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Sample records for fractionation inplants final

  1. In-plant evaluation of dense medium process performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.Q. Honaker; A. Patwardhan [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Department of Mining Engineering

    2006-07-15

    The separation density and process efficiency values achieved by dense medium processes are a function of the particle size fractions being treated, hydrodynamics of the separator, and medium rheology. An in-plant evaluation of the dense medium processes being used in an operating preparation plant was conducted in an effort to develop relationships between the actual separation density and the medium density and to quantify the separation efficiency values. The results were found to correlate well with current fundamental and operating principles governing the processes, which are reviewed and discussed.

  2. In-plant testing of membranes to treat electroplating wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, D. B.; Talu, Orhan

    1995-01-01

    This is the final report submitted for the work performed under the NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-301 for the project entitled 'In-Plant Testing of Membranes To Treat Electroplating Waste water'. The main objective of the research project was to determine if the crosslinked polyacrylic acid salt films developed by NASA scientists could be used for heavy metal removal from the wastewater generated by the metals-finishing or electroplating industry. A variety of tasks identified in the original proposal were completed. These included: (1) analysis of our industrial partner Aetna Plating's zinc electroplating process and its wastewater treatment needs for zinc removal; (2) design and construction of a laboratory-scale unit to continuously supply and remove the ion exchange films from the zinc wastewater; (3) performance of a series of runs on such a unit to determine its operating characteristics; and (4) design of a prototype unit for use at the industrial site. In addition, there were a number of tasks that had not been identified in the original proposal but were later judged to be necessary for the successful completion of the project. These were: (1) batch equilibrium and kinetic experiments with analysis of the experimental results to accurately determine the equilibrium and kinetic parameters for the ion exchange films; (2 ) simulation studies for proper design of the prototype unit; and (3) preliminary runs to exchange the films from H form to Calcium form.

  3. INCREASING METROLOGICAL AUTONOMY OF IN-PLANT MEASURING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola Mykyychuk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors offer to solve the problem of providing traceability of measurements by increasing metrological autonomy of in-plant measuring systems. The paper shows the expedience of increasing metrological autonomy by creating a "virtual" reference. There are analysed possible variants of implementation of the "virtual" reference, which will provide high metrological stability of measurements at insignificant additional expenses. The authors point out the necessity of creation of universal technical and programmatic means of mutual comparison for the in-plant measuring systems to increase the reliability of measurements in the conditions of metrological autonomy.

  4. In-plant testing of the floatex density separator for fine coal cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, S.R.; Riffey, R. [Kerr McGee Coal Corp., Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Honaker, R. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States); Mankosa, M. [Carpco, Inc., Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A recent study found the Floatex Density Separator to be very efficient at cleaning the coarse fraction (16x100 mesh) in a typical fine coal circuit feed while achieving a throughput capacity of 2-3 tph/ft{sup 2}. Additionally, total sulfur rejection was improved by 10% as compared to typical spiral performance on this same size fraction. Based on these findings, in-plant tests using an 18x18-inch Floatex Density Separator were conducted at the Galatia preparation plant in Southern Illinois. A statistically designed test program was carried out to optimize the Floatex operating conditions and to evaluate the unit capacity and efficiency. Simultaneous samples were collected from the Floatex and the existing coal spirals to obtain a comparison of the separation performance for each unit process.

  5. Isotope Fractionation by Diffusion in Liquids (Final Technical Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Frank [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-11-09

    The overall objective of the DOE-funded research by grant DE-FG02-01ER15254 was document and quantify kinetic isotope fractionations during chemical and thermal (i.e., Soret) diffusion in liquids (silicate melts and water) and in the later years to include alloys and major minerals such as olivine and pyroxene. The research involved both laboratory experiments and applications to natural settings. The key idea is that major element zoning on natural geologic materials is common and can arise for either changes in melt composition during cooling and crystallization or from diffusion. The isotope effects associated with diffusion that we have documented are the key for determining whether or not the zoning observed in a natural system was the result of diffusion. Only in those cases were the zoning is demonstrably due to diffusion can use independently measured rates of diffusion to constrain the thermal evolution of the system.

  6. Recommended plutonium release fractions from postulated fires. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogan, V.; Schumacher, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    This report was written at the request of EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc. in support of joint emergency planning for the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) by EG&G and the State of Colorado. The intent of the report is to provide the State of Colorado with an independent assessment of any respirable plutonium releases that might occur in the event of a severe fire at the plant. Fire releases of plutonium are of interest because they have been used by EG&G to determine the RFP emergency planning zones. These zones are based on the maximum credible accident (MCA) described in the RFP Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) of 1980, that MCA is assumed to be a large airplane crashing into a RFP plutonium building.The objective of this report was first, to perform a worldwide literature review of relevant release experiments from 1960 to the present and to summarize those findings, and second, to provide recommendations for application of the experimental data to fire release analyses at Rocky Flats. The latter step requires translation between experimental and expected RFP accident parameters, or ``scaling.`` The parameters of particular concern are: quantities of material, environmental parameters such as the intensity of a fire, and the physico-chemical forms of the plutonium. The latter include plutonium metal, bulk plutonium oxide powder, combustible and noncombustible wastes contaminated with plutonium oxide powder, and residues from plutonium extraction processes.

  7. Guidelines for confirmatory inplant tests of safety-relief valve discharges for BWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, T.M.

    1981-05-01

    Inplant tests of safety/relief valve (SRV) discharges may be required to confirm generically established specifications for SRV loads and the maximum suppression pool temperature, and to evaluate possible effects of plant-unique parameters. These tests are required in those plants which have features that differ substantially from those previously tested. Guidelines for formulating appropriate test matrices, establishing test procedures, selecting necessary instrumentation, and reporting the test results are provided in this report. Guidelines to determine if inplant tests are required on the basis of the plant unique parameters are also included in the report.

  8. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: INPLANT SYSTEMS, INC. SFC 0.5 OLEOFILTRATION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleofiltration is used to separate suspended, emulsified and a portion of dissolved hydrocarbons from water. The InPlant Systems, Inc., SFC 0.5 Oleofiltration System was demonstrated under the SITE Program in June 1994 at a Superfund site in Florida that was contaminated with 29,...

  9. Innovative technology evaluation report: Inplant Systems, Inc. SFC 0.5 Oleofiltration system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, G.; Whitford, K.

    1995-03-01

    The InPlant Systems SFCO.5 Oleofilter is designed to separate mechanically emulsified and some dissolved oil from water. This report summarizes the results of the demonstration of this technology`s ability to separate oil from contaminated ground water.

  10. Numerical Identification of Multiparameters in the Space Fractional Advection Dispersion Equation by Final Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dali Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with an inverse problem for identifying multiparameters in 1D space fractional advection dispersion equation (FADE on a finite domain with final observations. The parameters to be identified are the fractional order, the diffusion coefficient, and the average velocity in the FADE. The forward problem is solved by a finite difference scheme, and then an optimal perturbation regularization algorithm is introduced to determine the three parameters simultaneously. Numerical inversions are performed both with the accurate data and noisy data, and several factors having influences on realization of the algorithm are discussed. The inversion solutions are in good approximations to the exact solutions demonstrating the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  11. Measurement of branching fractions for exclusive B decays to charmonium final states

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    We report branching fraction measurements for exclusive decays of charged and neutral B mesons into two-body final states containing a charmonium meson. We use a sample of 22.72 +/- 0.36 million B anti-B events collected between October 1999 and October 2000 with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The charmonium mesons considered here are J/psi, psi(2S), and chi_c1, and the light meson in the decay is either a K, K^*, or pi^0.

  12. Measurement of the B->Xsl+l- branching fraction from a sum of exclusive final states

    CERN Document Server

    Lees, J P

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the total branching fraction of the flavor-changing neutral-current process B->Xsl+l-, along with partial branching fractions in bins of dilepton and hadronic system (Xs) mass, using a sample of 471x10^6 Upsilon(4S)->BBbar events recorded with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider. B mesons are reconstructed by combining a dilepton pair, either e+e- or mu+mu-, with 10 different Xs final states containing exactly one charged or neutral kaon, two or fewer charged pions, and at most one pi0. Using a sum over these exclusive modes as the basis for extrapolation to the fully inclusive rate, we measure a lepton-flavor-averaged inclusive branching fraction BF(B->Xsl+l-) = (6.73 +0.70-0.64[stat] +0.34-0.25[exp syst] +/- 0.50[model syst])x10^-6 for m(l+l-)^2>0.1 GeV^2/c^4.

  13. In-plant source term measurements at Fort Calhoun Station - Unit 1. Topical technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, N.C.; Keller, J.H.; Bunting, R.L.; Motes, B.G.; Croney, S.T.

    1978-07-01

    Data obtained from an in-plant source term measurement program are presented. The objective of this program is to provide operational data that can be used in the generic evaluation of plant system design in the licensing process and for updating of the calculational models used by the NRC staff in their evaluation of radioactive waste management systems for operating pressurized water reactors. A data base is provided for radioisotope inventory in plant systems, radioactive waste management system performance, and source terms for both liquid and gaseous systems. Data presented were obtained at the Fort Calhoun Station - Unit 1, operated by the Omaha Public Power District (OPPD), located at Blair, Nebraska. In-plant measurements were conducted during the time period from August, 1976 through February 1977. This plant is the first of a planned series of six (6) operating PWR's to be studied.

  14. Calibration of routine dosimeters in radiation processing: Validation procedure for in-plant calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šećerov Bojana Lj.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential prerequisite of radiation dosimetry is to provide quality assurance and documentation that the irradiation procedure has been carried out according to the specification requirement of correct calibration of the chosen dosimetry system. At the Radiation Plant of the Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences we compared two recommended protocols of irradiation procedures in the calibration of dosimetry systems in radiation processing: (1 by irradiation of routine dosimeters (ethanol-chlorobenzene - ECB at the calibration laboratory and (2, by in-plant calibration with alanine transfer - dosimeters. The critical point for in-plant calibration is irradiation geometry, so we carefully positioned the phantom carrying both dosimeters in order to minimize dose gradients across the sample. The analysis of results obtained showed that the difference among determined absorbed doses for the construction of calibration curves between these two methods, (alanine vs. ECB, is less than 1%. The difference in combined standard uncertainty for each calibration procedure is 0.1%. These results demonstrate that our in-plant calibration is as good as calibration by irradiation at the calibration laboratory and validates our placement of the irradiation phantom during irradiation.

  15. Final report of CCQM-K130 nitrogen mass fraction measurements in glycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedevskikh, Maria; Krasheninina, Maria; do Rego, Eliane C. P.; Wollinger, Wagner; Monteiro, Tânia M.; de Carvalho, Lucas J.; Acco Garcia, Steve Ali; Haraldsson, Conny; Rodriguez, M. Alejandra; Rodriguez, Gabriela; Salvo, Karino; Gavrilkin, Vladimir; Kulyk, Sergij; Samuel, Laly

    2017-01-01

    CCQM key comparison K-130 in the field of nitrogen mass fracton has been performed by the Inorganic Analysis Working Group (IAWG) of the Consultative Committee for Amount of Substance (CCQM). The aim of this key comparison CCQM-K130 is to support National Measurement Institutes (NMIs) and Designated Institutes (DIs) to demonstrate the validity of the procedures the employed for determination of nitrogen mass fraction in glycine. Mass fraction of nitrogen is very important pointer because the results of these measurements are often used for determination of protein mass fraction that is an important indicator of the quality of the vast majority of food products and raw materials, in particular dry milk powder. Proteins-enzymes catalyze chemical reactions, protein along with fats and carbohydrates is one of the indicators characterizing the energy value of food, so its definition is mandatory for all food products. The study material for this key comparison has been selected to be representative as one of the aminoacid - the simplest part of the protein. Glycine is an amino acid, single acid that does not have any isomers (melting point -290 °C specific heat of evaporation - 528,6 J/kg; specific melting heat - 981,1 J/kg; pKa - 2, 34, molar mass - 75,07 g/mol, density - 1,607 g/cm3). Ural Scientific Research Institute for Metrology (UNIIM) acted as the coordinating laboratory of this comparison. Nine NMIs participated in this key comparison and one NMI participated in Pilot study that was condacted in parallel. Report A contains the results of key comparison and pilot study. The results of Pilot study were excluded from the Report B Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM

  16. Final Report for Fractionation and Separation of Polydisperse Nanoparticles into Distinct Monodisperse Fractions Using CO2 Expanded Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chistopher Roberts

    2007-08-31

    The overall objective of this project was to facilitate efficient fractionation and separation of polydisperse metal nanoparticle populations into distinct monodisperse fractions using the tunable solvent properties of gas expanded liquids. Specifically, the dispersibility of ligand-stabilized nanoparticles in an organic solution was controlled by altering the ligand-solvent interaction (solvation) by the addition of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) gas as an antisolvent (thereby tailoring the bulk solvent strength) in a custom high pressure apparatus developed in our lab. This was accomplished by adjusting the CO{sub 2} pressure over the liquid dispersion, resulting in a simple means of tuning the nanoparticle precipitation by size. Overall, this work utilized the highly tunable solvent properties of organic/CO{sub 2} solvent mixtures to selectively size-separate dispersions of polydisperse nanoparticles (ranging from 1 to 20 nm in size) into monodisperse fractions ({+-}1nm). Specifically, three primary tasks were performed to meet the overall objective. Task 1 involved the investigation of the effects of various operating parameters (such as temperature, pressure, ligand length and ligand type) on the efficiency of separation and fractionation of Ag nanoparticles. In addition, a thermodynamic interaction energy model was developed to predict the dispersibility of different sized nanoparticles in the gas expanded liquids at various conditions. Task 2 involved the extension of the experimental procedures identified in task 1 to the separation of other metal particles used in catalysis such as Au as well as other materials such as semiconductor particles (e.g. CdSe). Task 3 involved using the optimal conditions identified in tasks 1 and 2 to scale up the process to handle sample sizes of greater than 1 g. An experimental system was designed to allow nanoparticles of increasingly smaller sizes to be precipitated sequentially in a vertical series of high pressure vessels by

  17. In-Plant Fission Product Behavior in SGTR Accident with Long-Term SBO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Woon; Han, Seok Jung; Ahn, Kwang Il [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    , secondary cooling and safety injection strategy of RCS. Particularly, the isolation failure provides release path of radiological source term to the environment. With the given scenarios, in-plant fission product behaviors are estimated by using MELCOR code version 1.8.6. It is necessary to study a more detailed SGTR considering its importance in the consequential effects, but there are a few of knowledge bases of radiological source term behaviors during SGTR. SGTR scenario for Surry plant treated in SOARCA project presented much reduced release amounts of source term than previous accident source term study results (TID-14844, NUREG-1465, NUREG-0956, etc.). The release of major radioactive materials (Iodine and Cesium) were estimated as about 80% of Iodine and about 21% of Cesium of total core inventories release to environment in this study. The reason of Iodine release fraction to environment (80%) is much greater than Cesium release fraction to environment (21%) is that 67% of Cesium retained in RPV while only 1.4% of Iodine retained in RPV.

  18. HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HERTING DL

    2008-09-16

    The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

  19. Site technology capsule. Inplant Systems, Inc. SFC 0. 5 oleofiltration system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitford, K.

    1994-12-01

    Oleofiltration is used to separate suspended, emulsified and a portion of dissolved hydrocarbons from water. the InPlant Systems, Inc., SFC 0.5 Oleofiltration System was demonstrated under the SITE Program in June 1994 at a Superfund site in Florida that was contaminated with 29,000 gallons of Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (LNAPL) hydrocarbon. More than 90% of the TRPH was removed from the oil/water emulsion during the demonstration. This capsule provides information on the technology applicability, technology limitations, a technology description, process residuals, site requirements, latest performance data, the technology status, and the source of further information.

  20. U.S. DOE’s Energy Treasure Hunt Exchange In-Plant Trainings – DOE Resources, Early Results and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lung, Bruce [U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Brockway, Walter F. [ORNL; Nimbalkar, Sachin U. [ORNL; Wenning, Thomas J. [ORNL; Thirumaran, Kiran [ORNL

    2017-06-01

    The primary objective of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Energy Treasure Hunt In-Plant Training (INPLT) is to train Better Plants partner employees to lead and conduct future energy efficiency Treasure Hunts within their facilities without DOE assistance. By taking a “learning-by-doing” approach, this INPLT, like other DOE INPLT trainings, has the added benefit of uncovering real energy and cost-saving opportunities. This INPLT leverages DOE and Better Plants technical staff, resources and tools and the EPA “Energy Treasure Hunt Guide: Simple Steps to Finding Energy Savings” process. While Treasure Hunts are a relatively well-known approach to identifying energy-savings in manufacturing plants, DOE is adding several additional elements in its Treasure Hunt Exchanges. The first element is technical assistance and methodology. DOE provides high-quality technical resources, such as energy efficiency calculators, fact sheets, source books etc., to facilitate the Treasure Hunt process and teaches four fundamentals: 1) how to profile equipment, 2) how to collect data, and 3), data & ROI calculation methodologies. Another element is the “train the trainer” approach wherein the training facilitator will train at least one partner employee to facilitate future treasure hunts. Another element is that DOE provides energy diagnostic equipment and teaches the participants how to use them. Finally, DOE also offers partners the opportunity to exchange teams of employees either within a partners’ enterprise or with other partners to conduct the treasure hunt in each other’s facilities. This exchange of teams is important because each team can bring different insights and uncover energy-saving opportunities that would otherwise be missed. This paper will discuss DOE methodology and the early results and lessons learned from DOE’S Energy Treasure Hunt In-Plant Trainings at Better Plants Partner facilities.

  1. In-plant source term measurements at Fort Calhoun Station, Unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, N.C.; Bunting, R.L.; Croney, S.T.

    1978-04-01

    The report presents data obtained from an in-plant source term measurement program conducted for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research in support of the Effluent Treatment Systems Branch of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. The objective of this program is to provide operational data that can be used in the generic evaluation of plant system design in the licensing process and for updating of the calculational models used by the NRC staff in their evaluation of radioactive waste management systems for operating pressurized water reactors. A data base is provided for radioisotope inventory in plant systems, radioactive waste management system performance, and source terms for both liquid and gaseous systems. Data presented were obtained at the Fort Calhoun Station-Unit 1, operated by the Omaha Public Power District (OPPD), located at Blair, Nebraska. In-plant measurements were conducted during the time period from August, 1976 through February 1977. This plant is the first of a planned series of six (6) operating PWR's to be studied.

  2. In-plant material test experience under hydrogen water chemistry at a Japanese BWR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Masami; Koshiishi, Masato; Kato, Takahiko [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan). Hitachi Works; Abe, Ayumi; Sekiguchi, Masahiko; Takiguchi, Hideki

    1999-07-01

    Hydrogen injection technology has been applied to Japanese domestic aged BWR plants since 1994 to mitigate corrosive environment regarding Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) of Reactor Internals (RINs). The Tsuruga Unit-1 plant has also been operated with this technology since 1997, considering suppression of radiation increase in the main steam piping system besides mitigation of corrosive environment in the reactor; the hydrogen injection rate in the feed water was about 0.5 ppm. In order to confirm the effects of the hydrogen injection on suppression of SCC susceptibility of the RIN materials, several in-plant material tests have been conducted using the reactor water clean up system (RWCU). Cyclic-Slow Strain Rate Tensile (C-SSRT) test, Slow Strain Rate Tensile (SSRT) test and Compact Tension (CT) test were performed in the test facilities which were installed at the sampling line from the RWCU. Evaluation of SCC life by means of the C-SSRT test was the first application as an accelerated SCC test for in-plant material tests. It was confirmed that the hydrogen injection in the feed water has a good mitigation effects on IGSCC performance of the RIN materials. Results will be discussed from a viewpoint of the test condition such as total oxidant, ECP, conductivity and loading/unloading. (author)

  3. Theoretical Model for Volume Fraction of UC, 235U Enrichment, and Effective Density of Final U 10Mo Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Hu, Shenyang Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); McGarrah, Eric J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL)

    2016-04-12

    The purpose of this document is to provide a theoretical framework for (1) estimating uranium carbide (UC) volume fraction in a final alloy of uranium with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U 10Mo) as a function of final alloy carbon concentration, and (2) estimating effective 235U enrichment in the U 10Mo matrix after accounting for loss of 235U in forming UC. This report will also serve as a theoretical baseline for effective density of as-cast low-enriched U 10Mo alloy. Therefore, this report will serve as the baseline for quality control of final alloy carbon content

  4. In-plant safety/relief valve discharge load test, Monticello Plant. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzek, E.A. (comp.)

    1977-08-01

    This document reports the results of the test program of safety/relief valve (SRV) discharge load phenomena through a ramshead discharge device, and the effects upon the Mark I primary containment torus structure of the Monticello Nuclear Power Plant. The objectives were to provide a data base for verifying/improving bubble pressure, water reflood and piping load analytical models, and to measure the structural response of the torus, SRV piping, supports and acceleration of the basement and pedestal.

  5. Altair jig: an in-plant evaluation for fine coal cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, M.K.; Honaker, R.Q.; Patwardhan, A. [South Illinois University, Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mining & Mineral Resources Engineers

    2002-03-01

    The Altair centrifugal jig is an enhanced gravity technology, whose suitability for fine coal cleaning has been demonstrated through an in-plant study as reported in this paper. A relatively low specific gravity cut-point of 1.50 with a probable error value of 0.11 over a wide particle size range 1 mm x 45 {mu}m is indicative of the excellent separation performance achievable from the Altair jig. Tests performed with and without ragging material were performed with the goal that the latter would provide enhanced throughput capacities. However, although the performance was close to the theoretical limits over the broad range of product grades generated, the no-ragging experiments resulted in a significant loss in coal recovery under the given conditions. Overall, the centrifugal jig achieved 80% ash rejection and 50% total sulfur rejection while recovering nearly 80% of the combustibles.

  6. Measurement of Neutral B Decay Branching Fractions to Kspi+pi- Final States

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Band, H R; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2004-01-01

    Branching fraction measurements using B-meson decays to Kspi+pi- are presented. These measurements were obtained by analyzing a data sample of 88.9 million Y(4S) --> BB decays collected with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. Using a maximum likelihood fit, the following branching fraction results were obtained: Br(B0 -> K0pi+pi- = (43.7 +/- 3.8 +/- 3.4) * 10^-6, Br(B0 --> K{*+}pi-) = (12.9 +/- 2.4 +/- 1.4) * 10$^-6} and Br(B0 --> D-(--> Kspi-)pi+ = (42.7 +/- 2.1 +/- 2.2) * 10^{-6}. The CP violating char ge asymmetry A(K*pi} for the decay B0 --> $K{*+}pi-$ was measured to be A(K*pi} = 0.23 +/- $0.18^{+0.09}_{-0.06}$. For all these measurements the first error is statistical and the second is systematic.

  7. Measurements of the Branching Fractions of Charged B Decays to K+ pi- pi+ Final States

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; Le Clerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmücker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Latham, T E; MacKay, C; Wilson, F F; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dorsten, M P; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; Van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Bozzi, C; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Morii, M; Grenier, G J; Lee, S J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljevic, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Back, J J; Bellodi, G; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Pulliam, T; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, P; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graugès-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Ernst, J A; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-01-01

    We present preliminary results of searches for exclusive charged-B decays to K+ pi- pi+ from 61.6 million BBbar pairs collected at the Upsilon(4S) resonance with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric B Factory. The Dalitz plot is divided into eight regions and, using a maximum-likelihood fit, we measure statistically significant yields in all regions. We interpret the results as the following branching fractions averaged over charged--conjugate states: B+ --> K*0 pi+, K*0 --> K+ pi- = (10.3 +/- 1.2 +1.0 -2.7) x 10^-6, B+ --> f0 K+, f_0 --> pi+ pi- = (9.2 +/- 1.2 +2.1 -2.6) x 10^-6 B+ --> chi_c0 K+, chi_c0 --> pi+ pi- = (1.46 +/- 0.35 +/- 0.12) x 10^-6 and B+ --> D0bar pi+, D0bar --> K+ pi- = (184.6 +/- 3.2 +/- 9.7) x 10^-6. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic and includes resonance--model and interference uncertainties. We give 90% confidence upper limits on the branching fractions of the following channels: B+ --> rho K+ K+ pi- pi+ non-resonant < 17 x 10^-6.

  8. Investigation into the fractionation of refrigerant blends. Final technical report, March 1994--December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biancardi, F.R.; Michels, H.; Sienel, T.; Pandy, D.

    1996-01-01

    As a means of complying with current and impending national and international environmental regulations restricting the use and disposal of conventional CFC and HCFC refrigerants which contribute to the global ozone depletion effects, the HVAC industry is vigorously evaluating and testing BFC refrigerant blends. While analyses and system performance tools have shown that BFC refrigerant blends offer certain performance, capacity and operational advantages, there are significant possible service and operational issues that are raised by the use of blends. Many of these issues occur due to the fractionation of the blends. Therefore, the objective of this program is to conduct analyses and experimental tests aimed at understanding these issues, develop approaches or techniques to predict these effects and convey to the industry safe and reliable approaches. As a result, analytical models, verified by laboratory data, have been developed that predict the fractionation effects of HFC refrigerant blends when (1) exposed to selected POE lubricants, (2) during the system charging process from large liquid containers, and (3) during system startup, operation and shutdown within various system components (where two-phase refrigerant exists), and during selected system and component leakage scenarios. Model predictions and experimental results are presented for HFC refrigerant blends containing HFC-32, HFC-134a, and HFC-125 and the data are generalized for various operating conditions and scenarios.

  9. Separation, fractionation, concentration and drying of food products: Final report, March 4, 1987--March 31, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merlo, C.A.; Rose, W.W.; Pedersen, L.D.; Brewbaker, P.L.

    1988-03-01

    This project studied energy efficient processes for separation, fractionation, concentration, drying, and recombination of food products, in order to reduce energy requirements for processing, preservation, and transportation. The project had three phases. In the laboratory-scale phase, results of which are summarized in this report, tomato puree was separated by three methods: conventional vacuum filtration, centrifugation, and crossflow microfiltration to produce pulp and serum. Three methods of recombination were examined: homogenizing, stomacher blending, and static (in-line) mixing. Satisfactory recombined purees were obtained. In addition, after centrifugation, the pulp was rinsed producing rinsed-pulp, and the rinse water was added to the serum producing rinse/serum. The rinse/serum was concentrated by evaporation. This was recombined with the rinsed-pulp and water producing satisfactory puree. 11 refs., 18 figs., 18 tabs.

  10. Measurements of the Branching Fractions of Charged B Decays to K+-pi-+pi+- Final States

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; Le Clerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmücker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; MacKay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Shen, B C; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; Van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Biasini, M; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Pioppi, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljevic, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graugès-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-01-01

    We present results of searches for B-meson decays to K+ pi- pi+ with the BaBar detector. With a data sample of 61.6 million BBbar pairs, we measure the branching fractions and 90% confidence-level upper limits averaged over charge-conjugate states (the first error is statistical and the second is systematic): B+ --> K*0 pi+ = (15.5 +/- 1.8 +1.5 -4.0) x 10^-6, B+ --> f0 K+, f_0 --> pi+ pi- = (9.2 +/- 1.2 +2.1 -2.6) x 10^-6, B+ --> D0bar pi+, D0bar --> K+ pi- = (184.6 +/- 3.2 +/- 9.7) x 10^-6. B+ --> rho K+ K+ pi- pi+ non-resonant < 17 x 10^-6.

  11. Bio-Oil Separation and Stabilization by Supercritical Fluid Fractionation. 2014 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agblevor, Foster [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Petkovic, Lucia [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bennion, Edward [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Quinn, Jason [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Moses, John [CF Technologies, Hyde Park, MA (United States); Newby, Deborah [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ginosar, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this project is to use supercritical fluids to separate and fractionate algal-based bio-oils into stable products that can be subsequently upgraded to produce drop-in renewable fuels. To accomplish this objective, algae was grown and thermochemically converted to bio-oils using hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL), pyrolysis, and catalytic pyrolysis. The bio-oils were separated into an extract and a raffinate using near-critical propane or carbon dioxide. The fractions were then subjected to thermal aging studies to determine if the extraction process had stabilized the products. It was found that the propane extract fraction was twice as stable as the parent catalytic pyrolysis bio-oils as measured by the change in viscosity after two weeks of accelerated aging at 80°C. Further, in-situ NMR aging studies found that the propane extract was chemically more stable than the parent bio-oil. Thus the milestone of stabilizing the product was met. A preliminary design of the extraction plant was prepared. The design was based on a depot scale plant processing 20,000,000 gallons per year of bio-oil. It was estimated that the capital costs for such a plant would be $8,700,000 with an operating cost of $3,500,000 per year. On a per gallon of product cost and a 10% annual rate of return, capital costs would represent $0.06 per gallon and operating costs would amount to $0.20 per gallon. Further, it was found that the energy required to run the process represented 6.2% of the energy available in the bio-oil, meeting the milestone of less than 20%. Life cycle analysis and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission analysis found that the energy for running the critical fluid separation process and the GHG emissions were minor compared to all the inputs to the overall well to pump system. For the well to pump system boundary, energetics in biofuel conversion are typically dominated by energy demands in the growth, dewater, and thermochemical process. Bio-oil stabilization by

  12. Branching Fraction Measurements of psi(2S) Decay to Baryon-Antibaryon Final States

    CERN Document Server

    Pedlar, T K; Huang, G S; Lee, J; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Rangarajan, R; Sanghi, B; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Park, C S; Park, W; Thayer, J B; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Stroynowski, R; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Dambasuren, E; Dorjkhaidav, O; Mountain, R; Muramatsu, H; Nandakumar, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; McGee, S; Bornheim, A; Lipeles, E; Pappas, S P; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G T; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Boisvert, V; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Magerkurth, A; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Richichi, S J; Riley, D; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shepherd, M R; Thayer, J G; Urner, D; Wilksen, T; Warburton, A; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Potlia, V; Stöck, H; Yelton, J; Benslama, K; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Lowrey, N; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Gong, D T; Kubota, Y; Li, S Z; Poling, R A; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Urheim, J; Metreveli, Z V; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Zweber, P; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J; Jian, L; Saleem, M; Wappler, F; Arms, K; Eckhart, E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pedlar, T K; Von Törne, E; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Dytman, S A; Müller, J A; Nam, S; Savinov, V

    2005-01-01

    Using 3.08 million psi(2S) decays observed in e^+e^- collisions by the CLEO detector, we present the results of a study of the psi(2S) decaying into baryon-antibaryon final states. We report the most precise measurements of the following eight modes: proton-antiproton, lambda-antilambda, Xi^- antiXi^-, Xi^0-antiXi^0 (first observation), Sigma+-antiSigma^+ (first observation), and Sigma^0-antiSigma^0, and place upper limits for the modes, Xi^0*-antiXi^0* and Omega^- antiOmega^-.

  13. Measurements of the B -> X_s gamma Branching Fraction and Photon Spectrum from a Sum of Exclusive Final States

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De, R; Sangro; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Van Bakel, N; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martínez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, S; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2005-01-01

    Using 88.9 million BB events collected by the BaBar detector at the Y(4S), we measure the branching fraction for the radiative penguin process B -> X_s gamma from the sum of 38 exclusive final states. The inclusive branching fraction above a minimum photon energy E_gamma > 1.9 GeV is BF (b -> s gamma) = (3.27 +/- 0.18 (stat.) +0.55/-0.40 (syst.) +0.04/-0.09 (theory)) 10^-4. We also measure the isospin asymmetry between B^- -> X_s ubar gamma and B^0bar -> X_s dbar gamma to be Delta_0- = -0.006 +/- 0.058 (stat.) +/- 0.009 (syst.) +/- 0.024 (B^0bar / B^-). The photon energy spectrum is measured in the B rest frame, from which moments are derived for different values of the minimum photon energy. We present fits to the photon spectrum and moments which give the heavy-quark parameters m_b and mu_pi^2. The fitted parameters are consistent with those obtained from semileptonic B -> X_c l nu decays, and are useful inputs for the extraction of Vub from measurements of semileptonic B -> X_u l nu decays.

  14. Combined incineration of industrial wastes with in-plant residues in fluidized-bed utility boilers--decision relevant factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragossnig, Arne M; Lorber, Karl E

    2005-10-01

    In Austria more than 50% of the high-calorific industrial residues and wastes generated are utilized for energy recovery in industrial utility boilers. This study investigated full-scale trials of combined incineration of in-plant residues with various industrial wastes. These trials were carried out in order to learn how the alternatively used fuel influences the incineration process itself as well as the quantity and quality of the various incineration products. The currently used fuel, which consisted of in-plant residues as well as externally acquired waste wood and the refuse-derived fuel (RDF) mixtures used during the full-scale trials are characterized in terms of material composition as well as chemical and physical parameters. An input-output mass balance for the incineration plant (two fluidized bed combustion units, 20 and 30 MW, respectively) has been established, based on the data collected during the full-scale incineration trials. Furthermore, pollutant concentrations in the off-gas as well as the solid incineration residue are reported. It is not only the pollutant content but also a variety of other internal as well as external factors that have to be considered if a company is to decide whether or not to thermally utilize specific waste types. Therefore a strengths and weaknesses profile for several types of waste and the specific industrial boiler is also presented.

  15. Assisting in Providing Pre-Employment and In-Plant Training. Self-Paced Instructional Module, Module Number X-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Kenneth L.; Brooks, Kent

    One of 33 self-paced instructional modules for training industry services leaders, this module contains three sequential learning activities on assisting in providing pre-employment and inplant training in an industry services program. (Industry services are manpower services provided by public agencies to new or expanding private industries.) The…

  16. Continuous measurement of peak hydrogen fluoride exposures in aluminum smelter potrooms: instrument development and in-plant evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Neal; Xu, Weizong; Peace, Jon Nathaniel

    2008-02-01

    The aluminum smelting process continuously evolves both sulfur dioxide (SO2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) gases. The vast majority of these evolved gases are captured by local exhaust ventilation systems and transported to fume treatment centers. Any gas escaping the ventilation systems could create the potential for workplace exposures. Currently, there are no commercially available sensors that are capable of selectively measuring peak concentrations (< 10 sec) of HF in the presence of SO2. This measurement capability is critical for facilitating a better understanding of the etiology of respiratory health effects. This article presents the development and in-plant testing of a portable, tunable diode-based HF sensor that shows equivalent or improved performance relative to NIOSH Method 7902 and is capable of measuring short-term personal peak HF exposure potentials in operating aluminum smelters.

  17. Hydrolysis of the fiber fraction from wheat based production of ethanol. Final report; Hydrolys av fiberfraktionen fraan vetebaserad etanolproduktion. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacchi, Guido [Lund Inst. of Technology (Sweden). Dept of Chemical Engineering

    2004-05-01

    This was a preliminary study to investigate the potential of using a larger fraction of the raw material in the production of bio-ethanol from wheat. The study comprised both the fibre fraction in the wheat kernel, i. e. the hemi cellulose and cellulose fraction that remain after the starch hydrolysis, and wheat straw which could contribute to an increase of the ethanol yield per hectare raised wheat. The project has been performed in co-operation with Agroetanol AB that provided samples from their ethanol production plant. Samples were taken at various locations in the process, i. e. the raw material, after starch hydrolysis, before and after fermentation and from the stillage after distillation. The materials were analysed for starch, hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin in the liquid and solids fractions to investigate how the hemicellulose and cellulose were affected in the process. The materials were also subjected to heat treatmen, enzymatic hydrolysis and a combination of the two to investigate how much sugars that could be released from the hemicellulose and the cellulose. In the existing process more than 80 % of the cellulose (glucan) was in the solid residue after the distillation step. The corresponding figures for the hemicellulose sugars were 60% for xylan, 70 % for arabinan and 40 % for galactan. The conclusions from the study are that the sugars in the hemicellulose fraction could be released by enzymatic hydrolysis resulting in an increase of the total sugar yield with up to 14% of the present yield. However, to utilise these sugars for ethanol production a pentose fermenting micro organism is required. To release the cellulose sugar in the solid material requires a combination of heat treatment with addition of about 0. 1 % H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. On the other side this would yield sugars that directly fermentable by the baker's yeast used in the process today. Steam treatment of wheat straw has been performed after

  18. In-plant testing of a novel coal cleaning circuit using advanced technologies, Quarterly report, March 1 - May 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honaker, R.Q. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States); Reed, S.; Mohanty, M.K. [Kerr-McGee Coal Corp., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Research conducted at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale over the past two years has identified highly efficient methods for treating fine coal (i.e., -28 mesh). In this study, a circuit comprised of the three advanced fine coal cleaning technologies is being tested in an operating preparation plant to evaluate circuit performance and to compare the performance with the current technologies used to treat -16 mesh fine coal. The circuit integrated a Floatex hydrosizer, a Falcon concentrator and a Jameson froth flotation cell. The Floatex hydrosizer is being used as a primary cleaner for the nominally -16 mesh Illinois No. 5 fine coal circuit feed. The overflow of the Floatex is screened at 48 mesh using a Sizetec vibratory screen to produce a clean coal product from the screen overflow. The screen overflow is further treated by the Falcon and Jameson Cell. During this reporting period, tests were initiated on the fine coal circuit installed at the Kerr-McGee Galatia preparation plant. The circuit was found to reduce both the ash content and the pyritic sulfur content. Additional in-plant circuitry tests are ongoing.

  19. Design and construction of an in-plant activation cassette for transgene expression and recombinant protein production in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Benjamin; Mortimer, Cara L; Kato, Maiko; James, Tess A; Harding, Robert M; Dale, James L

    2014-05-01

    Virus-based transgene expression systems have become particularly valuable for recombinant protein production in plants. The dual-module in-plant activation (INPACT) expression platform consists of a uniquely designed split-gene cassette incorporating the cis replication elements of Tobacco yellow dwarf geminivirus (TYDV) and an ethanol-inducible activation cassette encoding the TYDV Rep and RepA replication-associated proteins. The INPACT system is essentially tailored for recombinant protein production in stably transformed plants and provides both inducible and high-level transient transgene expression with the potential to be adapted to diverse crop species. The construction of a novel split-gene cassette, the inducible nature of the system and the ability to amplify transgene expression via rolling-circle replication differentiates this system from other DNA- and RNA-based virus vector systems used for stable or transient recombinant protein production in plants. Here we provide a detailed protocol describing the design and construction of a split-gene INPACT cassette, and we highlight factors that may influence optimal activation and amplification of gene expression in transgenic plants. By using Nicotiana tabacum, the protocol takes 6-9 months to complete, and recombinant proteins expressed using INPACT can accumulate to up to 10% of the leaf total soluble protein.

  20. Low-dose fractionated radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy for recurrent or progressive glioblastoma. Final report of a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balducci, M.; Diletto, B.; Chiesa, S.; D' Agostino, G.R.; Gambacorta, M.A.; Ferro, M.; Valentini, V. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rome (Italy); Colosimo, C. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Maira, G.; Anile, C. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Neurosurgery, Rome (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    Evaluated in this study were the feasibility and the efficacy of concurrent low dose fractionated radiotherapy (LD-FRT) and chemotherapy as palliative treatment for recurrent/progressive glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Eligible patients had recurrent or progressive GBM, Karnofsky performance status ≥70, prior surgery, and standard radiochemotherapy treatment. Recurrence/progression disease during temozolomide (TMZ) received cisplatin (CDDP; 30 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1, 8, 15), fotemustine (FTM; 40 mg/m{sup 2} on days 2, 9, 16), and concurrent LD-FRT (0.3 Gy twice daily); recurrence/progression after 4 months from the end of adjuvant TMZ were treated by TMZ (150/200 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5) concomitant with LD-FRT (0.4 Gy twice daily). Primary endpoints were safety and toxicity. A total of 32 patients were enrolled. Hematologic toxicity G1-2 was observed in 18.7% of patients and G3-4 in 9.4%. One patient (3.1%) had complete response, 3 (9.4%) had partial response, 8 (25%) had stable disease for at least 8 weeks, while 20 patients (62.5%) experienced progressive disease. The clinical benefit was 37.5%. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 5 and 8 months, respectively. Survival rate at 12 months was of 27.8%. LD-FRT and chemotherapy for recurrent/progressive GBM have a good toxicity profile and clinical outcomes, even though further investigation of this novel palliative treatment approach is warranted. (orig.)

  1. In-plant testing of a novel coal cleaning circuit using advanced technologies. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honaker, R.Q. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering; Reed, S. [Kerr-McGee Coal Corp., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A circuit utilizing hindered-bed classifiers, enhanced gravity concentrators and column flotation has been found to provide a highly efficient cleaning of fine coal in which both ash and total sulfur contents are significantly reduced while maximizing the recovery of coal. In this study, a circuit comprised of the three technologies will be tested in an operating preparation plant to evaluate circuit performance and to compare the performance with the current technologies used to treat fine coal. Prior to the in-plant testing, the effect of changing feed characteristics on the performance of the enhanced gravity concentrator was evaluated for process control purposes. During this reporting period, a {minus}16 mesh Illinois No. 6 coal sample containing about 30% ash and 8.0% total sulfur was collected from a refuse pond. The ash and total sulfur contents of the sample were depleted by withdrawing a controlled amount of tailings produced by the unit to determine the effect of changing feed compositions. It was found that higher combustible recovery values are achieved when the feed ash content is decreased and slightly lower product sulfur content values are obtained when the pyritic sulfur content in the feed is decreased. The lower total sulfur contents are most likely due to the natural by-pass to the product stream of 5--10% of the heavy particles. In other words, an increase in the feed sulfur content results in an incremental increase in the sulfur content of the product. The higher combustible recovery values obtained with decreasing feed ash contents are likely due to a reduction in the amount of entrapped coal particles within the bed of heavy-particles formed contiguous to the bowl wall in the Falcon unit. Higher bowl speeds and adjustment of the tailings rate have been found to counter the negative effects caused by the increase in feed ash and total sulfur contents.

  2. The DOE s In-Plant Training (INPLT) Model to Promote Energy Efficiency in the Industrial Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; De Fontaine, Mr. Andre [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Industrial Technology Program; Schoeneborn, Fred C [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    In-Plant Training (INPLT) is a new model for developing energy efficiency expertise within the US manufacturing companies participating in the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) Better Buildings, Better Plants Program-a nationwide initiative to drive a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity in 10 years. INPLTs are designed to fill a market niche by providing hands on training in a real world manufacturing plant environment. Through INPLTs, participants from multiple manufacturing plants, supply chains, utilities, and other external stakeholders learn how to conduct energy assessments, use energy analysis tools to analyze energy saving opportunities, develop energy management systems, and implement energy savings projects. Typical INPLT events are led by DOE-certified Energy Experts and range from 2-4 days. Topics discussed include: identification of cross-cutting or system specific opportunities; introduction to ISO 50001 Energy Management Systems; and energy project implementation and replication. This model is flexible, and can be tailored to suit the needs of specific industries. The INPLTs are a significant departure from the traditional single plant energy assessment model previously employed by DOE. INPLTs shift the focus from the concept of a single-plant s energy profile to a broader focus on training and capacity building among multiple industrial participants. The objective is to enable trainees to identify, quantify, implement and replicate future energy saving projects without continued external assistance. This paper discusses the INPLT model and highlights some of the initial outcomes from the successfully delivered INPLTs and the overall impact in terms of numbers of plants/participants trained, impacted energy footprints, and potential replication of identified opportunities.

  3. Preliminary report: in-plant safety/relief valve discharge load test, Monticello Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H.C. (comp.)

    1976-12-01

    This preliminary report covers the results of the test program of safety/relief valve (SRV) discharge load phenomena and the effects upon the Mark I primary containment torus structure of the Monticello Nuclear Power Plant. The objectives of the test were to provide a data base for verifying/improving analytical models and to measure the structural response of the torus to SRV discharges. Objectives, instrumentation, and test plan are described. Results of continuing data evaluation will be included in the final report scheduled for publication later in 1977.

