantiated and partly arises from the necessity of modifications in the T{sub 0} evaluation itself at high degrees of embrittlement suggested in the literature.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Permeability Change in Wellbore Cement Fractures after Geomechanical Stress and Geochemical Reactions Using X-ray Computed Tomography Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabilan, Senthil; Jung, Hun Bok; Kuprat, Andrew P; Beck, Anthon N; Varga, Tamas; Fernandez, Carlos A; Um, Wooyong

    2016-06-21

    X-ray microtomography (XMT) imaging combined with three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling technique was used to study the effect of geochemical and geomechanical processes on fracture permeability in composite Portland cement-basalt caprock core samples. The effect of fluid density and viscosity and two different pressure gradient conditions on fracture permeability was numerically studied by using fluids with varying density and viscosity and simulating two different pressure gradient conditions. After the application of geomechanical stress but before CO2-reaction, CFD revealed fluid flow increase, which resulted in increased fracture permeability. After CO2-reaction, XMT images displayed preferential precipitation of calcium carbonate within the fractures in the cement matrix and less precipitation in fractures located at the cement-basalt interface. CFD estimated changes in flow profile and differences in absolute values of flow velocity due to different pressure gradients. CFD was able to highlight the profound effect of fluid viscosity on velocity profile and fracture permeability. This study demonstrates the applicability of XMT imaging and CFD as powerful tools for characterizing the hydraulic properties of fractures in a number of applications like geologic carbon sequestration and storage, hydraulic fracturing for shale gas production, and enhanced geothermal systems.

  13. Stress Fracture of the Fifth Metatarsal in Foot Deformity Secondary to Neuromuscular Disease: Experiences of Deformity Correction Treatment-A Report of 3 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payo-Ollero, Jesús; Álvarez Goenaga, Fernando; Elorriaga Sagarduy, Gotzon; Ruiz Nasarre, Alberto; Olmos-García, Matías Alfonso; Villas Tomé, Carlos

    2018-04-01

    Fractures at the proximal metaphyso-diaphyseal junction of the fifth metatarsal are associated with high rates of delayed union. When these fractures are the result of repeated stress in patients with equinovarus hindfoot, which in turn is caused by neurological disorders, delayed union is the rule. Therefore, in neurological patients with stress fractures, optimal treatment would be to achieve a plantigrade foot enabling them to relieve the fifth metatarsal overload, which prevents the consolidation. We report 3 cases of fifth metatarsal stress fracture resulting from an equinovarus hindfoot deformity caused by a neuromuscular disease. Our surgical indication was to correct the foot deformity with no direct action on the fracture. Once a good alignment (plantigrade foot) was obtained, stress causing the fracture disappeared, and union was achieved with optimal biomechanical function in all 3 fractures. When stress fracture of the fifth metatarsal is caused by a secondary foot deformity, treating the deformity can lead to healing the fracture efficiently and should be considered prior to indicating surgical stabilization of the fracture itself. Primary treatment of the fracture with no correction of the deformity leads to therapeutic failure. Therapeutic, Level IV.

  14. Roughness effects on the critical fracture toughness of materials under uniaxial stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, George

    1998-01-01

    The Griffith criterion is applied for the calculation of the critical fracture toughness upon which the formation of a rough self-affine crack (which is characterized by the rms roughness amplitude σ, the correlation length ξ, and the roughness exponent H) commences. For large crack sizes R»ξ, the

  15. The creation of an asymmetric hydraulic fracture as a result of driving stress gradients

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fischer, Tomáš; Hainzl, S.; Dahm, T.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 179, č. 1 (2009), s. 634-639 ISSN 0956-540X Grant - others:EU(XE) MTKI-CT-2004-517242 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : downhole methods * fracture and flow * earthquake source observations * geomechanics Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 2.435, year: 2009

  16. Fracture network growth for prediction of fracture characteristics and connectivity in tight reservoir rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnhoorn, A.; Cox, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    Fracturing experiments on very low-porosity dolomite rocks shows a difference in growth of fracture networks by stress-driven fracturing and fluid-driven fracturing. Stress-driven fracture growth, in the absence of fluid pressure, initially forms fractures randomly throughout the rocks followed by

  17. The point of view of the veterinary surgeon: bone and fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autefage, A

    2000-09-01

    It is important to understand the biomechanics of fractures if the morphological characteristics of fracture, fracture treatment and fracture healing are to be understood. Because of the mechanical properties of bone, which is stronger in compression than in tension, a fracture line is initiated perpendicular to the direction of tension or in shear. The mechanical properties of bone are also time-dependent (viscoelasticity). Subsequently, when the load is applied at a higher load range, a greater amount of energy is stored within the bone, resulting in a more severe fracture (high energy fractures). There are five types of fracture: tension, compression, torque, bending, and shear, with typical morphologies: transverse fractures in tension, fracture line at 45 degrees to the long axis of the bone in compression, spiral fracture in torsion, combined transverse and butterfly fracture in bending, shear line when the overload is applied eccentrically. These different morphological types are shown on radiographs.

  18. A displaced stress fracture of the femoral neck in an adolescent female distance runner with female athlete triad: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto Shinichi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report presents a case of a displaced stress fracture of the femoral neck in an adolescent female distance runner with amenorrhea. Both reduction and internal fixation were performed early after the injury. At 24 months postoperatively, magnetic resonance imaging and bone scintigraphy showed no positive signs of femoral head necrosis and bone union was confirmed on plain X-ray. A medical examination for the presence of the signs of the female athlete triad by checking weight, calorie intake and menstrual cycles is most important to prevent such stress fractures. Athletes as well as their coaches or parents therefore need to understand female athlete triad.

  19. Apparent Fracture Toughness of Low-carbon Steel CSN 411353 as Related to Stress Corrosion Cracks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gajdoš, Lubomír; Šperl, Martin; Siegl, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 32, 8/9 (2011), s. 4348-4353 ISSN 0261-3069 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/10/2052; GA ČR(CZ) GPP105/10/P555 Grant - others:GAMPO(CZ) FT-TA5/076 Program:FT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : corrosion * fracture * fractography Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.200, year: 2011

  20. On the fracture of human dentin: Is it stress- orstrain-controlled?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalla, R.K.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-02-01

    Despite substantial clinical interest in the fractureresistance of human dentin, there is little mechanistic information inarchival literature that can be usefully used to model such fracture. Infact, although the fracture event indent in, akin to other mineralizedtissues like bone, is widely believed to be locally strain-controlled,there has never been any scientific proof to support this belief. Thepresent study seeks to address this issue through the use of a novel setof in vitro experiments in Hanks' balanced salt solution involving adouble-notched bend test geometry, which is designed to discern whetherthe critical failure events involved in the onset of fracture are locallystress- or strain-controlled. Such experiments are further used tocharacterize the notion of "plasticity" in dentin and the interaction ofcracks with the salient microstructural features. It is observed thatfracture in dentin is indeed locally strain-controlled and that thepresence of dentinal tubules does not substantially affect this processof crack initiation and growth. The results presented are believed to becritical steps in the development ofa micromechanical model for thefracture of human dentin that takes into consideration the influence ofboth the microstructure and the local failure mode.

  1. Nose fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracture of the nose; Broken nose; Nasal fracture; Nasal bone fracture; Nasal septal fracture ... A fractured nose is the most common fracture of the face. It most ... occurs with other fractures of the face. Nose injuries and neck ...

  2. Case report 443: Florid cortical and periosteal reactions due to stress fractures of the right femur and left calcaneus in a 'break dancer'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihmeidan, I.H.; Oldham, S.A.; Tehranzadeh, J.; Mnaymneh, W.; Mnaymneh, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    A young male Hispano 'break dancer' presented with pain in the right thigh and left ankle. He demonstrated radiologically considerable bony sclerosis in the right femoral shaft, apparently cortical in location and in the left calcaneus. A biopsy was performed in the area of the extensive sclerosis in the right femur and essentially normal bone was obtained, except for one small area of woven or primitive bone. Although fractures were not identified in this case, presumably due to the marked bony sclerosis, multiple stress fractures are considered to be the cause in the extensive cortical sclerosis demonstrated in the femur and calcaneus. The differential diagnosis was considered and the nature of break dancing was described. Its relationship to stress fractures was discussed. (orig.)

  3. Multiple lumbar transverse process stress fractures as a cause of chronic low back ache in a young fast bowler - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bali Kamal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A rare case of multilevel transverse process stress fractures as a cause of low back ache in a professional cricket player has been presented. The report discusses the possible mechanism of such an injury in a cricket player and also highlights the preventive and therapeutic aspects of management in such patients. The report also stresses upon the need for early identification of such sports related injuries to prevent long term morbidity in the athletes.

  4. Exercise-induced rib stress fractures: potential risk factors related to thoracic muscle co-contraction and movement pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Knudsen, Archibald; Kanstrup, I-L; Christiansen, E

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of exercise-induced rib stress fractures (RSFs) in elite rowers is unclear. The purpose of the study was to investigate thoracic muscle activity, movement patterns and muscle strength in elite rowers. Electromyographic (EMG) and 2-D video analysis were performed during ergometer rowing......, and isokinetic muscle strength was measured in seven national team rowers with a history of RSF and seven matched controls (C). RSF displayed a higher velocity of the seat in the initial drive phase (RSF: 0.25+/-0.03, 0.25 (0.15-0.33) m/s vs C: 0.15+/-0.06, 0.18 (-0.11-0.29) m/s P=0.028) (Mean+/-SEM, median...

  5. The impact of different aperture distribution models and critical stress criteria on equivalent permeability in fractured rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Bertotti, Giovanni; Nick, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Predicting equivalent permeability in fractured reservoirs requires an understanding of the fracture network geometry and apertures. There are different methods for defining aperture, based on outcrop observations (power law scaling), fundamental mechanics (sublinear length-aperture scaling......), and experiments (Barton-Bandis conductive shearing). Each method predicts heterogeneous apertures, even along single fractures (i.e., intrafracture variations), but most fractured reservoir models imply constant apertures for single fractures. We compare the relative differences in aperture and permeability...

  6. Surgical versus conservative treatment for high-risk stress fractures of the lower leg (anterior tibial cortex, navicular and fifth metatarsal base): a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mallee, W.H.; Weel, H.; van Dijk, C.N.; van Tulder, M.W.; Kerkhoffs, G.M.; Lin, C.W.C.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To compare surgical and conservative treatment for high-risk stress fractures of the anterior tibial cortex, navicular and proximal fifth metatarsal. Methods Systematic searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and PEDro were performed to identify relevant prospective and

  7. SIMULATION OF THE stress-strain state of excavation BOUNDARIES in fractured massifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizomov Dzhahongir Nizomovich

    2012-07-01

    Any limiting process, namely, if or and any results are in line with the isotropic medium. The proposed algorithm and calculation pattern may be used to research the concentrated stresses alongside the boundaries of hydrotechnical engineering facilities.

  8. Stress corrosion of Zircaloy-4. Fracture mechanics study of the intergranular - transgranular transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Silvia B.; Duffo, Gustavo S.

    2003-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of Zircaloy-4 wires was studied in 1M NaCl, 1M KBr and 1M KI aqueous solutions, and in iodine alcoholic solutions. In all cases, intergranular attack preceded transgranular propagation. It is generally accepted that the intergranular-transgranular transition occurs when a critical value of the stress intensity factor is reached. In the present work it was confirmed that the transition from intergranular to transgranular propagation cracking in Zircaloy-4 wires also occurs when a critical value of the stress intensity factor is reached. This critical stress intensity factor in wire samples is independent of the solution tested and close to 10 MPa.m-1/2. This value is in good agreement with those reported in the literature measured by different techniques. (author)

  9. Assessment of foam fracture in sandwich beams using thermoelastic stress analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dulieu-Barton, J.M.; Berggreen, Christian; Mettemberg, C.

    2009-01-01

    Thermoelastic Stress Analysis (TSA) has been well established for determining crack-tip parameters in metallic materials. This paper examines its ability to determine accurately the crack-tip parameters for PVC foam used in sandwich structures.......Thermoelastic Stress Analysis (TSA) has been well established for determining crack-tip parameters in metallic materials. This paper examines its ability to determine accurately the crack-tip parameters for PVC foam used in sandwich structures....

  10. Finite element analysis of the equivalent stress distribution in Schanz screws during the use of a femoral fracture distractor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Giordano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT To evaluate the mechanical stress and elastic deformation exercised in the thread/shaft transition of Schanz screws in assemblies with different screw anchorage distances in the entrance to the bone cortex, through the distribution and location of tension in the samples. An analysis of 3D finite elements was performed to evaluate the distribution of the equivalent stress (triple stress state in a Schanz screw fixed bicortically and orthogonally to a tubular bone, using two mounting patterns: (1 thread/shaft transition located 20 mm from the anchorage of the Schanz screws in the entrance to the bone cortex and (2 thread/shaft transition located 3 mm from the anchorage of the Schanz screws in entrance to the bone cortex. The simulations were performed maintaining the same direction of loading and the same distance from the force vector in relation to the center of the hypothetical bone. The load applied, its direction, and the distance to the center of the bone were constant during the simulations in order to maintain the moment of flexion equally constant. The present calculations demonstrated linear behavior during the experiment. It was found that the model with a distance of 20 mm between the Schanz screws anchorage in the entrance to the bone cortex and the thread/shaft transition reduces the risk of breakage or fatigue of the material during the application of constant static loads; in this model, the maximum forces observed were higher (350 MPa. The distance between the Schanz screws anchorage at the entrance to the bone cortex and the smooth thread/shaft transition of the screws used in a femoral distractor during acute distraction of a fracture must be farther from the entrance to the bone cortex, allowing greater degree of elastic deformation of the material, lower mechanical stress in the thread/shaft transition, and minimized breakage or fatigue. The suggested distance is 20 mm.

