WorldWideScience

Sample records for fractionated irradiation

  1. Fractionated irradiation and haematopoiesis. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkov, V.; Karanovic, D.; Savovski, K.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of total single fractionated irradiation with short time interval on heamatopoietic regeneration of the bone marrow and spleen was investigated. Also, the importance of first dose, when dose of 600 R was divided in two unequal fractions with time interval of 300 s was studied. The investigation was performed on 25 day old rats. The dose of 600 R (X-rays) was divided on: 500 + 100, 400 + 200, 300 + 300, 200 + 400 or 100 + 500 R with time interval of 150, 300 or 600 s. Ten days after irradiation the changes in blood, bone marrow and spleen were observed. After unequal fractionated dose with interval of 600 s slight effect was found. The results after intervals of 600 s and 300 s were significant, when the total dose was divided in two equal doses. The first dose has no promoting role in haematopoietic regeneration when total dose was unequally fractionated. (orig.) [de

  2. Fractionated irradiation and haematopiesis. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkov, V.; Piletic, O.; Karanovic, D.; Belgrade Univ.

    1980-01-01

    Haemoregeneration after the irradiation with 600 R was studied using two different fractions given before and after the transplantation of bone-marrow cells. The dose of 600 R was divided in two uneven fractions: 500 + 100 R, 400 + 200 R and 300 + 300 R. During the free interval between the two doses (5 min) transplantation of bone-marrow cells was performed. Recolonization of bone-marrow and spleen was analysed on the 10th day after treatment. For analysis, samples of blood, bone-marrow and spleen were used. Maximal effect was found in the experimental group of animals irradiated with 500 R before and with 100 R after marrow-cell transplantation. Minimal haematopoietic response was in the group irradiated with 300 R before and after transplantation. This points at the importance of the primary dose for acceptance of the transplants and their activation. (orig.) [de

  3. Hypericin photocytotoxicyty followed after fractionated light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackova, V.; Kulikova, L.; Mikes, J.; Kleban, J.; Fedorocko, P.

    2006-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the in vitro effect of hypericin-mediated photodynamic therapy with fractionated light delivery. Cells were photosensitized with unequal light fractions separated by dark intervals (1 h, 6 h). The changes in survival, apoptosis and cell cycle were compared on HT-29 cells irradiated with a single light dose (12 J/cm 2 ) to the fractionated light delivery (1+11 J/cm 2 ) 24 h and 48 h after photodynamic treatment. It was found that a fractionated light regime with a longer dark period resulted in a decrease of hypericin photo-cytotoxicity. Cell survival was higher after light sensitization with a 6 h dark interval. DNA fragmentation occurred after a single light dose application, but in contrast no apoptotic DNA formation was detected with a 6 h dark pause. After fractionation the percentage of cells in G 1 phase of the cell cycle was increased, while the proportion of cells in the G 2 phase decreased as compared to a single light dose application i. e. both percentage of cells in G 1 and G 2 phase of cell cycle were near control levels. We presume that the longer dark interval after the irradiation of cells by first light dose makes them to resistant to the effect of the second illumination. These findings confirm that the light application scheme together with other photodynamic protocol components is crucial for the photo-cytotoxicity of hypericin. (authors)

  4. Acute skin reaction after fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozubek, S.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental data on acute mouse and pig skin reaction after fractionated γ or X irradiation have been analysed in terms of a new cell tissue kinetic model. The exponential-quadratic and generalized Huggett formulae have been used for cell lethality description. Fairly better results could be demonstrated with generalized Huggett formula. The speed of repopulation has been determined for fractionated regimes as well as for some irregular schedules. The repopulation is slower in the case of fractionated treatment. On considering the normal cell loss factor in the tissue, minimum cell cycle time has been calculated. Its value differs for various strains (Tsub(d)=28.8 hours for SAS/TO mice and Tsub(d) < or approximately 17 hours for WHT/Ht mice) and does not differ for plucked skin. The repopulation has been shown to follow exponential dependence after some latent period. Other factors influencing the effectiveness of radiation treatment (the length of the latent period or the changes of the survival curve during fractionated irradiation) have been considered, too

  5. Fractionated proton beam irradiation of pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronson, Brian B.; Schulte, Reinhard W.; Han, Khanh P.; Loredo, Lilia N.; Slater, James M.; Slater, Jerry D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Various radiation techniques and modalities have been used to treat pituitary adenomas. This report details our experience with proton treatment of these tumors. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with pituitary adenomas treated with protons, who had at least 6 months of follow-up, were included in this analysis. Forty-two patients underwent a prior surgical resection; 5 were treated with primary radiation. Approximately half the tumors were functional. The median dose was 54 cobalt-gray equivalent. Results: Tumor stabilization occurred in all 41 patients available for follow-up imaging; 10 patients had no residual tumor, and 3 had greater than 50% reduction in tumor size. Seventeen patients with functional adenomas had normalized or decreased hormone levels; progression occurred in 3 patients. Six patients have died; 2 deaths were attributed to functional progression. Complications included temporal lobe necrosis in 1 patient, new significant visual deficits in 3 patients, and incident hypopituitarism in 11 patients. Conclusion: Fractionated conformal proton-beam irradiation achieved effective radiologic, endocrinological, and symptomatic control of pituitary adenomas. Significant morbidity was uncommon, with the exception of postradiation hypopituitarism, which we attribute in part to concomitant risk factors for hypopituitarism present in our patient population

  6. Radioprotective effect of exogenic hypoxia in fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazymbetov, P.; Yarmonenko, S.P.; Vajnson, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    During the experiments with mice it is established, that exogenic hypoxia protective effect (8%O 2 ), evaluated according to survival rate, decreases at the change from single to fractionated irradiation. Dose change factor (DCF) is equal to 1.55 and 1.22-1.31, respectively. Skin protection using exogenic hypoxia at the local fractionated irradiation is expressed more, than at the fractionated one. DCF is equal to 1.56 and 1.28, respectively. Exogenic hypoxia protection effect in the tumor is expressed rather weakly. DCF at single and fractionated irradiation constitutes 1.03 and 1.07-1.13, respectively. Due to skin preferential protection the therapeutic gain factor at irradiation under the exogenic hypoxia conditions constitutes 1.24 and 1.38-1.46, respectively, at single and fractionated irradiation

  7. Prolongation of experimental islet transplant survival by fractionated splenic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, E.; Casanova, M.; Largiader, F.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments designed to delay the rejection of intrasplenic pancreatic fragment allotransplants in dogs showed increased transplant survival times from 3.1 days (controls) to 5.5 days with fractionated splenic irradiation and to 7.5 days with combined local irradiation and immunosuppressive chemotherapy. Drug treatment alone had no beneficial effect

  8. Serial histopathological changes in irradiated guinea pig lung receiving conventional fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Satoshi; Inomata, Taisuke; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Shoji; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Ohtsuki, Yuji

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine serial histopathological differences in guinea pig lungs receiving the same total dose as clinically used between conventional fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation. The guinea pigs received 80 Gy in 40 daily fractions of 2 Gy each (conventional fractionation), 80 Gy in 80 fractions of 1 Gy each twice a day (hyperfractionation), 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions of 3 Gy each (conventional fractionation), or 81 Gy in 54 fractions of 1.5 Gy each twice a day (hyperfractionation). We evaluated the histopathological changes of irradiated guinea pig lungs at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after irradiation. The guinea pig lungs that received 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions showed histopathological changes of inflammation including formation of lymph follicles after 6 months. The lungs which received 81 Gy in 54 fractions showed similar but slightly less pronounced changes than those that received 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions. The guinea pig lungs of other groups showed no histopathological changes during the observation period. In hyperfractionated irradiation the damage to the guinea pig lung is quantitatively less than that occurring as a result of conventional fractionated irradiation of the same total dose. (author)

  9. Serial histopathological changes in irradiated guinea pig lung receiving conventional fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Satoshi; Inomata, Taisuke; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Shoji; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Ohtsuki, Yuji [Kochi Medical School, Nankoku (Japan)

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine serial histopathological differences in guinea pig lungs receiving the same total dose as clinically used between conventional fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation. The guinea pigs received 80 Gy in 40 daily fractions of 2 Gy each (conventional fractionation), 80 Gy in 80 fractions of 1 Gy each twice a day (hyperfractionation), 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions of 3 Gy each (conventional fractionation), or 81 Gy in 54 fractions of 1.5 Gy each twice a day (hyperfractionation). We evaluated the histopathological changes of irradiated guinea pig lungs at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after irradiation. The guinea pig lungs that received 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions showed histopathological changes of inflammation including formation of lymph follicles after 6 months. The lungs which received 81 Gy in 54 fractions showed similar but slightly less pronounced changes than those that received 81 Gy in 27 daily fractions. The guinea pig lungs of other groups showed no histopathological changes during the observation period. In hyperfractionated irradiation the damage to the guinea pig lung is quantitatively less than that occurring as a result of conventional fractionated irradiation of the same total dose. (author)

  10. Thyroid tumours following fractionated irradiation in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vathaire, F. de; Grimaud, E.; Diallo, I.; Shamsaldin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Results of a cohort study designed to evaluate the long term risk of thyroid tumours after fractioned high doses of external beam radiotherapy received by the thyroid are reported. In this cohort study, doses have been estimated for each child. (author)

  11. Acute skin reactions observed in fractionated proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arimoto, Takuro; Maruhashi, Noboru; Takada, Yoshihisa; Hayakawa, Yoshinori; Inada, Tetsuo; Kitagawa, Toshio

    1989-01-01

    Between May 1985 and July 1987, 49 skin reactions of 43 patients treated by proton irradiation were observed at the Particle Radiation Medical Science Center (PARMS), the University of Tsukuba. Taking the peak skin score as an endpoint, the radiobiological effects [relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and time-dose relationship] of the proton beam in multi-fractionated treatments were estimated. Factors influencing the skin dose, such as the prescribed tumor dose, tumor site, and number of applied fields, were also analyzed. The following conclusions regarding acute skin reactions to the clinical use of proton irradiation were obtained: 1) the physical skin-sparing effect of proton irradiation in single-field irradiation, especially in superficial regions, is not large compared with that of high-energy photon irradiation; 2) multidirectional proton irradiation significantly reduced the skin dose and severity of acute reasons; 3) the radiobiological effects of the proton beam, RBE and the time factor, estimated in human skin in multi-fractional treatment were slightly smaller than those of X-rays, i.e., 0.92 and -0.25±0.09, respectively. (author)

  12. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, K; Chen, Y J; Ohira, C; Nojima, K; Ando, S; Kobayashi, N; Ohbuchi, T; Shimizu, W [Space and Particle Radiation Science Research Group, Chiba (Japan); Koike, S; Kanai, T [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Div. of Accelerator Physics

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/{mu}m also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/{mu}m in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/{mu}m were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/{mu} steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  13. Mouse skin damages caused by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, K.; Chen, Y.J.; Ohira, C.; Nojima, K.; Ando, S.; Kobayashi, N.; Ohbuchi, T.; Shimizu, W.; Koike, S.; Kanai, T.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated carbon-dose responses of early and late skin damages after daily fractionations to the mouse leg. Depilated legs were irradiated with 7 different positions within 290 MeV/u carbon beams. Fractionation schedules were 1, 2, 4 and 8 daily fractions. Skin reaction was scored every other day for 32 days. Five highest scores in individual mice were averaged, and used as averaged peak reaction. The isoeffect doses to produce an averaged peak skin reaction of 3.0 (moist desquamation) on dose-response curves were calculated with 95% confidence limit. The isoeffect dose for control gamma rays constantly increased with an increase in the number of fraction. The isoeffect doses in low LET carbon ions of 14- and 20 keV/μm also increased up to 4 fractions, but did not increase when 4 fractions increased to 8 fractions. The saturation of isoeffect dose was more prominently observed for 40 keV/μm in such that the isoeffect doses did not change among 2, 4 and 8 fractions. The isoeffect doses for LET higher than 50 keV/μm were smaller than those for lower LET. However, the isoeffect doses for 50-, 60-, 80- and 100 keV/μ steadily increased with an increase in the number of fraction and did not show any saturation up to 8 fractions. Relation between LET and RBE was linear for all fractionation schedules. The slope of regression line in 4 fractions was steepest, and significantly (P<0.05) different from that in 1 fraction. (orig.)

  14. Hypo fractionated conformal irradiation of patients with malignant glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboziada, M.A.; Abo-Kresha, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of a conformal irradiation in short fractionation scheme of 49.5 Gy in 15 fractions in an overall time of 3 weeks, in terms of overall survival (OAS) and progression free survival (PFS) rates in brain glioma patients. Patients and methods: A prospective study was conducted on 54 brain glioma patients and was carried out in the Radiation Oncology Department, South Egypt Cancer Institute, Assiut University during the period from April 2006 till June 2009. Patients were treated by hypo fractionated conformal irradiation (49.5 Gy/15 fractions/3 weeks). Results: The median follow up was 23 months (range: 9-39 months). Two-year OAS and PFS rates were 68% and 60%, respectively. In univariate analysis, age > 50 years, poor performance status [Karnofasky score of >40- 50 years and glioblastoma pathology were the only independent prognostic factors that were associated with poor OAS (p = 0.003 and p = 0.004, respectively), and PFS (p = 0.027 and p = 0.011, respectively). Conclusion: Hypo fractionated conformal radiotherapy was as effective as the conventional radiotherapy, with time sparing for patients, and for radiation oncology centers. Hypo fractionated radiotherapy may be considered the radiotherapy regimen of choice in clinical practice for patients with gliomas

  15. Intestinal complications following accelerated fractionated X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauer-Jensen, M.; Poulakos, L.; Osborne, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Due to paucity of suitable animal models, it has been difficult to study the development of long-term intestinal complications following fractionated irradiation. We recently developed a model which allows multiple radiation exposures of a short segment of rat ileum without the need for repeated surgery. In the present series, this model was used to study the influence of shortening the total treatment time (accelerated fractionation) on development of radiation enteropathy. Male rats were orchiectomized and a short segment of distal ileum was transposed to the scrotum. Starting 3 weeks after surgery, the scrotum containing the intestinal segment was X-irradiated with 20 fractions of 2.8 Gy (total dose 56 Gy). Two fractionation schedules were compared: one fraction per day (total treatment time 26 days) and 3 fractions per day (total treatment time 7 days). Actuarial survival curves were obtained, and the degree of radiation injury was assessed 2, 8 and 26 weeks after the last radiation exposure using a semiquantitative histopathologic scoring system. There was no mortality from acute radiation injury in either treatment group. All animals of the 1-fraction/day group survived the observation period (26 weeks). In the 3-fraction/day group, there was significant mortality due to intestinal obstruction, and cumulative mortality at 26 weeks was 100%. Radiation injury, as assessed by the histopathologic scoring system, was also more pronounced in this group than in the 1-fraction/day group. We conclude that shortening the total treatment time significantly increases the severity of late intestinal complications. Our data are suggestive of an association between acute mucosal damage and chronic radiation injury of the small intestine. (orig.)

  16. Ultrastructural morphometry of parotid acinar cells following fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grehn, A.-L.; Gustafsson, H.; Franzen, L.; Thornell, L.-E.; Henriksson, R.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long term effects on the ultrastructure of parotid glands after fractionated irradiation. The method implemented involved 5 x 6 Gy and 5 x 8 Gy, Monday to Friday 6 MV photons. By unilateral irradiation, the contralateral parotid gland served as a control. Although irradiation diminished the acinar cell density in light microscopic sections from 75 to 32% after 5 x 8 Gy of irradiation, ultrastructural morphometry could not detect any statistically significant differences in acinar cell size, nuclear size, nuclear density, granule area, mean granule size, or granule density. In general, greater differences were seen between rats receiving 30 or 40 Gy, on both the irradiated and the control side, than between the irradiated side and the control side. This was interpreted as due to differences in the nutritional state of the animals. This analysis concluded that individual acinar cells that survive irradiation seem not to be damaged in the long term when evaluated at the ultrastructural level. The study further stresses the importance of adequate sampling sizes and the use of adequate controls. (author)

  17. Effects of genistein following fractionated lung irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Para, Andrea E.; Bezjak, Andrea; Yeung, Ivan W.T.; Van Dyk, Jake; Hill, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study investigated protection of lung injury by genistein following fractionated doses of radiation and its effect on tumor response. Material and methods: C3H/HeJ mice were irradiated (100 kVp X-rays) with 9 fractions of 3.1 Gy over 30 days (approximately equivalent to 10 Gy single dose) and were maintained on a genistein diet (∼10 mg/kg). Damage was assessed over 28 weeks in lung cells by a cytokinesis block micronucleus (MN) assay and by changes in breathing rate and histology. Tumor protection was assessed using a colony assay to determine cell survival following in situ irradiation of small lung nodules (KHT fibrosarcoma). Results: Genistein caused about a 50% reduction in the MN damage observed during the fractionated radiation treatment and this damage continued to decrease at later times to background levels by 16 weeks. In mice not receiving Genistein MN levels remained well above background out to 28 weeks after irradiation. Genistein reduced macrophage accumulation by 22% and reduced collagen deposition by 28%. There was minimal protection against increases in breathing rate or severe morbidity during pneumonitis. No tumor protection by genistein treatment was observed. Conclusions: Genistein at the dose levels used in this study partially reduced the extent of fibrosis developing in mouse lung caused by irradiation but gave minimal protection against pneumonitis. There was no evidence that genistein caused protection of small tumors growing in the lung.

  18. Therapeutic use of fractionated total body and subtotal body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeffler, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    Ninety-one patients were treated using fractionated subtotal body (STBI) or total body irradiation (TBI). These patients had generalized lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, leukemias, myelomas, seminomas, or oat-cell carcinomas. Subtotal body irradiation is delivered to the entire body, except for the skull and extremities. It was expected that a significantly higher radiation dose could be administered with STBI than with TBI. A five- to ten-fold increase in tolerance for STBI was demonstrated. Many of these patients have had long-term emissions. There is little or no treatment-induced symptomatology, and no sanctuary sites

  19. Analytical formulae in fractionated irradiation of normal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozubek, S.

    1982-01-01

    The new conception of the modeling of the cell tissue kinetics after fractionated irradiation is proposed. The formulae given earlier are compared with experimental data on various normal tissues and further adjustments are considered. The tissues are shown to exhibit several general patterns of behaviour. The repopulation, if it takes place, seems to start after some time, independently of fractionation in first approximation and can be treated as simple autogenesis. The results are compared with the commonly used NSD conception and the well-known Cohen cell tissue kinetic model

  20. Immunosuppression by fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in collagen arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCune, W.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Belli, J.A.; Trentham, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    Treatments with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and cyclophosphamide were evaluated for rats injected with type II collagen. Preadministration of TLI and repeated injections of cyclophosphamide suppressed the severity of arthritis and lowered antibody titers to collagen significantly. TLI initiated at the onset of collagen arthritis decreased humoral and cellular responses to collagen but did not affect the severity of arthritis. These data demonstrate that both TLi and cyclophosphamide are immunosuppressive in an experimentally inducible autoimmune disease

  1. Effects of carbogen plus fractionated irradiation on KHT tumor oxygenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenton, Bruce M.

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: Numerous studies have demonstrated improvements in the oxygenation of tumor cells following both irradiation and carbogen breathing. The current studies were initiated to measure the combined effects of carbogen inhalation plus single and multi-dose irradiation on tumor oxygen availability, to better define the underlying physiological relationships. Materials and methods: Using KHT murine sarcomas, radiation was delivered to the tumor-bearing legs of non-anesthetized mice. Tumors were quick-frozen prior to or following single or multifraction irradiation and carbogen breathing, and intravascular HbO 2 saturation profiles were determined cryospectrophotometrically. Results: HbO 2 levels for blood vessels located near the tumor surface initially decreased following 10 Gy irradiation, then increased and remained elevated. Interior HbO 2 levels remained unchanged. Following 2.5 Gy, HbO 2 changes were minimal. At 24 h following 10 Gy, HbO 2 levels were significantly increased compared to non-irradiated controls, and carbogen breathing produced no additional benefit. At 24 h following five fractions of 2 Gy, HbO 2 levels throughout the tumor volume were significantly higher in carbogen breathing animals than in air breathing controls. Conclusions: Although peripheral blood vessels demonstrated substantial improvements in oxygenation following irradiation, oxygen availability nearer the tumor center remained at very low levels. The utility of carbogen in enhancing tumor oxygen availability was maintained following five clinically relevant fractions. At higher doses, radiation-induced enhancements in HbO 2 levels overshadowed the carbogen effect. For either air or carbogen breathing, a decrease in the percentage of vessels with very low oxygen content did not appear to be a major factor in the reoxygenation of the KHT tumor

  2. Radiotherapy. Non-standard fractionated regimens improving cancer treatment. Part II. Response of normal tissues to fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, A.; Hernandez, M.; Pera, J.; Cambray, M.; Villa, S.; Arnaiz, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    The phenomena participating in the response of tissues to fractionated irradiation are analyzed with special emphasis on the most relevant points influencing the design of non-standard fractionated regimens. (Author)

  3. Tumor oxygenation in a transplanted rat rhabdomyosarcoma during fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zywietz, Friedrich; Reeker, Wolfram; Kochs, Eberhard

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the changes in tumor oxygenation in the course of a fractionated radiation treatment extending over 4 weeks. Methods and Materials: Rhabdomyosarcomas R1H of the rat were irradiated with 60 Co-γ-rays with a total dose of 60 Gy, given in 20 fractions over 4 weeks. Oxygen partial pressure (pO 2 ) in tumors was measured at weekly intervals using polarographic needle probes in combination with a microprocessor-controlled device (pO 2 -Histograph/KIMOC). The pO 2 measurements were carried out in anesthetized animals under mechanical ventilation and in respiratory and hemodynamic steady state. Tumor pO 2 values were correlated to the arterial oxygen pressure p a O 2 , arterial pCO 2 , and pH determined with a blood gas analyzer. Results: Tumor oxygenation did not change significantly during the 3 weeks of irradiation (up to 45 Gy), from a median pO 2 of 23 ± 2 mmHg in untreated controls to 19 ± 4 mmHg after the third week. The decrease of the number of pO 2 values between 0 and 5 mmHg indicated that an improved oxygenation in the tumors occurred. However, with increasing radiation dose (fourth week, 60 Gy) a significant decrease in tumor oxygenation to a median pO 2 of 8 ± 2 mmHg and a rapid increase in the frequency of pO 2 values (35 ± 4%) between 0 and 5 mmHg was found. Conclusion: Improved oxygenation in rhabdomyosarcomas R1H was only present in the early phase of the fractionated irradiation. Radiation doses above 45 Gy led to a considerable decrease of tumor oxygenation in the later phase of irradiation

  4. Effectiveness of perfluorochemical emulsions and carbogen breathing with fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moulder, J.E.; Fish, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Oxygen-carrying perfluorochemical emulsions have been shown to enhance the response of experimental tumors to large single doses of radiation. Clinically, however, perfluorochemical emulsions will be used with only some fractions of multiple fraction radiation courses. To test the efficacy of a perfluorochemical emulsion (Fluosol-DA 20%, supplied by Alpha Therapeutic Co) under these conditions, BA1112 rat sarcomas were treated with three fractions/week of 6.25 Gy/fraction. Once a week, animals were given Fluosol-DA at 15 ml/kg, and allowed to breathe 95% O/sub 2/:5% CO/sub 2/ (carbogen) for 30 min prior to and during irradiation. The tumor regression rate during treatment was significantly greater in the Fluosol arm than in the control arm. Preliminary data analysis shows a 50% tumor control dose of 86.0 Gy (95% cl:78.0 - 94.3 Gy) in the control arm compared to 69.1 Gy (95% cl:58.3 - 77.3 Gy) in the Fluosol arm. The dose modification factor for intermittent Fluosol and carbogen breathing is 1.26 (95% cl:1.08 - 1.50). In the same fractionated schedule 0.4 mg/kg misonidazole, given once per week, gave a sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.15 (95% cl:1.03 - 1.33)

  5. The effect of fractionated irradiation on cell kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laasonen, A.; Pyrhoenen, S.; Kouri, M.; Raety, J.; Holsti, L.R.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of single and split-dose irradiation were compared by in vitro experiments on HeLa cells. Changes in rate of cell proliferation were detected by flow cytometry, simultaneously determining the DNA content and the bromodeoxyuridine incorporation of individual cells. Cell cultures were irradiated with either a single dose of 1-6 Gy or with a corresponding dose divided into multiple fractions given at 1-6-h intervals. A dose-dependent accumulation of cells in G2/M phase was observed. The method was sensitive enough for the detection of G2/M block even after 1 Gy. The block disappeared completely within a 24-h follow-up time at dose levels up to 3 Gy. Interestingly, no differences in cell kinetics were observed between the single and split-dose regiments. This approach proves to be valuable in evaluating novel fractionation models and the effects of radiation on the cell kinetics of human tumor cells. (orig.)

  6. Radiobiological aspects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turesson, I.

    1990-01-01

    The biological effects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation in interstitial and intracavitary radiotherapy and total body irradiation are discussed in terms of dose-rate fractionation sensitivity for various tissues. A scaling between dose-rate and fraction size was established for acute and late normal-tissue effects which can serve as a guideline for local treatment in the range of dose rates between 0.02 and 0.005 Gy/min and fraction sizes between 8.5 and 2.5 Gy. This is valid provided cell-cycle progression and proliferation can be ignored. Assuming that the acute and late tissue responses are characterized by α/β values of about 10 and 3 Gy and a mono-exponential repair half-time of about 3 h, the same total doses given with either of the two methods are approximately equivalent. The equivalence for acute and late non-hemopoietic normal tissue damage is 0.02 Gy/min and 8.5 Gy per fraction; 0.01 Gy/min and 5.5 Gy per fraction; and 0.005 Gy/min and 2.5Gy per fraction. A very low dose rate, below 0.005 Gy/min, is thus necessary to simulate high dose-rate radiotherapy with fraction sizes of about 2Gy. The scaling factor is, however, dependent on the repair half-time of the tissue. A review of published data on dose-rate effects for normal tissue response showed a significantly stronger dose-rate dependence for late than for acute effects below 0.02 Gy/min. There was no significant difference in dose-rate dependence between various acute non-hemopoietic effects or between various late effects. The consistent dose-rate dependence, which justifies the use of a general scaling factor between fraction size and dose rate, contrasts with the wide range of values for repair half-time calculated for various normal-tissue effects. This indicates that the model currently used for repair kinetics is not satisfactory. There are also few experimental data in the clinical dose-rate range, below 0.02 Gy/min. It is therefore

  7. Relationship between α/β and radiosensitivity and biologic effect of fractional irradiation of tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Chuanling; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Wang Jufang; Jin Xiaodong; Li Wenjian

    2006-01-01

    Five kinds of malignant human tumor cells, i.e. SMMC-7721, HeLa, A549, HT29 and PC3 cell lines, were irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays to 1-6 Gy in a single irradiation or two irradiations of half dose. The radiosensitivity was compared with the dose-survival curves and D 50 and D 10 values. Differences in the D 50 and D 10 between the single and fractional irradiation groups showed the effect of fractional irradiation. Except for PC3 cells, all the cell lines showed obvious relationship between radiosensitivity and biologic effect of fractional irradiation and the α/β value. A cell line with bigger α/β was more radiation sensitive, with less obvious effect of fractional irradiation. The results indicate that there were obvious differences in radiosensitivity, repair ability and biologic effect of fractional irradiation between tumor cells from different tissues. To some tumor cell lines, the relationship between radiosensitivity, biologic effect of fractional irradiation and repair ability was attested. The α/β value of single irradiation can be regarded as a parameter to investigate the radiosensitivity and biologic effect of fractional irradiation of tumor cells. (authors)

  8. The relationship between survival and mutagenesis in Escherichia coli after fractionated ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzidic, S.; Salaj-Smic, E.; Trgovcevic, Z.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between survival and mutagenesis in Escherichia coli after fractionated ultraviolet (UV) irradiation was studied. The cells were incubated either in buffer or nutrient media. Regardless of incubation conditions, greater survival is observed after fractionated irradiation than after acute irradiation. When the cells are incubated in buffer, UV mutagenesis decreases with an increase in the number of dose fractions. However, when the cells are cultivated in nutrient media, the increased survival is coupled with the enhanced capacity for UV mutagenesis. The authors, therefore, assume that during incubation in nutrient media, fractionated irradiation leads to full and prolonged expression of all UV inducible (SOS) genes, including those required for mutagenesis. (Auth.)

  9. Marrow toxicity of fractionated vs. single dose total body irradiation is identical in a canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storb, R.; Raff, R.F.; Graham, T.; Appelbaum, F.R.; Deeg, H.J.; Schuening, F.G.; Shulman, H.; Pepe, M.

    1993-01-01

    The authors explored in dogs the marrow toxicity of single dose total body irradiation delivered from two opposing 60 Co sources at a rate of 10 cGy/min and compared results to those seen with total body irradiation administered in 100 cGy fractions with minimum interfraction intervals of 6 hr. Dogs were not given marrow transplants. They found that 200 cGy single dose total body irradiation was sublethal, with 12 of 13 dogs showing hematopoietic recovery and survival. Seven of 21 dogs given 300 cGy single dose total body irradiation survived compared to 6 of 10 dogs given 300 cGy fractionated total body irradiation. One of 28 dogs given 400 cGy single dose total body irradiation survived compared to none of six given fractionated radiation. With granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) administered from day 0-21 after 400 cGy total body irradiation, most dogs survived with hematological recovery. Because of the almost uniform success with GCSF after 400 cGy single dose total body irradiation, a study of GCSF after 400 cGy fractionated total body irradiation was deemed not to be informative and, thus, not carried out. Additional comparisons between single dose and fractionated total body irradiation were carried out with GCSF administered after 500 and 600 cGy of total body irradiation. As with lower doses of total body irradiation, no significant survival differences were seen between the two modes of total body irradiation, and only 3 of 26 dogs studied survived with complete hematological recovery. Overall, therefore, survival among dogs given single dose total body irradiation was not different from that of dogs given fractionated total body irradiation (p = .67). Similarly, the slopes of the postirradiation declines of granulocyte and platelet counts and the rates of their recovery in surviving dogs given equal total doses of single versus fractionated total body irradiation were indistinguishable. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Fractionated total body irradiation; the gastrointestinal toxicity versus the conditioning effect for bone marrow transplantation with different fractionation schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walma, E.P.; Klapwijk, W.M.; Miller, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    In most cases, bone marrow transplantation is preceded by a conditioning regimen employing irradiation and/or cytotoxic drugs. The authors are searching for better fractionation schedules in order to optimize the conditioning regimen prior to transplantation of stem-cell-enriched bone marrow. They have determined damage to the gastrointestinal tract in dogs and mice after total body irradiation in mice and dogs following a number of fractionation schedules, and these results are presented. The schedules were chosen such as to minimize the interval between irradiation and the bone marrow transplantation and to maximize clinical feasibility. (Auth./C.F.)

  11. Radiobiological effect of different irradiation fractionated regimens in human brain glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai Xue; Yang Weizhi; Gao Li; Jiang Heng; Wang Mianrong; Shi Huizhen

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the radiobiological effect of different irradiation fractionated regimens in human glioma cells (BT 325 cell line). Methods: The xenografts in Balb/c-nude mice were irradiated with different single and fractionated regimens. The single fraction dose was 10, 20, 30, 40 and 60 Gy, respectively. The fractionated regimens were 2 Gy x 5 fractions ( irradiated every day), and 3 Gy x 3 fractions (irradiated every other day), 3 Gy x 5 fractions (irradiated every day) and 4 Gy x 3 fractions (irradiated every other day), with total doses of 125 Gy, 114 Gy, 126 Gy and 112 Gy, respectively. The growth curve was used to evaluate the tumor doubling time. clonogenic assays was performed to draw the cell survival curve and analyze the radiobiological parameters with doses of 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy. T 1/2 was measured by comet assay. Results: Tumor regression were not observed by single fraction irradiation, 2 Gy x 5 fractions and 3 Gy x 3 fractions irradiation regimens. The tumor regress was more significant with the increas of fraction dose. The 4 Gy x 3 fractions inhibited tumor more though not curing tumor. The cell doubling time of the BT 325 cell was 30. 16 h and the tumor doubling time of the xenograft was 43 days.When fitted with L-Q model, α was 0. 36 Gy -1 and β was 0. 057 Gy -2 . When fitted with the single-hit multi target model, D 0 was 1. 394 Gy, Dq was 2. 127 Gy and SF 2 was 0.714, respectively. The T 1/2 was 9.999 min. Conclusions: Glioma is a radioresistant tumor. Increase of the fraction dose improves recent effect.Further study is needed to control the tumor stem cells. (authors)

  12. The influence of fractionation on cell survival and premature differentiation after carbon ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jufang; Li Renming; Guo Chuanling; Fournier, C.; K-Weyrather, W.