  4. The responsibilities of the in-plant environmental protection officer under civil law and under criminal law. Zivilrechtliche und strafrechtliche Verantwortung des Betriebsbeauftragten fuer Umweltschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salje, P.

    1993-11-20

    The scope of responsibilities of the in-plant environmental protection officer covers a wide range of tasks: Water protection, waste management, control of emissions for air pollution abatement, emergency preparedness, radiological protection. What are the consequences for the EP officer in case of neglect This is the topic of the contribution, discussed from the viewpoint of criminal law and private law. The criminal liability of the EP officer results from the EP officer committing an offence either by wilful act or by neglect, it, in the latter case, the officer is in a warranty position. Under private law, the EP officer is subject to third party liability within the framework defined by Paragraph 823 BGB. There is no possibility for him to claim restriction of liability refering to the enhanced risks involved in his job. Hence a sound professional indemnity insurance is recommendable. (orig.)

  5. Study of Branching Fractions and CP-Violating Asymmetries in B Meson Decays to Rho And Pion Final State with the BABAR Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jinwei; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-03-22

    We present measurements of branching fractions and CP-violating asymmetries in B-meson decays to {rho}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, {rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} and {rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. The data sample comprises 89 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. We find the charge-averaged branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}) = (10.9 {+-} 1.9(stat) {+-} 1.9(syst)) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}) = (9.5 {+-} 1.1 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup -6}, and we set a 90% confidence-level upper limit {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) < 2.9 x 10{sup -6}. We measure the charge asymmetries A{sub CP}{rho}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} = 0.24 {+-} 0.16 {+-} 0.06 and {Alpha}{sub CP}{sup {rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}} = -0.19 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.02. We also present the preliminary measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} ({rho}{pi}){sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays using a time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis. The results are obtained from a data sample of 213 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays, collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. This analysis extends the narrow-{rho} quasi-two-body approximation used in the previous analysis, by taking into account the interference between the {rho} resonances of the three charges. We measure 16 coefficients of the bilinear form factor terms occurring in the time-dependent decay rate of the B{sup 0} meson with the use of a maximum-likelihood fit. We derive the physically relevant quantities from these coefficients. We measure the direct CP-violation parameters {Alpha}{sub {rho}{pi}} = -0.088 {+-} 0.049 {+-} 0.013 and C = 0.34 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.05, where the first errors are statistical and the second systematic. For the mixing-induced CP-violation parameter we find S = -0.10 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.04, and for the dilution and

  6. Final Results of Local-Regional Control and Late Toxicity of RTOG 9003: A Randomized Trial of Altered Fractionation Radiation for Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beitler, Jonathan J., E-mail: jjbeitl@emory.edu [Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Zhang, Qiang [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Fu, Karen K. [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Trotti, Andy [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center at the University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida (United States); Spencer, Sharon A. [University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, California (United States); Garden, Adam S. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States); Shenouda, George [McGill University, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Harris, Jonathan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ang, Kian K. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To test whether altered radiation fractionation schemes (hyperfractionation [HFX], accelerated fractionation, continuous [AFX-C], and accelerated fractionation with split [AFX-S]) improved local-regional control (LRC) rates for patients with squamous cell cancers (SCC) of the head and neck when compared with standard fractionation (SFX) of 70 Gy. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage III or IV (or stage II base of tongue) SCC (n=1076) were randomized to 4 treatment arms: (1) SFX, 70 Gy/35 daily fractions/7 weeks; (2) HFX, 81.6 Gy/68 twice-daily fractions/7 weeks; (3) AFX-S, 67.2 Gy/42 fractions/6 weeks with a 2-week rest after 38.4 Gy; and (4) AFX-C, 72 Gy/42 fractions/6 weeks. The 3 experimental arms were to be compared with SFX. Results: With patients censored for LRC at 5 years, only the comparison of HFX with SFX was significantly different: HFX, hazard ratio (HR) 0.79 (95% confidence interval 0.62-1.00), P=.05; AFX-C, 0.82 (95% confidence interval 0.65-1.05), P=.11. With patients censored at 5 years, HFX improved overall survival (HR 0.81, P=.05). Prevalence of any grade 3, 4, or 5 toxicity at 5 years; any feeding tube use after 180 days; or feeding tube use at 1 year did not differ significantly when the experimental arms were compared with SFX. When 7-week treatments were compared with 6-week treatments, accelerated fractionation appeared to increase grade 3, 4 or 5 toxicity at 5 years (P=.06). When the worst toxicity per patient was considered by treatment only, the AFX-C arm seemed to trend worse than the SFX arm when grade 0-2 was compared with grade 3-5 toxicity (P=.09). Conclusions: At 5 years, only HFX improved LRC and overall survival for patients with locally advanced SCC without increasing late toxicity.

  7. In-plant testing of a novel coal cleaning circuit using advanced technologies. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honaker, R.Q. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering; Reed, S.; Mohanty, M.K.

    1997-05-01

    A circuit comprised of advanced fine coal cleaning technologies was evaluated in an operating preparation plant to determine circuit performance and to compare the performance with current technologies used to treat -16 mesh fine coal. The circuit integrated a Floatex hydrosizer, a Falcon enhanced gravity concentrator and a Jameson flotation cell. A Packed-Column was used to provide additional reductions in the pyritic sulfur and ash contents by treatment of the Floatex-Falcon-Jameson circuit product. For a low sulfur Illinois No. 5 coal, the pyritic sulfur content was reduced from 0.67% to 0.34% at a combustible recovery of 93.2%. The ash content was decreased from 27.6% to 5.84%, which equates to an organic efficiency of 95% according to gravity-based washability data. The separation performance achieved on a high sulfur Illinois No. 5 coal resulted in the rejection of 72.7% of the pyritic sulfur and 82.3% of the ash-forming material at a recovery of 8 1 %. Subsequent pulverization of the cleaned product and retreatment in a Falcon concentrator and Packed-Column resulted in overall circuit ash and pyritic sulfur rejections of 89% and 93%, respectively, which yielded a pyritic sulfur content reduction from 2.43% to 0.30%. This separation reduced the sulfur dioxide emission rating of an Illinois No. 5 coal from 6.21 to 1.75 lbs SO{sub 2}/MBTU, which is Phase I compliance coal. A comparison of the results obtained from the Floatex-Falcon-Jameson circuit with those of the existing circuit revealed that the novel fine coal circuit provides 10% to 20% improvement in mass yield to the concentrate while rejecting greater amounts of ash and pyritic sulfur.

  8. Energy production from burning of mixtures of source-sorted waste fractions and biofuels. Final report; Sameldning av biobraenslen med kaellsorterade avfallsfraktioner. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Rolf; Marklund, Stellan; Nilsson, Calle; Burvall, Jan; Hedman, Bjoern [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Agricultural Research for Northern Sweden

    2002-02-01

    Energy production trough co-combustion of biofuel and the dry fraction of household waste might be an alternative in the future for rural district areas since the present system for recovery has been criticized. So far the results from the co-combustion of briquettes made by energy grass, Reed Canary grass, in mixture with very well separated dry fraction of household waste shows that new developed commercial boiler technology, 100-1000 kW, have been well designed for god function, high efficiency and low emissions using ordinary cyclone flue gas cleaning. By consideration of the new EU incineration waste directive for cocombustion of biofuel and waste fractions the achieved emission levels from this trials in many cases seam to fulfill the directive including critical parameters such as CO and dioxins without high advanced flue gas cleaning. Mixture of waste together with energy grass does not raise the emission levels of HCl compared to pure energy grass combustion. The importance of developing systems for well sorted dry fraction of household waste have been verified in the project. The quality insurance of the fuel is necessary to consider the new EU directive. In this project studies of systems for sorting of dry waste have been compared. A system in which the sorting part can be identified and attained by information and premium awards shows obvious advantages compared with local central placed container systems for the dry waste.

  9. Fractional Dynamics and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, José; Luo, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Fractional Dynamics and Control provides a comprehensive overview of recent advances in the areas of nonlinear dynamics, vibration and control with analytical, numerical, and experimental results. This book provides an overview of recent discoveries in fractional control, delves into fractional variational principles and differential equations, and applies advanced techniques in fractional calculus to solving complicated mathematical and physical problems.Finally, this book also discusses the role that fractional order modeling can play in complex systems for engineering and science. Discusses how fractional dynamics and control can be used to solve nonlinear science and complexity issues Shows how fractional differential equations and models can be used to solve turbulence and wave equations in mechanics and gravity theories and Schrodinger’s equation  Presents factional relaxation modeling of dielectric materials and wave equations for dielectrics  Develops new methods for control and synchronization of...

  10. A study of fiber volume fraction effects in notched unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn composite. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Notched unidirectional SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composite of three different fiber volume fractions (vf = 0.15, 0.37, and 0.41) was investigated for various room temperature microstructural and material properties including: fatigue crack initiation, fatigue crack growth, and fracture toughness. While the matrix hardness is similar for all fiber volume fractions, the fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength and matrix residual stress increases with fiber volume fraction. The composite fatigue crack initiation stress is shown to be matrix controlled and occurs when the net maximum matrix stress approaches the endurance limit stress of the matrix. A model is presented which includes residual stresses and presents the composite initiation stress as a function of fiber volume fraction. This model predicts a maximum composite initiation stress at vf approximately 0.15 which agrees with the experimental data. The applied composite stress levels were increased as necessary for continued crack growth. The applied Delta(K) values at crack arrest increase with fiber volume fraction by an amount better approximated using an energy based formulation rather than when scaled linear with modulus. After crack arrest, the crack growth rate exponents for vf37 and vf41 were much lower and toughness much higher, when compared to the unreinforced matrix, because of the bridged region which parades with the propagating fatigue crack. However, the vf15 material exhibited a higher crack growth rate exponent and lower toughness than the unreinforced matrix because once the bridged fibers nearest the crack mouth broke, the stress redistribution broke all bridged fibers, leaving an unbridged crack. Degraded, unbridged behavior is modeled using the residual stress state in the matrix ahead of the crack tip. Plastic zone sizes were directly measured using a metallographic technique and allow prediction of an effective matrix stress intensity which agrees with the fiber pressure model if residual stresses

  11. Palliation of advanced pelvic malignant disease with large fraction pelvic radiation and misonidazole: final report of RTOG phase I/II study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spanos, W.J. Jr.; Wasserman, T.; Meoz, R.; Sala, J.; Kong, J.; Stetz, J.

    1987-10-01

    Between October 1979 and June 1982 forty-six patients were entered on a non-randomized Phase I-II protocol for the evaluation of Misonidazole combined with high dose per fraction radiation for the treatment of advanced pelvic malignancies. Pelvic radiation consisted of 1000 cGy in one fraction repeated at 4-week intervals for a total of three treatments. Oral Misonidazole at a dose of 4 gm/m2 was administered 4-6 hr prior to radiation (total dose 12 g/m2). The distribution of histology consisted of 20 gynecologic, 24 bowel, and 2 prostate malignancies. Of the thirty-seven patients completing the three treatments; there were 6 complete responses (14% CR), 10 partial responses (27% PR) 19 minimal or no response (32% NR), and 4 unevaluable. One patient remains NED 5.5 years following radiation. Toxicity directly related to Misonidazole was minimal and consisted primarily of transcient Grade 1, 2 peripheral neuropathy (20% Grade 1, 4% Grade 2) and Grade 2 ototoxicity (4%). Radiation toxicity was significant for late bowel damage. There were 4 (11%) Grade 3 and 7 (19%) Grade 4 gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicities. Kaplan-Meier plot of GI toxicity showed a progressive increase in incidence with time for projected rate of 49% Grade 3, 4 by 12-month. GI toxicity (Grade 3, 4) was also related to tumor response. The complication rate was 80% (4/6) for CR, 30% (3/10) for PR and 26% (5/19) for NR or progression. Because of the GI complication rate, this protocol for palliation of advanced pelvic malignancies has been replaced by a protocol that uses 4 fractions over 2 days (b.i.d.) of 370 cGy per fraction repeated at 3-week intervals for a total of 3 courses.

  12. Branching Fraction Measurements of Charged B Decays to K*+K+K-, K*+pi+K-, K*+K+pi- and K*+pi+pi- Final States

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Bóna, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; Briand, H; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De, N; Groot; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martínez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H; al, et

    2006-01-01

    Branching fraction and asymmetry measurements of charmless $B^+\\to K^{*+}h^+_1h^-_2$ (where $h_{1,2}$ = $K$, $\\pi$) decays are presented, using a data sample of 232 million $\\Upsilon(4S) \\to$ $BB$ decays collected with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy $B$ factory. Using a maximum likelihood fit, the following branching fraction results were obtained: ${\\cal B}$($B^+ \\to K^{*+}K^+ K^-)$ = (36.2 $\\pm$ 3.3 $\\pm$ 3.6) $\\times$ 10$^{-6}$ and ${\\cal B}$($B^+$ $\\to$ $K^{*+}\\pi^+\\pi^-$) = (75.3 $\\pm$ 6.0 $\\pm$ 8.1) $\\times$ 10$^{-6}$. Upper limits were set for ${\\cal B}$($B^+$ $\\to$ $K^{*+}\\pi^+ K^-$) $<$ 11.8 $\\times$ 10$^{-6}$ and ${\\cal B}$($B^+$ $\\to$ $K^{*+}K^+ \\pi^-$) $<$ 6.1 $\\times$ 10$^{-6}$ at 90% confidence level. The charge asymmetries for the decays $B^+ \\to K^{*+}K^+ K^-$ and $B^+$ $\\to$ $K^{*+}\\pi^+\\pi^-$ were measured to be ${\\cal A}_{K^*KK} = 0.11 \\pm 0.08 \\pm 0.03$ and ${\\cal A}_{K^*\\pi\\pi} = 0.07 \\pm 0.07 \\pm 0.04$, respectively. The first error quoted on branching frac...

  13. Fractional Echoes

    CERN Document Server

    Karras, G; Billard, F; Lavorel, B; Siour, G; Hartmann, J -M; Faucher, O; Gershnabel, Erez; Prior, Yehiam; Averbukh, Ilya Sh

    2016-01-01

    We report the observation of fractional echoes in a double-pulse excited nonlinear system. Unlike standard echoes which appear periodically at delays which are integer multiple of the delay between the two exciting pulses, the fractional echoes appear at rational fractions of this delay. We discuss the mechanism leading to this phenomenon, and provide the first experimental demonstration of fractional echoes by measuring third harmonic generation in a thermal gas of CO2 molecules excited by a pair of femtosecond laser pulses.

  14. FRACTIONAL BANKING

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Klimikova

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the reasons of the present financial problems lies In understanding the substance of fractional reserve banking. The substance of fractional banking is in lending more money than the bankers have. Banking of partial reserves is an alternative form which links deposit banking and credit banking. Fractional banking is causing many unfavorable economic impacts in the worldwide system, specifically an inflation.

  15. FRACTIONAL BANKING

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Klimikova

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the reasons of the present financial problems lies In understanding the substance of fractional reserve banking. The substance of fractional banking is in lending more money than the bankers have. Banking of partial reserves is an alternative form which links deposit banking and credit banking. Fractional banking is causing many unfavorable economic impacts in the worldwide system, specifically an inflation.

  16. Fractional randomness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  17. Measurement of branching fractions for B \\to J/\\psi \\eta K decays and search for a narrow resonance in the J/\\psi \\eta final state

    CERN Document Server

    Iwashita, T; Bhardwaj, V; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Asner, D M; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Bhuyan, B; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Chang, M -C; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Esen, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Feindt, M; Ferber, T; Frey, A; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Ganguly, S; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Higuchi, T; Horii, Y; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W -S; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Jaegle, I; Julius, T; Kah, D H; Kang, J H; Kato, E; Kawasaki, T; Kichimi, H; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, H O; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, M J; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Klucar, J; Ko, B R; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kumita, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y -J; Lange, J S; Lee, S -H; Li, Y; Libby, J; Liu, C; Liu, Y; Lukin, P; Matvienko, D; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Moll, A; Mori, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Natkaniec, Z; Nayak, M; Ng, C; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Pakhlova, G; Panzenbock, E; Park, H; Park, H K; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Ritter, M; Rohrken, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sahoo, H; Saito, T; Sakai, K; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santel, D; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Semmler, D; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Stanic, S; Starič, M; Steder, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tanida, K; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Tsuboyama, T; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vorobyev, V; Vossen, A; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, M -Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamashita, Y; Yashchenko, S; Yook, Y; Yuan, C Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zupanc, A

    2013-01-01

    We report an observation of the $B^{\\pm} \\to J/\\psi \\eta K^{\\pm}$ and $B^0 \\to J/\\psi \\eta K^0_S$ decays using 772$\\times 10^{6}$ $B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider. We obtain the branching fractions ${\\cal B}(B^{\\pm}\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\eta K^{\\pm})=(1.27\\pm 0.11{\\rm (stat.)\\pm 0.11{\\rm (syst.)})}\\times10^{-4}$ and ${\\cal B}(B^0\\to J/\\psi \\eta K^0_S)=(5.22 \\pm 0.78 {\\rm(stat.)} \\pm 0.49{\\rm(syst.)})\\times10^{-5}$. We search for a new narrow charmonium(-like) state $X$ in the $J/\\psi \\eta$ mass spectrum and find no significant excess. We set upper limits on the product of branching fractions, ${\\cal B}(B^\\pm \\to XK^\\pm){\\cal B}(X \\to J/\\psi \\eta)$, at 3872 MeV$/c^2$ where a $C$-odd partner of X(3872) may exist, at $\\psi(4040)$ and $\\psi(4160)$ assuming their known mass and width, and over a range from 3.8 to 4.8 GeV$/c^2$. % at a 5 MeV$/c^2$ step. The obtained upper limits at 90% confidence level for $X^{C{\\rm -odd}}...

  18. Fractional thermoelasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Povstenko, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to fractional thermoelasticity, i.e. thermoelasticity based on the heat conduction equation with differential operators of fractional order. Readers will discover how time-fractional differential operators describe memory effects and space-fractional differential operators deal with the long-range interaction. Fractional calculus, generalized Fourier law, axisymmetric and central symmetric problems and many relevant equations are featured in the book. The latest developments in the field are included and the reader is brought up to date with current research.  The book contains a large number of figures, to show the characteristic features of temperature and stress distributions and to represent the whole spectrum of order of fractional operators.  This work presents a picture of the state-of-the-art of fractional thermoelasticity and is suitable for specialists in applied mathematics, physics, geophysics, elasticity, thermoelasticity and engineering sciences. Corresponding sections of ...

  19. In-plant reliability data base for nuclear plant components: a feasibility study on human error information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkowski, R.J.; Fragola, J.R.; Schurman, D.L.; Johnson, J.W.

    1984-03-01

    This report documents the procedure and final results of a feasibility study which examined the usefulness of nuclear plant maintenance work requests in the IPRDS as tools for understanding human error and its influence on component failure and repair. Developed in this study were (1) a set of criteria for judging the quality of a plant maintenance record set for studying human error; (2) a scheme for identifying human errors in the maintenance records; and (3) two taxonomies (engineering-based and psychology-based) for categorizing and coding human error-related events.

  20. FINAL REPORT ON CONTROL ALGORITHM TO IMPROVE THE PARTIAL-LOAD EFFICIENCY OFSURFACE PM MACHINES WITH FRACTIONAL-SLOT CONCENTRATED WINDINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, P.B.; Jahns, T.M.

    2007-04-30

    Surface permanent magnet (SPM) synchronous machines using fractional-slot concentrated windings are being investigated as candidates for high-performance traction machines for automotive electric propulsion systems. It has been shown analytically and experimentally that such designs can achieve very wide constant-power speed ratios (CPSR) [1,2]. This work has shown that machines of this type are capable of achieving very low cogging torque amplitudes as well as significantly increasing the machine power density [3-5] compared to SPM machines using conventional distributed windings. High efficiency can be achieved in this class of SPM machine by making special efforts to suppress the eddy-current losses in the magnets [6-8], accompanied by efforts to minimize the iron losses in the rotor and stator cores. Considerable attention has traditionally been devoted to maximizing the full-load efficiency of traction machines at their rated operating points and along their maximum-power vs. speed envelopes for higher speeds [9,10]. For example, on-line control approaches have been presented for maximizing the full-load efficiency of PM synchronous machines, including the use of negative d-axis stator current to reduce the core losses [11,12]. However, another important performance specification for electric traction applications is the machine's efficiency at partial loads. Partial-load efficiency is particularly important if the target traction application requires long periods of cruising operation at light loads that are significantly lower than the maximum drive capabilities. While the design of the machine itself is clearly important, investigation has shown that this is a case where the choice of the control algorithm plays a critical role in determining the maximum partial-load efficiency that the machine actually achieves in the traction drive system. There is no evidence that this important topic has been addressed for this type of SPM machine by any other

  1. Final Report on Control Algorithm to Improve the Partial-Load Efficiency of Surface PM Machines with Fractional-Slot Concentrated Windings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeever, John W [ORNL; Reddy, Patel [University of Wisconsin; Jahns, Thomas M [ORNL

    2007-05-01

    Surface permanent magnet (SPM) synchronous machines using fractional-slot concentrated windings are being investigated as candidates for high-performance traction machines for automotive electric propulsion systems. It has been shown analytically and experimentally that such designs can achieve very wide constant-power speed ratios (CPSR) [1,2]. This work has shown that machines of this type are capable of achieving very low cogging torque amplitudes as well as significantly increasing the machine power density [3-5] compared to SPM machines using conventional distributed windings. High efficiency can be achieved in this class of SPM machine by making special efforts to suppress the eddy-current losses in the magnets [6-8], accompanied by efforts to minimize the iron losses in the rotor and stator cores. Considerable attention has traditionally been devoted to maximizing the full-load efficiency of traction machines at their rated operating points and along their maximum-power vs. speed envelopes for higher speeds [9,10]. For example, on-line control approaches have been presented for maximizing the full-load efficiency of PM synchronous machines, including the use of negative d-axis stator current to reduce the core losses [11,12]. However, another important performance specification for electric traction applications is the machine's efficiency at partial loads. Partial-load efficiency is particularly important if the target traction application requires long periods of cruising operation at light loads that are significantly lower than the maximum drive capabilities. While the design of the machine itself is clearly important, investigation has shown that this is a case where the choice of the control algorithm plays a critical role in determining the maximum partial-load efficiency that the machine actually achieves in the traction drive system. There is no evidence that this important topic has been addressed for this type of SPM machine by any other

  2. Measurements of Neutral B Decay Branching Fractions to K0S pi+ pi- Final States and the Charge Asymmetry of B0 --> K*+ pi-

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De, R; Sangro; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Van Bakel, N; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martínez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, S; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the decay B0 -> K0s pi+ pi- using a sample of 232 million Upsilon(4S) -> BB decays collected with the BaBar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. A maximum likelihood fit finds the following branching fractions: BF(B0 -> K0 pi+ pi-) = (43.0 +/- 2.3 +/- 2.3) x 10^{-6}, BF(B0 -> f0 (-> pi+ pi-) K0) = (5.5 +/- 0.7 +/- 0.5 +/- 0.3) x 10^{-6} and BF(B0 -> K*+ pi-) = (11.0 +/- 1.5 +/- 0.5 +/- 0.5) x 10^{-6}. For these results, the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third (if present) is due to the effect of interference from other resonances. We also measure the CP-violating charge asymmetry in the decay B0 -> K*+ pi-, A(B0 -> K*+ pi-) = -0.11 +/- 0.14 +/- 0.05.

  3. Measurement of the W boson helicity fractions in the decays of top quark pairs to lepton+jets final states produced in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} = $ 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Poyraz, Deniz; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Schöfbeck, Robert; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Forthomme, Laurent; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Tongguang; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; Assran, Yasser; Elkafrawy, Tamer; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahrous, Ayman; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Peltola, Timo; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sabes, David; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Lomidze, David; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schomakers, Christian; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Zhukov, Valery; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Asin, Ivan; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Ntomari, Eleni; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Filipovic, Nicolas; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bahinipati, Seema; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Kole, Gouranga; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; De Nardo, Guglielmo; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; La Licata, Chiara; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Kim, Hyunsoo; Lee, Ari; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Oh, Sung Bin; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Hwang, Chanwook; Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoli; Chtchipounov, Leonid; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Sulimov, Valentin; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Rusinov, Vladimir; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Rusakov, Sergey V; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Korneeva, Natalia; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Savrin, Viktor; Volkov, Petr; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Soares, Mara Senghi; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Duggan, Daniel; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Fartoukh, Stephane; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Gulhan, Doga; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Knünz, Valentin; Kornmayer, Andreas; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krammer, Manfred; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Schönenberger, Myriam; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Candelise, Vieri; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Futyan, David; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Penning, Bjoern; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Berry, Edmund; Cutts, David; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Jesus, Orduna; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Spencer, Eric; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Ovcharova, Ana; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Cremonesi, Matteo; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Shchutska, Lesya; Sperka, David; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bein, Samuel; Diamond, Brendan; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Santra, Arka; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Bowen, James; Bruner, Christopher; Castle, James; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Tatar, Kaya; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bartek, Rachel; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Malta Rodrigues, Alan; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Low, Jia Fu; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, Kurt; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Juska, Evaldas; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    The W boson helicity fractions from top quark decays in $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} }$ events are measured using data from proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The data were collected in 2012 with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.8 fb$^{-1}$. Events are reconstructed with either one muon or one electron, along with four jets in the final state, with two of the jets being identified as originating from b quarks. The measured helicity fractions from both channels are combined, yielding $F_{\\rm 0}= 0.681 \\pm 0.012 $ (stat) $\\pm 0.023 $ (syst), $F_{\\rm L}= 0.323 \\pm 0.008 $ (stat) $\\pm 0.014 $ (syst), and $F_{\\rm R}= -0.004 \\pm 0.005 $ (stat) $\\pm 0.014 $ (syst) for the longitudinal, left-, and right-handed components of the helicity, respectively. These measurements of the W boson helicity fractions are the most accurate to date and they agree with the predictions from the standard model.

  4. Measurement of the W boson helicity fractions in the decays of top quark pairs to lepton+jets final states produced in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-05-29

    The W boson helicity fractions from top quark decays in t-tbar events are measured using data from proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The data were collected in 2012 with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.8 inverse-femtobarns. Events are reconstructed with either one muon or one electron, along with four jets in the final state, with two of the jets being identified as originating from b quarks. The measured helicity fractions from both channels are combined, yielding F[0] = 0.681 +/- 0.012 (stat) +/- 0.023 (syst), F[L] = 0.323 +/- 0.008 (stat) +/- 0.014 (syst), and F[R] = -0.004 +/- 0.005 (stat) +/- 0.014 (syst) for the longitudinal, left-, and right-handed components of the helicity, respectively. These measurements of the W boson helicity fractions are the most accurate to date and they agree with the predictions from the standard model.

  5. Single-arm phase II study of conformal radiation therapy and temozolomide plus fractionated stereotactic conformal boost in high-grade gliomas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balducci, Mario; Manfrida, Stefania; Mangiola, Annunziato; Fiorentino, Alba; D' Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Frascino, Vincenzo; Dinapoli, Nicola; Mantini, Giovanna; Albanese, Alessio; De Bonis, Pasquale; Chiesa, Silvia; Valentini, Vincenzo; Anile, Carmelo; Cellini, Numa [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Catholic Univ. of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Apicella, Giuseppina [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Catholic Univ. of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy); Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital Maggiore della Carita, Novara (Italy); Azario, Luigi [Dept. of Physics, Catholic Univ. of the Sacred Heart, Rome (Italy)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: To assess survival, local control and toxicity using fractionated stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (FSCRT) boost and temozolomide in high-grade gliomas (HGGs). Patients and Methods: Patients affected by HGG, with a CTV{sub 1} (clinical target volume, representing tumor bed {+-} residual tumor + a margin of 5 mm) {<=} 8 cm were enrolled into this phase II study. Radiotherapy (RT, total dose 6,940 cGy) was administered using a combination of two different techniques: three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, to achieve a dose of 5,040 or 5,940 cGy) and FSCRT boost (19 or 10 Gy) tailored by CTV{sub 1} diameter ({<=} 6 cm and > 6 cm, respectively). Temozolomide (75 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered during the first 2 or 4 weeks of RT, After the end of RT, temozolomide (150-200 mg/m{sup 2}) was administered for at least six cycles. The sample size of 41 patients was assessed by the single proportion-powered analysis. Results: 41 patients (36 with glioblastoma multiforme [GBM] and five with anaplastic astrocytoma [AA]) were enrolled; RTOG neurological toxicities G1-2 and G3 were 12% and 3%, respectively. Two cases of radionecrosis were observed. At a median follow-up of 44 months (range 6-56 months), global and GBM median overall survival (05) were 30 and 28 months. The 2-year survival rate was significantly better compared to the standard treatment (63% vs. 26.5%; p < 0.00001). Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 11 months, in GBM patients 10 months. Conclusion: FSCRT boost plus temozolomide is well tolerated and seems to increase survival compared to the standard treatment in patients with HGG. (orig.)

  6. Phase 1/2 Trials of Temozolomide, Motexafin Gadolinium, and 60-Gy Fractionated Radiation for Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Glioblastoma Multiforme: Final Results of RTOG 0513

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachman, David G., E-mail: david.brachman@dignityhealth.org [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Pugh, Stephanie L. [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ashby, Lynn S. [Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Thomas, Theresa A. [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Dunbar, Erin M. [University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Narayan, Samir [St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Robins, H. Ian [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bovi, Joseph A. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Rockhill, Jason K. [University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Won, Minhee [Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph' s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Curran, Walter P. [Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: The purpose of phase 1 was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) given concurrently with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT) in patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Phase 2 determined whether this combination improved overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in GBM recursive partitioning analysis class III to V patients compared to therapies for recently published historical controls. Methods and Materials: Dose escalation in phase 1 progressed through 3 cohorts until 2 of 6 patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity or a dose of 5 mg/kg was reached. Once MTD was established, a 1-sided 1-sample log-rank test at significance level of .1 had 85% power to detect a median survival difference (13.69 vs 18.48 months) with 60 deaths over a 12-month accrual period and an additional 18 months of follow-up. OS and PFS were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: In phase 1, 24 patients were enrolled. The MTD established was 5 mg/kg, given intravenously 5 days a week for the first 10 RT fractions, then 3 times a week for the duration of RT. The 7 patients enrolled in the third dose level and the 94 enrolled in phase 2 received this dose. Of these 101 patients, 87 were eligible and evaluable. Median survival time was 15.6 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.9-17.6 months), not significantly different from that of the historical control (P=.36). Median PFS was 7.6 months (95% CI: 5.7-9.6 months). One patient (1%) experienced a grade 5 adverse event possibly related to therapy during the concurrent phase, and none experience toxicity during adjuvant TMZ therapy. Conclusions: Treatment was well tolerated, but median OS did not reach improvement specified by protocol compared to historical control, indicating that the combination of standard RT with TMZ and MGd did not achieve a significant survival advantage.

  7. Fine coal flotation of plant waste: An in-plant comparison - columns vs. sub-A cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrlinger, H.P. III; Lytle, J.M.; Kohlenberger, L.; Rapp, D.M. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)); Stephenson, J.; Zipperian, D. (Deister Machine Co., Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States)); Sterner, R.M.; Norris, D. (Kerr-McGee Corp., Oklahoma City, OK (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to compare the flotation effectiveness of the column flotation and the sub-aeration technology to clean very fine ({minus}100 mesh) coal in the waste streams of coal washing plants. Good concentrate grades along with a high recovery of energy content have been achieved while rejecting a large percentage of the ash forming minerals and pyrite. However, comparative data of columns vs. sub-aeration cells is not available from a single plant. This project was developed to install a small commercial size Deister Column beside the existing sub-aeration flotation cells at Kerr-McGee's Galatia Plant so that a comparison of the flotation results can be made. A representative split of the fines which normally goes to sub-aeration cells can be diverted without reagent, to the column for continuous side by side flotation testing over an extended period. The Deister Column was installed during the quarter along with the sampling system and tailings volume measuring apparatus. Parts of several weeks were spent in assuring that realistic goals could be obtained. During the de-bugging period it was found that water pressure and air pressure within the plant was not constant due to cleanup hoses which were on the same fresh water line to assure constant water and air pressure to the column during testing periods. Most of the shakedown testing was completed in April and May. Preliminary tests have been run in which high grade concentrates have been made but with low Btu recoveries. Additional tests with increased reagent rates are planned to increase Btu recoveries and will be reported at the Contractors Conference and in the final report. 24 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Fractional motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliazar, Iddo I., E-mail: eliazar@post.tau.ac.il [Holon Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 305, Holon 58102 (Israel); Shlesinger, Michael F., E-mail: mike.shlesinger@navy.mil [Office of Naval Research, Code 30, 875 N. Randolph St., Arlington, VA 22203 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    Brownian motion is the archetypal model for random transport processes in science and engineering. Brownian motion displays neither wild fluctuations (the “Noah effect”), nor long-range correlations (the “Joseph effect”). The quintessential model for processes displaying the Noah effect is Lévy motion, the quintessential model for processes displaying the Joseph effect is fractional Brownian motion, and the prototypical model for processes displaying both the Noah and Joseph effects is fractional Lévy motion. In this paper we review these four random-motion models–henceforth termed “fractional motions” –via a unified physical setting that is based on Langevin’s equation, the Einstein–Smoluchowski paradigm, and stochastic scaling limits. The unified setting explains the universal macroscopic emergence of fractional motions, and predicts–according to microscopic-level details–which of the four fractional motions will emerge on the macroscopic level. The statistical properties of fractional motions are classified and parametrized by two exponents—a “Noah exponent” governing their fluctuations, and a “Joseph exponent” governing their dispersions and correlations. This self-contained review provides a concise and cohesive introduction to fractional motions.

  9. Polymer fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadermann, A. F.

    1985-04-09

    Soluble polymers are fractionated according to molecular weight by cryogenically comminuting the polymer and introducing the polymer particles, while still in the active state induced by cryogenic grinding, into a liquid having a solvent power selected to produce a coacervate fraction containing high molecular weight polymer species and a dilute polymer solution containing lower molecular weight polymer species. The coacervate may be physically separated from the solution and finds use in the production of antimisting jet fuels and the like.

  10. Understanding Multiplication of Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetland, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Discussed the use of Cuisenaire rods in teaching the multiplication of fractions. Considers whole number times proper fraction, proper fraction multiplied by proper fraction, mixed number times proper fraction, and mixed fraction multiplied by mixed fractions. (JN)

  11. Measurements of Branching Fraction and CP Violation inB Meson Rare Decays to Final States containing eta or eta' Mesons in the BaBar Experiment at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazzaro, Alfio [Univ. of Milan (Italy)

    2007-04-11

    Note that the main goal of this thesis work is the measurement of the branching fractions, charge asymmetry, and Time-Dependent CP Violation in η'K0 mode. All other measurements are reported here for completion because they are connected by similar physics arguments. They are part of the Milan analysis activity, done by undergraduate students. They should not be considered as done in this thesis work. The measurements of the two body-modes ηη, ηΦ, and η'Φare used to determine a theoretical bound based on SU(3) flavor symmetry for the difference between SM prediction and the experimental measurements of CP violation parameters in b → s loop-dominated modes. In general for this estimation we need to measure the branching fractions (or upper limits) of neutral B decays to two-body modes with η', η, Φ, ω, π0, K0, K*0 [13, 14, 15, 16]. There is an important issue related to the branching fractions of η'K (charged and neutral) modes. Since the discover of B → η'K in 1997 [17] with high branching fraction (higher than expected), it was found that the corresponding mode with η is suppressed. This fact was pointed out by Lipkin in 1991 [18]. In particular, using arguments concerning the η-η' mixing angle and the parity of K or K* we can say that η'K and vK* are enhanced, while ηK and η'K* are suppressed. This scheme is experimentally verified. The branching fraction of all these modes are already measured, but the B0 → ηK0. So it is important to measure also this mode to complete the scenario. Finally we report on the measurements of the radiative modes B → η'Kγ and of the three-body mode B → η'η'K. Both cases are good candidates to manifest effects due to NP in CP violations [19, 20]. For all measurements we use an unbinned maximum likelihood fit to extract the number of signal yields and CP parameters. To perform these

  12. Iron isotope fractionation during Fe uptake and translocation in alpine plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiczka, Mirjam; Wiederhold, Jan G; Kraemer, Stephan M; Bourdon, Bernard; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2010-08-15

    The potential of stable Fe isotopes as a tracer for the biogeochemical Fe cycle depends on the understanding and quantification of the fractionation processes involved. Iron uptake and cycling by plants may influence Fe speciation in soils. Here, we determined the Fe isotopic composition of different plant parts including the complete root system of three alpine plant species (Oxyria digyna, Rumex scutatus, Agrostis gigantea) in a granitic glacier forefield, which allowed us, for the first time, to distinguish between uptake and in-plant fractionation processes. The overall range of fractionation was 4.5 per thousand in delta(56)Fe. Mass balance calculations demonstrated that fractionation toward lighter Fe isotopic composition occurred in two steps during uptake: (1) before active uptake, probably during mineral dissolution and (2) during selective uptake of Fe at the plasma membrane with an enrichment factor of -1.0 to -1.7 per thousand for all three species. Iron isotopes were further fractionated during remobilization from old into new plant tissue, which changed the isotopic composition of leaves and flowers over the season. This study demonstrates the potential of Fe isotopes as a new tool in plant nutrition studies but also reveals challenges for the future application of Fe isotope signatures in soil-plant environments.

  13. Mystery Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  14. Mystery Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  15. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  16. Anatomical and functional assessment of Tryton bifurcation stent before and after final kissing balloon dilatation: Evaluations by three-dimensional coronary angiography, optical coherence tomography imaging and fractional flow reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyxaras, Stylianos A; Toth, Gabor G; Di Gioia, Giuseppe; Ughi, Giovanni J; Tu, Shengxian; Rusinaru, Dan; Adriaenssens, Tom; Reiber, Johan H C; Leon, Martin B; Bax, Jeroen J; Wijns, William

    2017-07-01

    To assess the anatomical and functional impact of final kissing balloon inflation (FKBI) after implantation of a dedicated bifurcation stent system. Current evidence suggests clinical benefit of FKBI in patients undergoing bifurcation dilatation using the Tryton side branch stent (Tryton-SBS). We hypothesized that FKBI improves anatomical reconstruction and functional results of bifurcation treated by Tryton-SBS. An unselected group of patients with complex bifurcation coronary lesions undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with Tryton-SBS underwent paired anatomical assessment with two- and three-dimensional quantitative coronary analysis (2D- and 3D-QCA), and optical coherence tomography (OCT), including 3D reconstruction before and after FKBI. Functional assessment by fractional flow reserve (FFR) was performed in the main branch (MB) and side branch (SB) before and after FKBI. Paired pre- and post-FKBI data were obtained in 10 patients. By OCT imaging, FKBI increased both the SB ostial area (4.93 ± 2.81 vs. 7.43 ± 2.87 mm(2) , P < 0.001) and the SB maximum diameter (3.12 ± 0.98 vs. 3.82 ± 1.10 mm, P = 0.003). These findings were associated with a significant increase in FFR in the SB (0.90 ± 0.05 vs. 0.94 ± 0.03; P = 0.011), with no significant change in the MB (0.91 ± 0.05 vs. 0.92 ± 0.04; P = 0.470). In patients with complex bifurcation stenosis undergoing PCI with a dedicated bifurcation system, FKBI is associated with improved anatomical and functional results at the SB level, without compromising the result at the MB. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Fractional complex transforms for fractional differential equations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ibrahim, Rabha W

    2012-01-01

    The fractional complex transform is employed to convert fractional differential equations analytically in the sense of the Srivastava-Owa fractional operator and its generalization in the unit disk...

  18. Testing Fractional Action Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Shchigolev, V K

    2015-01-01

    The present work deals with a combined test of the so-called Fractional Action Cosmology (FAC) on the example of a specific model obtained by the author earlier. In this model, the effective cosmological term is proportional to the Hubble parameter squared through the so-called kinematic induction. The reason of studying this cosmological model could be explained by its ability to describe two periods of accelerated expansion, that is in agreement with the recent observations and the cosmological inflation paradigm. First of all, we put our model through the theoretical tests that gives a general conception of the influence of the model parameters on its behavior. Then, we obtain some restrictions on the principal parameters of the model, including the fractional index, by means of the observational data. Finally, the cosmography parameters and the observational data compared to the theoretical predictions are presented both analytically and graphically.

  19. Testing fractional action cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchigolev, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    The present work deals with a combined test of the so-called Fractional Action Cosmology (FAC) on the example of a specific model obtained by the author earlier. In this model, the effective cosmological term is proportional to the Hubble parameter squared through the so-called kinematic induction. The reason of studying this cosmological model could be explained by its ability to describe two periods of accelerated expansion, that is in agreement with the recent observations and the cosmological inflation paradigm. First of all, we put our model through the theoretical tests, which gives a general conception of the influence of the model parameters on its behavior. Then, we obtain some restrictions on the principal parameters of the model, including the fractional index, by means of the observational data. Finally, the cosmography parameters and the observational data compared to the theoretical predictions are presented both analytically and graphically.

  20. Fractional complex transform for fractional differential equations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lİ, Zheng Biao; HE, Ji Huan

    2010-01-01

    Fractional complex transform is proposed to convert fractional differential equations into ordinary differential equations, so that all analytical methods devoted to advanced calculus can be easily...

  1. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  2. Mechanical Analogies of Fractional Elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Kai-Xin; ZHU Ke-Qin

    2009-01-01

    A Fractional element model describes a special kind of viscoelastic material.Its stress is proportional to the fractional-order derivative of strain. Physically the mechanical analogies of fractional elements can be represented by spring-dashpot fractal networks. We introduce a constitutive operator in the constitutive equations of viscoelastic materials.To derive constitutive operators for spring-dashpot fractal networks, we use Heaviside operational calculus, which provides explicit answers not otherwise obtainable simply.Then the series-parallel formulas for the constitutive operator are derived. Using these formulas, a constitutive equation of fractional element with 1/2-order derivative is obtained.Finally we find the way to derive the constitutive equations with other fractional-order derivatives and their mechanical analogies.

  3. Fractional trajectories: Decorrelation versus friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenkeson, A.; Beig, M. T.; Turalska, M.; West, B. J.; Grigolini, P.

    2013-11-01

    The fundamental connection between fractional calculus and subordination processes is explored and affords a physical interpretation of a fractional trajectory, that being an average over an ensemble of stochastic trajectories. Heretofore what has been interpreted as intrinsic friction, a form of non-Markovian dissipation that automatically arises from adopting the fractional calculus, is shown to be a manifestation of decorrelations between trajectories. We apply the general theory developed herein to the Lotka-Volterra ecological model, providing new insight into the final equilibrium state. The relaxation time to achieve this state is also considered.

  4. Development, testing, and demonstration of an optimal fine coal cleaning circuit. Task 5: Evaluation of bench-scale test results and equipment selection for in-plant pilot tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-14

    The overall objective of this research effort is to improve the efficiency of fine coal flotation in preparation plants above that of currently used conventional cells. In addition to evaluating single-stage operation of four selected advanced flotation devices, the project will also evaluate them in two-stage configurations. The project is being implemented in two phases. Phase 1 comprises bench-scale testing of the flotation units, and Phase 2 comprises in-plant, proof-of-concept (POC), pilot-scale testing of selected configurations at the Cyprus Emerald preparation plant. The Task 5 report presents the findings of the Phase 1 bench-scale test results and provides the basis for equipment selection for Phase 2. Four advanced flotation technologies selected for bench-scale testing are: Jameson cell; Outokumpu HG tank cell; packed column; and open column. In addition to testing all four of the cells in single-stage operation, the Jameson and Outokumpu cells were tested as candidate first-stage cells because of their propensity for rapid attachment of coal particles with air bubbles and low capital and operating costs. The column cells were selected as candidate second-stage cells because of their high-efficiency separation of low-ash products from high-ash feed coals. 32 figs., 72 tabs.

