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Sample records for fractionated low-dose ionizing

  1. A model of cardiovascular disease giving a plausible mechanism for the effect of fractionated low-dose ionizing radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P Little

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the main cause of coronary heart disease and stroke, the two major causes of death in developed society. There is emerging evidence of excess risk of cardiovascular disease at low radiation doses in various occupationally exposed groups receiving small daily radiation doses. Assuming that they are causal, the mechanisms for effects of chronic fractionated radiation exposures on cardiovascular disease are unclear. We outline a spatial reaction-diffusion model for atherosclerosis and perform stability analysis, based wherever possible on human data. We show that a predicted consequence of multiple small radiation doses is to cause mean chemo-attractant (MCP-1 concentration to increase linearly with cumulative dose. The main driver for the increase in MCP-1 is monocyte death, and consequent reduction in MCP-1 degradation. The radiation-induced risks predicted by the model are quantitatively consistent with those observed in a number of occupationally-exposed groups. The changes in equilibrium MCP-1 concentrations with low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration are also consistent with experimental and epidemiologic data. This proposed mechanism would be experimentally testable. If true, it also has substantive implications for radiological protection, which at present does not take cardiovascular disease into account. The Japanese A-bomb survivor data implies that cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality contribute similarly to radiogenic risk. The major uncertainty in assessing the low-dose risk of cardiovascular disease is the shape of the dose response relationship, which is unclear in the Japanese data. The analysis of the present paper suggests that linear extrapolation would be appropriate for this endpoint.

  2. Exposure to low doses of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2008-01-01

    The author discusses the knowledge about the effects of ionizing radiations on mankind. Some of them have been well documented (skin cancer and leukaemia for the pioneer scientists who worked on radiations, some other types of cancer for workers who handled luminescent paints, rock miners, nuclear explosion survivors, patients submitted to radiological treatments). He also evokes the issue of hereditary cancers, and discusses the issue of low dose irradiation where some surveys can now be performed on workers. He discusses the biological effects of these low doses. He outlines that many questions remain about these effects, notably the influence of dose level and of dose rate level on the biological reaction

  3. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    Ionizing radiation of cosmic or terrestrial origin is part of the environment in which all living things have evolved since the creation of the universe. The artificial radioactivity generated by medical diagnostic and treatment techniques, some industrial activities, radioactive fallout, etc. has now been added to this natural radioactivity. This article reviews the biological effects of the low doses of ionizing radiation to which the population is thus exposed. Their carcinogenic risk cannot simply be extrapolated from what we know about high-dose exposure. (author)

  4. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a 'Th2 polarized' immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in

  5. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

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    Nelson, Gregory A. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  6. Study of genomic instability induced by low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seoane, A.; Crudeli, C.; Dulout, F.

    2006-01-01

    The crews of commercial flights and services staff of radiology and radiotherapy from hospitals are exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. Genomic instability includes those adverse effects observed in cells, several generations after the exposure occurred. The purpose of this study was to analyze the occurrence of genomic instability by very low doses of ionizing radiation [es

  7. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2006-01-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  8. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst

    2009-01-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  9. Biological effects of very low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evseev, V.S.

    1987-01-01

    The paper deals with a qualitative microdosimetric analysis of a new radiobiological phenomenon (physiological reaction of the cell as a whole to very low doses of ionizing radiations). The analysis is aimed at identifying the type of the primary interaction of radiation with the cell and finding its place in the cell

  10. CARCINOGENIC EFFECTS OF LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcinogenic Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing RadiationR Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711The form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancers, particu...

  11. Low doses effects of ionizing radiation on Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, J.; Broock, M. van; Gillette, V.H.

    2000-01-01

    The exposure of living cells to low doses of ionizing radiation induce in response the activation of cellular protection mechanisms against subsequent larger doses of radiation. This cellular adaptive response may vary depending on radiation intensity and time of exposure, and also on the testing probes used whether they were mammalian cells, yeast, bacteria and other organisms or cell types. The mechanisms involved are the genome activation, followed by DNA repair enzymes synthesis. Due to the prompt cell response, the cell cycle can be delayed, and the secondary detoxification of free radicals and/or activation of membrane bound receptors may proceed. All these phenomena are submitted to intense scientific research nowadays, and their elucidation will depend on the complexity of the organism under study. In the present work, the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation (gamma rays) over a suspension of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was studied, mainly in respect to survival rate and radio-adaptive response. At first, the yeast surviving curve was assessed towards increasing doses, and an estimation of Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) was made. The irradiation tests were performed at LINAC (electrons Linear Accelerator) where electron energy reached approximately 2.65 MeV, and gamma-radiation was produced for bremsstrahlung process over an aluminium screen target. A series of experiments of conditioning doses was performed and an increment surviving fraction was observed when the dose was 2.3 Gy and a interval time between this and a higher dose (challenging dose) of 27 Gy was 90 minutes. A value of 58 ± 4 Gy was estimated for LD50, at a dose rate of 0.44 ± 0.03 Gy/min These quantities must be optimized. Besides data obtained over yeast survival, an unusual increasing amount of tiny yeast colonies appeared on the agar plates after incubation, and this number increased as increasing the time exposure. Preliminary results indicate these colonies as

  12. Health hazards of low doses of ionizing radiations. Vo. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation results in clinical manifestations of several disease entities that may be fatal. The onset and severity of these acute radiation syndromes are deterministic in relation to dose magnitude. Exposure to ionizing radiations at low doses and low dose rates could initiate certain damage in critical molecules of the cell, that may develop in time into serious health effects. The incidence of such delayed effects in low, and is only detectable through sophisticated epidemiological models carried out on large populations. The radiation damage induced in critical molecules of cells may develop by stochastic biochemical mechanisms of repair, residual damage, adaptive response, cellular transformation, promotion and progression into delayed health effects, the most important of which is carcinogenesis. The dose response relationship of probabilistic stochastic delayed effects of radiation at low doses and low dose rates, is very complex indeed. The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms, the factors involved, and the uncertainties encountered. Contrary to acute deterministic effects, the occurrence of probabilistic delayed effects of radiation remains to be enigmatic. 7 figs

  13. Late effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brilliant, M.D.; Vorob'ev, A.I.; Gogin, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most important problems, being stated before the medicine by the accident, which took place in Chernobyl in 1986- the problem of the so-called ionizing radiation low dose effect on a man's organism, is considered because a lot of people were subjected to low dose action. The concept of low doses of radiaion action and specificity of its immediate action in comparison with high dose action is considered. One of the most important poit while studying low dose action is the necessity to develop a system including all irradiated people and dosimetry, and espicially to study frequencies and periods of tumor appearance in different irradiated tissues. The results obtained when examining people who survived the atomic explosion in Japan and on the Marshall islands are analyzed. They testify to the fact that radiation affets more tissues than the clinical picture about the acute radiation sickness tells, and that tumors developing in them many years after radiation action tell about radiosensitivity in some tissues

  14. Effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Data are reported on the possible mechanism of biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on the human body. The lesioning effect of this radiation resulted in some of the persons in the development of disorders of the function of information and vegetative-regulatory systems determined as a desintegration syndrome. This syndrome is manifested in unspecific neuro-vegetative disorders of the function of most important physiological and homeostatic system of the body leading to weakening of the processes of compensation and adaptation. This condition is characterized by an unspecific radiation syndrome as distinct from acute or chronic radiation disease which is a specific radiation syndrome

  15. Problems linked to effects of ionizing radiations low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-10-01

    The question of exposure to ionizing radiations low doses and risks existing for professional and populations has been asked again, with the recommendations of the International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) to lower the previous standards and agreed as guides to organize radiation protection, by concerned countries and big international organisms. The sciences academy presents an analysis which concerned on epidemiological and dosimetric aspects in risk estimation, on cellular and molecular aspects of response mechanism to irradiation. The observation of absence of carcinogen effects for doses inferior to 200 milli-sieverts and a re-evaluation of data coming from Nagasaki and Hiroshima, lead to revise the methodology of studies to pursue, to appreciate more exactly the effects of low doses, in taking in part, particularly, the dose rate. The progress of molecular and cellular biology showed that the extrapolation from high doses to low doses is not in accordance with actual data. The acknowledge of DNA repair and carcinogenesis should make clearer the debate. (N.C.). 61 refs., 9 annexes

  16. The health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, A.N.; Dixit, Nishant

    2012-01-01

    It has been established by various researches, that high doses of ionizing radiation are harmful to health. There is substantial controversy regarding the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation despite the large amount of work carried out (both laboratory and epidemiological). Exposure to high levels of radiation can cause radiation injury, and these injuries can be relatively severe with sufficiently high radiation doses. Prolonged exposure to low levels of radiation may lead to cancer, although the nature of our response to very low radiation levels is not well known at this time. Many of our radiation safety regulations and procedures are designed to protect the health of those exposed to radiation occupationally or as members of the public. According to the linear no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis, any amount, however small, of radiation is potentially harmful, even down to zero levels. The threshold hypothesis, on the other hand, emphasizes that below a certain threshold level of radiation exposure, any deleterious effects are absent. At the same time, there are strong arguments, both experimental and epidemiological, which support the radiation hormesis (beneficial effects of low-level ionizing radiation). These effects cannot be anticipated by extrapolating from harmful effects noted at high doses. Evidence indicates an inverse relationship between chronic low-dose radiation levels and cancer incidence and/or mortality rates. Examples are drawn from: 1) state surveys for more than 200 million people in the United States; 2) state cancer hospitals for 200 million people in India; 3) 10,000 residents of Taipei who lived in cobalt-60 contaminated homes; 4) high-radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran; 5) 12 million person-years of exposed and carefully selected control nuclear workers; 6) almost 300,000 radon measurements of homes in the United States; and 7) non-smokers in high-radon areas of early Saxony, Germany. This evidence conforms to the hypothesis that

  17. Effect of low dose ionizing radiation upon concentration of

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viliae, M.; Kraljeviae, P.; Simpraga, M.; Miljaniae, S.

    2004-01-01

    It is known that low dose ionizing radiation might have stimulating effects (Luckey, 1982, Kraljeviae, 1988). This fact has also been confirmed in the previous papers of Kraljeviae et al. (2000-2000a; 2001). Namely, those authors showed that irradiation of chicken eggs before incubation by a low dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation increases the activity aspartateaminotrasferases (AST) and alanine-aminotransferases (ALT) in blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs, as well as growth of chickens during the fattening period. Low doses might also cause changes in the concentration of some biochemical parameters in blood plasma of the same chickens such as changes in the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol. In this paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effects of low dose gamma radiation upon the concentration of sodium and potassium in the blood plasma of chickens which were hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy. Obtained results were compared with the results from the control group (chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs). After hatching, all other conditions were the same for both groups. Blood samples were drawn from heart, and later from the wing vein on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30 and 42. The concentration of sodium and potassium was determined spectrophotometrically by atomic absorbing spectrophotometer Perkin-Elmer 1100B. The concentration of sodium and potassium in blood plasma of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy indicated a statistically significant increase (P>0.01) only on the first day of the experiment. Obtained results showed that irradiation of eggs on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation could have effects upon the metabolism of electrolytes in chickens. (Author)

  18. Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    Few weeks ago, when the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) submitted to the U.N. General Assembly the UNSCEAR 1994 report, the international community had at its disposal a broad view of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. The 1994 report (272 pages) specifically addressed the epidemiological studies of radiation carcinogenesis and the adaptive responses to radiation in cells and organisms. The report was aimed to supplement the UNSCEAR 1993 report to the U.N. General Assembly- an extensive document of 928 pages-which addressed the global levels of radiation exposing the world population, as well as some issues on the effects of ionizing radiation, including: mechanisms of radiation oncogenesis due to radiation exposure, influence of the level of dose and dose rate on stochastic effects of radiation, hereditary effects of radiation effects on the developing human brain, and the late deterministic effects in children. Those two UNSCEAR reports taken together provide an impressive overview of current knowledge on the biological effects of ionizing radiation. This article summarizes the essential issues of both reports, although it cannot cover all available information. (Author)

  19. Cardiovascular risks associated with low dose ionizing particle radiation.

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    Xinhua Yan

    Full Text Available Previous epidemiologic data demonstrate that cardiovascular (CV morbidity and mortality may occur decades after ionizing radiation exposure. With increased use of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and concerns about space radiation exposures to astronauts on future long-duration exploration-type missions, the long-term effects and risks of low-dose charged particle irradiation on the CV system must be better appreciated. Here we report on the long-term effects of whole-body proton ((1H; 0.5 Gy, 1 GeV and iron ion ((56Fe; 0.15 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon irradiation with and without an acute myocardial ischemia (AMI event in mice. We show that cardiac function of proton-irradiated mice initially improves at 1 month but declines by 10 months post-irradiation. In AMI-induced mice, prior proton irradiation improved cardiac function restoration and enhanced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with increased pro-survival gene expression in cardiac tissues. In contrast, cardiac function was significantly declined in (56Fe ion-irradiated mice at 1 and 3 months but recovered at 10 months. In addition, (56Fe ion-irradiation led to poorer cardiac function and more adverse remodeling in AMI-induced mice, and was associated with decreased angiogenesis and pro-survival factors in cardiac tissues at any time point examined up to 10 months. This is the first study reporting CV effects following low dose proton and iron ion irradiation during normal aging and post-AMI. Understanding the biological effects of charged particle radiation qualities on the CV system is necessary both for the mitigation of space exploration CV risks and for understanding of long-term CV effects following charged particle radiotherapy.

  20. Biochemical and immunological responses to low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabon, M.H.; Sayed, Z.S.; Mahdy, E.M.; El-Gawish, M.A.; Shosha, W.

    2006-01-01

    Malondialdehyde, lactate dehydrogenase, iron concentration, IL-6 and IL-1b concentration, hemoglobin content, red cells, white cells and platelet counts were determined in seventy-two male albino rats divided into two main groups. The first one was subdivided into 7 subgroups; control and 6 irradiated subgroups with 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 1 Gy single dose of gamma radiation. The other was subdivided into 4 subgroups irradiated with fractionated doses of gamma radiation; three groups were irradiated with 0.3, 0.7 and 1 Gy (0.1 Gy/day) and the last subgroup with 1 Gy (0.2 Gy/day). All animals were sacrificed after three days of the last irradiation dose. The results revealed that all biochemical parameters were increased in rats exposed to fractionated doses more than the single doses. Hematological parameters were decreased in rats exposed to single doses more than the fractionated ones. In conclusion, the data of this study highlights the stimulatory effect of low ionizing radiation doses (= 1 Gy), whether single or fractionated, on some biochemical and immunological parameters

  1. CANCER RISKS ATTRIBUTABLE TO LOW DOSES OF IONIZING RADIATION - ASSESSING WHAT WE REALLY KNOW?

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    Cancer Risks Attributable to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation - What Do We Really Know?AbstractHigh doses of ionizing radiation clearly produce deleterious consequences in humans including, but not exclusively, cancer induction. At very low radiation doses the situatio...

  2. Hormesis of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposure on Immune System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragab, M.H.; Abbas, M.O.; El-Asady, R.S.; Amer, H.A.; El-Khouly, W.A.; Shabon, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the immune system has been a controversial subject. To evaluate the effect of low-doses γ-irradiation exposure on immune system. An animal model, using Rattus Rattus rats was used. The rats were divided into groups exposed to either continuous or fractionated 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 mSv of radiation and compared to control rats that did not receive radiation. All groups were exposed to a total white blood count (Wcs), lymphocyte count and serum IgG level measurement, as indicators of the function of the cell-mediated (T lymphocytes) and the humoral (B lymphocytes) immune system. The results of the current study revealed that the counts of total leukocytes (WBCs) and lymphocytes, as well as the serum level of IgG were increased significantly in rats receiving low dose radiation, indicating enhancement of immune system. The data suggests that low-dose gamma-radiation improved hematological parameters and significantly enhances immune response indices of the exposed rats. These findings are similar to the radiation adaptive responses in which a small dose of pre irradiation would induce certain radiation resistance and enhances the cell response after exposure to further irradiation doses The applied low doses used in the present study may appear effective inducing the radio adaptive response. Farooqi and Kesavan (1993) and Bravard et al. (1999) reported that the adaptive response to ionizing radiation refers to the phenomenon by which cells irradiated with low (cGy) or sublethal doses (conditioning doses) become less susceptible to genotoxic effects of a subsequent high dose (challenge dose, several Gy).

  3. Influence of low dose ionizing radiation on amplification and antitumor activity of LAK/TIL cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Hou Dianjun; Qiao Jianwei; Shang Ximei; Li Jieqing

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of low dose ionization on amplification and antitumor activity of LAK/TIL cells. Methods: TIL cells isolated from Lewis lung cancer tissues and LAK cells from spleen of tumor-bearing mouse were irradiated with different low doses of X-rays and were cultured after irradiation. Results: Low dose ionizing radiation improved the amplification volume of LAK/TIL cells, decreased the cell death ratio in amplification process, and increased the toxicity of LAK/TIL cells, Conclusions: Low dose ionizing radiation can result in amplification of biologically activated lymphocytes, and decreases the death ratio of the cells in amplification process

  4. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  5. Exposures at low doses and biological effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masse, R.

    2000-01-01

    Everyone is exposed to radiation from natural, man-made and medical sources, and world-wide average annual exposure can be set at about 3.5 mSv. Exposure to natural sources is characterised by very large fluctuations, not excluding a range covering two orders of magnitude. Millions of inhabitants are continuously exposed to external doses as high as 10 mSv per year, delivered at low dose rates, very few workers are exposed above the legal limit of 50 mSv/year, and referring to accidental exposures, only 5% of the 116 000 people evacuated following the Chernobyl disaster encountered doses above 100 mSv. Epidemiological survey of accidentally, occupationally or medically exposed groups have revealed radio-induced cancers, mostly following high dose-rate exposure levels, only above 100 mSv. Risk coefficients were derived from these studies and projected into linear models of risk (linear non-threshold hypothesis: LNT), for the purpose of risk management following exposures at low doses and low dose-rates. The legitimacy of this approach has been questioned, by the Academy of sciences and the Academy of medicine in France, arguing: that LNT was not supported by Hiroshima and Nagasaki studies when neutron dose was revisited; that linear modelling failed to explain why so many site-related cancers were obviously nonlinearly related to the dose, and especially when theory predicted they ought to be; that no evidence could be found of radio-induced cancers related to natural exposures or to low exposures at the work place; and that no evidence of genetic disease could be shown from any of the exposed groups. Arguments were provided from cellular and molecular biology helping to solve this issue, all resulting in dismissing the LNT hypothesis. These arguments included: different mechanisms of DNA repair at high and low dose rate; influence of inducible stress responses modifying mutagenesis and lethality; bystander effects allowing it to be considered that individual

  6. Persistent DNA Damage in Spermatogonial Stem Cells After Fractionated Low-Dose Irradiation of Testicular Tissue

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    Grewenig, Angelika; Schuler, Nadine; Rübe, Claudia E., E-mail: claudia.ruebe@uks.eu

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Testicular spermatogenesis is extremely sensitive to radiation-induced damage, and even low scattered doses to testis from radiation therapy may pose reproductive risks with potential treatment-related infertility. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the greatest threat to the genomic integrity of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are essential to maintain spermatogenesis and prevent reproduction failure. Methods and Materials: During daily low-dose radiation with 100 mGy or 10 mGy, radiation-induced DSBs were monitored in mouse testis by quantifying 53 binding protein 1 (53BP-1) foci in SSCs within their stem cell niche. The accumulation of DSBs was correlated with proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of testicular germ cell populations. Results: Even very low doses of ionizing radiation arrested spermatogenesis, primarily by inducing apoptosis in spermatogonia. Eventual recovery of spermatogenesis depended on the survival of SSCs and their functional ability to proliferate and differentiate to provide adequate numbers of differentiating spermatogonia. Importantly, apoptosis-resistant SSCs resulted in increased 53BP-1 foci levels during, and even several months after, fractionated low-dose radiation, suggesting that surviving SSCs have accumulated an increased load of DNA damage. Conclusions: SSCs revealed elevated levels of DSBs for weeks after radiation, and if these DSBs persist through differentiation to spermatozoa, this may have severe consequences for the genomic integrity of the fertilizing sperm.

  7. Persistent DNA Damage in Spermatogonial Stem Cells After Fractionated Low-Dose Irradiation of Testicular Tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grewenig, Angelika; Schuler, Nadine; Rübe, Claudia E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Testicular spermatogenesis is extremely sensitive to radiation-induced damage, and even low scattered doses to testis from radiation therapy may pose reproductive risks with potential treatment-related infertility. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the greatest threat to the genomic integrity of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are essential to maintain spermatogenesis and prevent reproduction failure. Methods and Materials: During daily low-dose radiation with 100 mGy or 10 mGy, radiation-induced DSBs were monitored in mouse testis by quantifying 53 binding protein 1 (53BP-1) foci in SSCs within their stem cell niche. The accumulation of DSBs was correlated with proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of testicular germ cell populations. Results: Even very low doses of ionizing radiation arrested spermatogenesis, primarily by inducing apoptosis in spermatogonia. Eventual recovery of spermatogenesis depended on the survival of SSCs and their functional ability to proliferate and differentiate to provide adequate numbers of differentiating spermatogonia. Importantly, apoptosis-resistant SSCs resulted in increased 53BP-1 foci levels during, and even several months after, fractionated low-dose radiation, suggesting that surviving SSCs have accumulated an increased load of DNA damage. Conclusions: SSCs revealed elevated levels of DSBs for weeks after radiation, and if these DSBs persist through differentiation to spermatozoa, this may have severe consequences for the genomic integrity of the fertilizing sperm

  8. Cancer risk from low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvinen, A.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. A nationwide follow-up study covering the years up to 1992 revealed no significant association between fallout from the Chernobyl accident and incidence of childhood leukemia. An excess of eight cases or more per year could be excluded. However, some indication of an increase was evident in the most heavily affected areas. Furthermore, the risk estimates were in accordance with those reported from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although the confidence intervals were wide. (282 refs.)

  9. Cancer risk from low doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auvinen, A

    1997-06-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. A nationwide follow-up study covering the years up to 1992 revealed no significant association between fallout from the Chernobyl accident and incidence of childhood leukemia. An excess of eight cases or more per year could be excluded. However, some indication of an increase was evident in the most heavily affected areas. Furthermore, the risk estimates were in accordance with those reported from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although the confidence intervals were wide. (282 refs.).

  10. Low dose ionizing radiation responses and knockdown of ATM kinase activity in glioma stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Y.C.; Roberts, T.; Day, B.; Kozlov, S.; Walker, D.; Lavin, M.; Harding, A.

    2009-01-01

    Genesis of new cells in the mammalian brain has previously been regarded as a negligible event; an assumption that long limited our understanding in the development of neoplasias. The recent discovery of perpetual lineages derived from neural stem cells has resulted in a new approach to studying the cellular behaviour of potential cancer stem cells in the brain. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and lethal brain tumour is derived from a group of cancerous stem cells known as glioma stem cells. GBM cells are impervious to conventional therapies such as surgical resection and ionizing radiation because of their pluripotent and radioresistant properties. Thus in our study, we aim to investigate whether a combination of chemo- and radio- therapies is an effective treatment for glioma stem cells. The study utilizes a specific kinase inhibitor (ATMi) of the ATM (Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) protein which is an essential protein in DNA-damage responses. In the presence of both low dose radiation and ATMi, glioma stem cells have rapid onset of cell death and reduction in growth. Since DNA damage can be inherited through cell division, accumulated DNA breaks in later generations may also lead to cell death. The limitation of conventional radiation therapy is that administration of fractionated (low) doses to reduce any potential harm to the surrounding healthy cells in the brain outweighs the benefits of high radiation doses to induce actual arrest in the propagation of malignant cells. Our study demonstrates a benefit in using low dose radiation combined with chemotherapy resulting in a reduction in malignancy of glioma stem cells. (author)

  11. Characteristics of Noble Gas-filled Ionization Chambers for a Low Dose Rate Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Soo; Park, Se Hwan; Ha, Jan Ho; Lee, Jae Hyung; Lee, Nam Ho; Kim, Jung Bok; Kim, Yong Kyun; Kim, Do Hyun; Cho, Seung Yeon

    2007-01-01

    An ionization chamber is still widely used in fields such as an environmental radiation monitoring, a Radiation Monitoring System (RMS) in nuclear facilities, and an industrial application due to its operational stability for a long period and its designs for its applications. Ionization chambers for RMS and an environmental radiation monitoring are requested to detect a low dose rate at as low as 10-2 mR/h and several 3R/h, respectively. Filling gas and its pressure are two of the important factors for an ionization chamber development to use it in these fields, because these can increase the sensitivity of an ionization chamber. We developed cylindrical and spherical ionization chambers for a low dose rate monitoring. Response of a cylindrical ionization chamber, which has a 1 L active volume, was compared when it was filled with Air, Ar, and Xe gas respectively. Response of a spherical ionization chamber was also compared in the case of 9 atm and 25 atm filling-pressures. An inter-comparison with a commercially available high pressure Ar ionization chamber and a fabricated ionization chamber was also performed. A High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) ionization chamber, which was configured with a shielding mesh to eliminate an induced charge of positive ions, was fabricated both for the measurement of an environmental dose rate and for the measurement of an energy spectrum

  12. Biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure; Biologische Wirkungen niedriger Dosen ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinoehl-Kompa, Sabine; Baldauf, Daniela; Heller, Horst (comps.)

    2009-07-01

    The report on the meeting of the Strahlenschutzkommission 2007 concerning biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure includes the following contributions: Adaptive response. The importance of DNA damage mechanisms for the biological efficiency of low-energy photons. Radiation effects in mammography: the relative biological radiation effects of low-energy photons. Radiation-induced cataracts. Carcinomas following prenatal radiation exposure. Intercellular apoptosis induction and low-dose irradiation: possible consequences for the oncogenesis control. Mechanistic models for the carcinogenesis with radiation-induced cell inactivation: application to all solid tumors in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Microarrays at low radiation doses. Mouse models for the analysis of biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. The bystander effect: observations, mechanisms and implications. Lung carcinoma risk of Majak workers - modeling of carcinogenesis and the bystander effect. Microbeam studies in radiation biology - an overview. Carcinogenesis models with radiation-induced genomic instability. Application to two epidemiological cohorts.

  13. Evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation effect on some blood components in animal model

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shanshoury, H.; El-Shanshoury, G.; Abaza, A.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is known to have lethal effects in blood cells. It is predicted that an individual may spend days, weeks or even months in a radiation field without becoming alarmed. The study aimed to discuss the evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation (IR) effect on some blood components in animal model. Hematological parameters were determined for 110 animal rats (divided into 8 groups) pre- and post-irradiation. An attempt to explain the blood changes resulting from both ...

  14. The influence of low doses of ionizing radiation on biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiecinska, T.

    1986-11-01

    Recent results concerning possible beneficial effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on biological systems are summarized. It is also pointed out on the basis of existing evidence that harmful effects on living organisms take place not only in the case of excess but also in the case of deficiency of ionizing radiation. Possibility of using radio-enhanced ultralow luminescence for studying hormesis phenomena is discussed. 24 refs., 4 figs. (author)

  15. Low-dose ionizing radiation – is it harmful to health?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, A. H. [CERN Radiation Protection Group (European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN))

    1987-09-15

    A conference on the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation organized in London earlier this year by the British Nuclear Energy Society brought together epidemiologists who have been investigating the mortality of workers from the nuclear industry in an attempt to put low-level radiation risk estimates on a scientific basis.

  16. Mammalian Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: The Role of Oxidative Metabolism and Intercellular Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzam, Edouard I

    2013-01-16

    The objective of the project was to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low dose/low dose rate ionizing radiation in organs/tissues of irradiated mice that differ in their susceptibility to ionizing radiation, and in human cells grown under conditions that mimic the natural in vivo environment. The focus was on the effects of sparsely ionizing cesium-137 gamma rays and the role of oxidative metabolism and intercellular communication in these effects. Four Specific Aims were proposed. The integrated outcome of the experiments performed to investigate these aims has been significant towards developing a scientific basis to more accurately estimate human health risks from exposures to low doses ionizing radiation. By understanding the biochemical and molecular changes induced by low dose radiation, several novel markers associated with mitochondrial functions were identified, which has opened new avenues to investigate metabolic processes that may be affected by such exposure. In particular, a sensitive biomarker that is differentially modulated by low and high dose gamma rays was discovered.

  17. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization, in cooperation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, organized an international conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, held in seville, Spain, from 17 to 21 November 1997. This technical document contains concise papers submitted to the conference

  18. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization, in cooperation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, organized an international conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, held in seville, Spain, from 17 to 21 November 1997. This technical document contains concise papers submitted to the conference. Refs, figs, tabs.

  19. Occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and female breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelina, P.; Bliznakov, V.; Bairacova, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between past occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and cases of diagnosed and registered breast cancer [probability of causation - PC] among Bulgarian women who have used different ionizing radiation sources during their working experience. The National Institute of Health (NIH) in US has developed a method for estimating the probability of causation (PC) between past occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and cases of diagnosed cancer. We have used this method. A group of 27 women with diagnosed breast cancer has been studied. 11 of them are former workers in NPP - 'Kozloduy', and 16 are from other sites using different sources of ionizing radiation. Analysis was performed for 14 women, for whom full personal data were available. The individual radiation dose for each of them is below 1/10 of the annual dose limit, and the highest cumulative dose for a period of 14 years of occupational exposure is 50,21 mSv. The probability of causation (PC) values in all analyzed cases are below 1%, which confirms the extremely low probability of causation (PC) between past occupational radiation exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and occurring cases of breast cancer. (orig.)

  20. [Influence of low doses of ionizing radiation on tenascin expression in hybridoma cell systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunga, I N

    2003-01-01

    One of the achievements of the modern radiation ecology is the preparation and application of stable eukariotic cell lines to solve various problems occurring under exposure to ionizing radiation, especially to low doses. The detection of onco-fetal protein--tenascin in different embryonic and tumor cells of humans and animals supposes the probability of appropriate gene expression in lymphoid cells, including hybridomal cells. Using the immunochemical method, the study of tenascin expression in two mouse hybridomal lines was carried out. Tenascin was revealed in hybridomal lines MLC-1 and K-48. Further hybridomal cell lines were exposed to X-ray radiation (120 KV) with doses 2.10,15 cGy. The obtained results demonstrated the sensitivity of tenascin expression to low doses of ionizing radiation, that may be used as a convenient model of studying of genotoxic effects of various damaging ionizing agents on a cell level.

  1. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  2. The regulatory effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Ikaros-autotaxin interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hana; Cho, Seong Jun; Kim, Sung Jin; Nam, Seon Young; Yang, Kwang Hee [KHNP Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Ikaros, a transcription factor containing zinc-finger motif, has known as a critical regulator of hematopoiesis in immune system. Ikaros protein modulates the transcription of target genes via binding to the regulatory elements of the genes promoters. However the regulatory function of Ikaros in other organelle except nuclear remains to be determined. This study explored radiation-induced modulatory function of Ikaros in cytoplasm. The results showed that Ikaros protein lost its DNA binding ability after LDIR (low-dose ionizing radiation) exposure. Cell fractionation and Western blot analysis showed that Ikaros protein was translocated into cytoplasm from nuclear by LDIR. This was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. We identified Autotaxin as a novel protein which potentially interacts with Ikaros through in vitro protein-binding screening. Co-immunoprecipitation assay revealed that Ikaros and Autotaxin are able to bind each other. Autotaxin is a crucial enzyme generating lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a phospholipid mediator, which has potential regulatory effects on immune cell growth and motility. Our results indicate that LDIR potentially regulates immune system via protein-protein interaction of Ikaros and Autotaxin.

  3. Effects of low-dose fractionated external irradiation on metabolic and structural characteristics of rat thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadolnik, L.; Niatsetskaya, Z. [Institute of Biochemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Grodno (Belarus)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The problem of thyroid radiosensitivity to the effect of low dose external ionizing irradiation presently seems to be the least studied, and the experimental findings - the most contradictory. The aim of the work was to study the effects of long-term low-dose fractionated irradiation on the iodide metabolism and structure of the thyroid. Female Wistar rats weighing 140-160 g were irradiated 20 times (5 times a week, for 4 weeks) using a 60 Co installation. The single absorbed doses were 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 Gy and the total ones - 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0 Gy, respectively. The animals were decapitated after 1 day, 4 and 24 weeks following the last irradiation. The thyroid tissue was used to assay for thyro-peroxidase (T.P.O.) activity as well as total, protein -bound and free iodide concentrations. Microscopic and morphometric examination of histologic thyroid preparations was carried out. Blood was assayed for thyroxin (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations. After a day following the irradiation, the thyroid showed a pronounced increase in the concentration of total iodide (30.0-54.4%) as well in that of free (32.1-60.8%) and protein-bound ones (24.4-37.4%). The most pronounced iodide concentration elevation was noted in the 0.1 -Gy animals, with thyroid T.P.O. activity being raised by 48.0%. Only the 0.5 Gy-group had 1.4-1.5-fold reduced thyroid hormone levels. Four weeks after the irradiation, studied parameters of irradiated rats were brought back to the control values, except for the 0.5 Gy-group. However, after 24-weeks, the 0.5-and 0.25- irradiated rats experienced a 12-20% thyroid weight elevation in comparison with the control. The thyroid of these animals demonstrated reduced contents of total and free iodide as well as T.P.O. activity by 24.5 and 34.8%. The 0.1 Gy-group had a 1.7-fold increased T.P.O. activity. The concentration of the thyroid hormones was maintained diminished only in the 0.5 Gy -irradiated group. However

  4. On the common mechanism for initiation of different effects of low doses of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehjdus, L.Kh.

    1996-01-01

    Main regularities of different endpoints of ionizing radiation low dose effects (adaptive response, stimulation of proliferation, special radiosensitivity of lymphoid cells, and others) have been examined. It has been shown that these endpoints have a commonness for the dose interval, the shape of the dose-response curve, the reverse effect of dose rate, non-specificity toward initiating agents, and others. An explanation is suggested for the common mechanism of the initiation of all the studied low dose effects, basing on the theory of the non-specific reaction of cell to external influences. It is concluded that initiation of the low dose effects is conditioned by radiation induced damage of functions of plasmic and internal membranes

  5. Low-dose ionizing radiation alleviates Aβ42-induced defective phenotypes in Drosophila Alzheimer's disease models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, SooJin; Jeong, Hae Min; Nam, Seon Young [Low-dose Radiation Research Team, Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by amyloid plaques, progressive neuronal loss, and gradual deterioration of memory. Amyloid imaging using positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been developed and approved for clinical use in the evaluation of suspected neurodegenerative disease, including AD. Particularly, previous studies involving low-dose ionizing radiation on Aβ 42-treated mouse hippocampal neurons have suggested a potential role for low-dose ionizing radiation in the treatment of AD. However, associated in vivo studies involving the therapy effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on AD are still insufficient. As a powerful cell biological system, Drosophila AD models have been generated and established a useful model organism for study on the etiology of human AD. In this study, we investigated the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on Drosophila AD models. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Our results suggest that low-dose ionizing radiation have the beneficial effects on not only the Aβ42-induced developmental defective phenotypes but also motor defects in Drosophila AD models. These results might be due to a regulation of apoptosis, and provide insight into the hormesis effects of low-dose ionizing radiation.

  6. Mutational influences of low-dose and high let ionizing radiation in drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Huang; Fanjun, Kong; Sun, Yeqing

    For cosmic environment consists of a varying kinds of radiation particles including high Z and energy ions which was charactered with low-dose and high RBE, it is important to determine the possible biofuctions of high LET radiation on human beings. To analyse the possible effectes of mutational influences of low-dose and high-LET ionizing radiation, wild fruit flies drosophila melanogaster were irradiated by 12C6+ ions in two LET levels (63.3 and 30 keV/µum) with different low doses from 2mGy to 2000mGy (2, 20, 200, 2000mGy) in HIRFL (Heavy ion radiation facility laboratory, lanzhou, China).In the same LET value group, the average polymorphic frequency was elevated along with adding doses of irradation, the frequency in 2000 mGy dose samples was significantly higher than other samples (p<0.01).These results suggest that genomic DNA sequence could be effected by low-dose and high-LET ionizing radiation, the irradiation dose is an important element in genomic mutation frequency origination.

  7. Risk assessment from heterogeneous energy deposition in tissue, the problem of effects from low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Booz, J.

    1992-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation from external or internal sources cause heterogeneous distribution of energy deposition events in the exposed biological system. With the cell being the individual element of the tissue system, the fraction of cells hit, the dose received by the hit, and the biological response of the cell to the dose received eventually determine the effect in tissue. The hit cell may experience detriment, such as change in its DNA leading to a malignant transformation, or it may derive benefit in terms of an adaptive response such as a temporary improvement of DNA repair or temporary prevention of effects from intracellular radicals through enhanced radical detoxification. These responses are protective also to toxic substances that are generated during normal metabolism. Within a multicellular system the probability of detriment must be weighed against the probability of benefit through adaptive responses with protection against various toxic agents including those produced by normal metabolism. Because irradiation can principally induce both, detriment and adaptive responses, one type of affected cells may not be simply summed up at the expense of cells with other types of effects, in assessing risk to tissue. An inventory of various types of effects in the blood-forming system of mammals, even with large ranges of uncertainty, uncovers the possibility of benefit to the system from exposure to low doses of low-LET radiation. This experimental approach may complement epidemiological data on individuals exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation and may lead to a more rational appraisal of risk

  8. The effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the development of rat cerebral cortex, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Koji

    1993-01-01

    In order to study the molecular mechanisms of neuronal migration on developing rat cerebral cortex, we need a tissue culture system in which neuronal migration can be observed. We prepared a tissue culture system of embryonic rat cerebral cortex starting on embryonic day 16 and cultivating it for 48 hours. The autoradiographic study in this system revealed not only the migration of 3 H-thymidine labeled neurons but also neuronal migration delays from low doses of ionizing radiation of more than 10 cGy. In addition, on immunohistochemical study, cell-cell adhesion molecule N-CAM staining was remarkably decreased in the matrix cell layer. In the tissue culture system where monoclonal anti-N-CAM antibodies were added, neuronal migration delay comparable to that of 20 cGy radiation was found. In conclusion, it was speculated that neuronal migration delay might be caused by disturbed N-CAM synthesis in matrix cells after low dose ionizing radiation. (author)

  9. Inconsistencies and open questions regarding low-dose health effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaum, R.H.; Koehnlein, W.

    1994-01-01

    The state of knowledge of health effects from low-dose exposures to ionizing radiation has recently been reviewed in extensive reports by three prestigious national and international commissions of scientific and medical experts with partially overlapping membership, known by their acronyms UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation), BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation), and ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). Publication of these reports was followed by a number of summaries in scientific journals, authored by recognized radiation experts, that purport to present a scientific consensus of low-dose effects in a more accessible format for health professionals. A critical comparison between various presentations of accepted views, however, reveals inconsistencies regarding open-quotes establishedclose quotes facts and unsettled questions

  10. The biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on adaptive possibilities of the organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulbuc, G.

    1997-01-01

    The study of adaptive possibilities and cancer risk in animals exposed at low doses of ionizing radiation was the object of the present work. The action of immunostimulating treatment on these processes was studied as well. In previously irradiated animals the diminution of adaptive possibilities and of the antitumoral resistance of the organism was observed. The stimulating action of Bufostimulin on these processes in irradiated animals was less pronounced than in unirradiated ones. (author)

  11. Transient Genome-Wide Transcriptional Response to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation In Vivo in Humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, Susanne R.; Rocke, David M.; Dai Jian; Schwietert, Chad W.; Santana, Alison; Stern, Robin L.; Lehmann, Joerg; Hartmann Siantar, Christine L.; Goldberg, Zelanna

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The in vivo effects of low-dose low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation on healthy human skin are largely unknown. Using a patient-based tissue acquisition protocol, we have performed a series of genomic analyses on the temporal dynamics over a 24-hour period to determine the radiation response after a single exposure of 10 cGy. Methods and Materials: RNA from each patient tissue sample was hybridized to an Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 array. Data analysis was performed on selected gene groups and pathways. Results: Nineteen gene groups and seven gene pathways that had been shown to be radiation responsive were analyzed. Of these, nine gene groups showed significant transient transcriptional changes in the human tissue samples, which returned to baseline by 24 hours postexposure. Conclusions: Low doses of ionizing radiation on full-thickness human skin produce a definable temporal response out to 24 hours postexposure. Genes involved in DNA and tissue remodeling, cell cycle transition, and inflammation show statistically significant changes in expression, despite variability between patients. These data serve as a reference for the temporal dynamics of ionizing radiation response following low-dose exposure in healthy full-thickness human skin

  12. The effects of low doses of ionizing radiation - A question of ethics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschaeche, A.N.

    1996-01-01

    Three ethical questions are asked and answered about the current state of affairs concerning how those in power manipulate public understanding of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. The questions are as follows: (1) Is it ethical to frighten people when you do not know that there is anything to be frightened of? (2) Is it ethical to be so conservative that resources are spent to solve a problem that may not exist? (3) Is it ethical not to tell the whole truth about the effects of low levels of ionizing radiation?

  13. Alteration of cytokine profiles in mice exposed to chronic low-dose ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Suk Chul [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung-Mi [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yu Mi [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwanghee [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Cha Soon; Yang, Kwang Hee; Jin, Young-Woo [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chong Soon [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 612-030 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Sun, E-mail: hskimdvm@khnp.co.kr [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-09

    While a high-dose of ionizing radiation is generally harmful and causes damage to living organisms, a low-dose of radiation has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of animal models. To understand the basis for the effect of low-dose radiation in vivo, we examined the cellular and immunological changes evoked in mice exposed to low-dose radiation at very low (0.7 mGy/h) and low (3.95 mGy/h) dose rate for the total dose of 0.2 and 2 Gy, respectively. Mice exposed to low-dose radiation, either at very low- or low-dose rate, demonstrated normal range of body weight and complete blood counts. Likewise, the number and percentage of peripheral lymphocyte populations, CD4{sup +} T, CD8{sup +} T, B, or NK cells, stayed unchanged following irradiation. Nonetheless, the sera from these mice exhibited elevated levels of IL-3, IL-4, leptin, MCP-1, MCP-5, MIP-1{alpha}, thrombopoietin, and VEGF along with slight reduction of IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, and IFN-{gamma}. This pattern of cytokine release suggests the stimulation of innate immunity facilitating myeloid differentiation and activation while suppressing pro-inflammatory responses and promoting differentiation of naive T cells into T-helper 2, not T-helper 1, types. Collectively, our data highlight the subtle changes of cytokine milieu by chronic low-dose {gamma}-radiation, which may be associated with the functional benefits observed in various experimental models.

  14. Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation. Artificial neural networks inference from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao S.; Tachibana, Akira; Takeda, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    Cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation remains poorly defined because of ambiguity in the quantitative link to doses below 0.2 Sv in atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki arising from limitations in the statistical power and information available on overall radiation dose. To deal with these difficulties, a novel nonparametric statistics based on the ‘integrate-and-fire’ algorithm of artificial neural networks was developed and tested in cancer databases established by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. The analysis revealed unique features at low doses that could not be accounted for by nominal exposure dose, including (1) the presence of a threshold that varied with organ, gender and age at exposure, and (2) a small but significant bumping increase in cancer risk at low doses in Nagasaki that probably reflects internal exposure to 239 Pu. The threshold was distinct from the canonical definition of zero effect in that it was manifested as negative excess relative risk, or suppression of background cancer rates. Such a unique tissue response at low doses of radiation exposure has been implicated in the context of the molecular basis of radiation–environment interplay in favor of recently emerging experimental evidence on DNA double-strand break repair pathway choice and its epigenetic memory by histone marking. (author)

  15. Inter-Individual Variability in Human Response to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocke, David [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    In order to investigate inter-individual variability in response to low-dose ionizing radiation, we are working with three models, 1) in-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we have a realistic model, but with few subjects, all from a previous project, 2) ex-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we also have a realistic model, though with the limitations involved in keeping skin pieces alive in media, and 3) MatTek EpiDermFT skin plugs, which provides a more realistic model than cell lines, which is more controllable than human samples.

  16. Construction of data base for radiation safety assessment of low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saigusa, Shin

    2001-01-01

    Data base with an electronic text on the safety assessment of low dose ionizing radiation have been constructed. The contents and the data base system were designed to provide useful information to Japanese citizens, radiation specialists, and decision makers for a scientific and reasonable understanding of radiation health effects, radiation risk assessment, and radiation protection. The data base consists of the following four essential parts, namely, ORIGINAL DESCRIPTION, DETAILED INFORMATION, TOPIC INFORMATION, and RELATED INFORMATION. The first two parts of the data base are further classified into following subbranches: Radiobiological effects, radiation risk assessment, and radiation exposure and protection. (author)

  17. Low doses of ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide stimulate plant growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korystov, Y.; Narimanov, A.

    1997-01-01

    The present study shows that low-dose oxidative stress induced by ionizing radiation (10-20 cGy) and hydrogen peroxide (1-100 pmol per litre) stimulates germination of seeds and growth of sprouts and roots. The growth of seedlings can be stimulated by treatment of seeds as well as seedlings but in the latter case it needs lower doses. The stimulation effect is observed in a narrow dose interval which is the same for the plant species studied: barley, wheat, pea, maize and melon

  18. DNA excision repair as a component of adaptation to low doses of ionizing radiation Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.; Claycamp, H.G.

    1993-01-01

    In this study the authors examined whether or not DNA excision repair is a component of adaptation induced by very low-dose ionizing radiation in Escherichia coli, a well-characterized prokaryote, and investigated the relationship between enhanced excision repair and the SOS response. Their data suggest that there seems to be narrow 'windows' of dose-effect for the induction of SOS-independent DNA excision repair. Being similar to mammalian cell studies, the dose range for this effect was about 200-fold less than D 37 for radiation survival. (author)

  19. Evaluation of experimental animal biological state at exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozanov, V.A.; Rejtarova, T.Je.; Chernyikov, G.B.; Timoshevs'ka, Je.V.; Kozozojeva, O.O.

    1997-01-01

    New approaches to quantitative evaluation of ionizing radiation absorbed dose within the low-dose range (up to 400 mGy) according to the degree of the organism biological response was developed. The purpose of the stage of the work published in Communication 1 is to evaluate the shifts in the animal behaviour and cellular composition of the blood at irradiation by the dose of 100,200 and 400 mGy. Distinct dose dependence of behaviour reactions and hematological indices within the dose range of 100-400 mGy was not noted

  20. Inter-Individual Variability in Human Response to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation, Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocke, David

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate inter-individual variability in response to low-dose ionizing radiation, we are working with three models, 1) in-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we have a realistic model, but with few subjects, all from a previous project, 2) ex-vivo irradiated human skin, for which we also have a realistic model, though with the limitations involved in keeping skin pieces alive in media, and 3) MatTek EpiDermFT skin plugs, which provides a more realistic model than cell lines, which is more controllable than human samples.

  1. Non-targeted effects of low dose ionizing radiation act via TGF-beta to promote mammary carcinogenesis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a genome-wide approach to identifying genes persistently induced in the mouse mammary gland by acute whole body low dose ionizing radiation (10cGy) 1 and 4...

  2. The effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the development of rat cerebral cortex, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Koji

    1993-01-01

    We obtained the following results with regards to the effects of low dose ionizing radiation (5, 10, 15 and 20 cGy) on neuronal migration of developing rat cerebral cortex. Neuronal migration delay was found by autoradiography after intraperitoneal labeling with 3 H-thymidine to pregnant Wistar rats embryonic 16, and low dose radiation an hour or 48 hours after labeling. In 15-20 cGy, N-CAM (neural cell adhesion molecules) staining patterns changed with immunohistochemical method, whereas those of L1 and cytoskeleton neurofilament (160 KD), tauprotein, MAP2 (microtubule associated protein 2) did not. After 24-48 hours of radiation, N-CAM were not detected on the matrix cell layer. After 72-96 hours of radiation, N-CAM staining recovered to a normal pattern. In conclusion, low dose radiation of 15-20 cGy gave rise to neuronal migration delay and it was suggested that N-CAM may be related to neuronal migration as one of the mechanisms involved. (author)

  3. Mortality from diseases other than cancer following low doses of ionizing radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vrijheid, M; Cardis, E; Ashmore, P

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ionizing radiation at very high (radio-therapeutic) dose levels can cause diseases other than cancer, particularly heart diseases. There is increasing evidence that doses of the order of a few sievert (Sv) may also increase the risk of non-cancer diseases. It is not known, however......, whether such effects also occur following the lower doses and dose rates of public health concern. METHODS: We used data from an international (15-country) nuclear workers cohort study to evaluate whether mortality from diseases other than cancer is related to low doses of external ionizing radiation....... Analyses included 275 312 workers with adequate information on socioeconomic status, over 4 million person-years of follow-up and an average cumulative radiation dose of 20.7 mSv; 11 255 workers had died of non-cancer diseases. RESULTS: The excess relative risk (ERR) per Sv was 0.24 [95% CI (confidence...

  4. Choosing populations to study the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyer, N.A.; Loughlin, J.E.; Friedlander, E.R.; Clapp, R.W.; Fahey, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    In January 1978, the United States Congress requested information about the utility of additional epidemiologic studies for quantifying the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. In our judgment, no single population can be recommended for study on purely scientific grounds, since the largest group offers only a small chance to obtain a definitive result. On the other hand, if social pressures and regulatory agencies mandate that such studies be attempted, we would recommend prospective cohort studies of occupational populations. We propose that a national worker registry be developed using ionizing radiation as the prototype for studying other occupational exposures. The problems related to studying low-level radiation are not unique, but apply equally to investigations dealing with a great variety of toxic agents. A national plan for collecting information on workers' exposure and health could provide a cost-efficient means to answer public health questions posed by the Congress, scientists and the public

  5. Low doses of ionizing radiation and risk of cardiovascular disease: A review of epidemiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz-Flamant, C.; Bonaventure, A.; Tirmarche, M.; Laurier, D.; Bernier, M.O.; Milliat, F.

    2009-01-01

    Background While cardiovascular risks associated with high level of ionizing radiation are well-established, long-term effects of low and medium levels of exposure, between 0 and 5 gray (Gy), on the cardiovascular system are debated. Methods Available literature was reviewed considering various populations, such as survivors of atomic bombs, nuclear workers, Chernobyl liquidators, radiologists and radiological technologists and patients exposed for medical reasons. Results A significant increased risk of cardiovascular diseases associated with low doses of ionizing radiation was observed in 13 studies among the 27 analyzed. The ischemic heart diseases risk was detailed in 16 studies and seven of them showed a significant increase. The cerebrovascular risk was significantly increased in five studies among the 12 considered. Conclusion Some epidemiological and experimental data are clearly in favour of an increased cardiovascular risk associated with exposure to low doses. However, given the multi-factorial origin of cardiovascular diseases and the lack of a clear pathophysiologic mechanism, epidemiological results have to be carefully interpreted. Further research should be conducted in this area. (authors)

  6. State of research and perspective on adaptive response to low doses of ionizing radiation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadao Hattori

    1997-01-01

    In a review article entitled ''Physical Benefits from Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation,'' published in Health Physics in December of 1982, Professor T.D. Luckey of the University of Missouri, asserted the ''radiation hormesis'' with 200 references. This resulted in the first International Symposium on Radiation Hormesis in Oakland, California (August 1985). CRIEPI consulted many specialists about Luckey's paper and studied many other papers such as Lorenz, 1954; Luckey, 1980, Liu et al., 1985. Radiation hormesis research in Japan has been based on the rationale that if Luckey's claim were to be true, radiation management in Japan has been extremely erroneous. CRIEPI organized a Hormesis Research Steering Committee composed of leading specialists in the field concerned, and began research in cooperation with a number of universities, as well as the National Cancer Research Institute, and the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. After obtaining interesting results in various experiments on the health effects of exposure to low doses of radiation, we have proceeded on an expanded program, which involves fourteen universities and two research institutes throughout Japan. The interesting results we obtained can be categorized in five groups. 1. Enhancement of immune systems such as lymphocytes and suppression of cancer, 2. Radio-adaptive response relating to the activation of DNA repair and adoptosis, 3. Rejuvenation of cells such as increase of SOD and cell membrane permeability, 4. Radiation effect on neuro-transmitting system through increase of key enzymes, 5. Others, including the therapy of adult-disease such as diabetes and hypertension. We are now carrying out experimental activities on the effects of low-dose radiation on mammals. After several years of research activities, we are recognizing Luckey's claim. Some basic surveys including Hiroshima Nagasaki and animal experiments in Japan have brought us valuable informations on the health effects of low-dose

  7. Consequences of low dose ionizing radiation exposure on the hippocampal microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munjal M Acharya

    Full Text Available The response of the brain to irradiation is complex, involving a multitude of stress inducible pathways that regulate neurotransmission within a dynamic microenvironment. While significant past work has detailed the consequences of CNS radiotherapy following relatively high doses (≥ 45 Gy, few studies have been conducted at much lower doses (≤ 2 Gy, where the response of the CNS (like many other tissues may differ substantially from that expected from linear extrapolations of high dose data. Low dose exposure could elicit radioadaptive modulation of critical CNS processes such as neurogenesis, that provide cellular input into hippocampal circuits known to impact learning and memory. Here we show that mice deficient for chemokine signaling through genetic disruption of the CCR2 receptor exhibit a neuroprotective phenotype. Compared to wild type (WT animals, CCR2 deficiency spared reductions in hippocampal neural progenitor cell survival and stabilized neurogenesis following exposure to low dose irradiation. While radiation-induced changes in microglia levels were not found in WT or CCR2 deficient animals, the number of Iba1+ cells did differ between each genotype at the higher dosing paradigms, suggesting that blockade of this signaling axis could moderate the neuroinflammatory response. Interestingly, changes in proinflammatory gene expression were limited in WT animals, while irradiation caused significant elevations in these markers that were attenuated significantly after radioadaptive dosing paradigms in CCR2 deficient mice. These data point to the importance of chemokine signaling under low dose paradigms, findings of potential significance to those exposed to ionizing radiation under a variety of occupational and/or medical scenarios.

  8. High and Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Induce Different Secretome Profiles in a Human Skin Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Matzke, Melissa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Hu, Zeping; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-03-18

    It is postulated that secreted soluble factors are important contributors of bystander effect and adaptive responses observed in low dose ionizing radiation. Using multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based proteomics, we quantified the changes of skin tissue secretome – the proteins secreted from a full thickness, reconstituted 3-dimensional skin tissue model 48 hr after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. Overall, 135 proteins showed statistical significant difference between the sham (0 cGy) and any of the irradiated groups (3, 10 or 200 cGy) on the basis of Dunnett adjusted t-test; among these, 97 proteins showed a trend of downregulation and 9 proteins showed a trend of upregulation with increasing radiation dose. In addition, there were 21 and 8 proteins observed to have irregular trends with the 10 cGy irradiated group either having the highest or the lowest level among all three radiated doses. Moreover, two proteins, carboxypeptidase E and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 were sensitive to ionizing radiation, but relatively independent of radiation dose. Conversely, proteasome activator complex subunit 2 protein appeared to be sensitive to the dose of radiation, as rapid upregulation of this protein was observed when radiation doses were increased from 3, to 10 or 200 cGy. These results suggest that different mechanisms of action exist at the secretome level for low and high doses of ionizing radiation.

  9. Scientific conception on mechanisms of calcium homeostasis disorders under low dose effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abylaev, Zh.A.; Dospolova, Zh.G.

    1997-01-01

    Scientific conception of probable consequences of calcium homeostasis disorders in personals, exposed to low dose effect of ionizing radiation has been developed. Principle positions of the conception is that pathologic processes development have different ways of conducting. During predominance of low doses of external gamma-radiation there is leading pathologic mechanism (mechanism 1) of disorder neuroendocrine regulation of both the calcium and the phosphor. In this case sicks have disorders of both the vegetative tonus and the endocrine status. Under internal irradiation (mechanism 2) there is disfunction of organs and systems (bore changes and disorders of hormone status). These changes are considered as consequence of negative action on organism of incorporated long-living radionuclides. Radio-toxic factors action (mechanism 3) provokes the excess of hormones, which acting on bone tissue and could be cause of steroid osteoporosis. Influence of chronic stress factor (mechanism 4) enlarges and burden action on organism of low radiation doses. It is emphasized, that decisive role in development of pathologic processes has mechanism of disturbance of neuroendocrine regulation of calcium exchange

  10. The assessment of effects of low doses of ionizing radiations: contributions of epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verger, P.; Hubert, Ph.; Bard, D.

    1998-01-01

    After a brief recall of the history of the application of epidemiological studies to the field of ionizing radiations (actually to study the consequences of Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing), and after having outlined that most of these epidemiological studies addressed carcinogenic effects of radiations on populations exposed to doses greater than 0,2 Gy, this article more particularly addresses epidemiological studies for low doses (lower than 0,5-1 Gy). The authors present objectives and methods (monitoring, etiological research, risk quantification), and discuss the limitations of epidemiology and its strengths. In the next part, they comment and discuss the main data sources used for the epidemiological assessment of low doses. These sources respectively deal with Hiroshima and Nagasaki (the Life Span Study, its results in terms of solid cancers and leukaemia, its limitations), with occupational exposures (radiologists, workers in nuclear installations, crews of intercontinental flights, Chernobyl liquidators, uranium minors exposed to radon), with environmental exposures (domestic exposures to radon, exposure to natural radiation, to nuclear test fallouts, and to Chernobyl accident fallouts, exposure about nuclear installations), and with other types of exposure

  11. Effect of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Takanori; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Saitou, Mikio; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Junichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Radiobiology, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice, SPF C3H/HeN female mice were irradiated by {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with doses of 1-8 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy (22 h-day){sup -1}. After irradiation, the number of hemopoietic cells contained in bone marrow was determined by the methods of CFU-S and CFU-GM assay, and the number of peripheral blood cells was counted. It was shown that the day 12-CFU-S, which is in the earlier stage of differentiation, decreased as the dose increased. Decreases of the numbers of day 7-CFU-S and CFU-GM were also observed. However, there were no remarkable changes in the number of peripheral blood cells. (author)

  12. Effect of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanai, Takanori; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yamada, Yutaka; Saitou, Mikio; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    For evaluation of effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the hemopoiesis of mice, SPF C3H/HeN female mice were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with doses of 1-4 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/22h-day. After irradiation, the number of hemopoietic cells contained in spleen was determined by the methods of CFU-S and CFU-GM assay, and the number of peripheral blood cells was counted. It was shown that the number of CFU-S colonies on day 12, which is in the earlier stage of differentiation, decreased as dose increased. No remarkable changes in the number of peripheral blood cells, however, were observed. (author)

  13. Acceleration of skin wound healing by low-dose indirect ionizing radiation in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Nasrollah; Farjah, Gholam Hossein; Ghadimi, Behnam; Zanjani, Hajar; Heshmatian, Behnam

    2017-08-01

    A recent hypothesis has revealed that low-dose irradiation (LDI) with ionizing radiation might have a promoting effect on fracture healing. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of direct (electron beam) and indirect (gamma-ray) low-dose ionizing irradiations on the wound healing process in male rats. In 72 male rats, a full-thickness wound was incised. The animals were randomly assigned to three groups, each with 24 rats. The first two groups were named IG-I and IG-II and respectively exposed to electron and gamma-radiations (75 cGy) immediately after the surgical procedure. The third group was considered as the control (CG) and remained untreated. Skin biopsies from the subgroups were collected on days 3, 7, 15, and 21 after the operation and evaluated using histological and biomechanical methods. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's post hoc test using SPSS 20 software. Histological studies of tissues showed that the mean number of fibroblasts, macrophages, blood vessel sections, and neutrophils on the third and seventh days after the surgery in the gamma-treated group was higher than that in both other groups. In contrast, on day 21, the mean number of mentioned cells in the gamma-treated group was lower than in the other two groups. In addition, the mean maximum stress value was significantly greater in the gamma-treated group. Results of this study showed that gamma-ray irradiation is effective in the acceleration of wound healing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  14. Acceleration of skin wound healing by low-dose indirect ionizing radiation in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrollah Jabbari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A recent hypothesis has revealed that low-dose irradiation (LDI with ionizing radiation might have a promoting effect on fracture healing. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of direct (electron beam and indirect (gamma-ray low-dose ionizing irradiations on the wound healing process in male rats. In 72 male rats, a full-thickness wound was incised. The animals were randomly assigned to three groups, each with 24 rats. The first two groups were named IG–I and IG–II and respectively exposed to electron and gamma-radiations (75 cGy immediately after the surgical procedure. The third group was considered as the control (CG and remained untreated. Skin biopsies from the subgroups were collected on days 3, 7, 15, and 21 after the operation and evaluated using histological and biomechanical methods. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's post hoc test using SPSS 20 software. Histological studies of tissues showed that the mean number of fibroblasts, macrophages, blood vessel sections, and neutrophils on the third and seventh days after the surgery in the gamma-treated group was higher than that in both other groups. In contrast, on day 21, the mean number of mentioned cells in the gamma-treated group was lower than in the other two groups. In addition, the mean maximum stress value was significantly greater in the gamma-treated group. Results of this study showed that gamma-ray irradiation is effective in the acceleration of wound healing.

