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Sample records for fractionated low-level irradiations

  1. Concentration of Proteins and Protein Fractions in Blood Plasma of Chickens Hatched from Eggs Irradiated with Low Level Gamma Rays

    Kraljevic, P.; Vilic, M.; Simpraga, M.; Matisic, D.; Miljanic, S.

    2011-01-01

    In literature there are many results which have shown that low dose radiation can stimulate many physiological processes of living organism. In our earlier paper it was shown that low dose of gamma radiation has a stimulative effect upon metabolic process in chickens hatched from eggs irradiated before incubation. This was proved by increase of body weight gain and body weight, as well as by increase of two enzymes activities in blood plasma (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase) which play an important role in protein metabolism. Therefore, an attempt was made to determine the effect of eggs irradiation by low dose gamma rays upon concentration of total proteins and protein fractions in the blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs. The eggs of heavy breed chickens were irradiated with a dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation (60Co) before incubation. Along with the chickens which were hatched from irradiated eggs, there was a control group of chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs. All other conditions were the same for both groups of chickens. Blood samples were taken from the right jugular vein on the 1 s t and 3 r d day, or from the wing vein on days 5 and 7 after hatching. The total proteins concentration in the blood plasma was determined by the biuret method using Boehringer Mannheim GmbH optimized kits. The protein fractions (albumin, α 1 -globulin, α 2 -globulin, β- and γ-globulins) were estimated electrophoretically on Cellogel strips. The total proteins concentration was significantly decreased in blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs on days 3 (P t h day (P 2 -globulin was decreased on days 1 (P t h day of life. Obtained results indicate that low dose of gamma radiation has mostly inhibitory effect upon concentration of total proteins and protein fractions in the blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs before incubation. (author)

  2. Adaptive response after low level irradiation

    Pelevina, I I; Afanasjev, G G; JaGotlib, V; Tereschenko, D G; Tronov, V A; Serebrjany, A M [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Chemical Physics

    1996-02-01

    The experiments conducted on cultured HeLa (tissue culture) cells revealed that there is a limit of dose above which adaptive response was not observed and a limit of dose below which this response was not induced. The exposure of cells in the territories with elevated radiation background leads to genome instability which results in enhanced radiosensitivity. Investigations on the blood lymphocytes of people living in contaminated regions revealed that adaptive response was more significant in children whereas in adults there was slight increase. Acute irradiation serves as a tool revealing the changes that took place in DNA during chronic low level irradiations after Chernobyl disaster. (author).

  3. Genetic effects of low-level irradiation

    Selby, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    Recent estimates of the genetic effects of radiation by two widely recognized committees (BEIR III and UNSCEAR 1977) are based to a large extent on data collected in mice using either the specific-locus method or the approach of empirically determining the nature and extent of radiation-induced genetic damage to the skeleton. Both committees made use of doubling-dose and direct methods of estimating genetic hazard. Their estimates can be applied to assessments of risk resulting from medical irradiation in terms both of risk to the population at large and to the individual

  4. Acid fractionation for low level liquid waste cleanup and recycle

    Gombert, D. II; McIntyre, C.V.; Mizia, R.E.; Schindler, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    At the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, low level liquid wastes containing small amounts of radionuclides are concentrated via a thermosyphon evaporator for calcination with high level waste, and the evaporator condensates are discharged with other plant wastewater to a percolation pond. Although all existing discharge guidelines are currently met, work has been done to reduce all waste water discharges to an absolute minimum. In this regard, a 15-tray acid fractionation column will be used to distill the mildly acidic evaporator condensates into concentrated nitric acid for recycle in the plant. The innocuous overheads from the fractionator having a pH greater than 2, are superheated and HEPA filtered for atmospheric discharge. Nonvolatile radionuclides are below detection limits. Recycle of the acid not only displaces fresh reagent, but reduces nitrate burden to the environment, and completely eliminates routine discharge of low level liquid wastes to the environment

  5. The disturbances of lipid metabolism regulation after the prenatal low-level irradiation

    Rogov, Yu.I.; Danil'chik, V.S.; Spivak, L.V.; Rubchenya, I.N.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the influence of low-level irradiation on lipid metabolism in rats after prenatal exposure. Pregnant rats were irradiated during the period of gestation with the whole final dose 0,5 Gy/rat. The blood lipid fractions were investigated in newborn rats and in 6-month age rats. In irradiated offspring the lipo synthesis processes exceeded lipolysis in comparison with that of the control. The negative consequences of embryo low-level irradiation in the lipid metabolism regulation are discussed in this report. (authors)

  6. Effects of low-level chronic irradiation on aquatic organisms

    Etoh, H. (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan))

    1980-10-01

    Effects of continual irradiation for a long term on fishes and aquatic invertebrates were outlined. Effects of low-level chronic irradiation on aquatic organisms were less than acute effects induced when the same dose was irradiated once. The radiosensitivity of the genital organ to continual irradiation was high. There was a difference in radiosensitivity of the genital organ between female and male, and the degree of the difference varied according to kinds of animals. In an experiment on continual irradiation of adult killifishes, ova recovered from radiation damage, but spermatozoa did not recover. Incubation rates of eggs obtained from aquatic organisms which lived in water where radioactive sewage flowed into decreased significantly, and the frequency of reverse position of salivary gland chromosomes which were peculiar to exposed organisms increased in larvae of Chironomus tentans.

  7. Low level chronic irradiation of salmon. Annual progress report

    Hershberger, W.K.; Donaldson, L.R.; Bonham, K.; Brannon, E.L.

    1975-01-01

    A question of primary importance in the use of nuclear energy is what effect the effluent from a reactor will have on the aquatic life in the water used for cooling. Of particular concern in the Pacific Northwest are the effects of chronic irradiation on salmon that use the rivers for spawning and nursery area. The present program was designed in the early days of the atomic era to address this concern, and to provide some insight into the long-term consequences of exposure of fish to chronic, low levels of irradiation. The experimental techniques are described and data are summarized on irradiation effects on the entire life cycle of the chinook salmon. Also, long-term effects transmitted to future generations were assessed in F 1 offspring of irradiated parents

  8. Alternatives to dose, quality factor and dose equivalent for low level irradiation

    Sondhaus, C.A.; Bond, V.P.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    Randomly occurring energy deposition events produced by low levels of ionizing radiation interacting with tissue deliver variable amounts of energy to the sensitive target volumes within a small fraction of the cell population. A model is described in which an experimentally derived function relating event size to cell response probability operates mathematically on the microdosimetric event size distribution characterizing a given irradiation and thus determines the total fractional number of responding cells; this fraction measures the effectiveness of the given radiation. Normalizing to equal numbers of events produced by different radiations and applying this cell response or hit size effectiveness function (HSEF) should define radiation quality, or relative effectiveness, on a more nearly absolute basis than do the absorbed dose and dose evaluation, which are confounded when applied to low level irradiations. Examples using both calculation and experimental data are presented. 15 refs., 18 figs

  9. Low-level microwave irradiation and central cholinergic systems

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    Our previous research showed that 45 min of exposure to low-level, pulsed microwaves (2450-MHz, 2-microseconds pulses, 500 pps, whole-body average specific absorption rate 0.6 W/kg) decreased sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat. The effects of microwaves on central cholinergic systems were further investigated in this study. Increases in choline uptake activity in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus were observed after 20 min of acute microwave exposure, and tolerance to the effect of microwaves developed in the hypothalamus, but not in the frontal cortex and hippocampus, of rats subjected to ten daily 20-min exposure sessions. Furthermore, the effects of acute microwave irradiation on central choline uptake could be blocked by pretreating the animals before exposure with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone. In another series of experiments, rats were exposed to microwaves in ten daily sessions of either 20 or 45 min, and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in different regions of the brain were studied by 3H-QNB binding assay. Decreases in concentration of receptors occurred in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats subjected to ten 20-min microwave exposure sessions, whereas increase in receptor concentration occurred in the hippocampus of animals exposed to ten 45-min sessions. This study also investigated the effects of microwave exposure on learning in the radial-arm maze. Rats were trained in the maze to obtain food reinforcements immediately after 20 or 45 min of microwave exposure

  10. Effects of chronic low-level irradiation on Gambusia affinis

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1944, White Oak Lake (WOL), located on the Oak Ridge Reservation, has served as a final settling basin for low-level radioactive effluents from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Organisms inhabiting the lake have been exposed for many generations to chronic low-level radiation significantly higher than background. During the past decade, studies on Gambusia affinis from WOL have been carried out to relate estimated radiation doses to effects on the fitness of the Gambusia population. Results of studies on fecundity, temperature tolerance, and embryonic mortality have led to the conclusion that the Gambusia population in White Oak Lake has an increased frequency of deleterious and recessive lethal genes which may be attributed to the radiation exposure history. The frequency of nonviable embryos from WOL Gambusia did not change significantly from 1966 to 1978; however, it was still significantly greater than that of a control population. In July 1977, Gambusia from a control population were stocked into a 0.45-ha pond which had served as a low-level waste settling basin. The beta and gamma dose rate in this pond averaged from 37 rad/yr at the water surface, 394 rad/yr at mid-depth, and 1150 rad/yr at the surface of the sediments. Preliminary results from samples taken in August 1978 showed that although the frequency of nonviable embryos increased, the frequency was not significantly greater than that of the control parent population. Additional sampling of future generations of Gambusia in this pond will determine whether the frequency of nonviable embryos increases as succeeding generations are exposed to dose rates that are higher than the dose rates in WOL

  11. Assumed genetic effects of low level irradiation on man

    Dutrillaux, B.

    1976-01-01

    The significance of human genetic pathology is stated and a study is made of the assumed effect of low level ionizing radiations. The theoretical notions thus derived are compared to experimental data which are poor. A quick survey of the literature shows that is has not yet been possible to establish a direct relationship between an increase of exposure and any genetic effect on man. However, this must not lead to conclude on the innoxiousness of radiation but rather shows how such analyses are difficult in as much as the effect investigated is necessarily low [fr

  12. Evidence from mammalian studies on genetic effects of low level irradiation

    Searle, A.G.

    1989-01-01

    The major components of genetic damage and associated human risks are discussed, together with the experimental evidence on induction rates of chromosome anomalies in mice, and monkeys male and female germ cells, using low and high LET low level irradiation. (UK)

  13. Low-level laser irradiation induces in vitro proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvão; Ginani, Fernanda; Soares, Diego Moura; Henriques, Águida Cristina Gomes; Freitas, Roseana de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of low-level laser irradiation on the proliferation and possible nuclear morphological changes of mouse mesenchymal stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and adipose tissue were submitted to two applications (T0 and T48 hours) of low-level laser irradiation (660nm; doses of 0.5 and 1.0J/cm"2). The trypan blue assay was used to evaluate cell viability, and growth curves were used to analyze proliferation at zero, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Nuclear alterations were evaluated by staining with DAPI (4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) at 72 hours. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells responded to laser therapy in a dose-dependent manner. Higher cell growth was observed when the cells were irradiated with a dose of 1.0J/cm"2, especially after 24 hours (p<0.01). Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells responded better to a dose of 1.0J/cm"2, but higher cell proliferation was observed after 48 hours (p<0.05) and 72 hours (p<0.01). Neither nuclear alterations nor a significant change in cell viability was detected in the studied groups. Low-level laser irradiation stimulated the proliferation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells without causing nuclear alterations. The biostimulation of mesenchymal stem cells using laser therapy might be an important tool for regenerative therapy and tissue engineering

  14. Low-level laser irradiation induces in vitro proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvão; Ginani, Fernanda [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); Soares, Diego Moura [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Henriques, Águida Cristina Gomes; Freitas, Roseana de Almeida [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of low-level laser irradiation on the proliferation and possible nuclear morphological changes of mouse mesenchymal stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and adipose tissue were submitted to two applications (T0 and T48 hours) of low-level laser irradiation (660nm; doses of 0.5 and 1.0J/cm{sup 2}). The trypan blue assay was used to evaluate cell viability, and growth curves were used to analyze proliferation at zero, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Nuclear alterations were evaluated by staining with DAPI (4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) at 72 hours. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells responded to laser therapy in a dose-dependent manner. Higher cell growth was observed when the cells were irradiated with a dose of 1.0J/cm{sup 2}, especially after 24 hours (p<0.01). Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells responded better to a dose of 1.0J/cm{sup 2}, but higher cell proliferation was observed after 48 hours (p<0.05) and 72 hours (p<0.01). Neither nuclear alterations nor a significant change in cell viability was detected in the studied groups. Low-level laser irradiation stimulated the proliferation of mouse mesenchymal stem cells without causing nuclear alterations. The biostimulation of mesenchymal stem cells using laser therapy might be an important tool for regenerative therapy and tissue engineering.

  15. Effect of low level prenatal X-irradiation on postnatal growth in the Wistar rat

    Jensh, R.P.; Brent, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Forty-five pregnant Wistar strain rats were exposed to 0.0, 0.4, 0.6, or 0.8 Gy X-radiation on the 9th or 17th day of gestation to determined if prenatal X-irradiation would result in alterations in postnatal growth or growth rate. The mothers delivered their offspring, and the litters were reduced to a maximum of eight per litter on the second postnatal day. The 336 offspring were weighed weekly from day 3 until day 86, at which time they were killed, an autopsy was performed, and selected organs were removed and weighed. Postnatal growth rates did not differ significantly in irradiated offspring compared to sham irradiated animals. Irradiation on the 9th day, at any of the 3 dosage levels, did not result in significant differences in weekly weight. Weekly weight remained significantly lower due to irradiation on the 17th day of gestation. The gonadal weight ratio was significantly reduced in males irradiated on the 9th day. There were not other statistically significant changes in organ weight or organ/body weight ratios due to these levels of prenatal X-irradiation on the 9th or 17th day of pregnancy. These results indicate that low level prenatal X-irradiation, on the 17th day of rat gestation, causes prenatal growth retardation, evident at birth, which is not recuperable postnatally. Exposure to x-radiation at this time, however, does not affect the rate at which offspring grow during postnatal life. Offspring are smaller because they never fully recover from the original radiation-induced prenatal growth retardation

  16. Low-level laser irradiation protects the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane from UV cytotoxicity

    Hammami Amira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-level laser therapy or photobiomodulation is the medical use of a very low intensity light in the red to near infrared (wavelengths in the range of 630-940 nm. The present work was conducted to explore the effects of both UV and low-level laser irradiation (LLLI on microcirculation using the in vivo model of the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM. The effects were assessed by measuring lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activity. Cell cytotoxicity, survival and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS of the CAM were also evaluated. We found that UV irradiation induced alterations of the vessels, leading to bleeding and extravasation. This effect was intensified after 60 min of exposure to UV irradiation, leading to marked edema. UVA irradiation increased cell cytotoxicity as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release (56.23% of control and reduced cell viability as assessed by decreased fluorescein diacetate (FDA fluorescence (56.23% of control. Pretreatment with LLLI prior to UV exposure protected the CAM tissue from UV-mediated cell death. This protective effect was supported by the observation of significantly inhibited lipid peroxidation (from 0.3±0.004 for UV, to 0.177±0.012 after LLLI pretreatment, ROS and O2 -production, as indicated by respective dihydrorhodamine (DHR and dihydroethidium (DHE intensities (from 132.78% of control for UVA, to 95.90% of control for L-UV (DHR, and from 127.34% of control for UVA, to 82.03% of control for L-UV (DHE, and by preventing the increase in oxidative activities. LLLI efficiently protected CAM cells from UV-induced oxidative stress and appeared as a safe protective pretreatment against UV irradiation.

  17. In vitro analysis of low-level laser irradiation on human osteoblast-like cells proliferation

    Bloise, Nora; Saino, Enrica; Bragheri, Francesca; Minzioni, Paolo; Cristiani, Ilaria; Imbriani, Marcello; Visai, Livia

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro effect of a single or a multiple doses of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on proliferation of the human osteosarcoma cell line, SAOS-2. SAOS-2 cells were divided in five groups and exposed to LLLI (659 nm diode laser; 11 mW power output): group I as a control (dark), group II exposed to a single laser dose of 1 J/cm2, group III irradiated with a single dose of 3 J/cm2, and group IV and V exposed for three consecutive days to 1 or 3 J/cm², respectively. Cellular proliferation was assessed daily up to 7 days of culturing. The obtained results showed an increase in proliferative capacity of SAOS-2 cells during the first 96 h of culturing time in once-irradiated cells, as compared to control cells. Furthermore, a significantly higher proliferation in the group IV and V was detected if compared to a single dose or to control group after 96 h and 7 days. In conclusion, the effect of the single dose on cell proliferation was transitory and repeated irradiations were necessary to observe a strong enhancement of SAOS-2 growth. As a future perspective, we would like to determine the potential of LLLI as a new approach for promoting bone regeneration onto biomaterials.

  18. Effects of increased low-level diode laser irradiation time on extraction socket healing in rats.

    Park, Joon Bong; Ahn, Su-Jin; Kang, Yoon-Goo; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Heo, Jung Sun; Kang, Kyung Lhi

    2015-02-01

    In our previous studies, we confirmed that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) with a 980-nm gallium-aluminum-arsenide diode laser was beneficial for the healing of the alveolar bone in rats with systemic disease. However, many factors can affect the biostimulatory effects of LLLT. Thus, we attempted to investigate the effects of irradiation time on the healing of extraction sockets by evaluating the expressions of genes and proteins related to bone healing. The left and right first maxillary molars of 24 rats were extracted. Rats were randomly divided into four groups in which extraction sockets were irradiated for 0, 1, 2, or 5 min each day for 3 or 7 days. Specimens containing the sockets were examined using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. LLLT increased the expressions of all tested genes, Runx2, collagen type 1, osteocalcin, platelet-derived growth factor-B, and vascular endothelial growth factor, in a time-dependent manner. The highest levels of gene expressions were in the 5-min group after 7 days. Five minutes of irradiation caused prominent increases of the expression of all tested proteins after both 3 and 7 days. The expression level of each protein in group 4 was higher by almost twofold compared with group 1 after 7 days. Laser irradiation for 5 min caused the highest expressions of genes and proteins related to bone healing. In conclusion, LLLT had positive effects on the early stages of bone healing of extraction sockets in rats, which were irradiation time-dependent.

  19. assessment Of the effect Of low Level Laser Therapy on Parotid glands of gamma Irradiated Rats

    Ahmed, S.F.

    2013-01-01

    Gamma radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction has a major deleterious effect on oral health. Aim: This study was carried out to evaluate the possible effect of low level laser therapy (LLLT) on radiation induced oxidative stress in rats’ salivary glands. Material and Methods: Sixty four male Albino rats were divided into two groups. One group where the left parotid gland was exposed to 3 sessions of LLL, then rats were subjected to 3 sessions of whole body gamma-radiation. In the other group, rats were subjected to 3 sessions of gamma-radiation; each was followed by a session of LLL to the left parotid gland. The right gland of both groups was used as irradiated control. Parotid glands were collected 1 day, 3 days, 1 week and 2 weeks after the end of treatment and were subjected to histological examination and immunohistochemical analysis. Results: The parotid gland of both laser groups showed less intra cytoplasmic vacuolisation, slight alteration of acinar architecture and almost even size nuclei as compared to the irradiated gland. LLL either before or parallel to gamma-irradiation was effective in increasing cell proliferation on the third and seventh day, respectively as compared to the gamma irradiated group (P<0.05). Statistically, results revealed significant decrease in optical density of caspase 3 activity in the lased groups on the first week as compared to the control. Conclusion: LLLT attenuates the harmful effect of gamma irradiation on the parotid glands of the rats. Also, it improves gland regeneration through modulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis inflammation

  20. Paramecium tetraurelia growth stimulation under low-level chronic irradiation: investigations on a possible mechanism

    Croute, F.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Vidal, S.; Dupouy, D.; Planel, H.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to demonstrate the effects of low-level chronic irradiation on Paramecium tetraurelia proliferation. Biological effects were strongly dependent on the bacterial density of culture medium and more exactly on the catalase content of the medium. Significant growth stimulation was found under 60 Co chronic irradiation at a dose rate of 2 rad/year when paramecia were grown in a medium containing a high bacterial concentration (2.5 x 10 2 cells/m) or supplemented with catalase (300 U/ml). In a medium with a low bacterial density (1 x 10 6 cell/ml) or supplemented with a catalase activity inhibitor, growth simulation was preceded by a transitory inhibiting effect which could be correlated with extracellularly radioproduced H 2 O 2 . H 2 O 2 addition appeared to be able to simulate the biological effects of chronic irradiation. A possible mechanism is discussed.We proposed that the stimulating effects were the result of intracellular enzymatic scavenging of radioproduced H 2 O 2

  1. The effects of low level laser irradiation on proliferation of human dental pulp: a narrative review.

    Staffoli, S; Romeo, U; Amorim, R N S; Migliau, G; Palaia, G; Resende, L; Polimeni, A

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the capability for self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation in various types of specialized cells, so they are very important in cellular therapies. MSC from dental pulp are simply obtainable and have high proliferative capability. Among the therapies that can stimulate the proliferation of certain cell types, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) stands out. The target of this study is to perform a literature review to investigate these effects of low-level laser irradiation on proliferation of human dental pulp.The electronic search of scientific papers was conducted in the Lilacs, Scielo, Medline and PubMed databases through scientific articles published in national and international journals in the past 20 years.The results of this review suggest that LLLT may be a useful and important tool for future advances in cell therapy and tissue engineering associated to stem cells. Studies on cell therapy for regenerating dental tissues has already been done, and shows promising results.

  2. Role Of SYNBIOTICS And Low Level GAMMA Irradiation Treatments In Improving Performance Of Japanese Quails

    ABU-TALEB, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    A total number of 800 Japanese quail eggs were obtained from a parent flock maintained the poultry research unit of the Biological Application Department, Nuclear Research Centre at Inshas, Egypt, and used in the present study. Before incubating the eggs, they were divided into two equal groups of 400 eggs each; the 1 st group was exposed to a low level of gamma irradiation at 50 rad before sitting while the 2 nd group did not exposed to gamma irradiation. After hatching of the two groups, fertility, hatchability, embryonic mortality and hatching weight were determined. Hatched quail chicks from each group (1 and 2) were divided into four identical subgroups and all fed the basal diet but with a different supplement. The diet of the 1 st subgroup was supplemented with 2.5% Lactobacilli, the 2 nd with 1.5% lactose, the 3 rd with 2.5% Lactobacilli plus 1.5% lactose, while the 4 th subgroup was fed the basal diet only and served as control. The results showed decreased embryonic mortality and increased hatchability and hatching weight due to exposing quail eggs to low level of gamma radiation as compared to non-exposed eggs. The average body weight and the relative weights of carcass, testis and oviduct, egg production, egg weight, serum total protein, albumin, globulins, RBC, WBC and Hb values were increased significantly (P th week due to adding Lactobacilli and lactose to the basal diet. Significant reduction (P<0.05) in the intestinal wall index was observed due to adding Lactobacilli and lactose to the basal diet of hatched quails. In conclusion, adding Lactobacilli and/or lactose to the basal diet of hatched Japanese quails improved performance as well as blood constituents and intestinal wall index. The magnitude of this improvement was even greater when both supplements were combined. In addition, the exposure of eggs to low level of gamma radiation (50 rad) improved hatchability and hatching weight of Japanese quail eggs, but no relationship to dietary

  3. Biological effects of low-level laser irradiation on umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    Chen, Hongli; Wang, Hong; Li, Yingxin; Liu, Weichao; Chen, Zhuying; Wang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) can enhance stem cell (SC) activity by increasing migration and proliferation. This study investigated the effects of LLLI on proliferation, enzymatic activity, and growth factor production in human umbilical cord mesenchymal SCs (hUC-MSCs) as well as the underlying mechanisms. hUC-MSCs were assigned to a control group (non-irradiation group) and three LLLI treatment groups (635 nm group, 808 nm group, and 635/808 nm group). Laser power density and energy density of 20 mW/cm"2 and 12 J/cm"2, respectively, were used for each experiment. The proliferation rate was higher in the 635 nm as compared to the other groups. LLLI at 808 nm did not induce cell proliferation. ROS levels in cells exposed to 635, 808, and 635/808 nm radiation were increased by 52.81%, 26.89%, and 21.15%, respectively, relative to the control group. CAT, tGPx, and SOD activity was increased. LLLI at 808 nm increased the levels of IL-1, IL-6, and NFκB but not VEGF. LLLI improved hUC-MSCs function and increased antioxidant activity. Dual-wavelength LLLI had more potent effects on hUC-MSCs than single-wavelength treatment. LLLI has potential applications in the preconditioning of hUC-MSCs in vitro prior to transplantation, which could improve the regenerative capacity of cells.

  4. Biological effects of low-level laser irradiation on umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    Chen, Hongli; Wang, Hong; Li, Yingxin; Liu, Weichao; Wang, Chao; Chen, Zhuying

    2016-04-01

    Low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) can enhance stem cell (SC) activity by increasing migration and proliferation. This study investigated the effects of LLLI on proliferation, enzymatic activity, and growth factor production in human umbilical cord mesenchymal SCs (hUC-MSCs) as well as the underlying mechanisms. hUC-MSCs were assigned to a control group (non-irradiation group) and three LLLI treatment groups (635 nm group, 808 nm group, and 635/808 nm group). Laser power density and energy density of 20 mW/cm2 and 12 J/cm2, respectively, were used for each experiment. The proliferation rate was higher in the 635 nm as compared to the other groups. LLLI at 808 nm did not induce cell proliferation. ROS levels in cells exposed to 635, 808, and 635/808 nm radiation were increased by 52.81%, 26.89%, and 21.15%, respectively, relative to the control group. CAT, tGPx, and SOD activity was increased. LLLI at 808 nm increased the levels of IL-1, IL-6, and NFκB but not VEGF. LLLI improved hUC-MSCs function and increased antioxidant activity. Dual-wavelength LLLI had more potent effects on hUC-MSCs than single-wavelength treatment. LLLI has potential applications in the preconditioning of hUC-MSCs in vitro prior to transplantation, which could improve the regenerative capacity of cells.

  5. Biological effects of low-level laser irradiation on umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    Chen, Hongli; Wang, Hong; Li, Yingxin, E-mail: yingxinli2005@126.com; Liu, Weichao; Chen, Zhuying [Key Laboratory of Laser Medicine of Tianjin, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300192 (China); Wang, Chao [Biomedical Engineering and Technology College, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 300070 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) can enhance stem cell (SC) activity by increasing migration and proliferation. This study investigated the effects of LLLI on proliferation, enzymatic activity, and growth factor production in human umbilical cord mesenchymal SCs (hUC-MSCs) as well as the underlying mechanisms. hUC-MSCs were assigned to a control group (non-irradiation group) and three LLLI treatment groups (635 nm group, 808 nm group, and 635/808 nm group). Laser power density and energy density of 20 mW/cm{sup 2} and 12 J/cm{sup 2}, respectively, were used for each experiment. The proliferation rate was higher in the 635 nm as compared to the other groups. LLLI at 808 nm did not induce cell proliferation. ROS levels in cells exposed to 635, 808, and 635/808 nm radiation were increased by 52.81%, 26.89%, and 21.15%, respectively, relative to the control group. CAT, tGPx, and SOD activity was increased. LLLI at 808 nm increased the levels of IL-1, IL-6, and NFκB but not VEGF. LLLI improved hUC-MSCs function and increased antioxidant activity. Dual-wavelength LLLI had more potent effects on hUC-MSCs than single-wavelength treatment. LLLI has potential applications in the preconditioning of hUC-MSCs in vitro prior to transplantation, which could improve the regenerative capacity of cells.

  6. Role of laser fluence in protein synthesis of cultured DRG neurons following low-level laser irradiation

    Zheng, Liqin; Qiu, Caimin; Wang, Yuhua; Zeng, Yixiu; Yang, Hongqin; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2014-11-01

    Low-level lasers have been used to relieve pain in clinical for many years. But the mechanism is not fully clear. In animal models, nitric oxide (NO) has been reported involving in the transmission and modulation of nociceptive signals. So the objective of this study was to establish whether low-level laser with different fluence could stimulate the production of nitric oxide synthese (NOS), which produces NO in cultured primary dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG neurons). The primary DRG neurons were isolated from healthy Sprague Dawley rats (8-12 weeks of age) and spread on 35 mm culture dishes specially used for confocal microscopy. 24 hours after spreading, cells were irradiated with 658 nm laser for two consecutive days at the energy density of 20, 40, 60 and 80 mJ·cm-2 respectively. Control groups were not exposed to the laser, but were kept under the same conditions as the irradiated ones. The synthesis of NOS after laser irradiation was detected by immunofluorescence assay, and the changes of NOS were evaluated using confocal microscopy and Image J software. The results showed that all the laser fluence could promote the production of NOS in DRG neurons, especially the 60 mJ·cm-2 . These results demonstrated that low-level laser irradiation could modify protein synthesis in a dose- or fluence- dependent manner, and indicated that low-level laser irradiation might achieve the analgesic effect through modulation of NO production.

  7. Effects of Low-Level Laser Irradiation on the Pathogenicity of Candida albicans: In Vitro and in Vivo Study

    Seyedmousavi Tasieh, S.; Hashemi, S.J.; Rezaie, S.; Fateh, M.; Djavid, G.E.; Zibafar, E.; Morsali, F.; Zand, N.; Alinaghizadeh, M.; Ataie-Fashtami, L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on the in vitro growth characteristics and in vivo pathogenicity of Candida albicans in a murine model in the absence of a photosensitizer. Background data: C. albicans is an opportunistic

  8. Fractional treatment of spent scintillation cocktail with low level tritium by azeotropic distillation

    Nishikawa, Masabumi; Kotoh, Kenji; Koga, Keisuke; Katase, Akira

    1982-01-01

    Among various waste from RI laboratories, one of the most troublesome wastes is the spent liquid scintillation cocktail, because there are no good disposal way but to store in each laboratories. The fractionation of tritiated water, solvent and alkyl detergent from the spent scintillation cocktail by the azeotropic distillation method is examined in this study, and it has been concluded that this method is applicable, It is also found in this study that removal of tritiated water from distilled solvent can be conducted by using adsorption tower with Molecular sieve 3A. Treatment of the spent scintillation cocktail within 3 months after use is recomended because no isotope exchange reaction with solvent or detergent is observed within 3 months after use in this study. No isotope effects are observed in the zeotropic distillation process. (author)

  9. Lifespan studies on different strains of mice exposed chronically to low levels of whole body gamma irradiation

    Fox, L.A.; Klein, A.K.; Cain, G.R.; Rosenblatt, L.S.

    1982-01-01

    Several strains of mice, chosen for their predisposition to immunohematological disorders, were exposed to low levels of 60 irradiation continuously for four weeks. All individuals were subsequently followed throughout their lifetimes. W/W/sup v/ mice, which are tyically subject to a stem cell deficiency, had a lower cumulative survival rate for the irradiated group than for the unirradiated controls. Irradiated RF/sub j/ mice had a dramatically lower cumulative survival rate than their unirradiated controls. Conversely, BXSB mice, which have a lumphoproliferative autoimmune disorder, had a higher cumulative survival rate after chronic irradiation than did unirradiated BXSBs. Irradiation had no effect upon the survival rate curves of the NZB strain, the murine model for Lupus Erythematosus

  10. Effects of low-level gamma irradiation on the characteristics of fermented pork sausage during storage

    Kim, I.S.; Jo, C.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, E.J.; Ahn, D.U.; Kang, S.N.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation (0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kGy) on the quality of vacuum-packaged dry fermented sausages during refrigerated storage was evaluated. At Day 0 of irradiation, the pH, redness (CIE a ⁎ ), yellowness (CIE b ⁎ ), 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) values of samples irradiated at 2 and 4 kGy were higher (p ⁎ values (lightness) were lower than those of the non-irradiated control (p ⁎ , CIE a ⁎ and CIE b ⁎ -value of samples were not significantly influenced by irradiation. The CIE a ⁎ , and CIE b ⁎ -values of samples irradiated at 2 and 4 kGy decreased with the increase of storage time. The VBN, TBARS, and CIE L ⁎ -values of samples irradiated at 4 kGy were not changed significantly during refrigerated storage for 90 days (p>0.05). The total plate counts (TPC) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in the samples irradiated at 4 kGy were significantly lower (p<0.01) than those with lower irradiation doses. At the end of storage, the TPC, coliform, and LAB in the samples were not increased after irradiation at 1, 0.5 and 1 kGy, respectively. TPC and LAB were not detected in samples irradiated at 4 kGy at Day 90. In addition, no coliform bacteria were found in samples irradiated at 1 kGy during refrigerated storage. Sensory evaluation indicated that the rancid flavor of samples irradiated at 4 kGy was significantly higher, but aroma and taste scores were lower than those of the control at Day 3 of storage. Irradiation of dry fermented sausages at 2 kGy was the best conditions to prolong the shelf-life and decrease the rancid flavor without significant quality deterioration. - Highlights: ► Effect of gamma irradiation on the quality of vacuum-packaged dry fermented sausages during refrigerated storage was evaluated. ► At Day 90, the TPC, coliform, and LAB in the dry fermented sausages were not increased after irradiation at 2, 0.5 and 4 kGy, respectively. ► TPC and LAB were not detected in

  11. Researchin chronic low-level gamma -irradiation on laboratory populations of Lemna minor

    Rasskazova, M.M.; Berestina, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Researching carried out on the laboratory population of Lemna minor showed that the chronically γ-irradiated plants significantly reduced specific rate of population growth, accelerating the process of withering away of the fronds. Chronic irradiation with dose of 5,0 mGy/h stimulates the growth of the roots, and irradiation with a capacity of 50 mGy/h significantly increases the percentage of damage fronds. Found out independent of dose effect on the criterion of the number of deaths of individuals in the range of absorbed dose between 0,01 - 1 Gy. (authors)

  12. Low Level (Sub Threshold), Large Spot Laser Irradiations of the Foveas of Macaca Mulatta.

    1981-11-01

    spherules. In a portion of the block containing the macula a degenerating patch is seen, displaying considerable edema, with pyknotic and missing nuclei...6 Peripheral areas 11 Macula 11 Eye # 3 M31 2KD 15 (enucleated 7 days after focal irradiation jby gallium arsenide laser). Control areas 15 Neodymium...laser irradiations peripheral areas 23 Macula 28 TABLE OF CONTENTS continued Page Eye # 5 M443 2JD Patched Eye 32 Most areas 32 area nasal to optic disc

  13. Pre-1989 epidemiological surveys of low-level dose pre-conception irradiation

    Rose, K.S.B.

    1990-01-01

    Information from 59 pre-1989 epidemiological surveys concerning pre-conception irradiation at doses less than 0.1 Gy has been collated to determine whether any consistent patterns of health effects emerge. The surveys are considered in three groups: childhood malignancies, Down's syndrome and indicators of reproductive damage. Although a pattern is observed for Down's syndrome, no reliable associations are apparent for childhood malignancies (where all surveys pre-date the Gardner survey at Sellafield) or indications of reproductive damage. The twelve surveys of Down's syndrome in relation to maternal pre-conception irradiation received for medical reasons show a pattern consistent with a doubling dose of about 20 mGy. This doubling dose value is, however, not based on individual measurements of ovarian dose and is inconsistent with results from high-level dose surveys. There is no association between paternal irradiation and Down's syndrome. (author)

  14. Over-expression of CXCR4, a stemness enhancer, in human blastocysts by low level laser irradiation

    Mohammad Hossein Tahmasbi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The key role of chemokine receptor CXCR4 in the maintenance of stemness property of stem cells has been shown recently. The low level laser irradiation (LLLI is being used currently in a wide variety of clinical cases as a therapeutic tool for wound healing, relieving pain and destroying tumor cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of LLLI mimicking low level laser therapy (LLLT on the expression level of CXCR4 gene a few hours after irradiation on human blastocysts. After the development of human embryos to the first grade blastocyst stage, they were irradiated with a low power Ga-Al-As laser at a continuous wavelength of 650 nm and a power output of 30 mW. The total RNA of the irradiated blastocysts and control groups were isolated in groups of 1x2 J/cm2, 2x2 J/cm2, 1x4 J/cm2 and 2x4 J/cm2 LLLI. Specific Real-Time PCR primers were designed to amplify all the two CXCR4 isoforms yet identified. RNA amplifications were done for all the groups. We showed for the first time that LLLI makes the human blastocysts to increase the expression level of CXCR4 a few hours after irradiation. Moreover, it was shown that two irradiation doses with one day interval can cause a significant increase in CXCR4 expression level in human blastocysts. This study revealed that LLLI could be a proliferation motivator for embryonic cell divisions through enhanced over-expression of CXCR4 level.

  15. Fractionated irradiation and haematopoiesis. Pt. 3

    Ninkov, V.; Karanovic, D.; Savovski, K.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of total single fractionated irradiation with short time interval on heamatopoietic regeneration of the bone marrow and spleen was investigated. Also, the importance of first dose, when dose of 600 R was divided in two unequal fractions with time interval of 300 s was studied. The investigation was performed on 25 day old rats. The dose of 600 R (X-rays) was divided on: 500 + 100, 400 + 200, 300 + 300, 200 + 400 or 100 + 500 R with time interval of 150, 300 or 600 s. Ten days after irradiation the changes in blood, bone marrow and spleen were observed. After unequal fractionated dose with interval of 600 s slight effect was found. The results after intervals of 600 s and 300 s were significant, when the total dose was divided in two equal doses. The first dose has no promoting role in haematopoietic regeneration when total dose was unequally fractionated. (orig.) [de

  16. Low-level laser irradiation promotes the proliferation and maturation of keratinocytes during epithelial wound repair

    Sperandio, Felipe F.; Simões, Alyne; Corrêa, Luciana; Aranha, Ana Cecília C.; Giudice, Fernanda S.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Sousa, Suzana C.O.M.

    2015-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been extensively employed to improve epithelial wound healing, though the exact response of epithelium maturation and stratification after LLLT is unknown. Thus, this study aimed to assess the in vitro growth and differentiation of keratinocytes (KCs) and in vivo wound healing response when treated with LLLT. Human KCs (HaCaT cells) showed an enhanced proliferation with all the employed laser energy densities (3, 6 and 12 J/cm2, 660nm, 100mW), together with an increased expression of Cyclin D1. Moreover, the immunoexpression of proteins related to epithelial proliferation and maturation (p63, CK10, CK14) all indicated a faster maturation of the migrating KCs in the LLLT-treated wounds. In that way, an improved epithelial healing was promoted by LLLT with the employed parameters; this improvement was confirmed by changes in the expression of several proteins related to epithelial proliferation and maturation. PMID:25411997

  17. Fractionated irradiation and haematopiesis. Pt. 2

    Ninkov, V.; Piletic, O.; Karanovic, D.; Belgrade Univ.

    1980-01-01

    Haemoregeneration after the irradiation with 600 R was studied using two different fractions given before and after the transplantation of bone-marrow cells. The dose of 600 R was divided in two uneven fractions: 500 + 100 R, 400 + 200 R and 300 + 300 R. During the free interval between the two doses (5 min) transplantation of bone-marrow cells was performed. Recolonization of bone-marrow and spleen was analysed on the 10th day after treatment. For analysis, samples of blood, bone-marrow and spleen were used. Maximal effect was found in the experimental group of animals irradiated with 500 R before and with 100 R after marrow-cell transplantation. Minimal haematopoietic response was in the group irradiated with 300 R before and after transplantation. This points at the importance of the primary dose for acceptance of the transplants and their activation. (orig.) [de

  18. Caffeine enhanced measurement of mutagenesis by low levels of [gamma]-irradiation in human lymphocytes

    Puck, T.P.; Johnson, R.; Waldren, C.A. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute for Cancer Research, Denver, CO (United States)); Morse, H. (Univ. of Colorado Cancer Center, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-09-01

    The well-known action of caffeine in synergizing mutagenesis (including chromosome aberrations) of agents like ionizing radiation by inhibition of cellular repair processes has been incorporated into a rapid procedure for detection of mutagenicity with high sensitivity. Effects of 5-10 rads of [gamma]-irradiation, which approximate the human lifetime dose accumulation from background radiation, can be detected in a two-day procedure using an immortalized human WBC culture. Chromosomally visible lesions are scored on cells incubated for 2 h after irradiation in the presence and absence of 1.0 mg/ml of caffeine. An eightfold amplification of scorable lesions is achieved over the action of radiation alone. This approach provides a closer approximation to absolute mutagenicity unmitigated by repair processes, which can vary in different situations. It is proposed that mutagenesis testing of this kind, using caffiene or other repair-inhibitory agents, be employed to identify mutagens in their effective concentrations to which human populations may be exposed; to detect agents such as caffeine that may synergize mutagenic actions and pose epidemiologic threats; and to discover effective anti-mutagens. Information derived from the use of such procedures may help prevent cancer and newly acquired genetic disease.

  19. Photobiostimulation on chondrocytes proliferation in different concentration of fetal bovine serum under low-level laser irradiation

    Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; Qiu, Caimin; Chen, Jianlin; Yang, Hongqin; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on the chondrocytes proliferation cultured in different concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS) using 658 nm, 785 nm and 830 nm diode lasers. The role of energy density (10-70 mJ·cm-2) on chondrocytes proliferation following irradiation with 658 nm laser for 2 days was firstly investigated to find out the best laser energy density. Then the effect of LLLI on the proliferation of chondrocytes cultured with fetal bovine serum at 0%, 2%, 5% and 10% was also evaluated. The results showed that there was no or little photobiostimulation on the proliferation of chondrocytes cultured with 0% FBS and 10% FBS; the cell proliferation at 2% and 5% FBS was significantly modulated by LLLI.

  20. Aquaporin-1-Mediated Effects of Low Level He-Ne Laser Irradiation on Human Erythrocytes

    Gang-Yue Luo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of membrane aquaporin-1 (APQ-1 in the photobiomodulation (PBM on erythrocyte deformability will be studied in this paper with human dehydrated erythrocytes as echinocytic shape alterations lead to decreased cellular deformability. Human dehydrated erythrocytes were irradiated with low intensity He-Ne laser irradiation (LHNL at 0.9, 1.8, 2.7, and 4.4 mW/cm2 for 5, 15, and 30 min, respectively, and APQ-1 inhibitor, 0.2 μmol/L HgCl2, was used to study the role of APQ-1 in mediating PBM with LHNL at 4.4 mW/cm2 for 5 min. Comprehensive morphological parameters of an intact cell such as contact area, perimeter, roundness and erythrocyte elongation index (EEI were measured to characterize erythrocyte deformability with fast micro multi-channel spectrophotometer. It was observed that the dosage of LHNL improvement of the morphological parameters of dehydrated erythrocytes was morphological-parameter-dependent, but the Bunsen-Roscoe rule did not hold for roundness. The LHNL at 4.4 mW/cm2 for 5 min significantly improved the contact area (P<0.05 and EEI (P<0.05 of the dehydrated erythrocytes, but the improvement was significantly inhibited by 0.2 μmol/L HgCl2 (P<0.05. It was concluded that AQP-1 might mediate the effects of LHNL on erythrocyte deformability, which supports the membranotropic mechanism of PBM.

  1. INHIBITION OF AFLATOXIN PRODUTION BY ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS USING LOW LEVEL Y - IRRADIATION

    F

    1981-05-01

    Full Text Available Effects o f s e l ected l ow l evel doses of y - Rad iation (100-400 K rad on t he abi l ity o f toxin strain o f Asperg i l l us flavus t o survive and pr oduce a f latox in in c ul t ure med ium and p is tachio nuts hav e been s tudied . A reduction of 60 per c e nt in growth and spore production by Asperg i l l us flavus in c u l ture me di um was observed after treatment wi th 100 K rad of y - Radiation ."nIn spore inoculated pistachio nuts , 100 K rad o f y Radi a tion reduced the a f la toxin B l and G l nroduction by 75% aft er e i ght week s s t orage per iod . The afla toxin prod~ ction ability by Aspergillus f lavus on pistachio nuts was affectively eliminated by t he treatment o f spore inoculated pist achio nuts wi th 200 K rad of y-Radiation , although very l itt le growth coul d be detected after eight weeks ' storage of 40 0 K rad y-irradiated pistachio nuts.  

  2. The Relevance of Chromosome Aberration Yields for Biological Dosimetry After Low-Level Occupational Irradiation

    Bauchinger, M.; Schmid, E.; Hug, O. [Gesellschaft fuer Strahlenforschung, Institut fuer Biologie, Neuherberg, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany); Strahlenbiologisches Institut der Universitaet Muenchen, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1971-06-15

    The usefulness of chromosome analysis for biological dosimetry has been tested in two groups of persons occupationally exposed to radiation: (I) in nurses employed in gynaecological radiology, exposed especially when handling radium inserts; and (II) in nuclear industry workers, all of which were exposed to external gamma irradiation and some of them also to internal radiation after incorporation of various radionuclides. The total dose registered with personal dosimeters ranged in Group 1 from 0.1 to 91.1 rem accumulated over working periods of 0.1 to 13 years, and in Group II from 1.0 to 18.2 rem accumulated over 1 to 9 years. Compared with unexposed controls, both groups exhibit a significant increase of cells with chromosome aberrations as well as larger numbers of breaks per cell. Dicentrics and rings could be observed in some cells, providing good evidence for previous radiation exposure, since these types of aberrations are extremely rare events in unexposed individuals. No correlation between the aberration yields and the film badge values could be demonstrated in Group II. Also, in Group I the fluctuations from individual to individual are rather high. Nevertheless, a positive correlation to the ''dose'' was obtained. Even a sub-group of the nurses that had only been exposed to 20 rem showed significantly more aberrations than control persons. From the results obtained, type and frequency of chromosome aberrations may be considered an indicator of radiation exposure even at the low doses. The reasons for lack of correspondence of chromosome aberration yields and the results of personal monitoring procedures are discussed in detail. (author)

  3. Hypericin photocytotoxicyty followed after fractionated light irradiation

    Sackova, V.; Kulikova, L.; Mikes, J.; Kleban, J.; Fedorocko, P.

    2006-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the in vitro effect of hypericin-mediated photodynamic therapy with fractionated light delivery. Cells were photosensitized with unequal light fractions separated by dark intervals (1 h, 6 h). The changes in survival, apoptosis and cell cycle were compared on HT-29 cells irradiated with a single light dose (12 J/cm 2 ) to the fractionated light delivery (1+11 J/cm 2 ) 24 h and 48 h after photodynamic treatment. It was found that a fractionated light regime with a longer dark period resulted in a decrease of hypericin photo-cytotoxicity. Cell survival was higher after light sensitization with a 6 h dark interval. DNA fragmentation occurred after a single light dose application, but in contrast no apoptotic DNA formation was detected with a 6 h dark pause. After fractionation the percentage of cells in G 1 phase of the cell cycle was increased, while the proportion of cells in the G 2 phase decreased as compared to a single light dose application i. e. both percentage of cells in G 1 and G 2 phase of cell cycle were near control levels. We presume that the longer dark interval after the irradiation of cells by first light dose makes them to resistant to the effect of the second illumination. These findings confirm that the light application scheme together with other photodynamic protocol components is crucial for the photo-cytotoxicity of hypericin. (authors)

  4. Effects of carbogen plus fractionated irradiation on KHT tumor oxygenation

    Fenton, Bruce M.

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: Numerous studies have demonstrated improvements in the oxygenation of tumor cells following both irradiation and carbogen breathing. The current studies were initiated to measure the combined effects of carbogen inhalation plus single and multi-dose irradiation on tumor oxygen availability, to better define the underlying physiological relationships. Materials and methods: Using KHT murine sarcomas, radiation was delivered to the tumor-bearing legs of non-anesthetized mice. Tumors were quick-frozen prior to or following single or multifraction irradiation and carbogen breathing, and intravascular HbO 2 saturation profiles were determined cryospectrophotometrically. Results: HbO 2 levels for blood vessels located near the tumor surface initially decreased following 10 Gy irradiation, then increased and remained elevated. Interior HbO 2 levels remained unchanged. Following 2.5 Gy, HbO 2 changes were minimal. At 24 h following 10 Gy, HbO 2 levels were significantly increased compared to non-irradiated controls, and carbogen breathing produced no additional benefit. At 24 h following five fractions of 2 Gy, HbO 2 levels throughout the tumor volume were significantly higher in carbogen breathing animals than in air breathing controls. Conclusions: Although peripheral blood vessels demonstrated substantial improvements in oxygenation following irradiation, oxygen availability nearer the tumor center remained at very low levels. The utility of carbogen in enhancing tumor oxygen availability was maintained following five clinically relevant fractions. At higher doses, radiation-induced enhancements in HbO 2 levels overshadowed the carbogen effect. For either air or carbogen breathing, a decrease in the percentage of vessels with very low oxygen content did not appear to be a major factor in the reoxygenation of the KHT tumor

  5. Low-level APC mutational mosaicism is the underlying cause in a substantial fraction of unexplained colorectal adenomatous polyposis cases.

    Spier, Isabel; Drichel, Dmitriy; Kerick, Martin; Kirfel, Jutta; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Laner, Andreas; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Peters, Sophia; Adam, Ronja; Zhao, Bixiao; Becker, Tim; Lifton, Richard P; Perner, Sven; Hoffmann, Per; Kristiansen, Glen; Timmermann, Bernd; Nöthen, Markus M; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Schweiger, Michal R; Aretz, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    In 30-50% of patients with colorectal adenomatous polyposis, no germline mutation in the known genes APC, causing familial adenomatous polyposis, MUTYH, causing MUTYH-associated polyposis, or POLE or POLD1, causing polymerase-proofreading-associated polyposis can be identified, although a hereditary aetiology is likely. This study aimed to explore the impact of APC mutational mosaicism in unexplained polyposis. To comprehensively screen for somatic low-level APC mosaicism, high-coverage next-generation sequencing of the APC gene was performed using DNA from leucocytes and a total of 53 colorectal tumours from 20 unrelated patients with unexplained sporadic adenomatous polyposis. APC mosaicism was assumed if the same loss-of-function APC mutation was present in ≥ 2 anatomically separated colorectal adenomas/carcinomas per patient. All mutations were validated using diverse methods. In 25% (5/20) of patients, somatic mosaicism of a pathogenic APC mutation was identified as underlying cause of the disease. In 2/5 cases, the mosaic level in leucocyte DNA was slightly below the sensitivity threshold of Sanger sequencing; while in 3/5 cases, the allelic fraction was either very low (0.1-1%) or no mutations were detectable. The majority of mosaic mutations were located outside the somatic mutation cluster region of the gene. The present data indicate a high prevalence of pathogenic mosaic APC mutations below the detection thresholds of routine diagnostics in adenomatous polyposis, even if high-coverage sequencing of leucocyte DNA alone is taken into account. This has important implications for both routine work-up and strategies to identify new causative genes in this patient group. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Acute skin reaction after fractionated irradiation

    Kozubek, S.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental data on acute mouse and pig skin reaction after fractionated γ or X irradiation have been analysed in terms of a new cell tissue kinetic model. The exponential-quadratic and generalized Huggett formulae have been used for cell lethality description. Fairly better results could be demonstrated with generalized Huggett formula. The speed of repopulation has been determined for fractionated regimes as well as for some irregular schedules. The repopulation is slower in the case of fractionated treatment. On considering the normal cell loss factor in the tissue, minimum cell cycle time has been calculated. Its value differs for various strains (Tsub(d)=28.8 hours for SAS/TO mice and Tsub(d) < or approximately 17 hours for WHT/Ht mice) and does not differ for plucked skin. The repopulation has been shown to follow exponential dependence after some latent period. Other factors influencing the effectiveness of radiation treatment (the length of the latent period or the changes of the survival curve during fractionated irradiation) have been considered, too

  7. Hippocampal development in the rat: cytogenesis and morphogenesis examined with autoradiography and low-level x-irradiation

    Bayer, S.A.; Altman, J.

    1974-01-01

    The cytogenesis and morphogenesis of the rat hippocampus was examined with the techniques of 3 H-thymidine autoradiography, cell pyknosis produced by low-level x-irradiation, and quantitative histology. The procedure of progressively delayed cumulative labelling was used for autoradiography. Groups of rats were injected with four successive daily doses of 3 H-thymidine during non-overlapping periods ranging from birth to day 19. They were killed at 60 days of age, and the percentage of labelled cells was determined. Cell pyknosis in Ammon's horn reaches a maximal level prenatally and declines rapidly during the early postnatal period. Cell pyknosis in the dentate gyrus reaches its highest level during the second postnatal week and declines gradually with some radiosensitive cells still present in the adult. Immature granule cells are also at their highest level during the second postnatal week, while mature granule cells gradually accumulate to attain asymptotic levels at around two months of age. The alignment of the pyramidal cells to form the characteristic curvature of Ammon's horn occurs shortly after pyramidal cell cytogenesis is completed. Mechanisms for the morphological development of the dentate gyrus along with a consideration of the possible migratory route of granule cell precursors are discussed. (U.S.)

  8. Ultrastructure and Light Microscope Analysis of Intact Skin after a Varying Number of Low Level Laser Irradiations in Mice

    Mamie Mizusaki Iyomasa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low level laser therapy (LLLT has been used to relieve pain, inflammation, and wound healing processes. Thus, the skin is overexposed to laser and this effect is not completely understood. This study analyzed the effects of the number of laser applications (three, six, and 10 on the intact skin of the masseteric region in mice of strain HRS/J. The animals (n=30 were equally divided into control (0 J/cm2 and irradiated (20 J/cm2, and each of these groups was further equally divided according to the number of laser applications (three, six, and 10 and underwent LLLT on alternate days. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The animals receiving applications exhibited open channels more dilated between the keratinocytes and photobiomodulation effect on endothelial cells and fibroblasts by TEM. Under the light microscope after 10 laser applications, the type I collagen decreased (P<0.05 compared to the three and six applications. Under these experimental conditions, all numbers of applications provided photobiomodulatory effect on the epidermis and dermis, without damage. More studies are needed to standardize the energy density and number of applications recommended for laser therapy to have a better cost-benefit ratio associated with treatment.

  9. Effects of low-level laser irradiation on the pathogenicity of Candida albicans: in vitro and in vivo study.

    Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Hashemi, Seyed Jamal; Rezaie, Sasan; Fateh, Mohsen; Djavid, Gholamreza Esmaeeli; Zibafar, Ensieh; Morsali, Farhad; Zand, Nasrin; Alinaghizadeh, Mohammadreza; Ataie-Fashtami, Leila

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on the in vitro growth characteristics and in vivo pathogenicity of Candida albicans in a murine model in the absence of a photosensitizer. C. albicans is an opportunistic commensal organism that causes a wide variety of diseases in human beings, ranging from superficial infections to life-threatening invasive candidiasis. The incidence of C. albicans infection is increasing, because of the greater frequency of acquired immunodeficiency conditions. A high recurrence rate has been reported for vulvovaginal and oral candidiasis, despite the best available treatments. Therefore, the search for new treatment modalities seems quite rational. Candida culture plates were exposed to common clinical energies of LLLI: 3, 5, 10, and 20 J at 685 nm (BTL Laser 5000, Medicinos Projektai, Czech Republic, Prague, max power output 50 mW) and 3, 5, 10, 30, and 50 J at 830 nm (BTL Laser 5000, Medicinos Projektai, Czech Republic, Prague, max power output 400 mW). Following LLLI with energies >10 J at both 685 and 830 nm wavelengths, statistically significant effects were observed in vitro on the turbidimetric growth kinetics of C. albicans and in vivo on the survival rate of infected mice (p value ≤ 0.05). Therefore, this energy could be considered a threshold for clinical investigation. Translating our data into the clinical setting, it can be proposed that a direct laser-based approach without using a photosensitizing dye can significantly reduce the pathogenicity of Candida albicans. It can also be concluded that laser light at specific wavelengths could be a possible promising novel treatment for superficial and mucocutaneous C. albicans infections.

  10. Fractionated proton beam irradiation of pituitary adenomas

    Ronson, Brian B.; Schulte, Reinhard W.; Han, Khanh P.; Loredo, Lilia N.; Slater, James M.; Slater, Jerry D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Various radiation techniques and modalities have been used to treat pituitary adenomas. This report details our experience with proton treatment of these tumors. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with pituitary adenomas treated with protons, who had at least 6 months of follow-up, were included in this analysis. Forty-two patients underwent a prior surgical resection; 5 were treated with primary radiation. Approximately half the tumors were functional. The median dose was 54 cobalt-gray equivalent. Results: Tumor stabilization occurred in all 41 patients available for follow-up imaging; 10 patients had no residual tumor, and 3 had greater than 50% reduction in tumor size. Seventeen patients with functional adenomas had normalized or decreased hormone levels; progression occurred in 3 patients. Six patients have died; 2 deaths were attributed to functional progression. Complications included temporal lobe necrosis in 1 patient, new significant visual deficits in 3 patients, and incident hypopituitarism in 11 patients. Conclusion: Fractionated conformal proton-beam irradiation achieved effective radiologic, endocrinological, and symptomatic control of pituitary adenomas. Significant morbidity was uncommon, with the exception of postradiation hypopituitarism, which we attribute in part to concomitant risk factors for hypopituitarism present in our patient population

  11. Radioprotective effect of exogenic hypoxia in fractionated irradiation

    Kazymbetov, P.; Yarmonenko, S.P.; Vajnson, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    During the experiments with mice it is established, that exogenic hypoxia protective effect (8%O 2 ), evaluated according to survival rate, decreases at the change from single to fractionated irradiation. Dose change factor (DCF) is equal to 1.55 and 1.22-1.31, respectively. Skin protection using exogenic hypoxia at the local fractionated irradiation is expressed more, than at the fractionated one. DCF is equal to 1.56 and 1.28, respectively. Exogenic hypoxia protection effect in the tumor is expressed rather weakly. DCF at single and fractionated irradiation constitutes 1.03 and 1.07-1.13, respectively. Due to skin preferential protection the therapeutic gain factor at irradiation under the exogenic hypoxia conditions constitutes 1.24 and 1.38-1.46, respectively, at single and fractionated irradiation

  12. Prolongation of experimental islet transplant survival by fractionated splenic irradiation

    Kolb, E.; Casanova, M.; Largiader, F.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments designed to delay the rejection of intrasplenic pancreatic fragment allotransplants in dogs showed increased transplant survival times from 3.1 days (controls) to 5.5 days with fractionated splenic irradiation and to 7.5 days with combined local irradiation and immunosuppressive chemotherapy. Drug treatment alone had no beneficial effect

  13. Effect of low-level laser irradiation on osteoblast-like cells cultured on porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds

    Serena Incerti Parenti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of laser irradiation at a low dose on human osteoblastlike cells. Materials and methods: 32 porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds currently used for bone tissue engineering were seeded with MG63 cells and irradiated or not with a GaAlAs diode laser (wavelength 915 nm, dose 2 J/cm² using different power density and exposure duration. RESULTS: After 72-h incubation, cells showed well spread morphology and good adhesion on both laser-treated and untreated scaffolds. Laser irradiation did not interfere in cell viability and proliferation as compared with the non-irradiated controls. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that there is no effect of 915 nm laser irradiation at a dose of 2 J/cm² on the proliferation rate of MG63 cells. Future investigations are needed to compare different dose and wavelength regimens in order to determine the optimal set of laser parameters for maximum cell yield and safe clinical application.

  14. Preconditioning With Low-Level Laser Irradiation Enhances the Therapeutic Potential of Human Adipose-derived Stem Cells in a Mouse Model of Photoaged Skin.

    Liao, Xuan; Li, Sheng-Hong; Xie, Guang-Hui; Xie, Shan; Xiao, Li-Ling; Song, Jian-Xing; Liu, Hong-Wei

    2018-02-19

    This study was conducted to explore the therapeutic potential of human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) irradiated with a low-level laser (LLL). Cultured ADSCs were treated with 650-nm GaAlAs laser irradiation at 2, 4 and 8 J cm -2 . Cell proliferation was quantified by MTT assays, cytokine secretion was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and adipogenic differentiation was examined by oil red O staining. Additionally, the expression profiles of putative ADSC surface markers were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. In addition, a mouse photoaged skin model was established by UVB irradiation. Effects of GaAlAs laser-treated ADSCs on the thicknesses of the epidermis and dermis were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The results showed that GaAlAs laser treatment of cells at a radiant exposure of 4 J cm -2 enhanced ADSC proliferation and adipogenic differentiation and increased secretion of growth factors. Furthermore, GaAlAs laser irradiation upregulated the expression of putative ADSC surface markers. In the mouse model of photoaged skin, ADSCs treated with GaAlAs laser irradiation had markedly decreased the epidermal thickness and increased the dermal thickness of photoaged mouse skin. Our data indicate that LLL irradiation is an effective biostimulator of ADSCs and might enhance the therapeutic potential of ADSCs for clinical use. © 2018 The American Society of Photobiology.

  15. Low levels of glutathione are sufficient for survival of keratinocytes after UV irradiation and for healing of mouse skin wounds.

    Telorack, Michèle; Abplanalp, Jeannette; Werner, Sabine

    2016-08-01

    Reduced levels of the cellular antioxidant glutathione are associated with premature skin aging, cancer and impaired wound healing, but the in vivo functions of glutathione in the skin remain largely unknown. Therefore, we analyzed mice lacking the modifier subunit of the glutamate cysteine ligase (Gclm), the enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glutathione biosynthesis. Glutathione levels in the skin of these mice were reduced by 70 %. However, neither skin development and homeostasis, nor UVA- or UVB-induced apoptosis in the epidermis were affected. Histomorphometric analysis of excisional wounds did not reveal wound healing abnormalities in young Gclm-deficient mice, while the area of hyperproliferative epithelium as well as keratinocyte proliferation were affected in aged mice. These findings suggest that low levels of glutathione are sufficient for wound repair in young mice, but become rate-limiting upon aging.

  16. A follow-up study on radiation effect of low-level γ-irradiation on 45 persons

    Xu Xiufeng; Wang Yongxiao; Fang Yongxin

    1985-01-01

    Forty-five males once exposed to γ-irradiation were observed clinically and by biological method from 1966 to 1981. The doses ranged form 0.10 to 0.468 Gy. Neurasthenic syndromes were observed in all cases. Thirty cases of lens opacities were observed by slit lamp microscopy. There were one case of spontaneous abortion, one neonatal death, one strabismus and one mental retardation among 37 children born to the irradiated subjects. There was one case whose wife failed to conceive since she married for 4 years. Analysis of chromosome aberrations and scoring of micro-nuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes were statistically higher (P < 0.01) than that of controls, but withot linear relationships between doses and effects. The levels of serum immunoglobulin and serum follicular stimulating hormone were within normal limits. No cancer, or leukemia were detected by clinical examinations

  17. The Lack of Cytotoxic Effect and Radioadaptive Response in Splenocytes of Mice Exposed to Low Level Internal β-Particle Irradiation through Tritiated Drinking Water in Vivo

    Matthew Flegal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Health effects of tritium, a β-emitter and a by-product of the nuclear industry, is a subject of significant controversy. This mouse in vivo study was undertaken to monitor biological effects of low level tritium exposure. Mice were exposed to tritiated drinking water (HTO at 10 KBq/L, 1 MBq/L and 20 MBq/L concentrations for one month. The treatment did not result in a significant increase of apoptosis in splenocytes. To examine if this low level tritium exposure alters radiosensitivity, the extracted splenocytes were challenged in vitro with 2 Gy γ-radiation, and apoptotic responses at 1 and 24 h were measured. No alterations in the radiosensitivity were detected in cells from mice exposed to tritium compared to sham-treated mice. In contrast, low dose γ-irradiation at 20 or 100 mGy, resulted in a significant increase in resistance to apoptotic cell death after 2 Gy irradiation; an indication of the radioadaptive response. Overall, our data suggest that low concentrations of tritium given to mice as HTO in drinking water do not exert cytotoxic effect in splenocytes, nor do they change cellular sensitivity to additional high dose γ-radiation. The latter may be considered as the lack of a radioadaptive response, typically observed after low dose γ-irradiation.