  5. Meadow based Fraction Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Bergstra, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of an involutive meadow a precise definition of fractions is formulated and on that basis formal definitions of various classes of fractions are given. The definitions follow the fractions as terms paradigm. That paradigm is compared with two competing paradigms for storytelling on fractions: fractions as values and fractions as pairs.

  6. Riesz potential versus fractional Laplacian

    KAUST Repository

    Ortigueira, Manuel Duarte

    2014-09-01

    This paper starts by introducing the Grünwald-Letnikov derivative, the Riesz potential and the problem of generalizing the Laplacian. Based on these ideas, the generalizations of the Laplacian for 1D and 2D cases are studied. It is presented as a fractional version of the Cauchy-Riemann conditions and, finally, it is discussed with the n-dimensional Laplacian.

  7. On stability of equilibrium points in nonlinear fractional differential equations and fractional Hamiltonian systems

    OpenAIRE

    Keshtkar, F.; Erjaee, G.; Boutefnouchet, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, a brief stability analysis of equilibrium points in nonlinear fractional order dynamical systems is given. Then, based on the first integral concept, a definition of planar Hamiltonian systems with fractional order introduced. Some interesting properties of these fractional Hamiltonian systems are also presented. Finally, we illustrate two examples to see the differences between fractional Hamiltonian systems with their classical order counterparts. NPRP . Grant Number: NP...

  8. Matrix fractional systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the matrix representation of dynamical systems in the perspective of fractional calculus. Fractional elements and fractional systems are interpreted under the light of the classical Cole-Cole, Davidson-Cole, and Havriliak-Negami heuristic models. Numerical simulations for an electrical circuit enlighten the results for matrix based models and high fractional orders. The conclusions clarify the distinction between fractional elements and fractional systems.

  9. Fractional Chemotaxis Diffusion Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Langlands, T A M

    2010-01-01

    We introduce mesoscopic and macroscopic model equations of chemotaxis with anomalous subdiffusion for modelling chemically directed transport of biological organisms in changing chemical environments with diffusion hindered by traps or macro-molecular crowding. The mesoscopic models are formulated using Continuous Time Random Walk master equations and the macroscopic models are formulated with fractional order differential equations. Different models are proposed depending on the timing of the chemotactic forcing. Generalizations of the models to include linear reaction dynamics are also derived. Finally a Monte Carlo method for simulating anomalous subdiffusion with chemotaxis is introduced and simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the model equations. The model equations developed here could be used to replace Keller-Segel type equations in biological systems with transport hindered by traps, macro-molecular crowding or other obstacles.

  10. Isolation of (-)-Patchouli Alcohol from Patchouli Oil by Fractional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation of (-)-Patchouli Alcohol from Patchouli Oil by Fractional Distillation and Crystallization. ... Methods: PO, obtained from commercial source, was separated into four fractions (A, B, ... Finally, PA was further purified by suction filtration.

  11. State-Space Modelling of Loudspeakers using Fractional Derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    King, Alexander Weider; Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the use of fractional order derivatives in modeling moving-coil loudspeakers. A fractional order state-space solution is developed, leading the way towards incorporating nonlinearities into a fractional order system. The method is used to calculate the response....... It is shown that the identified parameters can be used in a linear fractional order state-space model to simulate the loudspeakers’ time domain response...... of a fractional harmonic oscillator, representing the mechanical part of a loudspeaker, showing the effect of the fractional derivative and its relationship to viscoelasticity. Finally, a loudspeaker model with a fractional order viscoelastic suspension and fractional order voice coil is fit to measurement data...

  12. Charmless hadronic three-body decays of neutral $B$ mesons with a $K^0_s$ in the final state in the LHCb experiment: branching fractions and an amplitude analysis Désintégrations hadroniques à trois corps sans charme de mésons $B$ avec un $K^0_s$ dans l'état final dans l'expérience LHCb : mesure de rapports d'embranchement et une analyse en amplitude

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00390866

    This dissertation presents several studies of the decays of both $B^{0}$ and $B^{0}_{s}$ mesons to charmless three-body final states including a $K^{0}_{s}$ meson. They use the data recorded by the LHCb experiment during Run I of LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $\\int\\=3 fb^{-1}$ A first analysis consists of the measurement of the branching fractions of \\BdstoKshhp decays, where $h^{(')}$ designates a kaon or a pion. Preceding \\lhcb measurements of branching fractions for all decay channels, relative to that of $\\Bd\\to\\KS\\pip\\pim$, are updated. Furthermore, the primary goal of this analysis is to search for the, as yet, unobserved decay $\\Bs\\to\\KS\\Kp\\Km$. The relative branching fractions are measured to be: \\begin{align} \\frac{\\Br{\\BstoKsPiPi}}{\\Br{\\BdtoKsPiPi}} &= 0.26 \\pm 0.04\\mathrm{(stat.)} \\pm 0.02\\mathrm{(syst.)} \\pm 0.01\\mathrm{(f_s/f_d}\\mathrm{)},\

  13. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  14. Type-2 fuzzy fractional derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazandarani, Mehran; Najariyan, Marzieh

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce two definitions of the differentiability of type-2 fuzzy number-valued functions of fractional order. The definitions are in the sense of Riemann-Liouville and Caputo derivative of order β ɛ (0, 1), and based on type-2 Hukuhara difference and H2-differentiability. The existence and uniqueness of the solutions of type-2 fuzzy fractional differential equations (T2FFDEs) under Caputo type-2 fuzzy fractional derivative and the definition of Laplace transform of type-2 fuzzy number-valued functions are also given. Moreover, the approximate solution to T2FFDE by a Predictor-Evaluate-Corrector-Evaluate (PECE) method is presented. Finally, the approximate solutions of two examples of linear and nonlinear T2FFDEs are obtained using the PECE method, and some cases of T2FFDEs applications in some sciences are presented.

  15. Fraction Sense: Foundational Understandings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Francis Skip; Karp, Karen

    2016-08-09

    The intent of this commentary is to identify elements of fraction sense and note how the research studies provided in this special issue, in related but somewhat different ways, validate the importance of such understandings. Proficiency with fractions serves as a prerequisite for student success in higher level mathematics, as well as serving as a gateway to many occupations and varied contexts beyond the mathematics classroom. Fraction sense is developed through instructional opportunities involving fraction equivalence and magnitude, comparing and ordering fractions, using fraction benchmarks, and computational estimation. Such foundations are then extended to operations involving fractions and decimals and applications involving proportional reasoning. These components of fraction sense are all addressed in the studies provided in this issue, with particular consideration devoted to the significant importance of the use of the number line as a central representational tool for conceptually understanding fraction magnitude.

  16. Meaning of Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, D. A. K.; Suryadi, D.; Suratno, T.; Mulyana, E.; Kurniawan, H.

    2017-02-01

    Introducing fractions is identical to divide an object. Suppose we divide the apple into two parts. One divided into two parts, the question arises whether one part can be called a half or not. Based on this activity, how can students give meaning to fractions. This study aims at designing a different fractions lesson by applying Didactical Design Research. In doing so, we undertook several research phases: 1) thinking what is fractions and why students should learn this concept; 2) designing didactical situation based on identified learning obstacles; and 3) reflecting retrospectively on the lesson design and its implementation as to redesign the fractions lesson. Our analysis revealed that most students held epistemological obstacles in giving meaning of fractions because they only know fractions as numbers that have numerator and denominator. By positioning ourselves as students, we discuss the ideal design to help students in constructing the meaning of fractions.

  17. Fractional Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Edelman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the author presents the results of the preliminary investigation of fractional dynamical systems based on the results of numerical simulations of fractional maps. Fractional maps are equivalent to fractional differential equations describing systems experiencing periodic kicks. Their properties depend on the value of two parameters: the non-linearity parameter, which arises from the corresponding regular dynamical systems; and the memory parameter which is the order of the fractional derivative in the corresponding non-linear fractional differential equations. The examples of the fractional Standard and Logistic maps demonstrate that phase space of non-linear fractional dynamical systems may contain periodic sinks, attracting slow diverging trajectories, attracting accelerator mode trajectories, chaotic attractors, and cascade of bifurcations type trajectories whose properties are different from properties of attractors in regular dynamical systems. The author argues that discovered properties s...

  18. On continued fraction algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, Ionica

    2010-01-01

    Is there a good continued fraction approximation between every two bad ones? What is the entropy of the natural extension for alpha-Rosen fractions? How do you find multi-dimensional continued fractions with a guaranteed quality in polynomial time? These, and many more, questions are answered in thi

  19. DIY Fraction Pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Alan; Graham, Louise

    2003-01-01

    Describes a very successful attempt to teach fractions to year 5 pupils based on pupils making their own fraction pack. Children decided for themselves how to make the fractional slices used in the activity using colored cardboard sheets and templates of a paper circle consisting of 24 equal slices. (Author/NB)

  20. On continued fraction algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, Ionica

    2010-01-01

    Is there a good continued fraction approximation between every two bad ones? What is the entropy of the natural extension for alpha-Rosen fractions? How do you find multi-dimensional continued fractions with a guaranteed quality in polynomial time? These, and many more, questions are answered in thi

  1. Fractional Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An extended fractional subequation method is proposed for solving fractional differential equations by introducing a new general ansätz and Bäcklund transformation of the fractional Riccati equation with known solutions. Being concise and straightforward, this method is applied to the space-time fractional coupled Burgers’ equations and coupled MKdV equations. As a result, many exact solutions are obtained. It is shown that the considered method provides a very effective, convenient, and powerful mathematical tool for solving fractional differential equations.

  2. Fractional smith chart theory

    KAUST Repository

    Shamim, Atif

    2011-03-01

    For the first time, a generalized Smith chart is introduced here to represent fractional order circuit elements. It is shown that the standard Smith chart is a special case of the generalized fractional order Smith chart. With illustrations drawn for both the conventional integer based lumped elements and the fractional elements, a graphical technique supported by the analytical method is presented to plot impedances on the fractional Smith chart. The concept is then applied towards impedance matching networks, where the fractional approach proves to be much more versatile and results in a single element matching network for a complex load as compared to the two elements in the conventional approach. © 2010 IEEE.

  3. Fractional factorial plans

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Aloke

    2009-01-01

    A one-stop reference to fractional factorials and related orthogonal arrays.Presenting one of the most dynamic areas of statistical research, this book offers a systematic, rigorous, and up-to-date treatment of fractional factorial designs and related combinatorial mathematics. Leading statisticians Aloke Dey and Rahul Mukerjee consolidate vast amounts of material from the professional literature--expertly weaving fractional replication, orthogonal arrays, and optimality aspects. They develop the basic theory of fractional factorials using the calculus of factorial arrangements, thereby providing a unified approach to the study of fractional factorial plans. An indispensable guide for statisticians in research and industry as well as for graduate students, Fractional Factorial Plans features: * Construction procedures of symmetric and asymmetric orthogonal arrays. * Many up-to-date research results on nonexistence. * A chapter on optimal fractional factorials not based on orthogonal arrays. * Trend-free plans...

  4. Anti-Platelet Fraction Isolated from Galega Officinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanasov A.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A fraction from crude extract of Galega officinalis has been purified by column chromatography on Sephadex G-25, Sepharose 4B, DEAE-Cellulose and Sephadex G-100. The final purification factor of the fraction is 120. The peak in elution profile after Sephadex G-150 shows a molecular weight of 100-140 kDa. The isolated fraction appears to have 74% polysaccharides and 23% of proteins. No loss of activity of the final fraction is observed after storage for several months at 4°C and in lyophilized condition. The fraction compounds inhibit platelet aggregation induced by ADP, collagen and thrombin.

  5. Dividing Fractions: A Pedagogical Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robert

    2016-01-01

    When dividing one fraction by a second fraction, invert, that is, flip the second fraction, then multiply it by the first fraction. To multiply fractions, simply multiply across the denominators, and multiply across the numerators to get the resultant fraction. So by inverting the division of fractions it is turned into an easy multiplication of…

  6. Large deviations for fractional Poisson processes

    CERN Document Server

    Beghin, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    We present large deviation results for two versions of fractional Poisson processes: the main version which is a renewal process, and the alternative version where all the random variables are weighted Poisson distributed. We also present a sample path large deviation result for suitably normalized counting processes; finally we show how this result can be applied to the two versions of fractional Poisson processes considered in this paper.

  7. Frequency domain stability criteria for fractional-order control systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper concerns about the frequency domain stability criteria for fractional-order control systems. On the base of characteristics of the fractional-order equations solutions, we consider the Nyquist stability criterion in a wider sense and obtain a more common means to analyze the stability of fractional-order systems conveniently. Finally, this paper illustrates the generalized stability criteria with an example to show the effect of the parameters variation on the fractional-order control systems.

  8. Multiparameter Fractional Difference Linear Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Mozyrska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Riemann-Liouville-, Caputo-, and Grünwald-Letnikov-type fractional order difference operators are discussed and used to state and solve the controllability and observability problems of linear fractional order discrete-time control systems with multiorder and multistep. It is shown that the obtained results do not depend on the type of fractional operators and steps. The comparison of systems is made under the number of steps needed, firstly to achieve a final point, and secondly to distinguish initial conditions for particular operator.

  9. Fractional Pure Birth Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Orsingher, Enzo; 10.3150/09-BEJ235

    2010-01-01

    We consider a fractional version of the classical non-linear birth process of which the Yule-Furry model is a particular case. Fractionality is obtained by replacing the first-order time derivative in the difference-differential equations which govern the probability law of the process, with the Dzherbashyan-Caputo fractional derivative. We derive the probability distribution of the number $ \\mathcal{N}_\

  10. Fractional vortex Hilbert's Hotel

    CERN Document Server

    Gbur, Greg

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate how the unusual mathematics of transfinite numbers, in particular a nearly perfect realization of Hilbert's famous hotel paradox, manifests in the propagation of light through fractional vortex plates. It is shown how a fractional vortex plate can be used, in principle, to create any number of "open rooms," i.e. topological charges, simultaneously. Fractional vortex plates are therefore demonstrated to create a singularity of topological charge, in which the vortex state is completely undefined and in fact arbitrary.

  11. Fractional Electromagnetic Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, J F; Bernal, J J; Tkach, V I; Guía, M

    2011-01-01

    In the present work we consider the electromagnetic wave equation in terms of the fractional derivative of the Caputo type. The order of the derivative being considered is 0 <\\gamma<1. A new parameter \\sigma, is introduced which characterizes the existence of the fractional components in the system. We analyze the fractional derivative with respect to time and space, for \\gamma = 1 and \\gamma = 1/2 cases.

  12. Construction of Fractional Power Series Solutions to Fractional Boussinesq Equations Using Residual Power Series Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at constructing fractional power series (FPS solutions of time-space fractional Boussinesq equations using residual power series method (RPSM. Firstly we generalize the idea of RPSM to solve any-order time-space fractional differential equations in high-dimensional space with initial value problems in Rn. Using RPSM, we can obtain FPS solutions of fourth-, sixth-, and 2nth-order time-space fractional Boussinesq equations in R and fourth-order time-space fractional Boussinesq equations in R2 and Rn. Finally, by numerical experiments, it is shown that RPSM is a simple, effective, and powerful method for seeking approximate analytic solutions of fractional differential equations.

  13. Fractional and noncommutative spacetimes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arzano, M.; Calcagni, M.; Oriti, D.; Scalisi, M.

    2011-01-01

    We establish a mapping between fractional and noncommutative spacetimes in configuration space. Depending on the scale at which the relation is considered, there arise two possibilities. For a fractional spacetime with log-oscillatory measure, the effective measure near the fundamental scale determi

  14. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems (Empson…

  15. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems (Empson…

  16. An Appetite for Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Trena L.; Bryan, Tommy; Curry, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how using candy bars as models gives sixth-grade students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve. Using paper models of the candy bars, students explored and compared fractions. They noticed fewer different representations for one-third than for one-half. The authors conclude…

  17. Categories of Fractions Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Fritz, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    The theory of categories of fractions as originally developed by Gabriel and Zisman is reviewed in a pedagogical manner giving detailed proofs of all statements. A weakening of the category of fractions axioms used by Higson is discussed and shown to be equivalent to the original axioms.

  18. On fractional programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajona-Xandri, C.; Martinez-Legaz, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    This paper studies the minimax fractional programming problem, assuming quasiconvexity of the objective function, under the lower subdifferentiability viewpoint. Necessary and sufficient optimality conditions and dual properties are found. We present applications of this theory to find the Pareto efficient solutions of a multiobjective fractional problem and to solve several economic models.

  19. Fractional calculus in bioengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  20. Social Trust and Fractionalization:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This paper takes a closer look at the importance of fractionalization for the creation of social trust. It first argues that the determinants of trust can be divided into two categories: those affecting individuals' trust radii and those affecting social polarization. A series of estimates using...... a much larger country sample than in previous literature confirms that fractionalization in the form of income inequality and political diversity adversely affects social trust while ethnic diversity does not. However, these effects differ systematically across countries, questioning standard...... interpretations of the influence of fractionalization on trust....

  1. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurney, Kevin R

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  2. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  3. Fractional graph theory a rational approach to the theory of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Scheinerman, Edward R

    2013-01-01

    A unified treatment of the most important results in the study of fractional graph concepts, this volume explores the various ways in which integer-valued concepts can be modified to derive nonintegral values. It begins with the general fractional theory of hypergraphs and presents in-depth coverage of fundamental and advanced topics. Subjects include fractional matching, fractional coloring, fractional edge coloring, fractional arboricity via matroid methods, and fractional isomorphism. The final chapter examines additional topics such as fractional domination, fractional intersection numbers

  4. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Benson

    2012-09-24

    This project combines outcrop-scale heterogeneity characterization, laboratory experiments, and numerical simulations. The study is designed to test whether established dispersion theory accurately predicts the behavior of solute transport through heterogeneous media and to investigate the relationship between heterogeneity and the parameters that populate these models. The dispersion theory tested by this work is based upon the fractional advection-dispersion equation (fADE) model. Unlike most dispersion studies that develop a solute transport model by fitting the solute transport breakthrough curve, this project will explore the nature of the heterogeneous media to better understand the connection between the model parameters and the aquifer heterogeneity. Our work at the Colorado School of Mines was focused on the following questions: 1) What are the effects of multi-scale geologic variability on transport of conservative and reactive solutes? 2) Can those transport effects be accounted for by classical methods, and if not, can the nonlocal fractional-order equations provide better predictions? 3) Can the fractional-order equations be parameterized through a link to some simple observable geologic features? 4) Are the classical equations of transport and reaction sufficient? 5) What is the effect of anomalous transport on chemical reaction in groundwater systems? The work is predicated on the observation that upscaled transport is defined by loss of information, or spatio-temporal averaging. This averaging tends to make the transport laws such as Fick's 2nd-order diffusion equation similar to central limit theory. The fractional-order advection-dispersion equations rely on limit theory for heavy-tailed random motion that has some diverging moments. The equations predict larger tails of a plume in space and/or time than those predicted by the classical 2nd-order advection-dispersion equation. The heavy tails are often seen in plumes at field sites.

  5. Discrete fractional calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Goodrich, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This text provides the first comprehensive treatment of the discrete fractional calculus. Experienced researchers will find the text useful as a reference for discrete fractional calculus and topics of current interest. Students who are interested in learning about discrete fractional calculus will find this text to provide a useful starting point. Several exercises are offered at the end of each chapter and select answers have been provided at the end of the book. The presentation of the content is designed to give ample flexibility for potential use in a myriad of courses and for independent study. The novel approach taken by the authors includes a simultaneous treatment of the fractional- and integer-order difference calculus (on a variety of time scales, including both the usual forward and backwards difference operators). The reader will acquire a solid foundation in the classical topics of the discrete calculus while being introduced to exciting recent developments, bringing them to the frontiers of the...

  6. Fractional Derivative Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Mark D

    2009-01-01

    The degree by which a function can be differentiated need not be restricted to integer values. Usually most of the field equations of physics are taken to be second order, curiosity asks what happens if this is only approximately the case and the field equations are nearly second order. For Robertson-Walker cosmology there is a simple fractional modification of the Friedman and conservation equations. In general fractional gravitational equations similar to Einstein's are hard to define as this requires fractional derivative geometry. What fractional derivative geometry might entail is briefly looked at and it turns out that even asking very simple questions in two dimensions leads to ambiguous or intractable results. A two dimensional line element which depends on the Gamma-function is looked at.

  7. The Space-Fractional Poisson Process

    CERN Document Server

    Orsingher, Enzo

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the space-fractional Poisson process whose state probabilities $p_k^\\alpha(t)$, $t>0$, $\\alpha \\in (0,1]$, are governed by the equations $(\\mathrm d/\\mathrm dt)p_k(t) = -\\lambda^\\alpha (1-B)p_k^\\alpha(t)$, where $(1-B)^\\alpha$ is the fractional difference operator found in the study of time series analysis. We explicitly obtain the distributions $p_k^\\alpha(t)$, the probability generating functions $G_\\alpha(u,t)$, which are also expressed as distributions of the minimum of i.i.d.\\ uniform random variables. The comparison with the time-fractional Poisson process is investigated and finally, we arrive at the more general space-time fractional Poisson process of which we give the explicit distribution.

  8. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  9. New Fractional Complex Transform for Conformable Fractional Partial Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çenesiz Y.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Conformable fractional complex transform is introduced in this paper for converting fractional partial differential equations to ordinary differential equations. Hence analytical methods in advanced calculus can be used to solve these equations. Conformable fractional complex transform is implemented to fractional partial differential equations such as space fractional advection diffusion equation and space fractional telegraph equation to obtain the exact solutions of these equations.

  10. On fractional Langevin equation involving two fractional orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghani, Omid

    2017-01-01

    In numerical analysis, it is frequently needed to examine how far a numerical solution is from the exact one. To investigate this issue quantitatively, we need a tool to measure the difference between them and obviously this task is accomplished by the aid of an appropriate norm on a certain space of functions. For example, Sobolev spaces are indispensable part of theoretical analysis of partial differential equations and boundary integral equations, as well as are necessary for the analysis of some numerical methods for the solving of such equations. But most of articles that appear in this field usually use ‖.‖∞ in the space of C[a, b] which is very restrictive. In this paper, we introduce a new norm that is convenient for the fractional and singular differential equations. Using this norm, the existence and uniqueness of initial value problems for nonlinear Langevin equation with two different fractional orders are studied. In fact, the obtained results could be used for the classical cases. Finally, by two examples we show that we cannot always speak about the existence and uniqueness of solutions just by using the previous methods.

  11. Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.

    This final report for the Hybrid Ventilation Centre at Aalborg University describes the activities and research achievement in the project period from August 2001 to August 2006. The report summarises the work performed and the results achieved with reference to articles and reports published...

  12. Fractional Vortices and Lumps

    CERN Document Server

    Eto, Minoru; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Konishi, Kenichi; Nagashima, Takayuki; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Vinci, Walter

    2009-01-01

    We study what might be called fractional vortices, vortex configurations with the minimum winding from the viewpoint of their topological stability, but which are characterized by various notable substructures in the transverse energy distribution. The fractional vortices occur in diverse Abelian or non-Abelian generalizations of the Higgs model. The global and local features characterizing these are studied, and we identify the two crucial ingredients for their occurrence - the vacuum degeneracy leading to non-trivial vacuum moduli M, and the BPS nature of the vortices. Fractional vortices are further classified into two kinds. The first type of such vortices appear when M has orbifold Z_n singularities; the second type occurs in systems in which the vacuum moduli space M possesses either a deformed geometry or some singularity. These general features are illustrated with several concrete models.

  13. Fractional-order devices

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Karabi; Caponetto, Riccardo; Mendes Lopes, António; Tenreiro Machado, José António

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on two specific areas related to fractional order systems – the realization of physical devices characterized by non-integer order impedance, usually called fractional-order elements (FOEs); and the characterization of vegetable tissues via electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) – and provides readers with new tools for designing new types of integrated circuits. The majority of the book addresses FOEs. The interest in these topics is related to the need to produce “analogue” electronic devices characterized by non-integer order impedance, and to the characterization of natural phenomena, which are systems with memory or aftereffects and for which the fractional-order calculus tool is the ideal choice for analysis. FOEs represent the building blocks for designing and realizing analogue integrated electronic circuits, which the authors believe hold the potential for a wealth of mass-market applications. The freedom to choose either an integer- or non-integer-order analogue integrator...

  14. Fractional and noncommutative spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzano, Michele; Calcagni, Gianluca; Oriti, Daniele; Scalisi, Marco

    2011-12-01

    We establish a mapping between fractional and noncommutative spacetimes in configuration space. Depending on the scale at which the relation is considered, there arise two possibilities. For a fractional spacetime with log-oscillatory measure, the effective measure near the fundamental scale determining the log-period coincides with the nonrotation-invariant but cyclicity-preserving measure of κ-Minkowski spacetime. At scales larger than the log-period, the fractional measure is averaged and becomes a power law with real exponent. This can be also regarded as the cyclicity-inducing measure in a noncommutative spacetime defined by a certain nonlinear algebra of the coordinates, which interpolates between κ-Minkowski and canonical spacetime. These results are based upon a braiding formula valid for any nonlinear algebra which can be mapped onto the Heisenberg algebra.

  15. Fractional and noncommutative spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Arzano, Michele; Oriti, Daniele; Scalisi, Marco

    2011-01-01

    We establish a mapping between fractional and noncommutative spacetimes in configuration space. Depending on the scale at which the relation is considered, there arise two possibilities. For a fractional spacetime with log-oscillatory measure, the effective measure near the fundamental scale determining the log-period coincides with the non-rotation-invariant but cyclicity-preserving measure of \\kappa-Minkowski. At scales larger than the log-period, the fractional measure is averaged and becomes a power-law with real exponent. This can be also regarded as the cyclicity-inducing measure in a noncommutative spacetime defined by a certain nonlinear algebra of the coordinates, which interpolates between \\kappa-Minkowski and canonical spacetime. These results are based upon a braiding formula valid for any nonlinear algebra which can be mapped onto the Heisenberg algebra.

  16. Fractionated Marine Invertebrate Extract Libraries for Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris M. Ireland

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The high-throughput screening and drug discovery paradigm has necessitated a change in preparation of natural product samples for screening programs. In an attempt to improve the quality of marine natural products samples for screening, several fractionation strategies were investigated. The final method used HP20SS as a solid support to effectively desalt extracts and fractionate the organic components. Additionally, methods to integrate an automated LCMS fractionation approach to shorten discovery time lines have been implemented.

  17. Fractional standard map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Mark, E-mail: edelman@cims.nyu.ed [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Stern College at Yeshiva University, 245 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Tarasov, Vasily E. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States)] [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2009-12-28

    Properties of the phase space of the standard map with memory are investigated. This map was obtained from a kicked fractional differential equation. Depending on the value of the map parameter and the fractional order of the derivative in the original differential equation, this nonlinear dynamical system demonstrates attractors (fixed points, stable periodic trajectories, slow converging and slow diverging trajectories, ballistic trajectories, and fractal-like structures) and/or chaotic trajectories. At least one type of fractal-like sticky attractors in the chaotic sea was observed.

  18. Microfluidic Devices for Blood Fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwee Teck Lim

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood, a complex biological fluid, comprises 45% cellular components suspended in protein rich plasma. These different hematologic components perform distinct functions in vivo and thus the ability to efficiently fractionate blood into its individual components has innumerable applications in both clinical diagnosis and biological research. Yet, processing blood is not trivial. In the past decade, a flurry of new microfluidic based technologies has emerged to address this compelling problem. Microfluidics is an attractive solution for this application leveraging its numerous advantages to process clinical blood samples. This paper reviews the various microfluidic approaches realized to successfully fractionate one or more blood components. Techniques to separate plasma from hematologic cellular components as well as isolating blood cells of interest including certain rare cells are discussed. Comparisons based on common separation metrics including efficiency (sensitivity, purity (selectivity, and throughput will be presented. Finally, we will provide insights into the challenges associated with blood-based separation systems towards realizing true point-of-care (POC devices and provide future perspectives.

  19. Optimal Control of Stochastic Systems Driven by Fractional Brownian Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-09

    motions and other stochastic processes. For the control of both continuous time and discrete time finite dimensional linear systems with quadratic...problems for stochastic partial differential equations driven by fractional Brownian motions are explicitly solved. For the control of a continuous time...2010 30-Jun-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Optimal Control of Stochastic Systems Driven by Fractional Brownian

  20. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinis, Panos [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-07

    This is the final report for the work conducted at the University of Minnesota (during the period 12/01/12-09/18/14) by PI Panos Stinis as part of the "Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials" (CM4). CM4 is a multi-institution DOE-funded project whose aim is to conduct basic and applied research in the emerging field of mesoscopic modeling of materials.

  1. Alternative Forms of Compound Fractional Poisson Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Beghin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We study here different fractional versions of the compound Poisson process. The fractionality is introduced in the counting process representing the number of jumps as well as in the density of the jumps themselves. The corresponding distributions are obtained explicitly and proved to be solution of fractional equations of order less than one. Only in the final case treated in this paper, where the number of jumps is given by the fractional-difference Poisson process defined in Orsingher and Polito (2012, we have a fractional driving equation, with respect to the time argument, with order greater than one. Moreover, in this case, the compound Poisson process is Markovian and this is also true for the corresponding limiting process. All the processes considered here are proved to be compositions of continuous time random walks with stable processes (or inverse stable subordinators. These subordinating relationships hold, not only in the limit, but also in the finite domain. In some cases the densities satisfy master equations which are the fractional analogues of the well-known Kolmogorov one.

  2. From Complex Fractional Fourier Transform to Complex Fractional Radon Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong-Yi; JIANG Nian-Quan

    2004-01-01

    We show that for n-dimensional complex fractional Fourier transform the corresponding complex fractional Radon transform can also be derived, however, it is different from the direct product of two n-dimensional real fractional Radon transforms. The complex fractional Radon transform of two-mode Wigner operator is calculated.

  3. Avoidance of Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kathleen; Kerslake, Daphne

    The Concepts in Secondary Mathematics and Science (CSMS) and Strategies and Errors in Secondary Mathematics (SESM) research projects based at Chelsa College, England, have shown the marked reluctance of secondary school students to use fractions when solving mathematical problems, even though they have been taught the topic for a number of years.…

  4. Brewing with fractionated barley

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkelaar, van L.H.G.

    2016-01-01

    Brewing with fractionated barley Beer is a globally consumed beverage, which is produced from malted barley, water, hops and yeast. In recent years, the use of unmalted barley and exogenous enzymes have become more popular because they enable simpler processing and reduced environmental impact. Raw

  5. Ramping up on Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Ana C.; Bottge, Brian A.; Rueda, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a technology-based and hands-on instructional intervention designed to advance middle school students' understandings of fractions. This problem-solving experience is based on the principles of Enhanced Anchored Instruction (EAI) and proved instructionally worthwhile and motivating to teachers and students in both inclusive …

  6. Sweet Work with Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Natalya; Blaine, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Almost everyone loves chocolate. However, the same cannot be said about fractions, which are loved by markedly fewer. Middle school students tend to view them with wary respect, but little affection. The authors attempt to sweeten the subject by describing a type of game involving division of chocolate bars. The activity they describe provides a…

  7. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-01

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in high-degree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifold singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.

  8. Fractional statistics and confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Gaete, P; Gaete, Patricio; Wotzasek, Clovis

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that a pointlike composite having charge and magnetic moment displays a confining potential for the static interaction while simultaneously obeying fractional statistics in a pure gauge theory in three dimensions, without a Chern-Simons term. This result is distinct from the Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory that shows a screening nature for the potential.

  9. Brewing with fractionated barley

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkelaar, van L.H.G.

    2016-01-01

    Brewing with fractionated barley Beer is a globally consumed beverage, which is produced from malted barley, water, hops and yeast. In recent years, the use of unmalted barley and exogenous enzymes have become more popular because they enable simpler processing and reduced environmental impact. Raw

  10. Fractional Differential Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa El-Shahed

    2007-01-01

    where 2<α<3 is a real number and D0+α is the standard Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative. Our analysis relies on Krasnoselskiis fixed point theorem of cone preserving operators. An example is also given to illustrate the main results.

  11. Fractional calculus in bioengineering, part 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    -threshold nerve propagation. By expanding the range of mathematical operations to include fractional calculus, we can develop new and potentially useful functional relationships for modeling complex biological systems in a direct and rigorous manner. In Part 2 of this review (Crit Rev Biomed Eng 2004; 32(1):105-193), fractional calculus was applied to problems in nerve stimulation, dielectric relaxation, and viscoelastic materials by extending the governing differential equations to include fractional order terms. In this third and final installment, we consider distributed systems that represent shear stress in fluids, heat transfer in uniform one-dimensional media, and subthreshold nerve depolarization. Classic electrochemical analysis and impedance spectroscopy are also reviewed from the perspective of fractional calculus, and selected examples from recent studies in neuroscience, bioelectricity, and tissue biomechanics are analyzed to illustrate the vitality of the field.

  12. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-12

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

  13. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    This is the final report of our research program on electronic transport experiments on Topological Insulator (TI) devices, funded by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences. TIbased electronic devices are attractive as platforms for spintronic applications, and for detection of emergent properties such as Majorana excitations , electron-hole condensates , and the topological magneto-electric effect . Most theoretical proposals envision geometries consisting of a planar TI device integrated with materials of distinctly different physical phases (such as ferromagnets and superconductors). Experimental realization of physics tied to the surface states is a challenge due to the ubiquitous presence of bulk carriers in most TI compounds as well as degradation during device fabrication.

  14. Creating, Naming, and Justifying Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Daniel; Gaskin, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    For students to develop meaningful conceptions of fractions and fraction operations, they need to think of fractions in terms other than as just whole-number combinations. In this article, we suggest two powerful images for thinking about fractions that move beyond whole-number reasoning. (Contains 5 figures.)

  15. -Dimensional Fractional Lagrange's Inversion Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Abd El-Salam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Riemann-Liouville fractional differential operator, a fractional extension of the Lagrange inversion theorem and related formulas are developed. The required basic definitions, lemmas, and theorems in the fractional calculus are presented. A fractional form of Lagrange's expansion for one implicitly defined independent variable is obtained. Then, a fractional version of Lagrange's expansion in more than one unknown function is generalized. For extending the treatment in higher dimensions, some relevant vectors and tensors definitions and notations are presented. A fractional Taylor expansion of a function of -dimensional polyadics is derived. A fractional -dimensional Lagrange inversion theorem is proved.

  16. Generalized fractional programming and cutting plane algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, A.; Frenk, J.B.G.

    1994-12-31

    In this presentation we introduce a variant of a cutting plane algorithm and show that this algorithm reduces to the well-known Dinkelbach type procedure of Crouzeix, Ferland and Schaible if our optimization problem is a generalized fractional program. By this observation an easy geometrical interpretation of one of the most important algorithms in generalized fractional programming is obtained. Moreover, it is shown that the convergence of the Dinkelbach type procedure is a direct consequence of the properties of this cutting plane method. Finally, a class of generalized fractional programs is considered where the standard positivity assumption on the denominators of the ratios of the objective function has to be explicitly imposed. It is also shown when using a Dinkelbach type approach for this class of programs that the constraints ensuring the positivity on the denominators can be dropped.

  17. Fractional lattice charge transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flach, Sergej; Khomeriki, Ramaz

    2017-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of noninteracting quantum particles on a square lattice in the presence of a magnetic flux α and a dc electric field E oriented along the lattice diagonal. In general, the adiabatic dynamics will be characterized by Bloch oscillations in the electrical field direction and dispersive ballistic transport in the perpendicular direction. For rational values of α and a corresponding discrete set of values of E(α) vanishing gaps in the spectrum induce a fractionalization of the charge in the perpendicular direction - while left movers are still performing dispersive ballistic transport, the complementary fraction of right movers is propagating in a dispersionless relativistic manner in the opposite direction. Generalizations and the possible probing of the effect with atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and photonic networks are discussed. Zak phase of respective band associated with gap closing regime has been computed and it is found converging to π/2 value. PMID:28102302

  18. Fractions in elementary education

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, Frank

    2013-01-01

    This paper is one of a series in which elementary-education practice is analyzed by comparison with the history of mathematics, mathematical structure, modern practice, and (occasionally) cognitive neuroscience. The primary concerns are: Why do so many children find elementary mathematics difficult? And, why are the ones who succeed still so poorly prepared for college material needed for technical careers? The answer provided by conventional wisdom is essentially that mathematics is difficult. Third-graders are not developmentally ready for the subtlety of fractions, for instance, and even high-performing students cannot be expected to develop the skills of experienced users. However we will see that this is far from the whole story and is probably wrong: elementary-education fractions are genuinely harder and less effective than the version employed by experienced users. Experts discard at least 90% of what is taught in schools. Our educational system is actually counterproductive for skill development, and...

  19. Hamiltonian theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect: Conserving approximation for incompressible fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Ganpathy

    2001-11-01

    A microscopic Hamiltonian theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect developed by Shankar and the present author based on the fermionic Chern-Simons approach has recently been quite successful in calculating gaps and finite-tempertature properties in fractional quantum Hall states. Initially proposed as a small-q theory, it was subsequently extended by Shankar to form an algebraically consistent theory for all q in the lowest Landau level. Such a theory is amenable to a conserving approximation in which the constraints have vanishing correlators and decouple from physical response functions. Properties of the incompressible fractions are explored in this conserving approximation, including the magnetoexciton dispersions and the evolution of the small-q structure factor as ν-->12. Finally, a formalism capable of dealing with a nonuniform ground-state charge density is developed and used to show how the correct fractional value of the quasiparticle charge emerges from the theory.

  20. Nonlinear fractional relaxation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Tofighi

    2012-04-01

    We define a nonlinear model for fractional relaxation phenomena. We use -expansion method to analyse this model. By studying the fundamental solutions of this model we find that when → 0 the model exhibits a fast decay rate and when → ∞ the model exhibits a power-law decay. By analysing the frequency response we find a logarithmic enhancement for the relative ratio of susceptibility.

  1. Brewing with fractionated barley

    OpenAIRE

    Donkelaar, van, CC René

    2016-01-01

    Brewing with fractionated barley Beer is a globally consumed beverage, which is produced from malted barley, water, hops and yeast. In recent years, the use of unmalted barley and exogenous enzymes have become more popular because they enable simpler processing and reduced environmental impact. Raw barley, however, contains less endogenous enzymes and more undesired components for the use of beer brewing, compared to malted barley.  The overall aim of this thesis is to investigate how ba...

  2. Momentum Fractionation on Superstrata

    CERN Document Server

    Bena, Iosif; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P

    2016-01-01

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in high-degree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifold singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with mom...

  3. Variable Order and Distributed Order Fractional Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2002-01-01

    Many physical processes appear to exhibit fractional order behavior that may vary with time or space. The continuum of order in the fractional calculus allows the order of the fractional operator to be considered as a variable. This paper develops the concept of variable and distributed order fractional operators. Definitions based on the Riemann-Liouville definitions are introduced and behavior of the operators is studied. Several time domain definitions that assign different arguments to the order q in the Riemann-Liouville definition are introduced. For each of these definitions various characteristics are determined. These include: time invariance of the operator, operator initialization, physical realization, linearity, operational transforms. and memory characteristics of the defining kernels. A measure (m2) for memory retentiveness of the order history is introduced. A generalized linear argument for the order q allows the concept of "tailored" variable order fractional operators whose a, memory may be chosen for a particular application. Memory retentiveness (m2) and order dynamic behavior are investigated and applications are shown. The concept of distributed order operators where the order of the time based operator depends on an additional independent (spatial) variable is also forwarded. Several definitions and their Laplace transforms are developed, analysis methods with these operators are demonstrated, and examples shown. Finally operators of multivariable and distributed order are defined in their various applications are outlined.

  4. Fractional random walk lattice dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Michelitsch, Thomas; Riascos, Alejandro Perez; Nowakowski, Andrzeij; Nicolleau, Franck

    2016-01-01

    We analyze time-discrete and continuous `fractional' random walks on undirected regular networks with special focus on cubic periodic lattices in $n=1,2,3,..$ dimensions.The fractional random walk dynamics is governed by a master equation involving {\\it fractional powers of Laplacian matrices $L^{\\frac{\\alpha}{2}}$}where $\\alpha=2$ recovers the normal walk.First we demonstrate thatthe interval $0\\textless{}\\alpha\\leq 2$ is admissible for the fractional random walk. We derive analytical expressions for fractional transition matrix and closely related the average return probabilities. We further obtain thefundamental matrix $Z^{(\\alpha)}$, and the mean relaxation time (Kemeny constant) for the fractional random walk.The representation for the fundamental matrix $Z^{(\\alpha)}$ relates fractional random walks with normal random walks.We show that the fractional transition matrix elements exihibit for large cubic $n$-dimensional lattices a power law decay of an $n$-dimensional infinite spaceRiesz fractional deriva...

  5. FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETER, GARY F. [UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

    2014-07-16

    Excellent progress was made in standardizing three complementary methods: Magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray micro CT, and MALDI imaging linear ion trap mass spectroscopy to image biomass and chemical, anatomical and functional changes that occur during pretreatment and hydrolysis. Magnetic resonance microscopy provides excellent images with as low as 5 uM resolution with hydrated biomass samples. We visualized dramatic changes in signal associated with the hydrolysis of the carbohydrates by strong acids. Quantitative diffusion approaches were used to probe more subtle structural changes in biomass. Diffusion tensor calculations reflect diffusion anisotropy and fractional anisotropy maps clearly show the longer range diffusion within the vessels compared to within the fiber cells. The diffusion is increased along the cell walls of the vessels. Suggesting that further research with NMR imaging should be pursued. X-ray CT provides excellent images at as low as 3.5 uM resolution from dried biomass. Small increases in surface area, and decreases in local density have been quantified in with wood after mild pretreatments; these changes are expected to be underestimates of the hydrated wood, due to the ~12% shrinkage that occurs upon drying untreated wood. MALDI-MS spectra show high ion intensities at most mass to charge ratios in untreated and pretreated woody material. MALDI-MSn is required to improve specificity and reduce background for imaging. MALDI-TOF is not specific enough for carbohydrate identification. Using MALDI-LIT/MSn we can readily identify oligomeric glucans and xylans and their fragmentation patterns as well as those of the glucuronic acid side chains of birch 4-O-methyl glucuronxylan. Imaging of glucan and xylan oligomers show that many contain isobaric ions with different distributions, indicating again that MSn is needed for accurate imaging of lignocellulosic materials. We are now starting to integrate the three imaging methods by using the same set

  6. Gauge Invariant Fractional Electromagnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lazo, Matheus Jatkoske

    2011-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrations of non-integers orders was introduced more than three centuries ago but only recently gained more attention due to its application on nonlocal phenomenas. In this context, several formulations of fractional electromagnetic fields was proposed, but all these theories suffer from the absence of an effective fractional vector calculus, and in general are non-causal or spatially asymmetric. In order to deal with these difficulties, we propose a spatially symmetric and causal gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic field from a Lagrangian formulation. From our fractional Maxwell's fields arose a definition for the fractional gradient, divergent and curl operators.

  7. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Robert C. [Texas A& M University; Kamon, Teruki [Texas A& M University; Toback, David [Texas A& M University; Safonov, Alexei [Texas A& M University; Dutta, Bhaskar [Texas A& M University; Dimitri, Nanopoulos [Texas A& M University; Pope, Christopher [Texas A& M University; White, James [Texas A& M University

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  8. Fractional Langevin equation and Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sau Fa, Kwok

    2007-10-01

    In this present work we consider a fractional Langevin equation with Riemann-Liouville fractional time derivative which modifies the classical Newtonian force, nonlocal dissipative force, and long-time correlation. We investigate the first two moments, variances and position and velocity correlation functions of this system. We also compare them with the results obtained from the same fractional Langevin equation which uses the Caputo fractional derivative.