  15. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Relationship between biological benefit and damage induction. A synopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.

    2005-01-01

    Absorption of ionizing radiation in biological tissue stochastically interacts with constituent atoms and molecules and always generates energy deposition (track) events accompanied by bursts of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These ROS are quite similar to those ROS that arise abundantly and constantly by normal oxidative metabolism. ROS effects from either source need attention when assessing radiation-induced alterations in biological structure and function. Endogenous ROS alone induce about 10 6 DNA oxyadducts per cell per day compared to about 5x10 -3 total DNA damage per average cell per day from background radiation exposure (1 mGy per year). At this background level, the corresponding ratio of probabilities of endogenous versus radiogenic DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) per cell per day is about 103 with some 25-40 % of low-LET caused radiogenic DNA-DSBs being of the multi-damage-site type. Radiogenic DNA damage increases in proportion to absorbed dose over a certain dose range. By evolution, tissues possess physiological mechanisms of protection against an array of potentially toxic agents, externally from the environment and endogenously from metabolism, mainly against the abundantly and constantly produced ROS. Ad hoc protection operates at a level that is genetically determined. Following small to moderate perturbation of cell-tissue homeostasis by a toxic impact, adaptive responses develop with a delay and may last from hours to weeks, even months, and aim at protecting the system against renewed insults. Protective responses encompass defense by scavenging mechanisms, DNA repair, damage removal largely by apoptosis and immune responses, as well as changes in cell proliferation. Acute low-dose irradiation below about 0.2 Gy can not only disturb cell-tissue homeostasis but also initiate adaptived protection that appears with a delay of hours and may last from less than a day to months. The balance between damage production and adaptive protection favors

  16. A framework to measure myocardial extracellular volume fraction using dual-phase low dose CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yixun; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T.; Bluemke, David A.; Nacif, Marcelo S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECVF) is a surrogate imaging biomarker of diffuse myocardial fibrosis, a hallmark of pathologic ventricular remodeling. Low dose cardiac CT is emerging as a promising modality to detect diffuse interstitial myocardial fibrosis due to its fast acquisition and low radiation; however, the insufficient contrast in the low dose CT images poses great challenge to measure ECVF from the image. Methods: To deal with this difficulty, the authors present a complete ECVF measurement framework including a point-guided myocardial modeling, a deformable model-based myocardium segmentation, nonrigid registration of pre- and post-CT, and ECVF calculation. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on 20 patients by two observers. Compared to the manually delineated reference segmentations, the accuracy of our segmentation in terms of true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), and average surface distance (ASD), were 92.18% ± 3.52%, 0.31% ± 0.10%, 0.69 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. The interobserver variability measured by concordance correlation coefficient regarding TPVF, FPVF, and ASD were 0.95, 0.90, 0.94, respectively, demonstrating excellent agreement. Bland-Altman method showed 95% limits of agreement between ECVF at CT and ECVF at MR. Conclusions: The proposed framework demonstrates its efficiency, accuracy, and noninvasiveness in ECVF measurement and dramatically advances the ECVF at cardiac CT toward its clinical use

  17. A framework to measure myocardial extracellular volume fraction using dual-phase low dose CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yixun; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua, E-mail: JYao@cc.nih.gov [Clinical Image Processing Service, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T.; Bluemke, David A. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 and Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Nacif, Marcelo S. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECVF) is a surrogate imaging biomarker of diffuse myocardial fibrosis, a hallmark of pathologic ventricular remodeling. Low dose cardiac CT is emerging as a promising modality to detect diffuse interstitial myocardial fibrosis due to its fast acquisition and low radiation; however, the insufficient contrast in the low dose CT images poses great challenge to measure ECVF from the image. Methods: To deal with this difficulty, the authors present a complete ECVF measurement framework including a point-guided myocardial modeling, a deformable model-based myocardium segmentation, nonrigid registration of pre- and post-CT, and ECVF calculation. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on 20 patients by two observers. Compared to the manually delineated reference segmentations, the accuracy of our segmentation in terms of true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), and average surface distance (ASD), were 92.18% ± 3.52%, 0.31% ± 0.10%, 0.69 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. The interobserver variability measured by concordance correlation coefficient regarding TPVF, FPVF, and ASD were 0.95, 0.90, 0.94, respectively, demonstrating excellent agreement. Bland-Altman method showed 95% limits of agreement between ECVF at CT and ECVF at MR. Conclusions: The proposed framework demonstrates its efficiency, accuracy, and noninvasiveness in ECVF measurement and dramatically advances the ECVF at cardiac CT toward its clinical use.

  18. Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Exposure, Oxidative Stress and Epigenetic Programing of Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Sreetharan, Shayenthiran; Kulesza, Adomas V; Boreham, Douglas R; Tai, T C

    2017-10-01

    Ionizing radiation exposure from medical diagnostic imaging has greatly increased over the last few decades. Approximately 80% of patients who undergo medical imaging are exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR). Although there is widespread consensus regarding the harmful effects of high doses of radiation, the biological effects of low-linear energy transfer (LET) LDIR is not well understood. LDIR is known to promote oxidative stress, however, these levels may not be large enough to result in genomic mutations. There is emerging evidence that oxidative stress causes heritable modifications via epigenetic mechanisms (DNA methylation, histone modification, noncoding RNA regulation). These epigenetic modifications result in permanent cellular transformations without altering the underlying DNA nucleotide sequence. This review summarizes the major concepts in the field of epigenetics with a focus on the effects of low-LET LDIR (stress on epigenetic gene modification. In this review, we show evidence that suggests that LDIR-induced oxidative stress provides a mechanistic link between LDIR and epigenetic gene regulation. We also discuss the potential implication of LDIR exposure during pregnancy where intrauterine fetal development is highly susceptible to oxidative stress-induced epigenetic programing.

  19. Low-Dose, Ionizing Radiation and Age-Related Changes in Skeletal Microarchitecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua S. Alwood

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis can profoundly affect the aged as a consequence of progressive bone loss; high-dose ionizing radiation can cause similar changes, although less is known about lower doses (≤100 cGy. We hypothesized that exposure to relatively low doses of gamma radiation accelerates structural changes characteristic of skeletal aging. Mice (C57BL/6J-10 wk old, male were irradiated (total body; 0-sham, 1, 10 or 100 cGy 137Cs and tissues harvested on the day of irradiation, 1 or 4 months later. Microcomputed tomography was used to quantify microarchitecture of high turnover, cancellous bone. Irradiation at 100 cGy caused transient microarchitectural changes over one month that were only evident at longer times in controls (4 months. Ex vivo bone cell differentiation from the marrow was unaffected by gamma radiation. In conclusion, acute ionizing gamma irradiation at 100 cGy (but not at 1 cGy or 10 cGy exacerbated microarchitectural changes normally found during progressive, postpubertal aging prior to the onset of age-related osteoporosis.

  20. Study of interaction of low doses of ionizing radiation with selected pesticides on Artemia franciscana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Špalková

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to observe the effect of low doses of ionizing radiation, azoxystrobin and glyphosate separately as well as in their mutual combinations on the lethality of Artemia franciscana. Increasing intensity of agricultural production leads to continual exposure of animals to pesticide residues. Animals could be exposed to these negative factors in case of possible nuclear accident. A total of 1000 nauplia, randomly placed in 20 groups (1 control and 19 experimental groups, were irradiated with gamma rays (0, 20, 30, 40 or 50 Gy and were kept in solution of standardized sea water and standardized sea water with addition of pesticides (azoxystrobin at a concentration of 0.0001 g·l-1 and glyphosate at a concentration of 0.5 g·l-1 individually or in combination. A significant increase of lethality was observed after 48, 72 and 96 h of exposure to only azoxystrobin, but also in the group exposed to the combined effect of azoxystrobin and glyphosate at all time intervals. On the other hand, a significant decrease of lethality was observed in those groups exposed to ionizing radiation even at the dose of 30 Gy at all time intervals compared to non-irradiated groups. These results confirm the toxicity of azoxystrobin to aquatic organisms; non-toxicity of glyphosate to crustaceans and support the theory of radiation hormesis at the level of 30 Gy radiation dose.

  1. Underprediction of human skin erythema at low doses per fraction by the linear quadratic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Christopher S.; Denham, James W.; O'Brien, Maree; Ostwald, Patricia; Kron, Tomas; Wright, Suzanne; Doerr, Wolfgang

    1996-01-01

    Background and purpose. The erythematous response of human skin to radiotherapy has proven useful for testing the predictions of the linear quadratic (LQ) model in terms of fractionation sensitivity and repair half time. No formal investigation of the response of human skin to doses less than 2 Gy per fraction has occurred. This study aims to test the validity of the LQ model for human skin at doses ranging from 0.4 to 5.2 Gy per fraction. Materials and methods. Complete erythema reaction profiles were obtained using reflectance spectrophotometry in two patient populations: 65 patients treated palliatively with 5, 10, 12 and 20 daily treatment fractions (varying thicknesses of bolus, various body sites) and 52 patients undergoing prostatic irradiation for localised carcinoma of the prostate (no bolus, 30-32 fractions). Results and conclusions. Gender, age, site and prior sun exposure influence pre- and post-treatment erythema values independently of dose administered. Out-of-field effects were also noted. The linear quadratic model significantly underpredicted peak erythema values at doses less than 1.5 Gy per fraction. This suggests that either the conventional linear quadratic model does not apply for low doses per fraction in human skin or that erythema is not exclusively initiated by radiation damage to the basal layer. The data are potentially explained by an induced repair model

  2. Mitochondrial-Derived Oxidants and Cellular Responses to Low Dose/Low LET Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation results in the immediate formation of free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been assumed that the subsequent injury processes leading to genomic instability and carcinogenesis following radiation, derive from the initial oxidative damage caused by these free radicals and ROS. It is now becoming increasingly obvious that metabolic oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions can be altered by irradiation leading to persistent increases in steady-state levels of intracellular free radicals and ROS that contribute to the long term biological effects of radiation exposure by causing chronic oxidative stress. The objective during the last period of support (DE-FG02-05ER64050; 5/15/05-12/31/09) was to determine the involvement of mitochondrial genetic defects in metabolic oxidative stress and the biological effects of low dose/low LET radiation. Aim 1 was to determine if cells with mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits C and D (SDHC and SDHD in mitochondrial complex II) demonstrated increases in steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS; O 2 - and H 2 O 2 ) as well as demonstrating increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation (10 cGy) in cultured mammalian cells. Aim No.2 was to determine if mitochondrially-derived ROS contributed to increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET radiation in mammalian cells containing mutations in SDH subunits. Aim No.3 was to determine if a causal relationship existed between increases in mitochondrial ROS production, alterations in electron transport chain proteins, and genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells. Evidence gathered in the 2005-2009 period of support demonstrated that mutations in genes coding for mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins (ETC); either Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH) subunit C (SDHC) or subunit D (SDHD); caused increased ROS production, increased genomic instability, and increased sensitivity to low dose/low LET

  3. Disordered redox metabolism of brain cells in rats exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation or UHF electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlaka, A P; Druzhyna, M O; Vovk, A V; Lukin, S М

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the changes of redox-state of mammalian brain cells as the critical factor of initiation and formation of radiation damage of biological structures in setting of continuous exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation or fractionated ultra high frequency electromagnetic radiation (UHF EMR) at non-thermal levels. The influence of low-intensity ionizing radiation was studied on outbred female rats kept for 1.5 years in the Chernobyl accident zone. The effects of total EMR in the UHF band of non-thermal spectrum were investigated on Wistar rats. The rate of formation of superoxide radicals and the rate of NO synthesis in mitochondria were determined by the EPR. After exposure to ionizing or UHF radiation, the levels of ubisemiquinone in brain tissue of rats decreased by 3 and 1.8 times, respectively. The content of NO-FeS-protein complexes in both groups increased significantly (р < 0.05). In the conditions of ionizing or EMR the rates of superoxide radical generation in electron-transport chain of brain cell mitochondria increased by 1.5- and 2-fold, respectively (р < 0.05). In brain tissue of rats kept in the Chernobyl zone, significant increase of NO content was registered; similar effect was observed in rats treated with UHFR (р < 0.05). The detected changes in the electron transport chain of mitochondria of brain cells upon low-intensity irradiation or UHF EMR cause the metabolic reprogramming of cell mitochondria that increases the rate of superoxide radical generation and nitric oxide, which may initiate the development of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "The Chornobyl Nuclear Accident: Thirty Years After".

  4. Environmental exposure to low-doses of ionizing radiation. Effects on early nephrotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellés, Montserrat; Gonzalo, Sergio; Serra, Noemí; Esplugas, Roser; Arenas, Meritxell; Domingo, José Luis; Linares, Victoria

    2017-07-01

    Nuclear accidents of tremendous magnitude, such as those of Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011), mean that individuals living in the contaminated areas are potentially exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). However, the dose-response relationship for effects of low doses of radiation is not still established. The present study was aimed at investigating in mice the early effects of low-dose internal radiation exposure on the kidney. Adult male (C57BL/6J) mice were divided into three groups. Two groups received a single subcutaneous (s.c.) doses of cesium ( 137 Cs) with activities of 4000 and 8000Bq/kg bw. A third group (control group) received a single s.c. injection of 0.9% saline. To evaluate acute and subacute effects, mice (one-half of each group) were euthanized at 72h and 10 days post-exposure to 137 Cs, respectively. Urine samples were collected for biochemical analysis, including the measurement of F2-isoprostane (F2-IsoP) and kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) levels. Moreover, the concentrations of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a sensitive marker of oxidative DNA damage, were measured in renal tissue. Urinary excretion of total protein significantly increased at 72h in mice exposed to Cs4000. Uric acid and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) decreased significantly at both times post-exposure in animals exposed to Cs8000. After 72h and 10d of exposure to Cs4000, a significant increase in the γ-glutamil transferase (GGT) and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activities was observed. In turn, F2-IsoP levels increased -mainly in the Cs4000 group- at 72h post-exposure. Following irradiation ( 137 Cs), the highest level of KIM-1 was corresponded to the Cs4000 group at 72h. Likewise, the main DNA damage was detected in mice exposed to Cs4000, mainly at 10d after irradiation. The alterations observed in several biomarkers suggest an immediate renal damage following exposure to low doses of IR (given as 137 Cs). Further investigations are required to clarify the

  5. Radiobiological aspects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turesson, I.

    1990-01-01

    The biological effects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation in interstitial and intracavitary radiotherapy and total body irradiation are discussed in terms of dose-rate fractionation sensitivity for various tissues. A scaling between dose-rate and fraction size was established for acute and late normal-tissue effects which can serve as a guideline for local treatment in the range of dose rates between 0.02 and 0.005 Gy/min and fraction sizes between 8.5 and 2.5 Gy. This is valid provided cell-cycle progression and proliferation can be ignored. Assuming that the acute and late tissue responses are characterized by α/β values of about 10 and 3 Gy and a mono-exponential repair half-time of about 3 h, the same total doses given with either of the two methods are approximately equivalent. The equivalence for acute and late non-hemopoietic normal tissue damage is 0.02 Gy/min and 8.5 Gy per fraction; 0.01 Gy/min and 5.5 Gy per fraction; and 0.005 Gy/min and 2.5Gy per fraction. A very low dose rate, below 0.005 Gy/min, is thus necessary to simulate high dose-rate radiotherapy with fraction sizes of about 2Gy. The scaling factor is, however, dependent on the repair half-time of the tissue. A review of published data on dose-rate effects for normal tissue response showed a significantly stronger dose-rate dependence for late than for acute effects below 0.02 Gy/min. There was no significant difference in dose-rate dependence between various acute non-hemopoietic effects or between various late effects. The consistent dose-rate dependence, which justifies the use of a general scaling factor between fraction size and dose rate, contrasts with the wide range of values for repair half-time calculated for various normal-tissue effects. This indicates that the model currently used for repair kinetics is not satisfactory. There are also few experimental data in the clinical dose-rate range, below 0.02 Gy/min. It is therefore

  6. Evaluating low dose ionizing radiation effects on gene expression in human skin biopsy cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, Z.; Schwietert, C.; Stern, R.L.; Lehnert, B.E.

    2003-01-01

    Significant biological effects can occur in animals, animal cells, immortalized human cell lines, and primary human cells after exposure to doses of ionizing radiation (IR) in the <1-10 cGy region. However it is unclear how these observations mimic or even pertain to the actual in vivo condition in humans, though such knowledge is required for reducing the uncertainty of assessing human risks due to low dose IR (LDIR) exposures. Further, low dose effects have increasing clinical relevance in the radiotherapeutic management of cancer as the volume of tissue receiving only LDIR increases as more targeted radiotherapy (i.e. IMRT) becomes more widely used. Thus, human translational data must be obtained with which to correlate in vitro experimental findings and evaluate their 'real-life' applicability. To evaluate LDIR effects in human tissue we have obtained freshly explanted full thickness human skin samples obtained from aesthetic surgery, and subjected them to ex vivo irradiation as a translational research model system of a complex human tissue. Ionizing radiation (IR) exposures were delivered at 1, 10, or 100 cGy. The temporal response to IR was assessed by harvesting RNA at multiple time points out to 24 hours post IR. Gene expression changes were assessed by real time PCR. We have shown that RNA can be reliably extracted with fidelity from 3 mm diameter punch biopsies of human tissue and provide good quality sample for the real time PCR evaluation. Genes of interest include those reported to have altered expression following LDIR from in vitro cell culture models. These include genes associated with cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and various cytokines. These feasibility studies in human skin irradiated ex vivo, have demonstrated that gene expression can be measured accurately from very small human tissue samples, thus setting the stage for biopsy acquisition of tissue irradiated in vivo from patients-volunteers. The clinical study has begun and the data from

  7. Prooxidate - antioxidate homeostasis in guinea pigs after fractional low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baraboj, V.A.; Olyijnik, S.A.; Khmelevs'kij, Yi.V.

    1993-01-01

    We studied the influence of fractional total irradiation in the total dose of 1 Gy on the amount of lipids peroxide oxidation (LPO) products and ascorbic acid in the spleen, intestine and brain of guinea-pigs. The obtained date suggest that it is advisable to use ascorbic acid to correct postirradiation changes in the organism exposed to small doses of ionizing radiation

  8. Absorbed dose to mice in prolonged irradiation by low-dose rate ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiragai, Akihiro [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Saitou, Mikio; Kudo, Iwao [and others

    2000-07-01

    In this paper, the dose absorbed by mice was evaluated as a preliminary study of the late effects of prolonged continuous irradiation of mice with low-dose rate ionizing radiation. Eight-week-old male and female SPF C3H/HeN mice in three irradiation rooms were exposed to irradiation at 8000, 400, and 20 mGy, respectively, using a {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-source. Nine racks were arranged in a circle approximately 2.5 m from the source in each room, and 10 cages were arranged on the 4 shelves of each rack. Dose distributions, such as in air at the source level, in the three rooms were estimated by using ionization chambers, and the absorbed dose distributions in the room and relative dose distributions in the cages in relation to the distance of the cage center were examined. The mean abdomen doses of the mice measured by TLD were compared with the absorbed doses in the cages. The absorbed dose distributions showed not only inverse-inverse-square-law behavior with distance from the source, but geometric symmetry in every room. The inherent scattering and absorption in each room are responsible for such behavior and asymmetry. Comparison of relative dose distributions revealed cage positions that are not suitable for experiments with high precision doses, but all positions can be used for prolonged continuous irradiation experiments if the position of the cages is rotated regularly. The mean abdomen doses of the mice were similar in each cage. The mean abdomen doses of the mice and the absorbed doses in a cage were almost the same in all cages. Except for errors concerning the positions of the racks and cages, the uncertainties in the exposure doses were estimated to be about {+-}12% for 8000 mGy group, 17% for 400 mGy group, and 35% for 20 mGy group. (K.H.)

  9. Some changes of cholesterol, glucose and total proteins in serum of chicken after effect of low dose of ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danova, D.; Novakova, J.; Benova, K.; Falis, M.; Sezstakova, E.; Toropila, M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of investigate was the effect of low-dose ionizing irradiation on the organism of chicken. We investigated changes of concentration of cholesterol and triacylglycerols in time gap 1, 3, 14 and 25 days after expose with a single whole-body gamma irradiation of 3 Gy. (authors)

  10. How to gain a better knowledge of the hazards of low doses of ionizing radiation to the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, L.

    1990-01-01

    The author shows that the approach chosen up to the present for obtaining knowledge of the hazards emanating from low-dose irradiation with ionizing radiation still relies exclusively on the metaphysical way, and that there is need for adding to this the way of scientific, basic research work. (orig./HSCH) [de

  11. Effects of low-dose continuously fractionated X-ray irradiation on murine peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yi; Zhang Hong; Dang Bingrong; Hao Jifang; Guo Hongyun; Wang Xiaohu

    2007-01-01

    For estimating biological risks from low doses continual irradiation, we investigated the effects of exposure to continuously fractionated X-rays on murine immune system. The BALB/c mice were irradiated with 0.07Gy at the first day and 0.08 Gy/d in the following 12 days at a dose rate of 0.2 Gy/min. The peripheral blood lymphocyte cycle and death were determined by flow cytometry at the cumulative doses of 0, 0.07, 0.23, 0.39, 0.55, 0.71, 0.87 and 1.03 Gy respectively. The results showed that the cycle of peripheral blood lymphocyte was arrested in G 0 /G 1 at cumulative doses of 0.07, 0.23, 0.71 and 0.87 Gy, and in G 2 /M at cumulative doses of 0.39 and 1.03 Gy; the percentage of death of peripheral blood lymphocyte was ascended with dose increasing, and reached the death peak at cumulative doses of 0.71 Gy. The results suggested that low doses continual X-rays total-body irradiated could result in changes of cellular cycle and death, and some damages to immunocytes, which accorded to linear square model. (authors)

  12. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Invited papers and discussions. Proceedings of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The levels and biological effects resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation are continuously reviewed by the United Nations Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). Since its creation in 1928, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has issued recommendations on protection against ionizing radiation. The UNSCEAR estimates and the ICRP recommendations have served as the basis for national and international safety standards on radiation safety, including those developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Concerning health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation, the international standards are based on the plausible assumption that, above the unavoidable background radiation dose, the probability of effects increases linearly with dose, i.e. on a 'linear, no threshold' (LNT) assumption. However, in recent years the biological estimates of health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation and the regulatory approach to the control of low level radiation exposure have been much debated. To foster information exchange on the relevant issues, an International Conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, jointly sponsored by the IAEA and WHO in co-operation with UNSCEAR, was held from 17-21 November 1997 at Seville, Spain. These Proceedings contain the invited special reports, keynote papers, summaries of discussions, session summaries and addresses presented at the opening and closing of the Conference

  13. Assay of new systems in vivo mutagenesis for determining the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauluz, C.; Sierra, I.; Martin, L.; Real, A.; Vidania, R. de

    1997-01-01

    Ionizing radiation reacts directly and indirectly with the genetic material in living cells and produces DNA damage. Processing of this damage by correcting enzymes may result in appearing of mutations which, in turn, may lead to carcinogenesis. We have focused on the determination of in vivo mutagenesis induced after exposure to X-rays, aiming at establishing methods to evaluate the effect of low doses of radiation. In vivo mutagenesis has been addressed in the Muta Mouse model that carries a lacZ marker gene and provides a relatively simple assay of appearance of mutations. Mutation frequencies were determined in the lacZ gene copies recovered from mice irradiated with 1Gy or 4Gy of X-rays, acute or fractionated. Liver, spleen and bone marrow DNA samples were isolated at different times after irradiation, ranging from 1 day to 2 months, and evolution of mutations was studied. Results showed different responses depending on the organ and especially on the time of analysis, suggesting that the mutagenic process in vivo is much more complex than previously deduced from in vitro experiments. Therefore, determination of the relationship between dose and mutagenic effect in vivo will require additional studies. (author)

  14. Single Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Induces Genotoxicity in Adult Zebrafish and its Non-Irradiated Progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, J; Neuparth, T; Trigo, M; Costa, P; Vieira, D; Cunha, L; Ponte, F; Costa, P S; Metello, L F; Carvalho, A P

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated to what extent a single exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation can induce genotoxic damage in irradiated adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and its non-irradiated F1 progeny. Four groups of adult zebrafish were irradiated with a single dose of X-rays at 0 (control), 100, 500 and 1000 mGy, respectively, and couples of each group were allowed to reproduce following irradiation. Blood of parental fish and whole-body offspring were analysed by the comet assay for detection of DNA damage. The level of DNA damage in irradiated parental fish increased in a radiation dose-dependent manner at day 1 post-irradiation, but returned to the control level thereafter. The level of DNA damage in the progeny was directly correlated with the parental irradiation dose. Results highlight the genotoxic risk of a single exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation in irradiated individuals and also in its non-irradiated progeny.

  15. Suppressing effect of low-dose ionizing radiation on incidence of type I diabetes of NOD mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, T.; Makino, N.; Oda, T.; Sakai, K.

    2002-01-01

    In the present study we examined the effects of 0.5 Gy of ionizing radiation, given acutely or chronically, on the incidence of type I diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice was examined. NOD mice are characterized by a progressive loss of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas by autoimmune mechanisms. The results suggest that the suppressive effects on the onset of he diabetes by the low dose irradiation are explain by the induction of the antioxidative activity

  16. Signalling detection of DNA damage induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valente, M.

    2011-01-01

    gamma-H2AX foci in response to irradiation. Using the methodological tools developed during this thesis we established for the various lymphocyte subsets the relationship between radiation dose and gamma-H2AX foci frequency as well as the kinetics of appearance/disappearance of gamma-H2AX foci. Finally, since no additional samples from patients of known radiosensitivity were available to continue the initial study with the improved protocol, we focused on radiosensitivity in another context: radio-adaptive response. This phenomenon corresponds to a lower cellular response to high dose of ionizing radiation exposure if it is preceded by an exposure to low doses. With the conditions used here we did not observe a radio-adaptive response in terms of gamma-H2AX signalling regardless of the lymphocyte subpopulation studied. However, the translocation rate of pre-irradiated CD4-positive lymphocytes was significantly different when compared to cells only irradiated acutely. This result thus indicates a differential repair of double strand breaks in lymphocytes after a radio-adaptation. (author)

  17. Possible radioprotective effect of folic acid supplementation on low dose ionizing radiation-induced genomic instability in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Gisel; Ponzinibbio, María Virginia; Seoane, Analia I

    2016-08-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) induces DNA damage through production of single and double-strand breaks and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Folic acid (FA) prevents radiation-induced DNA damage by modification of DNA synthesis and/or repair and as a radical scavenger. We hypothesized that in vitro supplementation with FA will decrease the sensitivity of cells to genetic damage induced by low dose of ionizing radiation. Annexin V, comet and micronucleus assays were performed in cultured CHO cells. After 7 days of pre-treatment with 0, 100, 200 or 300 nM FA, cultures were exposed to radiation (100 mSv). Two un-irradiated controls were executed (0 and 100 nM FA). Data were statistically analyzed with X2-test and linear regression analysis (P 0.05). We observed a significantly decreased frequency of apoptotic cells with the increasing FA concentration (P <0.05). The same trend was observed when analyzing DNA damage and chromosomal instability (P <0.05 for 300 nM). Only micronuclei frequencies showed significant differences for linear regression analysis (R2=94.04; P <0.01). Our results have demonstrated the radioprotective effect of folic acid supplementation on low dose ionizing radiation-induced genomic instability in vitro; folate status should be taken into account when studying the effect of low dose radiation in environmental or occupational exposure.

  18. Low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells may rather control than cause DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Sondhaus, C.A.; Altman, K.I.

    1998-01-01

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced metabolic changes that induce mechanisms of DNA damage mitigation, which do not operate at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. This paper aims at demonstrating tissue effects as an expression of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive, in relation to the energy deposited in cell mass, by use of microdosimetric concepts

  19. Low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells may rather control than cause DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.; Bond, V.P. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Sondhaus, C.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Control Office; Altman, K.I. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics

    1998-12-31

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced metabolic changes that induce mechanisms of DNA damage mitigation, which do not operate at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. This paper aims at demonstrating tissue effects as an expression of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive, in relation to the energy deposited in cell mass, by use of microdosimetric concepts.

  20. Role of Immunomodulators in Tumor Regression in Mice Exposed to Fractionated Low Dose of Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokaya Elsayed Maaroaf Elsayed

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most promising approaches of cancer treatment. The present study was designed to examine the role of irradiated tumor cell lysate vaccine, IFNα-2b and low dose of gamma irradiation as immunomodulators either alone or combined in tumor regression. Ehrlich ascite carcinoma (EAC) cells and 9 groups of female mice were used. Mice were immunized intramuscularly by tumor cell lysate vaccine one time/week for 3 weeks in the right thigh of mice. After two weeks from last immunization, all mice were challenged with normal viable EAC cells at count of 2.5 ×10 6 /mouse in the opposite left thigh for Ehrlich carcinoma (EC) production. Mice were subcutaneously injected with 10.000 units of IFNα-2b 3 times/week for 4 weeks and others were exposed to fractionated dose of γ- radiation (0.5 Gy/day x 4, day after day). Tumor size, serum tumor markers (TNF-α and CEA), tumor DNA fragmentation and Caspase-3 were evaluated. Oxidative stress (MDA and NO) markers and antioxidants (GSH, GPX and SOD) were determined in spleen and tumor tissues. Histopathological examinations, apoptosis and necrosis in spleen and tumor tissues were also examined. The results revealed significant inhibition in tumor size throughout the observation period either for treatments with vaccine or IFNα-2b either alone or combined with γ-irradiation. DNA fragmentation and Caspase-3 enzyme activities were significantly elevated in immunized mice as compared with EC group along with diminished tumor size while, tumor markers were significantly decreased. MDA and NO were significantly increased in tumor tissue.while, tumor GSH content, GPX and SOD activities were significantly decreased. Combined treatments of female mice bearing EC with IFN-α-2b, tumor cell lysate vaccine and low dose of γ-radiation cause a highly significant decrease in serum TNF-α and CEA levels, increase in Cas-3 activity, no DNA fragmentation, significant increase in MDA, decrease in SOD activity and decreased

  1. Low dose effects of ionizing radiations in in vitro and in vivo biological systems: a multi-scale approach study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoccia, A.; Berardinelli, F.; Argazzi, E.; Balata, M.; Bedogni, R.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term biological effects of low-dose radiation are little known nowadays and its carcinogenic risk is estimated on the assumption that risk remains linearly proportional to the radiation dose down to low-dose levels. However in the last 20 years this hypothesis has gradually begun to seem in contrast with a huge collection of experimental evidences, which has shown the presence of plethora of non-linear phenomena (including hypersensitivity and induced radioresistance, adaptive response, and non-targeted phenomena like bystander effect and genomic instability) occurring after low-dose irradiation. These phenomena might imply a non-linear behaviour of cancer risk curves in the low-dose region and question the validity of the Linear No-Threshold (LNT) model currently used for cancer risk assessment through extrapolation from existing high-dose data. Moreover only few information is available regarding the effects induced on cryo preserved cells by multi-year background radiation exposure, which might induce a radiation-damage accumulation, due to the inhibition of cellular repair mechanisms. In this framework, the multi-year Excalibur (Exposure effects at low doses of ionizing radiation in biological culture) experiment, funded by INFN-CNS5, has undertaken a multi-scale approach investigation on the biological effects induced in in vitro and in vivo biological systems, in culture and cryo preserved conditions, as a function of radiation quality (X/γ-rays, protons, He-4 ions of various energies) and dose, with particular emphasis on the low-dose region and non-linear phenomena, in terms of different biological endpoints.

  2. Low-dose ionizing radiation limitations to seed germination: Results from a model linking physiological characteristics and developmental-dynamics simulation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Hu, Dawei; Dong, Chen; Fu, Yuming; Liu, Guanghui; Qin, Youcai; Sun, Yi; Liu, Dianlei; Li, Lei; Liu, Hong

    2017-08-01

    There is much uncertainty about the risks of seed germination after repeated or protracted environmental low-dose ionizing radiation exposure. The purpose of this study is to explore the influence mechanism of low-dose ionizing radiation on wheat seed germination using a model linking physiological characteristics and developmental-dynamics simulation. A low-dose ionizing radiation environment simulator was built to investigate wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seeds germination process and then a kinetic model expressing the relationship between wheat seed germination dynamics and low-dose ionizing radiation intensity variations was developed by experimental data, plant physiology, relevant hypotheses and system dynamics, and sufficiently validated and accredited by computer simulation. Germination percentages were showing no differences in response to different dose rates. However, root and shoot lengths were reduced significantly. Plasma governing equations were set up and the finite element analysis demonstrated H 2 O, CO 2 , O 2 as well as the seed physiological responses to the low-dose ionizing radiation. The kinetic model was highly valid, and simultaneously the related influence mechanism of low-dose ionizing radiation on wheat seed germination proposed in the modeling process was also adequately verified. Collectively these data demonstrate that low-dose ionizing radiation has an important effect on absorbing water, consuming O 2 and releasing CO 2 , which means the risk for embryo and endosperm development was higher. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of low-dose ionizing radiation on luminous marine bacteria: radiation hormesis and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryasheva, N.S.; Rozhko, T.V.

    2015-01-01

    The paper summarizes studies of effects of alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides (americium-241, uranium-235+238, and tritium) on marine microorganisms under conditions of chronic low-dose irradiation in aqueous media. Luminous marine bacteria were chosen as an example of these microorganisms; bioluminescent intensity was used as a tested physiological parameter. Non-linear dose-effect dependence was demonstrated. Three successive stages in the bioluminescent response to americium-241 and tritium were found: 1 – absence of effects (stress recognition), 2 – activation (adaptive response), and 3 – inhibition (suppression of physiological function, i.e. radiation toxicity). The effects were attributed to radiation hormesis phenomenon. Biological role of reactive oxygen species, secondary products of the radioactive decay, is discussed. The study suggests an approach to evaluation of non-toxic and toxic stages under conditions of chronic radioactive exposure. - Highlights: • Luminous bacteria demonstrate nonlinear dose-effect relation in radioactive solutions. • Response to low-dose radiation includes 3 stages: threshold, activation, inhibition. • ROS are responsible for low-dose effects of alpha-emitting radionuclides. • Luminous marine bacteria are a convenient tool to study radiation hormesis

  4. Clustered DNA damages induced in isolated DNA and in human cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, B. M.; Bennett, P. V.; Sidorkina, O.; Laval, J.; Lowenstein, D. I. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Clustered DNA damages-two or more closely spaced damages (strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases) on opposing strands-are suspects as critical lesions producing lethal and mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. However, as a result of the lack of methods for measuring damage clusters induced by ionizing radiation in genomic DNA, neither the frequencies of their production by physiological doses of radiation, nor their repairability, nor their biological effects are known. On the basis of methods that we developed for quantitating damages in large DNAs, we have devised and validated a way of measuring ionizing radiation-induced clustered lesions in genomic DNA, including DNA from human cells. DNA is treated with an endonuclease that induces a single-strand cleavage at an oxidized base or abasic site. If there are two closely spaced damages on opposing strands, such cleavage will reduce the size of the DNA on a nondenaturing gel. We show that ionizing radiation does induce clustered DNA damages containing abasic sites, oxidized purines, or oxidized pyrimidines. Further, the frequency of each of these cluster classes is comparable to that of frank double-strand breaks; among all complex damages induced by ionizing radiation, double-strand breaks are only about 20%, with other clustered damage constituting some 80%. We also show that even low doses (0.1-1 Gy) of high linear energy transfer ionizing radiation induce clustered damages in human cells.

  5. Adaptation dynamics of laboratory populations of Drosophila Melanogaster to low dose chronic ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajnullin, V.G.; Yushkova, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    In genetically non-uniform populations D. melanogaster in conditions of a chronic irradiation in a doze 10-11 about sGy/generation dynamics parameters of populations was investigated. It is established, that number of individuals in irradiated populations is lower, than in control. It is revealed, that viability of populations undergone to a chronic irradiation depends on their genotype. The gradual increase in fruitfulness, viability of individuals and decrease in a level of lethal mutations in a number of generations after of an irradiation in low doses is caused by adaptable opportunities of populations. (authors)

  6. Human health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation: the BEIR III controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radford, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Controversy in the BEIR III Subcommittee on Somatic Effects concerning human health effects of low doses of low-LET radiation has centered on (a) the appropriate dose-response relationship by which extrapolation to low doses of data obtained at relatively high doses should be governed, and (b) the appropriate human evidence which should be the basis of estimation of lifetime cancer risk from radiation exposure. It is shown that the use of the linear no-threshold dose-response relationship for extrapolation purposes is an excellent approximation that is in agreement with widely accepted fundamental radiobiological principles. The appropriate human data for derivation of cancer risks are the composite age-specific risks derived from all epidemiologic studies of human cancer resulting from partial-body and whole-body radiation exposure; this composite is in good agreement with the currently available cancer incidence dose-response data obtained from the Nagasaki Tumor Registry. The current version of BEIR III significantly underestimates the radiation-induced cancer risk because it ignores the effect of high-dose-rate, low-LET radiation on cell survival in relation to cancer induction probability, and because it emphasizes cancer mortality rather than cancer incidence. The controversy and the way in which it was resolved raises important questions about how the public and its representatives can in the future obtain objective scientific evaluations of issues that may have significant economic, social, and political implications

  7. Inhibition of apoptosis: the Consequence of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmak, M.; Abramic, M.; Brozovic, A.; Hadzija, M.

    1998-01-01

    In our previous studies we have shown that human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells exposed to low repeated doses of ionising radiation became resistant to cisplatin. The aim of the present study was to determine the molecular mechanisms involved in this resistance. With this purpose, the profile of cytosolic proteins was examined and the induction of apoptosis followed for control and preirradiated Hela cells. The profile of cytosolic proteins was analysed by SDS-electrophoresis. The kinetic of apoptosis was followed by fluorescent microscope in control HeLa and preirradiated HeLa cells during 72 hours after l hour cell treatment with 50 or 150 μM cisplatin. Analysis of DNA fragmentation was done by agarose gel electrophoresis. SDS-electrophoresis of the cytosolic proteins from parental Hela and preirradiated Hela cells exhibited similar pattern. Contrary to that, significantly lower number of apoptotic cells was determined in preirradiated than in control cells following the treatment with cisplatin. The nucleosome ladder was observed in human cervical carcinoma cells 12 hours after the cisplatin treatment. In conclusion, our in vitro studies indicate that repeated low doses of irradiation can cause drug resistance due to the inhibition of apoptosis. To our knowledge, it is shown for the first time that even low doses of ionising radiation may inhibit apoptosis. (author)

  8. Neoplastic transformation in vitro by low doses of ionizing radiation: Role of adaptive response and bystander effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, M.; Lao, X.-Y.; Kapadia, R.; Elmore, E.; Redpath, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction by low doses of ionizing radiation is of critical importance to the assessment of cancer risk at such doses. Epidemiologic analyses are limited by sensitivity to doses typically greater than 50-100 mGy for low LET radiation. Laboratory studies allow for the examination of lower doses using cancer-relevant endpoints. One such endpoint is neoplastic transformation in vitro. It is known that this endpoint is responsive to both adaptive response and bystander effects. The relative balance of these processes is likely to play an important role in determining the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses. A factor that may influence this balance is cell density at time of irradiation. The findings reported in this paper indicate that the transformation suppressive effect of low doses previously seen following irradiation of sub-confluent cultures, and attributed to an adaptive response, is reduced for irradiated confluent cultures. However, even under these conditions designed to optimize the role of bystander effects the data do not fit a linear no-threshold model and are still consistent with the notion of a threshold dose for neoplastic transformation in vitro by low LET radiation

  9. Genome Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to Controlled, In vivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Pathways and Mechanisms Final Report, September 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocke, David M. [University of California Davis

    2013-09-09

    During course of this project, we have worked in several areas relevant to low-dose ionizing radiation. Using gene expression to measure biological response, we have examined the response of human skin exposed in-vivo to radation, human skin exposed ex-vivo to radiation, and a human-skin model exposed to radiation. We have learned a great deal about the biological response of human skin to low-dose ionizing radiation.

  10. Charophyte electrogenesis as a biomarker for assessing the risk from low-dose ionizing radiation to a single plant cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevriukova, Olga; Kanapeckaite, Auste; Lapeikaite, Indre; Kisnieriene, Vilma; Ladygiene, Rima; Sakalauskas, Vidmantas

    2014-01-01

    The impact of low-dose ionizing radiation on the electrical signalling pattern and membrane properties of the characea Nitellopsis obtusa was examined using conventional glass-microelectrode and voltage-clamp techniques. The giant cell was exposed to a ubiquitous radionuclide of high biological importance – tritium – for low-dose irradiation. Tritium was applied as tritiated water with an activity concentration of 15 kBq L −1 (an external dose rate that is approximately 0.05 μGy h −1 above the background radiation level); experiments indicated that this was the lowest effective concentration. Investigating the dynamics of electrical excitation of the plasma membrane (action potential) showed that exposing Characeae to tritium for half an hour prolonged the repolarization phase of the action potential by approximately 35%: the repolarization rate decreased from 39.2 ± 3.1 mV s −1 to 25.5 ± 1,8 mV s −1 due to tritium. Voltage-clamp measurements showed that the tritium exposure decreased the Cl – efflux and Ca 2+ influx involved in generating an action potential by approximately 27% (Δ = 12.4 ± 1.1 μA cm −2 ) and 64% (Δ = −5.3 ± 0.4 μA cm −2 ), respectively. The measured alterations in the action potential dynamics and in the chloride and calcium ion transport due to the exogenous low-dose tritium exposure provide the basis for predicting possible further impairments of plasma membrane regulatory functions, which subsequently disturb essential physiological processes of the plant cell. - Highlights: • We show some cellular details of the impact of low-dose ionizing radiation on biota. • Giant green algae cells provides a useful tool for studying HTO toxicity to a single plant cell. • Rapid real-time electrophysiological methods allowed to determine low dose tritium effect on transmembrane ion fluxes. • Pattern of charophyte cell membrane electrical excitation encodes tritium-caused alteration in cell homeostasis

  11. Proceedings of the 8. LOWRAD: International conference on the effects of low doses and very low doses of ionizing radiation on human health and biotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental papers are presented in these proceedings covering the following subjects: radiation protection, dosimetry, radiation dosimetry, cells, technetium, plutonium, uranium, thorium, low dose irradiation, radiation doses, cesium, radiation chemistry, nuclear medicine, safety and occupational exposure, neoplasm, cytology and radioisotopes

  12. Effects of chronic exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation on the reproductive performance and outcome of an exposed population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannino, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that low doses of ionizing radiation (cumulative dose less than 5.0 rads/yr) effects the reproductive history and/or outcome of a human population. Medically-related personnel who were exposed to low doses of radiation in the course of their employment were compared with medically-related personnel who were not routinely exposed to ionizing radiation. Each population consisted of 3000 persons from the states of Michigan and Ohio. Reproductive performance, history, and outcome of each sample population was compared statistically. Nineteen congenital defects and 47 postnatal defects were recorded for conceptions of the non-exposed population and 50 congenital defects and 83 postnatal defects were recorded for the exposed group. These groups were further broken down as to whether conception took place before, during, or after exposure and the results statistically analyzed. It was found that the exposure population had greater than expected numbers of postnatal defects and less than expected numbers of normal conceptions

  13. Quantification of gene expression modulation at the human genome wide induced by low doses of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosel, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to identify the molecular mechanisms involved in the response to low doses of ionizing radiation by using oligonucleotide micro-arrays. The results presented in this study demonstrate the relevance of this tool in the characterization of changes in gene expression at low doses of g radiation. All experimentations conducted were conducted on T CD4+ human lymphocytes. From this model we tried to characterize in 600 minutes after irradiation the molecular players in response to a dose range of 5 and 500 mGy. In this study, we highlight two types of molecular response. First, a dose-dependent response to irradiation involving groups of genes whose proteins are implicated in the response to DNA damage and in the p53 signaling pathway. The expression of the majority of the genes is modulated from 100 mGy. The second type of response is independent of the irradiation dose and the proteins encoded are involved in the mechanism of oxidative phosphorylation. Some of these genes could potentially be regulated by a family of transcription factor with an ETS domain. These ETS factors are known to be potential targets of the MAPKinase pathway. All these genes are modulated from 5 mGy and are therefore potential molecular players involved in the cellular response to ionizing stress with a low intensity. (author)

  14. Panel discussion on health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation. Scientific findings and non-threshold hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This is a record of a panel discussion in the IAEA Interregional Training Course. In current radiation work, protection measures are taken on the assumption that any amount of radiation, however small, entails a risk of deleterious effects. This so-called non-threshold assumption of radiation effects, on the one hand, creates public distrust of radiation use. However, because the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation are difficult to verify, wide views ranging from the non-threshold hypothesis to one which sees small amounts of radiation as rather useful and necessary are presented. In this panel discussion, how the health effects of low-dose ionizing radiation should be considered from the standpoint of radiation protection was discussed. Panelists included such eminent scientists as Dr. Sugahara and Dr. Okada, who are deeply interested in this field and are playing leading parts in radiobiology research in Japan, and Dr. Stather, deputy Director of NRPB, UK, who, in UNSCEAR and ICRP, is actively participating in the international review of radiation effects and the preparation of reports on radiation protection recommendations. They agreed with each other that although it is reasonable, under the current scientific understanding, to follow the recommendation of ICRP, research in this area should be strongly promoted hereafter, for basing radiation protection on firm scientific grounds. Many participants actively asked about and discussed problems in their own field. (author)

  15. Effect of low-dose ionizing radiation on luminous marine bacteria: radiation hormesis and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryasheva, N S; Rozhko, T V

    2015-04-01

    The paper summarizes studies of effects of alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides (americium-241, uranium-235+238, and tritium) on marine microorganisms under conditions of chronic low-dose irradiation in aqueous media. Luminous marine bacteria were chosen as an example of these microorganisms; bioluminescent intensity was used as a tested physiological parameter. Non-linear dose-effect dependence was demonstrated. Three successive stages in the bioluminescent response to americium-241 and tritium were found: 1--absence of effects (stress recognition), 2--activation (adaptive response), and 3--inhibition (suppression of physiological function, i.e. radiation toxicity). The effects were attributed to radiation hormesis phenomenon. Biological role of reactive oxygen species, secondary products of the radioactive decay, is discussed. The study suggests an approach to evaluation of non-toxic and toxic stages under conditions of chronic radioactive exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular mechanisms involved in modulation of p-glycoprotein expression from squamous cell carcinoma by low dose fractionated radiation (LDFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shajahan; Shahin; Shareef, Mohammed M.; Sathishkumar, Sabapathi; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Ahmed, Mansoor M.; Brown, Brandee C.; Jones, Raleigh; Spring, Paul M.

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, two squamous cell carcinoma oral cavity cells (SCCOC), T-167 (p53 wild type) and T-409 (p53 mutant), were exposed to either clinically relevant dose (2 Gy), high dose (7Gy) or fractionated low dose (LDFR) (0.5 Gy x 4) and the expression of Mdr1 gene was assessed by real time RT-PCR, semiquantitative 32 P RT-PCR and luciferase reporter assay

  17. Effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on circulating microparticles levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekhtiar, A.; Al-Massarani, Gh.; Najjar, F.; Aljapawe, A.

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to cause disruption of cytoskeleton. Cytoskeleton disorganization results in circulating microvesicles (MVs). The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the exposure to low-radiation and MVs levels in the peripheral blood of individuals working in radiation technology field.(author)

  18. Analysis of the health of a group exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Ledesma, F.; Crespo, H.

    1997-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of exposure to low radiation doses, the health status of professional staff exposed to ionizing radiation is investigated. Based on archived material of medical and radiation exposure records taken over a time span of 13 years, a variety of medical parameters are explored. Findings of surveys made are given. (author)

  19. Risk of Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation to Humans Symposium Annual Meeting of the Environmental Mutagen Society: Agenda and Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veigl, Martina L. [Environmental Mutagen Society (EMS), Reston, VA (United States); Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Case Comprehensive Cancer Center; Morgan, William F. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Schwartz, Jeffrey L. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2009-11-11

    The low dose symposium thoughtfully addressed controversy of risk from low dose radiation exposure, hormesis and radon therapy. The stem cell symposium cogently considered the role of DNA damage and repair in hematopoietic stem cells underlying aging and malignancy and provocatively presented evidence that stem cells may have distinct morphologies and replicative properties, as well as special roles in cancer initiation. In the epigenetics symposium, studies illustrated the long range interaction of epigenetic mechanisms, the roles of CTCF and BORIS in region/specific regulation of epigenetic processes, the impact of DNA damage on epigenetic processes as well as links between epigenetic mechanisms and early nutrition and bystander effects. This report shows the agenda and abstracts for this symposium.

  20. Inhibition of gastric secretion in guinea pig by relatively low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batzri, S.; Catravas, G.

    1988-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of a single dose of ionizing radiation on gastric secretion in awake guinea pigs equipped with a permanent gastric cannula. Changes in gastric secretion were measured using a dye dilution technique. Infusion of histamine increased acid and fluid output and there was a positive correlation (r = 0.93) between the two. Total body irradiation with 400 cGy, like cimetidine, suppressed acid and fluid secretion under basal conditions and during histamine stimulation by 50-90%. Recovery from the radiation damage was only partial after one week. Irradiation inhibited the rise in gastric juice volume during histamine stimulation and also reduced the normal gain in body weight of the guinea pig. These results demonstrate that ionizing radiations have an immediate and long lasting effects on the gastric mucosal function of the guinea pig

  1. Campylobacter radicidation of poultry meat by means of low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarjan, Veronika

    1984-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on the number of sprouts of pathogenic Campylobacter was studied in the function of time, storage temperature and radiation dose. Culture-media and minced poultry meat treated with isolated bacteria were irradiated by sup(60)Co up to a dose of 1 kGy. It would be established that low irradiation doses of 3-5 kGy used to eliminate Salmonella infection satisfactorily destroy Campylobacter in chilled meat. (V.N.)

  2. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; Effets des faibles doses de rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  3. Cancer and non-cancer brain and eye effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picano, Eugenio; Vano, Eliseo; Domenici, Luciano; Bottai, Matteo; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    According to a fundamental law of radiobiology (“Law of Bergonié and Tribondeau”, 1906), the brain is a paradigm of a highly differentiated organ with low mitotic activity, and is thus radio-resistant. This assumption has been challenged by recent evidence discussed in the present review. Ionizing radiation is an established environmental cause of brain cancer. Although direct evidence is lacking in contemporary fluoroscopy due to obvious sample size limitation, limited follow-up time and lack of focused research, anecdotal reports of clusters have appeared in the literature, raising the suspicion that brain cancer may be a professional disease of interventional cardiologists. In addition, although terminally differentiated neurons have reduced or mild proliferative capacity, and are therefore not regarded as critical radiation targets, adult neurogenesis occurs in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulb, and is important for mood, learning/memory and normal olfactory function, whose impairment is a recognized early biomarker of neurodegenerative diseases. The head doses involved in radiotherapy are high, usually above 2 Sv, whereas the low-dose range of professional exposure typically involves lifetime cumulative whole-body exposure in the low-dose range of < 200 mSv, but with head exposure which may (in absence of protection) arrive at a head equivalent dose of 1 to 3 Sv after a professional lifetime (corresponding to a brain equivalent dose around 500 mSv). At this point, a systematic assessment of brain (cancer and non-cancer) effects of chronic low-dose radiation exposure in interventional cardiologists and staff is needed

  4. Molecular Characterization of TP53 Gene in Human Populations Exposed to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Brasil-Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation, such as that emitted by uranium, may cause mutations and consequently lead to neoplasia in human cells. The TP53 gene acts to maintain genomic integrity and constitutes an important biomarker of susceptibility. The present study investigated the main alterations observed in exons 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the TP53 gene and adjacent introns in Amazonian populations exposed to radioactivity. Samples were collected from 163 individuals. Occurrence of the following alterations was observed: (i a missense exchange in exon 4 (Arg72Pro; (ii 2 synonymous exchanges, 1 in exon 5 (His179His, and another in exon 6 (Arg213Arg; (iii 4 intronic exchanges, 3 in intron 7 (C → T at position 13.436; C → T at position 13.491; T → G at position 13.511 and 1 in intron 8 (T → G at position 13.958. Alteration of codon 72 was found to be an important risk factor for cancer development (P=0.024; OR=6.48; CI: 1.29–32.64 when adjusted for age and smoking. Thus, TP53 gene may be an important biomarker for carcinogenesis susceptibility in human populations exposed to ionizing radiation.

  5. Information approach to the assessment of mechanisms and action consequences of ionizing radiation in low doses on a living organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulanova, K.Ya.; Kundas, S.P.; Lobanok, L.M.; Konoplya, E.F.

    2006-01-01

    In order to reveal the regularities of interaction of the organism with low-intense ionizing radiation, cybernetic approaches are needed. Living organisms are a self-regulating system of behavioural type. The complexity of the organization is determined by the hierarchy of a controlling system. Relations between systems are not of physico-chemical nature; they are based on control, i. e. on information processes. In the information system, all the weak influences (including ionizing radiation) are perceived in the form of a signal. Signal information of a natural radiation background is vitally important for organisms as in cardioversion type, as bioradiation, it is used for management initiation, i. e. self-regulation, self-development and so on. In the case of a superfluous surge of information at man-caused impacts of ionizing radiation (up to 10 Gy) the information system loses its ability to solve information tasks quickly and begins to experience the state of tension. Brought to a very tensed state it is able to lose its balance, its stability, i. e. to die. The signal-information perception of radiation explains the effects of its low dose, the non-linear character of dependence of biologic response of irradiated dose, hormesis phenomenon, apoptosis, remote consequences of irradiation, bystander effect and other postradiation effects. (authors)

  6. Raman micro-spectroscopy analysis of human lens epithelial cells exposed to a low-dose-range of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christian Harry; Kumar, Achint; Qutob, Sami; Nyiri, Balazs; Chauhan, Vinita; Murugkar, Sangeeta

    2018-01-01

    Recent findings in populations exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) indicate dose-related lens opacification occurs at much lower doses (micro-spectroscopy was used to investigate the effects of varying doses of radiation, ranging from 0.01 Gy to 5 Gy, on human lens epithelial (HLE) cells which were chemically fixed 24 h post-irradiation. Raman spectra were acquired from the nucleus and cytoplasm of the HLE cells. Spectra were collected from points in a 3  ×  3 grid pattern and then averaged. The raw spectra were preprocessed and principal component analysis followed by linear discriminant analysis was used to discriminate between dose and control for 0.25, 0.5, 2, and 5 Gy. Using leave-one-out cross-validation accuracies of greater than 74% were attained for each dose/control combination. The ultra-low doses 0.01 and 0.05 Gy were included in an analysis of band intensities for Raman bands found to be significant in the linear discrimination, and an induced repair model survival curve was fit to a band-difference-ratio plot of this data, suggesting HLE cells undergo a nonlinear response to low-doses of IR. A survival curve was also fit to clonogenic assay data done on the irradiated HLE cells, showing a similar nonlinear response.

  7. Low Dose of Ionizing Radiation Effect on the Professionally Exposure Worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spasojevic, V.; Joksic, T. G.; Pavelkic, V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper shows the comparative medical results of the peripheral blood hematological biochemical analysis as well as chromosome aberration in the lymphocytes of the peripheral blood of the people professionally exposed to the small doses of the ionizing radiation.Selected group is formed of 54 x-rays radiotherapy technicians (22 male and 32 female) and 38 radio-diagnosis technicians (20 male, 18 female). The ophthalmology and occupational medical specialists medically examined them. The changes on eye-lenses such as cataract have not been confirmed in any of the examined group. In regard to the TLD-dosimeter's results, there were no oversteps in the allowed annual doses. The middle value of the exposed work experience (EWE) at x-ray radiotherapy technicians was 13 years and radio-diagnosis technician a 10 years. The middle value of the red blood cells (RBC) was 4.74? 1012/1 at radiodiagnosis and 4.93? 1012/1 at radio therapist while the middle values of hemoglobin (Hgb) were 13.91 g/l and 14.3 g/l respectively. The middle value of white blood cells (WBC) at a radiotherapy technician was 6.96 ? 1091 (granulocyte 66.34% and lymphocyte 27.39%), at radiodiagnosis technician 6.92? 109/l (granulocyte 63.94% and lymphocyte 28.17%). Analysis confirmed hematological biochemical changes at 4 radio diagnostics technicians (2 anemia, leucopenia and leucocytosis). the chromosome confirmed aberration analysis in white blood cells of peripheral blood that 16 technicians do have the changes of the dicenteric type and acentric fragment up to 14 technicians of the radio-diagnosis and at 2 radiotherapy technicians. At 3 radio diagnostic technician found lowered value of leukocytes followed by the changes of dicentric type of chromosomes but the results of one person showed that the while blood cells were essentially raised level 11.6? 109/l followed as well as with the changes on the chromosomes. All the examined workers that showed positive to any changes were subjectively healthy

  8. Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation: Conflict between assumptions and observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavan, P.C.; Devasagayam, T.P.A.

    1997-01-01

    Recent epidemiological data on cancer incidence among the A-bomb survivors and more importantly experimental studies in cell and molecular radiobiology do not lend unequivocal support to the ''linear, no threshold'' (LNT) hypothesis; in fact, the discernible evidence that low and high doses of ionizing radiations induce qualitatively different/opposite effects cannot be summarily rejected. A time has come to examine the mechanistic aspects of ''radiation hormesis'' and ''radioadaptive response'' seriously rather than proclaiming one's profound disbelief about these phenomena. To put the discussion in a serious scientific mode, we briefly catalogue here reports in the literature on gene expression differentially influenced by low and high doses. These are not explicable in terms of the current radiation paradigm. (author)

  9. Study on serum metabonomics of rats exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation, carbon monoxide, benzene and noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-rong WANG

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the combined effects of low-dose ionizing radiation, carbon monoxide, benzene and noise on serum metabolites and the mechanism of injury induced by these complex environmental factors in rats. Methods  Sixteen adult SD rats were randomly divided into control group and exposed group (8 each. The exposed group received the combined effect every day for 7 days. At the end of experiment, sera were collected from the abdominal aorta of rats. The metabolic fingerprint of serum was obtained by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR spectroscopy and determined with pattern recognition techniques of principal component analysis (PCA and orthogonal signal correction-partial least squares (OSC-PLS. The similarities and differences in metabolic profiles between two groups were visualized by SIMCA-P software. Results The rat serum 1H NMR spectra revealed different metabolic spectra between the control group and exposed group. The OSC-PLS plots of the serum samples presented respectively marked clustering between the two groups. Compared with the control group, the contents of lipid, high density lipoprotein, glycine/glucose, N-acetyl glycoprotein 1, N-acetyl glycoprotein 2, phosphatidyl choline and unsaturated fatty acid increased, while those of lactic acid, threonine/lipid, alanine, creatine, glycerylphosphorylcholine/ trimethylamine oxide, low density lipoprotein/high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein/ low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein and saturated fatty acid decreased. Conclusions Combination of low-dose ionizing radiation, carbon monoxide, benzene and noise could induce changes of serum metabolites in rats, involving in immune function, renal function and energy metabolism. The NMR-based-metabonomics method has potential of application in research on combined biological effects of the complex environmental factors. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.07.09

  10. The hemodynamic effects of spinal block with low dose of bupivacaine and sufentanil in patients with low myocardial ejection fraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Sanatkar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of spinal block with low dose of bupivacaine and sufentanil on patients with low cardiac output who underwent lower limb surgery. Fifteen patients who had ejection fraction less than 40% (group 1 were compared with 65 cases with ejection fraction more than 40% (group 2 in our study. Our subjects underwent spinal block with 7.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% and 5 µg sufentanil. We recorded early events such as hypotension, bradycardia, vasopressor need and ST segment change in our cases. The average mean arterial pressure decreased 13% (110 mmHg to 95.7 mmHg in group 1 and 20% (160 mmHg to 128 mmHg in group 2 (P<0.001. Hypotension due to spinal anesthesia was observed in none of our subjects in both groups and none of our cases need to vasopressor support. All patients remained alert, and no ST segment changes were observed in two groups. In our study none of subjects complained of pain intraoperatively. The subjects were without complaints during the spinal anesthetic in both groups. Spinal block with low dose local anesthetic and sufentanil was a safe and effective method for lower limb surgery in patients with low ejection fraction.