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the influence of fractionation on cell survival and radiation induced premature differentiation as markers for early and late effects after X-rays and carbon irradiation. Normal human fibroblasts NHDF, AG1522B and WI-38 were irradiated with 250 kV X-rays, or 266 MeV/u, 195 MeV/u and 11 MeV/u carbon ions. Cytotoxicity was measured by a clonogenic survival assay or by determination of the differentiation pattern. Experiments with high-energy carbon ions show that fractionation induced repair effects are similar to photon irradiation. The relative biological effective (RBE) 10 values for clonogenic survival are 1.3 and 1.6 for irradiation in one or two fractions for NHDF cells and around 1.2 for AG1522B cells regardless of the fractionation scheme. The RBE for a doubling of post mitotic fibroblasts (PMF) in the population is 1 for both single and two fractionated irradiation of NHDF cells. Using 11 MeV/u carbon ions, no repair effect can be seen in WI-38 cells. The RBE 10 for clonogenic survival is 3.2 for single irradiation and 4.9 for two fractionated irradiations. The RBE for a doubling of PMF is 3.1 and 5.0 for single and two fractionated irradiations, respectively. For both cell lines the effects of high-energy carbon ions representing the irradiation of the skin and the normal tissue in the entrance channel are similar to the effects of X-rays. The fractionation effects are maintained. For the lower energy, which is representative for the irradiation of the tumor region, RBE is enhanced for clonogenic survival as well as for premature terminal differentiation. Fractionation effects are not detectable. Consequently, the therapeutic ratio is significantly enhanced by fractionated irradiation with carbon ions. (author)

  13. A simple graphical method for deriving kinetics of repair from fractionated and protracted irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalliet, P.; Schueren, E. van der; Erfmann, R.K.L.; Landuyt, W.

    1988-01-01

    The authors present a method for the derivation of the time constant of repair from fractionated and protracted irradiations, using formulae based on those derived by Dale (1985) and Liversage (1969) establishing the correlation between the biological effects of low dose rate and acute fractionated irradiation. (UK)

  14. Recovery from sublethal damage during fractionated irradiation of human FaDu SCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Cordula; Zips, Daniel; Krause, Mechthild; Voelkel, Wolfram; Thames, Howard D.; Baumann, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The present study addresses whether recovery of sublethal damage in tumours may change during fractionated irradiation in FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma and whether such an effect might contribute to the pronounced time factor of fractionated irradiation previously found in this tumour. Patients and methods: FaDu tumours were transplanted s.c. into the right hind leg of NMRI nu/nu mice. Single doses or 2, 4, and 8 equal fractions in 3.5 days were applied in previously unirradiated tumours and after priming with 18 fractions of 3 Gy in 18 or 36 days. All irradiations were given under clamp hypoxic conditions. Experimental endpoints were tumour control dose 50% (TCD 50 ) and α/β values without and after priming. Results: Without priming TCD 50 increased with increasing number of fractions from 38.8 Gy (95% CI 35;45) after single dose irradiation to 54.0 Gy (42;57) after 8 fractions. No increase in TCD 50 when given in 1, 2, 4, or 8 fractions in 3.5 days was found after priming with 18 3-Gy fractions in 18 and 36 days. After priming with 18 fractions in 18 days TCD 50 remained constant at 25 Gy and after priming with 18 fractions in 36 days at 42 Gy. The α/β ratio without priming was 68 Gy (42;127). After fractionated irradiation with 18 3-Gy fractions in 18 and 36 days the α/β ratio increased to 317 Gy (38;∞) and to infinite, respectively. Conclusions: Our results indicate that clonogenic cells in FaDu tumours lose entirely their capacity to recover from sublethal radiation damage during fractionated irradiation. Therefore, an increased repair capacity as an explanation for the pronounced time factor of fractionated irradiation in this tumour can be ruled out

  15. Allograft tolerance in pigs after fractionated lymphoid irradiation. I. Skin grafts after partial lateral irradiation and bone marrow cell grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaiman, M.; Daburon, F.; Remy, J.; Villiers, P.A.; de Riberolles, C.; Lecompte, Y.; Mahouy, G.; Fradelizi, D.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments with pigs have been performed to establish bone marrow chimerism and skin graft tolerance between SLA genotyped animals. Recipients were conditioned by means of fractionated partial irradiation from lateral cobalt sources (partial lateral irradiation (PLI)). The head, neck, and lungs were protected with lead, the rest of the body being irradiated including the thymus, the majority of lymphoid organs with spleen, and most of the bone marrow sites

  16. Functional activity of symphathetic-adrenal system under chronic and fractionated irradiation of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musagalieva, G.M.

    1975-01-01

    Chronic irradiation of rats at 5 R twice a week (total dose 400 R) significantly increased adrenaline concentration in the brain, liver and kidney and dophamine and DOPA concentration in liver tissue, adrenal glands and thymus. Fractionated irradiation (chronic irradiation at 400 R plus acute single irradiation at 400 R) increased the adrenaline level in the brain and heart muscle and led to a higher concentration of dophamine and DOPA in the liver, thymus and heart muscle [ru

  17. Sulfur transfer in the distillate fractions of Arabian crude oils under gamma-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basfar, Ahmed A.; Soliman, Yasser S.; Alkhuraiji, Turki S.

    2017-05-01

    Desulfurization of light distillation fractions including gasoline, kerosene and diesel obtained from the four Arabian crude oils (heavy, medium, light and extra light) upon γ-rays irradiation to different doses was investigated. In addition, yields vol%, FTIR analysis, kinematic viscosity and density of all distillation fractions of irradiated crude oils were evaluated. Limited radiation-induced desulfurization of those fractions was observed up to an irradiation dose of 200 kGy. FTIR analysis of those fractions indicates the absence of oxidized sulfur compounds, represented by S=O of sulfone group, indicating that γ-irradiation of the Arabian crude oils at normal conditions does not induce an oxidative desulfurization in those distillation fractions. Radiation-induced sulfur transfer decreases by 28.56% and increases in total sulfur by 16.8% in Arabian extra light oil and Arabian medium crude oil respectively.

  18. Spatiotemporal Fractionation Schemes for Irradiating Large Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkelbach, Jan, E-mail: junkelbach@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bussière, Marc R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chapman, Paul H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To optimally exploit fractionation effects in the context of radiosurgery treatments of large cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). In current practice, fractionated treatments divide the dose evenly into several fractions, which generally leads to low obliteration rates. In this work, we investigate the potential benefit of delivering distinct dose distributions in different fractions. Methods and Materials: Five patients with large cerebral AVMs were reviewed and replanned for intensity modulated arc therapy delivered with conventional photon beams. Treatment plans allowing for different dose distributions in all fractions were obtained by performing treatment plan optimization based on the cumulative biologically effective dose delivered at the end of treatment. Results: We show that distinct treatment plans can be designed for different fractions, such that high single-fraction doses are delivered to complementary parts of the AVM. All plans create a similar dose bath in the surrounding normal brain and thereby exploit the fractionation effect. This partial hypofractionation in the AVM along with fractionation in normal brain achieves a net improvement of the therapeutic ratio. We show that a biological dose reduction of approximately 10% in the healthy brain can be achieved compared with reference treatment schedules that deliver the same dose distribution in all fractions. Conclusions: Boosting complementary parts of the target volume in different fractions may provide a therapeutic advantage in fractionated radiosurgery treatments of large cerebral AVMs. The strategy allows for a mean dose reduction in normal brain that may be valuable for a patient population with an otherwise normal life expectancy.

  19. Colon mucosal cells after high-dose fractional irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorc-Pleskovic, R.; Vraspir-Porenta, O.; Petrovic, D.; Zorc, M.; Pleskovic, L.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histological and stereological changes in cryptal enterocytes, mucosal lymphocytes and mast cells 10 days after irradiation. For experimental model, 24 Beagle dogs 1-2 years old were used. Twelve dogs were irradiated 20 days with 32 Gy over the whole pelvis and tail. Another 12 dogs represented a control group. For the detection of apoptosis, the TUNEL technique was used. Histological and stereological analyses were performed using a Wild sampling microscope M 1000. In the irradiated group, volume density (P < 0.01), numerical density (P < 0.05) and average volume of lymphocytes (P < 0.001) were significantly lower than in the nonirradiated group. Numerical areal density of mast cells in the irradiated group was also significantly lower (P < 0.05). Volume density (P < 0.001) and average volume of mast cells (P < 0.001) were significantly higher in the irradiated group. The results of our experiments show that irradiation causes injury and loss of lymphocytes and mast cells in the colon mucosa. Apoptosis was detected in enterocytes and lymphocytes in the irradiated group and in nonirradiated group in equal numbers (2.5 ± 0.3 vs. 2.3 ± 0.3; ns.), suggesting that 10 days after high-dose irradiation, the cell loss is not due to apoptosis. (author)

  20. Chromosome aberrations in human peripheral lymphocytes induced by single or fractionated X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.; Leonard, A.; Deknyudt, G.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated is the effect of single (125 and 250 R) and fractionated (2x125 R) irradiation on the output of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes of human peripheral blood kept between irradiations at the temperature of 5 deg C. The single irradiation is carried out immediately after vein-puncture. In the case of fractionated irradiation the first dose of 125R is given after vein-puncture, the second, in the interval of 2, 8 and 24 hours. Blood is cultivated immediately after two irradiations in order to prepare metaphase plates for cytogenic analysis. Repair processes in cell heritage structures are not realised in blood irradiated by fractions which is kept at 5 deg C between irradiations. On the contrary, chromosome fragments, interstitial deletions, aberrant cells and cell breaks are found in a large amount in blood irradiated by fractions. They have appeared with the authentically high statistic difference as compared with the cells irradiated one time with the same dose. This effect is probably attained due to blood preservation

  1. The kinetics of repair in mouse lung after fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, E.L.; Thames, H.D.; Watkins, T.L.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of repair of sublethal damage in mouse lung was studied after fractionated doses of 137 Cs γ-rays. A wide range of doses per fraction (1.7-12 Gy) was given with interfraction intervals ranging from 0.5 to 24 h. Data were analysed by a direct method of analysis using the incomplete repair model. The half-time of repair (Tsub(1/2)) was 0.76 h for the pneumonitis phase of damage (up to 8 months) and 0.65 h for the later phase of damage up to 12 months. Rate of repair was dependent on fraction size for both phases of lung damage and was faster after large dose fractions than after small fractions. Tsub(1/2) was 0.6 h (95% c.1. 0.53, 0.69) for doses per fraction greater than 5 Gy and 0.83 h (95% c.1. 0.76, 0.92) for doses per fraction of 2 Gy. Repair was nearly complete by 6 h at least for the pneumonitis phase of damage. If extrapolated to humans, these results imply that treatments with multiple fractions per day involving the lung will not be limited by the necessity for interfraction intervals much longer than 6 h. (author)

  2. The proliferative response of mouse intestinal crypts during fractionated irradiation of carbon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abo, M.; Abe, Y.; Mariya, Y.; Ando, K.

    2000-01-01

    Clonogenic assay of jejunal crypt during carbon beam and X-ray irradiations was performed. Fractionation with top-up dose assay revealed carbon beam irradiations caused more damage than X-ray did. To clarify this problem is urgent. (author)

  3. Evaluation of cell regeneration of bone marrow after fractionated irradiation of mouse in toto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisin, H.; Evercoren, A. van; Anckaert, M.A.; Coster, B.M. de

    1979-01-01

    We have studied the recovery for mice bone marrow cells after fractionated irradiation of the whole body. The additional dose (Dr) to obtain a given biological effect if the irradiation is split in two equal subfractions (2 Di) separated by a short interval of time (i) is 40 rad per day when the interval of time between the two irradiations is lenghtened of one day [fr

  4. Sulfur transfer in the distillate fractions of Arabian crude oils under gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basfar, Ahmed A.; Soliman, Yasser S.; Alkhuraiji, Turki S.

    2017-01-01

    Desulfurization of light distillation fractions including gasoline, kerosene and diesel obtained from the four Arabian crude oils (heavy, medium, light and extra light) upon γ-rays irradiation to different doses was investigated. In addition, yields vol%, FTIR analysis, kinematic viscosity and density of all distillation fractions of irradiated crude oils were evaluated. Limited radiation-induced desulfurization of those fractions was observed up to an irradiation dose of 200 kGy. FTIR analysis of those fractions indicates the absence of oxidized sulfur compounds, represented by S=O of sulfone group, indicating that γ-irradiation of the Arabian crude oils at normal conditions does not induce an oxidative desulfurization in those distillation fractions. Radiation-induced sulfur transfer decreases by 28.56% and increases in total sulfur by 16.8% in Arabian extra light oil and Arabian medium crude oil respectively. - Highlights: • Limited desulfurization in the light distillate fraction of Arabian crude oils using γ-rays was observed. • FTIR analysis confirms limited unchanged in density, viscosity and yields of Arabian crude oils. • In absence of oxidizer, radiation-induced sulfur transfer was observed in gasoline and diesel fractions of Arabian crude oils. • Radiation-induced oxidative desulfuration of the light distillate fractions depends on its characteristics.

  5. Differential effects of fractionated X irradiation on mouse spermatogonial stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Y.; Huiskamp, R.; Davids, J. A.; de rooij, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    The response of spermatogonial stem cells to fractionated X irradiation was studied in the various stages of the spermatogenic cycle of the CBA mouse. Fractionated doses of 2 + 2, 1 + 3, and 3 + 1 Gy with a 24-h interval between the doses were compared with a single dose of 4 Gy. The numbers of

  6. Response of the skin of hamsters to fractionated irradiation with X rays or accelerated carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leith, J.T.; Powers-Risius, P.; Woodruff, K.H.; McDonald, M.; Howard, J.

    1981-01-01

    The ventral thoracic skin of hamsters was irradiated with either single, split (two fractions given in 24 hr), or multiple (five fractions given daily) exposures of X rays or accelerated carbon ions using a 4-cm spread Bragg peak. Animals were positioned in the heavy-ion beam so that the ventral thoracic skin surface was 1 cm distal to the proximal peak of the modified beam. Early skin reactions from 6 to 30 days postirradiation were assessed. Using the average skin reactions produced in this period, it was found that the relative biological effect (RBE) for single doses of carbon ions was about 1.6 (5-17 Gy per fraction), for two fractions about 1.8 (5-17 Gy perfraction), and for five fractions about 1.9 (2.4-7.2 Gy per fraction). The fractional amount of sublethal damage repaired after carbon ion irradiation was about 0.3 (at dose levels of 2.4-8.0 Gy per fraction) compared to a value of about 0.45 (at dose levels of 60-13.0 Gy per fraction) found for the fractionated X irradiations, indicting about a 33% decrease in the relative amount of sublethal damage repaired after carbon ion irradiation in this position in the spread Bragg curve. Also, data were interpreted using plots of the reciprocal total dose needed to produce a given level of skin damage versus the dose per fraction used in the multifraction experiments, and of the RBE versus dose per fraction obtained from a nonparametric analysis of the responses. These approaches allow estimation of RBE at dose levels relevant to the clinical situation. Also, estimation may be made of the maximum permissible RBE by using the zero dose intercept value from the linear reciprocal dose plot. With this approach, the RBE at a dose level of 2 Gy is about 2.5 and the maximum RBE value is about 2.7

  7. Tests of equal effect per fraction in microcolony assays of survival after fractionated irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.M.G.

    1985-01-01

    H.D Thames, Jr. and H.R. Withers propose a test of an equal effect per fraction in microcolony assays after fractionated radiation, in which the total effect is measured by counting microcolonies derived from surviving cells in a tissue. The factors considered to influence the cytocidal effect per fraction are incomplete repair, repopulation, and synchrony. The statistics used in the method are criticized and conditions are given under which the test should not be used. An alternative method of testing for an equal effect per fraction is proposed. The pros and cons of each test are discussed and compared using some mouse jejunal crypt cell survival data

  8. Influence of trichlorfon and fractionated irradiation on hydroproteolytic activity of pancreas and intestinal tissues of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocmierska-Grodzka, D [Akademia Medyczna, Bialystok (Poland). Zaklad Farmakologii

    1976-03-01

    Investigations were carried out of the hydroproteolytic activity of pancreas, small intestine and colon of rats after fractionated irradiation (5x150 R). Marked postirradiation enhancement of lipase activity was found in pancreas and duodenal part of intestine as well as an increase of B-glucuronidase and acid phosphatase activity in nearly all parts of the intestinal tissues. Fractionated irradiation resulted in an increase of pancreatic catheptic (proteolytic) activity, causing simultaneous decrease of proteolytic activity in intestine and colon. Preventive administation of Trichlorfon ten days before irradiation (10 mg or 30 mg/kg) evoked modification of hydroproteolytic activity in intestinal tissues of healthy and irradiated rats. 30mg/kg Trichlorfon exerted antilipolytic and anticatheptic effects in pancreas and intestinal tissues of irradiated rats.

  9. Accumulation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Normal Tissues After Fractionated Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebe, Claudia E.; Fricke, Andreas; Wendorf, Juliane; Stuetzel, Annika; Kuehne, Martin; Ong, Mei Fang; Lipp, Peter; Ruebe, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: There is increasing evidence that genetic factors regulating the recognition and/or repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are responsible for differences in radiosensitivity among patients. Genetically defined DSB repair capacities are supposed to determine patients' individual susceptibility to develop adverse normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. In a preclinical murine model, we analyzed the impact of different DSB repair capacities on the cumulative DNA damage in normal tissues during the course of fractionated irradiation. Material and Methods: Different strains of mice with defined genetic backgrounds (SCID -/- homozygous, ATM -/- homozygous, ATM +/- heterozygous, and ATM +/+ wild-type mice) were subjected to single (2 Gy) or fractionated irradiation (5 x 2 Gy). By enumerating γH2AX foci, the formation and rejoining of DSBs were analyzed in organs representative of both early-responding (small intestine) and late-responding tissues (lung, kidney, and heart). Results: In repair-deficient SCID -/- and ATM -/- homozygous mice, large proportions of radiation-induced DSBs remained unrepaired after each fraction, leading to the pronounced accumulation of residual DNA damage after fractionated irradiation, similarly visible in early- and late-responding tissues. The slight DSB repair impairment of ATM +/- heterozygous mice was not detectable after single-dose irradiation but resulted in a significant increase in unrepaired DSBs during the fractionated irradiation scheme. Conclusions: Radiation-induced DSBs accumulate similarly in acute- and late-responding tissues during fractionated irradiation, whereas the whole extent of residual DNA damage depends decisively on the underlying genetically defined DSB repair capacity. Moreover, our data indicate that even minor impairments in DSB repair lead to exceeding DNA damage accumulation during fractionated irradiation and thus may have a significant impact on normal tissue responses in clinical

  10. Histological examination of the effect of differently fractionated irradiations in rat and mouse organs. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unger, E.

    1984-01-01

    The spleen of rats was irradiated with 50 Gy dose local X-rays in two different fractionation rhythms, i.e. twice a week given high and daily applied lower fractions of radiation. According to the results of 3 H-thymidine autoradiography made after the last irradiation 24 hours later both in the white and the red pulp the labelling index was less on the effect of twice in a week applied high radiation fractions than in case of daily given lower fractions. This indicate in correlation with the results of earlier analogous histological experiments that the damaging effect of rarely given higher fractions of radiation in the spleen is especially obvious. (orig.) [de

  11. Investigation of the bystander effect in MRC5 cells after acute and fractionated irradiation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhozaman Soleymanifard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE has been defined as radiation responses observed in nonirradiated cells. It has been the focus of investigators worldwide due to the deleterious effects it induces in nonirradiated cells. The present study was performed to investigate whether acute or fractionated irradiation will evoke a differential bystander response in MRC5 cells. A normal human cell line (MRC5, and a human lung tumor cell line (QU-DB were exposed to 0, 1, 2, and 4Gy of single acute or fractionated irradiation of equal fractions with a gap of 6 h. The MRC5 cells were supplemented with the media of irradiated cells and their micronucleus frequency was determined. The micronucleus frequency after single and fractionated irradiation did not vary significantly in the MRC5 cells conditioned with autologous or QU-DB cell-irradiated media, except for 4Gy where the frequency of micronucleated cells was lower in those MRC5 cells cultured in the media of QU-DB-exposed with a single dose of 4Gy. Our study demonstrates that the radiation-induced bystander effect was almost similar after single acute and fractionated exposure in MRC5 cells.

  12. Investigation of the bystander effect in MRC5 cells after acute and fractionated irradiation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Toossi, Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni; Samani, Roghayeh Kamran; Mohebbi, Shokoufeh

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has been defined as radiation responses observed in nonirradiated cells. It has been the focus of investigators worldwide due to the deleterious effects it induces in nonirradiated cells. The present study was performed to investigate whether acute or fractionated irradiation will evoke a differential bystander response in MRC5 cells. A normal human cell line (MRC5), and a human lung tumor cell line (QU-DB) were exposed to 0, 1, 2, and 4Gy of single acute or fractionated irradiation of equal fractions with a gap of 6 h. The MRC5 cells were supplemented with the media of irradiated cells and their micronucleus frequency was determined. The micronucleus frequency after single and fractionated irradiation did not vary significantly in the MRC5 cells conditioned with autologous or QU-DB cell-irradiated media, except for 4Gy where the frequency of micronucleated cells was lower in those MRC5 cells cultured in the media of QU-DB-exposed with a single dose of 4Gy. Our study demonstrates that the radiation-induced bystander effect was almost similar after single acute and fractionated exposure in MRC5 cells. (author)

  13. Clinical and immunologic effects of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in refractory rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trentham, D.E.; Belli, J.A.; Anderson, R.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Goetzl, E.J.; David, J.R.; Austen, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Ten patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were given 3000 rad of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in an uncontrolled therapeutic trial. Total lymphoid irradiation was associated with objective evidence of considerable clinical improvement in eight patients and with reduced blood lymphocyte counts in all 10. On completion of irradiation, there was an abrogation of lymphocyte reactivity in vitro in the patients with clinical responses, but abnormal antibody activities characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis and normal components of humoral immunity were not suppressed. Partial recrudescence of arthritis occurred shortly after a year after the completion of irradiation and was paralleled by a restitution of lymphocyte concentrations and responsiveness to mitogens to levels similar to those observed before irradiation. These data provide further evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and demonstrate that total lymphoid irradiation can induce temporary relief, but they do not ascertain whether the natural history of this disease was altered

  14. Clinical and immunologic effects of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in refractory rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trentham, D.E.; Belli, J.A.; Anderson, R.J.; Buckley, J.A.; Goetzl, E.J.; David, J.R.; Austen, K.F.

    1981-01-01

    Ten patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were given 3000 rad of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation in an uncontrolled therapeutic trial. Total lymphoid irradiation was associated with objective evidence of considerable clinical improvement in eight patients and with reduced blood lymphocyte counts in all 10. On completion of irradiation, there was an abrogation of lymphocyte reactivity in vitro in the patients with clinical responses, but abnormal antibody activities characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis and normal components of humoral immunity were not suppressed. Partial recrudescence of arthritis occurred shortly before a year after the completion of irradiation and was paralleled by a restitution of lymphocyte concentrations and responsiveness to mitogens to levels similar to those observed before irradiation. These data provide further evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and demonstrate that total lymphoid irradiation can induce temporary relief, but they do not ascertain whether the natural history of this disease was altered

  15. Boll weevil: experimental sterilization of large numbers by fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, J.W.; Wright, J.E.; Davich, T.B.; Roberson, J.; Griffin, J.G.; Darden, E.

    1978-01-01

    Boll weevils, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman, 9 days after egg implantation in the larval diet were transported from the Boll Weevil Research Laboratory, Mississippi State, MS, to the Comparative Animal Research Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, and irradiated with 6.9 krad (test 1) or 7.2 krad (test 2) of 60 Co gamma rays delivered in 25 equal doses over 100 h. In test 1, from 600 individual pairs of T (treated) males x N (normal) females, only 114 eggs hatched from a sample of 950 eggs, and 47 adults emerged from a sample of 1042 eggs. Also, from 600 pairs of T females x N males, 6 eggs hatched of a sample of 6 eggs and 12 adults emerged from a sample of 20 eggs. In test 2, from 700 individual pairs of T males x N females, 54 eggs hatched from a sample of 1510, and 10 adults emerged from a sample of 1703 eggs. Also, in T females x N males matings, 1 egg hatched of a sample of 3, and no adults emerged from a sample of 4. Transportation and handling in the 2nd test reduced adult emergence an avg of 49%. Thus the 2 replicates in test 2 resulted in 3.4 x 10 5 and 4.3 x 10 5 irradiated weevils emerging/day for 7 days. Bacterial contamination of weevils was low

  16. Effect of low molecular fraction of thymus humoral factor on blood formation processes of irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolyarova, T.V.; Skobel'tsyna, E.S.; Grinberg, S.M.; Kruglikov, I.L.; Korotaev, G.K.; Tepelina, O.M.; Il'ina, T.I.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of low-molecular fraction of thymus humoral factor on blood formation in mice irradiated at 4 Gy was studied. It is shown that injection of low-molecular fraction of thymus hymoral factor to irradiated animals affects proliferative processes in spleen and bone marrow, however the degree of the effect depends on the injection scheme of the preparation. Application of mathematical planning methods of the experiment enables to analyze various injection schemes of low-molecular fraction of thymus humoral factor on the investigated indices. The optimal scheme of preparation injection is determined: 1st injection with the dose of 10 mkg/kg following 4 hour after irradiation, 2d injection - with the same dose in 7-21 days

  17. The clinical research on fractionated irradiation treatment with X knife in patients of PD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Pengxiang; Chen Xu; Ai Quanshan; Xia Jiyong; Yang Jiongda; Chen Binghuan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore X knife treatment methods and to seek a new effective way for PD therapy. Methods: Sixteen patients of PD were treated by performing VIM with 2 times of X knife fractionated irradiation (interval, 24 h) to a total dose of 140 Gy, and 8 patients of PD were treated by performing VIM with 3 times of X knife fractionated irradiation (interval, 24 h) to a total of dose of 165 Gy. Results: During 3-24 months follow-up after X knife treatment, tremor was stopped in 19 patients and was relived significantly in 5 patients. Rigidity and bradykinesia of PD were relieved slightly. No complications were observed. Conclusion: To perform VIM with X knife fractionated irradiation can be safely and effectively used to treat PD. The tremor of PD can be relieved slightly

  18. Histopathological changes in the irradiated normal organs of guinea pigs with conventional fractionation and hyperfractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inomata, Taisuke; Itoh, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Nobuaki

    1998-01-01

    Guinea pigs were divided into groups according to four irradiation schedules : 2 Gy/3 Gy x 1/day, five fractions/week, total 80 Gy/81 Gy (A/C group) and 1.0 Gy/1.5 Gy x 2/day, ten fractions/week, total 80 Gy/81 Gy (B/D group). The A group and the C group pathologically caused severe damage in the kidney six and three months after irradiation, respectively. In the B group pathological analysis suggested that only slight-to-moderate changes were occurred in the Bowman's capsule. The D group caused slight damage in the kidney six months after irradiation. Hyperfractionation (B/D group) used in this protocol can clearly reduce radiation damage in the kidney of guinea pigs as compared with conventional fractionation (A/C group). (author)

  19. Role of Rad52 in fractionated irradiation induced signaling in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Krishna, Malini

    2012-01-01

    The effect of fractionated doses of γ-irradiation (2 Gy per fraction over 5 days), as delivered in cancer radiotherapy, was compared with acute doses of 10 and 2 Gy, in A549 cells. A549 cells were found to be relatively more radioresistant if the 10 Gy dose was delivered as a fractionated regimen. Microarray analysis showed upregulation of DNA repair and cell cycle arrest genes in the cells exposed to fractionated irradiation. There was intense activation of DNA repair pathway-associated genes (DNA-PK, ATM, Rad52, MLH1 and BRCA1), efficient DNA repair and phospho-p53 was found to be translocated to the nucleus of A549 cells exposed to fractionated irradiation. MCF-7 cells responded differently in fractionated regimen. Silencing of the Rad52 gene in fractionated group of A549 cells made the cells radiosensitive. The above result indicated increased radioresistance in A549 cells due to the activation of Rad52 gene.

  20. Dietary enhancement of intestinal radioresistance during fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pageau, R.; St-Pierre, C.

    1978-01-01

    Rats fed laboratory chow or elemental diet 3 were given fractions of 240 rads of 60 Co γ radiation abdominally (1200 rads/week) until all animals had died. Changes in appetite, body weight, and mortality were monitored as a function of the cumulative dose received. More radiation was needed in the diet-fed group to achieve both 0 and 100% mortality, a difference of 37% at the mean lethal dose level. Both groups developed similar progressive anorexia but the diet-fed animals lost weight more slowly. Data indicate that basic intestinal radioresistance is enhanced by feeding the elemental diet

  1. Monitoring PAI-1 and VEGF Levels in 6 Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Xenografts During Fractionated Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Christine; Kielow, Achim; Schilling, Daniela; Maftei, Constantin-Alin; Zips, Daniel; Yaromina, Ala; Baumann, Michael; Molls, Michael; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that the plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are regulated by hypoxia and irradiation and are involved in neoangiogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine in vivo whether changes in PAI-1 and VEGF during fractionated irradiation could predict for radiation resistance. Methods and Materials: Six xenografted tumor lines from human squamous cell carcinomas (HSCC) of the head and neck were irradiated with 0, 3, 5, 10, and 15 daily fractions of 2 Gy. The PAI-1 and VEGF antigen levels in tumor lysates were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The amounts of PAI-1 and VEGF were compared with the dose to cure 50% of tumors (TCD 50 ). Colocalization of PAI-1, pimonidazole (hypoxia), CD31 (endothelium), and Hoechst 33342 (perfusion) was examined by immunofluorescence. Results: Human PAI-1 and VEGF (hVEGF) expression levels were induced by fractionated irradiation in UT-SCC-15, UT-SCC-14, and UT-SCC-5 tumors, and mouse VEGF (msVEGF) was induced only in UT-SCC-5 tumors. High hVEGF levels were significantly associated with radiation sensitivity after 5 fractions (P=.021), and high msVEGF levels were significantly associated with radiation resistance after 10 fractions (P=.007). PAI-1 staining was observed in the extracellular matrix, the cytoplasm of fibroblast-like stroma cells, and individual tumor cells at all doses of irradiation. Colocalization studies showed PAI-1 staining close to microvessels. Conclusions: These results indicate that the concentration of tumor-specific and host-specific VEGF during fractionated irradiation could provide considerably divergent information for the outcome of radiation therapy.

  2. Curcumin Stimulates the Antioxidant Mechanisms in Mouse Skin Exposed to Fractionated γ-Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Chandra Jagetia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractionated irradiation is one of the important radiotherapy regimens to treat different types of neoplasia. Despite of the immense therapeutic gains accrued by delivering fractionated irradiation to tumors, the radiation burden on skin increases significantly. Low doses of irradiation to skin adversely affect its molecular and metabolic status. The use of antioxidant/s may help to alleviate the radiation-induced changes in the skin and allow delivering a higher dose of radiation to attain better therapeutic gains. Curcumin is an antioxidant and a free radical scavenging dietary supplement, commonly used as a flavoring agent in curries. Therefore, the effect of 100 mg/kg body weight curcumin was studied on the antioxidant status of mice skin exposed to a total dose of 10, 20 and 40 Gy γ-radiation below the rib cage delivered as a single fraction of 2 Gy per day for 5, 10 or 20 days. Skin biopsies from both the curcumin treated or untreated irradiated groups were collected for the biochemical estimations at various post-irradiation times. The irradiation of animals caused a dose dependent decline in the glutathione concentration, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activities and increased the lipid peroxidation in the irradiated skin. Curcumin treatment before irradiation resulted in a significant rise in the glutathione concentration and activities of both the glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymes in mouse skin, whereas lipid peroxidation declined significantly. The present study indicates that curcumin treatment increased the antioxidant status of mouse exposed to different doses of fractionated γ-radiation.