  18. Serial histopathological changes in irradiated guinea pig lung receiving conventional fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation

    Itoh, Satoshi; Inomata, Taisuke; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Shoji; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Ohtsuki, Yuji

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine serial histopathological differences in guinea pig lungs receiving the same total dose as clinically used between conventional fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation. The guinea pigs received 80 Gy in 40 daily fractions of 2 Gy each (conventional fractionation), 80 Gy in 80 fractions of 1 Gy each twice a day (hyperfractionation), 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions of 3 Gy each (conventional fractionation), or 81 Gy in 54 fractions of 1.5 Gy each twice a day (hyperfractionation). We evaluated the histopathological changes of irradiated guinea pig lungs at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after irradiation. The guinea pig lungs that received 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions showed histopathological changes of inflammation including formation of lymph follicles after 6 months. The lungs which received 81 Gy in 54 fractions showed similar but slightly less pronounced changes than those that received 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions. The guinea pig lungs of other groups showed no histopathological changes during the observation period. In hyperfractionated irradiation the damage to the guinea pig lung is quantitatively less than that occurring as a result of conventional fractionated irradiation of the same total dose. (author)

  19. Serial histopathological changes in irradiated guinea pig lung receiving conventional fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation

    Itoh, Satoshi; Inomata, Taisuke; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Shoji; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Ohtsuki, Yuji [Kochi Medical School, Nankoku (Japan)

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine serial histopathological differences in guinea pig lungs receiving the same total dose as clinically used between conventional fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation. The guinea pigs received 80 Gy in 40 daily fractions of 2 Gy each (conventional fractionation), 80 Gy in 80 fractions of 1 Gy each twice a day (hyperfractionation), 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions of 3 Gy each (conventional fractionation), or 81 Gy in 54 fractions of 1.5 Gy each twice a day (hyperfractionation). We evaluated the histopathological changes of irradiated guinea pig lungs at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after irradiation. The guinea pig lungs that received 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions showed histopathological changes of inflammation including formation of lymph follicles after 6 months. The lungs which received 81 Gy in 54 fractions showed similar but slightly less pronounced changes than those that received 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions. The guinea pig lungs of other groups showed no histopathological changes during the observation period. In hyperfractionated irradiation the damage to the guinea pig lung is quantitatively less than that occurring as a result of conventional fractionated irradiation of the same total dose. (author)

  20. The effect of low-level laser irradiation (In-Ga-Al-AsP - 660 nm) on melanoma in vitro and in vivo

    Frigo, Lúcio; Luppi, Juliana SS; Favero, Giovani M; Maria, Durnavei A; Penna, Sócrates C; Bjordal, Jan M; Bensadoun, Rene J; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo AB

    2009-01-01

    It has been speculated that the biostimulatory effect of Low Level Laser Therapy could cause undesirable enhancement of tumor growth in neoplastic diseases. The aim of the present study is to analyze the behavior of melanoma cells (B16F10) in vitro and the in vivo development of melanoma in mice after laser irradiation. We performed a controlled in vitro study on B16F10 melanoma cells to investigate cell viability and cell cycle changes by the Tripan Blue, MTT and cell quest histogram tests at 24, 48 and 72 h post irradiation. The in vivo mouse model (male Balb C, n = 21) of melanoma was used to analyze tumor volume and histological characteristics. Laser irradiation was performed three times (once a day for three consecutive days) with a 660 nm 50 mW CW laser, beam spot size 2 mm 2 , irradiance 2.5 W/cm 2 and irradiation times of 60s (dose 150 J/cm 2 ) and 420s (dose 1050 J/cm 2 ) respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the in vitro groups, except for an increase in the hypodiploid melanoma cells (8.48 ± 1.40% and 4.26 ± 0.60%) at 72 h post-irradiation. This cancer-protective effect was not reproduced in the in vivo experiment where outcome measures for the 150 J/cm 2 dose group were not significantly different from controls. For the 1050 J/cm 2 dose group, there were significant increases in tumor volume, blood vessels and cell abnormalities compared to the other groups. LLLT Irradiation should be avoided over melanomas as the combination of high irradiance (2.5 W/cm 2 ) and high dose (1050 J/cm 2 ) significantly increases melanoma tumor growth in vivo

  1. Thyroid tumours following fractionated irradiation in childhood

    Vathaire, F. de; Grimaud, E.; Diallo, I.; Shamsaldin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Results of a cohort study designed to evaluate the long term risk of thyroid tumours after fractioned high doses of external beam radiotherapy received by the thyroid are reported. In this cohort study, doses have been estimated for each child. (author)

  2. Effects of low-level prenatal γ-ray irradiation on postnatal growth and behavior in mice

    Wang Bing; Zhou Xiangyan

    1994-01-01

    Pregnant adult C57BL/6J mice were randomly allotted to six experimental groups. Doses of 0, 0.106, 0.156, 0.312, 0.518 or 0.656 Gy from 60 Co γ-rays were delivered respectively on the 12.5th day of gestation by single radiation except for group 1 (used as control). Pups were observed for the growth (body weight, BW), the age of acquisition of three reflexes (surface righting, SR, negative geotaxis, NG and grasp reflex, GR), the appearance of three physiologic markers (eye opening, EO, pinna detachment, PD and incisor eruption, IE) and the sensuous functions (visual placing, VP and mother-taxis, MT). And by using these parameters 0.156 to 0.312 Gy irradiation may represent a threshold range for exposure on the 12.5th day of gestation to a single γ-radiation

  3. Effects of low level prenatal beta-irradiation of tritiated water on postnatal behavior, learning and memory ability in mice

    Wang Bing; Zhou Xiangyan

    1993-01-01

    Pregnant adult C57 BL/6J strain mice, randomly assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups, were irradiated with exponentially decreasing doses of tritium beta-rays but group 1 (used as a control) by single injection of tritiated water (HTO) at their 12.5 th day of gestation. Offsprings of male, received accumulative doses of 0, 0.5, 1.10 or 0.30 Gy in uterus were trained or examined on learning and memory ability or with behavioral tests. Significant dose-response relationships for alternations in those test were found due to exposure to 0.10 Gy or above. These results indicate that exposure to HTO during the fetal period in mice results in dose-dependent alteration in postnatal behavior, learning and memory ability. 0.05-0.10 Gy exposure may represent a threshold for the experimental conditions of this research using these parameters

  4. Epidemiological surveys on the effects of low-level radiation dose: a comparative assessment. Vol. A: pre-conception irradiation effects. Vol. E (DRAFT A): group collation tables

    Rose, K.S.B.

    1988-01-01

    In this report, the health effects of low-level doses of radiation are considered by reference to published epidemiological surveys. The work was carried out with three objectives in mind: 1. to provide a comprehensive and critical review of the subject; 2. to seek consistent indications of particular health effects by collating results and comparing with those from surveys at moderate-level doses; 3. to provide an authoritative view on the epidemiology of low-level radiation-induced health effects. Vol E (DRAFT A) is appended and contains group collation tables. Epidemiological surveys can be conveniently divided into four classes (A, B, C, D) according to the phase of life when irradiation occurs or the effect is diagnosed. The first of the classes (A) is addressed here; this class is concerned with possible effects arising from radiation received by a parent before conception. Possible effects of preconception irradiation were identified under four broad groupings. These are Down's syndrome, ''Indicators of Reproductive Damage'' (mainly Primary Sterility, Congenital Abnormalities, Sex Ratio, Fetal Mortality, Infant Mortality), Childhood Malignancies, and Chromosomal Changes in Abortuses. Information about each survey, and comparisons with results from moderate-level dose surveys, are contained in synopses that are set out in the Appendix.

  5. Studies concerning the effects of low level prenatal X-irradiation on postnatal growth and adult behaviour in the Wistar rat

    Jensh, R.P.; Brent, R.L.; Vogel, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    Fifty-nine pregnant Wistar strain rats were sham irradiated or given a 0.1 or 0.2 Gy exposure of X-radiation on the 9th or 17th day of gestation. Twenty-seven were killed at term for teratologic analysis. The remaining mothers raised their young. At 60 days of age the 252 offspring were randomly assigned three of six tests: open field, swimming, hanging, activity wheel, water T-maze, or conditioned avoidance response. Male offspring exposed at the 0.2 Gy level exhibited retarded growth only during the first few weeks of postnatal life. Female offspring exposed on the 17th day to 0.2 Gy X-radiation were growth retarded throughout the test period. Postnatal growth rates were not significantly different between the irradiated and control groups. There were no significant alterations in adult behaviour due to prenatal X-irradiation. There were sex differences in activity wheel and forelimb hanging performance, unrelated to radiation exposure. These results indicate that prenatal low level X-irradiation on the 9th or 17th day of gestation dose not result in significant alterations in rat adult behavioural performance but prenatal growth retardation persists postnatally. Growth may be a more sensitive indicator of the effects of prenatal exposure than postnatal behaviour. (author)

  6. Acute skin reactions observed in fractionated proton irradiation

    Arimoto, Takuro; Maruhashi, Noboru; Takada, Yoshihisa; Hayakawa, Yoshinori; Inada, Tetsuo; Kitagawa, Toshio

    1989-01-01

    Between May 1985 and July 1987, 49 skin reactions of 43 patients treated by proton irradiation were observed at the Particle Radiation Medical Science Center (PARMS), the University of Tsukuba. Taking the peak skin score as an endpoint, the radiobiological effects [relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and time-dose relationship] of the proton beam in multi-fractionated treatments were estimated. Factors influencing the skin dose, such as the prescribed tumor dose, tumor site, and number of applied fields, were also analyzed. The following conclusions regarding acute skin reactions to the clinical use of proton irradiation were obtained: 1) the physical skin-sparing effect of proton irradiation in single-field irradiation, especially in superficial regions, is not large compared with that of high-energy photon irradiation; 2) multidirectional proton irradiation significantly reduced the skin dose and severity of acute reasons; 3) the radiobiological effects of the proton beam, RBE and the time factor, estimated in human skin in multi-fractional treatment were slightly smaller than those of X-rays, i.e., 0.92 and -0.25±0.09, respectively. (author)

  7. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    Ando, K; Chen, Y J; Ohira, C; Nojima, K; Ando, S; Kobayashi, N; Ohbuchi, T; Shimizu, W [Space and Particle Radiation Science Research Group, Chiba (Japan); Koike, S; Kanai, T [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Accelerator Physics

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/{mu}m also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/{mu}m in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/{mu}m were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/{mu} steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  8. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    Ando, K.; Chen, Y.J.; Ohira, C.; Nojima, K.; Ando, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Ohbuchi, T.; Shimizu, W.; Koike, S.; Kanai, T.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/μm also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/μm in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/μm were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/μ steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  9. Low-level ultrahigh-frequency and ultrashort-pulse blue laser irradiation enhances osteoblast extracellular calcification by upregulating proliferation and differentiation via transient receptor potential vanilloid 1.

    Mikami, Risako; Mizutani, Koji; Aoki, Akira; Tamura, Yukihiko; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Izumi, Yuichi

    2018-04-01

    Low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) exerts various biostimulative effects, including promotion of wound healing and bone formation; however, few studies have examined biostimulation using blue lasers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level ultrahigh-frequency (UHF) and ultrashort-pulse (USP) blue laser irradiation on osteoblasts. The MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cell line was used in this study. Following LLLI with a 405 nm newly developed UHF-USP blue laser (80 MHz, 100 fs), osteoblast proliferation, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were assessed. In addition, mRNA levels of the osteoblast differentiation markers, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), osterix (Osx), alkaline phosphatase (Alp), and osteopontin (Opn) was evaluated, and extracellular calcification was quantified. To clarify the involvement of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in LLLI-induced biostimulation, cells were treated prior to LLLI with capsazepine (CPZ), a selective inhibitor of TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), and subsequent proliferation and ALP activity were measured. LLLI with the 405 nm UHF-USP blue laser significantly enhanced cell proliferation and ALP activity, compared with the non-irradiated control and LLLI using continuous-wave mode, without significant temperature elevation. LLLI promoted osteoblast proliferation in a dose-dependent manner up to 9.4 J/cm 2 and significantly accelerated cell proliferation in in vitro wound healing assay. ALP activity was significantly enhanced at doses up to 5.6 J/cm 2 , and expression of Osx and Alp mRNAs was significantly increased compared to that of the control on days 3 and 7 following LLLI at 5.6 J/cm 2 . The extent of extracellular calcification was also significantly higher as a result of LLLI 3 weeks after the treatment. Measurement of TRPV1 protein expression on 0, 3, and 7 days post-irradiation revealed no differences between the LLLI and control groups; however, promotion of cell

  10. Hypo fractionated conformal irradiation of patients with malignant glioma

    Aboziada, M.A.; Abo-Kresha, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of a conformal irradiation in short fractionation scheme of 49.5 Gy in 15 fractions in an overall time of 3 weeks, in terms of overall survival (OAS) and progression free survival (PFS) rates in brain glioma patients. Patients and methods: A prospective study was conducted on 54 brain glioma patients and was carried out in the Radiation Oncology Department, South Egypt Cancer Institute, Assiut University during the period from April 2006 till June 2009. Patients were treated by hypo fractionated conformal irradiation (49.5 Gy/15 fractions/3 weeks). Results: The median follow up was 23 months (range: 9-39 months). Two-year OAS and PFS rates were 68% and 60%, respectively. In univariate analysis, age > 50 years, poor performance status [Karnofasky score of >40- 50 years and glioblastoma pathology were the only independent prognostic factors that were associated with poor OAS (p = 0.003 and p = 0.004, respectively), and PFS (p = 0.027 and p = 0.011, respectively). Conclusion: Hypo fractionated conformal radiotherapy was as effective as the conventional radiotherapy, with time sparing for patients, and for radiation oncology centers. Hypo fractionated radiotherapy may be considered the radiotherapy regimen of choice in clinical practice for patients with gliomas

  11. Intestinal complications following accelerated fractionated X-irradiation

    Hauer-Jensen, M.; Poulakos, L.; Osborne, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Due to paucity of suitable animal models, it has been difficult to study the development of long-term intestinal complications following fractionated irradiation. We recently developed a model which allows multiple radiation exposures of a short segment of rat ileum without the need for repeated surgery. In the present series, this model was used to study the influence of shortening the total treatment time (accelerated fractionation) on development of radiation enteropathy. Male rats were orchiectomized and a short segment of distal ileum was transposed to the scrotum. Starting 3 weeks after surgery, the scrotum containing the intestinal segment was X-irradiated with 20 fractions of 2.8 Gy (total dose 56 Gy). Two fractionation schedules were compared: one fraction per day (total treatment time 26 days) and 3 fractions per day (total treatment time 7 days). Actuarial survival curves were obtained, and the degree of radiation injury was assessed 2, 8 and 26 weeks after the last radiation exposure using a semiquantitative histopathologic scoring system. There was no mortality from acute radiation injury in either treatment group. All animals of the 1-fraction/day group survived the observation period (26 weeks). In the 3-fraction/day group, there was significant mortality due to intestinal obstruction, and cumulative mortality at 26 weeks was 100%. Radiation injury, as assessed by the histopathologic scoring system, was also more pronounced in this group than in the 1-fraction/day group. We conclude that shortening the total treatment time significantly increases the severity of late intestinal complications. Our data are suggestive of an association between acute mucosal damage and chronic radiation injury of the small intestine. (orig.)

  12. Ultrastructural morphometry of parotid acinar cells following fractionated irradiation

    Grehn, A.-L.; Gustafsson, H.; Franzen, L.; Thornell, L.-E.; Henriksson, R.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long term effects on the ultrastructure of parotid glands after fractionated irradiation. The method implemented involved 5 x 6 Gy and 5 x 8 Gy, Monday to Friday 6 MV photons. By unilateral irradiation, the contralateral parotid gland served as a control. Although irradiation diminished the acinar cell density in light microscopic sections from 75 to 32% after 5 x 8 Gy of irradiation, ultrastructural morphometry could not detect any statistically significant differences in acinar cell size, nuclear size, nuclear density, granule area, mean granule size, or granule density. In general, greater differences were seen between rats receiving 30 or 40 Gy, on both the irradiated and the control side, than between the irradiated side and the control side. This was interpreted as due to differences in the nutritional state of the animals. This analysis concluded that individual acinar cells that survive irradiation seem not to be damaged in the long term when evaluated at the ultrastructural level. The study further stresses the importance of adequate sampling sizes and the use of adequate controls. (author)

  13. Effects of genistein following fractionated lung irradiation in mice

    Para, Andrea E.; Bezjak, Andrea; Yeung, Ivan W.T.; Van Dyk, Jake; Hill, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study investigated protection of lung injury by genistein following fractionated doses of radiation and its effect on tumor response. Material and methods: C3H/HeJ mice were irradiated (100 kVp X-rays) with 9 fractions of 3.1 Gy over 30 days (approximately equivalent to 10 Gy single dose) and were maintained on a genistein diet (∼10 mg/kg). Damage was assessed over 28 weeks in lung cells by a cytokinesis block micronucleus (MN) assay and by changes in breathing rate and histology. Tumor protection was assessed using a colony assay to determine cell survival following in situ irradiation of small lung nodules (KHT fibrosarcoma). Results: Genistein caused about a 50% reduction in the MN damage observed during the fractionated radiation treatment and this damage continued to decrease at later times to background levels by 16 weeks. In mice not receiving Genistein MN levels remained well above background out to 28 weeks after irradiation. Genistein reduced macrophage accumulation by 22% and reduced collagen deposition by 28%. There was minimal protection against increases in breathing rate or severe morbidity during pneumonitis. No tumor protection by genistein treatment was observed. Conclusions: Genistein at the dose levels used in this study partially reduced the extent of fibrosis developing in mouse lung caused by irradiation but gave minimal protection against pneumonitis. There was no evidence that genistein caused protection of small tumors growing in the lung.

  14. Therapeutic use of fractionated total body and subtotal body irradiation

    Loeffler, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    Ninety-one patients were treated using fractionated subtotal body (STBI) or total body irradiation (TBI). These patients had generalized lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, leukemias, myelomas, seminomas, or oat-cell carcinomas. Subtotal body irradiation is delivered to the entire body, except for the skull and extremities. It was expected that a significantly higher radiation dose could be administered with STBI than with TBI. A five- to ten-fold increase in tolerance for STBI was demonstrated. Many of these patients have had long-term emissions. There is little or no treatment-induced symptomatology, and no sanctuary sites

  15. Large-area irradiated low-level laser effect in a biodegradable nerve guide conduit on neural regeneration of peripheral nerve injury in rats.

    Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Yang, Yi-Chin; Liu, Bai-Shuan

    2011-08-01

    This study used a biodegradable composite containing genipin-cross-linked gelatin annexed with β-tricalcium phosphate ceramic particles (genipin-gelatin-tricalcium phosphate, GGT), developed in a previous study, as a nerve guide conduit. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of a large-area irradiated aluminium-gallium-indium phosphide (AlGaInP) diode laser (660 nm) on the neural regeneration of the transected sciatic nerve after bridging the GGT nerve guide conduit in rats. The animals were divided into two groups: group 1 comprised sham-irradiated controls and group 2 rats underwent low-level laser (LLL) therapy. A compact multi-cluster laser system with 20 AlGaInP laser diodes (output power, 50mW) was applied transcutaneously to the injured peripheral nerve immediately after closing the wound, which was repeated daily for 5 min for 21 consecutive days. Eight weeks after implantation, walking track analysis showed a significantly higher sciatic function index (SFI) score (Pguide conduit in rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Analytical formulae in fractionated irradiation of normal tissue

    Kozubek, S.

    1982-01-01

    The new conception of the modeling of the cell tissue kinetics after fractionated irradiation is proposed. The formulae given earlier are compared with experimental data on various normal tissues and further adjustments are considered. The tissues are shown to exhibit several general patterns of behaviour. The repopulation, if it takes place, seems to start after some time, independently of fractionation in first approximation and can be treated as simple autogenesis. The results are compared with the commonly used NSD conception and the well-known Cohen cell tissue kinetic model

  17. Immunosuppression by fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in collagen arthritis

    McCune, W.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Belli, J.A.; Trentham, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    Treatments with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and cyclophosphamide were evaluated for rats injected with type II collagen. Preadministration of TLI and repeated injections of cyclophosphamide suppressed the severity of arthritis and lowered antibody titers to collagen significantly. TLI initiated at the onset of collagen arthritis decreased humoral and cellular responses to collagen but did not affect the severity of arthritis. These data demonstrate that both TLi and cyclophosphamide are immunosuppressive in an experimentally inducible autoimmune disease

  18. Radiotherapy. Non-standard fractionated regimens improving cancer treatment. Part II. Response of normal tissues to fractionated irradiation

    Villar, A.; Hernandez, M.; Pera, J.; Cambray, M.; Villa, S.; Arnaiz, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    The phenomena participating in the response of tissues to fractionated irradiation are analyzed with special emphasis on the most relevant points influencing the design of non-standard fractionated regimens. (Author)

  19. Sublethal effects of tritium on aquatic systems, effects of low-level chronic irradiation on embryonic development, effects of beryllium and lithium on aquatic systems, and teratogenic effects of low-level magnetic fields

    Strand, J.A.; Roesijadi, G.; Emery, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    It is conceivable, and possible, that with increasing applications of nuclear energy, greater quantities of potentially harmful radionuclides will be released to the environment. This may be particularly true for advanced reactor designs such as the fusion reactor where radionuclides, principally tritium, may be expected to escape from the plant both in gaseous and liquid effluents in quantities significantly greater than for present PWR or BWR designs. Foreseeing such contingencies, the research programs described herein are in response to the need to measure the potential radiation effects of tritium releases on individuals, and ultimately populations and biotic communities. As a first approach, our efforts are directed to determine effects of low-level chronic exposures on developing embryo and larval stages, clearly the most radiosensitive. The anticipated increase in the release of beryllium and lithium from mining, refining, and fabrication of materials used during construction of fusion reactors has also caused concern as to potential adverse effects on the environment. Accordingly, FY-78 fusion related research will include efforts to study the metabolism of each metal in the living organism, and to determine at what levels toxicity may be expected. Fusion related research will also include preliminary experiments on the effects of low-level magnetic fields. It is conceivable that magnetic fields of 70 to 450 gauss will be encountered by attendant personnel working in the transport and hot cell areas of fusion reactors. Also, those personnel assigned to the areas immediately surrounding the reactor may be exposed

  20. Tumor oxygenation in a transplanted rat rhabdomyosarcoma during fractionated irradiation

    Zywietz, Friedrich; Reeker, Wolfram; Kochs, Eberhard

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the changes in tumor oxygenation in the course of a fractionated radiation treatment extending over 4 weeks. Methods and Materials: Rhabdomyosarcomas R1H of the rat were irradiated with 60 Co-γ-rays with a total dose of 60 Gy, given in 20 fractions over 4 weeks. Oxygen partial pressure (pO 2 ) in tumors was measured at weekly intervals using polarographic needle probes in combination with a microprocessor-controlled device (pO 2 -Histograph/KIMOC). The pO 2 measurements were carried out in anesthetized animals under mechanical ventilation and in respiratory and hemodynamic steady state. Tumor pO 2 values were correlated to the arterial oxygen pressure p a O 2 , arterial pCO 2 , and pH determined with a blood gas analyzer. Results: Tumor oxygenation did not change significantly during the 3 weeks of irradiation (up to 45 Gy), from a median pO 2 of 23 ± 2 mmHg in untreated controls to 19 ± 4 mmHg after the third week. The decrease of the number of pO 2 values between 0 and 5 mmHg indicated that an improved oxygenation in the tumors occurred. However, with increasing radiation dose (fourth week, 60 Gy) a significant decrease in tumor oxygenation to a median pO 2 of 8 ± 2 mmHg and a rapid increase in the frequency of pO 2 values (35 ± 4%) between 0 and 5 mmHg was found. Conclusion: Improved oxygenation in rhabdomyosarcomas R1H was only present in the early phase of the fractionated irradiation. Radiation doses above 45 Gy led to a considerable decrease of tumor oxygenation in the later phase of irradiation

  1. Long-term changes in open field activity of male mice irradiated with low levels of gamma rays at late stage of development

    Minamisawa, Takeru; Hirokaga, Kouichi.

    1996-01-01

    The open field activity of first generation (F 1 ) hybrid male C57BL/6 x C3H mice irradiated with γ-rays on the 14th day of gestation was studied at the following ages: 6-7 months, 12-13 months and 19-20 months. Doses were 0.1 Gy or 0.2 Gy. Open field activity was recorded with a camera. The camera output signal was recorded every sec through an A/D converter to a personal computer. The field was divided into 25 units of 8 cm square. All recordings were continuous for 60 min. The time which the 0.2-Gy group recorded at 6-7 months, spent in the 4 squares in the corner fields was high in comparison with the control group at the same age. The walking distance of the 0.1-Gy group recorded at 12-13 months was longer than that for the age matched control group. No effect of radiation was found on any of the behaviors observed and recorded at 19-20 months. The results demonstrate that exposure to low levels of γ-rays on the 14th day of gestation results in behavioral changes, which occur at 6-7 and 12-13 months but not 19-20 months. (author)

  2. Long-term changes in open field activity of male mice irradiated with low levels of gamma rays at late stage of development.

    Minamisawa, T; Hirokaga, K

    1996-06-01

    The open field activity of first generation (F1) hybrid male C57BL/6 x C3H mice irradiated with gamma-rays on the 14th day of gestation was studied at the following ages: 6-7 months, 12-13 months and 19-20 months. Doses were 0.1 Gy or 0.2 Gy. Open field activity was recorded with a camera. The camera output signal was recorded every sec through an A/D converter to a personal computer. The field was divided into 25 units of 8 cm square. All recordings were continuous for 60 min. The time which the 0.2-Gy group recorded at 6-7 months, spent in the 4 squares in the corner fields was high in comparison with the control group at the same age. The walking distance of the 0.1-Gy group recorded at 12-13 months was longer than that for the age matched control group. No effect of radiation was found on any of the behaviors observed and recorded at 19-20 months. The results demonstrate that exposure to low levels of gamma-rays on the 14th day of gestation results in behavioral changes, which occur at 6-7 and 12-13 months but not 19-20 months.

  3. Long-term changes in open field activity of male mice irradiated with low levels of gamma rays at late stage of development

    Minamisawa, Takeru [Yamanashi Medical Univ., Tamaho (Japan); Hirokaga, Kouichi

    1996-06-01

    The open field activity of first generation (F{sub 1}) hybrid male C57BL/6 x C3H mice irradiated with {gamma}-rays on the 14th day of gestation was studied at the following ages: 6-7 months, 12-13 months and 19-20 months. Doses were 0.1 Gy or 0.2 Gy. Open field activity was recorded with a camera. The camera output signal was recorded every sec through an A/D converter to a personal computer. The field was divided into 25 units of 8 cm square. All recordings were continuous for 60 min. The time which the 0.2-Gy group recorded at 6-7 months, spent in the 4 squares in the corner fields was high in comparison with the control group at the same age. The walking distance of the 0.1-Gy group recorded at 12-13 months was longer than that for the age matched control group. No effect of radiation was found on any of the behaviors observed and recorded at 19-20 months. The results demonstrate that exposure to low levels of {gamma}-rays on the 14th day of gestation results in behavioral changes, which occur at 6-7 and 12-13 months but not 19-20 months. (author)

  4. Effectiveness of perfluorochemical emulsions and carbogen breathing with fractionated irradiation

    Moulder, J.E.; Fish, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Oxygen-carrying perfluorochemical emulsions have been shown to enhance the response of experimental tumors to large single doses of radiation. Clinically, however, perfluorochemical emulsions will be used with only some fractions of multiple fraction radiation courses. To test the efficacy of a perfluorochemical emulsion (Fluosol-DA 20%, supplied by Alpha Therapeutic Co) under these conditions, BA1112 rat sarcomas were treated with three fractions/week of 6.25 Gy/fraction. Once a week, animals were given Fluosol-DA at 15 ml/kg, and allowed to breathe 95% O/sub 2/:5% CO/sub 2/ (carbogen) for 30 min prior to and during irradiation. The tumor regression rate during treatment was significantly greater in the Fluosol arm than in the control arm. Preliminary data analysis shows a 50% tumor control dose of 86.0 Gy (95% cl:78.0 - 94.3 Gy) in the control arm compared to 69.1 Gy (95% cl:58.3 - 77.3 Gy) in the Fluosol arm. The dose modification factor for intermittent Fluosol and carbogen breathing is 1.26 (95% cl:1.08 - 1.50). In the same fractionated schedule 0.4 mg/kg misonidazole, given once per week, gave a sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.15 (95% cl:1.03 - 1.33)

  5. Effects of low-level laser irradiation on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and associated pain with self-ligating brackets.

    Qamruddin, Irfan; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Mahroof, Verda; Fida, Mubassar; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli; Husein, Adam

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-level laser irradiation applied at 3-week intervals on orthodontic tooth movement and pain associated with orthodontic tooth movement using self-ligating brackets. Twenty-two patients (11 male, 11 female; mean age, 19.8 ± 3.1 years) with Angle Class II Division 1 malocclusion were recruited for this split-mouth clinical trial; they required extraction of maxillary first premolars bilaterally. After leveling and alignment with self-ligating brackets (SmartClip SL3; 3M Unitek, St Paul, Minn), a 150-g force was applied to retract the canines bilaterally using 6-mm nickel-titanium closed-coil springs on 0.019 x 0.025-in stainless steel archwires. A gallium-aluminum-arsenic diode laser (iLas; Biolase, Irvine, Calif) with a wavelength of 940 nm in a continuous mode (energy density, 7.5 J/cm 2 /point; diameter of optical fiber tip, 0.04 cm 2 ) was applied at 5 points buccally and palatally around the canine roots on the experimental side; the other side was designated as the placebo. Laser irradiation was applied at baseline and then repeated after 3 weeks for 2 more consecutive follow-up visits. Questionnaires based on the numeric rating scale were given to the patients to record their pain intensity for 1 week. Impressions were made at each visit before the application of irradiation at baseline and the 3 visits. Models were scanned with a CAD/CAM scanner (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland). Canine retraction was significantly greater (1.60 ± 0.38 mm) on the experimental side compared with the placebo side (0.79 ± 0.35 mm) (P orthodontic tooth movement and reduce the pain associated with it. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of fractionated irradiation on cell kinetics

    Laasonen, A.; Pyrhoenen, S.; Kouri, M.; Raety, J.; Holsti, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of single and split-dose irradiation were compared by in vitro experiments on HeLa cells. Changes in rate of cell proliferation were detected by flow cytometry, simultaneously determining the DNA content and the bromodeoxyuridine incorporation of individual cells. Cell cultures were irradiated with either a single dose of 1-6 Gy or with a corresponding dose divided into multiple fractions given at 1-6-h intervals. A dose-dependent accumulation of cells in G2/M phase was observed. The method was sensitive enough for the detection of G2/M block even after 1 Gy. The block disappeared completely within a 24-h follow-up time at dose levels up to 3 Gy. Interestingly, no differences in cell kinetics were observed between the single and split-dose regiments. This approach proves to be valuable in evaluating novel fractionation models and the effects of radiation on the cell kinetics of human tumor cells. (orig.)

  7. Radiobiological aspects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation

    Turesson, I.

    1990-01-01

    The biological effects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation in interstitial and intracavitary radiotherapy and total body irradiation are discussed in terms of dose-rate fractionation sensitivity for various tissues. A scaling between dose-rate and fraction size was established for acute and late normal-tissue effects which can serve as a guideline for local treatment in the range of dose rates between 0.02 and 0.005 Gy/min and fraction sizes between 8.5 and 2.5 Gy. This is valid provided cell-cycle progression and proliferation can be ignored. Assuming that the acute and late tissue responses are characterized by α/β values of about 10 and 3 Gy and a mono-exponential repair half-time of about 3 h, the same total doses given with either of the two methods are approximately equivalent. The equivalence for acute and late non-hemopoietic normal tissue damage is 0.02 Gy/min and 8.5 Gy per fraction; 0.01 Gy/min and 5.5 Gy per fraction; and 0.005 Gy/min and 2.5Gy per fraction. A very low dose rate, below 0.005 Gy/min, is thus necessary to simulate high dose-rate radiotherapy with fraction sizes of about 2Gy. The scaling factor is, however, dependent on the repair half-time of the tissue. A review of published data on dose-rate effects for normal tissue response showed a significantly stronger dose-rate dependence for late than for acute effects below 0.02 Gy/min. There was no significant difference in dose-rate dependence between various acute non-hemopoietic effects or between various late effects. The consistent dose-rate dependence, which justifies the use of a general scaling factor between fraction size and dose rate, contrasts with the wide range of values for repair half-time calculated for various normal-tissue effects. This indicates that the model currently used for repair kinetics is not satisfactory. There are also few experimental data in the clinical dose-rate range, below 0.02 Gy/min. It is therefore

  8. Low level waste repositories

    Hill, P.R.H.; Wilson, M.A.

    1983-11-01

    Factors in selecting a site for low-level radioactive waste disposal are discussed. South Australia has used a former tailings dam in a remote, arid location as a llw repository. There are also low-level waste disposal procedures at the Olympic Dam copper/uranium project

  9. Relationship between α/β and radiosensitivity and biologic effect of fractional irradiation of tumor cells

    Guo Chuanling; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Wang Jufang; Jin Xiaodong; Li Wenjian

    2006-01-01

    Five kinds of malignant human tumor cells, i.e. SMMC-7721, HeLa, A549, HT29 and PC3 cell lines, were irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays to 1-6 Gy in a single irradiation or two irradiations of half dose. The radiosensitivity was compared with the dose-survival curves and D 50 and D 10 values. Differences in the D 50 and D 10 between the single and fractional irradiation groups showed the effect of fractional irradiation. Except for PC3 cells, all the cell lines showed obvious relationship between radiosensitivity and biologic effect of fractional irradiation and the α/β value. A cell line with bigger α/β was more radiation sensitive, with less obvious effect of fractional irradiation. The results indicate that there were obvious differences in radiosensitivity, repair ability and biologic effect of fractional irradiation between tumor cells from different tissues. To some tumor cell lines, the relationship between radiosensitivity, biologic effect of fractional irradiation and repair ability was attested. The α/β value of single irradiation can be regarded as a parameter to investigate the radiosensitivity and biologic effect of fractional irradiation of tumor cells. (authors)

  10. The relationship between survival and mutagenesis in Escherichia coli after fractionated ultraviolet irradiation

    Dzidic, S.; Salaj-Smic, E.; Trgovcevic, Z.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between survival and mutagenesis in Escherichia coli after fractionated ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was studied. The cells were incubated either in buffer or nutrient media. Regardless of incubation conditions, greater survival is observed after fractionated irradiation than after acute irradiation. When the cells are incubated in buffer, UV mutagenesis decreases with an increase in the number of dose fractions. However, when the cells are cultivated in nutrient media, the increased survival is coupled with the enhanced capacity for UV mutagenesis. The authors, therefore, assume that during incubation in nutrient media, fractionated irradiation leads to full and prolonged expression of all UV inducible (SOS) genes, including those required for mutagenesis. (Auth.)

  11. Marrow toxicity of fractionated vs. single dose total body irradiation is identical in a canine model

    Storb, R.; Raff, R.F.; Graham, T.; Appelbaum, F.R.; Deeg, H.J.; Schuening, F.G.; Shulman, H.; Pepe, M.

    1993-01-01

    The authors explored in dogs the marrow toxicity of single dose total body irradiation delivered from two opposing 60 Co sources at a rate of 10 cGy/min and compared results to those seen with total body irradiation administered in 100 cGy fractions with minimum interfraction intervals of 6 hr. Dogs were not given marrow transplants. They found that 200 cGy single dose total body irradiation was sublethal, with 12 of 13 dogs showing hematopoietic recovery and survival. Seven of 21 dogs given 300 cGy single dose total body irradiation survived compared to 6 of 10 dogs given 300 cGy fractionated total body irradiation. One of 28 dogs given 400 cGy single dose total body irradiation survived compared to none of six given fractionated radiation. With granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) administered from day 0-21 after 400 cGy total body irradiation, most dogs survived with hematological recovery. Because of the almost uniform success with GCSF after 400 cGy single dose total body irradiation, a study of GCSF after 400 cGy fractionated total body irradiation was deemed not to be informative and, thus, not carried out. Additional comparisons between single dose and fractionated total body irradiation were carried out with GCSF administered after 500 and 600 cGy of total body irradiation. As with lower doses of total body irradiation, no significant survival differences were seen between the two modes of total body irradiation, and only 3 of 26 dogs studied survived with complete hematological recovery. Overall, therefore, survival among dogs given single dose total body irradiation was not different from that of dogs given fractionated total body irradiation (p = .67). Similarly, the slopes of the postirradiation declines of granulocyte and platelet counts and the rates of their recovery in surviving dogs given equal total doses of single versus fractionated total body irradiation were indistinguishable. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Fractionated total body irradiation; the gastrointestinal toxicity versus the conditioning effect for bone marrow transplantation with different fractionation schedules

    Walma, E.P.; Klapwijk, W.M.; Miller, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    In most cases, bone marrow transplantation is preceded by a conditioning regimen employing irradiation and/or cytotoxic drugs. The authors are searching for better fractionation schedules in order to optimize the conditioning regimen prior to transplantation of stem-cell-enriched bone marrow. They have determined damage to the gastrointestinal tract in dogs and mice after total body irradiation in mice and dogs following a number of fractionation schedules, and these results are presented. The schedules were chosen such as to minimize the interval between irradiation and the bone marrow transplantation and to maximize clinical feasibility. (Auth./C.F.)

  13. Radiobiological effect of different irradiation fractionated regimens in human brain glioma

    Gai Xue; Yang Weizhi; Gao Li; Jiang Heng; Wang Mianrong; Shi Huizhen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the radiobiological effect of different irradiation fractionated regimens in human glioma cells (BT 325 cell line). Methods: The xenografts in Balb/c-nude mice were irradiated with different single and fractionated regimens. The single fraction dose was 10, 20, 30, 40 and 60 Gy, respectively. The fractionated regimens were 2 Gy x 5 fractions ( irradiated every day), and 3 Gy x 3 fractions (irradiated every other day), 3 Gy x 5 fractions (irradiated every day) and 4 Gy x 3 fractions (irradiated every other day), with total doses of 125 Gy, 114 Gy, 126 Gy and 112 Gy, respectively. The growth curve was used to evaluate the tumor doubling time. clonogenic assays was performed to draw the cell survival curve and analyze the radiobiological parameters with doses of 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy. T 1/2 was measured by comet assay. Results: Tumor regression were not observed by single fraction irradiation, 2 Gy x 5 fractions and 3 Gy x 3 fractions irradiation regimens. The tumor regress was more significant with the increas of fraction dose. The 4 Gy x 3 fractions inhibited tumor more though not curing tumor. The cell doubling time of the BT 325 cell was 30. 16 h and the tumor doubling time of the xenograft was 43 days.When fitted with L-Q model, α was 0. 36 Gy -1 and β was 0. 057 Gy -2 . When fitted with the single-hit multi target model, D 0 was 1. 394 Gy, Dq was 2. 127 Gy and SF 2 was 0.714, respectively. The T 1/2 was 9.999 min. Conclusions: Glioma is a radioresistant tumor. Increase of the fraction dose improves recent effect.Further study is needed to control the tumor stem cells. (authors)

  14. The influence of fractionation on cell survival and premature differentiation after carbon ion irradiation

    Wang Jufang; Li Renming; Guo Chuanling; Fournier, C.; K-Weyrather, W.

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the influence of fractionation on cell survival and radiation induced premature differentiation as markers for early and late effects after X-rays and carbon irradiation. Normal human fibroblasts NHDF, AG1522B and WI-38 were irradiated with 250 kV X-rays, or 266 MeV/u, 195 MeV/u and 11 MeV/u carbon ions. Cytotoxicity was measured by a clonogenic survival assay or by determination of the differentiation pattern. Experiments with high-energy carbon ions show that fractionation induced repair effects are similar to photon irradiation. The relative biological effective (RBE) 10 values for clonogenic survival are 1.3 and 1.6 for irradiation in one or two fractions for NHDF cells and around 1.2 for AG1522B cells regardless of the fractionation scheme. The RBE for a doubling of post mitotic fibroblasts (PMF) in the population is 1 for both single and two fractionated irradiation of NHDF cells. Using 11 MeV/u carbon ions, no repair effect can be seen in WI-38 cells. The RBE 10 for clonogenic survival is 3.2 for single irradiation and 4.9 for two fractionated irradiations. The RBE for a doubling of PMF is 3.1 and 5.0 for single and two fractionated irradiations, respectively. For both cell lines the effects of high-energy carbon ions representing the irradiation of the skin and the normal tissue in the entrance channel are similar to the effects of X-rays. The fractionation effects are maintained. For the lower energy, which is representative for the irradiation of the tumor region, RBE is enhanced for clonogenic survival as well as for premature terminal differentiation. Fractionation effects are not detectable. Consequently, the therapeutic ratio is significantly enhanced by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions. (author)

  15. A simple graphical method for deriving kinetics of repair from fractionated and protracted irradiations

    Scalliet, P.; Schueren, E. van der; Erfmann, R.K.L.; Landuyt, W.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a method for the derivation of the time constant of repair from fractionated and protracted irradiations, using formulae based on those derived by Dale (1985) and Liversage (1969) establishing the correlation between the biological effects of low dose rate and acute fractionated irradiation. (UK)

  16. Recovery from sublethal damage during fractionated irradiation of human FaDu SCC

    Petersen, Cordula; Zips, Daniel; Krause, Mechthild; Voelkel, Wolfram; Thames, Howard D.; Baumann, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The present study addresses whether recovery of sublethal damage in tumours may change during fractionated irradiation in FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma and whether such an effect might contribute to the pronounced time factor of fractionated irradiation previously found in this tumour. Patients and methods: FaDu tumours were transplanted s.c. into the right hind leg of NMRI nu/nu mice. Single doses or 2, 4, and 8 equal fractions in 3.5 days were applied in previously unirradiated tumours and after priming with 18 fractions of 3 Gy in 18 or 36 days. All irradiations were given under clamp hypoxic conditions. Experimental endpoints were tumour control dose 50% (TCD 50 ) and α/β values without and after priming. Results: Without priming TCD 50 increased with increasing number of fractions from 38.8 Gy (95% CI 35;45) after single dose irradiation to 54.0 Gy (42;57) after 8 fractions. No increase in TCD 50 when given in 1, 2, 4, or 8 fractions in 3.5 days was found after priming with 18 3-Gy fractions in 18 and 36 days. After priming with 18 fractions in 18 days TCD 50 remained constant at 25 Gy and after priming with 18 fractions in 36 days at 42 Gy. The α/β ratio without priming was 68 Gy (42;127). After fractionated irradiation with 18 3-Gy fractions in 18 and 36 days the α/β ratio increased to 317 Gy (38;∞) and to infinite, respectively. Conclusions: Our results indicate that clonogenic cells in FaDu tumours lose entirely their capacity to recover from sublethal radiation damage during fractionated irradiation. Therefore, an increased repair capacity as an explanation for the pronounced time factor of fractionated irradiation in this tumour can be ruled out

  17. Low-level x-irradiation of the brain during development morphological, physiological, and behavioral consequences. Final report, September 1, 1976--August 31, 1977

    Altman, J.

    1977-01-01

    Morphological research was continued in the following areas: glial recovery patterns in the rat corpus callosum after x-irradiation during infancy; the prenatal development of the deep nuclei and cortex of the cerebellum; the prenatal development of the inferior olive, pontine gray and the precerebellar reticular nuclei; and the postnatal development of the olfactory bulb. In these studies autoradiography and x-irradiation were among the experimental techniques utilized. The behavioral studies, all of which are still in progress, are concerned with the effects of different schedules of postnatal x-irradiation of the cerebellum, and the effects of x-irradiation of the olfactory bulb. A list is included of 14 publications that report results in detail

  18. Low level waste disposal

    Barthoux, A.

    1985-01-01

    Final disposal of low level wastes has been carried out for 15 years on the shallow land disposal of the Manche in the north west of France. Final participant in the nuclear energy cycle, ANDRA has set up a new waste management system from the production center (organization of the waste collection) to the disposal site including the setting up of a transport network, the development of assessment, additional conditioning, interim storage, the management of the disposal center, records of the location and characteristics of the disposed wastes, site selection surveys for future disposals and a public information Department. 80 000 waste packages representing a volume of 20 000 m 3 are thus managed and disposed of each year on the shallow land disposal. The disposal of low level wastes is carried out according to their category and activity level: - in tumuli for very low level wastes, - in monoliths, a concrete structure, of the packaging does not provide enough protection against radioactivity [fr

  19. Allograft tolerance in pigs after fractionated lymphoid irradiation. I. Skin grafts after partial lateral irradiation and bone marrow cell grafting

    Vaiman, M.; Daburon, F.; Remy, J.; Villiers, P.A.; de Riberolles, C.; Lecompte, Y.; Mahouy, G.; Fradelizi, D.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments with pigs have been performed to establish bone marrow chimerism and skin graft tolerance between SLA genotyped animals. Recipients were conditioned by means of fractionated partial irradiation from lateral cobalt sources (partial lateral irradiation (PLI)). The head, neck, and lungs were protected with lead, the rest of the body being irradiated including the thymus, the majority of lymphoid organs with spleen, and most of the bone marrow sites

  20. Functional activity of symphathetic-adrenal system under chronic and fractionated irradiation of rats

    Musagalieva, G.M.

    1975-01-01

    Chronic irradiation of rats at 5 R twice a week (total dose 400 R) significantly increased adrenaline concentration in the brain, liver and kidney and dophamine and DOPA concentration in liver tissue, adrenal glands and thymus. Fractionated irradiation (chronic irradiation at 400 R plus acute single irradiation at 400 R) increased the adrenaline level in the brain and heart muscle and led to a higher concentration of dophamine and DOPA in the liver, thymus and heart muscle [ru

  1. Sulfur transfer in the distillate fractions of Arabian crude oils under gamma-irradiation

    Basfar, Ahmed A.; Soliman, Yasser S.; Alkhuraiji, Turki S.

    2017-05-01

    Desulfurization of light distillation fractions including gasoline, kerosene and diesel obtained from the four Arabian crude oils (heavy, medium, light and extra light) upon γ-rays irradiation to different doses was investigated. In addition, yields vol%, FTIR analysis, kinematic viscosity and density of all distillation fractions of irradiated crude oils were evaluated. Limited radiation-induced desulfurization of those fractions was observed up to an irradiation dose of 200 kGy. FTIR analysis of those fractions indicates the absence of oxidized sulfur compounds, represented by S=O of sulfone group, indicating that γ-irradiation of the Arabian crude oils at normal conditions does not induce an oxidative desulfurization in those distillation fractions. Radiation-induced sulfur transfer decreases by 28.56% and increases in total sulfur by 16.8% in Arabian extra light oil and Arabian medium crude oil respectively.

  2. Low-level waste program technical strategy

    Bledsoe, K.W.

    1994-01-01

    The Low-Level Waste Technical Strategy document describes the mechanisms which the Low-Level Waste Program Office plans to implement to achieve its mission. The mission is to manage the receipt, immobilization, packaging, storage/disposal and RCRA closure (of the site) of the low-level Hanford waste (pretreated tank wastes) in an environmentally sound, safe and cost-effective manner. The primary objective of the TWRS Low-level waste Program office is to vitrify the LLW fraction of the tank waste and dispose of it onsite

  3. Photocatalytic Oxidation of Low-Level Airborne 2-Propanol and Trichloroethylene over Titania Irradiated with Bulb-Type Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Jo, Wan-Kuen

    2013-01-18

    This study examined the photocatalytic oxidation of gas-phase trichloroethylene (TCE) and 2-propanol, at indoor levels, over titanium dioxide (TiO₂) irradiated with light-emitting diodes (LED) under different operational conditions. TiO₂ powder baked at 450 °C exhibited the highest photocatalytic decomposition efficiency (PDE) for TCE, while all photocatalysts baked at different temperatures showed similar PDEs for 2-propanol. The average PDEs of TCE over a three hour period were four, four, five, and 51% for TiO₂ powders baked at 150, 250, 350, and 450 °C, respectively. The average PDEs of 2-propanol were 95, 97, 98, and 96% for TiO₂ powders baked at 150, 250, 350, and 450 °C, respectively. The ratio of anatase at 2θ = 25.2° to rutile at 2θ = 27.4° was lowest for the TiO₂ powder baked at 450 °C. Although the LED-irradiated TiO₂ system revealed lower PDEs of TCE and 2-propanol when compared to those of the eight watt, black-light lamp-irradiated TiO₂ system, the results for the PDEs normalized to the energy consumption were reversed. Other operational parameters, such as relative humidity, input concentrations, flow rate, and feeding type were also found to influence the photocatalytic performance of the UV LED-irradiated TiO₂ system when applied to the cleaning of TCE and 2-propanol at indoor air levels.

  4. Low-level x-irradiation of the brain during development: morphological, physiological, and behavioral consequences. Progress report, September 1, 1974--August 31, 1975

    Altman, J.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on studies on the effects of exposure to low-dose x radiation on the developing brain of rats. Brief summaries of results of morphological, physiological, and behavioral studies on rats exposed using various x-irradiation schedules are included. A list of papers published and submitted for publication during the period is included. (U.S.)

  5. Spatiotemporal Fractionation Schemes for Irradiating Large Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    Unkelbach, Jan, E-mail: junkelbach@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bussière, Marc R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chapman, Paul H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To optimally exploit fractionation effects in the context of radiosurgery treatments of large cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). In current practice, fractionated treatments divide the dose evenly into several fractions, which generally leads to low obliteration rates. In this work, we investigate the potential benefit of delivering distinct dose distributions in different fractions. Methods and Materials: Five patients with large cerebral AVMs were reviewed and replanned for intensity modulated arc therapy delivered with conventional photon beams. Treatment plans allowing for different dose distributions in all fractions were obtained by performing treatment plan optimization based on the cumulative biologically effective dose delivered at the end of treatment. Results: We show that distinct treatment plans can be designed for different fractions, such that high single-fraction doses are delivered to complementary parts of the AVM. All plans create a similar dose bath in the surrounding normal brain and thereby exploit the fractionation effect. This partial hypofractionation in the AVM along with fractionation in normal brain achieves a net improvement of the therapeutic ratio. We show that a biological dose reduction of approximately 10% in the healthy brain can be achieved compared with reference treatment schedules that deliver the same dose distribution in all fractions. Conclusions: Boosting complementary parts of the target volume in different fractions may provide a therapeutic advantage in fractionated radiosurgery treatments of large cerebral AVMs. The strategy allows for a mean dose reduction in normal brain that may be valuable for a patient population with an otherwise normal life expectancy.

  6. Photocatalytic Oxidation of Low-Level Airborne 2-Propanol and Trichloroethylene over Titania Irradiated with Bulb-Type Light-Emitting Diodes

    Wan-Kuen Jo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the photocatalytic oxidation of gas-phase trichloroethylene (TCE and 2-propanol, at indoor levels, over titanium dioxide (TiO2 irradiated with light-emitting diodes (LED under different operational conditions. TiO2 powder baked at 450 °C exhibited the highest photocatalytic decomposition efficiency (PDE for TCE, while all photocatalysts baked at different temperatures showed similar PDEs for 2-propanol. The average PDEs of TCE over a three hour period were four, four, five, and 51% for TiO2 powders baked at 150, 250, 350, and 450 °C, respectively. The average PDEs of 2-propanol were 95, 97, 98, and 96% for TiO2 powders baked at 150, 250, 350, and 450 °C, respectively. The ratio of anatase at 2θ = 25.2° to rutile at 2θ = 27.4° was lowest for the TiO2 powder baked at 450 °C. Although the LED-irradiated TiO2 system revealed lower PDEs of TCE and 2-propanol when compared to those of the eight watt, black-light lamp-irradiated TiO2 system, the results for the PDEs normalized to the energy consumption were reversed. Other operational parameters, such as relative humidity, input concentrations, flow rate, and feeding type were also found to influence the photocatalytic performance of the UV LED-irradiated TiO2 system when applied to the cleaning of TCE and 2-propanol at indoor air levels.

  7. Colon mucosal cells after high-dose fractional irradiation

    Zorc-Pleskovic, R.; Vraspir-Porenta, O.; Petrovic, D.; Zorc, M.; Pleskovic, L.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histological and stereological changes in cryptal enterocytes, mucosal lymphocytes and mast cells 10 days after irradiation. For experimental model, 24 Beagle dogs 1-2 years old were used. Twelve dogs were irradiated 20 days with 32 Gy over the whole pelvis and tail. Another 12 dogs represented a control group. For the detection of apoptosis, the TUNEL technique was used. Histological and stereological analyses were performed using a Wild sampling microscope M 1000. In the irradiated group, volume density (P < 0.01), numerical density (P < 0.05) and average volume of lymphocytes (P < 0.001) were significantly lower than in the nonirradiated group. Numerical areal density of mast cells in the irradiated group was also significantly lower (P < 0.05). Volume density (P < 0.001) and average volume of mast cells (P < 0.001) were significantly higher in the irradiated group. The results of our experiments show that irradiation causes injury and loss of lymphocytes and mast cells in the colon mucosa. Apoptosis was detected in enterocytes and lymphocytes in the irradiated group and in nonirradiated group in equal numbers (2.5 ± 0.3 vs. 2.3 ± 0.3; ns.), suggesting that 10 days after high-dose irradiation, the cell loss is not due to apoptosis. (author)

  8. Effects of microcurrent application and 670 nm InGaP low-level laser irradiation on experimental wound healing in healthy and diabetic Wistar rats

    Neves, L M G; Matheus, R L; Santos, G M T; Esquisatto, M A M; Amaral, M E C; Mendonça, F A S

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of microcurrent application and 670 nm InGaP laser irradiation on wound healing in healthy and alloxan diabetic rats. The animals were divided into eight groups: healthy control (HC); diabetic control (DC); healthy treated with microcurrent (HMC); diabetic treated with microcurrent (DMC); healthy irradiated with laser (HL); diabetic irradiated with laser (DL); healthy receiving laser and microcurrent application (HLMC) and diabetic receiving laser and microcurrent application (DLMC). Wound samples were collected on days 2, 6, 10 and 14 of treatment for structural analysis, morphometry, and Western blotting to quantify the expression of TGF-β1 and VEGF. Comparison of animals receiving laser and microcurrent therapy showed a reduction in the number of inflammatory cells in diabetic animals, as well as an increase of fibroblasts in healthy animals and of newly formed vessels in healthy and diabetic animals. Expression of TGF-β1 was increased on day 6 in all groups, especially diabetic animals. A reduction in the expression of this protein was observed on day 10 in all groups. VEGF expression was higher on day 6 in treated and control diabetic animals when compared to healthy animals. Analysis of VEGF expression in the laser- and microcurrent-treated groups on day 10 showed a decrease in diabetic animals and an increase in healthy animals. In conclusion, laser therapy and microcurrent stimulation exert beneficial effects on wound healing in both healthy and diabetic animals. (paper)

  9. Chromosome aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes induced by single or fractionated X-irradiation

    Ivanov, B.; Leonard, A.; Deknyudt, G.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated is the effect of single (125 and 250 R) and fractionated (2x125 R) irradiation on the output of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of human peripheral blood kept between irradiations at the temperature of 5 deg C. The single irradiation is carried out immediately after vein-puncture. In the case of fractionated irradiation the first dose of 125R is given after vein-puncture, the second, in the interval of 2, 8 and 24 hours. Blood is cultivated immediately after two irradiations in order to prepare metaphase plates for cytogenic analysis. Repair processes in cell heritage structures are not realised in blood irradiated by fractions which is kept at 5 deg C between irradiations. On the contrary, chromosome fragments, interstitial deletions, aberrant cells and cell breaks are found in a large amount in blood irradiated by fractions. They have appeared with the authentically high statistic difference as compared with the cells irradiated one time with the same dose. This effect is probably attained due to blood preservation

  10. Low-level effects

    Devine, R.T.; Chaput, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Risk assignments can be made to given practices involving exposure to radiation, because sufficient data are available for the effects of high-dose, low-LET radiation and because sufficient exists in the methods of extrapolation to low doses and low dose rates. The confidence in the extrapolations is based on the fact that the risk is not expected to be overestimated, using the assumptions made (as opposed to the possibility that the extrapolations represent an accurate estimate of the risk). These risk estimates have been applied to the selection of permissible exposure levels, to show that various amounts of radiation involve no greater risk to the worker than the risk expected in another industry that is generally considered safe. The setting of standards for protection from exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation is made by expert committees at the national and international levels who weigh social factors as well as scientific factors. Data on low-level effects may be applied when assigning a ''probability of causation'' to a certain exposure of radiation. This has become a prominent method for arriving at an equitable award for damages caused by such exposure. The generation of these tables requires as many (if not more) social and political considerations as does the setting up of protection criteria. It is impossible to extract a purely scientific conclusion solely from the protection standards and other legal decisions. Sufficient information exists on low-LET radiation that safety standards for exposure can be rationally (if not scientifically) agreed upon

  11. Effects of low-level (1.0 R) x-irradiation on the erythroid response of the rat bone marrow

    Gong, J.K.; Glomski, C.A.; Frederiksen, N.L.; Lawson, A.J.; Daley, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    The levels of normoblasts in the bone marrow of six groups of female Sprague--Dawley rats previously exposed to a 1.0 R dose of x rays were compared with those in sham-exposed animals at intervals from 14 hr to 10 weeks postirradiation. Four parameters were analyzed, the percentage of normoblasts in Wright's Giemsa stained marrow smears, and the number of erythroid precursors per milligram of isolated marrow sample, per whole femur, and per entire skeleton. The studies were based on marrow examinations and on 59 Fe tracer data. At all intervals except the earliest, [14 hr], significant elevations in the percentage of normoblasts were found in the bone marrow. In addition, at 6 and 10 weeks postirradiation increases were found in the number of normoblasts in the isolated marrow samples, whole femurs, and total skeletons. When compared 81 hr after phlebotomy, subnormal increases in normoblast levels were found in all four parameters of the irradiated subjects. The results suggest that x irradiation at this dose level can induce an abnormal marrow function manifested by an elevated number of normoblasts and, after phlebotomy, by a subnormal proliferation of the erythroid precursors

  12. The kinetics of repair in mouse lung after fractionated irradiation

    Travis, E.L.; Thames, H.D.; Watkins, T.L.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of repair of sublethal damage in mouse lung was studied after fractionated doses of 137 Cs γ-rays. A wide range of doses per fraction (1.7-12 Gy) was given with interfraction intervals ranging from 0.5 to 24 h. Data were analysed by a direct method of analysis using the incomplete repair model. The half-time of repair (Tsub(1/2)) was 0.76 h for the pneumonitis phase of damage (up to 8 months) and 0.65 h for the later phase of damage up to 12 months. Rate of repair was dependent on fraction size for both phases of lung damage and was faster after large dose fractions than after small fractions. Tsub(1/2) was 0.6 h (95% c.1. 0.53, 0.69) for doses per fraction greater than 5 Gy and 0.83 h (95% c.1. 0.76, 0.92) for doses per fraction of 2 Gy. Repair was nearly complete by 6 h at least for the pneumonitis phase of damage. If extrapolated to humans, these results imply that treatments with multiple fractions per day involving the lung will not be limited by the necessity for interfraction intervals much longer than 6 h. (author)

  13. The proliferative response of mouse intestinal crypts during fractionated irradiation of carbon beams

    Abo, M.; Abe, Y.; Mariya, Y.; Ando, K.

    2000-01-01

    Clonogenic assay of jejunal crypt during carbon beam and X-ray irradiations was performed. Fractionation with top-up dose assay revealed carbon beam irradiations caused more damage than X-ray did. To clarify this problem is urgent. (author)

  14. Evaluation of cell regeneration of bone marrow after fractionated irradiation of mouse in toto

    Maisin, H.; Evercoren, A. van; Anckaert, M.A.; Coster, B.M. de

    1979-01-01

    We have studied the recovery for mice bone marrow cells after fractionated irradiation of the whole body. The additional dose (Dr) to obtain a given biological effect if the irradiation is split in two equal subfractions (2 Di) separated by a short interval of time (i) is 40 rad per day when the interval of time between the two irradiations is lenghtened of one day [fr

  15. Sulfur transfer in the distillate fractions of Arabian crude oils under gamma-irradiation

    Basfar, Ahmed A.; Soliman, Yasser S.; Alkhuraiji, Turki S.

    2017-01-01

    Desulfurization of light distillation fractions including gasoline, kerosene and diesel obtained from the four Arabian crude oils (heavy, medium, light and extra light) upon γ-rays irradiation to different doses was investigated. In addition, yields vol%, FTIR analysis, kinematic viscosity and density of all distillation fractions of irradiated crude oils were evaluated. Limited radiation-induced desulfurization of those fractions was observed up to an irradiation dose of 200 kGy. FTIR analysis of those fractions indicates the absence of oxidized sulfur compounds, represented by S=O of sulfone group, indicating that γ-irradiation of the Arabian crude oils at normal conditions does not induce an oxidative desulfurization in those distillation fractions. Radiation-induced sulfur transfer decreases by 28.56% and increases in total sulfur by 16.8% in Arabian extra light oil and Arabian medium crude oil respectively. - Highlights: • Limited desulfurization in the light distillate fraction of Arabian crude oils using γ-rays was observed. • FTIR analysis confirms limited unchanged in density, viscosity and yields of Arabian crude oils. • In absence of oxidizer, radiation-induced sulfur transfer was observed in gasoline and diesel fractions of Arabian crude oils. • Radiation-induced oxidative desulfuration of the light distillate fractions depends on its characteristics.

  16. Differential effects of fractionated X irradiation on mouse spermatogonial stem cells

    van der Meer, Y.; Huiskamp, R.; Davids, J. A.; de rooij, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    The response of spermatogonial stem cells to fractionated X irradiation was studied in the various stages of the spermatogenic cycle of the CBA mouse. Fractionated doses of 2 + 2, 1 + 3, and 3 + 1 Gy with a 24-h interval between the doses were compared with a single dose of 4 Gy. The numbers of

  17. Effect of Low Level Laser Irradiation at Wavelengths 488 and 515 nm on Glutamate Neurotransmitter in Mitochondria of Visual Brain Cortex in Albino Rat

    Omran, M.F.; El-Ahdal, M.A.; El-Kady, M.H.; Yousri, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    The presence of glutamate in the visual cortex and mitochondria could be used as a measure for the argon laser effect having wavelengths 488 and 515 nm, on the mitochondria. A comparative response for the bound and free glutamate was found. Irradiation with different energies 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 J for both wavelengths were accomplished. This study makes us to recommend the advantage of using argon laser having wavelength 515 nm to enhance the blocking of glutamate and hence the reduction of brain toxicity. Most of the energy required for cellular functions comes from mitochondria (Shepherd, 1994). Glutamate, which is present in central nervous system at very high level is essential for brain intermediary metabolism (Frazer et al., 1994; Meldrum et al., 2000 and Blumcke et al., 2000). Glutamate is enriched in synaptic vesicles, the subcellular organelles, which are associated with the storage and release of neurotransmitters. Also, biochemical evidence for glutamate as neurotransmitter in fibers from the visual cortex to the subcortical visual relay nuclei has been indicated (Fose and Fonnum, 1987 and George, 1998)

  18. Response of the skin of hamsters to fractionated irradiation with X rays or accelerated carbon ions

    Leith, J.T.; Powers-Risius, P.; Woodruff, K.H.; McDonald, M.; Howard, J.

    1981-01-01

    The ventral thoracic skin of hamsters was irradiated with either single, split (two fractions given in 24 hr), or multiple (five fractions given daily) exposures of X rays or accelerated carbon ions using a 4-cm spread Bragg peak. Animals were positioned in the heavy-ion beam so that the ventral thoracic skin surface was 1 cm distal to the proximal peak of the modified beam. Early skin reactions from 6 to 30 days postirradiation were assessed. Using the average skin reactions produced in this period, it was found that the relative biological effect (RBE) for single doses of carbon ions was about 1.6 (5-17 Gy per fraction), for two fractions about 1.8 (5-17 Gy perfraction), and for five fractions about 1.9 (2.4-7.2 Gy per fraction). The fractional amount of sublethal damage repaired after carbon ion irradiation was about 0.3 (at dose levels of 2.4-8.0 Gy per fraction) compared to a value of about 0.45 (at dose levels of 60-13.0 Gy per fraction) found for the fractionated X irradiations, indicting about a 33% decrease in the relative amount of sublethal damage repaired after carbon ion irradiation in this position in the spread Bragg curve. Also, data were interpreted using plots of the reciprocal total dose needed to produce a given level of skin damage versus the dose per fraction used in the multifraction experiments, and of the RBE versus dose per fraction obtained from a nonparametric analysis of the responses. These approaches allow estimation of RBE at dose levels relevant to the clinical situation. Also, estimation may be made of the maximum permissible RBE by using the zero dose intercept value from the linear reciprocal dose plot. With this approach, the RBE at a dose level of 2 Gy is about 2.5 and the maximum RBE value is about 2.7

  19. Tests of equal effect per fraction in microcolony assays of survival after fractionated irradiations

    Taylor, J.M.G.

    1985-01-01

    H.D Thames, Jr. and H.R. Withers propose a test of an equal effect per fraction in microcolony assays after fractionated radiation, in which the total effect is measured by counting microcolonies derived from surviving cells in a tissue. The factors considered to influence the cytocidal effect per fraction are incomplete repair, repopulation, and synchrony. The statistics used in the method are criticized and conditions are given under which the test should not be used. An alternative method of testing for an equal effect per fraction is proposed. The pros and cons of each test are discussed and compared using some mouse jejunal crypt cell survival data

  20. Influence of trichlorfon and fractionated irradiation on hydroproteolytic activity of pancreas and intestinal tissues of rats

    Kocmierska-Grodzka, D [Akademia Medyczna, Bialystok (Poland). Zaklad Farmakologii

    1976-03-01

    Investigations were carried out of the hydroproteolytic activity of pancreas, small intestine and colon of rats after fractionated irradiation (5x150 R). Marked postirradiation enhancement of lipase activity was found in pancreas and duodenal part of intestine as well as an increase of B-glucuronidase and acid phosphatase activity in nearly all parts of the intestinal tissues. Fractionated irradiation resulted in an increase of pancreatic catheptic (proteolytic) activity, causing simultaneous decrease of proteolytic activity in intestine and colon. Preventive administation of Trichlorfon ten days before irradiation (10 mg or 30 mg/kg) evoked modification of hydroproteolytic activity in intestinal tissues of healthy and irradiated rats. 30mg/kg Trichlorfon exerted antilipolytic and anticatheptic effects in pancreas and intestinal tissues of irradiated rats.

  1. Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Normal Tissues After Fractionated Irradiation

    Ruebe, Claudia E.; Fricke, Andreas; Wendorf, Juliane; Stuetzel, Annika; Kuehne, Martin; Ong, Mei Fang; Lipp, Peter; Ruebe, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: There is increasing evidence that genetic factors regulating the recognition and/or repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are responsible for differences in radiosensitivity among patients. Genetically defined DSB repair capacities are supposed to determine patients' individual susceptibility to develop adverse normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. In a preclinical murine model, we analyzed the impact of different DSB repair capacities on the cumulative DNA damage in normal tissues during the course of fractionated irradiation. Material and Methods: Different strains of mice with defined genetic backgrounds (SCID -/- homozygous, ATM -/- homozygous, ATM +/- heterozygous, and ATM +/+ wild-type mice) were subjected to single (2 Gy) or fractionated irradiation (5 x 2 Gy). By enumerating γH2AX foci, the formation and rejoining of DSBs were analyzed in organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding tissues (lung, kidney, and heart). Results: In repair-deficient SCID -/- and ATM -/- homozygous mice, large proportions of radiation-induced DSBs remained unrepaired after each fraction, leading to the pronounced accumulation of residual DNA damage after fractionated irradiation, similarly visible in early- and late-responding tissues. The slight DSB repair impairment of ATM +/- heterozygous mice was not detectable after single-dose irradiation but resulted in a significant increase in unrepaired DSBs during the fractionated irradiation scheme. Conclusions: Radiation-induced DSBs accumulate similarly in acute- and late-responding tissues during fractionated irradiation, whereas the whole extent of residual DNA damage depends decisively on the underlying genetically defined DSB repair capacity. Moreover, our data indicate that even minor impairments in DSB repair lead to exceeding DNA damage accumulation during fractionated irradiation and thus may have a significant impact on normal tissue responses in clinical

  2. Low-level radiation

    Myers, D.K.