  11. The fracture mechanical significance of cracks formed during stress-relief annealing of a submerged arc weldment in pressure vessel steel of type A508 class 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljestrand, L.-G.; Oestberg, G.

    1978-01-01

    In large weldments of type A508 C12 cracks can form in the heat-affected zone during stress-relief annealing. The significance of such cracks with respect to catastrophic fracture is of interest from the point of view of safety, in particular for nuclear pressure vessels. In this investigation the size of reheat cracks, as formed and after fatigue growth, has been compared with the critical size for fast fracture. The latter was assessed by determination of the toughness of the heat-affected zones. The fracture toughness of the heat-affected zones did not differ much from that of the parent material. The presence of microcracks reduced the fracture toughness (of a special type of simulated specimen) at 20 0 C by about 20%. The fracture mechanical evaluation indicates that the cracks formed during stress-relief annealing should not impair the safety of the vessel under normal conditions, except for particular geometries and when the cracks may rapidly link together during fatigue. (author)

  12. Optimization of Fracture Resistance and Stiffness of Heat-Polymerized High Impact Acrylic Resin with Localized E-Glass FiBER FORCE® Reinforcement at Different Stress Points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Haitham; Flinton, Robert; Vaidyanathan, Tritala

    2016-12-01

    Dentures are subject to fracture through flexural stresses during masticatory function. Distribution of stresses under flexural loading varies from compressive to tensile stress along the thickness of the denture cross section. The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of reinforcing compressive, tensile, and no stress regions of flexurally loaded rectangular bars of heat-cured denture base acrylic resin reinforced with tough E-Glass FiBER FORCE (GFF) on their fracture resistance under flexural loading. Forty rectangular specimens (65 mm long × 10 mm wide × 2.5 mm thick) were prepared and divided into four groups (n = 10). Group FN had no fiber reinforcement, group FM had fiber in the middle at the no-stress neutral axis, group FC had fiber close to the surface on the compressive stress side, and group FT had the fiber close to the surface on the tensile stress side. The effect of GFF reinforcement on flexural strength (FS), flexural toughness (TG), and flexural modulus of elasticity (MOE) was evaluated. The mean and (SD) of the FS, TG, and MOE varied as follows. FS (MPa): group FN: 91.49 (7.88); group FM: 102.83 (13.5); group FC: 107.68 (11.21); group FT: 141.46 (14.77). TG (mJ/mm 3 ): group FN: 0.171 (0.026); group FM: 0.236 (0.033); group FC: 0.156 (0.032); group FT: 0.347 (0.010). MOE (MPa): group FN: 2682 (761); group FM: 2601 (417); group FC: 4188 (1012); group FT: 4215 (674). Statistical analysis showed that reinforcement on the tensile side of the neutral axis yielded improvement in all properties evaluated. Placement of the GFF close to the tensile stress side surface of the bar increased the resistance to elastic deformation (i.e., higher MOE or stiffness) and the stress level needed for flexural fracture (i.e., higher FS). In addition, more energy was absorbed by reinforced specimens before fracture occurred (i.e., higher toughness). Localized reinforcement targeting tensile stress centers is thus a practical way to improve clinical

  13. Fracture Mechanisms For SiC Fibers And SiC/SiC Composites Under Stress-Rupture Conditions at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A.; Yun, Hee Mann; Hurst, Janet B.; Viterna, L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The successful application of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites as high-temperature structural materials depends strongly on maximizing the fracture or rupture life of the load-bearing fiber and matrix constituents. Using high-temperature data measured under stress-rupture test conditions, this study examines in a mechanistic manner the effects of various intrinsic and extrinsic factors on the creep and fracture behavior of a variety of SiC fiber types. It is shown that although some fiber types fracture during a large primary creep stage, the fiber creep rate just prior to fracture plays a key role in determining fiber rupture time (Monkman-Grant theory). If it is assumed that SiC matrices rupture in a similar manner as fibers with the same microstructures, one can develop simple mechanistic models to analyze and optimize the stress-rupture behavior of SiC/SiC composites for applied stresses that are initially below matrix cracking.

  14. Stress orientation and fracturing during three-dimensional buckling: Numerical simulation and application to chocolate-tablet structures in folded turbidites, SW Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, J. E.; Schmalholz, S. M.; Burg, J.-P.

    2010-10-01

    Two orthogonal sets of veins, both orthogonal to bedding, form chocolate tablet structures on the limbs of folded quartzwackes of Carboniferous turbidites in SW Portugal. Structural observations suggest that (1) mode 1 fractures transverse to the fold axes formed while fold amplitudes were small and limbs were under layer-subparallel compression and (2) mode 1 fractures parallel to the fold axes formed while fold amplitudes were large and limbs were brought to be under layer-subparallel tension. We performed two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations investigating the evolution of stress orientations during viscous folding to test whether and how these two successive sets of fractures were related to folding. We employed ellipses and ellipsoids for the visualization and quantification of the local stress field. The numerical simulations show a change in the orientation of the local σ1 direction by almost 90° with respect to the bedding plane in the fold limbs. The coeval σ3 direction rotates from parallel to the fold axis at low fold amplitudes to orthogonal to the fold axis at high fold amplitudes. The stress orientation changes faster in multilayers than in single-layers. The numerical simulations are consistent with observation and provide a mechanical interpretation for the formation of the chocolate tablet structures through consecutive sets of fractures on rotating limbs of folded competent layers.

  15. Fracture Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Dong Il; Jeong, Gyeong Seop; Han, Min Gu

    1992-08-01

    This book introduces basic theory and analytical solution of fracture mechanics, linear fracture mechanics, non-linear fracture mechanics, dynamic fracture mechanics, environmental fracture and fatigue fracture, application on design fracture mechanics, application on analysis of structural safety, engineering approach method on fracture mechanics, stochastic fracture mechanics, numerical analysis code and fracture toughness test and fracture toughness data. It gives descriptions of fracture mechanics to theory and analysis from application of engineering.

  16. Analysis of the Impact of Configuration of the Stabilisation System for Femoral Diaphyseal Fractures on the State of Stresses and Displacements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub J. Słowiński

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The treatment of femoral diaphyseal fractures by intramedullary nailing has become a common procedure in orthopaedic surgery. The purpose of this numerical simulation was to present how the changes in configuration of the stabilisation system can affect the stress and displacement state in the bone tissue and implanted device. Material and Methods. The numerical comparison of the stabilisation variants for the type 32-A2 femoral diaphyseal fracture (according to the AO classification performed by using the Charfix2 (ChM® anatomical nail locked in a number of chosen ways. The displacement and the stress distributions both in the bone and implant were obtained and analysed by computational simulation. Results. In all models, there was the same characteristic distribution, which shows there were minimal rotational movements of the bone around the anatomical axis. In all cases, stress concentrations were generated in the nail material in the area of the fracture gap. Conclusions. The obtained results indicate that there is a visible advantage to one-plane distal stabilisation in the reduction of stresses regardless of the type of proximal stabilisation. The results of calculations indicate that the use of proximal stabilisation with a neck screw reduces the possibility of damage to the implant.

  17. Determination of Fracture Stress and Effective Crack Tip Radius from Toughness (KIC) and Yield Strength (Y)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-01

    analysis of nominal stress S and trajectory angle change t of behavior de - scribed above led to a dimensionless relationship between K = simi, yield...690lf .6530 • 6lf 71 .50LiO .7098 .55lfO .7371 . GOlfO .6895 .tiSLiO .Gil 63 .5050 .7337 .5550 .73Gl .GO 50 .GOoG .6550 .G455 .5060 .7876 .5560 .7351 .6060... California , 8erkeley, California 94700 Prof. W. Goldsmith, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California , 8erke1ey, California 94720

  18. A comparison of the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of commercially pure titanium grade 4 in Ringer's solution and in distilled water: a fracture mechanics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Michael D; Williamson, R Scott; Thomas, Joseph A; Griggs, Jason A; Zardiackas, Lyle D

    2014-01-01

    From the results of laboratory investigations reported in the literature, it has been suggested that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms may contribute to early failures in titanium alloys that have elevated oxygen concentrations. However, the susceptibility of titanium alloys to SCC in physiological environments remains unclear. In this study, a fracture mechanics approach was used to examine the SCC susceptibility of CP titanium grade 4 in Ringer's solution and distilled de-ionized (DI) water, at 37°C. The study duration was 26 weeks, simulating the non-union declaration of a plated fracture. Four wedge loads were used corresponding to 86-95% of the alloy's ligament yield load. The longest cracks were measured to be 0.18 mm and 0.10 mm in Ringer's solution and DI water, respectively. SEM analysis revealed no evidence of extensive fluting and quasi-cleavage fracture features which, in literature reports, were attributed to SCC. We thus postulate that the Ringer's solution accelerated the wedge-loaded crack growth without producing the critical stresses needed to change the fracture mechanism. Regression analysis of the crack length results led to a significant best-fit relationship between crack growth velocity (independent variable) and test electrolyte, initial wedge load, and time of immersion of specimen in electrolyte (dependent variables). Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Fracture risk in hepatitis C virus infected persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Omland, Lars Haukali; Krarup, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The association between Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infection and fracture risk is not well characterized. We compared fracture risk between HCV-seropositive (HCV-exposed) patients and the general population and between patients with cleared and chronic HCV-infection. METHODS......: Outcome measures were time to first fracture at any site, time to first low-energy and first non-low-energy (other) fracture in 12,013 HCV-exposed patients from the DANVIR cohort compared with a general population control cohort (n=60,065) matched by sex and age. Within DANVIR, 4500 patients with chronic......-energy fractures. Our study suggests that fracture risk in HCV-infected patients is multi-factorial and mainly determined by lifestyle-related factors associated with HCV-exposure....

  20. The effect of army vest design on the occurrence of stress fractures and overuse injuries in female military recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmanovich, Ezequiel; Frankl, M; Nyska, M; Hetsroni, I; Constantini, N; Trejo, L; Bechar, R; Novak, G; Lankovsky, Z; Mann, G

    2017-08-01

    Stress fractures (SFs) occur when microdamage caused by repetitive mechanical load exceeds the biological load-bearing capacity of the bone. The study objective was to test whether a vest specifically designed and manufactured for female recruits, compared with the standard vest used on a regular basis by Border Police recruits, would reduce the incidence of SF in female Border Police recruits. Data based on reports of military personnel show that women are more likely to sustain SFs. A follow-up of 240 female Border Police infantry recruits, divided into two trial groups, was conducted from 2007 to 2009. Two different vests were evaluated-the standard special unit fighting vest, which was conventionally used by both men and women during basic training, and the new fighting vest, specially design for female body shape. No significant difference was noted in the number of SFs between the two groups which may be attributed to increased weight of the new vest. There was a lower incidence of long bone SFs which may have been due to the superior vest design. The female Border Police Infantry recruits expressed great satisfaction with the new vest. Increased effort should be invested to further reduce the weight of female combat gear, alongside efforts to improve fit and comfort. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Associations of early premenopausal fractures with subsequent fractures vary by sites and mechanisms of fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkanen, R; Tuppurainen, M; Kroger, H; Alhava, E; Puntila, E

    1997-04-01

    In a retrospective population-based study we assessed whether and how self-reported former fractures sustained at the ages of 20-34 are associated with subsequent fractures sustained at the ages of 35-57. The 12,162 women who responded to fracture questions of the baseline postal enquiry (in 1989) of the Kuopio Osteoporosis Study, Finland formed the study population. They reported 589 former and 2092 subsequent fractures. The hazard ratio (HR), with 95% confidence interval (CI), of a subsequent fracture was 1.9 (1.6-2.3) in women with the history of a former fracture compared with women without such a history. A former low-energy wrist fracture was related to subsequent low-energy wrist [HR = 3.7 (2.0-6.8)] and high-energy nonwrist [HR = 2.4 (1.3-4.4)] fractures, whereas former high-energy nonwrist fractures were related only to subsequent high-energy nonwrist [HR = 2.8 (1.9-4.1)] but not to low-energy wrist [HR = 0.7 (0.3-1.8)] fractures. The analysis of bone mineral density (BMD) data of a subsample of premenopausal women who underwent dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) during 1989-91 revealed that those with a wrist fracture due to a fall on the same level at the age of 20-34 recorded 6.5% lower spinal (P = 0.140) and 10.5% lower femoral (P = 0.026) BMD than nonfractured women, whereas the corresponding differences for women with a former nonwrist fracture due to high-energy trauma were -1.8% (P = 0.721) and -2.4% (P = 0. 616), respectively. Our results suggest that an early premenopausal, low-energy wrist fracture is an indicator of low peak BMD which predisposes to subsequent fractures in general, whereas early high-energy fractures are mainly indicators of other and more specific extraskeletal factors which mainly predispose to same types of subsequent fractures only.