  9. Preheating with fractional powers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Hossein Bazrafshan; Brandenberger, Robert

    2016-11-01

    We consider preheating in models in which the potential for the inflaton is given by a fractional power, as is the case in axion monodromy inflation. We assume a standard coupling between the inflaton field and a scalar matter field. We find that in spite of the fact that the oscillation of the inflaton about the field value which minimizes the potential is anharmonic, there is nevertheless a parametric resonance instability, and we determine the Floquet exponent which describes this instability as a function of the parameters of the inflaton potential.

  10. Fractional cointegration rank estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasak, Katarzyna; Velasco, Carlos

    We consider cointegration rank estimation for a p-dimensional Fractional Vector Error Correction Model. We propose a new two-step procedure which allows testing for further long-run equilibrium relations with possibly different persistence levels. The fi…rst step consists in estimating......-likelihood ratio test of no-cointegration on the estimated p - r common trends that are not cointegrated under the null. The cointegration degree is re-estimated in the second step to allow for new cointegration relationships with different memory. We augment the error correction model in the second step...

  11. Fractional Reserve Banking

    OpenAIRE

    Andreasen, Niels; Bjerregaard, Mads; Lund, Jonas; Olsen, Ove Bitsch; Rasmussen, Andreas Dalgas

    2012-01-01

    Projektet er bygget op omkring kritisk realisme, som er det gennemgående videnskabelige fundament til undersøgelsen af hvilke strukturelle grunde der er til finansiel ustabilitet i Danmark. Projektet går i dybden med Fractional Reserve Banking og incitamentsstrukturen i banksystemet. Vi bevæger os både på det makro- og mikroøkonomiske niveau i analysen. På makro niveau bruger vi den østrigske skole om konjunktur teori (The Positive Theory of the Cycle). På mikro niveau arbejder vi med princip...

  12. Fractional Reserve Banking

    OpenAIRE

    Andreasen, Niels; Bjerregaard, Mads; Lund, Jonas; Olsen, Ove Bitsch; Rasmussen, Andreas Dalgas

    2012-01-01

    Projektet er bygget op omkring kritisk realisme, som er det gennemgående videnskabelige fundament til undersøgelsen af hvilke strukturelle grunde der er til finansiel ustabilitet i Danmark. Projektet går i dybden med Fractional Reserve Banking og incitamentsstrukturen i banksystemet. Vi bevæger os både på det makro- og mikroøkonomiske niveau i analysen. På makro niveau bruger vi den østrigske skole om konjunktur teori (The Positive Theory of the Cycle). På mikro niveau arbejder vi med princip...

  13. Fractional Integral Inequalities via Hadamard’s Fractional Integral

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We establish new fractional integral inequalities, via Hadamard’s fractional integral. Several new integral inequalities are obtained, including a Grüss type Hadamard fractional integral inequality, by using Young and weighted AM-GM inequalities. Many special cases are also discussed.

  14. Body Fractions: A Physical Approach to Fraction Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Many students experience great difficulty understanding the meaning of fractions. For many students who have spent their early mathematics lessons focusing on counting (whole) numbers, recognising that there are many numbers between those whole numbers called fractional numbers, is quite revolutionary. The foundation of understanding fractions is…

  15. Cosmological Models with Fractional Derivatives and Fractional Action Functional

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.K. Shchigolev

    2011-01-01

    Cosmological models of a scalar field with dynamical equations containing fractional derivatives or derived from the Einstein-Hilbert action of fractional order, are constructed. A number of exact solutions to those equations of fractional cosmological models in both eases is given.

  16. The Geminga Fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K; Gonthier, P L; Harding, Alice K.; Grenier, Isabelle A.; Gonthier, Peter L.

    2007-01-01

    Radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars like Geminga may account for a number of the unidentified EGRET sources in the Galaxy. The number of Geminga-like pulsars is very sensitive to the geometry of both the gamma-ray and radio beams. Recent studies of the shape and polarization of pulse profiles of young radio pulsars have provided evidence that their radio emission originates in wide cone beams at altitudes that are a significant fraction (1 -10%) of their light cylinder radius. Such wide radio emission beams will be visible at a much larger range of observer angles than the narrow core components thought to originate at lower altitude. Using 3D geometrical modeling that includes relativistic effects from pulsar rotation, we study the visibility of such radio cone beams as well as that of the gamma-ray beams predicted by slot gap and outer gap models. From the results of this study one can obtain revised predictions for the fraction of Geminga-like, radio quiet pulsars present in the gamma-ray pulsar population.

  17. NESDIS VIIRS Green Vegetation Fraction

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains weekly Green Vegetation Fraction (GVF) derived from VIIRS. The Green Vegetation Fraction product is updated daily and is used as an input to...

  18. Advances in robust fractional control

    CERN Document Server

    Padula, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    This monograph presents design methodologies for (robust) fractional control systems. It shows the reader how to take advantage of the superior flexibility of fractional control systems compared with integer-order systems in achieving more challenging control requirements. There is a high degree of current interest in fractional systems and fractional control arising from both academia and industry and readers from both milieux are catered to in the text. Different design approaches having in common a trade-off between robustness and performance of the control system are considered explicitly. The text generalizes methodologies, techniques and theoretical results that have been successfully applied in classical (integer) control to the fractional case. The first part of Advances in Robust Fractional Control is the more industrially-oriented. It focuses on the design of fractional controllers for integer processes. In particular, it considers fractional-order proportional-integral-derivative controllers, becau...

  19. Fractional Reserve in Banking System

    OpenAIRE

    Valkonen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is aimed to provide understanding of the role of the fractional reserve in the mod-ern banking system worldwide and particularly in Finland. The fractional reserve banking is used worldwide, but the benefits of this system are very disputable. On the one hand, experts say that the fractional reserve is a necessary instrument for the normal business and profit making. On the other hand, sceptics openly criticize the fractional reserve system and blame it for fiat money (money n...

  20. Fractional Reserve in Banking System

    OpenAIRE

    Valkonen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is aimed to provide understanding of the role of the fractional reserve in the mod-ern banking system worldwide and particularly in Finland. The fractional reserve banking is used worldwide, but the benefits of this system are very disputable. On the one hand, experts say that the fractional reserve is a necessary instrument for the normal business and profit making. On the other hand, sceptics openly criticize the fractional reserve system and blame it for fiat money (money n...

  1. Experimental observation of fractional echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, G.; Hertz, E.; Billard, F.; Lavorel, B.; Siour, G.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Faucher, O.; Gershnabel, Erez; Prior, Yehiam; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2016-09-01

    We report the observation of fractional echoes in a double-pulse excited nonlinear system. Unlike standard echoes, which appear periodically at delays which are integer multiples of the delay between the two exciting pulses, the fractional echoes appear at rational fractions of this delay. We discuss the mechanism leading to this phenomenon, and provide experimental demonstration of fractional echoes by measuring third harmonic generation in a thermal gas of CO2 molecules excited by a pair of femtosecond laser pulses.

  2. Fractional Hopfield Neural Networks: Fractional Dynamic Associative Recurrent Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yi-Fei; Yi, Zhang; Zhou, Ji-Liu

    2016-07-14

    This paper mainly discusses a novel conceptual framework: fractional Hopfield neural networks (FHNN). As is commonly known, fractional calculus has been incorporated into artificial neural networks, mainly because of its long-term memory and nonlocality. Some researchers have made interesting attempts at fractional neural networks and gained competitive advantages over integer-order neural networks. Therefore, it is naturally makes one ponder how to generalize the first-order Hopfield neural networks to the fractional-order ones, and how to implement FHNN by means of fractional calculus. We propose to introduce a novel mathematical method: fractional calculus to implement FHNN. First, we implement fractor in the form of an analog circuit. Second, we implement FHNN by utilizing fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, and further analyze its attractors. Third, we perform experiments to analyze the stability and convergence of FHNN, and further discuss its applications to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. The main contribution of our work is to propose FHNN in the form of an analog circuit by utilizing a fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, prove its Lyapunov stability, analyze its attractors, and apply FHNN to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. A significant advantage of FHNN is that its attractors essentially relate to the neuron's fractional order. FHNN possesses the fractional-order-stability and fractional-order-sensitivity characteristics.

  3. Nonholonomic constraints with fractional derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasov, Vasily E [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Zaslavsky, George M [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St, New York, NY 10012 (United States)

    2006-08-04

    We consider the fractional generalization of nonholonomic constraints defined by equations with fractional derivatives and provide some examples. The corresponding equations of motion are derived using variational principle. We prove that fractional constraints can be used to describe the evolution of dynamical systems in which some coordinates and velocities are related to velocities through a power-law memory function.

  4. How Weird Are Weird Fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuffelbeam, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    A positive rational is a weird fraction if its value is unchanged by an illegitimate, digit-based reduction. In this article, we prove that each weird fraction is uniquely weird and initiate a discussion of the prevalence of weird fractions.

  5. Nonlocal Transport Processes and the Fractional Cattaneo-Vernotte Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Gómez Aguilar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cattaneo-Vernotte equation is a generalization of the heat and particle diffusion equations; this mathematical model combines waves and diffusion with a finite velocity of propagation. In disordered systems the diffusion can be anomalous. In these kinds of systems, the mean-square displacement is proportional to a fractional power of time not equal to one. The anomalous diffusion concept is naturally obtained from diffusion equations using the fractional calculus approach. In this paper we present an alternative representation of the Cattaneo-Vernotte equation using the fractional calculus approach; the spatial-time derivatives of fractional order are approximated using the Caputo-type derivative in the range (0,2]. In this alternative representation we introduce the appropriate fractional dimensional parameters which characterize consistently the existence of the fractional space-time derivatives into the fractional Cattaneo-Vernotte equation. Finally, consider the Dirichlet conditions, the Fourier method was used to find the full solution of the fractional Cattaneo-Vernotte equation in analytic way, and Caputo and Riesz fractional derivatives are considered. The advantage of our representation appears according to the comparison between our model and models presented in the literature, which are not acceptable physically due to the dimensional incompatibility of the solutions. The classical cases are recovered when the fractional derivative exponents are equal to 1.

  6. Nonhomogeneous fractional Poisson processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xiaotian [School of Management, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)]. E-mail: swa001@126.com; Zhang Shiying [School of Management, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Fan Shen [Computer and Information School, Zhejiang Wanli University, Ningbo 315100 (China)

    2007-01-15

    In this paper, we propose a class of non-Gaussian stationary increment processes, named nonhomogeneous fractional Poisson processes W{sub H}{sup (j)}(t), which permit the study of the effects of long-range dependance in a large number of fields including quantum physics and finance. The processes W{sub H}{sup (j)}(t) are self-similar in a wide sense, exhibit more fatter tail than Gaussian processes, and converge to the Gaussian processes in distribution in some cases. In addition, we also show that the intensity function {lambda}(t) strongly influences the existence of the highest finite moment of W{sub H}{sup (j)}(t) and the behaviour of the tail probability of W{sub H}{sup (j)}(t)

  7. Membrane Assisted Enzyme Fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Linfeng

    . In this thesis, separations using crossflow elecro-membrane filtration (EMF) of amino acids, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and industrial enzymes from Novozymes were performed. The main objective of this study was to investigate the technological feasibility of EMF in the application of industrial enzyme...... fractionation, such as removal of a side activity from the main enzyme activity. As a proof-of-concept, amino acids were used as model solution to test the feasibility of EMF in the application of amphoteric molecule separation. A single amino acid was used to illustrate the effect of an electric field...... on the separation performance were very small in the investigated range. The mass transport of each enzyme can be well explained by the Extended-Nernst-Planck equation. Better separation was observed at lower feed concentration, higher solution pH in the investigated range and with a polysulfone (PS) MF membrane...

  8. Membrane Assisted Enzyme Fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Linfeng

    . In this thesis, separations using crossflow elecro-membrane filtration (EMF) of amino acids, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and industrial enzymes from Novozymes were performed. The main objective of this study was to investigate the technological feasibility of EMF in the application of industrial enzyme...... fractionation, such as removal of a side activity from the main enzyme activity. As a proof-of-concept, amino acids were used as model solution to test the feasibility of EMF in the application of amphoteric molecule separation. A single amino acid was used to illustrate the effect of an electric field...... on the separation performance were very small in the investigated range. The mass transport of each enzyme can be well explained by the Extended-Nernst-Planck equation. Better separation was observed at lower feed concentration, higher solution pH in the investigated range and with a polysulfone (PS) MF membrane...

  9. A Statistical Treatment of Bioassay Pour Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Hughes, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The binomial probability distribution is used to treat the statistics of a microbiological sample that is split into two parts, with only one part evaluated for spore count. One wishes to estimate the total number of spores in the sample based on the counts obtained from the part that is evaluated (pour fraction). Formally, the binomial distribution is recharacterized as a function of the observed counts (successes), with the total number (trials) an unknown. The pour fraction is the probability of success per spore (trial). This distribution must be renormalized in terms of the total number. Finally, the new renormalized distribution is integrated and mathematically inverted to yield the maximum estimate of the total number as a function of a desired level of confidence ( P(fraction. The extension to recovery efficiency corrections is also presented. Now the product of recovery efficiency and pour fraction may be small enough that the likely value may be much larger than the usual calculation: the number of spores divided by that product. The use of this analysis would not be limited to microbiological data.

  10. Parameter identification of fractional order linear system based on Haar wavelet operational matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanlu; Meng, Xiao; Zheng, Bochao; Ding, Yaqing

    2015-11-01

    Fractional order systems can be more adequate for the description of dynamical systems than integer order models, however, how to obtain fractional order models are still actively exploring. In this paper, an identification method for fractional order linear system was proposed. This is a method based on input-output data in time domain. The input and output signals are represented by Haar wavelet, and then fractional order systems described by fractional order differential equations are transformed into fractional order integral equations. Taking use of the Haar wavelet operational matrix of the fractional order integration, the fractional order linear system can easily be converted into a system of algebraic equation. Finally, the parameters of the fractional order system are determined by minimizing the errors between the output of the real system and that of the identified system. Numerical simulations, involving integral and fractional order systems, confirm the efficiency of the above methodology.

  11. Fractional Calculus: Integral and Differential Equations of Fractional Order

    CERN Document Server

    Gorenflo, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    We introduce the linear operators of fractional integration and fractional differentiation in the framework of the Riemann-Liouville fractional calculus. Particular attention is devoted to the technique of Laplace transforms for treating these operators in a way accessible to applied scientists, avoiding unproductive generalities and excessive mathematical rigor. By applying this technique we shall derive the analytical solutions of the most simple linear integral and differential equations of fractional order. We show the fundamental role of the Mittag-Leffler function, whose properties are reported in an ad hoc Appendix. The topics discussed here will be: (a) essentials of Riemann-Liouville fractional calculus with basic formulas of Laplace transforms, (b) Abel type integral equations of first and second kind, (c) relaxation and oscillation type differential equations of fractional order.

  12. An improved fractional divider for fractional-N frequency synthesizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Yongqi

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents an improved fractional divider used in 1.8~2GHz fractional-N frequency synthesizers. A new clock setting for delta-sigma modulator (DSM) is proposed to prevent the potential problems of traditional fractional dividers: the DSM output would be wrongly loaded and the action of DSM circuit may affect the phase-detection of phase-frequency-detector (PFD). Simulation result shows the effectiveness of this improvement.

  13. Density fractions versus size separates: Does physical fractionation isolate functional soil compartments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Christophe; Hatton, Pierre-Joseph; Bernd, Zeller; Derrien, Delphine; Markus, Kleber

    2013-04-01

    decomposition pathway or protective mechanism. This also implies that historical assumptions about the "adsorbed" state of carbon associated with fine fractions need to be re-evaluated. Finally, this work demonstrates that establishing a comprehensive picture of whole soil OM dynamics requires a combination of both methodologies and we offer a suggestion for an efficient combination of the density and size-based approaches.

  14. Fractional magnetohydrodynamics Oldroyd-B fluid over an oscillating plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some new exact solutions corresponding to the oscillating flows of a MHD Oldroyd-B fluid with fractional derivatives. The fractional calculus approach in the governing equations is used. The exact solutions for the oscillating motions of a fractional MHD Oldroyd-B fluid due to sine and cosine oscillations of an infinite plate are established with the help of discrete Laplace transform. The expressions for velocity field and the associated shear stress that have been obtained, presented in series form in terms of Fox H functions, satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions. Similar solutions for ordinary MHD Oldroyd-B, fractional and ordinary MHD Maxwell, fractional and ordinary MHD Second grade and MHD Newtonian fluid as well as those for hydrodynamic fluids are obtained as special cases of general solutions. Finally, the obtained solutions are graphically analyzed through various parameters of interest.

  15. Robust fractional order differentiators using generalized modulating functions method

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Dayan

    2015-02-01

    This paper aims at designing a fractional order differentiator for a class of signals satisfying a linear differential equation with unknown parameters. A generalized modulating functions method is proposed first to estimate the unknown parameters, then to derive accurate integral formulae for the left-sided Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives of the studied signal. Unlike the improper integral in the definition of the left-sided Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative, the integrals in the proposed formulae can be proper and be considered as a low-pass filter by choosing appropriate modulating functions. Hence, digital fractional order differentiators applicable for on-line applications are deduced using a numerical integration method in discrete noisy case. Moreover, some error analysis are given for noise error contributions due to a class of stochastic processes. Finally, numerical examples are given to show the accuracy and robustness of the proposed fractional order differentiators.

  16. Multivariate Padé Approximation for Solving Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations of Fractional Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veyis Turut

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two tecHniques were implemented, the Adomian decomposition method (ADM and multivariate Padé approximation (MPA, for solving nonlinear partial differential equations of fractional order. The fractional derivatives are described in Caputo sense. First, the fractional differential equation has been solved and converted to power series by Adomian decomposition method (ADM, then power series solution of fractional differential equation was put into multivariate Padé series. Finally, numerical results were compared and presented in tables and figures.

  17. Incompressible Stars and Fractional Derivatives

    CERN Document Server

    Bayin, S S

    2014-01-01

    Fractional calculus is an effective tool in incorporating the effects of non-locality and memory into physical models. In this regard, successful applications exist rang- ing from signal processing to anomalous diffusion and quantum mechanics. In this paper we investigate the fractional versions of the stellar structure equations for non radiating spherical objects. Using incompressible fluids as a comparison, we develop models for constant density Newtonian objects with fractional mass distributions or stress conditions. To better understand the fractional effects, we discuss effective values for the density, gravitational field and equation of state. The fractional ob- jects are smaller and less massive than integer models. The fractional parameters are related to a polytropic index for the models considered.

  18. Proton Fraction in Neutron Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丰收; 陈列文

    2001-01-01

    The proton fraction in β-stable neutron stars is investigated within the framework of the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock theory using the extended Skyrme effective interaction for the first time. The calculated results show that the proton fraction disappears at high density, which implies that the pure neutron matter may exist in the interior of neutron stars. The incompressibility of the nuclear equation-of-state is shown to be more important to determine the proton fraction. Meanwhile, it is indicated that the addition of muons in neutron stars will change the proton fraction. It is also found that the higher-order terms of the nuclear symmetry energy have obvious effects on the proton fraction and the parabolic law of the nuclear symmetry energy is not enough to determine the proton fraction.

  19. Accessible solitons of fractional dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Wei-Ping, E-mail: zhongwp6@126.com [Department of Electronic and Information Engineering, Shunde Polytechnic, Guangdong Province, Shunde 528300 (China); Texas A& M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Belić, Milivoj [Texas A& M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Zhang, Yiqi [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education & Shaanxi Key Lab of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrate that accessible solitons described by an extended Schrödinger equation with the Laplacian of fractional dimension can exist in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media. The soliton solutions of the model are constructed by two special functions, the associated Legendre polynomials and the Laguerre polynomials in the fraction-dimensional space. Our results show that these fractional accessible solitons form a soliton family which includes crescent solitons, and asymmetric single-layer and multi-layer necklace solitons. -- Highlights: •Analytic solutions of a fractional Schrödinger equation are obtained. •The solutions are produced by means of self-similar method applied to the fractional Schrödinger equation with parabolic potential. •The fractional accessible solitons form crescent, asymmetric single-layer and multilayer necklace profiles. •The model applies to the propagation of optical pulses in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media.

  20. Approximate Controllability of Fractional Neutral Stochastic System with Infinite Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivel, R.; Ganesh, R.; Suganya, S.

    2012-12-01

    The concept of controllability plays an important role in analysis and design of linear and nonlinear control systems. Further, fractional differential equations have wide applications in engineering and science. In this paper, the approximate controllability of neutral stochastic fractional integro-differential equation with infinite delay in a Hilbert space is studied. By using Krasnoselskii's fixed point theorem with stochastic analysis theory, we derive a new set of sufficient conditions for the approximate controllability of nonlinear fractional stochastic system under the assumption that the corresponding linear system is approximately controllable. Finally, an example is provided to illustrate the obtained theory.

  1. Number line representations of fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Behr, Merlyn J.; Bright, George W.; Wachsmuth, Ipke; Wagner, Sigrid

    1982-01-01

    The study explored students' interpretations of representations of fractions on number lines and the effect of instruction on those interpretations. Subjects were five fourth-graders, and instruction was a four-day unit on the use of number lines. A 16-item, multiple-choice pre- and posttest was used along with videotaped interviews. Performance improved except when students had to associate a reduced fraction symbol with an equivalent, unreduced fraction representation on a number line. The ...

  2. Fractionating human intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampshire, Adam; Highfield, Roger R; Parkin, Beth L; Owen, Adrian M

    2012-12-20

    What makes one person more intellectually able than another? Can the entire distribution of human intelligence be accounted for by just one general factor? Is intelligence supported by a single neural system? Here, we provide a perspective on human intelligence that takes into account how general abilities or "factors" reflect the functional organization of the brain. By comparing factor models of individual differences in performance with factor models of brain functional organization, we demonstrate that different components of intelligence have their analogs in distinct brain networks. Using simulations based on neuroimaging data, we show that the higher-order factor "g" is accounted for by cognitive tasks corecruiting multiple networks. Finally, we confirm the independence of these components of intelligence by dissociating them using questionnaire variables. We propose that intelligence is an emergent property of anatomically distinct cognitive systems, each of which has its own capacity.

  3. Comment on "Fractional quantum mechanics" and "Fractional Schroedinger equation"

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Yuchuan

    2016-01-01

    In this comment, we point out some shortcomings in two papers "Fractional quantum mechanics" [Phys. Rev. E 62, 3135 (2000)] and "Fractional Schroedinger equation" [Phys. Rev. E 66, 056108 (2002)]. We prove that the fractional uncertainty relation does not hold generally. The probability continuity equation in fractional quantum mechanics has a missing source term, which leads to particle teleportation, i.e., a particle can teleport from one place to another. Since the relativistic kinetic energy can be viewed as an approximate realization of the fractional kinetic energy, the particle teleportation should be an observable relativistic effect in quantum mechanics. With the help of this concept, superconductivity could be viewed as the teleportation of electrons from one side of a superconductor to another and superfluidity could be viewed as the teleportation of helium atoms from one end of a capillary tube to the other. We also point out how to teleport a particle to a destination.

  4. Couple of the Variational Iteration Method and Fractional-Order Legendre Functions Method for Fractional Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Junqiang; Leng, Hongze; Lu, Fengshun

    2014-01-01

    We present a new numerical method to get the approximate solutions of fractional differential equations. A new operational matrix of integration for fractional-order Legendre functions (FLFs) is first derived. Then a modified variational iteration formula which can avoid “noise terms” is constructed. Finally a numerical method based on variational iteration method (VIM) and FLFs is developed for fractional differential equations (FDEs). Block-pulse functions (BPFs) are used to calculate the FLFs coefficient matrices of the nonlinear terms. Five examples are discussed to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the technique. PMID:24511303

  5. Numerical Approach Based on Two-Dimensional Fractional-Order Legendre Functions for Solving Fractional Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingxue Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a robust, effective, and accurate numerical approach is proposed to obtain the numerical solution of fractional differential equations. The principal characteristic of the approach is the new orthogonal functions based on shifted Legendre polynomials to the fractional calculus. Also the fractional differential operational matrix is driven. Then the matrix with the Tau method is utilized to transform this problem into a system of linear algebraic equations. By solving the linear algebraic equations, the numerical solution is obtained. The approach is tested via some examples. It is shown that the FLF yields better results. Finally, error analysis shows that the algorithm is convergent.

  6. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  7. Non-Noether symmetries of Hamiltonian systems with conformable fractional derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin-Li, Wang; Jing-Li, Fu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present the fractional Hamilton’s canonical equations and the fractional non-Noether symmetry of Hamilton systems by the conformable fractional derivative. Firstly, the exchanging relationship between isochronous variation and fractional derivatives, and the fractional Hamilton principle of the system under this fractional derivative are proposed. Secondly, the fractional Hamilton’s canonical equations of Hamilton systems based on the Hamilton principle are established. Thirdly, the fractional non-Noether symmetries, non-Noether theorem and non-Noether conserved quantities for the Hamilton systems with the conformable fractional derivatives are obtained. Finally, an example is given to illustrate the results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11272287 and 11472247), the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University, China (Grant No. IRT13097), and the Key Science and Technology Innovation Team Project of Zhejiang Province, China (Grant No. 2013TD18).

  8. Deterministic ratchets for suspension fractionation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulrattanarak, T.

    2010-01-01

    Driven by the current insights in sustainability and technological development in biorefining natural renewable resources, the food industry has taken an interest in fractionation of agrofood materials, like milk and cereal crops. The purpose of fractionation is to split the raw material in sever

  9. Financial Planning with Fractional Goals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Goedhart; J. Spronk (Jaap)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWhen solving financial planning problems with multiple goals by means of multiple objective programming, the presence of fractional goals leads to technical difficulties. In this paper we present a straightforward interactive approach for solving such linear fractional programs with mult

  10. Financial Planning with Fractional Goals

    OpenAIRE

    Goedhart, M.H.; Spronk, Jaap

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWhen solving financial planning problems with multiple goals by means of multiple objective programming, the presence of fractional goals leads to technical difficulties. In this paper we present a straightforward interactive approach for solving such linear fractional programs with multiple goal variables. The approach is illustrated by means of an example in financial planning.

  11. Approximations of fractional Brownian motion

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yuqiang; 10.3150/10-BEJ319

    2012-01-01

    Approximations of fractional Brownian motion using Poisson processes whose parameter sets have the same dimensions as the approximated processes have been studied in the literature. In this paper, a special approximation to the one-parameter fractional Brownian motion is constructed using a two-parameter Poisson process. The proof involves the tightness and identification of finite-dimensional distributions.

  12. Investigations on Multiplication of Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Khoo Phon; Inder, Walter R. D.

    1984-01-01

    Three different models with continuous materials, discontinuous materials, and number lines were used to study the operation concept in six investigations on multiplication with fractions with pupils aged 11-12 in a Penang International School. All approaches could be understood by pupils, but they preferred the area and fractional models. (MNS)

  13. Understanding Magnitudes to Understand Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Fractions are known to be difficult to learn and difficult to teach, yet they are vital for students to have access to further mathematical concepts. This article uses evidence to support teachers employing teaching methods that focus on the conceptual understanding of the magnitude of fractions.

  14. Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement Updated:Feb 15,2017 The ejection fraction ( ... failure This content was last reviewed April 2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  15. Unwrapping Students' Ideas about Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Rebecca M.; Gibbons, Lynsey K.; Kazemi, Elham; Lind, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Supporting students to develop an understanding of the meaning of fractions is an important goal of elementary school mathematics. This involves developing partitioning strategies, creating representations, naming fractional quantities, and using symbolic notation. This article describes how teachers can use a formative assessment problem to…

  16. Rational Exponentials and Continued Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    Using continued fraction expansions, we can approximate constants, such as pi and e, using an appropriate integer n raised to the power x[superscript 1/x], x a suitable rational. We review continued fractions and give an algorithm for producing these approximations.

  17. Wavelet-fractional Fourier transforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Lin

    2008-01-01

    This paper extends the definition of fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) proposed by Namias V by using other orthonormal bases for L2 (R) instead of Hermite-Ganssian functions.The new orthonormal basis is gained indirectly from multiresolution analysis and orthonormal wavelets. The so defined FRFT is called wavelets-fractional Fourier transform.

  18. Identification of fractional order systems using modulating functions method

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Dayan

    2013-06-01

    The modulating functions method has been used for the identification of linear and nonlinear systems. In this paper, we generalize this method to the on-line identification of fractional order systems based on the Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives. First, a new fractional integration by parts formula involving the fractional derivative of a modulating function is given. Then, we apply this formula to a fractional order system, for which the fractional derivatives of the input and the output can be transferred into the ones of the modulating functions. By choosing a set of modulating functions, a linear system of algebraic equations is obtained. Hence, the unknown parameters of a fractional order system can be estimated by solving a linear system. Using this method, we do not need any initial values which are usually unknown and not equal to zero. Also we do not need to estimate the fractional derivatives of noisy output. Moreover, it is shown that the proposed estimators are robust against high frequency sinusoidal noises and the ones due to a class of stochastic processes. Finally, the efficiency and the stability of the proposed method is confirmed by some numerical simulations.

  19. Radiating subdispersive fractional optical solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujioka, J., E-mail: fujioka@fisica.unam.mx; Espinosa, A.; Rodríguez, R. F. [Departamento de Física Química, Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico); Malomed, B. A. [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2014-09-01

    It was recently found [Fujioka et al., Phys. Lett. A 374, 1126 (2010)] that the propagation of solitary waves can be described by a fractional extension of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation which involves a temporal fractional derivative (TFD) of order α > 2. In the present paper, we show that there is also another fractional extension of the NLS equation which contains a TFD with α < 2, and in this case, the new equation describes the propagation of radiating solitons. We show that the emission of the radiation (when α < 2) is explained by resonances at various frequencies between the pulses and the linear modes of the system. It is found that the new fractional NLS equation can be derived from a suitable Lagrangian density, and a fractional Noether's theorem can be applied to it, thus predicting the conservation of the Hamiltonian, momentum and energy.

  20. Final Report to DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail Gultepe

    2012-05-15

    This final report summarizes the accomplished goals and provide a list of the publications and presentations made during the project. The goals of the project were accomplished through the various publications submitted to Journals and presentations done at the DOE and international meetings and conferences. The 8 journal articles related to the goals of this project were accepted or submitted. The 23 presentations related to goals of the project were presented at the meetings. There were some minor changes regarding to project goals because of issues encountered during the analysis of the data. For example, a total water probe sensor mounted on the Convair-580 that can be used for defining mixed phase conditions and parameterization, had some problems to estimate magnitude of total water mass, and this resulted in issues providing an accurate parameterization for cloud fraction. Variability related aerosol number concentrations and their composition for direct and indirect effects were studied and published. Results were given to explain aerosol and ice microphysical effects on climate change studies. It is suggested that developed parameterizations should consider the variability in aerosol and ice parameters over the Arctic regions.

  1. Permutation entropy of fractional Brownian motion and fractional Gaussian noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zunino, L. [Centro de Investigaciones Opticas, C.C. 124 Correo Central, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP), 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: lucianoz@ciop.unlp.edu.ar; Perez, D.G. [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso (PUCV), 23-40025 Valparaiso (Chile)], E-mail: dario.perez@ucv.cl; Martin, M.T. [Instituto de Fisica (IFLP), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata and Argentina' s National Council (CCT-CONICET), C.C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: mtmartin@fisica.unlp.edu.ar; Garavaglia, M. [Centro de Investigaciones Opticas, C.C. 124 Correo Central, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: garavagliam@ciop.unlp.edu.ar; Plastino, A. [Instituto de Fisica (IFLP), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata and Argentina' s National Council (CCT-CONICET), C.C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: plastino@fisica.unlp.edu.ar; Rosso, O.A. [Centre for Bioinformatics, Biomarker Discovery and Information-Based Medicine, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan NSW 2308 (Australia); Chaos and Biology Group, Instituto de Calculo, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pabellon II, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428 Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: oarosso@fibertel.com.ar

    2008-06-30

    We have worked out theoretical curves for the permutation entropy of the fractional Brownian motion and fractional Gaussian noise by using the Bandt and Shiha [C. Bandt, F. Shiha, J. Time Ser. Anal. 28 (2007) 646] theoretical predictions for their corresponding relative frequencies. Comparisons with numerical simulations show an excellent agreement. Furthermore, the entropy-gap in the transition between these processes, observed previously via numerical results, has been here theoretically validated. Also, we have analyzed the behaviour of the permutation entropy of the fractional Gaussian noise for different time delays.

  2. Helical flows of fractionalized Burgers' fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Jamil

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady flows of Burgers’ fluid with fractional derivatives model, through a circular cylinder, is studied by means of the Laplace and finite Hankel transforms. The motion is produced by the cylinder that at the initial moment begins to rotate around its axis with an angular velocity Ωt, and to slide along the same axis with linear velocity Ut. The solutions that have been obtained, presented in series form in terms of the generalized Ga,b,c(•, t functions, satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions. Moreover, the corresponding solutions for fractionalized Oldroyd-B, Maxwell and second grade fluids appear as special cases of the present results. Furthermore, the solutions for ordinary Burgers’, Oldroyd-B, Maxwell, second grade and Newtonian performing the same motion, are also obtained as special cases of general solutions by substituting fractional parameters α = β = 1. Finally, the influence of the pertinent parameters on the fluid motion, as well as a comparison among models, is shown by graphical illustrations.

  3. Ferroelectric Fractional-Order Capacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Agambayev, Agamyrat

    2017-07-25

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride)-based polymers and their blends are used to fabricate electrostatic fractional-order capacitors. This simple but effective method allows us to precisely tune the constant phase angle of the resulting fractional-order capacitor by changing the blend composition. Additionally, we have derived an empirical relation between the ratio of the blend constituents and the constant phase angle to facilitate the design of a fractional order capacitor with a desired constant phase angle. The structural composition of the fabricated blends is investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques.

  4. On Generalized Fractional Differentiator Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid A. Jalab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available By employing the generalized fractional differential operator, we introduce a system of fractional order derivative for a uniformly sampled polynomial signal. The calculation of the bring in signal depends on the additive combination of the weighted bring-in of N cascaded digital differentiators. The weights are imposed in a closed formula containing the Stirling numbers of the first kind. The approach taken in this work is to consider that signal function in terms of Newton series. The convergence of the system to a fractional time differentiator is discussed.

  5. Solutions of fractional diffusion problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabha W. Ibrahim

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the concept of majorant functions, we prove the existence and uniqueness of holomorphic solutions to nonlinear fractional diffusion problems. The analytic continuation of these solutions is studied and the singularity for two cases are posed.

  6. Australia's Next Top Fraction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Gould suggests Australia's next top fraction model should be a linear model rather than an area model. He provides a convincing argument and gives examples of ways to introduce a linear model in primary classrooms.

  7. Fractional Dynamics of Relativistic Particle

    CERN Document Server

    Tarasov, Vasily E

    2011-01-01

    Fractional dynamics of relativistic particle is discussed. Derivatives of fractional orders with respect to proper time describe long-term memory effects that correspond to intrinsic dissipative processes. Relativistic particle subjected to a non-potential four-force is considered as a nonholonomic system. The nonholonomic constraint in four-dimensional space-time represents the relativistic invariance by the equation for four-velocity u_{\\mu} u^{\\mu}+c^2=0, where c is a speed of light in vacuum. In the general case, the fractional dynamics of relativistic particle is described as non-Hamiltonian and dissipative. Conditions for fractional relativistic particle to be a Hamiltonian system are considered.

  8. Physcicists rewarded for 'fractional electrons'

    CERN Multimedia

    Ball, P

    1998-01-01

    The 1998 Nobel prize for physics has been awarded to Horst Stormer, Daniel Tsui and Robert Laughlin.Stormer and Tsui were the first to observe the fractional quantum Hall effect and Laughlin provided the theory shortly afterwards (1 page).

  9. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  10. Concurrent fractional and equilibrium crystallisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Lian-Kun

    2012-06-01

    This paper proposes the concept of concurrent fractional and equilibrium crystallisation (CFEC) in a multi-phase magmatic system in light of experimental results on diffusivities of elements and other species in minerals and melts. A group of equations are presented to describe how the concentrations of an element or isotope change in fractionated solid, equilibrated solid, melt, liquid, and gas phases, as well as in magma, as a function of distribution coefficients and mass fractions during the CFEC process. CFEC model is a generalised and unified formulation that is valid, not only for pure fractional crystallisation (FC) and perfect equilibrium crystallisation (EC) singly, as two of its limiting end-member cases, but also for the geologically more important process of concurrent fractional and equilibrium crystallisation. The concept that both fractional and equilibrium crystallisation can operate concurrently in a magmatic system, for a given element, among different minerals, and even within different-sized crystal grains of the very same mineral phase, is of fundamental importance in deepening our current understanding of magmatic differentiation processes. CFEC probably occurs more frequently in the natural world than either pure fractional or perfect equilibrium crystallisation alone, as a result of the interplay of varying diffusivities of elements under diverse physicochemical conditions, different residence time and growth rates of mineral phases in magmas, and varying grain sizes within each phase and among different phases. The marked systematic variations in trace element concentrations in the melts of the Bishop Tuff have long been perplexing and difficult to reconcile with existing models of differentiation. CFEC, which is able to better explain the scatter trends in a systematic way than fractional crystallisation, is considered to be the cause.

  11. The Periodogram of fractional processes

    OpenAIRE

    Velasco, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    We analyse asymptotic properties of the discrete Fourier transform and the periodogram of time series obtained through (truncated) linear filtering of stationary processes. The class of filters contains the fractional differencing operator and its coefficients decay at an algebraic rate, implying long-range-dependent properties for the filtered processes when the degree of integration α is positive. These include fractional time series which are nonstationary for any value of the memory param...

  12. Fractional Reserve Banking: Some Quibbles

    OpenAIRE

    Bagus, Philipp; Howden, David

    2010-01-01

    We explore several unaddressed issues in George Selgin’s (1988) claim that the best monetary system to maintain monetary equilibrium is a fractional reserve free banking one. The claim that adverse clearing balances would limit credit expansion in a fractional reserve free banking system is more troublesome than previously reckoned. Both lengthened clearing periods and interbank agreements render credit expansion unrestrained. “The theory of free banking” confuses increases in money held with...

  13. Xenon fractionation in porous planetesimals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K; Pollack, J B; Kasting, J F

    1990-01-01

    The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and Earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. We begin with Ozima and Nakazawa's hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large porous planetesimals. We point out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. We show that enough fractionated Xe to supply the Earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, our hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula. The required planetesimals are large, representing a class of object now extinct in the solar system.

  14. Fractional Charge Definitions and Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldhaber, A.S.

    2004-06-04

    Fractional charge is known through theoretical and experimental discoveries of isolable objects carrying fractions of familiar charge units--electric charge Q, spin S, and the difference of baryon and lepton numbers B-L. With a few simple assumptions all these effects may be described using a generalized version of charge renormalization for locally conserved charges, in which medium correlations yield familiar adiabatic, continuous renormalization, or sometimes nonadiabatic, discrete renormalization. Fractional charges may be carried by fundamental particles or fundamental solitons. Either picture works for the simplest fractional-quantum-Hall-effect quasiholes, though the particle description is far more general. The only known fundamental solitons in three or fewer space dimensions d are the kink (d = 1), the vortex (d = 2), and the magnetic monopole (d = 3). Further, for a charge not intrinsically coupled to the topological charge of a soliton, only the kink and the monopole may carry fractional values. The same reasoning enforces fractional values of B-L for electrically charged elementary particles.

  15. Effect of solvents on the fractionation of high oleic-high stearic sunflower oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bootello, Miguel A; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Salas, Joaquín J

    2015-04-01

    Solvent fractionation of high oleic-high stearic (HOHS) sunflower oil was studied to determine the best solvent to use (hexane or acetone) in terms of the operational parameters and properties of the final stearins. Acetone fractionation on two types of HOHS sunflower oils (N17 and N20) was carried out at temperatures from 5 to 10 °C using micelles with different oil/solvent ratios. Acetone was more suitable than hexane as a solvent for HSHO sunflower oil fractionation because it allowed the oil to be fractionated at higher temperatures and at lower supercooling degrees. Likewise, a sunflower soft stearin obtained by dry fractionation of HOHS sunflower oil was also used to produce high-melting point stearins by acetone or hexane fractionation. The fractionation of these stearins could be performed at higher temperatures and gave higher yields. The combination of dry and solvent fractionation to obtain tailor-made stearins is discussed.

  16. Fractional characteristic times and dissipated energy in fractional linear viscoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colinas-Armijo, Natalia; Di Paola, Mario; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2016-08-01

    In fractional viscoelasticity the stress-strain relation is a differential equation with non-integer operators (derivative or integral). Such constitutive law is able to describe the mechanical behavior of several materials, but when fractional operators appear, the elastic and the viscous contribution are inseparable and the characteristic times (relaxation and retardation time) cannot be defined. This paper aims to provide an approach to separate the elastic and the viscous phase in the fractional stress-strain relation with the aid of an equivalent classical model (Kelvin-Voigt or Maxwell). For such equivalent model the parameters are selected by an optimization procedure. Once the parameters of the equivalent model are defined, characteristic times of fractional viscoelasticity are readily defined as ratio between viscosity and stiffness. In the numerical applications, three kinds of different excitations are considered, that is, harmonic, periodic, and pseudo-stochastic. It is shown that, for any periodic excitation, the equivalent models have some important features: (i) the dissipated energy per cycle at steady-state coincides with the Staverman-Schwarzl formulation of the fractional model, (ii) the elastic and the viscous coefficients of the equivalent model are strictly related to the storage and the loss modulus, respectively.

  17. From fractional Fourier transformation to quantum mechanical fractional squeezing transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕翠红; 范洪义; 李东韡

    2015-01-01

    By converting the triangular functions in the integration kernel of the fractional Fourier transformation to the hy-perbolic function, i.e., tanα→tanhα, sinα→sinhα, we find quantum mechanical fractional squeezing transformation (FrST) which satisfies additivity. By virtue of the integration technique within ordered product of operators (IWOP) wederive the unitary operator responsible for the FrST, which is composite and is made of eiπa†a/2 and exp[ iα2 (a2+a†2)]. The FrST may be implemented in combinations of quadratic nonlinear crystals with different phase mismatches.

  18. FRACTIONAL TRANSPORT OF SEDIMENT MIXTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baosheng WU; Albert MOLINAS; Anping SHU

    2003-01-01

    A new method based on the Transport Capacity Fraction (TCF) concept is proposed to compute the fractional transport rates for nonuniform sediment mixtures in sand-bed channels. The TCF concept is derived from the understanding that the measurements and predictions of bed-material load are more accurate and reliable than the measurements and predictions of fractional loads. First the bed-material load is computed using an appropriate equation, then the fractional transport rates are determined by distributing the bed-material load into size groups through a transport capacity distribution function. For the computation of bed-material loads, the Aekers and White, Engelund and Hansen, and Yang equations are used in this study. Two new transport capacity distribution functions are developed for flows in sand-bed channels. The new expressions presented in this paper account for the sheltering and exposure effects that exist in mixtures. Comparisons with measured data show that the proposed method can significantly improve the predictions of fractional transport rates for nonuniform sediment mixtures.

  19. Phytotoxic characterization of various fractions of Launaea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... Abbreviations: DMSO, Dimethyl sulfoxide; LPME, Launaea procumbens ... 1, non treated control; 2, n-hexane fraction; 3, ethyl acetate fraction; ... fractionated using n-hexane, ethyl acetate, chloroform, butanol and distilled ...