    1982-05-01

    It is known that the normal incidence of cancer in human populations is increased by exposure to moderately high doses of ionizing radiation. At background radiation levels or at radiation levels which are 100 times greater, the potential health risks are considered to be directly proportional to the total accumulated dose of radiation. Some of the uncertainties associated with this assumption and with the accepted risk estimates have been critically reviewed in this document. The general scientific consensus at present suggests that the accepted risk estimates may exaggerate the actual risk of low levels of sparsely ionizing radiations (beta-, gamma- or X-rays) somewhat but are unlikely to overestimate the actual risks of densely ionizing radiations (fast neutrons, alpha-particles). At the maximum permissible levels of exposure for radiation workers in nuclear power stations, the potential health hazards in terms of life expectancy would be comparable to those encountered in transportation and public utilities or in the construction industry. At the average radiation exposures received by these workers in practice, the potential health hazards are similar to those associated with safe categories of industries. Uranium mining remains a relativly hazardous occupation. In terms of absolute numbers, the genetic hazards, which are less well established, are thought to be smaller than the carcinogenic hazards of radiation when only the first generation is considered but to be of the same order of magnitude as the carcinogenic hazards when the total number of induced genetic disorders is summed over all generations

  3. Histological examination of the effect of differently fractionated irradiations in rat and mouse organs. Pt. 3

    Unger, E.

    1984-01-01

    The spleen of rats was irradiated with 50 Gy dose local X-rays in two different fractionation rhythms, i.e. twice a week given high and daily applied lower fractions of radiation. According to the results of 3 H-thymidine autoradiography made after the last irradiation 24 hours later both in the white and the red pulp the labelling index was less on the effect of twice in a week applied high radiation fractions than in case of daily given lower fractions. This indicate in correlation with the results of earlier analogous histological experiments that the damaging effect of rarely given higher fractions of radiation in the spleen is especially obvious. (orig.) [de

  4. Investigation of the bystander effect in MRC5 cells after acute and fractionated irradiation in vitro

    Shokouhozaman Soleymanifard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE has been defined as radiation responses observed in nonirradiated cells. It has been the focus of investigators worldwide due to the deleterious effects it induces in nonirradiated cells. The present study was performed to investigate whether acute or fractionated irradiation will evoke a differential bystander response in MRC5 cells. A normal human cell line (MRC5, and a human lung tumor cell line (QU-DB were exposed to 0, 1, 2, and 4Gy of single acute or fractionated irradiation of equal fractions with a gap of 6 h. The MRC5 cells were supplemented with the media of irradiated cells and their micronucleus frequency was determined. The micronucleus frequency after single and fractionated irradiation did not vary significantly in the MRC5 cells conditioned with autologous or QU-DB cell-irradiated media, except for 4Gy where the frequency of micronucleated cells was lower in those MRC5 cells cultured in the media of QU-DB-exposed with a single dose of 4Gy. Our study demonstrates that the radiation-induced bystander effect was almost similar after single acute and fractionated exposure in MRC5 cells.

  5. Investigation of the bystander effect in MRC5 cells after acute and fractionated irradiation in vitro

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Toossi, Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni; Samani, Roghayeh Kamran; Mohebbi, Shokoufeh

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has been defined as radiation responses observed in nonirradiated cells. It has been the focus of investigators worldwide due to the deleterious effects it induces in nonirradiated cells. The present study was performed to investigate whether acute or fractionated irradiation will evoke a differential bystander response in MRC5 cells. A normal human cell line (MRC5), and a human lung tumor cell line (QU-DB) were exposed to 0, 1, 2, and 4Gy of single acute or fractionated irradiation of equal fractions with a gap of 6 h. The MRC5 cells were supplemented with the media of irradiated cells and their micronucleus frequency was determined. The micronucleus frequency after single and fractionated irradiation did not vary significantly in the MRC5 cells conditioned with autologous or QU-DB cell-irradiated media, except for 4Gy where the frequency of micronucleated cells was lower in those MRC5 cells cultured in the media of QU-DB-exposed with a single dose of 4Gy. Our study demonstrates that the radiation-induced bystander effect was almost similar after single acute and fractionated exposure in MRC5 cells. (author)

  6. Clinical and immunologic effects of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in refractory rheumatoid arthritis

    Trentham, D.E.; Belli, J.A.; Anderson, R.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Goetzl, E.J.; David, J.R.; Austen, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Ten patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were given 3000 rad of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in an uncontrolled therapeutic trial. Total lymphoid irradiation was associated with objective evidence of considerable clinical improvement in eight patients and with reduced blood lymphocyte counts in all 10. On completion of irradiation, there was an abrogation of lymphocyte reactivity in vitro in the patients with clinical responses, but abnormal antibody activities characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis and normal components of humoral immunity were not suppressed. Partial recrudescence of arthritis occurred shortly after a year after the completion of irradiation and was paralleled by a restitution of lymphocyte concentrations and responsiveness to mitogens to levels similar to those observed before irradiation. These data provide further evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and demonstrate that total lymphoid irradiation can induce temporary relief, but they do not ascertain whether the natural history of this disease was altered

  7. Clinical and immunologic effects of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in refractory rheumatoid arthritis

    Trentham, D.E.; Belli, J.A.; Anderson, R.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Goetzl, E.J.; David, J.R.; Austen, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Ten patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were given 3000 rad of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in an uncontrolled therapeutic trial. Total lymphoid irradiation was associated with objective evidence of considerable clinical improvement in eight patients and with reduced blood lymphocyte counts in all 10. On completion of irradiation, there was an abrogation of lymphocyte reactivity in vitro in the patients with clinical responses, but abnormal antibody activities characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis and normal components of humoral immunity were not suppressed. Partial recrudescence of arthritis occurred shortly before a year after the completion of irradiation and was paralleled by a restitution of lymphocyte concentrations and responsiveness to mitogens to levels similar to those observed before irradiation. These data provide further evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and demonstrate that total lymphoid irradiation can induce temporary relief, but they do not ascertain whether the natural history of this disease was altered

  8. Boll weevil: experimental sterilization of large numbers by fractionated irradiation

    Haynes, J.W.; Wright, J.E.; Davich, T.B.; Roberson, J.; Griffin, J.G.; Darden, E.

    1978-01-01

    Boll weevils, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman, 9 days after egg implantation in the larval diet were transported from the Boll Weevil Research Laboratory, Mississippi State, MS, to the Comparative Animal Research Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, and irradiated with 6.9 krad (test 1) or 7.2 krad (test 2) of 60 Co gamma rays delivered in 25 equal doses over 100 h. In test 1, from 600 individual pairs of T (treated) males x N (normal) females, only 114 eggs hatched from a sample of 950 eggs, and 47 adults emerged from a sample of 1042 eggs. Also, from 600 pairs of T females x N males, 6 eggs hatched of a sample of 6 eggs and 12 adults emerged from a sample of 20 eggs. In test 2, from 700 individual pairs of T males x N females, 54 eggs hatched from a sample of 1510, and 10 adults emerged from a sample of 1703 eggs. Also, in T females x N males matings, 1 egg hatched of a sample of 3, and no adults emerged from a sample of 4. Transportation and handling in the 2nd test reduced adult emergence an avg of 49%. Thus the 2 replicates in test 2 resulted in 3.4 x 10 5 and 4.3 x 10 5 irradiated weevils emerging/day for 7 days. Bacterial contamination of weevils was low

  9. Effect of low molecular fraction of thymus humoral factor on blood formation processes of irradiated mice

    Stolyarova, T.V.; Skobel'tsyna, E.S.; Grinberg, S.M.; Kruglikov, I.L.; Korotaev, G.K.; Tepelina, O.M.; Il'ina, T.I.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of low-molecular fraction of thymus humoral factor on blood formation in mice irradiated at 4 Gy was studied. It is shown that injection of low-molecular fraction of thymus hymoral factor to irradiated animals affects proliferative processes in spleen and bone marrow, however the degree of the effect depends on the injection scheme of the preparation. Application of mathematical planning methods of the experiment enables to analyze various injection schemes of low-molecular fraction of thymus humoral factor on the investigated indices. The optimal scheme of preparation injection is determined: 1st injection with the dose of 10 mkg/kg following 4 hour after irradiation, 2d injection - with the same dose in 7-21 days

  10. The clinical research on fractionated irradiation treatment with X knife in patients of PD

    Wei Pengxiang; Chen Xu; Ai Quanshan; Xia Jiyong; Yang Jiongda; Chen Binghuan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore X knife treatment methods and to seek a new effective way for PD therapy. Methods: Sixteen patients of PD were treated by performing VIM with 2 times of X knife fractionated irradiation (interval, 24 h) to a total dose of 140 Gy, and 8 patients of PD were treated by performing VIM with 3 times of X knife fractionated irradiation (interval, 24 h) to a total of dose of 165 Gy. Results: During 3-24 months follow-up after X knife treatment, tremor was stopped in 19 patients and was relived significantly in 5 patients. Rigidity and bradykinesia of PD were relieved slightly. No complications were observed. Conclusion: To perform VIM with X knife fractionated irradiation can be safely and effectively used to treat PD. The tremor of PD can be relieved slightly

  11. Histopathological changes in the irradiated normal organs of guinea pigs with conventional fractionation and hyperfractionation

    Inomata, Taisuke; Itoh, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Nobuaki

    1998-01-01

    Guinea pigs were divided into groups according to four irradiation schedules : 2 Gy/3 Gy x 1/day, five fractions/week, total 80 Gy/81 Gy (A/C group) and 1.0 Gy/1.5 Gy x 2/day, ten fractions/week, total 80 Gy/81 Gy (B/D group). The A group and the C group pathologically caused severe damage in the kidney six and three months after irradiation, respectively. In the B group pathological analysis suggested that only slight-to-moderate changes were occurred in the Bowman's capsule. The D group caused slight damage in the kidney six months after irradiation. Hyperfractionation (B/D group) used in this protocol can clearly reduce radiation damage in the kidney of guinea pigs as compared with conventional fractionation (A/C group). (author)

  12. Greater-than-Class C low-level waste characterization. Appendix G: Evaluation of potential for greater-than-Class C classification of irradiated hardware generated by utility-operated reactors

    Cline, J.E.

    1991-08-01

    This study compiles and evaluates data from many sources to expand a base of data from which to estimate the activity concentrations and volumes of greater-than-Class C low-level waste that the Department of Energy will receive from the commercial power industry. Sources of these data include measurements of irradiated hardware made by or for the utilities that was classified for disposal in commercial burial sites, measurements of neutron flux in the appropriate regions of the reactor pressure vessel, analyses of elemental constituents of the particular structural material used for the components, and the activation analysis calculations done for hardware. Evaluations include results and assumptions in the activation analyses. Sections of this report and the appendices present interpretation of data and the classification definitions and requirements

  13. Role of Rad52 in fractionated irradiation induced signaling in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells

    Ghosh, Somnath; Krishna, Malini

    2012-01-01

    The effect of fractionated doses of γ-irradiation (2 Gy per fraction over 5 days), as delivered in cancer radiotherapy, was compared with acute doses of 10 and 2 Gy, in A549 cells. A549 cells were found to be relatively more radioresistant if the 10 Gy dose was delivered as a fractionated regimen. Microarray analysis showed upregulation of DNA repair and cell cycle arrest genes in the cells exposed to fractionated irradiation. There was intense activation of DNA repair pathway-associated genes (DNA-PK, ATM, Rad52, MLH1 and BRCA1), efficient DNA repair and phospho-p53 was found to be translocated to the nucleus of A549 cells exposed to fractionated irradiation. MCF-7 cells responded differently in fractionated regimen. Silencing of the Rad52 gene in fractionated group of A549 cells made the cells radiosensitive. The above result indicated increased radioresistance in A549 cells due to the activation of Rad52 gene.

  14. Dietary enhancement of intestinal radioresistance during fractionated irradiation

    Pageau, R.; St-Pierre, C.

    1978-01-01

    Rats fed laboratory chow or elemental diet 3 were given fractions of 240 rads of 60 Co γ radiation abdominally (1200 rads/week) until all animals had died. Changes in appetite, body weight, and mortality were monitored as a function of the cumulative dose received. More radiation was needed in the diet-fed group to achieve both 0 and 100% mortality, a difference of 37% at the mean lethal dose level. Both groups developed similar progressive anorexia but the diet-fed animals lost weight more slowly. Data indicate that basic intestinal radioresistance is enhanced by feeding the elemental diet

  15. Monitoring PAI-1 and VEGF Levels in 6 Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Xenografts During Fractionated Irradiation

    Bayer, Christine; Kielow, Achim; Schilling, Daniela; Maftei, Constantin-Alin; Zips, Daniel; Yaromina, Ala; Baumann, Michael; Molls, Michael; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that the plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are regulated by hypoxia and irradiation and are involved in neoangiogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo whether changes in PAI-1 and VEGF during fractionated irradiation could predict for radiation resistance. Methods and Materials: Six xenografted tumor lines from human squamous cell carcinomas (HSCC) of the head and neck were irradiated with 0, 3, 5, 10, and 15 daily fractions of 2 Gy. The PAI-1 and VEGF antigen levels in tumor lysates were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The amounts of PAI-1 and VEGF were compared with the dose to cure 50% of tumors (TCD 50 ). Colocalization of PAI-1, pimonidazole (hypoxia), CD31 (endothelium), and Hoechst 33342 (perfusion) was examined by immunofluorescence. Results: Human PAI-1 and VEGF (hVEGF) expression levels were induced by fractionated irradiation in UT-SCC-15, UT-SCC-14, and UT-SCC-5 tumors, and mouse VEGF (msVEGF) was induced only in UT-SCC-5 tumors. High hVEGF levels were significantly associated with radiation sensitivity after 5 fractions (P=.021), and high msVEGF levels were significantly associated with radiation resistance after 10 fractions (P=.007). PAI-1 staining was observed in the extracellular matrix, the cytoplasm of fibroblast-like stroma cells, and individual tumor cells at all doses of irradiation. Colocalization studies showed PAI-1 staining close to microvessels. Conclusions: These results indicate that the concentration of tumor-specific and host-specific VEGF during fractionated irradiation could provide considerably divergent information for the outcome of radiation therapy.

  16. Curcumin Stimulates the Antioxidant Mechanisms in Mouse Skin Exposed to Fractionated γ-Irradiation

    Ganesh Chandra Jagetia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractionated irradiation is one of the important radiotherapy regimens to treat different types of neoplasia. Despite of the immense therapeutic gains accrued by delivering fractionated irradiation to tumors, the radiation burden on skin increases significantly. Low doses of irradiation to skin adversely affect its molecular and metabolic status. The use of antioxidant/s may help to alleviate the radiation-induced changes in the skin and allow delivering a higher dose of radiation to attain better therapeutic gains. Curcumin is an antioxidant and a free radical scavenging dietary supplement, commonly used as a flavoring agent in curries. Therefore, the effect of 100 mg/kg body weight curcumin was studied on the antioxidant status of mice skin exposed to a total dose of 10, 20 and 40 Gy γ-radiation below the rib cage delivered as a single fraction of 2 Gy per day for 5, 10 or 20 days. Skin biopsies from both the curcumin treated or untreated irradiated groups were collected for the biochemical estimations at various post-irradiation times. The irradiation of animals caused a dose dependent decline in the glutathione concentration, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activities and increased the lipid peroxidation in the irradiated skin. Curcumin treatment before irradiation resulted in a significant rise in the glutathione concentration and activities of both the glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymes in mouse skin, whereas lipid peroxidation declined significantly. The present study indicates that curcumin treatment increased the antioxidant status of mouse exposed to different doses of fractionated γ-radiation.

  17. Effect-independent measures of tissue responses to fractionated irradiation

    Thames, H.D. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Tissue repair factors measure the sparing that can be achieved from dose fractionation in the absence of proliferation. Four repair factors are analysed in these terms: Fsub(R),Fsub(rec), the ratio of linear-quadratic survival model parameters β/α and the half-time Tsub(1/2) for intracellular repair processes. Theoretically, Fsub(R) and Fsub(rec) are increasing functions of D 1 , and thus depend on level of effect. This is confirmed by analysis of skin reactions after multifractionated radiation. By contrast, β/α is effect-independent as a measure of repair capacity in skin, gut, and bone marrow, tissues for which it is reasonable to assume that survival of identifiable target cells is the primary determinant of the endpoint. For a functional endpoint not clearly connected with the depletion of a specific target-cell population (late fibrotic reactions in the kidney), there was an increase in β/α with increased levels of injury, but this was statistically insignificant. Tsub(1/2) is independent of fraction size in skin, gut, and spinal cord, and is longer (1.5 hours) in the late-reacting tissues (lung and spinal cord) than in those that react acutely (Tsub(1/2) less than 1 hour), with skin as the exception (Tsub(1/2) approx. 1.3 hours). (author)

  18. Long-term survival of skin allografts in mice treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation

    Slavin, S.; Strober, S.; Fuks, Z.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1976-01-01

    Treatment of recipient Balb/c mice with fractionated, high-dose total lymphoid irradiation, a procedure commonly used in the therapy of human malignant lymphomas, resulted in fivefold prolongation of the survival of C57BL/Ka skin allografts despite major histocompatibility differences between the strains (H-2/sup d/ and H-2/sup b/, respectively). Infusion of 10 7 (C57BL/Ka x Balb/c)F 1 bone marrow cells after total lymphoid irradiation further prolonged C57BL/Ka skin graft survival to more than 120 days. Total lymphoid irradiation may eventually prove useful in clinical organ transplantation

  19. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF IRRADIATION-DRIVEN HYDROGEN ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION IN ANALOGS OF PROTOPLANETARY HYDROUS SILICATE DUST

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Remusat, Laurent [IMPMC, CNRS UMR 7590, Sorbonne Universités, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, IRD, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, CP 52, 57 rue Cuvier, Paris F-75231 (France); Laurent, Boris; Leroux, Hugues, E-mail: mathieu.roskosz@mnhn.fr [Unité Matériaux et Transformations, Université Lille 1, CNRS UMR 8207, Bâtiment C6, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2016-11-20

    The origin of hydrogen in chondritic components is poorly understood. Their isotopic composition is heavier than the solar nebula gas. In addition, in most meteorites, hydrous silicates are found to be lighter than the coexisting organic matter. Ionizing irradiation recently emerged as an efficient hydrogen fractionating process in organics, but its effect on H-bearing silicates remains essentially unknown. We report the evolution of the D/H of hydrous silicates experimentally irradiated by electrons. Thin films of amorphous silica, amorphous “serpentine,” and pellets of crystalline muscovite were irradiated at 4 and 30 keV. For all samples, irradiation leads to a large hydrogen loss correlated with a moderate deuterium enrichment of the solid residue. The entire data set can be described by a Rayleigh distillation. The calculated fractionation factor is consistent with a kinetically controlled fractionation during the loss of hydrogen. Furthermore, for a given ionizing condition, the deuteration of the silicate residues is much lower than the deuteration measured on irradiated organic macromolecules. These results provide firm evidence of the limitations of ionizing irradiation as a driving mechanism for D-enrichment of silicate materials. The isotopic composition of the silicate dust cannot rise from a protosolar to a chondritic signature during solar irradiations. More importantly, these results imply that irradiation of the disk naturally induces a strong decoupling of the isotopic signatures of coexisting organics and silicates. This decoupling is consistent with the systematic difference observed between the heavy organic matter and the lighter water typically associated with minerals in the matrix of most carbonaceous chondrites.

  20. Prooxidate - antioxidate homeostasis in guinea pigs after fractional low-dose irradiation

    Baraboj, V.A.; Olyijnik, S.A.; Khmelevs'kij, Yi.V.

    1993-01-01

    We studied the influence of fractional total irradiation in the total dose of 1 Gy on the amount of lipids peroxide oxidation (LPO) products and ascorbic acid in the spleen, intestine and brain of guinea-pigs. The obtained date suggest that it is advisable to use ascorbic acid to correct postirradiation changes in the organism exposed to small doses of ionizing radiation

  1. Annual rate of hearing loss falls after fractionated stereotactic irradiation for vestibular schwannoma

    Sakamoto, Touru; Shirato, Hiroki; Takeichi, Norihito; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Fukuda, Satoshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The rate of hearing loss in a population before and after irradiation was investigated to determine the effect of irradiation on hearing impairment. Methods and materials: In 72 patients with vestibular schwannoma who received fractionated stereotactic irradiation from 1992 to 1999, 21 had had their hearing levels examined 3 months or more before the treatment. The mean time between the initial examination and treatment was 18.6 months (range: 3-89 months), and the mean time between treatment and the last follow-up was 24.2 months (12-69 months). Thirty-six to 50 Gy in 20-25 fractions over 5 to 6 weeks was given using an X-ray beam from a linear accelerator. Pure tone average (PTA) was measured using the mean hearing level at five frequencies, and the annual rate of hearing loss was defined as [(hearing loss in PTA(dB))/(follow-up period (months)x12)]. Results: The actual cumulative curve of decrease in tumor size of 2 mm or more was 38.3% at 2 years and 80.0% at 3 years. The mean of hearing loss in PTA was 11.6±10.3 dB (-1 to 35 dB) from the initial examination to the start of irradiation and 11.9±14.4 dB (-14 to 37 dB) from the start of irradiation to the last follow-up. The mean annual rates of hearing loss before irradiation and in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th years after irradiation were, respectively, 18.6, 11.2, 6.2, 5.1, and 5.0 dB/year. The annual rates of hearing loss in the 2nd year (P=0.025) and 3rd year (P=0.018) were significantly slower than the rate before irradiation. Conclusions: The mean annual rate of hearing loss was higher before irradiation than after irradiation, and hearing loss slowed rather than accelerated after irradiation. Although hearing loss after the treatment was usually permanent, fractionated stereotactic irradiation was suggested to be effective to lower the rate of hearing loss

  2. Histologic alterations of the normal bladder wall following to variably fractionated irradiation - an experimentation on animals

    Fueller, J.; Fritzsche, V.; Kob, D.; Arndt, J.; Kriester, A.; Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Jena

    1986-01-01

    The histopathologic alterations of the bladder wall were investigated in 180 rabbits irradiated with different fractionations and total focal doses. Animals sacrified one week after the end of irradiation showed alterations of the urothelium (desquamation, increased polymorphism of nuclei vacuolizations) as well as oedematous and hyperemic reactions in submucosa and muscularis. These alterations became stronger when the single and total focal dose and the ret values were increased. Animals sacrified three to six months after the end of irradiation showed dystrophic-sclerotic processes as well as vascular obliterations in the submucosa and muscularis. The alterations were only clearly visible in case of a total focal dose of at least 30 Gy. With regard to a minimization of histopathologic alterations of the bladder wall, a fractionation of 1.5 Gy per day has to be considered as favorable in radiotherapy of the carcinoma of the urinary bladder. (orig.) [de

  3. A non-invasive method for fractionated steriotactic irradiation of brain tumors with linear accelerator

    Hariz, M.I.; Laitinen, L.V.; Henriksson, R.; Saeterborg, N.-E.; Loefroth, P.-O.

    1990-01-01

    A new technique for fractionated stereotactic irradiation of intracranial lesions is described. The treatment is based on a versatile, non-invasive interface for stereotactic localization of the brain target imaged by computed tomography (CT), angiography or magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), and subsequent repetitive stereotactic irradiation of the target using a linear accelerator. The fractionation of the stereotactic irradiation was intended to meet the requirements of the basic principles of radiobiology. The radiophysical evaluation using phantoms, and the clinical results in a small number of patients, demonstrated a good reproducibilit between repeated positionings of the target in the isocenter of the accelerator, and a high degree of accuracy in the treatment of brain lesions. (authors). 28 refs.; 11 figs.; 1 tab

  4. Chromosomal aberrations in Cynomolgus peripheral lymphocytes during and after fractionated whole-body γ-irradiation

    Guedeney, G.; Malarbet, J.L.; Doloy, M.T.

    1989-01-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were exposed to fractionated whole-body γ-irradiation at high and low dose rates for 4 or 5 weeks. The time-dependence of chromosomal aberrations was studied in relation to the number of lymphocytes during irradiation and after exposure for periods of up to about 600 days for chromosomal aberrations and 200 days for lymphocyte counts. Additivity of the daily effects on the number of chromosomal aberrations was observed during the exposures. Immediately after the end of the exposures the number of chromosomal aberrations decreased to reach low values. The disappearance of chromosomal aberrations seemed to be related to recovery of the lymphocyte counts. The data presented here emphasize the different kinetic patterns of chromosomal aberrations after fractionated and acute irradiation. (author)

  5. Low-level waste management

    Levin, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    An overview of the current situation in the United States and a look to the future of low-level waste management are presented. Current problems and challenges are discussed, such as: the need of additional disposal sites in the future; risks and costs involved in transport of low-level wastes; reduction of low-level waste volume through smelting, incineration, and storage for wastes containing nuclides with short half lives; development of a national policy for the management of low-level waste, and its implementation through a sensible system of regulations. Establishing a success with low-level waste management should provide the momentum and public confidence needed to continue on and to resolve the technical and politically more difficult low-level waste problems

  6. Changes in the fraction of total hypoxia and hypoxia subtypes in human squamous cell carcinomas upon fractionated irradiation: Evaluation using pattern recognition in microcirculatory supply units

    Maftei, Constantin-Alin; Bayer, Christine; Shi, Kuangyu; Astner, Sabrina T.; Vaupel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Evaluate changes in total hypoxia and hypoxia subtypes in vital tumor tissue of human head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (hHNSCC) upon fractionated irradiation. Materials and methods: Xenograft tumors were generated from 5 hHNSCC cell lines (UT-SCC-15, FaDu, SAS, UT-SCC-5 and UT-SCC-14). Hypoxia subtypes were quantified in cryosections based on (immuno-)fluorescent marker distribution patterns of Hoechst 33342 (perfusion), pimonidazole (hypoxia) and CD31 (endothelium) in microcirculatory supply units (MCSUs). Tumors were irradiated with 5 or 10 fractions of 2 Gy, 5×/week. Results: Upon irradiation with 10 fractions, the overall fraction of hypoxic MCSUs decreased in UT-SCC-15, FaDu and SAS, remained the same in UT-SCC-5 and increased in UT-SCC-14. Decreases were observed in the proportion of chronically hypoxic MCSUs in UT-SCC-15, in the fraction of acutely hypoxic MCSUs in UT-SCC-15 and SAS, and in the percentage of hypoxemically hypoxic MCSUs in SAS tumors. After irradiation with 5 fractions, there were no significant changes in hypoxia subtypes. Changes in the overall fraction of hypoxic MCSUs were comparable to corresponding alterations in the proportions of acutely hypoxic MCSUs. There was no correlation between radiation resistance (TCD 50 ) and any of the investigated hypoxic fractions upon fractionated irradiation. Conclusions: This study shows that there are large alterations in the fractions of hypoxia subtypes upon irradiation that can differ from changes in the overall fraction of hypoxic MCSUs.

  7. Repair of skin damage during fractionated irradiation with gamma rays and low-LET carbon ions

    Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Uzawa, Akiko; Takai, Nobuhiko; Fukawa, Takeshi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Aoki, Mizuho; Hirayama, Ryoichi

    2006-01-01

    In clinical use of carbon-ion beams, a deep-seated tumor is irradiated with a Spread-Out Bragg peak (SOBP) with a high-linear energy transfer (LET) feature, whereas surface skin is irradiated with an entrance plateau, the LET of which is lower than that of the peak. The repair kinetics of murine skin damage caused by an entrance plateau of carbon ions was compared with that caused by photons using a scheme of daily fractionated doses followed by a top-up dose. Right hind legs received local irradiations with either 20 keV/μm carbon ions or γ rays. The skin reaction of the irradiated legs was scored every other day up to Day 35 using a scoring scale that consisted of 10 steps, ranging from 0.5 to 5.0. An isoeffect dose to produce a skin reaction score of 3.0 was used to obtain a total dose and a top-up dose for each fractionation. Dependence on a preceding dose and on the time interval of a top-up dose was examined using γ rays. For fractionated γ rays, the total dose linearly increased while the top-up dose linearly decreased with an increase in the number of fractions. The magnitude of damage repair depended on the size of dose per fraction, and was larger for 5.2 Gy than 12.5 Gy. The total dose of carbon ions with 5.2 Gy per fraction did not change till 2 fractions, but abruptly increased at the 3rd fraction. Factors such as rapid repopulation, induced repair and cell cycle synchronization are possible explanations for the abrupt increase. As an abrupt increase/decrease of normal tissue damage could be caused by changing the number of fractions in carbon-ion radiotherapy, we conclude that, unlike photon therapy, skin damage should be carefully studied when the number of fractions is changed in new clinical trials. (author)

  8. Beam Attenuators and the Risk of Unrecognized Large-Fraction Irradiation of Critical Tissues

    Luka, S.; Marks, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiation beam attenuators led to radiation injury of the spinal cord in one patient and of the peripheral nerve in another due to unsuspected large-fraction irradiation. The anatomic distribution of radiation dose was reconstructed in the sagittal plane for the patient who developed radiation myelopathy and in the axial plane for the patient who developed peripheral neuropathy. The actual dose delivered to the injured structure in each patient was taken from the dose distribution and recorded along with the time, number of fractions, and dose per fraction. The patient who developed radiation myelopathy received a total of 46.5 Gy in twenty-three 2.1 Gy fractions in 31 days to the upper cervical spinal cord where the thickness of the neck was less than the central axis thickness due to cervical lordosis and absence of a posterior compensating filter. The patient who developed peripheral neuropathy received 55 Gy in twenty-five 2.2 Gy fractions in 50 days to the femoral nerve using bolus over the groins and an anterior one-half value layer Cerrobend pelvic block to bias the dose anteriorly. Compensating filters and other beam attenuators should be used with caution because they may result in unsuspected large-fraction irradiation and total doses of radiation that exceed the tolerance of critical structures.

  9. Beam Attenuators and the Risk of Unrecognized Large-Fraction Irradiation of Critical Tissues

    Luka, S.; Marks, J.E.

    2015-01-15

    The use of radiation beam attenuators led to radiation injury of the spinal cord in one patient and of the peripheral nerve in another due to unsuspected large-fraction irradiation. The anatomic distribution of radiation dose was reconstructed in the sagittal plane for the patient who developed radiation myelopathy and in the axial plane for the patient who developed peripheral neuropathy. The actual dose delivered to the injured structure in each patient was taken from the dose distribution and recorded along with the time, number of fractions, and dose per fraction. The patient who developed radiation myelopathy received a total of 46.5 Gy in twenty-three 2.1 Gy fractions in 31 days to the upper cervical spinal cord where the thickness of the neck was less than the central axis thickness due to cervical lordosis and absence of a posterior compensating filter. The patient who developed peripheral neuropathy received 55 Gy in twenty-five 2.2 Gy fractions in 50 days to the femoral nerve using bolus over the groins and an anterior one-half value layer Cerrobend pelvic block to bias the dose anteriorly. Compensating filters and other beam attenuators should be used with caution because they may result in unsuspected large-fraction irradiation and total doses of radiation that exceed the tolerance of critical structures.

  10. Altered fractionation of hemithorax irradiation for pleural mesothelioma and failure patterns after treatment

    Holsti, L.R. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Pyrhoenen, S. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Kajanti, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Maentylae, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Mattson, K. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Div. of Pulmonary Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Maasilta, P. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Div. of Pulmonary Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Kivisaari, L. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland)

    1997-09-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare malignancy with a bleak prognosis. The role of radiotherapy has not yet been clarified. Our aim was to study the effect of altered fractionation on mesothelioma. We have treated 57 patients, 41 males and 16 females, with hemithorax irradiation with six different fractionation schedules. All the patients have been included in a combined modality program consisting of surgery followed by chemotherapy and finally by hemithorax irradiation. The radiotherapy schedules used were: I. Conventional fractionation of 20 Gy in 10 fractions over 12 days. II, Split-course radiotherapy 55 Gy in 25 fractions of 2.2 Gy over 7 weeks (a two weeks rest halfways) followed by a boost dose of 15 Gy over 8 days to the major tumour area. III. Hyperfractionation of 70 Gy over 7 weeks, 1.25 Gy BID with a 6-h interval and a 10-day rest halfways. IV. Combined hyperfractionation and hypofractionation, 35 Gy hyperfractionation in 28 fractions (1.25 Gy BID with a 6-h interval) over three weeks followed by 36 Gy hypofractionation 9 fractions of 4 Gy given every other day over 3 weeks to the major tumour areas only. V. Hypofractionation of 38.5 Gy over 15 days (9x3.5 Gy). VI. Combined conventional radiotherapy and hypofractionation with 20 Gy given conventionally in 10 fractions followed by 10 fractions of 3 Gy over two weeks, overall time 4 weeks. The 2-year survival rate of all patients was 21% and the 5-year survival rate 9%. Two patients are still alive more than 6 and 9 years after radiotherapy. Progression occurred after surgery in four patients, during and after chemotherapy in 22 patients and after completed radiotherapy in 29 patients. The pattern of progression was similar in each treatment group. (orig.).

  11. Fractionated homogenous total-body irradiation prior to bone marrow transplantation

    Duehmke, E; Brix, F; Hebbinghaus, D; Jensen, M; Wendhausen, H; Schmitz, N

    1985-03-01

    At the University of Kiel, myeloid and acute lymphatic leukemia is treated since 1983 by total-body irradiation applied prior to bone marrow transplantation. Dose deviations in the midplane caused by the irregular surface and tissue inhomogeneities of the patient are reduced down to +-3.5% compared to the central ray, with the help of CT-based individual compensators. This method prevents above all an excessive dose to the lungs. The radiobiologic advantages of fractionated irradiation have been employed for all patients treated hitherto (n = 9). At present, a total body dose of 12 Gy in six fractions is applied within three days. There were no undesired acute radiogenic reactions except a mild acute mucositis found in all patients. Chronic side effects, especially in the lungs, were not demonstrated, too. However, the average follow-up time of 149 days has been rather short. One patient died from relapse of leukemia after a total dose of 10 Gy, another patient died because the transplanted bone marrow was rejected, and a third died from catheter sepsis. Six out of nine patients are in complete remission with a maximum index of Karnofsky. The limited experiences gained hitherto show that the homogeneous accelerated-fractionated total-body irradiation offers essential advantages compared to non-compensated single dose irradiation with respect to the prevention of undesired radiogenic effects in sound tissues and that its therapeutic efficacy is at least the same.

  12. Combined treatment of the immunoconjugate bivatuzumab mertansine and fractionated irradiation improves local tumour control in vivo

    Gurtner, Kristin; Hessel, Franziska; Eicheler, Wolfgang; Dörfler, Annegret; Zips, Daniel; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: To test whether BIWI 1 (bivatuzumab mertansine), an immunoconjugate of the humanized anti-CD44v6 monoclonal antibody BIWA 4 and the maytansinoid DM1, given simultaneously to fractionated irradiation improves local tumour control in vivo compared with irradiation alone. Material and methods: For growth delay, FaDu tumours were treated with 5 intravenous injections (daily) of phosphate buffered saline (PBS, control), BIWA 4 (monoclonal antibody against CD44v6) or BIWI 1 (bivatuzumab mertansine) at two different dose levels (50 μg/kg DM1 and 100 μg/kg DM1). For local tumour control, FaDu tumours received fractionated irradiation (5f/5d) with simultaneous PBS, BIWA 4 or BIWI 1 (two dose levels). Results: BIWI 1 significantly improved local tumour control after irradiation with 5 fractions already in the lower concentration. The dose modifying factor of 1.9 is substantial compared to the majority of other modifiers of radiation response. Conclusion: Because of the magnitude of the curative effect, this approach is highly promising and should be further evaluated using similar combinations with improved tumour-specificity.

  13. The effects of single and fractionated irradiation of the trunk in rats

    Giri, P.G.S.; Kimler, B.F.; Giri, U.P.; Cox, G.G.; Reddy, E.K.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of whole trunk irradiation on the development of functional damage was investigated in rats. Rats were restrained without anesthesia such that only the trunk (from clavicle to pelvic girdle) was irradiated with a Cs-137 irradiator at a dose rate of 8.5 Gy/min. Rats received single doses of 9.4, 11.7, 14.1, or 16.4 Gy; or total doses of 11.7, 14.1, 16.4, 18.8, or 21.1 Gy in two equal fractions separated by 4-6 hr. Except for the highest dose in both schedules, there was no lethality; 16.4 Gy reduced survival to 45% and 21.1 Gy in two fractions reduced survival to 77% by day 150. From day 10 to day 150 there was a dose-dependent reduction in weight for both schedules, with the two-dose response displaced from the single dose response by ≅ 6 Gy. A whole-body plethysmograph was used to measure respiration frequency. There was no increase in respiration frequency compared to control animals, except for the highest single dose - 16.4 Gy producing an increase that was manifested from 10 to 150 days. The authors conclude that, in this rat trunk irradiation model, fractionation into two equal doses separated by 4-6 hr produces a sparing effect of ≅ 6 Gy as measured by delay in weight gain (presumably a result of irradiation of the abdomen); and ≥ 6 Gy as measured by survival and increased respiration frequency (a result of irradiation of the thorax)

  14. Audiological assessment before and after fractionated stereotactic irradiation for vestibular schwannoma

    Sakamoto, T.; Sato, N.; Inuyama, Y.; Shirato, H.; Kagei, K.; Fukuda, S.; Miyasaka, K.; Sawamura, Y.; Suzuki, K.; Takizawa, H.; Hokunan, K.; Isu, T.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To find the audiological outcome after LINAC-based fractionated stereotactic irradiation (STI). Materials and methods: Twenty-four patients with vestibular schwannoma treated by fractionated STI between 1991 and 1997 had measurable hearing before STI and were followed audiologically for more than 6 months. The pure tone average (PTA) was measured by averaging the air-conduction threshold for five main frequencies (250-4000 Hz) before and periodically after STI in the 24 patients. Several possible prognostic factors for hearing preservation (defined as a PTA change at the last follow-up of less than 10 dB) were investigated. The median follow-up time was 22 months, ranging from 5 to 69 months. The irradiation schedule was 36 Gy in 20 fractions in 5 weeks to 44 Gy in 22 fractions in 6 weeks followed by 4 Gy/1 fraction boost. Results: The pure tone average before STI was distributed from 7 to 73 dB. Fifty percent of patients showed a change in PTA of less than 10 dB, 79.2% of patients showed a change in PTA of less than 20 dB and 20.8% of patients showed a change in PTA of more than 21 dB at the last follow-up. Only one patient (4%) became deaf. Cases with a sudden loss of hearing were more likely to experience hearing preservation than those with gradual loss of hearing (P<0.05). The mean age was younger in patients whose hearing was preserved (P<0.05). Poor pretreatment PTA appeared to linearly correspond to the changes in PTA (regression coefficient 0.78). The size of the tumor was not related to the change in PTA. No relationship was observed between the maximum or peripheral dose and the PTA change. The real benefit of stereotactic boost after small-field fractionated irradiation was not certain. Conclusion: Fractionated STI produced a hearing preservation rate compatible with meticulously collimated multi-spots single fraction irradiation. Further follow-up is required to confirm the long-term benefits of fractionation. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier

  15. Preparing, Loading and Shipping Irradiated Metals in Canisters Classified as Remote-Handled (RH) Low-Level Waste (LLW) From Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    McClelland, B.C.; Moore, T.D.

    2006-01-01

    Irradiated metals, classified as remote-handled low-level waste generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, were containerised in various sized canisters for long-term storage. The legacy waste canisters were placed in below-grade wells located at the 7827 Facility until a pathway for final disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) could be identified and approved. Once the pathway was approved, WESKEM, LLC was selected by Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC to prepare, load, and ship these canisters from ORNL to the NTS. This paper details some of the technical challenges encountered during the retrieval process and solutions implemented to ensure the waste was safely and efficiently over-packed and shipped for final disposal. The technical challenges detailed in this paper include: 1) how to best perform canister/lanyard pre-lift inspections since some canisters had not been moved in ∼10 years, so deterioration was a concern; 2) replacing or removing damaged canister lanyards; 3) correcting a mis-cut waste canister lanyard resulting in a shielded overpack lid not seating properly; 4) retrieving a stuck canister; and 5) developing a path forward after an overstrained lanyard failed causing a well shield plug to fall and come in contact with a waste canister. Several of these methods can serve as positive lessons learned for other projects encountering similar situations. (authors)

  16. Effect of intra-peritoneal fludarabine on rat spinal cord tolerance to fractionated irradiation

    Gregoire, V; Ruifrok, A C.C.; Price, R E; Brock, W A; Hittelman, W N; Plunkett, W K; Ang, K K

    1995-07-01

    The effect of fludarabine (9-{beta}-d-arabinosyl-2-fluoroadenine-5'-monophosphate), an adenine nucleoside analogue, on the tolerance of the spinal cord to fractionated irradiation was studied in a rat model. Anesthesized female Fisher 344 rats received irradiation to 2 cm of the cervical spine with a telecobalt unit (dose rate 1.14 Gy/min). Radiation was administered in two, four or eight fractions spread over a 48-h period with or without fludarabine. Animals assigned to combined therapy received two daily intraperitoneal injections of fludarabine (150 mg/kg) given 3 h prior to the first daily radiation fraction. It was found that fludarabine reduced the iso-effect dose required to induce leg paresis at 9 months after irradiation for all fractionation schedules. Dose modification factors of 1.23, 1.29 and greater than 1.27 were obtained for two, four and eight fractions, respectively. Fitting the data with the direct analysis method of Thames et al. with an incomplete repair model [18] showed that the potentiating effect of fludarabine may be mediated through reduction in the number of 'tissue-rescuing units' (lnK). Alpha and {beta} values were slightly but not significantly decreased, whereas the ({alpha}({beta})) ratio was unchanged. These features suggest that fludarabine did not significantly inhibit cellular repair processes but rather reduced the spinal cord tolerance by a fixed additive toxic effect on the same target cells. In rodent models, the combination of fludarabine and fractionated radiation has previously been found to yield a therapeutic gain, i.e., the drug enhanced tumor response to a greater extent than it reduced normal tissue tolerance. However, given our results, caution should be exercised in extrapolating these findings to the clinic. Normal tissue reactions will have to be monitored rigorously in phase I clinical studies.

  17. Short-term irradiation of the glioblastoma with high-dosed fractions

    Hinkelbein, W.; Bruggmoser, G.; Schmidt, M.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1984-01-01

    Compared to surgery alone, postoperative radiotherapy leads with glioblastomas (grade IV gliomas) to a significant improvement of the therapeutic results. The prolongation of survival time, however, is to a large extent compensated by the therapy itself (it normally implicates hospitalisation). Therefore, we tested the efficiency of rapid course irradiation with high fractions. 70 patients were treated daily with individual fractions of 3.5 Gy, 4 to 6 fractions per week. The entire dose amounted to 31.5 to 38.5 Gy. The average survival time was 33.5 weeks corresponding to the survival time known from the combined surgical and radiotherapeutical treatment of glioblastomas. An effective increase in therapy-free survival time seems possible, especially when the entire focal dose does not exceed 35 Gy. It is remarkable that the patients with the maximum exposure did not have the longest survival times and rates. Living conditions for the patients were similar to those with conventional fractioning, or even better. Rapid course irradiation with high fractions and a limited total dose (35 Gy) presently is - apart from the accelerated superfractioning - a successful measure to prolong the therapyfree survival time for patients with grade IV gliomas. (orig.) [de

  18. Evaluation of the analgesic activity and safety of ketorolac in whole body fractionated gamma irradiated animals

    Sara Aly

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to evaluate the analgesic activity and the toxicity of ketorolac in normal and fractionated (1.5 Gy/day/4 days γ-irradiated animals. Determination of brain serotonin content and serum prostaglandin level were also undertaken. The analgesic activity was tested using formalin test, at three dose levels (15, 30 and 60 mg/kg after 1 and 7 days post radiation exposure. LD50 determinations and assessment of liver and kidney function tests were performed. Our results indicated marked analgesic effects on the early and late phases of nociception. Double treatment with ketorolac and irradiation increased brain serotonin content. The acute LD50 of ketorolac was decreased in irradiated animals as compared to the LD50 of normal animals. Double treatment with ketorolac and irradiation induced an elevation of gastric mucin content, urea and BUN levels on the 1st day post irradiation, whereas, albumin level was lowered and globulin level was elevated after 7 days post irradiation. Depending on this study the dose of ketorolac used for treating cancer patients addressed to radiotherapy should be reduced, however, this requires further clinical confirmation.

  19. Effective dose as an irritating influence during fractionated γ-irradiation

    Karpov, V.N.; Ushakov, I.B.; Davydov, B.I.

    1990-01-01

    The study of early neurological disturbances (END) in rats after fractionated γ-irradiation with doses of 37.5-225 Gy at dose rate of 30.11 Gy/min has demonstrated that the initial response of animals to pulse ionizing radiation is a function of the electric charge induced by ionizing radiation. A change in the probability of occurrence of each of the END symptoms, with the increased intervals between exposures, is merely an indirect indication of the eliminating mechanisms and is intricately connected with the irritating charge value. The proposed empiric relationships permit to correlate the probability of END symptom occurrence with the continuous quantitative parameter of fractionated irradiation, that is, with an effective dose as an analogue of the irritating effect

  20. Sterilization of boll weevil pupae with fractionated doses of gamma irradiation

    Haynes, J.W.; Mitlin, N.; Davich, T.B.; Dawson, J.R.; McGovern, W.L.; McKibben, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Fractionated doses of 6,250-8,000 rads of gamma irradiation administered to pupae of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh., sexually sterilized both sexes. Mortality of males thus treated with 6,250 and 8,000 rads via fractionation was 14% and 27% respectively, by 5 days posttreatment compared with 46% mortality when an equivalent acute dose was administered to newly emerged adults. Pheromone production of males irradiated at 6,250 rads was one-third that of the control for the first 4 days, but equal that of the control during 5-11 days posttreatment. This procedure lends itself to the large-scale sterilization of weevils needed in an eradication program. This technique is applicable to other insects that are highly susceptible to acute doses

  1. Large effect of irradiance on hydrogen isotope fractionation of alkenones in Emiliania huxleyi

    van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Benthien, Albert; French, Katherine L.; Epping, Eric; Zondervan, Ingrid; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Bijma, Jelle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogen isotopic (δD) composition of long-chain alkenones produced by certain haptophyte algae has been suggested as a potential proxy for reconstructing paleo sea surface salinity. However, environmental parameters other than salinity may also affect the δD of alkenones. We investigated the impact of the level of irradiance on hydrogen isotopic fractionation of alkenones versus growth water by cultivating two strains of the cosmopolitan haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi at different light intensities. The hydrogen isotope fractionation decreased by approximately 40‰ when irradiance was increased from 15 to 200 μmol photons m-2 s-1 above which it was relatively constant. The response is likely a direct effect of photosystem I and II activity as the relationship of the fractionation factor α versus light intensity can be described by an Eilers-Peeters photosynthesis model. This irradiance effect is in agreement with published δD data of alkenones derived from suspended particulate matter collected from different depths in the photic zone of the Gulf of California and the eastern tropical North Pacific. However, haptophyte algae tend to bloom at relatively high light intensities (>500 μmol photons m-2 s-1) occurring at the sea surface, at which hydrogen isotope fractionation is relatively constant and not affected by changes in light intensity. Alkenones accumulating in the sediment are likely mostly derived from these surface water haptophyte blooms, when the largest amount of biomass is produced. Therefore, the observed irradiance effect is unlikely to affect the applicability of the hydrogen isotopic composition of sedimentary long chain alkenones as a proxy for paleosalinity.

  2. A study of the effect of fractional gamma irradiation of leptospirae

    Vasilevska, M.; Khristova, M.; Yankova, N.; Pandev, I.

    1977-01-01

    In view of the theoretical and practical interest in obtaining antigens from killed leptospirae for immune or diagnostic serums, a two hour leptospiral culture from the pathogenic strain Pomona (Calapica) was fractionally gamma-irradiated with a total dose of 2 Mrad. Changes were observed in the size, motility and survival duration of the leptospiral strains. The results are interpreted and compared with those of single administration of the same dose, studied in a previous work. (author)

  3. Impact of drug permeability of blood-brain barrier after whole brain conventional fractionation irradiation

    Zhang Longzhen; Cao Yuandong; Chen Yong; Yu Changzhou; Zhuang Ming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of drug permeability in rat blood-brain barrier(BBB) after different doses of whole brain conventional fractionation irradiation in rats and provide the experimental basis for the optimum time of clinical chemotherapy. Methods: According to different irradiation doses, 100 adult Sprague-Dowley rats were divided randomly into 5 groups: the normal control group(0 Gy); 10 Gy; 20 Gy; 30 Gy; and 40 Gy group. All rats were exposed to conventional fractionation(2 Gy/d, 5 d/w) with 60 Co γ-ray. MTX(25 mg/kg) was injected through the tail mainline 16 hours after whole brain irradiation. Cerebrospinal fluid(CSF) and blood were collected 2 hours later. Those samples were used to assay MTX concentration using RP-HPLC. Results: MTX mean concentrations in CSF was 0.07, 0.08, 0.12, 0.24, 0.23 mg/L in the control, 10 Gy, 20 Gy, 30 Gy, 40 Gy groups, respectively. All the data was analyzed with rank test of transform. MTX concentration of CSF was significantly different except the control and 10 Gy, 30 Gy and 40 Gy group. MTX concentration of blood was not significantly different in all groups (P>0.05). Conclusions: Irradiation can directly damage the function of BBB. BBB would be opened gradually following the increase of irradiation dose. It could be considered as the optimum time of chemotherapy when the whole brain irradiation ranges from 20 Gy to 30 Gy. (authors)

  4. Treatment results by uneven fractionated irradiation, low-dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost, and intraoperative irradiation for malignant glioma

    Yamada, Shogo; Takai, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Kenji; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Kakuto, Yoshihisa; Hoshi, Akihiko; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko; Kayama, Takamasa; Yoshimoto, Takashi (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-08-01

    The prognosis of malignant glioma is extremely poor. We applied conventionally fractionated irradiation combined with 1-(4-aminio-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosourea (ACNU), uneven fractionated irradiation with ACNU, low dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost, and intraoperative irradiation against 110 malignant gliomas to investigate the efficacy of these methods as alternative treatments for malignant glioma. Although local tumor control by uneven fractionated irradiation was better than that by the other methods, no significant improvement was obtained in survival rates. As a result of multiple regression analysis, age and histology were major factors for survival rates, and the difference of treatment methods was not important. Both low-dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost and intraoperative irradiation showed little advantage because of the high risk of brain necrosis associated with them. (author).

  5. Changes in some blood lipid fractions in whole-body irradiated rats as influenced by some radioprotectors

    Yousri, R.M.; Roushdy, H.; Gawish, M.A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of sublethal and lethal total body gamma irradiation on some serum lipid fractions in male rats was investigated. The protective efficacy of estradiol and/or α-tocopherol was also studied. The results of this study demonstrate that the lethally irradiated rats showed significant alteration in serum triglycerides, cholesterol, total lipids and phospholipids level. Estradiol exerted a benefical effect on lipid fractions after one and two days post lethal α-irradiation (8 Gy). No consistent radioprotective effect of tocopherol could be detected on the levels of serum lipid fractions. This finding was also observed when both radioprotectors were used. (orig.) [de

  6. Accelerated repopulation of mouse tongue epithelium during fractionated irradiations or following single doses

    Doerr, W.; Kummermehr, J.

    1990-01-01

    Mouse tongue mucosa was established as an animal model to study repopulation after large single doses or during continuous irradiation. A top-up irradiation technique was used employing priming doses or fractionated treatment to the whole snout (300 kV X-rays) followed by local test doses (25 kV X-rays) to elicit denudation in a confined field of the inferior tongue surface. Clearcut quantal dose-response curves of ulcer incidence were obtained to all protocols; animal morbidity, i.e. body weight loss was minimal. Repopulation following priming doses of 10 and 13 Gy started with a delay of at least 3 days and then progressed rapidly to nearly restore original tissue tolerance by day 11. During continuous fractionation over 1 to 3 weeks with 5 fractions/week and doses per fraction of 2.5, 3 and 3.5 Gy, repopulation was small in week one but subsequently increased to fully compensate the weekly dose at all dose levels. Additional measurements of cell density during a 4 weeks course of 5 x 3 Gy or 5 x 4 Gy per week showed only moderate depletion to 67% of the control figures. The fact that rapid repopulation is achieved at relatively moderate damage levels should be taken into account when the timing of a treatment split is considered. (author). 18 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  7. Effects of low-dose fractionated external irradiation on metabolic and structural characteristics of rat thyroid

    Nadolnik, L.; Niatsetskaya, Z. [Institute of Biochemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Grodno (Belarus)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The problem of thyroid radiosensitivity to the effect of low dose external ionizing irradiation presently seems to be the least studied, and the experimental findings - the most contradictory. The aim of the work was to study the effects of long-term low-dose fractionated irradiation on the iodide metabolism and structure of the thyroid. Female Wistar rats weighing 140-160 g were irradiated 20 times (5 times a week, for 4 weeks) using a 60 Co installation. The single absorbed doses were 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 Gy and the total ones - 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0 Gy, respectively. The animals were decapitated after 1 day, 4 and 24 weeks following the last irradiation. The thyroid tissue was used to assay for thyro-peroxidase (T.P.O.) activity as well as total, protein -bound and free iodide concentrations. Microscopic and morphometric examination of histologic thyroid preparations was carried out. Blood was assayed for thyroxin (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations. After a day following the irradiation, the thyroid showed a pronounced increase in the concentration of total iodide (30.0-54.4%) as well in that of free (32.1-60.8%) and protein-bound ones (24.4-37.4%). The most pronounced iodide concentration elevation was noted in the 0.1 -Gy animals, with thyroid T.P.O. activity being raised by 48.0%. Only the 0.5 Gy-group had 1.4-1.5-fold reduced thyroid hormone levels. Four weeks after the irradiation, studied parameters of irradiated rats were brought back to the control values, except for the 0.5 Gy-group. However, after 24-weeks, the 0.5-and 0.25- irradiated rats experienced a 12-20% thyroid weight elevation in comparison with the control. The thyroid of these animals demonstrated reduced contents of total and free iodide as well as T.P.O. activity by 24.5 and 34.8%. The 0.1 Gy-group had a 1.7-fold increased T.P.O. activity. The concentration of the thyroid hormones was maintained diminished only in the 0.5 Gy -irradiated group. However

  8. Content of DNA in cancerous tumours of the breast before and after large-fractionated irradiation

    Shiukashvili, N N

    1976-07-01

    The article presents the results of microspectrophotometric investigation of DNA in different cancerous tumors of the breast gland before and after large-fractionated irradiation. The study of quantitative content of DNA in the non-irradiated tumors of the breast of different histological structure showed that parenchymatous cells are characterized by a definite variety in the DNA content with a different level of their polyploidy. This points to the fact that different histological forms of the breast cancer are distinguished by the character of the components differentiation. The comparative assessment of the ploidity of the cancerous cells of irradiated and non-irradiated tumors revealed that under the changed conditions of co-existence in all histological forms of cancer new modal classes of the cells develop and general quantity of the DNA content decreases. This testifies to the fact that the histological forms of the breast cancer are not equal sensitive tumors. A microspectrophotometric study of the breast tumors makes it possible to reveal the injury of the malignant tumor cells in the initial period of irradiation, when it is difficult to discover clear-cut dystrophical changes during histological investigation.

  9. Simultaneous PLK1 inhibition improves local tumour control after fractionated irradiation

    Krause, Mechthild; Kummer, Berit; Deparade, Andre; Eicheler, Wolfgang; Pfitzmann, Dorothee; Yaromina, Ala; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) plays an important role in mitotic progression, is frequently overexpressed and associated with a poor prognosis of cancer patients, thus providing a promising target in anticancer treatment. Aim of the current project was to evaluate the effect of the novel PLK1 inhibitor BI 6727 in combination with irradiation. Material and methods: In vitro proliferation and radiation cell survival assays as well as in vivo local tumour control assays after single treatment and combined radiation and drug application were carried out using the squamous cell carcinoma models A431 and FaDu. In addition, cell cycle phases were monitored in vitro and in vivo. Results: BI 6727 showed a dose-dependent antiproliferative effect and an increase in the mitotic fraction. BI 6727 alone reduced clonogenic cell survival, while radiosensitivity in vitro (SF2) and in vivo (single-dose TCD 50 under clamped hypoxia) was not affected. In contrast, local tumour control was significantly improved after application of BI 6727 simultaneously to fractionated irradiation (A431: TCD 50 = 60.5 Gy [95% C.I. 57; 63] after IR alone and <30 Gy after combined treatment; FaDu: 49.5 Gy [43; 56 Gy] versus 32.9 Gy [26; 40]). Conclusions: Despite the lack of direct cellular radiosensitisation, PLK1 inhibition with BI 6727 during fractionated irradiation significantly improves local tumour control when compared to irradiation alone. This result is likely explained by a considerable effect on cell cycle and an independent cytotoxic potential of BI 6727

  10. Somatic and genetic effects of low-level radiation

    Upton, A.C.

    1974-01-01

    Although the biological effects of ionizing radiation are probably better known than those of any other physical or chemical agent in the environment, our information about such effects has come from observations at doses and dose rates which are orders of magnitude higher than natural background environmental radiation levels. Whether, therefore biological effects occur in response to such low levels can be estimated only by extrapolation, based on assumptions about the dose-effect relationship and the mechanisms of the effects in question. Present knowledge suggests the possibility that several types of biological effects may result from low-level irradiation. The induction of heritable genetic changes in germ cells and carcinogenic changes in somatic cells are considered to be the most important from the standpoint of their potential threat to health. On the basis of existing data, it is possible to make only tentative upper limit estimates of the risks of these effects at low doses. The estimates imply that the frequency of such effects attributable to exposure at natural background radiation levels would constitute only a small fraction of their natural incidence. 148 references

  11. Single-dose and fractionated irradiation of four human lung cancer cell lines in vitro

    Brodin, O.; Lennartsson, L.; Nilsson, S.

    1991-01-01

    Four established human lung cancer cell lines were exposed to single-dose irradiation. The survival curves of 2 small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC) were characterized by a limited capacity for repair with small and moderate shoulders with extrapolation numbers (n) of 1.05 and 1.60 respectively. Two non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines, one squamous cell (SQCLC) and one large cell (LCLC) had large shoulders with n-values of 73 and 15 respectively. The radiosensitivity when measured as D 0 did not, however, differ as much from cell line to cell line, with values from 1.22 to 1.65. The surviving fraction after 2 Gy (SF2) was 0.24 and 0.42 respectively in the SCLC cell lines and 0.90 and 0.88 respectively in the NSCLC cell lines. Fractionated irradiation delivered according to 3 different schedules was also investigated. All the schedules delivered a total dose of 10 Gy in 5 days and were applied in 1, 2 and 5 Gy dose fractions respectively. Survival followed the pattern found after single-dose irradiation; it was lowest in the SCLC cell line with the lowest SF and highest in the two NSCLC cell lines. In the SCLC cell lines all schedules were approximately equally efficient. In the LCLC and in the SQCLC cell lines, the 5 Gy schedule killed more cells than the 1 and 2 Gy schedules. The results indicate that the size of the shoulder of the survival curve is essential when choosing the most tumoricidal fractionation schedule. (orig.)

  12. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    Churtgen, C.

    2007-01-01

    The low-level radioactivity measurements service performs measurements of alpha or beta emitters on various types of low-radioactivity samples (biological and environmental) from internal and external clients. to maintain and develop techniques concerning the measurement of low-level radioactivity of alpha and beta emitting radionuclides in environmental or biological samples; to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters and alpha-spectrometers); to support and advise the nuclear and non-nuclear industry on problems of radioactive contamination or low level radioactivity measurements; to maintain the quality assurance system according to the ISO17025 standard for which we obtained the Beltest accreditation in 1998; to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides for workers of the nuclear industry;

  13. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    Hurtgen, C.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the research performed in the area of low-level radioactivity measurements are (1) to maintain and develop techniques for the measurement of low-level environmental and biological samples, (2) to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters, alpha spectrometry), (3) to support and advise the nuclear and non-nuclear industry on problems of radioactive contamination and low-level radioactivity measurements; (4) to maintain and improve the quality assurance system according to the ISO17025 standard; and (5) to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides of workers of the nuclear industry. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are reported

  14. Low-level Radioactivity Measurements

    Hurtgen, C.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of the research performed in the area of low-level radioactivity measurements are (1) to maintain and develop techniques for the measurement of low-level environmental and biological samples, (2) to measure these samples by means of low-background counters (liquid scintillators, proportional counters, ZnS counters, alpha spectrometry), (3) to support and advice the nuclear and non-nuclear industry in matters concerning radioactive contamination and/or low-level radioactivity measurements; (4) to maintain the quality assurance system according to the EN45001/ISO17025 standard; and (5) to assess the internal dose from occupational intakes of radionuclides of workers of the nuclear industry. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are reported

  15. Repopulation capacity during fractionated irradiation of squamous cell carcinomas and glioblastomas in vitro

    Budach, Wilfried; Gioioso, Danielle; Taghian, Alphonse; Stuschke, Martin; Suit, Herman D

    1997-10-01

    Purpose: Determination of clonogenic cell proliferation of three highly malignant squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and two glioblastoma cell lines during a 20-day course of fractionated irradiation under in vitro conditions. Methods and Materials: Tumor cells in exponential growth phase were plated in 24-well plastic flasks and irradiated 24 h after plating with 250 kV x-rays at room temperature. Six fractions with single doses between 0.6 and 9 Gy were administered in 1.67, 5, 10, 15, and 20 days. Colony growth was monitored for at least 60 days after completion of irradiation. Wells with confluent colonies were considered as 'recurrences' and wells without colonies as 'controlled'. The dose required to control 50% of irradiated wells (WCD{sub 50}) was estimated by a logistic regression for the different overall treatment times. The effective doubling time of clonogenic cells (T{sub eff}) was determined by a direct fit using the maximum likelihood method. Results: The increase of WCD{sub 50} within 18.3 days was highly significant for all tumor cell lines accounting for 7.9 and 12.0 Gy in the two glioblastoma cell lines and for 12.7, 14.0, and 21.7 Gy in the three SCC cell lines. The corresponding T{sub eff}s were 4.4 and 2.0 days for glioblastoma cell lines and 2.4, 4.2, and 1.8 days for SCC cell lines. Population doubling times (PDT) of untreated tumor cells ranged from 1.0 to 1.9 days, showing no correlation with T{sub eff}s. T{sub eff} was significantly longer than PDT in three of five tumor cell lines. No significant differences were observed comparing glioblastomas and SCC. Increase of WCD{sub 50} with time did not correlate with T{sub eff} but with T{sub eff}* InSF2 (surviving fraction at 2 Gy). Conclusion: The intrinsic ability of SCC and glioblastoma cells to repopulate during fractionated irradiation could be demonstrated. Repopulation induced dose loss per day depends on T{sub eff} and intrinsic radiation sensitivity. Proliferation during treatment was

  16. Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33 secreted from impaired vessels in the skin compared to fractionated irradiation

    Lee, Eun-Jung, E-mail: forejs2@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Won, E-mail: JUNWON@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Hyun, E-mail: gochunghee@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Woori, E-mail: asleo02@snu.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary Program in Bioinformatics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Hoon, E-mail: wonhoon@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seoae, E-mail: seoae@cnkgenomics.com [C& K Genomics, Seoul National University Mt.4-2, Main Bldg. #514, SNU Research Park, NakSeoungDae, Gwanakgu, Seoul 151-919 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yu Jeong, E-mail: yunk9275@daum.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoon-Jin, E-mail: yjlee8@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Effects, Research Center for Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-760 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jaeho, E-mail: jjhmd@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-14

    We have revealed in a porcine skin injury model that eosinophil recruitment was dose-dependently enhanced by a single high-dose irradiation. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of eosinophil-associated skin fibrosis and the effect of high-dose-per-fraction radiation. The dorsal skin of a mini-pig was divided into two sections containing 4-cm{sup 2} fields that were irradiated with 30 Gy in a single fraction or 5 fractions and biopsied regularly over 14 weeks. Eosinophil-related Th2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and C–C motif chemokine-11 (CCL11/eotaxin) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. RNA-sequencing using 30 Gy-irradiated mouse skin and functional assays in a co-culture system of THP-1 and irradiated-human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed to investigate the mechanism of eosinophil-mediated radiation fibrosis. Single high-dose-per-fraction irradiation caused pronounced eosinophil accumulation, increased profibrotic factors collagen and transforming growth factor-β, enhanced production of eosinophil-related cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, CCL11, IL-13, and IL-33, and reduced vessels compared with 5-fraction irradiation. IL-33 notably increased in pig and mouse skin vessels after single high-dose irradiation of 30 Gy, as well as in irradiated HUVECs following 12 Gy. Blocking IL-33 suppressed the migration ability of THP-1 cells and cytokine secretion in a co-culture system of THP-1 cells and irradiated HUVECs. Hence, high-dose-per-fraction irradiation appears to enhance eosinophil-mediated fibrotic responses, and IL-33 may be a key molecule operating in eosinophil-mediated fibrosis in high-dose-per fraction irradiated skin. - Highlights: • Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33. • Vascular endothelial cells damaged by high-dose radiation secrete IL-33. • Blocking IL-33 suppressed migration of inflammatory cells and cytokine secretion. • IL

  17. Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33 secreted from impaired vessels in the skin compared to fractionated irradiation

    Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Yoo, Hyun; Kwak, Woori; Choi, Won Hoon; Cho, Seoae; Choi, Yu Jeong; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-01-01

    We have revealed in a porcine skin injury model that eosinophil recruitment was dose-dependently enhanced by a single high-dose irradiation. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of eosinophil-associated skin fibrosis and the effect of high-dose-per-fraction radiation. The dorsal skin of a mini-pig was divided into two sections containing 4-cm 2 fields that were irradiated with 30 Gy in a single fraction or 5 fractions and biopsied regularly over 14 weeks. Eosinophil-related Th2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and C–C motif chemokine-11 (CCL11/eotaxin) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. RNA-sequencing using 30 Gy-irradiated mouse skin and functional assays in a co-culture system of THP-1 and irradiated-human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed to investigate the mechanism of eosinophil-mediated radiation fibrosis. Single high-dose-per-fraction irradiation caused pronounced eosinophil accumulation, increased profibrotic factors collagen and transforming growth factor-β, enhanced production of eosinophil-related cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, CCL11, IL-13, and IL-33, and reduced vessels compared with 5-fraction irradiation. IL-33 notably increased in pig and mouse skin vessels after single high-dose irradiation of 30 Gy, as well as in irradiated HUVECs following 12 Gy. Blocking IL-33 suppressed the migration ability of THP-1 cells and cytokine secretion in a co-culture system of THP-1 cells and irradiated HUVECs. Hence, high-dose-per-fraction irradiation appears to enhance eosinophil-mediated fibrotic responses, and IL-33 may be a key molecule operating in eosinophil-mediated fibrosis in high-dose-per fraction irradiated skin. - Highlights: • Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33. • Vascular endothelial cells damaged by high-dose radiation secrete IL-33. • Blocking IL-33 suppressed migration of inflammatory cells and cytokine secretion. • IL-33

  18. Pathologic changes in the hearts of beagles irradiated with fractionated fast neutrons or photons

    Zook, B.C.; Bradley, E.W.; Casarett, G.W.; Rogers, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-nine adult male purebred beagles received either fast-neutron or photon irradiation to the right thorax to determine the effects on pulmonary tissue. The right atrium, a small portion of the right ventricle, and the right anterior abdomen were included in the field. Twenty-four dogs (six/group) received fast neutrons with a mean energy of 15 MeV to doses of 1000, 1500, 2250, or 3375 rad in four fractions per week for 6 weeks. Fifteen dogs received 3000, 4500, or 6750 rad of photons (five/group) in an identical fractionation pattern. Fourteen dogs died or were euthanatized in extremis between 47 and 708 days after radiation because of radiation damage to digestive organs. Six other dogs died of anesthetic accidents between 196 and 1144 days after radiation; these deaths were probably related to hepatic dysfunction. Two neutron-irradiated dogs developed cardiac neoplasms after 396 and 1624 days. One dog died of a myocardial infarct and one died of an unrelated infection. The major atrial lesions were hemorrhage and necrosis of myocardial cells in dogs that died 47-109 days postirradiation. Myocardial and endocardial fibrosis were most extensive in dogs that died 84 or more days following irradiation. All beagles had degenerative and occlusive vascular changes associated with atrial lesions. The relative biological effectiveness of fast neutrons for pathologic injury of the heart was estimated to be between 4 and 5

  19. Reemergence of apoptotic cells between fractionated doses in irradiated murine tumors

    Meyn, R.E.; Hunter, N.R.; Milas, L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to follow up our previous studies on the development of apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors by testing whether an apoptotic subpopulation of cells reemerges between fractionated exposures. Mice bearing a murine ovarian carcinoma, OCa-I, were treated in vivo with two fractionation protocols: two doses of 12.5 Gy separated by various times out to 5 days and multiple daily fractions of 2.5 Gy. Animals were killed 4 h after the last dose in each protocol, and the percent apoptosis was scored from stained histological sections made from the irradiated tumors according to the specific features characteristic of this mode of cell death. The 12.5+12.5 Gy protocol yielded a net total percent apoptosis of about 45% when the two doses were separated by 5 days (total dose = 25 Gy), whereas the 2.5 Gy per day protocol yielded about 50% net apoptotic cells when given for 5 days (total dose = 12.5 Gy). These values are to be compared to the value of 36% apoptotic cells that is yielded by large single doses (> 25 Gy). Thus, these results indicate that an apoptotic subpopulation of cells reemerged between the fractions in both protocols, but the kinetics appeared to be delayed in the 12.5+12.5 Gy vs. the multiple 2.5 Gy protocol. This reemergence of cells with the propensity for radiation-induced apoptosis between fractionated exposures is consistent with a role for this mode of cell death in the response of tumors to radiotherapy and may represent the priming of a new subpopulation of tumor cells for apoptosis as part of normal tumor homeostasis to counterbalance cell division. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  20. Single fraction prophylactic cranial irradiation for small cell carcinoma of the lung

    Brewster, A.E.; Hopwood, P.; Stout, R.; Burt, P.A.; Thatcher, N.