  3. Effect-independent measures of tissue responses to fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thames, H.D. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Tissue repair factors measure the sparing that can be achieved from dose fractionation in the absence of proliferation. Four repair factors are analysed in these terms: Fsub(R),Fsub(rec), the ratio of linear-quadratic survival model parameters β/α and the half-time Tsub(1/2) for intracellular repair processes. Theoretically, Fsub(R) and Fsub(rec) are increasing functions of D 1 , and thus depend on level of effect. This is confirmed by analysis of skin reactions after multifractionated radiation. By contrast, β/α is effect-independent as a measure of repair capacity in skin, gut, and bone marrow, tissues for which it is reasonable to assume that survival of identifiable target cells is the primary determinant of the endpoint. For a functional endpoint not clearly connected with the depletion of a specific target-cell population (late fibrotic reactions in the kidney), there was an increase in β/α with increased levels of injury, but this was statistically insignificant. Tsub(1/2) is independent of fraction size in skin, gut, and spinal cord, and is longer (1.5 hours) in the late-reacting tissues (lung and spinal cord) than in those that react acutely (Tsub(1/2) less than 1 hour), with skin as the exception (Tsub(1/2) approx. 1.3 hours). (author)

  4. Long-term survival of skin allografts in mice treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavin, S.; Strober, S.; Fuks, Z.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1976-01-01

    Treatment of recipient Balb/c mice with fractionated, high-dose total lymphoid irradiation, a procedure commonly used in the therapy of human malignant lymphomas, resulted in fivefold prolongation of the survival of C57BL/Ka skin allografts despite major histocompatibility differences between the strains (H-2/sup d/ and H-2/sup b/, respectively). Infusion of 10 7 (C57BL/Ka x Balb/c)F 1 bone marrow cells after total lymphoid irradiation further prolonged C57BL/Ka skin graft survival to more than 120 days. Total lymphoid irradiation may eventually prove useful in clinical organ transplantation

  5. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF IRRADIATION-DRIVEN HYDROGEN ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION IN ANALOGS OF PROTOPLANETARY HYDROUS SILICATE DUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Remusat, Laurent [IMPMC, CNRS UMR 7590, Sorbonne Universités, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, IRD, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, CP 52, 57 rue Cuvier, Paris F-75231 (France); Laurent, Boris; Leroux, Hugues, E-mail: mathieu.roskosz@mnhn.fr [Unité Matériaux et Transformations, Université Lille 1, CNRS UMR 8207, Bâtiment C6, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2016-11-20

    The origin of hydrogen in chondritic components is poorly understood. Their isotopic composition is heavier than the solar nebula gas. In addition, in most meteorites, hydrous silicates are found to be lighter than the coexisting organic matter. Ionizing irradiation recently emerged as an efficient hydrogen fractionating process in organics, but its effect on H-bearing silicates remains essentially unknown. We report the evolution of the D/H of hydrous silicates experimentally irradiated by electrons. Thin films of amorphous silica, amorphous “serpentine,” and pellets of crystalline muscovite were irradiated at 4 and 30 keV. For all samples, irradiation leads to a large hydrogen loss correlated with a moderate deuterium enrichment of the solid residue. The entire data set can be described by a Rayleigh distillation. The calculated fractionation factor is consistent with a kinetically controlled fractionation during the loss of hydrogen. Furthermore, for a given ionizing condition, the deuteration of the silicate residues is much lower than the deuteration measured on irradiated organic macromolecules. These results provide firm evidence of the limitations of ionizing irradiation as a driving mechanism for D-enrichment of silicate materials. The isotopic composition of the silicate dust cannot rise from a protosolar to a chondritic signature during solar irradiations. More importantly, these results imply that irradiation of the disk naturally induces a strong decoupling of the isotopic signatures of coexisting organics and silicates. This decoupling is consistent with the systematic difference observed between the heavy organic matter and the lighter water typically associated with minerals in the matrix of most carbonaceous chondrites.

  6. Prooxidate - antioxidate homeostasis in guinea pigs after fractional low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baraboj, V.A.; Olyijnik, S.A.; Khmelevs'kij, Yi.V.

    1993-01-01

    We studied the influence of fractional total irradiation in the total dose of 1 Gy on the amount of lipids peroxide oxidation (LPO) products and ascorbic acid in the spleen, intestine and brain of guinea-pigs. The obtained date suggest that it is advisable to use ascorbic acid to correct postirradiation changes in the organism exposed to small doses of ionizing radiation

  7. Annual rate of hearing loss falls after fractionated stereotactic irradiation for vestibular schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Touru; Shirato, Hiroki; Takeichi, Norihito; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Fukuda, Satoshi; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The rate of hearing loss in a population before and after irradiation was investigated to determine the effect of irradiation on hearing impairment. Methods and materials: In 72 patients with vestibular schwannoma who received fractionated stereotactic irradiation from 1992 to 1999, 21 had had their hearing levels examined 3 months or more before the treatment. The mean time between the initial examination and treatment was 18.6 months (range: 3-89 months), and the mean time between treatment and the last follow-up was 24.2 months (12-69 months). Thirty-six to 50 Gy in 20-25 fractions over 5 to 6 weeks was given using an X-ray beam from a linear accelerator. Pure tone average (PTA) was measured using the mean hearing level at five frequencies, and the annual rate of hearing loss was defined as [(hearing loss in PTA(dB))/(follow-up period (months)x12)]. Results: The actual cumulative curve of decrease in tumor size of 2 mm or more was 38.3% at 2 years and 80.0% at 3 years. The mean of hearing loss in PTA was 11.6±10.3 dB (-1 to 35 dB) from the initial examination to the start of irradiation and 11.9±14.4 dB (-14 to 37 dB) from the start of irradiation to the last follow-up. The mean annual rates of hearing loss before irradiation and in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th years after irradiation were, respectively, 18.6, 11.2, 6.2, 5.1, and 5.0 dB/year. The annual rates of hearing loss in the 2nd year (P=0.025) and 3rd year (P=0.018) were significantly slower than the rate before irradiation. Conclusions: The mean annual rate of hearing loss was higher before irradiation than after irradiation, and hearing loss slowed rather than accelerated after irradiation. Although hearing loss after the treatment was usually permanent, fractionated stereotactic irradiation was suggested to be effective to lower the rate of hearing loss

  8. Histologic alterations of the normal bladder wall following to variably fractionated irradiation - an experimentation on animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueller, J.; Fritzsche, V.; Kob, D.; Arndt, J.; Kriester, A.; Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet, Jena

    1986-01-01

    The histopathologic alterations of the bladder wall were investigated in 180 rabbits irradiated with different fractionations and total focal doses. Animals sacrified one week after the end of irradiation showed alterations of the urothelium (desquamation, increased polymorphism of nuclei vacuolizations) as well as oedematous and hyperemic reactions in submucosa and muscularis. These alterations became stronger when the single and total focal dose and the ret values were increased. Animals sacrified three to six months after the end of irradiation showed dystrophic-sclerotic processes as well as vascular obliterations in the submucosa and muscularis. The alterations were only clearly visible in case of a total focal dose of at least 30 Gy. With regard to a minimization of histopathologic alterations of the bladder wall, a fractionation of 1.5 Gy per day has to be considered as favorable in radiotherapy of the carcinoma of the urinary bladder. (orig.) [de

  9. A non-invasive method for fractionated steriotactic irradiation of brain tumors with linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hariz, M.I.; Laitinen, L.V.; Henriksson, R.; Saeterborg, N.-E.; Loefroth, P.-O.

    1990-01-01

    A new technique for fractionated stereotactic irradiation of intracranial lesions is described. The treatment is based on a versatile, non-invasive interface for stereotactic localization of the brain target imaged by computed tomography (CT), angiography or magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), and subsequent repetitive stereotactic irradiation of the target using a linear accelerator. The fractionation of the stereotactic irradiation was intended to meet the requirements of the basic principles of radiobiology. The radiophysical evaluation using phantoms, and the clinical results in a small number of patients, demonstrated a good reproducibilit between repeated positionings of the target in the isocenter of the accelerator, and a high degree of accuracy in the treatment of brain lesions. (authors). 28 refs.; 11 figs.; 1 tab

  10. Chromosomal aberrations in Cynomolgus peripheral lymphocytes during and after fractionated whole-body γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedeney, G.; Malarbet, J.L.; Doloy, M.T.

    1989-01-01

    Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were exposed to fractionated whole-body γ-irradiation at high and low dose rates for 4 or 5 weeks. The time-dependence of chromosomal aberrations was studied in relation to the number of lymphocytes during irradiation and after exposure for periods of up to about 600 days for chromosomal aberrations and 200 days for lymphocyte counts. Additivity of the daily effects on the number of chromosomal aberrations was observed during the exposures. Immediately after the end of the exposures the number of chromosomal aberrations decreased to reach low values. The disappearance of chromosomal aberrations seemed to be related to recovery of the lymphocyte counts. The data presented here emphasize the different kinetic patterns of chromosomal aberrations after fractionated and acute irradiation. (author)

  11. Changes in the fraction of total hypoxia and hypoxia subtypes in human squamous cell carcinomas upon fractionated irradiation: Evaluation using pattern recognition in microcirculatory supply units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maftei, Constantin-Alin; Bayer, Christine; Shi, Kuangyu; Astner, Sabrina T.; Vaupel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Evaluate changes in total hypoxia and hypoxia subtypes in vital tumor tissue of human head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (hHNSCC) upon fractionated irradiation. Materials and methods: Xenograft tumors were generated from 5 hHNSCC cell lines (UT-SCC-15, FaDu, SAS, UT-SCC-5 and UT-SCC-14). Hypoxia subtypes were quantified in cryosections based on (immuno-)fluorescent marker distribution patterns of Hoechst 33342 (perfusion), pimonidazole (hypoxia) and CD31 (endothelium) in microcirculatory supply units (MCSUs). Tumors were irradiated with 5 or 10 fractions of 2 Gy, 5×/week. Results: Upon irradiation with 10 fractions, the overall fraction of hypoxic MCSUs decreased in UT-SCC-15, FaDu and SAS, remained the same in UT-SCC-5 and increased in UT-SCC-14. Decreases were observed in the proportion of chronically hypoxic MCSUs in UT-SCC-15, in the fraction of acutely hypoxic MCSUs in UT-SCC-15 and SAS, and in the percentage of hypoxemically hypoxic MCSUs in SAS tumors. After irradiation with 5 fractions, there were no significant changes in hypoxia subtypes. Changes in the overall fraction of hypoxic MCSUs were comparable to corresponding alterations in the proportions of acutely hypoxic MCSUs. There was no correlation between radiation resistance (TCD 50 ) and any of the investigated hypoxic fractions upon fractionated irradiation. Conclusions: This study shows that there are large alterations in the fractions of hypoxia subtypes upon irradiation that can differ from changes in the overall fraction of hypoxic MCSUs.

  12. Repair of skin damage during fractionated irradiation with gamma rays and low-LET carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko; Uzawa, Akiko; Takai, Nobuhiko; Fukawa, Takeshi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Aoki, Mizuho; Hirayama, Ryoichi

    2006-01-01

    In clinical use of carbon-ion beams, a deep-seated tumor is irradiated with a Spread-Out Bragg peak (SOBP) with a high-linear energy transfer (LET) feature, whereas surface skin is irradiated with an entrance plateau, the LET of which is lower than that of the peak. The repair kinetics of murine skin damage caused by an entrance plateau of carbon ions was compared with that caused by photons using a scheme of daily fractionated doses followed by a top-up dose. Right hind legs received local irradiations with either 20 keV/μm carbon ions or γ rays. The skin reaction of the irradiated legs was scored every other day up to Day 35 using a scoring scale that consisted of 10 steps, ranging from 0.5 to 5.0. An isoeffect dose to produce a skin reaction score of 3.0 was used to obtain a total dose and a top-up dose for each fractionation. Dependence on a preceding dose and on the time interval of a top-up dose was examined using γ rays. For fractionated γ rays, the total dose linearly increased while the top-up dose linearly decreased with an increase in the number of fractions. The magnitude of damage repair depended on the size of dose per fraction, and was larger for 5.2 Gy than 12.5 Gy. The total dose of carbon ions with 5.2 Gy per fraction did not change till 2 fractions, but abruptly increased at the 3rd fraction. Factors such as rapid repopulation, induced repair and cell cycle synchronization are possible explanations for the abrupt increase. As an abrupt increase/decrease of normal tissue damage could be caused by changing the number of fractions in carbon-ion radiotherapy, we conclude that, unlike photon therapy, skin damage should be carefully studied when the number of fractions is changed in new clinical trials. (author)

  13. Beam Attenuators and the Risk of Unrecognized Large-Fraction Irradiation of Critical Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luka, S.; Marks, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiation beam attenuators led to radiation injury of the spinal cord in one patient and of the peripheral nerve in another due to unsuspected large-fraction irradiation. The anatomic distribution of radiation dose was reconstructed in the sagittal plane for the patient who developed radiation myelopathy and in the axial plane for the patient who developed peripheral neuropathy. The actual dose delivered to the injured structure in each patient was taken from the dose distribution and recorded along with the time, number of fractions, and dose per fraction. The patient who developed radiation myelopathy received a total of 46.5 Gy in twenty-three 2.1 Gy fractions in 31 days to the upper cervical spinal cord where the thickness of the neck was less than the central axis thickness due to cervical lordosis and absence of a posterior compensating filter. The patient who developed peripheral neuropathy received 55 Gy in twenty-five 2.2 Gy fractions in 50 days to the femoral nerve using bolus over the groins and an anterior one-half value layer Cerrobend pelvic block to bias the dose anteriorly. Compensating filters and other beam attenuators should be used with caution because they may result in unsuspected large-fraction irradiation and total doses of radiation that exceed the tolerance of critical structures.

  14. Beam Attenuators and the Risk of Unrecognized Large-Fraction Irradiation of Critical Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luka, S.; Marks, J.E.

    2015-01-15

    The use of radiation beam attenuators led to radiation injury of the spinal cord in one patient and of the peripheral nerve in another due to unsuspected large-fraction irradiation. The anatomic distribution of radiation dose was reconstructed in the sagittal plane for the patient who developed radiation myelopathy and in the axial plane for the patient who developed peripheral neuropathy. The actual dose delivered to the injured structure in each patient was taken from the dose distribution and recorded along with the time, number of fractions, and dose per fraction. The patient who developed radiation myelopathy received a total of 46.5 Gy in twenty-three 2.1 Gy fractions in 31 days to the upper cervical spinal cord where the thickness of the neck was less than the central axis thickness due to cervical lordosis and absence of a posterior compensating filter. The patient who developed peripheral neuropathy received 55 Gy in twenty-five 2.2 Gy fractions in 50 days to the femoral nerve using bolus over the groins and an anterior one-half value layer Cerrobend pelvic block to bias the dose anteriorly. Compensating filters and other beam attenuators should be used with caution because they may result in unsuspected large-fraction irradiation and total doses of radiation that exceed the tolerance of critical structures.

  15. Altered fractionation of hemithorax irradiation for pleural mesothelioma and failure patterns after treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holsti, L.R. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Pyrhoenen, S. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Kajanti, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Maentylae, M. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Mattson, K. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Div. of Pulmonary Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Maasilta, P. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Div. of Pulmonary Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Kivisaari, L. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland)

    1997-09-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare malignancy with a bleak prognosis. The role of radiotherapy has not yet been clarified. Our aim was to study the effect of altered fractionation on mesothelioma. We have treated 57 patients, 41 males and 16 females, with hemithorax irradiation with six different fractionation schedules. All the patients have been included in a combined modality program consisting of surgery followed by chemotherapy and finally by hemithorax irradiation. The radiotherapy schedules used were: I. Conventional fractionation of 20 Gy in 10 fractions over 12 days. II, Split-course radiotherapy 55 Gy in 25 fractions of 2.2 Gy over 7 weeks (a two weeks rest halfways) followed by a boost dose of 15 Gy over 8 days to the major tumour area. III. Hyperfractionation of 70 Gy over 7 weeks, 1.25 Gy BID with a 6-h interval and a 10-day rest halfways. IV. Combined hyperfractionation and hypofractionation, 35 Gy hyperfractionation in 28 fractions (1.25 Gy BID with a 6-h interval) over three weeks followed by 36 Gy hypofractionation 9 fractions of 4 Gy given every other day over 3 weeks to the major tumour areas only. V. Hypofractionation of 38.5 Gy over 15 days (9x3.5 Gy). VI. Combined conventional radiotherapy and hypofractionation with 20 Gy given conventionally in 10 fractions followed by 10 fractions of 3 Gy over two weeks, overall time 4 weeks. The 2-year survival rate of all patients was 21% and the 5-year survival rate 9%. Two patients are still alive more than 6 and 9 years after radiotherapy. Progression occurred after surgery in four patients, during and after chemotherapy in 22 patients and after completed radiotherapy in 29 patients. The pattern of progression was similar in each treatment group. (orig.).

  16. Fractionated homogenous total-body irradiation prior to bone marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duehmke, E; Brix, F; Hebbinghaus, D; Jensen, M; Wendhausen, H; Schmitz, N

    1985-03-01

    At the University of Kiel, myeloid and acute lymphatic leukemia is treated since 1983 by total-body irradiation applied prior to bone marrow transplantation. Dose deviations in the midplane caused by the irregular surface and tissue inhomogeneities of the patient are reduced down to +-3.5% compared to the central ray, with the help of CT-based individual compensators. This method prevents above all an excessive dose to the lungs. The radiobiologic advantages of fractionated irradiation have been employed for all patients treated hitherto (n = 9). At present, a total body dose of 12 Gy in six fractions is applied within three days. There were no undesired acute radiogenic reactions except a mild acute mucositis found in all patients. Chronic side effects, especially in the lungs, were not demonstrated, too. However, the average follow-up time of 149 days has been rather short. One patient died from relapse of leukemia after a total dose of 10 Gy, another patient died because the transplanted bone marrow was rejected, and a third died from catheter sepsis. Six out of nine patients are in complete remission with a maximum index of Karnofsky. The limited experiences gained hitherto show that the homogeneous accelerated-fractionated total-body irradiation offers essential advantages compared to non-compensated single dose irradiation with respect to the prevention of undesired radiogenic effects in sound tissues and that its therapeutic efficacy is at least the same.

  17. Combined treatment of the immunoconjugate bivatuzumab mertansine and fractionated irradiation improves local tumour control in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurtner, Kristin; Hessel, Franziska; Eicheler, Wolfgang; Dörfler, Annegret; Zips, Daniel; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: To test whether BIWI 1 (bivatuzumab mertansine), an immunoconjugate of the humanized anti-CD44v6 monoclonal antibody BIWA 4 and the maytansinoid DM1, given simultaneously to fractionated irradiation improves local tumour control in vivo compared with irradiation alone. Material and methods: For growth delay, FaDu tumours were treated with 5 intravenous injections (daily) of phosphate buffered saline (PBS, control), BIWA 4 (monoclonal antibody against CD44v6) or BIWI 1 (bivatuzumab mertansine) at two different dose levels (50 μg/kg DM1 and 100 μg/kg DM1). For local tumour control, FaDu tumours received fractionated irradiation (5f/5d) with simultaneous PBS, BIWA 4 or BIWI 1 (two dose levels). Results: BIWI 1 significantly improved local tumour control after irradiation with 5 fractions already in the lower concentration. The dose modifying factor of 1.9 is substantial compared to the majority of other modifiers of radiation response. Conclusion: Because of the magnitude of the curative effect, this approach is highly promising and should be further evaluated using similar combinations with improved tumour-specificity.

  18. The effects of single and fractionated irradiation of the trunk in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giri, P.G.S.; Kimler, B.F.; Giri, U.P.; Cox, G.G.; Reddy, E.K.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of whole trunk irradiation on the development of functional damage was investigated in rats. Rats were restrained without anesthesia such that only the trunk (from clavicle to pelvic girdle) was irradiated with a Cs-137 irradiator at a dose rate of 8.5 Gy/min. Rats received single doses of 9.4, 11.7, 14.1, or 16.4 Gy; or total doses of 11.7, 14.1, 16.4, 18.8, or 21.1 Gy in two equal fractions separated by 4-6 hr. Except for the highest dose in both schedules, there was no lethality; 16.4 Gy reduced survival to 45% and 21.1 Gy in two fractions reduced survival to 77% by day 150. From day 10 to day 150 there was a dose-dependent reduction in weight for both schedules, with the two-dose response displaced from the single dose response by ≅ 6 Gy. A whole-body plethysmograph was used to measure respiration frequency. There was no increase in respiration frequency compared to control animals, except for the highest single dose - 16.4 Gy producing an increase that was manifested from 10 to 150 days. The authors conclude that, in this rat trunk irradiation model, fractionation into two equal doses separated by 4-6 hr produces a sparing effect of ≅ 6 Gy as measured by delay in weight gain (presumably a result of irradiation of the abdomen); and ≥ 6 Gy as measured by survival and increased respiration frequency (a result of irradiation of the thorax)

  19. Audiological assessment before and after fractionated stereotactic irradiation for vestibular schwannoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, T.; Sato, N.; Inuyama, Y.; Shirato, H.; Kagei, K.; Fukuda, S.; Miyasaka, K.; Sawamura, Y.; Suzuki, K.; Takizawa, H.; Hokunan, K.; Isu, T.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To find the audiological outcome after LINAC-based fractionated stereotactic irradiation (STI). Materials and methods: Twenty-four patients with vestibular schwannoma treated by fractionated STI between 1991 and 1997 had measurable hearing before STI and were followed audiologically for more than 6 months. The pure tone average (PTA) was measured by averaging the air-conduction threshold for five main frequencies (250-4000 Hz) before and periodically after STI in the 24 patients. Several possible prognostic factors for hearing preservation (defined as a PTA change at the last follow-up of less than 10 dB) were investigated. The median follow-up time was 22 months, ranging from 5 to 69 months. The irradiation schedule was 36 Gy in 20 fractions in 5 weeks to 44 Gy in 22 fractions in 6 weeks followed by 4 Gy/1 fraction boost. Results: The pure tone average before STI was distributed from 7 to 73 dB. Fifty percent of patients showed a change in PTA of less than 10 dB, 79.2% of patients showed a change in PTA of less than 20 dB and 20.8% of patients showed a change in PTA of more than 21 dB at the last follow-up. Only one patient (4%) became deaf. Cases with a sudden loss of hearing were more likely to experience hearing preservation than those with gradual loss of hearing (P<0.05). The mean age was younger in patients whose hearing was preserved (P<0.05). Poor pretreatment PTA appeared to linearly correspond to the changes in PTA (regression coefficient 0.78). The size of the tumor was not related to the change in PTA. No relationship was observed between the maximum or peripheral dose and the PTA change. The real benefit of stereotactic boost after small-field fractionated irradiation was not certain. Conclusion: Fractionated STI produced a hearing preservation rate compatible with meticulously collimated multi-spots single fraction irradiation. Further follow-up is required to confirm the long-term benefits of fractionation. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier

  20. Effect of intra-peritoneal fludarabine on rat spinal cord tolerance to fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregoire, V; Ruifrok, A C.C.; Price, R E; Brock, W A; Hittelman, W N; Plunkett, W K; Ang, K K

    1995-07-01

    The effect of fludarabine (9-{beta}-d-arabinosyl-2-fluoroadenine-5'-monophosphate), an adenine nucleoside analogue, on the tolerance of the spinal cord to fractionated irradiation was studied in a rat model. Anesthesized female Fisher 344 rats received irradiation to 2 cm of the cervical spine with a telecobalt unit (dose rate 1.14 Gy/min). Radiation was administered in two, four or eight fractions spread over a 48-h period with or without fludarabine. Animals assigned to combined therapy received two daily intraperitoneal injections of fludarabine (150 mg/kg) given 3 h prior to the first daily radiation fraction. It was found that fludarabine reduced the iso-effect dose required to induce leg paresis at 9 months after irradiation for all fractionation schedules. Dose modification factors of 1.23, 1.29 and greater than 1.27 were obtained for two, four and eight fractions, respectively. Fitting the data with the direct analysis method of Thames et al. with an incomplete repair model [18] showed that the potentiating effect of fludarabine may be mediated through reduction in the number of 'tissue-rescuing units' (lnK). Alpha and {beta} values were slightly but not significantly decreased, whereas the ({alpha}({beta})) ratio was unchanged. These features suggest that fludarabine did not significantly inhibit cellular repair processes but rather reduced the spinal cord tolerance by a fixed additive toxic effect on the same target cells. In rodent models, the combination of fludarabine and fractionated radiation has previously been found to yield a therapeutic gain, i.e., the drug enhanced tumor response to a greater extent than it reduced normal tissue tolerance. However, given our results, caution should be exercised in extrapolating these findings to the clinic. Normal tissue reactions will have to be monitored rigorously in phase I clinical studies.

  1. Short-term irradiation of the glioblastoma with high-dosed fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkelbein, W.; Bruggmoser, G.; Schmidt, M.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1984-01-01

    Compared to surgery alone, postoperative radiotherapy leads with glioblastomas (grade IV gliomas) to a significant improvement of the therapeutic results. The prolongation of survival time, however, is to a large extent compensated by the therapy itself (it normally implicates hospitalisation). Therefore, we tested the efficiency of rapid course irradiation with high fractions. 70 patients were treated daily with individual fractions of 3.5 Gy, 4 to 6 fractions per week. The entire dose amounted to 31.5 to 38.5 Gy. The average survival time was 33.5 weeks corresponding to the survival time known from the combined surgical and radiotherapeutical treatment of glioblastomas. An effective increase in therapy-free survival time seems possible, especially when the entire focal dose does not exceed 35 Gy. It is remarkable that the patients with the maximum exposure did not have the longest survival times and rates. Living conditions for the patients were similar to those with conventional fractioning, or even better. Rapid course irradiation with high fractions and a limited total dose (35 Gy) presently is - apart from the accelerated superfractioning - a successful measure to prolong the therapyfree survival time for patients with grade IV gliomas. (orig.) [de

  2. Evaluation of the analgesic activity and safety of ketorolac in whole body fractionated gamma irradiated animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Aly

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to evaluate the analgesic activity and the toxicity of ketorolac in normal and fractionated (1.5 Gy/day/4 days γ-irradiated animals. Determination of brain serotonin content and serum prostaglandin level were also undertaken. The analgesic activity was tested using formalin test, at three dose levels (15, 30 and 60 mg/kg after 1 and 7 days post radiation exposure. LD50 determinations and assessment of liver and kidney function tests were performed. Our results indicated marked analgesic effects on the early and late phases of nociception. Double treatment with ketorolac and irradiation increased brain serotonin content. The acute LD50 of ketorolac was decreased in irradiated animals as compared to the LD50 of normal animals. Double treatment with ketorolac and irradiation induced an elevation of gastric mucin content, urea and BUN levels on the 1st day post irradiation, whereas, albumin level was lowered and globulin level was elevated after 7 days post irradiation. Depending on this study the dose of ketorolac used for treating cancer patients addressed to radiotherapy should be reduced, however, this requires further clinical confirmation.

  3. Effective dose as an irritating influence during fractionated γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, V.N.; Ushakov, I.B.; Davydov, B.I.

    1990-01-01

    The study of early neurological disturbances (END) in rats after fractionated γ-irradiation with doses of 37.5-225 Gy at dose rate of 30.11 Gy/min has demonstrated that the initial response of animals to pulse ionizing radiation is a function of the electric charge induced by ionizing radiation. A change in the probability of occurrence of each of the END symptoms, with the increased intervals between exposures, is merely an indirect indication of the eliminating mechanisms and is intricately connected with the irritating charge value. The proposed empiric relationships permit to correlate the probability of END symptom occurrence with the continuous quantitative parameter of fractionated irradiation, that is, with an effective dose as an analogue of the irritating effect

  4. Sterilization of boll weevil pupae with fractionated doses of gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, J.W.; Mitlin, N.; Davich, T.B.; Dawson, J.R.; McGovern, W.L.; McKibben, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Fractionated doses of 6,250-8,000 rads of gamma irradiation administered to pupae of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh., sexually sterilized both sexes. Mortality of males thus treated with 6,250 and 8,000 rads via fractionation was 14% and 27% respectively, by 5 days posttreatment compared with 46% mortality when an equivalent acute dose was administered to newly emerged adults. Pheromone production of males irradiated at 6,250 rads was one-third that of the control for the first 4 days, but equal that of the control during 5-11 days posttreatment. This procedure lends itself to the large-scale sterilization of weevils needed in an eradication program. This technique is applicable to other insects that are highly susceptible to acute doses

  5. Large effect of irradiance on hydrogen isotope fractionation of alkenones in Emiliania huxleyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Benthien, Albert; French, Katherine L.; Epping, Eric; Zondervan, Ingrid; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Bijma, Jelle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogen isotopic (δD) composition of long-chain alkenones produced by certain haptophyte algae has been suggested as a potential proxy for reconstructing paleo sea surface salinity. However, environmental parameters other than salinity may also affect the δD of alkenones. We investigated the impact of the level of irradiance on hydrogen isotopic fractionation of alkenones versus growth water by cultivating two strains of the cosmopolitan haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi at different light intensities. The hydrogen isotope fractionation decreased by approximately 40‰ when irradiance was increased from 15 to 200 μmol photons m-2 s-1 above which it was relatively constant. The response is likely a direct effect of photosystem I and II activity as the relationship of the fractionation factor α versus light intensity can be described by an Eilers-Peeters photosynthesis model. This irradiance effect is in agreement with published δD data of alkenones derived from suspended particulate matter collected from different depths in the photic zone of the Gulf of California and the eastern tropical North Pacific. However, haptophyte algae tend to bloom at relatively high light intensities (>500 μmol photons m-2 s-1) occurring at the sea surface, at which hydrogen isotope fractionation is relatively constant and not affected by changes in light intensity. Alkenones accumulating in the sediment are likely mostly derived from these surface water haptophyte blooms, when the largest amount of biomass is produced. Therefore, the observed irradiance effect is unlikely to affect the applicability of the hydrogen isotopic composition of sedimentary long chain alkenones as a proxy for paleosalinity.

  6. A study of the effect of fractional gamma irradiation of leptospirae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevska, M.; Khristova, M.; Yankova, N.; Pandev, I.

    1977-01-01

    In view of the theoretical and practical interest in obtaining antigens from killed leptospirae for immune or diagnostic serums, a two hour leptospiral culture from the pathogenic strain Pomona (Calapica) was fractionally gamma-irradiated with a total dose of 2 Mrad. Changes were observed in the size, motility and survival duration of the leptospiral strains. The results are interpreted and compared with those of single administration of the same dose, studied in a previous work. (author)

  7. Impact of drug permeability of blood-brain barrier after whole brain conventional fractionation irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Longzhen; Cao Yuandong; Chen Yong; Yu Changzhou; Zhuang Ming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of drug permeability in rat blood-brain barrier(BBB) after different doses of whole brain conventional fractionation irradiation in rats and provide the experimental basis for the optimum time of clinical chemotherapy. Methods: According to different irradiation doses, 100 adult Sprague-Dowley rats were divided randomly into 5 groups: the normal control group(0 Gy); 10 Gy; 20 Gy; 30 Gy; and 40 Gy group. All rats were exposed to conventional fractionation(2 Gy/d, 5 d/w) with 60 Co γ-ray. MTX(25 mg/kg) was injected through the tail mainline 16 hours after whole brain irradiation. Cerebrospinal fluid(CSF) and blood were collected 2 hours later. Those samples were used to assay MTX concentration using RP-HPLC. Results: MTX mean concentrations in CSF was 0.07, 0.08, 0.12, 0.24, 0.23 mg/L in the control, 10 Gy, 20 Gy, 30 Gy, 40 Gy groups, respectively. All the data was analyzed with rank test of transform. MTX concentration of CSF was significantly different except the control and 10 Gy, 30 Gy and 40 Gy group. MTX concentration of blood was not significantly different in all groups (P>0.05). Conclusions: Irradiation can directly damage the function of BBB. BBB would be opened gradually following the increase of irradiation dose. It could be considered as the optimum time of chemotherapy when the whole brain irradiation ranges from 20 Gy to 30 Gy. (authors)

  8. Treatment results by uneven fractionated irradiation, low-dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost, and intraoperative irradiation for malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Shogo; Takai, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Kenji; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Kakuto, Yoshihisa; Hoshi, Akihiko; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko; Kayama, Takamasa; Yoshimoto, Takashi (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-08-01

    The prognosis of malignant glioma is extremely poor. We applied conventionally fractionated irradiation combined with 1-(4-aminio-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosourea (ACNU), uneven fractionated irradiation with ACNU, low dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost, and intraoperative irradiation against 110 malignant gliomas to investigate the efficacy of these methods as alternative treatments for malignant glioma. Although local tumor control by uneven fractionated irradiation was better than that by the other methods, no significant improvement was obtained in survival rates. As a result of multiple regression analysis, age and histology were major factors for survival rates, and the difference of treatment methods was not important. Both low-dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost and intraoperative irradiation showed little advantage because of the high risk of brain necrosis associated with them. (author).

  9. Changes in some blood lipid fractions in whole-body irradiated rats as influenced by some radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousri, R.M.; Roushdy, H.; Gawish, M.A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of sublethal and lethal total body gamma irradiation on some serum lipid fractions in male rats was investigated. The protective efficacy of estradiol and/or α-tocopherol was also studied. The results of this study demonstrate that the lethally irradiated rats showed significant alteration in serum triglycerides, cholesterol, total lipids and phospholipids level. Estradiol exerted a benefical effect on lipid fractions after one and two days post lethal α-irradiation (8 Gy). No consistent radioprotective effect of tocopherol could be detected on the levels of serum lipid fractions. This finding was also observed when both radioprotectors were used. (orig.) [de

  10. Accelerated repopulation of mouse tongue epithelium during fractionated irradiations or following single doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, W.; Kummermehr, J.