  20. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  1. Optical encryption with cascaded fractional wavelet transforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Liang-hua; CHEN Lin-fei; ZHAO Dao-mu

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of fractional wavelet transform, we propose a new method called cascaded fractional wavelet transform to encrypt images. It has the virtues of fractional Fourier transform and wavelet transform. Fractional orders, standard focal lengths and scaling factors are its keys. Multistage fractional Fourier transforms can add the keys easily and strengthen information security. This method can also realize partial encryption just as wavelet transform and fractional wavelet transform. Optical realization of encryption and decryption is proposed. Computer simulations confirmed its possibility.

  2. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristos Aristidou Natureworks); Robert Kean (NatureWorks); Tom Schechinger (IronHorse Farms, Mat); Stuart Birrell (Iowa State); Jill Euken (Wallace Foundation & Iowa State)

    2007-10-01

    The two main objectives of this project were: 1) to develop and test technologies to harvest, transport, store, and separate corn stover to supply a clean raw material to the bioproducts industry, and 2) engineer fermentation systems to meet performance targets for lactic acid and ethanol manufacturers. Significant progress was made in testing methods to harvest corn stover in a “single pass” harvest mode (collect corn grain and stover at the same time). This is technically feasible on small scale, but additional equipment refinements will be needed to facilitate cost effective harvest on a larger scale. Transportation models were developed, which indicate that at a corn stover yield of 2.8 tons/acre and purchase price of $35/ton stover, it would be unprofitable to transport stover more than about 25 miles; thus suggesting the development of many regional collection centers. Therefore, collection centers should be located within about 30 miles of the farm, to keep transportation costs to an acceptable level. These collection centers could then potentially do some preprocessing (to fractionate or increase bulk density) and/or ship the biomass by rail or barge to the final customers. Wet storage of stover via ensilage was tested, but no clear economic advantages were evident. Wet storage eliminates fire risk, but increases the complexity of component separation and may result in a small loss of carbohydrate content (fermentation potential). A study of possible supplier-producer relationships, concluded that a “quasi-vertical” integration model would be best suited for new bioproducts industries based on stover. In this model, the relationship would involve a multiyear supply contract (processor with purchase guarantees, producer group with supply guarantees). Price will likely be fixed or calculated based on some formula (possibly a cost plus). Initial quality requirements will be specified (but subject to refinement).Producers would invest in harvest

  3. Noble gas fractionation during subsurface gas migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathaye, Kiran J.; Larson, Toti E.; Hesse, Marc A.

    2016-09-01

    Environmental monitoring of shale gas production and geological carbon dioxide (CO2) storage requires identification of subsurface gas sources. Noble gases provide a powerful tool to distinguish different sources if the modifications of the gas composition during transport can be accounted for. Despite the recognition of compositional changes due to gas migration in the subsurface, the interpretation of geochemical data relies largely on zero-dimensional mixing and fractionation models. Here we present two-phase flow column experiments that demonstrate these changes. Water containing a dissolved noble gas is displaced by gas comprised of CO2 and argon. We observe a characteristic pattern of initial co-enrichment of noble gases from both phases in banks at the gas front, followed by a depletion of the dissolved noble gas. The enrichment of the co-injected noble gas is due to the dissolution of the more soluble major gas component, while the enrichment of the dissolved noble gas is due to stripping from the groundwater. These processes amount to chromatographic separations that occur during two-phase flow and can be predicted by the theory of gas injection. This theory provides a mechanistic basis for noble gas fractionation during gas migration and improves our ability to identify subsurface gas sources after post-genetic modification. Finally, we show that compositional changes due to two-phase flow can qualitatively explain the spatial compositional trends observed within the Bravo Dome natural CO2 reservoir and some regional compositional trends observed in drinking water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett shale regions. In both cases, only the migration of a gas with constant source composition is required, rather than multi-stage mixing and fractionation models previously proposed.

  4. Static Output Feedback H-infinity Control for a Fractional-Order Glucose-Insulin System

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the H∞ static output feedback control of nonlinear fractional-order systems. Based on the extended bounded real lemma, the H∞ control is formulated and sufficient conditions are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) formulation by using the fractional Lyapunov direct method where the fractional-order α belongs to 0 < α < 1. The control approach is finally applied to the regulation of the glucose level in diabetes type 1 treatment. Therefore, it is attemp...

  5. The Periodic Solutions of the Compound Singular Fractional Differential System with Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XuTing Wei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives sufficient conditions on the existence of periodic solution for a class of compound singular fractional differential systems with delay, involving Nishimoto fractional derivative. Furthermore, for the particular functions, the necessary conditions on the existence of periodic solution are also derived. Especially, for two-dimensional compound singular fractional differential equation with delay, the criteria of existence of periodic solution are obtained. Finally, two examples are presented to verify the validity of criteria.

  6. Sliding Mode Control of the Fractional-Order Unified Chaotic System

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Yuan; Bao Shi; Xiaoyun Zeng; Wenqiang Ji; Tetie Pan

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with robust synchronization of the fractional-order unified chaotic systems. Firstly, control design for synchronization of nominal systems is proposed via fractional sliding mode technique. Then, systematic uncertainties and external disturbances are considered in the fractional-order unified chaotic systems, and adaptive sliding mode control is designed for the synchronization issue. Finally, numerical simulations are carried out to verify the effectiveness of the two propo...

  7. Fractional Derivatives in Dengue Epidemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooseh, Shakoor; Rodrigues, Helena Sofia; Torres, Delfim F. M.

    2011-09-01

    We introduce the use of fractional calculus, i.e., the use of integrals and derivatives of non-integer (arbitrary) order, in epidemiology. The proposed approach is illustrated with an outbreak of dengue disease, which is motivated by the first dengue epidemic ever recorded in the Cape Verde islands off the coast of west Africa, in 2009. Numerical simulations show that in some cases the fractional models fit better the reality when compared with the standard differential models. The classical results are obtained as particular cases by considering the order of the derivatives to take an integer value.

  8. On a fractional difference operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Baliarsingh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present article, a set of new difference sequence spaces of fractional order has been introduced and subsequently, an application of these spaces, the notion of the derivatives and the integrals of a function to the case of non-integer order have been generalized. Certain results involving the unusual and non-uniform behavior of the corresponding difference operator have been investigated and also been verified by using some counter examples. We also verify these unusual and non-uniform behaviors by studying the geometry of fractional calculus.

  9. A Fast Fractional Difference Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Noack; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    We provide a fast algorithm for calculating the fractional difference of a time series. In standard implementations, the calculation speed (number of arithmetic operations) is of order T 2, where T is the length of the time series. Our algorithm allows calculation speed of order T logT . For mode......We provide a fast algorithm for calculating the fractional difference of a time series. In standard implementations, the calculation speed (number of arithmetic operations) is of order T 2, where T is the length of the time series. Our algorithm allows calculation speed of order T log...

  10. Fractional Boundaries for Fluid Spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Bayin, S; Krisch, J P; Bayin, Selcuk; Krisch, Jean P.

    2006-01-01

    A single Israel layer can be created when two metrics adjoin with no continuous metric derivative across the boundary. The properties of the layer depend only on the two metrics it separates. By using a fractional derivative match, a family of Israel layers can be created between the same two metrics. The family is indexed by the order of the fractional derivative. The method is applied to Tolman IV and V interiors and a Schwarzschild vacuum exterior. The method creates new ranges of modeling parameters for fluid spheres. A thin shell analysis clarifies pressure/tension in the family of boundary layers.

  11. Fractional derivatives in Dengue epidemics

    CERN Document Server

    Pooseh, Shakoor; Torres, Delfim F M

    2011-01-01

    We introduce the use of fractional calculus, i.e., the use of integrals and derivatives of non-integer (arbitrary) order, in epidemiology. The proposed approach is illustrated with an outbreak of dengue disease, which is motivated by the first dengue epidemic ever recorded in the Cape Verde islands off the coast of west Africa, in 2009. Numerical simulations show that in some cases the fractional models fit better the reality when compared with the standard differential models. The classical results are obtained as particular cases by considering the order of the derivatives to take an integer value.

  12. CONTROLLABILITY AND OBSERVABILITY FOR A CLASS OF FRACTIONAL-ORDER IMPULSIVE SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the controllability and observability for a class of fractionalorder impulsive systems.First,the basic acknowledgement of fractional-order systems is presented.Then the solution of the fractional-order impulsive systems is given.Finally,necessary and sufficient criteria for controllability and observability are obtained.

  13. Applying GG-Convex Function to Hermite-Hadamard Inequalities Involving Hadamard Fractional Integrals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By virtue of fractional integral identities, incomplete beta function, useful series, and inequalities, we apply the concept of GG-convex function to derive new type Hermite-Hadamard inequalities involving Hadamard fractional integrals. Finally, some applications to special means of real numbers are demonstrated.

  14. Measurements of Branching Fractions of $\\tau$ Lepton Decays with one or more $K^{0}_{S}$

    CERN Document Server

    Ryu, S; Aihara, H; Asner, D M; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Bala, A; Bhuyan, B; Bobrov, A; Bondar, A; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, S -K; Choi, Y; Dalseno, J; Doležal, Z; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Gaur, V; Gabyshev, N; Ganguly, S; Garmash, A; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Golob, B; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W -S; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Iwashita, T; Julius, T; Kato, E; Kiesling, C; Kim, B H; Kim, D Y; Kim, J B; Kim, J H; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Ko, B R; Kodyš, P; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kwon, Y -J; Lee, S -H; Li, J; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Lukin, P; MacNaughton, J; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Moll, A; Mori, T; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Nayak, M; Nedelkovska, E; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, H K; Pedlar, T K; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Ritter, M; Röhrken, M; Rostomyan, A; Sahoo, H; Saito, T; Sakai, Y; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Savinov, V; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Semmler, D; Seon, O; Shebalin, V; Shen, C P; Shibata, T -A; Shiu, J -G; Shwartz, B; Sibidanov, A; Simon, F; Sohn, Y -S; Sokolov, A; Solovieva, E; Stanič, S; Starič, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Tamponi, U; Tatishvili, G; Teramoto, Y; Uchida, M; Uehara, S; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Van Hulse, C; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Vinokurova, A; Vorobyev, V; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, P; Watanabe, M; Watanabe, Y; Won, E; Yamashita, Y; Yashchenko, S; Yook, Y; Yuan, C Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2014-01-01

    We report measurements of branching fractions of $\\tau$ lepton decays to final states with a $K^{0}_{S}$ meson using a 669 fb$^{-1}$ data sample accumulated with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^{+}e^{-}$ collider. The inclusive branching fraction is measured to be $\\mathcal{B}(\\tau^{-} \\to K^{0}_{S}\\ X^{-} \

  15. An Investigation on Generalized Eulerian Polynomials and Fractions%关于广义Euler多项式和分式的讨论

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙佳宁

    2006-01-01

    This note establishes a pair of exponential generating functions for generalized Eulerian polynomials and Eulerian fractions, respectively. A kind of recurrence relation is obtained for the Eulerian fractions. Finally, a short proof of a certain summation formula is given.

  16. Fractional condensation of pyrolysis vapors produced from Nordic feedstocks in cyclone pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Ann-Christine; Iisa, Kristiina; Sandström, Linda; Ben, Haoxi; Pilath, Heidi; Deutch, Steve; Wiinikka, Henrik; Öhrman, Olov G. W.

    2017-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil is a complex mixture of different chemical compounds with a wide range of molecular weights and boiling points. Due to its complexity, an efficient fractionation of the oil may be a more promising approach of producing liquid fuels and chemicals than treating the whole oil. In this work a sampling system based on fractional condensation was attached to a cyclone pyrolysis pilot plant to enable separation of the produced pyrolysis vapors into five oil fractions. The sampling system was composed of cyclonic condensers and coalescing filters arranged in series. The objective was to characterize the oil fractions produced from three different Nordic feedstocks and suggest possible applications. The oil fractions were thoroughly characterized using several analytical techniques including water content; elemental composition; heating value, and chemical compound group analysis using solvent fractionation, quantitative 13C NMR and 1H NMR and GC x GC - TOFMS. The results show that the oil fractions significantly differ from each other both in chemical and physical properties. The first fractions and the fraction composed of aerosols were highly viscous and contained larger energy-rich compounds of mainly lignin-derived material. The middle fraction contained medium-size compounds with relatively high concentration of water, sugars, alcohols, hydrocarbonyls and acids and finally the last fraction contained smaller molecules such as water, aldehydes, ketones and acids. However, the properties of the respective fractions seem independent on the studied feedstock types, i.e. the respective fractions produced from different feedstock are rather similar. This promotes the possibility to vary the feedstock depending on availability while retaining the oil properties. Possible applications of the five fractions vary from oil for combustion and extraction of the pyrolytic lignin in the early fractions to extraction of sugars from the early and middle fractions, and

  17. The Active Fractional Order Control for Maglev Suspension System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peichang Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maglev suspension system is the core part of maglev train. In the practical application, the load uncertainties, inherent nonlinearity, and misalignment between sensors and actuators are the main issues that should be solved carefully. In order to design a suitable controller, the attention is paid to the fractional order controller. Firstly, the mathematical model of a single electromagnetic suspension unit is derived. Then, considering the limitation of the traditional PD controller adaptation, the fractional order controller is developed to obtain more excellent suspension specifications and robust performance. In reality, the nonlinearity affects the structure and the precision of the model after linearization, which will degrade the dynamic performance. So, a fractional order controller is addressed to eliminate the disturbance by adjusting the parameters which are added by the fractional order controller. Furthermore, the controller based on LQR is employed to compare with the fractional order controller. Finally, the performance of them is discussed by simulation. The results illustrated the validity of the fractional order controller.

  18. Staircase and Fractional Part Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amram, Meirav; Dagan, Miriam; Ioshpe, Michael; Satianov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The staircase and fractional part functions are basic examples of real functions. They can be applied in several parts of mathematics, such as analysis, number theory, formulas for primes, and so on; in computer programming, the floor and ceiling functions are provided by a significant number of programming languages--they have some basic uses in…

  19. Fractional Laplace Transforms - A Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Treumann, R A

    2014-01-01

    A form of the Laplace transform is reviewed as a paradigm for an entire class of fractional functional transforms. Various of its properties are discussed. Such transformations should be useful in application to differential/integral equations or problems in non-extensive statistical mechanics.

  20. Subcellular fractionation of rough microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, David D

    2014-09-02

    When eukaryotic cells are homogenized, the rough endoplasmic reticula are converted into small vesicles, called rough microsomes. Strategies for the isolation of rough microsomes are introduced here, as are methods for evaluating the purity and intactness of an isolated rough microsomal fraction.

  1. Working with a fractional object:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bodil Just; Hillersdal, Line; Holm, Lotte

    2017-01-01

    constitutes ‘appetite’ was a key concern, as each discipline has its particular definition and operationalization of the term. In response, a material-semiotic approach was chosen which allowed for a reconceptualization of appetite as a ‘fractional object’, engaged in multiple relations and enacted...

  2. Complexity and the Fractional Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    developed in a number of signif- icant ways in the recent past. Sokolov et al. [1] maintain that this calculus was restricted to the field of mathematics... Sokolov , J. Klafter, and A. Blumen, “Fractional kinetics,” Physics Today, vol. 55, no. 11, pp. 48–54, 2002. [2] V. Seshadri and B. J. West, “Fractal

  3. Fractional Laplace Transforms - A Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf A. Treumann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A new form of the Laplace transform is reviewed as a paradigm for an entire class of fractional functional transforms. Various of its properties are discussed. Such transformations should be useful in application to differential/integral equations or problems in non-extensive statistical mechanics.

  4. A note on fractional supersolutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janne Korvenpaa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We study a class of equations driven by nonlocal, possibly degenerate, integro-differential operators of differentiability order $s\\in (0,1$ and summability growth $p>1$, whose model is the fractional $p$-Laplacian with measurable coefficients. We prove that the minimum of the corresponding weak supersolutions is a weak supersolution as well.

  5. Math Fair: Focus on Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokashi, Neelima A.

    2009-01-01

    This article depicts the rewarding experience of creating mathematical environments for kindergarten and elementary students by focusing on one of the most important and often difficult-to-grasp concepts (fractions) through play methods incorporated into a math fair. The basic concept of a math fair is threefold: (1) to create preplanned,…

  6. Pythagorean Approximations and Continued Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Javier

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we will show that the Pythagorean approximations of [the square root of] 2 coincide with those achieved in the 16th century by means of continued fractions. Assuming this fact and the known relation that connects the Fibonacci sequence with the golden section, we shall establish a procedure to obtain sequences of rational numbers…

  7. Fractional diffusion: recovering the distributed fractional derivative from overposed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, W.; Zhang, Z.

    2017-03-01

    There has been considerable recent study in ‘subdiffusion’ models that replace the standard parabolic equation model by a one with a fractional derivative in the time variable. There are many ways to look at this newer approach and one such is to realize that the order of the fractional derivative is related to the time scales of the underlying diffusion process. This raises the question of what order α of derivative should be taken and if a single value actually suffices. This has led to models that combine a finite number of these derivatives each with a different fractional exponent {αk} and different weighting value c k to better model a greater possible range of time scales. Ultimately, one wants to look at a situation that combines derivatives in a continuous way—the so-called distributional model with parameter μ ≤ft(α \\right) . However all of this begs the question of how one determines this ‘order’ of differentiation. Recovering a single fractional value has been an active part of the process from the beginning of fractional diffusion modeling and if this is the only unknown then the markers left by the fractional order derivative are relatively straightforward to determine. In the case of a finite combination of derivatives this becomes much more complex due to the more limited analytic tools available for such equations, but recent progress in this direction has been made, (Li et al 2015 Appl. Math. Comput. 257 381–97, Li and Yamamoto 2015 Appl. Anal. 94 570–9). This paper considers the full distributional model where the order is viewed as a function μ ≤ft(α \\right) on the interval (0, 1]. We show existence, uniqueness and regularity for an initial-boundary value problem including an important representation theorem in the case of a single spatial variable. This is then used in the inverse problem of recovering the distributional coefficient μ ≤ft(α \\right) from a time trace of the solution and a uniqueness result is

  8. Galaxy Cluster Baryon Fractions Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Sivanandam, Suresh; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2013-11-01

    We measure the baryons contained in both the stellar and hot-gas components for 12 galaxy clusters and groups at z ~ 0.1 with M = 1-5 × 1014 M ⊙. This paper improves upon our previous work through the addition of XMM-Newton X-ray data, enabling measurements of the total mass and masses of each major baryonic component—intracluster medium, intracluster stars, and stars in galaxies—for each system. We recover a mean relation for the stellar mass versus halo mass, M_{\\star }\\propto M_{500}^{-0.52+/- 0.04}, that is 1σ shallower than in our previous result. We confirm that the partitioning of baryons between the stellar and hot-gas components is a strong function of M 500; the fractions of total mass in stars and X-ray gas within a sphere of radius r 500 scale as f_{\\star }\\propto M_{500}^{-0.45+/- 0.04} and f_{gas}\\propto M_{500}^{0.26+/- 0.03}, respectively. We also confirm that the combination of the brightest cluster galaxy and intracluster stars is an increasingly important contributor to the stellar baryon budget in lower halo masses. Studies that fail to fully account for intracluster stars typically underestimate the normalization of the stellar baryon fraction versus M 500 relation by ~25%. Our derived stellar baryon fractions are also higher, and the trend with halo mass weaker, than those derived from recent halo occupation distribution and abundance matching analyses. One difference from our previous work is the weak, but statistically significant, dependence here of the total baryon fraction upon halo mass: f_{bary}\\propto M_{500}^{0.16+/- 0.04}. For M 500 >~ 2 × 1014, the total baryon fractions within r 500 are on average 18% below the universal value from the seven year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) analysis, or 7% below for the cosmological parameters from the Planck analysis. In the latter case, the difference between the universal value and cluster baryon fractions is less than the systematic uncertainties associated with

  9. Fractional Processes and Fractional-Order Signal Processing Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sheng, Hu; Qiu, TianShuang

    2012-01-01

    Fractional processes are widely found in science, technology and engineering systems. In Fractional Processes and Fractional-order Signal Processing, some complex random signals, characterized by the presence of a heavy-tailed distribution or non-negligible dependence between distant observations (local and long memory), are introduced and examined from the ‘fractional’ perspective using simulation, fractional-order modeling and filtering and realization of fractional-order systems. These fractional-order signal processing (FOSP) techniques are based on fractional calculus, the fractional Fourier transform and fractional lower-order moments. Fractional Processes and Fractional-order Signal Processing: • presents fractional processes of fixed, variable and distributed order studied as the output of fractional-order differential systems; • introduces FOSP techniques and the fractional signals and fractional systems point of view; • details real-world-application examples of FOSP techniques to demonstr...

  10. In-Plant Reuse of Pollution Abated Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    sulphur , wheat and xnany oik-en. A typicP1 r-plkmflem of ig. 254 Pd--ctor i shown in the applic llon &anr.\\ 7 Aitatinxg jeta kccip ths intf±ri frnm...streams De-watering tallow after washing operation De-gritting gas scrubber effluent ahead of centrifuge Benieficiation of china clay ( kaolin

  11. In-plant emergency response training: Technical matters and technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wray, T.K.

    1997-02-01

    There are four key elements to any effective training program: knowledge, skill, attitude and behavior. Prior to commencement of any learning experience, there must be a knowledge objective. It is the responsibility of the trainer to provide students with the information needed to properly implement a specific task. All training can be boiled down to one thing -- behavior modification. Emergency response training is no exception. To have a well-trained team, all four elements must be present. Improving a training program`s effectiveness is the primary focus of this article. The emergency response provisions of the HAZWOPER legislation provide all companies that may be required to respond to hazardous materials emergencies with two options: train their own team or call in a qualified outside response team. There are advantages and disadvantages in either case. Training and equipping one`s own team is an expensive, time-consuming option, but it can decrease the response time and enhance the probability that a standard response procedure will be implemented.

  12. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SFC OLEOFILTRATION SYSTEM - INPLANT SYSTEMS, INC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SFC Oleofiltration System (SFC System) is a hydrocarbon recovery technology that utilizes an amine-coated ceramic granule to separate suspended and mechanically emulsified hydrocarbons from aqueous solutions. The granules reportedly also separate some chemical emulsions and red...

  13. In-Plant Testing of High-Efficiency Hydraulic Separators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. H. Luttrell; R. Q. Honaker; R. C. Bratton; T. C. Westerfield; J. N. Kohmuench

    2004-07-20

    The mineral processing industry has commonly utilized hydraulic separators throughout history for classification and gravity concentration of various minerals. More commonly referred to as hindered-bed or fluidized-bed separators, these units make use of differential particle settling rates to segregate particles according to shape, size, and/or density. As with any equipment, there are inefficiencies associated with its operation, which prompted an industry driven research program to further evaluate two novel high-efficiency hindered bed separators. These units, which are commercially called the CrossFlow separator and HydroFloat separator, have the potential to improve performance (separation efficiency and throughput) and reduce operating costs (power consumption, water and reagent usage). This report describes the results of Phase I activities (laboratory and pilot-scale tests) conducted with the CrossFlow and HydroFloat separators at several locations in the minerals and coal industries. Details of the testing programs (equipment setup, shakedown testing and detailed testing) associated with four coal plants and two phosphate plants are summarized in this work. In most of these applications, the high-efficiency units proved to provide a higher quality product at reduced costs when compared against the performance of conventional separators. Based on promising results obtained from Phase I, full-scale prototypes will be purchased by several mining companies for use in Phase II of this project. Two of the prototype units, which will be constructed by Eriez Manufacturing, are expected to be installed by a major U.S. phosphate producer and a large eastern U.S. coal company. Negotiations are also underway to purchase and install additional prototype units by a mineral sands producer and a second phosphate producer. The data obtained from the full-scale evaluations will be used to further promote commercialization and industrial applications of these innovative technologies.

  14. In-Plant Testing of High-Efficiency Hydraulic Separators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. H. Luttrell; R. Q. Honaker; R. C. Bratton; T. C. Westerfield; J. N. Kohmuench

    2006-06-30

    Hydraulic separators are commonly used for particle size classification and gravity concentration of minerals and coal. Unfortunately, the efficiency of these processes can be quite low due to poor equipment design and variations in feed consistency. To help alleviate these problems, an industry-driven R&D program has been undertaken to develop a new generation of hydraulic separators that are more efficient and less costly to operate and maintain. These units, which are commercially called the CrossFlow separator and HydroFloat separator, have the potential to improve performance (separation efficiency and throughput) and reduce operating costs (power consumption, water and reagent usage). In Phase I of this project, laboratory and pilot-scale test units were evaluated at various industrial sites in both the coal and mineral industries. Based on promising results obtained from Phase I, full-scale prototypes were purchased and installed by a major U.S. phosphate producer and a large eastern U.S. coal company. The test data obtained from these sites demonstrate that significant performance improvements can be realized through the application of these high-efficiency separators.

  15. IN-PLANT TESTING OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY HYDRAULIC SEPARATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.H. Luttrell; R.Q. Honaker; R.C. Bratton; T.C. Westerfield; J.N. Kohmuench

    2006-05-22

    Hydraulic separators are commonly used for particle size classification and gravity concentration of minerals and coal. Unfortunately, the efficiency of these processes can be quite low due to poor equipment design and variations in feed consistency. To help alleviate these problems, an industry-driven R&D program has been undertaken to develop a new generation of hydraulic separators that are more efficient and less costly to operate and maintain. These units, which are commercially called the CrossFlow separator and HydroFloat separator, have the potential to improve performance (separation efficiency and throughput) and reduce operating costs (power consumption, water and reagent usage). In Phase I of this project, laboratory and pilot-scale test units were evaluated at various industrial sites in both the coal and mineral industries. Based on promising results obtained from Phase I, full-scale prototypes were purchased and installed by a major U.S. phosphate producer and a large eastern U.S. coal company. The test data obtained from these sites demonstrate that significant performance improvements can be realized through the application of these high-efficiency separators.

  16. The radiosurgery fractionation quandary: single fraction or hypofractionation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, John P; Soltys, Scott G; Lo, Simon S; Beal, Kathryn; Shrieve, Dennis C; Brown, Paul D

    2017-04-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), typically administered in a single session, is widely employed to safely, efficiently, and effectively treat small intracranial lesions. However, for large lesions or those in close proximity to critical structures, it can be difficult to obtain an acceptable balance of tumor control while avoiding damage to normal tissue when single-fraction SRS is utilized. Treating a lesion in 2 to 5 fractions of SRS (termed "hypofractionated SRS" [HF-SRS]) potentially provides the ability to treat a lesion with a total dose of radiation that provides both adequate tumor control and acceptable toxicity. Indeed, studies of HF-SRS in large brain metastases, vestibular schwannomas, meningiomas, and gliomas suggest that a superior balance of tumor control and toxicity is observed compared with single-fraction SRS. Nonetheless, a great deal of effort remains to understand radiobiologic mechanisms for HF-SRS driving the dose-volume response relationship for tumors and normal tissues and to utilize this fundamental knowledge and the results of clinic studies to optimize HF-SRS. In particular, the application of HF-SRS in the setting of immunomodulatory cancer therapies offers special challenges and opportunities.

  17. Improving Children's Knowledge of Fraction Magnitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Lisa K.; Kennedy, Casey A.; Siegler, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether playing a computerized fraction game, based on the integrated theory of numerical development and on the Common Core State Standards' suggestions for teaching fractions, would improve children's fraction magnitude understanding. Fourth and fifth-graders were given brief instruction about unit fractions and played "Catch…

  18. Green's Theorem for Generalized Fractional Derivatives

    CERN Document Server

    Odzijewicz, Tatiana; Torres, Delfim F M

    2012-01-01

    We study three types of generalized partial fractional operators. An extension of Green's theorem, by considering partial fractional derivatives with more general kernels, is proved. New results are obtained, even in the particular case when the generalized operators are reduced to the standard partial fractional derivatives and fractional integrals in the sense of Riemann-Liouville or Caputo.

  19. Using Number Sense to Compare Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Wendy S.; Abreu-Sanchez, Laura

    2010-01-01

    One mathematical focus for third graders is to develop deep understanding of fractions and fraction equivalence, including comparing fractions through use of models and reasoning strategies. Before reading further, consider how you might solve the following problem: Which fraction is greater, 14/24 or 17/36? The initial impulse of many adults is…

  20. 'The mother of all continued fractions'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dajani, K.; Kraaikamp, C.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we give the relationship between the regular continued fraction and the Lehner fractions using a procedure known as insertion Starting from the regular continued fraction expansion of any real irrational x when the maximal number of insertions is applied one obtains the Lehner fraction

  1. 9 CFR 113.7 - Multiple fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Multiple fractions. 113.7 Section 113... § 113.7 Multiple fractions. (a) When a biological product contains more than one immunogenic fraction, the completed product shall be evaluated by tests applicable to each fraction. (b) When...

  2. Evaluating fractionated space systems - Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornford, S.; Jenkins, S.; Wall, S.; Cole, B.; Bairstow, B.; Rouquette, N.; Dubos, G.; Ryan, T.; Zarifian, P.; Boutwell, J.

    DARPA has funded a number of teams to further refine its Fractionated Spacecraft vision. Several teams, including this team led by JPL, have been tasked to develop a tool for the evaluation of the Business case for a fractionated system architecture. This evaluation is to understand under what conditions and constraints the fractionated architecture make more sense (in a cost/benefit sense) than the traditional monolithic paradigm. Our approach to this evaluation is to generate and evaluate a variety of trade space options. These options include various sets of stimuli, various degrees of fractionation and various subsystem element properties. The stimuli include many not normally modeled such as technology obsolescence, funding profile changes and changes in mission objectives during the mission itself. The degrees of fractionation enable various traditional subsystem elements to be distributed across different free flyers which then act in concert as needed. This will enable key technologies to be updated as need dictates and availability allows. We have described our approach in a previous IEEE Aerospace conference paper but will briefly summarize here. Our approach to generate the Business Case evaluation is to explicitly model both the implementation and operation phases for the life cycle of a fractionated constellation. A variety of models are integrated into the Phoenix ModelCenter framework and are used to generate various intermediate data which is aggregated into the Present Strategic Value (PSV). The PSV is essentially the value (including the value of the embedded real options) minus the cost. These PSVs are calculated for a variety of configurations and scenarios including variations of various stimuli or uncertainties (e.g. supply chain delays, launch vehicle failures and orbital debris events). There are various decision options (e.g. delay, accelerate, cancel) which can now be exercised for each stimulus. We can compute the PSV for the various comb

  3. Fractional conservation laws in optimal control theory

    CERN Document Server

    Frederico, Gastao S F

    2007-01-01

    Using the recent formulation of Noether's theorem for the problems of the calculus of variations with fractional derivatives, the Lagrange multiplier technique, and the fractional Euler-Lagrange equations, we prove a Noether-like theorem to the more general context of the fractional optimal control. As a corollary, it follows that in the fractional case the autonomous Hamiltonian does not define anymore a conservation law. Instead, it is proved that the fractional conservation law adds to the Hamiltonian a new term which depends on the fractional-order of differentiation, the generalized momentum, and the fractional derivative of the state variable.

  4. Fuzzy fractional order sliding mode controller for nonlinear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavari, H.; Ghaderi, R.; Ranjbar, A.; Momani, S.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, an intelligent robust fractional surface sliding mode control for a nonlinear system is studied. At first a sliding PD surface is designed and then, a fractional form of these networks PDα, is proposed. Fast reaching velocity into the switching hyperplane in the hitting phase and little chattering phenomena in the sliding phase is desired. To reduce the chattering phenomenon in sliding mode control (SMC), a fuzzy logic controller is used to replace the discontinuity in the signum function at the reaching phase in the sliding mode control. For the problem of determining and optimizing the parameters of fuzzy sliding mode controller (FSMC), genetic algorithm (GA) is used. Finally, the performance and the significance of the controlled system two case studies (robot manipulator and coupled tanks) are investigated under variation in system parameters and also in presence of an external disturbance. The simulation results signify performance of genetic-based fuzzy fractional sliding mode controller.

  5. On the solutions of fractional order of evolution equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Delgado, V. F.; Taneco-Hernández, M. A.; Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present a discussion of generalized Cauchy problems in a diffusion wave process, we consider bi-fractional-order evolution equations in the Riemann-Liouville, Liouville-Caputo, and Caputo-Fabrizio sense. Through Fourier transforms and Laplace transform we derive closed-form solutions to the Cauchy problems mentioned above. Similarly, we establish fundamental solutions. Finally, we give an application of the above results to the determination of decompositions of Dirac type for bi-fractional-order equations and write a formula for the moments for the fractional vibration of a beam equation. This type of decomposition allows us to speak of internal degrees of freedom in the vibration of a beam equation.

  6. Entropy Solution Theory for Fractional Degenerate Convection-Diffusion Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Jakobsen, Simone Cifani And Espen R

    2010-01-01

    We study a class of degenerate convection diffusion equations with a fractional nonlinear diffusion term. These equations are natural generalizations of anomalous diffusion equations, fractional conservations laws, local convection diffusion equations, and some fractional Porous medium equations. In this paper we define weak entropy solutions for this class of equations and prove well-posedness under weak regularity assumptions on the solutions, e.g. uniqueness is obtained in the class of bounded integrable functions. Then we introduce a monotone conservative numerical scheme and prove convergence toward an Entropy solution in the class of bounded integrable functions of bounded variation. We then extend the well-posedness results to non-local terms based on general L\\'evy type operators, and establish some connections to fully non-linear HJB equations. Finally, we present some numerical experiments to give the reader an idea about the qualitative behavior of solutions of these equations.

  7. Random-order fractional bistable system and its stochastic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shilong; Zhang, Li; Liu, Hui; Kan, Bixia

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the diffusion motion of Brownian particles in a viscous liquid suffering from stochastic fluctuations of the external environment is modeled as a random-order fractional bistable equation, and as a typical nonlinear dynamic behavior, the stochastic resonance phenomena in this system are investigated. At first, the derivation process of the random-order fractional bistable system is given. In particular, the random-power-law memory is deeply discussed to obtain the physical interpretation of the random-order fractional derivative. Secondly, the stochastic resonance evoked by random-order and external periodic force is mainly studied by numerical simulation. In particular, the frequency shifting phenomena of the periodical output are observed in SR induced by the excitation of the random order. Finally, the stochastic resonance of the system under the double stochastic excitations of the random order and the internal color noise is also investigated.

  8. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuur, Edward [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Luo, Yiqi [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This final grant report is a continuation of the final grant report submitted for DE-SC0006982 as the Principle Investigator (Schuur) relocated from the University of Florida to Northern Arizona University. This report summarizes the original project goals, as well as includes new project activities that were completed in the final period of the project.

  9. Exclusive B decays to charmonium final states

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, Bernard; Boutigny, D; De Bonis, I; Favier, Jean; Gaillard, Jean-Marc; Galeazzi, F; Jérémie, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zachariadou, K; Palano, A; Chen, G P; Chen Jia Chao; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Reinertsen, P L; Stugu, B; Abbott, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Clark, A R; Fan, Q; Gill, M S; Gowdy, S J; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kluth, S; Kral, J F; Leclerc, C; Levi, M E; Liu, T; Lynch, G; Meyer, A B; Momayezi, M; Oddone, P J; Perazzo, A; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Strother, P; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Champion, T J; Hawkes, C M; Kirk, A; O'Neale, S W; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Koch, H; Krug, J; Kunze, M; Lewandowski, B; Peters, K; Schmücker, H; Steinke, M; Andress, J C; Chevalier, N; Clark, P J; Cottingham, N; De Groot, N; Dyce, N; Foster, B; Mass, A; McFall, J D; Wallom, D; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Camanzi, B; McKemey, A K; Tinslay, J; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Bukin, D A; Buzykaev, A R; Dubrovin, M S; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Korol, A A; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Salnikov, A A; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Yushkov, A N; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Stoker, D P; Ahsan, A; Arisaka, K; Buchanan, C D; Chun, S; Branson, J G; Faccini, R; MacFarlane, D B; Rahatlou, S; Raven, G; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Hart, P A; Kuznetsova, N P; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Witherell, M; Yellin, S; Beringer, J; Dorfan, D E; Eisner, A M; Frey, A; Grillo, A A; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Johnson, R P; Kröger, W; Lockman, W S; Pulliam, T; Sadrozinski, H F W; Schalk, T L; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Williams, D C; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoredsky, A P; Hitlin, D G; Kolomensky, Yu G; Metzler, S; Oyang, J Y T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Weaver, M; Yang, S; Zhu, R Y; Aleksan, Roy; De Domenico, G; de Lesquen, A; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Serfass, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Devmal, S C; Geld, T L; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blouw, J; Harton, J L; Krishnamurthy, M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Fahey, S; Ford, W T; Gaede, F; Johnson, D R; Michael, A K; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Park, H; Rankin, P; Roy, J D; Sen, S; Smith, J G; Wagner, D L; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dahlinger, G; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Kocian, M L; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Behr, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Ferrag, S; Roussot, E; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Anjomshoaa, A; Bernet, R; Di Lodovico, F; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Bozzi, C; Dittongo, S; Folegani, M; Piemontese, L; Treadwell, E A; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Bagnasco, S; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Musenich, R; Parodi, R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F; Patrignani, C; Pia, M G; Priano, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Fischer, P A; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Rosenberg, E I; Bartoldus, R; Dignan, T; Hamilton, R; Mallik, U; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Simi, G; Triggiani, G; Benkebil, M; Grosdidier, G; Hast, C; Höcker, A; Le Peltier, V; Lutz, A M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Valassi, Andrea; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljevic, V; Fackler, O; Fujino, D; Lange, D J; Mugge, M; Shi, X; Wenaus, T J; Wright, D M; Wuest, C R; Carroll, M; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; George, M; Kay, M; McMahon, S; McMahon, T R; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Dauncey, P D; Eschrich, I; Gunawardane, N J W; Martin, R D; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Smith, D; Azzopardi, D E; Back, J J; Dixon, P; Harrison, P F; Vidal, P B; Williams, M I; Cowan, G D; Green, M G; Kurup, A; McGrath, P; Scott, I; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Li, Y; Pavlovich, J; Trunov, A G; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Boyd, J T; Fullwood, J; Khan, A; Lafferty, G D; Savvas, N; Simopoulos, E T; Thompson, R J; Weatherall, J H; Dallapiccola, C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Lillard, V; Olsen, J; Roberts, D A; Brau, B; Cowan, R; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Blaylock, G; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R R; Lin, C S; Willocq, S; Wittlin, J; Bloom, P; Britton, D I; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Trischuk, J; Lanni, F; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Booke, M; Cremaldi, L M; Kroeger, R A; Reidy, J; Sanders, D; Summers, D J; Arguin, J F; Martin, J P; Nief, J Y; Seitz, R; Taras, P; Woch, A; Zacek, V; Nicholson, H; Sutton, C S; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Falbo, M; LoSecco, J M; Alsmiller, J R G; Gabriel, T A; Handler, T; Colecchia, F; Dal Corso, F; Michelon, G; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Stroili, R; Torassa, E; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Le Diberder, F R; Leruste, P J; Lory, J; Martínez-Vidal, F; Roos, L; Stark, J; Versille, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Speziali, V; Frank, E D; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J H; Haire, M J; Judd, D; Paick, K; Turnbull, L; Wagoner, D E; Albert, J; Bula, C; Kelsey, M H; Lü, C; McDonald, K T; Miftakov, V; Schaffner, S F; Smith, A J S; Tumanov, A; Varnes, E W; Cavoto, G; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Fratini, K; Lamanna, E; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Waldi, R; Jacques, P F; Kalelkar, M S; Plano, R J; Adye, T; Egede, U; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, Gian P; Copty, N K; Purohit, M V; Yumiceva, F X; Adam, I; Anthony, P L; Anulli, F; Aston, D; Baird, K G; Bloom, Elliott D; Boyarski, A M; Bulos, F; Calderini, G; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Coward, D H; Dorfan, J; Doser, Michael; Dunwoodie, W M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G L; Grosso, P; Hewett, J L; Himel, Thomas M; Huffer, M E; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kim, P; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Manzin, G; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Moffeit, K C; Morii, M; Mount, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Paolucci, P; Petrak, S; Quinn, Helen R; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Rochester, L S; Roodman, A; Schietinger, T; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Sciolla, G; Serbo, V V; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Spanier, S M; Stahl, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Talby, M; Tanaka, H A; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weinstein, A J; Wisniewski, W J; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Cheng, C H; Kirkby, D; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; De Silva, A; Henderson, R; Bugg, W; Cohn, H; Hart, E; Weidemann, A W; Benninger, T; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Turcotte, M; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Di Girolamo, B; Gamba, D; Smol, A V; Zanin, D; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Pompili, A; Poropat, P; Prest, M; Vallazza, E; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Brown, C M; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Charles, E; Dasu, S; Elmer, P; Johnson, J R; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Yu, Z; Zobernig, H

    2000-01-01

    We report on exclusive decays of B mesons into final states containing charmonium using data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings. The charmonium states considered here are J/psi, psi(2S), and chi_C1. Branching fractions for several exclusive final states, a measurement of the decay amplitudes for the B0 --> J/psi K* decay, and measurements of the B0 and B+ masses are presented. All of the results we present here are preliminary.

  10. Exclusive B Decays to Charmonium Final States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Barbara

    2000-10-13

    We report on exclusive decays of B mesons into final states containing charmonium using data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings. The charmonium states considered here are J/{psi}, {psi}(2S), and {chi}{sub c1}. Branching fractions for several exclusive final states, a measurement of the decay amplitudes for the B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K* decay, and measurements of the B{sup 0} and B{sup +} masses are presented. All of the results we present here are preliminary.

  11. Fractional Authorship in Nuclear Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pritychenko, B

    2015-01-01

    Large, multi-institutional groups or collaborations of scientists are engaged in nuclear physics research projects, and the number of research facilities is dwindling. These collaborations have their own authorship rules, and they produce a large number of highly-cited papers. Multiple authorship of nuclear physics publications creates a problem with the assessment of an individual author's productivity relative to his/her colleagues and renders ineffective a performance metrics solely based on annual publication and citation counts. Many institutions are increasingly relying on the total number of first-author papers; however, this approach becomes counterproductive for large research collaborations with an alphabetical order of authors. A concept of fractional authorship (the claiming of credit for authorship by more than one individual) helps to clarify this issue by providing a more complete picture of research activities. In the present work, nuclear physics fractional and total authorships have been inv...

  12. Nitrogen fractionation in Titan's aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Nathalie; Kuga, Maia; Marty, Bernard; Fleury, Benjamin; Marrocchi, Yves

    2016-06-01

    A strong nitrogen fractionation is found by Cassini in Titan's atmosphere with the detection of 15N-rich HCN relative to N2. Photodissociation of N2 associated or not to self-shielding might involve 15N-rich radicals prone to incorporation into forming organics. However the isotopic composition is only available for very simple gaseous N-bearing compounds, and the propagation and conservation of such a large N-isotopic fractionation upon polymerization is actually out of reach with the instruments onboard Cassini. We will therefore present a first laboratory investigation of the possible enrichment in the solid organic aerosols. We will also discuss the space instrumention required in the future to answer this pending issue on Titan.

  13. Astrophysical Applications of Fractional Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, Aleksander A.

    The paradigm of fractional calculus occupies an important place for the macroscopic description of subdiffusion. Its advance in theoretical astrophysics is expected to be very attractive too. In this report we discuss a recent development of the idea to some astrophysical problems. One of them is connected with a random migration of bright points associated with magnetic fields at the solar photosphere. The transport of the bright points has subdiffusive features that require the fractional generalization of the Leighton's model. Another problem is related to the angular distribution of radio beams, being propagated through a medium with random inhomogeneities. The peculiarity of this medium is that radio beams are trapped because of random wave localization. This idea can be useful for the diagnostics of interplanetary and interstellar turbulent media.