  2. A displaced stress fracture of the femoral neck in an adolescent female distance runner with female athlete triad: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Shinichi; Arai, Yuji; Hara, Kunio; Tsuzihara, Takashi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This report presents a case of a displaced stress fracture of the femoral neck in an adolescent female distance runner with amenorrhea. Both reduction and internal fixation were performed early after the injury. At 24 months postoperatively, magnetic resonance imaging and bone scintigraphy showed no positive signs of femoral head necrosis and bone union was confirmed on plain X-ray. A medical examination for the presence of the signs of the female athlete triad by checking weight, ca...

  3. Effect of mid-frequency pulse therapy combined with external fixation on bone metabolism, inflammatory response and oxidative stress in patients with osteoporotic distal radial fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Ning Luo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of mid-frequency pulse therapy combined with external fixation on bone metabolism, inflammatory response and oxidative stress in patients with osteoporotic distal radial fractures. Methods: A total of 72 patients with osteoporotic distal radial fractures who were treated in the hospital between September 2015 and January 2017 were collected and divided into control group (n=36 and observation group (n=36 according to the random number table method. Control group received routine external fixation, and observation group received mid-frequency pulse therapy combined with external fixation. The differences in serum levels of bone metabolism indexes, inflammatory factors and oxidative stress indexes were compared between two groups of patients before and after treatment. Results: Before treatment, differences in serum levels of bone metabolism indexes, inflammatory factors and oxidative stress indexes were not statistically significant between the two groups. After 1 month of treatment, serum BGP, TAC and SOD levels of both groups of patients were higher than those before treatment while β-CTX, AKP, TRAP, CRP, IL-1β, IL-6 and MDA levels were lower than those before treatment, and serum BGP, TAC and SOD levels of observation group were higher than those of control group while β-CTX, AKP, TRAP, CRP, IL-1β, IL-6 and MDA levels were lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Mid-frequency pulse therapy combined with external fixation can promote fracture healing and reduce postoperative inflammatory response and oxidative stress response in patients with osteoporotic distal radial fracture.

  4. Risk of osteoporotic fractures in multiple sclerosis patients in southwest Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åivo, J; Kurki, S; Sumelahti, M-L; Hänninen, K; Ruutiainen, J; Soilu-Hänninen, M

    2017-05-01

    Increased risk of osteoporotic fractures in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients compared with general population has been reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of osteoporotic and other low-energy fractures in an MS cohort from a large hospital district in southwest Finland. Age-adjusted total and gender-specific prevalence for definite MS per 100 000 in a population of 472 139 was calculated as a point prevalence in December 31, 2012. Patients with MS and comorbid fractures were identified by searching for ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes during a period from 2004 to 2012 from hospital administrative data in Turku University Hospital (TYKS) in southwest Finland Case ascertainment was performed by review of medical records. Osteoporotic fracture was defined as a low-energy fracture of the pelvis, hip, femur, tibia, humerus, collar bone, ulna/radius, vertebrae, or rib. The control population was a 10-fold age- and gender-matched population. The point prevalence (N 1004) of MS was 212.6/10 5 (CI 199.5-225.8) in December 31, 2012. A total of 100 (9.9%) of 1004 confirmed MS cases experienced at least one fracture during the study period. Relative risks (RRs) for all fractures (1.33, 95% CI 1.10-1.60) and osteoporotic fractures (1.50, 95% CI 1.18-1.90) were significantly increased in patients with MS compared with controls. In particular, RRs for hip fractures (5.00, 95% CI 2.96-8.43) and fractures of humerus (2.36, 95% CI 1.32-4.42) were elevated in patients with MS vs controls. We observed high prevalence of MS in southwest Finland and confirmed increased age-adjusted comorbid risk for osteoporotic fractures and other low-energy fractures compared with individually matched controls. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Comparison of plantar flexor musculotendinous stiffness, geometry, and architecture in male runners with and without a history of tibial stress fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamukoff, Derek N; Blackburn, J Troy

    2015-02-01

    Greater lower extremity joint stiffness may be related to the development of tibial stress fractures in runners. Musculotendinous stiffness is the largest contributor to joint stiffness, but it is unclear what factors contribute to musculotendinous stiffness. The purpose of this study was to compare plantar flexor musculotendinous stiffness, architecture, geometry, and Achilles tendon stiffness between male runners with and without a history of tibial stress fracture. Nineteen healthy runners (age = 21 ± 2.7 years; mass = 68.2 ± 9.3 kg; height = 177.3 ± 6.0 cm) and 19 runners with a history of tibial stress fracture (age = 21 ± 2.9 years; mass = 65.3 ± 6.0 kg; height = 177.2 ± 5.2 cm) were recruited from community running groups and the university's varsity and club cross-country teams. Plantar flexor musculotendinous stiffness was estimated from the damped frequency of oscillatory motion about the ankle follow perturbation. Ultrasound imaging was used to measure architecture and geometry of the medial gastrocnemius. Dependent variables were compared between groups via one-way ANOVAs. Previously injured runners had greater plantar flexor musculotendinous stiffness (P < .001), greater Achilles tendon stiffness (P = .004), and lesser Achilles tendon elongation (P = .003) during maximal isometric contraction compared with healthy runners. No differences were found in muscle thickness, pennation angle, or fascicle length.

  6. Effect of α-lipoic acid combined with nerve growth factor on bone metabolism, oxidative stress and nerve conduction function after femoral fracture surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Jun Cao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the effect of 毩 -lipoic acid combined with nerve growth factor on bone metabolism, oxidative stress and nerve conduction function after femoral fracture surgery. Methods: A total of 110 patients with femoral fracture who received surgical treatment in the hospital between January 2015 and January 2017 were collected and divided into the control group (n=55 and study group (n=55 by random number table. Control group received postoperative nerve growth factor therapy, and study group received postoperative 毩 -lipoic acid combined with nerve growth factor therapy. The differences in the contents of bone metabolism and oxidative stress indexes as well as the levels of nerve conduction function indexes were compared between the two groups before and after treatment. Results: Before treatment, the differences in the contents of bone metabolism and oxidative stress indexes as well as the levels of nerve conduction function indexes were not statistically significant between the two groups. After treatment, serum bone metabolism indexes BGP and PⅠNP contents of study group were higher than those of control group while CTX-Ⅰ and TRAP contents were lower than those of control group; serum oxidative stress indexes TAC, CAT and SOD contents of study group were higher than those of control group while MDA content was lower than that of control group; limb nerve conduction velocity SCV and MCV levels of study group were higher than those of control group. Conclusion: 毩 -lipoic acid combined with nerve growth factor therapy after femoral fracture surgery can effectively balance osteoblast/ osteoclast activity, reduce oxidative stress and improve limb nerve conduction velocity.

  7. Faulting, fracturing and in-situ stress prediction in the Ahnet Basin, Algeria - a finite element approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, W.W.W.; Badsi, M; van Wees, J.D.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Many low-efficiency hydrocarbon reservoirs are productive largely because effective reservoir permeability is controlled by faults and natural fractures. Accurate and low-cost information on basic fault and fracture properties, orientation in particular, is critical in reducing well costs and

  8. Influence of stress concentrator shape and testing temperature on impact bending fracture of 17Mn1Si pipe steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panin, S. V.; Vlasov, I. V.; Maruschak, P. O.; Moiseenko, D. D.; Berto, F.; Vinogradov, A.

    2017-12-01

    The influence of the notch shape on the impact fracture of 17Mn1Si steel is investigated at different temperatures, with the focus placed on the low temperature behavior. An approach towards fracture characterization has been suggested based on the description of elastic-plastic deformation of impact loaded specimens on the stage of crack initiation and growth at ambient and lower temperatures. The analysis of the impact loading diagrams and fracture energy values for the 17Mn1Si pipe steel reveals the fracture mechanisms depending on the notch shape. It has been found that the testing temperature reduction plays a decisive role in plastic strain localization followed by dynamic fracture of the specimens with differently shaped notches.

  9. Imaging of insufficiency fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestan, Christian [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Waehringerstr. 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: christian.krestan@meduniwien.ac.at; Hojreh, Azadeh [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Waehringerstr. 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2009-09-15

    This review focuses on the occurrence, imaging and differential diagnosis of insufficiency fractures. Prevalence, the most common sites of insufficiency fractures and their clinical implications are discussed. Insufficiency fractures occur with normal stress exerted on weakened bone. Postmenopausal osteoporosis is the most common cause of insufficiency fractures. Other conditions which affect bone turnover include osteomalacia, hyperparathyroidism, chronic renal failure and high-dose glucocorticoid therapy. It is a challenge for the radiologist to detect and diagnose insufficiency fractures, and to differentiate them from other bone lesions. Radiographs are still the most widely used imaging method for identification of insufficiency fractures, but sensitivity is limited, depending on the location of the fractures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a very sensitive tool to visualize bone marrow abnormalities associated with insufficiency fractures. Thin section, multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) depicts subtle fracture lines allowing direct visualization of cortical and trabecular bone. Bone scintigraphy still plays a role in detecting fractures, with good sensitivity but limited specificity. The most important differential diagnosis is underlying malignant disease leading to pathologic fractures. Bone densitometry and clinical history may also be helpful in confirming the diagnosis of insufficiency fractures.

  10. Recent progress to understand stress corrosion cracking in sodium borosilicate glasses: linking the chemical composition to structural, physical and fracture properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, Cindy L.

    2017-08-01

    This topical review is dedicated to understanding stress corrosion cracking in oxide glasses and specifically the SiO_2{\\text-B_2O_3{\\text-}Na_2O} (SBN) ternary glass systems. Many review papers already exist on the topic of stress corrosion cracking in complex oxide glasses or overly simplified glasses (pure silica). These papers look at how systematically controlling environmental factors (pH, temperature...) alter stress corrosion cracking, while maintaining the same type of glass sample. Many questions still exist, including: What sets the environmental limit? What sets the velocity versus stress intensity factor in the slow stress corrosion regime (Region I)? Can researchers optimize these two effects to enhance a glass’ resistance to failure? To help answer these questions, this review takes a different approach. It looks at how systemically controlling the glass’ chemical composition alters the structure and physical properties. These changes are then compared and contrasted to the fracture toughness and the stress corrosion cracking properties. By taking this holistic approach, researchers can begin to understand the controlling factors in stress corrosion cracking and how to optimize glasses via the initial chemical composition.

  11. Fatigue and insufficiency fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodwick, G.S.; Rosenthal, D.I.; Kattapuram, S.V.; Hudson, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    The incidence of stress fracture is increasing. In our younger society this is due largely to a preocupation with physical conditioning, but in our elderly population it is due to improved recognition and better methods of detection and diagnosis. Stress fracture of the elderly is an insufficiency fracture which occurs in the spine, the pelvis, the sacrum and other bones afflicted with disorders which cause osteopenia. Stress fracture is frequently misdiagnosed as a malignant lesion of bone resulting in biopsy. Scintiscanning provides the greatest frequency of detection, while computed tomography often provides the definitive diagnosis. With increased interest and experience a better insight into the disease has been achieved, and what was once thought of as a simple manifestation of mechanical stress is now known to be an orderly, complex pattern of physiological changes in bone which conform to a model by Frost. The diffuse nature of these changes can be recognized by scintigraphy, radiography and magnetic resonance imaging. 27 refs.; 8 figs

  12. Fatigue stress fractures of the pubic ramus in the army: imaging features with radiographic, scintigraphic and MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Woo; Lee, Chang Hyun [The Armed Forces Capital Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    Although fatigue fractures are not unusual in athletes and military personnel those of the pubic ramus are rare. We report three cases of fatigue fractures of the inferior pubic rami in two male recruits and one female military cadet. On the initial radiograph, most of the lesions were subtle and easy to overlook. However, bone scintigraphy provided more distinct images that allowed easy and early detection of lesion, and MR imaging presented more diagnostic information, which allowed a precise diagnosis.