  11. Responses of rat R-1 cells to low dose rate gamma radiation and multiple daily dose fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Bijman, J.Th.

    1981-01-01

    Multifraction irradiation may offer the same therapeutic gain as continuous irradiation. Therefore, a comparison of the efficacy of low dose rate irradiation and multifraction irradiation was the main objective of the experiments to be described. Both regimens were tested on rat rhabdomyosarcoma (R-1) cells in vitro and in vivo. Exponentially growing R-1 cells were treated in vitro by a multifraction irradiation procedure with dose fractions of 2 Gy gamma radiation and time intervals of 1 to 3 h. The dose rate was 1.3 Gy.min -1 . The results indicate that multifractionation of the total dose is more effective with respect to cell inactivation than continuous irradiation. (Auth.)

  12. A study of the indices of the peripheral blood of women, professionally exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bliznakov, V.; Mikhajlov, M.A.; Serafimov, A.; Nikolov, A.

    1979-01-01

    The peripheral blood content in women, which, due to their occupation are exposed to low dose ionizing radiation effect, has been investigated. One hundred and ten women from 20 to 50 years of age and occupation service in a sphere of ionizing radiation from 6 months to 4 years (an average length of 2,5 years) were examined. The unequal external gamma irradiation was the fundamental factor of the radiation effect under conditions of occupational media. The mean annual dose did never exceed the maximum permissible limits. As control, a group of 106 clinically healthy women of the same age and working in the industry but not exposed to radiation effect, was formed. Hemoglobin quantity, erythrocytes and leukocytes number, differential count of leukocytes and thrombocytes number were analyzed. Not any statistically significant differences (p > 0,05) between the mean values of the studied parameters of the control group and this one of women exposed to occupational irradiation were observed. This analysis of the hematological parameters represents the first stage of the already undertaken dynamic examination of the health status of a new and relatively stable contingent of occupationally irradiated persons. (A.B.)

  13. GATA3 is a master regulator of the transcriptional response to low-dose ionizing radiation in human keratinocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, F.; Molina, M.; Berthier-Vergnes, O.; Lamartine, J. [Universite de Lyon, Lyon, F-69003 (France); Universite Lyon 1, Lyon, F-69003 (France); CNRS, UMR5534, Centre de Genetique Moleculaire et Cellulaire, Villeurbanne, F-69622 (France); Malet, C.; Ginestet, C. [Centre Leon Berard, Service de Radiotherapie, Lyon F-69008 (France); Martin, M.T. [Laboratoire de Genomique et Radiobiologie de la Keratinopoiese, CEA, IRCM, Evry F-91000 (France)

    2009-07-01

    Background: The general population is constantly exposed to low levels of radiation through natural, occupational or medical irradiation. Even if the biological effects of low-level radiation have been intensely debated and investigated, the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to low doses remain largely unknown. Results: The present study investigated the role of GATA3 protein in the control of the cellular and molecular response of human keratinocytes exposed to a 1 cGy dose of X-rays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed GATA3 to be able to bind the promoter of 4 genes responding to a 1 cGy exposure. To go further into the role of GATA3 after ionizing radiation exposure, we studied the cellular and molecular consequences of radiation in GATA3 knock-down cells. Knockdown was obtained by lentiviral-mediated expression of an shRNA targeting the GATA3 transcript in differentiated keratinocytes. First, radiosensitivity was assessed: the toxicity, in terms of immediate survival (with XTT test), associated with 1 cGy radiation was found to be increased in GATA3 knock-down cells. The impact of GATA3 knock-down on the transcriptome of X-ray irradiated cells was also investigated, using oligonucleotide micro-arrays to assess changes between 3 h and 72 h post-irradiation in normal vs GATA3 knock-down backgrounds; transcriptome response was found to be completely altered in GATA3 knock-down cells, with a strong induction/repression peak 48 h after irradiation. Functional annotation revealed enrichment in genes known to be involved in chaperone activity, TGF{beta} signalling and stress response. Conclusion: Taken together, these data indicate that GATA3 is an important regulator of the cellular and molecular response of epidermal cells to very low doses of radiation. (authors)

  14. GATA3 is a master regulator of the transcriptional response to low-dose ionizing radiation in human keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, F.; Molina, M.; Berthier-Vergnes, O.; Lamartine, J.; Malet, C.; Ginestet, C.; Martin, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The general population is constantly exposed to low levels of radiation through natural, occupational or medical irradiation. Even if the biological effects of low-level radiation have been intensely debated and investigated, the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular response to low doses remain largely unknown. Results: The present study investigated the role of GATA3 protein in the control of the cellular and molecular response of human keratinocytes exposed to a 1 cGy dose of X-rays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed GATA3 to be able to bind the promoter of 4 genes responding to a 1 cGy exposure. To go further into the role of GATA3 after ionizing radiation exposure, we studied the cellular and molecular consequences of radiation in GATA3 knock-down cells. Knockdown was obtained by lentiviral-mediated expression of an shRNA targeting the GATA3 transcript in differentiated keratinocytes. First, radiosensitivity was assessed: the toxicity, in terms of immediate survival (with XTT test), associated with 1 cGy radiation was found to be increased in GATA3 knock-down cells. The impact of GATA3 knock-down on the transcriptome of X-ray irradiated cells was also investigated, using oligonucleotide micro-arrays to assess changes between 3 h and 72 h post-irradiation in normal vs GATA3 knock-down backgrounds; transcriptome response was found to be completely altered in GATA3 knock-down cells, with a strong induction/repression peak 48 h after irradiation. Functional annotation revealed enrichment in genes known to be involved in chaperone activity, TGFβ signalling and stress response. Conclusion: Taken together, these data indicate that GATA3 is an important regulator of the cellular and molecular response of epidermal cells to very low doses of radiation. (authors)

  15. Effect of Fractionated Low Doses of Gamma Radiation on Some Haematological and Immunological Parameters in Albino Rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahgat, M.M.; Abdel-Khalek, L.G.

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed on 30 mature male albino rats to evaluate the direct effect of fractionated low doses (0.5 Gy twice weekly) gamma radiation and delayed effect (one month post-irradiation) on some haematological and immunological parameters. The rats were divided into three equal groups, Control and two whole body gamma-irradiated groups the irradiated groups were subjected to total doses of 4 and 8 Grays over a period of one and two months, respectively. The blood samples and peritoneal macrophages were taken twice from each irradiated rats at the end of their irradiation period and after one month post irradiation. Activated peritoneal macrophages in all groups showed significant decrease as compared to control group denoting that irradiation may cause receptor alteration and/or decrease in the phagocytic power of macrophages lasting for a longer time. Throughout the whole experiment there was wide variation in platelet count with no significant or minimal changes in other blood elements. Moreover, in the post irradiation group after two months irradiation, all the haematological parameters tested, except the Hct, were increased as compared to the control group. These results pointed to that the bone marrow and lymphoid organs of the animals can tolerate fractionated low dose irradiation through rapid recovery and/or compensatory stimulation. The presence of many target cells in the post irradiated group increases the red blood cell fragility

  16. Low-dose X-irradiation of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Efficacy of different fractionation schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebmann, A.; Hindemith, M.; Jahns, J.; Kamprad, F.; Hildebrandt, G.; Madaj-Sterba, P.; Weisheit, S.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: low-dose radiotherapy is widely accepted as a very effective treatment option for inflammatory symptoms associated with painful degenerative joint disorders. Radiation doses and fractionation schedules in practical use are empirical and mainly based on clinical observations. Experimental data are rare. The efficacy of low-dose X-irradiation on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats using different fractionation schemes was investigated in vivo, in order to explore whether there is a dose and fractionation dependence. Material and methods: adjuvant arthritis in female lewis rats (n = 128) was induced by intradermal injection of heat-inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis on day 0. Both arthritic hind paws were sham-irradiated (group 1: days 10-14; group 2: days 15-19; group 3: days 22-26) or X-irradiated with either 5 x 1.0 Gy (group 4: days 10-14; group 6: days 15-19; group 8: days 22-26; group 10: days 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18) or 5 x 0.5 Gy (group 5: days 10-14; group 7: days 15-19; group 9: days 22-26; group 11: days 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18; group 12: days 10-14 and 22-26). The clinical parameters arthritis score (AS), hind paw volume (HPV), and body weight were determined. Results: a significant decrease of the clinical arthritis parameters was observed following 5 x 0.5 Gy or 5 x 1.0 Gy during the acute maximum of the inflammatory response (days 15-19). The most pronounced treatment effect was reached after two daily fractionated series of 5 x 0.5 Gy with an early treatment onset (days 10-14) and repetition in interval (days 22-26). After the application of 5 x 1.0 Gy on days 10-14 or in a protracted scheme (days 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18), only a nonsignificant positive trend could be detected. Daily fractionated X-irradiation in the chronic phase of adjuvant arthritis (days 22-26) did not show any positive clinical effect. Conclusion: low-dose radiotherapy is able to prevent a full-blown arthritic reaction if given during the florid phase of

  17. Acute hematological tolerance to multiple fraction, whole body, low dose irradiation in an experimental murine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melamed, J.S.; Chen, M.G.; Brown, J.W.; Katagiri, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Using a dose fractionation scheme patterned after the current regimen for treatment of disseminated non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the authors studied the effects of irradation on progenitor and effector cells for hematopoiesis in five-month-old BC3F 1 mice. Fractions of 20 or 50 rad (0.2 or 0.5 Gy) total body irradation were given twice weekly to a final total dose of 200 or 500 rad (2 or 5 Gy), respectively. Weekly assays revealed a marked, sustained depression of stem cell activity, measured as numbers of spleen colony-forming units (CFU-S) and in vitro colony-forming cells (CFU-C), without corresponding depression of effector cells (red and white cells, and platelets). The lack of correlation between numbers of stem cells and peripheral elements is relevant to clinical assessment of marrow reserve

  18. Genetic differences in transcript responses to low-dose ionizing radiation identify tissue functions associated with breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Antoine M; Marchetti, Francesco; Bhatnagar, Sandhya; Duru, Nadire; Han, Ju; Hu, Zhi; Mao, Jian-Hua; Gray, Joe W; Wyrobek, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    High dose ionizing radiation (IR) is a well-known risk factor for breast cancer but the health effects after low-dose (LD, differences in their sensitivity to radiation-induced mammary cancer (BALB/c and C57BL/6) for the purpose of identifying mechanisms of mammary cancer susceptibility. Unirradiated mammary and blood tissues of these strains differed significantly in baseline expressions of DNA repair, tumor suppressor, and stress response genes. LD exposures of 7.5 cGy (weekly for 4 weeks) did not induce detectable genomic instability in either strain. However, the mammary glands of the sensitive strain but not the resistant strain showed early transcriptional responses involving: (a) diminished immune response, (b) increased cellular stress, (c) altered TGFβ-signaling, and (d) inappropriate expression of developmental genes. One month after LD exposure, the two strains showed opposing responses in transcriptional signatures linked to proliferation, senescence, and microenvironment functions. We also discovered a pre-exposure expression signature in both blood and mammary tissues that is predictive for poor survival among human cancer patients (p = 0.0001), and a post-LD-exposure signature also predictive for poor patient survival (pidentify genetic features that predispose or protect individuals from LD-induced breast cancer.

  19. Macroarray analysis of gene expression in hematopoietic tissues from mice continuously irradiated by low dose-rate ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitou, Mikio; Nakamura, Shingo; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Izumi, Jun; Sugihara, Takashi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kimio; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Inst. for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    We found that the number of hematopoietic progenitor cells in bone marrow and spleen from 4 - 8 Gy-irradiated mice decreased about 50%, in spite of no change in the number of peripheral blood cells. To evaluate the effects of chronic irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the gene expression in mice hematopoietic cells from bone marrow and spleen, the RNA expressions of more than 500 genes such as cytokine genes and oncogenes were measured on the membranes by the RNA macroarray analysis method at accumulated doses at 4.7 and 8 Gy in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H/HeN female mice irradiated by {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with the dose rate of 20 mGy/day. The RNA macroarray analysis in spleens from 8 Gy-irradiated mice showed that the expressions in 16 genes including noggin were more than 1.5 times larger than that of control, while those in 64 genes including shh (sonic hedgehog) and BMP-4 (bone morphogenesis protein 4) were more than 1.5 times smaller than that of control. (author)

  20. On the risk to low doses (<100 mSv) of ionizing radiation during medical imaging procedures - IOMP policy statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    The science committee of International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) developed a policy statement on the predictions of radiation-induced cancers and cancer deaths in patients exposed to low doses (<100 mSv) of ionizing radiation during medical imaging; this statement has been approved by the IOMP council. In order to attract the attention of medical physicists, an editorial (1) titled 'Risk of Medical Imaging' that includes the said statement has recently been published in Medical Physics journal of American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). As stated, IOMP represents 80 national and 6 regional medical physics organizations and 18,000 medical physicists worldwide. The IOMP affiliated bodies/organizations in different countries (such as Association of Medical Physicists of India, AMPI) have been encouraged to reproduce the IOMP statement in their journals/newsletters for the benefit of larger community of medical physicists. The IOMP statement is reproduced below (readers may also go through the supportive literature listed in references). It is hoped that this policy statement will have some deterrent influence on the continued propagation of unproven risk related to medical imaging procedures conducted with small doses.

  1. Effects of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Exposures on Stress-Responsive Gene Expression in Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykyta Sokolov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a great deal of uncertainty on how low (≤0.1 Gy doses of ionizing radiation (IR affect human cells, partly due to a lack of suitable experimental model systems for such studies. The uncertainties arising from low-dose IR human data undermine practical societal needs to predict health risks emerging from diagnostic medical tests’ radiation, natural background radiation, and environmental radiological accidents. To eliminate a variability associated with remarkable differences in radioresponses of hundreds of differentiated cell types, we established a novel, human embryonic stem cell (hESC-based model to examine the radiobiological effects in human cells. Our aim is to comprehensively elucidate the gene expression changes in a panel of various hESC lines following low IR doses of 0.01; 0.05; 0.1 Gy; and, as a reference, relatively high dose of 1 Gy of IR. Here, we examined the dynamics of transcriptional changes of well-established IR-responsive set of genes, including CDKN1A, GADD45A, etc. at 2 and 16 h post-IR, representing “early” and “late” radioresponses of hESCs. Our findings suggest the temporal- and hESC line-dependence of stress gene radioresponses with no statistically significant evidence for a linear dose-response relationship within the lowest doses of IR exposures.

  2. The optimal fraction size in high-dose-rate brachytherapy: dependency on tissue repair kinetics and low-dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sminia, Peter; Schneider, Christoph J.; Fowler, Jack F.

    2002-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Indications of the existence of long repair half-times on the order of 2-4 h for late-responding human normal tissues have been obtained from continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART). Recently, these data were used to explain, on the basis of the biologically effective dose (BED), the potential superiority of fractionated high-dose rate (HDR) with large fraction sizes of 5-7 Gy over continuous low-dose rate (LDR) irradiation at 0.5 Gy/h in cervical carcinoma. We investigated the optimal fraction size in HDR brachytherapy and its dependency on treatment choices (overall treatment time, number of HDR fractions, and time interval between fractions) and treatment conditions (reference low-dose rate, tissue repair characteristics). Methods and Materials: Radiobiologic model calculations were performed using the linear-quadratic model for incomplete mono-exponential repair. An irradiation dose of 20 Gy was assumed to be applied either with HDR in 2-12 fractions or continuously with LDR for a range of dose rates. HDR and LDR treatment regimens were compared on the basis of the BED and BED ratio of normal tissue and tumor, assuming repair half-times between 1 h and 4 h. Results: With the assumption that the repair half-time of normal tissue was three times longer than that of the tumor, hypofractionation in HDR relative to LDR could result in relative normal tissue sparing if the optimum fraction size is selected. By dose reduction while keeping the tumor BED constant, absolute normal tissue sparing might therefore be achieved. This optimum HDR fraction size was found to be largely dependent on the LDR dose rate. On the basis of the BED NT/TUM ratio of HDR over LDR, 3 x 6.7 Gy would be the optimal HDR fractionation scheme for replacement of an LDR scheme of 20 Gy in 10-30 h (dose rate 2-0.67 Gy/h), while at a lower dose rate of 0.5 Gy/h, four fractions of 5 Gy would be preferential, still assuming large differences between tumor

  3. Low dose/low fluence ionizing radiation-induced biological effects: The role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Edouard

    Mechanistic investigations have been considered critical to understanding the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. To gain greater insight in the biological effects of exposure to low dose/low fluence space radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) properties, we examined short and long-term biological responses to energetic protons and high charge (Z) and high energy (E) ions (HZE particles) in human cells maintained in culture and in targeted and non-targeted tissues of irradiated rodents. Particular focus of the studies has been on mod-ulation of gene expression, proliferative capacity, induction of DNA damage and perturbations in oxidative metabolism. Exposure to mean doses of 1000 MeV/nucleon iron ions, by which a small to moderate proportion of cells in an exposed population is targeted through the nucleus by an HZE particle, induced stressful effects in the irradiated and non-irradiated cells in the population. Direct intercellular communication via gap-junctions was a primary mediator of the propagation of stressful effects from irradiated to non-irradiated cells. Compromised prolif-erative capacity, elevated level of DNA damage and oxidative stress evaluated by measurements of protein carbonylation, lipid peroxidation and activity of metabolic enzymes persisted in the progeny of irradiated and non-irradiated cells. In contrast, progeny of cells exposed to high or low doses from 150-1000 MeV protons retained the ability to form colonies and harbored similar levels of micronuclei, a surrogate form of DNA damage, as control, which correlated with normal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Importantly, a significant increase in the spontaneous neoplastic transformation frequency was observed in progeny of bystander mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) co-cultured with MEFs irradiated with energetic iron ions but not protons. Of particular significance, stressful effects were detected in non-targeted tissues of rats that received partial

  4. Low-dose fractionated percutaneous teletherapy in age-related macular degeneration with subfoveolar neovascularization - 3 year results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schittkowski, M.; Schneider, H.; Guthoff, R.; Grueschow, K.; Ziegler, P.G.; Fietkau, R.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of low dose fractionated percutaneous teletherapy to visual acuity and the changes in subfoveolar neovascular membranes in age-related macular degeneration were investigated. Patients and Method: 126 eyes of 118 patients (age 55-89 years; mean 74 ys.) were treated. Best distal and near visual acuity was assessed prior to (= initial visual acuity [IVA]) and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months after teletherapy. Fluorescein angiography was performed prior to and 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after radiation therapy. For analysis patients were divided into different groups by IVA and membrane size. Maximal duration of observation was 36 months. Teletherapy was done by a 9-MeV photon linear accelerator through a lateral port in half-beam technique with a single dose of 2 Gy up to a total dose of 20 Gy within 12 days. Results: No severe negative side effects have been observed. Eight patients reported of epiphora and four patients complained of transient sicca syndrome. Visual acuity decreased more than one line in the group IVA 0.05-0.2. The group IVA 0.3-0.5 remained unchanged for 1 year. We found a tendency for increased visual acuity in group IVA ≥ 0.6 for 18 months. After that time both groups showed decreased visual acuity, but all these patients reported of reduced metamorphopsia and increased color and contrast perception. Conclusions: There is an influence of low dose fractionated percutaneous teletherapy on visual acuity, subfoveal neovascular membranes and metamorphopsia. IVA and duration of anamnesis play an important role. There seems to be no persistent effect; possibly increased dosage will bring a benefit. (orig.) [de

  5. Low doses effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1997-01-01

    In this article is asked the question about a possible carcinogens effect of low dose irradiation. With epidemiological data, knowledge about the carcinogenesis, the professor Tubiana explains that in spite of experiments made on thousand or hundred of thousands animals it has not been possible to bring to the fore a carcinogens effect for low doses and then it is not reasonable to believe and let the population believe that low dose irradiation could lead to an increase of neoplasms and from this point of view any hardening of radiation protection standards could in fact, increase anguish about ionizing radiations. (N.C.)

  6. Expression of Cellular Isoform of Prion Protein on the Surface of Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Among Women Exposed to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klucinski, P.; Martirosian, G.; Mazur, B.; Kaufman, J.; Hrycek, A.; Masluch, E.; Cieslik, P.

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation affect the expression of adhesive and co-stimulation molecules in lymphocytes. The objective of this study was to determinate the effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the expression of prion protein PrPc on the surface peripheral blood lymphocytes in the women operating X-ray equipment. In female workers and persons of the control group the PrPc expression on CD3 (T-lymphocytes), Cd4 (T-helper), CD8 (T-cytotoxic) and CD19 (B- lymphocytes), were tested. We conclude that in women operating X-ray equipment the relationship between low doses of ionizing radiation and expression of PrPc on lymphocytes does exist concerning CD3, CD4 and CD lymphocytes. (author)

  7. Alzheimer ’s Disease: Possible Mechanisms Behind Neurohormesis Induced by Exposure to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevelacqua, J.J.; Mortazavi, S.M.J.

    2018-01-01

    In 2016, scientists reported that human exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (CT scans of the brain) might relieve symptoms of both Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD). The findings were unbelievable for those who were not familiar with neurohormesis. X-ray stimulation of the patient’s adaptive protection systems against neurodegenerative diseases was the mechanism proposed by those authors. Now, some more recent studies performed in the field of neurobiological research confirm that low levels of stress can produce protective responses against the pathogenic processes. This paper outlines possible protective consequences of LDR in preventing the pathogenesis of AD through mechanisms such as restoring the myelin sheath and preventing neurodegeneration caused by oxidative stress. Focal demyelination is frequently reported in the proximity of beta-amyloid plaques within neocortex. Extracellular accumulation of amyloid is among well-characterized pathological changes in AD. It should be noted that LDR has been shown to contribute to the regeneration and functional recovery after transverse peripheral nerve injury (through inducing increased production of VEGF and GAP-43), which advances both the axonal regeneration and myelination. Another mechanism which is possibly involved is preventing neurodegeneration caused by oxidative stress. While high doses can induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, oxidative stress and neuro-inflammation, substantial evidence now indicates that LDR can mitigate tissue damage through antioxidant defenses. Although adult neurogenesis has been reported to be beneficial for the regeneration of nervous system, some studies demonstrate that neurogenesis increases in AD brains. In spite of these reports, cellular therapy is introduced as a promising strategy for AD, and hence, LDR can affect the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Although such mechanisms are not fully known yet, it is hoped

  8. Clarifying the Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Reported Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on Cells - Clarifying the Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Producing the Reported Effects of Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willey, Neil J. [Centre for Research In Biosciences, University of the West of England, Coldharbour Lane, Frenchay, Bristol BS16 1QY (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Chronic low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) to cells, such as those that occur in contaminated environments, are widely reported to produce a variety of effects, from adverse effects to no effects to positive effects. In addition, bystander effects have been reported in some studies. For only relatively few of these effects have mechanistic explanations been reported but in many of those for which they have, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or the anti-oxidants that help to control their effects, have often been suggested to have a role. In general, it is assumed that either radiolysis of water or stress due to IR cause an increase in ROS and/or anti-oxidant activity, and hence the observed effects. The role of ROS in producing the effects reported at chronic low doses of radiation has infrequently been tested at either a theoretical or experimental level. Here we use a dynamic model of anti-oxidant capacity in cells to test the theoretical underpinnings of the ROS hypothesis together with genomic and proteomic experiments using Arabidopsis thaliana to test the molecular effects of IR in cells. The published model we have constructed for testing the interaction of IR and anti-oxidant systems (Smith et al, 2012) first calculates the amount of ROS produced by IR. Overall, at the dose rates that occur in contaminated environments the amount of ROS produced by IR is extremely small, certainly much smaller than is routinely produced in a cell during many metabolic processes. ROS from respiration leak out of mitochondria at significant rates and in plant cells ROS also leak out of photo-synthesizing chloroplasts. Although there is a variety of anti-oxidants in many cells, the nexus of their capacity is glutathione (GSH) which ultimately derives its reducing power from NADPH. We thus modeled the anti-oxidative capacity of a cell from the activity GSH and used predicted concentrations of ROS from IR to calculate the oxidative stress that they would cause via the

  9. Low-dose fractionated whole-body irradiation in the treatment of advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, N.C.; Timothy, A.R.; Kaufman, S.D.; Carey, R.W.; Aisenberg, A.C.

    1979-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients with advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (38 patients with lymphocytic lymphoma and 1 patient with mixed lymphocytic and histiocytic lymphoma) were treated by fractionated low dose whole body irradiation (WBI) with a minimum follow-up of 8 months. Twenty-eight patients had no previous treatment and the other 11 patients were in relapse after previous chemotherapy or regional radiotherapy. There were 20 and 19 patients in stages III and IV groups, respectively. The majority of patients (31) had nodular histology; diffuse lymphocytic lymphoma was present in 8 patients (Rappaport criteria) (9). Constitutional symptoms were present in 10 patients. Thirty-three (85%) attained complete remission (CR) with median duration of remission 24 months. Actuarial survival was 78% and 74% at 3 and 4 years. However, relapse free survival was 26% at 3 and 4 years. A prospective randomized trial to compare 10 vs. 15 rad per fraction of fractionated WBI schedules (the same total dose 150 rad) demonstrated no difference in response rate, response duration, and median nadir platelet or WBC counts between the two schedules. Supplement radiotherapy to bulky tumor site prevented local recurrence, but did not influence survival or duration or remission. Major toxicity was thrombocytopenia with median nadir platelet counts 77,000/mm 3 (11,000 to 170,000/mm 3 ). Five of 6 patients with diffuse lymphocytic poorly differentiated lymphoma attained CR. However, their median survival was 30 months which is much shorter than that of nodular lymphoma. Constitutional symptoms and advanced stage (stage IV) were associated with shorter duration of remission. Response of patients in relapse after WBI to subsequent chemotherapy +- local radiotherapy was CR in 50% and PR in 40%. Fractionated whole body irradiation is an excellent systemic induction agent for advanced lymphocytic and mixed lymphoma

  10. Pulsed dose rate and fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy: choice of brachytherapy schedules to replace low dose rate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Andries G.; Aardweg, Gerard J.M.J. van den; Levendag, Peter C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a new type of afterloading brachytherapy (BT) in which a continuous low dose rate (LDR) treatment is simulated by a series of 'pulses,' i.e., fractions of short duration (less than 0.5 h) with intervals between fractions of 1 to a few hours. At the Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, the term 'PDR brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with a large number of fractions (at least four per day), while the term 'fractionated high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with just one or two brachytherapy fractions per day. Both treatments can be applied as alternatives for LDR BT. This article deals with the choice between PDR and fractionated HDR schedules and proposes possible fractionation schedules. Methods and Materials: To calculate HDR and PDR fractionation schedules with the intention of being equivalent to LDR BT, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been used in an incomplete repair formulation as given by Brenner and Hall, and by Thames. In contrast to earlier applications of this model, both the total physical dose and the overall time were not kept identical for LDR and HDR/PDR schedules. A range of possible PDR treatment schedules is presented, both for booster applications (in combination with external radiotherapy (ERT) and for BT applications as a single treatment. Because the knowledge of both α/β values and the half time for repair of sublethal damage (T (1(2)) ), which are required for these calculations, is quite limited, calculations regarding the equivalence of LDR and PDR treatments have been performed for a wide range of values of α/β and T (1(2)) . The results are presented graphically as PDR/LDR dose ratios and as ratios of the PDR/LDR tumor control probabilities. Results: If the condition that total physical dose and overall time of a PDR treatment must be exactly identical to the values for the corresponding LDR treatment regimen is not applied, there appears

  11. Review and Evaluation of Updated Research on the Health Effects Associated with Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauer, Lawrence T.; Brooks, Antone L.; Hoel, David G.; Morgan, William F.; Stram, Daniel; Tran, Phung

    2010-01-01

    Potential health effects of low levels of radiation have predominantly been based on those effects observed at high levels of radiation. The authors have reviewed more than 200 percent publications in radiobiology and epidermiology related to low dose radiation and concluded that recent radiobiological studies at low-doses; that doses <100 mSv in a single exposure appear to be too small to allow epidermiological detection of statistically significant excess cancers in the presence of naturally occurring cancers; that low dose radiation research should to holistic, systems-based approaches to develop models that define the shape of the dose-response relationships at low doses; and that these results should be combined with the latest epidermiology to produce a comprehensive understanding of radiation effects that addresses both damage, likely with a linear effect, and response, possibly with non-linear consequences.

  12. Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Affects Mesenchymal Stem Cells via Extracellular Oxidized Cell-Free DNA: A Possible Mediator of Bystander Effect and Adaptive Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sergeeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We have hypothesized that the adaptive response to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR is mediated by oxidized cell-free DNA (cfDNA fragments. Here, we summarize our experimental evidence for this model. Studies involving measurements of ROS, expression of the NOX (superoxide radical production, induction of apoptosis and DNA double-strand breaks, antiapoptotic gene expression and cell cycle inhibition confirm this hypothesis. We have demonstrated that treatment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs with low doses of IR (10 cGy leads to cell death of part of cell population and release of oxidized cfDNA. cfDNA has the ability to penetrate into the cytoplasm of other cells. Oxidized cfDNA, like low doses of IR, induces oxidative stress, ROS production, ROS-induced oxidative modifications of nuclear DNA, DNA breaks, arrest of the cell cycle, activation of DNA reparation and antioxidant response, and inhibition of apoptosis. The MSCs pretreated with low dose of irradiation or oxidized cfDNA were equally effective in induction of adaptive response to challenge further dose of radiation. Our studies suggest that oxidized cfDNA is a signaling molecule in the stress signaling that mediates radiation-induced bystander effects and that it is an important component of the development of radioadaptive responses to low doses of IR.

  13. Protecting effects specifically from low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells challenge the concept of linearity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Sondhaus, C.A.; Altman, K.I.

    1998-01-01

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced changes in intracellular signaling that induce mechanisms of DNA damage control different from those operating at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that by use of microdosimetric concepts, the energy deposited in cell mass can be related to the occurrence of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive

  14. Protecting effects specifically from low doses of ionizing radiation to mammalian cells challenge the concept of linearity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.; Bond, V.P. [Washington State Univ., Richland, WA (United States); Sondhaus, C.A. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Control Office; Altman, K.I. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics

    1998-12-31

    This report examines the origin of tissue effects that may follow from different cellular responses to low-dose irradiation, using published data. Two principal categories of cellular responses are considered. One response category relates to the probability of radiation-induced DNA damage. The other category consists of low-dose induced changes in intracellular signaling that induce mechanisms of DNA damage control different from those operating at high levels of exposure. Modeled in this way, tissue is treated as a complex adaptive system. The interaction of the various cellular responses results in a net tissue dose-effect relation that is likely to deviate from linearity in the low-dose region. This suggests that the LNT hypothesis should be reexamined. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that by use of microdosimetric concepts, the energy deposited in cell mass can be related to the occurrence of cellular responses, both damaging and defensive.

  15. Relationship between dose and risk, and assessment of carcinogenic risks associated with low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.; Aurengo, A.

    2005-01-01

    This report raises doubts on the validity of using LNT (linear no-threshold) relationship for evaluating the carcinogenic risk of low doses (< 100 mSv) and even more for very low doses (< 10 mSv). The LNT concept can be a useful pragmatic tool for assessing rules in radioprotection for doses above 10 mSv; however since it is not based on biological concepts of our current knowledge, it should not be used without precaution for assessing by extrapolation the risks associated with low and even more so, with very low doses (< 10 mSv), especially for benefit-risk assessments imposed on radiologists by the European directive 97-43. The biological mechanisms are different for doses lower than a few dozen mSv and for higher doses. The eventual risks in the dose range of radiological examinations (0.1 to 5 mSv, up to 20 mSv for some examinations) must be estimated taking into account radiobiological and experimental data. An empirical relationship which has been just validated for doses higher than 200 mSv may lead to an overestimation of risks (associated with doses one hundred fold lower), and this overestimation could discourage patients from undergoing useful examinations and introduce a bias in radioprotection measures against very low doses (< 10 mSv). Decision makers confronted with problems of radioactive waste or risk of contamination, should re-examine the methodology used for the evaluation of risks associated with very low doses and with doses delivered at a very low dose rate. This report confirms the inappropriateness of the collective dose concept to evaluate population irradiation risks

  16. A generalised formulation of the 'incomplete-repair' model for cell survival and tissue response to fractionated low dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, P.; Joiner, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    A generalized equation for cell survival or tissue effects after fractionated low dose-rate irradiations, when there is incomplete repair between fractions and significant repair during fractions, is derived in terms of the h- and g-functions of the 'incomplete-repair' (IR) model. The model is critically dependent on α/β, repair half-time, treatment time and interfraction interval, and should therefore be regarded primarily as a tool for the analysis of fractionation and dose-rate effects in carefully designed radiobiological experiments, although it should also be useful in exploring, in a general way, the feasibility of clinical treatment protocols using fractionated low dose-rate treatments. (author)

  17. Low-dose ionizing irradiation triggers a 53BP1 response to DNA double strand breaks in mouse spermatogonial stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Wei; Qi, Lixin; Li, Jiaxuan; Wu, DengIong; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Jinfu

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to examine the effect of low-dose ionizing irradiation on DNA double strand breaks (DSB) in mouse spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) and reveal the underlying pathways for the DNA repair for DSB in SSCs. Eighteen one-month-old mice were divided into 6 groups and sacrificed separately at 45 minutes, 2 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after 0.1Gy X-ray irradiation (mice without receiving ionizing irradiation served as control). After perfusion fixation, testes were removed, sectioned, and followed by staining of γH2AX, 53BP1, Caspase 3, and promyelocytic leukemia zinc-finger (PLZF) for analysis among the different groups. The staining was observed by immunofluorescence visualized by confocal laser scanning. After low-dose irradiation, only 53BP1, but not Caspase3 or γH2AX was upregulated in PLZF positive SSCs within 45 minutes. The expression level of 53BP1 gradually decreased 24 hours after irradiation. Moreover, low-dose irradiation had no effect on the cell number and apoptotic status of SSCs. However other spermatogenic cells highly expressed γH2AX shortly after irradiation which was dramatically reduced following the events of DNA repair. It appears that low-dose ionizing irradiation may cause the DNA DSB of mouse spermatogenic cells. 53BP1, but not γH2AX, is involved in the DNA repair for DSB in SSCs. Our data indicates that 53BP1 plays an important role in the pathophysiological repair of DNA DSB in SSCs. This may open a new avenue to understanding the mechanisms of DNA repair of SSCs and male infertility.

  18. The effect of low dose ionizing radiation on homeostasis and functional integrity in an organotypic human skin model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubeck, Claere von [German Cancer Consortium DKTK partner site Dresden, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universität Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Geniza, Matthew J. [Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, Oregon State University, Corvallis OR 97331 (United States); Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, R. Joe; Chrisler, William B. [Health Impacts and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 (United States); Sowa, Marianne B., E-mail: marianne.sowa@pnnl.gov [Health Impacts and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Low doses of high LET radiation influence skin homeostasis. • Effects on proliferation and differentiation profiles are LET dependent. • Skin barrier function is not compromised following low dose exposure. - Abstract: Outside the protection of Earth's atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Future NASA plans for deep space missions or a permanent settlement on the moon are limited by the health risks associated with space radiation exposures. There is a paucity of direct epidemiological data for low dose exposures to space radiation-relevant high LET ions. Health risk models are used to estimate the risk for such exposures, though these models are based on high dose experiments. There is increasing evidence, however, that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events at the molecular level, and may involve different response mechanisms. Further, despite their low abundance, high LET particles have been identified as the major contributor to health risk during manned space flight. The human skin is exposed in every external radiation scenario, making it an ideal epithelial tissue model in which to study radiation induced effects. Here, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional (3-D) human organotypic skin tissue model to low doses of high LET oxygen (O), silicon (Si) and iron (Fe) ions. We measured proliferation and differentiation profiles in the skin tissue and examined the integrity of the skin's barrier function. We discuss the role of secondary particles in changing the proportion of cells receiving a radiation dose, emphasizing the possible impact on radiation-induced health issues in astronauts.

  19. Low-dose fractionated radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy for recurrent or progressive glioblastoma. Final report of a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balducci, M.; Diletto, B.; Chiesa, S.; D' Agostino, G.R.; Gambacorta, M.A.; Ferro, M.; Valentini, V. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rome (Italy); Colosimo, C. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Maira, G.; Anile, C. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Neurosurgery, Rome (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    Evaluated in this study were the feasibility and the efficacy of concurrent low dose fractionated radiotherapy (LD-FRT) and chemotherapy as palliative treatment for recurrent/progressive glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Eligible patients had recurrent or progressive GBM, Karnofsky performance status ≥70, prior surgery, and standard radiochemotherapy treatment. Recurrence/progression disease during temozolomide (TMZ) received cisplatin (CDDP; 30 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1, 8, 15), fotemustine (FTM; 40 mg/m{sup 2} on days 2, 9, 16), and concurrent LD-FRT (0.3 Gy twice daily); recurrence/progression after 4 months from the end of adjuvant TMZ were treated by TMZ (150/200 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5) concomitant with LD-FRT (0.4 Gy twice daily). Primary endpoints were safety and toxicity. A total of 32 patients were enrolled. Hematologic toxicity G1-2 was observed in 18.7% of patients and G3-4 in 9.4%. One patient (3.1%) had complete response, 3 (9.4%) had partial response, 8 (25%) had stable disease for at least 8 weeks, while 20 patients (62.5%) experienced progressive disease. The clinical benefit was 37.5%. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 5 and 8 months, respectively. Survival rate at 12 months was of 27.8%. LD-FRT and chemotherapy for recurrent/progressive GBM have a good toxicity profile and clinical outcomes, even though further investigation of this novel palliative treatment approach is warranted. (orig.)

  20. The potential impact of low dose ionizing γ-radiation on immune response activity up-regulated by Ikaros in IM-9 B lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Sung Jn; Jang, Seon A; Yang, Kwang Hee; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Cha Soon; Nam, Seon Young; Jeong, Mee Seon; Jin, Young Woo

    2011-01-01

    The biological effects of low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) remain insufficiently understood. We examined for the scientific evidence to show the biological effects of LDIR using radiation-sensitive immune cells. We found that Ikaros protein was responded to low dose-dependent effects of gamma radiation in IM-9 B lymphocytes. Ikaros encodes zinc finger transcription factors that is important regulators of a hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) progression to the B lymphoid lineage development, differentiation and proliferation. In this study, we observed that cell proliferation was enhanced from 10% to 20% by LDIR (0.05 Gy) in IM-9 B lymphocytes. The Ikaros protein was phosphorylated in its serine/threonine (S/T) region and decreased its DNA binding activity in the cells exposed to LDIR. We found that Ikaros phosphorylation was up-regulated by CK2/AKT pathway and the residues of ser-304 and ser-306 in Ikaros was phosphorylated by LDIR. We also observed that Ikaros protein was localized from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after LDIR and bound with Autotaxin (ENPP2, ATX) protein, stimulating proliferation, migration and survival of immune cells. In addition, we found that the lysoPLD activity of ATX was dependent on Ikaros-ATX binding activity. These results indicate that the Ikaros is an important regulator of immune activation. Therefore, we suggest that low dose ionizing radiation can be considered as a beneficial effects, stimulating the activation of immune cells.

  1. Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiations. Evidence of effect of pre-irradiation of culture medium on subsequent growth in Cyanobacterium Synechococcus lividus in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conter, A.; Planel, H.

    1986-01-01

    In order to distinguish the direct effects of low dose of ionizing radiations at the cellular level from those indirect through the culture medium, we have compared proliferation of Synechococcus lividus grown in pre-irradiated medium to proliferation of cultures grown in non-irradiated medium. A stimulation of growth was observed at the 7th day in cultures inoculated with cells selected in deceleration phase, while an inhibition occured in cultures inoculated with exponential growing cells. Addition of catalase (100 U/ml) counteracted the stimulating effect but did not change the inhibiting effect induced by pre-irradiated medium. Results demonstrated the indirect effect of low dose of irradiation, implying hydrogen peroxide, but let us to think that others radioproduced products could be also involved in the mechanism [fr

  2. Combined action of low doses of Ionizing Radiation, Electromagnetic Fields, and Homeopathic Remedies of low dilution on Ionic Homeostasis of a Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadareishvili, G.

    2006-01-01

    It is known fact that low doses of ionizing radiation, electromagnetic fields (EMF) of certain frequency, and a number of homeopathic remedies produce stimulating effect in the cellular ionic homeostasis. The objective of present study was investigation of combined, simultaneous action of these three factors. The mice fibroblasts served as cell source. With an aid of ion-selective electrodes the sum effect of the following factors was evaluated: low dose irradiation (0.05 Gy), EMF (45 Hz, 2 mT), and stimulated phosphoric acid (homeopathic preparation diluted at 10 -14 ). It was found that integral index of the ionic homeostasis during above action, was higher than after action of any of these factors separately. It is suggested that these data point at beneficial action of the homeopathic remedy and it should be considered when promoting the homeopathic means of therapy. (author)

  3. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averbeck, D.

    1999-01-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  4. Treatment results by uneven fractionated irradiation, low-dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost, and intraoperative irradiation for malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Shogo; Takai, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Kenji; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Kakuto, Yoshihisa; Hoshi, Akihiko; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko; Kayama, Takamasa; Yoshimoto, Takashi (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-08-01

    The prognosis of malignant glioma is extremely poor. We applied conventionally fractionated irradiation combined with 1-(4-aminio-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosourea (ACNU), uneven fractionated irradiation with ACNU, low dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost, and intraoperative irradiation against 110 malignant gliomas to investigate the efficacy of these methods as alternative treatments for malignant glioma. Although local tumor control by uneven fractionated irradiation was better than that by the other methods, no significant improvement was obtained in survival rates. As a result of multiple regression analysis, age and histology were major factors for survival rates, and the difference of treatment methods was not important. Both low-dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost and intraoperative irradiation showed little advantage because of the high risk of brain necrosis associated with them. (author).

  5. Influence mechanism of low-dose ionizing radiation on Escherichia coli DH5α population based on plasma theory and system dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yi; Hu, Dawei; Li, Liang; Jing, Zheng; Wei, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Lantao; Fu, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    It remains a mystery why the growth rate of bacteria is higher in low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) environment than that in normal environment. In this study, a hypothesis composed of environmental selection and competitive exclusion was firstly proposed from observed phenomena, experimental data and microbial ecology. Then a LDIR environment simulator (LDIRES) was built to cultivate a model organism of bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) DH5α, the accurate response of bacterial population to ionizing radiation intensity variation was measured experimentally, and then the precise relative dosage of ionizing radiation E. coli DH5α population received was calculated by finite element analysis based on drift-diffusion equations of plasma. Finally, a highly valid mathematical model expressing the relationship between E. coli DH5α population and LDIR intensity was developed by system dynamics based on hypotheses, experimental data and microbial ecology. Both experiment and simulation results clearly showed that the E. coli DH5α individuals with greater specific growth rate and lower substrate consumption coefficient would adapt and survive in LDIR environment and those without such adaptability were finally eliminated under the combined effects of ionizing radiation selection and competitive exclusion. - Highlights: • Establishment of a low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) environment simulator. • Escherichiacoli DH5α was selected as a bacterial representative for investigation. • Precise LDIR intensity for E. coli DH5α was calculated by FEA and plasma theory. • Development of system dynamics model of LDIR influence on E. coli DH5α population. • Mechanism of bacterial boom in LDIR environment was elucidated by computer simulation.

  6. The effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the development of rat cerebral cortex, (2); In vitro study with regards to neuronal migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Koji [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1993-03-01

    In order to study the molecular mechanisms of neuronal migration on developing rat cerebral cortex, we need a tissue culture system in which neuronal migration can be observed. We prepared a tissue culture system of embryonic rat cerebral cortex starting on embryonic day 16 and cultivating it for 48 hours. The autoradiographic study in this system revealed not only the migration of [sup 3]H-thymidine labeled neurons but also neuronal migration delays from low doses of ionizing radiation of more than 10 cGy. In addition, on immunohistochemical study, cell-cell adhesion molecule N-CAM staining was remarkably decreased in the matrix cell layer. In the tissue culture system where monoclonal anti-N-CAM antibodies were added, neuronal migration delay comparable to that of 20 cGy radiation was found. In conclusion, it was speculated that neuronal migration delay might be caused by disturbed N-CAM synthesis in matrix cells after low dose ionizing radiation. (author).

  7. Site-Specific Phosphorylation of Ikaros Induced by Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Regulates Cell Cycle Progression of B Lymphoblast Through CK2 and AKT Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong-Jun; Kang, Hana; Kim, Min Young; Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Sung Jin; Nam, Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Hee Sun; Pyo, Suhkneung; Yang, Kwang Hee

    2016-04-01

    To determine how low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) regulates B lympho-proliferation and its molecular mechanism related with Ikaros, transcription factor. Splenocytes and IM-9 cells were uniformly irradiated with various doses of a (137)Cs γ-source, and cell proliferation was analyzed. To determine the LDIR-specific phosphorylation of Ikaros, immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis were performed. To investigate the physiologic function of LDIR-mediatied Ikaros phosphorylation, Ikaros mutants at phosphorylation sites were generated, and cell cycle analysis was performed. First, we found that LDIR enhances B lymphoblast proliferation in an Ikaros-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that LDIR elevates the phosphorylation level of Ikaros protein. Interestingly, we showed that CK2 and AKT are involved in LDIR-induced Ikaros phosphorylation and capable of regulating DNA binding activity of Ikaros via specific phosphorylation. Finally, we identified LDIR-specific Ikaros phosphorylation sites at S391/S393 and showed that the Ikaros phosphorylations at these sites control Ikaros's ability to regulate G1/S cell cycle progression. Low-dose ionizing radiation specifically phosphorylates Ikaros protein at Ser 391/393 residues to regulate cell cycle progression in B lymphoblast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Site-Specific Phosphorylation of Ikaros Induced by Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Regulates Cell Cycle Progression of B Lymphoblast Through CK2 and AKT Activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seong-Jun; Kang, Hana; Kim, Min Young; Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Sung Jin; Nam, Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Hee Sun; Pyo, Suhkneung; Yang, Kwang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine how low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) regulates B lympho-proliferation and its molecular mechanism related with Ikaros, transcription factor. Methods and Materials: Splenocytes and IM-9 cells were uniformly irradiated with various doses of a "1"3"7Cs γ-source, and cell proliferation was analyzed. To determine the LDIR-specific phosphorylation of Ikaros, immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis were performed. To investigate the physiologic function of LDIR-mediatied Ikaros phosphorylation, Ikaros mutants at phosphorylation sites were generated, and cell cycle analysis was performed. Results: First, we found that LDIR enhances B lymphoblast proliferation in an Ikaros-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that LDIR elevates the phosphorylation level of Ikaros protein. Interestingly, we showed that CK2 and AKT are involved in LDIR-induced Ikaros phosphorylation and capable of regulating DNA binding activity of Ikaros via specific phosphorylation. Finally, we identified LDIR-specific Ikaros phosphorylation sites at S391/S393 and showed that the Ikaros phosphorylations at these sites control Ikaros's ability to regulate G1/S cell cycle progression. Conclusion: Low-dose ionizing radiation specifically phosphorylates Ikaros protein at Ser 391/393 residues to regulate cell cycle progression in B lymphoblast.

  9. Combined Impact of low dose Ionizing Radiation, Electromagnetic Field, and Homeopathic Remedy at low Dilution on the Transmembrane Transport of Na+, K+ and Ca2+ in Tumor Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadareishvili, G.

    2006-01-01

    Influence of different agents on the ionic homeostasis of the tumor cells has its specificity - transmembrane transport is faster and these cells are more sensitive to various agents. It is known fact that low doses of ionizing radiation, electromagnetic fields (EMF) of certain frequency, and a number of homeopathic remedies produce stimulating effect in the cellular ionic homeostasis. The objective of present study was investigation of combined, simultaneous action of these three factors. The cell of Ehrlich carcinoma served as major material. With an aid of ion-selective electrodes the sum effect of the following factors was evaluated: low dose irradiation (0.05 Gy), EMF (45 Hz, 2 mT), and stimulated phosphoric acid (homeopathic preparation diluted at 10 -14 ). It was found that integral index of the ionic homeostasis during above action, was higher than after action of any of these factors separately. On the other hand, if dose of ionizing radiation was increased to 0.5 Gy, which is known to inhibit ionic transport, the sum effect was decreased. (author)

  10. Site-Specific Phosphorylation of Ikaros Induced by Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Regulates Cell Cycle Progression of B Lymphoblast Through CK2 and AKT Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seong-Jun; Kang, Hana [KHNP Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Young [Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Sciences, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Sung Jin; Nam, Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Hee Sun [KHNP Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Suhkneung [College of Pharmacy, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Kwang Hee, E-mail: kwangheey@khnp.co.kr [KHNP Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To determine how low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) regulates B lympho-proliferation and its molecular mechanism related with Ikaros, transcription factor. Methods and Materials: Splenocytes and IM-9 cells were uniformly irradiated with various doses of a {sup 137}Cs γ-source, and cell proliferation was analyzed. To determine the LDIR-specific phosphorylation of Ikaros, immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis were performed. To investigate the physiologic function of LDIR-mediatied Ikaros phosphorylation, Ikaros mutants at phosphorylation sites were generated, and cell cycle analysis was performed. Results: First, we found that LDIR enhances B lymphoblast proliferation in an Ikaros-dependent manner. Moreover, we found that LDIR elevates the phosphorylation level of Ikaros protein. Interestingly, we showed that CK2 and AKT are involved in LDIR-induced Ikaros phosphorylation and capable of regulating DNA binding activity of Ikaros via specific phosphorylation. Finally, we identified LDIR-specific Ikaros phosphorylation sites at S391/S393 and showed that the Ikaros phosphorylations at these sites control Ikaros's ability to regulate G1/S cell cycle progression. Conclusion: Low-dose ionizing radiation specifically phosphorylates Ikaros protein at Ser 391/393 residues to regulate cell cycle progression in B lymphoblast.

  11. Effect of anxiolytic aphobazole on hemopoietic system under exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and emotional stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, B.B.; Deshevoj, Yu.B.; Seredenin, S.B.; Lyrshchikova, A.V.; Lebedev, V.G.

    2001-01-01

    Effect of aphobazole in investigated on the course of adaptation reactions and state of compensatory capabilities of hemopoietic system of rats-males under long-term emotional stress developed following the low-dose gamma-radiation. Gamma-quanta from 137 Cs source at 0.9 Gy dose (1.3 Gy/min dose rate) were used for single and uniform irradiation of animals. Two days later rats were exposed to long-term emotional stress. Aphobazole at the dose of 10.0 mg/kg was incorporated into rats once a day. It is shown that aphobazole permits to stop the violations in adaptation reactions and compensatory capabilities of hemopoietic system under conditions of emotional stress development in the early period following the exposure to gamma radiation at 0.9 Gy dose [ru

  12. Augmentation of natural cytotoxicity by chronic low-dose ionizing radiation in murine natural killer cells primed by IL-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonn, Chung-Hee; Choi, Jong-Rip; Kim, Tae-Jin

    2012-01-01

    The possible beneficial effects of chronic low-dose irradiation (LDR) and its mechanism of action in a variety of pathophysiological processes such as cancer are a subject of intense investigation. While animal studies involving long-term exposure to LDR have yielded encouraging results, the influence of LDR at the cellular level has been less well defined. We reasoned that since natural killer (NK) cells constitute an early responder to exogenous stress, NK cells may reveal sentinel alterations in function upon exposure to LDR. When purified NK cells received LDR at 4.2 mGy/h for a total of 0.2 Gy in vitro, no significant difference in cell viability was observed. Likewise, no functional changes were detected in LDR-exposed NK cells, demonstrating that LDR alone was insufficient to generate changes at the cellular level. Nonetheless, significant augmentation of cytotoxic, but not proliferative, function was detected when NK cells were stimulated with low-dose IL-2 prior to irradiation. This enhancement of NK cytotoxicity was not due to alterations in NK-activating receptors, NK1.1, NKG2D, CD69 and 2B4, or changes in the rate of early or late apoptosis. Therefore, LDR, in the presence of suboptimal cytokine levels, can facilitate anti-tumor cytotoxicity of NK cells without influencing cellular proliferation or apoptosis. Whether these results translate to in vivo consequences remains to be seen; however, our data provide initial evidence that exposure to LDR can lead to subtle immune-enhancing effects on NK cells and may explain, in part, the functional basis underlying, diverse beneficial effects seen in the animals chronically exposed to LDR. (author)

  13. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the gene expression of hemopoietic factors of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirata, Katsutoshi; Saitou, Mikio; Yanai, Takanori; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Science, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of prolonged low-dose irradiation on the gene expression of hemopoietic factors in tissues, gene expression was analyzed in the spleen as a hemopoietic tissue that is well known to be one of the most sensitive tissues to irradiation. SPF C3H/HeN female mice (Clea Japan Inc.) were irradiated under SPF conditions with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays at doses of 2, 4, 6, and 8 Gy and a dose rate of 20 mGy/day. Non-irradiated mice of the same age were maintained as controls. At the end of the period of irradiation, both groups of mice were sacrificed and dissected to extract total RNA from their tissues. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and the Northern hybridization were employed to detect gene expression. RT-PCT showed no marked changes in the gene expression of GM-CSF. IL-6 gene expression was shown to tend to be enhanced by prolonged low-dose irradiation. The results of Northern hybridization showed that IL-6 mRNA was expressed slightly in both groups, and it was too weak to compare the difference in mRNA expression level between the irradiated group and the controls. No mRNA expression of GM-CSF was detected by Northern hybridization. Based on these results, it was concluded that the gene expression levels of IL-6 and GM-CSF were inadequate to detect the chemiluminescence signals without amplification. It was therefore concluded that improvement of detection sensitivity and larger RNA samples would be necessary for further analysis of the gene expression of hemopoietic factors. (K.H.)

  14. Adaptive Response to ionizing Radiation Induced by Low Doses of Gamma Rays in Human Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jin Sil; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Gwi Eon

    1994-01-01

    When cells are exposed to low doses of a mutagenic or clastogenic agents, they often become less sensitive to the effects of a higher does administered subsequently. Such adaptive responses were first described in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells to low doses of an alkylating agent. Since most of the studies have been carried out with human lymphocytes, it is urgently necessary to study this effect in different cellular systems. Its relation with inherent cellular radiosensitivity and underlying mechanism also remain to be answered. In this study, adaptive response by 1 cGy of gamma rays was investigated in three human lymphoblastoid cell lines which were derived from ataxia telangiectasia homozygote, ataxia telangiectasia heterozygote, and normal individual. Experiments were carried out by delivering 1 cGy followed by 50 cGy of gamma radiation and chromatid breaks were scored as an endpoint. The results indicate that prior exposure to 1 cGy of gamma rays reduces the number of chromatid breaks induced by subsequent higher does (50 cGy). The expression of this adaptive response was similar among three cell lines despite of their different radiosensitivity. When 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, was added after 50 cGy, adaptive responses were abolished in all the tested cell lines. Therefore it is suggested that the adaptive response can be observed in human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Which was first documented through this study. The expression of adaptive response was similar among the cell lines regardless of their radiosensitivity. The elimination of the adaptive response by 3-aminobenzamide is consistent with the proposal that this adaptive response is the result of the induction of a certain chromosomal repair mechanism

  15. Evaluation of the genotoxic effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure on nuclear medicine workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Ali [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Medical School, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey)], E-mail: alibabam2001@yahoo.com; Tatar, Abdulgani; Oztas, Sitki [Department of Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Seven, Bedri; Varoglu, Erhan [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Medical School, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Yesilyurt, Ahmet [Department of Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, Ataturk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Ayan, Arif Kursad [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Medical School, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2009-07-15

    Introduction: Nuclear medicine workers are occupationally exposed to chronic ionizing radiation. It is known that ionizing radiation may have damaging effects on chromosomes. In the present study, we investigated the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation on nuclear medicine workers. We used two different indicators of genotoxicity methods: sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronucleus (MN). Methods: The present research was carried out using 21 nuclear medicine workers (11 females and 10 males) during two periods: during normal working conditions and after a 1-month vacation. The radiation dose varied from 1.20 to 48.56 mSv, which accumulated during the occupational exposure time between two vacations. Peripheral blood samples were taken from each subject for two distinct lymphocyte cultures (SCE and MN) in each period. Results: In nearly all subjects, SCE values increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Similarly, MN frequencies in most of the subjects increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Conclusions: This study revealed that both SCE and MN frequencies in most of the subjects were significantly higher during exposure to ionizing radiation than after a 1-month vacation period. However, this genotoxic effect was reversible in most of the subjects.

  16. Evaluation of the genotoxic effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation exposure on nuclear medicine workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Ali; Tatar, Abdulgani; Oztas, Sitki; Seven, Bedri; Varoglu, Erhan; Yesilyurt, Ahmet; Ayan, Arif Kursad

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Nuclear medicine workers are occupationally exposed to chronic ionizing radiation. It is known that ionizing radiation may have damaging effects on chromosomes. In the present study, we investigated the genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation on nuclear medicine workers. We used two different indicators of genotoxicity methods: sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and micronucleus (MN). Methods: The present research was carried out using 21 nuclear medicine workers (11 females and 10 males) during two periods: during normal working conditions and after a 1-month vacation. The radiation dose varied from 1.20 to 48.56 mSv, which accumulated during the occupational exposure time between two vacations. Peripheral blood samples were taken from each subject for two distinct lymphocyte cultures (SCE and MN) in each period. Results: In nearly all subjects, SCE values increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Similarly, MN frequencies in most of the subjects increased significantly during radiation exposure compared to the postvacation period (P<.05). Conclusions: This study revealed that both SCE and MN frequencies in most of the subjects were significantly higher during exposure to ionizing radiation than after a 1-month vacation period. However, this genotoxic effect was reversible in most of the subjects.

  17. Spectrum of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes of hospital workers occupationally exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maffei, Francesca; Angelini, Sabrina; Forti, Giorgio Cantelli; Violante, Francesco S.; Lodi, Vittorio; Mattioli, Stefano; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2004-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations frequency was estimated in peripheral lymphocytes from hospital workers occupationally exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation and controls. Chromosome aberrations yield was analyzed by considering the effects of dose equivalent of ionizing radiation over time, and of confounding factors, such as age, gender and smoking status. Frequencies of aberrant cells and chromosome breaks were higher in exposed workers than in controls (P=0.007, and P=0.001, respectively). Seven dicentric aberrations were detected in the exposed group and only three in controls, but the mean frequencies were not significantly different. The dose equivalent to whole body of ionizing radiation (Hwb) did appear to influence the spectrum of chromosomal aberrations when the exposed workers were subdivided by a cut off at 50 mSv. The frequencies of chromosome breaks in both subgroups of workers were significantly higher than in controls (≤50 mSv, P=0.041; >50 mSv, P=0.018). On the other hand, the frequency of chromatid breaks observed in workers with Hwb >50 mSv was significantly higher than in controls (P=0.015) or workers with Hwb ≤50 mSv (P=0.046). Regarding the influence of confounding factors on genetic damage, smoking status and female gender seem to influence the increase in chromosome aberration frequencies in the study population. Overall, these results suggested that chromosome breaks might provide a good marker for assessing genetic damage in populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation

  18. Influence mechanism of low-dose ionizing radiation on Escherichia coli DH5α population based on plasma theory and system dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Hu, Dawei; Li, Liang; Jing, Zheng; Wei, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Lantao; Fu, Yuming; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    It remains a mystery why the growth rate of bacteria is higher in low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) environment than that in normal environment. In this study, a hypothesis composed of environmental selection and competitive exclusion was firstly proposed from observed phenomena, experimental data and microbial ecology. Then a LDIR environment simulator (LDIRES) was built to cultivate a model organism of bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) DH5α, the accurate response of bacterial population to ionizing radiation intensity variation was measured experimentally, and then the precise relative dosage of ionizing radiation E. coli DH5α population received was calculated by finite element analysis based on drift-diffusion equations of plasma. Finally, a highly valid mathematical model expressing the relationship between E. coli DH5α population and LDIR intensity was developed by system dynamics based on hypotheses, experimental data and microbial ecology. Both experiment and simulation results clearly showed that the E. coli DH5α individuals with greater specific growth rate and lower substrate consumption coefficient would adapt and survive in LDIR environment and those without such adaptability were finally eliminated under the combined effects of ionizing radiation selection and competitive exclusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of low dose of ionizing radiation and psycho emotional stress on the behaviour of laboratory rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudnev, M.I.; Varetskij, V.V.; Snezhko, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    Central nervous system activation, accompanied by decline of short-term memory was observed in the radial maze in rats exposed to ionizing radiation at dose of 0.5 Gy. Irradiated animals as compared to those exposed to stress, showed inhibition of exploratory activity. This resulted in some automation in the performance. Exposure to psycho emotional stress after irradiation significantly modified the animal behaviour causing inhibition of central nervous system accompanied by decline of long-term memory. (author)

  20. The Effects of Low Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation on the Shapes of Transients in the LM124 Operational Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Stephen; McMorrow, Dale; Roche, Nicholas; Dusseau, Laurent; Pease, Ron L.