    1990-01-01

    Mouse tongue mucosa was established as an animal model to study repopulation after large single doses or during continuous irradiation. A top-up irradiation technique was used employing priming doses or fractionated treatment to the whole snout (300 kV X-rays) followed by local test doses (25 kV X-rays) to elicit denudation in a confined field of the inferior tongue surface. Clearcut quantal dose-response curves of ulcer incidence were obtained to all protocols; animal morbidity, i.e. body weight loss was minimal. Repopulation following priming doses of 10 and 13 Gy started with a delay of at least 3 days and then progressed rapidly to nearly restore original tissue tolerance by day 11. During continuous fractionation over 1 to 3 weeks with 5 fractions/week and doses per fraction of 2.5, 3 and 3.5 Gy, repopulation was small in week one but subsequently increased to fully compensate the weekly dose at all dose levels. Additional measurements of cell density during a 4 weeks course of 5 x 3 Gy or 5 x 4 Gy per week showed only moderate depletion to 67% of the control figures. The fact that rapid repopulation is achieved at relatively moderate damage levels should be taken into account when the timing of a treatment split is considered. (author). 18 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Effects of low-dose fractionated external irradiation on metabolic and structural characteristics of rat thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadolnik, L.; Niatsetskaya, Z. [Institute of Biochemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Grodno (Belarus)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The problem of thyroid radiosensitivity to the effect of low dose external ionizing irradiation presently seems to be the least studied, and the experimental findings - the most contradictory. The aim of the work was to study the effects of long-term low-dose fractionated irradiation on the iodide metabolism and structure of the thyroid. Female Wistar rats weighing 140-160 g were irradiated 20 times (5 times a week, for 4 weeks) using a 60 Co installation. The single absorbed doses were 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 Gy and the total ones - 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0 Gy, respectively. The animals were decapitated after 1 day, 4 and 24 weeks following the last irradiation. The thyroid tissue was used to assay for thyro-peroxidase (T.P.O.) activity as well as total, protein -bound and free iodide concentrations. Microscopic and morphometric examination of histologic thyroid preparations was carried out. Blood was assayed for thyroxin (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations. After a day following the irradiation, the thyroid showed a pronounced increase in the concentration of total iodide (30.0-54.4%) as well in that of free (32.1-60.8%) and protein-bound ones (24.4-37.4%). The most pronounced iodide concentration elevation was noted in the 0.1 -Gy animals, with thyroid T.P.O. activity being raised by 48.0%. Only the 0.5 Gy-group had 1.4-1.5-fold reduced thyroid hormone levels. Four weeks after the irradiation, studied parameters of irradiated rats were brought back to the control values, except for the 0.5 Gy-group. However, after 24-weeks, the 0.5-and 0.25- irradiated rats experienced a 12-20% thyroid weight elevation in comparison with the control. The thyroid of these animals demonstrated reduced contents of total and free iodide as well as T.P.O. activity by 24.5 and 34.8%. The 0.1 Gy-group had a 1.7-fold increased T.P.O. activity. The concentration of the thyroid hormones was maintained diminished only in the 0.5 Gy -irradiated group. However

  12. Content of DNA in cancerous tumours of the breast before and after large-fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiukashvili, N N

    1976-07-01

    The article presents the results of microspectrophotometric investigation of DNA in different cancerous tumors of the breast gland before and after large-fractionated irradiation. The study of quantitative content of DNA in the non-irradiated tumors of the breast of different histological structure showed that parenchymatous cells are characterized by a definite variety in the DNA content with a different level of their polyploidy. This points to the fact that different histological forms of the breast cancer are distinguished by the character of the components differentiation. The comparative assessment of the ploidity of the cancerous cells of irradiated and non-irradiated tumors revealed that under the changed conditions of co-existence in all histological forms of cancer new modal classes of the cells develop and general quantity of the DNA content decreases. This testifies to the fact that the histological forms of the breast cancer are not equal sensitive tumors. A microspectrophotometric study of the breast tumors makes it possible to reveal the injury of the malignant tumor cells in the initial period of irradiation, when it is difficult to discover clear-cut dystrophical changes during histological investigation.

  13. Simultaneous PLK1 inhibition improves local tumour control after fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, Mechthild; Kummer, Berit; Deparade, Andre; Eicheler, Wolfgang; Pfitzmann, Dorothee; Yaromina, Ala; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) plays an important role in mitotic progression, is frequently overexpressed and associated with a poor prognosis of cancer patients, thus providing a promising target in anticancer treatment. Aim of the current project was to evaluate the effect of the novel PLK1 inhibitor BI 6727 in combination with irradiation. Material and methods: In vitro proliferation and radiation cell survival assays as well as in vivo local tumour control assays after single treatment and combined radiation and drug application were carried out using the squamous cell carcinoma models A431 and FaDu. In addition, cell cycle phases were monitored in vitro and in vivo. Results: BI 6727 showed a dose-dependent antiproliferative effect and an increase in the mitotic fraction. BI 6727 alone reduced clonogenic cell survival, while radiosensitivity in vitro (SF2) and in vivo (single-dose TCD 50 under clamped hypoxia) was not affected. In contrast, local tumour control was significantly improved after application of BI 6727 simultaneously to fractionated irradiation (A431: TCD 50 = 60.5 Gy [95% C.I. 57; 63] after IR alone and <30 Gy after combined treatment; FaDu: 49.5 Gy [43; 56 Gy] versus 32.9 Gy [26; 40]). Conclusions: Despite the lack of direct cellular radiosensitisation, PLK1 inhibition with BI 6727 during fractionated irradiation significantly improves local tumour control when compared to irradiation alone. This result is likely explained by a considerable effect on cell cycle and an independent cytotoxic potential of BI 6727

  14. Single-dose and fractionated irradiation of four human lung cancer cell lines in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodin, O.; Lennartsson, L.; Nilsson, S.

    1991-01-01

    Four established human lung cancer cell lines were exposed to single-dose irradiation. The survival curves of 2 small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC) were characterized by a limited capacity for repair with small and moderate shoulders with extrapolation numbers (n) of 1.05 and 1.60 respectively. Two non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines, one squamous cell (SQCLC) and one large cell (LCLC) had large shoulders with n-values of 73 and 15 respectively. The radiosensitivity when measured as D 0 did not, however, differ as much from cell line to cell line, with values from 1.22 to 1.65. The surviving fraction after 2 Gy (SF2) was 0.24 and 0.42 respectively in the SCLC cell lines and 0.90 and 0.88 respectively in the NSCLC cell lines. Fractionated irradiation delivered according to 3 different schedules was also investigated. All the schedules delivered a total dose of 10 Gy in 5 days and were applied in 1, 2 and 5 Gy dose fractions respectively. Survival followed the pattern found after single-dose irradiation; it was lowest in the SCLC cell line with the lowest SF and highest in the two NSCLC cell lines. In the SCLC cell lines all schedules were approximately equally efficient. In the LCLC and in the SQCLC cell lines, the 5 Gy schedule killed more cells than the 1 and 2 Gy schedules. The results indicate that the size of the shoulder of the survival curve is essential when choosing the most tumoricidal fractionation schedule. (orig.)

  15. Repopulation capacity during fractionated irradiation of squamous cell carcinomas and glioblastomas in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, Wilfried; Gioioso, Danielle; Taghian, Alphonse; Stuschke, Martin; Suit, Herman D

    1997-10-01

    Purpose: Determination of clonogenic cell proliferation of three highly malignant squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and two glioblastoma cell lines during a 20-day course of fractionated irradiation under in vitro conditions. Methods and Materials: Tumor cells in exponential growth phase were plated in 24-well plastic flasks and irradiated 24 h after plating with 250 kV x-rays at room temperature. Six fractions with single doses between 0.6 and 9 Gy were administered in 1.67, 5, 10, 15, and 20 days. Colony growth was monitored for at least 60 days after completion of irradiation. Wells with confluent colonies were considered as 'recurrences' and wells without colonies as 'controlled'. The dose required to control 50% of irradiated wells (WCD{sub 50}) was estimated by a logistic regression for the different overall treatment times. The effective doubling time of clonogenic cells (T{sub eff}) was determined by a direct fit using the maximum likelihood method. Results: The increase of WCD{sub 50} within 18.3 days was highly significant for all tumor cell lines accounting for 7.9 and 12.0 Gy in the two glioblastoma cell lines and for 12.7, 14.0, and 21.7 Gy in the three SCC cell lines. The corresponding T{sub eff}s were 4.4 and 2.0 days for glioblastoma cell lines and 2.4, 4.2, and 1.8 days for SCC cell lines. Population doubling times (PDT) of untreated tumor cells ranged from 1.0 to 1.9 days, showing no correlation with T{sub eff}s. T{sub eff} was significantly longer than PDT in three of five tumor cell lines. No significant differences were observed comparing glioblastomas and SCC. Increase of WCD{sub 50} with time did not correlate with T{sub eff} but with T{sub eff}* InSF2 (surviving fraction at 2 Gy). Conclusion: The intrinsic ability of SCC and glioblastoma cells to repopulate during fractionated irradiation could be demonstrated. Repopulation induced dose loss per day depends on T{sub eff} and intrinsic radiation sensitivity. Proliferation during treatment was

  16. Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33 secreted from impaired vessels in the skin compared to fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun-Jung, E-mail: forejs2@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Won, E-mail: JUNWON@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Hyun, E-mail: gochunghee@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Woori, E-mail: asleo02@snu.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary Program in Bioinformatics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Hoon, E-mail: wonhoon@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seoae, E-mail: seoae@cnkgenomics.com [C& K Genomics, Seoul National University Mt.4-2, Main Bldg. #514, SNU Research Park, NakSeoungDae, Gwanakgu, Seoul 151-919 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yu Jeong, E-mail: yunk9275@daum.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoon-Jin, E-mail: yjlee8@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Effects, Research Center for Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-760 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jaeho, E-mail: jjhmd@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-14

    We have revealed in a porcine skin injury model that eosinophil recruitment was dose-dependently enhanced by a single high-dose irradiation. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of eosinophil-associated skin fibrosis and the effect of high-dose-per-fraction radiation. The dorsal skin of a mini-pig was divided into two sections containing 4-cm{sup 2} fields that were irradiated with 30 Gy in a single fraction or 5 fractions and biopsied regularly over 14 weeks. Eosinophil-related Th2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and C–C motif chemokine-11 (CCL11/eotaxin) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. RNA-sequencing using 30 Gy-irradiated mouse skin and functional assays in a co-culture system of THP-1 and irradiated-human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed to investigate the mechanism of eosinophil-mediated radiation fibrosis. Single high-dose-per-fraction irradiation caused pronounced eosinophil accumulation, increased profibrotic factors collagen and transforming growth factor-β, enhanced production of eosinophil-related cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, CCL11, IL-13, and IL-33, and reduced vessels compared with 5-fraction irradiation. IL-33 notably increased in pig and mouse skin vessels after single high-dose irradiation of 30 Gy, as well as in irradiated HUVECs following 12 Gy. Blocking IL-33 suppressed the migration ability of THP-1 cells and cytokine secretion in a co-culture system of THP-1 cells and irradiated HUVECs. Hence, high-dose-per-fraction irradiation appears to enhance eosinophil-mediated fibrotic responses, and IL-33 may be a key molecule operating in eosinophil-mediated fibrosis in high-dose-per fraction irradiated skin. - Highlights: • Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33. • Vascular endothelial cells damaged by high-dose radiation secrete IL-33. • Blocking IL-33 suppressed migration of inflammatory cells and cytokine secretion. • IL

  17. Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33 secreted from impaired vessels in the skin compared to fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Yoo, Hyun; Kwak, Woori; Choi, Won Hoon; Cho, Seoae; Choi, Yu Jeong; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-01-01

    We have revealed in a porcine skin injury model that eosinophil recruitment was dose-dependently enhanced by a single high-dose irradiation. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of eosinophil-associated skin fibrosis and the effect of high-dose-per-fraction radiation. The dorsal skin of a mini-pig was divided into two sections containing 4-cm 2 fields that were irradiated with 30 Gy in a single fraction or 5 fractions and biopsied regularly over 14 weeks. Eosinophil-related Th2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and C–C motif chemokine-11 (CCL11/eotaxin) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. RNA-sequencing using 30 Gy-irradiated mouse skin and functional assays in a co-culture system of THP-1 and irradiated-human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed to investigate the mechanism of eosinophil-mediated radiation fibrosis. Single high-dose-per-fraction irradiation caused pronounced eosinophil accumulation, increased profibrotic factors collagen and transforming growth factor-β, enhanced production of eosinophil-related cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, CCL11, IL-13, and IL-33, and reduced vessels compared with 5-fraction irradiation. IL-33 notably increased in pig and mouse skin vessels after single high-dose irradiation of 30 Gy, as well as in irradiated HUVECs following 12 Gy. Blocking IL-33 suppressed the migration ability of THP-1 cells and cytokine secretion in a co-culture system of THP-1 cells and irradiated HUVECs. Hence, high-dose-per-fraction irradiation appears to enhance eosinophil-mediated fibrotic responses, and IL-33 may be a key molecule operating in eosinophil-mediated fibrosis in high-dose-per fraction irradiated skin. - Highlights: • Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33. • Vascular endothelial cells damaged by high-dose radiation secrete IL-33. • Blocking IL-33 suppressed migration of inflammatory cells and cytokine secretion. • IL-33

  18. Pathologic changes in the hearts of beagles irradiated with fractionated fast neutrons or photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zook, B.C.; Bradley, E.W.; Casarett, G.W.; Rogers, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-nine adult male purebred beagles received either fast-neutron or photon irradiation to the right thorax to determine the effects on pulmonary tissue. The right atrium, a small portion of the right ventricle, and the right anterior abdomen were included in the field. Twenty-four dogs (six/group) received fast neutrons with a mean energy of 15 MeV to doses of 1000, 1500, 2250, or 3375 rad in four fractions per week for 6 weeks. Fifteen dogs received 3000, 4500, or 6750 rad of photons (five/group) in an identical fractionation pattern. Fourteen dogs died or were euthanatized in extremis between 47 and 708 days after radiation because of radiation damage to digestive organs. Six other dogs died of anesthetic accidents between 196 and 1144 days after radiation; these deaths were probably related to hepatic dysfunction. Two neutron-irradiated dogs developed cardiac neoplasms after 396 and 1624 days. One dog died of a myocardial infarct and one died of an unrelated infection. The major atrial lesions were hemorrhage and necrosis of myocardial cells in dogs that died 47-109 days postirradiation. Myocardial and endocardial fibrosis were most extensive in dogs that died 84 or more days following irradiation. All beagles had degenerative and occlusive vascular changes associated with atrial lesions. The relative biological effectiveness of fast neutrons for pathologic injury of the heart was estimated to be between 4 and 5

  19. Reemergence of apoptotic cells between fractionated doses in irradiated murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyn, R.E.; Hunter, N.R.; Milas, L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to follow up our previous studies on the development of apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors by testing whether an apoptotic subpopulation of cells reemerges between fractionated exposures. Mice bearing a murine ovarian carcinoma, OCa-I, were treated in vivo with two fractionation protocols: two doses of 12.5 Gy separated by various times out to 5 days and multiple daily fractions of 2.5 Gy. Animals were killed 4 h after the last dose in each protocol, and the percent apoptosis was scored from stained histological sections made from the irradiated tumors according to the specific features characteristic of this mode of cell death. The 12.5+12.5 Gy protocol yielded a net total percent apoptosis of about 45% when the two doses were separated by 5 days (total dose = 25 Gy), whereas the 2.5 Gy per day protocol yielded about 50% net apoptotic cells when given for 5 days (total dose = 12.5 Gy). These values are to be compared to the value of 36% apoptotic cells that is yielded by large single doses (> 25 Gy). Thus, these results indicate that an apoptotic subpopulation of cells reemerged between the fractions in both protocols, but the kinetics appeared to be delayed in the 12.5+12.5 Gy vs. the multiple 2.5 Gy protocol. This reemergence of cells with the propensity for radiation-induced apoptosis between fractionated exposures is consistent with a role for this mode of cell death in the response of tumors to radiotherapy and may represent the priming of a new subpopulation of tumor cells for apoptosis as part of normal tumor homeostasis to counterbalance cell division. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  20. Single fraction prophylactic cranial irradiation for small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewster, A.E.; Hopwood, P.; Stout, R.; Burt, P.A.; Thatcher, N.

    1995-01-01

    The effectiveness of a single 8-Gy fraction prophylactic cranial irradiation regime was assessed in 106 patients with small-cell carcinoma of the lung. All patients had limited stage disease and received combination chemotherapy consisting of either cisplatin or carboplatin with ifosfamide, etoposide, and vincristine (VICE). Cranial irradiation was administered 48 h after the first cycle of chemotherapy and was well tolerated. Actual 2-year survival was 35% and cranial relapse occurred in 22% of those patients who achieved complete remission. This compares favourably with a cranial relapse rate of 45% incomplete remitters previously reported with the same chemotherapy regime after a minimum follow-up of 2 years where PCI was not used. Formal psychometric testing was performed retrospectively on a series of 25 long-term survivors of whom 14 were taken from this reported series. Whilst 75% of patients were impaired on at least one test with 68% performing badly in the most complex task, this was not associated with clinically detectable neurological damage and the patients did not complain of memory or concentration difficulties. In conclusion, single fraction PCI, when used with platinum based combination chemotherapy, appears to be equally effective but may be less neurotoxic than the more standard fractionated regimes

  1. Hippocampal Neuron Number Is Unchanged 1 Year After Fractionated Whole-Brain Irradiation at Middle Age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Lei; Molina, Doris P.; Robbins, Michael E.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether hippocampal neurons are lost 12 months after middle-aged rats received a fractionated course of whole-brain irradiation (WBI) that is expected to be biologically equivalent to the regimens used clinically in the treatment of brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Twelve-month-old Fischer 344 X Brown Norway male rats were divided into WBI and control (CON) groups (n = 6 per group). Anesthetized WBI rats received 45 Gy of 137 Cs γ rays delivered as 9 5-Gy fractions twice per week for 4.5 weeks. Control rats were anesthetized but not irradiated. Twelve months after WBI completion, all rats were anesthetized and perfused with paraformaldehyde, and hippocampal sections were immunostained with the neuron-specific antibody NeuN. Using unbiased stereology, total neuron number and the volume of the neuronal and neuropil layers were determined in the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1 subregions of hippocampus. Results: No differences in tissue integrity or neuron distribution were observed between the WBI and CON groups. Moreover, quantitative analysis demonstrated that neither total neuron number nor the volume of neuronal or neuropil layers differed between the two groups for any subregion. Conclusions: Impairment on a hippocampal-dependent learning and memory test occurs 1 year after fractionated WBI at middle age. The same WBI regimen, however, does not lead to a loss of neurons or a reduction in the volume of hippocampus

  2. Chromosome aberrations of the peripheral lymphocytes in rabbits exposed to single and fractionated whole-body x-irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Hiroaki; Sakurai, Masaharu; Sugahara, Tsutomu.

    1978-01-01

    The changes in the frequency of peripheral lymphocytes with chromosome aberrations were observed during or after irradiation of rabbits exposed to fractionated or single whole-body irradiations. In rabbits given daily fractionated whole-body irradiations the incidence of the aberrations showed a linear increase in the first week; however, the incidence decreased thereafter though exposures were repeated. The lymphocyte count tended to decrease as the number of irradiations increased. In rabbits exposed to a single dose of 250 R or 500 R the incidence of aberrations rapidly decreased over a period of 10 days following irradiation, and then showed a little change thereafter. The lymphocyte count in the peripheral blood reached a nadir 2 - 5 days after irradiation, and then started to increase gradually. It was speculated that there are two types of lymphocytes, long-lived and short-lived, in the peripheral blood of rabbits, both of which are PHA-committed. (auth.)

  3. Effect of single and fractionated x-irradiation on maze learning ability of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Takashi; Norimura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Isao

    1976-01-01

    Fifty-six-day-old male ddk mice at the starting of the investigation were used as subjects through the experiment for 64 weeks. After 15 days' preliminary training, and 16 times of weekly trial training using complete maze, 15 mice received a single 224 rads of x-rays (S group), another 15 mice received two 112 rads spaced two weeks apart (F group) and another 15 mice were sham-irradiated (Control group). Then those mice were tested on the multiple T-maze with nine-choice points and change of performance was observed in terms of errorchoices by giving one test trial a week. We introduced the concept of ''confusional trials'' as an index for surmising to what extent mice failed to exhibit good maze learning habits. In the results, the F group showed significantly worse performance than the two other groups at early stages, opposite to it the S group exhibited the same, but at late stages after irradiation. The worse performance of F group should be considered to be due to the psychological after-effect to fractionated irradiation and that for S group could be assumed to be due to the acceleration of aging by the irradiation. (auth.)

  4. On kinetic study of blood cells and bone marrow under fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teterina, V.I.

    1977-01-01

    To study the changes in the cellular composition of bone marrow during irradiation experiments on the guinea pigs have been carried out. Animals were subjected to fractionated irradiation; daily dose of 12 rad, total doses of 250, 500, 750, 1000 and 1500 rad, total duration of radiation of 1,2,3,4 and 6 monts. Experiments have shown that with small levels of total doses of the ionizing radiation haemopoiesis in the bone marrow reached its maximum. This led to suppression of anaemia and profound leukaemia in the peripheral blood. With the increase of total doses phase of insufficient compensation of harmful effects of radiation has been reached, which with continuing radiation may lead to the exhaustion of reserve possibilities of bone marrow and to the development of pancytopenia

  5. Changes in tumor oxygenation during a combined treatment with fractionated irradiation and hyperthermia: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywietz, F; Reeker, W; Kochs, E

    1997-01-01

    To determine the influence of adjuvant hyperthermia on the oxygenation status of fractionated irradiated tumors. Oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in rat rhabdomyosarcomas (R1H) was measured sequentially at weekly intervals during a fractionated irradiation with 60Co-gamma-rays (60 Gy/20f/4 weeks) in combination with local hyperthermia (8 f(HT) at 43 degrees C, 1 h/4 weeks). Tumors were heated twice weekly with a 2450 MHz microwave device at 43 degrees C, 1 h starting 10 min after irradiation. The pO2 measurements (pO2-histograph, Eppendorf, Germany) were performed in anesthetized animals during mechanical ventilation and in hemodynamic steady state. All tumor pO2 measurements were correlated to measurements of the arterial oxygen partial pressure (paO2) determined by a blood gas analyzer. The oxygenation status of R1H tumors decreased continuously from the start of the combined treatment, with increasing radiation dose and number of heat fractions. In untreated controls a median tumor pO2 of 23 +/- 2 mmHg (mean +/- SEM) was measured. Tumor pO2 decreased to 11 +/- 2 mmHg after 30 Gy + 4 HT (2 weeks), and to 6 +/- 2 mmHg after 60 Gy + 8HT (4 weeks). The increase in the frequency of pO2-values below 5 mmHg and the decrease in the range of the pO2 histograms [delta p(10/90)] further indicated that tumor hypoxia increased relatively rapidly from the start of combined treatment. After 60 Gy + 8HT 48 +/- 5% (mean +/- SEM) of the pO2-values recorded were below 5 mmHg. These findings suggest that adjuvant hyperthermia to radiotherapy induces greater changes in tumor oxygenation than radiation alone [cf. (39)]. This might be of importance for the temporary application of hyperthermia in the course of a conventional radiation treatment.

  6. Cytogenetic studies on recipients of allogeneic bone marrow transplants after fractionated total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, N; Goedde-Salz, E; Loeffler, H [Christian-Albrechts-Univ., Kiel (Germany, F.R.)

    1985-06-01

    Cytogenetic findings from the bone marrow (BM) and the peripheral blood (PB) of nine consecutive patients after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for acute or chronic myelogenous leukaemia are reported. After a conditioning regimen consisting of cyclophosphamide and fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) given in five or six fractions of 2 Gy, persistence of host cells was detected in four out of seven cases with permanent engraftment. While one of these patients relapsed 4 months after host cells had been found in BM and PB, the other patients stayed relapse-free 124, 257 and 347 d after grafting. Before transplantation, the leukaemic cells in all three cases carried unique cytogenetic abnormalities giving the opportunity to distinguish the leukaemic population from chromosomally non-aberrant cells thought to represent residual normal host cells. As the persisting host cells after BMT lacked any cytogenetic abnormalities, it is suggested that they were members of residual normal clones not involved in the leukaemic process.

  7. Volumetrical and morphological responses of human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma xenografts treated with fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogenhout, J.; Gasteren, H. van; Jerusalem, C.R.; Kal, H.B.

    1988-01-01

    Xenografts of both primary human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and its metastases were irradiated with five daily fractions of 5.0 Gy. Tumor volume changes, morphology, mitotic index and mitotic figures were studied. Primary xenografts disappeared within 17±3 days. Grafts of metastases showed complete regression within 26±5 days, or regrowth after a delay period. Mitotic activity was higher in the grafts of metastases. The number of mitotic figures decreased and ceased within 14 days in the primary tumor, while some were still occasionally noted in the grafts of metastases. Telophase stages were practically absent after the first fraction. This study suggests that the response of metastases to radiation therapy is lower than the response of the primary tumor. (orig.) [de

  8. Cytogenetic studies on recipients of allogeneic bone marrow transplants after fractionated total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, N.; Goedde-Salz, E.; Loeffler, H.

    1985-01-01

    Cytogenetic findings from the bone marrow (BM) and the peripheral blood (PB) of nine consecutive patients after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for acute or chronic myelogenous leukaemia are reported. After a conditioning regimen consisting of cyclophosphamide and fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) given in five or six fractions of 2 Gy, persistence of host cells was detected in four out of seven cases with permanent engraftment. While one of these patients relapsed 4 months after host cells had been found in BM and PB, the other patients stayed relapse-free 124, 257 and 347 d after grafting. Before transplantation, the leukaemic cells in all three cases carried unique cytogenetic abnormalities giving the opportunity to distinguish the leukaemic population from chromosomally non-aberrant cells thought to represent residual normal host cells. As the persisting host cells after BMT lacked any cytogenetic abnormalities, it is suggested that they were members of residual normal clones not involved in the leukaemic process. (author)

  9. Dose rate and dose fractionation studies in total body irradiation of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, H.J.; Netzel, B.; Schaffer, E.; Kolb, H.

    1979-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) with 800-900 rads and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation according to the regimen designated by the Seattle group has induced remissions in patients with otherwise refractory acute leukemias. Relapse of leukemia after bone marrow transplantation remains the major problem, when the Seattle set up of two opposing 60 Co-sources and a low dose rate is used in TBI. Studies in dogs with TBI at various dose rates confirmed observations in mice that gastrointestinal toxicity is unlike toxicity against hemopoietic stem cells and possibly also leukemic stem cells depending on the dose rate. However, following very high single doses (2400 R) and marrow infusion acute gastrointestinal toxicity was not prevented by the lowest dose rate studied (0.5 R/min). Fractionated TBI with fractions of 600 R in addition to 1200 R (1000 rads) permitted the application of total doses up to 300 R followed by marrow infusion without irreversible toxicity. 26 dogs given 2400-3000 R have been observed for presently up to 2 years with regard to delayed radiation toxicity. This toxicity was mild in dogs given single doses at a low dose rate or fractionated TBI. Fractionated TBI is presently evaluated with allogeneic transplants in the dog before being applied to leukemic patients

  10. Total body irradiation in bone marrow transplantation: the influence of fractionation and delay of marrow infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichter, A.S.; Tracy, D.; Lam, W.C.; Order, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) after total body irradiation (TBI) and cyclophosphamide is being employed increasingly in the therapy of end stage leukemia. Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) represents a major acute toxicity after allogeneic transplantation. A more rapid reconstitution of lymphoid organs and bone marrow post transplant may result in increased immune competence and hence fewer opportunistic pulmonary infections and IP. By delaying the infusion of marrow to 72 hr after TBI (1250 rad at 7.5 rad/min) instead of the customary 24 hr, we can demonstrate an increase in initial repopulation of thymus, spleen and bone marrow, with syngeneic transplants in Lewis rats. Interstitial pneumonitis may also be caused, in part, by the pulmonary toxicity of large single exposures of TBI. Clinical and laboratory data suggest that fractionated TBI may be less toxic to the lung. When fractionated TBI (625 rad x 2, 7.5 rad/min) is compared to single dose TBI (1250 rad, 7.5 rad/min), and increased initial repopulation of lymphoid organs is observed when fractionated therapy is employed. Delay in marrow infusion and fractionation of TBI exposure may have clinical advantages in patients who receive BMT

  11. Kinetics of EGFR expression during fractionated irradiation varies between different human squamous cell carcinoma lines in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eicheler, Wolfgang; Krause, Mechthild; Hessel, Franziska; Zips, Daniel; Baumann, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Preclinical and clinical data indicate that high pretherapeutic EGFR expression is associated with poor local tumour control, possibly caused by a high repopulation rate of clonogenic cells during radiotherapy in these tumours. Previous data reported from our laboratory showed a correlation between EGFR expression and acceleration of repopulation in poorly differentiated FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) during fractionated irradiation. To test whether this is a general phenomenon, two further SCC were investigated in the present study. Patients and methods: GL and UT-SCC-14, two moderately well differentiated and keratinising hSCC, were grown as xenografts in nude mice. Functional data on the repopulation kinetics during fractionated irradiation for these tumour models have been previously determined. The expression of EGFR during fractionation was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Endpoints were the membrane-staining score and the proportion of EGFR-positive cells (EGFR labelling index). Results: Different kinetics of EGFR expression during fractionated RT were found. In UT-SCC-14, EGFR staining score and labelling index increased significantly during radiotherapy. In GL SCC, the EGFR expression was unchanged. Both tumours are characterized by a small but significant repopulation rate during radiotherapy. Conclusions: The expression of EGFR may change significantly during fractionated irradiation. No clear correlation between EGFR expression and the repopulation kinetics of clonogenic tumour cells during fractionated irradiation was found. The changes in EGFR expression during irradiation warrant further investigation on their prognostic implications and on their importance for therapeutic interventions

  12. Skin toxicity during hypo fractionated breast irradiation in patient with early breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrova, Deva; Smichkoska, Snezhana

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an important component in the treatment of breast cancer. (1) Many women with an early stage of breast cancer are candidates for a breast conservation therapy, which combines both conservative surgery and radiotherapy. (2) According to the data from some series, an estimated 90% of the patients treated with radiotherapy for breast cancer will develop a degree of radiation-induced dermatitis. (3) The severity of the skin reactions during and following the breast irradiation is influenced by both treatment-related and patient-related factors. The treatment - related factors include the fraction size (the dose delivered with each treatment), the total dose delivered, the volume of tissue treated, the type of radiation (4) and the addition of chemotherapy. (5) The patient-related factors include breast size, smoking, axillary lymphocele drainage before treatment, age, and infection of the surgical wound. (6) A hypo fractionation radiotherapy is alternative for a standard fractionation radiotherapy for women with early stage of breast cancer after conservative surgery. The aim of the study was to analyse the acute skin reactions during a hypo fractionated radiotherapy in patients with early breast cancer at our institution. Materials and methods: Twenty patients with early stage of breast cancer (Stadium I and II) and conservative surgery (quadrantectomy of breast with ipsilateral axillary dissection) were analysed. The patients were treated with 6MV x rays on LINAC, using tangential fields with 2.65Gy per fraction and the total dose prescribed to target volume was 42,4 Gy. These patients were observed for acute skin toxicity during the second week and at the end of the treatment. We evaluated dryness, epilation, pigmentation, changes and eritema, dry desquamation (clinically characterized by scaling and pruritus) and moist desquamation (characterized by serious oozing and exposure of the dermis). By using the radiation therapy oncology group’s (RTOG

  13. The effect of fractional CO2 laser irradiation on remineralization of enamel white spot lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poosti, Maryam; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Moosavi, Horieh; Najjaran, Hoda

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the combined effect of fractional CO(2) laser irradiation and fluoride on treatment of enamel caries. Sixty intact premolars were randomly assigned into four groups and then stored in a demineralizing solution to induce white spot lesions. Tooth color was determined at baseline (T1) and after demineralization (T2). Afterwards, the teeth in group 1 remained untreated (control), while group 2 was exposed to an acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel for 4 min. In groups 3 and 4, a fractional CO(2) laser was applied (10 mJ, 200 Hz, 10 s) either before (group 3) or through (group 4) the APF gel. The teeth were then immersed in artificial saliva for 90 days while subjected to daily fluoride mouthrinse and weekly brushing. Color examinations were repeated after topical fluoride application (T3) and 90 days later (T4). Finally, the teeth were sectioned, and microhardness was measured at the enamel surface and at 30 and 60 μ from the surface. In both lased groups, the color change between T1 and T4 stages (∆E(T1-T4)) was significantly lower than those of the other groups (p Laser irradiation followed by fluoride application (group 3) caused a significant increase in surface microhardness compared to APF alone and control groups (p laser before fluoride therapy is suggested for recovering the color and rehardening of demineralized enamel.

  14. In vivo induction of apoptosis in human lymphocytes by therapeutic fractionated total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delic, J.; Magdelenat, H.; Barbaroux, C.; Chaillet, M.-P.; Dubray, B.; Fourquet, A.; Cosset, J.-M.; Gluckman, E.; Girinsky, T.