  13. Brittle fracture properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    In this manual, the following topics are discussed: introduction to the fracture mechanics; theories of brittle fractures; solutions of the boundary value problems of cracks; conservation laws in elastostatics; methods to derive stress-intensity factors; three-dimensional problems; dynamic problems; thermo-elasticity; theories of cracked plates; rock mechanics; crack parameters in elastodynamics; formulae for stress-intensity factors and a programme using the finite element method [fr

  14. Fracture strength and principal stress fields during crush testing of the SiC layer in TRISO-coated fuel particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Brian C., E-mail: brian.campbell.davis@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Ward, Logan [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Butt, Darryl P. [Materials and Science Engineering Department, Boise State University, 1910 University Blvd., Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Fillery, Brent [Rolls-Royce Deutschland Ltd & Co KG, Eschenweg 11, Dahlewitz, 15827 Blankenfelde-Mahlow (Germany); Reimanis, Ivar [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Colorado Center for Advanced Ceramics, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Diametrical compression testing is an important technique to evaluate fracture properties of the SiC layer in TRISO-coated nuclear fuel particles. This study was conducted to expand the understanding and improve the methodology of the test. An analytic solution and multiple FEA models are used to determine the development of the principal stress fields in the SiC shell during a crush test. An ideal fracture condition where the diametrical compression test best mimics in-service internal pressurization conditions was discovered. For a small set of empirical data points, results from different analysis methodologies were input to an iterative Weibull equation set to determine characteristic strength (332.9 MPa) and Weibull modulus (3.80). These results correlate well with published research. It is shown that SiC shell asphericity is currently the limiting factor of greatest concern to obtaining repeatable results. Improvements to the FEA are the only apparent method for incorporating asphericity and improving accuracy. - Highlights: • A continuous stress vs. force function is defined by modifying the analytic solution. • FEA simulations with nonlinear geometry show improvements over analytic solutions. • During the test there are three different stress regimes defined by divot size. • SiC asphericity is a likely cause of numerical results deviating from empirical data. • Modeling true shell geometry is the factor of greatest concern in improving accuracy.

  15. Characterizing the influence of stress-induced microcracks on the laboratory strength and fracture development in brittle rocks using a finite-discrete element method-micro discrete fracture network FDEM-μDFN approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooya Hamdi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity is an inherent component of rock and may be present in different forms including mineral heterogeneity, geometrical heterogeneity, weak grain boundaries and micro-defects. Microcracks are usually observed in crystalline rocks in two forms: natural and stress-induced; the amount of stress-induced microcracking increases with depth and in-situ stress. Laboratory results indicate that the physical properties of rocks such as strength, deformability, P-wave velocity and permeability are influenced by increase in microcrack intensity. In this study, the finite-discrete element method (FDEM is used to model microcrack heterogeneity by introducing into a model sample sets of microcracks using the proposed micro discrete fracture network (μDFN approach. The characteristics of the microcracks required to create μDFN models are obtained through image analyses of thin sections of Lac du Bonnet granite adopted from published literature. A suite of two-dimensional laboratory tests including uniaxial, triaxial compression and Brazilian tests is simulated and the results are compared with laboratory data. The FDEM-μDFN models indicate that micro-heterogeneity has a profound influence on both the mechanical behavior and resultant fracture pattern. An increase in the microcrack intensity leads to a reduction in the strength of the sample and changes the character of the rock strength envelope. Spalling and axial splitting dominate the failure mode at low confinement while shear failure is the dominant failure mode at high confinement. Numerical results from simulated compression tests show that microcracking reduces the cohesive component of strength alone, and the frictional strength component remains unaffected. Results from simulated Brazilian tests show that the tensile strength is influenced by the presence of microcracks, with a reduction in tensile strength as microcrack intensity increases. The importance of microcrack heterogeneity in

  16. Polymer liquids fracture like solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qian; Hassager, Ole

    2017-01-01

    While fracture in brittle solids has been studied for centuries until today, there are few studies on fracture in polymer liquids. Recent developments in experimental techniques, especially the combination of controlled filament stretching rheometry and high speed imaging, have opened new windows...... into the detailed study of fracture processes for polymer liquids. High speed imaging shows that polymer liquids fracture like solids with initiation and propagation of an edge fracture. However, remarkable features such as highly reproducible critical stress, independent appearance of multiple fractures...

  17. Conversion of fracture toughness testing values from small scale three point bending test specimens to small scale yielding state (SSY) by elastic-plastic stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikonen, K.

    1993-07-01

    The report describes the work performed for achieving readiness to calculate fracture toughness dependence on dimension effects and loading conditions in fracture test specimens and real structures. In the report two- and three-dimensional computer codes developed and calculational methods applied are described. One of the main goals is to converse fracture toughness from small scale three point bending test specimens to case of a depth crack in plane strain i.e. to small scale yielding state (SSY) by numerical elastic-plastic stress analysis. Thickness effect of a test specimens and effect of a crack depth are separately investigated. Tests of three point bending specimens with and without sidegrooves and curved crack front are numerically simulated and experimental and computed results are compared. J-integral is calculated along crack front and also from force-deflection dependence of the beam. For the analyses the computing system was thoroughly automatized. Measuring capacity of three point bending test specimens was tried to evaluate. (orig.) (7 refs., 54 figs.)

  18. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  19. Numerical Analysis on the Formation of Fracture Network during the Hydraulic Fracturing of Shale with Pre-Existing Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming He

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, configurations of pre-existing fractures in cubic rock blocks were investigated and reconstructed for the modeling of experimental hydraulic fracturing. The fluid-rock coupling process of hydraulic fracturing was simulated based on the displacement discontinuities method. The numerical model was validated against the related laboratory experiments. The stimulated fracture configurations under different conditions can be clearly shown using the validated numerical model. First, a dominated fracture along the maximum principle stress direction is always formed when the stress difference is large enough. Second, there are less reopened pre-existing fractures, more newly formed fractures and less shear fractures with the increase of the cohesion value of pre-existing fractures. Third, the length of the stimulated shear fracture decreases rapidly with the increase of the friction coefficient, while the length of the tensile fracture has no correlation to the fiction coefficient. Finally, the increase of the fluid injection rate is favorable to the formation of a fracture network. The unfavorable effects of the large stress difference and the large cohesion of pre-existing fractures can be partly suppressed by an increase of the injection rate in the hydraulic fracturing treatment. The results of this paper are useful for understanding fracture propagation behaviors during the hydraulic fracturing of shale reservoirs with pre-existing fractures.

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of the gravity stress test and clinical signs in cases of isolated supination-external rotation-type lateral malleolar fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nortunen, S; Flinkkilä, T; Lantto, I; Kortekangas, T; Niinimäki, J; Ohtonen, P; Pakarinen, H

    2015-08-01

    We prospectively assessed the diagnostic accuracy of the gravity stress test and clinical findings to evaluate the stability of the ankle mortise in patients with supination-external rotation-type fractures of the lateral malleolus without widening of the medial clear space. The cohort included 79 patients with a mean age of 44 years (16 to 82). Two surgeons assessed medial tenderness, swelling and ecchymosis and performed the external rotation (ER) stress test (a reference standard). A diagnostic radiographer performed the gravity stress test. For the gravity stress test, the positive likelihood ratio (LR) was 5.80 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 2.75 to 12.27, and the negative LR was 0.15 (95% CI 0.07 to 0.35), suggesting a moderate change from the pre-test probability. Medial tenderness, both alone and in combination with swelling and/or ecchymosis, indicated a small change (positive LR, 2.74 to 3.25; negative LR, 0.38 to 0.47), whereas swelling and ecchymosis indicated only minimal changes (positive LR, 1.41 to 1.65; negative LR, 0.38 to 0.47). In conclusion, when gravity stress test results are in agreement with clinical findings, the result is likely to predict stability of the ankle mortise with an accuracy equivalent to ER stress test results. When clinical examination suggests a medial-side injury, however, the gravity stress test may give a false negative result. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  1. Odontoid Fracture: Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Peña

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: An 84-year-old male presented with left-sided posterior head, neck, and back pain after a ground level fall. Exam was notable for left parietal scalp laceration and midline cervical spine tenderness with no obvious deformities. He was neurovascularly intact, and placed in an Aspen Collar with strict spine precautions. Significant findings: Computed Tomography (CT of the cervical spine showed a stable, acute, non-displaced fracture of the odontoid process extending into the body of C2, consistent with a Type III Odontoid Fracture. He was evaluated by orthopedic spine service who recommended conservative, non-operative management. Discussion: The cervical spine is composed of seven vertebrae, with C1 and C2 commonly referred to as the Atlas and Axis, respectively. Unique to C2 is a bony prominence, the Odontoid Process (Dens. Hyperextension or hyperflexion injuries can induce significant stress causing fractures. Odontoid fractures comprise approximately 10% of vertebral fractures, and there are three types with varying stability.1 Type 1 is the rarest and is a fracture involving the superior segment of the Dens. It is considered a stable fracture. Type 2 is the most common and is a fracture involving the base of the odontoid process, below the transverse component of the cruciform ligament. This fracture is unstable and requires operative stabilization. 2 Type 3 odontoid fractures are classified by a fracture of the Odontoid process, as well as the lateral masses of the C2. Determining the stability of a Type III Odontoid fracture requires radiographic evaluation. Strict cervical spine precautions must be adhered to until adequate imaging and surgical consultation is obtained. CT of the of cervical spine fractures poses several advantages to plain film radiography due to the ability to view the anatomy in three planes. 3 However, if there is concern for ligamentous injury, MRI is the preferred modality.3

  2. Studies on the influence of metallurgical variables on the stress corrosion behavior of aisi 304 stainless steel in sodium chloride solution using the fracture mechanics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatak, H. S.; Gnanamoorthy, J. B.; Rodriguez, P.

    1996-05-01

    Stress corrosion data on a nuclear grade AISI type 304 stainless steel in a boiling solution of 5M NaCl+ 0.15M Na2SO4+ 3 mL/L HC1 (bp 381 K) for various metallurgical conditions of the steel are presented in this article. The metallurgical conditions used are solution annealing, sensitization, 10 pct cold work, 20 pct cold work, solution annealing + sensitization, 10 pct cold work + sensi-tization, and 20 pct cold work + sensitization. The fracture mechanics approach has been used to obtain quantitative data on the stress corrosion crack growth rates. The stress intensity factor, K 1, and J integral, J 1, have been used as evaluation parameters. The crack growth rates have been measured using compact tension type samples under both increasing and decreasing stress intensity factors. A crack growth rate of 5 X 10-11 m/s was chosen for the determination of threshold para-meters. Results of the optical microscopic and fractographic examinations are presented. Acoustic signals were recorded during crack growth. Data generated from acoustic emissions, activation energy measurements, and fractographic features indicate hydrogen embrittlement as the possible mechanism of cracking.

  3. Stress history and fracture pattern in fault-related folds based on limit analysis: application to the Sub-Andean thrust belt of Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbe, Charlotte; Leroy, Yves; Ben Miloud, Camille

    2017-04-01

    A methodology is proposed to construct the stress history of a complex fault-related fold in which the deformation mechanisms are essentially frictional. To illustrate the approach, fours steps of the deformation of an initially horizontally layered sand/silicone laboratory experiment (Driehaus et al., J. of Struc. Geol., 65, 2014) are analysed with the kinematic approach of limit analysis (LA). The stress, conjugate to the virtual velocity gradient in the sense of mechanicam power, is a proxy for the true statically admmissible stress field which prevailed over the structure. The material properties, friction angles and cohesion, including their time evolution are selected such that the deformation pattern predicted by the LA is consistent with the two main thrusting events, the first forward and the second backward once the layers have sufficiently rotated. The fractures associated to the stress field determined at each step are convected on today configuration to define the complete pattern which should be observed. The end results are presented along virtual vertical wells and could be used within the oil industry at an early phase of exploration to prepare drealing operations.

  4. Compression type stress fracture of femoral neck with equivocal X-ray features diagnosed on 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT in a case of trivial hip pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitalkar, Saurabh; Manglunia, Ashmi S.; Kulkarni, Arvind; Puranik, Ameya D.

    2016-01-01

    Stress insufficiency fracture is usually diagnosed clinically and on the basis of routine X-ray imaging findings. However, the absence of any known predisposing factors and negative or occult radiographic findings pose diagnostic challenges. We report the case of an elderly male patient who presented with a chief complaint of trivial left hip pain and with equivocal radiographic findings. Triphasic 99m Tc-methylene diphosphonate bone scan and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography helped in arriving at the diagnosis of stress insufficiency fracture involving femoral neck

  5. Examination of cracks and fractures on operationally stressed turbine blades; Untersuchung von Rissen und Bruechen an betriebsbeanspruchten Turbinenschaufeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodopivec, F. [Inst. of Metals and Technologies, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vrbic, V.S. [Electric Power Work Nikola Tesla, Obrenovac (Yugoslavia); Ule, B. [Inst. of Metals and Technologies, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zvokelj, J. [Inst. of Metals and Technologies, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vehovar, L. [Inst. of Metals and Technologies, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1997-04-01

    This paper summarises the results of mechanical and fractographic examinations which had been carried out on fractures on the low-pressure blades of a 300 MW steam turbine. The crack-affected turbine blades had been removed, partly during inspections and partly after turbine breakdowns, in contrast to the fractured blades which had been extracted without exception following turbine breakdowns. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im vorliegenden Beitrag werden die Ergebnisse der mechanischen und fraktographischen Untersuchungen zusammengefasst, die an Bruechen von ND-Schaufeln einer 300-MW-Dampfturbine durchgefuehrt wurden. Die rissbehafteten Turbinenschaufeln wurden teilweise waehrend Revisionen und teilweise nach Turbinenversagen entnommen, im Gegensatz zu den gebrochenen Schaufeln, die ausnahmslos nach Turbinenausfall ausgebaut wurden. (orig.)