    2008-01-01

    Shapes of single event transients (SETs) in a linear bipolar circuit (LM124) change with exposure to total ionizing dose (TID) radiation. SETs shape changes are a direct consequence of TID-induced degradation of bipolar transistor gain. A reduction in transistor gain causes a reduction in the drive current of the current sources in the circuit, and it is the lower drive current that most affects the shapes of large amplitude SETs.

  1. Low dose ionizing radiation exposure and cardiovascular disease mortality: cohort study based on Canadian national dose registry of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, J. M.; Band, P. R.; Ashmore, P. J.; Jiang, H.; Shilnikova, N. S.; Tait, V. K.; Krewski, D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to assess the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in a Canadian cohort of 337 397 individuals (169 256 men and 168 141 women) occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and included in the National Dose Registry (NDR) of Canada. Material and Methods: Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, such as those received during radiotherapy, leads to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. The emerging evidence of excess risk of CVDs after exposure to doses well below those previously considered as safe warrants epidemiological studies of populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the cohort consisted of employees at nuclear power stations (nuclear workers) as well as medical, dental and industrial workers. The mean whole body radiation dose was 8.6 mSv for men and 1.2 mSv for women. Results: During the study period (1951 - 1995), as many as 3 533 deaths from cardiovascular diseases have been identified (3 018 among men and 515 among women). In the cohort, CVD mortality was significantly lower than in the general population of Canada. The cohort showed a significant dose response both among men and women. Risk estimates of CVD mortality in the NDR cohort, when expressed as excess relative risk per unit dose, were higher than those in most other occupational cohorts and higher than in the studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Conclusions: The study has demonstrated a strong positive association between radiation dose and the risk of CVD mortality. Caution needs to be exercised when interpreting these results, due to the potential bias introduced by dosimetry uncertainties, the possible record linkage errors, and especially by the lack of adjustment for non-radiation risk factors. (authors)

  2. Histogenetic disorders of cerebral cortex induced by in utero exposure to low-doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushiki, Shinji; Kinoshita, Chikako; Hyodo-Taguchi, Yasuko; Ishikawa, Yuji; Hirobe, Tomohisa

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the short- and long-term effects of low-level ionizing radiation on cell migration in the developing cerebral cortex of mice and rats, we irradiated them at the middle of cortical histogenesis with either γ-rays or X-rays. We have demonstrated an effect of ionizing radiation on neuronal migration at doses as low as 0.15 Gy together with a changing pattern of expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule N-CAM. Our findings suggest a possible role of N-CAM in neuronal migration and suggest the presence of a threshold in terms of the effects of small radiation doses on the developing cerebral cortex. In addition, the effects of radiation on neuronal migration during the embryonic stage remained even after birth in that aberrantly placed neurons were noted in the cerebral cortex. However, such derangement was less pronounced in mature animals compared to younger ones. These observations suggest that some modification process including apoptosis might have occurred during the postnatal period. In this review, molecular pathogenesis of neuronal migration disorders will also be discussed, based upon recent experimental as well as molecular genetic studies. (author)

  3. Gamma Low-Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Adaptive Functional and Molecular Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells in a Threshold-, Dose-, and Dose Rate-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Dias, Juliana; Gloaguen, Celine; Kereselidze, Dimitri; Manens, Line; Tack, Karine; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2018-01-01

    A central question in radiation protection research is whether low-dose and low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures to ionizing radiation play a role in progression of cardiovascular disease. The response of endothelial cells to different LDR exposures may help estimate risk of cardiovascular disease by providing the biological mechanism involved. We investigated the effect of chronic LDR radiation on functional and molecular responses of human aorta endothelial cells (HAoECs). Human aorta endothelial cells were continuously irradiated at LDR (6 mGy/h) for 15 days and analyzed at time points when the cumulative dose reached 0.05, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy. The same doses were administered acutely at high-dose rate (HDR; 1 Gy/min). The threshold for the loss of angiogenic capacity for both LDR and HDR radiations was between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. At 2.0 Gy, angiogenic capacity returned to normal only for HAoEC exposed to LDR radiation, associated with increased expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes. Pre-LDR, but not pre-HDR, radiation, followed by a single acute 2.0 Gy challenge dose sustained the expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes and stimulated angiogenesis. Our results suggest that dose rate is important in cellular response and that a radioadaptive response is involved for a 2.0 Gy dose at LDR.

  4. Gamma Low-Dose-Rate Ionizing Radiation Stimulates Adaptive Functional and Molecular Response in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells in a Threshold-, Dose-, and Dose Rate–Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Dias, Juliana; Gloaguen, Celine; Kereselidze, Dimitri; Manens, Line; Tack, Karine; Ebrahimian, Teni G

    2018-01-01

    A central question in radiation protection research is whether low-dose and low-dose-rate (LDR) exposures to ionizing radiation play a role in progression of cardiovascular disease. The response of endothelial cells to different LDR exposures may help estimate risk of cardiovascular disease by providing the biological mechanism involved. We investigated the effect of chronic LDR radiation on functional and molecular responses of human aorta endothelial cells (HAoECs). Human aorta endothelial cells were continuously irradiated at LDR (6 mGy/h) for 15 days and analyzed at time points when the cumulative dose reached 0.05, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 Gy. The same doses were administered acutely at high-dose rate (HDR; 1 Gy/min). The threshold for the loss of angiogenic capacity for both LDR and HDR radiations was between 0.5 and 1.0 Gy. At 2.0 Gy, angiogenic capacity returned to normal only for HAoEC exposed to LDR radiation, associated with increased expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes. Pre-LDR, but not pre-HDR, radiation, followed by a single acute 2.0 Gy challenge dose sustained the expression of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory genes and stimulated angiogenesis. Our results suggest that dose rate is important in cellular response and that a radioadaptive response is involved for a 2.0 Gy dose at LDR. PMID:29531508

  5. Dose-rate effect of adaptive response of apoptosis and cell cycle progression induced by low-dose ionizing radiation in EL-4 lymphoma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shuchun; Lu Zhe; Li Yanbo; Kang Shunai; Gong Shouliang; Zhao Wenju

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To observe the dose-rate effect of adaptive response of apoptosis and cell cycle progression induced by low-dose ionizing radiation in EL-4 lymphoma cells in vitro in order to reveal the possible mechanism of biological effect and adaptive response induced by low dose radiation. Methods: The experiment was divided into D2 (challenging dose), D1 (inductive dose) + D2 and sham-irradiation groups. EL-4 lymphoma cells were irradiated with D1 (75 mGy, 6.25-200.00 mGy·mm -1 ) and D2(1.5 Gy, 287 mGy·min -1 ), the time interval between D1 and D2 was 6 h. The percentage of apoptosis and each cell cycle phase were measured with flow cytometry. Results: When the dose rates of D1 were 6.25-50.00 mGy·min -1 , the percentages of apoptosis in the D1 + D2 group were significantly lower than those in the D2 group (P 0 /G 1 phase cells decreased significantly (P -1 , D2 is 1.5 Gy (287 mGy·min -1 ), and the time interval between D1 and D2 is 6 h, the adaptive response of apoptosis and cell cycle progression in EL-4 lymphoma cells in vitro could be induced. (authors)

  6. Effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the thymus-dependent humoral immune response and the polyclonal activation of B-lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharetskij, A.N.; Surinov, B.P.; Abramova, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    The results of studies on the effect of the low-dose (10 cGy with the dose rate of 1cGy/min) γ-radiation on the indices of the mice system and local immune response are presented. The sheep erythrocytes were used as a thymus-dependent antigen. It is shown that the total irradiation with the above dose rate induced the increase in the primary thymus-dependent humoral immune response on the sheep erythrocytes and polyclonal activation of the B-lymphocytes. The sharp oppression of the antibody formation was observed in the immune response dynamics after the phase of the radiation-induced elevation. The injection of hydroquinone right after the irradiation resulted in elimination of the radiation stimulation of the polyclonal response of the B-cells. The essential decrease in the immunoantilogarithmic radiation effect took place in the animals treated with thymogen. The possible negative consequences of the low-dose ionizing radiation impact on the body immune system are discussed [ru

  7. Health effects of low dose exposures to external ionizing radiation in the French cohort of nuclear workers CEA-AREVA-EDF - 5287

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuraud, K.; Fournier, L.; Samson, E.; Caer-Lorho, S.; Laurier, D.; Laroche, P.; Le Guen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Populations of nuclear workers are particularly relevant to study health effects of low dose and low dose-rate exposures to ionizing radiation. In France, a cohort of nuclear workers employed by CEA, AREVA NC, or EDF, and badge-monitored for radiation exposure, has been followed-up. Annual exposure to penetrating photons was reconstructed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios were calculated using national mortality rates as the reference. Estimates of radiation dose-mortality associations were obtained using a linear excess relative risk (ERR) model. A total of 59,004 workers were followed-up between 1968 and 2004, for an average of 25 years. The mean cumulative photons dose was 16.1 mSv. At the end of the follow-up, workers were 56 years old and 6,310 workers had died. A strong healthy worker effect was observed. Positive but imprecise estimates of ERR/Sv were observed for all solid cancers and leukemia excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia. A significant ERR/Sv was found for myeloid leukemia. This cohort study is the most informative ever conducted in France among nuclear workers. Results confirmed a healthy worker effect due to selection at hiring and health monitoring from occupational medicine. Observed dose-risk relationships were consistent with risks estimated in other studies, even if they remained associated to a large uncertainty. (authors)

  8. Measuring gluconeogenesis using a low dose of 2H2O: advantage of isotope fractionation during gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katanik, Jill; McCabe, Brendan J; Brunengraber, Daniel Z; Chandramouli, Visvanathan; Nishiyama, Fumie J; Anderson, Vernon E; Previs, Stephen F

    2003-05-01

    The contribution of gluconeogenesis to glucose production can be measured by enriching body water with (2)H(2)O to approximately 0.5% (2)H and determining the ratio of (2)H that is bound to carbon-5 vs. carbon-2 of blood glucose. This labeling ratio can be measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after the corresponding glucose carbons are converted to formaldehyde and then to hexamethylenetetramine (HMT). We present a technique for integrating ion chromatograms that allows one to use only 0.05% (2)H in body water (i.e., 10 times less than the current dose). This technique takes advantage of the difference in gas chromatographic retention times of naturally labeled HMT and [(2)H]HMT. We discuss the advantage(s) of using a low dose of (2)H(2)O to quantify the contribution of gluconeogenesis.

  9. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors in murine bone marrow cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitou, Mikio; Sirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Junichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Department of Radiobiology, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors of cells, the dose dependency of the expression of cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), of mice is being measured at accumulated doses between 1 and 8 Gy, with the dose interval of 1 Gy. In the present work, specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H-HeN female mice were irradiated by {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with the doses of 5-8 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy (22 h-day){sup -1}, and the expression of IL-6 and GM-CSF in bone marrow and spleen cells from the mice were measured semiquantitatively by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. (author)

  10. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors in murine bone marrow cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitou, Mikio; Yamada, Yutaka; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Jun' ichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki [Institute for Environmental Sciences, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors of cells, the expression of cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), of mice is being measured at accumulated doses between 1 and 8 Gy, with the dose interval of 1 Gy. In the present work, ten specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H/HeN female mice per experimental group were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs {gamma}-rays with the doses of 1-4 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/(22 h-day), and the expression of IL-6 and GM-CSF in bone marrow and spleen cells from the mice was measured semiquantitatively by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. (author)

  11. Effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors in murine bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitou, Mikio; Yamada, Yutaka; Shirata, Katsutoshi; Yanai, Takanori; Izumi, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Onodera, Jun'ichi; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate effects of prolonged irradiation by low dose-rate ionizing radiation on the production of growth factors of cells, the expression of cytokines, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), of mice is being measured at accumulated doses between 1 and 8 Gy, with the dose interval of 1 Gy. In the present work, ten specific-pathogen-free (SPF) C3H/HeN female mice per experimental group were irradiated with 137 Cs γ-rays with the doses of 1-4 Gy at the dose rate of 20 mGy/(22 h-day), and the expression of IL-6 and GM-CSF in bone marrow and spleen cells from the mice was measured semiquantitatively by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. (author)

  12. Estimate of radiation detriment long period after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation: Chromosomal aberrations in liquidators 6-10 years after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiforov, A.M.; Slozina, N.M.; Neronova, E.G.; Kharchenko, T.V.; Drygina, L.B.; Strukov, E.L.

    1997-01-01

    The group of 297 liquidators was cytogenetically investigated 6 - 10 years after the Chernobyl accident. The significantly increased level of chromosomal and chromatid types exchange aberrations was shown. For all subjects questionnaires that provide consideration of known and suspected confounding variables were filled in. The participation in recovery works at the Chernobyl nuclear power station was the only reason for dicentrics and rings rise in liquidators. An investigation of the tumor-specific markers (CEA, AFP, CA19-9, PSA, NSE) was carried out in 56 liquidators simultaneously with chromosomal analysis. The increased level of NSE was found in liquidators bearing the chromosomal aberrations of exchange type. The results of this work let us to consider the liquidators who underwent to low doses of ionizing radiation 6-10 years ago as a detrimental group that needs special scientific and medical attention. (author)

  13. Occupational exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and cataract development: a systematic literature review and perspectives on future studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, Gael P. [University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Institute for Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics (IMBEI), Mainz (Germany); Registre Morphologique des Tumeurs, Laboratoire National de Sante, Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Scheidemann-Wesp, Ulrike; Wicke, Henryk; Blettner, Maria [University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Institute for Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics (IMBEI), Mainz (Germany); Samkange-Zeeb, Florence [University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Institute for Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics (IMBEI), Mainz (Germany); Leibniz Institute for Prevention Research and Epidemiology - BIPS GmbH, Department of Prevention and Evaluation, Bremen (Germany); Neriishi, Kazuo [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Ionizing radiation is a well-known but little understood risk factor for lens opacities. Until recently, cataract development was considered to be a deterministic effect occurring at lens doses exceeding a threshold of 5-8 Gy. Substantial uncertainty about the level and the existence of a threshold subsists. The International Commission on Radiation Protection recently revised it to 0.5 Gy. Based on a systematic literature review of epidemiological studies on exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation and the occurrence of lens opacities, a list of criteria for new epidemiological studies was compiled, and a list of potential study populations was reviewed. Among 24 publications finally identified, six report analyses of acute exposures in atomic bomb survivors and Chernobyl liquidators, and the others report analyses of protracted exposures in occupationally, medically or accidentally exposed populations. Three studies investigated a dose threshold: in atomic bomb survivors, the best estimates were 1 Sv (95 % CI <0-0.8 Sv) regarding lensectomies; in survivors exposed as children, 0.6 Sv (90 % CI <0.0-1.2 Sv) for cortical cataract prevalence and 0.7 Sv (90 % CI 0.0-2.8 Sv) for posterior subcapsular cataract; and in Chernobyl liquidators, 0.34 Sv (95 % CI 0.19-0.68 Sv) for stage 1 cataract. Current studies are heterogeneous and inconclusive regarding the dose-response relationship. Protracted exposures and high lens doses occur in several occupational groups, for instance, in physicians performing fluoroscopy-guided interventional procedures, and in accidentally exposed populations. New studies with a good retrospective exposure assessment are feasible and should be initiated. (orig.)

  14. A comparison of anti-tumor effects of high dose rate fractionated and low dose rate continuous irradiation in multicellular spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Nobuo; Omura, Motoko; Matsubara, Sho.

    1997-01-01

    In a clinical experience, high dose rate (HDR) fractionated interstitial radiotherapy can be an alternative to traditional low dose rate (LDR) continuous interstitial radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. To investigate biological effect of HDR, compared to LDR, comparisons have been made using spheroids of human squamous carcinoma cells. Both LDR and HDR were delivered by 137 Cs at 37degC. Dose rate of LDR was 8 Gy/day and HDR irradiations of fraction size of 4, 5 or 6 Gy were applied twice a day with an interval time of more than 6 hr. We estimated HDR fractionated dose of 31 Gy with 4 Gy/fr to give the same biological effects of 38 Gy by continuous LDR for spheroids. The ratio of HDR/LDR doses to control 50% spheroids was 0.82. (author)

  15. Fractional carbon dioxide laser versus low-dose UVA-1 phototherapy for treatment of localized scleroderma: a clinical and immunohistochemical randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, S M; Bosseila, M; Fawzy, M M; Abdel Halim, D M; Sayed, S S; Allam, R S H M

    2016-11-01

    Morphea is a rare fibrosing skin disorder that occurs as a result of abnormal homogenized collagen synthesis. Fractional ablative laser resurfacing has been used effectively in scar treatment via abnormal collagen degradation and induction of healthy collagen synthesis. Therefore, fractional ablative laser can provide an effective modality in treatment of morphea. The study aimed at evaluating the efficacy of fractional carbon dioxide laser as a new modality for the treatment of localized scleroderma and to compare its results with the well-established method of UVA-1 phototherapy. Seventeen patients with plaque and linear morphea were included in this parallel intra-individual comparative randomized controlled clinical trial. Each with two comparable morphea lesions that were randomly assigned to either 30 sessions of low-dose (30 J/cm 2 ) UVA-1 phototherapy (340-400 nm) or 3 sessions of fractional CO 2 laser (10,600 nm-power 25 W). The response to therapy was then evaluated clinically and histopathologically via validated scoring systems. Immunohistochemical analysis of TGF-ß1 and MMP1 was done. Patient satisfaction was also assessed. Wilcoxon signed rank test for paired (matched) samples and Spearman rank correlation equation were used as indicated. Comparing the two groups, there was an obvious improvement with fractional CO 2 laser that was superior to that of low-dose UVA-1 phototherapy. Statistically, there was a significant difference in the clinical scores (p = 0.001), collagen homogenization scores (p = 0.012), and patient satisfaction scores (p = 0.001). In conclusion, fractional carbon dioxide laser is a promising treatment modality for cases of localized morphea, with proved efficacy of this treatment on clinical and histopathological levels.

  16. Diagnostic Performance of a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography System With Low-Dose Technetium-99m as Assessed by Fractional Flow Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikamori, Taishiro; Hida, Satoshi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Igarashi, Yuko; Yamashita, Jun; Shiba, Chie; Murata, Naotaka; Hoshino, Kou; Hokama, Yohei; Yamashina, Akira

    2016-04-25

    Although stress single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using a cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) camera facilitates radiation dose reduction, only a few studies have evaluated its diagnostic accuracy in Japanese patients by applying fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurements. We prospectively evaluated 102 consecutive patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease with a low-dose stress/rest protocol ((99m)Tc radiotracer 185/370 MBq) using CZT SPECT. Within 3 months, coronary angiography was performed and a significant stenosis was defined as ≥90% diameter narrowing on visual estimation, or as a lesion of <90% and ≥ 50% stenosis with FFR ≤0.80. To detect individual coronary stenosis, the respective sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 86%, 75%, and 82% for left anterior descending artery stenosis, 76%, 81%, and 79% for left circumflex artery stenosis, and 87%, 92%, and 90% for right coronary artery stenosis. When limited to 92 intermediate stenotic lesions in which FFR was measured, stress SPECT showed 77% sensitivity, 91% specificity, and 84% accuracy, whereas the diagnostic value decreased to 52% sensitivity, 68% specificity, and 58% accuracy based only on visual estimation of ≥75% diameter narrowing. CZT SPECT demonstrated a good diagnostic yield in detecting hemodynamically significant coronary stenoses as assessed by FFR, even when using a low-dose (99m)Tc protocol with an effective dose ≤5 mSv. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1217-1224).

  17. Study of the intervention effect of Laminaria japonica polysaccharides on testis tissue in male rats exposed by repeated low-dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jun; Luo Qiong; Cui Xiaoyan; Yang Mingliang; Yan Jun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of the Laminaria japonica polysaccharides (LJP) intervention on the male rats' testicular tissue oxidative damage which was caused by repeated low-dose local ionizing radiation. Methods: Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control group, model group and LJP intervention group. The rats in the LJP intervention group was given with LJP. The rats in each group were exposed to 60 Co γ-ray local irradiation 7 d after adaptability breeding, once per day for 20 times in 4 weeks. Each rat was irradiated with the total dose of 2.3 Gy. The rats were killed at 1, 7 and 14 d post-irradiation, respectively. The testis and the epididymis were taken out. The contents of MDA and GSH, and the activities of SOD, LDH and GSH-Px were measured using spectrophotometer. The amorphous of testicular tissue was observed and the sperm count and viability were analyzed. Results: As compared with those in the model group, the content of MDA decreased in testicular tissue in the LJP group (t=3.66-5.03, P<0.01), while the GSH content increased. The activities of SOD, LDH and GSH-Px (t=2.77-25.52, P<0.05) and the sperm count and viability increased (t=3.11-23.08, P<0.01). Each index was more close to that in the control group 14 d post-irradiation. Conclusions: LJP can promote the recovery of testicular tissue oxidative damage caused by chronic local ionizing radiation. It has a role in promoting the spermatogenic function of male rate. (authors)

  18. T cell potentiation in normal and autoimmune-prone mice after extended exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and/or caloric restriction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, S.J.; Makinodan, T.

    1988-01-01

    In order to better understand the apparent physiologic up-regulation in response to low levels of potentially lethal insults, murine T lymphocytes were analysed for functional and phenotypic alterations after exposure to 0.005 Gy/day, 0.01 Gy/day and 0.04 Gy/day in groups of ad-libitum-fed and calorie-restricted mice. Studies were conducted in two strains of mice: long-lived and immunologically normal C57B1/6 +/+ and congenic short-lived immunologically depressed C57B1/6 1pr/1pr. Whole-body exposure to 0.01 Gy/day and 0.04 Gy/day for an extended period of 20 days was associated with an increase in splenic proliferative response and shifts in proportions of T cell subpopulations in the thymus and spleen of both strains. Caloric restriction independently altered functional activity and T cell subpopulations in the same direction as low dose rates of ionizing radiation. Although dose-response augmentation in proliferative activity was similar in the strains, observed alterations in thymic and splenic T cell subpopulations were clearly different, suggesting different mechanisms were responsible for immune enhancement in each strain.

  19. Radiosensitivity of Nicotiana protoplasts. Action on cell; cycle effects of low dose and fractionated irradiations; biological repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnien, E.

    1981-10-01

    Leaf protoplasts of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and Nicotiana sylvestris demonstrate five main qualities: they can be maintained as haploid lines; they constitute starting populations with a remarkable cytological homogeneity; they show a transient initial lag-phase; they yield very high plating efficiencies and retain permanently a complete differentiation capacity; being derived of a cell wall, they appear well adapted for fusion experiments or enzymatic dosages. The resumption of mitotic activity was followed by cytophotometric measurements, labelling experiments, nuclear sizing and enzymatic assays. The action of 5 Gy gamma-ray irradiations delayed entrance in the S-phase, provoked an otherwise not verified dependency between transcription, translation and protein synthesis, increased nuclear volumes in the G2-phase, and slightly stimulated the activity of a repair enzyme. The plating efficiency was a sensitive end-point which allowed the evaluation of the biological effectiveness of low to medium radiation-doses after gamma-ray and fast neutron irradiations. The neutron dose-RBE relationship increased from 3 to 25 when the dose decreased from 5 Gy to 5 mGy. When fractionated into low single doses only, a neutron dose of 300 mGy markedly increased its biological effectiveness: this phenomenon could not be explained by cell progression, and necessitated additional hypotheses involving other mechanisms in the specific action of low radiation doses. Radiation-induced UDS was measured in presence of aphidicolin. A beta-like DNA-polymerase was shown to be definitely involved in nuclear repair synthesis [fr

  20. Identification of Differential Gene Expression Patterns after Acute Exposure to High and Low Doses of Low-LET Ionizing Radiation in a Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilton, Susan C.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Hays, Spencer; Taylor, Ronald C.; Stenoien, David L.

    2016-11-01

    Our goal here was to identify dose and temporal dependent radiation responses in a complex tissue, reconstituted human skin. Direct sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) was used to quantify altered transcripts following exposure to 0.1, 2 and 10 Gy of ionizing radiation at 3 and 8 hours. These doses include a low dose in the range of some medical diagnostic procedures (0.1 Gy), a dose typically received during radiotherapy (2.0 Gy) and a lethal dose (10 Gy). These doses could be received after an intentional or accidental radiation exposure and biomarkers are needed to rapidly and accurately triage exposed individuals. A total of 1701 genes were deemed to be significantly affected by high dose radiation exposure with the majority of genes affected at 10 Gy. A group of 29 genes including GDF15, BBC3, PPM1D, FDXR, GADD45A, MDM2, CDKN1A, TP53INP1, CYCSP27, SESN1, SESN2, PCNA, and AEN were similarly altered at both 2 and 10 Gy, but not 0.1 Gy, at multiple time points. A much larger group of up regulated genes, including those involved in inflammatory responses, was significantly altered only after a 10 Gy exposure. At high doses, down regulated genes were associated with cell cycle regulation and exhibited an apparent linear response between 2 and 10 Gy. While only a handful of genes were significantly affected by 0.1 Gy exposure using stringent statistical filters, groups of related genes regulating cell cycle progression and inflammatory responses consistently exhibited opposite trends in their regulation compared to the high dose exposures. Differential regulation of PLK1 signaling at low and high doses was confirmed using qRT-PCR. These results indicate that some alterations in gene expression are qualitatively different at low and high doses of radiation in this model system.

  1. Fractionated dose skews differentiation of Glial progenitor cells into immature oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, with lower mature oligodendrocytes formation, as compared to singe low dose of low and high LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Zina; Pena, Louis; Naidu, Mamta

    2010-01-01

    In the proposed study, the effect of fractionated, low dose versus single low dose of low LET X-rays and charged particles on induction of base excision repair enzyme Apurinic Endonuclease-1 (Ape1) are determined, which is known to inhibit cell differentiation, and found that at lower doses of 10,25 and 50 cGy there was a very significant induction of Apel which correlated to number of fractions, whereas at 100 cGy this induction was significantly lower. Also, there was a clear correlation between increase in fractions and higher immature OL and astrocyte formation

  2. THE ESCAPE FRACTION OF IONIZING RADIATION FROM GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, Andrew; Venkatesan, Aparna; Shull, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    The escape of ionizing radiation from galaxies plays a critical role in the evolution of gas in galaxies, and the heating and ionization history of the intergalactic medium. We present semi-analytic calculations of the escape fraction of ionizing radiation for both hydrogen and helium from galaxies ranging from primordial systems to disk-type galaxies that are not heavily dust-obscured. We consider variations in the galaxy density profile, source type, location, and spectrum, and gas overdensity/distribution factors. For sufficiently hard first-light sources, the helium ionization fronts closely track or advance beyond that of hydrogen. Key new results in this work include calculations of the escape fractions for He I and He II ionizing radiation, and the impact of partial ionization from X-rays from early active galactic nuclei or stellar clusters on the escape fractions from galaxy halos. When factoring in frequency-dependent effects, we find that X-rays play an important role in boosting the escape fractions for both hydrogen and helium, but especially for He II. We briefly discuss the implications of these results for recent observations of the He II reionization epoch at low redshifts, as well as the UV data and emission-line signatures from early galaxies anticipated from future satellite missions.

  3. THE ESCAPE FRACTION OF IONIZING RADIATION FROM GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Andrew [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Venkatesan, Aparna [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Shull, J. Michael, E-mail: abenson@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: avenkatesan@usfca.edu, E-mail: michael.shull@colorado.edu [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    The escape of ionizing radiation from galaxies plays a critical role in the evolution of gas in galaxies, and the heating and ionization history of the intergalactic medium. We present semi-analytic calculations of the escape fraction of ionizing radiation for both hydrogen and helium from galaxies ranging from primordial systems to disk-type galaxies that are not heavily dust-obscured. We consider variations in the galaxy density profile, source type, location, and spectrum, and gas overdensity/distribution factors. For sufficiently hard first-light sources, the helium ionization fronts closely track or advance beyond that of hydrogen. Key new results in this work include calculations of the escape fractions for He I and He II ionizing radiation, and the impact of partial ionization from X-rays from early active galactic nuclei or stellar clusters on the escape fractions from galaxy halos. When factoring in frequency-dependent effects, we find that X-rays play an important role in boosting the escape fractions for both hydrogen and helium, but especially for He II. We briefly discuss the implications of these results for recent observations of the He II reionization epoch at low redshifts, as well as the UV data and emission-line signatures from early galaxies anticipated from future satellite missions.

  4. Identification of early-stage usual interstitial pneumonia from low-dose chest CT scans using fractional high-density lung distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yiting; Salvatore, Mary; Liu, Shuang; Jirapatnakul, Artit; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2017-03-01

    A fully-automated computer algorithm has been developed to identify early-stage Usual Interstitial Pneumonia (UIP) using features computed from low-dose CT scans. In each scan, the pre-segmented lung region is divided into N subsections (N = 1, 8, 27, 64) by separating the lung from anterior/posterior, left/right and superior/inferior in 3D space. Each subsection has approximately the same volume. In each subsection, a classic density measurement (fractional high-density volume h) is evaluated to characterize the disease severity in that subsection, resulting in a feature vector of length N for each lung. Features are then combined in two different ways: concatenation (2*N features) and taking the maximum in each of the two corresponding subsections in the two lungs (N features). The algorithm was evaluated on a dataset consisting of 51 UIP and 56 normal cases, a combined feature vector was computed for each case and an SVM classifier (RBF kernel) was used to classify them into UIP or normal using ten-fold cross validation. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) was used for evaluation. The highest AUC of 0.95 was achieved by using concatenated features and an N of 27. Using lung partition (N = 27, 64) with concatenated features had significantly better result over not using partitions (N = 1) (p-value < 0.05). Therefore this equal-volume partition fractional high-density volume method is useful in distinguishing early-stage UIP from normal cases.

  5. Effect of low doses of ionizing radiation, azoxystrobin and selected heavy metals on the model organism of species Artemia franciscana; Posobenie nizkych davok ionizujuceho ziarenia, azoxystrobinu a vybranych tazkych kovov na modelovy organizmus druhu Artemia franciscana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalkova, M.; Danova, D. [Univerzita veterinarskeho lekarstva a farmacie, Katedra biologie a genetiky, Ustav biologie, zoologie a radiobiologie, 04181 Kosice (Slovakia); Falis, M. [Univerzita veterinarskeho lekarstva a farmacie, Katedra farmakologie a toxikologie, Ustav toxikologie, 04181 Kosice (Slovakia); Zdarsky, M. [Veterinarni a farmaceuticka univerzita Brno, Ustav biochemie, chemie a biofyziky, 61242 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2013-04-16

    The aim of our study was to observe the effect of low doses of ionizing radiation, azoxystrobin, zinc and chrome on the lethality of Artemia franciscana. Significant increase of the lethality was observed after 72 and 96 hours of exposure to azoxystrobin and chrome as well as to azoxystrobin, chrome and irradiation. On the other hand, we observed significant decrease of the lethality in the groups exposed to pesticide and chrome or pesticide and zinc in combination with ionizing radiation with the dose of 50 Gy at time interval of 96 hours in comparison to non-irradiated groups. (authors)

  6. Stimulating effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the activity of chicken liver and spleen plasma membrane Ca+2 ATPase during different periods of development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islamov, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    Effect of pre incubative irradiation of chickens on the activity of chicken liver and spleen plasma membrane Ca +2 -ATPase in 13, 15, 17 day embryos and 1, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 day chickens has been studied. Low doses of radiation are discovered to stimulate liver and spleen enzyme activity. On the basis of data obtained it is suggested that in the cells of radiosensitive and radio resistive organs molecular mechanisms of stimulating effect of low doses are similar. (author). 10 refs.; 1 fig.; 2 tabs

  7. Low dose irradiation and biological defense mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugahara, Tsutomu; Sagan, L.A.; Aoyama, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    It has been generally accepted in the context of radiation protection that ionizing radiation has some adverse effect even at low doses. However, epidemiological studies of human populations cannot definitively show its existence or absence. Furthermore, recent studies of populations living in areas of different background radiation levels reported some decrease in adverse health effects at high background levels. Genetic studies of atomic bomb survivors failed to produce statistically significant findings on the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation. A British study however, suggests that a father's exposure to low dose radiation on the job may increase his children's risk of leukemia. On the other hand, many experimental studies have raised the possibility that low doses of ionizing radiation may not be harmful or may even produce stimulating or adaptive responses. The term 'hormesis' has come to be used to describe these phenomena produced by low doses of ionizing radiation when they were beneficial for the organisms studied. At the end of the International Conference on Low Dose Irradiation one conclusion appeared to be justified: radiation produces an adaptive response, though it is not universally detected yet. The conference failed to obtain any consensus on risk assessment at low doses, but raised many problems to be dealt with by future studies. The editors therefore believe that the Proceedings will be useful for all scientists and people concerned with radiation protection and the biological effects of low-dose irradiation

  8. New ionization fractions for the lithium- and helium-like ionization stages of calcium and iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, J.G.; Raymond, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The high resolution X-ray spectra of Ca XIX and Fe XXV observed during a solar flare on 1979 March 25 have been re-interpreted using new ionization fractions for Ca XVIII, Ca XIX, Fe XXIV and Fe XXV. These new calculations substantially change the interpretation of the spectra, implying the flare to be ionizing during the rise phase and recombining during the decay phase. The results favour the ECIP ionization rates over those of Lotz, though other interpretations are possible. (author)

  9. Chronic Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation Exposure Induces Premature Senescence in Human Fibroblasts that Correlates with Up Regulation of Proteins Involved in Protection against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Loseva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The risks of non-cancerous diseases associated with exposure to low doses of radiation are at present not validated by epidemiological data, and pose a great challenge to the scientific community of radiation protection research. Here, we show that premature senescence is induced in human fibroblasts when exposed to chronic low dose rate (LDR exposure (5 or 15 mGy/h of gamma rays from a 137Cs source. Using a proteomic approach we determined differentially expressed proteins in cells after chronic LDR radiation compared to control cells. We identified numerous proteins involved in protection against oxidative stress, suggesting that these pathways protect against premature senescence. In order to further study the role of oxidative stress for radiation induced premature senescence, we also used human fibroblasts, isolated from a patient with a congenital deficiency in glutathione synthetase (GS. We found that these GS deficient cells entered premature senescence after a significantly shorter time of chronic LDR exposure as compared to the GS proficient cells. In conclusion, we show that chronic LDR exposure induces premature senescence in human fibroblasts, and propose that a stress induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS is mechanistically involved.

  10. Structural and functional changes in the gastric intramural nervous plexus in emotionally stressed rats exposed to low doses of prolonged ionizing radiation and lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapsha, V.I.; Bocharova, V.N.; Utkina, L.N.; Rolevich, I.V.

    1999-01-01

    Changes in the catecholamine content in adrenergic fibres, acethylcholinesterase activity, and in the energy metabolism enzymes lactate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase in neurons of the gastric intramural plexus during emotional stress in rats a day after combined exposure to prolonged (30 days) ionizing radiation at a total dose 1.0 Gy and 0.6 mg/kg lead were studied. A decrease in catecholamines in adrenergic fibres and acethylcholinesterase and lactate dehydrogenase activity in neurons was observed. An enhanced sensitivity of the gastric intramural plexus after the prolonged exposure to small doses of ionizing radiation and lead in conditions of emotional stress was suggested [ru

  11. Analysis of the health of a group exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation; Analisis de salud en un grupo expuesto a dosis bajas de radiaciones ionizantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Ledesma, F [Servicio Medico de Tecnatom, SA Madrid (Spain); Crespo, H [Hospital Gregorio Maranon de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-11-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of exposure to low radiation doses, the health status of professional staff exposed to ionizing radiation is investigated. Based on archived material of medical and radiation exposure records taken over a time span of 13 years, a variety of medical parameters are explored. Findings of surveys made are given. (author). 1 fig.

  12. Low dose epidemiologic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    In this chapter the BEIR committee has reviewed low-dose irradiation studies since the BEIR III report. They have considered the carcinogenic effectiveness of low-LET in populations exposed to radiation from a number of different sources: diagnostic radiography; fallout from nuclear weapons testing; nuclear installations; radiation in the workplace and high levels of natural background radiation

  13. Analysis of the common deletions in the mitochondrial DNA is a sensitive biomarker detecting direct and non-targeted cellular effects of low dose ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling-Toth, Boglarka; Sandor, Nikolett; Kis, Eniko; Kadhim, Munira; Safrany, Geza; Hegyesi, Hargita

    2011-01-01

    One of the key issues of current radiation research is the biological effect of low doses. Unfortunately, low dose science is hampered by the unavailability of easily performable, reliable and sensitive quantitative biomarkers suitable detecting low frequency alterations in irradiated cells. We applied a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) based protocol detecting common deletions (CD) in the mitochondrial genome to assess direct and non-targeted effects of radiation in human fibroblasts. In directly irradiated (IR) cells CD increased with dose and was higher in radiosensitive cells. Investigating conditioned medium-mediated bystander effects we demonstrated that low and high (0.1 and 2 Gy) doses induced similar levels of bystander responses and found individual differences in human fibroblasts. The bystander response was not related to the radiosensitivity of the cells. The importance of signal sending donor and signal receiving target cells was investigated by placing conditioned medium from a bystander response positive cell line (F11-hTERT) to bystander negative cells (S1-hTERT) and vice versa. The data indicated that signal sending cells are more important in the medium-mediated bystander effect than recipients. Finally, we followed long term effects in immortalized radiation sensitive (S1-hTERT) and normal (F11-hTERT) fibroblasts up to 63 days after IR. In F11-hTERT cells CD level was increased until 35 days after IR then reduced back to control level by day 49. In S1-hTERT cells the increased CD level was also normalized by day 42, however a second wave of increased CD incidence appeared by day 49 which was maintained up to day 63 after IR. This second CD wave might be the indication of radiation-induced instability in the mitochondrial genome of S1-hTERT cells. The data demonstrated that measuring CD in mtDNA by qRT-PCR is a reliable and sensitive biomarker to estimate radiation-induced direct and non-targeted effects.

  14. Analysis of the common deletions in the mitochondrial DNA is a sensitive biomarker detecting direct and non-targeted cellular effects of low dose ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling-Tóth, Boglárka; Sándor, Nikolett; Kis, Eniko; Kadhim, Munira; Sáfrány, Géza; Hegyesi, Hargita

    2011-11-01

    One of the key issues of current radiation research is the biological effect of low doses. Unfortunately, low dose science is hampered by the unavailability of easily performable, reliable and sensitive quantitative biomarkers suitable detecting low frequency alterations in irradiated cells. We applied a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) based protocol detecting common deletions (CD) in the mitochondrial genome to assess direct and non-targeted effects of radiation in human fibroblasts. In directly irradiated (IR) cells CD increased with dose and was higher in radiosensitive cells. Investigating conditioned medium-mediated bystander effects we demonstrated that low and high (0.1 and 2Gy) doses induced similar levels of bystander responses and found individual differences in human fibroblasts. The bystander response was not related to the radiosensitivity of the cells. The importance of signal sending donor and signal receiving target cells was investigated by placing conditioned medium from a bystander response positive cell line (F11-hTERT) to bystander negative cells (S1-hTERT) and vice versa. The data indicated that signal sending cells are more important in the medium-mediated bystander effect than recipients. Finally, we followed long term effects in immortalized radiation sensitive (S1-hTERT) and normal (F11-hTERT) fibroblasts up to 63 days after IR. In F11-hTERT cells CD level was increased until 35 days after IR then reduced back to control level by day 49. In S1-hTERT cells the increased CD level was also normalized by day 42, however a second wave of increased CD incidence appeared by day 49 which was maintained up to day 63 after IR. This second CD wave might be the indication of radiation-induced instability in the mitochondrial genome of S1-hTERT cells. The data demonstrated that measuring CD in mtDNA by qRT-PCR is a reliable and sensitive biomarker to estimate radiation-induced direct and non-targeted effects. Copyright

  15. Status of calcium regulating hormonal systems in delayed period in persons exposed to occupational exposure of low doses of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dospolova, Zh.G.; Abylaev, Zh.A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose of study is consideration of endocrine system participation in development of calcium exchange disorders in persons exposed to action of low dose radiation . By radio- immune method in blood serum of 150 liquidators of Chernobyl accident consequences the concentration the following hormones were determined: parathormone, T 3 , T 4 , TSH, cortisol, ACTH, testosteron, insulin. Content of these hormones have been studied in according to following radiation factors: value of absorbed doses of external irradiation, degree of radioactive contamination of zone and exposition duration. It was determined, that basically dishormone disorders development have been concerned with parathormone, cortisol, hormones of thyroid axis, and in some cases to ACTH and insulin. Liquidators' frequencies of normal and changed concentration of calcium regulating hormones are sited in tabular form. It was established, that examined persons in result hormone disorders have of decrease functions of pituitary glands (76.78 %), pancreas (55 %), thyroid gland (24.31 %) and sex glands (19.23 %) and simultaneously cases of increase functions of parathyroid gland (58.2 %), adrenal glands (52.32 %) and adeno-pituitary glands (17.39). It is concluded, that inter hormonal correlation disorders are accompanying with morphologic and functional futures of secretory activity changes

  16. Effect of low dose radiation in lymphocytes from children exposed to ionizing radiation after the Chernobyl accident. Cytogenetic, chromosome painting, GPA and adaptive response studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padovani, L.; Appolloni, M.; Anzidei, P.; Spano, M.; Stronati, L.; Testa, A.; Mauro, F.

    1997-01-01

    The present study concerns the monitoring of some children coming from Byelorussian, Ukrainian and Russian republics, exposed to the fall-out, or to the initial acute dose of radiation with the aim of assessing the effects of ionizing radiation on human health and of verifying the persisting of chromosomal damage several years after the accident. Both structural chromosomes damage (conventional cytogenetic and chromosome painting) and molecular mutation (GPA) have been investigated, moreover the possible induction of an adaptive response has been tested. (author)

  17. Effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guen, B.

    2001-01-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  18. A non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, M.N.; Zaider, M.

    1992-01-01

    A microdosimetric-based specific quality factor, q(y), is determined for eight sets of experimental data on cellular inactivation, mutation, chromosome aberration and neoplastic transformation. Bias-free Bayesian and maximum entropy approaches were used. A comparison of the curves q(y) thus determined reveals a surprising degree of uniformity. In our view this is prima facie evidence that the spatial pattern of microscopic energy deposition - rather than the specific end point or cellular system - is the quantity which determines the dependency of the cellular response to the quality of the ionizing radiation. For further applications of this approach to radiation protection experimental microdosimetric spectra are urgently needed. Further improvement in the quality of the q(y) functions could provide important clues on fundamental biophysical mechanisms. (author)

  19. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  20. Effect of. gamma. radiation in relatively low dose on the activity of glutaminase in subcellular fraction of brain and liver cells. [Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkach, V M

    1973-01-01

    The effect of ..gamma..-irradiation at a dose of 40 rads was studied on the exchange of glutamine in rats. It has been shown that the irradiation leads to a significant lowering of the activity of glutaminamidohydrolase (I) in brain mitochondria and in the liver after 1, 3, 7, 15, and 30 days post exposure. In the fractions containing nuclei, fraction of myofibrillae and connective tissue, a slow down of the deamidation of glutamine also takes place, and only after 7 days the ammonium separation from glutamine increases and returns to normal. At the 15 and 30 days a second wave of the lower rate of the activity of I takes place. The type of the changes of I is the same in both organs, but in the liver it is expressed to a lesser degree. (JPRS)

  1. Multi-institutional phase I study of low-dose ultra-fractionated radiotherapy as a chemosensitizer for gemcitabine and erlotinib in patients with locally advanced or limited metastatic pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konski, Andre; Meyer, Joshua E.; Joiner, Michael; Hall, Michael J.; Philip, Philip; Shields, Anthony; McSpadden, Erin; Choi, Minsig; Adaire, Beth; Duncan, Gail; Meropol, Neal J.; Cescon, Terrence P.; Cohen, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Gemcitabine (G) has been shown to sensitize pancreatic cancer to radiotherapy but requires lower doses of G and thus delays aggressive systemic treatment, potentially leading to distant failure. We initiated a phase I trial combining ultra-fractionated low-dose radiotherapy with full dose G and erlotinib in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods: Patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer confined to the abdomen and an ECOG performance status (PS) of 0–1 who had received 0–1 prior regimens (without G or E) and no prior radiotherapy were eligible. Patients were treated in 21 day cycles with G IV days 1 and 8, E once PO QD, and twice daily RT fractions separated by at least 4 h on days 1, 2, 8, and 9. Whole abdominal RT fields were used. Primary endpoint was to define dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Results: 27 patients (median age 64 years and 15 male) were enrolled between 11/24/08 and 4/12/12. 1 patient withdrew consent prior to receiving any protocol therapy. 17 patients had a PS of 1. The majority of patients were stage IV. One DLT was noted out of 7 patients at dose level (DL) 1. Subsequently no DLTs were noted in 3 patients each enrolled at DL2-4 or 11 patients in the expansion cohort. The majority of grade 3 toxicities were hematologic with 1 grade 5 bowel perforation in dose level 1 in cycle 4. Best response in 24 evaluable patients: PR (8), stable (15), PD 1. Median survival for the entire group was 9.1 months. Conclusion: This phase I study combining low-dose ultra-fractionated RT as a sensitizer to full dose G plus E was well tolerated with encouraging efficacy. This represents a novel strategy worthy of further investigation in advanced pancreatic cancer patients

  2. Low dose ionizing radiation treated lymphoblastoid cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Irradiated cell lines exposed to 1-10 Gy 2 Lymphoblastoid cell lines (GM15510 and GM15036) irradiated 1 2.5 5 7.5 10 Gy RNA is isolated and labeled using a T7...

  3. Carcinogenesis induced by low-dose radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotrowski Igor

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Although the effects of high dose radiation on human cells and tissues are relatively well defined, there is no consensus regarding the effects of low and very low radiation doses on the organism. Ionizing radiation has been shown to induce gene mutations and chromosome aberrations which are known to be involved in the process of carcinogenesis. The induction of secondary cancers is a challenging long-term side effect in oncologic patients treated with radiation. Medical sources of radiation like intensity modulated radiotherapy used in cancer treatment and computed tomography used in diagnostics, deliver very low doses of radiation to large volumes of healthy tissue, which might contribute to increased cancer rates in long surviving patients and in the general population. Research shows that because of the phenomena characteristic for low dose radiation the risk of cancer induction from exposure of healthy tissues to low dose radiation can be greater than the risk calculated from linear no-threshold model. Epidemiological data collected from radiation workers and atomic bomb survivors confirms that exposure to low dose radiation can contribute to increased cancer risk and also that the risk might correlate with the age at exposure.

  4. Low dose irradiation reduces cancer mortality rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckey, T.D.

    2000-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation stimulate development, growth, memory, sensual acuity, fecundity, and immunity (Luckey, T.D., ''Radiation Hormesis'', CRC Press, 1991). Increased immune competence reduces cancer mortality rates and provides increased average lifespan in animals. Decreased cancer mortality rates in atom bomb victims who received low dose irradiation makes it desirable to examine populations exposed to low dose irradiation. Studies with over 300,000 workers and 7 million person-years provide a valid comparison of radiation exposed and control unclear workers (Luckey, T.D., Nurture with Ionizing Radiation, Nutrition and Cancer, 34:1-11, 1999). Careful selection of controls eliminated any ''healthy worker effect''. The person-year corrected average indicated the cancer mortality rate of exposed workers was only 51% that of control workers. Lung cancer mortality rates showed a highly significant negative correlation with radon concentrations in 272,000 U.S. homes (Cohen, B.L., Health Physics 68:157-174, 1995). In contrast, radon concentrations showed no effect on lung cancer rates in miners from different countries (Lubin, J.H. Am. J. Epidemiology 140:323-332, 1994). This provides evidence that excessive lung cancer in miners is caused by particulates (the major factor) or toxic gases. The relative risk for cancer mortality was 3.7% in 10,000 Taiwanese exposed to low level of radiation from 60 Co in their steel supported homes (Luan, Y.C. et al., Am. Nuclear Soc. Trans. Boston, 1999). This remarkable finding needs further study. A major mechanism for reduced cancer mortality rates is increased immune competence; this includes both cell and humoral components. Low dose irradiation increases circulating lymphocytes. Macrophage and ''natural killer'' cells can destroy altered (cancer) cells before the mass becomes too large. Low dose irradiation also kills suppressor T-cells; this allows helper T-cells to activate killer cells and antibody producing cells

  5. [Risk of deterministic effects after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation: retrospective study among health workers in view of a new publication of International Commission on Radiological Protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrone, Mario; Di Lascio, Doriana

    2016-01-01

    The new recommended equivalent (publication n. 118 of International Commission on Radiological Protection) dose limit for occupational exposure of the lens of the eye is based on prevention of radiogenic cataracts, with the underlying assumption of a nominal threshold which has been adjusted from 2,5 Gy to 0.5 Gy for acute or protracted exposure. The study aim was to determine the prevalence of ocular lens opacity among healthcare workers (radiologic technologists, physicians, physician assistants) with respect to occupational exposures to ionizing radiations. Therefore, we conducted another retrospective study to explore the relationship between occupational exposure to radiation and opacity lens increase. Healthcare data (current occupational dosimetry, occupational history) are used to investigate risk of increase of opacity lens of eye. The sample of this study consisted of 148 health-workers (64 M and 84 W) aged from 28 to 66 years coming from different hospitals of the ASL of Potenza (clinic, hospital and institute with scientific feature). On the basis of the evaluation of the dosimetric history of the workers (global and effective dose) we agreed to ascribe the group of exposed subjects in cat A (equivalent dose > 2 mSV) and the group of non exposed subjects in cat B (workers with annual absorbed level of dose near 0 mSv). The analisys was conducted using SPSS 15.0 (Statistical Package for Social Science). A trend of increased ocular lens opacity was found with increasing number for workers in highest category of exposure (cat. A, Yates' chi-squared test = 13,7 p = 0,0002); variable significantly related to opacity lens results job: nurse (Χ(2)Y = 14,3 p = 0,0002) physician (Χ(2)Y = 2.2 p = 0,1360) and radiologic technologists (Χ(2)Y = 0,1 p = 0,6691). In conclusion our provides evidence that exposure to relatively low doses of ionizing radiation may be harmful to the lens of the eye and may increase a long-term risk of cataract formation; similary

  6. New risk estimates at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The age of molecular radiation epidemiology may be at hand. The techniques are available to establish with the degree of precision required to determine whether agent-specific mutations can be identified consistently. A concerted effort to examine radiation-induced changes in as many relevant genes as possible appears to be justified. Cancers in those exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation should be chosen for the investigation. Parallel studies of radiation-induced cancers in experimental animals would not only complement the human studies, but perhaps reveal approaches to extrapolation of risk estimates across species. A caveat should be added to this optimistic view of what molecular studies might contribute to the knotty problem of risk estimates at low doses. The suggestions are made by one with no expertise in the field of molecular biology

  7. Cytogenetic effects of low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metalli, P.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on chromosomes have been known for several decades and dose-effect relationships are also fairly well established in the mid- and high-dose and dose-rate range for chromosomes of mammalian cells. In the range of low doses and dose rates of different types of radiation few data are available for direct analysis of the dose-effect relationships, and extrapolation from high to low doses is still the unavoidable approach in many cases of interest for risk assessment. A review is presented of the data actually available and of the attempts that have been made to obtain possible generalizations. Attention is focused on some specific chromosomal anomalies experimentally induced by radiation (such as reciprocal translocations and aneuploidies in germinal cells) and on their relevance for the human situation. (author)

  8. Epigenomic Adaptation to Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, Michael N. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that the adaptive responses elicited by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) result in part from heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. In the final budget period at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, we will specifically address this hypothesis by determining if the epigenetically labile, differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that regulate parental-specific expression of imprinted genes are deregulated in agouti mice by low dose radiation exposure during gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the 1) increased human exposure to medical sources of radiation; 2) increased number of people predicted to live and work in space; and 3) enhanced citizen concern about radiation exposure from nuclear power plant accidents and terrorist ‘dirty bombs.’

  9. Pretreatment of low dose radiation reduces radiation-induced apoptosis in mouse lymphoma (EL4) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Hyun, S J; Yoon, M Y; Ji, Y H; Cho, C K; Yoo, S Y

    1997-06-01

    Induction of an adaptive response to ionizing radiation in mouse lymphoma (EL4) cells was studied by using cell survival fraction and apoptotic nucleosomal DNA fragmentation as biological end points. Cells in early log phase were pre-exposed to low dose of gamma-rays (0.01 Gy) 4 or 20 hrs prior to high dose gamma-ray (4, 8 and 12 Gy for cell survival fraction analysis; 8 Gy for DNA fragmentation analysis) irradiation. Then cell survival fractions and the extent of DNA fragmentation were measured. Significant adaptive response, increase in cell survival fraction and decrease in the extent of DNA fragmentation were induced when low and high dose gamma-ray irradiation time interval was 4 hr. Addition of protein or RNA synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide or 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRFB), respectively during adaptation period, the period from low dose gamma-ray irradiation to high dose gamma-ray irradiation, was able to inhibit the induction of adaptive response, which is the reduction of the extent DNA fragmentation in irradiated EL4 cells. These data suggest that the induction of adaptive response to ionizing radiation in EL4 cells required both protein and RNA synthesis.

  10. Low-dose fractionated percutaneous teletherapy in age-related macular degeneration with subfoveolar neovascularization - 3 year results; 3 Jahre Erfahrung mit der niedrig dosierten fraktionierten perkutanen Teletherapie bei subfoveolaeren Neovaskularisationen. Klinische Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schittkowski, M.; Schneider, H.; Guthoff, R. [Universitaetsaugenklinik Rostock (Germany); Grueschow, K.; Ziegler, P.G.; Fietkau, R. [Zentrum fuer Radiologie, Univ. Rostock (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    The effect of low dose fractionated percutaneous teletherapy to visual acuity and the changes in subfoveolar neovascular membranes in age-related macular degeneration were investigated. Patients and Method: 126 eyes of 118 patients (age 55-89 years; mean 74 ys.) were treated. Best distal and near visual acuity was assessed prior to (= initial visual acuity [IVA]) and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months after teletherapy. Fluorescein angiography was performed prior to and 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after radiation therapy. For analysis patients were divided into different groups by IVA and membrane size. Maximal duration of observation was 36 months. Teletherapy was done by a 9-MeV photon linear accelerator through a lateral port in half-beam technique with a single dose of 2 Gy up to a total dose of 20 Gy within 12 days. Results: No severe negative side effects have been observed. Eight patients reported of epiphora and four patients complained of transient sicca syndrome. Visual acuity decreased more than one line in the group IVA 0.05-0.2. The group IVA 0.3-0.5 remained unchanged for 1 year. We found a tendency for increased visual acuity in group IVA {>=} 0.6 for 18 months. After that time both groups showed decreased visual acuity, but all these patients reported of reduced metamorphopsia and increased color and contrast perception. Conclusions: There is an influence of low dose fractionated percutaneous teletherapy on visual acuity, subfoveal neovascular membranes and metamorphopsia. IVA and duration of anamnesis play an important role. There seems to be no persistent effect; possibly increased dosage will bring a benefit. (orig.) [German] Es wurde die Wirkung der Bestrahlung auf die Sehschaerfe bei altersabhaengiger Makuladegeneration mit chorioidalen Neovaskularisationen, die nach den MPS-Kriterien einer Laserkoagulation nicht zugaenglich sind, untersucht. Patienten und Methode: 126 Augen von 118 Patienten im Alter von 55-89 Jahren (Mittel 74) wurden behandelt. Ein

  11. Magnetic diffusion and ionization fractions in dense molecular clouds: The role of charged grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmegreen, B.G.

    1979-01-01

    The ionization fraction is determined for dense molecular clouds by considering charge exchange, dissociative recombination, radiative recombination, and collisions between grains and charged species. The inclusion of grains tends to lower the ionization fraction for a given cosmic-ray ionization rate zeta and metal depletion delta. The observed values of the ionization fractions in dense cloud cores (i.e., -8 ) are obtained for reasonable values of zeta=10 -17 s -1 and delta=0.1.For temperatures less than 30 K, each grain alternates in charge between -e and 0. The resulting motion of the grains in a self-graviting cloud that contains a magnetic field will be periodic; their response to electromagnetic forces will depend on their instantaneous charge. This complex motion is calculated in order to determine the average viscous force between the grains and the neutral molecules in the cloud. The grain-neutral viscous force combines with the ion-neutral viscous force to regulate the motion of the neutral molecules relative to the magnetic field. The resultant The result neutral drift leads to a diffusion of the magnetic field out of the cloud. The time scale for this diffusion is calculated. Grain-related viscous forces dominate ion-related forces for ionization fractions less than 5 x 10 -8 . The magnetic diffusion time in a self-gravitating cloud that is supported by an internal magnetic field is shown to be at least 10 times larger thanthe free-fall time even when the ionization fraction is much less than 10 -8

  12. Mammography-oncogenecity at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyes, G J; Mill, A J; Charles, M W

    2009-01-01

    dose exposure, it is not a low dose rate examination, and protraction of dose should not be confused with fractionation. Although there is potential for a suppressive effect at low doses, recent epidemiological data, and several international radiation risk assessments, continue to promote the linear no-threshold (LNT) model. Finally, recent studies have shown that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is more sensitive than mammography in detecting invasive breast cancer in women with a genetic sensitivity. Since an increase in the risk associated with mammographic screening would blur the justification of exposure for this high risk subgroup, the use of other (non-ionising) screening modalities is preferable.

  13. Development of ProCaRS Clinical Nomograms for Biochemical Failure-free Survival Following Either Low-Dose Rate Brachytherapy or Conventionally Fractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Andrew; Pickles, Tom; Crook, Juanita; Martin, Andre-Guy; Souhami, Luis; Catton, Charles; Lukka, Himu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although several clinical nomograms predictive of biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS) for localized prostate cancer exist in the medical literature, making valid comparisons can be challenging due to variable definitions of biochemical failure, the disparate distribution of prognostic factors, and received treatments in patient populations. The aim of this investigation was to develop and validate clinically-based nomograms for 5-year BFFS using the ASTRO II “Phoenix” definition for two patient cohorts receiving low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy or conventionally fractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) from a large Canadian multi-institutional database. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected from the GUROC (Genitourinary Radiation Oncologists of Canada) Prostate Cancer Risk Stratification (ProCaRS) database if they received (1) LDR brachytherapy ≥ 144 Gy (n=4208) or (2) EBRT ≥ 70 Gy  (n=822). Multivariable Cox regression analysis for BFFS was performed separately for each cohort and used to generate clinical nomograms predictive of 5-year BFFS. Nomograms were validated using calibration plots of nomogram predicted probability versus observed probability via Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results: Patients receiving LDR brachytherapy had a mean age of 64 ± 7 years, a mean baseline PSA of 6.3 ± 3.0 ng/mL, 75% had a Gleason 6, and 15% had a Gleason 7, whereas patients receiving EBRT had a mean age of 70 ± 6 years, a mean baseline PSA of 11.6 ± 10.7 ng/mL, 30% had a Gleason 6, 55% had a Gleason 7, and 14% had a Gleason 8-10. Nomograms for 5-year BFFS included age, use and duration of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), baseline PSA, T stage, and Gleason score for LDR brachytherapy and an ADT (months), baseline PSA, Gleason score, and biological effective dose (Gy) for EBRT. Conclusions: Clinical nomograms examining 5-year BFFS were developed for patients receiving either LDR brachytherapy or conventionally fractionated EBRT and

  14. Low Dose Radiation-Induced Genome and Epigenome Instability Symposium and Epigenetic Mechanisms, DNA Repair, and Chromatin Symposium at the EMS 2008 Annual Meeting - October 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F; Kovalchuk, Olga; Dolinoy, Dana C; Dubrova, Yuri E; Coleman, Matthew A; Schär, Primo; Pogribny, Igor; Hendzel, Michael

    2010-02-19

    The Low Dose Radiation Symposium thoughtfully addressed ionizing radiation non-mutational but transmissable alterations in surviving cells. Deregulation of epigenetic processes has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis, and there is increasing realization that a significant fraction of non-targeted and adaptive mechanisms in response to ionizing radiation are likely to be epigenetic in nature. Much remains to be learned about how chromatin and epigenetic regulators affect responses to low doses of radiation, and how low dose radiation impacts other epigenetic processes. The Epigenetic Mechanisms Symposium focused on on epigenetic mechanisms and their interplay with DNA repair and chromatin changes. Addressing the fact that the most well understood mediators of epigenetic regulation are histone modifications and DNA methylation. Low levels of radiation can lead to changes in the methylation status of certain gene promoters and the expression of DNA methyltransferases, However, epigenetic regulation can also involve changes in higher order chromosome structure.