  14. Geometrical explanation of the fractional complex transform and derivative chain rule for fractional calculus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Ji-Huan, E-mail: hejihuan@suda.edu.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Modern Silk, College of Textile and Engineering, Soochow University, 199 Ren-ai Road, Suzhou 215123 (China); Elagan, S.K., E-mail: sayed_khalil2000@yahoo.com [Mathematics and Statistics Department, Faculty of Science, Taif University, P.O. 888 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Menofiya University, Shebin Elkom (Egypt); Li, Z.B., E-mail: zhengbiaoli@l26.com [College of Mathematics and Information Science, Qujing Normal University, Qujing, Yunnan 655011 (China)

    2012-01-09

    The fractional complex transform is suggested to convert a fractional differential equation with Jumarie's modification of Riemann–Liouville derivative into its classical differential partner. Understanding the fractional complex transform and the chain rule for fractional calculus are elucidated geometrically. -- Highlights: ► The chain rule for fractional calculus is invalid, a counter example is given. ► The fractional complex transform is explained geometrically. ► Fractional equations can be converted into differential equations.

  15. Fractional-calculus diffusion equation

    OpenAIRE

    Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali MS; Al-Rabai'ah, Hussam A

    2010-01-01

    Background Sequel to the work on the quantization of nonconservative systems using fractional calculus and quantization of a system with Brownian motion, which aims to consider the dissipation effects in quantum-mechanical description of microscale systems. Results The canonical quantization of a system represented classically by one-dimensional Fick's law, and the diffusion equation is carried out according to the Dirac method. A suitable Lagrangian, and Hamiltonian, describing the diffusive...

  16. Final Focus Test Stand final report

    CERN Document Server

    Jeremie, A; Burrows, P

    2013-01-01

    Future Linear colliders will need particle beam sizes in the nanometre range. The beam also needs to be stable all along the beam line and especially at the Final Focus section. A dedicated Final Focus test stand has been used for this study and is comprised of several sub-parts. First there is the Stabilisation/Isolation system with sensors and actuators stabilizing down to sub-nanometre level. Then the Magnet itself needs to comply with very specific design constraints. In addition to the mechanical items, the beam can be stabilized acting on the trajectory directly and Beam-based controls have been developed and tested on different accelerator facilities.

  17. Fractional statistical potential in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardenghi, J. S.

    2017-03-01

    In this work the fractional statistics is applied to an anyon gas in graphene to obtain the special features that the arbitrary phase interchange of the particle coordinates introduce in the thermodynamic properties. The electron gas is constituted by N anyons in the long wavelength approximation obeying fractional exclusion statistics and the partition function is analyzed in terms of a perturbation expansion up to first order in the dimensionless constant λ / L being L the length of the graphene sheet and λ = βℏvF the thermal wavelength. By considering the correct permutation expansion of the many-anyons wavefunction, taking into account that the phase changes with the number of inversions in each permutation, the statistical fermionic/bosonic potential is obtained and the intermediate statistical behavior is found. It is shown that "extra" fermonic and bosonic particles states appears and this "statistical particle" distribution depends on N. Entropy and specific heat is obtained up to first order in λ / L showing that the results obtained differs from those obtained in different approximation to the fractional exclusion statistics.

  18. Symmetry fractionalization and twist defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Nicolas; Lindner, Netanel H.; Fidkowski, Lukasz

    2016-03-01

    Topological order in two-dimensions can be described in terms of deconfined quasiparticle excitations—anyons—and their braiding statistics. However, it has recently been realized that this data does not completely describe the situation in the presence of an unbroken global symmetry. In this case, there can be multiple distinct quantum phases with the same anyons and statistics, but with different patterns of symmetry fractionalization—termed symmetry enriched topological order. When the global symmetry group G, which we take to be discrete, does not change topological superselection sectors—i.e. does not change one type of anyon into a different type of anyon—one can imagine a local version of the action of G around each anyon. This leads to projective representations and a group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, with the second cohomology group {H}2(G,{{ A }}{{abelian}}) being the relevant group. In this paper, we treat the general case of a symmetry group G possibly permuting anyon types. We show that despite the lack of a local action of G, one can still make sense of a so-called twisted group cohomology description of symmetry fractionalization, and show how this data is encoded in the associativity of fusion rules of the extrinsic ‘twist’ defects of the symmetry. Furthermore, building on work of Hermele (2014 Phys. Rev. B 90 184418), we construct a wide class of exactly-solvable models which exhibit this twisted symmetry fractionalization, and connect them to our formal framework.

  19. A Fast Implicit Finite Difference Method for Fractional Advection-Dispersion Equations with Fractional Derivative Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taohua Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractional advection-dispersion equations, as generalizations of classical integer-order advection-dispersion equations, are used to model the transport of passive tracers carried by fluid flow in a porous medium. In this paper, we develop an implicit finite difference method for fractional advection-dispersion equations with fractional derivative boundary conditions. First-order consistency, solvability, unconditional stability, and first-order convergence of the method are proven. Then, we present a fast iterative method for the implicit finite difference scheme, which only requires storage of O(K and computational cost of O(Klog⁡K. Traditionally, the Gaussian elimination method requires storage of O(K2 and computational cost of O(K3. Finally, the accuracy and efficiency of the method are checked with a numerical example.

  20. Controllability of Neutral Fractional Functional Equations with Impulses and Infinite Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine the controllability problem for a class of neutral fractional integrodifferential equations with impulses and infinite delay. More precisely, a set of sufficient conditions are derived for the exact controllability of nonlinear neutral impulsive fractional functional equation with infinite delay. Further, as a corollary, approximate controllability result is discussed by assuming compactness conditions on solution operator. The results are established by using solution operator, fractional calculations, and fixed point techniques. In particular, the controllability of nonlinear fractional control systems is established under the assumption that the corresponding linear control system is controllable. Finally, an example is given to illustrate the obtained theory.

  1. Robust Fuzzy Control for Fractional-Order Uncertain Hydroturbine Regulating System with Random Disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjiao Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The robust fuzzy control for fractional-order hydroturbine regulating system is studied in this paper. First, the more practical fractional-order hydroturbine regulating system with uncertain parameters and random disturbances is presented. Then, on the basis of interval matrix theory and fractional-order stability theorem, a fuzzy control method is proposed for fractional-order hydroturbine regulating system, and the stability condition is expressed as a group of linear matrix inequalities. Furthermore, the proposed method has good robustness which can process external random disturbances and uncertain parameters. Finally, the validity and superiority are proved by the numerical simulations.

  2. Generalized Combination Complex Synchronization for Fractional-Order Chaotic Complex Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuimei Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on two fractional-order chaotic complex drive systems and one fractional-order chaotic complex response system with different dimensions, we propose generalized combination complex synchronization. In this new synchronization scheme, there are two complex scaling matrices that are non-square matrices. On the basis of the stability theory of fractional-order linear systems, we design a general controller via active control. Additionally, by virtue of two complex scaling matrices, generalized combination complex synchronization between fractional-order chaotic complex systems and real systems is investigated. Finally, three typical examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness and feasibility of the schemes.

  3. Synchronization in a unified fractional-order chaotic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Zheng-Mao; Xie Jian-Ying

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the synchronization in a unified fractional-order chaotic system is investigated by two methods. One is the frequency-domain method that is analysed by using the Laplace transform theory. The other is the time-domain method that is analysed by using the Lyapunov stability theory. Finally, the numerical simulations are used-to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed synchronization methods.

  4. Cassini's Grand Finale: The Final Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda; Edgington, Scott

    2016-04-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission, a joint collaboration between NASA, ESA and the Italian Space Agency, is approaching its last year of operations after nearly 12 years in orbit around Saturn. Cassini will send back its final bits of unique data on September 15th, 2017 as it plunges into Saturn's atmosphere, vaporizing and satisfying planetary protection requirements. Before that time Cassini will continue its legacy of exploration and discovery with 12 close flybys of Titan in 2016 and 2017 that will return new science data as well as sculpt the inclinations and periods of the final orbits. Even though all of our close icy satellite flybys, including those of Enceladus, are now completed, numerous Voyager-class flybys (summer solstice approaches. In November 2016 Cassini will transition to a series of orbits with peripases just outside Saturn's F ring. These 20 orbits will include close flybys of some tiny ring moons and excellent views of the F ring and outer A ring. The 126th and final close flyby of Titan will propel Cassini across Saturn's main rings and into its final orbits. Cassini's Grand Finale, starting in April 2017, is comprised of 22 orbits at an inclination of 63 degrees. Cassini will repeatedly dive between the innermost rings and the upper atmosphere of the planet providing insights into fundamental questions unattainable during the rest of the mission. Cassini will be the first spacecraft to explore this region. These close orbits provide the highest resolution observations of both the rings and Saturn, and direct in situ sampling of the ring particles, composition, plasma, Saturn's exosphere and the innermost radiation belts. Saturn's gravitational field will be measured to unprecedented accuracy, providing information on the interior structure of the planet, winds in the outer layers of Saturn's atmosphere, and the mass distribution in the rings. Probing the magnetic field will give insight into the nature of the magnetic dynamo, telling us: why the

  5. Packing fraction of particles with a Weibull size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, H. J. H.

    2016-07-01

    This paper addresses the void fraction of polydisperse particles with a Weibull (or Rosin-Rammler) size distribution. It is demonstrated that the governing parameters of this distribution can be uniquely related to those of the lognormal distribution. Hence, an existing closed-form expression that predicts the void fraction of particles with a lognormal size distribution can be transformed into an expression for Weibull distributions. Both expressions contain the contraction coefficient β. Likewise the monosized void fraction φ1, it is a physical parameter which depends on the particles' shape and their state of compaction only. Based on a consideration of the scaled binary void contraction, a linear relation for (1 - φ1)β as function of φ1 is proposed, with proportionality constant B, depending on the state of compaction only. This is validated using computational and experimental packing data concerning random close and random loose packing arrangements. Finally, using this β, the closed-form analytical expression governing the void fraction of Weibull distributions is thoroughly compared with empirical data reported in the literature, and good agreement is found. Furthermore, the present analysis yields an algebraic equation relating the void fraction of monosized particles at different compaction states. This expression appears to be in good agreement with a broad collection of random close and random loose packing data.

  6. Conformable Fractional Nikiforov—Uvarov Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayer, H.; Demirhan, D.; Büyükkılıç, F.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce conformable fractional Nikiforov—Uvarov (NU) method by means of conformable fractional derivative which is the most natural definition in non-integer calculus. Since, NU method gives exact eigenstate solutions of Schrödinger equation (SE) for certain potentials in quantum mechanics, this method is carried into the domain of fractional calculus to obtain the solutions of fractional SE. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the conformable fractional NU method, we solve fractional SE for harmonic oscillator potential, Woods—Saxon potential, and Hulthen potential.

  7. Fractional vortex dipole phase filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Joseph, Joby; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam

    2014-10-01

    In spatial filtering experiments, the use of vortex phase filters plays an important role in realizing isotropic edge enhancement. In this paper, we report the use of a vortex dipole phase filter in spatial filtering. A dipole made of fractional vortices is used, and its filtering characteristics are studied. It is observed that the filter performance can be tuned by varying the distance of separation between the vortices of the dipole to achieve better contrast and output noise suppression, and when this distance tends to infinity, the filter performs like a 1-D Hilbert mask. Experimental and simulation results are presented.

  8. Fractional Trajectories: Decorrelation Versus Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-27

    function, andmoving back to the time domain yields the fractional trajectory V(t) = Eα(Otα)V(0). (4) Note that the Mittag-Leffler function is defined...bxy) ∂ ∂x − (cy − δxy) ∂ ∂y , (35) with the vector V having the components x and y. The predictor– corrector integration method is adopted to solve...Using the predictor– corrector method with α = 1 we numerically integrate the system of differential equations to find the operational time trajectory

  9. Reconstructing past fractional record values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy E. El-Adll

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, reconstructing past fractional upper (lower records from any absolutely continuous distribution is proposed. For this purpose, two pivotal quantities are given and their exact distributions are derived. More detailed results, including the case of unknown parameters, are given for the exponential and Fre´chet distributions. Moreover, the exact mean square reconstructor errors are obtained and some comparisons between the pivotal quantities are performed. To explore the efficiency of the obtained results, a simulation study is conducted and two real data sets are analyzed.

  10. Fractional Moments on Bandit Problems

    CERN Document Server

    B, Ananda Narayanan

    2012-01-01

    Reinforcement learning addresses the dilemma between exploration to find profitable actions and exploitation to act according to the best observations already made. Bandit problems are one such class of problems in stateless environments that represent this explore/exploit situation. We propose a learning algorithm for bandit problems based on fractional expectation of rewards acquired. The algorithm is theoretically shown to converge on an eta-optimal arm and achieve O(n) sample complexity. Experimental results show the algorithm incurs substantially lower regrets than parameter-optimized eta-greedy and SoftMax approaches and other low sample complexity state-of-the-art techniques.

  11. A New Scheme on Synchronization of Commensurate Fractional-Order Chaotic Systems Based on Lyapunov Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new fractional-order approach for synchronization of a class of fractional-order chaotic systems in the presence of model uncertainties and external disturbances. A simple but practical method to synchronize many familiar fractional-order chaotic systems has been put forward. A new theorem is proposed for a class of cascade fractional-order systems and it is applied in chaos synchronization. Combined with the fact that the states of the fractional chaotic systems are bounded, many coupled items can be taken as zero items. Then, the whole system can be simplified greatly and a simpler controller can be derived. Finally, the validity of the presented scheme is illustrated by numerical simulations of the fractional-order unified system.

  12. Noether symmetries and conserved quantities for fractional Birkhoffian systems with time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiang-Hua; Zhang, Yi

    2016-07-01

    The Noether symmetries and the conserved quantities for fractional Birkhoffian systems with time delay in terms of Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives are proposed and studied. First, the fractional Pfaff-Birkhoff principle with time delay is proposed, and the fractional Birkhoff's equations with time delay are obtained. Second, based on the invariance of the fractional Pfaff action with time delay under a group of infinitesimal transformations, the Noether symmetric transformations and the Noether quasi-symmetric transformations of the system are defined, and the criteria of the Noether symmetries are established. Finally, the relationship between the symmetries and the conserved quantities are studied, and the Noether theorems for fractional Birkhoffian systems with time delay are established. Some examples are given to illustrate the application of the results.

  13. A Local Fractional Variational Iteration Method for Laplace Equation within Local Fractional Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Ju Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The local fractional variational iteration method for local fractional Laplace equation is investigated in this paper. The operators are described in the sense of local fractional operators. The obtained results reveal that the method is very effective.

  14. Galaxy Cluster Baryon Fractions Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Anthony H; Zabludoff, Ann I; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    We measure the baryons contained in both the stellar and hot gas components for twelve galaxy clusters and groups at z~0.1 with M=1-5e14 Msun. This paper improves upon our previous work through the addition of XMM data, enabling measurements of the total mass and masses of each major baryonic component --- ICM, intracluster stars, and stars in galaxies --- for each system. We recover a relation for the stellar mass versus halo mass consistent with our previous result. We confirm that the partitioning of baryons between the stellar and hot gas components is a strong function of M500; the fractions of total mass in stars and X-ray gas within r500 scale as M500^-0.45 and M500^0.26, respectively. We also confirm that the combination of the BCG and intracluster stars is an increasingly important contributor to the stellar baryon budget in lower halo masses. We find a weak, but statistically significant, dependence of the total baryon fraction upon halo mass, scaling as M500^0.16. For M500>2e14, the total baryon fr...

  15. Continued fractions and heavy sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Boshernitzan, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We initiate the study of the sets $H(c)$, $0=x-[x]$ stands for the fractional part of $x\\in \\mathbb R$. We prove that, for rational $c$, the sets $H(c)$ are of positive Hausdorff dimension and, in particular, are uncountable. For integers $m\\geq1$, we obtain a surprising characterization of the numbers $\\alpha\\in H_m= H(\\frac1m)$ in terms of their continued fraction expansions: The odd entries (partial quotients) of these expansions are divisible by $m$. The characterization implies that $x\\in H_m$ if and only if $\\frac 1{mx} \\in H_m$, for $x>0$. We are unaware of a direct proof of this equivalence, without making a use of the mentioned characterization of the sets $H_m$. We also introduce the dual sets $\\hat H_m$ of reals $y$ for which the sequence of integers $\\big([ky]\\big)_{k\\geq1}$ consistently hits the set $m\\mathbb Z$ with the at least expected frequency $\\frac1m$ and establish the connection with the sets $H_m$: {2mm} If $xy=m$ for $x,y>0$, then $x\\in H_m$ if and only if $y\\in \\hat H_m$. The motivatio...

  16. Fractional baud-length coding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vierinen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel approach for modulating radar transmissions in order to improve target range and Doppler estimation accuracy. This is achieved by using non-uniform baud lengths. With this method it is possible to increase sub-baud range-resolution of phase coded radar measurements while maintaining a narrow transmission bandwidth. We first derive target backscatter amplitude estimation error covariance matrix for arbitrary targets when estimating backscatter in amplitude domain. We define target optimality and discuss different search strategies that can be used to find well performing transmission envelopes. We give several simulated examples of the method showing that fractional baud-length coding results in smaller estimation errors than conventional uniform baud length transmission codes when estimating the target backscatter amplitude at sub-baud range resolution. We also demonstrate the method in practice by analyzing the range resolved power of a low-altitude meteor trail echo that was measured using a fractional baud-length experiment with the EISCAT UHF system.

  17. Staircase and fractional part functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amram, Meirav; Dagan, Miriam; Ioshpe, Michael; Satianov, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    The staircase and fractional part functions are basic examples of real functions. They can be applied in several parts of mathematics, such as analysis, number theory, formulas for primes, and so on; in computer programming, the floor and ceiling functions are provided by a significant number of programming languages - they have some basic uses in various programming tasks. In this paper, we view the staircase and fractional part functions as a classical example of non-continuous real functions. We introduce some of their basic properties, present some interesting constructions concerning them, and explore some intriguing interpretations of such functions. Throughout the paper, we use these functions in order to explain basic concepts in a first calculus course, such as domain of definition, discontinuity, and oddness of functions. We also explain in detail how, after researching the properties of such functions, one can draw their graph; this is a crucial part in the process of understanding their nature. In the paper, we present some subjects that the first-year student in the exact sciences may not encounter. We try to clarify those subjects and show that such ideas are important in the understanding of non-continuous functions, as a part of studying analysis in general.

  18. Dean flow fractionation of chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockin, Matt; Sant, Himanshu J.; Capecchi, Mario; Gale, Bruce K.

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to transfer intact mammalian chromosomes between cells have been attempted for more than 50 years with the consistent result being transfer of sub unit length pieces regardless of method. Inertial microfluidics is a new field that has shown much promise in addressing the fractionation of particles in the 2-20 μm size range (with unknown limits) and separations are based upon particles being carried by curving confined flows (within a spiral shaped, often rectangular flow chamber) and migrating to stable "equilibrium" positions of varying distance from a chamber wall depending on the balance of dean and lift forces. We fabricated spiral channels for inertial microfluidic separations using a standard soft lithography process. The concentration of chromosomes, small contaminant DNA and large cell debris in each outlets were evaluated using microscope (60X) and a flow cytometer. Using Dean Flow Fractionation, we were able to focus 4.5 times more chromosomes in outlet 2 compared to outlet 4 where most of the large debris is found. We recover 16% of the chromosomes in outlet #1- 50% in 2, 23% in 3 and 11% in 4. It should be noted that these estimates of recovery do not capture one piece of information- it actually may be that the chromosomes at each outlet are physically different and work needs to be done to verify this potential.

  19. Multiple Interactive Representations for Fractions Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, Laurens; Aleven, Vincent; Rummel, Nikol; Taatgen, Niels; Aleven,; Kay, J; Mostow, J

    2010-01-01

    Multiple External Representations (MERs) have been used successfully in instructional activities, including fractions However, students often have difficulties making the connections between the MERs spontaneously We argue that interactive fraction representations may help students in discovering re

  20. Boundary Controllability of Nonlinear Fractional Integrodifferential Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed HamdyM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sufficient conditions for boundary controllability of nonlinear fractional integrodifferential systems in Banach space are established. The results are obtained by using fixed point theorems. We also give an application for integropartial differential equations of fractional order.

  1. Fractional Order Element Based Impedance Matching

    KAUST Repository

    Radwan, Ahmed Gomaa

    2014-06-24

    Disclosed are various embodiments of methods and systems related to fractional order element based impedance matching. In one embodiment, a method includes aligning a traditional Smith chart (|.alpha.|=1) with a fractional order Smith chart (|.alpha.|.noteq.1). A load impedance is located on the traditional Smith chart and projected onto the fractional order Smith chart. A fractional order matching element is determined by transitioning along a matching circle of the fractional order Smith chart based at least in part upon characteristic line impedance. In another embodiment, a system includes a fractional order impedance matching application executed in a computing device. The fractional order impedance matching application includes logic that obtains a first set of Smith chart coordinates at a first order, determines a second set of Smith chart coordinates at a second order, and determines a fractional order matching element from the second set of Smith chart coordinates.

  2. Fractional Smoothness of Some Stochastic Integrals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng XIE; Xi Cheng ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    We study the fractional smoothness in the sense of Malliavin calculus of stochastic integralsof the form ∫10 φ(Xs)d Xs,where Xs is a semimartingale and φ belongs to some fractional Sobolev spaceover R.

  3. The multiple-parameter fractional Fourier transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LANG Jun; TAO Ran; RAN QiWen; WANG Yue

    2008-01-01

    The fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) has multiplicity, which is intrinsic in frac-tional operator. A new source for the multiplicity of the weight-type fractional Fou-rier transform (WFRFT) is proposed, which can generalize the weight coefficients of WFRFT to contain two vector parameters MN,∈ZM. Therefore a generalized frac-tional Fourier transform can be defined, which is denoted by the multiple-parameter fractional Fourier transform (MPFRFT). It enlarges the multiplicity of the FRFT, which not only includes the conventional FRFT and general multi-fractional Fourier transform as special cases, but also introduces new fractional Fourier transforms. It provides a unified framework for the FRFT, and the method is also available for fractionalizing other linear operators. In addition, numerical simulations of the MPFRFT on the Hermite-Gaussian and rectangular functions have been performed as a simple application of MPFRFT to signal processing.

  4. A fractional model for dye removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Huan He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption process has a fractional property, and a fractional model is suggested to study a transport model of direct textile industry wastewater. An approximate solution of the concentration is obtained by the variational iteration method.

  5. Fractional Transforms in Optical Information Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Calvo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available We review the progress achieved in optical information processing during the last decade by applying fractional linear integral transforms. The fractional Fourier transform and its applications for phase retrieval, beam characterization, space-variant pattern recognition, adaptive filter design, encryption, watermarking, and so forth is discussed in detail. A general algorithm for the fractionalization of linear cyclic integral transforms is introduced and it is shown that they can be fractionalized in an infinite number of ways. Basic properties of fractional cyclic transforms are considered. The implementation of some fractional transforms in optics, such as fractional Hankel, sine, cosine, Hartley, and Hilbert transforms, is discussed. New horizons of the application of fractional transforms for optical information processing are underlined.

  6. Direct and inverse source problems for a space fractional advection dispersion equation

    KAUST Repository

    Aldoghaither, Abeer

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, direct and inverse problems for a space fractional advection dispersion equation on a finite domain are studied. The inverse problem consists in determining the source term from final observations. We first derive the analytic solution to the direct problem which we use to prove the uniqueness and the unstability of the inverse source problem using final measurements. Finally, we illustrate the results with a numerical example.

  7. Langevin equation with two fractional orders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, S.C. [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, Cyberjaya 63100, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)], E-mail: sclim@mmu.edu.my; Li Ming [School of Information Science and Technology, East China Normal University, No. 500, Dong-Chuan Road, Shanghai 200241 (China)], E-mail: mli@ee.ecnu.edu.cn; Teo, L.P. [Faculty of Information Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, Cyberjaya 63100, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)], E-mail: lpteo@mmu.edu.my

    2008-10-13

    A new type of fractional Langevin equation of two different orders is introduced. The solutions for this equation, known as the fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes, based on Weyl and Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives are obtained. The basic properties of these processes are studied. An example of the spectral density of ocean wind speed which has similar spectral density as that of Weyl fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is given.

  8. Transcendental $p$-adic continued fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Ooto, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    We establish a new transcendence criterion of $p$-adic continued fractions which are called Ruban continued fractions. By this result, we give explicit transcendental Ruban continued fractions with bounded $p$-adic absolute value of partial quotients. This is $p$-adic analogy of Baker's result. We also prove that $p$-adic analogy of Lagrange Theorem for Ruban continued fractions is not true.

  9. Lyapunov functions for fractional order systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguila-Camacho, Norelys; Duarte-Mermoud, Manuel A.; Gallegos, Javier A.

    2014-09-01

    A new lemma for the Caputo fractional derivatives, when 0<α<1, is proposed in this paper. This result has proved to be useful in order to apply the fractional-order extension of Lyapunov direct method, to demonstrate the stability of many fractional order systems, which can be nonlinear and time varying.

  10. An Alternative Starting Point for Fraction Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, José Luis; Višnovská, Jana; Zúñiga, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the results of a study conducted for the purpose of assessing the viability of an alternative starting point for teaching fractions. The alternative is based on Freudenthal's insights about fraction as comparison. It involves portraying the entities that unit fractions quantify as always being apart from the reference unit, instead of…

  11. Early Predictors of Middle School Fraction Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Drew H.; Siegler, Robert S.; Geary, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings that earlier fraction knowledge predicts later mathematics achievement raise the question of what predicts later fraction knowledge. Analyses of longitudinal data indicated that whole number magnitude knowledge in first grade predicted knowledge of fraction magnitudes in middle school, controlling for whole number arithmetic…

  12. Stretching Student Teachers' Understanding of Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Roger

    2012-01-01

    The teaching of fractions in elementary school is known to be challenging. Literature indicates that teachers' and prospective teachers' lack of depth of fraction content knowledge and associated pedagogical knowledge is of concern. This study investigated the fraction content knowledge of prospective teachers and their ability to use that…

  13. Mathematical modelling of fractional order circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Moreles, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    In this work a classical derivation of fractional order circuits models is presented. Generalized constitutive equations in terms of fractional Riemann-Liouville derivatives are introduced in the Maxwell's equations. Next the Kirchhoff voltage law is applied in a RCL circuit configuration. A fractional differential equation model is obtained with Caputo derivatives. Thus standard initial conditions apply.

  14. Stretching Student Teachers' Understanding of Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Roger

    2012-01-01

    The teaching of fractions in elementary school is known to be challenging. Literature indicates that teachers' and prospective teachers' lack of depth of fraction content knowledge and associated pedagogical knowledge is of concern. This study investigated the fraction content knowledge of prospective teachers and their ability to use that…

  15. Take a Bite out of Fraction Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Nesrin; Rathouz, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Division of fractions is often considered the most mechanical and least understood topic in elementary school. Enacting fraction division tasks in meaningful ways requires that teachers know not only "how" fraction division works but also "why" it works. The authors have created materials to help preservice teachers develop that knowledge. To…

  16. Preparing for Algebra by Building Fraction Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jessica; Dyson, Nancy I.; Hansen, Nicole; Jordan, Nancy C.

    2016-01-01

    Fractions are troublesome for many children, especially students with learning difficulties and disabilities in mathematics. To address this serious educational concern, this article recommends the use of number lines to build fraction sense. Math activities that center on the number line build fraction concepts as early as third grade. A number…

  17. The Richness of Children's Fraction Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Laura B.; Empson, Susan B.; Nielsen, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a special type of multiplication-and-division-of-fractions problem that elementary school teachers can use to promote children's understanding of fractional quantities and their relationships. These problems are accessible to students working at different levels of fraction understanding, and they can be solved…

  18. Continued fractions and the second Kepler law

    OpenAIRE

    Karpenkov, Oleg

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a link between geometry of ordinary continued fractions and trajectories of points that moves according to the second Kepler law. We expand geometric interpretation of ordinary continued fractions to the case of continued fractions with arbitrary elements.

  19. Identifying Fractions on a Number Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Fractions are generally introduced to students using the part--whole model. Yet the number line is another important representation which can be used to build fraction concepts (Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority [ACARA], 2012). Number lines are recognised as key in students' number development not only of fractions, but…

  20. 16 CFR 500.17 - Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fractions. 500.17 Section 500.17 Commercial... LABELING ACT § 500.17 Fractions. (a) SI metric declarations of net quantity of contents of any consumer commodity may contain only decimal fractions. Other declarations of net quantity of contents may...

  1. Locating Fractions on a Number Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Understanding fractions remains problematic for many students. The use of the number line aids in this understanding, but requires students to recognise that a fraction represents the distance from zero to a dot or arrow marked on a number line which is a linear scale. This article continues the discussion from "Identifying Fractions on a…

  2. Teaching Fractions. Educational Practices Series-22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Lisa; Siegler, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Students around the world have difficulties in learning about fractions. In many countries, the average student never gains a conceptual knowledge of fractions. This research guide provides suggestions for teachers and administrators looking to improve fraction instruction in their classrooms or schools. The recommendations are based on a…

  3. 12 CFR 5.67 - Fractional shares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... fractional shares. The bank may: (a) Issue scripts or warrants for trading; (b) Make reasonable arrangements... fair price upon the fraction not being issued through its sale, or the purchase of the additional... such stock is available; or (d) Sell full shares representing all the fractions at public auction, or...

  4. Fractions but not negative numbers are represented on the mental number line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganor-Stern, Dana

    2012-02-01

    The present study is the first to directly compare numerical representations of positive numbers, negative numbers and unit fractions. The results show that negative numbers and unit fractions were not represented in the same way. Distance effects were found when positive numbers were compared with fractions but not when they were compared with negative numbers, thus suggesting that unit fractions but not negative numbers were represented on the number line with positive numbers. As indicated by the semantic congruity effect, negative numbers were perceived to be small, positive numbers were perceived as large, while unit fractions were perceived neither as large nor small. Comparisons between negative numbers were faster than between unit fractions, possibly due to the smaller differences between the holistic magnitudes of the unit fractions. Finally, comparing unit fractions to 1 was faster than comparing them to 0, consistent with the idea that unit fractions are perceived as entities smaller than 1 (Kallai & Tzelgov, 2009). The results are consistent with the idea of a mental division between numbers that represent a quantity (positive numbers and unit fractions) and those that do not (negative numbers).

  5. Fractionation of Soil Selenium with Relation to Se Availability to Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEZHEN-LI; XIAWEI-PING; 等

    1994-01-01

    Nine soils with distince properties and Se levels were selected to test a fractionation procedure of soil Se based on sequential extraction.Soil Se was fractionated into readily available Se(fraction I,extracted by 0.5 M NaHCO3),slowly available Se(fraction II,extracted by 0.1 M NaOH-0.1 M Na4P2O7),amorphous oxide-occluded Se(fraction Ⅲ,extracted by acid ammonium oxalate)free oxide-occluded Se (fraction VI,extracted by dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate buffer solution)and residual Se(fraction V,determined by NHO3-HClO4 digestion of the final soil residue).The recovery of soil Se(the sum of all fractions over total soil Se determined independently)by this procedure was from 88.1% to 110.9%,mean 99.2%±6.4% for the test soils.The sum of fractions I and II,provided a good measure of available Se in soils and the percentage of fraction I plus II over the total soil Se,tentatively defined as Se availability index.could be used to indicate soil Se status and predict Se deficiency.

  6. Natural fractionation of uranium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noordmann, Janine

    2015-01-24

    The topic of this thesis was the investigation of U (n({sup 238}U) / n({sup 235}U)) isotope variations in nature with a focus on samples (1) that represent the continental crust and its weathering products (i.e. granites, shales and river water) (2) that represent products of hydrothermal alteration on mid-ocean ridges (i.e. altered basalts, carbonate veins and hydrothermal water) and (3) from restricted euxinic basins (i.e. from the water column and respective sediments). The overall goal was to explore the environmental conditions and unravel the mechanisms that fractionate the two most abundant U isotopes, n({sup 238}U) and n({sup 235}U), on Earth.

  7. Superconducting wires and fractional flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá de Melo, C. A. R.

    1996-05-01

    The quantization of flux quanta in superconductors is revisited and analyzed in a new geometry. The system analyzed is a superconducting wire. The geometry is such that the superconducting wire winds N times around an insulating cylinder and that the wire has its end connected back to its beginning, thus producing an N-loop short circuited solenoid. The winding number N acts as a topological index that controls flux quantization. In this case, fractional flux quanta can be measured through the center of the insulating cylinder, provided that the cylinder radius is small enough. The Little-Parks experiment for an identical geometry is discussed. The period of oscillation of the transition temperature of the wire is found to vary as 1/N in units of flux Φ relative to the flux quantum Φ0. When a SQUID is made in such a geometry the maximal current through the SQUID varies with period Φ0/N.

  8. Subordination Pathways to Fractional Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Gorenflo, Rudolf; 10.1140/epjst/e2011-01386-2

    2011-01-01

    The uncoupled Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) in one space-dimension and under power law regime is splitted into three distinct random walks: (rw_1), a random walk along the line of natural time, happening in operational time; (rw_2), a random walk along the line of space, happening in operational time;(rw_3), the inversion of (rw_1), namely a random walk along the line of operational time, happening in natural time. Via the general integral equation of CTRW and appropriate rescaling, the transition to the diffusion limit is carried out for each of these three random walks. Combining the limits of (rw_1) and (rw_2) we get the method of parametric subordination for generating particle paths, whereas combination of (rw_2) and (rw_3) yields the subordination integral for the sojourn probability density in space-time fractional diffusion.

  9. Fractional Action Cosmology with Variable Order Parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nabulsi, Rami Ahmad

    2017-04-01

    Fractional action cosmology with variable order parameter was constructed in this paper. Starting from a fractional weighted action which generalizes the fractional actionlike variational approach, a large number of cosmological dynamical equations are obtained depending on the mathematical type of the fractional order parameter. Through this paper, we selected two independent types which result on a number of cosmological scenarios and we discussed their dynamical consequences. It was observed that the present fractional cosmological formalism holds a large family of solutions and offers new features not found in the standard formalism and in many fundamental research papers.

  10. Correlation Structure of Fractional Pearson Diffusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-09-01

    The stochastic solution to a diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients is called a Pearson diffusion. If the first time derivative is replaced by a Caputo fractional derivative of order less than one, the stochastic solution is called a fractional Pearson diffusion. This paper develops an explicit formula for the covariance function of a fractional Pearson diffusion in steady state, in terms of Mittag-Leffler functions. That formula shows that fractional Pearson diffusions are long range dependent, with a correlation that falls off like a power law, whose exponent equals the order of the fractional derivative.

  11. On the Definitions of Nabla Fractional Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thabet Abdeljawad

    2012-01-01

    properties of the one operator by using the known properties of the other. We illustrate this idea with proving power rule and commutative property of discrete fractional sum operators. We also introduce and prove summation by parts formulas for the right and left fractional sum and difference operators, where we employ the Riemann-Liouville definition of the fractional difference. We formalize initial value problems for nonlinear fractional difference equations as an application of our findings. An alternative definition for the nabla right fractional difference operator is also introduced.

  12. Linearized asymptotic stability for fractional differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Cong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We prove the theorem of linearized asymptotic stability for fractional differential equations. More precisely, we show that an equilibrium of a nonlinear Caputo fractional differential equation is asymptotically stable if its linearization at the equilibrium is asymptotically stable. As a consequence we extend Lyapunov's first method to fractional differential equations by proving that if the spectrum of the linearization is contained in the sector $\\{\\lambda \\in \\mathbb{C} : |\\arg \\lambda| > \\frac{\\alpha \\pi}{2}\\}$ where $\\alpha > 0$ denotes the order of the fractional differential equation, then the equilibrium of the nonlinear fractional differential equation is asymptotically stable.

  13. Laplace transform of fractional order differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Liang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we show that Laplace transform can be applied to fractional system. To this end, solutions of linear fractional-order equations are first derived by a direct method, without using Laplace transform. Then the solutions of fractional-order differential equations are estimated by employing Gronwall and Holder inequalities. They are showed be to of exponential order, which are necessary to apply the Laplace transform. Based on the estimates of solutions, the fractional-order and the integer-order derivatives of solutions are all estimated to be exponential order. As a result, the Laplace transform is proved to be valid in fractional equations.

  14. Fractional Action Cosmology with Variable Order Parameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nabulsi, Rami Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Fractional action cosmology with variable order parameter was constructed in this paper. Starting from a fractional weighted action which generalizes the fractional actionlike variational approach, a large number of cosmological dynamical equations are obtained depending on the mathematical type of the fractional order parameter. Through this paper, we selected two independent types which result on a number of cosmological scenarios and we discussed their dynamical consequences. It was observed that the present fractional cosmological formalism holds a large family of solutions and offers new features not found in the standard formalism and in many fundamental research papers.

  15. Second Study of Hyper-Fractionated Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jacob

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Method. Hyper-fractionated radiotherapy for treatment of soft tissue sarcomas is designed to deliver a higher total dose of radiation without an increase in late normal tissue damage. In a previous study at the Royal Marsden Hospital, a total dose of 75 Gy using twice daily 1.25 Gy fractions resulted in a higher incidence of late damage than conventional radiotherapy using 2 Gy daily fractions treating to a total of 60 Gy. The current trial therefore used a lower dose per fraction of 1.2 Gy and lower total dose of 72 Gy, with 60 fractions given over a period of 6 weeks.

  16. Utilization of Different Corn Fractions by Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIFR Costa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThis study was conducted to evaluate the nutritional values of fractions of damaged corn. One hundred and eighty 22-d-old Cobb 500 male broilers were distributed in batteries according to a completely randomized design with six treatments of six replicates each. The treatments consisted of diets containing five corn fractions, classified as sound, fermented, insect-damaged, mold-damaged, or reference corn. The test diets consisted of 60% of reference diet + 40% of each corn fraction. Only the reference corn fraction included all the fractions at different proportions (0.8% fermented, 0.05% insect-damaged, 3.3% mold-damaged, and 95.85% sound grains. The method of total excreta collection was used to determine AMEn values and metabolizability coefficients of dry matter (MDM, crude protein (MCP, ether extract (MEE, and gross energy (MGE of the reference corn and its fractions. The density values of the corn fractions were used to calculate the correlations among the evaluated parameters. The evaluated corn fractions presented different compositions values. The insect-damaged and mold-damaged grains presented higher CP level, lower density, and MDM and MCP coefficients compared with the other fractions. However, calculated AMEn values were not significantly different (p>0.05 among corn fractions. A low correlation between density and AMEn content (r0.8 were calculated. Although the evaluated corn fractions presented different nutritional values, there were no marked differences in their utilization by broilers.

  17. Hydrologic transport and partitioning of phosphorus fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, C.; Sansalone, J.

    2011-06-01

    SummaryPhosphorus (P) in rainfall-runoff partitions between dissolved and particulate matter (PM) bound phases. This study investigates the transport and partitioning of P to PM fractions in runoff from a landscaped and biogenically-loaded carpark in Gainesville, FL (GNV). Additionally, partitioning and concentration results are compared to a similarly-sized concrete-paved source area of a similar rainfall depth frequency distribution in Baton Rouge, LA (BTR), where in contrast vehicular traffic represents the main source of pollutants. Results illustrate that concentrations of P fractions (dissolved, suspended, settleable and sediment) for GNV are one to two orders of magnitude higher than BTR. Despite these differences the dissolved fraction ( f d) and partitioning coefficient ( K d) distributions are similar, illustrating that P is predominantly bound to PM fractions. Examining PM size fractions, specific capacity for P (PSC) indicates that the P concentration order is suspended > settleable > sediment for GNV, similarly to BTR. For GNV the dominant PM mass fraction is sediment (>75 μm), while the mass of P is distributed predominantly between sediment and suspended (<25 μm) fractions since these PM mass fractions dominated the settleable one. With respect to transport of PM and P fractions the predominance of events for both areas is mass-limited first-flush, although each fraction illustrated unique washoff parameters. However, while transport is predominantly mass-limited, the transport of each PM and P fraction is influenced by separate hydrologic parameters.

  18. Fractional linear systems and electrical circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Kaczorek, Tadeusz

    2015-01-01

    This monograph covers some selected problems of positive and fractional electrical circuits composed of resistors, coils, capacitors and voltage (current) sources. The book consists of 8 chapters, 4 appendices and a list of references. Chapter 1 is devoted to fractional standard and positive continuous-time and discrete-time linear systems without and with delays. In chapter 2 the standard and positive fractional electrical circuits are considered and the fractional electrical circuits in transient states are analyzed.  Descriptor linear electrical circuits and their properties are investigated in chapter 3,  while chapter 4 is devoted to the stability of fractional standard and positive linear electrical circuits. The reachability, observability and reconstructability of fractional positive electrical circuits and their decoupling zeros are analyzed in chapter 5. The fractional linear electrical circuits with feedbacks are considered in chapter 6. In chapter 7 solutions of minimum energy control for standa...

  19. Size-dependent geometrically nonlinear free vibration analysis of fractional viscoelastic nanobeams based on the nonlocal elasticity theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, R.; Faraji Oskouie, M.; Gholami, R.

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, mathematical modeling and engineering applications of fractional-order calculus have been extensively utilized to provide efficient simulation tools in the field of solid mechanics. In this paper, a nonlinear fractional nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model is established using the concept of fractional derivative and nonlocal elasticity theory to investigate the size-dependent geometrically nonlinear free vibration of fractional viscoelastic nanobeams. The non-classical fractional integro-differential Euler-Bernoulli beam model contains the nonlocal parameter, viscoelasticity coefficient and order of the fractional derivative to interpret the size effect, viscoelastic material and fractional behavior in the nanoscale fractional viscoelastic structures, respectively. In the solution procedure, the Galerkin method is employed to reduce the fractional integro-partial differential governing equation to a fractional ordinary differential equation in the time domain. Afterwards, the predictor-corrector method is used to solve the nonlinear fractional time-dependent equation. Finally, the influences of nonlocal parameter, order of fractional derivative and viscoelasticity coefficient on the nonlinear time response of fractional viscoelastic nanobeams are discussed in detail. Moreover, comparisons are made between the time responses of linear and nonlinear models.

  20. Uncertainty-based Optimization Algorithms in Designing Fractionated Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Xin; Yuan, Jianping; Yue, Xiaokui

    2016-03-01

    A fractionated spacecraft is an innovative application of a distributive space system. To fully understand the impact of various uncertainties on its development, launch and in-orbit operation, we use the stochastic missioncycle cost to comprehensively evaluate the survivability, flexibility, reliability and economy of the ways of dividing the various modules of the different configurations of fractionated spacecraft. We systematically describe its concept and then analyze its evaluation and optimal design method that exists during recent years and propose the stochastic missioncycle cost for comprehensive evaluation. We also establish the models of the costs such as module development, launch and deployment and the impacts of their uncertainties respectively. Finally, we carry out the Monte Carlo simulation of the complete missioncycle costs of various configurations of the fractionated spacecraft under various uncertainties and give and compare the probability density distribution and statistical characteristics of its stochastic missioncycle cost, using the two strategies of timing module replacement and non-timing module replacement. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of the comprehensive evaluation method and show that our evaluation method can comprehensively evaluate the adaptability of the fractionated spacecraft under different technical and mission conditions.