  6. Dynamic fracture toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, A. S.; Ramulu, M.; Dadkhah, M. S.; Yang, K.-H.; Kang, B. S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic fracture toughness versus crack velocity relations of Homalite-100, polycarbonate, hardened 4340 steel and reaction bonded silicon nitride are reviewed and discrepancies with published data and their probable causes are discussed. Data scatter in published data are attributed in part to the observed fluctuations in crack velocities. The results reaffirmed our previous conclusion that the dynamic fracture toughness versus crack velocity relation is specimen dependent and that the dynamic arrest stress intensity factor is not a unique material property.

  7. Estimating the Reactivation Potential of Pre-Existing Fractures in Subsurface Granitoids from Outcrop Analogues and in-Situ Stress Modeling: Implications for EGS Reservoir Stimulation with an Example from Thuringia (Central Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, N.; Ustaszewski, K. M.; Siegburg, M.; Navabpour, P.; Hesse, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Mid-German Crystalline Rise (MGCR) in Thuringia (central Germany) is part of the European Variscan orogen and hosts large extents of Visean granites (c. 350 Ma), locally overlain by up to 3 km of Early Permian to Mid-Triassic volcanic and sedimentary rocks. A geothermal gradient of 36°C km-1 suggests that such subsurface granites form an economically viable hot dry rock reservoir at > 4 km depth. In order to assess the likelihood of reactivating any pre-existing fractures during hydraulic reservoir stimulation, slip and dilation tendency analyses (Morris et al. 1996) were carried out. For this purpose, we determined orientations of pre-existing fractures in 14 granite exposures along the southern border fault of an MGCR basement high. Additionally, the strike of 192 Permian magmatic dikes affecting the granite was considered. This analysis revealed a prevalence of NW-SE-striking fractures (mainly joints, extension veins, dikes and subordinately brittle faults) with a maximum at 030/70 (dip azimuth/dip). Borehole data and earthquake focal mechanisms reveal a maximum horizontal stress SHmax trending N150°E and a strike-slip regime. Effective in-situ stress magnitudes at 4.5 km depth, assuming hydrostatic conditions and frictional equilibrium along pre-existing fractures with a friction coefficient of 0.85 yielded 230 and 110 MPa for SHmax and Shmin, respectively. In this stress field, fractures with the prevailing orientations show a high tendency of becoming reactivated as dextral strike-slip faults if stimulated hydraulically. To ensure that a stimulation well creates fluid connectivity on a reservoir volume as large as possible rather than dissipating fluids along existing fractures, it should follow a trajectory at the highest possible angle to the orientation of prevailing fractures, i.e. subhorizontal and NE-SW-oriented. References: Morris, A., D. A. Ferrill, and D. B. Henderson (1996), Slip-tendency analysis and fault reactivation, Geology, 24, 275-278.

  8. Fratura de estresse do púbis em atleta de futebol de 15 anos de idade Pubis stress fracture in a 15-year-old soccer player

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Melo Bertolini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este relato de caso apresenta um atleta de futebol de 15 anos de idade diagnosticado com fratura de estresse do púbis e tratado conservadoramente, com resultados satisfatórios. Uma vez realizada revisão da literatura, os autores descreveram quadro clínico, diagnóstico e tratamento. A importância desta publicação reside no fato de a lesão descrita ser raramente encontrada na literatura.This case report presents a 15-year-old football player who was diagnosed with a pubis stress fracture and underwent conservative treatment with satisfactory results. After a review of the literature, the clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment are described. The importance of this paper comes from the rarity of finding reports about this kind of injury in the literature.

  9. Fractures in high-strength bolts due to hydrogen induced stress corrosion. Causes and corrective actions; Brueche hochfester Schrauben infolge wasserstoffinduzierter Spannungsrisskorrosion. Ursachen und Abhilfemassnahmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoche, Holger; Oechsner, Matthias [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Zentrum fuer Konstruktionswerkstoffe

    2017-03-15

    Delayed brittle fractures of high-strength bolts of the strength class 10.9 are presented, taking the example of three damage cases. The respective damage mechanisms could be attributed to hydrogen induced stress corrosion which was caused, in turn, by hydrogen absorption during operation. The examples were chosen with a particular focus on the material condition's susceptibility which explains the cause for the occurrence of the damage mechanism. However, in only one of the three cases the susceptibility was evident and could be explained by violations of normative specifications and an unfavorable material choice. Whereas in the two other examples, only slight or no deviations from the standards and/or regulations could be found. The influencing parameters that caused the damage, those that further promoted the damage, as well as possible corrective actions are discussed taking into account the three exemplary damage cases.

  10. Hip Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hip fractures in people of all ages. In older adults, a hip fracture is most often a result of a fall from a standing height. In people with very weak bones, a hip fracture can occur simply by standing on the leg and twisting. Risk factors The rate of hip fractures increases substantially with ...

  11. DEM Particle Fracture Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Boning [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Herbold, Eric B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Homel, Michael A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Regueiro, Richard A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-12-01

    An adaptive particle fracture model in poly-ellipsoidal Discrete Element Method is developed. The poly-ellipsoidal particle will break into several sub-poly-ellipsoids by Hoek-Brown fracture criterion based on continuum stress and the maximum tensile stress in contacts. Also Weibull theory is introduced to consider the statistics and size effects on particle strength. Finally, high strain-rate split Hopkinson pressure bar experiment of silica sand is simulated using this newly developed model. Comparisons with experiments show that our particle fracture model can capture the mechanical behavior of this experiment very well, both in stress-strain response and particle size redistribution. The effects of density and packings o the samples are also studied in numerical examples.

  12. Numerical simulation of hydraulic fracture propagation in heterogeneous unconventional reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunting; Li, Mingzhong; Hao, Lihua; Hu, Hang

    2017-10-01

    The distribution of the unconventional reservoir fracture network is influenced by many factors. For the natural fracture undeveloped reservoir, the reservoir heterogeneity, construction factors (fracturing fluid flow rate, fluid viscosity, perforation clusters spacing), horizontal stress difference and stress different coefficient are the main factors that affect the fracture propagation. In the study, first, calculate the reservoir physics mechanics parameters that affect the fracture propagation on the base of the logging date from one actual horizontal well. Set the formation parameters according to the calculation that used to simulate the reservoir heterogeneity. Then, using damage mechanics method, the 2D fracture propagation model with seepage-stress-damage coupling of multi-fracture tight sand reservoir was established. Study the influences of different fracturing ways (open whole fracturing and oriented perforation fracturing) and the position of the perforation clusters to the fracture propagation for heterogeneity reservoir. Analyze the effects of flow rate, fracturing fluid viscosity, perforation clusters spacing, horizontal stress difference and stress different coefficient to fracture morphology for the heterogeneity reservoir and contrast with the homogeneous reservoir. The simulation results show that: the fracture morphology is more complexity formed by oriented perforation crack than open whole crack; For natural fracture undeveloped reservoir, as the flow rate or the fracturing fluid viscosity increases within a certain range, the fracture network tends to be more complexity and the effect is more obvious to heterogeneous reservoir than homogeneous reservoir; As the perforation clusters spacing decreases, the interaction of each fracture will increase, it tends to form more complexity fracture network but with short major fracture; If the horizontal stress difference and stress different coefficient is large (The stress different coefficient >0

  13. A cross-sectional study of the effects of load carriage on running characteristics and tibial mechanical stress: implications for stress fracture injuries in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-23

    revealed that the peak tibial stress during running ( tension , 90.6 MPa; compression, 136.2 MPa) was more than three times as great as that during walking... tension , 24.1 MPa; compression, 40.3 MPa), whereas the cumulative stress within one stride did not differ substantially between running (15.2 MPa · s...corresponding to the location of the superficial posterior muscle compartment, including the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Similar to our previous

  14. Two-parameter fracture mechanical analysis of a near-crack-tip stress field in wedge splitting test specimens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seitl, Stanislav; Veselý, V.; Řoutil, L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 89, 21-22 (2011), s. 1852-1858 ISSN 0045-7949. [International Conference on Civil, Structural and Enviromental Engineering Computing /12./. Funchal, Madeira, 01.09.2009-04.09.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Wedge splitting test * Stress intensity factor * T-stress * Numerical simulation * Direct method Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.874, year: 2011

  15. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy: A systematic review of its use in fracture management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrisor B

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal shockwave therapy is increasingly used as an adjuvant therapy in the management of nonunions, delayed unions and more recently fresh fractures. This is in an effort to increase union rates or obtain unions when fractures have proven recalcitrant to healing. In this report we have systematically reviewed the English language literature to attempt to determine the potential clinical efficacy of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in fracture management. Of 32 potentially eligible studies identified, 10 were included that assessed the extracorporeal shockwave therapy use for healing nonunions or delayed unions, and one trial was included that assessed its use for acute high-energy fractures. From the included, studies′ overall union rates were in favor of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (72% union rate overall for nonunions or delayed unions, and a 46% relative risk reduction in nonunions when it is used for acute high-energy fractures. However, the methodologic quality of included studies was weak and any clinical inferences made from these data should be interpreted with caution. Further research in this area in the form of a large-scale randomized trial is necessary to better answer the question of the effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy on union rates for both nonunions and acute fractures.

  16. Atomistic simulations of nanotube fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belytschko, T.; Xiao, S. P.; Schatz, G. C.; Ruoff, R. S.

    2002-06-01

    The fracture of carbon nanotubes is studied by molecular mechanics simulations. The fracture behavior is found to be almost independent of the separation energy and to depend primarily on the inflection point in the interatomic potential. The fracture strain of a zigzag nanotube is predicted to be between 10% and 15%, which compares reasonably well with experimental results. The predicted range of fracture stresses is 65-93 GPa and is markedly higher than observed. The computed fracture strengths of chiral and armchair nanotubes are above these values. Various plausible small-scale defects do not suffice to bring the failure stresses into agreement with available experimental results. As in the experiments, the fracture of carbon nanotubes is predicted to be brittle.

  17. Pressure and pressure derivative analysis for vertical gas and oil wells in stress sensitive homogeneous and naturally fractured formations without type-curve matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, Freddy Humberto; Cantillo, Jose Humberto; Montealegre M, Matilde

    2007-01-01

    Currently, rock mechanics plays an important role in the oil industry. Effects of reservoir subsidence, compaction and dilation are being taken into account in modern reservoir management of complex systems. On the other hand, pressure well tests run in stress sensitive formations ought to be interpreted with non conventional techniques. During the last three decades, several studies relating transient pressure analysis for characterization of stress sensitive reservoirs have been introduced in the literature. Some of them deal with type curves and/or automated history matching. However, due to the nature of the problem, it does not exist a definitive study focused on the adequate characterization of reservoirs which permeability changes as fluid withdrawal advances; in this paper, the permeability modulus concept introduced by Pedroso (1986) is token as the starting basis. A great number of type curves were generated to study the behavior of the above mentioned formations under stress influence. It was found that permeability modulus, therefore permeability changes, can be correlated with the slope of the pressure derivative trend during the radial flow regime when the reservoir suffers compaction. It is also worth to mention that the time of which the minimum characteristic point of a naturally fractured formation (or the inflection point of o semi-log plot) found on the pressure derivative plot is practically the same for formations without stress influence. This contributes to the extension of the TDS technique, Tiab (1993), so a new methodology to characterize this kind of reservoirs is proposed here. This was verified by the solution of synthetic problems

  18. Golfer's fracture of the ribs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Golfer's fracture is stress fracture of the posterior portion of left 3, 4, 5, 6 or 7th ribs of golfer's, usually beginners,and it is considered due to exposure to unaccustomed severe exercise of this fascinating sport. Healing is usually uneventful, but possible complication may occur, because symptom is mild and golfers continue the exercise with physical therapy such as massage. Author report 4 cases of golfer's fracture, including 1 case complicated by platelike at electasis of lung.

  19. Effects of Thermal Aging on Material Properties, Stress Corrosion Cracking, and Fracture Toughness of AISI 316L Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Timothy; Forsström, Antti; Saukkonen, Tapio; Ballinger, Ronald; Hänninen, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Thermal aging and consequent embrittlement of materials are ongoing issues in cast stainless steels, as well as duplex, and high-Cr ferritic stainless steels. Spinodal decomposition is largely responsible for the well-known "748 K (475 °C) embrittlement" that results in drastic reductions in ductility and toughness in these materials. This process is also operative in welds of either cast or wrought stainless steels where δ-ferrite is present. While the embrittlement can occur after several hundred hours of aging at 748 K (475 °C), the process is also operative at lower temperatures, at the 561 K (288 °C) operating temperature of a boiling water reactor (BWR), for example, where ductility reductions have been observed after several tens of thousands of hours of exposure. An experimental program was carried out in order to understand how spinodal decomposition may affect changes in material properties in Type 316L BWR piping weld metals. The study included material characterization, nanoindentation hardness, double-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR), Charpy-V, tensile, SCC crack growth, and in situ fracture toughness testing as a function of δ-ferrite content, aging time, and temperature. SCC crack growth rates of Type 316L stainless steel weld metal under simulated BWR conditions showed an approximate 2 times increase in crack growth rate over that of the unaged as-welded material. In situ fracture toughness measurements indicate that environmental exposure can result in a reduction of toughness by up to 40 pct over the corresponding at-temperature air-tested values. Material characterization results suggest that spinodal decomposition is responsible for the degradation of material properties measured in air, and that degradation of the in situ properties may be a result of hydrogen absorbed during exposure to the high-temperature water environment.