  15. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  16. Human lymphocytes exposed to low doses of ionizing radiations become refractory to high doses of radiation as well as to chemical mutagens that induce double-strand breaks in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, Sheldon; Afzal, Veena; Wiencke, J.K.; Olivieri, G.; Michaeli, A.

    1988-01-01

    The results indicate that prior exposure to 0.01 Gy of X-rays reduces the number of chromosome breaks induced by double-strand breaks, and perhaps even by cross-links, in DNA, but has the opposite effect on breaks induced by the alkylating agent MMS. The results also show that the induced repair mechanism is different from that observed in the adaptive reponse that follows exposure to low doses of alkylating agents. (author)

  17. Advance of study on hormesis of low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Liaoyuan

    2003-01-01

    There have been growing interests in recent years over the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on human. The paper gives a brief review on the LDR studies, which include LDR-induced hormesis and adaptive response, LDR experiments in vivo or in vitro and epidemiologic investigation, and clinical applications of LDR as well

  18. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  19. THE INTRINSIC FRACTIONS AND RADIO PROPERTIES OF LOW-IONIZATION BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Xinyu; Shankar, Francesco; Sivakoff, Gregory R.

    2012-01-01

    Low-ionization (Mg II, Fe II, and Fe III) broad absorption line quasars (LoBALs) probe a relatively obscured quasar population and could be at an early evolutionary stage for quasars. We study the intrinsic fractions of LoBALs using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Two Micron All Sky Survey, and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm survey. We find that the LoBAL fractions of the near-infrared (NIR) and radio samples are approximately 5-7 times higher than those measured in the optical sample. This suggests that the fractions measured in the NIR and radio bands are closer to the intrinsic fractions of the populations, and that the optical fractions are significantly biased due to obscuration effects, similar to high-ionization broad absorption line quasars (HiBALs). Considering a population of obscured quasars that do not enter the SDSS, which could have a much higher LoBAL fraction, we expect that the intrinsic fraction of LoBALs could be even higher. We also find that the LoBAL fractions decrease with increasing radio luminosities, again, similarly to HiBALs. In addition, we find evidence for increasing fractions of LoBALs toward higher NIR luminosities, especially for FeLoBALs with a fraction of ∼18% at M K s < -31 mag. This population of NIR-luminous LoBALs may be at an early evolutionary stage of quasar evolution. To interpret the data, we use a luminosity-dependent model for LoBALs that yields significantly better fits than those from a pure geometric model.

  20. Cancer risk of low dose/low dose rate radiation: a meta-analysis of cancer data of mammals exposed to low doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Hiromitsu; Magae, Junji

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Linear No Threshold (LNT) model is a basic theory for radioprotection, but the adaptability of this hypothesis to biological responses at low doses or at low dose rates is not sufficiently investigated. Simultaneous consideration of the cumulative dose and the dose rate is necessary for evaluating the risk of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation at low dose. This study intends to examine several numerical relationships between doses and dose rates in biological responses to gamma radiation. Collected datasets on the relationship between dose and the incidence of cancer in mammals exposed to low doses of radiation were analysed using meta-regression models and modified exponential (MOE) model, which we previously published, that predicts irradiation time-dependent biological response at low dose rate ionizing radiation. Minimum doses of observable risk and effective doses with a variety of dose rates were calculated using parameters estimated by fitting meta-regression models to the data and compared them with other statistical models that find values corresponding to 'threshold limits'. By fitting a weighted regression model (fixed-effects meta-regression model) to the data on risk of all cancers, it was found that the log relative risk [log(RR)] increased as the total exposure dose increased. The intersection of this regression line with the x-axis denotes the minimum dose of observable risk. These estimated minimum doses and effective doses increased with decrease of dose rate. The goodness of fits of MOE-model depended on cancer types, but the total cancer risk is reduced when dose rates are very low. The results suggest that dose response curve for cancer risk is remarkably affected by dose rate and that dose rate effect changes as a function of dose rate. For scientific discussion on the low dose exposure risk and its uncertainty, the term 'threshold' should be statistically defined, and dose rate effects should be included in the risk

  1. Statistical and low dose response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, M.R.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1981-01-01

    The low dose response and the lower limit of detection of the Hanford dosimeter depend upon may factors, including the energy of the radiation, whether the exposure is to be a single radiation or mixed fields, annealing cycles, environmental factors, and how well various batches of TLD materials are matched in the system. A careful statistical study and sensitivity analysis were performed to determine how these factors influence the response of the dosimeter system. Estimates have been included in this study of the standard deviation of calculated dose for various mixed field exposures from 0 to 1000 mrem

  2. Advanced Computational Approaches for Characterizing Stochastic Cellular Responses to Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, Bobby, R., Ph.D.

    2003-06-27

    OAK - B135 This project final report summarizes modeling research conducted in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Low Dose Radiation Research Program at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute from October 1998 through June 2003. The modeling research described involves critically evaluating the validity of the linear nonthreshold (LNT) risk model as it relates to stochastic effects induced in cells by low doses of ionizing radiation and genotoxic chemicals. The LNT model plays a central role in low-dose risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation (or genotoxic chemical) exposure is assumed to increase one¡¯s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of cancer deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Our research has focused on developing biologically based models that explain the shape of dose-response curves for low-dose radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells. Understanding the shape of the dose-response curve for radiation and genotoxic chemical-induced stochastic effects in cells helps to better understand the shape of the dose-response curve for cancer induction in humans. We have used a modeling approach that facilitated model revisions over time, allowing for timely incorporation of new knowledge gained related to the biological basis for low-dose-induced stochastic effects in cells. Both deleterious (e.g., genomic instability, mutations, and neoplastic transformation) and protective (e.g., DNA repair and apoptosis) effects have been included in our modeling. Our most advanced model, NEOTRANS2, involves differing levels of genomic instability. Persistent genomic instability is presumed to be associated with nonspecific, nonlethal mutations and to increase both the risk for neoplastic transformation and for cancer occurrence. Our research results, based on

  3. Fractional Stark state selective electric field ionization of very high-n Rydberg states of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, H.; Mueller-Dethlefs, K.; Baranov, L.Y.

    1996-01-01

    For the first time fractional Stark state selective electric field ionization of very high-n (n approx-gt 250) molecular Rydberg states is observed. An open-quote open-quote offset close-quote close-quote electric pulse selectively ionizes the more fragile open-quote open-quote red close-quote close-quote (down shifted in energy) Stark states. The more resilient open-quote open-quote bluer close-quote close-quote, or up-shifted, ones survive and are shifted down in energy upon application of a second (open-quote open-quote probe close-quote close-quote) pulse of opposite direction (diabatic Stark states close-quote inversion). Hence, even for smaller probe than offset fields ionization is observed. The offset/probe ratio allows one to control spectral peak shapes in zero-kinetic-energy photoelectron spectroscopy. copyright 1995 The American Physical Society

  4. The Ionization Fraction in the Obscuring ``Torus'' of an Active Galactic Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A. S.; Roy, A. L.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Colbert, E. J. M.; Weaver, K. A.; Braatz, J. A.; Henkel, C.; Matsuoka, M.; Xue, S.; Iyomoto, N.; Okada, K.

    1998-10-01

    The LINER galaxy NGC 2639 contains a water vapor megamaser, suggesting the presence of a nuclear accretion disk or torus viewed close to edge-on. This galaxy is thus a good candidate for revealing absorption by the torus of any compact nuclear continuum emission. In this paper, we report VLBA radio maps at three frequencies and an ASCA X-ray spectrum obtained to search for free-free and photoelectric absorptions, respectively. The radio observations reveal a compact (~1.3 × 10-5, which is comparable to the theoretical upper limit derived by Neufeld, Maloney, and Conger for X-ray heated molecular gas. The two values may be reconciled if the molecular gas is very dense: nH2>~109 cm-3. The measured ionization fraction is also consistent with the idea that both absorptions occur in a hot (~6000 K), weakly ionized (ionization fraction a few times 10-2) atomic region that may coexist with the warm molecular gas. If this is the case, the absorbing gas is ~1 pc from the nucleus. We rule out the possibility that both absorptions occur in a fully ionized gas near 104 K. If our line of sight passes through more than one phase, the atomic gas probably dominates the free-free absorption, while the molecular gas may dominate the photoelectric absorption.

  5. Some remarks on the significance of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cigna, A.A.

    1989-12-01

    The criteria of the present system of individual dose limitation are considered as well as the evolution of the limiting values. The assumption of the linearity of the dose-effect relationship without any threshold is probably the best approach to adopt for recommendations in radiation protection and for accounting the doses acquired by exposure to ionizing radiation. On the other hand the present evaluation of the natural background could imply a different dose-effect relationship in the low doses region and perhaps the existence of a threshold. Therefore the extrapolations which are usually made after exposures of different groups of people to low doses cannot be considered as scientifically sound. (author)

  6. Development of Plant Application Technique of Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae Sung; Lim, Yong Taek (and others)

    2007-07-15

    The project was carried out to achieve three aims. First, development of application techniques of cell-stimulating effects by low-dose radiation. Following irradiation with gamma-rays of low doses, beneficial effects in crop germination, early growth, and yield were investigated using various plant species and experimental approaches. For the actual field application, corroborative studies were also carried out with a few concerned experimental stations and farmers. Moreover, we attempted to establish a new technique of cell cultivation for industrial mass-production of shikonin, a medicinal compound from Lithospermum erythrorhizon and thereby suggested new application fields for application techniques of low-dose radiation. Second, elucidation of action mechanisms of ionizing radiation in plants. By investigating changes in plant photosynthesis and physiological metabolism, we attempted to elucidate physiological activity-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation and to search for radiation-adaptive cellular components. Besides, analyses of biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms for stimulus-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation were accomplished by examining genes and proteins inducible by low-dose radiation. Third, development of functional crop plants using radiation-resistant factors. Changes in stress-tolerance of plants against environmental stress factors such as light, temperature, salinity and UV-B stress after exposed to low-dose gamma-rays were investigated. Concerned reactive oxygen species, antioxidative enzymes, and antioxidants were also analyzed to develop high value-added and environment-friendly functional plants using radiation-resistant factors. These researches are important to elucidate biological activities increased by low-dose radiation and help to provide leading technologies for improvement of domestic productivity in agriculture and development of high value-added genetic resources.

  7. Development of Plant Application Technique of Low Dose Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae Sung; Lim, Yong Taek

    2007-07-01

    The project was carried out to achieve three aims. First, development of application techniques of cell-stimulating effects by low-dose radiation. Following irradiation with gamma-rays of low doses, beneficial effects in crop germination, early growth, and yield were investigated using various plant species and experimental approaches. For the actual field application, corroborative studies were also carried out with a few concerned experimental stations and farmers. Moreover, we attempted to establish a new technique of cell cultivation for industrial mass-production of shikonin, a medicinal compound from Lithospermum erythrorhizon and thereby suggested new application fields for application techniques of low-dose radiation. Second, elucidation of action mechanisms of ionizing radiation in plants. By investigating changes in plant photosynthesis and physiological metabolism, we attempted to elucidate physiological activity-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation and to search for radiation-adaptive cellular components. Besides, analyses of biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms for stimulus-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation were accomplished by examining genes and proteins inducible by low-dose radiation. Third, development of functional crop plants using radiation-resistant factors. Changes in stress-tolerance of plants against environmental stress factors such as light, temperature, salinity and UV-B stress after exposed to low-dose gamma-rays were investigated. Concerned reactive oxygen species, antioxidative enzymes, and antioxidants were also analyzed to develop high value-added and environment-friendly functional plants using radiation-resistant factors. These researches are important to elucidate biological activities increased by low-dose radiation and help to provide leading technologies for improvement of domestic productivity in agriculture and development of high value-added genetic resources

  8. Influence of low dose irradiation on differentiation, maturation and T-cell activation of human dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahns, Jutta [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Anderegg, Ulf; Saalbach, Anja [Department for Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, University of Leipzig, Johannisallee 30, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Rosin, Britt; Patties, Ina; Glasow, Annegret [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Kamprad, Manja [Institute for Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, University of Leipzig, Johannisallee 30, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Scholz, Markus [Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology, University of Leipzig, Haertelstr. 16-18, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Hildebrandt, Guido, E-mail: Guido.Hildebrandt@uni-rostock.de [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Rostock, Suedring 75, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 21, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-05-10

    Ionizing irradiation could act directly on immune cells and may induce bystander effects mediated by soluble factors that are released by the irradiated cells. This is the first study analyzing both the direct effect of low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) on the maturation and cytokine release of human dendritic cells (DCs) and the functional consequences for co-cultured T-cells. We showed that irradiation of DC-precursors in vitro does not influence surface marker expression or cytokine profile of immature DCs nor of mature DCs after LPS treatment. There was no difference of single dose irradiation versus fractionated irradiation protocols on the behavior of the mature DCs. Further, the low dose irradiation did not change the capacity of the DCs to stimulate T-cell proliferation. But the irradiation of the co-culture of DCs and T-cells revealed significantly lower proliferation of T-cells with higher doses. Summarizing the data from approx. 50 DC preparations there is no significant effect of low dose ionizing irradiation on the cytokine profile, surface marker expression and maturation of DCs in vitro although functional consequences cannot be excluded.

  9. Second International MELODI Workshop on Low Dose Risk Research - Slides of the presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repussard, J.; Weiss, W.; Quintana Trias, O.; Rosario Perez, M. del; Andersen, M.; Rudiger Trott, K.; Ottolenghi, A.; Smyth, V.; Graw, J.; Little, M.P.; Yonai, S.; Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.; Bouffler, S.; Chevillard, S.; Jeggo, P.; Sabatier, L.; Baatout, S.; Niwa, O.; Oesch, F.; Atkinson, M.; Averbeck, D.; Lloyd, D.; O'Neill, P.

    2011-01-01

    The MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) mission is to impulse low dose risk research in Europe through a strategic research agenda (SRA) and road-map of priorities. The last presentation is dedicated to the SRA and its preference research programs. The other presentations deal principally with the low-dose exposure in medical uses of ionizing radiations, radiosensitivity, radiation-induced cataracts, or epidemiology and radiobiology of cardiovascular disease. This document is composed of the slides of the presentations

  10. Risks to health from radiation at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.; Osborne, R.V.

    1997-01-01

    Our focus is on whether, using a balance-of-evidence approach, it is possible to say that at a low enough dose, or at a sufficiently low dose rate, radiation risk reduces to zero in a population. We conclude that insufficient evidence exists at present to support such a conclusion. In part this reflects statistical limitations at low doses, and in part (although mechanisms unquestionably exist to protect us against much of the damage induced by ionizing radiation) the biological heterogeneity of human populations, which means these mechanisms do not act in all members of the population at all times. If it is going to be possible to demonstrate that low doses are less dangerous than we presently assume, the evidence, paradoxically, will likely come from studies of higher dose and dose rate scenarios than are encountered occupationally. (author)

  11. Low Dose Suppression of Neoplastic Transformation in Vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Leslie Redpath

    2012-05-01

    This grant was to study the low dose suppression of neoplastic transformation in vitro and the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses and dose-rates of ionizing radiation. Previous findings had indicated a suppression of transformation at dose <10cGy of low-LET radiation when delivered at high dose-rate. The present study indicates that such suppression extends out to doses in excess of 100cGy when the dose (from I-125 photons) is delivered at dose-rates as low as 0.2 mGy/min and out to in excess of {approx}25cGy the highest dose studied at the very low dose-rate of 0.5 mGy/day. We also examined dose-rate effects for high energy protons (which are a low-LET radiation) and suppression was evident below {approx}10cGy for high dose-rate delivery and at least out to 50cGy for low dose-rate (20cGy/h) delivery. Finally, we also examined the effect of low doses of 1 GeV/n iron ions (a high-LET radiation) delivered at high dose-rate on transformation at low doses and found a suppression below {approx}10cGy that could be attributable to an adaptive response in bystander cells induced by the associated low-LET delta rays. These results have implications for cancer risk assessment at low doses.

  12. A Paradigm Shift in Low Dose Radiation Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Alatas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available When ionizing radiation traverses biological material, some energy depositions occur and ionize directly deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA molecules, the critical target. A classical paradigm in radiobiology is that the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA are responsible for the detrimental biological effects of radiation. It is presumed that no radiation effect would be expected in cells that receive no direct radiation exposure through nucleus. The risks of exposure to low dose ionizing radiation are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to high dose radiation. However, the validity of using this dose-response model is controversial because evidence accumulated over the past decade has indicated that living organisms, including humans, respond differently to low dose radiation than they do to high dose radiation. Moreover, recent experimental evidences from many laboratories reveal the fact that radiation effects also occur in cells that were not exposed to radiation and in the progeny of irradiated cells at delayed times after radiation exposure where cells do not encounter direct DNA damage. Recently, the classical paradigm in radiobiology has been shifted from the nucleus, specifically the DNA, as the principal target for the biological effects of radiation to cells. The universality of target theory has been challenged by phenomena of radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effect and adaptive response. The new radiation biology paradigm would cover both targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. The mechanisms underlying these responses involve biochemical/molecular signals that respond to targeted and non-targeted events. These results brought in understanding that the biological response to low dose radiation at tissue or organism level is a complex process of integrated response of cellular targets as well as extra-cellular factors. Biological understanding of

  13. Low Dose Risk, Decisions, and Risk Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, James

    2002-01-01

    The overall research objective was to establish new levels of information about how people, groups, and communities respond to low dose radiation exposure. This is basic research into the social psychology of individual, group, and community responses to radiation exposures. The results of this research are directed to improving risk communication and public participation in management of environmental problems resulting from low dose radiation

  14. Characteristics of repair following very low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.; Metting, N.F.; Nelson, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation on living systems being with the physical processes of energy deposition and develop through many stages of chemical reaction and biological response. The modeling effort attempts to organize the available data and theories of all of these stages into self-consistent models that can be compared and tested. In some cases, important differences among models result in only small differences in cell survival within the ranges of dose and dose rate that are normally investigated. To overcome this limitation, new ways of irradiating cells at extremes of dose rate, or ways of evaluating the effects of very small doses, are developed. Mathematical modeling and cellular studies complement each other. It has recently been found that some mechanisms are not adequate to account for the interaction of dose and repair time as they affect the reproductive survival of plateau-phase Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Repair of radiation-induced cellular damage plays a central role in the survival of cells exposed to doses of 1 Gy or more. This repair is responsible for the dose rate, split-dose and delayed plating effect and can be evaluated. Because split-dose and dose-rate experiments involve repair during irradiation and delayed plating experiments involve repair after irradiation is completed, it was originally thought that different repair processes were involved. It is now clear that this is not necessarily the case. Appropriately designed models can account for observed effects at conventional doses (1 Gy or more) whether they assume all damage is lethal unless repaired or some damage is innocuous unless it interacts with additional damage. The fact that the survival following a plating delay is always less than the survival following immediate plating at low doses indicates that the damage produced is probably not potentially lethal

  15. Low-dose effects hypothesis and observations on NPP personal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgieva, R.; Acheva, A.; Boteva, R.; Chobanova, N.; Djounova, J.; Gyuleva, I.; Ivanova, K.; Kurchatova, G.; Milchev, A.; Negoicheva, K.; Nikolov, V.; Panova, D.; Pejankov, I.; Rupova, I.; Stankova, K.; Zacharieva, E. [Radiobiology Department, National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-07-01

    In the modern world the use of various sources of ionizing radiation is nearly ubiquitous. They have numerous applications in industry, medicine, science, agriculture, etc. Radiation doses to workers nevertheless are commensurable to the natural background exposure. Published data on the health effects of occupational radiation exposure are often contradictory. Addressing the issue of „negative” (bystander effects, genomic instability) and „positive” (adaptive response, radiation hormesis) effects of low doses is important and has a significant social and economic impact. In this paper we summarize the results of our extensive monitoring of nuclear power plant (NPP) staff. We believe it is a cohort suitable for analysis of health effects at low doses, because of their good medical and dosimetric control. Our results rather support the idea of absence of adverse health effects in NPP workers. (author)

  16. Low-dose radiation-induced endothelial cell retraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantak, S.S.; Onoda, J.M.; Diglio, C.A.; Harper Hospital, Detroit, MI

    1993-01-01

    The data presented here are representative of a series of studies designed to characterize low-dose radiation effects on pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Data suggest that post-irradiation lung injuries (e.g. oedema) may be induced with only a single fraction of therapeutic radiation, and thus microscopic oedema may initiate prior to the lethal effects of radiation on the microvascular endothelium, and much earlier than would be suggested by the time course for clinically-detectable oedema. (author)

  17. Ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document reprints the text of the French by-law from January 8, 2002 relative to the approval and to the controls and verifications of facilities devoted to the ionizing of food products for human beings and animals. The by-law imposes the operators of such facilities to perform measurements and dosimetric verifications all along the ionization process. (J.S.)

  18. Induction of chromosomal instability in human lymphoblasts by low doses of γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, C.F.; Grosovsky, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Genomic instability is a hallmark of tumorigenic progression, and a similar phenotype is also observed in a high fraction (10 - 50%) of cells that survive exposure to ionizing radiation. In both cases unstable clones are characterized by non-clonal chromosomal rearrangements, which are indicative of a high rate of genetic change during the outgrowth of an unstable parental cell. We postulate that the remarkably high frequency of radiation-induced genomic instability is incompatible with a mutational mechanism for a specific gene, or even a large family of genes. Rather, we hypothesize that a major portion of instability is attributable to the formation of chromosomal rearrangement junction sequences that act as de novo chromosomal breakage hotspots. We further suggest that critical target sequences, which represent at least 10% of the genome and include repetitive DNA sequences such as those found in centromeric heterochromatin, can be involved in breakage and rearrangement hotspots that drive persistent genomic instability and karyotypic heterogeneity. Since chromosomal damage is induced even by low dose radiation exposure, we hypothesize that this phenotype can be efficiently induced at doses that are relevant to environmental, occupational, or medical exposure. In the present study, TK6 human B-lymphoblastoid cells were irradiated with 0, 10, 20 and 200cGy, in order to provide a set of data points for single, low dose exposures. Independent clones were analyzed karyotypically approximately 40 generations after radiation exposure. Preliminary results suggest that the fraction of clones exhibiting genomic instability after 20 cGy (0.16) is similar to and statistically indistinguishable from the fraction of unstable clones following 200 cGy (0.2) exposure. These findings support the hypothesis that instability following radiation, and perhaps also in cancer, primarily reflects non-mutational mechanisms

  19. Ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, J.

    1989-01-01

    Ionizing radiation results in biological damage that differs from other hazardous substances and is highly dangerous to man. Ionizing radiation cannot be perceived by man's sense organs and the biological damage cannot be detected immediately afterwards (except in very high doses). Every human being is exposed to low doses of radiation. The structure of the atom; sources of ionizing radiation; radiation units; biological effects; norms for radiation protection; and the national control in South Africa are discussed. 1 fig., 5 refs

  20. Pharmacological radionuclide ventriculography for detection of myocardial contractile reserve in patients after myocardial infarction: head-to-head comparison of low dose dobutamine and low dose dypiridamole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrasinovic, Z.; Ostojic, M.; Beleslin, B.; Stojkovic, S.; Nedeljkovic, M.; Stankovic, G.; Dikic, A.; Pavlovic, S.; Sobic, D.

    2002-01-01

    Background. Low dose pharmacological stress echocardiography with either dobutamine or dipyridamole infusion has been proposed for recognition of myocardial viability. However, dependence on adequate acoustic window, observer experience, and the mild degree of wall motion changes make the viability assessment by stress echocardiography especially bothersome. The objective of the study was to evaluate the ability of low dose dobutamine and low dose dipyridamole radionuclide ventriculography to detect contractile reserve in patients after myocardial infarction and functional recovery after coronary angioplasty. Methods. The study group consisted of 20 consecutive patients (52±10 years, 17 male) with previous myocardial infarction and resting regional dyssynergy, in whom diagnostic cardiac catheterization revealed significant one-vessel coronary artery stenosis suitable for angioplasty. Each patient underwent equilibrium 99m-Tc radionuclide ventriculography which was performed at rest and during low dose dipyridamole (0.28 mg/kg over 2 minutes) and low dose dobutamine infusion (up to 10 mcg/kg/min). Left ventricular global and regional ejection fractions were determined. Increase of regional ejection fraction for >5% (inferoapical and posterolateral regions) or >10% (anteroseptal regions) during low dose dobutamine and dipyridamole in infarcted regions, as well as in the follow up period, was considered as index of contractile reserve. After 8 weeks of successful angioplasty, resting radionuclide ventriculography was repeated in all patients in order to identify functional recovery of the infarct zone. Results. Out of the 180 analyzed segments (20x9), 90 regional ejection fractions have shown depressed contractility. The mean of the regional ejection fractions showing depressed contractility increased from the resting value of 34±12% to 42±14% in the follow-up period (p=0.06). Of the 90 with baseline dyssynergy, 46 were responders during low-dose dobutamine (51

  1. Plants as warning signal for exposure to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusli Ibrahim; Norhafiz Talib

    2012-01-01

    The stamen-hair system of Tradescantia for flower colour has proven to be one of the most suitable materials to study the frequency of mutations induced by low doses of various ionizing radiations and chemical mutagens. The system has also been used successfully for detecting mutagenic synergisms among chemical mutagens and ionizing radiations as well as for studying the variations of spontaneous mutation frequency. In this study of radiobiology, the main objective is to observe somatic mutation (occurrence of pink cells from blue cells) induced on stamen hairs of five Tradescantia sp. available in Malaysia after exposure to low doses of chronic gamma irradiation using Gamma Green House. Pink cells appeared only on Tradescantia Pallida Purpurea stamen hairs after 13 days of exposure to irradiation with different doses of gamma rays. The highest number of stamens with pink cells was recorded from flowers irradiated with the highest dose of 6.37 Gy with 0.07 Gy/ h of dose rate. The lowest number of stamens with pink cells was recorded with an average of 0.57, irradiated with the lowest dose of 0.91 Gy with 0.01 Gy/ h of dose rate. There were no pink cells observed on Tradescantia Spathaceae Discolor after exposure to different doses of gamma rays. Similar negative results were observed for the control experiments. The principal cells in this assay are the mitotic stamen hair cells developing in the young flower buds. After exposure to radiation, the heterozygous dominant blue character of the stamen hair cell is prevented, resulting in the appearance of the recessive pink color. Furthermore, no pink cell appears on all species of Tradescantia spathaceae after irradiated with different doses of gamma rays. The sensitivity of the Tradescantia has been used widely and has demonstrated the relation between radiation dose and frequency of mutation observed at low doses which can contribute to the effects of low doses and their consequences for human health. This system

  2. Radiation protection and environment day the low doses in everyday life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The consequences of low doses exposures are difficult to explore and the studies give often place to controversies. According to the are, differences exist in the methodological approaches. It results from it a confusion on the acceptable levels of exposure, even on the definition of low dose. This day organised by the sections 'non ionizing and research and health of the French society of radiation protection (S.F.R.P.), will be a meeting between professionals of different disciplines, to compare the approaches used for the ionizing and non ionizing radiations as well as the chemical and microbiological agents. It will allow to share the knowledge and the abilities and to progress on methodologies adapted to the evaluation and the management of risks in relation with low doses. (N.C.)

  3. How to gain a better knowledge of the hazards of low doses of ionizing radiation to the population. Lecture presented at the festive colloquium at Munich Technical University on the occasion of his (L. Merz) 85th birthday in January 1990; Die Erkenntnis der Gefahren kleiner Dosen ionisierender Strahlung fuer die Bevoelkerung. Vortrag gehalten an der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen anlaesslich des Festkolloquiums zu seinem (L. Merz) 85. Geburtstag im Januar 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merz, L.

    1990-12-31

    The author shows that the approach chosen up to the present for obtaining knowledge of the hazards emanating from low-dose irradiation with ionizing radiation still relies exclusively on the metaphysical way, and that there is need for adding to this the way of scientific, basic research work. (orig./HSCH). [Deutsch] Der Autor zeigt, dass die Erkenntnis der Gefaehrlichkeit von kleinen Dosen ionisierender Strahlung heute noch ausschliesslich auf den metaphysischen Weg zurueckgefuehrt wird und dass die wissenschaftliche Erforschung der Gefaehrlichkeit kleiner Dosen ionisierender Strahlung noch mehr Grundlagenforschung bedarf. (orig./HSCH).

  4. Reduced oxygen enhancement ratio at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palcic, B.; Skarsgard, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    The oxygen depletion rate in cell suspensions was measured using a Clark electrode. It was found that under experimental conditions used in this laboratory for hypoxic irradiations, the oxygen levels before the start of irradiation are always below 0.1μm, the levels which could give any significant enhancement to radiation inactivation by x-rays. The measured O/sub 2/ depletion rates were comparable to those reported in the literature. Chinese hamster cells (CHO) were made hypoxic by gas exchange, combined with metabolic consumption of oxygen by cells at 37 0 C. Full survival curves were determined in the dose range 0 to 3Gy using the low dose survival assay. The results confirmed the authors' earlier finding that the OER decreases at low doses. The authors therefore believe that the dose-dependent OER is a true radiobiological phenomenon and not an artifact of the experimental method used in the low dose survival assay

  5. LOW DOSE RISK, DECISIONS, and RISK COMMUNICATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, James

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project is to conduct basic research on how people receive, evaluate, and form positions on scientific information and its relationship to low-dose radiation exposure. There are three major areas of study in our research program. First is the development of theories, frameworks and concepts essential to guiding data collection and analysis. The second area is a program of experimental studies on risk perception, evaluation of science information, and the structure of individual positions regarding low-dose exposures. Third is the community-level studies to examine and record how the social conditions, under which science communications take place, influence the development of attitudes and opinions about: low-dose exposures, the available management options, control of radiation risks, and preferences for program and policy goals

  6. Clinical characteristic of epidemic hepatitis in case of the effect of low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geras'kov, O.P.; Shubik, V.M.

    1990-01-01

    Clinical course of infections hepatitics B, developed on the background of pulmonary tuberculosis in people, who were subjected to chronic low dose ionizing radiation, indicated more frequent cases of severe and medium-severe forms of morbidity as compared to non-irradiated patients and those with no comitant pulmonary tuberculosis. However the reconvalescence terms, hepatitis size normalization, urine colour in different group patients did not differ essentially. The data obtained testify to the absence of significant peculiarities in the course of infections hepatitis B, combined with pulmonar tuberculosis under conditions of chronic low dose ionizing radiation. 3 refs.; 3 tabs

  7. ABSORPTION-LINE SPECTROSCOPY OF GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED GALAXIES: FURTHER CONSTRAINTS ON THE ESCAPE FRACTION OF IONIZING PHOTONS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leethochawalit, Nicha; Ellis, Richard S.; Zitrin, Adi [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Jones, Tucker A. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Stark, Daniel P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2016-11-10

    The fraction of ionizing photons escaping from high-redshift star-forming galaxies is a key obstacle in evaluating whether galaxies were the primary agents of cosmic reionization. We previously proposed using the covering fraction of low-ionization gas, measured via deep absorption-line spectroscopy, as a proxy. We now present a significant update, sampling seven gravitationally lensed sources at 4 < z < 5. We show that the absorbing gas in our sources is spatially inhomogeneous, with a median covering fraction of 66%. Correcting for reddening according to a dust-in-cloud model, this implies an estimated absolute escape fraction of ≃19% ± 6%. With possible biases and uncertainties, collectively we find that the average escape fraction could be reduced to no less than 11%, excluding the effect of spatial variations. For one of our lensed sources, we have sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to demonstrate the presence of such spatial variations and scatter in its dependence on the Ly α equivalent width, consistent with recent simulations. If this source is typical, our lower limit to the escape fraction could be reduced by a further factor ≃2. Across our sample, we find a modest anticorrelation between the inferred escape fraction and the local star formation rate, consistent with a time delay between a burst and leaking Lyman continuum photons. Our analysis demonstrates considerable variations in the escape fraction, consistent with being governed by the small-scale behavior of star-forming regions, whose activities fluctuate over short timescales. This supports the suggestion that the escape fraction may increase toward the reionization era when star formation becomes more energetic and burst-like.

  8. Biological influence from low dose and low-dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji

    2007-01-01

    Although living organisms have defense mechanisms for radioadaptive response, the influence is considered to vary qualitatively and quantitatively for low dose and high dose, as well as for low-dose rate and high-dose rate. This article describes the bioresponse to low dose and low-dose rate. Among various biomolecules, DNA is the most sensitive to radiation, and accurate replication of DNA is an essential requirement for the survival of living organisms. Also, the influence of active enzymes resulted from the effect of radiation on enzymes in the body is larger than the direct influence of radiation on the body. After this, the article describes the carcinogenic risk by low-dose radiation, and then so-called Hormesis effect to create cancer inhibition effect by stimulating active physiology. (S.K.)

  9. Stimulation of seeds by low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, Helen

    1976-05-01

    The first section of the bibliography lists materials on the stimulation of seeds by low dose irradiation, with particular reference to stimulation of germination and yield. The second section contains a small number of selected references on seed irradiation facilities. (author)

  10. Low-dose prophylactic craniospinal radiotherapy for intracranial germinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenfeld, Gordon O.; Amdur, Robert J.; Schmalfuss, Ilona M.; Morris, Christopher G.; Keole, Sameer R.; Mendenhall, William M.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of patients with localized intracranial germinoma treated with low-dose craniospinal irradiation (CSI) followed by a boost to the ventricular system and primary site. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients had pathologically confirmed intracranial germinoma and no spine metastases. Low-dose CSI was administered in 29 patients: usually 21 Gy of CSI, 9.0 Gy of ventricular boost, and a 19.5-Gy tumor boost, all at 1.5 Gy per fraction. Our neuroradiologist recorded three-dimensional tumor size on magnetic resonance images before, during, and after radiotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 7.0 years, 29 of 31 patients (94%) are disease free. One failure had nongerminomatous histology; the initial diagnosis was a sampling error. Of 3 patients who did not receive CSI, 1 died. No patient developed myelopathy, visual deficits, dementia, or skeletal growth problems. In locally controlled patients, tumor response according to magnetic resonance scan was nearly complete within 6 months after radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiotherapy alone with low-dose prophylactic CSI cures almost all patients with localized intracranial germinoma. Complications are rare when the daily dose of radiotherapy is limited to 1.5 Gy and the total CSI dose to 21 Gy. Patients without a near-complete response to radiotherapy should undergo resection to rule out a nongerminomatous element

  11. Anti-tumor effect of low dose radiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Zhengping; Lu Jiaben; Zhu Bingchai

    1997-01-01

    The author reports the effects of the total body irradiation of low dose radiation (LDR) and/or the local irradiation of large dose on average tumor weights and tumor inhibitory rates in 170 mice inoculated S 180 sarcoma cell, and the influence of LDR on average longevity in 40 tumor-bearing animals. Results show (1) LDR in the range of 75∼250 mGy can inhibit tumor growth to some extent; (2) fractionated irradiation of 75 mGy and local irradiation of 10 Gy may produce a synergism in tumor growth inhibition; and (3)LDR may enhance average longevity in ascitic tumor-bearing mice

  12. Effects of low dose radiation on repair processes in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuschl, H.; Altmann, H.; Kovac, R.; Topaloglou, A.; Egg, D.; Guenther, R.

    1978-10-01

    DNA excision repair was investigated in lymphocytes of persons occupationally exposed to low dose radiation of 222 Rn. Autoradiographic studies of unscheduled DNA synthesis and measurement of 3 H-thymidine incorporation by repair replication into double stranded and single-strand containing DNA fractions obtained by BND cellulose chromatography seem to indicate a stimulatory effect of repeated low dose radiation on repair enzymes. (author)

  13. Radiation effects of high and low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The extensive proliferation of the uses and applications of atomic and nuclear energy resulted in possible repercussions on human health. The prominent features of the health hazards that may be incurred after exposure to high and low radiation doses are discussed. The physical and biological factors involved in the sequential development of radiation health effects and the different cellular responses to radiation injury are considered. The main criteria and features of radiation effects of high and low doses are comprehensively outlined

  14. Estimation of radiation risks at low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The report presents a review of the effects caused by radiation in low doses, or at low dose rates. For the inheritable (or ''genetic''), as well as for the cancer producing effects of radiation, present evidence is consistent with: (a) a non-linear relationship between the frequency of at least some forms of these effects, with comparing frequencies caused by doses many times those received annually from natural sources, with those caused by lower doses; (b) a probably linear relationship, however, between dose and frequency of effects for dose rates in the region of that received from natural sources, or at several times this rate; (c) no evidence to indicate the existence of a threshold dose below which such effects are not produced, and a strong inference from the mode of action of radiation on cells at low dose rates that no such thresholds are likely to apply to the detrimental, cancer-producing or inheritable, effects resulting from unrepaired damage to single cells. 19 refs

  15. Deep learning for low-dose CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hu; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Jiliu; Wang, Ge

    2017-09-01

    Given the potential risk of X-ray radiation to the patient, low-dose CT has attracted a considerable interest in the medical imaging field. Currently, the main stream low-dose CT methods include vendor-specific sinogram domain filtration and iterative reconstruction algorithms, but they need to access raw data whose formats are not transparent to most users. Due to the difficulty of modeling the statistical characteristics in the image domain, the existing methods for directly processing reconstructed images cannot eliminate image noise very well while keeping structural details. Inspired by the idea of deep learning, here we combine the autoencoder, deconvolution network, and shortcut connections into the residual encoder-decoder convolutional neural network (RED-CNN) for low-dose CT imaging. After patch-based training, the proposed RED-CNN achieves a competitive performance relative to the-state-of-art methods. Especially, our method has been favorably evaluated in terms of noise suppression and structural preservation.

  16. Low doses of gamma radiation in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, José G.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.; Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B.; Franco, Caio H.

    2017-01-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Dry soya seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.210 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. A treatment with four radiation doses was applied as follows: 0 (control); 12.5; 25.0 and 50.0 Gy. Seed germination and harvested of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds number and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were the doses of 12.5 and 50.0 Gy. The results show that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  17. Modification of damage following low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.; Nelson, J.M.; Metting, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    At very low doses the damage-interaction mechanism is responsible for very little lethal or potentially lethal damage, and repair of the latter should essentially disappear. An alternative model suggests that potentially lethal damage is either repaired with a constant half time or misrepaired at a rate which is proportional to the square of the damage concentration. In this case, as the dose decreases, the probability of misrepair decreases faster than the probability of repair, and repair becomes a more pronounced feature of the cell response. Since the consequence of unrepaired damage is an important question in determining the effects of low doses of radiation delivered at low dose rates, we have attempted to determine which of these two types of models is consistent with the response of plateau-phase CHO cells. In the earlier experiments, there was no indication of repair after a 50-rad exposure with a 24-hour split dose or plating delay; in fact, immediate plating resulted in survival slightly above control and delayed plating in survival slightly below the control value

  18. Low doses of gamma radiation in soybean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, José G.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C., E-mail: zegilmar60@gmail.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br, E-mail: villavic@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Franco, Caio H. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Microbiologia, Imunologia e Parasitologia

    2017-07-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Dry soya seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.210 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. A treatment with four radiation doses was applied as follows: 0 (control); 12.5; 25.0 and 50.0 Gy. Seed germination and harvested of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds number and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were the doses of 12.5 and 50.0 Gy. The results show that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  19. Cytogenetics dosimetry: dose-response curve for low doses of X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, Virginia E. Noval; Pineda Bolivar, William R.; Riano, Victor M. Pabon; Ureana, Cecilia Crane

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a preliminary study for the standardization in the future, the dose-response curve for low doses of X-rays, through the analysis of in vitro cultures of peripheral blood samples of 3 men and 3 women occupationally not exposed to artificial sources of ionizing radiation, age 18-40 years, where possible nonsmokers

  20. The new in molecular mechanisms of the action of the irradiation in low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pukhteeva, I.V.; Gerasimovich, N.V.; Prokopenko, N.V.

    2011-01-01

    The data about nontarged effect after ionizing irradiation in low doses are considered. It is noted that activate or inhibit the synthesis of protein factor leading to cell cycle arrest in the checkpoints, to apoptosis in intact cells. Potential prospective research directions in radiobiology in connection with the data of bystander effect, adaptive protection are reviewed.

  1. The effects of low-dose radiotherapy on fresh osteochondral allografts: An experimental study in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğur Gönç

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: In osteochondral massive allograft transplantations, the immune reaction of the host could be precluded with radiotherapy, and the side-effects can be prevented by low-dose fractionated regimen. The total dose of fractionated radiotherapy for an immune suppression should be adjusted not to damage the cartilage tissue, but to avoid articular degeneration in the long term.

  2. Metabolomics: new prospects in low-dose radio-toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souidi, Maamar; Grison, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    There is recurring public concern regarding the health impact of chronic exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation. This concern is further heightened when possible sources of exposure are identified, such as disused mines, the operation of nuclear facilities and radioactive waste disposal facilities, accidental release from fuel cycle facilities or the possible return of residents to areas contaminated following a reactor accident, such as the one that occurred at Fukushima. In keeping with the guidelines set out in the European strategic research agenda for MELODI, IRSN is conducting an extensive, largely experiment-based, research program to acquire scientific data to respond to this concern. The program has already revealed that chronic ingestion of cesium-137 or uranium induces many subtle, generally slight, metabolic changes, the overall biological effects of which remain to be studied. A recent 'broad-spectrum' analytical technique known as metabolomics was used to pinpoint these metabolic changes. (authors)

  3. Optical fiber sensor for low dose gamma irradiation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrés, Ana I.; Esteban, Ã.`scar; Embid, Miguel

    2016-05-01

    An optical fiber gamma ray detector is presented in this work. It is based on a Terbium doped Gadolinium Oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillating powder which cover a chemically etched polymer fiber tip. This etching improves the fluorescence gathering by the optical fiber. The final diameter has been selected to fulfill the trade-off between light gathering and mechanical strength. Powder has been encapsulated inside a microtube where the fiber tip is immersed. The sensor has been irradiated with different air Kerma doses up to 2 Gy/h with a 137Cs source, and the spectral distribution of the fluorescence intensity has been recorded in a commercial grade CCD spectrometer. The obtained signal-to-noise ratio is good enough even for low doses, which has allowed to reduce the integration time in the spectrometer. The presented results show the feasibility for using low cost equipment to detect/measure ionizing radiation as gamma rays are.

  4. Effect of low dose radiation on apoptosis in mouse spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dong; Liu Jiamei; Chen Aijun; Liu Shuzheng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of whole body irradiation (WBI) with different doses of X-ray on apoptosis in mouse spleen. Methods: Time course changes and dose-effect relationship of apoptosis in mouse spleen induced by WBI were observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) qualitatively and TUNEL method semi-quantitatively. Results: Many typical apoptotic lymphocytes were found by TEM in mouse spleen after WBI with 2 Gy. No marked alterations of ultrastructure were found following WBI with 0.075 Gy. It was observed by TUNEL that the apoptosis of splenocytes increased after high dose radiation and decreased following low dose radiation (LDR). The dose-effect relationship of radiation-induced apoptosis showed a J-shaped curve. Conclusion: The effect of different doses of ionizing radiation on apoptosis in mouse spleen was distinct. And the decrease of apoptosis after LDR is considered a manifestation of radiation hormesis

  5. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  6. Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Low-Dose and LET Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Polly Y. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Cucinotta, Francis A. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences; Bjornstad, Kathleen A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Bakke, James [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Rosen, Chris J. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Du, Nicholas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Fairchild, David G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Cacao, Eliedonna [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences; Blakely, Eleanor A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    2016-04-19

    Increased cancer risk remains a primary concern for travel into deep space and may preclude manned missions to Mars due to large uncertainties that currently exist in estimating cancer risk from the spectrum of radiations found in space with the very limited available human epidemiological radiation-induced cancer data. Existing data on human risk of cancer from X-ray and gamma-ray exposure must be scaled to the many types and fluences of radiations found in space using radiation quality factors and dose-rate modification factors, and assuming linearity of response since the shapes of the dose responses at low doses below 100 mSv are unknown. The goal of this work was to reduce uncertainties in the relative biological effect (RBE) and linear energy transfer (LET) relationship for space-relevant doses of charged-particle radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The historical data from the studies of Fry et al. and Alpen et al. for Harderian gland (HG) tumors in the female CB6F1 strain of mouse represent the most complete set of experimental observations, including dose dependence, available on a specific radiation-induced tumor in an experimental animal using heavy ion beams that are found in the cosmic radiation spectrum. However, these data lack complete information on low-dose responses below 0.1 Gy, and for chronic low-dose-rate exposures, and there are gaps in the LET region between 25 and 190 keV/μm. In this study, we used the historical HG tumorigenesis data as reference, and obtained HG tumor data for 260 MeV/u silicon (LET ~70 keV/μm) and 1,000 MeV/u titanium (LET ~100 keV/μm) to fill existing gaps of data in this LET range to improve our understanding of the dose-response curve at low doses, to test for deviations from linearity and to provide RBE estimates. Animals were also exposed to five daily fractions of 0.026 or 0.052 Gy of 1,000 MeV/u titanium ions to simulate chronic exposure, and HG tumorigenesis from this fractionated study were compared to the

  7. Bioavailability of diclofenac potassium at low doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Burkhard; Chevts, Julia; Renner, Bertold; Wuttke, Henrike; Rau, Thomas; Schmidt, Andreas; Szelenyi, Istvan; Brune, Kay; Werner, Ulrike

    2005-01-01

    Aim Diclofenac-K has been recently launched at low oral doses in different countries for over-the-counter use. However, given the considerable first-pass metabolism of diclofenac, the degree of absorption of diclofenac-K at low doses remained to be determined. The aim of this study was to determine the bioavailability of low-dose diclofenac-K. Methods A randomized, three-way, cross-over study was performed in 10 subjects. Each received diclofenac-K, 22.5 mg via short-term i.v. infusion and orally at single doses of 12.5 mg and 25 mg. Results Mean (± SD) times to maximal plasma concentration (tmax) of diclofenac were 0.48 ± 0.28 h (12.5 mg) and 0.93 ± 0.96 h (25 mg). The absolute bioavailability of diclofenac-K after oral administration did not differ significantly in the 12.5-mg and 25-mg dose group (63.1 ± 12.6% vs. 65.1 ± 19.4%, respectively). The 90% confidence intervals for the AUC∞ and AUCt ratios for the two oral regimes were 82.6, 103.4% (point estimate 92.4%) and 86.2, 112.9% (point estimate 98.6%), respectively. These values were within the acceptance criteria for bioequivalence (80–125%). Conclusions Our data indicate that diclofenac-K is rapidly and well absorbed at low dose, and are consistent with a rapid onset of action of the drug. Abbreviations AUC, area under plasma concentraton-time curve; Cmax, peak plasma concentration; CI, confidence interval; COX, cyclooxygenase; D, dose; F, absolute bioavailability; tmax, time to reach Cmax. PMID:15606444

  8. Low dose radiation and diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongguang; Gong Shouliang; Cai Lu

    2006-01-01

    Induction of hormesis and adaptive response by low-dose radiatio (LDR) has been extensively indicated. It's mechanism may be related with the protective protein and antioxidants that LDR induced, which take effects on the diabetes mellitus (DM) and other diseases. This review will summarize available dat with emphasis on three points: the preventive effect of LDR on the development of diabetes, the therapeutic effect of LDR on diabetic complications and possible mechanisms by which LDR prevents the development of diabetes and diabetic complications. Finally, the perspectives of LDR clinical, diabetes-related implication are discussed. (authors)

  9. Evaluation of low-dose irradiation on microbiological quality of white carrots and string beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Amanda C.R.; Santillo, Amanda G.; Rodrigues, Flávio T.; Duarte, Renato C.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H.

    2012-01-01

    The minimally processed food provided the consumer with a product quality, safety and practicality. However, minimal processing of food does not reduce pathogenic population of microorganisms to safe levels. Ionizing radiation used in low doses is effective to maintain the quality of food, reducing the microbiological load but rather compromising the nutritional values and sensory property. The association of minimal processing with irradiation could improve the quality and safety of product. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of low-doses of ionizing radiation on the reduction of microorganisms in minimally processed foods. The results show that the ionizing radiation of minimally processed vegetables could decontaminate them without several changes in its properties.

  10. Evaluation of low-dose irradiation on microbiological quality of white carrots and string beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Amanda C. R.; Santillo, Amanda G.; Rodrigues, Flávio T.; Duarte, Renato C.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C. H.

    2012-08-01

    The minimally processed food provided the consumer with a product quality, safety and practicality. However, minimal processing of food does not reduce pathogenic population of microorganisms to safe levels. Ionizing radiation used in low doses is effective to maintain the quality of food, reducing the microbiological load but rather compromising the nutritional values and sensory property. The association of minimal processing with irradiation could improve the quality and safety of product. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of low-doses of ionizing radiation on the reduction of microorganisms in minimally processed foods. The results show that the ionizing radiation of minimally processed vegetables could decontaminate them without several changes in its properties.

  11. Low-dose effect on blood chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl-Rueling, J.

    1992-01-01

    Linear dose response relationships of biological effects at low doses are experimentally and theoretically disputed. Structural chromosome aberration rates at doses ranging from normal background exposures up to about 30 mGy/yr in vivo and up to 50 mGy in vitro were investigated by the author and other scientists. Results are comparable and dose effect curves reveal following shapes; within the normal burden and up to 2-10 mGy/yr in vivo rates they increase sharply to about 3-6 times the lowest values; subsequent doses either from natural, occupational or accidental exposures up to about 30 mGy/yr yield either constant aberration rates, assuming a plateau, or perhaps even a decrease. In vitro experiments show comparable results up to 50 mGy. Other biological effects seem to have similar dose dependencies. The non-linearity of low-dose effects can be explained by induction of repair enzymes at certain damage to the DNA. This hypothesis is sustained experimentally and theoretically by several papers in literature. (author). 14 refs., 5 figs

  12. Low and very low doses, new recommendations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucher, N.

    1999-01-01

    The topic of the seminar organized by the world council of nuclear workers (WONUC) was the effects of low or very low doses on human health. Discussions centred round the linearity of the relation between dose and effect in the evaluation and management of the health hazard. The recommendations proposed by ICPR (international commission for radiological protection) are based on this linearity as a precaution. On the one hand it is remembered that low dose irradiation might be beneficial. It has been proved that the irradiation of the whole body is efficient in case of Hodgkin lymphoma. On the other hand it is remembered that doses as low as 10 mSv in utero have led to an excess of cancer in children. Studies based on experimentally radio-induced cancers have been carried out in Japan, China, Canada and France.Their results seem to be not consistent with the hypothesis of linearity. During the last decade a lot of work has been made but a conclusion is far to be reached, it is said that the American department of energy (DOE) has invited bids in 1999 to launch research programs in order to clarify the situation. (A.C.)

  13. Radon Exposure and the Definition of Low Doses-The Problem of Spatial Dose Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madas, Balázs G

    2016-07-01

    Investigating the health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation is considered to be one of the most important fields in radiological protection research. Although the definition of low dose given by a dose range seems to be clear, it leaves some open questions. For example, the time frame and the target volume in which absorbed dose is measured have to be defined. While dose rate is considered in the current system of radiological protection, the same cancer risk is associated with all exposures, resulting in a given amount of energy absorbed by a single target cell or distributed among all the target cells of a given organ. However, the biological effects and so the health consequences of these extreme exposure scenarios are unlikely to be the same. Due to the heterogeneous deposition of radon progeny within the lungs, heterogeneous radiation exposure becomes a practical issue in radiological protection. While the macroscopic dose is still within the low dose range, local tissue doses on the order of Grays can be reached in the most exposed parts of the bronchial airways. It can be concluded that progress in low dose research needs not only low dose but also high dose experiments where small parts of a biological sample receive doses on the order of Grays, while the average dose over the whole sample remains low. A narrow interpretation of low dose research might exclude investigations with high relevance to radiological protection. Therefore, studies important to radiological protection should be performed in the frame of low dose research even if the applied doses do not fit in the dose range used for the definition of low doses.

  14. Responses of epithelial cells to low and very low doses of low let radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mothersill, Carmel; Seymour, Colin

    2003-01-01

    Recent advances in our knowledge of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation have shown unexpected phenomena. These vary in the endpoint used to detect them and in the dose range examined but all occur as high-frequency events in cell populations. They include: 1. a 'bystander effect' which can be demonstrated at low doses as a transferable.factor(s) causing radiobiological effects in unexposed cells, 2. an assortment of delayed effects' occurring in progeny of cells exposed to low doses, 3. Low-dose Hypersensitivity (HRS) and Increased radioresistance (IRR) which can collectively be demonstrated as a change in the dose-effect relationship, occurring around 0.5-1 Gy of low LET radiation and 4. adaptive responses where cells exposed to very low doses followed by higher doses, exhibit an induced relatively resistant response to the second dose. In all cases, the effect of very low doses is greater than would be predicted by extrapolation of high dose data and is inconsistent with conventional DNA break/repair-based radiobiology. In practical risk assessment terms, the relative importance of the effects are high at low doses where they dominate the response, and small at high doses. This paper reviews these assorted phenomena and in particular seeks to explore whether related or distinct mechanisms underlie these various effects Understanding the mechanistic basis of these phenomena may suggest new approaches to controlling death or survival sectoring at low radiation doses. The key question is whether these low dose phenomena necessitate a new approach to risk assessment. (author)

  15. Cytogenetic Low-Dose Hyperradiosensitivity Is Observed in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth, Isheeta [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Joiner, Michael C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Tucker, James D., E-mail: jtucker@biology.biosci.wayne.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The shape of the ionizing radiation response curve at very low doses has been the subject of considerable debate. Linear-no-threshold (LNT) models are widely used to estimate risks associated with low-dose exposures. However, the low-dose hyperradiosensitivity (HRS) phenomenon, in which cells are especially sensitive at low doses but then show increased radioresistance at higher doses, provides evidence of nonlinearity in the low-dose region. HRS is more prominent in the G2 phase of the cell cycle than in the G0/G1 or S phases. Here we provide the first cytogenetic mechanistic evidence of low-dose HRS in human peripheral blood lymphocytes using structural chromosomal aberrations. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood lymphocytes from 2 normal healthy female donors were acutely exposed to cobalt 60 γ rays in either G0 or G2 using closely spaced doses ranging from 0 to 1.5 Gy. Structural chromosomal aberrations were enumerated, and the slopes of the regression lines at low doses (0-0.4 Gy) were compared with doses of 0.5 Gy and above. Results: HRS was clearly evident in both donors for cells irradiated in G2. No HRS was observed in cells irradiated in G0. The radiation effect per unit dose was 2.5- to 3.5-fold higher for doses ≤0.4 Gy than for doses >0.5 Gy. Conclusions: These data provide the first cytogenetic evidence for the existence of HRS in human cells irradiated in G2 and suggest that LNT models may not always be optimal for making radiation risk assessments at low doses.

  16. Health Effects of Exposure to Low Dose of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alatas, Zubaidah

    2003-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to natural radiation from external sources include radionuclides in the earth and cosmic radiation, and by internal radiation from radionuclides, mainly uranium and thorium series, incorporated into the body. Living systems have adapted to the natural levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources enhance these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are the outcomes of physical and chemical processes that occur immediately after the exposure, then followed by biological process in the body. These processes will involve successive changes in the molecular, cellular, tissue and whole organism levels. Any dose of radiation, no matter how small, may produce health effects since even a single ionizing event can result in DNA damage. The damage to DNA in the nucleus is considered to be the main initiating event by which radiation causes damage to cells that results in the development of cancer and hereditary disease. It has also been indicated that cytogenetic damage can occur in cells that receive no direct radiation exposure, known as bystander effects. This paper reviews health risks of low dose radiation exposure to human body causing stochastic effects, i.e. cancer induction in somatic cells and hereditary disease in genetic cells. (author)

  17. Biological Effects of Low-Dose Exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Komochkov, M M

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the two-protection reaction model an analysis of stochastic radiobiological effects of low-dose exposure of different biological objects has been carried out. The stochastic effects are the results published in the last decade: epidemiological studies of human cancer mortality, the yield of thymocyte apoptosis of mice and different types of chromosomal aberrations. The results of the analysis show that as dependent upon the nature of biological object, spontanous effect, exposure conditions and radiation type one or another form dose - effect relationship is realized: downwards concave, near to linear and upwards concave with the effect of hormesis included. This result testifies to the incomplete conformity of studied effects of 1990 ICRP recomendations based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis about dose - effect relationship. Because of this the methodology of radiation risk estimation recomended by ICRP needs more precisian and such quantity as collective dose ought to be classified into...

  18. Low dose radiation enhances the Locomotor activity of D. melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Ki Moon; Lee, Buyng Sub; Nam Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Choi, Tae In; Kim, Cha Soon [Radiation Effect Research Team, Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Mild stresses at low level including radiation can induce the beneficial effects in many vertebrate and invertebrate species. However, a large amount of studies in radiation biology have focused on the detrimental effects of high dose radiation (HDR) such as the increased incidence of cancers and developmental diseases. Low dose radiation (LDR) induces biologically favorable effects in diverse fields, for example, cancer development, genomic instability, immune response, and longevity. Our previous data indicated that LDR promotes cells proliferation of which degree is not much but significant, and microarray data explained that LDR irradiated fruit flies showing the augmented immunity significantly changed the program for gene expression of many genes in Gene Ontology (GO) categories related to metabolic process. Metabolic process in development one of major contributors in organism growth, interbreeding, motility, and aging. Therefore, it is valuable to examine whether LDR change the physiological parameters related to metabolism, and how LDR regulates the metabolism in D. melanogaster. In this study, to investigate that LDR influences change of the metabolism, a representative parameter, locomotor activity. In addition, the activation of several cellular signal molecules was determined to investigate the specific molecular mechanism of LDR effects on the metabolism. We explored whether ionizing radiation affects the motility activity. We performed the RING assays to evaluate the locomotor activity, a representative parameter presenting motility of fruit flies. HDR dramatically decreased the motor activity of irradiated flies. Surprisingly, the irradiated flies at low dose radiation in both acute and chronic showed the significantly increased locomotor activity, compared to non-irradiated flies. Irradiation would induce change of the several signal pathways for flies to respond to it. The activation of some proteins involved in the cells proliferation and stress

  19. Whole body exposure to low-dose γ-radiation enhances the antioxidant defense system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, C.M.; Avti, P.K.; Khanduja, K.L.; Sharma, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    It is believed that the extent of cellular damage by low- radiation dose is proportional to the effects observed at high radiation dose as per the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) hypothesis. However, this notion may not be true at low-dose radiation exposure in the living system. Recent evidence suggest that the living organisms do not respond to ionizing radiations in a linear manner in the low dose range 0.01-0.5Gy and rather restore the homeostasis both in vivo and in vitro by normal physiological mechanisms such as cellular and DNA repair processes, immune reactions, antioxidant defense, adaptive responses, activation of immune functions, stimulation of growth etc. In this study, we have attempted to find the critical radiation dose range and the post irradiation period during which the antioxidant defense systems in the lungs, liver and kidneys remain stimulated in these organs after whole body exposure of the animals to low-dose radiation

  20. Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI). Strategic research agenda for low dose radiation risk research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzer, M. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, BfS, Department of Radiation Protection and Health, Neuherberg (Germany); Auvinen, A. [University of Tampere, Tampere (Finland); STUK, Helsinki (Finland); Cardis, E. [ISGlobal, Barcelona Institute for Global Health, Barcelona (Spain); Durante, M. [Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications, TIFPA, Trento (Italy); Harms-Ringdahl, M. [Stockholm University, Centre for Radiation Protection Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Jourdain, J.R. [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN, Fontenay-aux-roses (France); Madas, B.G. [MTA Centre for Energy Research, Environmental Physics Department, Budapest (Hungary); Ottolenghi, A. [University of Pavia, Physics Department, Pavia (Italy); Pazzaglia, S. [Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), Rome (Italy); Prise, K.M. [Queens University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Quintens, R. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Sabatier, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission, CEA, Paris (France); Bouffler, S. [Public Health England, PHE, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    2018-03-15

    MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) is a European radiation protection research platform with focus on research on health risks after exposure to low-dose ionising radiation. It was founded in 2010 and currently includes 44 members from 18 countries. A major activity of MELODI is the continuous development of a long-term European Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) on low-dose risk for radiation protection. The SRA is intended to identify priorities for national and European radiation protection research programs as a basis for the preparation of competitive calls at the European level. Among those key priorities is the improvement of health risk estimates for exposures close to the dose limits for workers and to reference levels for the population in emergency situations. Another activity of MELODI is to ensure the availability of European key infrastructures for research activities, and the long-term maintenance of competences in radiation research via an integrated European approach for training and education. The MELODI SRA identifies three key research topics in low dose or low dose-rate radiation risk research: (1) dose and dose rate dependence of cancer risk, (2) radiation-induced non-cancer effects and (3) individual radiation sensitivity. The research required to improve the evidence base for each of the three key topics relates to three research lines: (1) research to improve understanding of the mechanisms contributing to radiogenic diseases, (2) epidemiological research to improve health risk evaluation of radiation exposure and (3) research to address the effects and risks associated with internal exposures, differing radiation qualities and inhomogeneous exposures. The full SRA and associated documents can be downloaded from the MELODI website (http://www.melodi-online.eu/sra.html). (orig.)