  1. A Mathematical Analysis of Fractional Fragmentation Dynamics with Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile Franc Doungmo Goufo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We make use of the theory of strongly continuous solution operators for fractional models together with the subordination principle for fractional evolution equations (Bazhlekova (2000 and Prüss (1993 to analyze and show existence results for a fractional fragmentation model with growth characterized by its growth rate r. Indeed, strange phenomena like the phenomenon of shattering (McGrady and Ziff (1987 and the sudden appearance of infinite number of particles in some systems with initial finite particles number could not be fully explained by classical models of fragmentation or aggregation. Then, there is an increasing volition to try new approaches and extend classical models to fractional ones. In the growth model, one of the major challenges in the analysis occurs when 1/r(x is integrable at x0≥0, the minimum size of a cell. We restrict our analysis to the case of integrability of r-1 at x0. This case needs more considerations on the boundary condition, which, in this paper, is the McKendrick-von Foerster renewal condition. In the process, some properties of Mittag-Leffler relaxation function Berberan-Santos (2005 are exploited to finally prove that there is a positive solution operator to the full model.

  2. [Identification of isoparaffin components in petroleum middle fractions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingrong; Jiang, Jingjie; Liu, Zelong; Tian, Songbai

    2016-02-01

    The identification of isoparaffin components in petroleum middle fractions including kerosene and diesel fuels was investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The isodewaxing middle fraction and distilled diesel were selected as the objective samples for identification. It was shown that the isoparaffin components in middle fraction were well separated with their branched alkyl substituent numbers on a capillary chromatographic column in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode of GC/MS. The identification for C10-C24 isoparaffins was realized with the technique of GC/MS, such as the fragmentation pathways of electron ionization and SIM technique, boiling point rule, published retention indices and theoretical rules about component retention behavior in GC including carbon number rule etc. Finally, the retention indices for the mono-substituted, di-substituted and multi-substituted isoparaffins from C10 to C24 were presented, which could provide an overall knowledge of isoparaffin distribution at carbon number level in fuels. Meanwhile, the peaks that could be well resolved in each isoparaffin group were also identified, and the detailed data for about 80 C10-C21 methyl-substituted isoparaffins and isoprenoid biomarkers were also given. The results showed that in isodewaxing middle fraction studied, the mono-substituted and di-substituted isoparaffins were the main paraffins, whereas in distilled diesel studies, the mono-substituted isoparaffins and isoprenoid biomarkers were the main ones.

  3. WMO Marine Final Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Final reports of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Commission for Marine Meteorology, Commission for Synoptic Meteorology, and Commission for Basic...

  4. Transacsys PLC - Final Results

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Final results from Transacsys PLC. A subsidary of this company was set up to develop the CERN EDH system into a commercial product but incurred too much financial loss so the project was cancelled (1/2 page).

  5. Aurora final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, Dross; Amedeo, Conti

    2013-12-06

    Final Technical report detailing the work done by Nuvera and its partners to fulfill the goals of the program "Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell Stacks" (a.k.a. AURORA)

  6. Final focus test beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.

  7. CLIC Final Focus Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2006-01-01

    The CLIC final focus system has been designed based on the local compensation scheme proposed by P. Raimondi and A. Seryi. However, there exist important chromatic aberrations that deteriorate the performance of the system. This paper studies the optimization of the final focus based on the computation of the higher orders of the map using MAD-X and PTC. The use of octupole tail folding to reduce the size of the halo in the locations with aperture limitations is also discussed.

  8. Data breaches. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-11

    This document adopts, without change, the interim final rule that was published in the Federal Register on June 22, 2007, addressing data breaches of sensitive personal information that is processed or maintained by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). This final rule implements certain provisions of the Veterans Benefits, Health Care, and Information Technology Act of 2006. The regulations prescribe the mechanisms for taking action in response to a data breach of sensitive personal information.

  9. Solution of nonlinear space time fractional differential equations via the fractional projective Riccati expansion method

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Salam, Emad A-B; Hassan, Gmal F

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the fractional projective Riccati expansion method is proposed to solve fractional differential equations. To illustrate the effectiveness of the method, we discuss the space-time fractional Burgers equation, the space-time fractional mKdV equation and time fractional biological population model. The solutions are expressed in terms of fractional hyperbolic functions. These solutions are useful to understand the mechanisms of the complicated nonlinear physical phenomena and fractional differential equations. Among these solutions, some are found for the first time. The fractal index for the obtained results is equal to one. Counter examples to compute the fractal index are introduced in appendix.

  10. Intermediate processes and critical phenomena: Theory, method and progress of fractional operators and their applications to modern mechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Mingyu; TAN; Wenchang

    2006-01-01

    From point of view of physics, especially of mechanics, we briefly introduce fractional operators (with emphasis on fractional calculus and fractional differential equations) used for describing intermediate processes and critical phenomena in physics and mechanics, their progress in theory and methods and their applications to modern mechanics. Some authors' researches in this area in recent years are included. Finally, prospects and evaluation for this subject are made.

  11. Exact Solutions of Fractional Burgers and Cahn-Hilliard Equations Using Extended Fractional Riccati Expansion Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on a general fractional Riccati equation and with Jumarie’s modified Riemann-Liouville derivative to an extended fractional Riccati expansion method for solving the time fractional Burgers equation and the space-time fractional Cahn-Hilliard equation, the exact solutions expressed by the hyperbolic functions and trigonometric functions are obtained. The obtained results show that the presented method is effective and appropriate for solving nonlinear fractional differential equations.

  12. Wright functions governed by fractional directional derivatives and fractional advection diffusion equations

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ovidio, Mirko

    2012-01-01

    We consider fractional directional derivatives and establish some connection with stable densities. Solutions to advection equations involving fractional directional derivatives are presented and some properties investigated. In particular we obtain solutions written in terms of Wright functions by exploiting operational rules involving the shift operator. We also consider fractional advection diffusion equations involving fractional powers of the negative Laplace operator and directional derivatives of fractional order and discuss the probabilistic interpretations of solutions.

  13. Control and Synchronization of the Fractional-Order Lorenz Chaotic System via Fractional-Order Derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unstable equilibrium points of the fractional-order Lorenz chaotic system can be controlled via fractional-order derivative, and chaos synchronization for the fractional-order Lorenz chaotic system can be achieved via fractional-order derivative. The control and synchronization technique, based on stability theory of fractional-order systems, is simple and theoretically rigorous. The numerical simulations demonstrate the validity and feasibility of the proposed method.

  14. Control and Synchronization of the Fractional-Order Lorenz Chaotic System via Fractional-Order Derivative

    OpenAIRE

    Ping Zhou; Rui Ding

    2012-01-01

    The unstable equilibrium points of the fractional-order Lorenz chaotic system can be controlled via fractional-order derivative, and chaos synchronization for the fractional-order Lorenz chaotic system can be achieved via fractional-order derivative. The control and synchronization technique, based on stability theory of fractional-order systems, is simple and theoretically rigorous. The numerical simulations demonstrate the validity and feasibility of the proposed method.

  15. Ablative fractional laser treatment for hypertrophic scars: comparison between Er:YAG and CO2 fractional lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Eun; Oh, Ga Na; Kim, Jong Yeob; Seo, Soo Hong; Ahn, Hyo Hyun; Kye, Young Chul

    2014-08-01

    Nonablative fractional photothermolysis has been reported to show early promise in the treatment of hypertrophic scars, but there are few reports on ablative fractional photothermolysis for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. To evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of Er:YAG fractional laser (EYFL) and CO2 fractional laser (CO2FL) for treatment of hypertrophic scars. Thirteen patients with hypertrophic scars were treated with 2,940 nm EYFL, and ten were treated with 10,600 nm CO2FL. An independent physician evaluator assessed the treatment outcomes using Vancouver scar scale (VSS) and 5-point grading scale (grade 0, no improvement; grade 1, 1-25%; grade 2, 26-50%; grade 3, 51-75%; grade 4, 76-100% improvement). Patients are queried about their subjective satisfaction with the treatment outcomes. After the final treatment, average percentage changes of VSS were 28.2% for EYFL and 49.8% for CO2FL. Improvement was evident in terms of pliability, while insignificant in terms of vascularity and pigmentation. Based on physician's global assessment, mean grade of 1.8 for EYFL and 2.7 for CO2FL was achieved. Patient's subjective satisfaction scores paralleled the physician's objective evaluation. CO2FL is a potentially effective and safe modality for the treatment of hypertrophic scars, particularly in terms of pliability.

  16. Optimal sequential change-detection for fractional stochastic differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Chronopoulou, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    The sequential detection of an abrupt and persistent change in the dynamics of an arbitrary continuous-path stochastic process is considered; the optimality of the cumulative sums (CUSUM) test is established with respect to a modified Lorden's criterion. As a corollary, sufficient conditions are obtained for the optimality of the CUSUM test when the observed process is described by a fractional stochastic differential equation. Moreover, a novel family of model-free, Lorden-like criteria is introduced and it is shown that these criteria are optimized by the CUSUM test when a fractional Brownian motion adopts a polynomial drift. Finally, a modification of the continuous-time CUSUM test is proposed for the case that only discrete-time observations are available.

  17. A statistical treatment of bioassay pour fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Hughes, David

    , for a desired value of uncertainty, one must invert the calculation. However, this probability of finding exactly the number of spores in the poured part is correct only in the case where all values of the true number of spores greater than or equal to the adjusted count are equally probable. This is not realistic, of course, but the result can only overestimate the uncertainty. So it is useful. In probability speak, one has the conditional probability given any true total number of spores. Therefore one must multiply it by the probability of each possible true count, before the summation. If the counts for a sample set (of which this is one sample) are available, one may use the calculated variance and the normal probability distribution. In this approach, one assumes a normal distribution and neglects the contribution from spatial variation. The former is a common assumption. The latter can only add to the conservatism (over estimate the number of spores at some level of confidence). A more straightforward approach is to assume a Poisson probability distribution for the measured total sample set counts, and use the product of the number of samples and the mean number of counts per sample as the mean of the Poisson distribution. It is necessary to set the total count to 1 in the Poisson distribution when actual total count is zero. Finally, even when the planetary protection requirements for spore burden refer only to the mean values, they require an adjustment for pour fraction and method efficiency (a PP specification based on independent data). The adjusted mean values are a 50/50 proposition (e.g., the probability of the true total counts in the sample set exceeding the estimate is 0.50). However, this is highly unconservative when the total counts are zero. No adjustment to the mean values occurs for either pour fraction or efficiency. The recommended approach is once again to set the total counts to 1, but now applied to the mean values. Then one may apply the

  18. Networked Convergence of Fractional-Order Multiagent Systems with a Leader and Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuntao Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the convergence of fractional-order discrete-time multiagent systems with a leader and sampling delay by using Hermite-Biehler theorem and the change of bilinearity. It is shown that such system can achieve convergence depending on the sampling interval h, the fractional-order α, and the sampling delay τ and its interconnection topology. Finally, some numerical simulations are given to illustrate the results.

  19. The Design of Lens Imaging System by Means of Fractional Fourier Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jiannong; XU Qiang; D.R.Selviah

    2002-01-01

    The relation between the 2nd fractional Fourier transform and the imaging process of an optical system is discussed. By changing the coordinate scales of the input plane in respect to the magnification of the optical imaging system, the fractional Fourier transform can be a powerful tool in designing specific imaging system. The Gaussian imaging formula of single lens is obtained by using the tool. Finally the procedures are generalized for designing a double-lens imaging system through an example.

  20. State-Feedback Control for Fractional-Order Nonlinear Systems Subject to Input Saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhai Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a state-feedback control method for fractional-order nonlinear systems subject to input saturation. First, a sufficient condition is derived for the asymptotical stability of a class of fractional-order nonlinear systems. Then based on Gronwall-Bellman lemma and a sector bounded condition of the saturation function, a linear state-feed back controller is designed. Finally, two simulation examples are presented to show the validity of the proposed method.

  1. Characteristics of the gasoline fraction obtained by thermodestruction of bituminous oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleyev, A.M.; Margulis, B.Y.; Martynov, A.A.; Vigdergauz, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    A chromatographic evaluation of the 35-95/sup 0/C gasoline fraction obtained by thermal decomposition of bituminous oil was carried out. The initial analysis involving liquid chromatography in conjunction with fluorescent indicator spectra pointed to the presence of aromatic, olefinic, and paraffin fractions, which were subsequently analyzed by gas chromatography. The final results indicated that thermal destruction by means of a gas generator yields products similar to those obtained by oxidative cracking.

  2. Function Projective Synchronization of Fractional-Order Hyperchaotic System Based on Open-Plus-Closed-Looping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xing-Yuan; LIU Rong; ZHANG Na

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the dynamic behavior of fractional-order four-order hyperchaotic Lii system, and use the Open-Plus-Closed-Looping (OPCL) coupling method to construct the system's corresponding response system, and then implement function projective synchronization (FPS) of fractional-order drive-response system with system parameters perturbation or not. Finally, the numerical simulations verify the effectiveness and robustness of this scheme.

  3. Differential Isotopic Fractionation during Cr(VI) Reduction by an Aquifer-Derived Bacterium under Aerobic versus Denitrifying Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, R.; Qin, L.; Brown, S. T.; Christensen, J. N.; Beller, H. R.

    2012-01-27

    We studied Cr isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2. Finally, despite the fact that strain RCH2 reduces Cr(VI) cometabolically under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions and at similar specific rates, fractionation was markedly different under these two conditions (ε was ~2‰ aerobically and ~0.4‰ under denitrifying conditions).

  4. Cassini's Grand Finale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, L. J.; Edgington, S. G.; Altobelli, N.

    2016-12-01

    After more than 12 years in Saturn orbit, the Cassini-Huygens mission has entered its final year of data collection. Cassini will return its final bits of unique data on 15 September 2017 as it plunges into Saturn's atmosphere, vaporizing and satisfying planetary protection requirements. Since early 2016 Cassini's orbital inclination was slowly increased towards its final inclination. In November Cassini transitioned to a series of 20 orbits with peripases just outside Saturn's F ring that include some of the closest flybys of the tiny ring moons and excellent views of the F ring and outer A ring. Cassini's final close flyby of Titan will propel it across Saturn's main rings and into its final orbits. Cassini's Grand Finale begins in April 2017 and is comprised of 22 orbits at an inclination of 63 degrees. Cassini will repeatedly dive between the innermost ring and Saturn's upper atmosphere providing insights into fundamental questions unattainable during the rest of the mission. It will be the first spacecraft to explore this region. These close orbits provide the highest resolution observations of both the rings and Saturn, and direct in situ sampling of the ring particles' composition, plasma, Saturn's exosphere and the innermost radiation belts. Saturn's gravitational field will be measured to unprecedented accuracy, providing information on Saturn's interior structure and mass distribution in the rings. Probing the magnetic field will give insight into the nature of the magnetic dynamo and the true rotation rate of Saturn's interior. The ion and neutral mass spectrometer will sniff the exosphere and upper atmosphere and examine water-based molecules originating from the rings. The cosmic dust analyzer will sample particle composition from different parts of the main rings. Recent science highlights and science objectives from Cassini's final orbits will be discussed. This work was carried out in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of

  5. Hamiltonian chaos and fractional dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zaslavsky, George M

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of realistic Hamiltonian systems has unusual microscopic features that are direct consequences of its fractional space-time structure and its phase space topology. The book deals with the fractality of the chaotic dynamics and kinetics, and also includes material on non-ergodic and non-well-mixing Hamiltonian dynamics. The book does not follow the traditional scheme of most of today's literature on chaos. The intention of the author has been to put together some of the most complex and yet open problems on the general theory of chaotic systems. The importance of the discussed issues and an understanding of their origin should inspire students and researchers to touch upon some of the deepest aspects of nonlinear dynamics. The book considers the basic principles of the Hamiltonian theory of chaos and some applications including for example, the cooling of particles and signals, control and erasing of chaos, polynomial complexity, Maxwell's Demon, and others. It presents a new and realistic image ...

  6. Water Fractions in Extrasolar Planetesimals

    CERN Document Server

    Jura, M

    2011-01-01

    With the goal of using externally-polluted white dwarfs to investigate the water fractions of extrasolar planetesimals, we assemble from the literature a sample that we estimate to be more than 60% complete of DB white dwarfs warmer than 13,000 K, more luminous than 3 ${\\times}$ 10$^{-3}$ L$_{\\odot}$ and within 80 pc of the Sun. When considering all the stars together, we find the summed mass accretion rate of heavy atoms exceeds that of hydrogen by over a factor of 1000. If so, this sub-population of extrasolar asteroids treated as an ensemble has little water and is at least a factor of 20 drier than CI chondrites, the most primitive meteorites. In contrast, while an apparent "excess" of oxygen in a single DB can be interpreted as evidence that the accreted material originated in a water-rich parent body, we show that at least in some cases, there can be sufficient uncertainties in the time history of the accretion rate that such an argument may be ambiguous. Regardless of the difficulty associated with int...

  7. Fractional ablative erbium YAG laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, Elisabeth H; Haak, Christina S; Erlendsson, Andrés M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Treatment of a variety of skin disorders with ablative fractional lasers (AFXL) is driving the development of portable AFXLs. This study measures micropore dimensions produced by a small 2,940 nm AFXL using a variety of stacked pulses, and determines a model correlating...... laser parameters with tissue effects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ex vivo pig skin was exposed to a miniaturized 2,940 nm AFXL, spot size 225 µm, density 5%, power levels 1.15-2.22 W, pulse durations 50-225 microseconds, pulse repetition rates 100-500 Hz, and 2, 20, or 50 stacked pulses, resulting in pulse...... 190 to 347 µm. CONCLUSIONS: Pulse stacking with a small, low power 2,940 nm AFXL created reproducible shallow to deep micropores, and influenced micropore configuration. Mathematical modeling established relations between laser settings and micropore dimensions, which assists in choosing laser...

  8. LMI Conditions for Global Stability of Fractional-Order Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuo; Yu, Yongguang; Yu, Junzhi

    2016-08-02

    Fractional-order neural networks play a vital role in modeling the information processing of neuronal interactions. It is still an open and necessary topic for fractional-order neural networks to investigate their global stability. This paper proposes some simplified linear matrix inequality (LMI) stability conditions for fractional-order linear and nonlinear systems. Then, the global stability analysis of fractional-order neural networks employs the results from the obtained LMI conditions. In the LMI form, the obtained results include the existence and uniqueness of equilibrium point and its global stability, which simplify and extend some previous work on the stability analysis of the fractional-order neural networks. Moreover, a generalized projective synchronization method between such neural systems is given, along with its corresponding LMI condition. Finally, two numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the established LMI conditions.

  9. The rheology of hard sphere suspensions at arbitrary volume fractions: An improved differential viscosity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Carlos I; Santamaría-Holek, I

    2009-01-28

    We propose a simple and general model accounting for the dependence of the viscosity of a hard sphere suspension at arbitrary volume fractions. The model constitutes a continuum-medium description based on a recursive-differential method where correlations between the spheres are introduced through an effective volume fraction. In contrast to other differential methods, the introduction of the effective volume fraction as the integration variable implicitly considers interactions between the spheres of the same recursive stage. The final expression for the viscosity scales with this effective volume fraction, which allows constructing a master curve that contains all the experimental situations considered. The agreement of our expression for the viscosity with experiments at low- and high-shear rates and in the high-frequency limit is remarkable for all volume fractions.

  10. Multiscale KF Algorithm for Strong Fractional Noise Interference Suppression in Discrete-Time UWB Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyun Su

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to suppress the interference of the strong fractional noise signal in discrete-time ultrawideband (UWB systems, this paper presents a new UWB multi-scale Kalman filter (KF algorithm for the interference suppression. This approach solves the problem of the narrowband interference (NBI as nonstationary fractional signal in UWB communication, which does not need to estimate any channel parameter. In this paper, the received sampled signal is transformed through multiscale wavelet to obtain a state transition equation and an observation equation based on the stationarity theory of wavelet coefficients in time domain. Then through the Kalman filter method, fractional signal of arbitrary scale is easily figured out. Finally, fractional noise interference is subtracted from the received signal. Performance analysis and computer simulations reveal that this algorithm is effective to reduce the strong fractional noise when the sampling rate is low.

  11. State-dependent switching control of switched positive fractional-order systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xudong; Yin, Yunfei; Zheng, Xiaolong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the problem of switching stabilization for a class of continuous-time switched positive fractional-order systems is studied by using state-dependent switching. First, the asymptotic stability condition of switched positive fractional-order systems with state-dependent switching is given, which is based on the fractional co-positive Lyapunov method. Moreover, by the sliding sector method, the stability condition of switched positive fractional-order systems whose subsystems are possibly all unstable is obtained. A variable structure (VS) switching law with sliding sector is also proposed to guarantee the switched positive fractional-order system to be asymptotically stable. Finally, two numerical examples are given to demonstrate the advantages and effectiveness of our developed results.

  12. Dynamics with Low-Level Fractionality

    CERN Document Server

    Tarasov, V E; Tarasov, Vasily E.; Zaslavsky, George M.

    2005-01-01

    The notion of fractional dynamics is related to equations of motion with one or a few terms with derivatives of a fractional order. This type of equation appears in the description of chaotic dynamics, wave propagation in fractal media, and field theory. For the fractional linear oscillator the physical meaning of the derivative of order $\\alpha<2$ is dissipation. In systems with many spacially coupled elements (oscillators) the fractional derivative, along the space coordinate, corresponds to a long range interaction. We discuss a method of constructing a solution using an expansion in $\\epsilon=n-\\alpha$ with small $\\epsilon$ and positive integer $n$. The method is applied to the fractional linear and nonlinear oscillators and to fractional Ginzburg-Landau or parabolic equations.

  13. The fractional oscillator process with two indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, S C [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, Cyberjaya 63100, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Teo, L P [Faculty of Information Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, Cyberjaya 63100, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)], E-mail: sclim@mmu.edu.my, E-mail: lpteo@mmu.edu.my

    2009-02-13

    We introduce a new fractional oscillator process which can be obtained as a solution of a stochastic differential equation with two fractional orders. Basic properties such as fractal dimension and short-range dependence of the process are studied by considering the asymptotic properties of its covariance function. By considering the fractional oscillator process as the velocity of a diffusion process, we derive the corresponding diffusion constant, fluctuation-dissipation relation and mean-square displacement. The fractional oscillator process can also be regarded as a one-dimensional fractional Euclidean Klein-Gordon field, which can be obtained by applying the Parisi-Wu stochastic quantization method to a nonlocal Euclidean action. The Casimir energy associated with the fractional field at positive temperature is calculated by using the zeta function regularization technique.

  14. Review of Some Promising Fractional Physical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Tarasov, Vasily E

    2015-01-01

    Fractional dynamics is a field of study in physics and mechanics investigating the behavior of objects and systems that are characterized by power-law non-locality, power-law long-term memory or fractal properties by using integrations and differentiation of non-integer orders, i.e., by methods of the fractional calculus. This paper is a review of physical models that look very promising for future development of fractional dynamics. We suggest a short introduction to fractional calculus as a theory of integration and differentiation of non-integer order. Some applications of integro-differentiations of fractional orders in physics are discussed. Models of discrete systems with memory, lattice with long-range inter-particle interaction, dynamics of fractal media are presented. Quantum analogs of fractional derivatives and model of open nano-system systems with memory are also discussed.

  15. Fractional RC and LC Electrical Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Aguilar José Francisco

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a fractional differential equation for the electrical RC and LC circuit in terms of the fractional time derivatives of the Caputo type. The order of the derivative being considered is 0 < ɣ ≤1. To keep the dimensionality of the physical parameters R, L, C the new parameter σ is introduced. This parameter characterizes the existence of fractional structures in the system. A relation between the fractional order time derivative ɣ and the new parameter σ is found. The numeric Laplace transform method was used for the simulation of the equations results. The results show that the fractional differential equations generalize the behavior of the charge, voltage and current depending of the values of ɣ. The classical cases are recovered by taking the limit when ɣ = 1. An analysis in the frequency domain of an RC circuit shows the application and use of fractional order differential equations.

  16. Oversampling analysis in fractional Fourier domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Feng; TAO Ran; WANG Yue

    2009-01-01

    Oversampling is widely used in practical applications of digital signal processing. As the fractional Fourier transform has been developed and applied in signal processing fields, it is necessary to consider the oversampling theorem in the fractional Fourier domain. In this paper, the oversampling theorem in the fractional Fourier domain is analyzed. The fractional Fourier spectral relation between the original oversampled sequence and its subsequences is derived first, and then the expression for exact reconstruction of the missing samples in terms of the subsequences is obtained. Moreover, by taking a chirp signal as an example, it is shown that, reconstruction of the missing samples in the oversampled signal Is suitable in the fractional Fourier domain for the signal whose time-frequency distribution has the minimum support in the fractional Fourier domain.

  17. Fractional order model reduction approach based on retention of the dominant dynamics: application in IMC based tuning of FOPI and FOPID controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli-Kakhki, Mahsan; Haeri, Mohammad

    2011-07-01

    Fractional order PI and PID controllers are the most common fractional order controllers used in practice. In this paper, a simple analytical method is proposed for tuning the parameters of these controllers. The proposed method is useful in designing fractional order PI and PID controllers for control of complicated fractional order systems. To achieve the goal, at first a reduction technique is presented for approximating complicated fractional order models. Then, based on the obtained reduced models some analytical rules are suggested to determine the parameters of fractional order PI and PID controllers. Finally, numerical results are given to show the efficiency of the proposed tuning algorithm.

  18. A NEW FRACTIONAL MODEL OF SINGLE DEGREE OF FREEDOM SYSTEM, BY USING GENERALIZED DIFFERENTIAL TRANSFORM METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HASHEM SABERI NAJAFI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Generalized differential transform method (GDTM is a powerful method to solve the fractional differential equations. In this paper, a new fractional model for systems with single degree of freedom (SDOF is presented, by using the GDTM. The advantage of this method compared with some other numerical methods has been shown. The analysis of new approximations, damping and acceleration of systems are also described. Finally, by reducing damping and analysis of the errors, in one of the fractional cases, we have shown that in addition to having a suitable solution for the displacement close to the exact one, the system enjoys acceleration once crossing the equilibrium point.

  19. Sliding Mode Control and Modified Generalized Projective Synchronization of a New Fractional-Order Chaotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junbiao Guan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new fractional-order chaotic system is addressed in this paper. By applying the continuous frequency distribution theory, the indirect Lyapunov stability of this system is investigated based on sliding mode control technique. The adaptive laws are designed to guarantee the stability of the system with the uncertainty and external disturbance. Moreover, the modified generalized projection synchronization (MGPS of the fractional-order chaotic systems is discussed based on the stability theory of fractional-order system, which may provide potential applications in secure communication. Finally, some numerical simulations are presented to show the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  20. Solvability and Optimal Controls of Semilinear Riemann-Liouville Fractional Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Pan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the control systems governed by semilinear differential equations with Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives in Banach spaces. Firstly, by applying fixed point strategy, some suitable conditions are established to guarantee the existence and uniqueness of mild solutions for a broad class of fractional infinite dimensional control systems. Then, by using generally mild conditions of cost functional, we extend the existence result of optimal controls to the Riemann-Liouville fractional control systems. Finally, a concrete application is given to illustrate the effectiveness of our main results.

  1. Function projective synchronization between integer-order and stochastic fractional-order nonlinear systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Lingling; Yu, Yongguang; Zhang, Shuo

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the function projective synchronization between integer-order and stochastic fractional-order nonlinear systems is investigated. Firstly, according to the stability theory of fractional-order systems and tracking control, a controller is designed. At the same time, based on the orthogonal polynomial approximation, the method of transforming stochastic error system into an equivalent deterministic system is given. Thus, the stability of the stochastic error system can be analyzed through its equivalent deterministic one. Finally, to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme, the function projective synchronization between integer-order Lorenz system and stochastic fractional-order Chen system is studied.

  2. Adaptive Fuzzy Control for Uncertain Fractional-Order Financial Chaotic Systems Subjected to Input Saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenhui

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, control of uncertain fractional-order financial chaotic system with input saturation and external disturbance is investigated. The unknown part of the input saturation as well as the system’s unknown nonlinear function is approximated by a fuzzy logic system. To handle the fuzzy approximation error and the estimation error of the unknown upper bound of the external disturbance, fractional-order adaptation laws are constructed. Based on fractional Lyapunov stability theorem, an adaptive fuzzy controller is designed, and the asymptotical stability can be guaranteed. Finally, simulation studies are given to indicate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:27783648

  3. Stability analysis of fractional-order Hopfield neural networks with time delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Yu, Yongguang; Wen, Guoguang

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates the stability for fractional-order Hopfield neural networks with time delays. Firstly, the fractional-order Hopfield neural networks with hub structure and time delays are studied. Some sufficient conditions for stability of the systems are obtained. Next, two fractional-order Hopfield neural networks with different ring structures and time delays are developed. By studying the developed neural networks, the corresponding sufficient conditions for stability of the systems are also derived. It is shown that the stability conditions are independent of time delays. Finally, numerical simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results obtained in this paper.

  4. Chaos and chaotic control in a fractional-order electronic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Yu, Jue-Bang

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, we study the chaotic behaviours in a fractional-order chaotic electronic oscillator. We find that chaos exists in the fractional-order electronic oscillator with an order being less than 3. In addition, we numerically simulate the continuance of the chaotic behaviours in the electronic oscillator with orders ranging from 2.8 to 3.2. Finally, we further investigate the method of controlling a fractional-order electronic oscillator based on adaptive backstepping. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness and feasibility of this approach.

  5. Robust stability and stabilization of fractional order linear systems with positive real uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingdong; Lu, Junguo; Chen, Weidong

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates the robust stability and stabilization of fractional order linear systems with positive real uncertainty. Firstly, sufficient conditions for the asymptotical stability of such uncertain fractional order systems are presented. Secondly, the existence conditions and design methods of the state feedback controller, static output feedback controller and observer-based controller for asymptotically stabilizing such uncertain fractional order systems are derived. The results are obtained in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, some numerical examples are given to validate the proposed theoretical results.

  6. Chaos and chaotic control in a fractional-order electronic oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Xin; Yu Jue-Bang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we study the chaotic behaviours in a fractional-order chaotic electronic oscillator. We find that chaos exists in the fractional-order electronic oscillator with an order being less than 3. In addition, we numerically simulate the continuance of the chaotic behaviours in the electronic oscillator with orders ranging from 2.8 to 3.2. Finally, we further investigate the method of controlling a fractional-order electronic oscillator based on adaptive backstepping.Numerical simulations show the effectiveness and feasibility of this approach.

  7. Fractional-Order Fast Terminal Sliding Mode Control for a Class of Dynamical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel fractional fast terminal sliding mode control strategy for a class of dynamical systems with uncertainty. In this strategy, a fractional-order sliding surface is proposed, the corresponding control law is derived based on Lyapunov stability theory to guarantee the sliding condition, and the finite time stability of the closeloop system is also ensured. Further, to achieve the equivalence between convergence rate and singularity avoidance, a fractional-order nonsingular fast terminal sliding mode controller is studied and the stability is presented. Finally, numerical simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Operator Fractional Brownian Motion and Martingale Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongshuai Dai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that martingale difference sequences are very useful in applications and theory. On the other hand, the operator fractional Brownian motion as an extension of the well-known fractional Brownian motion also plays an important role in both applications and theory. In this paper, we study the relation between them. We construct an approximation sequence of operator fractional Brownian motion based on a martingale difference sequence.

  9. Early Predictors of Middle School Fraction Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Drew H. Bailey; Siegler, Robert S.; David C Geary

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings that earlier fraction knowledge predicts later mathematics achievement raise the question of what predicts later fraction knowledge. Analyses of longitudinal data indicated that whole number magnitude knowledge in first grade predicted knowledge of fraction magnitudes in middle school, controlling for whole number arithmetic proficiency, domain general cognitive abilities, parental income and education, race, and gender. Similarly, knowledge of whole number arithmetic in first...

  10. Time-delay and fractional derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Tenreiro Machado JA

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes the calculation of fractional algorithms based on time-delay systems. The study starts by analyzing the memory properties of fractional operators and their relation with time delay. Based on the Fourier analysis an approximation of fractional derivatives through time-delayed samples is developed. Furthermore, the parameters of the proposed approximation are estimated by means of genetic algorithms. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the new perspective.

  11. A new procedure for Uranium fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costas Costas, E.; Baselga Cervara, B.; Tarin garcia, F.

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays only few procedures are employed for uranium fractionation, all of them at physico-chemical level. Ideally, we would develop a procedure based in a von Neumann machines (a rapid self-replicating machine capable of perform the uranium fractionation). Microorganism behave as von Newmann machines and al l known enzymatic processes are able to isotopic fractionation, often enriching the living organism in the lighter isotope. (Author)

  12. Fractional Order Models of Industrial Pneumatic Controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolhassan Razminia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a new approach for modeling of versatile controllers in industrial automation and process control systems such as pneumatic controllers. Some fractional order dynamical models are developed for pressure and pneumatic systems with bellows-nozzle-flapper configuration. In the light of fractional calculus, a fractional order derivative-derivative (FrDD controller and integral-derivative (FrID are remodeled. Numerical simulations illustrate the application of the obtained theoretical results in simple examples.

  13. Wavelet Analysis of Fractionally Integrated Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Mark J. Jensen

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we apply wavelet analysis to the class of fractionally integrated processes to show that this class is a member of the $1/f$ family of processes as defined by Wornell (1993) and to produce an alternative method of estimating the fractional differencing parameter. Currently the method by Geweke and Porter-Hudak (1983) is used most often to estimate and test the fractional differencing parameter. The GPH approach, however, has been shown to have poor statistical properties and suf...

  14. Unpacking the Division Interpretation of a Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Rebecca C.; Lewis, Priscilla Eide

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges in learning fractions is understanding how and why a fraction can have multiple interpretations. As presented in one textbook, a fraction is "a symbol, such as 2/3, 5/1, or 8/5, used to name a part of a whole, a part of a set, a location on a number line, or a division of whole numbers" (Charles et al. 2012, p.…

  15. Fractional constant elasticity of variance model

    OpenAIRE

    Ngai Hang Chan; Chi Tim Ng

    2007-01-01

    This paper develops a European option pricing formula for fractional market models. Although there exist option pricing results for a fractional Black-Scholes model, they are established without accounting for stochastic volatility. In this paper, a fractional version of the Constant Elasticity of Variance (CEV) model is developed. European option pricing formula similar to that of the classical CEV model is obtained and a volatility skew pattern is revealed.

  16. Isolation and Structural Elucidation of Antiproliferative Compounds of Lipidic Fractions from White Shrimp Muscle (Litopenaeus vannamei)

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Saiz, Carmen-María; Velázquez, Carlos; Hernández, Javier; Cinco-Moroyoqui, Francisco-Javier; Plascencia-Jatomea, Maribel; Robles-Sánchez, Maribel; Machi-Lara, Lorena; Burgos-Hernández, Armando

    2014-01-01

    Shrimp is one of the most popular seafood items worldwide, and has been reported as a source of chemopreventive compounds. In this study, shrimp lipids were separated by solvent partition and further fractionated by semi-preparative RP-HPLC and finally by open column chromatography in order to obtain isolated antiproliferative compounds. Antiproliferative activity was assessed by inhibition of M12.C3.F6 murine cell growth using the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide) assay. The methanolic fraction showed the highest antiproliferative activity; this fraction was separated into 15 different sub-fractions (M1–M15). Fractions M8, M9, M10, M12, and M13 were antiproliferative at 100 µg/mL and they were further tested at lower concentrations. Fractions M12 and M13 exerted the highest growth inhibition with an IC50 of 19.5 ± 8.6 and 34.9 ± 7.3 µg/mL, respectively. Fraction M12 was further fractionated in three sub-fractions M12a, M12b, and M12c. Fraction M12a was identified as di-ethyl-hexyl-phthalate, fraction M12b as a triglyceride substituted by at least two fatty acids (predominantly oleic acid accompanied with eicosapentaenoic acid) and fraction M12c as another triglyceride substituted with eicosapentaenoic acid and saturated fatty acids. Bioactive triglyceride contained in M12c exerted the highest antiproliferative activity with an IC50 of 11.33 ± 5.6 µg/mL. Biological activity in shrimp had been previously attributed to astaxanthin; this study demonstrated that polyunsaturated fatty acids are the main compounds responsible for antiproliferative activity. PMID:25526568

  17. A Fractional Micro-Macro Model for Crowds of Pedestrians based on Fractional Mean Field Games

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Ke-cai; Stuart, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of crowds of pedestrians has been considered in this paper from different aspects. Based on fractional microscopic model that may be much more close to reality, a fractional macroscopic model has been proposed using conservation law of mass. Then in order to characterize the competitive and cooperative interactions among pedestrians, fractional mean field games are utilized in the modeling problem when the number of pedestrians goes to infinity and fractional dynamic model composed of fractional backward and fractional forward equations are constructed in macro scale. Fractional micro-macro model for crowds of pedestrians are obtained in the end. Simulation results are also included to illustrate the proposed fractional microscopic model and fractional macroscopic model respectively.

  18. Calculation of combustible waste fraction (CWF) estimates used in organics safety issue screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heasler, P.G.; Gao, F.; Toth, J.J.

    1998-08-01

    This report describes how in-tank measurements of moisture (H{sub 2}O) and total organic carbon (TOC) are used to calculate combustible waste fractions (CWF) for 138 of the 149 Hanford single shell tanks. The combustible waste fraction of a tank is defined as that proportion of waste that is capable of burning when exposed to an ignition source. These CWF estimates are used to screen tanks for the organics complexant safety issue. Tanks with a suitably low fraction of combustible waste are classified as safe. The calculations in this report determine the combustible waste fractions in tanks under two different moisture conditions: under current moisture conditions, and after complete dry out. The first fraction is called the wet combustible waste fraction (wet CWF) and the second is called the dry combustible waste fraction (dry CWF). These two fractions are used to screen tanks into three categories: if the wet CWF is too high (above 5%), the tank is categorized as unsafe; if the wet CWF is low but the dry CWF is too high (again, above 5%), the tank is categorized as conditionally safe; finally, if both the wet and dry CWF are low, the tank is categorized as safe. Section 2 describes the data that was required for these calculations. Sections 3 and 4 describe the statistical model and resulting fit for dry combustible waste fractions. Sections 5 and 6 present the statistical model used to estimate wet CWF and the resulting fit. Section 7 describes two tests that were performed on the dry combustible waste fraction ANOVA model to validate it. Finally, Section 8 presents concluding remarks. Two Appendices present results on a tank-by-tank basis.

  19. Chaos in discrete fractional difference equations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AMEY DESHPANDE; VARSHA DAFTARDAR-GEJJI

    2016-10-01

    Recently, the discrete fractional calculus (DFC) is receiving attention due to its potential applications in the mathematical modelling of real-world phenomena with memory effects. In the present paper, the chaotic behaviour of fractional difference equations for the tent map, Gauss map and 2x(mod 1) map are studied numerically. We analyse the chaotic behaviour of these fractional difference equations and compare them with their integer counterparts. It is observed that fractional difference equations for the Gauss and tent maps are more stable compared to their integer-order version.

  20. Numerical Solutions of Fractional Boussinesq Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qi

    2007-01-01

    Based upon the Adomian decomposition method,a scheme is developed to obtain numerical solutions of a fractional Boussinesq equation with initial condition,which is introduced by replacing some order time and space derivatives by fractional derivatives.The fractional derivatives are described in the Caputo sense.So the traditional Adomian decomposition method for differential equations of integer order is directly extended to derive explicit and numerical solutions of the fractional differential equations.The solutions of our model equation are calculated in the form of convergent series with easily computable components.

  1. Synchronization of fractional order complex dynamical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Tianzeng

    2015-06-01

    In this letter the synchronization of complex dynamical networks with fractional order chaotic nodes is studied. A fractional order controller for synchronization of complex network is presented. Some new sufficient synchronization criteria are proposed based on the Lyapunov stability theory and the LaSalle invariance principle. These synchronization criteria can apply to an arbitrary fractional order complex network in which the coupling-configuration matrix and the inner-coupling matrix are not assumed to be symmetric or irreducible. It means that this method is more general and effective. Numerical simulations of two fractional order complex networks demonstrate the universality and the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Easy characterization of petroleum fractions: Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miquel, J. (Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya (Spain)); Castells, F. (Univ. Rovira i Virgili, Catalunya (Spain))

    1993-12-01

    A new method for characterizing petroleum fractions, based on pseudocomponent breakdown using the integral method has been developed. It requires only that one has an atmospheric true boiling point (tbp) distillation curve and known the entire fraction density. The proposed characterization procedure is valid for representing any oil fraction (light or heavy) with a boiling point range smaller than 300 K. It is based on the hypothesis of constant Watson's characterization factor, K[sub w], for all the pseudocomponents. Outside this range, it is less accurate (greater errors in material and molar balances). Therefore, a method considering the variable K[sub w] is best to treat these fractions.

  3. Mesoscopic Fractional Quantum in Soft Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, W

    2005-01-01

    Soft matter (e.g., biomaterials, polymers, sediments, oil, emulsions) has become an important bridge between physics and diverse disciplines. Its fundamental physical mechanism, however, is largely obscure. This study made the first attempt to connect fractional Schrodinger equation and soft matter physics under a consistent framework from empirical power scaling to phenomenological kinetics and macromechanics to mesoscopic quantum mechanics. The original contributions are the fractional quantum relationships, which show Levy statistics and fractional Brownian motion are essentially related to momentum and energy, respectively. The fractional quantum underlies fractal mesostructures and many-body interactions of macromolecules in soft matter and is experimentally testable.

  4. Integrated Fractional Resolvent Operator Function and Fractional Abstract Cauchy Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ning Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We firstly prove that β-times integrated α-resolvent operator function ((α,β-ROF satisfies a functional equation which extends that of β-times integrated semigroup and α-resolvent operator function. Secondly, for the inhomogeneous α-Cauchy problem cDtαu(t=Au(t+f(t, t∈(0,T, u(0=x0, u'(0=x1, if A is the generator of an (α,β-ROF, we give the relation between the function v(t=Sα,β(tx0+(g1*Sα,β(tx1+(gα-1*Sα,β*f(t and mild solution and classical solution of it. Finally, for the problem cDtαv(t=Av(t+gβ+1(tx, t>0, v(k(0=0, k=0,1,…,N-1, where A is a linear closed operator. We show that A generates an exponentially bounded (α,β-ROF on a Banach space X if and only if the problem has a unique exponentially bounded classical solution vx and Avx∈L loc 1(ℝ+,X. Our results extend and generalize some related results in the literature.

  5. Fractional Partial Differential Equation: Fractional Total Variation and Fractional Steepest Descent Approach-Based Multiscale Denoising Model for Texture Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Fei Pu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional integer-order partial differential equation-based image denoising approaches often blur the edge and complex texture detail; thus, their denoising effects for texture image are not very good. To solve the problem, a fractional partial differential equation-based denoising model for texture image is proposed, which applies a novel mathematical method—fractional calculus to image processing from the view of system evolution. We know from previous studies that fractional-order calculus has some unique properties comparing to integer-order differential calculus that it can nonlinearly enhance complex texture detail during the digital image processing. The goal of the proposed model is to overcome the problems mentioned above by using the properties of fractional differential calculus. It extended traditional integer-order equation to a fractional order and proposed the fractional Green’s formula and the fractional Euler-Lagrange formula for two-dimensional image processing, and then a fractional partial differential equation based denoising model was proposed. The experimental results prove that the abilities of the proposed denoising model to preserve the high-frequency edge and complex texture information are obviously superior to those of traditional integral based algorithms, especially for texture detail rich images.

  6. Fractional-order adaptive fault estimation for a class of nonlinear fractional-order systems

    KAUST Repository

    N'Doye, Ibrahima

    2015-07-01

    This paper studies the problem of fractional-order adaptive fault estimation for a class of fractional-order Lipschitz nonlinear systems using fractional-order adaptive fault observer. Sufficient conditions for the asymptotical convergence of the fractional-order state estimation error, the conventional integer-order and the fractional-order faults estimation error are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) formulation by introducing a continuous frequency distributed equivalent model and using an indirect Lyapunov approach where the fractional-order α belongs to 0 < α < 1. A numerical example is given to demonstrate the validity of the proposed approach.