  20. Stress field orientation inverted from source mechanisms of microseismic events induced by hydraulic fracturing and geomechanical interpretation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Staněk, František; Jechumtálová, Z.; Eisner, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2015), s. 2552-2556 ISSN 1052-3812. [SEG Annual Meeting 2015. 18.10.2015-23.10.2015, New Orleans] Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : microseismic monitoring * source mechanisms * stress Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure

  1. fracture criterion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fracture in metallic glasses. What are the connections between nano- and micro- mechanisms and toughness? Metallic glasses are schizophrenic in the fracture sense. PDF Create! 5 Trial www.nuance.com ...

  2. Hand Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thumb Arthritis Thumb Sprains Trigger Finger Tumors Wrist Fracture Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety ... Tunnel Ganglion Cysts Thumb Arthritis Trigger Finger Wrist Fracture Hand Safety Fireworks Safety Lawnmower Safety Snowblower safety ...

  3. Wrist Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Wrist Fractures Email to a friend * required fields From * To * DESCRIPTION A wrist fracture is a medical term for a broken wrist. The wrist is made up of eight ...

  4. Root fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg; Tsilingaridis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed.......The purpose of this study was to analyze tooth loss after root fractures and to assess the influence of the type of healing and the location of the root fracture. Furthermore, the actual cause of tooth loss was analyzed....

  5. Residual micro-stress distributions in heat-pressed ceramic on zirconia and porcelain-fused to metal systems: Analysis by FIB-DIC ring-core method and correlation with fracture toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiani, M; Massimi, F; Merlati, G; Bemporad, E

    2015-11-01

    The production of fixed partial dentures (FPDs) induces complex residual stress profiles, due to both the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the veneering ceramic and the framework and to the thermal gradients occurring during the final cooling. Detailed knowledge of residual stress distributions in the veneering ceramics is important to understand the interface phenomena with the framework and the consequences of the different firing systems. The first objective of this study was to analyse the residual stress distribution in heat-pressed ceramic on zirconia core with micrometer spatial resolution, with also a focus on the stress at the interface versus porcelain-fused-to-metal samples. The second purpose was to correlate the residual stress with the fracture toughness. The micron-scale focused ion beam (FIB) ring-core method was used to map the residual stress over the cross-sections of the veneering ceramics. The methodology is based on FIB micro-milling of annular trenches, combined with high-resolution in situ scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, a full field strain analysis by digital image correlation (DIC) and numerical models for residual stress calculation. Fracture toughness was evaluated by using high load Vickers indentation and hardness/modulus were measured by nanoindentation testing also across the interfaces. Both prosthetic systems showed a compressive stress at the ceramic surface on a micron-scale. The stress profile for porcelain fused to metal (PFM) showed a transition to tensile stress at the half of the layer, whilst the stress in proximity of the interface was more compressive in both the cases. Residual stress on a micron scale are higher in magnitude than the corresponding macro-scale values reported in the literature, due to the stress relaxation given, at larger scales, by micro-voids and cracks. The stress field was directly correlated with the indentation fracture toughness, which was higher in those areas where the

  6. Shoulder Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as shown on an x-ray. Selection of treatment depends upon the patient’s activity level, the location of the fracture and the severity of the fracture. Recovery Shoulder fractures may leave a patient with permanent shoulder stiffness, regardless of ...

  7. Skull fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... follow bicycle safety recommendations. Do not drink and drive. Do not allow yourself to be driven by someone who may have been drinking alcohol or is otherwise impaired. Alternative Names Basilar skull fracture; Depressed skull fracture; Linear skull fracture Images Skull of an adult Skull ...

  8. Hydraulic fracturing model based on the discrete fracture model and the generalized J integral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Liu, Z. F.; Wang, X. H.; Zeng, B.

    2016-08-01

    The hydraulic fracturing technique is an effective stimulation for low permeability reservoirs. In fracturing models, one key point is to accurately calculate the flux across the fracture surface and the stress intensity factor. To achieve high precision, the discrete fracture model is recommended to calculate the flux. Using the generalized J integral, the present work obtains an accurate simulation of the stress intensity factor. Based on the above factors, an alternative hydraulic fracturing model is presented. Examples are included to demonstrate the reliability of the proposed model and its ability to model the fracture propagation. Subsequently, the model is used to describe the relationship between the geometry of the fracture and the fracturing equipment parameters. The numerical results indicate that the working pressure and the pump power will significantly influence the fracturing process.

  9. [Hip fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisová, Drahomíra; Salášek, Martin; Pavelka, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Hip fractures are ranked among the frequent injuries. These fractures have been often coupled with high energy trauma in children and in patients with normal bone structure, low energy trauma and osteoporotic fracture (fragility fracture) is typical in elder patients. Hip fractures are divided into five groups: femoral head fracture, femoral neck fracture, pertrochanteric, intertrochateric and subtrochanteric fracture. Surgical treatment is indicated in all patients unless contraindications are present. Long bed rest has been accompanied by a high risk of development of thromboembolic disease, pneumonia and bed sore. Healing in the wrong position and nonunions are often the result of conservative treatment. Screw osteosynthesis is performed in isolated femoral head factures. Three cannulated screws or a DHS plate (dynamic hip screw) are used in fractures of the femoral neck with normal femoral head perfusion, total hip replacement is recommended in elder patients and in case of loss of blood supply of the femoral head. Pertrochanteric and intertrochanteric fractures can be stabilized by the femoral nails (PFN, PFN A, PFH - proximal femoral nail), nails are suitable for minimally invasive insertion and provide higher stability in the shaft, or plates (DHS) designed for stable pertronchanteric and intertrochanteric fractures. Subtrochanteric fractures can be fixed also intramedullary (nails - PFN long, PFN A long) and extramedullary (plates - DCS dynamic condylar screw, proximal femoral LCP - locking compression plate). Open reduction with internal plate fixation is advantageous for pathological fractures, as biopsy sampling can be performed. Hip fracture rehabilitation is integral part of the treatment, including walking on crutches or with a walker with partial weight bearing for at least six weeks.

  10. On the development of creep damage constitutive equations: modified hyperbolic sine law for minimum creep strain rate and stress and creep fracture criterion based on cavity area fraction along grain\\ud boundary

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Qiang; Yang, Xin; Lu, Zhongyu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: This paper reports 1) the latest development and application of modified hyperbolic sine law for minimum creep strain rate and stress for both low Cr and high Cr steels, and 2) the development of creep fracture criterion based on cavity area fraction along grain boundary for high Cr steel. This work is part of the fundamental development of creep damage constitutive equations which were identified through a critical literature review.\\ud In the former the application of the new law ...

  11. Dimensional threshold for fracture linkage and hooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Juliette; Chabani, Arezki; Gauthier, Bertrand D. M.

    2018-03-01

    Fracture connectivity in rocks depends on spatial properties of the pattern including length, abundance and orientation. When fractures form a single-strike set, they hardly cross-cut each other and the connectivity is limited. Linkage probability increases with increasing fracture abundance and length as small fractures connect to each other to form longer ones. A process for parallel fracture linkage is the "hooking", where two converging fracture tips mutually deviate and then converge to connect due to the interaction of their crack-tip stresses. Quantifying the processes and conditions for fracture linkage in single-strike fracture sets is crucial to better predicting fluid flow in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs. For 1734 fractures in Permian shales of the Lodève Basin, SE France, we measured geometrical parameters in 2D, characterizing three stages of the hooking process: underlapping, overlapping and linkage. We deciphered the threshold values, shape ratios and limiting conditions to switch from one stage to another one. The hook set up depends on the spacing (S) and fracture length (Lh) with the relation S ≈ 0.15 Lh. Once the hooking is initiated, with the fracture deviation length (L) L ≈ 0.4 Lh, the fractures reaches the linkage stage only when the spacing is reduced to S ≈ 0.02 Lh and the convergence (C) is < 0.1 L. These conditions apply to multi-scale fractures with a shape ratio L/S = 10 and for fracture curvature of 10°-20°.

  12. Deep gold mine fracture zone behaviour

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Napier, JAL

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available dimensional section through the samples using the standard DIGS displacement discontinuity program has proved that the numerical techniques are able to capture the nucleation from flaws and the effect of larger scale stress re-distributions by grain... boundaries. The coalescence of the fractures depends on a complicated process whereby tensile stresses produced ahead of growing fractures initiate other fractures and lead to a localized failure surface on a larger scale. In certain cases, the compressive...

  13. Acetabular Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Correa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 77-year-old female presented to her primary care physician (PCP with right hip pain after a mechanical fall. She did not lose consciousness or have any other traumatic injuries. She was unable to ambulate post-fall, so X-rays were ordered by her PCP. Her X-rays were concerning for a right acetabular fracture (see purple arrows, so the patient was referred to the emergency department where a computed tomography (CT scan was ordered. Significant findings: The non-contrast CT images show a minimally displaced comminuted fracture of the right acetabulum involving the acetabular roof, medial and anterior walls (red arrows, with associated obturator muscle hematoma (blue oval. Discussion: Acetabular fractures are quite rare. There are 37 pelvic fractures per 100,000 people in the United States annually, and only 10% of these involve the acetabulum. They occur more frequently in the elderly totaling an estimated 4,000 per year. High-energy trauma is the primary cause of acetabular fractures in younger individuals and these fractures are commonly associated with other fractures and pelvic ring disruptions. Fractures secondary to moderate or minimal trauma are increasingly of concern in patients of advanced age.1 Classification of acetabular fractures can be challenging. However, the approach can be simplified by remembering the three basic types of acetabular fractures (column, transverse, and wall and their corresponding radiologic views. First, column fractures should be evaluated with coronally oriented CT images. This type of fracture demonstrates a coronal fracture line running caudad to craniad, essentially breaking the acetabulum into two halves: a front half and a back half. Secondly, transverse fractures should be evaluated by sagittally oriented CT images. By definition, a transverse fracture separates the acetabulum into superior and inferior halves with the fracture line extending from anterior to posterior

  14. Laboratory tests of hydraulic fracturing and swell healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thunbo, Christensen Claes; Foged, Christensen Helle; Foged, Niels

    1998-01-01

    New laboratory test set-ups and test procedures are described - for testing the formation of hydraulically induced fractures as well as the potential for subsequent fracture closurefrom the relase of a swelling potential. The main purpose with the tests is to provide information on fracturing...... stresses and whether or not the material in question possesses the potential for fracture closure....

  15. Radial nerve palsy associated with humeral shaft fracture. Is the energy of trauma a prognostic factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venouziou, Aaron I; Dailiana, Zoe H; Varitimidis, Sokratis E; Hantes, Michael E; Gougoulias, Nikolaos E; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2011-11-01

    Radial nerve palsy associated with humeral shaft fractures is the most common nerve lesion complicating fractures of long bones. The purpose of the study was to review the outcome of surgical management in patients with low energy and high energy radial nerve palsy after humeral shaft fractures. Eighteen patients were treated operatively for a humeral shaft fracture with radial nerve palsy. The mean age was 32.2 years and the mean follow up time was 66.1 months (range: 30-104). The surgical management included fracture fixation with early nerve exploration and repair if needed. The patients were divided in two groups based on the energy of trauma (low vs. high trauma energy). The prevalence of injured and unrecovered nerves and time to nerve recovery were analysed. Five patients sustained low and 13 high energy trauma. All patients with low energy trauma had an intact (4) or entrapped (1) radial nerve and recovered completely. Full nerve recovery was also achieved in five of 13 patients with high energy trauma where the nerve was found intact or entrapped. Signs of initial recovery were present in a mean of 3.2 weeks (range: 1-8) for the low energy group and 12 weeks (range: 3-23) for the high energy group (p=0.036). In these patients, the average time to full recovery was 14 and 26 weeks for the low and high energy trauma group respectively. Eight patients with high energy trauma had severely damaged nerves and failed to recover, although microsurgical nerve reconstruction was performed in 4 cases. Patients with high energy trauma had a prolonged fracture healing time (18.7 weeks on average) compared to those with low energy fractures (10.4 weeks), (p=0.003). The outcome of the radial nerve palsy following humeral fractures is associated to the initial trauma. Palsies that are part of a low energy fracture uniformly recover and therefore primary surgical exploration seems unnecessary. In high energy fractures, neurotmesis or severe contusion must be expected. In

  16. Assessment of copper resistance to stress-corrosion cracking in nitrite solutions by means of joint analysis of acoustic emission measurements, deformation diagrams, qualitative and quantitative fractography, and non-linear fracture mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanzhin, V.G.; Nikulin, S.A. [Moscow State Inst. of Steel and Alloys (Russian Federation)