  1. Low dose diagnostic radiation does not increase cancer risk in cancer prone mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D., E-mail: dboreham@nosm.ca [Northern Ontario School of Medicine, ON (Canada); Phan, N., E-mail: nghiphan13@yahoo.com [Univ. of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Lemon, J., E-mail: lemonja@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The increased exposure of patients to low dose diagnostic ionizing radiation has created concern that these procedures will result in greater risk of carcinogenesis. However, there is substantial evidence that shows in many cases that low dose exposure has the opposite effect. We have investigated whether CT scans can modify mechanisms associated with carcinogenesis in cancer-prone mice. Cancer was induced in Trp53+/- mice with an acute high dose whole-body 4 Gy γ-radiation exposure. Four weeks following the cancer-inducing dose, weekly whole-body CT scans (10 mGy/scan, 75 kVp X-rays) were given for ten consecutive weeks adding an additional radiation burden of 0.1 Gy. Short-term biological responses and subsequent lifetime cancer risk were investigated. Five days following the last CT scan, there were no detectable differences in the spontaneous levels of DNA damage in blood cells (reticulocytes). In fact, CT scanned mice had significantly lower constitutive levels of oxidative DNA damage and cell death (apoptosis), compared to non-CT scanned mice. This shows that multiple low dose radiation exposures modified the radio response and indicates protective processes were induced in mice. In mice treated with the multiple CT scans following the high cancer-inducing 4 Gy dose, tumour latency was increased, significantly prolonging lifespan. We conclude that repeated CT scans can reduce the cancer risk of a prior high-dose radiation exposure, and delay the progression of specific types of radiation-induced cancers in Trp53+/-mice. This research shows for the first time that low dose exposure long after cancer initiation events alter risk and reduce cancer morbidity. Cancer induction following low doses does not follow a linear non-threshold model of risk and this model should not be used to extrapolate risk to humans following low dose exposure to ionizing radiation. (author)

  2. Mutation induction in cultured human cells after low-dose and low-dose-rate γ-ray irradiation. Detection by LOH analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umebayashi, Yukihiro; Iwaki, Masaya; Yatagai, Fumio; Honma, Masamitsu; Suzuki, Masao; Suzuki, Hiromi; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki

    2007-01-01

    To study the genetic effects of low-doses and low-dose-rate ionizing radiation (IR), human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells were exposed to 30 mGy of γ-rays at a dose-rate of 1.2 mGy/hr. The frequency of early mutations (EMs) in the thymidine kinase (TK) gene locus was determined to be 1.7 x 10 -6 , or 1.9-fold higher than the level seen in unirradiated controls. These mutations were analyzed with a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) detection system, a methodology which has been shown to be sensitive to the effects of radiation. Among the 15 EMs observed after IR exposure, 8 were small interstitial-deletion events restricted to the TK gene locus. However, this specific type of event was not found in unirradiated controls. Although these results were observed under the limited conditions, they strongly suggest that the LOH detection system can be used for estimating the genetic effects of a low-dose IR exposure delivered at a low-dose-rate. (author)

  3. ATM phosphorylation in HepG2 cells following continuous low dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei Quelin; Du Duanming; Chen Zaizhong; Liu Pengcheng; Yang Jianyong; Li Yanhao

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the change of ATM phosphorylation in HepG2 cells following a continuous low dose-rate irradiation. Methods: Cells were persistently exposed to low dose-rate (8.28 cGy/h) irradiation. Indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot were used to detect the expression of ATM phosphorylated proteins. Colony forming assay was used to observe the effect of a low dose-rate irradiation on HepG2 cell survival. Results: After 30 min of low dose-rate irradiation, the phosphorylation of ATM occurred. After 6 h persistent irradiation, the expression of ATM phosphorylated protein reached the peak value, then gradually decreased. After ATM phosphorylation was inhibited with Wortmannin, the surviving fraction of HepG2 cells was lower than that of the irradiation alone group at each time point (P<0.05). Conclusions: Continuous low dose-rate irradiation attenuated ATM phosphorylation, suggesting that continuous low dose-rate irradiation has a potential effect for increasing the radiosensitivity of HepG2 cells. (authors)

  4. Effect of action of fractioned ionizing radiation in small dose on thyroid gland of rats

    OpenAIRE

    О. О. Prykhodko; V. V. Lizogubov; V. S. Usenko

    2005-01-01

    The effect of fractionated X-irradiation by 0.25 Gy dose to rat thyroid gland was studied . It was shown the decrease of thyrocyte proliferative activity that can induce the late effect of pathogenesis to thyroid land and biochemical pathways that control by thyroid hormones. Additional effect by any mutagenic factor may induce thyroid tumor development.

  5. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia; Crudeli, Cintia

    2010-01-01

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  6. Low-dose radiation employed in diagnostic imaging causes genetic effects in cultured cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponzinibbio, Maria V.; Peral-Garcia, Pilar; Seoane, Analia (Inst. de Genetica Veterinaria, Univ. Nacional de La Plata CONICET, La Plata (Argentina)), e-mail: aseoane@fcv.unlp.edu.ar; Crudeli, Cintia (Agencia Nacional de Promocion Cientifica y Tecnologica, La Plata (Argentina))

    2010-11-15

    Background: Exposure to environmental, diagnostic, and occupational sources of radiation frequently involves low doses. Although these doses have no immediately noticeable impact on human health there is great interest in their long-term biological effects. Purpose: To assess immediate and time-delayed DNA damage in two cell lines exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation by using the comet assay and micronucleus test, and to compare these two techniques in the analysis of low-dose induced genotoxicity. Material and Methods: CHO and MRC-5 cells were exposed to 50 milliSievert (mSv) of ionizing radiation and assayed immediately after irradiation and at 16 or 12 passages post-irradiation, respectively. Comet assay and micronucleus test were employed. Results: The comet assay values observed in 50 mSv-treated cells were significantly higher than in the control group for both sample times and cell lines (P < 0.001). Micronuclei frequencies were higher in treated cells than in the control group (P < 0.01, CHO cells passage 16; P < 0.05, MRC-5 cells immediately after exposure; P < 0.01 MRC-5 cells passage 12). Correlation analysis between the two techniques was statistically significant (correlation coefficient 0.82, P < 0.05 and correlation coefficient 0.86, P < 0.05 for CHO and MRC-5 cells, respectively). Cells scored at passages 12 or 16 showed more damage than those scored immediately after exposure in both cell lines (no statistically significant differences). Conclusion: Cytomolecular and cytogenetic damage was observed in cells exposed to very low doses of X-rays and their progeny. A single low dose of ionizing radiation was sufficient to induce such response, indicating that mammalian cells are exquisitely sensitive to it. Comet and micronucleus assays are sensitive enough to assess this damage, although the former seems to be more efficient

  7. Low dose irradiation facilitates hepatocellular carcinoma genesis involving HULC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Ge, Chang; Feng, Guoxing; Xiao, Huiwen; Dong, Jiali; Zhu, Changchun; Jiang, Mian; Cui, Ming; Fan, Saijun

    2018-03-24

    Irradiation exposure positive correlates with tumor formation, such as breast cancer and lung cancer. However, whether low dose irradiation induces hepatocarcinogenesis and the underlying mechanism remain poorly defined. In the present study, we reported that low dose irradiation facilitated the proliferation of hepatocyte through up-regulating HULC in vitro and in vivo. Low dose irradiation exposure elevated HULC expression level in hepatocyte. Deletion of heightened HULC erased the cells growth accelerated following low dose irradiation exposure. CDKN1, the neighbor gene of HULC, was down-regulated by overexpression of HULC following low dose irradiation exposure via complementary base pairing, resulting in promoting cell cycle process. Thus, our findings provide new insights into the mechanism of low dose irradiation-induced hepatocarcinogenesis through HULC/CDKN1 signaling, and shed light on the potential risk of low dose irradiation for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in pre-clinical settings. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Dose response relationship at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schull, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    The data that have accrued in Hiroshima and Nagasaki on the effects of ionizing radiation on the developing human brain are reviewed. Effects considered are severe mental retardation, lowered IQ scores, decline in school performance, seizures, other neuropsychological effects, and small head size. All these factors may be related to radiation doses received by the mother during pregnancy. (L.L.) 3 figs., tab., 7 refs

  9. Low dose radiation and plant growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Jae; Lee, Hae Youn; Park, Hong Sook

    2001-03-01

    Ionizing radiation includes cosmic radiation, earth radiation, radionuclides for the medical purpose and nuclear industry, fallout radiation. From the experimental results of various radiation effects on seeds or seedlings, it was found that germination rate, development, respiration rate, reproduction and blooming were accelerated compared with the control. In mammal, hormesis phenomenon manifested itself in increased disease resistance, lifespan, and decreased rate of tumor incidence. In plants, it was shown that germination, sprouting, growth, development, blooming and resistance to disease were accelerated

  10. Low dose radiation and plant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Jae; Lee, Hae Youn; Park, Hong Sook

    2001-03-01

    Ionizing radiation includes cosmic radiation, earth radiation, radionuclides for the medical purpose and nuclear industry, fallout radiation. From the experimental results of various radiation effects on seeds or seedlings, it was found that germination rate, development, respiration rate, reproduction and blooming were accelerated compared with the control. In mammal, hormesis phenomenon manifested itself in increased disease resistance, lifespan, and decreased rate of tumor incidence. In plants, it was shown that germination, sprouting, growth, development, blooming and resistance to disease were accelerated.

  11. low dose irradiation growth in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortis, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Low dose neutron irradiation growth in textured and recrystallized zirconium, is studied, at the Candu Reactors Calandria temperature (340 K) and at 77 K. It was necessary to design and build 1: A facility to irradiate at high temperatures, which was installed in the Argentine Atomic Energy Commission's RA1 Reactor; 2: Devices to carry out thermal recoveries, and 3: Devices for 'in situ' measurements of dimensional changes. The first growth kinetics curves were obtained at 365 K and at 77 K in a cryostat under neutron fluxes of similar spectra. Irradiation growth experiments were made in zirconium doped with fissionable material (0,1 at % 235 U). In this way an equivalent dose two orders of magnitude greater than the reactor's fast neutrons dose was obtained, significantly reducing the irradiation time. The specimens used were bimetallic couples, thus obtaining a great accuracy in the measurements. The results allow to determine that the dislocation loops are the main cause of irradiation growth in recrystallized zirconium. Furthermore, it is shown the importance of 'in situ' measurements as a way to avoid the effect that temperature changes have in the final growth measurement; since they can modify the residual stresses and the overconcentrations of defects. (M.E.L.) [es

  12. Ultrasound extraction and thin layer chromatography-flame ionization detection analysis of the lipid fraction in marine mucilage samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecozzi, M; Amici, M; Romanelli, G; Pietrantonio, E; Deluca, A

    2002-07-19

    This paper reports an analytical procedure based on ultrasound to extract lipids in marine mucilage samples. The experimental conditions of the ultrasound procedure (solvent and time) were identified by a FT-IR study performed on different standard samples of lipids and of a standard humic sample, before and after the sonication treatment. This study showed that diethyl ether was a more suitable solvent than methanol for the ultrasonic extraction of lipids from environmental samples because it allowed to minimize the possible oxidative modifications of lipids due to the acoustic cavitation phenomena. The optimized conditions were applied to the extraction of total lipid amount in marine mucilage samples and TLC-flame ionization detection analysis was used to identify the relevant lipid sub-fractions present in samples.

  13. Heart Failure Treated with Low-dose Milrinone in a Full-term Newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Šebková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A term newborn with a hypocontractile myocardium complicating persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn was successfully treated with a low-dose phosphodiesterase III inhibitor milrinone. Echocardiography diagnosed heart failure with a left ventricular ejection fraction of 35% and a left ventricular shortening fraction of 18% and severe persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn with oxygenation index of 28. Milrinone was started at an initial dose of 50 mcg/kg, followed by continuous infusion of 0.20 mcg/kg/min. With lowdose milrinone oxygenation index decreased to 3 within 6 hours, left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular shortening fraction increased to 57%, and 30%, respectively. Low doses of milrinone might be promising in the treatment of heart failure and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn in term newborns.

  14. Heart failure treated with low-dose milrinone in a full-term newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebková, S; Tomek, V; Zemanová, P; Janota, J

    2012-01-01

    A term newborn with a hypocontractile myocardium complicating persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn was successfully treated with a low-dose phosphodiesterase III inhibitor milrinone. Echocardiography diagnosed heart failure with a left ventricular ejection fraction of 35% and a left ventricular shortening fraction of 18% and severe persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn with oxygenation index of 28. Milrinone was started at an initial dose of 50 mcg/kg, followed by continuous infusion of 0.20 mcg/kg/min. With lowdose milrinone oxygenation index decreased to 3 within 6 hours, left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular shortening fraction increased to 57%, and 30%, respectively. Low doses of milrinone might be promising in the treatment of heart failure and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn in term newborns.

  15. Quantitative determination of circulating endothelial cells in persons with low dose radioactivity exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Massarani, Gh.; Najjar, F.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the risk of occupational exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation on the endothelium detachment through the quantification of circulating endothelial cells (CEC) in the peripheral blood of 63 workers in the Atomic Energy Commission in Syria (AECS) using a Magnetic Immuno-separation technique (IMS) and compare the results with 28 healthy (controls) is not exposed during their careers for any type of ionizing radiation. Our study showed for the first time the significantly increasing in the circulating endothelial cells count (P <0.0001) when employees are exposed to low doses of radiation less than 50 mSv. This result with previous studies about the late effects of radiation, assuming the existence of impact late radiation exposure on the cohesion of the endothelium, despite the lack of correlation with radiation dose measured during the past four years of work in AECS (between 2006-2010). This is due to several reasons, including the small sample size and lack of commitment by some workers develop individual control films during some periods of their work. The prospective studies for such workers can allow us to know if the rise in the number of CEC will be considered an early indicator for the risk of a cardiovascular disease when workers exposed to low-doses of ionizing radiation( tens of millisievert) that up to date are considered harmless (author).

  16. Sensitivity to low-dose radiation in radiosensitive ''wasted'' mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paunesku, T.; Protic, M.; Woloschak, G. E.

    1999-01-01

    Mice homozygous for the autosomal recessive wasted mutation (wst/wst) have abnormalities in T-lymphocytes and in the anterior motor neuron cells of the spinal cord, leading to sensitivity to low doses of ionizing radiation, hind limb paralysis, and immunodeficiency. This defect results in a failure to gain weight by 20 days and death at 28 days of age. The wasted mutation (previously mapped to mouse chromosome 2) is shown to be a 3-bp deletion in a T-cell-specific (and perhaps motor-neuron-specific) regulatory region (promoter) of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene on mouse chromosome 2. A regulatory element is also shown to be important in PCNA expression in T-lymphocytes and motor neuron cells afflicted by the 3-bp deletion in the PCNA promoter. The model is as follows: Absence of PCNA expression in the thymuses (and motor neurons) of wasted mice causes cellular apoptosis; this absence of expression is mediated by a positive transactor that can bind to the wild-type but not the wasted mutant PCNA promoter; the bound protein induces late expression of PCNA in T-lymphocytes and prevents onset of radiation sensitivity in the cells

  17. Risk at Low Doses: Scientific knowledge, uncertainties and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giusssani, A.; Ballarini, F.; Ottolenghi, A.

    2002-01-01

    Most of the applications of ionizing radiation in the medical field, for the exposed workers as well as the majority of patients undergoing diagnostic examinations, can be seen as low situations. Epidemiological information is however available for dose and dose rates higher than the values typical of most medical situation. Main source of information is the Life Span Study (LSS) of Japanese. A-bomb survivors, supplemented by studies of selected groups of exposed workers (uranium miners, radium painters) or radiotherapy patients with a detailed follow-up history. All of these group studies, however, suffer from one or more of the following limitations: - lack of adequate dosimetry - lack of a reliable control group for the necessary comparison - influence of concomitant factors (not always easy to find out) - influence of social conditions. In addition exposed study populations are different than the population of patients for which the risk estimates are needed in the medical situation. Recent studies aimed to evaluate the available data on the cohorts of the inhabitants of the Techa river settlements as well as of the workers of the Mayak nuclear facilities may provide in the future useful information on large populations chronically exposed to relatively low doses. (Author)

  18. Bayesian approach in MN low dose of radiation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serna Berna, A.; Alcaraz, M.; Acevedo, C.; Navarro, J. L.; Alcanzar, M. D.; Canteras, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Micronucleus assay in lymphocytes is a well established technique for the assessment of genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. Due to the presence of a natural background of MN the net MN is obtained by subtracting this value to the gross value. When very low doses of radiation are given the induced MN is close even lower than the predetermined background value. Furthermore, the damage distribution induced by the radiation follows a Poisson probability distribution. These two facts pose a difficult task to obtain the net counting rate in the exposed situations. It is possible to overcome this problem using a bayesian approach, in which the selection of a priori distributions for the background and net counting rate plays an important role. In the present work we make a detailed analysed using bayesian theory to infer the net counting rate in two different situations: a) when the background is known for an individual sample, using exact value value for the background and Jeffreys prior for the net counting rate, and b) when the background is not known and we make use of a population background distribution as background prior function and constant prior for the net counting rate. (Author)

  19. Modulation of ionizing radiation induced oxidative imbalance by semi-fractionated extract of Piper betle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Savita; Dutta, Ajaswrata; Sankhwar, Sanghmitra; Shukla, Sandeep Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The study was planned to evaluate modulatory effect of aqueous extract of Piper betle leaf (PBL) on ionizing radiation mediated oxidative stress leading to normal tissues damage during radiotherapy and other radiation exposures. The total polyphenols and flavonoids known as free radical scavenger (chelators) were measured in the extract. To ascertain antioxidant potential of PBL extract, we studied free radical scavenging, metal chelation, reducing power, lipid peroxidation inhibition and ferric reducing antioxidant properties (FRAP ) using in vitro assays. Mice were exposed to varied radiation doses administered with the same extract prior to irradiation to confirm its oxidative stress minimizing efficacy by evaluating ferric reducing ability of plasma, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation and micro-nuclei frequency. PBL extract was effective in scavenging DPPH (up to 92% at 100 µg/ml) and superoxide radicals (up to 95% at 80 µg/ml), chelated metal ions (up to 83% at 50 µg/ml) and inhibited lipid peroxidation (up to 45.65% at 500 µg/ml) in a dose dependant manner using in vitro model. Oral administration of PBL extract (225 mg/kg body weight) 1 hr before irradiation in mice significantly enhanced (p < 0.01) radiation abated antioxidant potential of plasma and GSH level in all the observed organs. The treatment with extract effectively lowered the radiation induced lipid peroxidation at 24 hrs in all the selected organs with maximum inhibition in thymus (p < 0.01). After 48 hrs, lipid peroxidation was maximally inhibited in the group treated with the extract. Frequency of radiation induced micronucleated cells declined significantly (34.78%, p < 0.01) at 24 hrs post-irradiation interval by PBL extract administration. The results suggest that PBL extract has high antioxidant potential and relatively non-toxic and thus could be assertively used to mitigate radiotherapy inflicted normal tissues damage and also injuries caused by moderate doses of radiation

  20. Effects of low dose mitomycin C on experimental tumor radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jianzheng; Liang Shuo; Qu Yaqin; Pu Chunji; Zhang Haiying; Wu Zhenfeng; Wang Xianli

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the possibility of low dose mitomycin C(MMC) as an adjunct therapy for radiotherapy. Methods: Change in tumor size tumor-bearing mice was measured. Radioimmunoassay was used to determine immune function of mice. Results: Low dose Mac's pretreatment reduced tumor size more markedly than did radiotherapy only. The immune function in mice given with low dose MMC 12h before radiotherapy was obviously higher than that in mice subjected to radiotherapy only (P<0.05), and was close to that in the tumor-bearing mice before radiotherapy. Conclusion: Low dose MMC could improve the radiotherapy effect. Pretreatment with low dose MMC could obviously improve the immune suppression state in mice caused by radiotherapy. The mechanism of its improvement of radiotherapeutic effect by low dose of MMC might be due to its enhancement of immune function and induction of adaptive response in tumor-bearing mice

  1. Low-dose effects of hormones and endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Laura N

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous hormones have effects on tissue morphology, cell physiology, and behaviors at low doses. In fact, hormones are known to circulate in the part-per-trillion and part-per-billion concentrations, making them highly effective and potent signaling molecules. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) mimic hormones, yet there is strong debate over whether these chemicals can also have effects at low doses. In the 1990s, scientists proposed the "low-dose hypothesis," which postulated that EDCs affect humans and animals at environmentally relevant doses. This chapter focuses on data that support and refute the low-dose hypothesis. A case study examining the highly controversial example of bisphenol A and its low-dose effects on the prostate is examined through the lens of endocrinology. Finally, the chapter concludes with a discussion of factors that can influence the ability of a study to detect and interpret low-dose effects appropriately. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Data integration reveals key homeostatic mechanisms following low dose radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilton, Susan C.; Matzke, Melissa M. [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99338 (United States); Sowa, Marianne B.; Stenoien, David L.; Weber, Thomas J. [Health Impacts and Exposure Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99338 (United States); Morgan, William F. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99338 (United States); Waters, Katrina M., E-mail: katrina.waters@pnnl.gov [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99338 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    The goal of this study was to define pathways regulated by low dose radiation to understand how biological systems respond to subtle perturbations in their environment and prioritize pathways for human health assessment. Using an in vitro 3-D human full thickness skin model, we have examined the temporal response of dermal and epidermal layers to 10 cGy X-ray using transcriptomic, proteomic, phosphoproteomic and metabolomic platforms. Bioinformatics analysis of each dataset independently revealed potential signaling mechanisms affected by low dose radiation, and integrating data shed additional insight into the mechanisms regulating low dose responses in human tissue. We examined direct interactions among datasets (top down approach) and defined several hubs as significant regulators, including transcription factors (YY1, MYC and CREB1), kinases (CDK2, PLK1) and a protease (MMP2). These data indicate a shift in response across time — with an increase in DNA repair, tissue remodeling and repression of cell proliferation acutely (24–72 h). Pathway-based integration (bottom up approach) identified common molecular and pathway responses to low dose radiation, including oxidative stress, nitric oxide signaling and transcriptional regulation through the SP1 factor that would not have been identified by the individual data sets. Significant regulation of key downstream metabolites of nitrative stress was measured within these pathways. Among the features identified in our study, the regulation of MMP2 and SP1 was experimentally validated. Our results demonstrate the advantage of data integration to broadly define the pathways and networks that represent the mechanisms by which complex biological systems respond to perturbation. - Highlights: • Low dose ionizing radiation altered homeostasis in 3D skin tissue model. • Global gene/protein/metabolite data integrated using complementary statistical approaches • Time and location-specific change in matrix regulation

  3. Stimulating effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworowski, Z.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of low doses on human organism is not definite known up to now. The worldwide discussion on this topic has been presented. A lot of analysed statistical data proved that the stimulating effect of low doses of ionizing radiation really exists and can have a beneficial influence on human health. 43 refs, 4 figs, 6 tabs

  4. RISC-RAD. A European integrated approach to the problem of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meunier, A.; Sabatier, L.; Atkinson, M.; Paretzke, H.; Bouffler, S.; Mullenders, L.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Funded by the European Commission in the framework of a dedicated programme supporting research in the Nuclear sector (FP6 Euratom), the project RISC-RAD undertakes experimental and modelling studies ultimately to improve low dose radiation cancer risk assessment by exploring and providing evidence for the most appropriate radiation cancer risk projection and interpolation models. It started on 1st January 2004 and is running until 31 st October 2008. It mobilizes a consortium of 31 partners and is coordinated by Dr. Laure Sabatier from the French atomic energy commission. Indeed the project represents an unprecedented attempt to integrate horizontally the research on the effects of low doses of IR at the European level. A multipartner project supporting objective-driven research, RISC-RAD aims at contributing to bridge the remaining gap of scientific knowledge about effects of lows doses of ionizing radiation. It spans a large part of the research spectrum, including many topics addressed during the LOWRAD2007 conference. This presentation intends to give an account of the integrative aspects of the project, insights on the innovative solutions found to approach a complex and controversial scientific topic like the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation, and links with some areas of social studies on science.The concept of 'integration' implies the development of a new kind of activity in the research field, which crosses its traditional boundaries : controversies of several kinds must temporarily be overcome within the project management board in order to define and follow a common strategy. Among them, how to reconcile the creative part of fundamental research with the compliance to strict project planning rules has come up as a debate which questions the best way a significant collective and coordinated action can address the issue of the low dose cancer risk assessment on the long term. The knowledge and

  5. Enhanced characterization of oil sands acid-extractable organics fractions using electrospray ionization-high-resolution mass spectrometry and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Anthony E; Frank, Richard A; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M; Hewitt, L Mark; Dixon, D George

    2015-05-01

    The open pit oil sands mining operations north of Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, are accumulating tailings waste at a rate approximately equal to 4.9 million m(3) /d. Naphthenic acids are among the most toxic components within tailings to aquatic life, but structural components have largely remained unidentified. In the present study, electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HRMS) and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) were used to characterize fractions derived from the distillation of an acid-extractable organics (AEO) mixture isolated from oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). Mean molecular weights of each fraction, and their relative proportions to the whole AEO extract, were as follows: fraction 1: 237 Da, 8.3%; fraction 2: 240 Da, 23.8%; fraction 3: 257 Da, 26.7%; fraction 4: 308 Da, 18.9%; fraction 5: 355 Da, 10.0%. With increasing mean molecular weight of the AEO fractions, a concurrent increase occurred in the relative abundance of nitrogen-, sulfur-, and oxygen-containing ions, double-bond equivalents, and degree of aromaticity. Structures present in the higher-molecular-weight fractions (fraction 4 and fraction 5) suggested the presence of heteroatoms, dicarboxyl and dihydroxy groups, and organic acid compounds with the potential to function as estrogens. Because organic acid compositions become dominated by more recalcitrant, higher-molecular-weight acids during natural degradation, these findings are important in the context of oil sands tailings pond water remediation. © 2015 SETAC.

  6. Endometrial safety of ultra-low-dose estradiol vaginal tablets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon, James; Nachtigall, Lila; Ulrich, Lian G

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma rate after 52-week treatment with ultra-low-dose 10-microgram 17ß-estradiol vaginal tablets in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy.......To evaluate the endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma rate after 52-week treatment with ultra-low-dose 10-microgram 17ß-estradiol vaginal tablets in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy....

  7. Endometrial safety of ultra-low-dose estradiol vaginal tablets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simon, James; Nachtigall, Lila; Ulrich, Lian G

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma rate after 52-week treatment with ultra-low-dose 10-microgram 17β-estradiol vaginal tablets in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy.......To evaluate the endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma rate after 52-week treatment with ultra-low-dose 10-microgram 17β-estradiol vaginal tablets in postmenopausal women with vaginal atrophy....

  8. Residual γH2AX foci induced by low dose x-ray radiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells do not cause accelerated senescence in the progeny of irradiated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pustovalova, Margarita; Astrelina, Тatiana A; Grekhova, Anna; Vorobyeva, Natalia; Tsvetkova, Anastasia; Blokhina, Taisia; Nikitina, Victoria; Suchkova, Yulia; Usupzhanova, Daria; Brunchukov, Vitalyi; Kobzeva, Irina; Karaseva, Тatiana; Ozerov, Ivan V; Samoylov, Aleksandr; Bushmanov, Andrey; Leonov, Sergey; Izumchenko, Evgeny; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Klokov, Dmitry; Osipov, Andreyan N

    2017-11-21

    Mechanisms underlying the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (IR) exposure (10-100 mGy) remain unknown. Here we present a comparative study of early (less than 24h) and delayed (up to 11 post-irradiation passages) radiation effects caused by low (80 mGy) vs intermediate (1000 mGy) dose X-ray exposure in cultured human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We show that γН2АХ foci induced by an intermediate dose returned back to the control value by 24 h post-irradiation. In contrast, low-dose irradiation resulted in residual γН2АХ foci still present at 24 h. Notably, these low dose induced residual γН2АХ foci were not co-localized with рАТМ foci and were observed predominantly in the proliferating Кi67 positive (Кi67+) cells. The number of γН2АХ foci and the fraction of nonproliferating (Кi67-) and senescent (SA-β-gal+) cells measured at passage 11 were increased in cultures exposed to an intermediate dose compared to unirradiated controls. These delayed effects were not seen in the progeny of cells that were irradiated with low-dose X-rays, although such exposure resulted in residual γН2АХ foci in directly irradiated cells. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that the low-dose IR induced residual γH2AХ foci do not play a role in delayed irradiation consequences, associated with cellular senescence in cultured MSCs.

  9. Differential stimulation of antioxidant defense in various organs of mice after whole body exposure to low-dose gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, C.M.; Avti, P.K.; Khanduja, K.L.; Sharma, S.C.

    2007-01-01

    It has been generally considered that any dose of ionizing radiation is detrimental to the living organisms, however low the radiation dose may be. The much relied upon 'Linear-No-Threshold' (LNT) hypothesis dose not have any convincing experimental evidence regarding the damaging effects at very low-doses and low-dose rates. Generally, the deleterious biological effects have been inferred theoretically by extrapolating the known effects of high radiation dose to low-dose range. Recently, it has been reported that the living organisms do not respond to ionizing radiations in a linear manner in the low-dose range 0.01-0.50 Gy and rather restore the homeostasis both in-vivo and in-vitro by normal physiological mechanisms such as, cellular and DNA repair processes, immune reactions, antioxidant defense, adaptive responses, activation of immune functions; stimulation of growth etc. In this study, we have attempted to find: (i) the critical radiation dose range and the post irradiation period during which the antioxidant defense systems in the lungs, liver and kidneys remain stimulated; and (ii) to evaluate the degree to which these defense mechanisms remain stimulated in these organs after whole body exposure of the animal to low-dose radiation

  10. Biological responses to low dose rate gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magae, Junji; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    2003-01-01

    Linear non-threshold (LNT) theory is a basic theory for radioprotection. While LNT dose not consider irradiation time or dose-rate, biological responses to radiation are complex processes dependent on irradiation time as well as total dose. Moreover, experimental and epidemiological studies that can evaluate LNT at low dose/low dose-rate are not sufficiently accumulated. Here we analyzed quantitative relationship among dose, dose-rate and irradiation time using chromosomal breakage and proliferation inhibition of human cells as indicators of biological responses. We also acquired quantitative data at low doses that can evaluate adaptability of LNT with statistically sufficient accuracy. Our results demonstrate that biological responses at low dose-rate are remarkably affected by exposure time, and they are dependent on dose-rate rather than total dose in long-term irradiation. We also found that change of biological responses at low dose was not linearly correlated to dose. These results suggest that it is necessary for us to create a new model which sufficiently includes dose-rate effect and correctly fits of actual experimental and epidemiological results to evaluate risk of radiation at low dose/low dose-rate. (author)

  11. Exposure of luminous marine bacteria to low-dose gamma-radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryasheva, N S; Petrova, A S; Dementyev, D V; Bondar, A A

    2017-04-01

    The study addresses biological effects of low-dose gamma-radiation. Radioactive 137 Cs-containing particles were used as model sources of gamma-radiation. Luminous marine bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum was used as a bioassay with the bioluminescent intensity as the physiological parameter tested. To investigate the sensitivity of the bacteria to the low-dose gamma-radiation exposure (≤250 mGy), the irradiation conditions were varied as follows: bioluminescence intensity was measured at 5, 10, and 20°С for 175, 100, and 47 h, respectively, at different dose rates (up to 4100 μGy/h). There was no noticeable effect of gamma-radiation at 5 and 10°С, while the 20°С exposure revealed authentic bioluminescence inhibition. The 20°С results of gamma-radiation exposure were compared to those for low-dose alpha- and beta-radiation exposures studied previously under comparable experimental conditions. In contrast to ionizing radiation of alpha and beta types, gamma-emission did not initiate bacterial bioluminescence activation (adaptive response). As with alpha- and beta-radiation, gamma-emission did not demonstrate monotonic dose-effect dependencies; the bioluminescence inhibition efficiency was found to be related to the exposure time, while no dose rate dependence was found. The sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene did not reveal a mutagenic effect of low-dose gamma radiation. The exposure time that caused 50% bioluminescence inhibition was suggested as a test parameter for radiotoxicity evaluation under conditions of chronic low-dose gamma irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. AT cells are not radiosensitive for simple chromosomal exchanges at low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hada, Megumi; Huff, Janice L.; Patel, Zarana S.; Kawata, Tetsuya; Pluth, Janice M.; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Cells deficient in ATM (product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome) show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high doses (>0.5 Gy) of ionizing radiation (X-rays or γ-rays), however less is known on how these cells respond at low dose. Previously we had shown that the increased chromosome aberrations in ATM and NBS defective lines was due to a significantly larger quadratic dose-response term compared to normal fibroblasts for both simple and complex exchanges. The linear dose-response term for simple exchanges was significantly higher in NBS cells compared to wild type cells, but not for AT cells. However, AT cells have a high background level of exchanges compared to wild type or NBS cells that confounds the understanding of low dose responses. To understand the sensitivity differences for high to low doses, chromosomal aberration analysis was first performed at low dose-rates (0.5 Gy/d), and results provided further evidence for the lack of sensitivity for exchanges in AT cells below doses of 1 Gy. Normal lung fibroblast cells treated with KU-55933, a specific ATM kinase inhibitor, showed increased numbers of exchanges at a dose of 1 Gy and higher, but were similar to wild type cells at 0.5 Gy or below. These results were confirmed using siRNA knockdown of ATM. The present study provides evidence that the increased radiation sensitivity of AT cells for chromosomal exchanges found at high dose does not occur at low dose.

  13. Multilevel mechanisms of stimulatory effect of low dose radiation on immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu-Zeng Liu

    1992-01-01

    Attention is paid to the effects of low level ionizing radiation on humans. The conference is devoted to low dose radiation and defense mechanisms of the body. Due to the importance of the immune system in body resistance, special attention has been given to host defense mechanisms following exposure to different doses of ionizing radiation. The immune system has long been known to be highly sensitive to moderate to high doses of ionizing radiation with immuno-depression as one of the most important causes of death in acute radiation syndrome. However, the dose-effect relationship of immune functions has been found to be quite different in the low dose range, especially with doses within 0.1 Gy. With doses above 0.5 Gy most immunologic parameters show a dose dependent depression. With doses between 0.1-0.5 Gy there may be no definite changes in immune functions. Doses within 0.1 Gy, given in single or chronic exposures, have been found to stimulate many immune responses. (author). 16 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  14. Exposure to Low-Dose X-Ray Radiation Alters Bone Progenitor Cells and Bone Microarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Florence; Swift, Joshua M; Greene, Elisabeth S; Allen, Matthew R; Cunningham, David A; Braby, Leslie A; Bloomfield, Susan A

    2017-10-01

    Exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation during medical treatment exerts well-documented deleterious effects on bone health, reducing bone density and contributing to bone growth retardation in young patients and spontaneous fracture in postmenopausal women. However, the majority of human radiation exposures occur in a much lower dose range than that used in the radiation oncology clinic. Furthermore, very few studies have examined the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on bone integrity and results have been inconsistent. In this study, mice were irradiated with a total-body dose of 0.17, 0.5 or 1 Gy to quantify the early (day 3 postirradiation) and delayed (day 21 postirradiation) effects of radiation on bone microarchitecture and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Female BALBc mice (4 months old) were divided into four groups: irradiated (0.17, 0.5 and 1 Gy) and sham-irradiated controls (0 Gy). Micro-computed tomography analysis of distal femur trabecular bone from animals at day 21 after exposure to 1 Gy of X-ray radiation revealed a 21% smaller bone volume (BV/TV), 22% decrease in trabecular numbers (Tb.N) and 9% greater trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) compared to sham-irradiated controls (P X-rays, whereas osteoclastogenesis was enhanced. A better understanding of the effects of radiation on osteoprogenitor cell populations could lead to more effective therapeutic interventions that protect bone integrity for individuals exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation.

  15. Risk of cancer subsequent to low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, S.

    1980-01-01

    The author puts low dose irradiation risks in perspective using average background radiation doses for standards. He assailed irresponsible media coverage during the height of public interest in the Three-Mile Island Reactor incident

  16. Radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Friesecke, I.

    1997-01-01

    This document approaches the radiation effects after low dose chronic long-term exposure, presenting examples occurred, the pathophysiologic mechanisms for cell system tolerance in elevated radiation fields, and the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities

  17. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-01-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  18. Low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yosuke; Dokiya, Takushi; Yorozu, Atsunori; Suzuki, Takayuki; Saito, Shiro; Monma, Tetsuo; Ohki, Takahiro [National Tokyo Medical Center (Japan); Murai, Masaru; Kubo, Atsushi

    2000-04-01

    From December 1997 through January 1999, fifteen prostatic cancer patients were treated with low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy using TRUS and perineal template guidance without external radiotherapy. Up to now, as no apparent side effects were found, the safety of this treatment is suggested. In the future, in order to treat prostatic cancer patients with interstitial brachytherapy using I-125 or Pd-103, more investigation for this low dose rate Ir-192 interstitial brachytherapy is needed. (author)

  19. Review of European research trends of low dose radiation risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Large research projects on low dose radiation effects in Europe and US over the past decade have provided limited scientific knowledge which could underpin the validation of radiation protection systems. Recently in Europe, there have been repeated discussions and dialogues to improve the situation, and as the consequence, the circumstances surrounding low dose radiation risks are changing. In 2009, Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) was established as a trans-national organization capable of ensuring appropriate governance of research in the pursuit of a long term shared vision, and Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration (DoReMi) network was launched in 2010 to achieve fairly short term results in order to prove the validity of the MELODI approach. It is expected to be very effective and powerful activities to facilitate the reduction of uncertainties in the understanding of low dose risks, but the regulatory requests rushing the reinforcement of radiological protection regulations based on the precautional principles are more increasing. To develop reasonable radiological protection systems based on scientific evidences, we need to accelerate to collect scientific evidences which could directly underpin more appropriate radiation protection systems even in Japan. For the purpose, we Japan need to develop from an independent standpoint and share as a multidisciplinary vision a long term and holistic research strategy which enables to enhance Japanese advantages such as low dose rate facilities and animal facilities, as soon as possible. (author)

  20. Ameliorative effects of low dose/low dose-rate irradiation on reactive oxygen species-related diseases model mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Takaharu

    2008-01-01

    Living organisms have developed complex biological system which protects themselves against environmental radiation, and irradiation with proper dose, dose-rate and irradiation time can stimulate their biological responses against oxidative stress evoked by the irradiation. Because reactive oxygen species are involved in various human diseases, non-toxic low dose/low dose-rate radiation can be utilized for the amelioration of such diseases. In this study, we used mouse experimental models for fatty liver, nephritis, diabetes, and ageing to elucidate the ameliorative effect of low dose/low dose-rate radiation in relation to endogenous antioxidant activity. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy ameliorates carbon tetrachloride-induced fatty liver. The irradiation increases hepatic anti-oxidative system involving glutathione and glutathione peroxidase, suggesting that endogenous radical scavenger is essential for the ameliorative effect of low dose radiation on carbon tetrachloride-induced fatty liver. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy ameliorates ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced nephritis. The irradiation increases catalase and decreases superoxide dismutase in kidney. The result suggests that low dose radiation reduced generation of hydroxide radical generation by reducing cellular hydroperoxide level. Single irradiation at 0.5 Gy at 12 week of age ameliorates incidence of type I diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice through the suppression of inflammatory activity of splenocytes, and resultant apoptosis of β-cells in pancreas. The irradiation activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, which coordinately diminish intracellular reactive oxygen species. Continuous irradiation at 0.70 mGy/hr from 10 week of age elongates life span, and suppresses alopecia in type II diabetesmice. The irradiation improved glucose clearance without affecting insulin-resistance, and increased pancreatic catalase activity. The results suggest that continuous low dose-rate irradiation protect

  1. Low-Dose Radiation Therapy (2 Gy × 2) in the Treatment of Orbital Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasola, Carolina E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Jones, Jennifer C. [Vaccine Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Huang, Derek D. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of California-Los Angeles Olive View, Sylmar, California (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu; Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S., E-mail: sarah2@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Low-dose radiation has become increasingly used in the management of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but has not been studied specifically for cases of ocular adnexal involvement. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of low-dose radiation in the treatment of NHL of the ocular adnexa. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 20 NHL patients with 27 sites of ocular adnexal involvement treated with low-dose radiation consisting of 2 successive fractions of 2 Gy at our institution between 2005 and 2011. The primary endpoint of this study is freedom from local relapse (FFLR). Results: At a median follow-up time of 26 months (range 7-92), the overall response rate for the 27 treated sites was 96%, with a complete response (CR) rate of 85% (n=23) and a partial response rate of 11% (n=3). Among all treated sites with CR, the 2-year FFLR was 100%, with no in-treatment field relapses. The 2-year freedom from regional relapse rate was 96% with 1 case of relapse within the ipsilateral orbit (outside of the treatment field). This patient underwent additional treatment with low-dose radiation of 4 Gy to the area of relapse achieving a CR and no evidence of disease at an additional 42 months of follow-up. Orbital radiation was well tolerated with only mild acute side effects (dry eye, conjunctivitis, transient periorbital edema) in 30% of treated sites without any reports of long-term toxicity. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation with 2 Gy × 2 is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of indolent NHL of the ocular adnexa with high response rates and durable local control with the option of reirradiation in the case of locoregional relapse.

  2. Low-Dose Radiation Therapy (2 Gy × 2) in the Treatment of Orbital Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasola, Carolina E.; Jones, Jennifer C.; Huang, Derek D.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Hoppe, Richard T.; Donaldson, Sarah S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Low-dose radiation has become increasingly used in the management of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but has not been studied specifically for cases of ocular adnexal involvement. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of low-dose radiation in the treatment of NHL of the ocular adnexa. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 20 NHL patients with 27 sites of ocular adnexal involvement treated with low-dose radiation consisting of 2 successive fractions of 2 Gy at our institution between 2005 and 2011. The primary endpoint of this study is freedom from local relapse (FFLR). Results: At a median follow-up time of 26 months (range 7-92), the overall response rate for the 27 treated sites was 96%, with a complete response (CR) rate of 85% (n=23) and a partial response rate of 11% (n=3). Among all treated sites with CR, the 2-year FFLR was 100%, with no in-treatment field relapses. The 2-year freedom from regional relapse rate was 96% with 1 case of relapse within the ipsilateral orbit (outside of the treatment field). This patient underwent additional treatment with low-dose radiation of 4 Gy to the area of relapse achieving a CR and no evidence of disease at an additional 42 months of follow-up. Orbital radiation was well tolerated with only mild acute side effects (dry eye, conjunctivitis, transient periorbital edema) in 30% of treated sites without any reports of long-term toxicity. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation with 2 Gy × 2 is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of indolent NHL of the ocular adnexa with high response rates and durable local control with the option of reirradiation in the case of locoregional relapse

  3. Up-regulation of calreticulin in mouse liver tissues after long-term irradiation with low-dose-rate gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lan; Hu, Nan; Yin, Jie; Sun, Jing; Mu, Hongxiang; Dai, Keren; Ding, Dexin

    2017-01-01

    The biological effects of low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation on normal tissues has attracted attention. Based on previous research, we observed the morphology of liver tissues of C57BL/6J mice that received irradiation dose rates increased. Additionally, differential protein expression in liver tissues was analyzed using a proteomics approach. Compared with the matched group in the 2D gel analysis of the irradiated groups, 69 proteins had ≥ 1.5-fold changes in expression. Twenty-three proteins were selected based on ≥2.5-fold change in expression, and 22 of them were meaningful for bioinformatics and protein fingerprinting analysis. These molecules were relevant to cytoskeleton processes, cell metabolism, biological defense, mitochondrial damage, detoxification and tumorigenesis. The results from real-time PCR and western blot (WB) analyses showed that calreticulin (CRT) was up-regulated in the irradiated groups, which indicates that CRT may be relevant to stress reactions when mouse livers are exposed to low-dose irradiation and that low-dose-rate ionizing radiation may pose a cancer risk. The CRT protein can be a potential candidate for low-dose or low-dose-rate ionizing radiation early-warning biomarkers. However, the underlying mechanism requires further investigation.

  4. Low-dose-rate total lymphoid irradiation: a new method of rapid immunosuppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, J.E.; de Silva, S.M.; Rachman, D.B.; Order, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    Total Lymphoid Irradiation (TLI) has been successful in inducing immunosuppression in experimental and clinical applications. However, both the experimental and clinical utility of TLI are hampered by the prolonged treatment courses required (23 days in rats and 30-60 days in humans). Low-dose-rate TLI has the potential of reducing overall treatment time while achieving comparable immunosuppression. This study examines the immunosuppressive activity and treatment toxicity of conventional-dose-rate (23 days) vs low-dose-rate (2-7 days) TLI. Seven groups of Lewis rats were given TLI with 60Co. One group was treated at conventional-dose-rates (80-110 cGy/min) and received 3400 cGy in 17 fractions over 23 days. Six groups were treated at low-dose-rate (7 cGy/min) and received total doses of 800, 1200, 1800, 2400, 3000, and 3400 cGy over 2-7 days. Rats treated at conventional-dose-rates over 23 days and at low-dose-rate over 2-7 days tolerated radiation with minimal toxicity. The level of immunosuppression was tested using allogeneic (Brown-Norway) skin graft survival. Control animals retained allogeneic skin grafts for a mean of 14 days (range 8-21 days). Conventional-dose-rate treated animals (3400 cGy in 23 days) kept their grafts 60 days (range 50-66 days) (p less than .001). Low-dose-rate treated rats (800 to 3400 cGy total dose over 2-7 days) also had prolongation of allogeneic graft survival times following TLI with a dose-response curve established. The graft survival time for the 3400 cGy low-dose-rate group (66 days, range 52-78 days) was not significantly different from the 3400 cGy conventional-dose-rate group (p less than 0.10). When the total dose given was equivalent, low-dose-rate TLI demonstrated an advantage of reduced overall treatment time compared to conventional-dose-rate TLI (7 days vs. 23 days) with no increase in toxicity

  5. Cytogenetic damage at low doses and the problem of bioindication of chronic low level radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geras'kin, S.A.; Dikarev, V.G.; Nesterov, E.B.; Vasiliev, D.V.; Dikareva, N.S.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis undertaken by us of the experimentally observed cellular responses to low dose irradiation has shown that the relationship between the yield of induced cytogenetic damage and radiation dose within low dose range is non-linear and universal in character. Because of the relationship between the yield of cytogenetic damage and dose within low dose range is non-linear, the aberration frequency cannot be used in biological dosimetry in the most important in terms of practical application case. The cytogenetic damage frequency cannot be used in biological dosimetry also because of the probability of synergistic and antagonistic interaction effects of the different nature factors simultaneously acting on test-object in real conditions is high within low dose (concentration) range. In our experimental study of the regularities in the yield of structural mutations in conditions of combined influence of ionizing radiation, heavy metals and pesticides it was found that synergistic and antagonistic effects are mainly induced in conditions of combined action of low exposure injuring agents. Experiments on agricultural plants were carried out in 1986-1989 at the 30-km zone around Chernobyl NPP. It was shown that chronic low dose exposure could cause an inheritable destabilization of genetic structures expressing in increase of cytogenetic damage and yield karyotypic variability in offspring's of irradiated organisms. Obviously exactly this circumstance is the reason of the phenomenon found in our researches of significant time delay of cytogenetic damage reduction rate from radioactive pollution reduction rate from time past from the accident moment. Research of cytogenetic damage of reproductive (seeds) and vegetative (needles) plant organs of the Pinus sylvestris tree micropopulations growing in contrast by radioactive pollution level sites of the 30-km ChNPP zone and also in the vicinity of the industrial plant > for processing and temporary storage of

  6. Long-term follow-up of low-dose external pituitary irradiation for Cushing's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Littley, M.D.; Shalet, S.M.; Beardwell, C.G.; Ahmed, S.R.; Sutton, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four patients (three male) with Cushing's disease, aged between 11 and 67 years, were treated with low-dose external pituitary irradiation (20 Gy in eight fractions over 10-12 days) and followed for between 13 and 171 months (median 93 months). Eleven patients (46%) went into remission 4-36 months after irradiation, but five subsequently relapsed. In this series, the low incidence of radiation-induced hypopituitarism and absence of other complications attributable to radiotherapy suggest that low-dose pituitary irradiation may be a useful treatment option in selected patients. However, long-term follow-up has demonstrated a high relapse rate and failure to prevent Nelson's syndrome in adrenalectomized patients, indicating that it should not be used as primary treatment in preference to selective adenomectomy. (author)

  7. Radiation protection and environment day the low doses in everyday life; Radioprotection et environnement les faibles doses dans la vie quotidienne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The consequences of low doses exposures are difficult to explore and the studies give often place to controversies. According to the are, differences exist in the methodological approaches. It results from it a confusion on the acceptable levels of exposure, even on the definition of low dose. This day organised by the sections 'non ionizing and research and health of the French society of radiation protection (S.F.R.P.), will be a meeting between professionals of different disciplines, to compare the approaches used for the ionizing and non ionizing radiations as well as the chemical and microbiological agents. It will allow to share the knowledge and the abilities and to progress on methodologies adapted to the evaluation and the management of risks in relation with low doses. (N.C.)

  8. Effects of low dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Li; Hou Dianjun; Huang Shanying; Deng Daping; Wang Linchao; Cheng Yufeng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of low-dose radiation on tumor-bearing mice and radiotherapy induced by low-dose radiation. Methods: Male Wistar mice were implanted with Walker-256 sarcoma cells in the right armpit. On day 4, the mice were given 75 mGy whole-body X-ray radiation. From the fifth day, tumor volume was measured, allowing for the creation of a graph depicting tumor growth. Lymphocytes activity in mice after whole-body X-ray radiation with LDR was determinned by FCM. Cytokines level were also determined by ELISA. Results: Compared with the radiotherapy group, tumor growth was significantly slower in the mice pre-exposed to low-dose radiation (P<0.05), after 15 days, the average tumor weight in the mice pre- exposed to low-dose radiation was also significantly lower (P<0.05). Lymphocytes activity and the expression of the CK in mice after whole-body y-ray radiation with LDR increased significantly. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation can markedly improve the immune function of the lymphocyte, inhibit the tumor growth, increase the resistant of the high-dose radiotherapy and enhance the effect of radiotherapy. (authors)

  9. Low Dose Vaporized Cannabis Significantly Improves Neuropathic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsey, Barth; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Deutsch, Reena; Gouaux, Ben; Sakai, Staci; Donaghe, Haylee

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluating the analgesic efficacy of vaporized cannabis in subjects, the majority of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite traditional treatment. Thirty-nine patients with central and peripheral neuropathic pain underwent a standardized procedure for inhaling either medium dose (3.53%), low dose (1.29%), or placebo cannabis with the primary outcome being VAS pain intensity. Psychoactive side-effects, and neuropsychological performance were also evaluated. Mixed effects regression models demonstrated an analgesic response to vaporized cannabis. There was no significant difference between the two active dose groups’ results (p>0.7). The number needed to treat (NNT) to achieve 30% pain reduction was 3.2 for placebo vs. low dose, 2.9 for placebo vs. medium dose, and 25 for medium vs. low dose. As these NNT are comparable to those of traditional neuropathic pain medications, cannabis has analgesic efficacy with the low dose being, for all intents and purposes, as effective a pain reliever as the medium dose. Psychoactive effects were minimal and well-tolerated, and neuropsychological effects were of limited duration and readily reversible within 1–2 hours. Vaporized cannabis, even at low doses, may present an effective option for patients with treatment-resistant neuropathic pain. PMID:23237736

  10. Cancer and non-cancer risk at low doses of radiation: biological basis of radiation-environment interplay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer and non-cancer risk at low doses of ionizing radiation remains poorly defined due to ambiguity at low doses caused by limitations in statistical power and information available on interplay with environment. To deal with these problems, a novel non-parametric statistics was developed based on artificial neural networks theorem and applied to cancer and non-cancer risk in A-bomb survivors. The analysis revealed several unique features at low doses that could not be accounted for by nominal radiation dose alone. They include (1) threshold that varies with organ, gender and age, including cardiovascular diseases, (2) prevalence of infectious diseases, and (3) suppression of pathogenesis of HTLV1. The threshold is unique as it is manifested as negative excess relative risk, a reduction of spontaneous rate at low doses. The response is consistent with currently emerging laboratory data on DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice and its sustainability as epigenetic memory in accordance with histone code theory. In response to DSB, of radiation or DNA replication arrest origin, distinct and competitively operating repair pathways are instigated. Activation by low doses of restitution-directed canonical non-homologous end-joining (C-NHEJ) suppresses both error-prone alternative end-joining (Alt-NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). The latter two present major pathways to mutagenesis at stalled replication folk associated with endogenous and exogenous genotoxin such as tobacco smoke metabolites and AID-associated somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in Ig gene. Suppression of these error-prone pathways by low doses of low LET radiation is consistent with the reduction of cancer occurrence by environmental genotoxin, immunodiversity and stable integration of retrovirus DNA, providing a significant modulator of dose linearity at low doses. Whole picture may bring about a new landscape of cancer and non-cancer molecular epidemiology which

  11. Low doses of arsenic, via perturbing p53, promotes tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapathy, Suthakar, E-mail: s.ganapathy@neu.edu [Center for Drug Development, Northeastern University, Boston (United States); Li, Ping [The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); The Institute of Clinic Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Fagman, Johan [The Institute of Clinic Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Yu, Tianqi; Lafontant, Jean [Center for Drug Development, Northeastern University, Boston (United States); Zhang, Guojun [The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Chen, Changyan [Center for Drug Development, Northeastern University, Boston (United States); The Institute of Clinic Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-09-01

    In drinking water and in workplace or living environments, low doses of arsenic can exist and operate as a potent carcinogen. Due to insufficient understanding and information on the pervasiveness of environmental exposures to arsenic, there is an urgent need to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of arsenic regarding its carcinogenic effect on human health. In this study, we demonstrate that low doses of arsenic exposure mitigate or mask p53 function and further perturb intracellular redox state, which triggers persistent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activates UPR (unfolded protein response), leading to transformation or tumorigenesis. Thus, the results suggest that low doses of arsenic exposure, through attenuating p53-regulated tumor suppressive function, change the state of intracellular redox and create a microenvironment for tumorigenesis. Our study also provides the information for designing more effective strategies to prevent or treat human cancers initiated by arsenic exposure.

  12. Low doses of arsenic, via perturbing p53, promotes tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganapathy, Suthakar; Li, Ping; Fagman, Johan; Yu, Tianqi; Lafontant, Jean; Zhang, Guojun; Chen, Changyan

    2016-01-01

    In drinking water and in workplace or living environments, low doses of arsenic can exist and operate as a potent carcinogen. Due to insufficient understanding and information on the pervasiveness of environmental exposures to arsenic, there is an urgent need to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of arsenic regarding its carcinogenic effect on human health. In this study, we demonstrate that low doses of arsenic exposure mitigate or mask p53 function and further perturb intracellular redox state, which triggers persistent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activates UPR (unfolded protein response), leading to transformation or tumorigenesis. Thus, the results suggest that low doses of arsenic exposure, through attenuating p53-regulated tumor suppressive function, change the state of intracellular redox and create a microenvironment for tumorigenesis. Our study also provides the information for designing more effective strategies to prevent or treat human cancers initiated by arsenic exposure.

  13. Regulatory aspects of low doses control in Albania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollani, K.; Kushe, R.

    1997-01-01

    In the present paper are described the status of regulatory aspects of low doses control as well as the existing procedures for their implementation in Albania. According to new Radiological Protection Act, approved by Parliament in 1995, the establishment of the infrastructures in radiation protection area is in course, accompanied by the installation and functioning of new equipment for low dose control. Based in many years experience it is concluded that personal doses of the workers added by practices in Albania are 1/10 of dose Emits. Some particular cases of overexposured workers were investigated. Last times the elements of the optimisation procedures (QA and QC) are outlined in the frame of improving regulatory aspects of low doses control. (author)

  14. Low-Dose Risk, Decisions, and Risk Communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, James; Slovic, Paul

    2001-01-01

    To conduct basic research on how people receive, evaluate, and form positions on scientific information and its relationship to low-dose radiation exposure. There are three major areas of study in our research program. First is the development of theories, frameworks and concepts essential to guiding data collection and analysis. The second area is a program of experimental studies on risk perception, evaluation of science information, and the structure of individual positions regarding low dose exposures. This involves the study of existing knowledge and the evaluation of science information presented within a variety of formats, as educational information, news media stories, and alternative communication methods (personal contact, small group interaction, email and internet, etc.). Third is the community-level studies to examine and record how the social conditions, under which science communications take place, influence the development of attitudes and opinions about: low- dose exposures, the available management options, control of radiation risks, and preferences for program and policy goals

  15. Analysis of ionic mobilities in liquid isooctane with low dose radiotherapy pulsed photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo-Montero, J; Gago-Arias, A; González-Castaño, D M; Gómez, F; Tegami, S; Holzscheiter, M H

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present a model of signal temporal development in ionization chambers and we use it to determine ionic mobilities and relative densities of charge carriers in non-ultrapure liquid isooctane using a liquid-filled ionization chamber dosimeter. The detector has been irradiated with a low dose rate, short pulsed photon beam generated with a medical LINAC. Ionic mobilities have been obtained by studying the temporal development of the readout signal and fitting it to a model for low dose rate beams where recombination is negligible. The best fit has been obtained for 3 ionic species with mobilities k 1 = (2.22±0.22) × 10 −8 , k 2 = (3.37±0.43) × 10 −8 , k 3 = (19.69±2.59) × 10 −8 m 2 V −1 s −1 and relative densities n 1 = 0.5 (n 1 is not a fitting parameter), n 2 = 0.23±0.03 and n 3 = 0.27±0.03.

  16. Final Report - Epigenetics of low dose radiation effects in an animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-10-22

    This project sought mechanistic understanding of the epigenetic response of tissues as well as the consequences of those responses, when induced by low dose irradiation in a well-established model system (mouse). Based on solid and extensive preliminary data we investigated the molecular epigenetic mechanisms of in vivo radiation responses, particularly – effects of low, occupationally relevant radiation exposures on the genome stability and adaptive response in mammalian tissues and organisms. We accumulated evidence that low dose irradiation altered epigenetic profiles and impacted radiation target organs of the exposed animals. The main long-term goal was to dissect the epigenetic basis of induction of the low dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response and the specific fundamental roles of epigenetic changes (i.e. DNA methylation, histone modifications and miRNAs) in their generation. We hypothesized that changes in global and regional DNA methylation, global histone modifications and regulatory microRNAs played pivotal roles in the generation and maintenance low-dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response. We predicted that epigenetic changes influenced the levels of genetic rearrangements (transposone reactivation). We hypothesized that epigenetic responses from low dose irradiation were dependent on exposure regimes, and would be greatest when organisms are exposed in a protracted/fractionated manner: fractionated exposures > acute exposures. We anticipated that the epigenetic responses were correlated with the gene expression levels. Our immediate objectives were: • To investigate the exact nature of the global and locus-specific DNA methylation changes in the LDR exposed cells and tissues and dissect their roles in adaptive response • To investigate the roles of histone modifications in the low dose radiation effects and adaptive response • To dissect the roles of regulatory microRNAs and their targets in low

  17. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF A DIFFUSE CLOUD ALONG A LINE OF SIGHT TOWARD W51: MOLECULAR FRACTION AND COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION RATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gerin, M. [LERMA, CNRS, Observatoire de Paris and ENS, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Geballe, T. R. [Gemini Observatory, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Black, J. H. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-43992 Onsala (Sweden); Menten, K. M. [MPI fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Goicoechea, J. R. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Centro de Astrobiologia (CSIC-INTA), E-28850 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-20

    Absorption lines from the molecules OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and H{sup +} {sub 3} have been observed in a diffuse molecular cloud along a line of sight near W51 IRS2. We present the first chemical analysis that combines the information provided by all three of these species. Together, OH{sup +} and H{sub 2}O{sup +} are used to determine the molecular hydrogen fraction in the outskirts of the observed cloud, as well as the cosmic-ray ionization rate of atomic hydrogen. H{sup +} {sub 3} is used to infer the cosmic-ray ionization rate of H{sub 2} in the molecular interior of the cloud, which we find to be {zeta}{sub 2} = (4.8 {+-} 3.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} s{sup -1}. Combining the results from all three species we find an efficiency factor-defined as the ratio of the formation rate of OH{sup +} to the cosmic-ray ionization rate of H-of {epsilon} = 0.07 {+-} 0.04, much lower than predicted by chemical models. This is an important step in the future use of OH{sup +} and H{sub 2}O{sup +} on their own as tracers of the cosmic-ray ionization rate.