    1995-01-01

    Ionizing radiations have been reported as an in vitro apoptosis initiating stimulus in human lymphocytes. As the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiations and chemotherapeutic agents appears to be dependent on the efficacy of cell death induction, the manipulation of apoptosis initiation might be used as a means to suppress some pathological process. In the present study the in vivo induction of γ-ray mediated programmed cell death in humans is reported. The in vivo induction of apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) by ionizing radiations was investigated in 33 patients after each of two sessions (2 Gy and 4 Gy) of fractionated total body irradiation (FTBI) as part of their conditioning regimen before bone marrow transplantation. PBL committed to apoptosis were scored before irradiation (S1), 4 h (S2) and 24 h after 2 Gy (S3, 14-17 h after the second 2 Gy fraction). Nuclear morphology and chromatin-DNA were analysed by fluorescence microscopy immediately after blood sample withdrawal (I) and after 24 h in cell culture medium (II). (author)

  15. Combined effect of carcinogenic n-nitrosodimethylamine precursors and fractioned γ-irradiation on tumor development in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galenko, P.M.; Nedopitanskaya, N.N.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of combined action of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and fractioned γ-irradiation on tumor development in rats was investigated. Both the tumor frequency and tumor plurality coefficient have been studied for two types of treatment: precursors of NDMA (amidopyrine and/or sodium nitrite (SN)) alone and the combination 'precursors plus radiation'. Tumor frequency decreased by about 11% after combination of γ-irradiation and precursors in comparison with precursors alone. Nevertheless, treatment with SN and γ-irradiation did not change tumor frequency in comparison with SN alone. Irradiation of rats treated with precursors led to an increased tumor plurality coefficient

  16. Test of equal effect per fraction and estimation of initial clonogen number in microcolony assays of survival after fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thames, H.D.; Withers, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    In the use of multifraction microcolony assays to infer the low-dose response of in situ renewal systems such as intestinal crypts, the assumption of equal effect per dose fraction is required. Moreover, the construction of a cell-survival curve requires knowledge of the initial count of cells capable of repopulating each renewal structure. We describe a method of designing fractionation protocols which provides a regression estimate of the initial number of clonogens per renewal structure and a test of the hypothesis of equal effect per fraction. The essential factor in the experimental design is the use of common dose fractions (use of the same dose per fraction in series with different numbers of fractions). Applications of the method to data for which the assumption of equal effect per fraction holds (four-hour fractionation interval murine testis study) and does not hold (one-hour fractionation interval murine jejunal crypt study) are presented. (author)

  17. Effects of low-dose continuously fractionated X-ray irradiation on murine peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yi; Zhang Hong; Dang Bingrong; Hao Jifang; Guo Hongyun; Wang Xiaohu

    2007-01-01

    For estimating biological risks from low doses continual irradiation, we investigated the effects of exposure to continuously fractionated X-rays on murine immune system. The BALB/c mice were irradiated with 0.07Gy at the first day and 0.08 Gy/d in the following 12 days at a dose rate of 0.2 Gy/min. The peripheral blood lymphocyte cycle and death were determined by flow cytometry at the cumulative doses of 0, 0.07, 0.23, 0.39, 0.55, 0.71, 0.87 and 1.03 Gy respectively. The results showed that the cycle of peripheral blood lymphocyte was arrested in G 0 /G 1 at cumulative doses of 0.07, 0.23, 0.71 and 0.87 Gy, and in G 2 /M at cumulative doses of 0.39 and 1.03 Gy; the percentage of death of peripheral blood lymphocyte was ascended with dose increasing, and reached the death peak at cumulative doses of 0.71 Gy. The results suggested that low doses continual X-rays total-body irradiated could result in changes of cellular cycle and death, and some damages to immunocytes, which accorded to linear square model. (authors)

  18. Radiogenic responses of normal cells induced by fractionated irradiation -a simulation study. Pt. 2. Late responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duechting, W.; Ulmer, W.; Ginsberg, T.; Kikhounga-N'Got, O.; Saile, C.

    1995-01-01

    Based on controlled theory, a computed simulation model has been constructed which describes the time course of slowly responding normal cells after irradiation exposure. Subsequently, different clinical irradiation schemes are compared in regard to their delayed radiogenic responses referred to as late effects in radiological terminology. A cybernetic model of a paraenchymal tissue consisting of dominantly resting functional cells has been developed and transferred into a computer model. The radiation effects are considered by characteristic cell parameters as well as by the linear-quadratic model. Three kinds of tissue (brain and lung parenchym of the mouse, liver parenchym of rat) have been irradiated in the model according to standard-, super-, hyperfractionation and a single high dose per week. The simulation studies indicate that the late reaction of brain parenchym to hyperfractionation (3 x 1.5 Gy per day) and of lung parenchym tissue with regard to all fractionation schemes applied is particularly severe. The behavior of liver parenchym is not unique. A comparison of the simulation results basing to the survival of cell numbers with clinical experience and practice shows that the clinical reality can qualitatively be represented by the model. This opens the door for connecting side effects to normal tissue with the corresponding tumor efficacy (discussed in previous papers). The model is open to further refinement and to discussions referring to the phenomenon of late effects. (orig.) [de

  19. Simvastatin Ameliorates Radiation Enteropathy Development After Localized, Fractionated Irradiation by a Protein C-Independent Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junru; Boerma, Marjan; Fu Qiang; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Fink, Louis M.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Microvascular injury plays a key role in normal tissue radiation responses. Statins, in addition to their lipid-lowering effects, have vasculoprotective properties that may counteract some effects of radiation on normal tissues. We examined whether administration of simvastatin ameliorates intestinal radiation injury, and whether the effect depends on protein C activation. Methods and Materials: Rats received localized, fractionated small bowel irradiation. The animals were fed either regular chow or chow containing simvastatin from 2 weeks before irradiation until termination of the experiment. Groups of rats were euthanized at 2 weeks and 26 weeks for assessment of early and delayed radiation injury by quantitative histology, morphometry, and quantitative immunohistochemistry. Dependency on protein C activation was examined in thrombomodulin (TM) mutant mice with deficient ability to activate protein C. Results: Simvastatin administration was associated with lower radiation injury scores (p < 0.0001), improved mucosal preservation (p = 0.0009), and reduced thickening of the intestinal wall and subserosa (p = 0.008 and p = 0.004), neutrophil infiltration (p = 0.04), and accumulation of collagen I (p = 0.0003). The effect of simvastatin was consistently more pronounced for delayed than for early injury. Surprisingly, simvastatin reduced intestinal radiation injury in TM mutant mice, indicating that the enteroprotective effect of simvastatin after localized irradiation is unrelated to protein C activation. Conclusions: Simvastatin ameliorates the intestinal radiation response. The radioprotective effect of simvastatin after localized small bowel irradiation does not appear to be related to protein C activation. Statins should undergo clinical testing as a strategy to minimize side effects of radiation on the intestine and other normal tissues

  20. A theoretical study on the influence of the homogeneity of heavy-ion irradiation field on the survival fraction of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Xiaoqiong; Li Qiang; Zhou Guangming; Li Wenjian; Wang Jufang; Wei Zengquan

    2001-01-01

    In order to provide theoretical basis for the homogeneity request of heavy-ion irradiation field, the most important design parameter of the heavy-ion radiotherapy facility planned in IMP (Institute of Modern Physics), the influence of the homogeneity of heavy-ion irradiation field on the survival fraction of cells was investigated theoretically. A formula for survival fraction of cells irradiated by the un-uniform heavy-ion irradiation field was deduced to estimate the influence of the homogeneity of heavy-ion irradiation field on the survival fraction of cells. The results show that the survival fraction of cells irradiation by the un-uniform irradiation field is larger than that of cells irradiated by the uniform irradiation field, and the survival fraction of cells increases as the homogeneity of heavy-ion irradiation field decreasing. Practically, the heavy-ion irradiation field can be treated as uniform irradiation field when its homogeneity is better than 95%. According to these results, design request for the homogeneity of heavy-ion irradiation field should be better than 95%. The present results also show that the agreement of homogeneity of heavy-ion irradiation field must be checked while comparing the survival fraction curves obtained by different laboratory

  1. Fractionated total lymphoid irradiation as preparative immunosuppression in high risk renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najarian, J.S.; Ferguson, R.M.; Sutherland, D.E.; Slavin, S.; Kim, T.; Kersey, J.; Simmons, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Twenty-two patients at high risk to reject renal allografts have been treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (FTLI) prior to transplantation of primary (2), secondary (16) or tertiary (4) renal allografts. All patients undergoing retransplantation had rapidly rejected previous grafts. At 24 months following transplantation, 72% of grafts were functioning in the TLI group compared with a 38% graft function in an historical control group of recipients receiving secondary or tertiary grafts and treated with conventional immunosuppression. Important variables in determining success of transplantation following fractionated TLI include the dose of TLI, the interval from radiation to transplantation, and maintenance post-transplant immunosuppressive therapy. Optimal results were achieved with 2500 rads delivered in 100 rad fractions followed by transplantation within two weeks, and a tapering prednisone schedule and maintenance azathioprine post-transplantation. Seventeen patients had significant complications of the radiation treatment and there was one death, prior to transplantation, associated with pneumonitis. In vitro assessment of immune function demonstrated marked peripheral T cell depletion and loss of in vitro responsiveness to mitogen and allogeneic stimulation following FTLI. The administration of donor bone marrow at the time of transplantation did not produce chimerism. The results suggest that when properly utilized FTLI can produce effective adjunctive immunosuppression for clinical transplantation

  2. Fractionated half body irradiation for palliation of multiple symptomatic bone metastases from solid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiguchi, Kenji; Hayashi, Shinya; Sunagawa, Yoshimitsu; Sougawa, Mitsuharu; Nakazawa, Masanori; Yamashita, Takashi (Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital)

    1992-06-01

    This was a phase I-II nonrandomized study that explored the toxicity and response of fractionated half-body irradiation (F-HBI) in patients with multiple symptomatic osseous metastases. The patients had no premedication and received 10 Gy in 5 fractions with a dose rate of 15 cGy/min. At the Cancer Institute Hospital, 9 patients were treated by this technique (1 upper and lower F-HBI, 6 upper F-HBI, 2 lower F-HBI). All patients were female and had adenocarcinomas (8 breast and 1 lung). Adverse effects were myelosuppression, vomiting and partial alopecia. But hematologic toxicity was treated with blood transfusion or G-CSF. All toxicity was transient, and no pneumonitis nor radiation-related deaths occurred. When given as palliation, F-HBI was found to relieve pain in 80% of the patients. In 10% of the patients the pain relief was complete. The mean time to achieve pain relief in responders after F-HBI was 9 days. The pain relief was long-lasting and continued without need of reirradiation for 40% of the remaining patient's life. This treatment modality appears to be well tolerated and effective in patients with multiple symptomatic osseous metastases. The optimal indications, dose and fractionation for F-HBI should be further explored in randomized trials. (author).

  3. Enhancing hair follicle regeneration by nonablative fractional laser: Assessment of irradiation parameters and tissue response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yueh-Feng; Wang, Shiou-Han; Wu, Pei-Shan; Fan, Sabrina Mai-Yi; Chiu, Hsien-Yi; Tsai, Tsung-Hua; Lin, Sung-Jan

    2015-04-01

    Identification of methods to enhance anagen entry can be helpful for alopecia. Recently, nonablative laser has been proposed as a potential treatment for alopecia. However, how the laser parameters affect stem cell activity, hair cycles and the associated side effects have not been well characterized. Here we examine the effects of irradiation parameters of 1,550-nm fractional laser on hair cycles. The dorsal skin of eight-week-old female C57BL/6 mice with hair follicles in synchronized telogen was shaved and irradiated with a 1,550-nm fractional erbium-glass laser (Fraxel RE:STORE (SR1500) Laser System, Solta Medical, U.S.A.) with varied beam energies (5-35 mJ) and beam densities (500-3500 microthermal zones/cm(2) ). The cutaneous changes were evaluated both grossly and histologically. Hair follicle stem cell activity was detected by BrdU incorporation and changes in gene expression were quantified by real-time PCR. Direct thermal injury to hair follicles could be observed early after irradiation, especially at higher beam energy. Anagen induction in the irradiated skin showed an all-or-non change. Anagen induction and ulcer formation were affected by the combination of beam energy and density. The lowest beam energy of 5 mJ failed to promote anagen entry at all beam densities tested. As beam energy increased from 10 mJ to 35 mJ, we found a decreasing trend of beam density that could induce anagen entry within 7-9 days with activation of hair follicle stem cells. Beam density above the pro-regeneration density could lead to ulcers and scarring followed by anagen entry in adjacent skin. Analysis of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, revealed that transient moderate inflammation was associated with anagen induction and intense prolonged inflammation preceded ulcer formation. To avoid side effects of hair follicle injury and scarring, appropriate combination of beam energy and density is required. Parameters outside the therapeutic

  4. Kinetics and capacity of repair of sublethal damage in mouse lip mucosa during fractionated irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, K.K.; Xu, F.X.; Landuyt, W.; van der Schueren, E.

    1985-01-01

    The kinetics and capacity of repair of sublethal damage in mouse lip mucosa have been investigated. To assess the rate of repair 2 and 5 irradiations have been given with intervals ranging from 1 to 24 hours. It was found that the sublethal damage induced by a dose of approximately 10 Gy was fully recovered in approximately 4 hr. After a dose of 5-6 Gy, cellular repair was completed within 3 hr. The half time of repair (T1/2) was estimated to be approximately 72 min for 10 Gy and approximately 54 min for 5-6 Gy. Although these results suggest that the rate of repair is dependent on the fraction size, the possible influence of the amount of repair of sublethal radiation damage with the various fraction sizes used can not be ruled out. To evaluate the capacity of repair, a single dose, 2, 4 and 10 fractions have been given in a maximal overall time of 3 days in order to minimize the influence of repopulation. The slope of the isoeffective curve was 0.32 and the alpha/beta ratio was 8.5 Gy. This indicates that the capacity of cellular repair of lip mucosa is similar to those of other rapidly proliferating tissues but smaller than those of late responding tissues. The results of the present and other studies demonstrate that there are considerable differences in the repair characteristics between acutely and late responding tissues. These features have to be dealt with when fractionation schedules are markedly altered

  5. Haemopoiesis-enhancing effects of repeatedly administered carboxymethylglucan in mice exposed to fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, M.; Pospisil, M.; Pipalova, I.; Hola, J.

    1995-01-01

    Carboxymethylglucan (CMG), a water-soluble glucan derivative, enhanced the number of granulocytes in the peripheral blood as well as other indices of haemopoietic recovery (total cellularity and the number of granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells in femoral marrow, spleen weight) investigated after fractionated gamma-irradiation of mice (five doses of 2 Gy each, or three, four and five doses of 3 Gy each given at 24 hours' intervals). An increased liver weight and a more pronounced anaemia found in the CMG-treated mice suggested that also inflammatory side effects were evoked by repeated CMG administration. On the other hand, the development of tolerance, i.e., a decreased effectiveness of CMG treatment on repeated administration did not seem to play a major role under the experimental conditions studied because the protective effects of CMG increased with the increasing number of CMG injections. (author) 2 figs., 16 refs

  6. Total proteins and protein fractions levels in pregnant rats subjected to whole-body gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, M.A.; Roushdy, H.M.; Mazhar, F.M.; Abu-Gabal, H.A.

    1986-01-01

    A total number of 180 mature rats (120 females and 60 males) weighing from 120-140 g were used to study the effect of two doses (2 and 4 Gy) whole-body gamma irradiation on the level of total protein and protein fractions in serum of pregnant rats during the period of organogenesis. It was found that the levels of total protein, albumin and gamma globulins significantly decreased according to the doses of exposure. The levels of alpha and beta globulins significantly increased more in the serum of rats exposed to 2 Gy than in rats exposed to 4 Gy. The level of A/G ratio significantly decreased more in the serum of rats exposed to 2Gy than in those exposed to 4 Gy

  7. Fractionated vs acute irradiation: the effects of treating adult boll weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) at different ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, J.W.; Wright, J.E.; Mattix, E.

    1979-01-01

    When 6-7 days old mass-reared ebony boll weevils, Anthonomus grandis Boheman, were given 25 doses of γ-irradiation totaling 6625 rads, mortality was 14%-15% less 1 week later than when young weevils (1-2 day-old) were similarly treated. However, giving older weevils an acute dose of 6625 rads did not reduce mortality. Seven-day-old weevils receiving the acute treatment mated 10% more than weevils that were 3 days old at the time of treatment. Seven-day-old male weevils exposed to the fractionated treatment transferred sperm to 12% more females than 7-day-old males exposed to the acute treatment. (Auth.)

  8. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in adults after fractionated body irradiation and high dose cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinch, L.; Evensen, S.A.; Albrechtsen, D.; Egeland, T.; Solheim, B.G.; Rollag, H.; Naalsund, A.; Jacobsen, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present short and long-term results of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation after hyper-fractionated total body irradiation and high dose cyclophosphamide in ten patients treated for leukaemia during th period 1985-89. Three patients died from complications connected to the transplantation, while seven are living free from leukaemia 18 to 59 months after transplantation. Two patients need treatment for chronic graft versus host disease. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is expensive and risky. Close cooperation between clinicians and laboratory specialists is essential. The treatment increases long term survival and probably cures certain patients with leukaemia. Some of the patients will need treatment for chronic graft versus host disease and other late sequelae. 19 refs., 2 tabs

  9. Proliferation and clonal survival of human lung cancer cells treated with fractionated irradiation in combination with paclitaxel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijn, Johannes van; Berg, Jaap van den; Meijer, Otto W.M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to determine the effects of a continuous exposure to paclitaxel (taxol) in combination with fractionated irradiation on cell proliferation and survival. Methods and Materials: Human lung carcinoma cells (SW1573) were given a daily treatment with 3 Gy of x-rays during 5 days in the continuous presence of 5 nM taxol. The surviving fraction and the total number of cells were determined every 24 h before and immediately after irradiation. Results: Irradiation with 5 x 3 Gy and 5 nM taxol cause approximately the same inhibition of cell proliferation. In combination these treatments have an additional effect and the cell population increases no further after the first 24 h. Whereas the cells become more resistant to taxol after the first 24 h with a minimum survival of 42%, taxol progressively reduces the population of surviving cells in combination with x-rays when the number of fractions increases, up to 25-fold relative to irradiation alone. The enhancement effect of 5 nM taxol is likely to be attributed to an inhibition of the repopulation during fractionated irradiation and not to an increased radiosensitivity. Only after treatment with 10 or 100 nM taxol for 24 h, which is attended with a high cytotoxicity, is moderate radiosensitization observed. Conclusion: Taxol, continuously present at a low concentration with little cytotoxicity, causes a progressive reduction of the surviving cell population in combination with fractionated irradiation, mainly by an inhibition of the repopulation of surviving cells between the dose fractions

  10. First experiences with super fractionated skin irradiations using large afterloading molds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, Peter; Hensley, Frank W.; Berns, Christiane; Schraube, Peter; Wannenmacher, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer requires large radiation fields and high doses. This report examines the effectiveness and sequelae of super fractionated irradiation of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer with afterloading molds on preirradiated and nonirradiated skin. Methods and Materials: A flexible reusable skin mold was developed for use with a pulsed (PDR) after loader. An array of 18 parallel catheters was sewn between two foam rubber slabs 5 mm in thickness to provide a defined constant distance to the skin. By selection of appropriate dwell positions, arbitrarily shaped skin areas can be irradiated up to a maximal field size of 17 x 23.5 cm 2 . Irradiations are performed with a nominal 37 GBq 192 Ir stepping source in pulses of 1 Gy/h at the skin surface. The dose distribution is geometrically optimized. The 80 and 50% dose levels lie 5 and 27 mm below the skin surface. Sixteen patients suffering from metastases at the thoracic wall were treated with 18 fields (78-798 cm 2 ) and total doses of 40-50 Gy applying two PDR split courses with a pause of 4-6 weeks. Eleven of the fields had been previously irradiated with external beam therapy to doses of 50-60 Gy at 7-22 months in advance. Results: For preirradiated fields (n = 10) the results were as follows: follow-up 4.5-28.5 months (median 17); local control (LC): 8 of 10; acute skin reactions: Grade 2 (moist desquamation) 2 of 10; intermediate/late skin reactions after minimum follow-up of 3 months: Grade 1 (atrophy/pigmentation): 2 of 10, Grade 2-3a (minimal/marked telangiectasia): 7 of 10, Grade 4 (ulcer): 1 of 10; recurrencies: 2 of 10. For newly irradiated fields (n = 7) results were: follow-up: 2-20 months (median 5); LC: 6 of 7; acute reactions: Grade 1:4 of 7, Grade 2:3 of 7; intermediate/late skin reactions after minimum follow-up of 3 months (n = 5): Grade 2-3a: 2 of 5; recurrencies: 0 of 7. Local control could be achieved in 82% of the mold fields. Geometric

  11. Pathologic changes in the lung following single and multi-fraction irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, E.L.; Harley, R.A.; Fenn, J.O.; Klobukowski, C.J.; Hargrove, H.B.

    1977-01-01

    The limiting factor in the treatment of malignant disease with irradiation is the tolerance of normal tissue irradiated. In the present study the right lungs of rats were exposed to single doses of 2000 rad of x-radiation, to 10 x 200 rad, or to 5 x 400 rad. Animals from each group were sacrificed monthly for 6 months post exposure. Sections of lung were examined by light microscopy (LM) and by scanning or transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). A focal exudative lesion was seen at 2 months after the single dose; it progressed to a proliferative and then reparative, fibrotic lesion by 6 months. Changes in epithelial lung components, particularly the presence of Type II pneumocytes, were found with both LM and TM. Vascular changes were less pronounced. A striking finding was the presence of mast cells in the alveolar walls. Neither of the multi-fraction schedules produced any of these changes, except hyperplasia of Type II cells following 5 x 400 rad. The possible implication of Type II and mast cells in radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis is discussed

  12. Tirapazamine vs carbogen and nicotinamide with fractionated irradiation. What is the optimum time of giving tirapazamine during the course of irradiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsaid, A.A.; Menke, D.; Dorie, M.J.; Brown, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: 1) To compare in a fractionated regimen, with clinically relevant radiation doses, using human tumor xenografts, two radiation response modifiers that function by different mechanisms: A) Tirapazamine (TPZ), a bioreductive drug of the benzotriazine-di-N-oxide class which shows a highly selective cytotoxicity for hypoxic cells. B) Nicotinamide (NAM), an amide of vitamin B 3 , with Carbogen breathing (CBG), a combination that has been shown to reduce both acute (perfusion-limited) hypoxia and chronic (diffusion-limited) hypoxia. 2) To determine the optimum time of giving TPZ during the course of irradiation (XRT). Materials and Methods: Cell survival assays were used to examine the response of two different human tumor xenografts: FaDu, a carcinoma of the head and neck, and HT29, a colon carcinoma, in SCID mice. Growth delay studies were performed with the FaDu tumor to compare the following treatments: TPZ with XRT, NAM + CBG with XRT, and TPZ + NAM + CBG with XRT. Clinical phase I studies of TPZ have been completed and suggest that a fractionated course of 3 fractions/week of TPZ is tolerable at an effective cytotoxic dose. However, if hypoxic cells are present in the tumor on the days that TPZ is not given (i.e. rehypoxiation has occurred) then this will reduce the effectiveness of the drug-radiation combination. To investigate this we have given CBG and NAM on the days TPZ is not given with fractionated irradiation. The fractionated irradiation schedule consisted of 2.0 or 2.5 Gy once or twice daily for one or two weeks with and without drug pre treatment. TPZ was given i.p. at 0.08 mmol/kg 30 min before irradiation for the whole course, or for 3 fractions per week alone, or with 2 fractions per week of NAM and CBG. NAM was given i.p. at 1000 mg/kg, 1 hr prior to irradiation, with CBG exposure 5 min. prior to and during the irradiation. Another growth delay study is being performed to investigate which schedule produces the most enhancement: TPZ during

  13. Re-irradiation of recurrent anaplastic ependymoma using radiosurgery or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Taro; Sato, Kengo; Iwabuchi, Michio; Manabe, Yoshihiko; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Hiromitsu; Tatewaki, Koshi; Yokota, Naoki; Ohta, Seiji; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-03-01

    Recurrent ependymomas were retreated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). The efficacy, toxicities, and differences between SRS and FSRT were analyzed. Eight patients with recurrent ependymomas fulfilling the criteria described below were evaluated. Inclusion criteria were: (1) the patient had previously undergone surgery and conventional radiotherapy as first-line treatment; (2) targets were located in or adjacent to the eloquent area or were deep-seated; and (3) the previously irradiated volume overlapped the target lesion. FSRT was delivered to 18 lesions, SRS to 20 lesions. A median follow-up period was 23 months. The local control rate was 76 % at 3 years. No significant differences in local control were observed due to tumor size or fractionation schedule. Lesions receiving >25 Gy/5 fr or 21 Gy/3 fr did not recur within 1 year, whereas no dose-response relationship was observed in those treated with SRS. No grade ≥2 toxicity was observed. Our treatment protocol provided an acceptable LC rate and minimal toxicities. Because local recurrence of tumors may result in patient death, a minimum dose of 21 Gy/3 fr or 25 Gy/5 fr or higher may be most suitable for treatment of these cases.

  14. Benefits of online in vivo dosimetry for single-fraction total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, David J., E-mail: davideaton@nhs.net [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Warry, Alison J. [Department of Radiotherapy Physics, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Trimble, Rachel E.; Vilarino-Varela, Maria J.; Collis, Christopher H. [Department of Radiotherapy, Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-01

    Use of a patient test dose before single-fraction total body irradiation (TBI) allows review of in vivo dosimetry and modification of the main treatment setup. However, use of computed tomography (CT) planning and online in vivo dosimetry may reduce the need for this additional step. Patients were treated using a supine CT-planned extended source-to-surface distance (SSD) technique with lead compensators and bolus. In vivo dosimetry was performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and diodes at 10 representative anatomical locations, for both a 0.1-Gy test dose and the treatment dose. In total, 28 patients were treated between April 2007 and July 2013, with changes made in 10 cases (36%) following test dose results. Overall, 98.1% of measured in vivo treatment doses were within 10% of the prescribed dose, compared with 97.0% of test dose readings. Changes made following the test dose could have been applied during the single-fraction treatment itself, assuming that the dose was delivered in subportions and online in vivo dosimetry was available for all clinically important anatomical sites. This alleviates the need for a test dose, saving considerable time and resources.

  15. Benefits of online in vivo dosimetry for single-fraction total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, David J.; Warry, Alison J.; Trimble, Rachel E.; Vilarino-Varela, Maria J.; Collis, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Use of a patient test dose before single-fraction total body irradiation (TBI) allows review of in vivo dosimetry and modification of the main treatment setup. However, use of computed tomography (CT) planning and online in vivo dosimetry may reduce the need for this additional step. Patients were treated using a supine CT-planned extended source-to-surface distance (SSD) technique with lead compensators and bolus. In vivo dosimetry was performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and diodes at 10 representative anatomical locations, for both a 0.1-Gy test dose and the treatment dose. In total, 28 patients were treated between April 2007 and July 2013, with changes made in 10 cases (36%) following test dose results. Overall, 98.1% of measured in vivo treatment doses were within 10% of the prescribed dose, compared with 97.0% of test dose readings. Changes made following the test dose could have been applied during the single-fraction treatment itself, assuming that the dose was delivered in subportions and online in vivo dosimetry was available for all clinically important anatomical sites. This alleviates the need for a test dose, saving considerable time and resources

  16. Lipid peroxide levels of serum lipoprotein fractions of diabetic patients with angiopathy and 60Co-irradiated rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunekawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    For a better understanding of the relationship between lipid peroxide (LPO) and vascular diseases, the author determined LPO levels and lipid contents of serum lipoprotein fractions of diabetics with angiopathy. The LPO level in high density lipoprotein (HDL) fraction of diabetic serum was significantly higher than that of normal serum whereas no significant increase was observed in the levels of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) fractions of diabetic serum. As to the ratios of LPO to total lipids in these lipoprotein fractions, it was found that the ratio in HDL fraction of the diabetics was markedly higher than that of the normals. These results suggest that the increase in LPO levels in the sera of diabetic patiens is due to that in HDL fraction. To study further this problem, the author employed 60 Co-irradiated rabbit as a model, since it was already reported that radiation affects lipid metabolism and LPO formation, and that it induces the development of atherosclerosis. Upon irradiation with 60 Co ranging from 100R to 700R, serum LPO level of rabbit was significantly increased. Although elevation of LPO level was found in each serum lipoprotein fraction of VLDL, LDL and HDL, LPO level per lipid content was significantly increased only in HDL fraction. In the irradiated rabbit, significant elevation of the level of LPO was also observed in the liver, while no significant increase was found in the kidney and spleen. These results indicate that high level of LPO observed in the serum of irradiated rabbit would be the reflection of the increased LPO in the liver. (J.P.N.)

  17. Lipid peroxide levels of serum lipoprotein fractions of diabetic patients with angiopathy and /sup 60/Co-irradiated rabbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsunekawa, Hiroshi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1982-09-01

    For a better understanding of the relationship between lipid peroxide (LPO) and vascular diseases, the author determined LPO levels and lipid contents of serum lipoprotein fractions of diabetics with angiopathy. The LPO level in high density lipoprotein (HDL) fraction of diabetic serum was significantly higher than that of normal serum whereas no significant increase was observed in the levels of very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) fractions of diabetic serum. As to the ratios of LPO to total lipids in these lipoprotein fractions, it was found that the ratio in HDL fraction of the diabetics was markedly higher than that of the normals. These results suggest that the increase in LPO levels in the sera of diabetic patients is due to that in HDL fraction. To study further this problem, the author employed /sup 60/Co-irradiated rabbit as a model, since it was already reported that radiation affects lipid metabolism and LPO formation, and that it induces the development of atherosclerosis. Upon irradiation with /sup 60/Co ranging from 100R to 700R, serum LPO level of rabbit was significantly increased. Although elevation of LPO level was found in each serum lipoprotein fraction of VLDL, LDL and HDL, LPO level per lipid content was significantly increased only in HDL fraction. In the irradiated rabbit, significant elevation of the level of LPO was also observed in the liver, while no significant increase was found in the kidney and spleen. These results indicate that high level of LPO observed in the serum of irradiated rabbit would be the reflection of the increased LPO in the liver.

  18. In vivo dosimetry of high-dose fractionated irradiation in an experimental set-up with rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortan, L; Van Hecke, H; Van Duyse, B; De Neve, W; De Meerleer, B [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Pattyn, P; Van Renthergem, K [Ghent University (Belgium). Dept. of Surgery

    1995-12-01

    The feasibility to irradiate a limited section of a rat abdomen with well-defined edges was assessed. Because of the relative small volume involved, in vivo dosimetry with TLDs was necessary in providing us information about the accuracy of the irradiation method. Three to five days prior to the start of the radiotherapy treatment, two plastic strips - each containing a TLD-dosimeter (Harshaw TLD10 LiF rods, 1 mm dia x 6 mm) sealed in polyethylene tubing, and a lead bean - were implanted in the rat abdomen. The plastic strips made a closed loop around the bowel, through the mesenterium, and were fixed with a single stitch on the inner abdominal wall. One loop was made in the hepatic area; another was made in the lower abdomen, around the rectosigmoid. Conscious animals were irradiated using a purpose-build plexi-holder, with rear legs immobilised to avoid longitudinal movements. The implanted lead beans enabled us to simulate the rat prior to each radiation session. This way, the radiation field could be set up individually for each rat, in such way that the rectosigmoid area received full dose and the hepatic area received no irradiation dose at all. Irradiation was carried out, using 5 MV photons of a linear accelerator. Fifteen animals per group were irradiated according a conventional (2.0 Gy / fraction; 5 fractions / week) or a hyperfractionated (1.6 Gy / fraction; 2 daily fractions; 5 days / week) schedule, with different total doses. Prior to implantation, TLDs were individually calibrated and checked for stability. After removal from the abdomen . TLDs were tested again for accuracy. TLDs with an unacceptable read-out curve were rejected (about 2 to 4 TLDs per group of 15). The obtained accumulated doses - as determined by TLD read-outs-were comparable to the theoretical doses, indicating that fractionated radiation of small fields, with well defined mark off, in rats is feasible.