    2005-06-01

    A study of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of copper in 0.1M NaNO{sub 2} aqueous solution is presented. The fracture kinetics was monitored by measuring the acoustic emission (AE) signals. Macro- and micro-fractography analysis, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), was employed to investigate the fracture mechanisms. Estimates of stress intensity factor, KI, and J-integral were derived in order to assess the resistance of copper to stress corrosion cracking. Two kinds of SCC tests under continuous circulation of the corrosive solution were employed in the present study: 1. Constant extension rate (2x10{sup -6}/s) tests on pre-cracked, middle tension (MT) panel specimens. 2. Tests on pre-cracked, compact tension (CT) specimens at a fixed (by a fixing bolt) opening of the crack walls ({delta} = 0.3 mm, K{sub i} = 27 MPax{radical}m). The time base for these tests was about two months. After the completion of the SCC test, the CT specimen was additionally tested, under a constant-rate (0.02 mm/s) off-center extension. In the both kinds of tests, the SCC fracture kinetics is found to exhibit two typical stages: Stage 1: SCC initiation stage (after a certain incubation period, T{sub i}, measured to be T{sub i} {approx_equal} 3-4 hours for MT specimens under constant extension, the corresponding stress was {sigma} {approx_equal} 40-70 MPa, and T{sub i} {approx_equal} 200 hours for CT specimens under a fixed crack wall opening). Stage 2: Active fracture process (SCC macro-fracture) distinguished by strong AE pulses (which are registered after time T{sub 2} {approx_equal} 8 hours for MT specimens and T{sub 2} {approx_equal} 800 hours for CT specimens). Fractography analysis has shown that the zone of SCC fracture in MT specimens extends to approximately 1,500 {mu}m. A 400-700 {mu}m deep zone of brittle transgranular fracture, which included small areas showing characteristic SCC 'striations', was observed adjacent to the fatigue pre-crack area. At higher

  17. Hydraulic fracture propagation modeling and data-based fracture identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing

    Successful shale gas and tight oil production is enabled by the engineering innovation of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Hydraulically induced fractures will most likely deviate from the bi-wing planar pattern and generate complex fracture networks due to mechanical interactions and reservoir heterogeneity, both of which render the conventional fracture simulators insufficient to characterize the fractured reservoir. Moreover, in reservoirs with ultra-low permeability, the natural fractures are widely distributed, which will result in hydraulic fractures branching and merging at the interface and consequently lead to the creation of more complex fracture networks. Thus, developing a reliable hydraulic fracturing simulator, including both mechanical interaction and fluid flow, is critical in maximizing hydrocarbon recovery and optimizing fracture/well design and completion strategy in multistage horizontal wells. A novel fully coupled reservoir flow and geomechanics model based on the dual-lattice system is developed to simulate multiple nonplanar fractures' propagation in both homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoirs with or without pre-existing natural fractures. Initiation, growth, and coalescence of the microcracks will lead to the generation of macroscopic fractures, which is explicitly mimicked by failure and removal of bonds between particles from the discrete element network. This physics-based modeling approach leads to realistic fracture patterns without using the empirical rock failure and fracture propagation criteria required in conventional continuum methods. Based on this model, a sensitivity study is performed to investigate the effects of perforation spacing, in-situ stress anisotropy, rock properties (Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and compressive strength), fluid properties, and natural fracture properties on hydraulic fracture propagation. In addition, since reservoirs are buried thousands of feet below the surface, the

  18. Colles Fracture

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez León, Belisario

    2014-01-01

    Our expertise is the study of more than 2,000 cases of Colles' fractures. Colles name should in this case to synthesize the type of fractures of the lower end of the radius. There have been various proposed classifications according to the different fracture lines can be demonstrated radiologically in the region of the wrist. We believe that these ratings should only be retained if the concept of the articular fracture or not in the classical sense, since it has great value in the functional ...

  19. [Calcaneus fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, M P; Sanders, R W

    2011-10-01

    Fractures of the calcaneus generally occur in the setting of high-energy trauma, resulting in complex, three-dimensionally oriented fracture patterns. Surgical treatment is typically indicated for displaced intra-articular fractures, permitting restoration of calcaneal height, width and overall morphology, in addition to the posterior facet articular surface where possible, and enabling late in situ arthrodesis as a means of salvage in the event of post-traumatic arthritis. The present article briefly discusses our preferred methods for the management of calcaneal fractures. An English full text version of this article is available at SpringerLink as supplemental.

  20. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  1. Estimation of a stress field in the earth`s crust using drilling-induced tensile fractures observed at well WD-1 in the Kakkonda geothermal field; Kakkonda WD-1 sei de kansokusareta drilling induced tensile fracture ni yoru chikaku oryokuba no suitei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okabe, T. [GERD Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Hayashi, K. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Fluid Science; Kato, O.; Doi, N.; Miyazaki, S. [Japan Metals and Chemicals Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Uchida, T. [New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Tokyo, (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    This paper describes estimation of a stress field in the earth`s crust in the Kakkonda geothermal field. Formation micro imager (FMI) logging known as a crack detecting logging was performed in the well WD-1. This FMI logging has made observation possible on cracks along well axis thought to indicate size and direction of the crust stress, and drilling-induced tensile fractures (DTF). It was verified that these DTFs are generated initially in an azimuth determined by in-situ stress (an angle up to the DTF as measured counterclockwise with due north as a starting point, expressed in {theta}) in the well`s circumferential direction. It was also confirmed that a large number of cracks incline at a certain angle to the well axis (an angle made by the well axis and the DTF, expressed in {gamma}). The DTF is a crack initially generated on well walls as a result of such tensile stresses as mud pressure and thermal stress acting on the well walls during well excavation, caused by the in-situ stress field. Measurement was made on the {theta} and {gamma} from the FMI logging result, and estimation was given on a three-dimensional stress field. Elucidating the three-dimensional crust stress field in a geothermal reservoir is important in making clear the formation mechanism thereof and the growth of water-permeable cracks. This method can be regarded as an effective method. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part I. Ductility and fracture toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolin, B., E-mail: mail@crism.ru; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Minkin, A.; Potapova, V.; Smirnov, V.

    2016-11-15

    The radiation swelling effect on the fracture properties of irradiated austenitic steels under static loading has been studied and analyzed from the mechanical and physical viewpoints. Experimental data on the stress-strain curves, fracture strain, fracture toughness and fracture mechanisms have been represented for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various swelling. Some phenomena in mechanical behaviour of irradiated austenitic steels have been revealed and explained as follows: a sharp decrease of fracture toughness with swelling growth; untypical large increase of fracture toughness with decrease of the test temperature; some increase of fracture toughness after preliminary cyclic loading. Role of channel deformation and channel fracture has been clarified in the properties of irradiated austenitic steel and different tendencies to channel deformation have been shown and explained for the same austenitic steel irradiated at different temperatures and neutron doses.

  3. Facial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Rajarshi; Gopalkrishnan, Kulandaswamy

    2018-01-29

    The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the incidence of facial fractures along with age, gender predilection, etiology, commonest site, associated dental injuries, and any complications of patients operated in Craniofacial Unit of SDM College of Dental Sciences and Hospital. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of OMFS, SDM College of Dental Sciences, Dharwad from January 2003 to December 2013. Data were recorded for the cause of injury, age and gender distribution, frequency and type of injury, localization and frequency of soft tissue injuries, dentoalveolar trauma, facial bone fractures, complications, concomitant injuries, and different treatment protocols.All the data were analyzed using statistical analysis that is chi-squared test. A total of 1146 patients reported at our unit with facial fractures during these 10 years. Males accounted for a higher frequency of facial fractures (88.8%). Mandible was the commonest bone to be fractured among all the facial bones (71.2%). Maxillary central incisors were the most common teeth to be injured (33.8%) and avulsion was the most common type of injury (44.6%). Commonest postoperative complication was plate infection (11%) leading to plate removal. Other injuries associated with facial fractures were rib fractures, head injuries, upper and lower limb fractures, etc., among these rib fractures were seen most frequently (21.6%). This study was performed to compare the different etiologic factors leading to diverse facial fracture patterns. By statistical analysis of this record the authors come to know about the relationship of facial fractures with gender, age, associated comorbidities, etc.

  4. Fracture sacrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogra A

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available An extremely rare case of combined transverse and vertical fracture of sacrum with neurological deficit is reported here with a six month follow-up. The patient also had an L1 compression fracture. The patient has recovered significantly with conservative management.

  5. Elbow Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... occur commonly in children and in the elderly. Nerve and/or artery injuries can be associated with these types of fractures and must be carefully evaluated by your doctor. These fractures usually require surgical repair with plates and/or screw, unless they are ...

  6. Determination of Dynamic Fracture Toughness Properties of Rail Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    Motivated by the occurrence of a long-running rail web fracture in service, dynamic fracture mechanics research was undertaken to (1) quantify the crack driving force due to the residual stresses induced by roller straightening operations, (2) determ...

  7. Experimental and finite element analysis of fracture criterion in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    . The prevention of failure in stressed structural components currently requires fracture mechanics based design parameters like critical load, critical crack-tip opening displacement or fracture toughness. The present attempt would aim to fulfill ...

  8. Multiscale Multifunctional Progressive Fracture of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Minnetyan, L.

    2012-01-01

    A new approach is described for evaluating fracture in composite structures. This approach is independent of classical fracture mechanics parameters like fracture toughness. It relies on computational simulation and is programmed in a stand-alone integrated computer code. It is multiscale, multifunctional because it includes composite mechanics for the composite behavior and finite element analysis for predicting the structural response. It contains seven modules; layered composite mechanics (micro, macro, laminate), finite element, updating scheme, local fracture, global fracture, stress based failure modes, and fracture progression. The computer code is called CODSTRAN (Composite Durability Structural ANalysis). It is used in the present paper to evaluate the global fracture of four composite shell problems and one composite built-up structure. Results show that the composite shells. Global fracture is enhanced when internal pressure is combined with shear loads. The old reference denotes that nothing has been added to this comprehensive report since then.

  9. Mechanisms of hydraulic fracturing in cohesive soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-jie Wang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing in the soil core of earth-rockfill dams is a common problem affecting the safety of the dams. Based on fracture tests, a new criterion for hydraulic fracturing in cohesive soil was suggested. Using this criterion, the mechanisms of hydraulic fracturing in cubic soil specimens were investigated. The results indicate that the propagation of the crack in a cubic specimen under water pressure occurs in a mixed mode I-II if the crack face is not perpendicular to any of the principal stresses, and the crack most likely to propagate is the one that is perpendicular to the minor principal stress and propagates in mode I.

  10. Fatigue fracture of the sacrum in an adolescent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Scott P.; Daffner, Richard H.; Sciulli, Robert L. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Allegheny General Hospital, 320 E. North Ave., 15212-4772, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Schneck-Jacob, Stephanie L. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Allegheny General Hospital, 320 E. North Ave., 15212-4772, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2004-08-01

    There are relatively few reports of sacral stress fractures in children. In adolescents, sacral stress fractures have been reported in patients involved in vigorous athletic activity. Recognition of these fractures is important to avoid unnecessary biopsy if the findings are confused with tumor or infection. We report a sacral fatigue fracture in a 15-year-old without a history of athletic participation or trauma. (orig.)

  11. Stress !!!

    OpenAIRE

    Fledderus, M.

    2012-01-01

    Twee op de vijf UT-studenten hebben last van ernstige studiestress, zo erg zelfs dat het ze in hun privéleven belemmert. Die cijfers komen overeen met het landelijk beeld van stress onder studenten. Samen met 14 andere universiteits- en hogeschoolbladen enquêteerde UT Nieuws bijna 5500 studenten. Opvallend is dat mannelijke studenten uit Twente zich veel minder druk lijken te maken over hun studie. Onder vrouwen ligt de stress juist erg hoog ten opzichte van het landelijk gemiddelde.

  12. Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Hanne Dauer

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb.......Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb....