  18. Effects of low dose radiation and epigenetic regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Benzheng; Ma Shumei; Yi Heqing; Kong Dejuan; Zhao Guangtong; Gao Lin; Liu Xiaodong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To conclude the relationship between epigenetics regulation and radiation responses, especially in low-dose area. Methods: The literature was examined for papers related to the topics of DNA methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling and non-coding RNA modulation in low-dose radiation responses. Results: DNA methylation and radiation can regulate reciprocally, especially in low-dose radiation responses. The relationship between histone methylation and radiation mainly exists in the high-dose radiation area; histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors show a promising application to enhance radiation sensitivity, no matter whether in low-dose or high-dose areas; the connection between γ-H2AX and LDR has been remained unknown, although γ-H2AX has been shown no radiation sensitivities with 1-15 Gy irradiation; histone ubiquitination play an important role in DNA damage repair mechanism. Moreover, chromatin remodeling has an integral role in DSB repair and the chromatin response, in general, may be precede DNA end resection. Finally, the effect of radiation on miRNA expression seems to vary according to cell type, radiation dose, and post-irradiation time point. Conclusion: Although the advance of epigenetic regulation on radiation responses, which we are managing to elucidate in this review, has been concluded, there are many questions and blind blots deserved to investigated, especially in low-dose radiation area. However, as progress on epigenetics, we believe that many new elements will be identified in the low-dose radiation responses which may put new sights into the mechanisms of radiation responses and radiotherapy. (authors)

  19. Low-dose vaporized cannabis significantly improves neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsey, Barth; Marcotte, Thomas; Deutsch, Reena; Gouaux, Ben; Sakai, Staci; Donaghe, Haylee

    2013-02-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluating the analgesic efficacy of vaporized cannabis in subjects, the majority of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite traditional treatment. Thirty-nine patients with central and peripheral neuropathic pain underwent a standardized procedure for inhaling medium-dose (3.53%), low-dose (1.29%), or placebo cannabis with the primary outcome being visual analog scale pain intensity. Psychoactive side effects and neuropsychological performance were also evaluated. Mixed-effects regression models demonstrated an analgesic response to vaporized cannabis. There was no significant difference between the 2 active dose groups' results (P > .7). The number needed to treat (NNT) to achieve 30% pain reduction was 3.2 for placebo versus low-dose, 2.9 for placebo versus medium-dose, and 25 for medium- versus low-dose. As these NNTs are comparable to those of traditional neuropathic pain medications, cannabis has analgesic efficacy with the low dose being as effective a pain reliever as the medium dose. Psychoactive effects were minimal and well tolerated, and neuropsychological effects were of limited duration and readily reversible within 1 to 2 hours. Vaporized cannabis, even at low doses, may present an effective option for patients with treatment-resistant neuropathic pain. The analgesia obtained from a low dose of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (1.29%) in patients, most of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite conventional treatments, is a clinically significant outcome. In general, the effect sizes on cognitive testing were consistent with this minimal dose. As a result, one might not anticipate a significant impact on daily functioning. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. The researches on the effects of low doses irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    All research conducted as part of 'Risc-Rad' and those conducted by actors in international programs on low doses allow progress in understanding mechanisms of carcinogenesis associated with irradiation. The data do not question the use in radiation protection, risk estimation models based on a linear increase of the risk with the dose of radiation. Nevertheless, they show that the nature of biological responses induced by low doses of radiation has differences with the responses induced by high doses of radiation. They also show the diversity of effects/dose relationships as the mechanism observed and the importance of genetic predisposition in the individual sensitivity to low doses of radiation. It is therefore essential to continue to bring new data to better understand the complex biological effects and their impact on the establishment of radiation protection standards. In addition, the results have often been at the cellular level. The diversity of responses induced by radiations is also a function of cell types observed, the aging of cells and tissue organization. It is essential to strengthen researches at the tissue and body level, involving in vitro and in vivo approaches while testing the hypothesis in epidemiology with a global approach to systems biology. Over the past four years, the collaboration between partners of 'Risc-Rad' using experimental biology approaches and those using mathematical modeling techniques aimed at developing a new model describing the carcinogenesis induced by low radiation doses. On an other hand, The High level expert group on European low dose risk research (H.L.E.G.) develop programmes in the area of low dose irradiation (Germany, Finland, France, Italy and United Kingdom). It proposed a structure of trans national government called M.E.L.O.D.I. ( multidisciplinary european low dose initiative). Its objective is to structure and integrate European research by gathering around a common programme of multidisciplinary

  1. Influence of conditioned psychological stress on immunological recovery in mice exposed to low-dose x irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Flood, J.F.; Makinodan, T.

    1984-01-01

    A study was initiated to determine the effects of psychological stress on the immune response in BALB/c mice recovering from exposure to a low dose of ionizing radiation. Mice were first subjected to conditioning training for 12 days, then exposed to 200 R, subjected to psychological stress for 14 days, and assessed for peak anti-sheep RBC response. The seven treatment groups included two unirradiated groups and five irradiated groups. Mice exposed to 200 R and then subjected to conditioned psychological stress responded less vigorously to antigenic stimulation than those of the other irradiated groups. The psychological stress imposed upon these mice did not influence the antibody-forming capacity of unirradiated mice. These results indicate that a psychological stress which did not affect the immunological activity of unirradiated mice can curtail the immunological recovery of mice exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation

  2. James V. Neel and Yuri E. Dubrova: Cold War debates and the genetic effects of low-dose radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Donna M; Stawkowski, Magdalena E

    2015-01-01

    This article traces disagreements about the genetic effects of low-dose radiation exposure as waged by James Neel (1915-2000), a central figure in radiation studies of Japanese populations after World War II, and Yuri Dubrova (1955-), who analyzed the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. In a 1996 article in Nature, Dubrova reported a statistically significant increase in the minisatellite (junk) DNA mutation rate in the children of parents who received a high dose of radiation from the Chernobyl accident, contradicting studies that found no significant inherited genetic effects among offspring of Japanese A-bomb survivors. Neel's subsequent defense of his large-scale longitudinal studies of the genetic effects of ionizing radiation consolidated current scientific understandings of low-dose ionizing radiation. The article seeks to explain how the Hiroshima/Nagasaki data remain hegemonic in radiation studies, contextualizing the debate with attention to the perceived inferiority of Soviet genetic science during the Cold War.

  3. The effects of chronic, low doses of Ra-226 on cultured fish and human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xiaopei; Seymour, Colin; Mothersill, Carmel, E-mail: mothers@mcmaster.ca

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the chronic low-dose radiation effects caused by α-particle radiation from {sup 226}Ra over multiple cell generations in CHSE/F fish cells and HaCaT human cells. Methods: CHSE/F cells and HaCaT cells were cultured in medium containing {sup 226}Ra to deliver the chronic low-dose α-particle radiation. Clonogenic assay was used to test the clonogenic survival fractions of cells with or without being exposed to radiation from {sup 226}Ra. Results: The chronic low-dose radiation from {sup 226}Ra does have effects on the clonogenic survival of CHSE/F cells and HaCaT cells. When CHSE/F cells were cultured in {sup 226}Ra-medium over 9 passages for about 134 days, the clonogenic surviving fractions for cells irradiated at dose rates ranging from 0.00066 to 0.66 mGy/d were significantly lower than that of cells sham irradiated. For HaCaT cells grown in medium containing the same range of {sup 226}Ra activity, the clonogenic surviving fraction decreased at first and reached the lowest value at about 42 days (8 passages). After that, the clonogenic survival began to increase, and was significantly higher than that of control cells by the end of the experimental period. Conclusion: The chronic, low-dose high LET radiation from {sup 226}Ra can influence the clonogenic survival of irradiated cells. CHSE/F cells were sensitized by the radiation, and HaCaT cells were initially sensitized but later appeared to be adapted. The results could have implications for determining risk from chronic versus acute exposures to radium. - Highlights: • Cells were exposed to chronic low-dose α-radiation from {sup 226}Ra in medium with {sup 226}Ra. • The clonogenic survival of CHSE/F cells decreased when exposed to {sup 226}Ra for 134 days. • The clonogenic survival of HaCaT cells decreased at first and then increased. • The doubling time of both cells were not affected by this kind of radiation.

  4. Single Low-Dose Radiation Induced Regulation of Keratinocyte Differentiation in Calcium-Induced HaCaT Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Hyung Jin; Youn, Hae Jeong; Cha, Hwa Jun; Kim, Karam; An, Sungkwan; Ahn, Kyu Joong

    2016-01-01

    Background We are continually exposed to low-dose radiation (LDR) in the range 0.1 Gy from natural sources, medical devices, nuclear energy plants, and other industrial sources of ionizing radiation. There are three models for the biological mechanism of LDR: the linear no-threshold model, the hormetic model, and the threshold model. Objective We used keratinocytes as a model system to investigate the molecular genetic effects of LDR on epidermal cell differentiation. Methods To identify kera...

  5. Agreement of quadratic and CRE models in predicting the late effects of continuous low dose-rate radiotherapy; and reply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donoghue, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    These letters discuss the problems associated with the fact that the normal tissue isoeffect formulae based on the Ellis equation (1969) do not correctly account for the late-occurring effects of fractionated radiotherapy, and with the extension of the linear quadratic model to include continuous low dose-rate radiotherapy with constant or decaying sources by R.G. Dale (1985). J.A. O'Donoghue points out that the 'late effects' and CRE curves correspond closely, whilst the 'acute effects; and CRE curves are in obvious disagreement. For continuous low-dose-rate radiotherapy, the CRE and late effects quadratic model are in agreement. Useful bibliography. (U.K.)

  6. Use of combined paracetamol and low dose ketamine in pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of Paracetamol and low dose Ketamine in controlling burn pain during dressings. Setting: The burns ward of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, a 750 bed capacity tertiary centre in Western Kenya. Subjects: Consenting patients were recruited to the study on admission. Babies and ...

  7. Low-dose aspirin and risk of intracranial bleeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cea Soriano, Lucía; Gaist, David; Soriano-Gabarró, Montse

    2017-01-01

    cohort of nonusers of low-dose aspirin at baseline were followed (maximum 14 years, median 5.4 years) to identify incident cases of ICB, with validation by manual review of patient records or linkage to hospitalization data. Using 10,000 frequency-matched controls, adjusted rate ratios (RRs) with 95...

  8. Low dose CT simulation using experimental noise model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Satori; Zamyatin, Alexander A. [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Tochigi, Otawarashi (Japan); Silver, Michael D. [Toshiba Medical Research Institute, Vernon Hills, IL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We suggest a method to obtain system noise model experimentally without relying on assumptions on statistical distribution of the noise; also, knowledge of DAS gain and electronic noise level are not required. Evaluation with ultra-low dose CT data (5 mAs) shows good match between simulated and real data noise. (orig.)

  9. Malignant melanoma of the tongue following low-dose radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalemeris, G.C.; Rosenfeld, L.; Gray, G.F. Jr.; Glick, A.D.

    1985-03-01

    A 47-year-old man had a spindly malignant melanoma of the tongue many years after low-dose radiation therapy for lichen planus. To our knowledge, only 12 melanomas of the tongue have been reported previously, and in none of these was radiation documented.

  10. Malignant melanoma of the tongue following low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalemeris, G.C.; Rosenfeld, L.; Gray, G.F. Jr.; Glick, A.D.

    1985-01-01

    A 47-year-old man had a spindly malignant melanoma of the tongue many years after low-dose radiation therapy for lichen planus. To our knowledge, only 12 melanomas of the tongue have been reported previously, and in none of these was radiation documented

  11. Topics on study of low dose-effect relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Takeshi [Toho Univ., School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Ohyama, Harumi

    1999-09-01

    It is not exceptional but usually observed that a dose-effect relationship in biosystem is not linear. Sometimes, the low dose-effect relationship appears entirely contrary to the expectation from high dose-effect. This is called a 'hormesis' phenomena. A high dose irradiation inflicts certainly an injury on biosystem. No matter how low the dose may be, an irradiation might inflict some injury on biosystem according to Linear Non-Threshold hypothesis(LNT). On the contrary to the expectation, a low dose irradiation stimulates immune system, and promotes cell proliferation. This is called 'radiation hormesis'. The studies of the radiation hormesis are made on from four points of view as follows: (1) radiation adaptive response, (2) revitalization caused by a low dose stimulation, (3) a low dose response unexpected from the LNT hypothesis, (4) negation of the LNT hypothesis. The various empirical proofs of radiation hormesis are introduced in the report. (M . Suetake)

  12. Mechanisms of Low Dose Radio-Suppression of Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelward, Bevin P. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2009-09-16

    The major goal of this project is to contribute toward the elucidation of the impact of long term low dose radiation on genomic stability. We have created and characterized novel technologies for delivering long term low dose radiation to animals, and we have studied genomic stability by applying cutting edge molecular analysis technologies. Remarkably, we have found that a dose rate that is 300X higher than background radiation does not lead to any detectable genomic damage, nor is there any significant change in gene expression for genes pertinent to the DNA damage response. These results point to the critical importance of dose rate, rather than just total dose, when evaluating public health risks and when creating regulatory guidelines. In addition to these studies, we have also further developed a mouse model for quantifying cells that have undergone a large scale DNA sequence rearrangement via homologous recombination, and we have applied these mice in studies of both low dose radiation and space radiation. In addition to more traditional approaches for assessing genomic stability, we have also explored radiation and possible beneficial effects (adaptive response), long term effects (persistent effects) and effects on communication among cells (bystander effects), both in vitro and in vivo. In terms of the adaptive response, we have not observed any significant induction of an adaptive response following long term low dose radiation in vivo, delivered at 300X background. In terms of persistent and bystander effects, we have revealed evidence of a bystander effect in vivo and with researchers at and demonstrated for the first time the molecular mechanism by which cells “remember” radiation exposure. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms by which radiation can induce genomic instability is fundamental to our ability to assess the biological impact of low dose radiation. Finally, in a parallel set of studies we have explored the effects of heavy

  13. Personal dosimetry statistics and specifics of low dose evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, R.E.; Gómez Salinas, R.A.; Oyarzún Cortés, C.H.

    2015-01-01

    The dose statistics of a personal dosimetry service, considering 35,000+ readings, display a sharp peak at low dose (below 0.5 mSv) with skewness to higher values. A measure of the dispersion is that approximately 65% of the doses fall below the average plus 2 standard deviations, an observation which may prove helpful to radiation protection agencies. Categorizing the doses by the concomitant use of a finger ring dosimeter, that skewness is larger in the whole body, and ring dosimeters. The use of Harshaw 5500 readers at high gain leads to frequent values of the glow curve that are judged to be spurious, i.e. values not belonging to the roughly normal noise over the curve. A statistical criterion is shown for identifying those anomalous values, and replacing them with the local behavior, as fit by a cubic polynomial. As a result, the doses above 0.05 mSv which are affected by more than 2% comprise over 10% of the data base. The low dose peak of the statistics, above, has focused our attention on the evaluation of LiF(Mg,Ti) dosimeters exposed at low dose, and read with Harshaw 5500 readers. The standard linear procedure, via an overall reader calibration factor, is observed to fail at low dose, in detailed calibrations from 0.02 mSv to 1 Sv. A significant improvement is achieved by a piecewise polynomials calibration curve. A cubic, at low dose is matched, at ∼10 mSv, in value and first derivative, to a linear dependence at higher doses. This improvement is particularly noticeable below 2 mSv, where over 60% of the evaluated dosimeters are found. (author)

  14. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low dose/low LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munira A Kadhim

    2010-03-05

    To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e., less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these “non-targeted” responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander responses in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/H and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition on two non-targeted radiation responses in these models; the bystander effect and genomic instability, which we believe are closely related. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to doses approaching a single electron traversal. Using conventional X-ray and γ-ray sources, novel dish separation and targeted irradiation approaches, we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various bystander conditions at doses down to a few electron tracks. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for bystander targeted studies. Mechanistic studies of instability and the bystander response in different cell lineages will focus initially on the role of cytokines which have been shown to be involved in bystander signaling and the initiation of instability. These studies also aim

  15. Chromosomal Aberrations in Normal and AT Cells Exposed to High Dose of Low Dose Rate Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, T.; Shigematsu, N.; Kawaguchi, O.; Liu, C.; Furusawa, Y.; Hirayama, R.; George, K.; Cucinotta, F.

    2011-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a human autosomally recessive syndrome characterized by cerebellar ataxia, telangiectases, immune dysfunction, and genomic instability, and high rate of cancer incidence. A-T cell lines are abnormally sensitive to agents that induce DNA double strand breaks, including ionizing radiation. The diverse clinical features in individuals affected by A-T and the complex cellular phenotypes are all linked to the functional inactivation of a single gene (AT mutated). It is well known that cells deficient in ATM show increased yields of both simple and complex chromosomal aberrations after high-dose-rate irradiation, but, less is known on how cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation. It has been shown that AT cells contain a large number of unrejoined breaks after both low-dose-rate irradiation and high-dose-rate irradiation, however sensitivity for chromosomal aberrations at low-dose-rate are less often studied. To study how AT cells respond to low-dose-rate irradiation, we exposed confluent normal and AT fibroblast cells to up to 3 Gy of gamma-irradiation at a dose rate of 0.5 Gy/day and analyzed chromosomal aberrations in G0 using fusion PCC (Premature Chromosomal Condensation) technique. Giemsa staining showed that 1 Gy induces around 0.36 unrejoined fragments per cell in normal cells and around 1.35 fragments in AT cells, whereas 3Gy induces around 0.65 fragments in normal cells and around 3.3 fragments in AT cells. This result indicates that AT cells can rejoin breaks less effectively in G0 phase of the cell cycle? compared to normal cells. We also analyzed chromosomal exchanges in normal and AT cells after exposure to 3 Gy of low-dose-rate rays using a combination of G0 PCC and FISH techniques. Misrejoining was detected in the AT cells only? When cells irradiated with 3 Gy were subcultured and G2 chromosomal aberrations were analyzed using calyculin-A induced PCC technique, the yield of unrejoined breaks decreased in both normal and AT

  16. Successful treatment of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis using low-dose radiotherapy. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietzel, Christian T.; Vordermark, Dirk; Schaefer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is a rare autoinflammatory disease, which lacks an infectious genesis and predominantly involves the metaphysis of long bones. Common treatments range from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroids at first onset of disease, to immunosuppressive drugs and bisphosphonates in cases of insufficient remission. The therapeutic use of low-dose radiotherapy for CRMO constitutes a novelty. A 67-year-old female patient presented with radiologically proven CRMO affecting the right tibia/talus and no response to immunosuppressive therapy. Two treatment series of radiation therapy were applied with an interval of 6 weeks. Each series contained six fractions (three fractions per week) with single doses of 0.5 Gy, thus the total applied dose was 6 Gy. Ten months later, pain and symptoms of osteomyelitis had completely vanished. Radiotherapy seems to be an efficient and feasible complementary treatment option for conventional treatment refractory CRMO in adulthood. The application of low doses per fraction is justified by the inflammatory pathomechanism of disease. (orig.) [de

  17. Comparison of hyperuricemia in type 2 diabetics on low dose aspirin and not on low dose aspirin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the frequency of hyperuricemia in type 2 diabetes patients who are taking low dose aspirin with those patients who are not taking low dose aspirin. Study design: Quasi experimental study. Place and duration of study: This study was carried out at Military Hospital Rawalpindi for a period of two years (June 2006-May 2008). Patients and Methods: Sixty diabetic patients were selected who were taking low dose aspirin comparing group A and sixty diabetic patients who were not taking aspirin were placed in group B. These patients were selected from the OPD through non probability convenience sampling. All these patients were being followed up in medical outpatient quite regularly on fort-nightly basis. Data had been collected through a carefully designed questionnaire. Results: In group A, 90% of the patients had uric acid less than 445 micro mol/l and 10% of the patients had uric acid more than 445micro mol/l. Whereas in group B 100% of the patients had uric acid less than 445umol/l, there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Aspirin in low doses cause hyperuricemia and regular monitoring of uric acid is mandatory to prevent its adverse effects. (author)

  18. Ionizing and non-ionizing radiation and the risk of childhood cancer-illustrated with domestic radon and radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Hauri, Dimitri

    2013-01-01

    Background Children are exposed to many different environmental factors, including exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation and to non-ionizing radiation. Low-dose ionizing radiation comprises anthropogenic modified radiation and natural ionizing radiation from cosmic rays from the atmosphere, terrestrial gamma radiation from radionuclides in rocks and soils and radiation from radon. Non-ionizing radiation comprises optical radiation and radiation from electromagnetic fields. The la...

  19. Early brain response to low-dose radiation exposure involves molecular networks and pathways associated with cognitive functions, advanced aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy and environmental nuclear contamination as well as for Earth-orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of mouse brain tissue after whole-body irradiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high-dose radiation (2 Gy) and that low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues and pathways that were specific for brain tissue. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (P < 10(-53)) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified nine neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose irradiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down-regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, Xiu R.; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p -53 ) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease

  1. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-06-06

    Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Addition of low-dose ketamine to midazolam and low-dose bupivacaine improves hemodynamics and postoperative analgesia during spinal anesthesia for cesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Sobhy Basuni

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Intrathecal low-dose ketamine combined with midazolam and low-dose bupivacaine stabilizes hemodynamics and prolongs postoperative analgesia without significant side-effects in parturients undergoing CS.

  3. Repair and dose-response at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totter, J.R.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1977-04-01

    The DNA of each individual is subject to formation of some 2-4 x 10 14 ion pairs during the first 30 years of life from background radiation. If a single hit is sufficient to cause cancer, as is implicit in the linear, no-threshold theories, it is unclear why all individuals do not succumb to cancer, unless repair mechanisms operate to remove the damage. We describe a simple model in which the exposed population displays a distribution of repair thresholds. The dose-response at low dose is shown to depend on the shape of the threshold distribution at low thresholds. If the probability of zero threshold is zero, the response at low dose is quadratic. The model is used to resolve a longstanding discrepancy between observed incidence of leukemia at Nagasaki and the predictions of the usual linear hypothesis

  4. Response of human fibroblasts to low dose rate gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritschilo, A.; Brennan, T.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Mossman, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Cells from 11 human strains, including fibroblasts from patients with the genetic diseases of ataxia telangiectasia (AT), xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), and Fanconi's anemia (FA), were exposed to γ radiation at high (1.6-2.2 Gy/min) and at low (0.03-0.07 Gy/min) dose rates. Survival curves reveal an increase inthe terminal slope (D 0 ) when cells are irradiated at low dose rates compared to high dose rates. This was true for all cell lines tested, although the AT, FA, and XP cells are reported or postulated to have radiation repair deficiencies. From the response of these cells, it is apparent that radiation sensitivities differ; however, at low dose rate, all tested human cells are able to repair injury

  5. Low dose CT in early lung cancer diagnosis: prevalence data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardinale, Luciano; Cortese, Giancarlo; Ferraris, Fabrizio; Perotto, Fabio; Fava, Cesare; Borasio, Piero; Dogliotti, Luigi; Novello, Silvia; Scagliotti, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. Lung cancer has a high mortality rate and its prognosis largely depends on early detection. We report the prevalence data of the study on early detection of lung cancer with low-dose spiral CT underway at our hospital. Materials and methods. Since the beginning of 2001, 519 asymptomatic volunteers have undergone annual blood tests, sputum tests, urinalyses and low-dose spiral CT. The inclusion criteria were age (55 years old), a history of cigarette smoking and a negative history for previous neoplastic disease. The diagnostic workup varied depending on the size and CT features of the nodules detected. Results. At baseline, the CT scan detected nodules> 5 mm in 22% of subjects; the nodules were single in 42 and multiple in 71. In 53% of cases the findings were completely negative, while in 122 (23.4%) nodules with a diameter [it

  6. Low-Dose Aspirin for the Prevention of Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantasia, Heidi Collins

    2018-02-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder specific to pregnancy that remains a significant cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Identification of women who are most at risk for preeclampsia is imprecise. Because of the potential negative health consequences of preeclampsia for women and newborns and the lack of effective screening mechanisms preventing preeclampsia is an important component of prenatal care. Researchers have documented that low-dose aspirin, taken daily after the first trimester, can decrease the development of preeclampsia and reduce the incidence of preterm birth and birth of small-for-gestational-age infants. This column includes an overview of low-dose aspirin in pregnancy and a review of current recommendations from leading national organizations. © 2018 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  7. The assessment of the carcinogenic effects of low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.; Lafuma, J.; Masse, R.; Latarjet, R.

    1991-01-01

    It is concluded that the exclusion of patients for the purposes of risk estimation, the choice of a particular relative risk projection model and of a dose reduction factor equal to 2 are all decisions which result in an overestimation of the actual risk. These choices can be understood when the aim is radiation protection and when it is safer to overestimate the risk; however, they are open to criticism if the aim is a realistic assessment of the risk. For low doses, below 50 mSv/year, and when all causes of uncertainty are added, the actual risk might be markedly lower than the risk estimated with the ICRP (1991) carcinogenic risk coefficient and the DRF estimated by ICRP. Future studies should aim at providing direct and more precise assessments of risk coefficients in the low dose region. (Author)

  8. Gamma regularization based reconstruction for low dose CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Chen, Yang; Hu, Yining; Luo, Limin; Shu, Huazhong; Li, Bicao; Liu, Jin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the radiation in computerized tomography is today a major concern in radiology. Low dose computerized tomography (LDCT) offers a sound way to deal with this problem. However, more severe noise in the reconstructed CT images is observed under low dose scan protocols (e.g. lowered tube current or voltage values). In this paper we propose a Gamma regularization based algorithm for LDCT image reconstruction. This solution is flexible and provides a good balance between the regularizations based on l 0 -norm and l 1 -norm. We evaluate the proposed approach using the projection data from simulated phantoms and scanned Catphan phantoms. Qualitative and quantitative results show that the Gamma regularization based reconstruction can perform better in both edge-preserving and noise suppression when compared with other norms. (paper)

  9. Effect of low-dose radiation on ocular circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Keiko; Hiroishi, Goro; Honda, Masae; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Kimihiko; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    1999-01-01

    We treated 6 eyes of unilateral age-related macular degeneration by low-dose radiation. Each eye received daily dose of 2 Gy by 4MV lineac totalling 20 Gy over 2 weeks. Color doppler flowmetry was used to determine the mean blood flow velocity (Vmean) and vascular resistive index (RI) in the short posterior ciliary artery, central retinal artery and ophthalmic artery in the treated and fellow eyes before and up to 6 months of treatment. There were no significant differences in Vmean and RI before and after treatment. The findings show the absence of apparent influence of low-dose radiation on the ocular circulation in age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  10. Cystoid Macular Edema Induced by Low Doses of Nicotinic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Domanico

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystoid macular edema (CME is a condition that involves the macula, causing painless vision loss. In this paper, we report a case of niacin-induced bilateral cystoid macular edema (CME in a middle-age woman taking low dose of niacin (18 mg of nicotinic acid. Optical coherence tomography (OCT showed retinal thickening and cystoid spaces in both eyes, whereas fluorescein angiography (FA; HRA 2, Heidelberg Engineering revealed the absence of fluorescein leakage also in later phases. Four weeks after discontinuation of therapy there were a complete disappearance of macular edema at funduscopic examination and an improvement of visual acuity in both eyes. Furthermore OCT showed a normal retinal profile in both eyes. In our opinion considering the wide availability of niacin, medical monitoring and periodical examination should be considered during niacin administration. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature that described the very low-dose niacin-induced bilateral niacin maculopathy.

  11. Effect of low-dose radiation on ocular circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Keiko; Hiroishi, Goro; Honda, Masae; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Kimihiko; Ishibashi, Tatsuro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1999-05-01

    We treated 6 eyes of unilateral age-related macular degeneration by low-dose radiation. Each eye received daily dose of 2 Gy by 4MV lineac totalling 20 Gy over 2 weeks. Color doppler flowmetry was used to determine the mean blood flow velocity (Vmean) and vascular resistive index (RI) in the short posterior ciliary artery, central retinal artery and ophthalmic artery in the treated and fellow eyes before and up to 6 months of treatment. There were no significant differences in Vmean and RI before and after treatment. The findings show the absence of apparent influence of low-dose radiation on the ocular circulation in age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  12. Late effects of low doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper outlines the spectrum of problems and approaches used in work on the derivation of quantitative prognoses of late effects in man of low doses and dose rates. The origins of principal problems encountered in radiation risks assessments, definitions and explanations of useful quantities, methods of deriving risk factors from biological and epidemiological data, and concepts of risk evaluation and problems of acceptance are individually discussed

  13. Effects of low doses; Effet des faibles doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B. [Electricite de France (EDF-LAM-SCAST), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    2001-07-01

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  14. Fruit-flies in low-dose exposure experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajnullin, V.G.; Moskalev, A.A.; Shaposhnikov, M.V.; Sheptyakova, A.I.

    2002-01-01

    In vivo exposure of fruit-flies of Drosophila melanogaster line to low doses provided new data indicating that mechanisms of induced genetic instability are involved in radiation-induced alteration of genotype. It is true for increase of genetic variance due to change in transposition number, for change in adaptation capabilities due to modification of gene expression, and for mutability-associated reparation and apoptosis. (author)

  15. Transportable, Low-Dose Active Fast-Neutron Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalczo, John T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wright, Michael C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McConchie, Seth M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Archer, Daniel E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Palles, Blake A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This document contains a description of the method of transportable, low-dose active fast-neutron imaging as developed by ORNL. The discussion begins with the technique and instrumentation and continues with the image reconstruction and analysis. The analysis discussion includes an example of how a gap smaller than the neutron production spot size and detector size can be detected and characterized depending upon the measurement time.

  16. Biological effects of low doses of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmak, M.

    1998-01-01

    A study was performed with the aim to examine whether the progeny of cells that had been repeatedly irradiated with low doses of gamma rays will change their sensitivity to cytotoxic agents. Four mammalian cell lines were used in the experiment. It was found that the progeny of cells irradiated in this way do not change their sensitivity to gamma rays but would change their sensitivity to various cytostatics drugs. (A.K.)

  17. Low dose monitoring by double implant technique in IC fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.B.; Weidemann, J.

    1995-01-01

    The utilisation of low dose implant monitoring (using Boron) in a manufacturing line has been discussed. The utilisation of phosphorus ions as the second implant dose were also studied as comparison. The technique relies on the fact that the sheet resistant of doped layer will increase significantly when damaged by relatively low implant dose. The technique is very sensitive and applicable for adjusting the channel dose so that an accurate threshold voltage in MOS device could be achieved

  18. adverse effects of low dose methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilani, S.T.; Khan, D.A.; Khan, F.A.; Ahmed, M.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the frequency of adverse effects attributed to Methotrexate (MTX) toxicity and serum minimum toxic concentration with low dose MTX in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients. Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Chemical Pathology and Endocrinology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi, from March 2010 to March 2011. Methodology: One hundred and forty adult patients of RA receiving low dose MTX (10 mg/week) for at least 3 months, ere included by consecutive sampling. Blood samples were collected 2 hours after the oral dose of MTX. Serum alanine transaminase and creatinine were analyzed on Hitachi and blood counts on Sysmex analyzer. Serum MTX concentration was measured on TDX analyzer. Results: Out of one hundred and forty patients; 68 males (49%) and 72 females (51%), 38 developed MTX toxicity (27%), comprising of hepatotoxicity in 12 (8.6%), nephrotoxicity in 3 (2.1%), anaemia in 8 (5.7%), leucopenia in 2 (1.4%), thrombocytopenia in 3 (2.1%), pancytopenia in 2 (1.4%), gastrointestinal adverse effects in 5 (3.6%) and mucocutaneous problems in 3 (2.1%). Receiver operating characteristic curve revealed serum minimum toxic concentration of MTX at cutoff value of 0.71 mu mol/l with a sensitivity of 71% and specificity of 76%. Conclusion: Adverse effects of low dose MTX were found in 27% of RA patients, mainly comprising of hepatotoxicity and haematological problems. MTX toxicity can be detected by therapeutic drug monitoring of serum concentration of 0.71 mu mol/l with sensitivity of 71% and specificity of 76% in the patients on low dose MTX maintenance therapy. (author)

  19. Global DNA methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, M.R.; Ormsby, R.J.; Blyth, B.J.; Sykes, P.J.; Bezak, E.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: High radiation doses cause breaks in the DNA which are considered the critical lesions in initiation of radiation-induced cancer. However, at very low radiation doses relevant for the general public, the induction of such breaks will be rare, and other changes to the DNA such as DNA methylation which affects gene expression may playa role in radiation responses. We are studying global DNA methylation after low dose radiation exposure to determine if low dose radiation has short- and/or long-term effects on chromatin structure. We developed a sensitive high resolution melt assay to measure the levels of DNA methylation across the mouse genome by analysing a stretch of DNA sequence within Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements-I (LINE I) that comprise a very large proportion of the mouse and human genomes. Our initial results suggest no significant short-term or longterm) changes in global NA methylation after low dose whole-body X-radiation of 10 J1Gyor 10 mGy, with a significant transient increase in NA methylation observed I day after a high dose of I Gy. If the low radiation doses tested are inducing changes in bal DNA methylation, these would appear to be smaller than the variation observed between the sexes and following the general stress of the sham-irradiation procedure itself. This research was funded by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Biological and Environmental Research, US DOE, Grant DE-FG02-05ER64104 and MN is the recipient of the FMCF/BHP Dose Radiation Research Scholarship.

  20. Exercise and Sport Performance with Low Doses of Caffeine

    OpenAIRE

    Spriet, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine is a popular work-enhancing supplement that has been actively researched since the 1970s. The majority of research has examined the effects of moderate to high caffeine doses (5–13 mg/kg body mass) on exercise and sport. These caffeine doses have profound effects on the responses to exercise at the whole-body level and are associated with variable results and some undesirable side effects. Low doses of caffeine (

  1. Investigation of the dose rate dependency of the PAGAT gel dosimeter at low dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehtabian, M.; Faghihi, R.; Zahmatkesh, M.H.; Meigooni, A.S.; Mosleh-Shirazi, M.A.; Mehdizadeh, S.; Sina, S.; Bagheri, S.

    2012-01-01

    Medical physicists need dosimeters such as gel dosimeters capable of determining three-dimensional dose distributions with high spatial resolution. To date, in combination with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), polyacrylamide gel (PAG) polymers are the most promising gel dosimetry systems. The purpose of this work was to investigate the dose rate dependency of the PAGAT gel dosimeter at low dose rates. The gel dosimeter was used for measurement of the dose distribution around a Cs-137 source from a brachytherapy LDR source to have a range of dose rates from 0.97 Gy h −1 to 0.06 Gy h −1 . After irradiation of the PAGAT gel, it was observed that the dose measured by gel dosimetry was almost the same at different distances (different dose rates) from the source, although the points nearer the source had been expected to receive greater doses. Therefore, it was suspected that the PAGAT gel is dose rate dependent at low dose rates. To test this further, three other sets of measurements were performed by placing vials containing gel at different distances from a Cs-137 source. In the first two measurements, several plastic vials were exposed to equal doses at different dose rates. An ionization chamber was used to measure the dose rate at each distance. In addition, three TLD chips were simultaneously irradiated in order to verify the dose to each vial. In the third measurement, to test the oxygen diffusion through plastic vials, the experiment was repeated again using plastic vials in a nitrogen box and glass vials. The study indicates that oxygen diffusion through plastic vials for dose rates lower than 2 Gy h −1 would affect the gel dosimeter response and it is suggested that the plastic vials or (phantoms) in an oxygen free environment or glass vials should be used for the dosimetry of low dose rate sources using PAGAT gel to avoid oxygen diffusion through the vials.

  2. Cytogenetic characterization of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity in Cobalt-60 irradiated human lymphoblastoid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Gnanada S. [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Joiner, Michael C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Tucker, James D., E-mail: jtucker@biology.biosci.wayne.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Human cells were irradiated in G1 or G2 and evaluated for micronuclei and bridges. • Cells irradiated in G2 but not in G1 exhibit low dose hyper-radiosensitivity. • Response curves of cells irradiated in G2 do not fit a linear-no-threshold model. • Response curves of cells irradiated in G1 fit a linear-no-threshold model. - Abstract: The dose-effect relationships of cells exposed to ionizing radiation are frequently described by linear quadratic (LQ) models over an extended dose range. However, many mammalian cell lines, when acutely irradiated in G2 at doses ≤0.3 Gy, show hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) as measured by reduced clonogenic cell survival, thereby indicating greater cell lethality than is predicted by extrapolation from high-dose responses. We therefore hypothesized that the cytogenetic response in G2 cells to low doses would also be steeper than predicted by LQ extrapolation from high doses. We tested our hypothesis by exposing four normal human lymphoblastoid cell lines to 0–400 cGy of Cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The cytokinesis block micronucleus assay was used to determine the frequencies of micronuclei and nucleoplasmic bridges. To characterize the dependence of the cytogenetic damage on dose, univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to compare the responses in the low- (HRS) and high-dose response regions. Our data indicate that the slope of the response for all four cell lines at ≤20 cGy during G2 is greater than predicted by an LQ extrapolation from the high-dose responses for both micronuclei and bridges. These results suggest that the biological consequences of low-dose exposures could be underestimated and may not provide accurate risk assessments following such exposures.

  3. The effects of repeated low-dose sarin exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, T.-M.; Hulet, S.W.; McDonough, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    This project assessed the effects of repeated low-dose exposure of guinea pigs to the organophosphorus nerve agent sarin. Animals were injected once a day, 5 days per week (Monday-Friday), for 2 weeks with fractions (0.3x, 0.4x, 0.5x, or 0.6x) of the established LD 5 dose of sarin (42 μg/kg, s.c.). The animals were assessed for changes in body weight, red blood cell (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels, neurobehavioral reactions to a functional observational battery (FOB), cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectrum, and intrinsic acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmitter (NT) regulation over the 2 weeks of sarin exposure and for up to 12 days postinjection. No guinea pig receiving 0.3, 0.4 or 0.5 x LD 5 of sarin showed signs of cortical EEG seizures despite decreases in RBC AChE levels to as low as 10% of baseline, while seizures were evident in animals receiving 0.6 x LD 5 of sarin as early as the second day; subsequent injections led to incapacitation and death. Animals receiving 0.5 x LD 5 sarin showed obvious signs of cholinergic toxicity; overall, 2 of 13 animals receiving 0.5 x LD 5 sarin died before all 10 injections were given, and there was a significant increase in the angle of gait in the animals that lived. By the 10th day of injection, the animals receiving saline were significantly easier to remove from their cages and handle and significantly less responsive to an approaching pencil and touch on the rump in comparison with the first day of testing. In contrast, the animals receiving 0.4 x LD 5 sarin failed to show any significant reductions in their responses to an approaching pencil and a touch on the rump as compared with the first day. The 0.5 x LD 5 sarin animals also failed to show any significant changes to the approach and touch responses and did not adjust to handling or removal from the cage from the first day of injections to the last day of handling. Thus, the guinea pigs receiving the 0.4 and 0.5 x LD 5 doses of sarin failed to

  4. MELODI: The 'Multidisciplinary European Low-Dose Initiative'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belli, M.; Salomaa, S.; Ottolenghi, A.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of research to reduce uncertainties in risk assessment of low and protracted exposures is now recognised globally. In Europe a new initiative, called 'Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative' (MELODI), has been proposed by a 'European High Level and Expert Group on low-dose risk research' (www.hleg.de), aimed at integrating national and EC (Euratom) efforts. Five national organisations: BfS (DE), CEA (FR), IRSN (FR), ISS (IT) and STUK (FI), with the support of the EC, have initiated the creation of MELODI by signing a letter of intent. In the forthcoming years, MELODI will integrate in a step-by-step approach EU institutions with significant programmes in the field and will be open to other scientific organisations and stakeholders. A key role of MELODI is to develop and maintain over time a strategic research agenda (SRA) and a road map of scientific priorities within a multidisciplinary approach, and to transfer the results for the radiation protection system. Under the coordination of STUK a network has been proposed in the 2009 Euratom Programme, called DoReMi (Low-Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration), which can help the integration process within the MELODI platform. DoReMi and the First MELODI Open Workshop, organised by BfS in September 2009, are now important inputs for the European SRA. (authors)

  5. Low dose effects detected by micronucleus assay in lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koeteles, G.J.; Bojtor, I.; Kubasova, T.; Horvath, G.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of low doses of X-rays between 0.01 and 1 Gy were studied on whole blood samples of various individuals using the cytokinesis-blocked lymphocyte micronucleus assay as an endpoint. The adaptive response could be induced in G 0 cells by 0.01 Gy followed by 1 Gy challenging dose within a time period of 8 hours, in vitro. The probability distribution of micronucleus increments in those samples which had received very low doses in the range 0.01-0.05 Gy proved to be of asymmetrical type (i.e. lognormal) -very likely to the same shape which has been verified for unirradiated (control) population - while the variable turned to be normally distributed at or above 1 Gy. Profound changes have been experienced in the main characteristics of the linear dose - response relationship and in regression parameters, as well, when successively lessened dose ranges were studied toward 0.01 Gy. In the range below ∼ 0.2 Gy the response were found to be unrelated to the absorbed dose. These findings suggest that in (very) low dose range a higher attention should be needed to biological parameters like repair, protective mechanisms and antioxidant capacities, rather than to the absorbed radiation energy only. (author)

  6. Thermoluminescent dosimeters for low dose X-ray measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Sol Fernández, S.; García-Salcedo, R.; Sánchez-Guzmán, D.; Ramírez-Rodríguez, G.; Gaona, E.; León-Alfaro, M.A. de; Rivera-Montalvo, T.

    2016-01-01

    The response of TLD-100, CaSO_4:Dy and LiF:Mg,Cu,P for a range of X-ray low dose was measured. For calibration, the TLDs were arranged at the center of the X-ray field. The dose output of the X-ray machine was determined using an ACCU-Gold. All dosimeters were exposed at the available air kerma values of 14.69 mGy within a field 10×10 cm"2 at 80 cm of SSD. Results of LiF:Mg,Cu,P X-ray irradiated showed 4.8 times higher sensitivity than TLD-100. Meanwhile, TL response of CaSO_4:Dy exposed at the same dose was 5.6 time higher than TLD-100. Experimental results show for low dose X-ray measurements a better linearity for LiF:Mg,Cu,P compared with that of TLD-100. CaSO_4:Dy showed a linearity from 0.1 to 60 mGy - Highlights: • Low dose X-ray doses for personal dosimetry were measured. • Radiation dose (µGy ) for environmental dosimetry were determined. • Scattering radiation dose were measured by TLDs. • Linearity of pair TLD system was successful in the range of microgray. • Pair TLDs composed by CaSO_4:Dy and by LiF:Mg,Cu,P. is suggested for clinical dosimetry.

  7. Ageing effects of polymers at very low dose-rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenion, J.; Armand, X.; Berthet, J.; Carlin, F.; Gaussens, G.; Le Meur, M.

    1987-10-01

    The equipment irradiation dose-rate into the containment is variable from 10 -6 to 10 -4 gray per second for the most exposed materials. During qualification, safety equipments are submitted in France to dose-rates around 0.28 gray per second. This study purpose is to now if a so large irradiation dose-rate increase is reasonable. Three elastomeric materials used in electrical cables, o'rings seals and connectors, are exposed to a very large dose-rates scale between 2.1.10 -4 and 1.4 gray per second, to 49 KGy dose. This work was carried out during 3.5 years. Oxygen consumption measurement of the air in contact with polymer materials, as mechanical properties measurement show that: - at very low dose-rate, oxygen consumption is maximum at the same time (1.4 year) for the three elastomeric samples. Also, mechanical properties simultaneously change with oxygen consumption. At very low dose-rate, for the low irradiation doses, oxygen consumption is at least 10 times more important that it is showed when irradiation is carried out with usual material qualification dose-rate. At very low dose-rate, oxygen consumption decreases when absorbed irradiation dose by samples increases. The polymer samples irradiation dose is not still sufficient (49 KGy) to certainly determine, for the three chosen polymer materials, the reasonable irradiation acceleration boundary during nuclear qualification tests [fr

  8. Biochemical and cellular mechanisms of low-dose effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Booz, J.; Muehlensiepen, H.

    1988-01-01

    The question of health effects from small radiation doses remains open. Individual cells, when being hit by single elemental doses - in low-dose irradiation - react acutely and temporarily by altering control of enzyme activity, as is demonstrated for the case of thymidine kinase. This response is not constant in that it provides a temporary protection of enzyme activity against a second irradiation, by a mechanism likely to be via improved detoxification of intracellular radicals. It must be considered that in the low-dose region radiation may also exert protection against other challenges involving radicals, causing a net beneficial effect by temporarily shielding the hit cell against radicals produced by metabolism. Since molecular alterations leading to late effects are considered a consequence of the initial cellular response, late effects from small radiation doses do not necessarily adhere to a linear dose-effect relationship. The reality of the linear relationship between the risk of late effects from high doses to small doses is an assumption, for setting dose limits, but it must not be taken for predicting health detriment from low doses. (author)

  9. Exercise and sport performance with low doses of caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriet, Lawrence L

    2014-11-01

    Caffeine is a popular work-enhancing supplement that has been actively researched since the 1970s. The majority of research has examined the effects of moderate to high caffeine doses (5-13 mg/kg body mass) on exercise and sport. These caffeine doses have profound effects on the responses to exercise at the whole-body level and are associated with variable results and some undesirable side effects. Low doses of caffeine (caffeine doses (1) do not alter the peripheral whole-body responses to exercise; (2) improve vigilance, alertness, and mood and cognitive processes during and after exercise; and (3) are associated with few, if any, side effects. Therefore, the ergogenic effect of low caffeine doses appears to result from alterations in the central nervous system. However, several aspects of consuming low doses of caffeine remain unresolved and suffer from a paucity of research, including the potential effects on high-intensity sprint and burst activities. The responses to low doses of caffeine are also variable and athletes need to determine whether the ingestion of ~200 mg of caffeine before and/or during training and competitions is ergogenic on an individual basis.

  10. Cytogenetics dosimetry: dose-response curve for low doses of X-ray; Dosimetria citogenetica: curva dosis-respuesta para bajas dosis de rayos-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Virginia E. Noval; Pineda Bolivar, William R.; Riano, Victor M. Pabon, E-mail: venovall.15@hotmail.com, E-mail: wrpineda@misena.edu.co, E-mail: vmpabonr@udistrital.edu.co [Universidad Distrital Francisco Jose de Caldas (UD), Bogota (Colombia). Grupo de Investigacion en Ciencia y Tecnologia Nuclear; Ureana, Cecilia Crane, E-mail: cecicrane@yahoo.com [Instituto Nacional de Salud (INS), Bogota (Colombia). Laboratorio de Genetica

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a preliminary study for the standardization in the future, the dose-response curve for low doses of X-rays, through the analysis of in vitro cultures of peripheral blood samples of 3 men and 3 women occupationally not exposed to artificial sources of ionizing radiation, age 18-40 years, where possible nonsmokers.

  11. The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

    2012-12-01

    Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, MIP-1α, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-γ, MIP-1α, TNF α, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

  12. Determination of oxygen and nitrogen derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fractions of asphalt mixtures using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Gobo, Luciana Assis; Bohrer, Denise; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Cravo, Margareth Coutinho; Leite, Leni Figueiredo Mathias

    2015-12-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was used for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon derivatives, the oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, formed in asphalt fractions. Two different methods have been developed for the determination of five oxygenated and seven nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are characterized by having two or more condensed aromatic rings and present mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all compounds. The detection limits of the methods ranged from 0.1 to 57.3 μg/L for nitrated and from 0.1 to 6.6 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The limits of quantification were in the range of 4.6-191 μg/L for nitrated and 0.3-8.9 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The methods were validated against a diesel particulate extract standard reference material (National Institute of Standards and Technology SRM 1975), and the obtained concentrations (two nitrated derivatives) agreed with the certified values. The methods were applied in the analysis of asphalt samples after their fractionation into asphaltenes and maltenes, according to American Society for Testing and Material D4124, where the maltenic fraction was further separated into its basic, acidic, and neutral parts following the method of Green. Only two nitrated derivatives were found in the asphalt sample, quinoline and 2-nitrofluorene, with concentrations of 9.26 and 2146 mg/kg, respectively, whereas no oxygenated derivatives were detected. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Use of BEIR V and UNSCEAR 1988 in radiation risk assessment: Lifetime total cancer mortality risk estimates at low doses and low dose rates for low-LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    In November 1986, the Department of Defense (DoD) asked the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC) to develop a coordinated Federal position on risk assessment for low levels of ionizing radiation. Since Federal risk assessment activities are based primarily on the scientific data and analyses in authoritative review documents prepared by groups like the National Academy of Sciences' Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR), the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the United Nations' Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), DoD proposed that the CIRRPC Science Panel undertake the task of providing coordinated interagency positions on the use of information in the reports of such groups. The practice has been for individual Federal agencies to interpret and decide independently how to use the information provided in such reports. As a result of its deliberations, the Subpanel recommends two nominal risk estimates for lifetime total cancer mortality following whole-body exposure to low levels of low-LET ionizing radiation, one for the general population and one for the working-age population (see Section II). The recommended risk estimates reflect the general agreement of information in BEIR V and UNSCEAR 1988 for total cancer mortality. The Subpanel's risk estimates and associated statements are intended to meet the needs of the Federal agencies for: (a) values that are current; (b) values that are relevant to the low-dose and low dose-rate ionizing radiation exposures principally encountered in carrying out Federal responsibilities; (c) a statement of the change in the estimates of lifetime total cancer mortality relative to estimates in previous authoritative review documents; and (d) a practical statement on the scientific uncertainty associated with applying the lifetime total cancer mortality values at very low doses

  14. Neurodegeneration and adaptation in response to low-dose photon irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limoli, Charles L. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2014-10-27

    Neural stem and precursor cells (i.e. multipotent neural cells) are concentrated in the neurogenic regions of the brain (hippocampal dentate gyrus, subventricular zones), and considerable evidence suggests that these cells are important in mediating the stress response of the CNS after damage from ionizing radiation. The capability of these cells to proliferate, migrate and differentiate (i.e. to undergo neurogenesis) suggests they can participate in the repair and maintenance of CNS functions by replacing brain cells damaged or depleted due to irradiation. Importantly, we have shown that multipotent neural cells are markedly sensitive to irradiation and oxidative stress, insults that compromise neurogenesis and hasten the onset and progression of degenerative processes that are likely to have an adverse impact on cognition. Our past and current work has demonstrated that relatively low doses of radiation cause a persistent (weeks-months) oxidative stress in multipotent neural cells that can elicit a range of degenerative sequelae in the CNS. Therefore, our project is focused on determining the extent that endogenous and redox sensitive multipotent neural cells represent important radioresponsive targets for low dose radiation effects. We hypothesize that the activation of redox sensitive signaling can trigger radioadaptive changes in these cells that can be either harmful or beneficial to overall cognitive health.

  15. Effect of low dose rate irradiation on doped silica core optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friebele, E.J.; Askins, C.G.; Gingerich, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    The optical attenuation induced in multimode doped silica core optical fiber waveguides by a year's exposure to low dose rate (1 rad/day) ionizing radiation was studied, allowing a characterization of fibers deployed in these environments and a determination of the permanent induced loss in the waveguides. Variations in the induced attenuation at 0.85 μm have been observed with changes in the dose rate between 1 rad/day and 9000 rads/min. These dose rate dependences have been found to derive directly from the recovery that occurs during the exposure; the recovery data predict little or no dose rate dependence of the damage at 1.3 μm. The low dose rate exposure has been found to induce significant permanent attenuation in the 0.7-1.7-μm spectral region in all fibers containing P in the core, whether doped uniformly across the diameter or constrained to a narrow spike on the centerline. Whereas permanent loss was induced at 0.85 μm in a P-free binary Ge-doped silica core fiber by the year's exposure, virtually no damage was observed at 1.3 μm

  16. Alkaline and Acid Phosphatase Activity in Blood Plasma of Chickens Irradiated by Low dose Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petar, K.; Marinko, V.; Saveta, M.; Miljenko, S.

    2004-01-01

    In our previous paper (Kraljevic et, al, 2000; Kraljevic et al 2002) we showed that the growth of the chickens hatched from eggs irradiated with 0.15 Gy gamma-rays before incubation was significantly higher than in controls during the fattening period (1-42 days). The concentration of total protein, glucose and cholesterol in the blood plasma of the same chickens was also significantly changed. In this paper an attempt was made to determine the effect of irradiation of eggs by low dose ionizing radiation before incubation upon activity of alkaline and acid phosphatase in the blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs. The eggs of heavy breeding chickens were irradiated by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation (60 Co) before incubation. Along with the chickens which were hatched from irradiated eggs, there was a control group of chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs. All other conditions were the same for both groups. After hatching, blood samples were taken from the wing vein on days 1, 3, 5, 6, 10, 20, 30 and 42. The activity of both enzymes was determined spectrophotometrically by using Boehring Mannheim GmbH optimized kits. the activity of alkaline phosphatase in blood plasma was decreased on days 42, and the activity of acid phosphatase in the blood plasma of the same chickens was increased on day 42. Obtained results confirm our early obtained results that low dose of gamma radiation has effects upon metabolic processes in the chickens hatched from eggs irradiated before incubation. (Author)

  17. Gene expression analysis after low dose ionising radiation exposure of the developing organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrafi Benotmane, M.