  19. In vivo dosimetry of high-dose fractionated irradiation in an experimental set-up with rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortan, L.; Van Hecke, H.; Van Duyse, B.; De Neve, W.; De Meerleer, B.; Pattyn, P.; Van Renthergem, K.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility to irradiate a limited section of a rat abdomen with well-defined edges was assessed. Because of the relative small volume involved, in vivo dosimetry with TLDs was necessary in providing us information about the accuracy of the irradiation method. Three to five days prior to the start of the radiotherapy treatment, two plastic strips - each containing a TLD-dosimeter (Harshaw TLD10 LiF rods, 1 mm dia x 6 mm) sealed in polyethylene tubing, and a lead bean - were implanted in the rat abdomen. The plastic strips made a closed loop around the bowel, through the mesenterium, and were fixed with a single stitch on the inner abdominal wall. One loop was made in the hepatic area; another was made in the lower abdomen, around the rectosigmoid. Conscious animals were irradiated using a purpose-build plexi-holder, with rear legs immobilised to avoid longitudinal movements. The implanted lead beans enabled us to simulate the rat prior to each radiation session. This way, the radiation field could be set up individually for each rat, in such way that the rectosigmoid area received full dose and the hepatic area received no irradiation dose at all. Irradiation was carried out, using 5 MV photons of a linear accelerator. Fifteen animals per group were irradiated according a conventional (2.0 Gy / fraction; 5 fractions / week) or a hyperfractionated (1.6 Gy / fraction; 2 daily fractions; 5 days / week) schedule, with different total doses. Prior to implantation, TLDs were individually calibrated and checked for stability. After removal from the abdomen . TLDs were tested again for accuracy. TLDs with an unacceptable read-out curve were rejected (about 2 to 4 TLDs per group of 15). The obtained accumulated doses - as determined by TLD read-outs-were comparable to the theoretical doses, indicating that fractionated radiation of small fields, with well defined mark off, in rats is feasible

  20. VARIATIONS IN RADIATION SENSITIVITY AND REPAIR AMONG DIFFERENT HEMATOPOIETIC STEM-CELL SUBSETS FOLLOWING FRACTIONATED-IRRADIATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOWN, JD; BOUDEWIJN, A; VANOS, R; THAMES, HD; PLOEMACHER, RE

    1995-01-01

    The radiation dose-survival of various hematopoietic cell subsets in murine bone marrow (BM) was determined in the cobblestone area forming cell (CAFC) assay under conditions of single-, split-, and multiple-dose irradiation. A greater recovery in cell survival with decreasing dose per fraction, or

  1. Cell kinetic changes in the follicular epithelium of pig skin after irradiation with single and fractionated doses of X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, G.M.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Changes in cell kinetics of the follicular epithelium of the pig were studied after x-irradiation with single and fractionated doses (30 fractions/39 days) and compared with previous epidermal data. In the follicular epithelium there was an initial degenerative phase, when the rate of cell depletion was independent of radiation dose and mode of administration. Repopulation was seen between the 14th and 18th days after single doses (15 or 20 Gy) and by the 28th day after the start of irradiation with fractionated doses (52.3-80.0 Gy). The degree of cell depletion and subsequent rate of repopulation were independent of dose. The regenerative phase was characterized by an increased cell proliferation. Islands of cells with appearance similar to cells in the normal follicular epithelium, were seen 18 days after a single dose of 20 Gy and 42 days after the start of fractionated irradiation. Compared with the epidermis, the follicular epithelium exhibited considerably less evidence of damage after both single and fractionated doses. There was a lower incidence of degenerate cells and reduced levels of cell depletion in the follicular epithelium. (author)

  2. Acute response of mouse kidney clonogens to fractionated irradiation in situ and then assayed in primary culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeemin Jen; Hendry, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of mouse kidney cells after in situ single-dose, 2, 8, and 16 fraction X-irradiations was measured in primary culture using a clonogenic assay. The assay was made 12 h after single doses or 12 h after the last dose of the multifraction regimens. When analysed using the linear-quadratic model, as predicted the individual α components for all the different fractionation schedules were not significantly different, and the changes in the β values were consistent with those expected on the basis of the reciprocal fraction numbers. When all four data sets were integrated to derive a common α/β ratio, the result was 4.4±1.3 (1SE) Gy, or 2.8±0.9 Gy (a better fit) if the single-dose data set was excluded. These values fall into the range reported for kidney using assays of tissue function at long times after irradiation. (author)

  3. Concentration of Proteins and Protein Fractions in Blood Plasma of Chickens Hatched from Eggs Irradiated with Low Level Gamma Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraljevic, P.; Vilic, M.; Simpraga, M.; Matisic, D.; Miljanic, S.

    2011-01-01

    In literature there are many results which have shown that low dose radiation can stimulate many physiological processes of living organism. In our earlier paper it was shown that low dose of gamma radiation has a stimulative effect upon metabolic process in chickens hatched from eggs irradiated before incubation. This was proved by increase of body weight gain and body weight, as well as by increase of two enzymes activities in blood plasma (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase) which play an important role in protein metabolism. Therefore, an attempt was made to determine the effect of eggs irradiation by low dose gamma rays upon concentration of total proteins and protein fractions in the blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs. The eggs of heavy breed chickens were irradiated with a dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation (60Co) before incubation. Along with the chickens which were hatched from irradiated eggs, there was a control group of chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs. All other conditions were the same for both groups of chickens. Blood samples were taken from the right jugular vein on the 1 s t and 3 r d day, or from the wing vein on days 5 and 7 after hatching. The total proteins concentration in the blood plasma was determined by the biuret method using Boehringer Mannheim GmbH optimized kits. The protein fractions (albumin, α 1 -globulin, α 2 -globulin, β- and γ-globulins) were estimated electrophoretically on Cellogel strips. The total proteins concentration was significantly decreased in blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs on days 3 (P t h day (P 2 -globulin was decreased on days 1 (P t h day of life. Obtained results indicate that low dose of gamma radiation has mostly inhibitory effect upon concentration of total proteins and protein fractions in the blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs before incubation. (author)

  4. Fractionation for Whole Breast Irradiation: An American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Evidence-Based Guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Benjamin D.; Bentzen, Soren M.; Correa, Candace R.; Hahn, Carol A.; Hardenbergh, Patricia H.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; McCormick, Beryl; McQueen, Julie R.; Pierce, Lori J.; Powell, Simon N.; Recht, Abram; Taghian, Alphonse G.; Vicini, Frank A.; White, Julia R.; Haffty, Bruce G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery, randomized trials have found little difference in local control and survival outcomes between patients treated with conventionally fractionated (CF-) whole breast irradiation (WBI) and those receiving hypofractionated (HF)-WBI. However, it remains controversial whether these results apply to all subgroups of patients. We therefore developed an evidence-based guideline to provide direction for clinical practice. Methods and Materials: A task force authorized by the American Society for Radiation Oncology weighed evidence from a systematic literature review and produced the recommendations contained herein. Results: The majority of patients in randomized trials were aged 50 years or older, had disease Stage pT1-2 pN0, did not receive chemotherapy, and were treated with a radiation dose homogeneity within ±7% in the central axis plane. Such patients experienced equivalent outcomes with either HF-WBI or CF-WBI. Patients not meeting these criteria were relatively underrepresented, and few of the trials reported subgroup analyses. For patients not receiving a radiation boost, the task force favored a dose schedule of 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions when HF-WBI is planned. The task force also recommended that the heart should be excluded from the primary treatment fields (when HF-WBI is used) due to lingering uncertainty regarding late effects of HF-WBI on cardiac function. The task force could not agree on the appropriateness of a tumor bed boost in patients treated with HF-WBI. Conclusion: Data were sufficient to support the use of HF-WBI for patients with early-stage breast cancer who met all the aforementioned criteria. For other patients, the task force could not reach agreement either for or against the use of HF-WBI, which nevertheless should not be interpreted as a contraindication to its use.

  5. Radiation Effect on Body Weight and Hematological Changes of Hybrid Mice by Conventional Fraction, Large Abdominal Field Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Heon; Shin, Sei One; Kim, Myung Se

    1985-01-01

    Radiation effect on mammals, especially on hematologic changes, has been studied since discovery of x-ray. Various experimental animals were tried for radiobiological studies. 72 hybrid mice with conventional fraction (5X/week), large abdominal field (2 x 3cm, from symphysis pubic to xyphoid process) were used. Body weight was declined gradually by increasing irradiation doses, nadir was about 29.7% in male ; 30.4% in female at 6000 rad irradiation group. Hemoglobin value was nearly normal throughout entire treatment. Significant dropping of WBC count was noted to 40-50% of pretreatment values by only 1000 rad irradiation. Change of differential count was interesting; lymphocyte proportion showed gradual reduction, instead of gradual increasing of segmented neutrophil. Those proportion were reversed after 6000 rad irradiation. Urinary protein tests showed + - +++, showing no correlation with dosage. Application. of our study in clinical combination therapy (radiation + chemotherapy) was discussed

  6. Factors associated with pulmonary toxicity after myeloablative conditioning using fractionated total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Hwa Kyung; Yoon, Hong In; Cho, Jae Ho [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-09-15

    Pulmonary toxicities, including infectious pneumonia (IP) and idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS), are serious side effects of total body irradiation (TBI) used for myeloablative conditioning. This study aimed to evaluate clinical factors associated with IP and IPS following TBI. Fifty-eight patients with hematologic malignancies who underwent TBI before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation between 2005 and 2014 were reviewed. Most patients (91%) received 12 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions twice a day. Pulmonary toxicities were diagnosed based on either radiographic evidence or reduced pulmonary function, and were subdivided into IP and IPS based on the presence or absence of concurrent infection. Pulmonary toxicities developed in 36 patients (62%); 16 (28%) had IP and 20 (34%) had IPS. IP was significantly associated with increased treatment-related mortality (p = 0.028) and decreased survival (p = 0.039). Multivariate analysis revealed that the risk of developing IPS was significantly higher in patients who received stem cells from a matched unrelated donor than from a matched sibling donor (p = 0.021; hazard ratio [HR] = 12.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46–110.30). Combining other conditioning agents with cyclophosphamide produced a higher tendency to develop IP (p = 0.064; HR = 6.19; 95% CI, 0.90–42.56). IP and IPS involve different risk factors and distinct pathogeneses that should be considered when planning treatments before and after TBI.

  7. Fractionated irradiation-induced EMT-like phenotype conferred radioresistance in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongfang; Luo, Honglei; Jiang, Zhenzhen; Yue, Jing; Hou, Qiang; Xie, Ruifei; Wu, Shixiu

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of radiotherapy, one major treatment modality for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is severely attenuated by radioresistance. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cellular process that determines therapy response and tumor progression. However, whether EMT is induced by ionizing radiation and involved in tumor radioresistance has been less studied in ESCC. Using multiple fractionated irradiation, the radioresistant esophageal squamous cancer cell line KYSE-150R had been established from its parental cell line KYSE-150. We found KYSE-150R displayed a significant EMT phenotype with an elongated spindle shape and down-regulated epithelial marker E-cadherin and up-regulated mesenchymal marker N-cadherin in comparison with KYSE-150. Furthermore, KYSE-150R also possessed some stemness-like properties characterized by density-dependent growth promotion and strong capability for sphere formation and tumorigenesis in NOD-SCID mice. Mechanical studies have revealed that WISP1, a secreted matricellular protein, is highly expressed in KYSE-150R and mediates EMT-associated radioresistance both in ESCC cells and in xenograft tumor models. Moreover, WISP1 has been demonstrated to be closely associated with the EMT phenotype observed in ESCC patients and to be an independent prognosis factor of ESCC patients treated with radiotherapy. Our study highlighted WISP1 as an attractive target to reverse EMT-associated radioresistance in ESCC and can be used as an independent prognostic factor of patients treated with radiotherapy. PMID:27125498

  8. Marrow transplantation for leukemia following fractionated total body irradiation. A comparative trial of methotrexate and cyclosporine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irle, C.; Deeg, H.J.; Buckner, C.D.; Swedish Hospital Medical Center, Seattle, WA; Veterans Administration Hospital, Seattle, WA; Washington Univ., Seattle

    1985-01-01

    Fifty-six patients, 30-47 yr of age, with leukemia in relapse received allogeneic marrow transplants from HLA-identical siblings. All patients were treated with cyclophosphamide (120 mg/kg) and 7 daily fractions of 2.25 Gy of total body irradiation (TBI) for seven consecutive days. Nine patients (16%) are currently alive, free of disease, 324-845 days from transplantation. Actuarial relapse and survival rates at 2 yr were 56% and 9.5% respectively. These data were not remarkably different from those in previous studies using 10 Gy of TBI administered as a single dose. Thirty patients were randomized to receive methotrexate (MTX) and 26 to receive cyclosporine (CSP) as postgrafting prophylaxis for acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Probability of developing significant acute GVHD by day 100 post-transplant was 71% for patients in the MTX group and 45% for patients in the CSP group (p<0.05). Probability of relapse was 37% for patients in the MTX group and 70% for patients in the CSP group (p<0.05). Transplant-related deaths were more frequent in the MTX group and leukemic deaths more frequent in the CSP group although this may have been related to an uneven distribution of high-risk patients. Long term disease-free survival was comparable. (author)

  9. Enzyme-activity mutations detected in mice after paternal fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, D.J.; Pretsch, W.

    1986-01-01

    (101/E1 X C3H/E1)F 1 -hybrid male mice were exposed in a 24-h fractionation interval to either 3.0 + 3.0-Gy or 5.1 + 5.1-Gy X-irradiation, and mated to untreated Test-stock females. The offspring were examined for mutations at 7 recessive specific loci and for activity alterations of erythrocyte enzymes controlled presumably by 12 loci. No enzyme-activity mutant was found in 3610 F 1 -offspring of the control group. In the experimental groups, no mutant was detected in 533 (3.0 + 3.0 Gy) and 173 (5.1 + 5.1 Gy) offspring from postspermatogonial germ cells treated. After treatment of spermatogonia, 1 mutant in 3388 F 1 -offspring of the 3.0 + 3.0-Gy group, and 5 mutants in 3187 F 1 offspring of the 5.1 + 5.1-Gy group were found. The mutants were all genetically confirmed. The frequency (expressed as mutants/locus/gamete) of enzyme-activity mutations is 2 (5.1 + 5.1-Gy group) to 10 (3.0 + 3.0-Gy group) times lower than the frequency of recessive specific-locus mutations. (Auth.)

  10. Fractionated irradiation-induced EMT-like phenotype conferred radioresistance in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hongfang; Luo, Honglei; Jiang, Zhenzhen; Yue, Jing; Hou, Qiang; Xie, Ruifei; Wu, Shixiu

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of radiotherapy, one major treatment modality for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is severely attenuated by radioresistance. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cellular process that determines therapy response and tumor progression. However, whether EMT is induced by ionizing radiation and involved in tumor radioresistance has been less studied in ESCC. Using multiple fractionated irradiation, the radioresistant esophageal squamous cancer cell line KYSE-150R had been established from its parental cell line KYSE-150. We found KYSE-150R displayed a significant EMT phenotype with an elongated spindle shape and down-regulated epithelial marker E-cadherin and up-regulated mesenchymal marker N-cadherin in comparison with KYSE-150. Furthermore, KYSE-150R also possessed some stemness-like properties characterized by density-dependent growth promotion and strong capability for sphere formation and tumorigenesis in NOD-SCID mice. Mechanical studies have revealed that WISP1, a secreted matricellular protein, is highly expressed in KYSE-150R and mediates EMT-associated radioresistance both in ESCC cells and in xenograft tumor models. Moreover, WISP1 has been demonstrated to be closely associated with the EMT phenotype observed in ESCC patients and to be an independent prognosis factor of ESCC patients treated with radiotherapy. Our study highlighted WISP1 as an attractive target to reverse EMT-associated radioresistance in ESCC and can be used as an independent prognostic factor of patients treated with radiotherapy

  11. Factors associated with pulmonary toxicity after myeloablative conditioning using fractionated total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Hwa Kyung; Yoon, Hong In; Cho, Jae Ho

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary toxicities, including infectious pneumonia (IP) and idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS), are serious side effects of total body irradiation (TBI) used for myeloablative conditioning. This study aimed to evaluate clinical factors associated with IP and IPS following TBI. Fifty-eight patients with hematologic malignancies who underwent TBI before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation between 2005 and 2014 were reviewed. Most patients (91%) received 12 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions twice a day. Pulmonary toxicities were diagnosed based on either radiographic evidence or reduced pulmonary function, and were subdivided into IP and IPS based on the presence or absence of concurrent infection. Pulmonary toxicities developed in 36 patients (62%); 16 (28%) had IP and 20 (34%) had IPS. IP was significantly associated with increased treatment-related mortality (p = 0.028) and decreased survival (p = 0.039). Multivariate analysis revealed that the risk of developing IPS was significantly higher in patients who received stem cells from a matched unrelated donor than from a matched sibling donor (p = 0.021; hazard ratio [HR] = 12.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46–110.30). Combining other conditioning agents with cyclophosphamide produced a higher tendency to develop IP (p = 0.064; HR = 6.19; 95% CI, 0.90–42.56). IP and IPS involve different risk factors and distinct pathogeneses that should be considered when planning treatments before and after TBI

  12. Glycolysis-related gene induction and ATP reduction during fractionated irradiation. Markers for radiation responsiveness of human tumor xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetze, K.; Meyer, S.S.; Mueller-Klieser, W. [University Medical Center Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Physiology and Pathophysiology; Yaromina, A. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Zips, D. [University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Baumann, M. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; University Hospital Dresden Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background and purpose: Lactate was previously shown to be a prognostic but not a predictive pre-therapeutic marker for radiation response of tumor xenografts. We hypothesize that metabolic changes during fractionated irradiation may restrict the predictiveness of lactate regarding tumor radiosensitivity. Materials and methods: Tumor xenografts were generated in nude mice by implanting 4 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma lines with different sensitivities to fractionated irradiation. Tumors were irradiated with up to 15 fractions of 2 Gy over a period of 3 weeks, and ATP and lactate levels were measured in vital tumor areas with induced metabolic bioluminescence imaging. Corresponding changes in mRNA expression of glycolysis-related genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Results: Lactate content decreased significantly in 3 out of 4 cell lines in the course of irradiation showing no correlation with cell line-specific radiosensitivity. Radiation-induced changes in ATP levels and glycolysis-related mRNA expression, however, only occurred in radiosensitive or intermediately radioresistant xenografts, whereas these parameters remained unchanged in radioresistant tumors. Conclusion: Sensitivity-related differences in the transcriptional response of tumors to radiotherapy may be exploited in the clinic for better individualization of tumor treatment. (orig.)

  13. Allograft tolerance in pigs after fractionated lymphoid irradiation. II. Kidney graft after conventional total lymphoid irradiation and bone marrow cell grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradelizi, D.; Mahouy, G.; de Riberolles, C.; Lecompte, Y.; Alhomme, P.; Douard, M.C.; Chotin, G.; Martelli, H.; Daburon, F.; Vaiman, M.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments with pigs have been performed in order to establish bone marrow chimerism and kidney graft tolerance between SLA genotyped semi-incompatible animals. Recipients were conditioned by means of conventional fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) delivered by a vertical cobalt source. The principal lymphoid regions of the pig, including thymus and spleen, were submitted to irradiation. Two protocols were tested: A = 250 cGy four times a week x 13 times (TLI) (two animals) and B = 350 cGy three times a week x 8 times (TLI) (four animals). Bone marrow cells were injected 24 h after the last irradiation. One day later, bilateral nephrectomy and the graft of one kidney from the bone marrow cell donor were performed simultaneously. Results convinced us that application of the TLI protocol to humans is not yet practicable and that further experimental work is needed

  14. Impact of anemia prevention by recombinant human erythropoietin on the sensitivity of xenografted glioblastomas to fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stueben, G.; Poettgen, C.; Knuehmann, K.; Sack, H.; Stuschke, M.; Thews, O.; Vaupel, P.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Pronounced oxygen deficiency in tumors which might be caused by a diminished oxygen transport capacity of the blood (e.g., in anemia) reduces the efficacy of ionizing radiation. The aim of this study was to analyze whether anemia prevention by recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) affects the radiosensitivity of human glioblastoma xenografts during fractionated irradiation. Material and Methods: Anemia was induced by total body irradiation (TBI, 2 x 4 Gy) of mice prior to tumor implantation into the subcutis of the hind leg. In one experimental group, the development of anemia was prevented by rHuEPO (750 U/kg s.c.) given three times weekly starting 10 days prior to TBI. 13 days after tumor implantation (tumor volume approx. 40 mm 3 ), fractionated irradiation (4 x 7 Gy, one daily fraction) of the glioblastomas was performed resulting in a growth delay with subsequent regrowth of the tumors. Results: Compared to nonanemic control animals (hemoglobin concentration cHb = 14.7 g/dl), the growth delay in anemic mice (cHb = 9.9 g/dl) was significantly shorter (49 ± 5 days vs. 79 ± 4 days to reach four times the initial tumor volume) upon fractionated radiation. The prevention of anemia by rHuEPO treatment (cHb = 13.3 g/dl) resulted in a significantly prolonged growth delay (61 ± 5 days) compared to the anemia group, even though the growth inhibition found in control animals was not completely achieved. Conclusions: These data indicate that moderate anemia significantly reduces the efficacy of radiotherapy. Prevention of anemia with rHuEPO partially restores the radiosensitivity of xenografted glioblastomas to fractionated irradiation. (orig.)

  15. Hypo-fractionated whole breast irradiation: Pro and cons; Irradiation hypofractionnee dans le cancer du sein: pour ou contre?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutuli, B. [Institut du cancer Courlancy, 38, rue de Courlancy, 51100 Reims (France); Fourquet, A. [Institut Curie, 26, rue d' Ulm, 75005 Paris (France)

    2011-10-15

    The continuous increase of breast cancer (BC) incidence, the logistic constraints of the protracted standard 5-week radiations regimen have led to test short hypo-fractionated whole breast radiation therapy schemes. Three prospective randomized trials and a pilot trial have been published. Large numbers of patients were included, with follow-up duration ranging from 5 to 12 years. The conclusions of these trials were similar, showing local control and toxicity equivalent to those of the standard regimen, and supporting the use of three schemes: 42.5 Gy/16 fractions/3 weeks, 40 Gy/15 fractions/3 weeks or 41.6 Gy/13 fractions/5 weeks. However, the patients in these trials had favourable prognostic factors, were treated to the breast only and the boost dose, when indicated, was delivered with a standard fractionation. Hypo-fractionated treatment can only be recommended in patients treated to the breast only, without nodal involvement, with grade < 3 tumours and who are not candidate to chemotherapy. If a boost is to be given, a standard fractionation should be used. Particular care should be taken to avoid heterogeneities leading to high fractional doses to organs at risk (lung and heart). (authors)

  16. Epinephrine ameliorating response of serum proteins and protein fractions to whole body gamma irradiation in albino rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, M.A.; Saada, H.N.; Roushdy, H.M.; Awad, O.M.; El-Sayed, M.M.; Azab, Kh.Sh.

    1997-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the role of epinephrine in modifying the radiation induced effects on serum protein as presented by total protein, protein fractions and albumin/globulin (A/G) ratio in adult albino rats. Epinephrine was intraperitoneally injected at a concentration of 200 M/g body weight, 15 min, pre-9 or just after 0 whole body gamma-irradiation of rats at a dose of 6 Gy (single dose). Studies have been undertaken at periods of 1 hr, 4 hrs, 1,3 and 7 days after irradiation. Data of the present study revealed that whole body gamma-irradiation induced significant decreased in the total content of serum protein and albumin at 1,3 and 7 days post radiation exposure alpha 1-globulin significantly increased only on the 1 st hr post-irradiation, however alpha 1-globulin significantly increased along all the experimental periods. B-globulin insignificantly changed after irradiation but gamma-globulin significantly decreased during the experimental periods. These changes were associated with significant decreases in A/G ratio at 3 and 7 days post-irradiation. Administration of epinephrine pre-or after radiation exposure produced some amelioration in the radiation induced changes in the studied parameters. So, it could be concluded that epinephrine plays a beneficial radioprotective role through its pharmacologic properties

  17. Radiobiological basis of total body irradiation with different dose rate and fractionation: repair capacity of hemopoietic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C.W.; Kim, T.H.; Khan, F.M.; Kersey, J.H.; Levitt, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) followed by bone marrow transplantation is being used in the treatment of malignant or non-malignant hemopoietic disorders. It has been believed that the ability of hemopoietic cells to repair sublethal radiation damage is negligible. Therefore, several schools of investigators suggested that TBI in a single exposure at extremely low dose rate (5 rad/min) over several hours, or in several fractions in 2-3 days, should yield a higher therapeutic gain, as compared with a single exposure at a high dose rate (26 rad/min). We reviewed the existing data in the literature, in particular, the response of hemopoietic cells to fractionated doses of irradiation and found that the repair capacity of both malignant and non-malignant hemopoietic cells might be greater than has been thought. It is concluded that we should not underestimate the ability of hemopoietic cells to repair sublethal radiation damage in using TBI

  18. Comparison of single, fractionated and hyperfractionated irradiation on the development of normal tissue damage in rat lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giri, P.G.S.; Kimler, B.F.; Giri, U.P.; Cox, G.G.; Reddy, E.K.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of fractionated thoracic irradiation on the development of normal tissue damage in rats was compared to that produced by single doses. Animals received a single dose of 15 Gy, 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions of 3 Gy each (fractionation), or 30 Gy in 30 fractions of 1 Gy each 3 times a day (hyperfractionation). The treatments produced minimal lethality since a total of only 6 animals died between days 273 and 475 after the initiation of treatment, with no difference in survival observed between the control and any of the 3 treated groups. Despite the lack of lethality, evidence of lung damage was obtained by histological examination. Animals that had received either single doses or fractionated doses had more of the pulmonary parenchyma involved than did animals that had received hyperfractionated doses. The authors conclude that, in the rat lung model, a total radiation dose of 30 Gy fractionated over 14 days produces no more lethality nor damage to lung tissue than does 15 Gy delivered as a single dose. However, long-term effects as evidenced by deposits of collagen and development of fibrosis are significantly reduced by hyperfractionation when compared to single doses and daily fractionation

  19. Mutation induction in haploid yeast after split-dose radiation-exposure. I. Fractionated UV-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, K; Zölzer, F; Kiefer, J

    1989-01-01

    Mutation induction was investigated in wild-type haploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae after split-dose UV-irradiation. Cells were exposed to fractionated 254 nm-UV-doses separated by intervals from 0 to 6 h with incubation either on non-nutrient or nutrient agar between. The test parameter was resistance to canavanine. If modifications of sensitivity due to incubation are appropriately taken into account there is no change of mutation frequency.

  20. Early reoxygenation in tumors after irradiation: Determining factors and consequences for radiotherapy regimens using daily multiple fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crokart, Nathalie; Jordan, Benedicte F.; Baudelet, Christine; Ansiaux, Reginald; Sonveaux, Pierre; Gregoire, Vincent; Beghein, Nelson; Wever, Julie de; Bouzin, Caroline; Feron, Olivier; Gallez, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize changes in the tumor microenvironment early after irradiation and determine the factors responsible for early reoxygenation. Methods and Materials: Fibrosarcoma type II (FSaII) and hepatocarcinoma transplantable liver tumor tumor oxygenation were determined using electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry and a fiberoptic device. Perfusion was assessed by laser Doppler, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, and dye penetration. Oxygen consumption was determined by electron paramagnetic resonance. The interstitial fluid pressure was evaluated by the wick-in-needle technique. Results: An increase in oxygen partial pressure was observed 3-4 h after irradiation. This increase resulted from a decrease in global oxygen consumption and an increase in oxygen delivery. The increase in oxygen delivery was due to radiation-induced acute inflammation (that was partially inhibited by the antiinflammatory agent diclofenac) and to a decrease in interstitial fluid pressure. The endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathway, identified as a contributing factor at 24 h after irradiation, did not play a role in the early stage after irradiation. We also observed that splitting a treatment of 18 Gy into two fractions separated by 4 h (time of maximal reoxygenation) had a greater effect on tumor regrowth delay than when applied as a single dose. Conclusion: Although the cell cycle redistribution effect is important for treatment protocols using multiple daily radiation fractions, the results of this work emphasize that the oxygen effect must be also considered to optimize the treatment strategy

  1. Effects of bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on oral mucositis (mouse) induced by fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.; Haagen, J.; Noack, R.; Siegemund, A.; Gabriel, P.; Doerr, W.

    2014-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a severe and dose limiting early side effect of radiotherapy for head-and-neck tumors. This study was initiated to determine the effect of bone marrow- and mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on oral mucositis (mouse tongue model) induced by fractionated irradiation. Daily fractionated irradiation (5 x 3 Gy/week) was given over 1 (days 0-4) or 3 weeks (days 0-4, 7-11, 14-18). Each protocol was terminated (day 7 or 21) by graded test doses (5 dose groups, 10 animals each) in order to generate complete dose-effect curves. The incidence of mucosal ulceration, corresponding to confluent mucositis grade 3 (RTOG/EORTC), was analyzed as the primary, clinically relevant endpoint. Bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted intravenously at various time points within these fractionation protocols. Transplantation of 6 x 10 6 , but not of 3 x 10 6 bone marrow stem cells on day -1, +4, +8, +11 or +15 significantly increased the ED 50 values (dose, at which an ulcer is expected in 50% of the mice); transplantation on day +2, in contrast, was ineffective. Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on day -1, 2 or +8 significantly, and on day +4 marginally increased the ED 50 values. Transplantation of bone marrow or mesenchymal stem cells has the potential to modulate radiation-induced oral mucositis during fractionated radiotherapy. The effect is dependent on the timing of the transplantation. The mechanisms require further investigation. (orig.)

  2. Effect of single dose, fractionated, and hyperfractionated trunk irradiation on weight gain, respiration frequency, and survival in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimler, B.F.; Giri, P.G.S.; Giri, U.P.; Cox, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    It is concluded that, in this rat trunk irradiation model, fractionation of a single dose into two equal doses separated by 4-6 h produced a sparing effect of approx. 5Gy as measured by delay in weight gain; approx. 4Gy as measured by increased respiration frequency; and approx. 6Gy as measured by survival. Fractionation into daily doses or hyperfractionation into twice-daily doses permitted an approximate doubling of the dose required for the same suppression of weight gain. For the respiration rates and survival endpoints, fractionation or hyperfractionation produced an even greater sparing effect since there was no increase in the respiration frequency at twice the doses that would produce changes if delivered within a few hours; and since essentially no lethality was observed at twice the doses that would kill 70%-100% of animals if delivered in one day. (UK)

  3. Influence of the timing of a concomitant boost during fractionated irradiation of rat rhabdomyosarcoma R1H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubben, H.H.; Beck-Bornholdt, H.P.

    1993-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcomas R1H of the rat (WAG/Rij) were treated using fractionation schedules including a boost. The total dose was 60 Gy. Overall treatment time was 6 weeks. Four different boost schedules were applied: A single dose boost (12.15 Gy) at the last day of treatment, a single dose boost (12.15 Gy) at the first day of treatment, a schedule including the boost in 7 fractions during the first week, and a schedule including the boost in 10 fractions during the first week of treatment. A standard schedule with 30 fractions of 2 Gy without a boost was used for comparison. Initially accelerated schedules, i.e. those with a boost at start of treatment, revealed higher effect on tumour parenchyma as monitored by local control rate and net growth delay. This could be due to a decrease of radio-sensitivity, that is, an increase of the hypoxic fraction of clonogenic tumour cells during fractionated irradiation. (orig.)

  4. Hourly distributions of the diffuse fraction of global solar irradiation in Cordoba (Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posadillo, R.; Lopez Luque, R. [Grupo de Investigacion de Fisica para las Energias y Recursos Renovables, Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada/UCO, Edificio C2 Campus de Rabanales, 14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2009-02-15

    Hourly global irradiations on tilted planes are required for dimensioning PV systems. However, for most sites, only global irradiations on a horizontal plane are available, and, given that to calculate the global irradiation on inclined planes the first step is to determine the diffuse component and this is not collected, we have studied the behaviour of the diffuse component on an hourly basis. Most parametrization models for the derivation of hourly diffuse irradiance from hourly global irradiance involve the clearness index, a parameter that implicitly includes solar altitude. The present paper has focused on the possibility of also including ''mean solar altitude anti {alpha}'' explicitly as a parameter in addition to the clearness index. Several analytical models are proposed, validated and compared here, using solar data collected on our station located in Cordoba (Spain). (author)

  5. Hourly distributions of the diffuse fraction of global solar irradiation in Cordoba (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posadillo, R.; Lopez Luque, R.

    2009-01-01

    Hourly global irradiations on tilted planes are required for dimensioning PV systems. However, for most sites, only global irradiations on a horizontal plane are available, and, given that to calculate the global irradiation on inclined planes the first step is to determine the diffuse component and this is not collected, we have studied the behaviour of the diffuse component on an hourly basis. Most parametrization models for the derivation of hourly diffuse irradiance from hourly global irradiance involve the clearness index, a parameter that implicitly includes solar altitude. The present paper has focused on the possibility of also including 'mean solar altitude α-bar' explicitly as a parameter in addition to the clearness index. Several analytical models are proposed, validated and compared here, using solar data collected on our station located in Cordoba (Spain)

  6. Expression profiling of murine lung 70 days following exposure to fractionated or acute dose of 1.0 Gy 56Fe- particle irradiation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Irradiation of the K-rasLA1 mouse model with a fractionated dose of 1.0Gy 56Fe- particles increases the incidence of invasive carcinoma compared to unirradiated...

  7. Effect of lithium carbonate on leukocyte number after influence of ionizing radiation. 3. Influence of lithium carbonate on peripheral leukocytes after fractionated caudal half-body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, H.; Saul, G.; Kehrberg, G. (Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (German Democratic Republic). Bereich Medizin (Charite))

    1985-01-01

    Fractionated half-body irradiation of rats resulted in leukopenia of the peripheral blood. The decrease of leukocytes was smaller in animals pretreated with an orally administered dose of lithium carbonate for 14 days.