    1995-01-01

    The effectiveness of a single 8-Gy fraction prophylactic cranial irradiation regime was assessed in 106 patients with small-cell carcinoma of the lung. All patients had limited stage disease and received combination chemotherapy consisting of either cisplatin or carboplatin with ifosfamide, etoposide, and vincristine (VICE). Cranial irradiation was administered 48 h after the first cycle of chemotherapy and was well tolerated. Actual 2-year survival was 35% and cranial relapse occurred in 22% of those patients who achieved complete remission. This compares favourably with a cranial relapse rate of 45% incomplete remitters previously reported with the same chemotherapy regime after a minimum follow-up of 2 years where PCI was not used. Formal psychometric testing was performed retrospectively on a series of 25 long-term survivors of whom 14 were taken from this reported series. Whilst 75% of patients were impaired on at least one test with 68% performing badly in the most complex task, this was not associated with clinically detectable neurological damage and the patients did not complain of memory or concentration difficulties. In conclusion, single fraction PCI, when used with platinum based combination chemotherapy, appears to be equally effective but may be less neurotoxic than the more standard fractionated regimes

  1. Hippocampal Neuron Number Is Unchanged 1 Year After Fractionated Whole-Brain Irradiation at Middle Age

    Shi Lei; Molina, Doris P.; Robbins, Michael E.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether hippocampal neurons are lost 12 months after middle-aged rats received a fractionated course of whole-brain irradiation (WBI) that is expected to be biologically equivalent to the regimens used clinically in the treatment of brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Twelve-month-old Fischer 344 X Brown Norway male rats were divided into WBI and control (CON) groups (n = 6 per group). Anesthetized WBI rats received 45 Gy of 137 Cs γ rays delivered as 9 5-Gy fractions twice per week for 4.5 weeks. Control rats were anesthetized but not irradiated. Twelve months after WBI completion, all rats were anesthetized and perfused with paraformaldehyde, and hippocampal sections were immunostained with the neuron-specific antibody NeuN. Using unbiased stereology, total neuron number and the volume of the neuronal and neuropil layers were determined in the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1 subregions of hippocampus. Results: No differences in tissue integrity or neuron distribution were observed between the WBI and CON groups. Moreover, quantitative analysis demonstrated that neither total neuron number nor the volume of neuronal or neuropil layers differed between the two groups for any subregion. Conclusions: Impairment on a hippocampal-dependent learning and memory test occurs 1 year after fractionated WBI at middle age. The same WBI regimen, however, does not lead to a loss of neurons or a reduction in the volume of hippocampus

  2. Chromosome aberrations of the peripheral lymphocytes in rabbits exposed to single and fractionated whole-body x-irradiations

    Tamura, Hiroaki; Sakurai, Masaharu; Sugahara, Tsutomu.

    1978-01-01

    The changes in the frequency of peripheral lymphocytes with chromosome aberrations were observed during or after irradiation of rabbits exposed to fractionated or single whole-body irradiations. In rabbits given daily fractionated whole-body irradiations the incidence of the aberrations showed a linear increase in the first week; however, the incidence decreased thereafter though exposures were repeated. The lymphocyte count tended to decrease as the number of irradiations increased. In rabbits exposed to a single dose of 250 R or 500 R the incidence of aberrations rapidly decreased over a period of 10 days following irradiation, and then showed a little change thereafter. The lymphocyte count in the peripheral blood reached a nadir 2 - 5 days after irradiation, and then started to increase gradually. It was speculated that there are two types of lymphocytes, long-lived and short-lived, in the peripheral blood of rabbits, both of which are PHA-committed. (auth.)

  3. Effect of single and fractionated x-irradiation on maze learning ability of mice

    Aoyama, Takashi; Norimura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Isao

    1976-01-01

    Fifty-six-day-old male ddk mice at the starting of the investigation were used as subjects through the experiment for 64 weeks. After 15 days' preliminary training, and 16 times of weekly trial training using complete maze, 15 mice received a single 224 rads of x-rays (S group), another 15 mice received two 112 rads spaced two weeks apart (F group) and another 15 mice were sham-irradiated (Control group). Then those mice were tested on the multiple T-maze with nine-choice points and change of performance was observed in terms of errorchoices by giving one test trial a week. We introduced the concept of ''confusional trials'' as an index for surmising to what extent mice failed to exhibit good maze learning habits. In the results, the F group showed significantly worse performance than the two other groups at early stages, opposite to it the S group exhibited the same, but at late stages after irradiation. The worse performance of F group should be considered to be due to the psychological after-effect to fractionated irradiation and that for S group could be assumed to be due to the acceleration of aging by the irradiation. (auth.)

  4. On kinetic study of blood cells and bone marrow under fractionated irradiation

    Teterina, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    To study the changes in the cellular composition of bone marrow during irradiation experiments on the guinea pigs have been carried out. Animals were subjected to fractionated irradiation; daily dose of 12 rad, total doses of 250, 500, 750, 1000 and 1500 rad, total duration of radiation of 1,2,3,4 and 6 monts. Experiments have shown that with small levels of total doses of the ionizing radiation haemopoiesis in the bone marrow reached its maximum. This led to suppression of anaemia and profound leukaemia in the peripheral blood. With the increase of total doses phase of insufficient compensation of harmful effects of radiation has been reached, which with continuing radiation may lead to the exhaustion of reserve possibilities of bone marrow and to the development of pancytopenia

  5. Changes in tumor oxygenation during a combined treatment with fractionated irradiation and hyperthermia: an experimental study.

    Zywietz, F; Reeker, W; Kochs, E

    1997-01-01

    To determine the influence of adjuvant hyperthermia on the oxygenation status of fractionated irradiated tumors. Oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in rat rhabdomyosarcomas (R1H) was measured sequentially at weekly intervals during a fractionated irradiation with 60Co-gamma-rays (60 Gy/20f/4 weeks) in combination with local hyperthermia (8 f(HT) at 43 degrees C, 1 h/4 weeks). Tumors were heated twice weekly with a 2450 MHz microwave device at 43 degrees C, 1 h starting 10 min after irradiation. The pO2 measurements (pO2-histograph, Eppendorf, Germany) were performed in anesthetized animals during mechanical ventilation and in hemodynamic steady state. All tumor pO2 measurements were correlated to measurements of the arterial oxygen partial pressure (paO2) determined by a blood gas analyzer. The oxygenation status of R1H tumors decreased continuously from the start of the combined treatment, with increasing radiation dose and number of heat fractions. In untreated controls a median tumor pO2 of 23 +/- 2 mmHg (mean +/- SEM) was measured. Tumor pO2 decreased to 11 +/- 2 mmHg after 30 Gy + 4 HT (2 weeks), and to 6 +/- 2 mmHg after 60 Gy + 8HT (4 weeks). The increase in the frequency of pO2-values below 5 mmHg and the decrease in the range of the pO2 histograms [delta p(10/90)] further indicated that tumor hypoxia increased relatively rapidly from the start of combined treatment. After 60 Gy + 8HT 48 +/- 5% (mean +/- SEM) of the pO2-values recorded were below 5 mmHg. These findings suggest that adjuvant hyperthermia to radiotherapy induces greater changes in tumor oxygenation than radiation alone [cf. (39)]. This might be of importance for the temporary application of hyperthermia in the course of a conventional radiation treatment.

  6. Effect of single-dose low-level helium-neon laser irradiation on orthodontic pain: a split-mouth single-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial.

    Sobouti, Farhad; Khatami, Maziar; Chiniforush, Nasim; Rakhshan, Vahid; Shariati, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Pain is the most common complication of orthodontic treatment. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been suggested as a new analgesic treatment free of the adverse effects of analgesic medications. However, it is not studied thoroughly, and the available studies are quite controversial. Moreover, helium neon (He-Ne) laser has not been assessed before. This split-mouth placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial was performed on 16 male and 14 female orthodontic patients requiring bilateral upper canine retraction. The study was performed at a private clinic in Sari, Iran, in 2014. It was single blind: patients, orthodontist, and personnel were blinded of the allocations, but the laser operator (periodontist) was not blinded. Once canine retractor was activated, a randomly selected maxillary quarter received a single dose of He-Ne laser irradiation (632.8 nm, 10 mw, 6 j/cm(2) density). The other quarter served as the placebo side, treated by the same device but powered off. In the first, second, fourth, and seventh days, blinded patients rated their pain sensed on each side at home using visual analog scale (VAS) questionnaires. There was no harm identified during or after the study. Pain changes were analyzed using two- and one-way repeated-measures ANOVA, Bonferroni, and t-test (α = 0.01, β > 0.99). This trial was not registered. It was self-funded by the authors. Sixteen males and 11 females remained in the study (aged 12-21). Average pain scores sensed in all 4 intervals on control and laser sides were 4.06 ± 2.85 and 2.35 ± 1.77, respectively (t-test P < 0.0001). One-way ANOVA showed significant pain declines over time, in each group (P < 0.0001). Two-way ANOVA showed significant effects for LLLT (P < 0.0001) and time (P = <0.0001). Single-dose He-Ne laser therapy might reduce orthodontic pain caused by retracting maxillary canines.

  7. Cytogenetic studies on recipients of allogeneic bone marrow transplants after fractionated total body irradiation

    Schmitz, N; Goedde-Salz, E; Loeffler, H [Christian-Albrechts-Univ., Kiel (Germany, F.R.)

    1985-06-01

    Cytogenetic findings from the bone marrow (BM) and the peripheral blood (PB) of nine consecutive patients after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for acute or chronic myelogenous leukaemia are reported. After a conditioning regimen consisting of cyclophosphamide and fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) given in five or six fractions of 2 Gy, persistence of host cells was detected in four out of seven cases with permanent engraftment. While one of these patients relapsed 4 months after host cells had been found in BM and PB, the other patients stayed relapse-free 124, 257 and 347 d after grafting. Before transplantation, the leukaemic cells in all three cases carried unique cytogenetic abnormalities giving the opportunity to distinguish the leukaemic population from chromosomally non-aberrant cells thought to represent residual normal host cells. As the persisting host cells after BMT lacked any cytogenetic abnormalities, it is suggested that they were members of residual normal clones not involved in the leukaemic process.

  8. Volumetrical and morphological responses of human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma xenografts treated with fractionated irradiation

    Hoogenhout, J.; Gasteren, H. van; Jerusalem, C.R.; Kal, H.B.

    1988-01-01

    Xenografts of both primary human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and its metastases were irradiated with five daily fractions of 5.0 Gy. Tumor volume changes, morphology, mitotic index and mitotic figures were studied. Primary xenografts disappeared within 17±3 days. Grafts of metastases showed complete regression within 26±5 days, or regrowth after a delay period. Mitotic activity was higher in the grafts of metastases. The number of mitotic figures decreased and ceased within 14 days in the primary tumor, while some were still occasionally noted in the grafts of metastases. Telophase stages were practically absent after the first fraction. This study suggests that the response of metastases to radiation therapy is lower than the response of the primary tumor. (orig.) [de

  9. Cytogenetic studies on recipients of allogeneic bone marrow transplants after fractionated total body irradiation

    Schmitz, N.; Goedde-Salz, E.; Loeffler, H.

    1985-01-01

    Cytogenetic findings from the bone marrow (BM) and the peripheral blood (PB) of nine consecutive patients after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for acute or chronic myelogenous leukaemia are reported. After a conditioning regimen consisting of cyclophosphamide and fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) given in five or six fractions of 2 Gy, persistence of host cells was detected in four out of seven cases with permanent engraftment. While one of these patients relapsed 4 months after host cells had been found in BM and PB, the other patients stayed relapse-free 124, 257 and 347 d after grafting. Before transplantation, the leukaemic cells in all three cases carried unique cytogenetic abnormalities giving the opportunity to distinguish the leukaemic population from chromosomally non-aberrant cells thought to represent residual normal host cells. As the persisting host cells after BMT lacked any cytogenetic abnormalities, it is suggested that they were members of residual normal clones not involved in the leukaemic process. (author)

  10. Hanford low-level tank waste interim performance assessment

    Mann, F.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Interim Performance Assessment examines the long-term environmental and human health effects associated with the disposal of the low-level fraction of the Hanford single and double-shell tank waste in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. This report was prepared as a good management practice to provide needed information about the relationship between the disposal system design and performance early in the disposal system project cycle. The calculations in this performance assessment show that the disposal of the low-level fraction can meet environmental and health performance objectives

  11. Dose rate and dose fractionation studies in total body irradiation of dogs

    Kolb, H.J.; Netzel, B.; Schaffer, E.; Kolb, H.

    1979-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) with 800-900 rads and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation according to the regimen designated by the Seattle group has induced remissions in patients with otherwise refractory acute leukemias. Relapse of leukemia after bone marrow transplantation remains the major problem, when the Seattle set up of two opposing 60 Co-sources and a low dose rate is used in TBI. Studies in dogs with TBI at various dose rates confirmed observations in mice that gastrointestinal toxicity is unlike toxicity against hemopoietic stem cells and possibly also leukemic stem cells depending on the dose rate. However, following very high single doses (2400 R) and marrow infusion acute gastrointestinal toxicity was not prevented by the lowest dose rate studied (0.5 R/min). Fractionated TBI with fractions of 600 R in addition to 1200 R (1000 rads) permitted the application of total doses up to 300 R followed by marrow infusion without irreversible toxicity. 26 dogs given 2400-3000 R have been observed for presently up to 2 years with regard to delayed radiation toxicity. This toxicity was mild in dogs given single doses at a low dose rate or fractionated TBI. Fractionated TBI is presently evaluated with allogeneic transplants in the dog before being applied to leukemic patients

  12. Total body irradiation in bone marrow transplantation: the influence of fractionation and delay of marrow infusion

    Lichter, A.S.; Tracy, D.; Lam, W.C.; Order, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) after total body irradiation (TBI) and cyclophosphamide is being employed increasingly in the therapy of end stage leukemia. Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) represents a major acute toxicity after allogeneic transplantation. A more rapid reconstitution of lymphoid organs and bone marrow post transplant may result in increased immune competence and hence fewer opportunistic pulmonary infections and IP. By delaying the infusion of marrow to 72 hr after TBI (1250 rad at 7.5 rad/min) instead of the customary 24 hr, we can demonstrate an increase in initial repopulation of thymus, spleen and bone marrow, with syngeneic transplants in Lewis rats. Interstitial pneumonitis may also be caused, in part, by the pulmonary toxicity of large single exposures of TBI. Clinical and laboratory data suggest that fractionated TBI may be less toxic to the lung. When fractionated TBI (625 rad x 2, 7.5 rad/min) is compared to single dose TBI (1250 rad, 7.5 rad/min), and increased initial repopulation of lymphoid organs is observed when fractionated therapy is employed. Delay in marrow infusion and fractionation of TBI exposure may have clinical advantages in patients who receive BMT

  13. Low-level radioactive waste

    McLaren, L.H.

    1983-03-01

    This bibliography contains information on low-level radioactive waste included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base for January through December 1982. The abstracts are grouped by subject category as shown in the table of contents. Entries in the subject index also facilitate access by subject, e.g., Low-Level Radioactive Wastes/Transport. Within each category the arrangement is by report number for reports, followed by nonreports in reverse chronological order. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each proceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. 492 references

  14. Low level photoneutron detection equipment

    Ji Changsong; Zhang Yuqin; Li Yuansui

    1991-01-01

    A low level photoneutron detection equipment has been developed. The photoneutrons produced by interaction of 226 Ra gamma quanta and deutron (D) target are detected with n-n discrimination detector made up of 3 He proportional counter array. The D-content information in the target can be obtained from the measured photoneutron counts. The equipment developed is mainly used for nondestructive D-content measurement of D-devices

  15. Kinetics of EGFR expression during fractionated irradiation varies between different human squamous cell carcinoma lines in nude mice

    Eicheler, Wolfgang; Krause, Mechthild; Hessel, Franziska; Zips, Daniel; Baumann, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Preclinical and clinical data indicate that high pretherapeutic EGFR expression is associated with poor local tumour control, possibly caused by a high repopulation rate of clonogenic cells during radiotherapy in these tumours. Previous data reported from our laboratory showed a correlation between EGFR expression and acceleration of repopulation in poorly differentiated FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) during fractionated irradiation. To test whether this is a general phenomenon, two further SCC were investigated in the present study. Patients and methods: GL and UT-SCC-14, two moderately well differentiated and keratinising hSCC, were grown as xenografts in nude mice. Functional data on the repopulation kinetics during fractionated irradiation for these tumour models have been previously determined. The expression of EGFR during fractionation was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Endpoints were the membrane-staining score and the proportion of EGFR-positive cells (EGFR labelling index). Results: Different kinetics of EGFR expression during fractionated RT were found. In UT-SCC-14, EGFR staining score and labelling index increased significantly during radiotherapy. In GL SCC, the EGFR expression was unchanged. Both tumours are characterized by a small but significant repopulation rate during radiotherapy. Conclusions: The expression of EGFR may change significantly during fractionated irradiation. No clear correlation between EGFR expression and the repopulation kinetics of clonogenic tumour cells during fractionated irradiation was found. The changes in EGFR expression during irradiation warrant further investigation on their prognostic implications and on their importance for therapeutic interventions

  16. Skin toxicity during hypo fractionated breast irradiation in patient with early breast cancer

    Petrova, Deva; Smichkoska, Snezhana

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important component in the treatment of breast cancer. (1) Many women with an early stage of breast cancer are candidates for a breast conservation therapy, which combines both conservative surgery and radiotherapy. (2) According to the data from some series, an estimated 90% of the patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer will develop a degree of radiation-induced dermatitis. (3) The severity of the skin reactions during and following the breast irradiation is influenced by both treatment-related and patient-related factors. The treatment - related factors include the fraction size (the dose delivered with each treatment), the total dose delivered, the volume of tissue treated, the type of radiation (4) and the addition of chemotherapy. (5) The patient-related factors include breast size, smoking, axillary lymphocele drainage before treatment, age, and infection of the surgical wound. (6) A hypo fractionation radiotherapy is alternative for a standard fractionation radiotherapy for women with early stage of breast cancer after conservative surgery. The aim of the study was to analyse the acute skin reactions during a hypo fractionated radiotherapy in patients with early breast cancer at our institution. Materials and methods: Twenty patients with early stage of breast cancer (Stadium I and II) and conservative surgery (quadrantectomy of breast with ipsilateral axillary dissection) were analysed. The patients were treated with 6MV x rays on LINAC, using tangential fields with 2.65Gy per fraction and the total dose prescribed to target volume was 42,4 Gy. These patients were observed for acute skin toxicity during the second week and at the end of the treatment. We evaluated dryness, epilation, pigmentation, changes and eritema, dry desquamation (clinically characterized by scaling and pruritus) and moist desquamation (characterized by serious oozing and exposure of the dermis). By using the radiation therapy oncology group’s (RTOG

  17. The effect of fractional CO2 laser irradiation on remineralization of enamel white spot lesions.

    Poosti, Maryam; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Moosavi, Horieh; Najjaran, Hoda

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the combined effect of fractional CO(2) laser irradiation and fluoride on treatment of enamel caries. Sixty intact premolars were randomly assigned into four groups and then stored in a demineralizing solution to induce white spot lesions. Tooth color was determined at baseline (T1) and after demineralization (T2). Afterwards, the teeth in group 1 remained untreated (control), while group 2 was exposed to an acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel for 4 min. In groups 3 and 4, a fractional CO(2) laser was applied (10 mJ, 200 Hz, 10 s) either before (group 3) or through (group 4) the APF gel. The teeth were then immersed in artificial saliva for 90 days while subjected to daily fluoride mouthrinse and weekly brushing. Color examinations were repeated after topical fluoride application (T3) and 90 days later (T4). Finally, the teeth were sectioned, and microhardness was measured at the enamel surface and at 30 and 60 μ from the surface. In both lased groups, the color change between T1 and T4 stages (∆E(T1-T4)) was significantly lower than those of the other groups (p Laser irradiation followed by fluoride application (group 3) caused a significant increase in surface microhardness compared to APF alone and control groups (p laser before fluoride therapy is suggested for recovering the color and rehardening of demineralized enamel.

  18. In vivo induction of apoptosis in human lymphocytes by therapeutic fractionated total body irradiation

    Delic, J.; Magdelenat, H.; Barbaroux, C.; Chaillet, M.-P.; Dubray, B.; Fourquet, A.; Cosset, J.-M.; Gluckman, E.; Girinsky, T.

    1995-01-01

    Ionizing radiations have been reported as an in vitro apoptosis initiating stimulus in human lymphocytes. As the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiations and chemotherapeutic agents appears to be dependent on the efficacy of cell death induction, the manipulation of apoptosis initiation might be used as a means to suppress some pathological process. In the present study the in vivo induction of γ-ray mediated programmed cell death in humans is reported. The in vivo induction of apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) by ionizing radiations was investigated in 33 patients after each of two sessions (2 Gy and 4 Gy) of fractionated total body irradiation (FTBI) as part of their conditioning regimen before bone marrow transplantation. PBL committed to apoptosis were scored before irradiation (S1), 4 h (S2) and 24 h after 2 Gy (S3, 14-17 h after the second 2 Gy fraction). Nuclear morphology and chromatin-DNA were analysed by fluorescence microscopy immediately after blood sample withdrawal (I) and after 24 h in cell culture medium (II). (author)

  19. Combined effect of carcinogenic n-nitrosodimethylamine precursors and fractioned γ-irradiation on tumor development in rats

    Galenko, P.M.; Nedopitanskaya, N.N.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of combined action of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and fractioned γ-irradiation on tumor development in rats was investigated. Both the tumor frequency and tumor plurality coefficient have been studied for two types of treatment: precursors of NDMA (amidopyrine and/or sodium nitrite (SN)) alone and the combination 'precursors plus radiation'. Tumor frequency decreased by about 11% after combination of γ-irradiation and precursors in comparison with precursors alone. Nevertheless, treatment with SN and γ-irradiation did not change tumor frequency in comparison with SN alone. Irradiation of rats treated with precursors led to an increased tumor plurality coefficient

  20. Test of equal effect per fraction and estimation of initial clonogen number in microcolony assays of survival after fractionated irradiation

    Thames, H.D.; Withers, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    In the use of multifraction microcolony assays to infer the low-dose response of in situ renewal systems such as intestinal crypts, the assumption of equal effect per dose fraction is required. Moreover, the construction of a cell-survival curve requires knowledge of the initial count of cells capable of repopulating each renewal structure. We describe a method of designing fractionation protocols which provides a regression estimate of the initial number of clonogens per renewal structure and a test of the hypothesis of equal effect per fraction. The essential factor in the experimental design is the use of common dose fractions (use of the same dose per fraction in series with different numbers of fractions). Applications of the method to data for which the assumption of equal effect per fraction holds (four-hour fractionation interval murine testis study) and does not hold (one-hour fractionation interval murine jejunal crypt study) are presented. (author)

  1. Effects of low-dose continuously fractionated X-ray irradiation on murine peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Xie Yi; Zhang Hong; Dang Bingrong; Hao Jifang; Guo Hongyun; Wang Xiaohu

    2007-01-01

    For estimating biological risks from low doses continual irradiation, we investigated the effects of exposure to continuously fractionated X-rays on murine immune system. The BALB/c mice were irradiated with 0.07Gy at the first day and 0.08 Gy/d in the following 12 days at a dose rate of 0.2 Gy/min. The peripheral blood lymphocyte cycle and death were determined by flow cytometry at the cumulative doses of 0, 0.07, 0.23, 0.39, 0.55, 0.71, 0.87 and 1.03 Gy respectively. The results showed that the cycle of peripheral blood lymphocyte was arrested in G 0 /G 1 at cumulative doses of 0.07, 0.23, 0.71 and 0.87 Gy, and in G 2 /M at cumulative doses of 0.39 and 1.03 Gy; the percentage of death of peripheral blood lymphocyte was ascended with dose increasing, and reached the death peak at cumulative doses of 0.71 Gy. The results suggested that low doses continual X-rays total-body irradiated could result in changes of cellular cycle and death, and some damages to immunocytes, which accorded to linear square model. (authors)

  2. Radiogenic responses of normal cells induced by fractionated irradiation -a simulation study. Pt. 2. Late responses

    Duechting, W.; Ulmer, W.; Ginsberg, T.; Kikhounga-N'Got, O.; Saile, C.

    1995-01-01

    Based on controlled theory, a computed simulation model has been constructed which describes the time course of slowly responding normal cells after irradiation exposure. Subsequently, different clinical irradiation schemes are compared in regard to their delayed radiogenic responses referred to as late effects in radiological terminology. A cybernetic model of a paraenchymal tissue consisting of dominantly resting functional cells has been developed and transferred into a computer model. The radiation effects are considered by characteristic cell parameters as well as by the linear-quadratic model. Three kinds of tissue (brain and lung parenchym of the mouse, liver parenchym of rat) have been irradiated in the model according to standard-, super-, hyperfractionation and a single high dose per week. The simulation studies indicate that the late reaction of brain parenchym to hyperfractionation (3 x 1.5 Gy per day) and of lung parenchym tissue with regard to all fractionation schemes applied is particularly severe. The behavior of liver parenchym is not unique. A comparison of the simulation results basing to the survival of cell numbers with clinical experience and practice shows that the clinical reality can qualitatively be represented by the model. This opens the door for connecting side effects to normal tissue with the corresponding tumor efficacy (discussed in previous papers). The model is open to further refinement and to discussions referring to the phenomenon of late effects. (orig.) [de

  3. Low-level Radioactive waste Management

    1991-01-01

    This meeting describes low-level radioactive waste management problems and contains 8 papers: 1 Low-level radioactive waste management: exemption concept and criteria used by international organizations. 2 Low-level radioactive waste management: french and foreign regulations 3 Low-level radioactive waste management in EDF nuclear power plants (FRANCE) 4 Low-level radioactive waste management in COGEMA (FRANCE) 5 Importance of low-level radioactive wastes in dismantling strategy in CEA (FRANCE) 6 Low-level radioactive waste management in hospitals 7 Low-level radioactive waste disposal: radiation protection laws 8 Methods of low-level radioactive materials measurements during reactor dismantling or nuclear facilities demolition (FRANCE)

  4. Low level radioactive waste disposal

    Balaz, J.; Chren, O.

    2015-01-01

    The Mochovce National Radwaste Repository is a near surface multi-barrier disposal facility for disposal of processed low and very low level radioactive wastes (radwastes) resulting from the operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities situated in the territory of the Slovak Republic and from research institutes, laboratories, hospitals and other institutions (institutional RAW) which are in compliance with the acceptance criteria. The basic safety requirement of the Repository is to avoid a radioactive release to the environment during its operation and institutional inspection. This commitment is covered by the protection barrier system. The method of solution designed and implemented at the Repository construction complies with the latest knowledge and practice of the repository developments all over the world and meets requirements for the safe radwaste disposal with minimum environmental consequences. All wastes are solidified and have to meet the acceptance criteria before disposal into the Repository. They are processed and treated at the Bohunice RAW Treatment Centre and Liquid RAW Final Treatment Facility at Mochovce. The disposal facility for low level radwastes consists of two double-rows of reinforced concrete vaults with total capacity 7 200 fibre reinforced concrete containers (FCCs) with RAW. One double-row contains 40 The operation of the Repository was started in year 2001 and after ten years, in 2011 was conducted the periodic assessment of nuclear safety with positive results. Till the end of year 2014 was disposed to the Repository 11 514 m 3 RAW. The analysis of total RAW production from operation and decommissioning of all nuclear installation in SR, which has been carried out in frame of the BIDSF project C9.1, has showed that the total volume estimation of conditioned waste is 108 thousand m 3 of which 45.5 % are low level waste (LLW) and 54,5 % very low level waste (VLLW). On the base of this fact there is the need to build 7

  5. Tradescantia in studies of genetic effects of low level radiation

    Yamashita, Atsushi

    1976-01-01

    Tradescantia in studies on genetic effects of low level radiation is briefly introduced. Radiosensitivity, method of screening stamen hair mutation, materials in current uses, spontaneous mutation rate, and modifying factors are refered. For stamen hair mutation b values in exponential model were lower in irradiation with low dose rate at high environmental temperature. The dose response curves under these modifying conditions, when extrapolated to low dose range, well fit to the line which was obtained by Sparrow's experiment of low level irradiation. In chronic irradiation, the frequency of stamen hair mutation reaches to the constant value after 17 days from the start of irradiation, and is as much as 4 times higher than the peak value in one day irradiation at the same exposure rate. The spontaneous mutation rate of KU-7 varied with temperature. The increase with 1 0 C increment of mean temperature was -0.04%. Uses of Tradescantia in monitoring the environmental radiation is discussed. (auth.)

  6. Simvastatin Ameliorates Radiation Enteropathy Development After Localized, Fractionated Irradiation by a Protein C-Independent Mechanism

    Wang Junru; Boerma, Marjan; Fu Qiang; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Fink, Louis M.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Microvascular injury plays a key role in normal tissue radiation responses. Statins, in addition to their lipid-lowering effects, have vasculoprotective properties that may counteract some effects of radiation on normal tissues. We examined whether administration of simvastatin ameliorates intestinal radiation injury, and whether the effect depends on protein C activation. Methods and Materials: Rats received localized, fractionated small bowel irradiation. The animals were fed either regular chow or chow containing simvastatin from 2 weeks before irradiation until termination of the experiment. Groups of rats were euthanized at 2 weeks and 26 weeks for assessment of early and delayed radiation injury by quantitative histology, morphometry, and quantitative immunohistochemistry. Dependency on protein C activation was examined in thrombomodulin (TM) mutant mice with deficient ability to activate protein C. Results: Simvastatin administration was associated with lower radiation injury scores (p < 0.0001), improved mucosal preservation (p = 0.0009), and reduced thickening of the intestinal wall and subserosa (p = 0.008 and p = 0.004), neutrophil infiltration (p = 0.04), and accumulation of collagen I (p = 0.0003). The effect of simvastatin was consistently more pronounced for delayed than for early injury. Surprisingly, simvastatin reduced intestinal radiation injury in TM mutant mice, indicating that the enteroprotective effect of simvastatin after localized irradiation is unrelated to protein C activation. Conclusions: Simvastatin ameliorates the intestinal radiation response. The radioprotective effect of simvastatin after localized small bowel irradiation does not appear to be related to protein C activation. Statins should undergo clinical testing as a strategy to minimize side effects of radiation on the intestine and other normal tissues

  7. A theoretical study on the influence of the homogeneity of heavy-ion irradiation field on the survival fraction of cells

    Wen Xiaoqiong; Li Qiang; Zhou Guangming; Li Wenjian; Wang Jufang; Wei Zengquan

    2001-01-01

    In order to provide theoretical basis for the homogeneity request of heavy-ion irradiation field, the most important design parameter of the heavy-ion radiotherapy facility planned in IMP (Institute of Modern Physics), the influence of the homogeneity of heavy-ion irradiation field on the survival fraction of cells was investigated theoretically. A formula for survival fraction of cells irradiated by the un-uniform heavy-ion irradiation field was deduced to estimate the influence of the homogeneity of heavy-ion irradiation field on the survival fraction of cells. The results show that the survival fraction of cells irradiation by the un-uniform irradiation field is larger than that of cells irradiated by the uniform irradiation field, and the survival fraction of cells increases as the homogeneity of heavy-ion irradiation field decreasing. Practically, the heavy-ion irradiation field can be treated as uniform irradiation field when its homogeneity is better than 95%. According to these results, design request for the homogeneity of heavy-ion irradiation field should be better than 95%. The present results also show that the agreement of homogeneity of heavy-ion irradiation field must be checked while comparing the survival fraction curves obtained by different laboratory

  8. Fractionated total lymphoid irradiation as preparative immunosuppression in high risk renal transplantation

    Najarian, J.S.; Ferguson, R.M.; Sutherland, D.E.; Slavin, S.; Kim, T.; Kersey, J.; Simmons, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-two patients at high risk to reject renal allografts have been treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (FTLI) prior to transplantation of primary (2), secondary (16) or tertiary (4) renal allografts. All patients undergoing retransplantation had rapidly rejected previous grafts. At 24 months following transplantation, 72% of grafts were functioning in the TLI group compared with a 38% graft function in an historical control group of recipients receiving secondary or tertiary grafts and treated with conventional immunosuppression. Important variables in determining success of transplantation following fractionated TLI include the dose of TLI, the interval from radiation to transplantation, and maintenance post-transplant immunosuppressive therapy. Optimal results were achieved with 2500 rads delivered in 100 rad fractions followed by transplantation within two weeks, and a tapering prednisone schedule and maintenance azathioprine post-transplantation. Seventeen patients had significant complications of the radiation treatment and there was one death, prior to transplantation, associated with pneumonitis. In vitro assessment of immune function demonstrated marked peripheral T cell depletion and loss of in vitro responsiveness to mitogen and allogeneic stimulation following FTLI. The administration of donor bone marrow at the time of transplantation did not produce chimerism. The results suggest that when properly utilized FTLI can produce effective adjunctive immunosuppression for clinical transplantation

  9. Fractionated half body irradiation for palliation of multiple symptomatic bone metastases from solid tumors

    Sekiguchi, Kenji; Hayashi, Shinya; Sunagawa, Yoshimitsu; Sougawa, Mitsuharu; Nakazawa, Masanori; Yamashita, Takashi (Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital)

    1992-06-01

    This was a phase I-II nonrandomized study that explored the toxicity and response of fractionated half-body irradiation (F-HBI) in patients with multiple symptomatic osseous metastases. The patients had no premedication and received 10 Gy in 5 fractions with a dose rate of 15 cGy/min. At the Cancer Institute Hospital, 9 patients were treated by this technique (1 upper and lower F-HBI, 6 upper F-HBI, 2 lower F-HBI). All patients were female and had adenocarcinomas (8 breast and 1 lung). Adverse effects were myelosuppression, vomiting and partial alopecia. But hematologic toxicity was treated with blood transfusion or G-CSF. All toxicity was transient, and no pneumonitis nor radiation-related deaths occurred. When given as palliation, F-HBI was found to relieve pain in 80% of the patients. In 10% of the patients the pain relief was complete. The mean time to achieve pain relief in responders after F-HBI was 9 days. The pain relief was long-lasting and continued without need of reirradiation for 40% of the remaining patient's life. This treatment modality appears to be well tolerated and effective in patients with multiple symptomatic osseous metastases. The optimal indications, dose and fractionation for F-HBI should be further explored in randomized trials. (author).

  10. Risks of low-level radiation - the evidence of epidemiology

    Gloag, D.

    1980-01-01

    The difficulties involved in estimating risks from very low levels of radiation and the use of dose-response models for cancer incidence are discussed with reference to the third BEIR Committee report on the Effects on Populations of Exposure to low levels of Ionizing Radiation (1980). Cancer risk estimates derived from different epidemiological studies are reviewed. They include atom bomb survivors, medically irradiated groups and occupational groups. (36 references). (author)

  11. Low level radiation: biological effects

    Loken, M.K.

    1983-01-01

    It is imperative that physicians and scientists using radiations in health care delivery continue to assess the benefits derived, vs. potential risk, to patients and radiation workers being exposed to radiation in its various forms as part of our health delivery system. Insofar as possible we should assure our patients and ourselves that the benefits outweigh the potential hazards involved. Inferences as to the possible biological effects of low level radiation are generally based on extrapolations from those effects observed and measured following acute exposures to considerably higher doses of radiation. Thus, in order to shed light on the question of the possible biological effects of low level radiation, a wide variety of studies have been carried out using cells in culture and various species of plant and animal life. This manuscript makes reference to some of those studies with indications as to how and why the studies were done and the conclusions that might be drawn there from. In addition reference is made to the handling of this information by scientists, by environmentalists, and by the news media. Unfortunately, in many instances the public has been misled by what has been said and/or written. It is hoped that this presentation will provide an understandable and reasonable perspective on the various appropriate uses of radiation in our lives and how such uses do provide significant improvement in our health and in our quality of life

  12. Very low level radioactive material

    Schaller, K.H.; Linsley, G.; Elert, M.

    1993-01-01

    Man's environment contains naturally occurring radionuclides and doses from exposures to these radionuclides mostly cannot be avoided. Consequently, almost everything may be considered as very low level radioactive material. In practical terms, management and the selection of different routes for low level material is confined to material which was subject to industrial processing or which is under a system of radiological control. Natural radionuclides with concentrations reaching reporting or notification levels will be discussed below; nevertheless, the main body of this paper will be devoted to material, mainly of artificial origin, which is in the system involving notification, registration and licensing of practices and sources. It includes material managed in the nuclear sector and sources containing artificially produced radionuclides used in hospitals, and in industry. Radioactive materials emit ionising radiations which are harmful to man and his environment. National and international regulations provide the frame for the system of radiation protection. Nevertheless, concentrations, quantities or types of radionuclide may be such, that the material presents a very low hazard, and may therefore be removed from regulatory control, as it would be a waste of time and effort to continue supervision. These materials are said to be exempted from regulatory control. Material exempted in a particular country is no longer distinguishable from ''ordinary'' material and may be moved from country to country. Unfortunately, criteria for exempting radioactive materials differ strongly between countries and free trade. Therefore there is a necessity for an international approach to be developed for exemption levels

  13. Enhancing hair follicle regeneration by nonablative fractional laser: Assessment of irradiation parameters and tissue response.

    Wu, Yueh-Feng; Wang, Shiou-Han; Wu, Pei-Shan; Fan, Sabrina Mai-Yi; Chiu, Hsien-Yi; Tsai, Tsung-Hua; Lin, Sung-Jan

    2015-04-01

    Identification of methods to enhance anagen entry can be helpful for alopecia. Recently, nonablative laser has been proposed as a potential treatment for alopecia. However, how the laser parameters affect stem cell activity, hair cycles and the associated side effects have not been well characterized. Here we examine the effects of irradiation parameters of 1,550-nm fractional laser on hair cycles. The dorsal skin of eight-week-old female C57BL/6 mice with hair follicles in synchronized telogen was shaved and irradiated with a 1,550-nm fractional erbium-glass laser (Fraxel RE:STORE (SR1500) Laser System, Solta Medical, U.S.A.) with varied beam energies (5-35 mJ) and beam densities (500-3500 microthermal zones/cm(2) ). The cutaneous changes were evaluated both grossly and histologically. Hair follicle stem cell activity was detected by BrdU incorporation and changes in gene expression were quantified by real-time PCR. Direct thermal injury to hair follicles could be observed early after irradiation, especially at higher beam energy. Anagen induction in the irradiated skin showed an all-or-non change. Anagen induction and ulcer formation were affected by the combination of beam energy and density. The lowest beam energy of 5 mJ failed to promote anagen entry at all beam densities tested. As beam energy increased from 10 mJ to 35 mJ, we found a decreasing trend of beam density that could induce anagen entry within 7-9 days with activation of hair follicle stem cells. Beam density above the pro-regeneration density could lead to ulcers and scarring followed by anagen entry in adjacent skin. Analysis of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, revealed that transient moderate inflammation was associated with anagen induction and intense prolonged inflammation preceded ulcer formation. To avoid side effects of hair follicle injury and scarring, appropriate combination of beam energy and density is required. Parameters outside the therapeutic

  14. Epidemiological survey of the effects of low level radiation dose: a comparative assessment

    Rose, K.S.B.

    1993-10-01

    This volume presents the collations tables of a six volume comparative epidemiological survey of the effects of low level radiation dose. Data are collated for the effects observed in the following irradiated groups:- Preconception irradiation, intra-uterine irradiation, childhood irradiation, adult irradiation. (UK).

  15. Kinetics and capacity of repair of sublethal damage in mouse lip mucosa during fractionated irradiations

    Ang, K.K.; Xu, F.X.; Landuyt, W.; van der Schueren, E.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics and capacity of repair of sublethal damage in mouse lip mucosa have been investigated. To assess the rate of repair 2 and 5 irradiations have been given with intervals ranging from 1 to 24 hours. It was found that the sublethal damage induced by a dose of approximately 10 Gy was fully recovered in approximately 4 hr. After a dose of 5-6 Gy, cellular repair was completed within 3 hr. The half time of repair (T1/2) was estimated to be approximately 72 min for 10 Gy and approximately 54 min for 5-6 Gy. Although these results suggest that the rate of repair is dependent on the fraction size, the possible influence of the amount of repair of sublethal radiation damage with the various fraction sizes used can not be ruled out. To evaluate the capacity of repair, a single dose, 2, 4 and 10 fractions have been given in a maximal overall time of 3 days in order to minimize the influence of repopulation. The slope of the isoeffective curve was 0.32 and the alpha/beta ratio was 8.5 Gy. This indicates that the capacity of cellular repair of lip mucosa is similar to those of other rapidly proliferating tissues but smaller than those of late responding tissues. The results of the present and other studies demonstrate that there are considerable differences in the repair characteristics between acutely and late responding tissues. These features have to be dealt with when fractionation schedules are markedly altered

  16. Understanding low-level radioactive waste. National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program

    1983-10-01

    Chapters are devoted to: background and policymaking for low-level waste management; commercial low-level waste generation; Department of Energy low-level waste generation; low-level waste treatment; packaging and transportation; commercial low-level waste disposal; Department of Energy low-level waste disposal; Department of Energy low-level waste management program; and laws and regulations

  17. Low-level radwaste solidification

    Naughton, M.D.; Miller, C.C.; Nelson, R.A.; Tucker, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of ''Advanced Low-Level Radioactive Waste Treatment Systems'' conducted under an EPRI contract. The object of the study is to identify advanced lowlevel radwaste treatment systems that are commercially available or are expected to be in the near future. The current state-ofthe-art in radwaste solidification technology is presented. Related processing technologies, such as the compaction of dry active waste (DAW), containers available for radwaste disposal, and the regulatory aspects of radwaste transportation and solidification, are described. The chemical and physical properties of the currently acceptable solidification agents, as identified in the Barnwell radwaste burial site license, are examined. The solidification agents investigated are hydraulic cements, thermoplastic polymers, and thermosetting polymers. It is concluded that solidification processes are complex and depend not only on the chemical and physical properties of the binder material and the waste, but also on how these materials are mixed

  18. Health effects of low level radiation

    Hattori, Sadao [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    In 1982, Prof. Thomas Don Luckey of Missouri Univ. asserted `Radiation Hormesis` on the Journal of Health Physics and he published two books. CRIEPI initiated the research program on Radiation Hormesis following his assertion to confirm `is it true or not?` After nearly ten year research activities on data surveys and animal tests with many Universities, we are realizing scientific truth of bio-positive effects by low level radiation exposures. The interesting bio-positive effects we found could be categorized in following five groups. 1) Rejuvenation of cells such as increase of SOD and cell membrane permeability, 2) Moderation of psychological stress through response of key enzymes, 3) Suppression and therapy of adult-diseases such as diabetes and hypertension, 4) Suppression of cancer through enhancement of immune systems such as lymphocytes, 5) Suppression of cancer and ratio-adaptive response by activation of DNA repair and apoptosis. In the responses of many specialists to our initiation of radiation hormesis research program following T.D. Luckey`s claim about low level radiation, I have to pick up for the first, the great success of Prof. Sakamoto. Prof. Sakamoto had been already applying whole body low dose irradiation for ten years before our radiation hormesis research started on the therapy to suppress the cancer reappearing after treatment. He reported about his successful trial to real patients and showed an enhancement of immune system. (author)

  19. Health effects of low level radiation

    Hattori, Sadao

    1998-01-01

    In 1982, Prof. Thomas Don Luckey of Missouri Univ. asserted 'Radiation Hormesis' on the Journal of Health Physics and he published two books. CRIEPI initiated the research program on Radiation Hormesis following his assertion to confirm 'is it true or not?' After nearly ten year research activities on data surveys and animal tests with many Universities, we are realizing scientific truth of bio-positive effects by low level radiation exposures. The interesting bio-positive effects we found could be categorized in following five groups. 1) Rejuvenation of cells such as increase of SOD and cell membrane permeability, 2) Moderation of psychological stress through response of key enzymes, 3) Suppression and therapy of adult-diseases such as diabetes and hypertension, 4) Suppression of cancer through enhancement of immune systems such as lymphocytes, 5) Suppression of cancer and ratio-adaptive response by activation of DNA repair and apoptosis. In the responses of many specialists to our initiation of radiation hormesis research program following T.D. Luckey's claim about low level radiation, I have to pick up for the first, the great success of Prof. Sakamoto. Prof. Sakamoto had been already applying whole body low dose irradiation for ten years before our radiation hormesis research started on the therapy to suppress the cancer reappearing after treatment. He reported about his successful trial to real patients and showed an enhancement of immune system. (author)

  20. Haemopoiesis-enhancing effects of repeatedly administered carboxymethylglucan in mice exposed to fractionated irradiation

    Hofer, M.; Pospisil, M.; Pipalova, I.; Hola, J.

    1995-01-01

    Carboxymethylglucan (CMG), a water-soluble glucan derivative, enhanced the number of granulocytes in the peripheral blood as well as other indices of haemopoietic recovery (total cellularity and the number of granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells in femoral marrow, spleen weight) investigated after fractionated gamma-irradiation of mice (five doses of 2 Gy each, or three, four and five doses of 3 Gy each given at 24 hours' intervals). An increased liver weight and a more pronounced anaemia found in the CMG-treated mice suggested that also inflammatory side effects were evoked by repeated CMG administration. On the other hand, the development of tolerance, i.e., a decreased effectiveness of CMG treatment on repeated administration did not seem to play a major role under the experimental conditions studied because the protective effects of CMG increased with the increasing number of CMG injections. (author) 2 figs., 16 refs

  1. Total proteins and protein fractions levels in pregnant rats subjected to whole-body gamma irradiation

    Mansour, M.A.; Roushdy, H.M.; Mazhar, F.M.; Abu-Gabal, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    A total number of 180 mature rats (120 females and 60 males) weighing from 120-140 g were used to study the effect of two doses (2 and 4 Gy) whole-body gamma irradiation on the level of total protein and protein fractions in serum of pregnant rats during the period of organogenesis. It was found that the levels of total protein, albumin and gamma globulins significantly decreased according to the doses of exposure. The levels of alpha and beta globulins significantly increased more in the serum of rats exposed to 2 Gy than in rats exposed to 4 Gy. The level of A/G ratio significantly decreased more in the serum of rats exposed to 2Gy than in those exposed to 4 Gy

  2. Fractionated vs acute irradiation: the effects of treating adult boll weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) at different ages

    Haynes, J.W.; Wright, J.E.; Mattix, E.

    1979-01-01

    When 6-7 days old mass-reared ebony boll weevils, Anthonomus grandis Boheman, were given 25 doses of γ-irradiation totaling 6625 rads, mortality was 14%-15% less 1 week later than when young weevils (1-2 day-old) were similarly treated. However, giving older weevils an acute dose of 6625 rads did not reduce mortality. Seven-day-old weevils receiving the acute treatment mated 10% more than weevils that were 3 days old at the time of treatment. Seven-day-old male weevils exposed to the fractionated treatment transferred sperm to 12% more females than 7-day-old males exposed to the acute treatment. (Auth.)

  3. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in adults after fractionated body irradiation and high dose cyclophosphamide

    Brinch, L.; Evensen, S.A.; Albrechtsen, D.; Egeland, T.; Solheim, B.G.; Rollag, H.; Naalsund, A.; Jacobsen, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present short and long-term results of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation after hyper-fractionated total body irradiation and high dose cyclophosphamide in ten patients treated for leukaemia during th period 1985-89. Three patients died from complications connected to the transplantation, while seven are living free from leukaemia 18 to 59 months after transplantation. Two patients need treatment for chronic graft versus host disease. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is expensive and risky. Close cooperation between clinicians and laboratory specialists is essential. The treatment increases long term survival and probably cures certain patients with leukaemia. Some of the patients will need treatment for chronic graft versus host disease and other late sequelae. 19 refs., 2 tabs

  4. Proliferation and clonal survival of human lung cancer cells treated with fractionated irradiation in combination with paclitaxel

    Rijn, Johannes van; Berg, Jaap van den; Meijer, Otto W.M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to determine the effects of a continuous exposure to paclitaxel (taxol) in combination with fractionated irradiation on cell proliferation and survival. Methods and Materials: Human lung carcinoma cells (SW1573) were given a daily treatment with 3 Gy of x-rays during 5 days in the continuous presence of 5 nM taxol. The surviving fraction and the total number of cells were determined every 24 h before and immediately after irradiation. Results: Irradiation with 5 x 3 Gy and 5 nM taxol cause approximately the same inhibition of cell proliferation. In combination these treatments have an additional effect and the cell population increases no further after the first 24 h. Whereas the cells become more resistant to taxol after the first 24 h with a minimum survival of 42%, taxol progressively reduces the population of surviving cells in combination with x-rays when the number of fractions increases, up to 25-fold relative to irradiation alone. The enhancement effect of 5 nM taxol is likely to be attributed to an inhibition of the repopulation during fractionated irradiation and not to an increased radiosensitivity. Only after treatment with 10 or 100 nM taxol for 24 h, which is attended with a high cytotoxicity, is moderate radiosensitization observed. Conclusion: Taxol, continuously present at a low concentration with little cytotoxicity, causes a progressive reduction of the surviving cell population in combination with fractionated irradiation, mainly by an inhibition of the repopulation of surviving cells between the dose fractions

  5. First experiences with super fractionated skin irradiations using large afterloading molds

    Fritz, Peter; Hensley, Frank W.; Berns, Christiane; Schraube, Peter; Wannenmacher, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer requires large radiation fields and high doses. This report examines the effectiveness and sequelae of super fractionated irradiation of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer with afterloading molds on preirradiated and nonirradiated skin. Methods and Materials: A flexible reusable skin mold was developed for use with a pulsed (PDR) after loader. An array of 18 parallel catheters was sewn between two foam rubber slabs 5 mm in thickness to provide a defined constant distance to the skin. By selection of appropriate dwell positions, arbitrarily shaped skin areas can be irradiated up to a maximal field size of 17 x 23.5 cm 2 . Irradiations are performed with a nominal 37 GBq 192 Ir stepping source in pulses of 1 Gy/h at the skin surface. The dose distribution is geometrically optimized. The 80 and 50% dose levels lie 5 and 27 mm below the skin surface. Sixteen patients suffering from metastases at the thoracic wall were treated with 18 fields (78-798 cm 2 ) and total doses of 40-50 Gy applying two PDR split courses with a pause of 4-6 weeks. Eleven of the fields had been previously irradiated with external beam therapy to doses of 50-60 Gy at 7-22 months in advance. Results: For preirradiated fields (n = 10) the results were as follows: follow-up 4.5-28.5 months (median 17); local control (LC): 8 of 10; acute skin reactions: Grade 2 (moist desquamation) 2 of 10; intermediate/late skin reactions after minimum follow-up of 3 months: Grade 1 (atrophy/pigmentation): 2 of 10, Grade 2-3a (minimal/marked telangiectasia): 7 of 10, Grade 4 (ulcer): 1 of 10; recurrencies: 2 of 10. For newly irradiated fields (n = 7) results were: follow-up: 2-20 months (median 5); LC: 6 of 7; acute reactions: Grade 1:4 of 7, Grade 2:3 of 7; intermediate/late skin reactions after minimum follow-up of 3 months (n = 5): Grade 2-3a: 2 of 5; recurrencies: 0 of 7. Local control could be achieved in 82% of the mold fields. Geometric

  6. Pathologic changes in the lung following single and multi-fraction irradiation

    Travis, E.L.; Harley, R.A.; Fenn, J.O.; Klobukowski, C.J.; Hargrove, H.B.

    1977-01-01

    The limiting factor in the treatment of malignant disease with irradiation is the tolerance of normal tissue irradiated. In the present study the right lungs of rats were exposed to single doses of 2000 rad of x-radiation, to 10 x 200 rad, or to 5 x 400 rad. Animals from each group were sacrificed monthly for 6 months post exposure. Sections of lung were examined by light microscopy (LM) and by scanning or transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). A focal exudative lesion was seen at 2 months after the single dose; it progressed to a proliferative and then reparative, fibrotic lesion by 6 months. Changes in epithelial lung components, particularly the presence of Type II pneumocytes, were found with both LM and TM. Vascular changes were less pronounced. A striking finding was the presence of mast cells in the alveolar walls. Neither of the multi-fraction schedules produced any of these changes, except hyperplasia of Type II cells following 5 x 400 rad. The possible implication of Type II and mast cells in radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis is discussed

  7. Tirapazamine vs carbogen and nicotinamide with fractionated irradiation. What is the optimum time of giving tirapazamine during the course of irradiation?

    Elsaid, A.A.; Menke, D.; Dorie, M.J.; Brown, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: 1) To compare in a fractionated regimen, with clinically relevant radiation doses, using human tumor xenografts, two radiation response modifiers that function by different mechanisms: A) Tirapazamine (TPZ), a bioreductive drug of the benzotriazine-di-N-oxide class which shows a highly selective cytotoxicity for hypoxic cells. B) Nicotinamide (NAM), an amide of vitamin B 3 , with Carbogen breathing (CBG), a combination that has been shown to reduce both acute (perfusion-limited) hypoxia and chronic (diffusion-limited) hypoxia. 2) To determine the optimum time of giving TPZ during the course of irradiation (XRT). Materials and Methods: Cell survival assays were used to examine the response of two different human tumor xenografts: FaDu, a carcinoma of the head and neck, and HT29, a colon carcinoma, in SCID mice. Growth delay studies were performed with the FaDu tumor to compare the following treatments: TPZ with XRT, NAM + CBG with XRT, and TPZ + NAM + CBG with XRT. Clinical phase I studies of TPZ have been completed and suggest that a fractionated course of 3 fractions/week of TPZ is tolerable at an effective cytotoxic dose. However, if hypoxic cells are present in the tumor on the days that TPZ is not given (i.e. rehypoxiation has occurred) then this will reduce the effectiveness of the drug-radiation combination. To investigate this we have given CBG and NAM on the days TPZ is not given with fractionated irradiation. The fractionated irradiation schedule consisted of 2.0 or 2.5 Gy once or twice daily for one or two weeks with and without drug pre treatment. TPZ was given i.p. at 0.08 mmol/kg 30 min before irradiation for the whole course, or for 3 fractions per week alone, or with 2 fractions per week of NAM and CBG. NAM was given i.p. at 1000 mg/kg, 1 hr prior to irradiation, with CBG exposure 5 min. prior to and during the irradiation. Another growth delay study is being performed to investigate which schedule produces the most enhancement: TPZ during

  8. Re-irradiation of recurrent anaplastic ependymoma using radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Murai, Taro; Sato, Kengo; Iwabuchi, Michio; Manabe, Yoshihiko; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Tatewaki, Koshi; Yokota, Naoki; Ohta, Seiji; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent ependymomas were retreated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). The efficacy, toxicities, and differences between SRS and FSRT were analyzed. Eight patients with recurrent ependymomas fulfilling the criteria described below were evaluated. Inclusion criteria were: (1) the patient had previously undergone surgery and conventional radiotherapy as first-line treatment; (2) targets were located in or adjacent to the eloquent area or were deep-seated; and (3) the previously irradiated volume overlapped the target lesion. FSRT was delivered to 18 lesions, SRS to 20 lesions. A median follow-up period was 23 months. The local control rate was 76 % at 3 years. No significant differences in local control were observed due to tumor size or fractionation schedule. Lesions receiving >25 Gy/5 fr or 21 Gy/3 fr did not recur within 1 year, whereas no dose-response relationship was observed in those treated with SRS. No grade ≥2 toxicity was observed. Our treatment protocol provided an acceptable LC rate and minimal toxicities. Because local recurrence of tumors may result in patient death, a minimum dose of 21 Gy/3 fr or 25 Gy/5 fr or higher may be most suitable for treatment of these cases.

  9. Benefits of online in vivo dosimetry for single-fraction total body irradiation

    Eaton, David J., E-mail: davideaton@nhs.net [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Warry, Alison J. [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Trimble, Rachel E.; Vilarino-Varela, Maria J.; Collis, Christopher H. [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-01

    Use of a patient test dose before single-fraction total body irradiation (TBI) allows review of in vivo dosimetry and modification of the main treatment setup. However, use of computed tomography (CT) planning and online in vivo dosimetry may reduce the need for this additional step. Patients were treated using a supine CT-planned extended source-to-surface distance (SSD) technique with lead compensators and bolus. In vivo dosimetry was performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and diodes at 10 representative anatomical locations, for both a 0.1-Gy test dose and the treatment dose. In total, 28 patients were treated between April 2007 and July 2013, with changes made in 10 cases (36%) following test dose results. Overall, 98.1% of measured in vivo treatment doses were within 10% of the prescribed dose, compared with 97.0% of test dose readings. Changes made following the test dose could have been applied during the single-fraction treatment itself, assuming that the dose was delivered in subportions and online in vivo dosimetry was available for all clinically important anatomical sites. This alleviates the need for a test dose, saving considerable time and resources.

  10. Benefits of online in vivo dosimetry for single-fraction total body irradiation

    Eaton, David J.; Warry, Alison J.; Trimble, Rachel E.; Vilarino-Varela, Maria J.; Collis, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Use of a patient test dose before single-fraction total body irradiation (TBI) allows review of in vivo dosimetry and modification of the main treatment setup. However, use of computed tomography (CT) planning and online in vivo dosimetry may reduce the need for this additional step. Patients were treated using a supine CT-planned extended source-to-surface distance (SSD) technique with lead compensators and bolus. In vivo dosimetry was performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and diodes at 10 representative anatomical locations, for both a 0.1-Gy test dose and the treatment dose. In total, 28 patients were treated between April 2007 and July 2013, with changes made in 10 cases (36%) following test dose results. Overall, 98.1% of measured in vivo treatment doses were within 10% of the prescribed dose, compared with 97.0% of test dose readings. Changes made following the test dose could have been applied during the single-fraction treatment itself, assuming that the dose was delivered in subportions and online in vivo dosimetry was available for all clinically important anatomical sites. This alleviates the need for a test dose, saving considerable time and resources

  11. Lipid peroxide levels of serum lipoprotein fractions of diabetic patients with angiopathy and 60Co-irradiated rabbit

    Tsunekawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    For a better understanding of the relationship between lipid peroxide (LPO) and vascular diseases, the author determined LPO levels and lipid contents of serum lipoprotein fractions of diabetics with angiopathy. The LPO level in high density lipoprotein (HDL) fraction of diabetic serum was significantly higher than that of normal serum whereas no significant increase was observed in the levels of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) fractions of diabetic serum. As to the ratios of LPO to total lipids in these lipoprotein fractions, it was found that the ratio in HDL fraction of the diabetics was markedly higher than that of the normals. These results suggest that the increase in LPO levels in the sera of diabetic patiens is due to that in HDL fraction. To study further this problem, the author employed 60 Co-irradiated rabbit as a model, since it was already reported that radiation affects lipid metabolism and LPO formation, and that it induces the development of atherosclerosis. Upon irradiation with 60 Co ranging from 100R to 700R, serum LPO level of rabbit was significantly increased. Although elevation of LPO level was found in each serum lipoprotein fraction of VLDL, LDL and HDL, LPO level per lipid content was significantly increased only in HDL fraction. In the irradiated rabbit, significant elevation of the level of LPO was also observed in the liver, while no significant increase was found in the kidney and spleen. These results indicate that high level of LPO observed in the serum of irradiated rabbit would be the reflection of the increased LPO in the liver. (J.P.N.)

  12. Lipid peroxide levels of serum lipoprotein fractions of diabetic patients with angiopathy and /sup 60/Co-irradiated rabbit

    Tsunekawa, Hiroshi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1982-09-01

    For a better understanding of the relationship between lipid peroxide (LPO) and vascular diseases, the author determined LPO levels and lipid contents of serum lipoprotein fractions of diabetics with angiopathy. The LPO level in high density lipoprotein (HDL) fraction of diabetic serum was significantly higher than that of normal serum whereas no significant increase was observed in the levels of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) fractions of diabetic serum. As to the ratios of LPO to total lipids in these lipoprotein fractions, it was found that the ratio in HDL fraction of the diabetics was markedly higher than that of the normals. These results suggest that the increase in LPO levels in the sera of diabetic patients is due to that in HDL fraction. To study further this problem, the author employed /sup 60/Co-irradiated rabbit as a model, since it was already reported that radiation affects lipid metabolism and LPO formation, and that it induces the development of atherosclerosis. Upon irradiation with /sup 60/Co ranging from 100R to 700R, serum LPO level of rabbit was significantly increased. Although elevation of LPO level was found in each serum lipoprotein fraction of VLDL, LDL and HDL, LPO level per lipid content was significantly increased only in HDL fraction. In the irradiated rabbit, significant elevation of the level of LPO was also observed in the liver, while no significant increase was found in the kidney and spleen. These results indicate that high level of LPO observed in the serum of irradiated rabbit would be the reflection of the increased LPO in the liver.

  13. Low-level radioactive biomedical wastes

    Casarett, G.W.