    2007-01-01

    Measuring gene expression using microarrays is relevant to many areas of biology and medicine, such as follow up of developmental stages and diseases onset, and treatment study. Since there can be tens of thousands of distinct probes on an array, each micro array experiment can accomplish the equivalent number of genetic tests in parallel. Arrays have therefore dramatically accelerated many types of investigations. For example, microarrays can be used to identify stress response genes by comparing gene expression in challenged versus normal cells. In the Molecular and Cellular Biology lab (MCB), the micro array experiments are performed within the Genomic Platform, fully equipped to analyse either the behaviour of bacteria during long space flight, the effect of low dose ionising radiation on the developing organism in mice, or the human individual radiation sensitivity. For the low dose effect, two main stages of development are of interest; 1) the gastrula stage at which ionizing radiation can induce several malformations. 2) the organogenesis. During brain development, epidemiological studies of the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima/Nagasaki showed increased risk of mental retardation in children of women exposed between weeks 8-15 of pregnancy or at a lower extend between weeks 15 to 25

  18. Effect of low dose radiation on thymocyte cytosol and nuclei protein synthesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Qingyong; Chen Shali; Liu Shuzheng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To the effect of low dose radiation on thymocyte cytosol and nuclei protein synthesis in mice. Methods: The expression of proteins was analyzed by gel filtration with Sephadex G-100 and HPLC based on separation of proteins on thymocyte cytosol and nuclei after whole-body irradiation with 75 mGy X-rays and sham-irradiation, and their biological activity was examined by mouse splenocyte proliferation and chromosome aberration of human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Results: HPLC analysis showed that there was a marked increase in expression of 61.4 kD protein in the extract of thymocyte cytosol and 30.4 kD protein in the extract of thymocyte nuclei in comparison with the corresponding fractions from the sham-irradiated control mice. These protein fractions from the thymocyte cytosol and nuclei of the irradiated mice showed both stimulating effect on normal T cell proliferation and protective effect on chromosome damage induced by high dose radiation. Conclusion: These findings might have implications in study of mechanism of immunoenhancement and cytogenetic adaptive response induced by low dose radiation

  19. Limiting values for the RBE of fission neutrons at low doses for life shortening in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storer, J.B.; Mitchell, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have analyzed recently published data on the effects of low doses of fission neutrons on the mean survival times of mice. The analysis for single-dose exposures was confined to doses of 20 rad or less, while for fractionated exposures only total doses of 80 rad or less were considered. They fitted the data to the frequently used power function model: life shortening = βD/sup γ/, where D is the radiation dose. They show that, at low doses per fraction, either the effects are not additive or the dose-effect curve for single exposures cannot show a greater negative curvature than about the 0.9 power of dose. Analysis of the data for γ rays showed that an exponent of 1.0 gave an acceptable fit. They conclude that at neutron doses of 20 rad or less the RBE for life shortening is constant and ranges from 13 to 22 depending on mouse strain and sex

  20. Intracranial germinomas: a case for low dose radiation therapy alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrigan, Patricia M.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shrieve, Dennis; Tarbell, Nancy J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimal dose and treatment outcome of patients treated with radiation for intracranial germinoma. Materials and Methods: Between 1975 and 1995, 39 patients with a diagnosis of intracranial germinoma were treated with radiation (RT) to the central nervous system. All but one pt received whole brain (WB) RT, (median dose: 3240 cGy range: 1500-4437 cGy) and a boost to the tumor volume (median total tumor volume dose: 5200 cGy, range: 3960-5950 cGy). Thirty-one pts received RT to the spine (median dose: 2500, range: 1875-3750). Eleven pts were treated with low dose RT and a tumor volume boost, (WB dose ≤ 2550 cGy, and spine dose ≤ 2160 cGy). Five pts were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and low dose WB RT. Fifteen pts were biopsy-proven and 18 presented with multiple midline germinomas (MMG). Among all pts, 33% had serum or CSF positive for low levels of HCG and none of 19 (9 biopsy-proven) germinomas measured positive for AFP tumor marker. Six of 22 (27%) pts who had spine imaging or CSF cytology had evidence of tumor seeding. The male-to female-ratio was 1.4. Median age at diagnosis was 14 yrs for male pts and 9.5 yrs for females (p=.02, overall age range: 1-31 yrs). Median follow-up for survivors is 64 months (range: 1-226 months). Toxicity of treatment relative to dose was assessed. Results: The 5-yr. actuarial rate of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival for presumed germinomas was 97%. No pts died of germinoma. One pt died of a shunt infection who had received concurrent chemotherapy and low dose whole brain RT. Among the low dose RT alone group 6 pts received whole brain RT of ≤ 2550 cGy and 9 pts were treated with spinal RT of ≤ 2160 cGy without chemotherapy. Two of these pts had CSF cytology positive for tumor seeding. Additionally, 8 pts received a total dose to the tumor volume of ≤ 4800 cGy without chemotherapy. The 5-yr DFS was 100%. Five pts were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed

  1. Intracranial germinomas: a case for low dose radiation therapy alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrigan, Patricia M; Loeffler, Jay S; Shrieve, Dennis; Tarbell, Nancy J

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimal dose and treatment outcome of patients treated with radiation for intracranial germinoma. Materials and Methods: Between 1975 and 1995, 39 patients with a diagnosis of intracranial germinoma were treated with radiation (RT) to the central nervous system. All but one pt received whole brain (WB) RT, (median dose: 3240 cGy range: 1500-4437 cGy) and a boost to the tumor volume (median total tumor volume dose: 5200 cGy, range: 3960-5950 cGy). Thirty-one pts received RT to the spine (median dose: 2500, range: 1875-3750). Eleven pts were treated with low dose RT and a tumor volume boost, (WB dose {<=} 2550 cGy, and spine dose {<=} 2160 cGy). Five pts were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and low dose WB RT. Fifteen pts were biopsy-proven and 18 presented with multiple midline germinomas (MMG). Among all pts, 33% had serum or CSF positive for low levels of HCG and none of 19 (9 biopsy-proven) germinomas measured positive for AFP tumor marker. Six of 22 (27%) pts who had spine imaging or CSF cytology had evidence of tumor seeding. The male-to female-ratio was 1.4. Median age at diagnosis was 14 yrs for male pts and 9.5 yrs for females (p=.02, overall age range: 1-31 yrs). Median follow-up for survivors is 64 months (range: 1-226 months). Toxicity of treatment relative to dose was assessed. Results: The 5-yr. actuarial rate of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival for presumed germinomas was 97%. No pts died of germinoma. One pt died of a shunt infection who had received concurrent chemotherapy and low dose whole brain RT. Among the low dose RT alone group 6 pts received whole brain RT of {<=} 2550 cGy and 9 pts were treated with spinal RT of {<=} 2160 cGy without chemotherapy. Two of these pts had CSF cytology positive for tumor seeding. Additionally, 8 pts received a total dose to the tumor volume of {<=} 4800 cGy without chemotherapy. The 5-yr DFS was 100%. Five pts were treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy

  2. Effect of low-dose gamma-radiation upon hatchability and weight of chickens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilic, M.; Kraljevic, P.; Simpraga, M.; Miljanic, S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Although any dose of ionizing radiation has generally been recognized to be detrimental to living being, low dose ionizing radiation seems to invoke primary stimulative effects. Stimulatory effects of low dose ionizing radiation include many aspects such as growth, fecundity and longevity stimulation, accelerated development, enhance biological responses for immune systems, enzymatic repair, physiological functions, and the removal of cellular damage, including prevention and removal of cancers and other diseases. Low dose ionizing radiation might also cause changes in the concentration of some biochemical parameters in blood plasma of chickens such as changes in the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of low doses of gamma irradiation before incubation and on the seventh day of incubation on hatchability of eggs and body weight of chickens. This study includes three independent experiments. In the first experiment, six-hundred eggs produced by a commercial flock of Avian-line 34, were irradiated by a dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation (60 Co) before incubation. In the second experiments also involving six-hundred-line 34 eggs were irradiated by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation on the seventh day of incubation. In the third experiment three-hundred eggs produced by a commercial flock of Ross 308 were irradiated by dose 0.30 Gy gamma irradiation before incubation. Along with the chickens which were hatched from irradiated eggs, there was a control group of chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs. All other conditions were the same for both groups. Hatchability was calculated in terms of all eggs divided with fertile eggs which hatched. The individual weights of the chickens were determined on the first and on the forty second day. Growth data were analyzed statistically by t-test. Irradiation of chicken eggs and embryos at rates o f 0.15 Gy increases

  3. Effects of low dose radiation on differential expression of serum protein in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wei; He Ying; Shen Xianrong

    2014-01-01

    The aim is to find out the key proteins related with low dose radiation (Ld) by parametric technology, which provided the theory foundation for LDR protection Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) was performed on serum protein Differential expression proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and database analysis Compared with the control group, 7 altered proteins was definite in terms of apolipoprotein C-Ⅲ, beta-globin parotid secretory protein alpha-2-macroglobulin precursor, mouse transthyretin, C1qc protein and clusterin. Some proteins related with LDR are found. It may provide some new explanations for the mechanism of LDR. (authors)

  4. Study of morbidity in persons subjected to combined effect of low dose irradiation and alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashneva, N.I.; Zakharov, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    Materials related to study of morbidity in persons from one of the controled areas subjected to combined effect of low dose ionizing radiation and alcohol are presented. The group under control included persons living in the same area but not misusing alcohol. The morbidity analysis for the period of two years before the accident showed that the number of morbidity cases and days characterized by incapacity for work among 100 working persons was 1.2 and 1.35 times higher as compared to persons not misusing alcohol. Two years after the accident these values constitute 1.6 and 1.75 correspondingly. It is established on the basis of the dispensary examnations, that taking into account other equal conditions the number of morbidity cases related to cardiovasular deseases among the persons misusing alcohol increased (11 % against 6.8 % bycontrol). The number of other chronic morbidity cases does not differ from control values. 7 refs.; 2 tabs

  5. New approach for food allergy management using low-dose oral food challenges and low-dose oral immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Noriyuki; Okada, Yu; Sato, Sakura; Ebisawa, Motohiro

    2016-04-01

    A number of studies have suggested that a large subset of children (approximately 70%) who react to unheated milk or egg can tolerate extensively heated forms of these foods. A diet that includes baked milk or egg is well tolerated and appears to accelerate the development of regular milk or egg tolerance when compared with strict avoidance. However, the indications for an oral food challenge (OFC) using baked products are limited for patients with high specific IgE values or large skin prick test diameters. Oral immunotherapies (OITs) are becoming increasingly popular for the management of food allergies. However, the reported efficacy of OIT is not satisfactory, given the high frequency of symptoms and requirement for long-term therapy. With food allergies, removing the need to eliminate a food that could be consumed in low doses could significantly improve quality of life. This review discusses the importance of an OFC and OIT that use low doses of causative foods as the target volumes. Utilizing an OFC or OIT with a low dose as the target volume could be a novel approach for accelerating the tolerance to causative foods. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Suppression of carcinogenesis in mice by adaptive responses to low dose rate irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Kazuo; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Hoshi, Yuko; Nomura, Takaharu; Ina, Yasuhiro; Tanooka, Hiroshi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Low Dose Radiation Research Center, Komae, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    Effects of prolonged low-dose-rate irradiation on the process of carcinogenesis were examined in mice treated with chemical carcinogen or irradiated with high doses of X-rays. Female ICR mice, 5 week-old, 35 in each group, were exposed to gamma-rays from a {sup 137}Cs source in the long-term low dose rate irradiation facility at CRIEPI. The dose rate was 2.6 mGy/hr (A), 0.96 mGy/hr (B), or 0.30 mGy/hr (C). Thirty-five days later, the mice were injected into the groin with 0.5 mg of methylcholanthrene (MC) dissolved in olive oil and irradiation was continued. Cumulative tumor incidences after 216 days following MC injection were 89% in group A, 76% in group B, and 94% in group C. That in non-irradiated control group was 94%. The difference in the tumor incidence between the control and position B was statistically significant, indicating the suppressive effect of the low dose rate irradiation on the process of MC-induced carcinogenesis with an optimum dose rate around 1 mGy/hr. In B6C3F1 mice, although the suppression of tumor incidence was not observed, there was a significant delay in tumor appearance in the irradiated mice between 100-150 days after MC injection. A group of 20 female C57BL/6N mice, 5 weeks old, were exposed to gamma-rays at 0.95 mGy/hr for 5 weeks. Then, they were exposed weekly to 1.8 Gy whole body X-irradiation (300 kVp) for consecutive 4 weeks to induce thymic lymphoma. Another group received only the fractionated irradiation. The first mouse died from thymic lymphoma appeared 89 days after the last irradiation in the group received only the fractionated irradiation, while 110 days in the group combined with the low dose rate irradiation. (author)

  7. Influence of low doses chronic contamination on the progression of atheromatous pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le-Gallic, Clelia

    2015-01-01

    Large amounts of radionuclides were released in the environment after the Chernobyl (1986) or Fukushima-Daichii (2011) nuclear accidents, and mostly cesium 137. Populations living in contaminated territories are chronically exposed to radionuclides by ingestion of contaminated food. There is a real interrogation about the potential effects that could be induced following such ionizing exposure on physiological functions in the long term. Concerning the cardiovascular system, there is a correlation between the irradiation dose and the appearance of cardiovascular diseases. However, when we focused on post-accidental situations, with a low dose exposure, available data are not all in accordance, due to multifactorial aspect of these pathologies. Epidemiological results should be interpreted carefully. Thus, the aim of my thesis is to complete epidemiological studies about chronic internal? low dose exposure, using cesium 137, in an atheromatous context. Atherosclerosis and its consequences are known to be the main cause of mortality/morbidity in industrialized countries. Predisposed animals (ApoE-/- mice) were exposed to 137 Cs through the drinking water. The concentration range was 4 to 100 kBq.L -1 , to surround concentration found in contaminated territories around Chernobyl. Exposure times were 3, 6 or 9 months to follow atherosclerosis progression. After 3 months exposure, for the early stages, mice exposed to the highest dose presented an increase in some inflammatory cytokines, notably IFN-γ and VCAM-1, with an intimal-medial thickness increased compared to non-exposed animals. Moreover, at this time exposure, we noticed concomitant variation of gene expression of pro and anti-oxidative enzymes (p47, p67, GPx). These effects are only transient and do not persist over the time. Indeed, after 6 and 9 months exposure, atheromatous plaque observed in the aortic sinus, present more stability parameters than the control group (collagen), with also a decrease in pro

  8. Low-dose CT: new tool for screening lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederich, S.; Wormanns, D.; Heindel, W.

    2001-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from malignant tumours as it is very common and has a poor prognosis at advanced tumour stages. Prognosis could be improved by treatment at early stages. As these stages are usually asymptomatic, a diagnostic test that would allow detection of early tumour stages in a population at risk could potentially reduce mortality from lung cancer. Previous approaches using chest radiography and sputum cytology in smokers have been disappointing. Fluorescent bronchoscopy and molecular markers are not yet applicable in clinical routine. Because of its high sensitivity for small pulmonary nodules, which are the most common manifestation of early lung cancer, CT appears suitable as a screening test. Low-dose examination parameters can and should be used for this purpose. From clinical practice it is well known that chest CT often demonstrates small pulmonary nodules, which do not represent lung cancer. Therefore, non-invasive diagnostic algorithms are required to avoid unnecessary biopsies in benign lesions. In preliminary studies of low-dose CT using algorithms based on size and density of detected nodules a large proportion of asymptomatic lung cancers and a large proportion of early, resectable tumour stages were found with a small proportion of invasive procedures for benign nodules. Before this technology can be recommended for broad application, however, further information is required regarding appropriate inclusion criteria (smoking habits, age groups) and screening intervals. Most importantly, further data are required to clarify whether lung cancer screening using low-dose CT can actually reduce mortality from lung cancer. (orig.)

  9. Low-dose multislice CT in febrile neutropenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendel, F.; Jenett, M.; Hahn, D.; Sandstede, J.; Geib, A.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to define the value of low-dose multislice CT in a clinical setting for early detection of pneumonia in neutropenic patients with fever of unknown origin. Materials and methods: thirty-five neutropenic patients suffering from fever of unknown origin with normal chest X-ray underwent unenhanced low-dose CT of the chest (120 kV, 10 eff. mAs, collimation 4 x 1 mm) using a multislice CT scanner. Axial und frontal slices with a thickness of 5 mm were calculated. If no pneumonia was found, standard antibiotics were given and a repeated examination was performed if fever continued. In case of pneumonia, antimycotic therapy was added and a follow-up CT was performed within one week. Regression or progression of pneumonia at follow-up served as evidence of pneumonia; lowering of fever within 48 h or inconspicuous follow-up CT was regarded as absence of pneumonia. Results: ten of 35 patients had pneumonic infiltration, which decreased or increased on follow-up CT in 3 and 6 patients, respectively. One patient revealed leucemic infiltration by bronchoalveolar lavage. Twenty-five of 35 patients had no evidence of pneumonia. Twenty of these patients were free of fever within 48 h under antibiotics; one patient died due to his basic illness. Out of 4 patients with persisting fever, 3 patients had no pneumonia on repeated examination; one patient showed disseminated micronodular infiltration. Frontal reconstructions helped to differentiate infiltration from atelectasis in 4 patients. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of pneumonia at the first examination were 90% and 96%, negative predictive value was 96%. Conclusion: low-dose multislice CT should be performed in neutropenic patients having a fever of unknown origin and normal chest X-ray. (orig.)

  10. Development of new chemical dosimeter for low dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhatre, Sachin G.V.; Adhikari, S.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate measurement of low dose radiation in complex systems is of utmost importance in radiation biology and related areas. Ferrous Benzoic acid Xylenol orange (FBX) system is being widely used for measurement of low dose gamma radiation because of its reproducibility and precision. However, an additional step, i.e., dissolution of benzoic acid in water at higher temperature followed by cooling at room temperature is involved for the preparation of this dosimeter. This makes it inconvenient as a ready to use dosimeter. In the present work, the organic molecule, sorbitol has been used for measurement of low doses of radiation. The advantages of using sorbitol are its ready availability and instantaneous water solubility. Owing to its dissolution at room temperature, possible errors those are involved in calculation of dose due to thermal oxidation of ferrous ions during preparation of the FBX dosimetric solution could be made insignificant in the proposed dosimeter. In the present system, sorbitol acts as radiolytic sensitizer for the oxidation of ferrous ion, and xylenol orange forms a 1:1 complex specifically with ferric ions. Thus, the analytical detection limit of ferric ions is enhanced compared to other systems. Final composition of the dosimetric solution is; 0.5 mol/m 3 xylenol orange, 10 mol/m 3 sorbitol and 0.2 mol/m 3 ferrous ion in 50 mol/m 3 sulfuric acid. Radiolytic sensitization in combination with analytical enhancement of the ferrous based system, allows us to measure radiation dose in the range of 0.05 Gy–12 Gy with ease and high reproducibility.

  11. Uncommon toxicity of low-dose methotrexate: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Yousefi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Standard treatment of Gestational Trophoblastic Disease (GTD is chemotherapy. Single-agent chemotherapy regime including Methotrexate (MTX or Actinomycin. Single-agent is widely used in treatment of persistent trophoblastic disease. We reported an uncommon toxicity of low-dose single-agent methotrexate in a patient. Case Presentation: A 20-year-old woman, primary gravid after two months missed period and spotting with diagnosis of incomplete abortion with uterine size equivalent of ten weeks pregnancy (8-10 cm underwent evacuation curettage. In serial follow-up, based on rise of beta-hCG titer and absence of metastatic disease, it was categorized as low-risk persistent trophoblastic disease. She was referred to gynecology oncology center of Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences in May 2014. Because of rise of beta-hCG titer, after complete metastatic work-up and lack of disease in other sites, persistent disease was diagnosed and candidate for chemotherapy (single agent low-dose. The patient received first course of therapy with MTX (50 mg/m², intra muscular. Unfortunately, after two days of treatment she developed uncommon severe toxicity, fever, severe nausea and vomiting, tachycardia, and generalized weakness. Also, we found hematologic abnormality (WBC: -14000-15000 µI, platelet- 540 µI and sever neutropenia, and abnormal rising in liver function test (SGOT, SGPT (three to four times and renal function test (BUN and Creatinine (two times. In addition, she had disseminated erosive lesion in all of body especially in face. Due to the fatal side effects of chemotherapy, she was admitted to intensive care unit (ICU. Fortunately, after two to three weeks, she was improved by conservative management. After few weeks beta-hCG titer was in normal limit. However she had normal serial beta-hCG in one year of follow-up. Conclusion: It is important to emphasis unpredictable side effects of chemotherapy with low-dose

  12. Exposure to low dose ionising radiation: Molecular and clinical consequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Lynn M

    2014-07-10

    This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the experimental data detailing the incidence, mechanism and significance of low dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS). Important discoveries gained from past and present studies are mapped and highlighted to illustrate the pathway to our current understanding of HRS and the impact of HRS on the cellular response to radiation in mammalian cells. Particular attention is paid to the balance of evidence suggesting a role for DNA repair processes in the response, evidence suggesting a role for the cell cycle checkpoint processes, and evidence investigating the clinical implications\\/relevance of the effect.

  13. Low-Dose Radiation Induces Genes Promoting Cell Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shu-Zheng; Chen, Dong; Mu, Ying

    1999-01-01

    Apoptosis is an important process controlling homeostasis of the body. It is influenced by stimuli constantly arising from the external and internal environment of the organism. It is well known that radiation could induce apoptosis of cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the dose-effect relationship of apoptosis extending to the low-dose range has scarcely been studied. Here, the molecular basis of the phenomenon is explored by examining the changes in expression of some of the proapoptotic and antiapoptotic genes

  14. A consideration of low dose radiation effects on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yoshiya; Nishimura, Mayumi; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Kakinuma, Shizuko

    2011-01-01

    On March 11, 2011, an earthquake categorized as 9 Mw occurred off the northeast coast of Japan. The subsequent destructive tsunami disabled emergency units of Fukushima Dai'ichi Nuclear Power Plant and caused partial meltdown of reactors and explosions. Resulting radiation releases forced large evacuations, bore concerns about food and water and fears against human health. In this manuscript, we described the effect of radiation, especially low dose radiation below 100 mSv, on cancer risk, focusing on fetuses and children. (author)

  15. Uterine malignant degeneration after low-dose endometrial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikkanen, V.; Salmi, T.; Groenroos, M.

    1980-01-01

    The effectiveness of low-dose intrauterine irradiation for benign diseases and its possible carcinogenic effect on the uterus was studied in 190 patients who were treated during the years 1952-1974. The indications for irradiation were premenopausal functional bleeding, leukemia, hemophilia, fibroids, endometriosis or other benign reason. Radiation was also performed on patients with severe neurologic diseases that contraindicated surgery and on some mentally retarded patients whose restlessness and epileptic seizures were aggravated premenstrually and during menstruation. The mean follow-up period was 15 years. Uterine bleeding recurred in 21 percent of the patients. No cases of uterine malignant degeneration were found. (author)

  16. From Chernobyl to Fukushima: the effect of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurengo, A.

    2011-01-01

    This Power Point presentation describes the Fukushima's reactors, recalls some data about the earthquake and tsunami, and indicates their consequences for the operation of the power station (notably the loss of cooling means). It identifies some design errors for the Chernobyl's and Fukushima's power stations, outlines differences between these two cases. It gives assessment of doses receives by external irradiation around Fukushima, of the dose rate evolution, of the sea contamination. It gives some data about the Chernobyl accident (radioactivity evolution). After some data about health consequences of Chernobyl, health risks and more particularly biological risks associated to low doses are described. Protection measures are evoked, as well as psycho-social impacts

  17. Application of low dose radiation for preservation of sea foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal, V.; Nair, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    Treatment of food with low doses of gamma radiation has been recognized to have two main advantages. These consist of: (1) improvement of food safety by elimination of pathogens and (2) reduction of microbial spoilage and extension of shelf life of perishable items by reducing the number of viable spoilage organisms. Studies during the last few decades have conclusively proved the beneficial effects of radiation with respect to fishery products. The three potential areas of application to fish products include: (i) radurization for shelf life extension (ii) radicidation to eliminate food borne pathogens in the products and (iii) radiation treatment to dried products to control insects

  18. Ionizing radiation and autoimmunity: Induction of autoimmune disease in mice by high dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and its prevention by inoculating normal T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, N.; Sakaguchi, S.; Miyai, K.

    1992-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can functionally alter the immune system and break self-tolerance. High dose (42.5 Gy), fractionated (2.5 Gy 17 times) total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on mice caused various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as gastritis, thyroiditis, and orchitis, depending on the radiation dosages, the extent of lymphoid irradiation, and the genetic background of the mouse strains. Radiation-induced tissue damage is not the primary cause of the autoimmune disease because irradiation of the target organs alone failed to elicit the autoimmunity and shielding of the organs from irradiation was unable to prevent it. In contrast, irradiation of both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid organs/tissues was required for efficient induction of autoimmune disease by TLI. TLI eliminated the majority of mature thymocytes and the peripheral T cells for 1 mo, and inoculation of spleen cell, thymocyte, or bone marrow cell suspensions (prepared from syngeneic nonirradiated mice) within 2 wk after TLI effectively prevented the autoimmune development. Depletion of T cells from the inocula abrogated the preventive activity. CD4 + T cells mediated the autoimmune prevention but CD8 + T cells did not. CD4 + T cells also appeared to mediate the TLI-induced autoimmune disease because CD4 + T cells from disease-bearing TLI mice adoptively transferred the autoimmune disease to syngeneic naive mice. Taken together, these results indicate that high dose, fractionated ionizing radiation on the lymphoid organs/tissues can cause autoimmune disease by affecting the T cell immune system, rather than the target self-Ags, presumably by altering T cell-dependent control of self-reactive T cells. 62 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Biologically based modelling and simulation of carcinogenesis at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Noriyuki B.

    2003-01-01

    The process of the carcinogenesis is studied by computer simulation. In general, we need a large number of experimental samples to detect mutations at low doses, but in practice it is difficult to get such a large number of data. To satisfy the requirements of the situation at low doses, it is good to study the process of carcinogenesis using biologically based mathematical model. We have mainly studied it by using as known as 'multi-stage model'; the model seems to get complicated, as we adopt the recent new findings of molecular biological experiments. Moreover, the basic idea of the multi-stage model is based on the epidemiologic data of log-log variation of cancer incidence with age, it seems to be difficult to compare with experimental data of irradiated cell culture system, which has been increasing in recent years. Taking above into consideration, we concluded that we had better make new model with following features: 1) a unit of the target system is a cell, 2) the new information of the molecular biology can be easily introduced, 3) having spatial coordinates for checking a colony formation or tumorigenesis. In this presentation, we will show the detail of the model and some simulation results about the carcinogenesis. (author)

  20. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umezaki Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yojiro Umezaki,1 Miho Takenoshita,2 Akira Toyofuku2 1Psychosomatic Dentistry Clinic, Dental Hospital, 2Psychosomatic Dentistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS. Keywords: burning mouth syndrome, low-dose aripiprazole, chronic pain

  1. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M.; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following γ-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of β-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following γ-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not γ-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to γ rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure

  2. Low dose iodine-131 therapy in solitary toxic thyroid nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Rajeev

    1999-01-01

    Forty patients with solitary hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules were treated with relatively low dose radioiodine therapy, 131 I doses were calculated taking into account thyroid mass and radioiodine kinetics to deliver 100 μCi/g of estimated nodule weight corrected for uptake. Patients remaining persistently hyperthyroid at four months after the initial therapy were retreated with a similarly calculated dose. Cure of the hyperthyroid state was achieved in all patients, total administered dose in individual cases ranging from 3-17 mCi. 28 of the 40 patients required a single therapy dose. 36 patients were euthyroid after a 4.5 year mean follow-up period. Four cases developed post therapy hypothyroidism requiring replacement therapy. Nodules regressed completely in nine cases following 131 I treatment, with partial regression in size in 19 patients. Control of hyperthyroid state in cases of solitary toxic thyroid nodules can be satisfactorily achieved using relatively low dose radioiodine therapy with low incidence of post therapy hypothyroidism. (author)

  3. Development of microcontroller based instrumentation for low dose implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh, K.; Saravanan, K.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Nair, K.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    In experiments like ion implantation based ion track formations, the sample is implanted to low doses of the order of 10 10 ions/cm 2 , limiting the ion beam currents to be less than 1-5 x 10 -12 A. However the standard current integrators available are not sensitive to very low currents, causing an unacceptable high level of error in dose measurement. Hence a low dose implantation measurement system has been developed. It consists of a very sensitive low current preamplifier with full scale input 1nA/100pA, a standard current integrator, a microcontroller based interface circuit, which are connected to a personal computer(PC) through USB. Two types of the software are developed for the system: the microcontroller firmware using C and windows based virtual instrument programs using LabVIEW 7.0. Necessary precautions associated with pA level measurement like rigidly fastened good quality cables, low ripple DC power supply, shielding, close mounting of the preamplifier to the sample are adopted. After necessary calibrations with an ECIL make low current source, the system has been put into regular use. Design and development details, salient features are discussed in this paper. (author)

  4. The risk of childhood cancer from low doses of ionizing radiation received in utero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakeford, R.; Doll, R.; Bithell, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Radiological protection is based upon the assumption that any additional exposure to ionising radiation leads to an increased risk of stochastic adverse health effects. The validity of this assumption is supported by the epidemiological association between childhood cancer and X-ray exposure of the fetus in utero for diagnostic purposes. Evidence for a direct causal interpretation of this association is compelling: the association has high statistical significance, it is consistent across many case-control studies carried out worldwide, and an appropriate dose-response relationship is indicated. Evidence against bias and confounding as alternative explanations is strong. Nonetheless, objections to causality have been raised. Four grounds for controversy are examined in detail, with the conclusion that they do not provide persuasive evidence against a cause and effect relationship. We conclude that acute doses of the order of 10 mGy received by the fetus in utero cause a subsequent increase in the risk of cancer in childhood, and that, in these circumstances, the excess absolute risk coefficient for childhood cancer incidence is 6-12% per Gy. (author)

  5. Evaluation of low dose ionizing radiation effect on some blood components in animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. El-Shanshoury

    2016-07-01

    The present findings suggest that damage from IR causes a significant reduction in blood cell counts in a dose-dependent manner, which may be considered a potential health risk during exposure to irradiation. Much effort must be done and focused on establishment of protocols for medical management of radiation injuries based on hematopoietic changes for biodosimetry.

  6. Adaptive response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frati, Diego Libkind; Bunge, Maria M.

    2001-01-01

    The term adaptive response (AR) applies to the phenomenon of protection or enhanced repair induced by a small dose of a mutagenic agent. In order to determine the existence of AR in human lymphocytes for two different irradiation schemes, microcultures of blood from 4 donors were irradiated. Samples were exposed 24 hours (hr) after phytohemagglutinin stimulation to an adapting dose of 0,01 Gy and to a challenging dose of 1,5 Gy either 6 or 24 hr later (irradiation scheme 24+30 or 24+48, respectively). Gamma radiation from a 2,5 MeV Linac was used in all experiments. A cytogenetic analysis of unstable chromosome aberrations was applied as the endpoint. High inter-individual variability was found for the first irradiation scheme: one expressed AR, two did not and the last showed an apparent synergistic response. For the second irradiation scheme, low mitotic indices (MI) were found, suggesting a G2 arrest. When a series of harvesting times were applied for the last donor, normal MI were obtained only harvesting after 58 hr. An AR was found when harvesting at 72 hr but not at 58 hr. (author)

  7. Radiation Risk Associated with Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Irrational Fear or Real Danger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reshetin, V.

    2007-01-01

    The established worldwide practice of protecting people from radiation based on the assessments of radiation risk received in the researches carried out earlier costs hundreds of billions of dollars a year to implement. In the opinion of the well-known experts, the maintenance of the existing radiation protection regulations or moreover acceptance of more tough regulations can influence the development of nuclear power engineering. The accepted practice of assessment of human health risk from radiation may also significantly affect our perception of threats of radiation terrorism. In this work, the critical analysis of publications on the assessment of the effects of small doses of radiation on human health is carried out. In our analysis, we especially emphasize the data on cancer mortality among survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who received instantaneous radiation doses of less than 200 mSv including the data on leukemia and solid cancer, as well as epidemiological studies in the regions of India and China with high level of natural radiation. Since the investigations of radiation risk is a base for formulating modern radiation protection regulations, their reliability and validity are of great importance. As follows from the analysis, the subsequent, during three decades, toughening of radiation protection regulations has already led to exceedingly prohibitive standards and impractical recommendations the science-based validity of which can cause serious doubts. Now, a number of world-wide known scientists and authoritative international organizations call for revision of these standards and of the radiation safety concept itself. (author)

  8. Radiosensitive target in the early mouse embryo exposed to very low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, Lynn M.; Raabe, Otto G.; Khan, Rakhshi; Straume, Tore

    1994-01-01

    We exposed mouse preimplantation embryos in vitro to either tritiated water (HTO) or tritiated thymidine (TdR) to determine whether the radiosensitive target was nuclear or extranuclear for embryonic cell proliferation disadvantage in the mouse embryo chimera assay. 8-cell embryos were incubated in either HTO or TdR for 2 h and paired with non-irradiated control embryos to form chimeras. Chimeras were cultured for an average of 20.2 h to allow for 2-3 cell cycles and then partially dissociated to obtain the number of progeny cells contributed by the two partner embryos for each chimera. These values were expressed as a 'proliferation ratio' (number of cells from the irradiated embryo: total number of cells in the chimera). A ratio significantly less than 0.50 indicates that the experimental embryo expressed an embryonic cell proliferation disadvantage, which is the endpoint of this assay. The activity concentrations of HTO and TdR were adjusted so that both would deliver comparable mean absorbed nuclear doses during the combined initial 2-h irradiation incubation and subsequent 20.2 h chimera incubation periods. Although nuclear doses were comparable under these conditions, the extranuclear dose delivered by the uniformly distributed HTO was about 100 times greater than the extranuclear dose delivered by TdR for each given nuclear dose. Consequently, obtaining mean TdR proliferation ratios≤mean HTO proliferation ratios would be evidence for a nuclear target while obtaining mean HTO proliferation ratios< mean TdR proliferation ratios would be evidence for an extranuclear target. TdR consistently produced lower mean proliferation ratios over a range of doses from 0.14 Gy to 0.43 Gy. Therefore, we conclude that the radiosensitive target for this endpoint is nuclear

  9. Interaction of Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation, Potassium Dichromate and Cadmium Chloride in Artemia franciscana Biotest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Beňová

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of cadmium chloride (at concentrations of 100 and 200 mg l-1 and potassium dichromate (at a concentration of 50 mg l-1 along with the effect of gamma radiation 60Co (at a dose of 10 and 50 Gy on lethality to Artemia franciscana was investigated. Four different interactions were studied, namely, those of potassium dichromate and gamma radiation, cadmium chloride and gamma radiation, and combinations of potassium dichromate and cadmium chloride in interaction with gamma radiation. A significant (α = 0.05 decrease was observed in lethality due to exposure to radiation (10 Gy in comparison with action of only potassium dichromate and cadmium chloride or their combination without exposure to gamma rays. These results support the theory of hormesis.

  10. Experimental investigation of combined blastomogenic effect of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation and chemical carcinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poruba, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    Exposure of high-and low cancer lines of mice in the contaminated area of Cherikov district in Gomel Region (dose rate 380-400 mR/h) for 120 days caused intensification of urethane-induced carcinogenesis in the lung of the high-cancer mouse line and did not exert a modifying effect on urethane pulmonary carcinogenesis in low-cancer animals. The findings indicate to genetic determination of body sensitivity to a complex blastomogenic effect of the factors studied (authors)

  11. Effect of low dose ionizing radiation on Bcl-2 transcription level of Peyer's patches in mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiamei; Chen Dong; Zheng Yongchen; Liu Shuzheng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of whole body irradiation (WBI) with different doses of X-rays on apoptosis in cells of mouse Peyer's patches and its molecular mechanism. Methods: RT-PCR was used to detect the changes of Bcl-2 transcription level. Agarose electrophoresis and flow cytometry were used to detect the changes of DNA and apoptotic bodies in Peyer's patches after WBI with different doses of X-rays. Results: The apoptotic was increased and Bcl-2 transcription level was decreased in Peyer's patches after 2 Gy X-rays. The apoptotic rate was decreased and Bcl-2 transcription level was increased in Peyer's patches after 75 mGy X-rays. Conclusion: Bcl-2 participates in the regulation of radiation-induced apoptosis in Peyer's patches

  12. Epidemiological analysis of common influence of low doses of ionizing radiation, heavy metals and pesticides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shestopalov, V.M.; Naboka, M.V.

    1997-01-01

    Comparison of ecological danger of substances of a chemical and radiating nature on the territory of Chernobyl's exhaust of Kyiv area is conducted. Epidemiological analysis, is conducted in accordance with ''Methodological recommendations for radioecological assessment of territories by mapping''. Influence on children's morbity of 27 factors contamination of an environment (radiocesium, heavy metals, pesticides and fertilizer) was investigated. Analysis has shown, that the influence from all investigated ecological factors reaches 30-40%, differing in different zones of supervision. The influence of radioactive factors in the Northern part of Kyiv test site, is 6 times greater than the risk caused by heavy metals and agrochemical pollution. A greater influence of heavy metals was found in the center of the Kyiv test site. The result of our research on the territory of Chernobyl's exhaust shows that there exist factors of different nature which influence on human health is significant and create combinations dangerous for health. (author)

  13. Cytogenetic studies in persons, professionally exposed to low doses ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulanova, M.; Ivanov, B.; Khristova, M.; Praskova, L.; Mikhajlov, M.; Dovev, I.

    1981-01-01

    Cytogenetic techniques were used to examine peripheral lymphocytes taken from 33 subjects employed at the IRT-2000-Sofia Nuclear Reactor and exposed to mixed gamma and neutron radiation in its Zone A. Physical dosimetry data (from pen and film personnel dosimeters) showed the exposures to be below maximum permissible levels, in complience with Radiation Safety Norms in the P.R. of Bulgaria (1972). The subjects were distributed into three groups according to the length of their occupational experience as radiation workers. Comparisons were made with cytogenetic findings in the lymphocyte cultures taken from 30 subjects with no occupational radiation exposure. Radiation workers exhibited a significant increase in chromosomal damage of the chromosome and chromatid type. Subjects with 5-10 years of occupational experience had a higher degree of chromosomal damage than the less-than-5-years group. For persons with more than 10 years of occupational experience, however, no increase over controls could be ascertained in percentage of chromosomal damage. When radiation workers were re-distributed in accord with the exposures received, it was evident that the effect increased with the accumulated dose, the group with about 0.02 Sievert having nearly twice the aberrant cell percentage for the 0.01 Sievert group. In the group of up to 0.05 Sievert, the percentage of aberrant cells was in the order of that observed after exposure to 0.02 Sievert. From the findings in the analysis, radiation quality seemed to play no part in enliciting the cytogenetic response of peripheral lymphocytes. (A.B.)

  14. Adaptive response to ionizing radiation induced by low doses of gamma rays in human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jinsil; Chang, Ok Suh; Gwi, Eon Kim

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the adaptive response could be induced in human lymphoblastoid cell lines and human tumor cell lines. The time necessary for the expression of the adaptive response was also investigated. Materials and Methods: Three lymphoblastoid cell lines from ataxia telangiectasia (AT) homozygote (GM 1526), AT heterozygote (GM 3382), and normal individual (3402p) and two hepatoma cell lines, Hep G2 and Hep 3B, were used in this study. Experiments were carried out by delivering 0.01 Gy followed by 0.5 Gy of gamma radiation to the exponentially growing cells. The time necessary for the expression of the adaptive response was determined by varying the time interval between the two doses from 1 to 72 h. In some experiments, 3-aminobenzamide, a potent inhibitor of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, was added immediately after the 0.5 Gy exposure. The cultures were fixed 30 min (for the G 2 chromatid) and 6 h (for the S chromatid) after the 0.5 Gy exposure. Metaphase chromosome assay was carried out to score chromatid breaks as an end point. Results: A prior exposure to 0.01 Gy of gamma rays significantly reduced the number of chromatid breaks induced by subsequent higher doses (0.5 Gy) in all the tested cell lines. The magnitude of the adaptive response was similar among the cell lines despite their different radiosensitivities. In the G 2 chromatids, the adaptive response was observed both at short-time intervals, as early as 1 h, and at long-time intervals. In the S chromatids, however, the adaptive response was shown only at long-time intervals. When 3-aminobenzamide was added after the 0.5 Gy, the adaptive responses were abolished in all the experimental groups. Conclusion: The adaptive response was observed in human lymphoblastoid cell lines and hepatoma cell lines. The magnitude of the adaptive response did not seem to be related to the radiosensitivity of the cells. The elimination of the adaptive response with 3-aminobenzamide is consistent with the proposal that this adaptive response is the result of the induction of a certain chromasomal repair mechanisms

  15. Application of low doses of ionizing radiation in the Brazilian fruit tucuma (Astrocaryum vulgare Mart.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Antonio Luis dos Santos; Lima, Keila dos Santos Cople; Araujo, Leandro Moreira; Gody, Ronoel Luiz de Oliveira; Pacheco, Sidney

    2011-01-01

    The tucuma (Astrocaryum vulgare Mart.) is a native fruit of Amazonia, occurring mainly in the state of Para, but also found in the Brazilian northeast states and in the Brazilian central-western states. The tucuma is considered an excellent source of carotenoids with a very high concentration of β-carotene, which is a precursor of vitamin A. In addition to carotenoids it is an important source of vitamin B2 (riboflavin) in fruits. This study aimed to analyze the effects of gamma radiation on the nutritional value of tucuma. The fruits were irradiated at doses of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 kGy irradiator with a source of cesium 137. The carotenoids were determined by spectrophotometry. The analysis of α and β-carotene, thiamine, riboflavin were carried out by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The β-carotene accounts for 80% of total carotenoids in tucuma, and with a dose of 2 kGy, it showed the highest reduction of β-carotene, about 7.5% in relation to the control. The tucuma fruit showed high levels of riboflavin from 0.183 to 0.222 μg 100 g -1 , and maintained stability after the gamma radiation process. However, it had low levels of thiamine from 0.050 to 0.033 μg 100 g -1 , and irradiated at a dose of 2 kGy showed significant reductions of thiamine, about 34% in relation to the control. (author)

  16. Stimulation of DNA synthesis in bacterial DNA-membrane complexes after low doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, D K [Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK). M.R.C. Experimental Radiopathology Unit

    1980-09-01

    DNA-membrane complexes from three strains of E. coli were irradiated and changes in the rates of DNA synthesis were observed. Doses from 1-10 krad to complexes from W3110 and pol A1 strains gave up to a 100 per cent increase in DNA synthesis; under the same conditions, no change was observed in Bsub(s-1). The degree of stimulation did not depend on the presence of oxygen during irradiation, and a post-irradiation incubation was necessary to achieve activation. The properties of all three complexes were similar when unirradiated. Irradiation of intact organisms under conditions which produced marked, oxygen-dependent inhibition of the Bsub(s-1) complex had no significant effect on those from W3110 and pol A1. Enhanced DNA synthesis is concluded to be due wholly to repair of pre-existing DNA. It is further postulated that DNA synthesis in untreated complexes (E.coli B's,W3110 and pol A1) is mainly of the repair-type and does not necessarily take place at the site of DNA-membrane attachment.

  17. Biochemical and cellular mechanisms responsible for effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trebukhina, R.V.; Ovchinnikov, V.A.; Lashak, L.K.; Ledneva, I.O.; Petushok, V.G.; Petushok, N.E.; Motylevich, Zh.V.; Kazhyna, M.V.

    1997-01-01

    In experiments on white rats influence of small dozes of gamma-exposure on morphological structure of blood and activity of enzymes in blood and thimus was investigated. Short-term reduction of quantity of leucocytes and more long (1 month) reduction of erythrocytes was shown. Accumulation in blood of products of lipid peroxidation correlates with activity of oxidizing enzymes (catalase, lysozyme). Radiation-induced activation of pentose-phosphate pathway of carbohydrates metabolism was established. (author)

  18. Linear, no threshold response at low doses of ionizing radiation: ideology, prejudice and science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavan, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    The linear, no threshold (LNT) response model assumes that there is no threshold dose for the radiation-induced genetic effects (heritable mutations and cancer), and it forms the current basis for radiation protection standards for radiation workers and the general public. The LNT model is, however, based more on ideology than valid radiobiological data. Further, phenomena such as 'radiation hormesis', 'radioadaptive response', 'bystander effects' and 'genomic instability' are now demonstrated to be radioprotective and beneficial. More importantly, the 'differential gene expression' reveals that qualitatively different proteins are induced by low and high doses. This finding negates the LNT model which assumes that qualitatively similar proteins are formed at all doses. Thus, all available scientific data challenge the LNT hypothesis. (author)

  19. Cellular sensitivity and low dose-rate recovery in Fanconi anaemia fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnet, N.G.; Wurm, R.; Tait, D.M.; Peacock, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a rare inherited condition characterized by developmental abnormalities and progressive bone marrow failure, which requires bone marrow transplantation for successful treatment. This involves the use of alkylating agents and total body or thoraco-abdominal irradiation. Both chemical clastogens and irradiation cause increased chromosome damage in FA cells compared with controls. In some studies FA fibroblasts have been found to be more radiosensitive than normal. From these data it has been inferred that patients with FA might be more sensitive than normal to radiotherapy. However, increased radiosensitivity of FA fibroblasts has not been a uniform finding. The radiosensitivity of fibroblasts from two FA patients was studied at high and low dose-rate (LDR), and their sensitivity compared with normal strains. Both FA strains fell at the sensitive end of the range, but both demonstrated marked dose-rate sparing, with D 0.01 recovery factors of 1.23 and 1.27, similar to the normal strains. These recovery factors are inconsistent with the suggestion that FA patients are recovery deficient. The data indicate that at least some FA strains are capable of LDR recovery, and imply that these patients would probably have a clinical benefit from fractionated or low dose-rate total body irradiation. (Author)

  20. Cellular sensitivity and low dose-rate recovery in Fanconi anaemia fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnet, N.G.; Wurm, R.; Tait, D.M.; Peacock, J.H. (Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom). Surrey Branch Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton (United Kingdom))

    1994-06-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a rare inherited condition characterized by developmental abnormalities and progressive bone marrow failure, which requires bone marrow transplantation for successful treatment. This involves the use of alkylating agents and total body or thoraco-abdominal irradiation. Both chemical clastogens and irradiation cause increased chromosome damage in FA cells compared with controls. In some studies FA fibroblasts have been found to be more radiosensitive than normal. From these data it has been inferred that patients with FA might be more sensitive than normal to radiotherapy. However, increased radiosensitivity of FA fibroblasts has not been a uniform finding. The radiosensitivity of fibroblasts from two FA patients was studied at high and low dose-rate (LDR), and their sensitivity compared with normal strains. Both FA strains fell at the sensitive end of the range, but both demonstrated marked dose-rate sparing, with D[sub 0.01] recovery factors of 1.23 and 1.27, similar to the normal strains. These recovery factors are inconsistent with the suggestion that FA patients are recovery deficient. The data indicate that at least some FA strains are capable of LDR recovery, and imply that these patients would probably have a clinical benefit from fractionated or low dose-rate total body irradiation. (Author).

  1. Toxicity risk of non-target organs at risk receiving low-dose radiation: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shueng, Pei-Wei; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Chang, Hou-Tai; Chong, Ngot-Swan; Chen, Yu-Jen; Wang, Li-Ying; Hsieh, Yen-Ping; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2009-01-01

    The spine is the most common site for bone metastases. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for palliation of pain and for prevention or treatment of spinal cord compression. Helical tomotherapy (HT), a new image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), delivers highly conformal dose distributions and provides an impressive ability to spare adjacent organs at risk, thus increasing the local control of spinal column metastases and decreasing the potential risk of critical organs under treatment. However, there are a lot of non-target organs at risk (OARs) occupied by low dose with underestimate in this modern rotational IMRT treatment. Herein, we report a case of a pathologic compression fracture of the T9 vertebra in a 55-year-old patient with cholangiocarcinoma. The patient underwent HT at a dose of 30 Gy/10 fractions delivered to T8-T10 for symptom relief. Two weeks after the radiotherapy had been completed, the first course of chemotherapy comprising gemcitabine, fluorouracil, and leucovorin was administered. After two weeks of chemotherapy, however, the patient developed progressive dyspnea. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed an interstitial pattern with traction bronchiectasis, diffuse ground-glass opacities, and cystic change with fibrosis. Acute radiation pneumonitis was diagnosed. Oncologists should be alert to the potential risk of radiation toxicities caused by low dose off-targets and abscopal effects even with highly conformal radiotherapy

  2. Low-dose radiation therapy for choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuhashi, Hideaki; Takahashi, Daisuke; Mariya, Yasushi; Tarusawa, Nobuko; Yoshimoto, Hiroshi; Matsuyama, Shuichi; Noda, Yasuko.

    1996-01-01

    The efficacy of low-dose radiation was evaluated in the treatment of eyes with subfoveal or juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration. Ten eyes of ten patients received a total dose of 14 Gy of 10 MV X-rays in seven fractions and the mean follow-up time was 12 months (range 9-18 months). Thirteen control eyes of thirteen patients were followed for an average of 18 months (range 12-24 months). Visual acuity was improved in 2 eyes (20%), unchanged in 3 eyes (30%), and deteriorated in 5 eyes (50%) of treated patients, and it was improved in no eyes (0%), unchanged in 5 eyes (32%), and deteriorated in 8 eyes (50%) of the control patients at their last follow-up examinations. Funduscopic and angiographic findings were improved in 3 eyes (30%), unchanged in 2 eyes (20%), and deteriorated in 5 eyes (50%) of treated patients, and they were improved in no eyes (0%), unchanged in 5 eyes (32%), and deteriorated in 8 eyes (50%) of the control patients. These results suggested that low-dose radiation is beneficial for the management of subfoveal or juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  3. Low-dose radiation therapy for choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuhashi, Hideaki; Takahashi, Daisuke; Mariya, Yasushi; Tarusawa, Nobuko; Yoshimoto, Hiroshi; Matsuyama, Shuichi [Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine; Noda, Yasuko

    1996-10-01

    The efficacy of low-dose radiation was evaluated in the treatment of eyes with subfoveal or juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration. Ten eyes of ten patients received a total dose of 14 Gy of 10 MV X-rays in seven fractions and the mean follow-up time was 12 months (range 9-18 months). Thirteen control eyes of thirteen patients were followed for an average of 18 months (range 12-24 months). Visual acuity was improved in 2 eyes (20%), unchanged in 3 eyes (30%), and deteriorated in 5 eyes (50%) of treated patients, and it was improved in no eyes (0%), unchanged in 5 eyes (32%), and deteriorated in 8 eyes (50%) of the control patients at their last follow-up examinations. Funduscopic and angiographic findings were improved in 3 eyes (30%), unchanged in 2 eyes (20%), and deteriorated in 5 eyes (50%) of treated patients, and they were improved in no eyes (0%), unchanged in 5 eyes (32%), and deteriorated in 8 eyes (50%) of the control patients. These results suggested that low-dose radiation is beneficial for the management of subfoveal or juxtafoveal choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration. (author)

  4. STELLAR POPULATIONS OF Lyα EMITTERS AT z ∼ 6-7: CONSTRAINTS ON THE ESCAPE FRACTION OF IONIZING PHOTONS FROM GALAXY BUILDING BLOCKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Okamura, Sadanori; Masami Ouchi; Dunlop, James; Farrah, Duncan; McLure, Ross

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the stellar populations of Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 5.7 and 6.6 in a 0.65 deg 2 sky of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) Field, using deep images taken with the Subaru/Suprime-Cam, United Kingdom Infrared Telescope/Wide Field Infrared Camera, and Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). We produce stacked multiband images at each redshift from 165 (z = 5.7) and 91 (z = 6.6) IRAC-undetected objects to derive typical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of z ∼ 6-7 LAEs for the first time. The stacked LAEs have as blue UV continua as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) z-dropout galaxies of similar M UV , with a spectral slope β ∼ -3, but at the same time they have red UV-to-optical colors with detection in the 3.6 μm band. Using SED fitting we find that the stacked LAEs have low stellar masses of ∼(3-10) x 10 7 M sun , very young ages of ∼1-3 Myr, negligible dust extinction, and strong nebular emission from the ionized interstellar medium, although the z = 6.6 object is fitted similarly well with high-mass models without nebular emission; inclusion of nebular emission reproduces the red UV-to-optical colors while keeping the UV colors sufficiently blue. We infer that typical LAEs at z ∼ 6-7 are building blocks of galaxies seen at lower redshifts. We find a tentative decrease in the Lyα escape fraction from z = 5.7 to 6.6, which may imply an increase in the intergalactic medium neutral fraction. From the minimum contribution of nebular emission required to fit the observed SEDs, we place an upper limit on the escape fraction of ionizing photons of f ion esc ∼ 0.6 at z = 5.7 and ∼0.9 at z = 6.6. We also compare the stellar populations of our LAEs with those of stacked HST/WFC3 z-dropout galaxies.

  5. Risk of radiation-induced cancer at low doses and low dose rates for radiation protection purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this report is to provide an updated, comprehensive review of the data available for assessing the risk of radiation-induced cancer for radiation protection purposes. Particular emphasis is placed on assessing risks at low doses and low dose rates. The review brings together the results of epidemiological investigations and fundamental studies on the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in radiation damage. Additionally, this information is supplemented by studies with experimental animals which provide further guidance on the form of the dose-response relationship for cancer induction, as well as on the effect of dose rate on the tumour yield. The emphasis of the report is on cancer induction resulting from exposure to radiations with a low linear energy transfer (LET). The work was performed under contract for the Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Paris, France, whose agreement to publish is gratefully ackowledged. It extends the advice on radiation risks given in Documents of the NRPB, 4 No. 4 (1993). (Author)

  6. The spectrum of mutation produced by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morley, Alexander A.; Turner, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Inherited mutations are the basis of evolution and acquired mutations in humans are important in ageing, cancer and possibly various forms of tissue degeneration. Mutations are responsible for many of the long-term effects of radiation. However, sensitive direct detection of mutations in humans has been difficult. The aims of the project were to develop methods for the sensitive enumeration of mutations in DNA, to measure mutation frequencies in a wide variety of tissue types and to quantify the mutational effect of direct oxidative damage produced by radiation, at both high and low doses. The project was successful in developing a sensitive method which could detect mutations directly in the genetic material, DNA at a sensitivity of 1 mutated molecule in 1000000000 unmutated molecules. However a number of methodological problems had to be overcome and lack of ongoing funding made it impossible to fulfill all of the aims of the project

  7. Low dose response analysis through a cytogenetic end-point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojtor, I.; Koeteles, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of low doses were studied on human lymphocytes of various individuals. The frequency of micronuclei in cytokinesis-blocked cultured lymphocytes was taken as end-point. The probability distribution of radiation-induced increment was statistically proved and identified as to be asymmetric when the blood samples had been irradiated with doses of 0.01-0.05 Gy of X-rays, similarly to that in unirradiated control population. On the contrary, at or above 1 Gy the corresponding normal curve could be accepted only reflecting an approximately symmetrical scatter of the increments about their mean value. It was found that the slope as well as the closeness of correlation of the variables considerably changed when lower and lower dose ranges had been selected. Below approximately 0.2 Gy even an unrelatedness was found betwen the absorbed dose and the increment

  8. Transcriptome profiling of mice testes following low dose irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belling, Kirstine C.; Tanaka, Masami; Dalgaard, Marlene Danner

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy is used routinely to treat testicular cancer. Testicular cells vary in radio-sensitivity and the aim of this study was to investigate cellular and molecular changes caused by low dose irradiation of mice testis and to identify transcripts from different cell types...... in the adult testis. METHODS: Transcriptome profiling was performed on total RNA from testes sampled at various time points (n = 17) after 1 Gy of irradiation. Transcripts displaying large overall expression changes during the time series, but small expression changes between neighbouring time points were...... selected for further analysis. These transcripts were separated into clusters and their cellular origin was determined. Immunohistochemistry and in silico quantification was further used to study cellular changes post-irradiation (pi). RESULTS: We identified a subset of transcripts (n = 988) where changes...

  9. The effect of low-dose spironolactone on resistant hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engbaek, Mette; Hjerrild, Mette; Hallas, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    with three classes of antihypertensive drugs. The effect on blood pressure was estimated by office measurements together with serum potassium and adverse effects. The data were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 544 patients were identified; 200 were excluded because of secondary hypertension, other......Our objective was to estimate the effect of addition of low-dose spironolactone to previous antihypertensive therapy in patients with resistant hypertension. Patients had 25 to 50 mg of spironolactone once daily added to the treatment of hypertension that was uncontrolled despite previous treatment...... indications for spironolactone than hypertension, previous antihypertensive therapy with less than three drugs unless demonstrated intolerance to a third drug, insufficient compliance, and lack of follow-up data. Thus, 344 cases were included in the analysis. The population was 62.1 ± 12.8 years old, 45...

  10. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Takenoshita, Miho; Toyofuku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS) ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder) 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS.

  11. 'Reasonable' regulation of low doses in the Netherlands?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuur, Ciska

    2002-01-01

    As long as it is not clear exactly what the risks of low doses are, exposures should be regulated to be 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). In radiation protection, for normal situations, this means that a projected dose reduction can only be obligatory when the efforts needed to achieve the reduction are 'reasonable' in comparison with it, economical and social aspects being taken into account. In the recent Dutch regulations, 'reasonable' values have been established for the relevant parameters used in the ALARA concept and the paper discusses the values required to calculate the doses for the critical group due to a source. In some cases, the effort expended in making the ALARA dose assessments might not be reasonable in comparison with the dose reduction to be expected. The system which has been developed in the Netherlands to avoid these 'unreasonable' dose calculations, measurements and assessments is explained. (author)

  12. State of human genome at low-doses ecological influences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mel'nov, S.B.; Rytik, P.G.; Kruchinskij, N.G.; Kovalev, V.A.; Palamar, L.A.; Senyuk, O.F.

    2005-01-01

    The results of analysis of the state of genome (amounts of single strand breaks in DNA) of the persons exposed to influence of complex 'Chernobyl factor' in remote terms after a failure on ChNPP are resulted. Findings allowed to expose the increase of level of single strand breaks in DNA at the chronically irradiated persons mainly carry adaptive character and probably can be related to instability of genome. Thus at organism level growth of mutational pressure and strengthening of instability of cellular genome is related to the change of spectrum of biological characteristics, in particular individual reaction of somatic cells of victims on additional mutagens influences. The indicated changes can testify to existence of potential risk of remote genetic consequences of long-term irradiation influence in low doses

  13. Low-dose irradiation for controlling prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttler, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among North American men and the second leading cause of death in those aged 65 and over. The American Cancer Society recommends testing those over age 50 who are expected to live at least 10 years, even though the ability of early detection to decrease prostate cancer mortality has not been demonstrated. So controversy exists about the appropriateness of screening because of the considerable economic and social burden of diagnosing and treating prostate cancer, coupled with the projected large increase in the number of new cases as the population ages. This very important public health issue could be addressed at low cost by total-body low-dose irradiation therapy to stimulate the patient's own defences to prevent and control most cancers, including prostate cancer, with no symptomatic side effects. (author)

  14. The effects of chronic low dose irradiation on drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajnullin, V.G.; Moskalev, A.A.; Shaposhnikov, M.V.; Yuraneva, I.N.; Taskaev, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    It was investigated the influence of the chronic gamma-irradiation in the dose rate of 0.17 cGy/h on the rate of genetic variability and on the life-span in the laboratory strains of Drosophila melanogaster with genotypic distinguishes in mobile genetic elements and defects in the DNA repair processes. It is shown that the radiation-induced alteration of the traits under study depends from genotype of investigated strains. In the different strains we have observed an increase as well as a decrease of the mutation rate and life-span. Also it was established that irradiation leads to the frequencies of the GD-sterility and mutability of the snw and h(w+) in the P-M and H-E dysgenic crosses. The obtained results suggest that mobile genetic elements play an important role in the forming of genetic effects in response to low dose irradiation. (author)

  15. Genetic effects of low-dose irradiation in Drosophila Melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajnulin, V.G.; Shaposhnikov, M.V.; Yuraneva, I.N.

    2000-01-01

    Influence of chronic γ-irradiation at the dose rate of 0.17 cGy/h on the rate of genetic variability in the laboratory strains of Drosophila Melanogaster with genotypic distinguishes by families of mobile genetic elements and of systems of hybrid disgenesis and also violations in reparation processes control mechanisms. It was shown that the rates of induction of recessive lethal mutations depended on genotype of investigated strains. In the different strains an increase as well as a decrease of the mutation rate were observed. Also in was established that irradiation leads to the increase in frequencies of the gonads sterility and mutability of the sn w and h(w + ) in the P-M and H-E dysgenic crosses. Obtained results suggest that mobile genetic elements play an important role in the forming of genetic effects in response to low dose irradiation [ru

  16. Low dose preoperative radiotherapy for carcinoma of the oesophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnott, S.J.; Duncan, W.; Kerr, G.R.; Jack, W.J.L.; Mackillop, W.J.; Walbaum, P.R.; Cameron, E.

    1992-01-01

    Patients (176) with potentially operable squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma of middle or lower thirds of oesophagus were randomly assigned to preoperative radiotherapy or surgery alone. Patients assigned to the radiotherapy arm received 20 Gy in 10 treatments over 2 weeks, using parallel opposed 4 MV beams. The preoperative radiotherapy was not associated with any significant acute morbidity or any increase in operative complications. The median survival of the overall group of 176 patients was 8 moths, and the 5-year survival was 13%. There was no significant difference in the survival of the 90 patients who received preoperative radiotherapy and the 86 who were managed by surgery alone. Proportional hazards analysis identified lymph node involvement, high tumor grade and male sex as significant adverse prognostic features, but the treatment option assigned had no prognostic significance. It was concluded that low dose preoperative radiotherapy offered no advantage over surgery alone. (author). 9 refs.; 3 figs.; 6 tabs

  17. High and low dose-rate brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    For the brachytherapy component of the r[iation treatment of cervical carcinoma, high dose rate (HDR) is slowly replacing conventional low dose rate (LDR) due primarily to r[iation safety and other physical benefits attributed to the HDR modality. Many r[iation oncologists are reluctant to make this change because of perceived r[iobiological dis[vantages of HDR. However, in clinical practice HDR appears to be as effective as LDR but with a lower risk of late complications, as demonstrated by one randomized clinical trial and two comprehensive literature and practice surveys. The reason for this appears to be that the r[iobiological dis[vantages of HDR are outweighed by the physical [vantages. (orig.)

  18. Lung cancer screening with low-dose CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederich, S.; Wormanns, D.; Heindel, W.

    2003-01-01

    Screening for lung cancer is hoped to reduce mortality from this common tumour, which is characterised by a dismal overall survival, relatively well defined risk groups (mainly heavy cigarette smokers and workers exposed to asbestos) and a lack of early symptoms. In the past studies using sputum cytology and chest radiography have failed to demonstrate any reduction in lung cancer mortality through screening. One of the reasons is probably the relatively poor sensitivity of both these tests in early tumours. Low radiation dose computed tomography (CT) has been shown to have a much higher sensitivity for small pulmonary nodules, which are believed to be the most common presentation of early lung cancer. As, however, small pulmonary nodules are common and most are not malignant, non-invasive diagnostic algorithms are required to correctly classify the detected lesions and avoid invasive procedures in benign nodules. Nodule density, size and the demonstration of growth at follow-up have been shown to be useful in this respect and may in the future be supplemented by contrast-enhanced CT and positron emission tomography. Based on these diagnostic algorithms preliminary studies of low-dose CT in heavy smokers have demonstrated a high proportion of asymptomatic, early, resectable cancers with good survival. As, however, several biases could explain these findings in the absence of the ultimate goal of cancer screening, i.e. mortality reduction, most researchers believe that randomised controlled trials including several 10000 subjects are required to demonstrate a possible mortality reduction. Only then general recommendations to screen individuals at risk of lung cancer with low-dose CT should be made. It can be hoped that international cooperation will succeed in providing results as early as possible

  19. Varicose Vein Stripping Under Low-Dose Spinal Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalan Muhammedoğlu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Spinal anesthesia is frequently used for procedures involving the lower limbs. Compared with general anesthesia, low-dose spinal anesthesia is a cost-effective method and has advantages such as avoiding hypotension, longer duration of anesthesia and increased length of hospitalization. The aim of this trial was to compare two different low-dose bupivacaine drug regimens. Methods: Sixty unpremedicated patients were randomly allocated into two groups (n=30. There were no differences between the groups in age, weight, the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA physical status classification, gender, and duration of surgery. We performed spinal anesthesia at the L3-4 interspace with the patient in the lateral decubitus position. We administered 6.5 mg (group 1 and 8 mg (group 2 0.5% heavy bupivacaine into the subarachnoid space. We positioned the patient laterally to the operation side for 15 minutes, then, turned to supine position. Motor and sensory block was assessed by the Bromage scale and pinprick test. Results: There were significant differences between the two groups in duration of motor block, but no significant differences in hemodynamic response to spinal anesthesia. None of the patients had intraoperative pain. Five patients in group 1 and 2 patients in group 2 had urinary retention. Conclusion: Our observations suggest that 6.5 mg heavy bupivacaine is efficient and suitable for unilateral varicose veins stripping operation. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 25-8

  20. Clinical application of low-dose spiral CT for orthodontics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Na; Gan Yungen; Shu Huang; Lin FeiFei; Li Zhiyong; Sun Jie

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of reducing the value of mA or kV on the image quality and the radiation dose of the patients undergoing low-dose spiral CT for orthodontics. Methods: Thirty patients were divided into three groups, each group has 10 patients. They were group 1 (80 kV and 200 mA), group 2 (120 kV and 80 mA), group 3 (120 kV and 200 mA) The volume CT dose index (CTDI) was recorded and the average dose-length produce (DLP) was calculated in three groups,respectively. Image quality of three groups were compared and scored by two radiologists, and the results were statistically analysed. Results: The CTDI and DLP of 80 kV group (group 2) were 8.7 mGy and (36.80 ± 3.60) mGy · cm, respectively, those of 80 mA group (group 3) were 19.6 mGy and (82.14 ± 7.18) mGy · cm, respectively, and those of conventional-dose group (group 1) were 19.6 mGy and (82.14 ± 7.18) mGy · cm, respectively. There was no significant difference among three groups in diagnostic image quality. Conclusions: Low-dose spiral CT for orthodontics, especially the low-kV scan, may decrease the radiation exposure and guarantee the image quality. (authors)

  1. Gynecological brachytherapy - from low-dose-rate to high-tech. Gynaekologische Brachytherapie - von Low-dose-rate zu High-tech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, T. (Abt. Strahlenthgerapie, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Akademie ' Carl Gustav Carus' , Dresden (Germany)); Christen, N. (Abt. Strahlenthgerapie, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Akademie ' Carl Gustav Carus' , Dresden (Germany)); Alheit, H.D. (Abt. Strahlenthgerapie, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Akademie ' Carl Gustav Carus' , Dresden (Germany))

    1993-03-01

    The transition from low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy to high-dose-rate (HDR) afterloading treatment is in progress in most centres of radiation therapy. First reports of studies comparing HDR and LDR treatment in cervix cancer demonstrate nearly equal local control. In our own investigations on 319 patients with primary irradiated carcinoma of the cervix (125 HDR/194 LDR) we found the following control rates: Stage FIGO I 95.4%/82.9% (HDR versus LDR), stage FIGO II 71.4%/73.7%, stage FIGO III 57.9%/38.5%. The results are not significant. The side effects - scored after EORT/RTOG criteria - showed no significant differences between both therapies for serious radiogenic late effects on intestine, bladder and vagina. The study and findings from the literature confi