  8. Decreased repopulation as well as increased reoxygenation contribute to the improvement in local control after targeting of the EGFR by C225 during fractionated irradiation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, M.; Ostermann, G.; Petersen, C.; Yaromina, A.; Hessel, F.; Harstrick, A.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Thames, H.D.; Baumann, M.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Inhibition of repopulation and enhanced reoxygenation has been suggested to contribute to improvement of local tumour control after fractionated irradiation combined with inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The present study addresses this hypothesis in

  9. Effect of fractionated versus unfractionated total body irradiation on the growth of the BN acute myelocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenbeek, A.; Martens, A.C.M.

    1981-01-01

    The efficacy of various total body irradiation (TBI) regimens prior to bone marrow transplantation was evaluated in a rat model for acute myelocytic leukemia (Dq = 85.1 cGy gamma ; N = 3.7). Using high dose rate gamma-irradiation (115 cGy/min), fractionated TBI with large total daily doses (400 to 600 cGy), either given as acute doses or as split doses at 8 hr intervals, was most effective. Split doses (2 fractions per day) offered no additional advantage. At the most, a 4 log leukemic cell kill was induced. No lethal toxicity was observed. Nine-hundred cGy flash TBI had a similar anti-tumor effect, but with this regimen almost half of the rats died from radiation-induced toxicity (lungs and gastro-intestinal tract). The results are explained in terms of differences between normal and leukemic cells as regards (a) repair of sublethal damage; and (b) repopulation. Low dose rate continuous gamma-irradiation (0.26 cGy/min) with total doses ranging from 900 to 2000 cGy was also quite effective. Maximally a 4 log cell kill was obtained. With 2000 cGy, 50% of the rats died from the gastro-intestinal tract-syndrome. In addition to the major role played by chemotherapy, TBI is mainly of importance in sterilizing the various sanctuaries in the body which contain leukemic cells anatomically resistant to most cytostatic agents

  10. Low-dose X-irradiation of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Efficacy of different fractionation schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebmann, A.; Hindemith, M.; Jahns, J.; Kamprad, F.; Hildebrandt, G.; Madaj-Sterba, P.; Weisheit, S.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: low-dose radiotherapy is widely accepted as a very effective treatment option for inflammatory symptoms associated with painful degenerative joint disorders. Radiation doses and fractionation schedules in practical use are empirical and mainly based on clinical observations. Experimental data are rare. The efficacy of low-dose X-irradiation on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats using different fractionation schemes was investigated in vivo, in order to explore whether there is a dose and fractionation dependence. Material and methods: adjuvant arthritis in female lewis rats (n = 128) was induced by intradermal injection of heat-inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis on day 0. Both arthritic hind paws were sham-irradiated (group 1: days 10-14; group 2: days 15-19; group 3: days 22-26) or X-irradiated with either 5 x 1.0 Gy (group 4: days 10-14; group 6: days 15-19; group 8: days 22-26; group 10: days 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18) or 5 x 0.5 Gy (group 5: days 10-14; group 7: days 15-19; group 9: days 22-26; group 11: days 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18; group 12: days 10-14 and 22-26). The clinical parameters arthritis score (AS), hind paw volume (HPV), and body weight were determined. Results: a significant decrease of the clinical arthritis parameters was observed following 5 x 0.5 Gy or 5 x 1.0 Gy during the acute maximum of the inflammatory response (days 15-19). The most pronounced treatment effect was reached after two daily fractionated series of 5 x 0.5 Gy with an early treatment onset (days 10-14) and repetition in interval (days 22-26). After the application of 5 x 1.0 Gy on days 10-14 or in a protracted scheme (days 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18), only a nonsignificant positive trend could be detected. Daily fractionated X-irradiation in the chronic phase of adjuvant arthritis (days 22-26) did not show any positive clinical effect. Conclusion: low-dose radiotherapy is able to prevent a full-blown arthritic reaction if given during the florid phase of

  11. The occurrence of recruitment supported from the finding of an increase in radiosensitivity of quiescent cells in solid tumors after fractionated irradiation with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Kinashi, Yuko; Suzuki, Minoru; Akaboshi, Mitsuhiko

    1998-01-01

    We examined the behavior of quiescent cells in solid tumors irradiated twice at various intervals with X-rays, using our recently developed method for selectively detecting the response of quiescent cells in solid tumors. To determine the labeling indices of tumors at the second irradiation, each mouse group included mice that were continuously administered BrdU until just before the second irradiation using mini-osmotic pumps which had been implanted before the first irradiation. Radiosensitivity of total tumor cells at the second irradiation decreased in proportion to the increase in interval time. However, radiosensitivity of quiescent cells was raised with increase in the interval time. In addition, the labeling index at the second irradiation was higher than that at the first irradiation. These findings supported the occurrence of recruitment from quiescent to proliferating state during fractionated irradiation. (author)

  12. Decreased repopulation as well as increased reoxygenation contribute to the improvement in local control after targeting of the EGFR by C225 during fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, Mechthild; Ostermann, Gernot; Petersen, Cordula; Yaromina, Ala; Hessel, Franziska; Harstrick, Andreas; Kogel, Albert J van der; Thames, Howard D; Baumann, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Inhibition of repopulation and enhanced reoxygenation has been suggested to contribute to improvement of local tumour control after fractionated irradiation combined with inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The present study addresses this hypothesis in FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma. For this tumour model marked repopulation and incomplete reoxygenation during fractionated irradiation has previously been demonstrated. Furthermore, the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody C225 has been shown to significantly improve the results of fractionated irradiation in this tumour. Materials and methods: FaDu tumours in nude mice were irradiated with 18 fractions in 18 days (18f/18d) or 18 fractions in 36 days (18f/36d). Three Gy fractions were given either under ambient or under clamp hypoxic conditions. C225 or carrier was applied four times during the course of treatment. Fractionated irradiations were followed by graded top-up doses to obtain complete dose-response curves for local tumour control. Tumour control dose 50% (TCD 50 ) was determined at day 120 after end of treatment. Results: Significant repopulation and reoxygenation occurred during fractionated irradiation of FaDu tumours (P-values between 0.028 and 50 for 18f/36d under ambient conditions (P=0.04). Bootstrap analysis revealed decreased repopulation and increased reoxygenation after application of C225 (P=0.06 for the combined effect). This was further corroborated by a significant effect of C225 on the 'repopulated' dose under ambient conditions which is influenced by both, reoxygenation and repopulation (P=0.012). Conclusions: Our study provides evidence that both decreased repopulation as well as increased reoxygenation contribute to the improvement of local control after targeting of EGFR by C225 during fractionated irradiation of FaDu tumours

  13. Arrested neuronal proliferation and impaired hippocampal function following fractionated brain irradiation in the adult rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Torsten Meldgaard; Kristjansen, P.E.G.; Bolwig, Tom Gert

    2003-01-01

    irradiation blocked the formation of new neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. At different time points after the termination of the irradiation procedure, the animals were tested in two tests of short-term memory that differ with respect to their dependence on hippocampal function. Eight and 21...... that blocked neurogenesis contributes to the reported deleterious side effects of this treatment, consisting of memory impairment, dysphoria and lethargy....

  14. Correlation between radiological, scintigraphic and histological changes in bone in rabbits following irradiation with single and fractionated doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgener, F.A.; King, M.A.; Weber, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    In the left hind legs of eight rabbits were irradiated with 1,750 rad in a single dose or with 4,650 rad divided over a period of three weeks. These animals, as well as four who had not been irradiated, were examined periodically radiologically and with 99 mTechnetium pyrophosphate scintigrams during one year. No difference could be detected between the results of the single and fractionated doses. Scintigraphically there was a biphasic increase in uptake, the first peak co-inciding with the irradiation and of vascular origin, whereas the second peak occured at four months and was due to a change in bone metabolism. At the end of a year uptake in the irradiated limb was slightly reduced. The earliest radiological changes were found after six months, at the end of the second scintigraphic peak; they consisted of coarsening and blurring of the trabeculae, non-homogeneous spotty mineralisation and endosteal scalloping. Six animals developed a radiation-induced bone sarcoma, first demonstrated either by scintigraphy or radiology depending on its histology. The value of combining radiological and scintigraphic examinations for the early detection of post-radiation abnormalities is stressed. (orig.) [de

  15. Expression of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance associated protein in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells after fractionated irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, D; Maare, C; Eriksen, J

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: To characterize irradiated murine tumor cells with respect to drug resistance, drug kinetics, and ATPase activity, and to evaluate the possible role of P-glycoprotein (PGP) and murine multidrug resistance associated protein (Mrp1) in the drug-resistant phenotype of these cells. METHODS...... AND MATERIALS: Sensitive Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EHR2) were in vitro exposed to fractionated irradiation (60 Gy). Western blot analysis was performed for determination of PGP and Mrp1, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for determination of mdr1a + b mRNA, and semiquantitative RT......-PCR for Mrp1 mRNA. The clonogenic assay was applied to investigate sensitivity, whereas the steady-state drug accumulation of daunorubicin (DNR), 3H-vincristine (VCR), and 3H-etoposide (VP16) was measured by spectrofluorometry and scintillation counting, respectively. For determining of ATPase activity...

  16. Reply to: Analysis of the effects of fractionated irradiation to the rat heart (by E. van Rongen)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttenberger, R.

    1987-01-01

    The applicability of the linear quadratic (LQ) model in the analysis of the data presented by Lauk et al. (Radiotherapy. Oncol. 8: 363-367, 1987) is investigated with the linear regression method of Tucker, by simulating fractionated irradiation experiments on tissues with α/β values varying from 1 to 20, starting from theoretical iso-effect doses. It turns out that the LQ model is unreliable for small (∼ 1) α/β values using the error probability p=0.05 and that the sensitivity of the linear regression method is dependent on the underlying α/β. 3 refs.; 1 table

  17. Low-dose fractionated whole-body irradiation in the treatment of advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, N.C.; Timothy, A.R.; Kaufman, S.D.; Carey, R.W.; Aisenberg, A.C.

    1979-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients with advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (38 patients with lymphocytic lymphoma and 1 patient with mixed lymphocytic and histiocytic lymphoma) were treated by fractionated low dose whole body irradiation (WBI) with a minimum follow-up of 8 months. Twenty-eight patients had no previous treatment and the other 11 patients were in relapse after previous chemotherapy or regional radiotherapy. There were 20 and 19 patients in stages III and IV groups, respectively. The majority of patients (31) had nodular histology; diffuse lymphocytic lymphoma was present in 8 patients (Rappaport criteria) (9). Constitutional symptoms were present in 10 patients. Thirty-three (85%) attained complete remission (CR) with median duration of remission 24 months. Actuarial survival was 78% and 74% at 3 and 4 years. However, relapse free survival was 26% at 3 and 4 years. A prospective randomized trial to compare 10 vs. 15 rad per fraction of fractionated WBI schedules (the same total dose 150 rad) demonstrated no difference in response rate, response duration, and median nadir platelet or WBC counts between the two schedules. Supplement radiotherapy to bulky tumor site prevented local recurrence, but did not influence survival or duration or remission. Major toxicity was thrombocytopenia with median nadir platelet counts 77,000/mm 3 (11,000 to 170,000/mm 3 ). Five of 6 patients with diffuse lymphocytic poorly differentiated lymphoma attained CR. However, their median survival was 30 months which is much shorter than that of nodular lymphoma. Constitutional symptoms and advanced stage (stage IV) were associated with shorter duration of remission. Response of patients in relapse after WBI to subsequent chemotherapy +- local radiotherapy was CR in 50% and PR in 40%. Fractionated whole body irradiation is an excellent systemic induction agent for advanced lymphocytic and mixed lymphoma

  18. Differential cisplatin responses in human carcinoma cell lines pre-exposed to fractionated X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempke, W.C.M.; Hosking, L.K.; Shellard, S.A.; Hill, B.T.

    1991-01-01

    These results suggest that cells exposed to X-irradiation may respond differently to subsequent cisplatin (CDDP) treatment. Initial studies of possible mechanisms responsible for these differential sensitivities indicate that they may differ according to whether resistance or hypersensitivity is expressed. (author)

  19. Effect of cetuximab and fractionated irradiation on tumour micro-environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santiago, A.; Eicheler, W.; Bussink, J.; Rijken, P.F.J.W.; Yaromina, A.; Beuthien-Baumann, B.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Baumann, M.; Krause, M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Previous experiments have shown that application of the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody C225 (cetuximab) improves local tumour control after irradiation in FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma (hSCC) due to the combined effect of decreased repopulation and improved reoxygenation.

  20. Vertebral compression fractures after spine irradiation using conventional fractionation in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ree, Woo Joong; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Chang, Jee Suk; Kim, Hyun Ju; Choi, Seo Hee; Koom, Woong Sub [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To evaluate the risk of vertebral compression fracture (VCF) after conventional radiotherapy (RT) for colorectal cancer (CRC) with spine metastasis and to identify risk factors for VCF in metastatic and non-metastatic irradiated spines. We retrospectively reviewed 68 spinal segments in 16 patients who received conventional RT between 2009 and 2012. Fracture was defined as a newly developed VCF or progression of an existing fracture. The target volume included all metastatic spinal segments and one additional non-metastatic vertebra adjacent to the tumor-involved spines. The median follow-up was 7.8 months. Among all 68 spinal segments, there were six fracture events (8.8%) including three new VCFs and three fracture progressions. Observed VCF rates in vertebral segments with prior irradiation or pre-existing compression fracture were 30.0% and 75.0% respectively, compared with 5.2% and 4.7% for segments without prior irradiation or pre-existing compression fracture, respectively (both p < 0.05). The 1-year fracture-free probability was 87.8% (95% CI, 78.2-97.4). On multivariate analysis, prior irradiation (HR, 7.30; 95% CI, 1.31-40.86) and pre-existing compression fracture (HR, 18.45; 95% CI, 3.42-99.52) were independent risk factors for VCF. The incidence of VCF following conventional RT to the spine is not particularly high, regardless of metastatic tumor involvement. Spines that received irradiation and/or have pre-existing compression fracture before RT have an increased risk of VCF and require close observation.

  1. Fractionated total body irradiation and autologous bone marrow transplantation in dogs: Hemopoietic recovery after various marrow cell doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenburger, U.; Kolb, H.J.; Thierfelder, S.; Netzel, B.; Schaeffer, E.; Kolb, H.

    1980-01-01

    Hemopoietic recovery was studied in dogs given 2400 R fractionated total body irradiation within one week and graded doses of cryopreserved autologous bone marrow. Complete hemopoietic recovery including histology was observed after this dose and sufficient doses of marrow cells. Doses of more than 5.5 x 10 7 mononuclear marrow cells/kg body weight were sufficient for complete recovery in all dogs, 1.5 to 5.5 x 10 7 cells/kg were effective in some of the dogs and less than 1.5 x 10 7 cells/kg were insufficient for complete recovery. Similarly, more than 30000 CFUsub(c)/kg body weight were required for hemopoietic recovery. The optimal marrow cell dose which has been defined as the minimal dose required for the earliest possible recovery of leukocyte and platelet counts was 7-8 x 10 7 mononuclear marrow cells/kg body weight. It has been concluded that fractionated total body irradiation with 2400 R dose not require greater doses of marrow cells for hemopoietic reconstitution than lower single doses and that the hemopoietic microenvironment is not persistently disturbed after this dose. (author)

  2. A pilot study to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of ondansetron and granisetron in fractionated total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, S.J.; Cassoni, A.M. [Middlesex Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01

    The duration of the antiemetic effect of granisetron was examined in a pilot study of patients (n = 26) undergoing a standard emetogenic stimulus in the form of total body irradiation fractionated over 3-4 days, in a randomized comparison with twice-daily ondansetron. A single intravenous dose of granisetron at the onset of therapy was effective over the entire follow-up period in 50% (6/12) of patients, compared with 77% (10/13) prescribed twice-daily oral ondansetron for 3 or 4 days. The response rate within the first 24 hours from the start of irradiation was 67% (8/12) for granisetron and 77% (10/13) for ondansetron. Granisetron and ondansetron was therefore of similar efficacy within the first 24-hour period, but granisetron was less efficaceous more than 24 hours after the onset of therapy. Patients who required a second dose of granisetron did so at intervals of 12, 42, 47 and 48 hours following the first fraction of radiotherapy. The cost per patient in this study was 48 for granisetron and {sub 1}54 for ondanestron, but the dose scheduling we used cannot be recommended in view of the lower effectiveness of granisetron. (author).

  3. A pilot study to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of ondansetron and granisetron in fractionated total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, S.J.; Cassoni, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The duration of the antiemetic effect of granisetron was examined in a pilot study of patients (n = 26) undergoing a standard emetogenic stimulus in the form of total body irradiation fractionated over 3-4 days, in a randomized comparison with twice-daily ondansetron. A single intravenous dose of granisetron at the onset of therapy was effective over the entire follow-up period in 50% (6/12) of patients, compared with 77% (10/13) prescribed twice-daily oral ondansetron for 3 or 4 days. The response rate within the first 24 hours from the start of irradiation was 67% (8/12) for granisetron and 77% (10/13) for ondansetron. Granisetron and ondansetron was therefore of similar efficacy within the first 24-hour period, but granisetron was less efficaceous more than 24 hours after the onset of therapy. Patients who required a second dose of granisetron did so at intervals of 12, 42, 47 and 48 hours following the first fraction of radiotherapy. The cost per patient in this study was 48 for granisetron and 1 54 for ondanestron, but the dose scheduling we used cannot be recommended in view of the lower effectiveness of granisetron. (author)

  4. Scanning electron microscopy and recording of the physiological activity of tracheal ciliated cells treated by fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertsson, M.; Hakansson, C.H.; Mecklenburg, C. von

    1983-01-01

    The ciliated epithelium of the rabbit's trachea was irradiated with daily fractions of 2 Gy to an accumulated dose of 20 Gy. The beat frequency of the cilia was recorded and specimens were taken for SEM-, TEM- and LM-investigations. Examination was made 1-10 days after each fractionation schedule. An increased ciliary beat frequency was recorded at 2 Gy and 4 Gy. With increasing dose, there was an inverted relationship to the frequency. Light-microscopy showed edema and an increased amount of goblet cells in relation to the increasing dose. With SEM an increased number of ciliary blebs could be seen. These could be classified according to size and number, and showed a positive correlation to the dose. TEM-investigations showed signs of increased intracellular activity at higher doses in the form of multilobulated nuclei and an increasing number of nuclear pores. At lower doses, an increased amount of mitochondria appeared in the apical part of the cell. It is at present difficult to evaluate any correlation between the physiological activity and the morphology. More biological data are needed to explain the early irradiation effects

  5. Fractionated stereotactic irradiation by Cyberknife of choroid melanomas: repositioning validation, closed eyelids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, S.; Rezvoy, N.; Lacornerie, T.; Mirabel, X.; Labalette, P.; Lartigau, E.

    2009-01-01

    The fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy by Cyberknife is an option in the treatment of eyes tumors. The advantages of the Cyberknife in the choroid melanomas are in its infra-millimetric precision, to the automated repositioning on the skull bones and to the conformity brought by the stereotaxy. The objective of this study was to validate the quality of repositioning and the immobility of the eyes with closed eyelids. Conclusion: the reproducibility of the eye positioning with closed eyelids seems enough to consider the conservative treatment of choroid melanomas by fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy by Cyberknife without implementation of fiducials nor retrobulbar anaesthesia. (N.C.)

  6. Density crosslink study of gamma irradiated LDPE predicted by gel-fraction, swelling and glass transition temperature characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Elisabeth C.L.; Scagliusi, Sandra R.; Moraes, Guilherme F.; Ono, Lilian S.; Parra, D.F.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental results showed that the crosslink density of polymeric stocks may be predicted from values of gel content based on the reactive portion of the stocks, that is, exclusive of plasticizers and fillers. Where entanglements may be neglected, the crosslink density is directly proportional to functions of the gel and sol contents. In order to predict the behavior of carbon-chain polymers exposed to ionizing radiation, an empirical rule can be used. According to this rule, polymers containing a hydrogen atom at each carbon atom predominantly undergo crosslinking. During irradiation, chain scission occurs simultaneously and competitively with crosslinking, the end result being determined by the ratio of the yields of the two reactions. The ratio of crosslinking to scission depends basically on factors including total irradiation dose, dose rate and the presence of oxygen. The glass transition temperature (Tg), temperature below which the polymer segments do not have sufficient energy to move past one another, marks the onset of segmental mobility for a polymer. Properties such as melt index, melt strength, crystallinity, glass transition, gel fraction, swelling ratio and elasticity modulus were assessed in LDPE (2.6 g.10 min -1 melt index) gamma irradiated within a 10, 15, 20 and 30 kGy and results obtained were further discussed prior conclusion. (author)

  7. The influence of single and fractionated dose external beam irradiation on injury-induced arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, U.; Micke, O.; Dorszewski, A.; Breithardt, G.; Willich, N.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Restenosis after catheter-based revascularization has been demonstrated to be primarily caused by smooth muscle cell proliferation. This study examined the effects of external beam irradiation on neointimal proliferation after external injury to the central artery of the rabbit ear. Materials and Methods: 40 male New Zealand White rabbits were used in this study. Crush lesions were performed on each ear under general anesthesia and bilateral auricular nerve blockade. A single dose of 12 Gy (n=10), 16 Gy (n=10), or 20 Gy (n=10) and a fractionated dose of 4 x 5 Gy (n=10) gamma radiation was delivered to the left or right central artery of the ear 24 hours after injury; the contralateral central artery served as control. All rabbits were sacrificed after twenty-one days and the central arteries of the ear were fixed for morphometric measurements. Results: Mean (± SD) neointimal area was 0.062 ± 0.005 mm 2 (12 Gy), 0.022 ± 0,005 mm 2 (16 Gy), 0,028 ± 0,006 mm 2 and 0.038 mm 2 ± 0,02 mm 2 (4 x 5 Gy) in irradiated arteries compared with 0,081 ± 0,009 mm 2 in the control group. Mean (±SD) luminal area was 0.049 ± 0.004 mm 2 (12 Gy), 0.059 ± 0.002 mm 2 (16 Gy), 0.072 ± 0,006 mm 2 (20 Gy) and 0.048 mm 2 ± 0,018 mm 2 (4 x 5 Gy) in irradiated arteries compared with 0,043 ± 0,008 mm 2 in the control group. The difference in neointimal and luminal area between control and irradiated arteries was significant (p<0.05) only for the 16 and 20 Gy group compared to control. Conclusion: We conclude that in this model, external beam X-ray irradiation was successful in reducing neointimal proliferation after injury of the central artery of the rabbit ear. The optimal dose seems to be a single dose of 16 Gy - 20 Gy. Only a less prominent effect was noted for a fractionated dose of 4 x 5 Gy. Whether this approach can be used successfully to inhibit restenosis in the clinical setting requires further investigation

  8. Comparison of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in QU-DB Cells after Acute and Fractionated Irradiation: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Kamran Samani, Roghayeh; Mohebbi, Shokoufeh

    2016-01-01

    Radiation effects induced in non-irradiated cells are termed radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE). The present study intends to examine the RIBE response of QU-DB bystander cells to first, second and third radiation fractions and compare their cumulative outcome with an equal, single acute dose. This experimental study irradiated three groups of target cells for one, two and three times with(60)Co gamma rays. One hour after irradiation, we transferred their culture media to non-irradiated (bystander) cells. We used the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay to evaluate RIBE response in the bystander cells. The numbers of micronuclei generated in bystander cells were determined. RIBE response to single acute doses increased up to 4 Gy, then decreased, and finally at the 8 Gy dose disappeared. The second and third fractions induced RIBE in bystander cells, except when RIBE reached to the maximum level at the first fraction. We split the 4 Gy acute dose into two fractions, which decreased the RIBE response. However, fractionation of 6 Gy (into two fractions of 3 Gy or three fractions of 2 Gy) had no effect on RIBE response. When we split the 8 Gy acute dose into two fractions we observed RIBE, which had disappeared following the single 8 Gy dose. The impact of dose fractionation on RIBE induced in QU-DB cells de- pended on the RIBE dose-response relationship. Where RIBE increased proportion- ally with the dose, fractionation reduced the RIBE response. In contrast, at high dos- es where RIBE decreased proportionally with the dose, fractionation either did not change RIBE (at 6 Gy) or increased it (at 8 Gy).

  9. Alterations in growth phenotype and radiosensitivity after fractionated irradiation of breast carcinoma cells from a single patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wazer, D.E.; Joyce, M.; Jung, L.; Band, V.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate growth regulation and radiosensitivity in surviving clonogens after fractionated irradiation. Four breast carcinoma cell lines isolated from the primary tumor (21NT, 21PT) and metastases (21MT-1, 21MT-2) of a single patient were exposed to cumulative radiation doses of 30 Gy yielding cell lines designated -IR with respect to their parent. The irradiated lines were then compared to their parent for serum- and growth factor-requirements under defined media conditions, ability to proliferate in soft agar, concentration of TGF-alpha in conditioned medium, and radiosensitivity. The irradiated lines showed no change in proliferative doubling times under serum- and growth factor-supplemented media conditions. A single line, 21MT-1-IR, acquired a limited ability to proliferate in serum- and growth factor-deplete medium with a day 2-4 doubling time of 44.5 hr. Three lines, 21MT-1-IR, 21MT-2-IR, and 21NT-IR, formed colonies in soft agar in contrast to none of the unirradiated parent lines. There were significant 6-8 fold increases in conditioned media TGF-alpha concentrations for 21MT-2-IR and 21NT-IR cells. The 21MT-1-IR and 21NT-IR cells were significantly less radiosensitive than their respective parent lines. This decrease in radiosensitivity appeared to be at least partially mediated by a released factor as the radiosensitivity of 21MT-1 cells was significantly decreased by pre-incubation with conditioned medium from 21MT-1-IR cells. Radiation-induced changes in growth phenotype vary with respect to clonal origin of the cell line and may influence the radiosensitivity of surviving clonogens after fractionated treatment. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  10. PAI-1 levels predict response to fractionated irradiation in 10 human squamous cell carcinoma lines of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Christine; Schilling, Daniela; Hoetzel, Joerg; Egermann, Hannes Peter; Zips, Daniel; Yaromina, Ala; Geurts-Moespot, Anneke; Sprague, Lisa Deborah; Sweep, Fred; Baumann, Michael; Molls, Michael; Adam, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the relationships between hypoxia, VEGF and components of the plasminogen activation system (PAS) and to determine their influence on local tumour control after fractionated radiotherapy. Material and methods: Ten cell lines derived from human squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) were investigated in vitro and used to generate xenograft tumours. The pimonidazole hypoxic fraction in the total tumour area (pHF tot ) was used to measure hypoxia in pre-treatment tumours and the local tumour control (TCD 50 ) was used as the functional endpoint in vivo. For in vitro experiments, cells were cultured for 24 h under either normoxic or mild hypoxic (∼0.66% O 2 ) conditions. VEGF, PAI-1 and uPA antigen levels were determined by ELISA and uPA activity by an activity assay kit. Results: Of all the factors investigated, only PAI-1 expression correlated with TCD 50 (r = 0.80, p 0.010) and was significantly higher (p = 0.001) in more hypoxic than in less hypoxic tumours. Accordingly, PAI-1 secretion was significantly induced (2.4x) by in vitro hypoxia. Conclusions: These results suggest that pre-treatment PAI-1 levels are higher in more hypoxic tumours and can predict the response to fractionated irradiation in SCCHN

  11. Evaluation of the efficacy of palliative irradiation with high fractionated doses and planned intervals of patients with advanced cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skolyszewski, J.; Reinfuss, M.

    1988-01-01

    200 patients, previously not treated, with advanced highly differentiated cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx have been palliatively irradiated in the Oncology Center in Cracow in the years 1976-1985. Megavoltage irradiation with fractionated doses 4-5 Gy up to the dose of 20 Gy to the tumor with 4-5 fractions during 4-7 days has been applied. 64 patients received 20 Gy as simple dose, in 65 cases such dose has been repeated after month. 71 patients have been irradiated for the third time with similar dose after another 1 month interval. Partial regression of 25-50% of the tumor volume has been obtained after the first series of irradiation in 19% of patients and more than 50% in 28% of patients, complete regression in 4% of patients. 15,5% of the total number of patients survived 1 year since the initiation of the irradiation, 5% without symptoms of the neoplasm. Worse prognosis is connected with major advancement of the tumor (T 4 , N 2 ), poor general condition, cachexia and alcohol addition. Absence of improvement after the first series of irradiations indicates the non-effectiveness of the treatment. Palliative treatment by irradiation with high fractionated doses and planned interval is a safe and efficacious method. 1 fig., 6 tabs., 14 refs. (author)

  12. Acute hematological tolerance to multiple fraction, whole body, low dose irradiation in an experimental murine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melamed, J.S.; Chen, M.G.; Brown, J.W.; Katagiri, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Using a dose fractionation scheme patterned after the current regimen for treatment of disseminated non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the authors studied the effects of irradation on progenitor and effector cells for hematopoiesis in five-month-old BC3F 1 mice. Fractions of 20 or 50 rad (0.2 or 0.5 Gy) total body irradation were given twice weekly to a final total dose of 200 or 500 rad (2 or 5 Gy), respectively. Weekly assays revealed a marked, sustained depression of stem cell activity, measured as numbers of spleen colony-forming units (CFU-S) and in vitro colony-forming cells (CFU-C), without corresponding depression of effector cells (red and white cells, and platelets). The lack of correlation between numbers of stem cells and peripheral elements is relevant to clinical assessment of marrow reserve

  13. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using once-daily fractionation: analysis of 312 cases with four years median follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Arif Y

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are limited data on accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI using external beam techniques. Moreover, there are recent reports of increased fibrosis and unacceptable cosmesis with APBI using external beam with BID fractionation. We adopted a once daily regimen of APBI with fractionation similar to that shown to be effective in a Canadian randomized trial of whole breast irradiation. It is unclear whether patients with DCIS or invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC are suitable for APBI. Methods The retrospective cohort included 310 patients with 312 tumors of T1-T2N0-N1micM0 invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC, ILC, or Tis (DCIS treated with APBI via external beam. Most patients were treated using IMRT with 16 daily fractions of 270 cGy to a dose of 4320 cGy. The target volume included the lumpectomy cavity plus 1.0 cm to account for microscopic disease and an additional 0.5 to 1.0 cm for setup uncertainty and breathing motion. Ipsilateral breast failure (IBF was pathologically confirmed as a local failure (LF or an elsewhere failure (EF. Results Median follow-up was 49 months. Among the 312 cases, 213 were IDC, 31 ILC, and 68 DCIS. Median tumor size was 1.0 cm. There were 9 IBFs (2.9% including 5 LFs and 4 EFs. The IBF rates among patients with IDC, ILC, and DCIS were 2.4%, 3.2%, and 4.4%, respectively, with no significant difference between histologies. When patients were analyzed by the ASTRO APBI consensus statement risk groups, 32% of treated cases were considered suitable, 50% cautionary, and 18% unsuitable. The IBF rates among suitable, cautionary, and unsuitable patients were 4.0%, 2.6%, and 1.8%, respectively, with no significant difference between risk groups. Acute skin reactions were rare and long-term cosmetic outcome was very good to excellent. Conclusions External beam APBI with once daily fractionation has a low rate of IBF consistent with other published APBI studies. The ASTRO risk stratification did not

  14. Effect of gamma irradiation on the activity of alanine and aspartate transaminases in subcellular fractions of the brain and heart in white rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plenin, A E

    1973-01-01

    In experiments on rats, the activity of alanine (I) and aspartate transaminases (II) was studied in homogenates and subcellular fractions of the brain and myocardium under normal conditions and for 30 days after ..gamma.. irradiation at 40 rads. The activity of II in brain homogenates increased 1 hour after irradiation but decreased by 20 percent on day 3; it decreased again on days 7 and 15. The activity of brain I increased after 1 hour and 3 days but then returned to normal. The activity of I in heart homogenates increased in all the periods after irradiation. The subcellular fractions exhibited phase changes in the activity of the enzymes. These changes were different in nature from those observed after X and ..gamma.. irradiation at the same dose.