    A summary of the management and hazards of low-level radioactive biomedical wastes is presented. The volume, disposal methods, current problems, regulatory agencies, and possible solutions to disposal problems are discussed. The benefits derived from using radioactivity in medicine are briefly described. Potential health risks are discussed. The radioactivity in most of the radioactive biomedical waste is a small fraction of that contained naturally in the human body or in the natural environment. Benefit-risk-cost considerations are presented. The cost of managing these wastes is getting so high that a new perspective for comparison of radioactivity (facts, risks, costs, benefits and trade-offs) and alternate approaches to minimize the risk and cost and maximize the benefits is suggested

  14. The LHC Low Level RF

    Baudrenghien, Philippe; Molendijk, John Cornelis; Olsen, Ragnar; Rohlev, Anton; Rossi, Vittorio; Stellfeld, Donat; Valuch, Daniel; Wehrle, Urs

    2006-01-01

    The LHC RF consists of eight 400 MHz superconducting cavities per ring, with each cavity independently powered by a 300 kW klystron, via a circulator. The challenge for the Low Level is to cope with very high beam current (more than 1 A RF component) and achieve excellent beam lifetime (emittance growth time in excess of 25 hours). Each cavity has an associated Cavity Controller rack consisting of two VME crates which implement high gain RF Feedback, a Tuner Loop with a new algorithm, a Klystron Ripple Loop and a Conditioning system. In addition each ring has a Beam Control system (four VME crates) which includes a Frequency Program, Phase Loop, Radial Loop and Synchronization Loop. A Longitudinal Damper (dipole and quadrupole mode) acting via the 400 MHz cavities is included to reduce emittance blow-up due to filamentation from phase and energy errors at injection. Finally an RF Synchronization system implements the bunch into bucket transfer from the SPS into each LHC ring. When fully installed in 2007, the...

  15. In vivo dosimetry of high-dose fractionated irradiation in an experimental set-up with rats

    Fortan, L; Van Hecke, H; Van Duyse, B; De Neve, W; De Meerleer, B [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Pattyn, P; Van Renthergem, K [Ghent University (Belgium). Dept. of Surgery

    1995-12-01

    The feasibility to irradiate a limited section of a rat abdomen with well-defined edges was assessed. Because of the relative small volume involved, in vivo dosimetry with TLDs was necessary in providing us information about the accuracy of the irradiation method. Three to five days prior to the start of the radiotherapy treatment, two plastic strips - each containing a TLD-dosimeter (Harshaw TLD10 LiF rods, 1 mm dia x 6 mm) sealed in polyethylene tubing, and a lead bean - were implanted in the rat abdomen. The plastic strips made a closed loop around the bowel, through the mesenterium, and were fixed with a single stitch on the inner abdominal wall. One loop was made in the hepatic area; another was made in the lower abdomen, around the rectosigmoid. Conscious animals were irradiated using a purpose-build plexi-holder, with rear legs immobilised to avoid longitudinal movements. The implanted lead beans enabled us to simulate the rat prior to each radiation session. This way, the radiation field could be set up individually for each rat, in such way that the rectosigmoid area received full dose and the hepatic area received no irradiation dose at all. Irradiation was carried out, using 5 MV photons of a linear accelerator. Fifteen animals per group were irradiated according a conventional (2.0 Gy / fraction; 5 fractions / week) or a hyperfractionated (1.6 Gy / fraction; 2 daily fractions; 5 days / week) schedule, with different total doses. Prior to implantation, TLDs were individually calibrated and checked for stability. After removal from the abdomen . TLDs were tested again for accuracy. TLDs with an unacceptable read-out curve were rejected (about 2 to 4 TLDs per group of 15). The obtained accumulated doses - as determined by TLD read-outs-were comparable to the theoretical doses, indicating that fractionated radiation of small fields, with well defined mark off, in rats is feasible.

  16. In vivo dosimetry of high-dose fractionated irradiation in an experimental set-up with rats

    Fortan, L.; Van Hecke, H.; Van Duyse, B.; De Neve, W.; De Meerleer, B.; Pattyn, P.; Van Renthergem, K.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility to irradiate a limited section of a rat abdomen with well-defined edges was assessed. Because of the relative small volume involved, in vivo dosimetry with TLDs was necessary in providing us information about the accuracy of the irradiation method. Three to five days prior to the start of the radiotherapy treatment, two plastic strips - each containing a TLD-dosimeter (Harshaw TLD10 LiF rods, 1 mm dia x 6 mm) sealed in polyethylene tubing, and a lead bean - were implanted in the rat abdomen. The plastic strips made a closed loop around the bowel, through the mesenterium, and were fixed with a single stitch on the inner abdominal wall. One loop was made in the hepatic area; another was made in the lower abdomen, around the rectosigmoid. Conscious animals were irradiated using a purpose-build plexi-holder, with rear legs immobilised to avoid longitudinal movements. The implanted lead beans enabled us to simulate the rat prior to each radiation session. This way, the radiation field could be set up individually for each rat, in such way that the rectosigmoid area received full dose and the hepatic area received no irradiation dose at all. Irradiation was carried out, using 5 MV photons of a linear accelerator. Fifteen animals per group were irradiated according a conventional (2.0 Gy / fraction; 5 fractions / week) or a hyperfractionated (1.6 Gy / fraction; 2 daily fractions; 5 days / week) schedule, with different total doses. Prior to implantation, TLDs were individually calibrated and checked for stability. After removal from the abdomen . TLDs were tested again for accuracy. TLDs with an unacceptable read-out curve were rejected (about 2 to 4 TLDs per group of 15). The obtained accumulated doses - as determined by TLD read-outs-were comparable to the theoretical doses, indicating that fractionated radiation of small fields, with well defined mark off, in rats is feasible

  17. VARIATIONS IN RADIATION SENSITIVITY AND REPAIR AMONG DIFFERENT HEMATOPOIETIC STEM-CELL SUBSETS FOLLOWING FRACTIONATED-IRRADIATION

    DOWN, JD; BOUDEWIJN, A; VANOS, R; THAMES, HD; PLOEMACHER, RE

    1995-01-01

    The radiation dose-survival of various hematopoietic cell subsets in murine bone marrow (BM) was determined in the cobblestone area forming cell (CAFC) assay under conditions of single-, split-, and multiple-dose irradiation. A greater recovery in cell survival with decreasing dose per fraction, or

  18. Cell kinetic changes in the follicular epithelium of pig skin after irradiation with single and fractionated doses of X rays

    Morris, G.M.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Changes in cell kinetics of the follicular epithelium of the pig were studied after x-irradiation with single and fractionated doses (30 fractions/39 days) and compared with previous epidermal data. In the follicular epithelium there was an initial degenerative phase, when the rate of cell depletion was independent of radiation dose and mode of administration. Repopulation was seen between the 14th and 18th days after single doses (15 or 20 Gy) and by the 28th day after the start of irradiation with fractionated doses (52.3-80.0 Gy). The degree of cell depletion and subsequent rate of repopulation were independent of dose. The regenerative phase was characterized by an increased cell proliferation. Islands of cells with appearance similar to cells in the normal follicular epithelium, were seen 18 days after a single dose of 20 Gy and 42 days after the start of fractionated irradiation. Compared with the epidermis, the follicular epithelium exhibited considerably less evidence of damage after both single and fractionated doses. There was a lower incidence of degenerate cells and reduced levels of cell depletion in the follicular epithelium. (author)

  19. Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project

    1992-04-01

    This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided

  20. Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project

    1992-04-01

    This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

  1. Acute response of mouse kidney clonogens to fractionated irradiation in situ and then assayed in primary culture

    Yeemin Jen; Hendry, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of mouse kidney cells after in situ single-dose, 2, 8, and 16 fraction X-irradiations was measured in primary culture using a clonogenic assay. The assay was made 12 h after single doses or 12 h after the last dose of the multifraction regimens. When analysed using the linear-quadratic model, as predicted the individual α components for all the different fractionation schedules were not significantly different, and the changes in the β values were consistent with those expected on the basis of the reciprocal fraction numbers. When all four data sets were integrated to derive a common α/β ratio, the result was 4.4±1.3 (1SE) Gy, or 2.8±0.9 Gy (a better fit) if the single-dose data set was excluded. These values fall into the range reported for kidney using assays of tissue function at long times after irradiation. (author)

  2. Fractionation for Whole Breast Irradiation: An American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Evidence-Based Guideline

    Smith, Benjamin D.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Correa, Candace R.; Hahn, Carol A.; Hardenbergh, Patricia H.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; McCormick, Beryl; McQueen, Julie R.; Pierce, Lori J.; Powell, Simon N.; Recht, Abram; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Vicini, Frank A.; White, Julia R.; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery, randomized trials have found little difference in local control and survival outcomes between patients treated with conventionally fractionated (CF-) whole breast irradiation (WBI) and those receiving hypofractionated (HF)-WBI. However, it remains controversial whether these results apply to all subgroups of patients. We therefore developed an evidence-based guideline to provide direction for clinical practice. Methods and Materials: A task force authorized by the American Society for Radiation Oncology weighed evidence from a systematic literature review and produced the recommendations contained herein. Results: The majority of patients in randomized trials were aged 50 years or older, had disease Stage pT1-2 pN0, did not receive chemotherapy, and were treated with a radiation dose homogeneity within ±7% in the central axis plane. Such patients experienced equivalent outcomes with either HF-WBI or CF-WBI. Patients not meeting these criteria were relatively underrepresented, and few of the trials reported subgroup analyses. For patients not receiving a radiation boost, the task force favored a dose schedule of 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions when HF-WBI is planned. The task force also recommended that the heart should be excluded from the primary treatment fields (when HF-WBI is used) due to lingering uncertainty regarding late effects of HF-WBI on cardiac function. The task force could not agree on the appropriateness of a tumor bed boost in patients treated with HF-WBI. Conclusion: Data were sufficient to support the use of HF-WBI for patients with early-stage breast cancer who met all the aforementioned criteria. For other patients, the task force could not reach agreement either for or against the use of HF-WBI, which nevertheless should not be interpreted as a contraindication to its use.

  3. Radiation Effect on Body Weight and Hematological Changes of Hybrid Mice by Conventional Fraction, Large Abdominal Field Irradiation

    Lee, Sung Heon; Shin, Sei One; Kim, Myung Se

    1985-01-01

    Radiation effect on mammals, especially on hematologic changes, has been studied since discovery of x-ray. Various experimental animals were tried for radiobiological studies. 72 hybrid mice with conventional fraction (5X/week), large abdominal field (2 x 3cm, from symphysis pubic to xyphoid process) were used. Body weight was declined gradually by increasing irradiation doses, nadir was about 29.7% in male ; 30.4% in female at 6000 rad irradiation group. Hemoglobin value was nearly normal throughout entire treatment. Significant dropping of WBC count was noted to 40-50% of pretreatment values by only 1000 rad irradiation. Change of differential count was interesting; lymphocyte proportion showed gradual reduction, instead of gradual increasing of segmented neutrophil. Those proportion were reversed after 6000 rad irradiation. Urinary protein tests showed + - +++, showing no correlation with dosage. Application. of our study in clinical combination therapy (radiation + chemotherapy) was discussed

  4. Factors associated with pulmonary toxicity after myeloablative conditioning using fractionated total body irradiation

    Byun, Hwa Kyung; Yoon, Hong In; Cho, Jae Ho [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-09-15

    Pulmonary toxicities, including infectious pneumonia (IP) and idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS), are serious side effects of total body irradiation (TBI) used for myeloablative conditioning. This study aimed to evaluate clinical factors associated with IP and IPS following TBI. Fifty-eight patients with hematologic malignancies who underwent TBI before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation between 2005 and 2014 were reviewed. Most patients (91%) received 12 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions twice a day. Pulmonary toxicities were diagnosed based on either radiographic evidence or reduced pulmonary function, and were subdivided into IP and IPS based on the presence or absence of concurrent infection. Pulmonary toxicities developed in 36 patients (62%); 16 (28%) had IP and 20 (34%) had IPS. IP was significantly associated with increased treatment-related mortality (p = 0.028) and decreased survival (p = 0.039). Multivariate analysis revealed that the risk of developing IPS was significantly higher in patients who received stem cells from a matched unrelated donor than from a matched sibling donor (p = 0.021; hazard ratio [HR] = 12.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46–110.30). Combining other conditioning agents with cyclophosphamide produced a higher tendency to develop IP (p = 0.064; HR = 6.19; 95% CI, 0.90–42.56). IP and IPS involve different risk factors and distinct pathogeneses that should be considered when planning treatments before and after TBI.

  5. Fractionated irradiation-induced EMT-like phenotype conferred radioresistance in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Zhang, Hongfang; Luo, Honglei; Jiang, Zhenzhen; Yue, Jing; Hou, Qiang; Xie, Ruifei; Wu, Shixiu

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of radiotherapy, one major treatment modality for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is severely attenuated by radioresistance. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cellular process that determines therapy response and tumor progression. However, whether EMT is induced by ionizing radiation and involved in tumor radioresistance has been less studied in ESCC. Using multiple fractionated irradiation, the radioresistant esophageal squamous cancer cell line KYSE-150R had been established from its parental cell line KYSE-150. We found KYSE-150R displayed a significant EMT phenotype with an elongated spindle shape and down-regulated epithelial marker E-cadherin and up-regulated mesenchymal marker N-cadherin in comparison with KYSE-150. Furthermore, KYSE-150R also possessed some stemness-like properties characterized by density-dependent growth promotion and strong capability for sphere formation and tumorigenesis in NOD-SCID mice. Mechanical studies have revealed that WISP1, a secreted matricellular protein, is highly expressed in KYSE-150R and mediates EMT-associated radioresistance both in ESCC cells and in xenograft tumor models. Moreover, WISP1 has been demonstrated to be closely associated with the EMT phenotype observed in ESCC patients and to be an independent prognosis factor of ESCC patients treated with radiotherapy. Our study highlighted WISP1 as an attractive target to reverse EMT-associated radioresistance in ESCC and can be used as an independent prognostic factor of patients treated with radiotherapy. PMID:27125498

  6. Marrow transplantation for leukemia following fractionated total body irradiation. A comparative trial of methotrexate and cyclosporine

    Irle, C.; Deeg, H.J.; Buckner, C.D.; Swedish Hospital Medical Center, Seattle, WA; Veterans Administration Hospital, Seattle, WA; Washington Univ., Seattle

    1985-01-01

    Fifty-six patients, 30-47 yr of age, with leukemia in relapse received allogeneic marrow transplants from HLA-identical siblings. All patients were treated with cyclophosphamide (120 mg/kg) and 7 daily fractions of 2.25 Gy of total body irradiation (TBI) for seven consecutive days. Nine patients (16%) are currently alive, free of disease, 324-845 days from transplantation. Actuarial relapse and survival rates at 2 yr were 56% and 9.5% respectively. These data were not remarkably different from those in previous studies using 10 Gy of TBI administered as a single dose. Thirty patients were randomized to receive methotrexate (MTX) and 26 to receive cyclosporine (CSP) as postgrafting prophylaxis for acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Probability of developing significant acute GVHD by day 100 post-transplant was 71% for patients in the MTX group and 45% for patients in the CSP group (p<0.05). Probability of relapse was 37% for patients in the MTX group and 70% for patients in the CSP group (p<0.05). Transplant-related deaths were more frequent in the MTX group and leukemic deaths more frequent in the CSP group although this may have been related to an uneven distribution of high-risk patients. Long term disease-free survival was comparable. (author)

  7. Enzyme-activity mutations detected in mice after paternal fractionated irradiation

    Charles, D.J.; Pretsch, W.

    1986-01-01

    (101/E1 X C3H/E1)F 1 -hybrid male mice were exposed in a 24-h fractionation interval to either 3.0 + 3.0-Gy or 5.1 + 5.1-Gy X-irradiation, and mated to untreated Test-stock females. The offspring were examined for mutations at 7 recessive specific loci and for activity alterations of erythrocyte enzymes controlled presumably by 12 loci. No enzyme-activity mutant was found in 3610 F 1 -offspring of the control group. In the experimental groups, no mutant was detected in 533 (3.0 + 3.0 Gy) and 173 (5.1 + 5.1 Gy) offspring from postspermatogonial germ cells treated. After treatment of spermatogonia, 1 mutant in 3388 F 1 -offspring of the 3.0 + 3.0-Gy group, and 5 mutants in 3187 F 1 offspring of the 5.1 + 5.1-Gy group were found. The mutants were all genetically confirmed. The frequency (expressed as mutants/locus/gamete) of enzyme-activity mutations is 2 (5.1 + 5.1-Gy group) to 10 (3.0 + 3.0-Gy group) times lower than the frequency of recessive specific-locus mutations. (Auth.)

  8. Fractionated irradiation-induced EMT-like phenotype conferred radioresistance in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Zhang, Hongfang; Luo, Honglei; Jiang, Zhenzhen; Yue, Jing; Hou, Qiang; Xie, Ruifei; Wu, Shixiu

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of radiotherapy, one major treatment modality for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is severely attenuated by radioresistance. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cellular process that determines therapy response and tumor progression. However, whether EMT is induced by ionizing radiation and involved in tumor radioresistance has been less studied in ESCC. Using multiple fractionated irradiation, the radioresistant esophageal squamous cancer cell line KYSE-150R had been established from its parental cell line KYSE-150. We found KYSE-150R displayed a significant EMT phenotype with an elongated spindle shape and down-regulated epithelial marker E-cadherin and up-regulated mesenchymal marker N-cadherin in comparison with KYSE-150. Furthermore, KYSE-150R also possessed some stemness-like properties characterized by density-dependent growth promotion and strong capability for sphere formation and tumorigenesis in NOD-SCID mice. Mechanical studies have revealed that WISP1, a secreted matricellular protein, is highly expressed in KYSE-150R and mediates EMT-associated radioresistance both in ESCC cells and in xenograft tumor models. Moreover, WISP1 has been demonstrated to be closely associated with the EMT phenotype observed in ESCC patients and to be an independent prognosis factor of ESCC patients treated with radiotherapy. Our study highlighted WISP1 as an attractive target to reverse EMT-associated radioresistance in ESCC and can be used as an independent prognostic factor of patients treated with radiotherapy

  9. Factors associated with pulmonary toxicity after myeloablative conditioning using fractionated total body irradiation

    Byun, Hwa Kyung; Yoon, Hong In; Cho, Jae Ho

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary toxicities, including infectious pneumonia (IP) and idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS), are serious side effects of total body irradiation (TBI) used for myeloablative conditioning. This study aimed to evaluate clinical factors associated with IP and IPS following TBI. Fifty-eight patients with hematologic malignancies who underwent TBI before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation between 2005 and 2014 were reviewed. Most patients (91%) received 12 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions twice a day. Pulmonary toxicities were diagnosed based on either radiographic evidence or reduced pulmonary function, and were subdivided into IP and IPS based on the presence or absence of concurrent infection. Pulmonary toxicities developed in 36 patients (62%); 16 (28%) had IP and 20 (34%) had IPS. IP was significantly associated with increased treatment-related mortality (p = 0.028) and decreased survival (p = 0.039). Multivariate analysis revealed that the risk of developing IPS was significantly higher in patients who received stem cells from a matched unrelated donor than from a matched sibling donor (p = 0.021; hazard ratio [HR] = 12.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46–110.30). Combining other conditioning agents with cyclophosphamide produced a higher tendency to develop IP (p = 0.064; HR = 6.19; 95% CI, 0.90–42.56). IP and IPS involve different risk factors and distinct pathogeneses that should be considered when planning treatments before and after TBI

  10. Controlling low-level radioactive waste

    1990-01-01

    This series of information sheets describes at a popular level the sources of low-level radioactive wastes, their associated hazards, methods of storage, transportation and disposal, and the Canadian regulations that cover low-level wastes

  11. Packaged low-level waste verification system

    Tuite, K.; Winberg, M.R.; McIsaac, C.V. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Department of Energy through the National Low-Level Waste Management Program and WMG Inc. have entered into a joint development effort to design, build, and demonstrate the Packaged Low-Level Waste Verification System. Currently, states and low-level radioactive waste disposal site operators have no method to independently verify the radionuclide content of packaged low-level waste that arrives at disposal sites for disposition. At this time, the disposal site relies on the low-level waste generator shipping manifests and accompanying records to ensure that low-level waste received meets the site`s waste acceptance criteria. The subject invention provides the equipment, software, and methods to enable the independent verification of low-level waste shipping records to ensure that the site`s waste acceptance criteria are being met. The objective of the prototype system is to demonstrate a mobile system capable of independently verifying the content of packaged low-level waste.

  12. Glycolysis-related gene induction and ATP reduction during fractionated irradiation. Markers for radiation responsiveness of human tumor xenografts

    Goetze, K.; Meyer, S.S.; Mueller-Klieser, W. [University Medical Center Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Physiology and Pathophysiology; Yaromina, A. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Zips, D. [University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Baumann, M. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; University Hospital Dresden Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background and purpose: Lactate was previously shown to be a prognostic but not a predictive pre-therapeutic marker for radiation response of tumor xenografts. We hypothesize that metabolic changes during fractionated irradiation may restrict the predictiveness of lactate regarding tumor radiosensitivity. Materials and methods: Tumor xenografts were generated in nude mice by implanting 4 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma lines with different sensitivities to fractionated irradiation. Tumors were irradiated with up to 15 fractions of 2 Gy over a period of 3 weeks, and ATP and lactate levels were measured in vital tumor areas with induced metabolic bioluminescence imaging. Corresponding changes in mRNA expression of glycolysis-related genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Results: Lactate content decreased significantly in 3 out of 4 cell lines in the course of irradiation showing no correlation with cell line-specific radiosensitivity. Radiation-induced changes in ATP levels and glycolysis-related mRNA expression, however, only occurred in radiosensitive or intermediately radioresistant xenografts, whereas these parameters remained unchanged in radioresistant tumors. Conclusion: Sensitivity-related differences in the transcriptional response of tumors to radiotherapy may be exploited in the clinic for better individualization of tumor treatment. (orig.)

  13. Effects of low levels of radiation on humans

    Auxier, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The state of knowledge on effects of low-level ionizing radiations on humans is reviewed. Several problems relating to dose thresholds or lack of thresholds for several types of cancer and high LET radiations and the effects of fractionation and dose protection are discussed

  14. Allograft tolerance in pigs after fractionated lymphoid irradiation. II. Kidney graft after conventional total lymphoid irradiation and bone marrow cell grafting

    Fradelizi, D.; Mahouy, G.; de Riberolles, C.; Lecompte, Y.; Alhomme, P.; Douard, M.C.; Chotin, G.; Martelli, H.; Daburon, F.; Vaiman, M.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments with pigs have been performed in order to establish bone marrow chimerism and kidney graft tolerance between SLA genotyped semi-incompatible animals. Recipients were conditioned by means of conventional fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) delivered by a vertical cobalt source. The principal lymphoid regions of the pig, including thymus and spleen, were submitted to irradiation. Two protocols were tested: A = 250 cGy four times a week x 13 times (TLI) (two animals) and B = 350 cGy three times a week x 8 times (TLI) (four animals). Bone marrow cells were injected 24 h after the last irradiation. One day later, bilateral nephrectomy and the graft of one kidney from the bone marrow cell donor were performed simultaneously. Results convinced us that application of the TLI protocol to humans is not yet practicable and that further experimental work is needed

  15. Impact of anemia prevention by recombinant human erythropoietin on the sensitivity of xenografted glioblastomas to fractionated irradiation

    Stueben, G.; Poettgen, C.; Knuehmann, K.; Sack, H.; Stuschke, M.; Thews, O.; Vaupel, P.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Pronounced oxygen deficiency in tumors which might be caused by a diminished oxygen transport capacity of the blood (e.g., in anemia) reduces the efficacy of ionizing radiation. The aim of this study was to analyze whether anemia prevention by recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) affects the radiosensitivity of human glioblastoma xenografts during fractionated irradiation. Material and Methods: Anemia was induced by total body irradiation (TBI, 2 x 4 Gy) of mice prior to tumor implantation into the subcutis of the hind leg. In one experimental group, the development of anemia was prevented by rHuEPO (750 U/kg s.c.) given three times weekly starting 10 days prior to TBI. 13 days after tumor implantation (tumor volume approx. 40 mm 3 ), fractionated irradiation (4 x 7 Gy, one daily fraction) of the glioblastomas was performed resulting in a growth delay with subsequent regrowth of the tumors. Results: Compared to nonanemic control animals (hemoglobin concentration cHb = 14.7 g/dl), the growth delay in anemic mice (cHb = 9.9 g/dl) was significantly shorter (49 ± 5 days vs. 79 ± 4 days to reach four times the initial tumor volume) upon fractionated radiation. The prevention of anemia by rHuEPO treatment (cHb = 13.3 g/dl) resulted in a significantly prolonged growth delay (61 ± 5 days) compared to the anemia group, even though the growth inhibition found in control animals was not completely achieved. Conclusions: These data indicate that moderate anemia significantly reduces the efficacy of radiotherapy. Prevention of anemia with rHuEPO partially restores the radiosensitivity of xenografted glioblastomas to fractionated irradiation. (orig.)

  16. Hypo-fractionated whole breast irradiation: Pro and cons; Irradiation hypofractionnee dans le cancer du sein: pour ou contre?

    Cutuli, B. [Institut du cancer Courlancy, 38, rue de Courlancy, 51100 Reims (France); Fourquet, A. [Institut Curie, 26, rue d' Ulm, 75005 Paris (France)

    2011-10-15

    The continuous increase of breast cancer (BC) incidence, the logistic constraints of the protracted standard 5-week radiations regimen have led to test short hypo-fractionated whole breast radiation therapy schemes. Three prospective randomized trials and a pilot trial have been published. Large numbers of patients were included, with follow-up duration ranging from 5 to 12 years. The conclusions of these trials were similar, showing local control and toxicity equivalent to those of the standard regimen, and supporting the use of three schemes: 42.5 Gy/16 fractions/3 weeks, 40 Gy/15 fractions/3 weeks or 41.6 Gy/13 fractions/5 weeks. However, the patients in these trials had favourable prognostic factors, were treated to the breast only and the boost dose, when indicated, was delivered with a standard fractionation. Hypo-fractionated treatment can only be recommended in patients treated to the breast only, without nodal involvement, with grade < 3 tumours and who are not candidate to chemotherapy. If a boost is to be given, a standard fractionation should be used. Particular care should be taken to avoid heterogeneities leading to high fractional doses to organs at risk (lung and heart). (authors)

  17. Delayed effects of low level acute irradiation and chronic environmental radioactive contamination on DNA lymphocytes of people living in Dolon, a settlement located in the vicinity of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (Kazakhstan)

    Chenal, C.; Legue, F.; Nourgalieva, K. [UMR CNRS 6553 ' Ecobio' , Equipe Radiations Environnement Adaptation. Universite de RENNES 1, Campus de Beaulieu, Bat 14, RENNES Cedex F 35042 (France)

    2006-10-01

    During 42 years several hundred nuclear tests were performed by the former USSR at the Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS, Kazakhstan), of which more than 100 were done in the atmosphere. We report here the late genetic damage of external exposure to radiation and environmental radioactive contamination in people living in Dolon, a small settlement situated in the vicinity of the STS. The comet assay was applied on DNA lymphocytes of 20 exposed women and 32 non-exposed women living at 500 km from the STS. We observed a statistically significant difference between the exposed and control groups for mean tail moment (MTM) and DNA% in the tail. The mean values of all comet assay parameters (MTM, DNA% in the tail and score) were higher in the group of women born before 1949 as compared to those born after 1950, which could reflect an effect of external irradiation in 1949 due to the most contaminating explosion. These results suggest that people exposed 50 years ago to relatively small doses of external irradiation and/or still living in an environment contaminated by small amounts of long life radionuclides, still present DNA damage which is in agreement with other cytogenetical studies performed at the same site, on the same population. (author)

  18. Delayed effects of low level acute irradiation and chronic environmental radioactive contamination on DNA lymphocytes of people living in Dolon, a settlement located in the vicinity of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (Kazakhstan)

    Chenal, C.; Legue, F.; Nourgalieva, K.

    2006-01-01

    During 42 years several hundred nuclear tests were performed by the former USSR at the Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS, Kazakhstan), of which more than 100 were done in the atmosphere. We report here the late genetic damage of external exposure to radiation and environmental radioactive contamination in people living in Dolon, a small settlement situated in the vicinity of the STS. The comet assay was applied on DNA lymphocytes of 20 exposed women and 32 non-exposed women living at 500 km from the STS. We observed a statistically significant difference between the exposed and control groups for mean tail moment (MTM) and DNA% in the tail. The mean values of all comet assay parameters (MTM, DNA% in the tail and score) were higher in the group of women born before 1949 as compared to those born after 1950, which could reflect an effect of external irradiation in 1949 due to the most contaminating explosion. These results suggest that people exposed 50 years ago to relatively small doses of external irradiation and/or still living in an environment contaminated by small amounts of long life radionuclides, still present DNA damage which is in agreement with other cytogenetical studies performed at the same site, on the same population

  19. Epinephrine ameliorating response of serum proteins and protein fractions to whole body gamma irradiation in albino rats

    Mohamed, M.A.; Saada, H.N.; Roushdy, H.M.; Awad, O.M.; El-Sayed, M.M.; Azab, Kh.Sh.

    1997-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the role of epinephrine in modifying the radiation induced effects on serum protein as presented by total protein, protein fractions and albumin/globulin (A/G) ratio in adult albino rats. Epinephrine was intraperitoneally injected at a concentration of 200 M/g body weight, 15 min, pre-9 or just after 0 whole body gamma-irradiation of rats at a dose of 6 Gy (single dose). Studies have been undertaken at periods of 1 hr, 4 hrs, 1,3 and 7 days after irradiation. Data of the present study revealed that whole body gamma-irradiation induced significant decreased in the total content of serum protein and albumin at 1,3 and 7 days post radiation exposure alpha 1-globulin significantly increased only on the 1 st hr post-irradiation, however alpha 1-globulin significantly increased along all the experimental periods. B-globulin insignificantly changed after irradiation but gamma-globulin significantly decreased during the experimental periods. These changes were associated with significant decreases in A/G ratio at 3 and 7 days post-irradiation. Administration of epinephrine pre-or after radiation exposure produced some amelioration in the radiation induced changes in the studied parameters. So, it could be concluded that epinephrine plays a beneficial radioprotective role through its pharmacologic properties

  20. Radiobiological basis of total body irradiation with different dose rate and fractionation: repair capacity of hemopoietic cells

    Song, C.W.; Kim, T.H.; Khan, F.M.; Kersey, J.H.; Levitt, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) followed by bone marrow transplantation is being used in the treatment of malignant or non-malignant hemopoietic disorders. It has been believed that the ability of hemopoietic cells to repair sublethal radiation damage is negligible. Therefore, several schools of investigators suggested that TBI in a single exposure at extremely low dose rate (5 rad/min) over several hours, or in several fractions in 2-3 days, should yield a higher therapeutic gain, as compared with a single exposure at a high dose rate (26 rad/min). We reviewed the existing data in the literature, in particular, the response of hemopoietic cells to fractionated doses of irradiation and found that the repair capacity of both malignant and non-malignant hemopoietic cells might be greater than has been thought. It is concluded that we should not underestimate the ability of hemopoietic cells to repair sublethal radiation damage in using TBI

  1. Comparison of single, fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation on the development of normal tissue damage in rat lung

    Giri, P.G.S.; Kimler, B.F.; Giri, U.P.; Cox, G.G.; Reddy, E.K.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of fractionated thoracic irradiation on the development of normal tissue damage in rats was compared to that produced by single doses. Animals received a single dose of 15 Gy, 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions of 3 Gy each (fractionation), or 30 Gy in 30 fractions of 1 Gy each 3 times a day (hyperfractionation). The treatments produced minimal lethality since a total of only 6 animals died between days 273 and 475 after the initiation of treatment, with no difference in survival observed between the control and any of the 3 treated groups. Despite the lack of lethality, evidence of lung damage was obtained by histological examination. Animals that had received either single doses or fractionated doses had more of the pulmonary parenchyma involved than did animals that had received hyperfractionated doses. The authors conclude that, in the rat lung model, a total radiation dose of 30 Gy fractionated over 14 days produces no more lethality nor damage to lung tissue than does 15 Gy delivered as a single dose. However, long-term effects as evidenced by deposits of collagen and development of fibrosis are significantly reduced by hyperfractionation when compared to single doses and daily fractionation

  2. Mutation induction in haploid yeast after split-dose radiation-exposure. I. Fractionated UV-irradiation.

    Schenk, K; Zölzer, F; Kiefer, J

    1989-01-01

    Mutation induction was investigated in wild-type haploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae after split-dose UV-irradiation. Cells were exposed to fractionated 254 nm-UV-doses separated by intervals from 0 to 6 h with incubation either on non-nutrient or nutrient agar between. The test parameter was resistance to canavanine. If modifications of sensitivity due to incubation are appropriately taken into account there is no change of mutation frequency.

  3. Early reoxygenation in tumors after irradiation: Determining factors and consequences for radiotherapy regimens using daily multiple fractions

    Crokart, Nathalie; Jordan, Benedicte F.; Baudelet, Christine; Ansiaux, Reginald; Sonveaux, Pierre; Gregoire, Vincent; Beghein, Nelson; Wever, Julie de; Bouzin, Caroline; Feron, Olivier; Gallez, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize changes in the tumor microenvironment early after irradiation and determine the factors responsible for early reoxygenation. Methods and Materials: Fibrosarcoma type II (FSaII) and hepatocarcinoma transplantable liver tumor tumor oxygenation were determined using electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry and a fiberoptic device. Perfusion was assessed by laser Doppler, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, and dye penetration. Oxygen consumption was determined by electron paramagnetic resonance. The interstitial fluid pressure was evaluated by the wick-in-needle technique. Results: An increase in oxygen partial pressure was observed 3-4 h after irradiation. This increase resulted from a decrease in global oxygen consumption and an increase in oxygen delivery. The increase in oxygen delivery was due to radiation-induced acute inflammation (that was partially inhibited by the antiinflammatory agent diclofenac) and to a decrease in interstitial fluid pressure. The endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathway, identified as a contributing factor at 24 h after irradiation, did not play a role in the early stage after irradiation. We also observed that splitting a treatment of 18 Gy into two fractions separated by 4 h (time of maximal reoxygenation) had a greater effect on tumor regrowth delay than when applied as a single dose. Conclusion: Although the cell cycle redistribution effect is important for treatment protocols using multiple daily radiation fractions, the results of this work emphasize that the oxygen effect must be also considered to optimize the treatment strategy

  4. Effects of bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on oral mucositis (mouse) induced by fractionated irradiation

    Schmidt, M.; Haagen, J.; Noack, R.; Siegemund, A.; Gabriel, P.; Doerr, W.

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a severe and dose limiting early side effect of radiotherapy for head-and-neck tumors. This study was initiated to determine the effect of bone marrow- and mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on oral mucositis (mouse tongue model) induced by fractionated irradiation. Daily fractionated irradiation (5 x 3 Gy/week) was given over 1 (days 0-4) or 3 weeks (days 0-4, 7-11, 14-18). Each protocol was terminated (day 7 or 21) by graded test doses (5 dose groups, 10 animals each) in order to generate complete dose-effect curves. The incidence of mucosal ulceration, corresponding to confluent mucositis grade 3 (RTOG/EORTC), was analyzed as the primary, clinically relevant endpoint. Bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted intravenously at various time points within these fractionation protocols. Transplantation of 6 x 10 6 , but not of 3 x 10 6 bone marrow stem cells on day -1, +4, +8, +11 or +15 significantly increased the ED 50 values (dose, at which an ulcer is expected in 50% of the mice); transplantation on day +2, in contrast, was ineffective. Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on day -1, 2 or +8 significantly, and on day +4 marginally increased the ED 50 values. Transplantation of bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cells has the potential to modulate radiation-induced oral mucositis during fractionated radiotherapy. The effect is dependent on the timing of the transplantation. The mechanisms require further investigation. (orig.)

  5. Effect of single dose, fractionated, and hyperfractionated trunk irradiation on weight gain, respiration frequency, and survival in rats

    Kimler, B.F.; Giri, P.G.S.; Giri, U.P.; Cox, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    It is concluded that, in this rat trunk irradiation model, fractionation of a single dose into two equal doses separated by 4-6 h produced a sparing effect of approx. 5Gy as measured by delay in weight gain; approx. 4Gy as measured by increased respiration frequency; and approx. 6Gy as measured by survival. Fractionation into daily doses or hyperfractionation into twice-daily doses permitted an approximate doubling of the dose required for the same suppression of weight gain. For the respiration rates and survival endpoints, fractionation or hyperfractionation produced an even greater sparing effect since there was no increase in the respiration frequency at twice the doses that would produce changes if delivered within a few hours; and since essentially no lethality was observed at twice the doses that would kill 70%-100% of animals if delivered in one day. (UK)

  6. Influence of the timing of a concomitant boost during fractionated irradiation of rat rhabdomyosarcoma R1H

    Dubben, H.H.; Beck-Bornholdt, H.P.

    1993-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcomas R1H of the rat (WAG/Rij) were treated using fractionation schedules including a boost. The total dose was 60 Gy. Overall treatment time was 6 weeks. Four different boost schedules were applied: A single dose boost (12.15 Gy) at the last day of treatment, a single dose boost (12.15 Gy) at the first day of treatment, a schedule including the boost in 7 fractions during the first week, and a schedule including the boost in 10 fractions during the first week of treatment. A standard schedule with 30 fractions of 2 Gy without a boost was used for comparison. Initially accelerated schedules, i.e. those with a boost at start of treatment, revealed higher effect on tumour parenchyma as monitored by local control rate and net growth delay. This could be due to a decrease of radio-sensitivity, that is, an increase of the hypoxic fraction of clonogenic tumour cells during fractionated irradiation. (orig.)

  7. Hourly distributions of the diffuse fraction of global solar irradiation in Cordoba (Spain)

    Posadillo, R.; Lopez Luque, R. [Grupo de Investigacion de Fisica para las Energias y Recursos Renovables, Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada/UCO, Edificio C2 Campus de Rabanales, 14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2009-02-15

    Hourly global irradiations on tilted planes are required for dimensioning PV systems. However, for most sites, only global irradiations on a horizontal plane are available, and, given that to calculate the global irradiation on inclined planes the first step is to determine the diffuse component and this is not collected, we have studied the behaviour of the diffuse component on an hourly basis. Most parametrization models for the derivation of hourly diffuse irradiance from hourly global irradiance involve the clearness index, a parameter that implicitly includes solar altitude. The present paper has focused on the possibility of also including ''mean solar altitude anti {alpha}'' explicitly as a parameter in addition to the clearness index. Several analytical models are proposed, validated and compared here, using solar data collected on our station located in Cordoba (Spain). (author)

  8. Hourly distributions of the diffuse fraction of global solar irradiation in Cordoba (Spain)

    Posadillo, R.; Lopez Luque, R.

    2009-01-01

    Hourly global irradiations on tilted planes are required for dimensioning PV systems. However, for most sites, only global irradiations on a horizontal plane are available, and, given that to calculate the global irradiation on inclined planes the first step is to determine the diffuse component and this is not collected, we have studied the behaviour of the diffuse component on an hourly basis. Most parametrization models for the derivation of hourly diffuse irradiance from hourly global irradiance involve the clearness index, a parameter that implicitly includes solar altitude. The present paper has focused on the possibility of also including 'mean solar altitude α-bar' explicitly as a parameter in addition to the clearness index. Several analytical models are proposed, validated and compared here, using solar data collected on our station located in Cordoba (Spain)

  9. Human exposure to low level ionising radiation

    Paix, David

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the low-level radiation sources and their effects on human populations, from a global perspective. 'Low-level' means exposures in the range of the natural background to which everybody is exposed. The quoted values are whole-world averages, but individual variations are mentioned in a few cases. (author). 22 refs

  10. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides highlights from the spring meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: state and compact reports; New York's challenge to the constitutionality of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Amendments Act of 1985; DOE technical assistance for 1993; interregional import/export agreements; Department of Transportation requirements; superfund liability; nonfuel bearing components; NRC residual radioactivity criteria

  11. Low back pain and low level flying

    J.C.F.M. Aghina

    1989-01-01

    textabstractLow level flying is a very good tactical possibility to carry out a mission unseen by a hostile radarsystem. Nowadays, Western Europe in general and the Federal Republic of Germany in particular, decreased . the permissions to low level flying in assigned regions. That's why the

  12. Expression profiling of murine lung 70 days following exposure to fractionated or acute dose of 1.0 Gy 56Fe- particle irradiation

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Irradiation of the K-rasLA1 mouse model with a fractionated dose of 1.0Gy 56Fe- particles increases the incidence of invasive carcinoma compared to unirradiated...

  13. Effect of lithium carbonate on leukocyte number after influence of ionizing radiation. 3. Influence of lithium carbonate on peripheral leukocytes after fractionated caudal half-body irradiation

    Rose, H.; Saul, G.; Kehrberg, G. (Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (German Democratic Republic). Bereich Medizin (Charite))

    1985-01-01

    Fractionated half-body irradiation of rats resulted in leukopenia of the peripheral blood. The decrease of leukocytes was smaller in animals pretreated with an orally administered dose of lithium carbonate for 14 days.

  14. Decreased repopulation as well as increased reoxygenation contribute to the improvement in local control after targeting of the EGFR by C225 during fractionated irradiation.

    Krause, M.; Ostermann, G.; Petersen, C.; Yaromina, A.; Hessel, F.; Harstrick, A.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Thames, H.D.; Baumann, M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Inhibition of repopulation and enhanced reoxygenation has been suggested to contribute to improvement of local tumour control after fractionated irradiation combined with inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The present study addresses this hypothesis in

  15. Effect of fractionated versus unfractionated total body irradiation on the growth of the BN acute myelocytic leukemia

    Hagenbeek, A.; Martens, A.C.M.

    1981-01-01

    The efficacy of various total body irradiation (TBI) regimens prior to bone marrow transplantation was evaluated in a rat model for acute myelocytic leukemia (Dq = 85.1 cGy gamma ; N = 3.7). Using high dose rate gamma-irradiation (115 cGy/min), fractionated TBI with large total daily doses (400 to 600 cGy), either given as acute doses or as split doses at 8 hr intervals, was most effective. Split doses (2 fractions per day) offered no additional advantage. At the most, a 4 log leukemic cell kill was induced. No lethal toxicity was observed. Nine-hundred cGy flash TBI had a similar anti-tumor effect, but with this regimen almost half of the rats died from radiation-induced toxicity (lungs and gastro-intestinal tract). The results are explained in terms of differences between normal and leukemic cells as regards (a) repair of sublethal damage; and (b) repopulation. Low dose rate continuous gamma-irradiation (0.26 cGy/min) with total doses ranging from 900 to 2000 cGy was also quite effective. Maximally a 4 log cell kill was obtained. With 2000 cGy, 50% of the rats died from the gastro-intestinal tract-syndrome. In addition to the major role played by chemotherapy, TBI is mainly of importance in sterilizing the various sanctuaries in the body which contain leukemic cells anatomically resistant to most cytostatic agents

  16. Low-dose X-irradiation of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Efficacy of different fractionation schedules

    Liebmann, A.; Hindemith, M.; Jahns, J.; Kamprad, F.; Hildebrandt, G.; Madaj-Sterba, P.; Weisheit, S.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: low-dose radiotherapy is widely accepted as a very effective treatment option for inflammatory symptoms associated with painful degenerative joint disorders. Radiation doses and fractionation schedules in practical use are empirical and mainly based on clinical observations. Experimental data are rare. The efficacy of low-dose X-irradiation on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats using different fractionation schemes was investigated in vivo, in order to explore whether there is a dose and fractionation dependence. Material and methods: adjuvant arthritis in female lewis rats (n = 128) was induced by intradermal injection of heat-inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis on day 0. Both arthritic hind paws were sham-irradiated (group 1: days 10-14; group 2: days 15-19; group 3: days 22-26) or X-irradiated with either 5 x 1.0 Gy (group 4: days 10-14; group 6: days 15-19; group 8: days 22-26; group 10: days 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18) or 5 x 0.5 Gy (group 5: days 10-14; group 7: days 15-19; group 9: days 22-26; group 11: days 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18; group 12: days 10-14 and 22-26). The clinical parameters arthritis score (AS), hind paw volume (HPV), and body weight were determined. Results: a significant decrease of the clinical arthritis parameters was observed following 5 x 0.5 Gy or 5 x 1.0 Gy during the acute maximum of the inflammatory response (days 15-19). The most pronounced treatment effect was reached after two daily fractionated series of 5 x 0.5 Gy with an early treatment onset (days 10-14) and repetition in interval (days 22-26). After the application of 5 x 1.0 Gy on days 10-14 or in a protracted scheme (days 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18), only a nonsignificant positive trend could be detected. Daily fractionated X-irradiation in the chronic phase of adjuvant arthritis (days 22-26) did not show any positive clinical effect. Conclusion: low-dose radiotherapy is able to prevent a full-blown arthritic reaction if given during the florid phase of

  17. The occurrence of recruitment supported from the finding of an increase in radiosensitivity of quiescent cells in solid tumors after fractionated irradiation with X-rays

    Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Kinashi, Yuko; Suzuki, Minoru; Akaboshi, Mitsuhiko

    1998-01-01

    We examined the behavior of quiescent cells in solid tumors irradiated twice at various intervals with X-rays, using our recently developed method for selectively detecting the response of quiescent cells in solid tumors. To determine the labeling indices of tumors at the second irradiation, each mouse group included mice that were continuously administered BrdU until just before the second irradiation using mini-osmotic pumps which had been implanted before the first irradiation. Radiosensitivity of total tumor cells at the second irradiation decreased in proportion to the increase in interval time. However, radiosensitivity of quiescent cells was raised with increase in the interval time. In addition, the labeling index at the second irradiation was higher than that at the first irradiation. These findings supported the occurrence of recruitment from quiescent to proliferating state during fractionated irradiation. (author)

  18. Decreased repopulation as well as increased reoxygenation contribute to the improvement in local control after targeting of the EGFR by C225 during fractionated irradiation

    Krause, Mechthild; Ostermann, Gernot; Petersen, Cordula; Yaromina, Ala; Hessel, Franziska; Harstrick, Andreas; Kogel, Albert J van der; Thames, Howard D; Baumann, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Inhibition of repopulation and enhanced reoxygenation has been suggested to contribute to improvement of local tumour control after fractionated irradiation combined with inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The present study addresses this hypothesis in FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma. For this tumour model marked repopulation and incomplete reoxygenation during fractionated irradiation has previously been demonstrated. Furthermore, the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody C225 has been shown to significantly improve the results of fractionated irradiation in this tumour. Materials and methods: FaDu tumours in nude mice were irradiated with 18 fractions in 18 days (18f/18d) or 18 fractions in 36 days (18f/36d). Three Gy fractions were given either under ambient or under clamp hypoxic conditions. C225 or carrier was applied four times during the course of treatment. Fractionated irradiations were followed by graded top-up doses to obtain complete dose-response curves for local tumour control. Tumour control dose 50% (TCD 50 ) was determined at day 120 after end of treatment. Results: Significant repopulation and reoxygenation occurred during fractionated irradiation of FaDu tumours (P-values between 0.028 and 50 for 18f/36d under ambient conditions (P=0.04). Bootstrap analysis revealed decreased repopulation and increased reoxygenation after application of C225 (P=0.06 for the combined effect). This was further corroborated by a significant effect of C225 on the 'repopulated' dose under ambient conditions which is influenced by both, reoxygenation and repopulation (P=0.012). Conclusions: Our study provides evidence that both decreased repopulation as well as increased reoxygenation contribute to the improvement of local control after targeting of EGFR by C225 during fractionated irradiation of FaDu tumours

  19. Arrested neuronal proliferation and impaired hippocampal function following fractionated brain irradiation in the adult rat

    Madsen, Torsten Meldgaard; Kristjansen, P.E.G.; Bolwig, Tom Gert

    2003-01-01

    irradiation blocked the formation of new neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. At different time points after the termination of the irradiation procedure, the animals were tested in two tests of short-term memory that differ with respect to their dependence on hippocampal function. Eight and 21...... that blocked neurogenesis contributes to the reported deleterious side effects of this treatment, consisting of memory impairment, dysphoria and lethargy....

  20. The Drigg low-level waste site

    1992-01-01

    Safe disposal of waste is a vital aspect of any industrial operation whether it be production of plastics, steel or chemicals or handling of radioactive materials. Appropriate methods must be used in every case. Radioactive waste falls into three distinct categories - high, intermediate and low-level. It is the solid low-level waste making up over 90% of the total which this booklet discusses. British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) operates a site for the disposal of solid low-level waste at Driggs, some six kilometres south of Sellafield in West Cumbria. The daily operations and control of the site, the responsibility of the BNFL Waste Management Unit is described. (author)

  1. Correlation between radiological, scintigraphic and histological changes in bone in rabbits following irradiation with single and fractionated doses

    Burgener, F.A.; King, M.A.; Weber, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    In the left hind legs of eight rabbits were irradiated with 1,750 rad in a single dose or with 4,650 rad divided over a period of three weeks. These animals, as well as four who had not been irradiated, were examined periodically radiologically and with 99 mTechnetium pyrophosphate scintigrams during one year. No difference could be detected between the results of the single and fractionated doses. Scintigraphically there was a biphasic increase in uptake, the first peak co-inciding with the irradiation and of vascular origin, whereas the second peak occured at four months and was due to a change in bone metabolism. At the end of a year uptake in the irradiated limb was slightly reduced. The earliest radiological changes were found after six months, at the end of the second scintigraphic peak; they consisted of coarsening and blurring of the trabeculae, non-homogeneous spotty mineralisation and endosteal scalloping. Six animals developed a radiation-induced bone sarcoma, first demonstrated either by scintigraphy or radiology depending on its histology. The value of combining radiological and scintigraphic examinations for the early detection of post-radiation abnormalities is stressed. (orig.) [de

  2. Expression of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance associated protein in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells after fractionated irradiation

    Nielsen, D; Maare, C; Eriksen, J

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To characterize irradiated murine tumor cells with respect to drug resistance, drug kinetics, and ATPase activity, and to evaluate the possible role of P-glycoprotein (PGP) and murine multidrug resistance associated protein (Mrp1) in the drug-resistant phenotype of these cells. METHODS...... AND MATERIALS: Sensitive Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EHR2) were in vitro exposed to fractionated irradiation (60 Gy). Western blot analysis was performed for determination of PGP and Mrp1, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for determination of mdr1a + b mRNA, and semiquantitative RT......-PCR for Mrp1 mRNA. The clonogenic assay was applied to investigate sensitivity, whereas the steady-state drug accumulation of daunorubicin (DNR), 3H-vincristine (VCR), and 3H-etoposide (VP16) was measured by spectrofluorometry and scintillation counting, respectively. For determining of ATPase activity...

  3. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    Sternwheeler, W.D.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides highlights from the 1992 winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Wastes Forum. Topics of discussion included: legal information; state and compact reports; freedom of information requests; and storage

  4. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides highlights from the summer meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: responsibility for nonfuel component disposal; state experiences in facility licensing; and volume projections

  5. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    1992-01-01

    This report provides highlights from the 1992 fall meeting of the Low LEvel Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: disposal options after 1992; interregional agreements; management alternatives; policy; and storage

  6. Reply to: Analysis of the effects of fractionated irradiation to the rat heart (by E. van Rongen)

    Guttenberger, R.

    1987-01-01

    The applicability of the linear quadratic (LQ) model in the analysis of the data presented by Lauk et al. (Radiotherapy. Oncol. 8: 363-367, 1987) is investigated with the linear regression method of Tucker, by simulating fractionated irradiation experiments on tissues with α/β values varying from 1 to 20, starting from theoretical iso-effect doses. It turns out that the LQ model is unreliable for small (∼ 1) α/β values using the error probability p=0.05 and that the sensitivity of the linear regression method is dependent on the underlying α/β. 3 refs.; 1 table

  7. Landfill disposal of very low level waste

    Luo Shanggeng

    2009-01-01

    The radioactivities of very low level wastes are very low. VLLW can be disposed by simple and economic burial process. This paper describes the significance of segregation of very low level waste (VLLW), the VLLW-definition and its limit value, and presents an introduction of VLLW-disposing approaches operated world wide. The disposal of VLLW in China is also briefly discussed and suggested here. (author)

  8. Microbiological treatment of low level radioactive waste

    Ashley, N.V.; Pugh, S.Y.R.; Banks, C.J.; Humphreys, P.N.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarises the work of an experimental programme investigating the anaerobic digestion of low-level radioactive wastes. The project focused on the selection of the optimum bioreactor design to achieve 95% removal or stabilisation of the biodegradable portion of low-level radioactive wastes. Performance data was obtained for the bioreactors and process scale-up factors for the construction of a full-scale reactor were considered. (author)

  9. Low-level-waste-treatment handbook

    Clinton, S.D.; Goeller, H.E.; Holladay, D.W.; Donaldson, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    The initial draft of the Low-Level Waste Treatment Handbook has been prepared and submitted to the DOE Low-Level Waste Management Program for review and comment. A revised draft is scheduled to be delivered to DOE Headquarters in December 1982. The Handbook is designed to be useful to all individuals and groups concerned with low-level wastes. It is one of several volumes that will ultimately comprise a Low-Level Waste Technology Handbook. The objective of the Low-Level Waste Treatment Handbook is to present an overview of current practices related to the segregation, classification, volume reduction, solidification, handling, packaging, and transportation of LLW for disposal in a shallow land burial facility. The Handbook is intended to serve as a guide to individuals interested in the treatment and handling of low-level radioactive waste. The Handbook will not explicitly tell the user how to design and operate LLW treatment facilities, but rather will identify (1) kinds of information required to evaluate the options, (2) methods that may be used to evaluate these options, and (3) limitations associated with the selection of the treatment options. The focus of the Handbook is providing guidance on how to do waste treatment for disposal by shallow land burial

  10. Low-dose fractionated whole-body irradiation in the treatment of advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Choi, N.C.; Timothy, A.R.; Kaufman, S.D.; Carey, R.W.; Aisenberg, A.C.

    1979-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients with advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (38 patients with lymphocytic lymphoma and 1 patient with mixed lymphocytic and histiocytic lymphoma) were treated by fractionated low dose whole body irradiation (WBI) with a minimum follow-up of 8 months. Twenty-eight patients had no previous treatment and the other 11 patients were in relapse after previous chemotherapy or regional radiotherapy. There were 20 and 19 patients in stages III and IV groups, respectively. The majority of patients (31) had nodular histology; diffuse lymphocytic lymphoma was present in 8 patients (Rappaport criteria) (9). Constitutional symptoms were present in 10 patients. Thirty-three (85%) attained complete remission (CR) with median duration of remission 24 months. Actuarial survival was 78% and 74% at 3 and 4 years. However, relapse free survival was 26% at 3 and 4 years. A prospective randomized trial to compare 10 vs. 15 rad per fraction of fractionated WBI schedules (the same total dose 150 rad) demonstrated no difference in response rate, response duration, and median nadir platelet or WBC counts between the two schedules. Supplement radiotherapy to bulky tumor site prevented local recurrence, but did not influence survival or duration or remission. Major toxicity was thrombocytopenia with median nadir platelet counts 77,000/mm 3 (11,000 to 170,000/mm 3 ). Five of 6 patients with diffuse lymphocytic poorly differentiated lymphoma attained CR. However, their median survival was 30 months which is much shorter than that of nodular lymphoma. Constitutional symptoms and advanced stage (stage IV) were associated with shorter duration of remission. Response of patients in relapse after WBI to subsequent chemotherapy +- local radiotherapy was CR in 50% and PR in 40%. Fractionated whole body irradiation is an excellent systemic induction agent for advanced lymphocytic and mixed lymphoma

  11. Low-level radioactive waste, mixed low-level radioactive waste, and biomedical mixed waste

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    This document describes the proceedings of a workshop entitled: Low-Level Radioactive Waste, Mixed Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Biomedical Mixed Waste presented by the National Low-Level Waste Management Program at the University of Florida, October 17-19, 1994. The topics covered during the workshop include technical data and practical information regarding the generation, handling, storage and disposal of low-level radioactive and mixed wastes. A description of low-level radioactive waste activities in the United States and the regional compacts is presented

  12. Differential cisplatin responses in human carcinoma cell lines pre-exposed to fractionated X-irradiation

    Dempke, W.C.M.; Hosking, L.K.; Shellard, S.A.; Hill, B.T.

    1991-01-01

    These results suggest that cells exposed to X-irradiation may respond differently to subsequent cisplatin (CDDP) treatment. Initial studies of possible mechanisms responsible for these differential sensitivities indicate that they may differ according to whether resistance or hypersensitivity is expressed. (author)

  13. Effect of cetuximab and fractionated irradiation on tumour micro-environment.

    Santiago, A.; Eicheler, W.; Bussink, J.; Rijken, P.F.J.W.; Yaromina, A.; Beuthien-Baumann, B.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Baumann, M.; Krause, M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Previous experiments have shown that application of the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody C225 (cetuximab) improves local tumour control after irradiation in FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma (hSCC) due to the combined effect of decreased repopulation and improved reoxygenation.

  14. Vertebral compression fractures after spine irradiation using conventional fractionation in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    Ree, Woo Joong; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Chang, Jee Suk; Kim, Hyun Ju; Choi, Seo Hee; Koom, Woong Sub [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate the risk of vertebral compression fracture (VCF) after conventional radiotherapy (RT) for colorectal cancer (CRC) with spine metastasis and to identify risk factors for VCF in metastatic and non-metastatic irradiated spines. We retrospectively reviewed 68 spinal segments in 16 patients who received conventional RT between 2009 and 2012. Fracture was defined as a newly developed VCF or progression of an existing fracture. The target volume included all metastatic spinal segments and one additional non-metastatic vertebra adjacent to the tumor-involved spines. The median follow-up was 7.8 months. Among all 68 spinal segments, there were six fracture events (8.8%) including three new VCFs and three fracture progressions. Observed VCF rates in vertebral segments with prior irradiation or pre-existing compression fracture were 30.0% and 75.0% respectively, compared with 5.2% and 4.7% for segments without prior irradiation or pre-existing compression fracture, respectively (both p < 0.05). The 1-year fracture-free probability was 87.8% (95% CI, 78.2-97.4). On multivariate analysis, prior irradiation (HR, 7.30; 95% CI, 1.31-40.86) and pre-existing compression fracture (HR, 18.45; 95% CI, 3.42-99.52) were independent risk factors for VCF. The incidence of VCF following conventional RT to the spine is not particularly high, regardless of metastatic tumor involvement. Spines that received irradiation and/or have pre-existing compression fracture before RT have an increased risk of VCF and require close observation.

  15. Fractionated total body irradiation and autologous bone marrow transplantation in dogs: Hemopoietic recovery after various marrow cell doses

    Bodenburger, U.; Kolb, H.J.; Thierfelder, S.; Netzel, B.; Schaeffer, E.; Kolb, H.

    1980-01-01

    Hemopoietic recovery was studied in dogs given 2400 R fractionated total body irradiation within one week and graded doses of cryopreserved autologous bone marrow. Complete hemopoietic recovery including histology was observed after this dose and sufficient doses of marrow cells. Doses of more than 5.5 x 10 7 mononuclear marrow cells/kg body weight were sufficient for complete recovery in all dogs, 1.5 to 5.5 x 10 7 cells/kg were effective in some of the dogs and less than 1.5 x 10 7 cells/kg were insufficient for complete recovery. Similarly, more than 30000 CFUsub(c)/kg body weight were required for hemopoietic recovery. The optimal marrow cell dose which has been defined as the minimal dose required for the earliest possible recovery of leukocyte and platelet counts was 7-8 x 10 7 mononuclear marrow cells/kg body weight. It has been concluded that fractionated total body irradiation with 2400 R dose not require greater doses of marrow cells for hemopoietic reconstitution than lower single doses and that the hemopoietic microenvironment is not persistently disturbed after this dose. (author)

  16. A pilot study to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of ondansetron and granisetron in fractionated total body irradiation

    Gibbs, S.J.; Cassoni, A.M. [Middlesex Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01

    The duration of the antiemetic effect of granisetron was examined in a pilot study of patients (n = 26) undergoing a standard emetogenic stimulus in the form of total body irradiation fractionated over 3-4 days, in a randomized comparison with twice-daily ondansetron. A single intravenous dose of granisetron at the onset of therapy was effective over the entire follow-up period in 50% (6/12) of patients, compared with 77% (10/13) prescribed twice-daily oral ondansetron for 3 or 4 days. The response rate within the first 24 hours from the start of irradiation was 67% (8/12) for granisetron and 77% (10/13) for ondansetron. Granisetron and ondansetron was therefore of similar efficacy within the first 24-hour period, but granisetron was less efficaceous more than 24 hours after the onset of therapy. Patients who required a second dose of granisetron did so at intervals of 12, 42, 47 and 48 hours following the first fraction of radiotherapy. The cost per patient in this study was 48 for granisetron and {sub 1}54 for ondanestron, but the dose scheduling we used cannot be recommended in view of the lower effectiveness of granisetron. (author).

  17. A pilot study to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of ondansetron and granisetron in fractionated total body irradiation

    Gibbs, S.J.; Cassoni, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The duration of the antiemetic effect of granisetron was examined in a pilot study of patients (n = 26) undergoing a standard emetogenic stimulus in the form of total body irradiation fractionated over 3-4 days, in a randomized comparison with twice-daily ondansetron. A single intravenous dose of granisetron at the onset of therapy was effective over the entire follow-up period in 50% (6/12) of patients, compared with 77% (10/13) prescribed twice-daily oral ondansetron for 3 or 4 days. The response rate within the first 24 hours from the start of irradiation was 67% (8/12) for granisetron and 77% (10/13) for ondansetron. Granisetron and ondansetron was therefore of similar efficacy within the first 24-hour period, but granisetron was less efficaceous more than 24 hours after the onset of therapy. Patients who required a second dose of granisetron did so at intervals of 12, 42, 47 and 48 hours following the first fraction of radiotherapy. The cost per patient in this study was 48 for granisetron and 1 54 for ondanestron, but the dose scheduling we used cannot be recommended in view of the lower effectiveness of granisetron. (author)

  18. Scanning electron microscopy and recording of the physiological activity of tracheal ciliated cells treated by fractionated irradiation

    Albertsson, M.; Hakansson, C.H.; Mecklenburg, C. von

    1983-01-01

    The ciliated epithelium of the rabbit's trachea was irradiated with daily fractions of 2 Gy to an accumulated dose of 20 Gy. The beat frequency of the cilia was recorded and specimens were taken for SEM-, TEM- and LM-investigations. Examination was made 1-10 days after each fractionation schedule. An increased ciliary beat frequency was recorded at 2 Gy and 4 Gy. With increasing dose, there was an inverted relationship to the frequency. Light-microscopy showed edema and an increased amount of goblet cells in relation to the increasing dose. With SEM an increased number of ciliary blebs could be seen. These could be classified according to size and number, and showed a positive correlation to the dose. TEM-investigations showed signs of increased intracellular activity at higher doses in the form of multilobulated nuclei and an increasing number of nuclear pores. At lower doses, an increased amount of mitochondria appeared in the apical part of the cell. It is at present difficult to evaluate any correlation between the physiological activity and the morphology. More biological data are needed to explain the early irradiation effects

  19. Fractionated stereotactic irradiation by Cyberknife of choroid melanomas: repositioning validation, closed eyelids

    Horn, S.; Rezvoy, N.; Lacornerie, T.; Mirabel, X.; Labalette, P.; Lartigau, E.

    2009-01-01

    The fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy by Cyberknife is an option in the treatment of eyes tumors. The advantages of the Cyberknife in the choroid melanomas are in its infra-millimetric precision, to the automated repositioning on the skull bones and to the conformity brought by the stereotaxy. The objective of this study was to validate the quality of repositioning and the immobility of the eyes with closed eyelids. Conclusion: the reproducibility of the eye positioning with closed eyelids seems enough to consider the conservative treatment of choroid melanomas by fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy by Cyberknife without implementation of fiducials nor retrobulbar anaesthesia. (N.C.)

  20. Density crosslink study of gamma irradiated LDPE predicted by gel-fraction, swelling and glass transition temperature characterization

    Cardoso, Elisabeth C.L.; Scagliusi, Sandra R.; Moraes, Guilherme F.; Ono, Lilian S.; Parra, D.F.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental results showed that the crosslink density of polymeric stocks may be predicted from values of gel content based on the reactive portion of the stocks, that is, exclusive of plasticizers and fillers. Where entanglements may be neglected, the crosslink density is directly proportional to functions of the gel and sol contents. In order to predict the behavior of carbon-chain polymers exposed to ionizing radiation, an empirical rule can be used. According to this rule, polymers containing a hydrogen atom at each carbon atom predominantly undergo crosslinking. During irradiation, chain scission occurs simultaneously and competitively with crosslinking, the end result being determined by the ratio of the yields of the two reactions. The ratio of crosslinking to scission depends basically on factors including total irradiation dose, dose rate and the presence of oxygen. The glass transition temperature (Tg), temperature below which the polymer segments do not have sufficient energy to move past one another, marks the onset of segmental mobility for a polymer. Properties such as melt index, melt strength, crystallinity, glass transition, gel fraction, swelling ratio and elasticity modulus were assessed in LDPE (2.6 g.10 min -1 melt index) gamma irradiated within a 10, 15, 20 and 30 kGy and results obtained were further discussed prior conclusion. (author)

  1. The influence of single and fractionated dose external beam irradiation on injury-induced arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Schaefer, U.; Micke, O.; Dorszewski, A.; Breithardt, G.; Willich, N.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Restenosis after catheter-based revascularization has been demonstrated to be primarily caused by smooth muscle cell proliferation. This study examined the effects of external beam irradiation on neointimal proliferation after external injury to the central artery of the rabbit ear. Materials and Methods: 40 male New Zealand White rabbits were used in this study. Crush lesions were performed on each ear under general anesthesia and bilateral auricular nerve blockade. A single dose of 12 Gy (n=10), 16 Gy (n=10), or 20 Gy (n=10) and a fractionated dose of 4 x 5 Gy (n=10) gamma radiation was delivered to the left or right central artery of the ear 24 hours after injury; the contralateral central artery served as control. All rabbits were sacrificed after twenty-one days and the central arteries of the ear were fixed for morphometric measurements. Results: Mean (± SD) neointimal area was 0.062 ± 0.005 mm 2 (12 Gy), 0.022 ± 0,005 mm 2 (16 Gy), 0,028 ± 0,006 mm 2 and 0.038 mm 2 ± 0,02 mm 2 (4 x 5 Gy) in irradiated arteries compared with 0,081 ± 0,009 mm 2 in the control group. Mean (±SD) luminal area was 0.049 ± 0.004 mm 2 (12 Gy), 0.059 ± 0.002 mm 2 (16 Gy), 0.072 ± 0,006 mm 2 (20 Gy) and 0.048 mm 2 ± 0,018 mm 2 (4 x 5 Gy) in irradiated arteries compared with 0,043 ± 0,008 mm 2 in the control group. The difference in neointimal and luminal area between control and irradiated arteries was significant (p<0.05) only for the 16 and 20 Gy group compared to control. Conclusion: We conclude that in this model, external beam X-ray irradiation was successful in reducing neointimal proliferation after injury of the central artery of the rabbit ear. The optimal dose seems to be a single dose of 16 Gy - 20 Gy. Only a less prominent effect was noted for a fractionated dose of 4 x 5 Gy. Whether this approach can be used successfully to inhibit restenosis in the clinical setting requires further investigation

  2. Comparison of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in QU-DB Cells after Acute and Fractionated Irradiation: An In Vitro Study.