  13. Elastic fracture in driven media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung Chiwei; Wang Shenggang; Long Qiyi

    1999-08-01

    Fracture as one of the mechanical properties of materials is structurally dependent. Defects, defect assemblies, grain boundaries and sub-boundaries materials, modify the local stress intensity factors intensively. Brittle fracture prefers to confine to the grain boundary where the specific surface energy is lower than that in the grain. Again, transgranular cracking may occur on the crystal cleavage plane or planes where the local toughness is lowered by dislocation interaction and motion. This paper shows the complexity of the fractal dimension or roughness index of fractured surfaces in materials with metallographic structures or in inhomogeneous media. (author)

  14. Femoral shaft fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, C.E.; Campbell, D.C. II

    1985-01-01

    The femur is the longest, largest, and strongest bone in the body. Because of its length, width, and role as primary weight-bearing bone, it must tolerate the extremes of axial loading and angulatory stresses. Massive musculature envelopes the femur. This masculature provides abundant blood supply to the bone, which also allows great potential for healing. Thus, the most significant problem relating to femoral shaft fractures is not healing, but restoration of bone length and alignment so that the femoral shaft will tolerate the functional stresses demanded of it

  15. Near Wellbore Hydraulic Fracture Propagation from Perforations in Tight Rocks: The Roles of Fracturing Fluid Viscosity and Injection Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Fallahzadeh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracture initiation and near wellbore propagation is governed by complex failure mechanisms, especially in cased perforated wellbores. Various parameters affect such mechanisms, including fracturing fluid viscosity and injection rate. In this study, three different fracturing fluids with viscosities ranging from 20 to 600 Pa.s were used to investigate the effects of varying fracturing fluid viscosities and fluid injection rates on the fracturing mechanisms. Hydraulic fracturing tests were conducted in cased perforated boreholes made in tight 150 mm synthetic cubic samples. A true tri-axial stress cell was used to simulate real far field stress conditions. In addition, dimensional analyses were performed to correspond the results of lab experiments to field-scale operations. The results indicated that by increasing the fracturing fluid viscosity and injection rate, the fracturing energy increased, and consequently, higher fracturing pressures were observed. However, when the fracturing energy was transferred to a borehole at a faster rate, the fracture initiation angle also increased. This resulted in more curved fracture planes. Accordingly, a new parameter, called fracturing power, was introduced to relate fracture geometry to fluid viscosity and injection rate. Furthermore, it was observed that the presence of casing in the wellbore impacted the stress distribution around the casing in such a way that the fracture propagation deviated from the wellbore vicinity.

  16. The prognostic value of the hawkins sign and diagnostic value of MRI after talar neck fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Liu, Wenzhou; Deng, Lianfu; Song, Weidong

    2014-12-01

    The early diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the talus (AVN) and prediction of ankle function for talar fractures are important. The Hawkins sign, as a radiographic predictor, could exclude the possibility of developing ischemic bone necrosis after talar neck fractures, but its relationship with ankle function remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to illustrate the prognostic effect of the Hawkins sign on ankle function after talar neck fractures and to study the value of early MRI in detecting the AVN changes after talus fractures. Cases of talar neck fractures between November 2008 and November 2013 were evaluated. The occurrences of the Hawkins sign and AVN were studied. X-ray imaging was performed at multiple time points from the 4th to the 12th week after the fractures, and MRI examinations were used in the Hawkins sign negative group, with the time span ranging from 1.5 to 12 months. AOFAS scores of the Hawkins sign positive and negative groups were compared during the follow-up. Forty-four cases (48 feet) were evaluated. The occurrence of positive Hawkins sign was 50%, 30%, and 33.3%, the incidence of AVN was 0%, 10%, and 50%, respectively, in type I, type II, and type III and IV talus fractures, respectively. The AOFAS scores showed no statistically significant difference between Hawkins sign positive group and negative group in type I and II fractures. The Hawkins sign positive group had better AOFAS scores than the negative group in type III and IV fractures. However, there was no statistically significant difference between Hawkins sign positive and negative groups when AVN cases were excluded in type III and IV fractures. The Hawkins sign was a reliable predictor excluding the possibility of AVN. It did not have predictive value on the ankle function in low-energy fractures and may predict better ankle function in high-energy fractures. MRI can diagnose AVN during an earlier period, and we believe Hawkins sign negative patients should undergo

  17. Fracture mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Nestor

    2017-01-01

    The second edition of this textbook includes a refined presentation of concepts in each chapter, additional examples; new problems and sections, such as conformal mapping and mechanical behavior of wood; while retaining all the features of the original book. The material included in this book is based upon the development of analytical and numerical procedures pertinent to particular fields of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and plastic fracture mechanics (PFM), including mixed-mode-loading interaction. The mathematical approach undertaken herein is coupled with a brief review of several fracture theories available in cited references, along with many color images and figures. Dynamic fracture mechanics is included through the field of fatigue and Charpy impact testing. Explains computational and engineering approaches for solving crack-related problems using straightforward mathematics that facilitate comprehension of the physical meaning of crack growth processes; Expands computational understandin...

  18. Supracondylar Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Andrusaitis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 15-year-old male presented to the emergency department with right elbow pain after falling off a skateboard. The patient denied a decrease in strength or sensation but did endorse paresthesias to his hand. On exam, the patient had an obvious deformity of his right elbow with tenderness to palpation and decreased range of motion at the elbow. Sensation, motor function, and pulses were intact. Radiographic imaging was obtained. Significant findings: The pre-reduction films show a type III supracondylar fracture. There is complete displacement of the distal humerus anteriorly. Specific findings for supracondylar fracture include: a posterior fat pad (red arrow and a displaced anterior humeral line (yellow line.1 When no fracture is present, the anterior humeral line should intersect the middle third of the capitellum; in this X-ray, it does not intersect the capitellum at all. This X-ray demonstrates a normal radiocapitellar line (blue line that intersects the capitellum. The presence of a narrow anterior fat pad aka “sail sign” can be normal. Discussion: Supracondylar fractures of the humerus occur at the distal portion of the humerus without involving the growth plate.2 This is the second most common fracture in children overall. In children, it is the most common fracture of the elbow.3 This injury has a high risk of neurovascular compromise, such as compartment syndrome or ischemic contracture, and thus the clinician must perform immediate and frequent neurovascular assessments focusing on the distributions of the brachial artery in addition to the median, ulnar, and radial nerves.4 Hyperextension injuries that typically occur following a fall onto an outstretched arm are responsible for 95% of supracondylar fractures.1 A type I supracondylar fracture is non-displaced and can be treated with immobilization through a posterior splint and sling5 with close follow-up, type II is angulated but with an intact

  19. Hydro-fracture in the laboratory: matching diagnostic seismic signals to fracture networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehne, S.; Benson, P. M.; Koor, N.; Dobson, K. J.; Enfield, M.; Barber, A.

    2017-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a key process in both natural (e.g. dyke intrusion) and engineered environments (e.g. shale gas). To better understand this process, we present new data from simulated hydraulic fracturing in a controlled laboratory environment in order to track fracture nucleation (location) and propagation (velocity) in space and time to assess the fracture mechanics and developing fracture network. Fluid overpressure is used to generate a permeable network of micro tensile fractures in an anisotropic sandstone and a highly anisotropic shale. A newly developed technique, using a steel guide arrangement to direct pressurised fluid into a sealed section of an axially drilled conduit, allows the pore fluid to contact the rock directly and to initiate tensile fractures from a pre-defined zone inside the sample. Acoustic emission location is used to record and map the nucleation and development of the micro-fracture network. For both rock types, fractures progresses parallel to the bedding plane (short-transverse) if the bedding plane is aligned with the direction of σ1 requiring breakdown pressures of approximately 7 and 13MPa respectively at a confining pressure of 8MPa. The data also indicates a more ductile behaviour of the shale than expected. We use X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) to evaluate the evolved fracture network in terms of fracture pattern and aperture. Hydraulic fracturing produces very planar fractures in the shale, with axial fractures over the entire length of the sample broadly following the bedding. In contrast, fractures in the sandstone are more diffuse, linking pore spaces as they propagate. However, secondary micro cracking, branching of the main fracture, are also observed. These new experiments suggest that fracture pattern, fracture propagation trajectories, and fracturing fluid pressures are predominantly controlled by the interaction between the anisotropic mechanical properties of the rock and the anisotropic stress environment.

  20. Simulation of complex fracture networks influenced by natural fractures in shale gas reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Jinzhou

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available When hydraulic fractures intersect with natural fractures, the geometry and complexity of a fracture network are determined by the initiation and propagation pattern which is affected by a number of factors. Based on the fracture mechanics, the criterion for initiation and propagation of a fracture was introduced to analyze the tendency of a propagating angle and factors affecting propagating pressure. On this basis, a mathematic model with a complex fracture network was established to investigate how the fracture network form changes with different parameters, including rock mechanics, in-situ stress distribution, fracture properties, and frac treatment parameters. The solving process of this model was accelerated by classifying the calculation nodes on the extending direction of the fracture by equal pressure gradients, and solving the geometrical parameters prior to the iteration fitting flow distribution. With the initiation and propagation criterion as the bases for the propagation of branch fractures, this method decreased the iteration times through eliminating the fitting of the fracture length in conventional 3D fracture simulation. The simulation results indicated that the formation with abundant natural fractures and smaller in-situ stress difference is sufficient conditions for fracture network development. If the pressure in the hydraulic fractures can be kept at a high level by temporary sealing or diversion, the branch fractures will propagate further with minor curvature radius, thus enlarging the reservoir stimulation area. The simulated shape of fracture network can be well matched with the field microseismic mapping in data point range and distribution density, validating the accuracy of this model.

  1. Landing on your own two feet: a case report of bilateral calcaneus and open pilon fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedeken, Nathan C; Hampton, David; Shaffer, Gene

    2014-01-01

    High energy fractures of the distal tibial plafond and calcaneus have been associated with high functional morbidity and wound complications. Although both of these fractures result from a similar mechanism, they have rarely been reported to occur on an ipsilateral extremity. The combination of these 2 injuries on the same extremity would increase the likelihood of an adverse surgical or functional outcome. We present the case and management strategy of a 43-year-old male with bilateral open pilon fractures and closed calcaneal fractures after falling from a height. A staged protocol was used for the bilateral pilon fractures, with external fixation until operative fixation on day 9. Nonoperative management of the calcaneal fractures resulted in a successful functional outcome at 10 months of follow-up. Treatment of this fracture pattern must incorporate the condition of the soft tissues, an understanding of the fractures, and minimize patient risk factors to optimize the functional and surgical outcomes. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Laboratory Visualization Experiments of Temperature-induced Fractures Around a Borehole (Cryogenic Fracturing) in Shale and Analogue Rock Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.; Wu, Y. S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2014-12-01

    In tight shales, hydraulic fracturing is the dominant method for improving reservoir permeability. However, injecting water-based liquids can induce formation damage and disposal problems, thus other techniques are being sought. One alternative to hydraulic fracturing is producing fractures thermally, using low-temperature fluids (cryogens). The primary consequence of thermal stimulation is that shrinkage fractures are produced around the borehole wall. Recently, cryogenic stimulation produced some promising results when the cryogen (typically liquid nitrogen and cold nitrogen gas) could be brought to reservoir depth. Numerical modeling also showed possible significant increases in gas production from a shale reservoir after cryogenic stimulation. However, geometry and the dynamic behavior of these thermally induced fractures under different stress regimes and rock anisotropy and heterogeneity is not yet well understood.Currently, we are conducting a series of laboratory thermal fracturing experiments on Mancos Shale and transparent glass blocks, by injecting liquid nitrogen under atmospheric pressure into room temperature blocks under various anisotropic stress states. The glass blocks allow clear optical visualization of fracture development and final fracturing patterns. For the shale blocks, X-ray CT is used to image both pre-existing and induced fractures. Also, the effect of borehole orientation with respect to the bedding planes and aligned preexisting fractures is examined. Our initial experiment on a uniaxially compressed glass block showed fracturing behavior which was distinctly different from conventional hydraulic fracturing. In addition to tensile fractures in the maximum principal stress directions, the thermal contraction by the cryogen induced (1) chaotic, spalling fractures around the borehole wall, and (2) a series of disk-shaped annular fractures perpendicular to the borehole. When applied to a horizontal borehole, the propagation plane of the

  3. Stress !!!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fledderus, M.

    2012-01-01

    Twee op de vijf UT-studenten hebben last van ernstige studiestress, zo erg zelfs dat het ze in hun privéleven belemmert. Die cijfers komen overeen met het landelijk beeld van stress onder studenten. Samen met 14 andere universiteits- en hogeschoolbladen enquêteerde UT Nieuws bijna 5500 studenten.

  4. Geomechanics of fracture caging in wellbores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijermars, R.; Zhang, X.; Schultz-Ela, D.

    2013-01-01

    This study highlights the occurrence of so-called ‘fracture cages’ around underbalanced wellbores, where fractures cannot propagate outwards due to unfavourable principal stress orientations. The existence of such cages is demonstrated here by independent analytical and numerical methods. We explain

  5. Quantitative three-dimensional computed tomography analysis of glenoid fracture patterns according to the AO/OTA classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Meulen, Dirk P; Janssen, Stein J; Hageman, Michiel G J S; Ring, David C

    2016-02-01

    This study measures the characteristics of glenoid fractures to determine if the AO Foundation and Orthopaedic Trauma Association (AO/OTA) classification captures the most common fracture patterns. The primary null hypothesis was that surface area and degree of fragmentation do not differ among the different fracture types. Secondarily, we tested if there was a relationship between high- vs. low-energy trauma and fracture classification. Three-dimensional models were created for a consecutive series of 53 fractures. The fracture classifications, the number of fragments, and the fragmented articular surface area were related to the type of injury. The difference of articular surface size and number of fragments among classification groups was analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test. There is a significant difference in fractured articular surface area among classification groups. Compared with transverse and multifragmented fractures, both anterior and posterior fractures involved significantly less of the articular surface area. High-energy trauma is associated with transverse