  7. A novel fractional sliding mode control configuration for synchronizing disturbed fractional-order chaotic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KARIMA RABAH; SAMIR LADACI; MOHAMED LASHAB

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, a new design of fractional-order sliding mode control scheme is proposed for the synchronization of a class of nonlinear fractional-order systems with chaotic behaviour. The considered design approach provides a set of fractional-order laws that guarantee asymptotic stability of fractional-order chaotic systems in the sense of the Lyapunov stability theorem. Two illustrative simulation examples on the fractional-order Genesio–Tesi chaotic systems and the fractional-order modified Jerk systems are provided. These examples show the effectiveness and robustness of this control solution.

  8. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Chris [Altamont Environmental, Inc.

    2014-11-13

    The project, Capital Investment to Fund Equipment Purchases and Facility Modifications to Create a Sustainable Future for EnergyXchange served to replace landfill gas energy with alternative energy resources, primarily solar and wood waste. This is the final project closeout report.

  9. CAFE Project : final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Weber; R. Carter; C.J. Stanford; A. Weber

    2003-01-01

    textabstract[MAS E-0302] This is the final public report of the CAFE project (ESPRIT 7023). CAFE developed a secure conditional access architecture and implemented a multi-currency electronic purse system based on smart cards and infrared wallets. The electronic purse was tested in user trials at

  10. CAFE Project : final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, A.; Carter, R.; Stanford, C.J.; Weber, A.

    2003-01-01

    [MAS E-0302] This is the final public report of the CAFE project (ESPRIT 7023). CAFE developed a secure conditional access architecture and implemented a multi-currency electronic purse system based on smart cards and infrared wallets. The electronic purse was tested in user trials at the European C

  11. Safety of protein hydrolysates, fractions thereof and

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gertjan Schaafsma

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates the safety for humans with regard to consumption of protein hydrolysates and fractions thereof, including bioactive peptides. The available literature on the safety of protein, protein hydrolysates, fractions thereof and free amino acids on relevant food legislation is reviewed

  12. Cell fractionation of parasitic protozoa: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Wanderley de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell fractionation, a methodological strategy for obtaining purified organelle preparations, has been applied successfully to parasitic protozoa by a number of investigators. Here we present and discuss the work of several groups that have obtained highly purified subcellular fractions from trypanosomatids, Apicomplexa and trichomonads, and whose work have added substantially to our knowledge of the cell biology of these parasites.

  13. Approximating fractional derivatives through the generalized mean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenreiro Machado, J. A.; Galhano, Alexandra M.; Oliveira, Anabela M.; Tar, József K.

    2009-11-01

    This paper addresses the calculation of fractional order expressions through rational fractions. The article starts by analyzing the techniques adopted in the continuous to discrete time conversion. The problem is re-evaluated in an optimization perspective by tacking advantage of the degree of freedom provided by the generalized mean formula. The results demonstrate the superior performance of the new algorithm.

  14. Continued fractions constructed from prime numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Wolf, Marek

    2010-01-01

    We give 50 digits values of the simple continued fractions whose denominators are formed from a) prime numbers, b) twin primes, c) primes of the form m^2+1 and Mersenne primes. All these continued fractions belong to the set of measure zero of exceptions to the Khinchin Theorem.

  15. Likelihood based testing for no fractional cointegration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasak, Katarzyna

    We consider two likelihood ratio tests, so-called maximum eigenvalue and trace tests, for the null of no cointegration when fractional cointegration is allowed under the alternative, which is a first step to generalize the so-called Johansen's procedure to the fractional cointegration case. The s...

  16. Maximum likelihood estimation of fractionally cointegrated systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasak, Katarzyna

    In this paper we consider a fractionally cointegrated error correction model and investigate asymptotic properties of the maximum likelihood (ML) estimators of the matrix of the cointe- gration relations, the degree of fractional cointegration, the matrix of the speed of adjustment...

  17. Numerical simulation of the fractional Langevin equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the fractional Langevin equation, whose derivative is in Caputo sense. By using the derived numerical algorithm, we obtain the displacement and the mean square displacement which describe the dynamic behaviors of the fractional Langevin equation.

  18. Safety of protein hydrolysates, fractions thereof and

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Gertjan

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates the safety for humans with regard to consumption of protein hydrolysates and fractions thereof, including bioactive peptides. The available literature on the safety of protein, protein hydrolysates, fractions thereof and free amino acids on relevant food legislation is reviewed

  19. Protein-contg. fraction from mussel feet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Leeden, M.C.; Groen, B.W.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract of NL 1000732 (C1) A protein-contg. fraction suitable for use as an adhesive that can provide an adhesive bond with a strength of more than 15 N/cm2 is claimed. The fraction comprises one or more proteins contg. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) and is obtd. by a process comprising trea

  20. Stability of Fractional Order Switching Systems

    CERN Document Server

    HosseinNia, S Hassan; Vinagre, Blas M

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the stabilization issue for fractional order switching systems. Common Lyapunov method is generalized for fractional order systems and frequency domain stability equivalent to this method is proposed to prove the quadratic stability. Some examples are given to show the applicability and effectiveness of the proposed theory.

  1. FRACTIONAL (g, f)-FACTORS OF GRAPHS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂真; 张兰菊

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a new proof of a charaterization of fractional (g, f)-factors of a graph in which multiple edges are allowed. From the proof a polynomial algorithm for finding the fractional (g, f)-factor can be induced.

  2. Potentials of Arbitrary Forces with Fractional Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabei, Eqab M.; Alhalholy, Tareq S.; Rousan, Akram

    The Laplace transform of fractional integrals and fractional derivatives is used to develop a general formula for determining the potentials of arbitrary forces: conservative and nonconservative in order to introduce dissipative effects (such as friction) into Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics. The results are found to be in exact agreement with Riewe's results of special cases. Illustrative examples are given.

  3. Paper Plate Fractions: The Counting Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Ann; Barnett, Joann; Stine, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Without a doubt, fractions prove to be a stumbling block for many children. Researchers have suggested a variety of explanations for why this is the case. The introduction of symbolization and operations before the development of conceptual understanding of fractions, a lack of understanding of the role of the numerator and denominator, and an…

  4. Assessing Students' Understanding of Fraction Multiplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, Chepina; Guarino, Jody; Beltramini, Jennie; Cole, Shelbi; Farmer, Alicia; Gray, Kristin; Saxby, Morgan

    2016-01-01

    In this article the authors describe a project during which they unpacked fraction standards, created rigorous tasks and lesson plans, and developed formative and summative assessments to analyze students' thinking about fraction multiplication. The purpose of this article is to (1) illustrate a process that can be replicated by educators…

  5. In Search of the Prototypical Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Vince

    2013-01-01

    Vince Wright makes a convincing argument for presenting children with a different "prototype" of a fraction to the typical one-half. Consider how the prototype that Wright mentions may be applied to a variety of fraction concepts. We are sure that you will never look at a doughnut in quite the same way.

  6. Engaging Students with Multiple Models of Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofen; Clements, M. A.; Ellerton, Nerida F.

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of unit fractions, and especially of one-half, one-third, and one-fourth, is crucially important for elementary school children's development of number sense (CCSSI 2010). We describe multimodal activities designed to assist elementary school students in gaining a rich understanding of unit fractions. Research has shown (Zhang,…

  7. Fractions Instruction: Linking Concepts and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsolantis, Nicole; Osana, Helena P.

    2013-01-01

    It is not surprising, as research has shown, that fractions are one of the most difficult of the elementary school math topics to teach and learn in ways that are meaningful. The authors reference a work by James Hiebert, "Mathematical, Cognitive, and Instructional Analyses of Decimal Fractions" (1992), that mathematical concepts should…

  8. Making Sense of Fractions and Percentages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitin, David J.; Whitin, Phyllis

    2012-01-01

    Because fractions and percentages can be difficult for children to grasp, connecting them whenever possible is beneficial. Linking them can foster representational fluency as children simultaneously see the part-whole relationship expressed numerically (as a fraction and as a percentage) and visually (as a pie chart). NCTM advocates these…

  9. Unpacking Referent Units in Fraction Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Randolph A.; Hawthorne, Casey

    2015-01-01

    Although fraction operations are procedurally straightforward, they are complex, because they require learners to conceptualize different units and view quantities in multiple ways. Prospective secondary school teachers sometimes provide an algebraic explanation for inverting and multiplying when dividing fractions. That authors of this article…

  10. Fractions Learning in Children with Mathematics Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Siegler, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Learning of fractions is difficult for children in general and especially difficult for children with mathematics difficulties (MD). Recent research on developmental and individual differences in fraction knowledge of MD and typically achieving (TA) children has demonstrated that U.S. children with MD start middle school behind TA peers in…

  11. Estimation's Role in Calculations with Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanning, Debra I.

    2011-01-01

    Estimation is more than a skill or an isolated topic. It is a thinking tool that needs to be emphasized during instruction so that students will learn to develop algorithmic procedures and meaning for fraction operations. For students to realize when fractions should be added, subtracted, multiplied, or divided, they need to develop a sense of…

  12. On Fractional Order Hybrid Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. E. Herzallah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop the theory of fractional hybrid differential equations with linear and nonlinear perturbations involving the Caputo fractional derivative of order 0<α<1. Using some fixed point theorems we prove the existence of mild solutions for two types of hybrid equations. Examples are given to illustrate the obtained results.

  13. Research on inter-fraction and intra-fraction motion of crystalline lens in radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ming YANG

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the range of inter-fraction and intra-fraction motion of crystalline lens in radiotherapy. Methods  The CT and MRI images of 17 patients were registered, and the profile of crystalline lens was delineated to determine the respective center coordinates, thus simulating and analyzing inter-fraction and intra-fraction motion of lens in radiotherapy. Results  Both left and right lens moved in different degree during both inter-or intra-fraction phase. The range of lens movement was larger in inter-fraction than in intra-fraction phase in all directions. Conclusion  When radiotherapy is given in the free state, considering the distance of lens movement alone in inter-and intra-fraction and without considering the setup error, the lens planning organs at risk should increase 1.5mm outside the lens boundary.

  14. Exact solutions of time-fractional heat conduction equation by the fractional complex transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zheng-Biao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fractional Complex Transform is extended to solve exactly time-fractional differential equations with the modified Riemann-Liouville derivative. How to incorporate suitable boundary/initial conditions is also discussed.

  15. Reply to "Comment on `Fractional quantum mechanics' and `Fractional Schrödinger equation' "

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Nick

    2016-06-01

    The fractional uncertainty relation is a mathematical formulation of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle in the framework of fractional quantum mechanics. Two mistaken statements presented in the Comment have been revealed. The origin of each mistaken statement has been clarified and corrected statements have been made. A map between standard quantum mechanics and fractional quantum mechanics has been presented to emphasize the features of fractional quantum mechanics and to avoid misinterpretations of the fractional uncertainty relation. It has been shown that the fractional probability current equation is correct in the area of its applicability. Further studies have to be done to find meaningful quantum physics problems with involvement of the fractional probability current density vector and the extra term emerging in the framework of fractional quantum mechanics.

  16. Reply to "Comment on 'Fractional quantum mechanics' and 'Fractional Schrödinger equation' ".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskin, Nick

    2016-06-01

    The fractional uncertainty relation is a mathematical formulation of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle in the framework of fractional quantum mechanics. Two mistaken statements presented in the Comment have been revealed. The origin of each mistaken statement has been clarified and corrected statements have been made. A map between standard quantum mechanics and fractional quantum mechanics has been presented to emphasize the features of fractional quantum mechanics and to avoid misinterpretations of the fractional uncertainty relation. It has been shown that the fractional probability current equation is correct in the area of its applicability. Further studies have to be done to find meaningful quantum physics problems with involvement of the fractional probability current density vector and the extra term emerging in the framework of fractional quantum mechanics.

  17. Fractional Order Differentiation by Integration and Error Analysis in Noisy Environment

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Da Yan

    2015-03-31

    The integer order differentiation by integration method based on the Jacobi orthogonal polynomials for noisy signals was originally introduced by Mboup, Join and Fliess. We propose to extend this method from the integer order to the fractional order to estimate the fractional order derivatives of noisy signals. Firstly, two fractional order differentiators are deduced from the Jacobi orthogonal polynomial filter, using the Riemann-Liouville and the Caputo fractional order derivative definitions respectively. Exact and simple formulae for these differentiators are given by integral expressions. Hence, they can be used for both continuous-time and discrete-time models in on-line or off-line applications. Secondly, some error bounds are provided for the corresponding estimation errors. These bounds allow to study the design parameters\\' influence. The noise error contribution due to a large class of stochastic processes is studied in discrete case. The latter shows that the differentiator based on the Caputo fractional order derivative can cope with a class of noises, whose mean value and variance functions are polynomial time-varying. Thanks to the design parameters analysis, the proposed fractional order differentiators are significantly improved by admitting a time-delay. Thirdly, in order to reduce the calculation time for on-line applications, a recursive algorithm is proposed. Finally, the proposed differentiator based on the Riemann-Liouville fractional order derivative is used to estimate the state of a fractional order system and numerical simulations illustrate the accuracy and the robustness with respect to corrupting noises.

  18. Search for methane isotope fractionation due to Rayleigh distillation on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ádámkovics, Máté; Mitchell, Jonathan L.

    2016-09-01

    We search for meridional variation in the abundance of CH3D relative to CH4 on Titan using near-IR spectra obtained with NIRSPAO at Keck, which have a photon-limited signal-to-noise ratio of ∼50. Our observations can rule out a larger than 10% variation in the column of CH3D below 50 km. The preferential condensation of the heavy isotopologues will fractionate methane by reducing CH3D in the remaining vapor, and therefore these observations place limits on the amount of condensation that occurs in the troposphere. While previous estimates of CH3D fractionation on Titan have estimated an upper limit of -6‰, assuming a solid condensate, we consider more recent laboratory data for the equilibrium fractionation over liquid methane, and use a Rayleigh distillation model to calculate fractionation in an ascending parcel of air that is following a moist adiabat. We find that deep, precipitating convection can enhance the fractionation of the remaining methane vapor by -10 to -40‰, depending on the final temperature of the rising parcel. By relating fractionation of our reference parcel model to the pressure level where the moist adiabat achieves the required temperature, we argue that the measured methane fractionation constrains the outflow level for a deep convective event. Observations with a factor of at least 4-6 times larger signal-to-noise are required to detect this amount of fractionation, depending on the altitude range over which the outflow from deep convection occurs.

  19. Effect of size-fractionation dissolved organic matter on the mobility of prometryne in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guang; Lin, Chao; Chen, Liang; Yang, Hong

    2010-05-01

    Import of organic materials in the form of compost, sludge or plant residues introduces large amounts of dissolved organic matter (DOM) into soils. DOM as a dynamic soil component affects the behaviors of organic pollutants. Different DOM constituents may affect herbicide action in a different way. However, the process of interaction between the distinct DOM-fractions and herbicides is largely unknown. In this study, DOM was separated by size-fractionation into three molecular size groups: MW14000 Da. Effects of DOM-fractions on prometryne sorption/desorption and mobility were analyzed using approaches of batch experiments, soil column and soil thin-layer chromatography. Application of varied DOM-fractions at 50mg DOCL(-1) to the soil reduced the sorption and increased desorption of prometryne. DOM-fraction with MW>14000 Da appeared most effective in prometryne mobilization in the soil than any other fractions. Finally, DOM-fractions were characterized by chemical analyses, fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) fluorescence spectroscopy. Our studies revealed that the high-molecular weight fraction contained more aromatic framework and unsaturated structure that was most likely the dominant factor modulating the behavior of prometryne in soils.

  20. Fractional flux and non-normal diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abdennadher

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Fractional diffusion equations are widely used for mass spreading in heterogeneous media. The correspondence between fractional equations and random walks based upon stable Levy laws, keeps in analogy with that between heat equation and Brownian motion. Several definitions of fractional derivatives yield operators, which coincide on a wide domain and can be used in fractional partial differential equations. Then, the various definitions are useful in different purposes: they may be very close to some physics, or to numerical schemes, or be based upon important mathematical properties. Here we present a definition, which enables us to describe the flux of particles, performing a random walk. We show that it is a left inverse to fractional integrals. Hence it coincides with Riemann-Liouville and Marchaud's derivatives when applied to functions, belonging to suitable domains.

  1. Neutron Imaging Calibration to Measure Void Fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Sharma, Vishaldeep [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Void fraction is an intuitive parameter that describes the fraction of vapor in a two-phase flow. It appears as a key variable in most heat transfer and pressure drop correlations used to design evaporating and condensing heat exchangers, as well as determining charge inventory in refrigeration systems. Void fraction measurement is not straightforward, however, and assumptions on the invasiveness of the measuring technique must be made. Neutron radiography or neutron imaging has the potential to be a truly non-invasive void fraction measuring technique but has until recently only offered qualitative descriptions of two-phase flow, in terms of flow maldistributions, for example. This paper describes the calibration approach necessary to employ neutron imaging to measure steady-state void fraction. Experiments were conducted at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold Guide 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN, USA.

  2. Generalized Fractional Derivative Anisotropic Viscoelastic Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry H. Hilton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Isotropic linear and nonlinear fractional derivative constitutive relations are formulated and examined in terms of many parameter generalized Kelvin models and are analytically extended to cover general anisotropic homogeneous or non-homogeneous as well as functionally graded viscoelastic material behavior. Equivalent integral constitutive relations, which are computationally more powerful, are derived from fractional differential ones and the associated anisotropic temperature-moisture-degree-of-cure shift functions and reduced times are established. Approximate Fourier transform inversions for fractional derivative relations are formulated and their accuracy is evaluated. The efficacy of integer and fractional derivative constitutive relations is compared and the preferential use of either characterization in analyzing isotropic and anisotropic real materials must be examined on a case-by-case basis. Approximate protocols for curve fitting analytical fractional derivative results to experimental data are formulated and evaluated.

  3. Representations of the magnitudes of fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Michael; Siegler, Robert S

    2010-10-01

    We tested whether adults can use integrated, analog, magnitude representations to compare the values of fractions. The only previous study on this question concluded that even college students cannot form such representations and instead compare fraction magnitudes by representing numerators and denominators as separate whole numbers. However, atypical characteristics of the presented fractions might have provoked the use of atypical comparison strategies in that study. In our 3 experiments, university and community college students compared more balanced sets of single-digit and multi-digit fractions and consistently exhibited a logarithmic distance effect. Thus, adults used integrated, analog representations, akin to a mental number line, to compare fraction magnitudes. We interpret differences between the past and present findings in terms of different stimuli eliciting different solution strategies.

  4. Variable-order fuzzy fractional PID controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Pan, Feng; Xue, Dingyu

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a new tuning method of variable-order fractional fuzzy PID controller (VOFFLC) is proposed for a class of fractional-order and integer-order control plants. Fuzzy logic control (FLC) could easily deal with parameter variations of control system, but the fractional-order parameters are unable to change through this way and it has confined the effectiveness of FLC. Therefore, an attempt is made in this paper to allow all the five parameters of fractional-order PID controller vary along with the transformation of system structure as the outputs of FLC, and the influence of fractional orders λ and μ on control systems has been investigated to make the fuzzy rules for VOFFLC. Four simulation results of different plants are shown to verify the availability of the proposed control strategy.

  5. A spectral method based on the second kind Chebyshev polynomials for solving a class of fractional optimal control problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Nemati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the second-kind Chebyshev polynomials (SKCPs for the numerical solution of the fractional optimal control problems (FOCPs. Firstly, an introduction of the fractional calculus and properties of the shifted SKCPs are given and then operational matrix of fractional integration is introduced. Next, these properties are used together with the Legendre-Gauss quadrature formula to reduce the fractional optimal control problem to solving a system of nonlinear algebraic equations that greatly simplifies the problem. Finally, some examples are included to confirm the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method.

  6. Minimum Energy Control of Descriptor Fractional Discrete–Time Linear Systems with Two Different Fractional Orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajewski Łukasz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Reachability and minimum energy control of descriptor fractional discrete-time linear systems with different fractional orders are addressed. Using the Weierstrass–Kronecker decomposition theorem of the regular pencil, a solution to the state equation of descriptor fractional discrete-time linear systems with different fractional orders is given. The reachability condition of this class of systems is presented and used for solving the minimum energy control problem. The discussion is illustrated with numerical examples.

  7. A New Fractional Subequation Method and Its Applications for Space-Time Fractional Partial Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanwei Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new fractional subequation method is proposed for finding exact solutions for fractional partial differential equations (FPDEs. The fractional derivative is defined in the sense of modified Riemann-Liouville derivative. As applications, abundant exact solutions including solitary wave solutions as well as periodic wave solutions for the space-time fractional generalized Hirota-Satsuma coupled KdV equations are obtained by using this method.

  8. Fractional Calculus of Variations in Terms of a Generalized Fractional Integral with Applications to Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana Odzijewicz; Malinowska, Agnieszka B.; Torres, Delfim F. M.

    2012-01-01

    We study fractional variational problems in terms of a generalized fractional integral with Lagrangians depending on classical derivatives, generalized fractional integrals and derivatives. We obtain necessary optimality conditions for the basic and isoperimetric problems, as well as natural boundary conditions for free-boundary value problems. The fractional action-like variational approach (FALVA) is extended and some applications to physics discussed. Copyright 2012 Tatiana Odzijewicz et al.

  9. Synchronization of Fractional-Order Hyperchaotic Systems via Fractional-Order Controllers

    OpenAIRE

    Tianzeng Li; Yu Wang; Yong Yang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the synchronization of fractional-order chaotic systems is studied and a new fractional-order controller for hyperchaos synchronization is presented based on the Lyapunov stability theory. The proposed synchronized method can be applied to an arbitrary four-dimensional fractional hyperchaotic system. And we give the optimal value of control parameters to achieve synchronization of fractional hyperchaotic system. This approach is universal, simple, and theoretically rigorous. Nu...

  10. Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Mike, J., P.E.

    2012-08-30

    The STI product is the Final Technical Report from ReliOn, Inc. for contract award DE-EE0000487: Recovery Act PEM Fuel Cell Systems Providing Emergency Reserve and Backup Power. The program covered the turnkey deployment of 431 ReliOn fuel cell systems at 189 individual sites for AT&T and PG&E with ReliOn functioning as the primary equipment supplier and the project manager. The Final Technical Report provides an executive level summary, a comparison of the actual accomplishments vs. the goals and objectives of the project, as well as a summary of the project activity from the contract award date of August 1, 2009 through the contract expiration date of December 31, 2011. Two photos are included in the body of the report which show hydrogen storage and bulk hydrogen refueling technologies developed as a result of this program.

  11. CMS Is Finally Completed

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Yet another step in the completion of the Large Hadron Collider was taken yesterday morning, as the final element of the Compact Muon Solenoid was lowered nearly 100 meters bellow ground. After more than eight years of work at the world's most powerful particle accelerator, scientists hope that they will be able to start initial experiments with the LHC until the end of this year.

  12. Geolocation Technologies Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnoli, D E

    2003-06-02

    This paper is the final report for LL998 In Situ Sensing Subtask 7 (Geo-location) undertaken for NNSA NA-22 enabling technologies R&D for Counterproliferation Detection. A few state-of-the-art resolution parameters are presented for accelerometers, indoor and outdoor GPS (Global Positioning Satellite) systems, and INSs (Inertial Navigation Systems). New technologies are described, including one which has demonstrated the ability to track within a building to a resolution of under a foot.

  13. Experimental facility and void fraction calibration methods for impedance probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Fernando L. de; Rocha, Marcelo S., E-mail: floliveira@ipen.br, E-mail: msrocha@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    An experimental facility was designed and constructed with aims of to calibrate a capacitance probe for gas-liquid flow void fraction measurements. The facility is composed of a metallic hack with a vertical 2,300 mm high glass tube with 38 mm ID with stagnant water and compressed air bubbling system simulating the gas phase (vapor). At the lower part, a mixing section with a porous media element releases the air bubbles into the water, and the compressed air flow is measured by two calibrated rotameters. At the upper part a stagnant water tank separates the liquid and gas. Two pressure taps are located near the lower and upper sides of the glass tube for pressure difference measurement. The pressure difference is used for low void fraction values (0-15%) calibration methods, as described in the work. Two electrically controlled quick closing valves are installed between the porous media element and the upward separation tank for high void fraction values measurement (15-50%) used to calibrate the capacitance probe. The experimental facility design, construction, capacitance probe calibration methods and results, as well as flow pattern visualization, are presented. Finally, the capacitance probe will be installed on a natural circulation circuit mounted at the Nuclear Engineering Center (CEN/IPEN/CNEN-SP) for measurement of the instantaneous bulk void. Instantaneous signals generated by the capacitance probe will allow the determination of natural circulation loop global energy balance. (author)

  14. Preparative isolation of polyphosphoinositide fractions from ox brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, G V

    1982-09-14

    A simple preparative method for chromatographic isolation of pure fractions of di- and triphosphoinositides (1-phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and 1-phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate) from ox brain is described. Polyphosphoinositide fractions have been obtained by ion-exchange chromatography of the lipid extract using gradient elution with 0-0.6 M ammonium acetate in chloroform/methanol/water (20:9:1) from a DEAE-cellulose column. Before chromatography, divalent metal ions were removed from the lipid extract by passing through a Dowex-50 (H+) column and lipids were converted to the sodium salt by neutralisation with sodium hydroxide in methanol solution. After chromatography, fractions of di- and triphosphoinositides were precipitated in methanol/water mixture (1:1) by evaporation in a vacuum to a final concentration of about 4 M ammonium acetate. Necessary salts of di- and triphosphoinositides were obtained by passing the ammonium salts of the lipids through Dowex-50 (H+) and neutralising with corresponding base in methanol solution. About 0.35 mmol of diphosphoinositide and 0.63 mmol of triphosphoinositide were obtained from 1 kg of wet ox brain tissue.

  15. Quantum mechanics in fractional and other anomalous spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calcagni, Gianluca [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute), Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Nardelli, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Universita Cattolica, via Musei 41, 25121 Brescia (Italy); INFN Gruppo Collegato di Trento, Universita di Trento, 38100 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Scalisi, Marco [Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute), Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    We formulate quantum mechanics in spacetimes with real-order fractional geometry and more general factorizable measures. In spacetimes where coordinates and momenta span the whole real line, Heisenberg's principle is proven and the wave-functions minimizing the uncertainty are found. In spite of the fact that ordinary time and spatial translations are broken and the dynamics is not unitary, the theory is in one-to-one correspondence with a unitary one, thus allowing us to employ standard tools of analysis. These features are illustrated in the examples of the free particle and the harmonic oscillator. While fractional (and the more general anomalous-spacetime) free models are formally indistinguishable from ordinary ones at the classical level, at the quantum level they differ both in the Hilbert space and for a topological term fixing the classical action in the path integral formulation. Thus, all non-unitarity in fractional quantum dynamics is encoded in a contribution depending only on the initial and final states.

  16. Fractional Fourier domain analysis of decimation and interpolation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG XiangYi; TAO Ran; WANG Yue

    2007-01-01

    The sampling rate conversion is always used in order to decrease computational amount and storage load in a system. The fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) is a powerful tool for the analysis of nonstationary signals, especially, chirp-like signal.Thus, it has become an active area in the signal processing community, with many applications of radar, communication, electronic warfare, and information security.Therefore, it is necessary for us to generalize the theorem for Fourier domain analysis of decimation and interpolation. Firstly, this paper defines the digital frequency in the fractional Fourier domain (FRFD) through the sampling theorems with FRFT. Secondly, FRFD analysis of decimation and interpolation is proposed in this paper with digital frequency in FRFD followed by the studies of interpolation filter and decimation filter in FRFD. Using these results, FRFD analysis of the sampling rate conversion by a rational factor is illustrated. The noble identities of decimation and interpolation in FRFD are then deduced using previous results and the fractional convolution theorem. The proposed theorems in this study are the bases for the generalizations of the multirate signal processing in FRFD, which can advance the filter banks theorems in FRFD. Finally, the theorems introduced in this paper are validated by simulations.

  17. Local Fractional Adomian Decomposition and Function Decomposition Methods for Laplace Equation within Local Fractional Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Ping Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We perform a comparison between the local fractional Adomian decomposition and local fractional function decomposition methods applied to the Laplace equation. The operators are taken in the local sense. The results illustrate the significant features of the two methods which are both very effective and straightforward for solving the differential equations with local fractional derivative.

  18. Numerical Investigations on Hybrid Fuzzy Fractional Differential Equations by Improved Fractional Euler Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Vivek

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the improved Euler method is used for solving hybrid fuzzy fractional differential equations (HFFDE of order $q \\in (0, 1 $ under Caputo-type fuzzy fractional derivatives. This method is based on the fractional Euler method and generalized Taylor's formula. The accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method is demonstrated by solving numerical examples.

  19. The relative roles of boundary layer fractionation and homogeneous fractionation in cooling basaltic magma chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuritani, Takeshi

    2009-06-01

    In a cooling magma chamber, magmatic differentiation can proceed both by fractionation of crystals from the main molten part of the magma body (homogeneous fractionation) and by mixing of the main magma with fractionated melt derived from low-temperature mush zones (boundary layer fractionation). In this study, the relative roles of boundary layer fractionation and homogeneous fractionation in basaltic magma bodies were examined using a thermodynamics-based mass balance model. Model calculations show that boundary layer fractionation cannot be a dominant fractionation mechanism when magma chambers are located at low pressures (magmatic evolution. On the other hand, boundary layer fractionation can occur effectively when magmas are hydrous (> ~ 2 wt.%), such as arc basalt, and the magma chambers are located at depth (> ~ 100 MPa). Because the melt derived from mush zones is enriched in alkalis and H 2O, crystallization from the main magma is suppressed by mixing with the mush melt as a consequence of depression of the liquidus temperature. Therefore, homogeneous fractionation is more effectively suppressed in magma chambers in which boundary layer fractionation is more active. If magmatic differentiation proceeds primarily by boundary layer fractionation, magmas can remain free of crystals for long periods during magmatic evolution.

  20. A Note on Fractional Differential Equations with Fractional Separated Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a new class of boundary value problems of nonlinear fractional differential equations with fractional separated boundary conditions. A connection between classical separated and fractional separated boundary conditions is developed. Some new existence and uniqueness results are obtained for this class of problems by using standard fixed point theorems. Some illustrative examples are also discussed.

  1. Single fraction versus multiple fraction radiotherapy for palliation of painful vertebral bone metastases: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipanjan Majumder

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Different fractionation of radiation has same response and toxicity in treatment of vertebral bone metastasis. Single fraction RT may be safely used to treat these cases as this is more cost effective and less time consuming. Studies may be conducted to find out particular subgroup of patients to be benefitted more by either fractionation schedule; however, our study cannot comment on that issue.

  2. The fractionation of adipose tissue procedure to obtain stromal vascular fractions for regenerative purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Joris A.; Stevens, Hieronymus P.; Parvizi, Mojtaba; van der Lei, Berend; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2016-01-01

    Autologous adipose tissue transplantation is clinically used to reduce dermal scarring and to restore volume loss. The therapeutic benefit on tissue damage more likely depends on the stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue than on the adipocyte fraction. This stromal vascular fraction can be obt

  3. On the Approximate Solutions of Local Fractional Differential Equations with Local Fractional Operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jafari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the local fractional decomposition method, variational iteration method, and differential transform method for analytic treatment of linear and nonlinear local fractional differential equations, homogeneous or nonhomogeneous. The operators are taken in the local fractional sense. Some examples are given to demonstrate the simplicity and the efficiency of the presented methods.

  4. Fractional Representation Formulae Under Initial Conditions and Fractional Ostrowski Type Inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastassiou George A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Here we present very general fractional representation formulae for a function in terms of the fractional Riemann-Liouville integrals of different orders of the function and its ordinary derivatives under initial conditions. Based on these, we derive general fractional Ostrowski type inequalities with respect to all basic norms.

  5. The Fractionation of Adipose Tissue (FAT) procedure to obtain stromal vascular fractions for regenerative purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Joris A; Stevens, Hieronymus P; Parvizi, Mojtaba; van der Lei, Berend; Harmsen, Martin C

    2016-01-01

    Autologous adipose tissue transplantation is clinically used to reduce dermal scarring and to restore volume loss. The therapeutic benefit on tissue damage more likely depends on the stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue than on the adipocyte fraction. This stromal vascular fraction can be obt

  6. The fractionation of adipose tissue procedure to obtain stromal vascular fractions for regenerative purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Joris A.; Stevens, Hieronymus P.; Parvizi, Mojtaba; van der Lei, Berend; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2016-01-01

    Autologous adipose tissue transplantation is clinically used to reduce dermal scarring and to restore volume loss. The therapeutic benefit on tissue damage more likely depends on the stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue than on the adipocyte fraction. This stromal vascular fraction can be obt

  7. Catarse e Final Feliz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Ávila

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: É a certeza de que nada mais – ou nada importante – pode acontecer após o final de um conto que permite o acontecimento da catarse. Se na maioria das narrativas existe algum tipo de dénouement, em algumas delas isso acontece de maneira especialmente satisfatória e afirmativa. O conto de fadas é uma dessas formas narrativas onde o efeito catártico é extremo e preenche objetivos específicos, de acordo com Bruno Bettelheim. Hollywood mimetizou essa forma como estratégia de sedução, iniciando a tradição do final feliz no cinema. A partir do conto de fadas Cinderela, em diferentes versões, juntamente com a animação homônima da Disney e ainda duas versões do filme Sabrina, será traçada aqui uma relação entre a catarse e o final feliz nos contos de fada, bem como seu uso pela indústria cultural. Palavras-chave: catarse, contos de fada, Hollywood

  8. Decentralized autonomous planning of cluster reconfiguration for fractionated spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jing; Guo, Jian; Gill, Eberhard

    2016-06-01

    Autonomous cluster operation such as cluster reconfiguration is one of the enabling technologies for fractionated spacecraft. By virtue of the multi-agent system theory, this paper presents an organizational architecture for fractionated spacecraft, which not only enables autonomous cluster operations but also facilitates its non-traditional attributes. Within this organizational architecture, a decentralized framework is proposed to solve cluster reconfiguration problems based on primal and dual decomposition, where subgradient methods are adopted to include reconfiguration cases with non-differentiable objectives. Two typical constraints are considered: final configuration constraints representing coupling variables and collision avoidance constraints representing coupling constraints, both of which are non-convex. General schemes are proposed to convexify those constraints via the linearization and convex restriction technology. Then final configuration constraints are tackled by primal decomposition, while collision avoidance constraints by dual decomposition. To the end, multi-level primal and dual decompositions are employed to solve reconfiguration problems with both coupling variables and coupling constraints. For illustration an example of in-plane cluster reconfiguration is solved and compared with the centralized approach the solution is optimal.

  9. Schedulability Analysis for Java Finalizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgholm, Thomas; Hansen, Rene Rydhof; Ravn, Anders P.;

    2010-01-01

    Java finalizers perform clean-up and finalisation of objects at garbage collection time. In real-time Java profiles the use of finalizers is either discouraged (RTSJ, Ravenscar Java) or even disallowed (JSR-302), mainly because of the unpredictability of finalizers and in particular their impact ...... programs. Finally, we extend the SARTS tool for automated schedulability analysis of Java bytecode programs to handle finalizers in a fully automated way.......Java finalizers perform clean-up and finalisation of objects at garbage collection time. In real-time Java profiles the use of finalizers is either discouraged (RTSJ, Ravenscar Java) or even disallowed (JSR-302), mainly because of the unpredictability of finalizers and in particular their impact...... on the schedulability analysis. In this paper we show that a controlled scoped memory model results in a structured and predictable execution of finalizers, more reminiscent of C++ destructors than Java finalizers. Furthermore, we incorporate finalizers into a (conservative) schedulability analysis for Predictable Java...

  10. Antibacterial Curcuma xanthorrhiza Extract and Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartiwi Diastuti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An acetone extract of Curcuma xanthorrhiza rhizomes and the nhexane and chloroform fractions obtained from it were tested on eight pathogenic bacteria. The results showed that the acetone extract and the nhexane fraction exhibited significant activities against Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, and weak activities against Shigella dysenteriae and Vibrio cholerae. They were inactive against Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes and Salmonella thypi, while the chloroform fraction was devoid of activities. NMR analysis disclosed the presence of α-curcumene, xanthorrhizol and an unknown monoterpene in the nhexane fraction. In the chloroform fraction, curcumin was found to be the main compound, together with xanthorrhizol as a minor compound. These results suggest that the antibacterial potency of acetone extract of C. xanthorrhiza is contained in the n-hexane fraction, in which the active constituents are terpenoid compounds. This is the first report of the use of NMR analysis for compound identification contained in an extract or fractions of C. xanthorrhiza.

  11. CCII based fractional filters of different orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Soltan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to generalize the design of continuous-time filters to the fractional domain with different orders and validates the theoretical results with two different CCII based filters. In particular, the proposed study introduces the generalized formulas for the previous fractional-order analysis of equal orders. The fractional-order filters enhance the design flexibility and prove that the integer-order performance is a very narrow subset from the fractional-order behavior due to the extra degrees of freedom. The general fundamentals of these filters are presented by calculating the maximum and minimum frequencies, the half power frequency and the right phase frequency which are considered a critical issue for the filter design. Different numerical solutions for the generalized fractional order low pass filters with two different fractional order elements are introduced and verified by the circuit simulations of two fractional-order filters: Kerwin–Huelsman–Newcomb (KHN and Tow-Tomas CCII-based filters, showing great matching.

  12. A Dynamic Programming Approach to Adaptive Fractionation

    CERN Document Server

    Ramakrishnan, Jagdish; Bortfeld, Thomas; Tsitsiklis, John

    2011-01-01

    We formulate a previously introduced adaptive fractionation problem in a dynamic programming (DP) framework and explore various solution techniques. The two messages of this paper are: (i) the DP model is a useful framework for studying adaptive radiation therapy, particularly adaptive fractionation, and (ii) there is a potential for substantial decrease in dose to the primary organ-at-risk (OAR), or equivalently increase in tumor escalation, when using an adaptive fraction size. The essence of adaptive fractionation is to increase the fraction size when observing a "favorable" anatomy or when the tumor and OAR are far apart and to decrease the fraction size when they are close together. Given that a fixed prescribed dose must be delivered to the tumor over the course of the treatment, such an approach results in a lower cumulative dose to the OAR when compared to that resulting from standard fractionation. We first establish a benchmark by using the DP algorithm to solve the problem exactly. In this case, we...

  13. Nonlinear system stochastic response determination via fractional equivalent linearization and Karhunen-Loève expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hongzhe; Zheng, Zhibao; Wang, Wei

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a novel fractional equivalent linearization (EL) approach is developed by incorporating a fractional derivative term into the classical linearization equation. Due to the introduction of the fractional derivative term, the accuracy of the new linearization is improved, illustrated by a Duffing oscillator that is subjected to a harmonic excitation. Furthermore, a new method for solving stochastic response of nonlinear SDOF system is developed by combining Karhunen-Loève (K-L) expansion and fractional EL. The method firstly decomposes the stochastic excitation in terms of a set of random variables and deterministic sub-excitations using K-L expansion, and then construct sub-fractional equivalent linear system according to each sub-excitation by fractional EL, the response of the original nonlinear system is finally approximated as the weighed summation of the deterministic response of each sub-system multiplied by the corresponding random variable. The random nature of the final response comes from the set of random variables that is obtained in K-L expansion. In this way, the stochastic response computation is converted to a set of deterministic response analysis problems. The effectiveness of the developed method is demonstrated by a Duffing oscillator that is subjected to stochastic excitation modeled by Winner process. The results are compared with the numerical method and Monte Carlo simulation (MCS).

  14. A New Fractional Projective Riccati Equation Method for Solving Fractional Partial Differential Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qing-Hua

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a new fractional projective Riccati equation method is proposed to establish exact solutions for fractional partial differential equations in the sense of modified Riemann—Liouville derivative. This method can be seen as the fractional version of the known projective Riccati equation method. For illustrating the validity of this method, we apply this method to solve the space-time fractional Whitham—Broer—Kaup (WBK) equations and the nonlinear fractional Sharma—Tasso—Olever (STO) equation, and as a result, some new exact solutions for them are obtained.

  15. Measurement of Prominent eta Decay Branching Fractions

    CERN Document Server

    López, A; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Ernst, J; Ecklund, K M; Severini, H; Love, W; Savinov, V

    2007-01-01

    The decay psi(2S) --> eta J/psi is used to measure, for the first time, all prominent eta-meson branching fractions with the same experiment in the same dataset, thereby providing a consistent treatment of systematics across branching fractions. We present results for eta decays to gamma gamma, pi+pi-pi0, 3 pi0, pi+ pi- gamma, and e+ e- gamma, accounting for 99.9% of all eta decays. The precisions for several of the branching fractions and their ratios are improved. Two channels, pi+ pi- gamma and e+ e- gamma, show results that differ at the level of three standard deviations from those previously determined.

  16. Identification of fractional chaotic system parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Assaf, Yousef E-mail: yassaf@aus.ac.ae; El-Khazali, Reyad E-mail: khazali@ece.ac.ae; Ahmad, Wajdi E-mail: wajdi@sharjah.ac.ae

    2004-11-01

    In this work, a technique is introduced for parameter identification of fractional order chaotic systems. Features are extracted, from chaotic system outputs obtained for different system parameters, using discrete Fourier transform (DFT), power spectral density (PSD), and wavelets transform (WT). Artificial neural networks (ANN) are then trained on these features to predict the fractional chaotic system parameters. A fractional chaotic oscillator model is used through this work to demonstrate the developed technique. Numerical results show that recurrent Jordan-Elman neural networks with features obtained by the PSD estimate via Welch functions give adequate identification accuracy compared to other techniques.

  17. Behavior of fractional diffusion at the origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabov, Ya E

    2003-09-01

    The present work discusses the fractional diffusion equation based on the Riemann-Liouville fractional time derivatives. It was shown that the normalization conservation constraint leads to the divergency of diffusive agent concentration at the origin. This divergency implies an external source of the diffusive agent at r-->0. Thus, the Riemann-Liouville fractional time derivative implies a loss of diffusive agent mass, which is compensated for by the source of this agent at the origin. In contrast, the absence of the normalization conservation constraint does not lead to any divergences in the limit r-->0 and at the same time provides the decay of normalization.

  18. Approximate Controllability of Fractional Integrodifferential Evolution Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the issue of approximate controllability for a class of control system which is represented by nonlinear fractional integrodifferential equations with nonlocal conditions. By using semigroup theory, p-mean continuity and fractional calculations, a set of sufficient conditions, are formulated and proved for the nonlinear fractional control systems. More precisely, the results are established under the assumption that the corresponding linear system is approximately controllable and functions satisfy non-Lipschitz conditions. The results generalize and improve some known results.

  19. Applications of fractional calculus in physics

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    Fractional calculus is a collection of relatively little-known mathematical results concerning generalizations of differentiation and integration to noninteger orders. While these results have been accumulated over centuries in various branches of mathematics, they have until recently found little appreciation or application in physics and other mathematically oriented sciences. This situation is beginning to change, and there are now a growing number of research areas in physics which employ fractional calculus.This volume provides an introduction to fractional calculus for physicists, and co

  20. FRACTIONATION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS FOR FUEL-GRADE ETHANOL PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.D. Guffey; R.C. Wingerson

    2002-10-01

    alkaline hydrolysis may be beneficial in removing hemicellulose and lignin from the feedstock. In addition, alkaline hydrolysis has been shown to remove a significant portion of the hemicellulose and lignin. The resulting cellulose can be exposed to a finishing step with wet alkaline oxidation to remove the remaining lignin. The final product is a highly pure cellulose fraction containing less than 1% of the native lignin with an overall yield in excess of 85% of the native cellulose. This report summarizes the results from the first year's effort to move the technology to commercialization.