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Kamran Samani, Roghayeh; Mohebbi, Shokoufeh

    2016-01-01

    Radiation effects induced in non-irradiated cells are termed radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE). The present study intends to examine the RIBE response of QU-DB bystander cells to first, second and third radiation fractions and compare their cumulative outcome with an equal, single acute dose. This experimental study irradiated three groups of target cells for one, two and three times with(60)Co gamma rays. One hour after irradiation, we transferred their culture media to non-irradiated (bystander) cells. We used the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay to evaluate RIBE response in the bystander cells. The numbers of micronuclei generated in bystander cells were determined. RIBE response to single acute doses increased up to 4 Gy, then decreased, and finally at the 8 Gy dose disappeared. The second and third fractions induced RIBE in bystander cells, except when RIBE reached to the maximum level at the first fraction. We split the 4 Gy acute dose into two fractions, which decreased the RIBE response. However, fractionation of 6 Gy (into two fractions of 3 Gy or three fractions of 2 Gy) had no effect on RIBE response. When we split the 8 Gy acute dose into two fractions we observed RIBE, which had disappeared following the single 8 Gy dose. The impact of dose fractionation on RIBE induced in QU-DB cells de- pended on the RIBE dose-response relationship. Where RIBE increased proportion- ally with the dose, fractionation reduced the RIBE response. In contrast, at high dos- es where RIBE decreased proportionally with the dose, fractionation either did not change RIBE (at 6 Gy) or increased it (at 8 Gy).

  3. Alterations in growth phenotype and radiosensitivity after fractionated irradiation of breast carcinoma cells from a single patient

    Wazer, D.E.; Joyce, M.; Jung, L.; Band, V.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate growth regulation and radiosensitivity in surviving clonogens after fractionated irradiation. Four breast carcinoma cell lines isolated from the primary tumor (21NT, 21PT) and metastases (21MT-1, 21MT-2) of a single patient were exposed to cumulative radiation doses of 30 Gy yielding cell lines designated -IR with respect to their parent. The irradiated lines were then compared to their parent for serum- and growth factor-requirements under defined media conditions, ability to proliferate in soft agar, concentration of TGF-alpha in conditioned medium, and radiosensitivity. The irradiated lines showed no change in proliferative doubling times under serum- and growth factor-supplemented media conditions. A single line, 21MT-1-IR, acquired a limited ability to proliferate in serum- and growth factor-deplete medium with a day 2-4 doubling time of 44.5 hr. Three lines, 21MT-1-IR, 21MT-2-IR, and 21NT-IR, formed colonies in soft agar in contrast to none of the unirradiated parent lines. There were significant 6-8 fold increases in conditioned media TGF-alpha concentrations for 21MT-2-IR and 21NT-IR cells. The 21MT-1-IR and 21NT-IR cells were significantly less radiosensitive than their respective parent lines. This decrease in radiosensitivity appeared to be at least partially mediated by a released factor as the radiosensitivity of 21MT-1 cells was significantly decreased by pre-incubation with conditioned medium from 21MT-1-IR cells. Radiation-induced changes in growth phenotype vary with respect to clonal origin of the cell line and may influence the radiosensitivity of surviving clonogens after fractionated treatment. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Packaged low-level waste verification system

    Tuite, K.T.; Winberg, M.; Flores, A.Y.; Killian, E.W.; McIsaac, C.V.

    1996-01-01

    Currently, states and low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal site operators have no method of independently verifying the radionuclide content of packaged LLW that arrive at disposal sites for disposal. At this time, disposal sites rely on LLW generator shipping manifests and accompanying records to insure that LLW received meets the waste acceptance criteria. An independent verification system would provide a method of checking generator LLW characterization methods and help ensure that LLW disposed of at disposal facilities meets requirements. The Mobile Low-Level Waste Verification System (MLLWVS) provides the equipment, software, and methods to enable the independent verification of LLW shipping records to insure that disposal site waste acceptance criteria are being met. The MLLWVS system was developed under a cost share subcontract between WMG, Inc., and Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies through the Department of Energy's National Low-Level Waste Management Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

  5. Commercial low-level radioactive waste management

    Coleman, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The goals, objectives and activities of the Department of Energy's Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management program are reviewed. The goal of the overall Program is to support development of an acceptable, nationwide, near surface waste disposal system by 1986. The commercial LLW program has two major functions: (1) application of the technology improvements for waste handling, treatment and disposal, and (2) assistance to states as they carry out their responsibilities under the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. The priorities for the commercial side of the Low-Level Waste Management Program have been established to meet one goal: to support development of an effective commercial management system by 1986. The first priority is being given to supporting state efforts in forming the institutional structures needed to manage the system. The second priority is the state and industry role in transferring and demonstrating treatment and disposal technologies

  6. The low-level radioactive waste crisis

    Bord, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    According to the author, the goals of the 1980 Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act have not been met. That act stipulated that regional disposal sites were to be established by 1986. To date, no new sites have been established and none are anywhere near the construction phase. Congress, responding to existing impasse, has extended the deadline to the end of 1992 with the passage of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act. The reasons for the impasse are no mystery: local intransigence regarding waste of any kind, public fears of radiation hazards, and politicians' anxieties about their constituents' fears. The focus of this paper is the viability of ongoing attempts to overcome public intransigence in the case of disposal siting for low-level radioactive waste (LLRW)

  7. Processing of low-level wastes

    Vance, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    Although low-level wastes have been generated and have required processing for more than two decades now, it is noteworthy that processing methods are continuing to change. The changes are not only attributable to improvements in technology, but are also the result of changing regulations and economics and uncertainties regarding the future availabilities of burial space for disposal. Indeed, because of the changes which have and are taking place in the processing of low-level waste, an overview of the current situation is in order. This presentation is a brief overview of the processing methods generally employed to treat the low-level wastes generated from both fuel cycle and non-fuel cycle sources. The presentation is far too brief to deal with the processing technologies in a comprehensive fashion, but does provide a snapshot of what the current or typical processing methods are and what changes are occurring and why

  8. Low-level waste workshops. Final report

    1983-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 specifies that each state is responsible for the disposal of the low-level waste which is generated within its boundaries. The Act states that such wastes can be most safely and efficiently managed on a regional basis through compacts. It also defines low-level waste as waste which is not classified as high-level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or by-product material as defined in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. The Policy Act also stipulates that regional agreements or compacts shall not be applicable to the transportation, management, or disposal of low-level radioactive waste from atomic energy defense activities or federal research and development activities. It also specifies that agreements or compacts shall take affect on January 1, 1986, upon Congressional approval. In February 1983, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Council of State Governments' Midwestern Office. The grant was to be used to fund workshops for legislation on low-level radioactive waste issues. The purpose of the workshops was to provide discussion specifically on the Midwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste. Legislators from the states which were eligible to join the compact were invited: Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin. Virginia, Kansas and Nebraska were also eligible but had joined other compacts. Consequently, they weren't invited to the workshops. The Governor's office of West Virginia expressed interest in the compact, and its legislators were invited to attend a workshop. Two workshops were held in March. This report is a summary of the proceedings which details the concerns of the compact and expresses the reasoning behind supporting or not supporting the compact

  9. Reasons for Low Levels of Interactivity

    Etter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The interactivity levels of online CSR communication are typically low. This study explores the reasons for the low levels of interactivity in the popular social media tool Twitter. An analysis of 41,864 Twitter messages (tweets) from the thirty most central corporate accounts in a CSR Twitter...... network is conducted. Comparisons (t-test) between CSR tweets and general tweets and between specialized CSR Twitter accounts and general accounts reveal that the low levels of interactivity are due to a reactive interaction approach and a lack of specialization....

  10. PAI-1 levels predict response to fractionated irradiation in 10 human squamous cell carcinoma lines of the head and neck

    Bayer, Christine; Schilling, Daniela; Hoetzel, Joerg; Egermann, Hannes Peter; Zips, Daniel; Yaromina, Ala; Geurts-Moespot, Anneke; Sprague, Lisa Deborah; Sweep, Fred; Baumann, Michael; Molls, Michael; Adam, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the relationships between hypoxia, VEGF and components of the plasminogen activation system (PAS) and to determine their influence on local tumour control after fractionated radiotherapy. Material and methods: Ten cell lines derived from human squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) were investigated in vitro and used to generate xenograft tumours. The pimonidazole hypoxic fraction in the total tumour area (pHF tot ) was used to measure hypoxia in pre-treatment tumours and the local tumour control (TCD 50 ) was used as the functional endpoint in vivo. For in vitro experiments, cells were cultured for 24 h under either normoxic or mild hypoxic (∼0.66% O 2 ) conditions. VEGF, PAI-1 and uPA antigen levels were determined by ELISA and uPA activity by an activity assay kit. Results: Of all the factors investigated, only PAI-1 expression correlated with TCD 50 (r = 0.80, p 0.010) and was significantly higher (p = 0.001) in more hypoxic than in less hypoxic tumours. Accordingly, PAI-1 secretion was significantly induced (2.4x) by in vitro hypoxia. Conclusions: These results suggest that pre-treatment PAI-1 levels are higher in more hypoxic tumours and can predict the response to fractionated irradiation in SCCHN

  11. Evaluation of the efficacy of palliative irradiation with high fractionated doses and planned intervals of patients with advanced cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx

    Skolyszewski, J.; Reinfuss, M.

    1988-01-01

    200 patients, previously not treated, with advanced highly differentiated cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx have been palliatively irradiated in the Oncology Center in Cracow in the years 1976-1985. Megavoltage irradiation with fractionated doses 4-5 Gy up to the dose of 20 Gy to the tumor with 4-5 fractions during 4-7 days has been applied. 64 patients received 20 Gy as simple dose, in 65 cases such dose has been repeated after month. 71 patients have been irradiated for the third time with similar dose after another 1 month interval. Partial regression of 25-50% of the tumor volume has been obtained after the first series of irradiation in 19% of patients and more than 50% in 28% of patients, complete regression in 4% of patients. 15,5% of the total number of patients survived 1 year since the initiation of the irradiation, 5% without symptoms of the neoplasm. Worse prognosis is connected with major advancement of the tumor (T 4 , N 2 ), poor general condition, cachexia and alcohol addition. Absence of improvement after the first series of irradiations indicates the non-effectiveness of the treatment. Palliative treatment by irradiation with high fractionated doses and planned interval is a safe and efficacious method. 1 fig., 6 tabs., 14 refs. (author)

  12. Disposal of low-level radioactive wastes

    Hendee, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The generation of low-level radioactive waste is a natural consequence of the societal uses of radioactive materials. These uses include the application of radioactive materials to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease and to research into the causes of human disease and their prevention. Currently, low level radioactive wastes are disposed of in one of three shallow land-burial disposal sites located in Washington, Nevada, and South Carolina. With the passage in December 1980 of Public Law 96-573, The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, the disposal of low-level wastes generated in each state was identified as a responsibility of the state. To fulfill this responsibility, states were encouraged to form interstate compacts for radioactive waste disposal. At the present time, only 37 states have entered into compact agreements, in spite of the clause in Public Law 96-573 that established January 1, 1986, as a target date for implementation of state responsibility for radioactive wastes. Recent action by Congress has resulted in postponement of the implementation date to January 1, 1993

  13. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    1991-01-01

    This report contains highlights from the 1991 fall meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included legal updates; US NRC updates; US EPA updates; mixed waste issues; financial assistance for waste disposal facilities; and a legislative and policy report

  14. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides the results of the winter meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Discussions were held on the following topics: new developments in states and compacts; adjudicatory hearings; information exchange on siting processes, storage surcharge rebates; disposal after 1992; interregional access agreements; and future tracking and management issues

  15. IEN Low-level-radioactive waste Management

    Rocha, A.C.S. da; Pina, J.L.S.; Silva, S. da; Silva, J.J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The control, treatment and disposal of the low-level radioactive waste produced in the units of IEN-CNEN, in Brazil are presented, in details. These wastes are generated from a particle accelerator (CV-28 cyclotron), radiochemistry laboratories and a nuclear research reactor (Argonaut type). (Author) [pt

  16. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    NONE

    1990-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the October 1990 meeting of the Low Level Radioactive Waste Forum. Topics of discussion included: a special session on liability and financial assurance needs; proposal to dispose of mixed waste at federal facilities; state plans for interim storage; and hazardous materials legislation.

  17. Actively shielded low level gamma - spectrometric system

    Mrdja, D.; Bikit, I.; Forkapic, S.; Slivka, J.; Veskovic, M.

    2005-01-01

    The results of the adjusting and testing of the actively shielded low level gamma-spectrometry system are presented. The veto action of the shield reduces the background in the energy region of 50 keV to the 2800 keV for about 3 times. (author) [sr

  18. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards.

  19. Analysis of Low Level DNA Mixtures

    Slovák, Dalibor; Zvárová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2013), s. 63-63 ISSN 1805-8698. [EFMI 2013 Special Topic Conference. 17.04.2013-19.04.2013, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : forensic DNA interpretation * low level samples * allele peak heights * dropout probability Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  20. Stochastic Models for Low Level DNA Mixtures

    Slovák, Dalibor; Zvárová, Jana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 5 (2012), s. 25-30 ISSN 1801-5603 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) SVV-2012-264513 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : forensic DNA interpretation * low level samples * allele peak areas * dropout probability Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science http://www.ejbi.org/img/ejbi/2012/5/Slovak_en.pdf

  1. Stochastic Models for Low Level DNA Mixtures

    Slovák, Dalibor; Zvárová, Jana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2013), s. 28-28 ISSN 1805-8698. [EFMI 2013 Special Topic Conference. 17.04.2013-19.04.2013, Prague] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : forensic DNA interpretation * low level samples * allele peak heights * dropout probability Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  2. Siting a low-level waste facility

    English, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    In processes to site disposal facilities for low-level radioactive waste, volunteerism and incentives packages hold more promise for attracting host communities than they have for attracting host states. But volunteerism and incentives packages can have disadvantages as well as advantages. This paper discusses their pros and cons and summarizes the different approaches that states are using in their relationships with local governments

  3. Low-level radiation risks in people

    Goloman, M.; Filjushkin, V. lgor

    1993-01-01

    Using the limited human data plus the relationships derived from the laboratory, a leukemia risk model has been developed as well as a suggested model for other cancers in people exposed to low levels of radiation. Theoretical experimental and epidemiological evidence will be presented in an integrated stochastic model for projection of radiation-induced cancer risks

  4. Characteristics of monsoon low level jet (MLLJ)

    Temperature and wind data are used to describe variation in the strength of the Monsoon Low Level Jet (MLLJ) from an active phase of the monsoon to a break phase. Also estimated are the characteristics of turbulence above and below MLLJ.

  5. Low-level waste forum meeting reports

    1995-01-01

    This paper provides highlights from the 1995 summer meeting of the Low Level radioactive Waste Forum. Topics included: new developments in state and compacts; federal waste management; DOE plans for Greater-Than-Class C waste management; mixed wastes; commercial mixed waste management; international export of rad wastes for disposal; scintillation cocktails; license termination; pending legislation; federal radiation protection standards

  6. Low-level radioactive waste management options

    Schmalz, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the non-technical problems associated with the social and political obstacles to the secure disposal of low level radioactive waste. The author reviews thirty years' experience managing non-military wastes. The merits of available options are considered

  7. Acute hematological tolerance to multiple fraction, whole body, low dose irradiation in an experimental murine system

    Melamed, J.S.; Chen, M.G.; Brown, J.W.; Katagiri, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Using a dose fractionation scheme patterned after the current regimen for treatment of disseminated non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the authors studied the effects of irradation on progenitor and effector cells for hematopoiesis in five-month-old BC3F 1 mice. Fractions of 20 or 50 rad (0.2 or 0.5 Gy) total body irradation were given twice weekly to a final total dose of 200 or 500 rad (2 or 5 Gy), respectively. Weekly assays revealed a marked, sustained depression of stem cell activity, measured as numbers of spleen colony-forming units (CFU-S) and in vitro colony-forming cells (CFU-C), without corresponding depression of effector cells (red and white cells, and platelets). The lack of correlation between numbers of stem cells and peripheral elements is relevant to clinical assessment of marrow reserve

  8. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using once-daily fractionation: analysis of 312 cases with four years median follow-up

    Shaikh Arif Y

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are limited data on accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI using external beam techniques. Moreover, there are recent reports of increased fibrosis and unacceptable cosmesis with APBI using external beam with BID fractionation. We adopted a once daily regimen of APBI with fractionation similar to that shown to be effective in a Canadian randomized trial of whole breast irradiation. It is unclear whether patients with DCIS or invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC are suitable for APBI. Methods The retrospective cohort included 310 patients with 312 tumors of T1-T2N0-N1micM0 invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC, ILC, or Tis (DCIS treated with APBI via external beam. Most patients were treated using IMRT with 16 daily fractions of 270 cGy to a dose of 4320 cGy. The target volume included the lumpectomy cavity plus 1.0 cm to account for microscopic disease and an additional 0.5 to 1.0 cm for setup uncertainty and breathing motion. Ipsilateral breast failure (IBF was pathologically confirmed as a local failure (LF or an elsewhere failure (EF. Results Median follow-up was 49 months. Among the 312 cases, 213 were IDC, 31 ILC, and 68 DCIS. Median tumor size was 1.0 cm. There were 9 IBFs (2.9% including 5 LFs and 4 EFs. The IBF rates among patients with IDC, ILC, and DCIS were 2.4%, 3.2%, and 4.4%, respectively, with no significant difference between histologies. When patients were analyzed by the ASTRO APBI consensus statement risk groups, 32% of treated cases were considered suitable, 50% cautionary, and 18% unsuitable. The IBF rates among suitable, cautionary, and unsuitable patients were 4.0%, 2.6%, and 1.8%, respectively, with no significant difference between risk groups. Acute skin reactions were rare and long-term cosmetic outcome was very good to excellent. Conclusions External beam APBI with once daily fractionation has a low rate of IBF consistent with other published APBI studies. The ASTRO risk stratification did not

  9. Effect of gamma irradiation on the activity of alanine and aspartate transaminases in subcellular fractions of the brain and heart in white rats

    Plenin, A E

    1973-01-01

    In experiments on rats, the activity of alanine (I) and aspartate transaminases (II) was studied in homogenates and subcellular fractions of the brain and myocardium under normal conditions and for 30 days after ..gamma.. irradiation at 40 rads. The activity of II in brain homogenates increased 1 hour after irradiation but decreased by 20 percent on day 3; it decreased again on days 7 and 15. The activity of brain I increased after 1 hour and 3 days but then returned to normal. The activity of I in heart homogenates increased in all the periods after irradiation. The subcellular fractions exhibited phase changes in the activity of the enzymes. These changes were different in nature from those observed after X and ..gamma.. irradiation at the same dose.

  10. The severity of late rectal and recto-sigmoid complications related to fraction size in irradiation treatment of carcinoma cervix stage III B

    Deore, S.M.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Viswanathan, P.S.; Dinshaw, K.A.; Tata Memorial Hospital, Bombay

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of late rectal and recto-sigmoid complications was carried out of the 203 patients with stage III B carcinoma of uterine cervix, treated using radiation therapy alone during January 1979 to December 1983. The patients were treated with a combination of external irradiation and single intracavitary insertion. External irradiation was randomised to one of the four different fractionation regimes having dose per fraction of 2 Gy, 3 Gy, 4 Gy and 5.4 Gy, delivering with five fractions/week, three fractions/week, two fractions/week and one fraction/week, respectively. The total doses in four different regimens were adjusted using the TDF model. There were 39 cases of late radiation induced rectal and recto-sigmoid complications. The complication rate was correlated with the dose per fraction and TDFs delivered in each regimen. The complication rate of 8.2% for 2 Gy per fraction was increased to 33.33% for 5.4 Gy per fraction. It was found that there is strong correlation (P [de

  11. A method for evaluation of proton plan robustness towards inter-fractional motion applied to pelvic lymph node irradiation

    Andersen, Andreas G; Casares-Magaz, Oscar; Muren, Ludvig P

    2015-01-01

    of the pelvic lymph nodes (LNs) from different beam angles. Patient- versus population-specific patterns in dose deterioration were explored. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patient data sets consisting of a planning computed tomography (pCT) as well as multiple repeat CT (rCT) scans for three patients were used......BACKGROUND: The benefit of proton therapy may be jeopardized by dose deterioration caused by water equivalent path length (WEPL) variations. In this study we introduced a method to evaluate robustness of proton therapy with respect to inter-fractional motion and applied it to irradiation...... in deterioration patterns were found for the investigated patients, with beam angles delivering less dose to rectum, bladder and overall normal tissue identified around 40° and around 150°-160° for the left LNs, and corresponding angles for the right LNs. These angles were also associated with low values of WEPL...

  12. Nucleic acid metabolism in hemopoietic tissues of polycythemic rats during long-term fractionated irradiation

    Mushkacheva, G.S.; Murzina, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of long-term fractionated exposure with a daily dose of 50 R on the nucleic acid metabolism in hemopoietic tissues (bone marrow and spleen) of rats with erythropoiesis selectively inhibited by posttransfusion polycythemia. The comparison of present and previously obtained results enables us to conclude that the pathways of changes in the nucleic acid metabolism, which is responsible for hemopoiesis compensation during long-term exposure, are, in the main, similar for both white and red compartments of hemopoiesis

  13. Expression of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance associated protein in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells after fractionated irradiation

    Nielsen, Dorte; Maare, Christian; Eriksen, Jens; Litman, Thomas; Skovsgaard, Torben

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize irradiated murine tumor cells with respect to drug resistance, drug kinetics, and ATPase activity, and to evaluate the possible role of P-glycoprotein (PGP) and murine multidrug resistance associated protein (Mrp1) in the drug-resistant phenotype of these cells. Methods and Materials: Sensitive Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EHR2) were in vitro exposed to fractionated irradiation (60 Gy). Western blot analysis was performed for determination of PGP and Mrp1, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for determination of mdr1a + b mRNA, and semiquantitative RT-PCR for Mrp1 mRNA. The clonogenic assay was applied to investigate sensitivity, whereas the steady-state drug accumulation of daunorubicin (DNR), 3 H-vincristine (VCR), and 3 H-etoposide (VP16) was measured by spectrofluorometry and scintillation counting, respectively. For determining of ATPase activity, the release of inorganic phosphate from ATP was quantified using a colorimetric method. Results: Compared with EHR2, the irradiated cell line EHR2/irr showed increased expression of PGP (threefold), Mrp1 (eightfold), and Mrp1 mRNA (sixfold), and a slight reduction of mdr1b mRNA, whereas mdr1a was present in EHR2 but could not be detected in EHR2/irr. EHR2/irr developed sixfold resistance to VP16, twofold resistance to vincristine, but remained sensitive to DNR. Addition of the PGP inhibitor, verapamil (VER) or depletion of glutathione by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) partly reversed the resistance in EHR2/irr. In EHR2/irr, the steady-state accumulation of 3 H-VCR and 3 H-VP16 was significantly decreased as compared with EHR2, whereas the accumulation of DNR was unchanged. The ATPase activity of plasma membrane vesicles prepared from EHR2/irr cells was similar to that of wild-type EHR2 cells. The ATPase activity was neither stimulated by vinblastine nor VER. Conclusion: Irradiation induced a multidrug-resistant phenotype in sensitive tumor cells. This phenotype was

  14. Influence of clinical and tumoral factors on the inter-fractions bones displacements during the treatment of gastric or esophagus cancers by external irradiation

    Quivrin, M.; Peignaux, K.; Truc, G.; Blanchard, N.; Ligey-Bartolomeu, A.; Maingon, P.; Crehange, G.; Liegard, M.; Bonnetain, F.; Petitfils, A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the influence of clinical and tumoral characteristics on the inter fractions bones displacements during the irradiation of eso gastric cancers. Conclusion: the local control of irradiated esophagus and gastric cancers stay not satisfying and could be improved by the individual adjustment of peritumoral margins in function of clinical and tumoral characteristics as age, sex, average weight at the beginning of the treatment, the index of the initial average body mass. (N.C.)

  15. Changes of the lactate dehydrogenase in the tissue fraction with Walker carcinoma under irradiation

    Schultheis, W.

    1972-01-01

    The behaviour of LDH, GOT and GPT of one and the same tissue with and without irradiation treatment as a means of cancer diagnosis is presented. Parallel to this, the corresponding blood values are determined, and an agar-gel isoenzyme separation of the LDH is carried out. In the 11 day-old Walker carcinoma of the rat, total tumour LDH as well as total serum LDH are increased. The X-radiation does not affect the result. The M 4 isoenzyme is mainly found in the tumour tissue, to whose benefit the tumour sera also change. In tissue processing, LDH, GOT and GPT behave corresponding to their occurence in the cell compartments. The enzymes, however, appear to differ in their solution behaviour. X-radiation leeds to an early removal of these enzymes in the sense of an 'enzyme release'. (BSC/LH) [de

  16. A low-level needle counter

    Fujita, Y.; Taguchi, Y.; Imamura, M.; Inoue, T.; Tanaka, S.

    1977-01-01

    A small end-window type gas-flow counter which has a sharpened needle (anode) against the end-window plane (cathode) was developed for low-level counting of β particles to the amount of less than one count per hour in solid sources of relatively high specific activity. The advantage of the needle counter for low-level work is that being of a conical shape the active volume as against the window area is small. The background count rate of 0.0092+-0.0005 cpm was obtained for a 10 mm dia needle counter operating in GM mode and in anticoincidence with a well-type NaI(Tl) guard crystal with massive shields. The counter design and the counter characteristics are presented in detail. The needle counter is simple in design, low-cost and stable in long time operation. (author)

  17. Low-level radiation waste management system

    Kubofcik, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a low-level radiation waste container set for use in conjunction with an open-topped receptacle. It comprises: a receptacle liner having a closed end and an open end, the receptacle liner sized for deployment as an inserted liner in an open-topped receptacle for collecting low-level radiation waste material within the receptacle liner within the open-topped receptacle; a cover sized and shaped to fit over the open top of the open-topped receptacle and the receptacle liner therein with the cover is in a closed position. The cover having a depending skirt which, when the cover is in the closed position, extends downwardly to overlap the open-topped receptacle adjacent the open top thereof and a portion of the receptacle liner received therein; and the receptacle liner and cover being fabricated of flexible radiation shielding material

  18. Low-level radioactive waste management

    Ishihara, T [Radioactive Waste Management Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    1980-08-01

    In the development and utilization of nuclear energy, variety of radioactive wastes arise. A largest part is low level radioactive wastes. In Japan, they are concentrated and solidified, and stored in drums. However, no low level wastes have yet been finally disposed of; there are now about 260,000 drums of such wastes stored on the sites. In Japan, the land is narrow, and its structure is geologically unstable, so that the sea disposal is sought. On the other hand, the development of technology for the ground disposal has lagged behind the sea disposal until recently because of the law concerned. The following matters are described: for the sea disposal, preparatory technology studies, environment safety assessment, administrative measures, and international control; for the ground disposal, experiments, surveys, disposal site selection, and the concept of island repositories.

  19. Characterization of the multiple drug resistance phenotype expressed by tumour cells following in vitro exposure to fractionated X-irradiation

    Hill, B.T.; McClean, S.; Hosking, L.; Shellard, S.; Dempke, W.; Whelan, R.

    1992-01-01

    The major clinical problem of the emergence of drug resistant tumor cell populations is recognized in patients previously treated with antitumor drugs and with radiotherapy. It is proposed that, although radiation-induced vascular fibrosis may limit drug delivery to the tumor, exposure to radiation may 'induce' or 'select for' drug resistance. This hypothesis was examined by establishing in vitro model systems to investigate the resistance phenotype of tumor cells following exposure to X-rays. Characteristically tumor cells surviving exposure to a series of fractions of X-irradiation are shown to have consistently expressed resistance to multiple drugs, including the Vinca alkaloids and the epipodophyllotoxins. Currently this research is aimed at determining whether distinctive resistance mechanisms operate depending on whether resistance results following drug or X-ray exposure. Initial results indicate that whilst some common mechanisms operate, drug resistant tumor cells identified following exposure to X-irradiation appear to exhibit a novel multidrug resistance phenotype. (author). 13 refs., 1 tab

  20. Radiosensitivity of Nicotiana protoplasts. Action on cell; cycle effects of low dose and fractionated irradiations; biological repair

    Magnien, E.

    1981-10-01

    Leaf protoplasts of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and Nicotiana sylvestris demonstrate five main qualities: they can be maintained as haploid lines; they constitute starting populations with a remarkable cytological homogeneity; they show a transient initial lag-phase; they yield very high plating efficiencies and retain permanently a complete differentiation capacity; being derived of a cell wall, they appear well adapted for fusion experiments or enzymatic dosages. The resumption of mitotic activity was followed by cytophotometric measurements, labelling experiments, nuclear sizing and enzymatic assays. The action of 5 Gy gamma-ray irradiations delayed entrance in the S-phase, provoked an otherwise not verified dependency between transcription, translation and protein synthesis, increased nuclear volumes in the G2-phase, and slightly stimulated the activity of a repair enzyme. The plating efficiency was a sensitive end-point which allowed the evaluation of the biological effectiveness of low to medium radiation-doses after gamma-ray and fast neutron irradiations. The neutron dose-RBE relationship increased from 3 to 25 when the dose decreased from 5 Gy to 5 mGy. When fractionated into low single doses only, a neutron dose of 300 mGy markedly increased its biological effectiveness: this phenomenon could not be explained by cell progression, and necessitated additional hypotheses involving other mechanisms in the specific action of low radiation doses. Radiation-induced UDS was measured in presence of aphidicolin. A beta-like DNA-polymerase was shown to be definitely involved in nuclear repair synthesis [fr

  1. IRMM low level underground laboratory in HADES

    Mouchel, D [CEC-JRC, Inst. for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Geel (Belgium); Wordel, R [CEC-JRC, Inst. for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Geel (Belgium)

    1997-03-01

    The operation of low background HPGe detectors at a depth of 225 m, reduced the background by two orders of magnitude; a large amount of the remaining background is still attributable to the cosmic rays. The selection of radiopure materials, the characterization of reference matrices and the measurements of low radioactivities in environmental samples are performed. Coupling the low level spectrometry with additional techniques, e.g. neutron activation, will allow to measure extremely low radioactivities. (orig.)

  2. Low-level waste certification plan

    Greenhalph, W.O.

    1995-01-01

    This plan describes the organization and methodology for the certification of solid low-level waste (LLW) and mixed-waste (MW) generated at any of the facilities or major work activities of the Engineered Process Application (EPA) organization. The primary LLW and MW waste generating facility operated by EPA is the 377 Building. This plan does not cover the handling of hazardous or non-regulated waste, though they are mentioned at times for completeness

  3. Low-level waste disposal technology

    Levin, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    A design has been proposed for a low-level radioactive waste disposal site that should provide the desired isolation under all foreseeable conditions. Although slightly more costly than current practices; this design provides additional reliability. This reliability is desirable to contribute to the closure of the fuel cycle and to demonstrate the responsible management of the uranium cycle by reestablishing confidence in the system

  4. State compacts and low-level waste

    Brown, H.

    1984-01-01

    In 1979, for the first time, low-level waste (LLW) was brought to the attention of policy makers in most states. For several decades, technical personnel had regulated and managed LLW, but elected officials and their staff had been largely ignorant of the origins and destination of low-level radioactive materials. Events in the fall of 1979 set in motion a sequence of events that has compelled the continuing attention of policy makers in every state in the nation. In December 1979, the Executive Committee of the National Governors' Association appointed an eight-member task force, chaired by Governor Bruce Babbitt of Arizona, to review low-level waste management and to formulate state policy by July 1980. The principal findings were as follows: 1. LLW could be managed most efficiently, both technically and politically, at the state level. 2. Each state should take responsibility for its own waste. 3. The creation of a regional waste management system by means of interstate compacts offered the best promise of creating new disposal capacity. 4. Regions should be allowed to exclude waste generated outside their borders after a specified date

  5. Low-level-waste-disposal methodologies

    Wheeler, M.L.; Dragonette, K.

    1981-01-01

    This report covers the followng: (1) history of low level waste disposal; (2) current practice at the five major DOE burial sites and six commercial sites with dominant features of these sites and radionuclide content of major waste types summarized in tables; (3) site performance with performance record on burial sites tabulated; and (4) proposed solutions. Shallow burial of low level waste is a continuously evolving practice, and each site has developed its own solutions to the handling and disposal of unusual waste forms. There are no existing national standards for such disposal. However, improvements in the methodology for low level waste disposal are occurring on several fronts. Standardized criteria are being developed by both the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and by DOE. Improved techniques for shallow burial are evolving at both commercial and DOE facilities, as well as through research sponsored by NRC, DOE, and the Environmental Protection Agency. Alternatives to shallow burial, such as deeper burial or the use of mined cavities is also being investigated by DOE

  6. Low level waste shipment accident lessons learned

    Rast, D.M.; Rowe, J.G.; Reichel, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    On October 1, 1994 a shipment of low-level waste from the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio, was involved in an accident near Rolla, Missouri. The accident did not result in the release of any radioactive material. The accident did generate important lessons learned primarily in the areas of driver and emergency response communications. The shipment was comprised of an International Standards Organization (ISO) container on a standard flatbed trailer. The accident caused the low-level waste package to separate from the trailer and come to rest on its top in the median. The impact of the container with the pavement and median inflicted relatively minor damage to the container. The damage was not substantial enough to cause failure of container integrity. The success of the package is attributable to the container design and the packaging procedures used at the Fernald Environmental Management Project for low-level waste shipments. Although the container survived the initial wreck, is was nearly breached when the first responders attempted to open the ISO container. Even though the container was clearly marked and the shipment documentation was technically correct, this information did not identify that the ISO container was the primary containment for the waste. The lessons learned from this accident have DOE complex wide applicability. This paper is intended to describe the accident, subsequent emergency response operations, and the lessons learned from this incident

  7. Epidemiological surveys on the effects of low-level radiation dose: a comparative assessment. V. E

    Rose, K.S.B.

    1990-01-01

    These tables present data on the effects of low-level radiation dose for the following effects:- pre-conception irradiation and Down's Syndrome, pre-conception irradiation and reproductive damage, surveys of effect in relation to the source of radiation, distribution by maternal preconception exposure of the 7 most common major congenital abnormalities in the Japanese, pre-conception irradiation and childhood malignancies, parental gonadal dose at Hiroshima and Nagasaki in relation to leukemia, sex chromosome aneuploids in children of A-bomb survivors, untoward pregnancy outcomes by parental gonad dose, pre-conception irradiation and chromosomal abnormalities, and intra-uterine irradiation and intelligence. (author).

  8. Epidemiological surveys on the effects of low-level radiation dose: a comparative assessment. V. E

    Rose, K.S.B.

    1990-01-01

    These tables present data on the effects of low-level radiation dose for the following effects:- pre-conception irradiation and Down's Syndrome, pre-conception irradiation and reproductive damage, surveys of effect in relation to the source of radiation, distribution by maternal preconception exposure of the 7 most common major congenital abnormalities in the Japanese, pre-conception irradiation and childhood malignancies, parental gonadal dose at Hiroshima and Nagasaki in relation to leukemia, sex chromosome aneuploids in children of A-bomb survivors, untoward pregnancy outcomes by parental gonad dose, pre-conception irradiation and chromosomal abnormalities, and intra-uterine irradiation and intelligence. (author)

  9. Greater-confinement disposal of low-level radioactive wastes

    Trevorrow, L.E.; Gilbert, T.L.; Luner, C.; Merry-Libby, P.A.; Meshkov, N.K.; Yu, C.

    1985-01-01

    Low-level radioactive wastes include a broad spectrum of wastes that have different radionuclide concentrations, half-lives, and physical and chemical properties. Standard shallow-land burial practice can provide adequate protection of public health and safety for most low-level wastes, but a small volume fraction (about 1%) containing most of the activity inventory (approx.90%) requires specific measures known as ''greater-confinement disposal'' (GCD). Different site characteristics and different waste characteristics - such as high radionuclide concentrations, long radionuclide half-lives, high radionuclide mobility, and physical or chemical characteristics that present exceptional hazards - lead to different GCD facility design requirements. Facility design alternatives considered for GCD include the augered shaft, deep trench, engineered structure, hydrofracture, improved waste form, and high-integrity container. Selection of an appropriate design must also consider the interplay between basic risk limits for protection of public health and safety, performance characteristics and objectives, costs, waste-acceptance criteria, waste characteristics, and site characteristics. This paper presents an overview of the factors that must be considered in planning the application of methods proposed for providing greater confinement of low-level wastes. 27 refs

  10. Hypofractionated Prostate Radiotherapy with or without Conventionally Fractionated Nodal Irradiation: Clinical Toxicity Observations and Retrospective Daily Dosimetry.

    McDonald, Andrew M; Bishop, Justin M; Jacob, Rojymon; Dobelbower, Michael C; Kim, Robert Y; Yang, Eddy S; Smith, Heather; Wu, Xingen; Fiveash, John B

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate toxicity associated with the addition of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) to a hypofractionated regimen for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials. Fifty-seven patients received pelvic image-guided IMRT to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions with a hypofractionated simultaneous boost to the prostate to 70 Gy. Thirty-one patients received prostate-only treatment to 70 Gy in 28 fractions. Results. Median followup was 41.1 months. Early grade ≥2 urinary toxicity rates were 49% (28 of 57) for patients receiving ENI and 58% (18 of 31) for those not (P = 0.61). Early grade ≥2 rectal toxicity rates were 40% (23 of 57) and 23% (7 of 31), respectively (P = 0.09). The addition of ENI resulted in a 21% actuarial rate of late grade ≥2 rectal toxicity at 4 years, compared to 0% for patients treated to the prostate only (P = 0.02). Retrospective daily dosimetry of patients experiencing late rectal toxicity revealed an average increase of 2.67% of the rectal volume receiving 70 Gy compared to the original plan. Conclusions. The addition of ENI resulted in an increased risk of late rectal toxicity. Grade ≥2 late rectal toxicity was associated with worse daily rectal dosimetry compared to the treatment plan.

  11. Long-term renal toxicity in children following fractionated total-body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT)

    Gerstein, Johanna; Meyer, Andreas; Fruehauf, Joerg; Karstens, Johann H.; Bremer, Michael; Sykora, Karl-Walter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: to retrospectively assess the incidence and time course of renal dysfunction in children (≤ 16 years) following total-body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Patients and methods: between 1986 and 2003, 92 children (median age, 11 years; range, 3-16 years) underwent TBI before allogeneic SCT. 43 of them had a minimum follow-up of 12 months (median, 51 months; range, 12-186 months) and were included into this analysis. Conditioning regimen included chemotherapy and fractionated TBI with 12 Gy (n = 26) or 11.1 Gy (n = 17). In one patient, renal dose was limited to 10 Gy by customized renal shielding due to known nephropathy prior to SCt. Renal dysfunction was defined as an increase of serum creatinine > 1.25 times the upper limit of age-dependent normal. Results: twelve children (28%) experienced an episode of renal dysfunction after a median of 2 months (range, 1-10 months) following SCT. In all but one patient renal dysfunction was transient and resolved after a median of 8 months (range, 3-16 months). One single patient developed persistent renal dysfunction with onset at 10 months after SCT. None of these patients required dialysis. The actuarial 3-year freedom from persistent renal toxicity for children surviving > 12 months after SCt was 97.3%. Conclusion: the incidence of persistent renal dysfunction after fractionated TBI with total doses ≤ 12 Gy was very low in this analysis. (orig.)

  12. Update on low-level waste compacts and state agencies

    Tenan, M.; Rabbe, D.; Thompson, P.

    1995-01-01

    This article updates information on the following agencies involved in low-level radioactive wastes: Appalachian States Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission; Central Interstate Low-Level radioactive Waste Commission; Central Midwest Interstate Low-Level radioactive Waste Compact; Massachusetts Low-Level radioactive Waste Management Board; Michigan Low-Level Radioactive Waste Authority; Midwest Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission; New York State Low-Level Radioactive Waste Siting Commission; Northeast Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact; Northwest Interstate Compact on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management; Rocky Mountain Low-Level Radioactive Waste Board; Southeast Compact Commission for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management;Southwest Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission; Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority

  13. Evaluation of photo destruction of chromophores of heme and globin components in UV-irradiated human carboxyhemoglobin and its electrophoretic fractions

    Putintseva, O.V.; Artykhov, V.G.; Kalaeva, E.A.

    2000-01-01

    The contribution of hem and globin components of electrophoretic fractions of UV-irradiated human carboxyhemoglobin to photo destruction of the protein was studied. The changes observed are the result of summation of some processes unequal in intensity and direction that take place in microgeterogenous media of photo modified protein. Photo sensitivity of hemoproteid in electrophoretic fraction depends on apoprotein condition, whereas the hem photo resistance cannot be the evidence of the photo stability of the whole molecule [ru

  14. Acute and Short-Term Toxicities of Conventionally Fractionated Versus Hypofractionated Whole Breast Irradiation in a Prospective, Randomized Trial

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Schlembach, Pamela J.; Arzu, Isidora; Ballo, Matthew; Bloom, Elizabeth S.; Buchholz, Daniel; Chronowski, Gregory M.; Dvorak, Tomas; Grade, Emily; Hoffman, Karen E.; Kelly, Patrick; Ludwig, Michelle; Perkins, George H.; Reed, Valerie; Shah, Shalin; Stauder, Michael C.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A.; Ensor, Joe; Baumann, Donald; Thompson, Alastair M.; Amaya, Diana; Davis, Tanisha; Guerra, William; Hamblin, Lois; Hortobagyi, Gabriel; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The most appropriate dose-fractionation for whole breast irradiation (WBI) remains uncertain. OBJECTIVE To assess acute and six-month toxicity and quality of life (QoL) with conventionally fractionated WBI (CF-WBI) versus hypofractionated WBI (HF-WBI). DESIGN Unblinded randomized trial of CF-WBI (n=149; 50 Gy/25 fractions + boost [10–14 Gy/5–7 fractions]) versus HF-WBI (n=138; 42.56 Gy/16 fractions + boost [10–12.5 Gy/4–5 fractions]). SETTING Community-based and academic cancer centers. PARTICIPANTS 287 women age ≥ 40 years with stage 0–II breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery for whom whole breast irradiation without addition of a third field was recommended. 76% (n=217) were overweight or obese. Patients were enrolled from February 2011 through February 2014. INTERVENTION(S) FOR CLINICAL TRIALS CF-WBI versus HF-WBI. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Physician-reported acute and six-month toxicities using NCICTCv4.0 and patient-reported QoL using the FACT-B version 4. All analyses were intention-to-treat, with outcomes compared using chi-square, Cochran-Armitage test, and ordinal logistic regression. Patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months. RESULTS Treatment arms were well-matched for baseline characteristics including FACT-B total score (P=0.46) and individual QoL items such as lack of energy (P=0.86) and trouble meeting family needs (P=0.54). Maximal physician-reported acute dermatitis (P<0.001), pruritus (P<0.001), breast pain (P=0.001), hyperpigmentation (P=0.002), and fatigue (P=0.02) during radiation were lower in patients randomized to HF-WBI. Overall grade ≥2 acute toxicity was less with HF-WBI vs. CF-WBI (47% vs. 78%; P<0.001). Six months after radiation, physicians reported less fatigue in patients randomized to HF-WBI (P=0.01), and patients randomized to HF-WBI reported less lack of energy (P<0.001) and less trouble meeting family needs (P=0.01). Multivariable regression confirmed the superiority of HF-WBI in terms

  15. Persistent DNA Damage in Spermatogonial Stem Cells After Fractionated Low-Dose Irradiation of Testicular Tissue

    Grewenig, Angelika; Schuler, Nadine; Rübe, Claudia E., E-mail: claudia.ruebe@uks.eu

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Testicular spermatogenesis is extremely sensitive to radiation-induced damage, and even low scattered doses to testis from radiation therapy may pose reproductive risks with potential treatment-related infertility. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the greatest threat to the genomic integrity of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are essential to maintain spermatogenesis and prevent reproduction failure. Methods and Materials: During daily low-dose radiation with 100 mGy or 10 mGy, radiation-induced DSBs were monitored in mouse testis by quantifying 53 binding protein 1 (53BP-1) foci in SSCs within their stem cell niche. The accumulation of DSBs was correlated with proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of testicular germ cell populations. Results: Even very low doses of ionizing radiation arrested spermatogenesis, primarily by inducing apoptosis in spermatogonia. Eventual recovery of spermatogenesis depended on the survival of SSCs and their functional ability to proliferate and differentiate to provide adequate numbers of differentiating spermatogonia. Importantly, apoptosis-resistant SSCs resulted in increased 53BP-1 foci levels during, and even several months after, fractionated low-dose radiation, suggesting that surviving SSCs have accumulated an increased load of DNA damage. Conclusions: SSCs revealed elevated levels of DSBs for weeks after radiation, and if these DSBs persist through differentiation to spermatozoa, this may have severe consequences for the genomic integrity of the fertilizing sperm.

  16. Persistent DNA Damage in Spermatogonial Stem Cells After Fractionated Low-Dose Irradiation of Testicular Tissue

    Grewenig, Angelika; Schuler, Nadine; Rübe, Claudia E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Testicular spermatogenesis is extremely sensitive to radiation-induced damage, and even low scattered doses to testis from radiation therapy may pose reproductive risks with potential treatment-related infertility. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the greatest threat to the genomic integrity of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are essential to maintain spermatogenesis and prevent reproduction failure. Methods and Materials: During daily low-dose radiation with 100 mGy or 10 mGy, radiation-induced DSBs were monitored in mouse testis by quantifying 53 binding protein 1 (53BP-1) foci in SSCs within their stem cell niche. The accumulation of DSBs was correlated with proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of testicular germ cell populations. Results: Even very low doses of ionizing radiation arrested spermatogenesis, primarily by inducing apoptosis in spermatogonia. Eventual recovery of spermatogenesis depended on the survival of SSCs and their functional ability to proliferate and differentiate to provide adequate numbers of differentiating spermatogonia. Importantly, apoptosis-resistant SSCs resulted in increased 53BP-1 foci levels during, and even several months after, fractionated low-dose radiation, suggesting that surviving SSCs have accumulated an increased load of DNA damage. Conclusions: SSCs revealed elevated levels of DSBs for weeks after radiation, and if these DSBs persist through differentiation to spermatozoa, this may have severe consequences for the genomic integrity of the fertilizing sperm

  17. The effect of low level laser on anaplastic thyroid cancer

    Rhee, Yun-Hee; Moon, Jeon-Hwan; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2015-02-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a non-thermal phototherapy used in several medical applications, including wound healing, reduction of pain and amelioration of oral mucositis. Nevertheless, the effects of LLLT upon cancer or dysplastic cells have been so far poorly studied. Here we report that the effects of laser irradiation on anaplastic thyroid cancer cells leads to hyperplasia. 650nm of laser diode was performed with a different time interval (0, 15, 30, 60J/cm2 , 25mW) on anaplastic thyroid cancer cell line FRO in vivo. FRO was orthotopically injected into the thyroid gland of nude mice and the irradiation was performed with the same method described previously. After irradiation, the xenograft evaluation was followed for one month. The thyroid tissues from sacrificed mice were undergone to H&E staining and immunohistochemical staining with HIF-1α, Akt, TGF-β1. We found the aggressive proliferation of FRO on thyroid gland with dose dependent. In case of 60 J/ cm2 of energy density, the necrotic bodies were found in a center of the thyroid. The phosphorylation of HIF-1α and Akt was detected in the thyroid gland, which explained the survival signaling of anaplastic cancer cell was turned on the thyroid gland. Furthermore, TGF-β1 expression was decreased after irradiation. In this study, we demonstrated that insufficient energy density irradiation occurred the decreasing of TGF-β1 which corresponding to the phosphorylation of Akt/ HIF-1α. This aggressive proliferation resulted to the hypoxic condition of tissue for angiogenesis. We suggest that LLLT may influence to cancer aggressiveness associated with a decrease in TGF-β1 and increase in Akt/HIF-1α.

  18. Low-level memory processes in vision.

    Magnussen, S

    2000-06-01

    Psychophysical studies of the short-term memory for attributes or dimensions of the visual stimulus that are known to be important in early visual processing (spatial frequency, orientation, contrast, motion and color) identify a low-level perceptual memory mechanism. This proposed mechanism is located early in the visual processing stream, prior to the structural description system responsible for shape priming but beyond primary visual cortex (V1); it is composed of a series of parallel, special-purpose perceptual mechanisms with independent but limited processing resources. Each mechanism is devoted to the analysis of a single dimension and is coupled to a memory store.

  19. IEN low-level radioactive waste management

    Rocha, A.C.S. da; Pina, J.L.S.; Silva, S. da; Silva, J.J.G.

    1986-09-01

    The low-level radioactive waste produced in Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear is generated basically from three distinct modes: a particle accelerator (CV-28 Cyclotron), radiochemistry laboratories and the operation of a nuclear research reactor (Argonaut type). In the Cyclotron unit, all water flow from hot labs as well as from the decontamination laundry is retained in special tank with homogenizing system and a remote control, that signalizes when the tank gets a pre-specified level. Samples homogenized from the tank are colected for previous analysis. (Author) [pt

  20. Network Communication for Low Level RF Control

    Liu Weiqing; Yin Chengke; Zhang Tongxuan; Fu Zechuan; Liu Jianfei

    2009-01-01

    Low Level RF (LLRF) control system for storage ring of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) has been built by digital technology. The settings of parameters and the feedback loop status are carried out through the network communication interface, and the local oscillation and clock, which is the important component of the digital LLRF control system, are also configured through network communication. NIOS II processor was employed as a core to build the embedded system with a real-time operating system MicroC/OS-II, finally Lightweight TCP/IP (LwIP) was used to achieve the communication interface. The communication network is stable after a long-term operation. (authors)

  1. Applications of low level liquid scintillation counting

    Noakes, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Low level liquid scintillation counting is reviewed in terms of its present use and capabilities for measuring low activity samples. New areas of application of the method are discussed with special interest directed to the food industry and environmental monitoring. Advantages offered in the use of a low background liquid scintillation counter for the nuclear power industry and nuclear navy are discussed. Attention is drawn to the need for commercial development of such instrumentation to enable wider use of the method. A user clientele is suggested as is the required technology to create such a counter

  2. Onsite storage facility for low level radwaste

    Maxwell, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has designed and constructed an onsite storage facility for low level radwaste (LLRW) at its Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant in northern Alabama. The paper addresses the function of this facility and provides a complete description of the reinforced concrete storage modules which are the principal structural elements of the facility. The loads and loading combinations for the design of the storage modules are defined to include the foundation design parameters. Other aspects of the modules that are addressed are; the structural roof elements that provide access to the modules, shielding requirements for the LLRW, and tornado missile considerations

  3. Can low-level radiation cause cancer?

    Trosko, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    Health in a multicellular organism is maintained by homeostatic processes. Disruption of these homeostatic controls at the molecular, biochemical, cellular, and organ systems levels can be brought about by irreversible changes in the genetic material (mutagenesis), cell death (cytotoxicity), or reversible changes in the expression of genes at the transcriptional, translational, or posttranslational levels (epigenesis). While radiation is known to induce DNA damage/mutations, cell, death and epigenetic changes, in addition to cancers that are found in radiation-exposed animals, experimentally, and in humans, epidemiologically, the question is, At low-level exposure, what is the risk that cancers are open-quotes causedclose quotes by the radiation?

  4. Solid low-level waste certification strategy

    Smith, M.A.

    1991-08-01

    The purpose of the Solid Low-Level Waste (SLLW) Certification Program is to provide assurance that SLLW generated at the ORNL meets the applicable waste acceptance criteria for those facilities to which the waste is sent for treatment, handling, storage, or disposal. This document describes the strategy to be used for certification of SLLW or ORNL. The SLLW Certification Program applies to all ORNL operations involving the generation, shipment, handling, treatment, storage and disposal of SLLW. Mixed wastes, containing both hazardous and radioactive constituents, and transuranic wastes are not included in the scope of this document. 13 refs., 3 figs

  5. Low-level siting, Edgemont, South Dakota

    Andrews, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The siting of a low-level radwaste disposal facility and characterization activities to date in Edgemont, South Dakota are discussed. By using past and present experience the author sets forth the major problem, the social and political considerations, community acceptance, media and public officials' attitudes, criteria for acceptance and significance of countywide vote in support of facility. Characterization activities, site selection planning and criteria, above-grade and below-grade technical evaluation, NRC interface, 10 CFR Part 61 related to technical work, as well as community acceptance and license application are covered. The paper deals with specific problems, solutions and ongoing activities

  6. Low-level siting, Edgemont, South Dakota

    Andrews, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The siting of a low-level radwaste disposal facility and characterization activities to date, at Edgemont, South Dakota are given. Using past and present experience setting forth the major problem as viewed by the author, the social and political considerations, community acceptance, media and public officials' attitudes, criteria for acceptance and significance of countywide vote in support of facility are presented. Characterization activities, site selection planning and criteria, above-grade and below-grade technical evaluation, NRC interface, 10 CFR Part 61 related to technical work, as well as community acceptance and license application are included. The paper deals with specific problems, solutions and ongoing activities

  7. Liquid low level waste management expert system

    Ferrada, J.J.; Abraham, T.J.; Jackson, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    An expert system has been developed as part of a new initiative for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) systems analysis program. This expert system will aid in prioritizing radioactive waste streams for treatment and disposal by evaluating the severity and treatability of the problem, as well as the final waste form. The objectives of the expert system development included: (1) collecting information on process treatment technologies for liquid low-level waste (LLLW) that can be incorporated in the knowledge base of the expert system, and (2) producing a prototype that suggests processes and disposal technologies for the ORNL LLLW system. 4 refs., 9 figs

  8. The effect of the overall treatment time of fractionated irradiation on the tumor control probability of a human soft tissue sarcoma xenograft in nude mice

    Allam, Ayman; Perez, Luis A.; Huang, Peigen; Taghian, Alphonse; Azinovic, Ignacio; Freeman, Jill; Duffy, Michael; Efird, Jimmy; Suit, Herman D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of the overall treatment time of fractionated irradiation on the tumor control probability (TCP) of a human soft tissue sarcoma xenograft growing in nude mice, as well as to compare the pretreatment potential doubling time (T pot ) of this tumor to the effective doubling time (T eff ) derived from three different schedules of irradiation using the same total number of fractions with different overall treatment times. Methods and Materials: The TCP was assessed using the TCD 50 value (the 50% tumor control dose) as an end point. A total of 240 male nude mice, 7-8 weeks old were used in three experimental groups that received the same total number of fractions (30 fractions) with different overall treatment times. In group 1, the animals received three equal fractions/day for 10 consecutive days, in group 2 they received two equal fractions/day for 15 consecutive days, and in group 3 one fraction/day for 30 consecutive days. All irradiations were given under normal blood flow conditions to air breathing animals. The mean tumor diameter at the start of irradiation was 7-8 mm. The mean interfraction intervals were from 8-24 h. The T pot was measured using Iododeoxyuridine (IudR) labeling and flow cytometry and was compared to T eff . Results: The TCD 50 values of the three different treatment schedules were 58.8 Gy, 63.2 Gy, and 75.6 Gy for groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. This difference in TCD 50 values was significant (p pot (2.4 days) was longer than the calculated T eff in groups 2 and 3 (1.35 days). Conclusion: Our data show a significant loss in TCP with prolongation of the overall treatment time. This is most probably due to an accelerated repopulation of tumor clonogens. The pretreatment T pot of this tumor model does not reflect the actual doubling of the clonogens in a protracted regimen

  9. Clinical evaluation of the hypoxic cytotoxin tirapazamine (SR-4233): phase I experience with repeated dose administration during fractionated irradiation

    Hancock, Steven L.; Spencer, Sharon; Mariscal, Carol; Wooten, Ann; Wheeler, Richard; Brown, J. Martin; Fisher, Cheryl; Roemeling, Reinhard von

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Regions of chronic or transient hypoxia are common in many human tumors and are thought to limit tumor cell killing and tumor control with conventional irradiation and some chemotherapeutic agents. Tirapazamine (3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine-1,4-di-N-oxide) forms a cytotoxic free radical during reductive metabolism in regions of hypoxia. In well oxygenated regions, the tirapazamine radical reacts with molecular oxygen to form the inactive parent drug. This results in markedly greater toxicity for hypoxic cells than for the well oxygenated cells that comprise most normal tissues. Tirapazamine increased the anti-tumor effects of single dose or fractionated irradiation or cis-platin chemotherapy in murine tumors,in vivo . This study evaluated the ability to repeat the administration of Tirapazamine during courses of fractionated irradiation in humans after an earlier phase I trial established a maximum tolerated dose of 390 mg per square meter of body surface area (mg/m 2 ) when given as a single dose with radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Between December 1993 and August 1995 22 patients with locally advanced or metastatic tumors of varying histology, normal renal, hepatic, and hematologic functions, and Karnofsky performance status ≥ 60 received repeated doses of Tirapazamine during a planned, 6 weeks course of standardly fractionated radiotherapy. After anti-emetic treatment with ondansetron (32 mg) and dexamethasone (16 mg), Tirapazamine was administered during a 2 hour intravenous infusion that ended from 30 to 90 minutes before a radiation treatment. Patients were monitored for acute toxicity during the course of treatment and for a minimum of one month after radiotherapy. Results: The study was initiated with three, biweekly doses of Tirapazamine at 330 mg/m 2 . Four of 7 patients who initiated treatment at this dose refused the second (1 patient) or third dose of Tirapazamine (3 patients). Two of the three patients who received three doses

  10. Radiation-induced transformation of SV40-immortalized human thyroid epithelial cells by single and fractionated exposure to γ-irradiation in vitro

    Riches, A.C.; Herceg, Z.; Bryant, P.E.; Wynford-Thomas, D.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation-induced transformation of a human thyroid epithelial cell line (HTori-3) has been investigated following exposure to single and fractionated doses of γ-irradiation. The human epithelial cells were irradiated in vitro and following passaging, transplanted to the athymic nude mouse. Following a single exposure to γ-irradiation in the range 0.5-4Gy, 22 tumours were observed in 45 recipients and following three equal fractions in the range 0.5-4Gy per fraction, 18 tumours were observed in 31 recipients. Tumours were undifferentiated carcinomas and were observed from 7 to 20 weeks after transplantation. They occurred after similar radiation doses to those received by the children in the Belarus region of Ukraine, who developed thyroid tumours. The number of tumours observed, in each group receiving cells irradiated with a single dose of γ-irradiation in the range 0.5-4 Gy, was similar. Cell lines were established from some tumours and the tumorigenicity confirmed by retransplantation. These tumour cell lines were more radiosensitive than the human thyroid epithelial cell line they were derived from. This indicates that transformed cells were not being selected from a subpopulation within the parent cell line but that radiation-induced transformants were being induced de novo. The human origin of the tumours was established by karyotyping, immunocytochemical demonstration of human epithelial cytokeratins and p53 analysis. DNA fingerprinting confirmed that the tumours were derived from the original cell line. (author)

  11. Radioprotective efficacy of dipyridamole and AMP combination in fractionated radiation regimen, and its dependence on the time of administration of the drugs prior to irradiation

    Hofer, M.; Pospisil, M.; Netikova, J.; Hola, J.; Znojil, V.; Vacha, J.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have recently demonstrated that a combined administration of dipyridamole and adenosine monophosphate to mice induces radioprotective effects in terms of postirradiation hematopoietic recovery in animals irradiated with a single dose. The aim of the present experiments was to investigate the radioprotective ability of the drug combination under conditions of fractionated radiation. It was shown that administration of the drugs either 15 or 60 min before each of the five daily 3-Gy doses of gamma radiation enhances hematopoietic recovery and survival of mice exposed to an additional 'top-up' dose of 3.5 Gy. Furthermore, it was ascertained that administration of the drugs 60 min prior to irradiation is more effective than administration of the drugs 15 min prior to irradiation. Due to the evidence that administration of the drugs 15 min prior to irradiation protects the organism mainly via mechanisms of systemic hypoxia while the pretreatment 60 min before irradiation avoids the role of hypoxia and mainly induces cell proliferation effects, the present results suggest a more protective role of mechanisms stimulating hematopoiesis under conditions of fractionated radiation. The data may provide a basis for more rational use of radioprotection in fractionated radiation techniques. (author) 1 tab., 1 fig., 25 refs

  12. Low level tank waste disposal study

    Mullally, J.A.

    1994-09-29

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted a team consisting of Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), British Nuclear Fuel Laboratories (BNFL), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and TRW through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Technical Support Contract to conduct a study on several areas concerning vitrification and disposal of low-level-waste (LLW). The purpose of the study was to investigate how several parameters could be specified to achieve full compliance with regulations. The most restrictive regulation governing this disposal activity is the National Primary Drinking Water Act which sets the limits of exposure to 4 mrem per year for a person drinking two liters of ground water daily. To fully comply, this constraint would be met independently of the passage of time. In addition, another key factor in the investigation was the capability to retrieve the disposed waste during the first 50 years as specified in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. The objective of the project was to develop a strategy for effective long-term disposal of the low-level waste at the Hanford site.

  13. Russian low-level waste disposal program

    Lehman, L. [L. Lehman and Associates, Inc., Burnsville, MN (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The strategy for disposal of low-level radioactive waste in Russia differs from that employed in the US. In Russia, there are separate authorities and facilities for wastes generated by nuclear power plants, defense wastes, and hospital/small generator/research wastes. The reactor wastes and the defense wastes are generally processed onsite and disposed of either onsite, or nearby. Treating these waste streams utilizes such volume reduction techniques as compaction and incineration. The Russians also employ methods such as bitumenization, cementation, and vitrification for waste treatment before burial. Shallow land trench burial is the most commonly used technique. Hospital and research waste is centrally regulated by the Moscow Council of Deputies. Plans are made in cooperation with the Ministry of Atomic Energy. Currently the former Soviet Union has a network of low-level disposal sites located near large cities. Fifteen disposal sites are located in the Federal Republic of Russia, six are in the Ukraine, and one is located in each of the remaining 13 republics. Like the US, each republic is in charge of management of the facilities within their borders. The sites are all similarly designed, being modeled after the RADON site near Moscow.

  14. Low level tank waste disposal study

    Mullally, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted a team consisting of Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), British Nuclear Fuel Laboratories (BNFL), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and TRW through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Technical Support Contract to conduct a study on several areas concerning vitrification and disposal of low-level-waste (LLW). The purpose of the study was to investigate how several parameters could be specified to achieve full compliance with regulations. The most restrictive regulation governing this disposal activity is the National Primary Drinking Water Act which sets the limits of exposure to 4 mrem per year for a person drinking two liters of ground water daily. To fully comply, this constraint would be met independently of the passage of time. In addition, another key factor in the investigation was the capability to retrieve the disposed waste during the first 50 years as specified in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. The objective of the project was to develop a strategy for effective long-term disposal of the low-level waste at the Hanford site

  15. Estimation of dependence between mean of fractionation of photons and neutrons dose and intensity of post-irradiation reaction of mouse large intestine

    Gasinska, A.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the work was verification of mouse large intestine tolerance on fractionated 250 kV X-rays and 2.3 MeV neutrons doses. Two cm of large intestine of mouse CBA/HT strain were irradiated with various fraction doses: from 0.25 to 35 Gy of X-rays and 0.05-12 Gy of neutrons. The measure of injury was handicap of intestine function. Early post-irradiation reaction was measured by loss of body weight (2-3 weeks after irradiation) and mouse mortality (till 2 months after irradiation, LD50/2). The late reaction was measured on the base of maximal body weight in 1 year period after irradiation, deformation of excrements (after 10 months) and death of animals (till 12. month after irradiation, LD50/12). Fractionation of X-ray dose influenced on decrease of intensification of late irradiation effects. After fractionation of neutrons this effect has not been observed. α/β coefficient for X-rays was 19.9 Gy [15.2; 27.0] for body weight nadir, 13.4 Gy [9.3; 19.5] for early mortality (LD50/2), 6.4 Gy [3.6;11.0] for maximal body weight and 6.9 [4.2; 10.8] for late mortality (LD50/12). Analysis of influence of low doses of photons 90.25-4 Gy) and neutrons (0.05-0.8 Gy) showed trend to reduction α/β for photons only (LD50/2=5.4 Gy; LD50/12=4.6 Gy). α/β coefficient for neutrons was defined by LQ model only for maximal body weight and was 19.9 Gy [9.5; 61.0]. In application of graphic method α/β for neutrons was 230 Gy for early and 48 Gy for late effects. Lower values of α/β coefficient for late irradiation effects for photon radiation demonstrate the big influence of fractionation of photons dose on large intestine tolerance (decrease intensity in all biological effects). Author did not observe increase of intestine tolerance in fractionation of neutrons dose. Effect of irradiation damages repair in interfraction pauses, measured by percent of regenerated dose (F r ) was much bigger for photons. For X-rays it was 50% for early and 63% for late effects. In case of

  16. The enhancing effect of fractionated whole-body x-irradiation on replication of endogenous leukemia viruses in BALB/c mice

    Takamori, Yasuhiko; Okumoto, Masaaki; Iwai, Mineko; Iwai, Yoshiaki

    1976-01-01

    The incidence of leukemia, changes in the tissue weight of spleen and thymus, and the expression of endogenous viruses were examined with BALB/c mice following 4 weekly fractionated whole-body x-irradiation of 170 R each, starting at 4 weeks of age. The leukemia incidence was quite low for the unirradiated controls, while 60% of the irradiated male mice developed thymic lymphoma. The virus-positive cells appeared earlier in the spleen than in the thymus and bone marrow, and increased with aging. The time of appearance of virus-positive cells in these tissues was remarkably promoted by the fractionated x-irradiation, and its frequency was also enhanced. (auth.)

  17. A generalised formulation of the 'incomplete-repair' model for cell survival and tissue response to fractionated low dose-rate irradiation

    Nilsson, P.; Joiner, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    A generalized equation for cell survival or tissue effects after fractionated low dose-rate irradiations, when there is incomplete repair between fractions and significant repair during fractions, is derived in terms of the h- and g-functions of the 'incomplete-repair' (IR) model. The model is critically dependent on α/β, repair half-time, treatment time and interfraction interval, and should therefore be regarded primarily as a tool for the analysis of fractionation and dose-rate effects in carefully designed radiobiological experiments, although it should also be useful in exploring, in a general way, the feasibility of clinical treatment protocols using fractionated low dose-rate treatments. (author)

  18. The effect of pentoxifylline on early and late radiation injury following fractionated irradiation in C3H mice

    Dion, M.W.; Hussey, D.H.; Osborne, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    An experiment was performed to test the effectiveness of pentoxifylline in reducing late radiation injury. One hundred and four C3H mice were randomized into eight groups of 13 mice each, and the right hind limbs were irradiated with 4000, 5000, 6000, or 7000 cGy in ten fractions. Each group was treated with once daily injections of either pentoxifylline or saline for 30+ weeks. An additional ten mice received daily injections of pentoxifylline or saline, but no irradiation. The pentoxifylline animals demonstrated significantly less late injury than the saline treated animals. The most obvious differences were observed in the 5000 and 6000 cGy groups. There were seven radiation related deaths in the saline treated control groups, but only one radiation related death in the pentoxifylline treated groups. Whereas 42% (20/48) of the saline treated animals had a late injury score of 3.0 or greater, only 8% (4/51) of the pentoxifylline treated animals had a late skin score as high as 3.0. Pentoxifylline had no effect on the acute radiation injury scores. The drug was well tolerated with no toxic effects noted. Pentoxifylline is a methyl xanthine derivative that is used to treat vascular occlusive disease in humans. It improves perfusion through small capillaries by improving the deformability of red blood cells, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and stimulating the release of prostacyclin. This study shows that the prophylactic administration of pentoxifylline can modify late radiation induced injury in the mouse extremity. It may have value in the prevention or treatment of late radiation induced injury in humans, and it could be a useful tool to help define the mechanisms of late radiation injury in specific organs.

  19. The effect of pentoxifylline on early and late radiation injury following fractionated irradiation in C3H mice

    Dion, M.W.; Hussey, D.H.; Osborne, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment was performed to test the effectiveness of pentoxifylline in reducing late radiation injury. One hundred and four C3H mice were randomized into eight groups of 13 mice each, and the right hind limbs were irradiated with 4000, 5000, 6000, or 7000 cGy in ten fractions. Each group was treated with once daily injections of either pentoxifylline or saline for 30+ weeks. An additional ten mice received daily injections of pentoxifylline or saline, but no irradiation. The pentoxifylline animals demonstrated significantly less late injury than the saline treated animals. The most obvious differences were observed in the 5000 and 6000 cGy groups. There were seven radiation related deaths in the saline treated control groups, but only one radiation related death in the pentoxifylline treated groups. Whereas 42% (20/48) of the saline treated animals had a late injury score of 3.0 or greater, only 8% (4/51) of the pentoxifylline treated animals had a late skin score as high as 3.0. Pentoxifylline had no effect on the acute radiation injury scores. The drug was well tolerated with no toxic effects noted. Pentoxifylline is a methyl xanthine derivative that is used to treat vascular occlusive disease in humans. It improves perfusion through small capillaries by improving the deformability of red blood cells, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and stimulating the release of prostacyclin. This study shows that the prophylactic administration of pentoxifylline can modify late radiation induced injury in the mouse extremity. It may have value in the prevention or treatment of late radiation induced injury in humans, and it could be a useful tool to help define the mechanisms of late radiation injury in specific organs

  20. A secretome analysis reveals that PPARα is upregulated by fractionated-dose γ-irradiation in three-dimensional keratinocyte cultures

    Lee, Jee Yong; Kim, Hyun Ji; Yi, Jae Youn

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) environment composed of properly interconnected and differentiated cells that allows communication and cooperation among cells via secreted molecules would be expected to more accurately reflect cellular responses. Here, we investigated γ-irradiation-induced changes in the secretome of 3D-cultured keratinocytes. An analysis of keratinocyte secretome profiles following fractionated-dose γ-irradiation revealed changes in genes involved in cell adhesion, angiogenesis, and the immune system. Notably, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-(PPARα) was upregulated in response to fractionated-dose γ-irradiation. This upregulation was associated with an increase in the transcription of known PPARα target genes, including angiopoietin-like protein 4, dermokine and kallikrein-related peptide 12, which were differentially regulated by fractionated-dose γ-irradiation. Collectively, our data imply a mechanism linking γ-irradiation and secretome changes, and suggest that these changes could play a significant role in the coordinated cellular responses to harmful ionizing radiation, such as those associated with radiation therapy. This extension of our understanding of γ-irradiation-induced secretome changes has the potential to improve radiation therapy strategies. Control of inflammatory waves, improved wound healing, and stabilization of the skin barrier are imperative for minimizing such injuries. Therefore, PPARα agonists and antagonists have the potential to become important therapeutic agents for the treatment of γ-irradiation induced skin damage. Specifically, our analysis suggests that the undesirable consequences of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation could be alleviated by PPARα agonists

  1. A secretome analysis reveals that PPARα is upregulated by fractionated-dose γ-irradiation in three-dimensional keratinocyte cultures

    Lee, Jee Yong; Kim, Hyun Ji; Yi, Jae Youn [Korea Institute of Radiation and Medical Sciences, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    A three-dimensional (3D) environment composed of properly interconnected and differentiated cells that allows communication and cooperation among cells via secreted molecules would be expected to more accurately reflect cellular responses. Here, we investigated γ-irradiation-induced changes in the secretome of 3D-cultured keratinocytes. An analysis of keratinocyte secretome profiles following fractionated-dose γ-irradiation revealed changes in genes involved in cell adhesion, angiogenesis, and the immune system. Notably, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-(PPARα) was upregulated in response to fractionated-dose γ-irradiation. This upregulation was associated with an increase in the transcription of known PPARα target genes, including angiopoietin-like protein 4, dermokine and kallikrein-related peptide 12, which were differentially regulated by fractionated-dose γ-irradiation. Collectively, our data imply a mechanism linking γ-irradiation and secretome changes, and suggest that these changes could play a significant role in the coordinated cellular responses to harmful ionizing radiation, such as those associated with radiation therapy. This extension of our understanding of γ-irradiation-induced secretome changes has the potential to improve radiation therapy strategies. Control of inflammatory waves, improved wound healing, and stabilization of the skin barrier are imperative for minimizing such injuries. Therefore, PPARα agonists and antagonists have the potential to become important therapeutic agents for the treatment of γ-irradiation induced skin damage. Specifically, our analysis suggests that the undesirable consequences of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation could be alleviated by PPARα agonists.

  2. Proof of radiation-induced tumour TNF-α expression in Ewing sarcoma cell line RM-82 following clinically relevant in vitro fractionated irradiation and in vivo one-time irradiation

    Litzenberger, K.; Ruebe, C.E.; Erren, M.; Liu, L.; Valen, F. van; Palm, J.; Yang, K.; Ruebe, C.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of fractionated irradiation on TNF-α expression in Ewing sarcoma cell line RM-82 in vitro and following its establishment as a xenograft tumour in the nude mouse in vivo [de

  3. Histological examination of the oral mucosa after fractional diode laser irradiation with different power and pulse duration

    Belikov, Andrey V.; Ermolaeva, Ludmila A.; Korzhevsky, Dmitriy E.; Sergeeva, Elena S.; Semyashkina, Yulia V.; Antropova, Maria M.; Fedotov, Denis Y.; Zaitseva, Maria A.; Kashina, Tatiana V.

    2018-04-01

    Optical and histological methods were used to examination of influence the power and pulse duration of 980-nm diode laser to the dimensions and morphology of tissue around fractional micro injuries created by the radiation of that laser in the oral mucosa of rats in vivo. The power of laser radiation (P) varied in the range of 1÷21 W, and its pulse duration (tp) - in the range 50÷500 ms. Histological examination showed that in the mucosa of the oral cavity after the laser fractional irradiation, there following effects are found: a tissue defect, a transudate in the lumen of ablative micro injury, stretching and compacting effect of the nuclei of the basal epithelium, the disappearance of granules of the keratohialin, destroying the structure of the connective tissue, erythrocyte stasis in the vessels, the disappearance of transverse striation in the muscle fibers in muscle layer. It has been found that ablative micro injury begins to form up at P = 5 W, tp = 100 ms and affects only the epithelial layer of the mucosa. At P = 7 W, tp = 120 ms, the ratio of width to depth of ablative micro injury is 1 : 1, and at P = 10 W, tp = 100 ms, an ablative micro column with ratio of 1 : 1.5 is formed in the epithelial and submucosal layers of the mucosa. The laser effect with P = 15 W, tp = 200 ms leads to lengthening of the ablation micro-column to 1 : 2, with the bottom of the ablative micro column reaching the muscular layer. With a further growth of laser power or pulse duration, the width of the micro injury increases, and the growth of the micro injury depth is slowed down so that the micro column buildup is ceased.

  4. Low-level radioactive waste form qualification testing

    Sohal, M.S.; Akers, D.W.

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes activities that have already been completed as well as yet to be performed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to develop a plan to quantify the behavior of radioactive low-level waste forms. It briefly describes the status of various tasks, including DOE approval of the proposed work, several regulatory and environmental related documents, tests to qualify the waste form, preliminary schedule, and approximate cost. It is anticipated that INEEL and Brookhaven National Laboratory will perform the majority of the tests. For some tests, services of other testing organizations may be used. It should take approximately nine months to provide the final report on the results of tests on a waste form prepared for qualification. It is anticipated that the overall cost of the waste quantifying service is approximately $150,000. The following tests are planned: compression, thermal cycling, irradiation, biodegradation, leaching, immersion, free-standing liquid tests, and full-scale testing.

  5. Low-level radioactive waste form qualification testing

    Sohal, M.S.; Akers, D.W.

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes activities that have already been completed as well as yet to be performed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to develop a plan to quantify the behavior of radioactive low-level waste forms. It briefly describes the status of various tasks, including DOE approval of the proposed work, several regulatory and environmental related documents, tests to qualify the waste form, preliminary schedule, and approximate cost. It is anticipated that INEEL and Brookhaven National Laboratory will perform the majority of the tests. For some tests, services of other testing organizations may be used. It should take approximately nine months to provide the final report on the results of tests on a waste form prepared for qualification. It is anticipated that the overall cost of the waste quantifying service is approximately $150,000. The following tests are planned: compression, thermal cycling, irradiation, biodegradation, leaching, immersion, free-standing liquid tests, and full-scale testing

  6. Development of digital low level rf system

    Michizono, Shinichiro; Anami, Shozo; Katagiri, Hiroaki; Fang, Zhigao; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Miura, Takako; Yano, Yoshiharu; Yamaguchi, Seiya; Kobayashi, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    One of the biggest advantages of the digital low level rf (LLRF) system is its flexibility. Owing to the recent rapid progress in digital devices (such as ADCs and DACs) and telecommunication devices (mixers and IQ modulators), digital LLRF system becomes popular in these 10 years. The J-PARC linac LLRF system adopted cPCI crates and FPGA based digital feedback system. Since the LLRF control of the normal conducting cavities are more difficult than super conducting cavities due to its lower Q values, fast processing using the FPGA was the essential to the feedback control. After the successful operation of J-PARC linac LLRF system, we developed the STF (ILC test facility in KEK) LLRF system. Since the klystron drives eight cavities in STF phase 1, we modified the FPGA board. Basic configuration and the performances of these systems are summarized. The future R and D projects (ILC and ERL) is also described from the viewpoints of LLRF. (author)

  7. Mixed low-level waste form evaluation

    Pohl, P.I.; Cheng, Wu-Ching; Wheeler, T.; Waters, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    A scoping level evaluation of polyethylene encapsulation and vitreous waste forms for safe storage of mixed low-level waste was performed. Maximum permissible radionuclide concentrations were estimated for 15 indicator radionuclides disposed of at the Hanford and Savannah River sites with respect to protection of the groundwater and inadvertent intruder pathways. Nominal performance improvements of polyethylene and glass waste forms relative to grout are reported. These improvements in maximum permissible radionuclide concentrations depend strongly on the radionuclide of concern and pathway. Recommendations for future research include improving the current understanding of the performance of polymer waste forms, particularly macroencapsulation. To provide context to these estimates, the concentrations of radionuclides in treated DOE waste should be compared with the results of this study to determine required performance

  8. Low level waste solidification practice in Japan

    Sakata, S.; Kuribayashi, H.; Kono, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Both sea dumping and land isolation are planned to be accomplished for low level waste disposal in Japan. The conceptual design of land isolation facilities has been completed, and site selection will presently get underway. With respect to ocean dumping, safety surveys are being performed along the lines of the London Dumping Convention and the Revised Definitions and Recommendations of the IAEA, and the review of Japanese regulations and applicable criteria is being expedited. This paper discusses the present approach to waste solidification practices in Japan. It reports that the bitumen solidification process and the plastic solidification process are being increasingly used in Japan. Despite higher investment costs, both processes have advantages in operating cost, and are comparable to the cement solidification process in overall costs

  9. Inheritance from low-level radioactive waste

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Kume, Tamikazu; Makuuchi, Keizo; Inoue, Tomio; Komoda, Fumio; Maeda, Mitsuru

    2009-01-01

    A benefit born as an inheritance from low-level radioactive waste is considered. In the present study, a direct economic scale of application of radiation in Japanese industry, agriculture and medicine is taken as parameter for quantifying the size of benefit. In 2006, the economic scale is about 21 billion dollars (b$) for industry, 2.5b$ for agriculture and 14b$ for medicine. Economic scale covered the all fields is totaled 37b$. Due to those benefit, one can drive a car and play an internet, pleasure the dinning food. Diagnosis and treatment by nuclear medicine can possible to survive the millions of lives and resulting in improving the quality of life, decreasing pain and suffering. However, most Japanese (80%>) may not aware those benefits to date. This report is prepared for aiming at disseminating those benefits to our peoples. (author)

  10. Solid low level waste management guidelines

    Saunders, P.

    1995-01-01

    In the 1980's the nuclear industry began focusing a great deal of attention on minimizing the volume of low level radioactive waste (LLW) that required disposal. This was driven by several factors including rising disposal costs, increased regulatory pressures, and increased pressure from other organizations such as INPO. In the 1990's most utilities are faced with intense competition in the electrical generation market. The survival of a utility is based on their ability to produce electricity by the most efficient and economical means available. Waste management related costs are a substantial portion of most utilities O ampersand M budgets. Disposal site access denial continues to be a major factor in waste management program decision, and the pressures to minimize waste volumes from outside organizations is greater than ever

  11. Low-level radwaste engineering economics

    Jacobs, M.H.; Miller, C.C.; Young, L.G.

    1984-07-01

    This topical report on engineering economics for low-level radwaste systems details the methodologies used for economic analyses of radwaste treatment systems and provides examples of radwaste economic evaluations. All of the parameters and cost items used in an evaluation are defined. Examples of the present-value-of-revenue-requirements method, levelized-revenue-requirements method, and the equivalent-capital-investment method are provided. Also, the calculation to determine the maximum justifiable capital expenditure for a radwaste system is illustrated. The report also provides examples of economic evaluations for many current radwaste treatment options. These options include evaporation versus demineralization, dewatering resins versus solidification of resins, and several volume reduction systems. 15 figures, 6 tables

  12. Low level processing of diode spectrometry results

    Philippot, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    Systematic measurements in gamma spectrometry on slightly radioactive samples have led to study low levels existing in the spectra and to develop suitable processing methods. These methods and the advance that they represent in reading sensitivity are now applicable to all types of spectrum. The principles of this automatic reading are briefly summarized, leading to a description of the modifications which proved necessary to increase sensitivity. Three sample spectra are used to illustrate the arguments employed to achieve this result. The conclusions from the corresponding measurements provide a clearer understanding of the quality of the responses obtained during the initial reading. The application of these methods to systematic measurements is considered in the case of atmospheric aerosols. The owerall results obtained since 1969 are presented [fr

  13. Draft low level waste technical summary

    Powell, W.J.; Benar, C.J.; Certa, P.J.; Eiholzer, C.R.; Kruger, A.A.; Norman, E.C.; Mitchell, D.E.; Penwell, D.E.; Reidel, S.P.; Shade, J.W.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to present an outline of the Hanford Site Low-Level Waste (LLW) disposal program, what it has accomplished, what is being done, and where the program is headed. This document may be used to provide background information to personnel new to the LLW management/disposal field and to those individuals needing more information or background on an area in LLW for which they are not familiar. This document should be appropriate for outside groups that may want to learn about the program without immediately becoming immersed in the details. This document is not a program or systems engineering baseline report, and personnel should refer to more current baseline documentation for critical information

  14. Low-level therapy in ophthalmology

    Pankov, O. P.

    1999-07-01

    Extremely slow introduction of low-level laser therapy into the practice of ophthalmologists is restricted by the lack of good methodological recommendation and modern equipment adopted to the needs of ophthalmology. The most perspective is considered to be further improvement of the methods and the elaboration of the medical equipment, working in several wave bands, combined with magnetotherapy and working with the use of various modes of the modulation of the intensity of the luminous flux. It may be asserted that unlike the mode of continuous radiation, in some cases, the effectiveness of the treatment increases when the modulated light with the frequency of one to a few tens HZ is used. Moreover, the methods are being elaborated, when the modulation frequency of laser light and the biorhythms of man physiologic parameters are synchronized. Very perspective seems the computerization of the treatment process with the simultaneous electrophysiological control of the condition of visual functions.

  15. Health effects of low level radiation

    Chevillard, S.; Ugolin, N.; Lebeau, J.; Ory, K.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear energy production is necessarily associated with the handling and storage of radioactive elements, which are liable to have deleterious effects on human health, and on environment. These deleterious effects are varied, but they greatly depend on the dose, which has been received, and the exposure type. Therefore, only intense and massive exposures are liable to be clinically detected. They can entail immediate consequences, even lead to the person's death. Thanks to safety measures, which have been implemented to an international scale, this occurs very rarely. Excluding extensive accidental cases, medical irradiation for therapeutic use and conflicts, workers and population in general are exposed to low doses and low dose-rates. Low dose exposures, resulting from either a contamination or an external irradiation are more frequent. In fact, we could say that the whole humanity is concerned by natural exposure, which varies depending on regions, as well as by medical exposure, which varies depending on the medicalisation status of the country. (author)

  16. Low Level Laser Therapy for chronic knee joint pain patients.

    Nakamura, Takashi; Ebihara, Satoru; Ohkuni, Ikuko; Izukura, Hideaki; Harada, Takashi; Ushigome, Nobuyuki; Ohshiro, Toshio; Musha, Yoshiro; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Kazuaki; Kubota, Ayako

    2014-12-27

    Chronic knee joint pain is one of the most frequent complaints which is seen in the outpatient clinic in our medical institute. In previous studies we have reported the benefits of low level laser therapy (LLLT) for chronic pain in the shoulder joints, elbow, hand, finger and the lower back. The present study is a report on the effects of LLLT for chronic knee joint pain. Over the past 5 years, 35 subjects visited the outpatient clinic with complaints of chronic knee joint pain caused by the knee osteoarthritis-induced degenerative meniscal tear. They received low level laser therapy. A 1000 mW semi-conductor laser device was used to deliver 20.1 J/cm(2) per point in continuous wave at 830nm, and four points were irradiated per session (1 treatment) twice a week for 4 weeks. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to determine the effects of LLLT for the chronic pain and after the end of the treatment regimen a significant improvement was observed (pknee joint range of motion. Discussions with the patients revealed that it was important for them to learn how to avoid postures that would cause them knee pain in everyday life in order to have continuous benefits from the treatment. The present study demonstrated that 830 nm LLLT was an effective form of treatment for chronic knee pain caused by knee osteoarthritis. Patients were advised to undertake training involving gentle flexion and extension of the knee.

  17. The effect of the overall treatment time of fractionated irradiation on the tumor control probability of a human soft tissue sarcoma xenograft in nude mice

    Allam, Ayman; Perez, Luis A; Huang, Peigen; Taghian, Alphonse; Azinovic, Ignacio; Freeman, Jill; Duffy, Michael; Efird, Jimmy; Suit, Herman D

    1995-04-30

    Purpose: To study the impact of the overall treatment time of fractionated irradiation on the tumor control probability (TCP) of a human soft tissue sarcoma xenograft growing in nude mice, as well as to compare the pretreatment potential doubling time (T{sub pot}) of this tumor to the effective doubling time (T{sub eff}) derived from three different schedules of irradiation using the same total number of fractions with different overall treatment times. Methods and Materials: The TCP was assessed using the TCD{sub 50} value (the 50% tumor control dose) as an end point. A total of 240 male nude mice, 7-8 weeks old were used in three experimental groups that received the same total number of fractions (30 fractions) with different overall treatment times. In group 1, the animals received three equal fractions/day for 10 consecutive days, in group 2 they received two equal fractions/day for 15 consecutive days, and in group 3 one fraction/day for 30 consecutive days. All irradiations were given under normal blood flow conditions to air breathing animals. The mean tumor diameter at the start of irradiation was 7-8 mm. The mean interfraction intervals were from 8-24 h. The T{sub pot} was measured using Iododeoxyuridine (IudR) labeling and flow cytometry and was compared to T{sub eff}. Results: The TCD{sub 50} values of the three different treatment schedules were 58.8 Gy, 63.2 Gy, and 75.6 Gy for groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. This difference in TCD{sub 50} values was significant (p < 0.05) between groups 1 and 2 (30 fractions/10 days and 30 fractions/15 days) vs. group 3 (30 fractions/30 days). The loss in TCP due to the prolongation of the overall treatment time from 10 days to 30 days was found to be 1.35-1.4 Gy/day. The pretreatment T{sub pot} (2.4 days) was longer than the calculated T{sub eff} in groups 2 and 3 (1.35 days). Conclusion: Our data show a significant loss in TCP with prolongation of the overall treatment time. This is most probably due to an

  18. Molecular and genetic approach to understanding the mechanisms by which fractionated X-irradiation induces leukemia in mice

    Meruelo, D; Rossomando, A

    1986-01-01

    The authors laboratory's approach to try to shed light on the question of a viral etiology for radiation-induced leukemia has focused on defining, localizing and understanding the mode of action of genes involved in susceptibility to fractionated x-irradiation-(FXI) induced disease. These studies have indicated that multiple genes control the process of leukemogenesis. Not every mouse strain which shows some susceptibility to FXI-induced leukemia carries the susceptible gene at each of the multiple loci involved in the disease process. It is plausible to conclude that more than one mechanism of leukemogenesis can be triggered by FXI. Studies have focused on the mode of action of one such locus Ril-1. Several reagents have been developed to help clone and characterize this locus. Currently chromosomal ''walking'' and ''hopping'' techniques are being used in conjunction with an RFLP molecular probe which is adjacent to Ril-1. In addition a cDNA library has been prepared from a radiation-induced thymoma and substraction hybridization analysis is being used in the search for Ril-1.

  19. A molecular and genetic approach to understanding the mechanisms by which fractionated X-irradiation induces leukemia in mice

    Meruelo, D.; Rossomando, A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors laboratory's approach to try to shed light on the question of a viral etiology for radiation-induced leukemia has focused on defining, localizing and understanding the mode of action of genes involved in susceptibility to fractionated x-irradiation-(FXI) induced disease. These studies have indicated that multiple genes control the process of leukemogenesis. Not every mouse strain which shows some susceptibility to FXI-induced leukemia carries the susceptible gene at each of the multiple loci involved in the disease process. It is plausible to conclude that more than one mechanism of leukemogenesis can be triggered by FXI. Studies have focused on the mode of action of one such locus Ril-1. Several reagents have been developed to help clone and characterize this locus. Currently chromosomal ''walking'' and ''hopping'' techniques are being used in conjunction with an RFLP molecular probe which is adjacent to Ril-1. In addition a cDNA library has been prepared from a radiation-induced thymoma and substraction hybridization analysis is being used in the search for Ril-1. (author)

  20. High-Dose, Single-Fraction Irradiation Rapidly Reduces Tumor Vasculature and Perfusion in a Xenograft Model of Neuroblastoma

    Jani, Ashish; Shaikh, Fauzia; Barton, Sunjay [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Willis, Callen [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Banerjee, Debarshi [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Mitchell, Jason [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Hernandez, Sonia L. [Department of Surgery, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Hei, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Kadenhe-Chiweshe, Angela [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamashiro, Darrell J. [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Connolly, Eileen P., E-mail: epc2116@cumc.columbia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize the effects of high-dose radiation therapy (HDRT) on neuroblastoma tumor vasculature, including the endothelial cell (EC)–pericyte interaction as a potential target for combined treatment with antiangiogenic agents. Methods and Materials: The vascular effects of radiation therapy were examined in a xenograft model of high-risk neuroblastoma. In vivo 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (3D-CEUS) imaging and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were performed. Results: HDRT significantly reduced tumor blood volume 6 hours after irradiation compared with the lower doses used in conventionally fractionated radiation. There was a 63% decrease in tumor blood volume after 12-Gy radiation compared with a 24% decrease after 2 Gy. Analysis of tumor vasculature by lectin angiography showed a significant loss of small vessel ends at 6 hours. IHC revealed a significant loss of ECs at 6 and 72 hours after HDRT, with an accompanying loss of immature and mature pericytes at 72 hours. Conclusions: HDRT affects tumor vasculature in a manner not observed at lower doses. The main observation was an early reduction in tumor perfusion resulting from a reduction of small vessel ends with a corresponding loss of endothelial cells and pericytes.

  1. Promotive effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation in mice

    Kabaya, Koji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kusaka, Masaru; Seki, Masatoshi (Kirin Brewery Co., Ltd., Gunma (Japan). Pharmaceutical Research Laboratory); Fushiki, Masato

    1994-08-01

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on the recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated whole-body irradiation was investigated in mice. Male 7-week old C3H/HeN mice received a total of ten exposures of 0.25 Gy/day from day 1 to 5 and from day 8 to 12. Peripheral neutropenia with a nadir on day 17 was caused by the fractionated irradiation. Daily subcutaneous injections of rhG-CSF at 0.25 and 2.5 [mu]g/body/day from day from day 1 to 21 promoted the recovery of neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. The kinetics of morphologically identifiable bone marrow cells were studied to clarify the mechanism behind the promotive effect of this factor. A slight decrease in mitotic immature granulocytes, such as myeloblasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes on day 5, and a drastic decrease in metamyelocytes and marrow neutrophils on days 5, 9, and 17 were seen in the femur of irradiated mice. Treatment using rhG-CSF caused an increase in immature granulocytes of all differential stages in the femur. Microscopic findings of the femurs and spleens also reveals an increase in immature granulocytes in these organs in mice injected with rhG-CSF. These results indicate that rhG-CSF accelerates granulopoiesis in the femur and spleen, thereby promoting recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation. (author).

  2. Promotive effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation in mice

    Kabaya, Koji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kusaka, Masaru; Seki, Masatoshi; Fushiki, Masato.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on the recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated whole-body irradiation was investigated in mice. Male 7-week old C3H/HeN mice received a total of ten exposures of 0.25 Gy/day from day 1 to 5 and from day 8 to 12. Peripheral neutropenia with a nadir on day 17 was caused by the fractionated irradiation. Daily subcutaneous injections of rhG-CSF at 0.25 and 2.5 μg/body/day from day from day 1 to 21 promoted the recovery of neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. The kinetics of morphologically identifiable bone marrow cells were studied to clarify the mechanism behind the promotive effect of this factor. A slight decrease in mitotic immature granulocytes, such as myeloblasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes on day 5, and a drastic decrease in metamyelocytes and marrow neutrophils on days 5, 9, and 17 were seen in the femur of irradiated mice. Treatment using rhG-CSF caused an increase in immature granulocytes of all differential stages in the femur. Microscopic findings of the femurs and spleens also reveals an increase in immature granulocytes in these organs in mice injected with rhG-CSF. These results indicate that rhG-CSF accelerates granulopoiesis in the femur and spleen, thereby promoting recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation. (author)

  3. HELLE: Health Effects of Low Level Exposures

    Schoten, Eert

    1998-01-01

    The Health Council is closely involved in establishing the scientific foundation of exposure limits for substances and radiation in order to protect public health. Through the years, the Council has contributed to the formulation of principles and procedures, both for carcinogenic and for noncarcinogenic agents. As a rule, the discussion with regard to the derivation of health-based recommended exposure limits centers around the appropriateness of extrapolation methods (What can be inferred from data on high exposure levels and on experimental animals?). Generally speaking, there is a lack of direct information on the health effects of low levels of exposure. Effects at these levels cannot usually be detected by means of traditional animal experiments or epidemiological research. The capacity of these analytical instruments to distinguish between ''signal'' and ''noise'' is inadequate in most cases. Annex B of this report contains a brief outline of the difficulties and the established methods for tackling this problem. In spite of this, the hope exists that the posited weak signals, if they are indeed present, can be detected by other means. The search will have to take place on a deeper level. In other words, effort must be made to discover what occurs at underlying levels of biological organization when organisms are exposed to low doses of radiation or substances. Molecular and cell biology provide various methods and techniques which give an insight into the processes within the cell. This results in an increase in the knowledge about the molecular and cellular effects of exposure to agents, or stated differently, the working mechanisms which form the basis of the health effects. Last year, the Health Council considered that the time was ripe to take stock of the state of knowledge in this field. To this end, an international working conference was held from 19 to 21 October 1997, entitled ''Health Effects of Low Level Exposures: Scientific Developments and

  4. Weekly bi-fractionated 40 Gy three-dimensional conformational accelerated partial irradiation of breast: results of a phase II French pilot study

    Bourgier, C.; Pichenot, C.; Verstraet, R.; Heymann, S.; Biron, B.; Delaloge, S.; Garbay, J.R.; Marsiglia, H.; Bourhis, J.; Taghian, A.; Marsiglia, H.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the first French experience of three-dimensional conformational and accelerated partial irradiation of breast. Twenty five patients have been concerned by this phase II trial. The prescribed total dose was 40 Gy, was delivered over 5 days in two daily fractions. Irradiation was performed with two 6 MV tangential mini-beams and a 6-22 MeV front electron beams. The planning target volume coverage was very good. Toxicity has been assessed. Healthy tissues (heart, lungs) are considerably protected. The acute and late toxicity is correct. Short communication

  5. Photomultiplier tubes for Low Level Cerenkov Detectors

    Strindehag, O.

    1965-03-01

    Tube backgrounds of several 2-inch photomultiplier types having S11, 'S' , S13 and S20 cathodes are compared by measuring signal and background pulse height distributions at pulse heights corresponding to a few photo-electrons. The reference signal is generated by means of a β-source and a plexiglass radiator. It is found that comparatively good results are obtained with selected tubes of the EMI types 6097B and 9514B having equivalent dark current dc values down to 10 -12 input lumens. Special interest is devoted to the correlation between the measured tube backgrounds and the dark current dc values of the tubes, as a good correlation between these parameters simplifies the selection of photomultiplier tubes. The equivalent dark currents of the tested tubes extend over the range 10 -12 to 10 -9 input lumens. Although the investigation deals with photomultiplier tubes intended for use in low level Cerenkov detectors it is believed that the results could be valuable in other fields where photomultiplier tubes are utilized for the detection of weak light pulses

  6. Low level radwaste packaging: why not cement

    Wilson, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Over the past several years many words have been expended in a quest to define a variety of competing radioactive waste immobilization technologies. With the more recent recognition of the technical pitfalls of urea-formaldehyde (UF) a liquid chemical binder considered as optimum less than two years ago, utilities, architect-engineers and systems vendors find themselves in a technology void, awaiting the inevitable breakthrough which will identify the perfect immobilization agent. The culmination of these pressures has brought about the introduction of new immobilization technologies including: one which offers both volume reduction and immobilization in yet another new binder agent; the costly development of highly sophisticated volume reduction systems, the highly-concentrated products from which may pose as-yet unknown immobilization problems; and, the marketing of several new more expensive liquid chemical binders which are reputed to have eliminated the kinds of problems associated with urea-formaldehyde. This paper addresses these issues by coming full circle and arriving back at the initial approach employed for low level radwaste immobilization, the use of cement. Based on an evaluation of the three principal competing immobilization approaches, liquid chemical, bitumen and cement, the merits and drawbacks of each is examined. As will be described, an objective assessment of these competing technologies has resulted in a somewhat surprising conclusion that, while none of the approaches is without disadvantages, cement can be shown to offer the most reliable, versatile long-term solution to today's needs

  7. Conditioning characterization of low level radioactive waste

    Osman, A. F.

    2010-12-01

    This study has been carried out in the radioactive waste management laboratory Sudan Atomic Energy Commission. The main purpose of this work is method development for treatment and conditioning of low level liquid waste in order to improve radiation protection level in the country. For that purpose a liquid radioactive material containing Cs-137 was treated using the developed method. In the method different type of materials (cement, sands, concrete..etc) were tested for absorption of radiation emitted from the source as well as suitability of the material for storage for long time. It was found that the best material to be used is Smsmia concrete. Where the surface dose reduced from 150 to 3μ/h. Also design of storage container was proposed (with specification: diameter 6.5 cm, height 6 cm, placed in internal cylinder of diameter 10.3 cm, height 12.3 cm) and all are installed on the concrete and cement in the cylinder. Method was used in the process of double-packaging configuration. For more protection it is proposed that a mixed of cement to fill the void in addition to the sand be added to ensure low amount of radiation exposure while transport or storage. (Author)

  8. Polyethylene solidification of low-level wastes

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1985-02-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive waste in polyethylene. Waste streams selected for this study included those which result from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Four types of commercially available low-density polyethylenes were employed which encompass a range of processing and property characteristics. Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste and polyethylene type. Property evaluation testing was performed on laboratory-scale specimens to assess the potential behavior of actual waste forms in a disposal environment. Waste form property tests included water immersion, deformation under compressive load, thermal cycling and radionuclide leaching. Recommended waste loadings of 70 wt % sodium sulfate, 50 wt % boric acid, 40 wt % incinerator ash, and 30 wt % ion exchange resins, which are based on process control and waste form performance considerations are reported. 37 refs., 33 figs., 22 tabs

  9. Photomultiplier tubes for Low Level Cerenkov Detectors

    Strindehag, O

    1965-03-15

    Tube backgrounds of several 2-inch photomultiplier types having S11, 'S' , S13 and S20 cathodes are compared by measuring signal and background pulse height distributions at pulse heights corresponding to a few photo-electrons. The reference signal is generated by means of a {beta}-source and a plexiglass radiator. It is found that comparatively good results are obtained with selected tubes of the EMI types 6097B and 9514B having equivalent dark current dc values down to 10{sup -12} input lumens. Special interest is devoted to the correlation between the measured tube backgrounds and the dark current dc values of the tubes, as a good correlation between these parameters simplifies the selection of photomultiplier tubes. The equivalent dark currents of the tested tubes extend over the range 10{sup -12} to 10{sup -9} input lumens. Although the investigation deals with photomultiplier tubes intended for use in low level Cerenkov detectors it is believed that the results could be valuable in other fields where photomultiplier tubes are utilized for the detection of weak light pulses.

  10. Low-level wastes pathways at EDF

    Hilmoine, R.; Casseau, L.Ph.

    1999-01-01

    First, what are, for EDF, the main issues dealing with the future management of low level wastes (LLW) will be recalled; and followed by a description of what are the implications of implementing these management principles: areas zoning, set up of pathways, traceability of the wastes and associated controls. The origin of the wastes will then be described using both qualitative and quantitative approaches; the description will specifically address the spreading of wastes production in time. LLW management at EDF will then be envisaged: storage in a specific discharge, pathways for treatment and elimination of wastes with acceptable radiological impact and costs. The example of LLW oils will be developed: particularly as far as hypothesis and results concerning the radiological impacts are concerned. The choice of incineration will then be justified, however expected difficulties to implement it industrially will be pointed out. Other on going studies and their main results will be mentioned: the present time is a turning point on that issue between thought and action; to be on going dismantling must take into account the emerging principles and give rise to good communication. (author)

  11. Solid low-level waste forecasting guide

    Templeton, K.J.; Dirks, L.L.

    1995-03-01

    Guidance for forecasting solid low-level waste (LLW) on a site-wide basis is described in this document. Forecasting is defined as an approach for collecting information about future waste receipts. The forecasting approach discussed in this document is based solely on hanford's experience within the last six years. Hanford's forecasting technique is not a statistical forecast based upon past receipts. Due to waste generator mission changes, startup of new facilities, and waste generator uncertainties, statistical methods have proven to be inadequate for the site. It is recommended that an approach similar to Hanford's annual forecasting strategy be implemented at each US Department of Energy (DOE) installation to ensure that forecast data are collected in a consistent manner across the DOE complex. Hanford's forecasting strategy consists of a forecast cycle that can take 12 to 30 months to complete. The duration of the cycle depends on the number of LLW generators and staff experience; however, the duration has been reduced with each new cycle. Several uncertainties are associated with collecting data about future waste receipts. Volume, shipping schedule, and characterization data are often reported as estimates with some level of uncertainty. At Hanford, several methods have been implemented to capture the level of uncertainty. Collection of a maximum and minimum volume range has been implemented as well as questionnaires to assess the relative certainty in the requested data

  12. Development of irradiation techniques and assessment of tumor response carbon ion radiotherapy in ultra-short fraction and time for a small lung cancer

    Baba, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Sugawara, Toshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    For planning safety carbon therapy for lung cancer, the minimum (threshold) dose to generate lung reaction on CT image was investigated at each fraction regimen. From 1995 January to 2003 December, 44 patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with carbon ion beams of various fractions (1-12 fractions a port) and total doses (28-90 GyE). The 78 irradiated fields for the early reaction (within 6 months) and 67 for the late (1 year after) were divided into the two groups: the positive (+) and the negative (-) after the reactions on CT image were graded according to Libshits's criteria. The α/βvalue of biological effective dose (BED) responsive curve was determined by assuming the biserial correlation coefficient between positive rate of lung reaction and BED dose. From the BED responsive curve, in turn, the dose responsive curve for lung reaction rate at each fraction regimen was obtained. Based on the curve, D10 (to generate the lung reaction at 10% of the patients) in single fraction regimen was determined to be 10.6 GyE for the late reaction and 9.96 GyE for the early reaction, respectively. These doses seem to be very useful to estimate lung injuries in singe-dose irradiation. (author)

  13. High-dose total-body irradiation and autologous marrow reconstitution in dogs: dose-rate-related acute toxicity and fractionation-dependent long-term survival

    Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.; Schumacher, D.; Shulman, H.; Graham, T.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    Beagle dogs treated by total-body irradiation (TBI) were given autologous marrow grafts in order to avoid death from marrow toxicity. Acute and delayed non-marrow toxicities of high single-dose (27 dogs) and fractionated TBI (20 dogs) delivered at 0.05 or 0.1 Gy/min were compared. Fractionated TBI was given in increments of 2 Gy every 6 hr for three increments per day. Acute toxicity and early mortality (<1 month) at identical total irradiation doses were comparable for dogs given fractionated or single-dose TBI. With single-dose TBI, 14, 16, and 18 Gy, respectively, given at 0.05 Gy/min, 0/5, 5/5, and 2/2 dogs died from acute toxicity; with 10, 12, and 14 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 5/5 dogs died acutely. With fractionated TBI, 14 and 16 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 2/2 dogs died auctely. Early deaths were due to radiation enteritis with or without associated septicemia (29 dogs; less than or equal to Day 10). Three dogs given 10 Gy of TBI at 0.1 Gy/min died from bacterial pneumonia; one (Day 18) had been given fractionated and two (Days 14, 22) single-dose TBI. Fifteen dogs survived beyond 1 month; eight of these had single-dose TBI (10-14 Gy) and all died within 7 months of irradiation from a syndrome consisting of hepatic damage, pancreatic fibrosis, malnutrition, wasting, and anemia. Seven of the 15 had fractionated TBI, and only one (14 Gy) died on Day 33 from hepatic failure, whereas 6 (10-14 Gy) are alive and well 250 to 500 days after irradiation. In conclusion, fractionated TBI did not offer advantages over single-dose TBI with regard to acute toxicity and early mortality; rather, these were dependent upon the total dose of TBI. The total acutely tolerated dose was dependent upon the exposure rate; however, only dogs given fractionated TBI became healthy long-term survivors

  14. In vivo assessment of the tolerance dose of small liver volumes after single-fraction HDR irradiation

    Ricke, Jens; Seidensticker, Max; Luedemann, Lutz; Pech, Maciej; Wieners, Gero; Hengst, Susanne; Mohnike, Konrad; Cho, Chie Hee; Lopez Haenninen, Enrique; Al-Abadi, Hussain; Felix, Roland; Wust, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess a dose-response relationship for small volumes of liver parenchyma after single-fraction irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five liver metastases were treated by computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial brachytherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed 1 day before and 3 days and 6, 12, and 24 weeks after therapy. MR sequences included T1-w gradient echo (GRE) enhanced by hepatocyte-targeted gadobenate dimeglumine. All MRI data sets were merged with 3D dosimetry data and evaluated by two radiologists. The reviewers indicated the border of hyperintensity on T2-w images (edema) or hypointensity on T1-w images (loss of hepatocyte function). Based on the total 3D data, a dose-volume histogram was calculated. We estimated the threshold dose for either edema or function loss as the D 90 , i.e., the dose achieved in at least 90% of the pseudolesion volume. Results: Between 3 days and 6 weeks, the extension of the edema increased significantly from the 12.9 Gy isosurface to 9.9 Gy (standard deviation [SD], 3.3 and 2.6). No significant change was detected between 6 and 12 weeks. After 24 weeks, the edematous tissue had shrunk significantly to 14.7 Gy (SD, 4.2). Three days postbrachytherapy, the D 90 for hepatocyte function loss reached the 14.9 Gy isosurface (SD, 3.9). At 6 weeks, the respective zone had increased significantly to 9.9 Gy (SD, 2.3). After 12 and 24 weeks, the dysfunction volume had decreased significantly to the 11.9 Gy and 15.2 Gy isosurface, respectively (SD, 3 and 4.1). Conclusions: The 95% interval from 7.6 to 12.2 Gy found as the minimal hepatocyte tolerance after 6 weeks accounts for the radiobiologic variations found in CT-guided brachytherapy, including heterogeneous dose rates by variable catheter arrays

  15. The influence of low-level radiation on nucleolus activity of cyprinidae embryos

    Arkhipchuk, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    The number and sizes of nucleoli in embryos of Cyprinus carpio and Carassius auratus gibelio exposed to low-level radiation at a dose-rate of 10 μ Gy/h and down were larger than those on non-irradiated controls

  16. In vivo assessment of catheter positioning accuracy and prolonged irradiation time on liver tolerance dose after single-fraction 192Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    Kropf Siegfried

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess brachytherapy catheter positioning accuracy and to evaluate the effects of prolonged irradiation time on the tolerance dose of normal liver parenchyma following single-fraction irradiation with 192 Ir. Materials and methods Fifty patients with 76 malignant liver tumors treated by computed tomography (CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT were included in the study. The prescribed radiation dose was delivered by 1 - 11 catheters with exposure times in the range of 844 - 4432 seconds. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI datasets for assessing irradiation effects on normal liver tissue, edema, and hepatocyte dysfunction, obtained 6 and 12 weeks after HDR-BT, were merged with 3D dosimetry data. The isodose of the treatment plan covering the same volume as the irradiation effect was taken as a surrogate for the liver tissue tolerance dose. Catheter positioning accuracy was assessed by calculating the shift between the 3D center coordinates of the irradiation effect volume and the tolerance dose volume for 38 irradiation effects in 30 patients induced by catheters implanted in nearly parallel arrangement. Effects of prolonged irradiation were assessed in areas where the irradiation effect volume and tolerance dose volume did not overlap (mismatch areas by using a catheter contribution index. This index was calculated for 48 irradiation effects induced by at least two catheters in 44 patients. Results Positioning accuracy of the brachytherapy catheters was 5-6 mm. The orthogonal and axial shifts between the center coordinates of the irradiation effect volume and the tolerance dose volume in relation to the direction vector of catheter implantation were highly correlated and in first approximation identically in the T1-w and T2-w MRI sequences (p = 0.003 and p p = 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively. There was a significant shift of the irradiation effect towards the catheter entry site compared with the planned dose

  17. Administration of the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist pioglitazone during fractionated brain irradiation prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment

    Zhao Weiling; Payne, Valerie; Tommasi, Ellen; Diz, Debra I.; Hsu, F.-C.; Robbins, Mike E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We hypothesized that administration of the anti-inflammatory peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist pioglitazone (Pio) to adult male rats would inhibit radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Methods and Materials: Young adult male F344 rats received one of the following: (1) fractionated whole brain irradiation (WBI); 40 or 45 Gy γ-rays in 4 or 4.5 weeks, respectively, two fractions per week and normal diet; (2) sham-irradiation and normal diet; (3) WBI plus Pio (120 ppm) before, during, and for 4 or 54 weeks postirradiation; (4) sham-irradiation plus Pio; or (5) WBI plus Pio starting 24h after completion of WBI. Results: Administration of Pio before, during, and for 4 or 54 weeks after WBI prevented Radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Administration of Pio for 54 weeks starting after completion of fractionated WBI substantially but not significantly reduced Radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Conclusions: These findings offer the promise of improving the quality of life and increasing the therapeutic window for brain tumor patients

  18. Mechanisms associated with the expression of cisplatin resistance in a human ovarian tumor cell line following exposure to fractionated x-irradiation in vitro

    Dempke, W.C.M.; Shellard, S.A.; Hosking, L.K.; Hill, B.T.

    1992-01-01

    Interactions between cisplatin (CDDP) and irradiation are of potential significance for the combined modality treatment of cancer. To identify parameters associated with CDDP resistance, the human ovarian carcinoma cell line SK-OV-3/P was pre-exposed to fractionated X-irradiation in vitro. The resultant subline (SK-OV-3/DXR-10) proved 2-fold resistant to CDDP, but not to acute X-irradiation. Consistent with unaltered dihydrofolate reductase and thymidylate synthase activities, SK-OV-3/DXR-10 cells were neither cross-resistant to methotrexate nor to 5-fluorouracil. Verapamil significantly enhanced CDDP-induced cytotoxicity in the resistant DXR-10 subline, but not in the parental cells. Resistance in the SK-OV-3/DXR-10 cells was associated with significantly decreased cisplatin uptake. After an 18 h post-treatment incubation the parental cell line appeared proficient in the removal of the intrastrand adduct Pt-AG, but deficient in removing the major adduct Pt-GG and the difunctional Pt-(GMP) 2 lesion, whilst the DXR-10 resistant subline appeared proficient in removal of all four Pt-DNA adducts. DNA polymerases α and β activities, however, were comparable in both cell lines. These data implicate both enhanced repair and increased tolerance of DNA damage as mechanisms of resistance to CDDP resulting from in vitro exposure of a human ovarian carcinoma cell line to fractionated X-irradiation. (author)

  19. The AT1 Receptor Antagonist, L-158,809, Prevents or Ameliorates Fractionated Whole-Brain Irradiation-Induced Cognitive Impairment

    Robbins, Mike E.; Payne, Valerie B.S.; Tommasi, Ellen B.S.; Diz, Debra I.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Brown, William R.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Olson, John; Zhao Weiling

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: We hypothesized that administration of the angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, L-158,809, to young adult male rats would prevent or ameliorate fractionated whole-brain irradiation (WBI)-induced cognitive impairment. Materials and Methods: Groups of 80 young adult male Fischer 344 x Brown Norway (F344xBN) rats, 12-14 weeks old, received either: (1) fractionated WBI; 40 Gy of γ rays in 4 weeks, 2 fractions/week, (2) sham-irradiation; (3) WBI plus L-158,809 (20 mg/L drinking water) starting 3 days prior, during, and for 14, 28, or 54 weeks postirradiation; and (4) sham-irradiation plus L-158,809 for 14, 28, or 54 weeks postirradiation. An additional group of rats (n = 20) received L-158,809 before, during, and for 5 weeks postirradiation, after which they received normal drinking water up to 28 weeks postirradiation. Results: Administration of L-158,809 before, during, and for 28 or 54 weeks after fractionated WBI prevented or ameliorated the radiation-induced cognitive impairment observed 26 and 52 weeks postirradiation. Moreover, giving L-158,809 before, during, and for only 5 weeks postirradiation ameliorated the significant cognitive impairment observed 26 weeks postirradiation. These radiation-induced cognitive impairments occurred without any changes in brain metabolites or gross histologic changes assessed at 28 and 54 weeks postirradiation, respectively. Conclusions: Administering L-158,809 before, during, and after fractionated WBI can prevent or ameliorate the chronic, progressive, cognitive impairment observed in rats at 26 and 52 weeks postirradiation. These findings offer the promise of improving the quality of life for brain tumor patients

  20. Overview of the hazards of low-level exposure to radiation

    Ritenour, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    In this chapter the authors are concerned with low-level radiation, doses of ionizing radiations that are ten to thousands of times smaller than those required to contract ARS. Low-level radiation may be defined as an absorbed dose of 10 rem or less delivered over a short period of time. A larger dose delivered over a long period of time, for instance, 50 rem in 10 years, may also be considered low level. The definition is purposely loose so as to cover a wide variety of sources of radiation exposure, such as natural background (100 mrem/year) occupational exposures (<5 rem/year), and medical applications, such as diagnostic radiography (<1 rem). Low-level radiation exposure does not produce ARS. The health effects that may be of concern in regard to low-level radiation are its long-term sequelae. Studies of survivors of high-level radiation exposure (both human and laboratory animals) have indicated that there are three health effects that should be examined at low levels of exposure: induction of cancer, birth abnormalities (from irradiation in utero), and genetic effects. No other long-term effects of low-level exposure have been conclusively demonstrated in animals or humans

  1. Low-level radioactive waste treatment technology. Low-level radioactive waste management handbook series

    1984-07-01

    Each generator of low-level radioactive waste must consider three sequential questions: (1) can the waste in its as-generated form be packaged and shipped to a disposal facility; (2) will the packaged waste be acceptable for disposal; and (3) if so, is it cost effective to dispose of the waste in its as-generated form. These questions are aimed at determining if the waste form, physical and chemical characteristics, and radionuclide content collectively are suitable for shipment and disposal in a cost-effective manner. If not, the waste management procedures will involve processing operations in addition to collection, segregation, packaging, shipment, and disposal. This handbook addresses methods of treating and conditioning low-level radioactive waste for shipment and disposal. A framework is provided for selection of cost-effective waste-processing options for generic categories of low-level radioactive waste. The handbook is intended as a decision-making guide that identifies types of information required to evaluate options, methods of evaluation, and limitations associated with selection of any of the processing options

  2. A comparison of anti-tumor effects of high dose rate fractionated and low dose rate continuous irradiation in multicellular spheroids

    Kubota, Nobuo; Omura, Motoko; Matsubara, Sho.

    1997-01-01

    In a clinical experience, high dose rate (HDR) fractionated interstitial radiotherapy can be an alternative to traditional low dose rate (LDR) continuous interstitial radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. To investigate biological effect of HDR, compared to LDR, comparisons have been made using spheroids of human squamous carcinoma cells. Both LDR and HDR were delivered by 137 Cs at 37degC. Dose rate of LDR was 8 Gy/day and HDR irradiations of fraction size of 4, 5 or 6 Gy were applied twice a day with an interval time of more than 6 hr. We estimated HDR fractionated dose of 31 Gy with 4 Gy/fr to give the same biological effects of 38 Gy by continuous LDR for spheroids. The ratio of HDR/LDR doses to control 50% spheroids was 0.82. (author)

  3. Influence of radiation field and fractionation schedule of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on the induction of suppressor cells and stable chimerism after bone marrow transplantation in mice

    Waer, M.; Ang, K.K.; van der Schueren, E.; Vandeputte, M.

    1984-01-01

    When BALB/c mice received 17 daily fractions of 2 Gy each of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI, total dose 34 Gy) and 30 x 10 6 C 57 B1 bone marrow cells (BM) on the day after the last fraction, stable bone marrow chimerism without signs of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) was obtained in 84% of the animals. On the contrary, in BALB/c mice receiving only seven fractions of TLI (total dose 14 Gy), all bone marrow grafts were rejected. When the last two fractions of a 14-Gy TLI course were given without shielding the extra lymphatic tissues (combined total lymphoid + total body irradiation, TLBI), chimerism could be induced in 53% of the animals. When this 14-Gy TLBI schedule was used, it was even possible to administer four fractions per day (multiple fractions per day schedule, MFD), thus reducing the overall treatment time to 2 consecutive days. After this concentrated form of TLBI, chimerism was detected in 35% of the animals. As in the 34-Gy TLI schedule, graft-vs-host reaction could not be prevented in the 14-Gy TLBI schedule when spleen lymphocytes (10 x 10 6 ) were added to the BM inocolum. Leucopenia or suppression of the phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced blastogenesis could not predict which schedule would result in a successful allogeneic bone marrow take. Suppressor cells of the mixed lymphocyte reaction, on the other hand, were only found in the spleen of BALB/c mice treated with the TLI or TLBI schedules, which also resulted in stable bone marrow chimerism

  4. Issue briefs on low-level radioactive wastes

    1981-01-01

    This report contains 4 Issue Briefs on low-level radioactive wastes. They are entitled: Handling, Packaging, and Transportation, Economics of LLW Management, Public Participation and Siting, and Low Level Waste Management

  5. Identification of radiation response genes and proteins from mouse pulmonary tissues after high-dose per fraction irradiation of limited lung volumes.

    Jin, Hee; Jeon, Seulgi; Kang, Ga-Young; Lee, Hae-June; Cho, Jaeho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2017-02-01

    The molecular effects of focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose per fraction irradiation (HDFR) such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have not been fully characterized. In this study, we used such an irradiation system and identified the genes and proteins after HDFR to mouse lung, similar to those associated with human therapy. High focal radiation (90 Gy) was applied to a 3-mm volume of the left lung of C57BL6 mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. As well as histological examination for lungs, a cDNA micro array using irradiated lung tissues and a protein array of sera were performed until 4 weeks after irradiation, and radiation-responsive genes and proteins were identified. For comparison, the long-term effects (12 months) of 20 Gy radiation wide-field dose to the left lung were also investigated. The genes ermap, epb4.2, cd200r3 (up regulation) and krt15, hoxc4, gdf2, cst9, cidec, and bnc1 (down-regulation) and the proteins of AIF, laminin, bNOS, HSP27, β-amyloid (upregulation), and calponin (downregulation) were identified as being responsive to 90 Gy HDFR. The gdf2, cst9, and cidec genes also responded to 20 Gy, suggesting that they are universal responsive genes in irradiated lungs. No universal proteins were identified in both 90 Gy and 20 Gy. Calponin, which was downregulated in protein antibody array analysis, showed a similar pattern in microarray data, suggesting a possible HDFR responsive serum biomarker that reflects gene alteration of irradiated lung tissue. These genes and proteins also responded to the lower doses of 20 Gy and 50 Gy HDFR. These results suggest that identified candidate genes and proteins are HDFR-specifically expressed in lung damage induced by HDFR relevant to SBRT in humans.

  6. DOE low-level waste long term technology development

    Barainca, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program is to provide a low-level waste management system by 1986. Areas of concentration are defined as: (1) Waste Generation Reduction Technology, (2) Process and Handling Technology, (3) Environmental Technology, (4) Low-Level Waste Disposal Technology. A program overview is provided with specific examples of technical development. 2 figures

  7. Low level radioactive waste management and discharge policies in Turkey

    Oezdemir, T.; Oezdemir, C.; Uslu, I.

    2005-01-01

    The legal infrastructure in Turkey for the management of low-level radioactive waste covers the liquid, solid and gaseous wastes. Management of these radioactive wastes is briefly described in this paper. Moreover, delay and decay tank systems that are used to collect and store the low level radioactive wastes as a part of low-level radioactive effluent discharge policy are introduced. (author)

  8. No effect of the hemoglobin solution HBOC-201 on the response of the rat R1H tumor to fractionated irradiation

    Raabe, A.

    2005-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Tumor hypoxia is regarded as one important underlying feature of radioresistance. The authors report on an experimental approach to improve tumor response to radiation by combining fractionated irradiation with HBOC-201, an ultrapurified polymerized hemoglobin solution, which is currently used in clinical phase II/III trials as alternative oxygen carrier and proved to be highly effective in tissue oxygenation (tpO 2 ). Material and Methods: Subcutaneously growing rhabdomyosarcoma R1H tumors of the rat were treated with either 40 Gy (2 Gy/fraction, 20 fractions in 2 weeks, ambient) followed by grade top-up doses (clamped) alone, or in combination with HBOC-201, or with HBOC-201 plus carbogen (95% O 2 +5% CO 2 ). Local tumor control (TCD50%) and growth delay were used as endpoints. In addition, the effect of HBOC-201 alone or in combination with carbogen on the tpO 2 of tumor and muscle was determined using a flexible stationary probe (Licox, GMS). Results: TCD50% values of 119 Gy (95% confidence interval 103; 135), 111 Gy (84; 138), and 102 Gy (83; 120) were determined for tumors irradiated alone, in combination with HBOC-201, and with HBOC-201 plus carbogen, respectively. Although the dose-response curves showed a slight shift to lower doses when HBOC-201 or HBOC-201 plus carbogen was added, the differences in TCD50% were not statistically significant. No effect was seen on the growth delay of recurrent tumors. HBOC-201 alone did not effect tumor or muscle tpO 2 . In combination with carbogen the mean tpO 2 muscle raised from 23.9 mmHg to 59.3 mmHg (p 2 by carbogen alone. Conclusion: Low-dose application of HBOC-201 does not improve the response of the rhabdomyosarcoma R1H of the rat to fractionated irradiation. (orig.)

  9. Ionizing radiation and autoimmunity: Induction of autoimmune disease in mice by high dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and its prevention by inoculating normal T cells

    Sakaguchi, N.; Sakaguchi, S.; Miyai, K.

    1992-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can functionally alter the immune system and break self-tolerance. High dose (42.5 Gy), fractionated (2.5 Gy 17 times) total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on mice caused various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as gastritis, thyroiditis, and orchitis, depending on the radiation dosages, the extent of lymphoid irradiation, and the genetic background of the mouse strains. Radiation-induced tissue damage is not the primary cause of the autoimmune disease because irradiation of the target organs alone failed to elicit the autoimmunity and shielding of the organs from irradiation was unable to prevent it. In contrast, irradiation of both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid organs/tissues was required for efficient induction of autoimmune disease by TLI. TLI eliminated the majority of mature thymocytes and the peripheral T cells for 1 mo, and inoculation of spleen cell, thymocyte, or bone marrow cell suspensions (prepared from syngeneic nonirradiated mice) within 2 wk after TLI effectively prevented the autoimmune development. Depletion of T cells from the inocula abrogated the preventive activity. CD4 + T cells mediated the autoimmune prevention but CD8 + T cells did not. CD4 + T cells also appeared to mediate the TLI-induced autoimmune disease because CD4 + T cells from disease-bearing TLI mice adoptively transferred the autoimmune disease to syngeneic naive mice. Taken together, these results indicate that high dose, fractionated ionizing radiation on the lymphoid organs/tissues can cause autoimmune disease by affecting the T cell immune system, rather than the target self-Ags, presumably by altering T cell-dependent control of self-reactive T cells. 62 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Usefulness of Daily Fractionated Administration of Wortmannin Combined With γ-Ray Irradiation in Terms of Local Tumor Response and Lung Metastasis

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Tano, Keizo; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the usefulness of fractionated administration of wortmannin combined with γ-ray irradiation in terms of local tumor response and lung metastatic potential, referring to the response of intratumor quiescent (Q) cells. Methods B16-BL6 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were continuously given 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) cells. The tumor-bearing mice then received γ-ray irradiation after wortmannin treatment through a single or 4 consecutive daily intraperitoneal administrations up to a total dose of 4 mg/kg in combination with an acute hypoxia-releasing agent (nicotinamide) or mild temperature hyperthermia (MTH). Immediately after the irradiation, cells from some tumors were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker. The responses of the Q and total (= P + Q) cell populations were assessed based on the frequency of micronuclei using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. In other tumor-bearing mice, 17 days after irradiation, macroscopic lung metastases were enumerated. Results Wortmannin raised the sensitivity of Q cells more remarkably than the total cell population in both single and daily administrations. Daily administration of wortmannin elevated the sensitivity of both the total and Q cell populations, but especially the total cell population, compared with single administration. Daily administration, especially combined with MTH, decreased the number of lung metastases. Conclusion Daily fractionated administration of wortmannin in combination with γ-ray irradiation was thought to be more promising than single administration because of its potential to enhance local tumor response and repress lung metastatic potential. PMID:29147327

  11. Significance of Fractionated Administration of Thalidomide Combined With γ-Ray Irradiation in Terms of Local Tumor Response and Lung Metastasis

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Sanada, Yu; Moriwaki, Takahiro; Tano, Keizo; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of fractionated administration of thalidomide combined with γ-ray irradiation in terms of local tumor response and lung metastatic potential, referring to the response of intratumor quiescent (Q) cells. Methods B16-BL6 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were continuously given 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) cells. The tumor-bearing mice then received γ-ray irradiation after thalidomide treatment through a single or two consecutive daily intraperitoneal administrations up to a total dose of 400 mg/kg in combination with an acute hypoxia-releasing agent (nicotinamide) or mild temperature hyperthermia (MTH). Immediately after the irradiation, cells from some tumors were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker. The responses of the Q and total (= P + Q) cell populations were assessed based on the frequency of micronuclei using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. In other tumor-bearing mice, 17 days after irradiation, macroscopic lung metastases were enumerated. Results Thalidomide raised the sensitivity of the total cell population more remarkably than Q cells in both single and daily administrations. Daily administration of thalidomide elevated the sensitivity of both the total and Q cell populations, but especially the total cell population, compared with single administration. Daily administration, especially combined with MTH, decreased the number of lung metastases. Conclusion Daily fractionated administration of thalidomide in combination with γ-ray irradiation was thought to be more promising than single administration because of its potential to enhance local tumor response and repress lung metastatic potential. PMID:29147396

  12. Splenic irradiation in the treatment of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia. Results of daily and intermittent fractionation with and without concomitant hydroxyurea

    Wagner, H. Jr.; McKeough, P.G.; Desforges, J.; Madoc-Jones, H.

    1986-01-01

    Seventeen patients with either chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia (MMM) received 24 courses of splenic irradiation at this institution from 1973 to 1982. Eleven of the 17 patients had received prior chemotherapy. Patients were treated with 60 Co gamma rays or 6 MV photons. The fraction size ranged from 15 to 100 rad and the total dose per treatment course from 15 to 650 rad, with the exception of one patient who received 1650 rad. Fourteen of 19 courses (71%) given for splenic pain yielded significant subjective relief while 17 of 26 courses given for splenomegaly obtained at least 50% regression of splenic size. Blood counts were carefully monitored before each treatment to limit hematologic toxicity. From this experience, the authors conclude that splenic irradiation effectively palliates splenic pain and reverses splenomegaly in the majority of patients with CML and MMM. Intermittent fractionation (twice or thrice weekly) is more convenient for the patient, appears to be as effective as daily treatment, and may be associated with less hematologic toxicity. Preliminary results of concurrent treatment with splenic irradiation and oral hydroxyurea show promise and warrant further study

  13. Autologous stem cell transplantation following high-dose whole-body irradiation of dogs - influence of cell number and fractionation regimes

    Bodenberger, U.

    1981-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome after a single dose of 1600 R (approx. 12-14 Gy in body midline) and after fractionated irradiation with 2400 R (approx. 18-20 Gy) was studied with regard to fractionation time and to the number of bone marrow cells infused. The acute radiation syndrome consisted of damage to the alimentary tract and of damage to the hemopoietic system. Damage of hemopoiesis was reversible in dogs which had been given a sufficient amount of hemopoietic cells. Furthermore changes in skin and in the mucous membranes occurred. Hemopoietic recovery following infusion of various amounts of bone marrow was investigated in dogs which were irradiated with 2400 R within 7 days. Repopulation of bone marrow as well as rise of leukocyte and platelet counts in the peripheral blood was taken as evidence of complete hemopoietic reconstitution. The results indicate that the acute radiation syndrom following 2400 R TBI and autologous BMT can be controlled by fractionation of this dose within 5 or 7 days. The acute gastrointestinal syndrome is aggravated by infusion of a lesser amount of hemopoietic cells. However, TBI with 2400 R does not require greater numbers of hemopoietic cells for restoration of hemopoiesis. Thus, the hemopoiesis supporting tissue can not be damage by this radiation dose to an essential degree. Longterm observations have not revealed serious late defects which could represent a contraindication to the treatment of malignent diseases with 2400 R of TBI. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Radiation cross-linked carboxymethyl sago pulp hydrogels loaded with ciprofloxacin: Influence of irradiation on gel fraction, entrapped drug and in vitro release

    Lam, Yi Lyn; Muniyandy, Saravanan; Kamaruddin, Hashim; Mansor, Ahmad; Janarthanan, Pushpamalar

    2015-01-01

    Carboxymethyl sago pulp (CMSP) with 0.4 DS, viscosity 184 dl/g and molecular weight 76,000 g/mol was synthesized from sago waste. 10 and 20% w/v solutions of CMSP were irradiated at 10–30 kGy to form hydrogels and were characterized by % gel fraction (GF). Irradiation of 20% CMSP using 25 kGy has produced stable hydrogels with the highest % GF and hence loaded with ciprofloxacin HCl. Drug-loaded hydrogels were produced by irradiating the mixture of drug and 20% CMSP solution at 25 kGy. After irradiation, the hydrogels were cut into circular discs with a diameter of 6±1 mm and evaluated for physicochemical properties as well as drug release kinetics. The ciprofloxacin loading in the disc was 14.7%±1 w/w with an entrapment efficiency of 73.5% w/w. The low standard deviation of drug-loaded discs indicated uniform thickness (1.5±0.3 mm). The unloaded discs were thinner (1±0.4 mm) and more brittle than the drug-loaded discs. FESEM, FT-IR, XRD, DSC and TGA analysis revealed the absence of polymer–drug interaction and transformation of crystalline to amorphous form of ciprofloxacin in the discs. The disc sustained the drug release in phosphate buffer pH 7.4 over 36 h in a first-order manner. The mechanism of the drug release was found to be swelling controlled diffusion and matrix erosion. The anti-bacterial effect of ciprofloxacin was retained after irradiation and CMSP disc could be a promising device for ocular drug delivery. - Highlights: • Carboxymethyl sago pulp (CMSP) with ciprofloxacin is irradiated to form hydrogels. • 20% CMSP at 25 kGy has produced stable hydrogels with the highest gel fraction. • Crystalline ciprofloxacin converted as amorphous during hydrogel formation. • Hydrogel in disc form sustained the drug release drug up to 36 h. • Irradiation cross-linked polymeric chain of CMSP resulted in controlled swelling

  15. Microwave irradiation of lignocellulosic materials, 8: Microwave irradiation of the neutral fraction (C-I-M) of pine Björkman LCC

    Azuma, J.; Katayama, T.; Koshijima, T.

    1986-01-01

    Effect of microwave irradiation on the partially acetylated galactoglucomannan bearing a small amount of lignin (C-I-M) isolated from pine Bjorkman LCC was investigated. When the native C-I-M was heated above 180°C by microwave irradiation in the presence of water, its carbohydrate portion was hydrolyzed into oligosaccharides having d.p. of 2-5 and monosaccharides. The degree of depolymerization of carbohydrates strongly depended upon the heating temperature and did not reach a maximum below 237°C, at which the reducing sugar content attained to 45.7%. The lignin molecules precipitated during microwave irradiation and a substancial amount of their (β-0-4 linkages were splitted. The lignin-carbohydrate bondings were also splitted at the heating temperature above 230°C. The hydrolysis of the carbohydrate portion of C-I-M was found to be remarkably enhanced by addition of 0.5% acetic acid during microwave irradiation. In this case, the reducing sugar production showed a maximum (74.2%) at about 210°C. Acetic acid was an excellent reagent for enhancement of the extent of depolymerization of galactoglucomannan in C-I-M. (author)

  16. Solid low level waste management guidelines: Final report

    Castagnacci, A.; Dalton, D.; Genoa, P.

    1994-11-01

    Since 1989, the nuclear industry has been moving in the direction of greater minimization of low level radioactive waste (LLW). This has been driven in part by increasing regulatory attention, but it also is in response to the desire on the part of nuclear utilities to be more cost efficient and to be environmentally responsive. Over the past half-dozen years, LLW disposal costs have increased dramatically. In addition, improvements in LLW volume reduction technologies have substantially reduced the volume of LLW that is disposed. At the same time, utilities are implementing aggressive source reduction programs and programs to reuse materials so as to extend the useful life of many materials. Thus, there has been a dramatic change in LLW economics and LLW management practices in just the past few years. This report was developed by utility nuclear experts to provide guidance to all utilities on mechanisms for integrating the program economics, advanced volume reduction techniques, and approaches to source reduction. Thus, utilizes will be able to use this report as a guide to optimizing their LLW program economics and minimizing LLW disposal volumes to the smallest reasonable fraction. This report discusses the implementation of these guidelines, management support, waste materials and waste inventory, radioactive tool and equipment management, protective clothing management, processing and volume reduction, solid LLW tracking, outage LLW management, and interim storage of LLW

  17. Radionuclide release from low-level waste in field lysimeters

    Oblath, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    A field program has been in operation for 8 years at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) to determine the leaching/migration behavior of low-level radioactive waste using lysimeters. The lysimeters are soil-filled caissons containing well characterized wastes, with each lysimeter serving as a model of a shallow land burial trench. Sampling and analysis of percolate water and vegetation from the lysimeters provide a determination of the release rates of the radionuclides from the waste/soil system. Vegetative uptake appears to be a major pathway for migration. Fractional release rates from the waste/soil system are less than 0.01% per year. Waste-to-soil leach rates up to 10% per year have been determined by coring several of the lysimeters. The leaching of solidified wasteforms under unsaturated field conditions has agreed well with static, immersion leaching of the same type waste in the laboratory. However, releases from the waste/soil system in the lysimeter may be greater than predicted based on leaching alone, due to complexation of the radionuclides by other components leached from the wastes to form mobile, anionic species

  18. Risk evaluation - conventional and low level effects of radiation

    Bond, V.P.; Varma, M.N.

    1984-04-01

    Any discussion of the risk of exposure to potentially-hazardous agents in the environment inevitably involves the question of whether the dose effect curve is of the threshold or linear, non-threshold type. A principal objective of this presentation is to show that the function is actually two separate relationships, each representing distinctly different functions with differing variables on the axes, and each characteristic of quite different functions with differing variables on the axes, and each characteristic of quite different disciplines (i.e., the threshold function, of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Medicine [PTM]; the linear, non-threshold function, of Public Health including safety and accident statistics [PHS]). It is shown that low-level exposure (LLE) to radiation falls clearly in the PHS category. A function for cell dose vs. the fraction of single cell quantal responses is characterized, which reflects the absolute and relative sensitivities of cells. Acceptance of this function would obviate any requirement for the use in Radiation Protection of the concepts of a standard radiation, Q, dose equivalent and rem. 9 references, 4 figures

  19. Disposal of low-level and mixed low-level radioactive waste during 1990

    1993-08-01

    Isotopic inventories and other data are presented for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed LLW disposed (and occasionally stored) during calendar year 1990 at commercial disposal facilities and Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Detailed isotopic information is presented for the three commercial disposal facilities located near Barnwell, SC, Richland, WA, and Beatty, NV. Less information is presented for the Envirocare disposal facility located near Clive, UT, and for LLW stored during 1990 at the West Valley site. DOE disposal information is included for the Savannah River Site (including the saltstone facility), Nevada Test Site, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Site, Y-12 Site, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Summary information is presented about stored DOE LLW. Suggestions are made about improving LLW disposal data

  20. Impact of overall treatment time on local control of slow growing human GL squamous cell carcinoma in nude mice treated by fractionated irradiation

    Baumann, M.; Petersen, C.; Schulz, P.; Baisch, H.

    1999-01-01

    Background and purpose: The impact of overall treatment time of fractionated irradiation on local control of slow growing human GL squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was determined. Materials and methods: Moderately well differentiated and keratinizing human GL SCC with a volume doubling time of 8 days were transplanted subcutaneously into the right hindleg of NMRI (nu/nu) mice and irradiated with 30 fractions under ambient conditions over 2, 3, 4.5, 6 and 10 weeks. Endpoint of the experiments was local tumor control at day 180 after end of treatment.Results: The tumor control dose 50% (TCD 50) increased from 40 to 57 Gy when the treatment time was extended from 2 to 10 weeks. The data can be well described by a linear increase in TCD 50 with time. The recovered dose per day (D r ) was 0.28 Gy (95% confidence interval 0.06; 0.48). The fit to the data was not significantly improved by assuming a biphasic (dog-leg) time course with constant TCD 50 values in the initial part of treatment followed by a more rapid increase of TCD 50 thereafter.Conclusions: D r in GL SCC was significantly less than the value of 1.0 Gy (0.7; 1.3 ) previously reported for poorly differentiated, non-keratinizing and fast growing human FaDu SCC (Baumann M, Liertz C, Baisch H, Wiegel T, Lorenzen J, Arps H. Impact of overall treatment time of fractionated irradiation on local control of human FaDu squamous cell carcinoma in nude mice. Radiother. Oncol. 1994;32:137-143), indicating important heterogeneity of the time factor between different tumors of the same histological type. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  1. Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Epithelial Damage by the TLR5 Agonist Entolimod in a Mouse Model of Fractionated Head and Neck Irradiation.

    Toshkov, Ilia A; Gleiberman, Anatoli S; Mett, Vadim L; Hutson, Alan D; Singh, Anurag K; Gudkov, Andrei V; Burdelya, Lyudmila G

    2017-05-01

    Radiation treatment of head and neck cancer frequently causes severe collateral damage to normal tissues including mouth mucosa, salivary glands and skin. This toxicity limits the radiation dose that can be delivered and affects the patient's quality of life. Previous studies in mice and nonhuman primates showed that entolimod, a toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) agonist derived from bacterial flagellin, effectively reduced radiation damage to hematopoietic and gastrointestinal tissues in both total-body and local irradiation scenarios, with no protection of tumors. Here, using a mouse model, we analyzed the efficacy of entolimod administered before or after irradiation in reducing damage to normal tissues. Animals received local fractionated radiation to the head and neck area, thus modeling radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. Tissue damage was evaluated through histomorphological examination of samples collected at different time points up to four weeks, mice were exposed locally to five daily fractions of 5, 6 or 7 Gy. A semiquantitative scoring system was used to assess the severity of observed pathomorphological changes. In this model, radiation damage was most severe in the lips, tongue and skin, moderate in the upper esophagus and minor in salivary glands. The kinetics of injury appearance and recovery of normal morphology varied among tissues, with maximal damage to the tongue, esophagus and salivary glands developing at earlier times (days 8-11 postirradiation) relative to that of lip and skin mucosa (days 11-15 postirradiation). While both tested regimens of entolimod significantly reduced the extent of radiation damage and accelerated restoration of normal structure in all tissues analyzed, administration of entolimod 1 h after each irradiation was more effective than treatment 30 min before irradiation. These results support the potential clinical use of entolimod as an adjuvant for improving the therapeutic index of head and neck cancer radiotherapy by

  2. Fractionated stereotactic irradiation by Cyberknife of choroid melanomas: repositioning validation, closed eyelids; Irradiation stereotaxique fractionnee par Cyberknife des melanomes choroidiens: validation du repositionnement, paupieres fermees

    Horn, S.; Rezvoy, N.; Lacornerie, T.; Mirabel, X.; Labalette, P.; Lartigau, E. [Centre Oscar-Lambret, Service de Radiotherapie, 59 - Lille (France)

    2009-10-15

    The fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy by Cyberknife is an option in the treatment of eyes tumors. The advantages of the Cyberknife in the choroid melanomas are in its infra-millimetric precision, to the automated repositioning on the skull bones and to the conformity brought by the stereotaxy. The objective of this study was to validate the quality of repositioning and the immobility of the eyes with closed eyelids. Conclusion: the reproducibility of the eye positioning with closed eyelids seems enough to consider the conservative treatment of choroid melanomas by fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy by Cyberknife without implementation of fiducials nor retrobulbar anaesthesia. (N.C.)

  3. Effects of the nonsugar fraction of brown sugar on chronic ultraviolet B irradiation-induced photoaging in melanin-possessing hairless mice.

    Sumiyoshi, Maho; Hayashi, Teruaki; Kimura, Yoshiyuki

    2009-04-01

    Brown sugar has been used traditionally for the treatment of skin trouble as a component of soaps or lotions. Symptoms of aging including wrinkles and pigmentation develop earlier in sun-exposed skin than unexposed skin, a phenomenon referred to as photoaging. Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation is one of the most important environmental factors influencing photoaging. The aim of this study was to clarify whether the nonsugar fraction of brown sugar prevents chronic UVB-induced aging of the skin using melanin-possessing hairless mice. The nonsugar fraction (1% or 3% solution, 50 mul/mouse) was applied topically to the dorsal region every day for 19 weeks. Both solutions prevented an increase in skin thickness and reduction in skin elasticity caused by the UVB. The 3% solution also prevented wrinkles and melanin pigmentation as well as increases in the diameter and length of skin blood vessels. Increases in the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in UVB-irradiated skin was inhibited by the nonsugar fraction. Prevention of UVB-induced aging of the skin by topical application of the nonsugar fraction of brown sugar may be due to inhibition of increases in MMP-2 and VEGF expression.

  4. Leaching studies of low-level radioactive waste forms

    Dayal, R.; Arora, H.; Milian, L.; Clinton, J.

    1985-01-01

    A research program has been underway at the Brookhaven National Laboratory to investigate the release of radionuclides from low-level waste forms under laboratory conditions. This paper describes the leaching behavior of Cs-137 from two major low-level waste streams, that is, ion exchange bead resin and boric acid concentrate, solidified in Portland cement. The resultant leach data are employed to evaluate and predict the release behavior of Cs-137 from low-level waste forms under field burial conditions

  5. Twelfth annual US DOE low-level waste management conference

    1990-01-01

    The papers in this document comprise the proceedings of the Department of Energy's Twelfth Annual Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, which was held in Chicago, Illinois, on August 28 and 29, 1990. General subjects addressed during the conference included: mixed waste, low-level radioactive waste tracking and transportation, public involvement, performance assessment, waste stabilization, financial assurance, waste minimization, licensing and environmental documentation, below-regulatory-concern waste, low-level radioactive waste temporary storage, current challenges, and challenges beyond 1990

  6. Effect of the γ-IFN on radiation damage and radiation fibrosis of the rabbit rectum after cavitas pelvisrute fractionated irradiation

    Yang Yunyi; Zhang Li; Wang Juan; Zhao Hengfang; Dai Li; Liu Zi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of γ-IFN on the radiation-induced injury and fibrosis of the rabbit rectum after the fractionated irradiation to pelvic cavity. Methods: The animal model of radiation rectum injury was established. 52 New Zealand rabbits were divided into 3 groups as the normal control group, the conventional radiation group, and γ-IFN group. Except the normal control group, the pelvic cavity of the two other groups were irradiated with 6 MV X-rays. At 5 d post-irradiatio the γ-IFN group was administered with 250 000 U/kg of γ-IFN once a week, while the conventional radiation group with 5 ml of saline solution. The rabbits were executed after 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks, and the recta in the irradiated field were taken out. HE dyeing, in-situ hybridization and immuno-histochemical methods were used to analyze the radiation-induced rectrum injury and fibrosis. Results: At 4, 8, and 12 weeks post-irradiation, the radiation rectum injury and fibrosis were significantly different between the conventional radiation group and γ-IFN group(P 0.05) . At 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks post-irradiation, the expression of TGF-β1 mRNA in-situ hybridization in the γ-IFN group were significantly different compared to the conventional radiation group and the normal control group (P <0.05) . The immuno-histochemical results of Col III showed the significant difference among the γ-IFN group and both the normal control group and conventional radiation group ( P < 0.05). Conclusions: γ-IFN could reduce the radiation rectum injury, suppress the expression of TGF-β1 mRNA in the rectum mucosa, inhibit the expression of Col III, and delay the formation of radiation-induced fibrosis. (authors)

  7. Low-Level Waste (LLW) forum meeting report

    1995-01-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties

  8. Assessment of LANL solid low-level waste management documentation

    Klein, R.B.; Jennrich, E.A.; Lund, D.M.; Danna, J.G.; Davis, K.D.; Rutz, A.C.

    1991-04-01

    DOE Order 5820.2A requires that a system performance assessment be conducted to assure efficient and compliant management of all radioactive waste. The objective of this report is to determine the present status of the Radioactive Waste Operations Section's capabilities regarding preparation and maintenance of appropriate criteria, plans and procedures and identify particular areas where these documents are not presently in existence or being fully implemented. DOE Order 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management, Chapter III sets forth the requirements and guidelines for preparation and implementation of criteria, plans and procedures to be utilized in the management of solid low-level waste. The documents being assessed in this report are: Solid Low-Level Waste Acceptance Criteria, Solid Low-Level Waste Characterization Plan, Solid Low-Level Waste Certification Plan, Solid Low-Level Waste Acceptance Procedures, Solid Low-Level Waste Characterization Procedures, Solid Low-Level Waste Certification Procedures, Solid Low-Level Waste Training Procedures, and Solid Low-Level Waste Recordkeeping Procedures. Suggested outlines for these documents are presented as Appendix A

  9. Low-Level Waste (LLW) forum meeting report

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum (LLW Forum) is an association of state and compact representatives, appointed by governors and compact commissions, established to facilitate state and compact implementation of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 and to promote the objectives of low-level radioactive waste regional compacts. The LLW Forum provides an opportunity for state and compact officials to share information with one another and to exchange views with officials of federal agencies and other interested parties.

  10. A nationwide low-level waste management system

    1985-01-01

    The National Governors' Association, in conjunction with the Department of Energy's National Low-Level Waste Management Program, invited various representatives of states, regions, and federal agencies to comment on their perceptions of what major features would constitute a nationwide low-level waste management system. Three meetings were conducted and this report summarizes results of those meetings. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 placed primary responsibility on the states for disposal of low-level waste. Although initial efforts of states have been directed toward establishing compacts, it is evident that a successful long term system requires significant cooperation and communication among states, regions, federal agencies, and Congress

  11. Effect of chronic fractionated low-dose gamma irradiation on division potential of human embryonic cells in vitro

    Watanabe, Masami; Suzuki, Masao; Suzuki, Keiji; Watanabe, Kimiko (Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Nakano, Kazushiro

    1991-12-01

    We investigated the in vitro phenotypic transformation of human embryo (HE) cells that were repeatedly irradiated (7.5 cGy once a week) throughout their life-span. Irradiation was repeated until the cells had accumulated 195 cGy (equivalent to the 26th passage). Samples of cells were assayed for survival by colony formation, as well as for mutation at the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus and for transformation by focus formation. The life-span (mean number of population doublings) of multiply irradiated cells with a total dose of 97.5 cGy was slightly but significantly prolonged over that of controls. After HE cells had accumulated 195 cGy, the maximum number of divisions increased to 130-160% of the number in non-irradiated control cells. Transformed foci were not observed until cells had accumulated 97.5 cGy, and then increased with the increasing accumulation of radiation. However, no cells showed immortality or expressed a malignant phenotype in vitro. (author).

  12. Effect of low level doses of fast neutrons on the activity of the snake venom

    Hanafy, Magda S.; Amin, Aida M.

    1998-01-01

    In this work, the effect of low level doses of fast neutrons from 252 Cf on snake venom (Cerastes cerastes) was studied through measurements of biophysical and haematological changes. The absorption spectrum (200-700 nm) of haemoglobin (Hb) collected from the blood of rats after 3 and 24 hours post injection with irradiated and non-irradiated snake venom with neutron fluences of 3x10 6 , 2.8x10 7 and 3X10 8 n/cm 2 was measured. The results indicated that injection of animals with either non- irradiated or irradiated venom ( with different neutron fluences) resulted into the decrease of the absorption band intensities of Hb. These changes in the properties of the characteristic band showed to be a marker for irradiated venom and is dose dependent. It was concluded that neutron irradiation of the venom leads to the decrease of its toxicity and, consequently, to the increase of the chance of repair mechanism in livings. Obvious changes of most haematological erythrocytic values of Hb, packed cell volume (PCV), red blood counts (RBC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCHb) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were observed in the blood of the rats injected with non-irradiated venom (as a first group) and those injected with the irradiated venom (as a second group). The microcytic haemolytic anemia was more acute in the first group than in the second one which showed lesser extent. It is concluded from this study that low level doses of fast neutrons could postpone and lower acute haematological action induced by the venom. (authors)

  13. The value of setup portal films as an estimate of a patient's position throughout fractionated tangential breast irradiation: an on-line study

    McGee, Kiaran P.; Fein, Douglas A.; Hanlon, Alex L.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Fowble, Barbara L.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if portal setup films are an accurate representation of a patient's position throughout the course of fractionated tangential breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients undergoing external beam irradiation for T1-T2 infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast following excisional biopsy and axillary dissection were imaged using an on-line portal imaging device attached to a 6 MV linear accelerator. Medial and lateral tangential fields were imaged and a total of 139 fractions, 225 portal fields, and 4450 images were obtained. Interfractional and intrafractional variations for anatomical parameters including the central lung distance (CLD), central flash distance (CFD), and inferior central margin (ICM) were calculated from these images. A pooled estimate of the random error associated with a given treatment was determined by adding the interfractional and intrafractional standard deviations in quadrature. A 95% confidence level assigned a value of two standard deviations of the random error estimate. Central lung distance, CFD, and ICM distances were then measured for all portal setup films. Significant differences were defined as occurring when the simulation-setup difference was greater than the 95% confidence value. Results: Differences between setup portal and simulation films were less than their 95% confidence values in 70 instances indicating that in 90% of the time these differences are a result of random differences in daily treatment positioning. Conclusions: In 90% of cases tested, initial portal setup films are an accurate representation of a patients daily treatment setup

  14. The effects of low-level laser on muscle damage caused by Bothrops neuwiedi venom

    DM Dourado

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to assess the effects of low-level laser (660 nm on myonecrosis caused by the insertion of Bothrops neuwiedi venom in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups (n = 24 each: Group S (0.9% saline solution; Group V (venom and Group VLLL (venom plus low-level laser. These categories were subdivided into four additional groups (n = 6 based on the euthanasia timing (3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days and 7 days. The groups V and VLLL were inoculated with 100 µL of concentrated venom (40 µg/mL in the gastrocnemius muscle. The muscle was irradiated using a gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser (GaAlAs at 35 mW power and 4 J/cm² energy density for 3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days or 7 days after venom inoculation. To evaluate the myotoxic activity of the venom, CK activity was measured and the muscle was histologically analyzed. The low-level laser reduced venom-induced CK activity in the groups euthanized at 3 hours, 24 hours and 3 days (p < 0.0001. Histological analysis revealed that low-level laser reduced neutrophilic inflammation as well as myofibrillar edema, hemorrhage and myonecrosis following B. neuwiedi envenomation. These results suggest that low-level laser can be useful as an adjunct therapy following B. neuwiedi envenomation.

  15. The effects of low-level laser on muscle damage caused by Bothrops neuwiedi venom

    Dourado, D.M.; Matias, R.; Almeida, M.F.; Paula, K.R. de; Carvalho, P.T.C. [University for the Development of the State and of the Region of Pantanal (UNIDERP), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Lab. of Experimental Histopathology]. E-mail: ccfi@uniderp.br; Vieira, R.P. [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Pathology and Physical Therapy; Oliveira, L.V.F. [Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Masters Program in Rehabilitation Sciences

    2008-07-01

    The present study aimed to assess the effects of low-level laser (660 nm) on myonecrosis caused by the insertion of Bothrops neuwiedi venom in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups (n = 24 each): Group S (0.9% saline solution); Group V (venom) and Group VLLL (venom plus low-level laser). These categories were subdivided into four additional groups (n = 6) based on the euthanasia timing (3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days and 7 days). The groups V and VLLL were inoculated with 100 {mu}L of concentrated venom (40 {mu}g/mL) in the gastrocnemius muscle. The muscle was irradiated using a gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser (GaAlAs) at 35 mW power and 4 J/cm{sup 2} energy density for 3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days or 7 days after venom inoculation. To evaluate the myotoxic activity of the venom, CK activity was measured and the muscle was histologically analyzed. The low-level laser reduced venom-induced CK activity in the groups euthanized at 3 hours, 24 hours and 3 days (p < 0.0001). Histological analysis revealed that low-level laser reduced neutrophilic inflammation as well as myofibrillar edema, hemorrhage and myonecrosis following B. neuwiedi envenomation. These results suggest that low-level laser can be useful as an adjunct therapy following B. neuwiedi envenomation. (author)

  16. The effects of low-level laser on muscle damage caused by Bothrops neuwiedi venom

    Dourado, D.M.; Matias, R.; Almeida, M.F.; Paula, K.R. de; Carvalho, P.T.C.; Vieira, R.P.; Oliveira, L.V.F.

    2008-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the effects of low-level laser (660 nm) on myonecrosis caused by the insertion of Bothrops neuwiedi venom in the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups (n = 24 each): Group S (0.9% saline solution); Group V (venom) and Group VLLL (venom plus low-level laser). These categories were subdivided into four additional groups (n = 6) based on the euthanasia timing (3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days and 7 days). The groups V and VLLL were inoculated with 100 μL of concentrated venom (40 μg/mL) in the gastrocnemius muscle. The muscle was irradiated using a gallium-aluminum-arsenide laser (GaAlAs) at 35 mW power and 4 J/cm 2 energy density for 3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days or 7 days after venom inoculation. To evaluate the myotoxic activity of the venom, CK activity was measured and the muscle was histologically analyzed. The low-level laser reduced venom-induced CK activity in the groups euthanized at 3 hours, 24 hours and 3 days (p < 0.0001). Histological analysis revealed that low-level laser reduced neutrophilic inflammation as well as myofibrillar edema, hemorrhage and myonecrosis following B. neuwiedi envenomation. These results suggest that low-level laser can be useful as an adjunct therapy following B. neuwiedi envenomation. (author)

  17. Combined effect of carcinogenic n-nitrosodimethylamine precursors and fractioned {gamma}-irradiation on tumor development in rats.; Kombinirovannoe vliyanie predshestvennikov kantserogennogo N-nitrozodimetilamina i fraktsionirovannogo {gamma}-oblucheniya na vozniknovenie opukholej u krys.

    Galenko, P M [Yinstitut Eksperimental` noyi Patologyiyi, Onkologyiyi yi Radyiobyiologyiyi, Natsyional` na Akademyiya Nauk Ukrayini, Kyiv (Ukraine); Nedopitanskaya, N N [Yinstitut Zdorov` ya, Myinyisterstvo Okhoroni Zdorov` ya, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    1996-12-01

    The influence of combined action of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and fractioned {gamma}-irradiation on tumor development in rats was investigated. Both the tumor frequency and tumor plurality coefficient have been studied for two types of treatment: precursors of NDMA (amidopyrine and/or sodium nitrite (SN)) alone and the combination `precursors plus radiation`. Tumor frequency decreased by about 11% after combination of {gamma}-irradiation and precursors in comparison with precursors alone. Nevertheless, treatment with SN and {gamma}-irradiation did not change tumor frequency in comparison with SN alone. Irradiation of rats treated with precursors led to an increased tumor plurality coefficient.

  18. Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal

    1994-08-01

    This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the last decade to ensure the safe disposal of low-level radioactive waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of comprehensive State and Federal regulations governing the disposal of low-level radioactive waste, and the enactment of Federal laws making States responsible for the disposal of such waste generated within their borders

  19. Biological alterations resulting from chronic lung irradiation. III. Effect of partial 60Co thoracic irradiation upon pulmonary collagen metabolism and fractionation in syrian hamsters

    Pickrell, J.A.; Harris, D.V.; Hahn, F.F.; Belasich, J.J.; Jones, R.K.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation-induced changes in pulmonary collagen metabolism were studied in Syrian hamsters given multiple thoracic doses of 60 Co radiation to achieve cumulative exposures of 6000, 4000, and 2000 R. At 13 to 14 wk after initial exposure, 6000- and 4000-R exposures had increased incorporation of injected [ 14 C]proline into pulmonary collagenous protein which suggested an increased collagen synthesis. By 21 to 22 wk after exposure, increased pulmonary soluble collagen was noted. Increased pulmonary scarring was indicated by a variable increase in native collagen at 13 to 36 wk. A collection of alveolar macrophages at 7 to 8 wk followed by inflammation at 13 to 14 wk and a beginning of pulmonary fibrosis at 13 to 19 wk were noted. At 21 to 22 wk after exposure a somewhat more marked pulmonary fibrosis and some epithelialization were observed. Hemosiderin deposits were also observed at 35 to 36 wk after exposure, but pathologic processes were lessened by this time. The early activation of collagen synthesis presumably caused the radiation-induced fibrosis. Later, when collagen tended to accumulate, the synthetic rate was normal. The activation of collagen synthesis caused by external thoracic irradiation resembles that caused by thoracic irradiation from the internal emitter, 144 Ce. Moreover, it demonstrates the usefulness of monitoring collagen biosynthesis by [ 14 C]proline incorporation into the lung. (U.S.)

  20. The semi-empirical low-level background statistics

    Tran Manh Toan; Nguyen Trieu Tu

    1992-01-01

    A semi-empirical low-level background statistics was proposed. The one can be applied to evaluated the sensitivity of low background systems, and to analyse the statistical error, the 'Rejection' and 'Accordance' criteria for processing of low-level experimental data. (author). 5 refs, 1 figs

  1. Responses to the low-level-radiation controversy

    Bond, V.P.

    1981-01-01

    Some data sets dealing with the hazards of low-level radiation are discussed. It is concluded that none of these reports, individually or collectively, changes appreciably or even significantly the evaluations of possible low-level radiation effects that have been made by several authoritative national and international groups

  2. Guidelines for interim storage of low level waste

    Hornibrook, C.; Castagnacci, A.; Clymer, G.; Kelly, J.; Naughton, M.; Saunders, P.; Stoner, P.; Walker, N.; Cazzolli, R.; Dettenmeier, R.; Loucks, L.; Rigsby, M.; Spall, M.; Strum, M.

    1992-12-01

    This report presents an overview of on-site storage of Low Level Waste while providing guidelines for using the complete Interim On-Site Storage of Low Level Waste report series. Overall, this report provides a methodology for planning and implementing on-site storage

  3. Low level cloud motion vectors from Kalpana-1 visible images

    . In this paper, an attempt has been made to retrieve low-level cloud motion vectors using Kalpana-1 visible (VIS) images at every half an hour. The VIS channel provides better detection of low level clouds, which remain obscure in thermal IR ...

  4. Elementary study on γ analysis software for low level measurement

    Ruan Guanglin; Huang Xianguo; Xing Shixiong

    2001-01-01

    The difficulty in using fashion γ analysis software in low level measurement is discussed. The ROI report file of ORTEC operation system has been chosen as interface file to write γ analysis software for low-level measurement. The author gives software flowchart and applied example and discusses the existent problems

  5. Three-year outcomes of a once daily fractionation scheme for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)

    Goyal, Sharad; Daroui, Parima; Khan, Atif J; Kearney, Thomas; Kirstein, Laurie; Haffty, Bruce G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report 3-year outcomes of toxicity, cosmesis, and local control using a once daily fractionation scheme (49.95 Gy in 3.33 Gy once daily fractions) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between July 2008 and August 2010, women aged ≥40 years with ductal carcinoma in situ or node-negative invasive breast cancer ≤3 cm in diameter, treated with breast-conserving surgery achieving negative margins, were accrued to a prospective study. Women were treated with APBI using 3–5 photon beams, delivering 49.95 Gy over 15 once daily fractions over 3 weeks. Patients were assessed for toxicities, cosmesis, and local control rates before APBI and at specified time points. Thirty-four patients (mean age 60 years) with Tis 0 (n = 9) and T1N0 (n = 25) breast cancer were treated and followed up for an average of 39 months. Only 3% (1/34) patients experienced a grade 3 subcutaneous fibrosis and breast edema and 97% of the patients had good/excellent cosmetic outcome at 3 years. The 3-year rate of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) was 0% while the rate of contralateral breast events was 6%. The 3-year disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) was 94%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Our novel accelerated partial breast fractionation scheme of 15 once daily fractions of 3.33 Gy (49.95 Gy total) is a remarkably well-tolerated regimen of 3D-CRT-based APBI. A larger cohort of patients is needed to further ascertain the toxicity of this accelerated partial breast regimen

  6. The Role of Low-Level Laser in Periodontal Surgeries

    Sobouti, Farhad; Khatami, Maziar; Heydari, Mohaddase; Barati, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Treatment protocols with low-level Laser (also called ‘soft laser therapy) have been used in health care systems for more than three decades. Bearing in mind the suitable sub-cellular absorption and the cellular-vascular impacts, low-level laser may be a treatment of choice for soft tissues. Low-level lasers have played crucial and colorful roles in performing periodontal surgeries. Their anti-inflammatory and painless effects have been variously reported in in-vitro studies. In this present review article, searches have been made in Pub Med, Google Scholar, and Science Direct, focusing on the studies which included low-level lasers, flap-periodontal surgeries, gingivectomy, and periodontal graft. The present study has sought to review the cellular impacts of low-level lasers and its role on reducing pain and inflammation following soft tissue surgical treatments. PMID:25987968

  7. Effect of low-level laser-treated mesenchymal stem cells on myocardial infarction.

    El Gammal, Zaynab H; Zaher, Amr M; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2017-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Although cardiac transplantation is considered the most effective therapy for end-stage cardiac diseases, it is limited by the availability of matching donors and the complications of the immune suppressive regimen used to prevent graft rejection. Application of stem cell therapy in experimental animal models was shown to reverse cardiac remodeling, attenuate cardiac fibrosis, improve heart functions, and stimulate angiogenesis. The efficacy of stem cell therapy can be amplified by low-level laser radiation. It is well established that the bio-stimulatory effect of low-level laser is influenced by the following parameters: wavelength, power density, duration, energy density, delivery time, and the type of irradiated target. In this review, we evaluate the available experimental data on treatment of myocardial infarction using low-level laser. Eligible papers were characterized as in vivo experimental studies that evaluated the use of low-level laser therapy on stem cells in order to attenuate myocardial infarction. The following descriptors were used separately and in combination: laser therapy, low-level laser, low-power laser, stem cell, and myocardial infarction. The assessed low-level laser parameters were wavelength (635-804 nm), power density (6-50 mW/cm 2 ), duration (20-150 s), energy density (0.96-1 J/cm 2 ), delivery time (20 min-3 weeks after myocardial infarction), and the type of irradiated target (bone marrow or in vitro-cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells). The analysis focused on the cardioprotective effect of this form of therapy, the attenuation of scar tissue, and the enhancement of angiogenesis as primary targets. Other effects such as cell survival, cell differentiation, and homing are also included. Among the evaluated protocols using different parameters, the best outcome for treating myocardial infarction was achieved by treating the bone marrow by one dose of low-level

  8. Increase in the fraction of necrotic, not apoptotic, cells in SiHa xenograft tumours shortly after irradiation

    Olive, P.L.; Vikse, C.M.; Vanderbyl, S.

    1999-01-01

    Background and purpose: Approximately 18% of the cells recovered by rapid mechanical dissociation of SiHa xenograft tumours contain large numbers of DNA strand breaks. The number of damaged cells increases to 30-40% 4-6 h after exposure to 5 or 15 Gy, returning to normal levels by 12 h. This observation is reminiscent of the rate of production of apoptotic cells in other murine and human xenograft tumours. The nature of this damage, rate of development and relation to cell proliferation rate were therefore examined in detail.Materials and methods: SiHa human cervical carcinoma cells were grown as xenograft tumours in SCID mice. Single-cell suspensions were prepared as a function of time after irradiation of the mouse and examined for DNA damage using the alkaline comet assay. Cell cycle progression was measured by flow cytometry evaluation of anti-bromodeoxyuridine-labelled tumour cells.Results: Significant numbers of apoptotic cells could not be detected in irradiated SiHa tumours using an end-labelling assay, electron microscopy, or histological examination of thin sections. Instead, xenograft cells exhibiting extensive DNA damage in the comet assay were predominantly necrotic cells. The increase in the proportion of heavily damaged cells 4-6 h after irradiation could be the result of an interplay between several factors including loss of viable cells and change in production or loss of necrotic cells. Analysis of the progression of BrdUrd-labelled cells confirmed that while 35% of cells from untreated SiHa tumours had divided and entered G 1 phase by 6 h after BrdUrd injection, none of the labelled cells from tumours exposed to 5 or 15 Gy had progressed to G 1 .Conclusions: The increase in the percentage of SiHa tumour cells with extensive DNA damage 4-6 h after irradiation is attributable to necrosis, not apoptosis. Cell cycle progression and cell loss are likely to influence the kinetics of appearance of both apoptotic and necrotic cells in irradiated tumours

  9. Unusual combination of Cis platinum and radiotherapy followed by a three fractions per day irradiation in splitcourse: a phase I-II study in brain glioma patients

    Ben-Hassel, M.; Lesimple, T.; Gedouin, D.; Chenal, C.; Guegan, Y.; Darcel, F.

    1992-01-01

    An unusual protocol based on a preliminary clinical study on cylindromas metastasized to the lung was proposed to brain glioma patients: Day 2 100 mg/m 2 i.v. Cis platinum (Cis P II) followed at days 3 and 5 by 6 Gy irradiation (RT) in two fractions and three days. Five cycles were scheduled at 21 days interval. On disease progression a three fractions per day radiotherapy regimen (3 FRT) in split-course (two series of 22.50 Gy in 15 fractions and five days separated by a two weeks period of rest) was then delivered to the patients. All patients had a measurable mass on the CT scan. 19 were entered into the study: 13 as first line therapy (group A) and six for salvage treatment (group B). Tolerance was globally good. Eight patients were considered responders at the end of five cycles of Cis II-RT. They were all group A patients. Median symptom-free interval was six months for the whole population. Survival was twelve months. The 3 FRT was well tolerated but does not seem to have improved the therapeutic gain of the chemoradiotherapy combination. The present study concerns patients whose prognosis was poor on inclusion: Surgery unadvisable or unsatisfactory and diagnosis mainly based on biopsy only. The number and the duration of responses justify further study into Cis P II as first line therapy as either an effective cytotoxic drug or a potential radio enhancer. (orig.) [de

  10. The efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen in modifying the response of tissue to irradiation in doses of 200-400 rad per fraction

    Suit, D.D.; Orsi, L.

    1975-01-01

    The efficacy of respiration of O 2 at 30 psi in modifying the response of normal and tumour tissue to irradiation administered at 200 to 400 rad per fraction to anaesthetized mice has been evaluated. End-points have been delay in growth and TCD 50 for an early generation iso-transplant of a C 3 H mouse mammary carcinoma, and the acute reaction of skin of the C 3 H/Sed mouse. Results showed that the ratios of dose (air)/dose (O 2 30 psi) to elicit these end points were in the range 1.2 to 1.4. In earlier work using the same end points but doses per fraction 430 to 2100 rad, the ratios were 1.6 to 1.8. That is, for these tissue responses, respiration of O 2 at 30 psi increases the response of both normal and tumour tissue to all radiation doses tested. It is of greater effectiveness when combined with large doses per fraction, eg. greater than 430 rad. (author)

  11. Development of threshold guidance: National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program

    1986-09-01

    The current study has been conducted to provide DOE with a technical basis for the development of threshold guidance. The objective of the study was to develop the necessary background information and recommendations to assist the DOE in implementing the threshold limit concept for the disposal of DOE wastes at DOE facilities. The nature of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) varies greatly in both form and radionuclide content. While some low-level waste streams can contain substantial quantities of radioactive constituents, a potentially significant fraction of low-level waste is contaminated either very slightly or not at all. There is a strong likelihood that managing wastes with extremely low levels of radioactivity as nonradioactive waste would pose no significant safety problems and could result in substantial cost savings relative to its handling as LLW. Since all materials, including waste products, contain some radioactivity, it is necessary to distinguish between those wastes that would require disposal as LLW and those that have sufficiently low levels of radiological content to be managed according to their nonradiological properties. 131 refs., 9 figs., 24 tabs

  12. Managing low-level radioactive waste in Massachusetts. Final report

    Bander, S.R.; Goldstein, M.E.

    1983-12-01

    As one of the country's largest generators of low-level radioactive waste, Massachusetts has begun independently seeking solutions to the questions surrounding low-level waste management issues. The Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Radiation Control Program, obtained funding from the U.S. Department ofEnergy through EG and G, Idaho, Inc. to develop a low-level waste management strategy for the Commonwealth. The Working Group was made up of individuals from various waste generating industries, environmental and public interest groups, medical and academic institutions, and affected state agencies. This final report document contains the following staff project reports: Proposed Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Plan for The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, February 1983 and Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management in Massachusetts - Actions to be Considered for Implementation in 1984-1986, December 1983. These two staff reports represent the completion of the Massachusetts Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Project. The first report provides some of the background material to the issues and some of the alternative courses of action which can be considered by state policy-makers. The second report provides the next phase in the process by delineating specific steps which may be taken before 1986 in order to address the low-level waste problem, and the estimated amount of time needed to complete each step

  13. Directions in low-level radioactive waste management: A brief history of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal

    1990-10-01

    This report presents a history of commercial low-level radioactive waste management in the United States, with emphasis on the history of six commercially operated low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The report includes a brief description of important steps that have been taken during the 1980s to ensure the safe disposal of low-level waste in the 1990s and beyond. These steps include the issuance of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 61, Licensing Requirements for the Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, and steps taken by states and regional compacts to establish additional disposal sites. 42 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  14. Induction of premature senescence by single and fractionated irradiation in human cancer cell line and xenografted mice model

    Yoo, Hee Jung; Kim, Bong Cho; Lee, Hyung Chul; Ji, Young Hoon; Park, Seung Woo; Lee, Jae Seon

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the best therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment. The cellular responses to ionizing radiation (IR) are varied ranging from cellular senescence to apoptotic cell death. To increase the efficacy of IR treatment is a major issue of radiation biology. From the point of view, the induction of premature senescence using the therapeutic dose of IR could be a promising treatment for tumors. The aim of this study is whether the premature senescence could contribute to cancer treatment by irradiation

  15. Twelfth annual US DOE low-level waste management conference

    1990-01-01

    The papers in this document comprise the proceedings of the Department of Energy's Twelfth Annual Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Conference, which was held in Chicago, Illinois, on August 28 and 29, 1990. General subjects addressed during the conference included: mixed waste, low-level radioactive waste tracking and transportation, public involvement, performance assessment, waste stabilization, financial assurance, waste minimization, licensing and environmental documentation, below-regulatory-concern waste, low-level radioactive waste temporary storage, current challenges, and challenges beyond 1990.

  16. Treatment of uncertainty in low-level waste performance assessment

    Kozak, M.W.; Olague, N.E.; Gallegos, D.P.; Rao, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    Uncertainties arise from a number of different sources in low-level waste performance assessment. In this paper the types of uncertainty are reviewed, and existing methods for quantifying and reducing each type of uncertainty are discussed. These approaches are examined in the context of the current low-level radioactive waste regulatory performance objectives, which are deterministic. The types of uncertainty discussed in this paper are model uncertainty, uncertainty about future conditions, and parameter uncertainty. The advantages and disadvantages of available methods for addressing uncertainty in low-level waste performance assessment are presented. 25 refs

  17. A phase I/II study to evaluate the effect of fractionated hemibody irradiation in the treatment of osseous metastases--RTOG 88-22

    Scarantino, C.W.; Caplan, R.; Rotman, M.; Coughlin, C.; Demas, W.; Delrowe, J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was initiated to determine the maximum tolerated total dose that can be delivered by fractionated hemibody irradiation (HBI), as defined by the acute hematological and non hematological toxicity. Although it was designed as a dose searching trial, the influence of higher doses on occult and overt disease were considered equally important. The study was not designed to evaluate pain relief. The results were compared to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 82-06, which employed single high-dose HBI, to determine if either single or fractionated HBI is more effective in controlling occult or overt disease. Methods and Materials: A total of 144 patients were entered from September 1989 to April 1993. Only patients with a single symptomatic bone metastases from either prostate or breast cancer primaries and a KPS ≥ 60 were eligible. All patients initially received 30.0 Gy in 10 fractions to the symptomatic area followed by HBI in 2.50 Gy fractions to one of five arms: I--10.0 Gy (37 patients); II--12.5 Gy (23 patients); III--15.0 Gy (18 patients); IV--17.5 Gy (40 patients), and V--20.0 Gy (26 patients). A dose limiting toxicity was defined as an observed toxicity of ≥ Grade 3 lasting more than 30 days post completion of HBI. If three or more dose-limiting toxicities occurred at any dose level, the previous dose was considered as the maximum tolerable dose. Results: Thirty-six of 142 patients experienced ≥ Grade 3 hematological toxicity at some time following HBI. The distribution of dose-limiting hematological toxicity in each arm was: I--two patients; II--one patient; III--zero patients; IV--one patient; and V--three patients. The major non hematological toxicity was gastrointestinal and occurred in 10 patients. None were dose limiting. At 12 months from the initiation of treatment, the percent of patients with new disease were: Arms I--19%; II-9%; III-17%; IV--19%; V--13%; the percent of patients requiring additional treatment in

  18. Development of a low-level radon reference chamber; Entwicklung einer Low-Level-Radon-Referenzkammer

    Linzmaier, Diana

    2013-01-04

    The naturally occurring, radioactive noble gas radon-222 exists worldwide in different activity concentrations in the air. During the decay of radon-222, decay products are generated which are electrically charged and attach to aerosols in the air. Together with the aerosols, the radon is inhaled and exhaled by humans. While the radon is nearly completely exhaled, ca. 20 % of the inhaled aerosols remain in the lungs in one breath cycle. Due to ionizing radiation, in a chain of events, lung cancer might occur. Consequently, radon and its decay products are according to the current findings the second leading cause of lung cancer. At the workplace and in the home measurements of radon activity concentration are performed to determine the radiation exposition of humans. All measurement devices for the determination of radon activity concentration are calibrated above 1000 Bq/m{sup 3}, even though the mean value of the present investigation in Germany shows only 50 Bq/m{sup 3}. For the calibration of measurement devices in the range below 1000 Bq/m{sup 3} over a long time period, the generation of a stable reference atmosphere is presented in this work. Due to a long term calibration (t>5 days) of the measurement devices, smaller uncertainties result for the calibration factor. For the calibration procedure, a so-called low-level radon reference chamber was set up and started operation. The generation of a stable reference atmosphere is effected by means of emanation sources which consist of a radium-226 activity standard. On the basis of {gamma}-spectrometry, the effective emanation coefficient ofthe emanation sources is determined. The traceability of the activity concentration in the reference volume is realized via the activity ofthe radium-226, the emanation coefficient and the volume. With the emanation sources produced, stable reference atmospheres within the range of 150 Bq/m{sup 3} to 1900 Bq/m{sup 3} are achieved. For the realization, maintenance and

  19. Mixed Low-Level Radioactive Waste (MLLW) Primer

    Schwinkendorf, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    This document presents a general overview of mixed low-level waste, including the regulatory definitions and drivers, the manner in which the various kinds of mixed waste are regulated, and a discussion of the waste treatment options

  20. Use of segregation techniques to reduce stored low level waste

    Nascimento Viana, R.; Vianna Mariano, N.; Antonio do Amaral, M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the use of segregation techniques in reducing the stored Low Level Waste on Intermediate Waste Repository 1, at Angra Nuclear Power Plant Site, from 1701 to 425 drums of compacted waste. (author)

  1. Low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States

    Ozaki, Calvin B.; Kerr, Thomas A.; Williams, R. Eric

    1991-01-01

    Two national systems comprise the low-level radioactive waste management system in the United States of America. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulates low-level radioactive waste produced in the public sector (commercial waste), and the U.S. Department of Energy manages low-level radioactive waste produced by government-sponsored programs. The primary distinction between the two national systems is the source of regulatory control. This paper discusses two issues critical to the success of each system: the site selection process used by the commercial low-level waste disposal system, and the evaluation process used to determine configuration of the DOE waste management system. The two national systems take different approaches to reach the same goals, which are increased social responsibility, protection of public health and safety, and protection of the environment

  2. Performance assessment strategy for low-level waste disposal sites

    Starmer, R.J.; Deering, L.G.; Weber, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff views on predicting the performance of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. Under the Atomic Energy Act, as amended, and the Low Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act, as amended, the NRC and Agreement States license land disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) using the requirements in 10 CFR Part 61 or comparable state requirements. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe regulatory requirements for performance assessment in low-level waste licensing, a strategy for performance assessments to support license applications, and NRC staff licensing evaluation of performance assessments. NRC's current activities in developing a performance assessment methodology will provide an overall systems modeling approach for assessing the performance of LLW disposal facilities. NRC staff will use the methodology to evaluate performance assessments conducted by applicants for LLW disposal facilities. The methodology will be made available to states and other interested parties

  3. Conflict resolution in low-level waste facility siting

    English, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    Siting a low-level waste facility is only one part of the low-level waste management process. But it is a crucial part, a prism that focuses many of the other issues in low-level waste management. And, as the 1990 and 1992 milestones approach, siting has a urgency that makes the use of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) techniques especially appropriate, to avoid protracted and expensive litigation and to reach creative and durable solutions. Drawing upon literature in the ADR field, this paper discusses ADR techniques as they apply to low-level waste management and the groundwork that must be laid before they can be applied. It also discusses questions that can arise concerning the terms under which negotiations are carried out. The paper then give suggestions for achieving win/win negotiations. Potential objections to negotiated agreements and potential answers to those objections are reviewed, and some requisites for negotiation are given

  4. Mixed Low-Level Radioactive Waste (MLLW) Primer

    W. E. Schwinkendorf

    1999-04-01

    This document presents a general overview of mixed low-level waste, including the regulatory definitions and drivers, the manner in which the various kinds of mixed waste are regulated, and a discussion of the waste treatment options.

  5. Status of vitrification for DOE low-level mixed waste

    Schumacher, R.F.; Jantzen, C.M.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1993-04-01

    Vitrification is being considered by the Department of Energy for solidification of many low-level mixed waste streams. Some of the advantages, requirements, and potential problem areas are described. Recommendations for future efforts are presented

  6. Institutional options for state management of low level radioactive waste

    Morris, F.A.

    1981-01-01

    This paper concerns ''institutional'' (legal, organizational, and political) aspects of low-level radioactive waste management. Its point of departure is the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980. With federal law and political consensus now behind the policy of state responsibility for low level waste, the question becomes, how is this new policy to be implemented. The questions of policy implementation are essentially institutional: What functions must a regional low level waste management system perform. What entities are capable of performing them. How well might various alternatives or combinations of alternatives work. This paper is a preliminary effort to address these questions. It discusses the basic functions that must be performed, and identifies the entities that could perform them, and discusses the workability of various alternative approaches

  7. Managing low-level radioactive wastes: a proposed approach

    1980-08-01

    This document is a consensus report of the Low-Level Waste Strategy Task Force. It covers system-wide issues; generation, treatment, and packaging; transportation; and disposal. Recommendations are made

  8. Low-Level Radioactive Waste siting simulation information package

    1985-12-01

    The Department of Energy's National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program has developed a simulation exercise designed to facilitate the process of siting and licensing disposal facilities for low-level radioactive waste. The siting simulation can be conducted at a workshop or conference, can involve 14-70 participants (or more), and requires approximately eight hours to complete. The exercise is available for use by states, regional compacts, or other organizations for use as part of the planning process for low-level waste disposal facilities. This information package describes the development, content, and use of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Siting Simulation. Information is provided on how to organize a workshop for conducting the simulation. 1 ref., 1 fig

  9. Low level waste management at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Rodgers, A.D.; Truitt, D.J.; Logan, J.A.; Brown, R.M.

    1986-02-01

    EG and G Idaho, Inc. is the lead contractor for the Department of Energy (DOE) National Low Level Waste Management Program, established in 1979. In this role, the company uses its waste management expertise to provide management and technical direction to support the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) in a manner that protects the environment and the public health and safety while improving efficiency and cost-effectiveness. Program activities are divided into two areas: defense-related and commercial nuclear reactor programs. The defense program was established to develop technology improvements, provide technology transfer, and to ensure a more efficient and uniform system for low level waste disposal. To achieve the program's goals, it is necessary to improve, document, and, where necessary, develop new methods for waste generation reduction, waste treatment, shallow-land burial, greater confinement disposal, and measures to correct existing site deficiencies. The commercial low level waste management program provides support to assist the states in developing an effective national low level waste management system and provides technical assistance for siting of regional commercial LLW disposal sites. The program provides technical and informational support to state officials, low level waste generators, managers, and facility operators to resolve low level waste problems and to improve the systems' overall effectiveness. Procedures are developed and documented and made available to commercial users through this program. Additional work is being conducted to demonstrate the stabilization and closure of low level radioactive waste disposal sites and develop the criteria and procedures for acceptance of such sites by the Department of Energy after closure has been completed. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  10. Assessment of LANL solid low-level mixed waste documentation

    Jennrich, E.A.; Lund, D.M.; Davis, K.D.; Hoevemeyer, S.S.

    1991-04-01

    DOE Order 5820.2A requires that a system performance assessment be conducted to assure efficient and compliant management of all radioactive waste. The objective of this report is to determine the present status of the Radioactive Waste Operations Section and the Chemical Waste Operations Section capabilities regarding preparation and maintenance of appropriate criteria, plans, and procedures. Additionally, a comparison is made which identifies areas where these documents are not presently in existence or being fully implemented. The documents being assessed in this report are: Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Acceptance Criteria, Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Characterization Plan, Solid Low-Level Mixed waste Certification Plan, Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Acceptance Procedures, Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste characterization Procedures, Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Certification Procedures, Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Training Procedures, and Solid Low-Level Mixed Waste Recordkeeping Requirements. This report compares the current status of preparation and implementation, by the Radioactive Waste Operations Section and the Chemical Waste Operations Section, of these documents to the requirements of DOE 5820.2A,. 40 CFR 260 to 270, and to recommended practice. Chapters 2 through 9 of the report presents the results of the comparison in tabular form for each of the documents being assessed, followed by narrative discussion of all areas which are perceived to be unsatisfactory or out of compliance with respect to the availability and content of the documents. The final subpart of each of the following chapters provides recommendations where documentation practices may be improved to achieve compliance or to follow the recommended practice

  11. Changes in the phospholipid fraction of intramuscular fat from pork loin (fresh and marinated) with different irradiation and packaging during storage

    Garcia-Marquez, I.; Narvaez-Rivas, M.; Gallardo, E.; Cabeza, C. M.; Leon-Camacho, M.

    2013-05-01

    A study on the effect of E-beam (1 and 2 kGy) on the phospholipid classes of fresh and marinated pork loin stored at 4 degree centigrade and 8 degree centigrade under different atmospheres (air, vacuum and carbon dioxide enriched atmospheres) has been conducted. This is the first time that a study of this kind has been carried out on these types of samples. The combined statistical treatment of the distinct variables shows that minor changes (cardiol pin and sphingomyelin between both types of loin, cardiolipin vs storage temperatures and phosphatidylethanolamine vs the modified atmospheres) are produced in the individual phospholipids subjected to the different selected conditions. The more relevant result was that no effect of the irradiation doses on the phospholipids classes was found, so the E-beam can be considered a useful tool to extend the shelf-life of fresh meat without changes in the phospholipid fraction. (Author) 24 refs.

  12. On the surviving fraction in irradiated multicellular tumour spheroids: calculation of overall radiosensitivity parameters, influence of hypoxia and volume effects

    Horas, Jorge A; Olguin, Osvaldo R; Rizzotto, Marcos G

    2005-01-01

    We model the heterogeneous response to radiation of multicellular tumour spheroids assuming position- and volume-dependent radiosensitivity. We propose a method to calculate the overall radiosensitivity parameters to obtain the surviving fraction of tumours. A mathematical model of a spherical tumour with a hypoxic core and a viable rim which is a caricature of a real tumour is constructed. The model is embedded in a two-compartment linear-quadratic (LQ) model, assuming a mixed bivariated Gaussian distribution to attain the radiosensitivity parameters. Ergodicity, i.e., the equivalence between ensemble and volumetric averages is used to obtain the overall radiosensitivities for the two compartments. We obtain expressions for the overall radiosensitivity parameters resulting from the use of both a linear and a nonlinear dependence of the local radiosensitivity with position. The model's results are compared with experimental data of surviving fraction (SF) for multicellular spheroids of different sizes. We make one fit using only the smallest spheroid data and we are able to predict the SF for the larger spheroids. These predictions are acceptable particularly using bounded sensitivities. We conclude with the importance of taking into account the contribution of clonogenic hypoxic cells to radiosensitivity and with the convenience of using bounded local sensitivities to predict overall radiosensitivity parameters

  13. Low-level lasers affect uncoupling protein gene expression in skin and skeletal muscle tissues

    Canuto, K S; Sergio, L P S; Mencalha, A L; Fonseca, A S; Paoli, F

    2016-01-01

    Wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses of biological tissues to low-level lasers. Free radicals are involved in these responses acting as second messengers in intracellular signaling processes. Irradiated cells present defenses against these chemical species to avoid unwanted effects, such as uncoupling proteins (UCPs), which are part of protective mechanisms and minimize the effects of free radical generation in mitochondria. In this work UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA gene relative expression in the skin and skeletal muscle tissues of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers was evaluated. Samples of the skin and skeletal muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and the evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA expression was differently altered in skin and skeletal muscle tissues exposed to lasers in a wavelength-dependent effect, with the UCP3 mRNA expression dose-dependent. Alteration on UCP gene expression could be part of the biostimulation effect and is necessary to make cells exposed to red and infrared low-level lasers more resistant or capable of adapting in damaged tissues or diseases. (paper)

  14. Phase 2 Trial of Accelerated, Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation of 39 Gy in 13 Fractions Followed by a Tumor Bed Boost Sequentially Delivering 9 Gy in 3 Fractions in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Kim, Ja Young; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Nam Kwon; Shin, Kyung Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report a phase 2 trial of accelerated, hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (AH-WBI) delivered as a daily dose of 3 Gy to the whole breast followed by a tumor bed boost. Methods and Materials: Two hundred seventy-six patients diagnosed with breast cancer (pT1-2 and pN0-1a) who had undergone breast-conserving surgery in which the operative margins were negative were treated with AH-WBI delivered as 39 Gy in 13 fractions of 3 Gy to the whole breast once daily over 5 consecutive working days, and 9 Gy in 3 sequential fractions of 3 Gy to a lumpectomy cavity, all within 3.2 weeks. Results: After a median follow-up period of 57 months (range: 27-75 months), the rate of 5-year locoregional recurrence was 1.4% (n=4), whereas that of disease-free survival was 97.4%. No grade 3 skin toxicity was reported during the follow-up period. Qualitative physician cosmetic assessments of good or excellent were noted in 82% of the patients at 2 months after the completion of AH-WBI. The global cosmetic outcome did not worsen over time, and a good or excellent cosmetic outcome was reported in 82% of the patients at 3 years. The mean pretreatment percentage breast retraction assessment was 12.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.14-12.86). The mean value of percentage breast retraction assessment increased to 13.99 (95% CI: 12.17-15.96) after 1 year and decreased to 13.54 (95% CI: 11.84-15.46) after 3 years but was not significant (P>.05). Conclusions: AH-WBI consisting of 39 Gy in 13 fractions followed by a tumor bed boost sequentially delivering 9 Gy in 3 fractions can be delivered with excellent disease control and tolerable skin toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery

  15. Radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses of repeated single-fraction hdr-irradiation of intersecting small liver volumes for recurrent hepatic metastases

    Wust Peter

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses as well as other toxic effects derived from repeated applications of single-fraction high dose rate irradiation of small liver volumes in clinical practice. Methods Twenty patients with liver metastases were treated repeatedly (2 - 4 times at identical or intersecting locations by CT-guided interstitial brachytherapy with varying time intervals. Magnetic resonance imaging using the hepatocyte selective contrast media Gd-BOPTA was performed before and after treatment to determine the volume of hepatocyte function loss (called pseudolesion, and the last acquired MRI data set was merged with the dose distributions of all administered brachytherapies. We calculated the BED (biologically equivalent dose for a single dose d = 2 Gy for different α/β values (2, 3, 10, 20, 100 based on the linear-quadratic model and estimated the tolerance dose for liver parenchyma D90 as the BED exposing 90% of the pseudolesion in MRI. Results The tolerance doses D90 after repeated brachytherapy sessions were found between 22 - 24 Gy and proved only slightly dependent on α/β in the clinically relevant range of α/β = 2 - 10 Gy. Variance analysis showed a significant dependency of D90 with respect to the intervals between the first irradiation and the MRI control (p 90 and the pseudolesion's volume. No symptoms of liver dysfunction or other toxic effects such as abscess formation occurred during the follow-up time, neither acute nor on the long-term. Conclusions Inactivation of liver parenchyma occurs at a BED of approx. 22 - 24 Gy corresponding to a single dose of ~10 Gy (α/β ~ 5 Gy. This tolerance dose is consistent with the large potential to treat oligotopic and/or recurrent liver metastases by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy without radiation-induced liver disease (RILD. Repeated small volume irradiation may be applied safely within the limits of this study.

  16. Influence of overall treatment time in a fractionated total lymphoid irradiation as an immunosuppressive therapy in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in mice

    Waer, M.; Ang, K.K.; Vandeputte, M.; Van der Schueren, E.

    1982-01-01

    Three groups of C 57 /BL/Ka mice received total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) in a total dose of 34 Gy in three different fractionation schedules. The tolerance of all different schedules was excellent. No difference in the peripheral white blood cell and lymphocyte counts nor the degree of immunosuppression as measured by phytohaemaglutinin or concanavalin A induced blastogenesis and mixed lymphocyte reaction were observed at the end of the treatment and up to 200 days. When bone marrow transplantation was performed one day after the end of each schedule, chimerism without signs of graft versus host disease was induced in all the groups. However, from the results in a limited number of animals it seems that concentrated schedules were less effective for chimerism induction. It has been demonstrated that it is possible to reduce drastically the overall treatment time for TLI before bone marrow transplantation. Further investigations are necessary in order to determine the optimal time-dose-fractionation factors and the different perameters involved in the transplantation

  17. The use of biological isodoses ''IsobioGy 2'' for evaluation of tumour and normal tissues response for fractionated irradiation

    Maciejewski, B.; Skolyszewski, J.; Majewski, S.; Lobodziec, W.; Jedynak, T.; Slosarek, K.

    1988-01-01

    Divergences between physical and biological dose distributions were analysed using linear quadratic model. It was found that small variations in physical dose distribution and differences in normal tissue sensitivity for change in dose per fraction, expressed by a α/β value, can cause a high difference between physical and biological doses. This difference significantly increases when one field instead of two fields is daily treated. If there is no enough separation between treated fields, the biological dose may dramatically increase. The use of biological ''isobioGy 2'' isodoses, instead of physical isodoses, can provide an important information on biological effect in tumour or normal tissue and may diminish the risk of giving too high dose to normal tissue and too low dose to the tumour. 6 figs., 13 refs. (author)

  18. Low-Level Radioactive Waste temporary storage issues

    1992-04-01

    The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 gave responsibility for the disposal of commercially generated low-level radioactive waste to the States. The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 attached additional requirements for specific State milestones. Compact regions were formed and host States selected to establish disposal facilities for the waste generated within their borders. As a result of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, the existing low-level radioactive waste disposal sites will close at the end of 1992; the only exception is the Richland, Washington, site, which will remain open to the Northwest Compact region only. All host States are required to provide for disposal of low-level radioactive waste by January 1, 1996. States also have the option of taking title to the waste after January 1, 1993, or taking title by default on January 1, 1996. Low-level radioactive waste disposal will not be available to most States on January 1, 1993. The most viable option between that date and the time disposal is available is storage. Several options for storage can be considered. In some cases, a finite storage time will be permitted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at the generator site, not to exceed five years. If disposal is not available within that time frame, other options must be considered. There are several options that include some form of extension for storage at the generator site, moving the waste to an existing storage site, or establishing a new storage facility. Each of these options will include differing issues specific to the type of storage sought

  19. Effect of low-level pulsed laser 890-nm on lumbar spondylolisthesis: a case report

    Mortazavi, Seyed M. J.; Afsharpad, Mitra; Djavid, Gholam-reza E.

    2002-10-01

    Objective: Evaluating the effectiveness of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in alleviating the symptoms of lumbar spondylolisthesis. Materials and Methods: Laser was irradiated for 2 mm at six symmetric points along the lumbosacral spine and 5 points along the referred point ofpain, six times a week for 2 weeks (890 nm; 8 J/cm2; pulsed at 1500 Hz). Perception of benefit, level of function was assessed by the Oswestry disability index, lumbar mobility range of motion and low back pain intensity. Results and Discussion: Results showed a complete reduction in pain and improvement in function in the patient. This case report suggests that low-level laser therapy (LLLT) could play a role in conservative management of low-grade lumbar spondylolisthesis.

  20. Aspects of research on effects of population exposed to low level radiation in China

    Wei, L.

    1992-01-01

    Research works of epidemiology and experimental biology concerning health effects on populations exposed to low level ionizing radiation in China have been reviewed, with emphasis on the studies of mortality of malignancies and prevalence of hereditary diseases in a high background radiation area (HBRA) (radiation level is about three times of the control area of normal background CA), where the inhabitant families have lived for many generations. About one million person-years in HBRA and as many in CA were observed for cancer mortality. Statistical analysis showed that no difference was found either in mortality of all cancers or leukemias between HBRA and CA. The incidence of Down Syndrome in HBRA was within the range of spontaneous incidence and dependent on age of maternity. The characteristics of adaptive response induced by low level irradiation in humans as well as in experimental animal lymphocytes observed in Chinese laboratories are also discussed in this presentation