  15. The severity of late rectal and recto-sigmoid complications related to fraction size in irradiation treatment of carcinoma cervix stage III B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deore, S.M.; Shrivastava, S.K.; Viswanathan, P.S.; Dinshaw, K.A.; Tata Memorial Hospital, Bombay

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of late rectal and recto-sigmoid complications was carried out of the 203 patients with stage III B carcinoma of uterine cervix, treated using radiation therapy alone during January 1979 to December 1983. The patients were treated with a combination of external irradiation and single intracavitary insertion. External irradiation was randomised to one of the four different fractionation regimes having dose per fraction of 2 Gy, 3 Gy, 4 Gy and 5.4 Gy, delivering with five fractions/week, three fractions/week, two fractions/week and one fraction/week, respectively. The total doses in four different regimens were adjusted using the TDF model. There were 39 cases of late radiation induced rectal and recto-sigmoid complications. The complication rate was correlated with the dose per fraction and TDFs delivered in each regimen. The complication rate of 8.2% for 2 Gy per fraction was increased to 33.33% for 5.4 Gy per fraction. It was found that there is strong correlation (P [de

  16. A method for evaluation of proton plan robustness towards inter-fractional motion applied to pelvic lymph node irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Andreas G; Casares-Magaz, Oscar; Muren, Ludvig P

    2015-01-01

    of the pelvic lymph nodes (LNs) from different beam angles. Patient- versus population-specific patterns in dose deterioration were explored. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patient data sets consisting of a planning computed tomography (pCT) as well as multiple repeat CT (rCT) scans for three patients were used......BACKGROUND: The benefit of proton therapy may be jeopardized by dose deterioration caused by water equivalent path length (WEPL) variations. In this study we introduced a method to evaluate robustness of proton therapy with respect to inter-fractional motion and applied it to irradiation...... in deterioration patterns were found for the investigated patients, with beam angles delivering less dose to rectum, bladder and overall normal tissue identified around 40° and around 150°-160° for the left LNs, and corresponding angles for the right LNs. These angles were also associated with low values of WEPL...

  17. Nucleic acid metabolism in hemopoietic tissues of polycythemic rats during long-term fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mushkacheva, G.S.; Murzina, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of long-term fractionated exposure with a daily dose of 50 R on the nucleic acid metabolism in hemopoietic tissues (bone marrow and spleen) of rats with erythropoiesis selectively inhibited by posttransfusion polycythemia. The comparison of present and previously obtained results enables us to conclude that the pathways of changes in the nucleic acid metabolism, which is responsible for hemopoiesis compensation during long-term exposure, are, in the main, similar for both white and red compartments of hemopoiesis

  18. Expression of P-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance associated protein in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells after fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Dorte; Maare, Christian; Eriksen, Jens; Litman, Thomas; Skovsgaard, Torben

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize irradiated murine tumor cells with respect to drug resistance, drug kinetics, and ATPase activity, and to evaluate the possible role of P-glycoprotein (PGP) and murine multidrug resistance associated protein (Mrp1) in the drug-resistant phenotype of these cells. Methods and Materials: Sensitive Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EHR2) were in vitro exposed to fractionated irradiation (60 Gy). Western blot analysis was performed for determination of PGP and Mrp1, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for determination of mdr1a + b mRNA, and semiquantitative RT-PCR for Mrp1 mRNA. The clonogenic assay was applied to investigate sensitivity, whereas the steady-state drug accumulation of daunorubicin (DNR), 3 H-vincristine (VCR), and 3 H-etoposide (VP16) was measured by spectrofluorometry and scintillation counting, respectively. For determining of ATPase activity, the release of inorganic phosphate from ATP was quantified using a colorimetric method. Results: Compared with EHR2, the irradiated cell line EHR2/irr showed increased expression of PGP (threefold), Mrp1 (eightfold), and Mrp1 mRNA (sixfold), and a slight reduction of mdr1b mRNA, whereas mdr1a was present in EHR2 but could not be detected in EHR2/irr. EHR2/irr developed sixfold resistance to VP16, twofold resistance to vincristine, but remained sensitive to DNR. Addition of the PGP inhibitor, verapamil (VER) or depletion of glutathione by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) partly reversed the resistance in EHR2/irr. In EHR2/irr, the steady-state accumulation of 3 H-VCR and 3 H-VP16 was significantly decreased as compared with EHR2, whereas the accumulation of DNR was unchanged. The ATPase activity of plasma membrane vesicles prepared from EHR2/irr cells was similar to that of wild-type EHR2 cells. The ATPase activity was neither stimulated by vinblastine nor VER. Conclusion: Irradiation induced a multidrug-resistant phenotype in sensitive tumor cells. This phenotype was

  19. Influence of clinical and tumoral factors on the inter-fractions bones displacements during the treatment of gastric or esophagus cancers by external irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quivrin, M.; Peignaux, K.; Truc, G.; Blanchard, N.; Ligey-Bartolomeu, A.; Maingon, P.; Crehange, G.; Liegard, M.; Bonnetain, F.; Petitfils, A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the influence of clinical and tumoral characteristics on the inter fractions bones displacements during the irradiation of eso gastric cancers. Conclusion: the local control of irradiated esophagus and gastric cancers stay not satisfying and could be improved by the individual adjustment of peritumoral margins in function of clinical and tumoral characteristics as age, sex, average weight at the beginning of the treatment, the index of the initial average body mass. (N.C.)

  20. Changes of the lactate dehydrogenase in the tissue fraction with Walker carcinoma under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultheis, W.

    1972-01-01

    The behaviour of LDH, GOT and GPT of one and the same tissue with and without irradiation treatment as a means of cancer diagnosis is presented. Parallel to this, the corresponding blood values are determined, and an agar-gel isoenzyme separation of the LDH is carried out. In the 11 day-old Walker carcinoma of the rat, total tumour LDH as well as total serum LDH are increased. The X-radiation does not affect the result. The M 4 isoenzyme is mainly found in the tumour tissue, to whose benefit the tumour sera also change. In tissue processing, LDH, GOT and GPT behave corresponding to their occurence in the cell compartments. The enzymes, however, appear to differ in their solution behaviour. X-radiation leeds to an early removal of these enzymes in the sense of an 'enzyme release'. (BSC/LH) [de

  1. Characterization of the multiple drug resistance phenotype expressed by tumour cells following in vitro exposure to fractionated X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, B.T.; McClean, S.; Hosking, L.; Shellard, S.; Dempke, W.; Whelan, R.

    1992-01-01

    The major clinical problem of the emergence of drug resistant tumor cell populations is recognized in patients previously treated with antitumor drugs and with radiotherapy. It is proposed that, although radiation-induced vascular fibrosis may limit drug delivery to the tumor, exposure to radiation may 'induce' or 'select for' drug resistance. This hypothesis was examined by establishing in vitro model systems to investigate the resistance phenotype of tumor cells following exposure to X-rays. Characteristically tumor cells surviving exposure to a series of fractions of X-irradiation are shown to have consistently expressed resistance to multiple drugs, including the Vinca alkaloids and the epipodophyllotoxins. Currently this research is aimed at determining whether distinctive resistance mechanisms operate depending on whether resistance results following drug or X-ray exposure. Initial results indicate that whilst some common mechanisms operate, drug resistant tumor cells identified following exposure to X-irradiation appear to exhibit a novel multidrug resistance phenotype. (author). 13 refs., 1 tab

  2. Radiosensitivity of Nicotiana protoplasts. Action on cell; cycle effects of low dose and fractionated irradiations; biological repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnien, E.

    1981-10-01

    Leaf protoplasts of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and Nicotiana sylvestris demonstrate five main qualities: they can be maintained as haploid lines; they constitute starting populations with a remarkable cytological homogeneity; they show a transient initial lag-phase; they yield very high plating efficiencies and retain permanently a complete differentiation capacity; being derived of a cell wall, they appear well adapted for fusion experiments or enzymatic dosages. The resumption of mitotic activity was followed by cytophotometric measurements, labelling experiments, nuclear sizing and enzymatic assays. The action of 5 Gy gamma-ray irradiations delayed entrance in the S-phase, provoked an otherwise not verified dependency between transcription, translation and protein synthesis, increased nuclear volumes in the G2-phase, and slightly stimulated the activity of a repair enzyme. The plating efficiency was a sensitive end-point which allowed the evaluation of the biological effectiveness of low to medium radiation-doses after gamma-ray and fast neutron irradiations. The neutron dose-RBE relationship increased from 3 to 25 when the dose decreased from 5 Gy to 5 mGy. When fractionated into low single doses only, a neutron dose of 300 mGy markedly increased its biological effectiveness: this phenomenon could not be explained by cell progression, and necessitated additional hypotheses involving other mechanisms in the specific action of low radiation doses. Radiation-induced UDS was measured in presence of aphidicolin. A beta-like DNA-polymerase was shown to be definitely involved in nuclear repair synthesis [fr

  3. Hypofractionated Prostate Radiotherapy with or without Conventionally Fractionated Nodal Irradiation: Clinical Toxicity Observations and Retrospective Daily Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Andrew M; Bishop, Justin M; Jacob, Rojymon; Dobelbower, Michael C; Kim, Robert Y; Yang, Eddy S; Smith, Heather; Wu, Xingen; Fiveash, John B

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate toxicity associated with the addition of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) to a hypofractionated regimen for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials. Fifty-seven patients received pelvic image-guided IMRT to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions with a hypofractionated simultaneous boost to the prostate to 70 Gy. Thirty-one patients received prostate-only treatment to 70 Gy in 28 fractions. Results. Median followup was 41.1 months. Early grade ≥2 urinary toxicity rates were 49% (28 of 57) for patients receiving ENI and 58% (18 of 31) for those not (P = 0.61). Early grade ≥2 rectal toxicity rates were 40% (23 of 57) and 23% (7 of 31), respectively (P = 0.09). The addition of ENI resulted in a 21% actuarial rate of late grade ≥2 rectal toxicity at 4 years, compared to 0% for patients treated to the prostate only (P = 0.02). Retrospective daily dosimetry of patients experiencing late rectal toxicity revealed an average increase of 2.67% of the rectal volume receiving 70 Gy compared to the original plan. Conclusions. The addition of ENI resulted in an increased risk of late rectal toxicity. Grade ≥2 late rectal toxicity was associated with worse daily rectal dosimetry compared to the treatment plan.

  4. Long-term renal toxicity in children following fractionated total-body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstein, Johanna; Meyer, Andreas; Fruehauf, Joerg; Karstens, Johann H.; Bremer, Michael; Sykora, Karl-Walter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: to retrospectively assess the incidence and time course of renal dysfunction in children (≤ 16 years) following total-body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Patients and methods: between 1986 and 2003, 92 children (median age, 11 years; range, 3-16 years) underwent TBI before allogeneic SCT. 43 of them had a minimum follow-up of 12 months (median, 51 months; range, 12-186 months) and were included into this analysis. Conditioning regimen included chemotherapy and fractionated TBI with 12 Gy (n = 26) or 11.1 Gy (n = 17). In one patient, renal dose was limited to 10 Gy by customized renal shielding due to known nephropathy prior to SCt. Renal dysfunction was defined as an increase of serum creatinine > 1.25 times the upper limit of age-dependent normal. Results: twelve children (28%) experienced an episode of renal dysfunction after a median of 2 months (range, 1-10 months) following SCT. In all but one patient renal dysfunction was transient and resolved after a median of 8 months (range, 3-16 months). One single patient developed persistent renal dysfunction with onset at 10 months after SCT. None of these patients required dialysis. The actuarial 3-year freedom from persistent renal toxicity for children surviving > 12 months after SCt was 97.3%. Conclusion: the incidence of persistent renal dysfunction after fractionated TBI with total doses ≤ 12 Gy was very low in this analysis. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of photo destruction of chromophores of heme and globin components in UV-irradiated human carboxyhemoglobin and its electrophoretic fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putintseva, O.V.; Artykhov, V.G.; Kalaeva, E.A.

    2000-01-01

    The contribution of hem and globin components of electrophoretic fractions of UV-irradiated human carboxyhemoglobin to photo destruction of the protein was studied. The changes observed are the result of summation of some processes unequal in intensity and direction that take place in microgeterogenous media of photo modified protein. Photo sensitivity of hemoproteid in electrophoretic fraction depends on apoprotein condition, whereas the hem photo resistance cannot be the evidence of the photo stability of the whole molecule [ru

  6. Acute and Short-Term Toxicities of Conventionally Fractionated Versus Hypofractionated Whole Breast Irradiation in a Prospective, Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaitelman, Simona F.; Schlembach, Pamela J.; Arzu, Isidora; Ballo, Matthew; Bloom, Elizabeth S.; Buchholz, Daniel; Chronowski, Gregory M.; Dvorak, Tomas; Grade, Emily; Hoffman, Karen E.; Kelly, Patrick; Ludwig, Michelle; Perkins, George H.; Reed, Valerie; Shah, Shalin; Stauder, Michael C.; Strom, Eric A.; Tereffe, Welela; Woodward, Wendy A.; Ensor, Joe; Baumann, Donald; Thompson, Alastair M.; Amaya, Diana; Davis, Tanisha; Guerra, William; Hamblin, Lois; Hortobagyi, Gabriel; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The most appropriate dose-fractionation for whole breast irradiation (WBI) remains uncertain. OBJECTIVE To assess acute and six-month toxicity and quality of life (QoL) with conventionally fractionated WBI (CF-WBI) versus hypofractionated WBI (HF-WBI). DESIGN Unblinded randomized trial of CF-WBI (n=149; 50 Gy/25 fractions + boost [10–14 Gy/5–7 fractions]) versus HF-WBI (n=138; 42.56 Gy/16 fractions + boost [10–12.5 Gy/4–5 fractions]). SETTING Community-based and academic cancer centers. PARTICIPANTS 287 women age ≥ 40 years with stage 0–II breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery for whom whole breast irradiation without addition of a third field was recommended. 76% (n=217) were overweight or obese. Patients were enrolled from February 2011 through February 2014. INTERVENTION(S) FOR CLINICAL TRIALS CF-WBI versus HF-WBI. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Physician-reported acute and six-month toxicities using NCICTCv4.0 and patient-reported QoL using the FACT-B version 4. All analyses were intention-to-treat, with outcomes compared using chi-square, Cochran-Armitage test, and ordinal logistic regression. Patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months. RESULTS Treatment arms were well-matched for baseline characteristics including FACT-B total score (P=0.46) and individual QoL items such as lack of energy (P=0.86) and trouble meeting family needs (P=0.54). Maximal physician-reported acute dermatitis (P<0.001), pruritus (P<0.001), breast pain (P=0.001), hyperpigmentation (P=0.002), and fatigue (P=0.02) during radiation were lower in patients randomized to HF-WBI. Overall grade ≥2 acute toxicity was less with HF-WBI vs. CF-WBI (47% vs. 78%; P<0.001). Six months after radiation, physicians reported less fatigue in patients randomized to HF-WBI (P=0.01), and patients randomized to HF-WBI reported less lack of energy (P<0.001) and less trouble meeting family needs (P=0.01). Multivariable regression confirmed the superiority of HF-WBI in terms

  7. Persistent DNA Damage in Spermatogonial Stem Cells After Fractionated Low-Dose Irradiation of Testicular Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grewenig, Angelika; Schuler, Nadine; Rübe, Claudia E., E-mail: claudia.ruebe@uks.eu

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Testicular spermatogenesis is extremely sensitive to radiation-induced damage, and even low scattered doses to testis from radiation therapy may pose reproductive risks with potential treatment-related infertility. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the greatest threat to the genomic integrity of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are essential to maintain spermatogenesis and prevent reproduction failure. Methods and Materials: During daily low-dose radiation with 100 mGy or 10 mGy, radiation-induced DSBs were monitored in mouse testis by quantifying 53 binding protein 1 (53BP-1) foci in SSCs within their stem cell niche. The accumulation of DSBs was correlated with proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of testicular germ cell populations. Results: Even very low doses of ionizing radiation arrested spermatogenesis, primarily by inducing apoptosis in spermatogonia. Eventual recovery of spermatogenesis depended on the survival of SSCs and their functional ability to proliferate and differentiate to provide adequate numbers of differentiating spermatogonia. Importantly, apoptosis-resistant SSCs resulted in increased 53BP-1 foci levels during, and even several months after, fractionated low-dose radiation, suggesting that surviving SSCs have accumulated an increased load of DNA damage. Conclusions: SSCs revealed elevated levels of DSBs for weeks after radiation, and if these DSBs persist through differentiation to spermatozoa, this may have severe consequences for the genomic integrity of the fertilizing sperm.

  8. Persistent DNA Damage in Spermatogonial Stem Cells After Fractionated Low-Dose Irradiation of Testicular Tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grewenig, Angelika; Schuler, Nadine; Rübe, Claudia E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Testicular spermatogenesis is extremely sensitive to radiation-induced damage, and even low scattered doses to testis from radiation therapy may pose reproductive risks with potential treatment-related infertility. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the greatest threat to the genomic integrity of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are essential to maintain spermatogenesis and prevent reproduction failure. Methods and Materials: During daily low-dose radiation with 100 mGy or 10 mGy, radiation-induced DSBs were monitored in mouse testis by quantifying 53 binding protein 1 (53BP-1) foci in SSCs within their stem cell niche. The accumulation of DSBs was correlated with proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of testicular germ cell populations. Results: Even very low doses of ionizing radiation arrested spermatogenesis, primarily by inducing apoptosis in spermatogonia. Eventual recovery of spermatogenesis depended on the survival of SSCs and their functional ability to proliferate and differentiate to provide adequate numbers of differentiating spermatogonia. Importantly, apoptosis-resistant SSCs resulted in increased 53BP-1 foci levels during, and even several months after, fractionated low-dose radiation, suggesting that surviving SSCs have accumulated an increased load of DNA damage. Conclusions: SSCs revealed elevated levels of DSBs for weeks after radiation, and if these DSBs persist through differentiation to spermatozoa, this may have severe consequences for the genomic integrity of the fertilizing sperm

  9. The effect of the overall treatment time of fractionated irradiation on the tumor control probability of a human soft tissue sarcoma xenograft in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allam, Ayman; Perez, Luis A.; Huang, Peigen; Taghian, Alphonse; Azinovic, Ignacio; Freeman, Jill; Duffy, Michael; Efird, Jimmy; Suit, Herman D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of the overall treatment time of fractionated irradiation on the tumor control probability (TCP) of a human soft tissue sarcoma xenograft growing in nude mice, as well as to compare the pretreatment potential doubling time (T pot ) of this tumor to the effective doubling time (T eff ) derived from three different schedules of irradiation using the same total number of fractions with different overall treatment times. Methods and Materials: The TCP was assessed using the TCD 50 value (the 50% tumor control dose) as an end point. A total of 240 male nude mice, 7-8 weeks old were used in three experimental groups that received the same total number of fractions (30 fractions) with different overall treatment times. In group 1, the animals received three equal fractions/day for 10 consecutive days, in group 2 they received two equal fractions/day for 15 consecutive days, and in group 3 one fraction/day for 30 consecutive days. All irradiations were given under normal blood flow conditions to air breathing animals. The mean tumor diameter at the start of irradiation was 7-8 mm. The mean interfraction intervals were from 8-24 h. The T pot was measured using Iododeoxyuridine (IudR) labeling and flow cytometry and was compared to T eff . Results: The TCD 50 values of the three different treatment schedules were 58.8 Gy, 63.2 Gy, and 75.6 Gy for groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. This difference in TCD 50 values was significant (p pot (2.4 days) was longer than the calculated T eff in groups 2 and 3 (1.35 days). Conclusion: Our data show a significant loss in TCP with prolongation of the overall treatment time. This is most probably due to an accelerated repopulation of tumor clonogens. The pretreatment T pot of this tumor model does not reflect the actual doubling of the clonogens in a protracted regimen

  10. Clinical evaluation of the hypoxic cytotoxin tirapazamine (SR-4233): phase I experience with repeated dose administration during fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, Steven L.; Spencer, Sharon; Mariscal, Carol; Wooten, Ann; Wheeler, Richard; Brown, J. Martin; Fisher, Cheryl; Roemeling, Reinhard von

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Regions of chronic or transient hypoxia are common in many human tumors and are thought to limit tumor cell killing and tumor control with conventional irradiation and some chemotherapeutic agents. Tirapazamine (3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine-1,4-di-N-oxide) forms a cytotoxic free radical during reductive metabolism in regions of hypoxia. In well oxygenated regions, the tirapazamine radical reacts with molecular oxygen to form the inactive parent drug. This results in markedly greater toxicity for hypoxic cells than for the well oxygenated cells that comprise most normal tissues. Tirapazamine increased the anti-tumor effects of single dose or fractionated irradiation or cis-platin chemotherapy in murine tumors,in vivo . This study evaluated the ability to repeat the administration of Tirapazamine during courses of fractionated irradiation in humans after an earlier phase I trial established a maximum tolerated dose of 390 mg per square meter of body surface area (mg/m 2 ) when given as a single dose with radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Between December 1993 and August 1995 22 patients with locally advanced or metastatic tumors of varying histology, normal renal, hepatic, and hematologic functions, and Karnofsky performance status ≥ 60 received repeated doses of Tirapazamine during a planned, 6 weeks course of standardly fractionated radiotherapy. After anti-emetic treatment with ondansetron (32 mg) and dexamethasone (16 mg), Tirapazamine was administered during a 2 hour intravenous infusion that ended from 30 to 90 minutes before a radiation treatment. Patients were monitored for acute toxicity during the course of treatment and for a minimum of one month after radiotherapy. Results: The study was initiated with three, biweekly doses of Tirapazamine at 330 mg/m 2 . Four of 7 patients who initiated treatment at this dose refused the second (1 patient) or third dose of Tirapazamine (3 patients). Two of the three patients who received three doses

  11. Radiation-induced transformation of SV40-immortalized human thyroid epithelial cells by single and fractionated exposure to γ-irradiation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riches, A.C.; Herceg, Z.; Bryant, P.E.; Wynford-Thomas, D.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation-induced transformation of a human thyroid epithelial cell line (HTori-3) has been investigated following exposure to single and fractionated doses of γ-irradiation. The human epithelial cells were irradiated in vitro and following passaging, transplanted to the athymic nude mouse. Following a single exposure to γ-irradiation in the range 0.5-4Gy, 22 tumours were observed in 45 recipients and following three equal fractions in the range 0.5-4Gy per fraction, 18 tumours were observed in 31 recipients. Tumours were undifferentiated carcinomas and were observed from 7 to 20 weeks after transplantation. They occurred after similar radiation doses to those received by the children in the Belarus region of Ukraine, who developed thyroid tumours. The number of tumours observed, in each group receiving cells irradiated with a single dose of γ-irradiation in the range 0.5-4 Gy, was similar. Cell lines were established from some tumours and the tumorigenicity confirmed by retransplantation. These tumour cell lines were more radiosensitive than the human thyroid epithelial cell line they were derived from. This indicates that transformed cells were not being selected from a subpopulation within the parent cell line but that radiation-induced transformants were being induced de novo. The human origin of the tumours was established by karyotyping, immunocytochemical demonstration of human epithelial cytokeratins and p53 analysis. DNA fingerprinting confirmed that the tumours were derived from the original cell line. (author)

  12. Radioprotective efficacy of dipyridamole and AMP combination in fractionated radiation regimen, and its dependence on the time of administration of the drugs prior to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, M.; Pospisil, M.; Netikova, J.; Hola, J.; Znojil, V.; Vacha, J.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have recently demonstrated that a combined administration of dipyridamole and adenosine monophosphate to mice induces radioprotective effects in terms of postirradiation hematopoietic recovery in animals irradiated with a single dose. The aim of the present experiments was to investigate the radioprotective ability of the drug combination under conditions of fractionated radiation. It was shown that administration of the drugs either 15 or 60 min before each of the five daily 3-Gy doses of gamma radiation enhances hematopoietic recovery and survival of mice exposed to an additional 'top-up' dose of 3.5 Gy. Furthermore, it was ascertained that administration of the drugs 60 min prior to irradiation is more effective than administration of the drugs 15 min prior to irradiation. Due to the evidence that administration of the drugs 15 min prior to irradiation protects the organism mainly via mechanisms of systemic hypoxia while the pretreatment 60 min before irradiation avoids the role of hypoxia and mainly induces cell proliferation effects, the present results suggest a more protective role of mechanisms stimulating hematopoiesis under conditions of fractionated radiation. The data may provide a basis for more rational use of radioprotection in fractionated radiation techniques. (author) 1 tab., 1 fig., 25 refs

  13. Estimation of dependence between mean of fractionation of photons and neutrons dose and intensity of post-irradiation reaction of mouse large intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasinska, A.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the work was verification of mouse large intestine tolerance on fractionated 250 kV X-rays and 2.3 MeV neutrons doses. Two cm of large intestine of mouse CBA/HT strain were irradiated with various fraction doses: from 0.25 to 35 Gy of X-rays and 0.05-12 Gy of neutrons. The measure of injury was handicap of intestine function. Early post-irradiation reaction was measured by loss of body weight (2-3 weeks after irradiation) and mouse mortality (till 2 months after irradiation, LD50/2). The late reaction was measured on the base of maximal body weight in 1 year period after irradiation, deformation of excrements (after 10 months) and death of animals (till 12. month after irradiation, LD50/12). Fractionation of X-ray dose influenced on decrease of intensification of late irradiation effects. After fractionation of neutrons this effect has not been observed. α/β coefficient for X-rays was 19.9 Gy [15.2; 27.0] for body weight nadir, 13.4 Gy [9.3; 19.5] for early mortality (LD50/2), 6.4 Gy [3.6;11.0] for maximal body weight and 6.9 [4.2; 10.8] for late mortality (LD50/12). Analysis of influence of low doses of photons 90.25-4 Gy) and neutrons (0.05-0.8 Gy) showed trend to reduction α/β for photons only (LD50/2=5.4 Gy; LD50/12=4.6 Gy). α/β coefficient for neutrons was defined by LQ model only for maximal body weight and was 19.9 Gy [9.5; 61.0]. In application of graphic method α/β for neutrons was 230 Gy for early and 48 Gy for late effects. Lower values of α/β coefficient for late irradiation effects for photon radiation demonstrate the big influence of fractionation of photons dose on large intestine tolerance (decrease intensity in all biological effects). Author did not observe increase of intestine tolerance in fractionation of neutrons dose. Effect of irradiation damages repair in interfraction pauses, measured by percent of regenerated dose (F r ) was much bigger for photons. For X-rays it was 50% for early and 63% for late effects. In case of

  14. The enhancing effect of fractionated whole-body x-irradiation on replication of endogenous leukemia viruses in BALB/c mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamori, Yasuhiko; Okumoto, Masaaki; Iwai, Mineko; Iwai, Yoshiaki

    1976-01-01

    The incidence of leukemia, changes in the tissue weight of spleen and thymus, and the expression of endogenous viruses were examined with BALB/c mice following 4 weekly fractionated whole-body x-irradiation of 170 R each, starting at 4 weeks of age. The leukemia incidence was quite low for the unirradiated controls, while 60% of the irradiated male mice developed thymic lymphoma. The virus-positive cells appeared earlier in the spleen than in the thymus and bone marrow, and increased with aging. The time of appearance of virus-positive cells in these tissues was remarkably promoted by the fractionated x-irradiation, and its frequency was also enhanced. (auth.)

  15. A generalised formulation of the 'incomplete-repair' model for cell survival and tissue response to fractionated low dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, P.; Joiner, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    A generalized equation for cell survival or tissue effects after fractionated low dose-rate irradiations, when there is incomplete repair between fractions and significant repair during fractions, is derived in terms of the h- and g-functions of the 'incomplete-repair' (IR) model. The model is critically dependent on α/β, repair half-time, treatment time and interfraction interval, and should therefore be regarded primarily as a tool for the analysis of fractionation and dose-rate effects in carefully designed radiobiological experiments, although it should also be useful in exploring, in a general way, the feasibility of clinical treatment protocols using fractionated low dose-rate treatments. (author)

  16. The effect of pentoxifylline on early and late radiation injury following fractionated irradiation in C3H mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dion, M.W.; Hussey, D.H.; Osborne, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    An experiment was performed to test the effectiveness of pentoxifylline in reducing late radiation injury. One hundred and four C3H mice were randomized into eight groups of 13 mice each, and the right hind limbs were irradiated with 4000, 5000, 6000, or 7000 cGy in ten fractions. Each group was treated with once daily injections of either pentoxifylline or saline for 30+ weeks. An additional ten mice received daily injections of pentoxifylline or saline, but no irradiation. The pentoxifylline animals demonstrated significantly less late injury than the saline treated animals. The most obvious differences were observed in the 5000 and 6000 cGy groups. There were seven radiation related deaths in the saline treated control groups, but only one radiation related death in the pentoxifylline treated groups. Whereas 42% (20/48) of the saline treated animals had a late injury score of 3.0 or greater, only 8% (4/51) of the pentoxifylline treated animals had a late skin score as high as 3.0. Pentoxifylline had no effect on the acute radiation injury scores. The drug was well tolerated with no toxic effects noted. Pentoxifylline is a methyl xanthine derivative that is used to treat vascular occlusive disease in humans. It improves perfusion through small capillaries by improving the deformability of red blood cells, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and stimulating the release of prostacyclin. This study shows that the prophylactic administration of pentoxifylline can modify late radiation induced injury in the mouse extremity. It may have value in the prevention or treatment of late radiation induced injury in humans, and it could be a useful tool to help define the mechanisms of late radiation injury in specific organs.

  17. The effect of pentoxifylline on early and late radiation injury following fractionated irradiation in C3H mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dion, M.W.; Hussey, D.H.; Osborne, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment was performed to test the effectiveness of pentoxifylline in reducing late radiation injury. One hundred and four C3H mice were randomized into eight groups of 13 mice each, and the right hind limbs were irradiated with 4000, 5000, 6000, or 7000 cGy in ten fractions. Each group was treated with once daily injections of either pentoxifylline or saline for 30+ weeks. An additional ten mice received daily injections of pentoxifylline or saline, but no irradiation. The pentoxifylline animals demonstrated significantly less late injury than the saline treated animals. The most obvious differences were observed in the 5000 and 6000 cGy groups. There were seven radiation related deaths in the saline treated control groups, but only one radiation related death in the pentoxifylline treated groups. Whereas 42% (20/48) of the saline treated animals had a late injury score of 3.0 or greater, only 8% (4/51) of the pentoxifylline treated animals had a late skin score as high as 3.0. Pentoxifylline had no effect on the acute radiation injury scores. The drug was well tolerated with no toxic effects noted. Pentoxifylline is a methyl xanthine derivative that is used to treat vascular occlusive disease in humans. It improves perfusion through small capillaries by improving the deformability of red blood cells, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and stimulating the release of prostacyclin. This study shows that the prophylactic administration of pentoxifylline can modify late radiation induced injury in the mouse extremity. It may have value in the prevention or treatment of late radiation induced injury in humans, and it could be a useful tool to help define the mechanisms of late radiation injury in specific organs

  18. A secretome analysis reveals that PPARα is upregulated by fractionated-dose γ-irradiation in three-dimensional keratinocyte cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jee Yong; Kim, Hyun Ji; Yi, Jae Youn

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) environment composed of properly interconnected and differentiated cells that allows communication and cooperation among cells via secreted molecules would be expected to more accurately reflect cellular responses. Here, we investigated γ-irradiation-induced changes in the secretome of 3D-cultured keratinocytes. An analysis of keratinocyte secretome profiles following fractionated-dose γ-irradiation revealed changes in genes involved in cell adhesion, angiogenesis, and the immune system. Notably, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-(PPARα) was upregulated in response to fractionated-dose γ-irradiation. This upregulation was associated with an increase in the transcription of known PPARα target genes, including angiopoietin-like protein 4, dermokine and kallikrein-related peptide 12, which were differentially regulated by fractionated-dose γ-irradiation. Collectively, our data imply a mechanism linking γ-irradiation and secretome changes, and suggest that these changes could play a significant role in the coordinated cellular responses to harmful ionizing radiation, such as those associated with radiation therapy. This extension of our understanding of γ-irradiation-induced secretome changes has the potential to improve radiation therapy strategies. Control of inflammatory waves, improved wound healing, and stabilization of the skin barrier are imperative for minimizing such injuries. Therefore, PPARα agonists and antagonists have the potential to become important therapeutic agents for the treatment of γ-irradiation induced skin damage. Specifically, our analysis suggests that the undesirable consequences of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation could be alleviated by PPARα agonists

  19. A secretome analysis reveals that PPARα is upregulated by fractionated-dose γ-irradiation in three-dimensional keratinocyte cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jee Yong; Kim, Hyun Ji; Yi, Jae Youn [Korea Institute of Radiation and Medical Sciences, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    A three-dimensional (3D) environment composed of properly interconnected and differentiated cells that allows communication and cooperation among cells via secreted molecules would be expected to more accurately reflect cellular responses. Here, we investigated γ-irradiation-induced changes in the secretome of 3D-cultured keratinocytes. An analysis of keratinocyte secretome profiles following fractionated-dose γ-irradiation revealed changes in genes involved in cell adhesion, angiogenesis, and the immune system. Notably, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-(PPARα) was upregulated in response to fractionated-dose γ-irradiation. This upregulation was associated with an increase in the transcription of known PPARα target genes, including angiopoietin-like protein 4, dermokine and kallikrein-related peptide 12, which were differentially regulated by fractionated-dose γ-irradiation. Collectively, our data imply a mechanism linking γ-irradiation and secretome changes, and suggest that these changes could play a significant role in the coordinated cellular responses to harmful ionizing radiation, such as those associated with radiation therapy. This extension of our understanding of γ-irradiation-induced secretome changes has the potential to improve radiation therapy strategies. Control of inflammatory waves, improved wound healing, and stabilization of the skin barrier are imperative for minimizing such injuries. Therefore, PPARα agonists and antagonists have the potential to become important therapeutic agents for the treatment of γ-irradiation induced skin damage. Specifically, our analysis suggests that the undesirable consequences of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation could be alleviated by PPARα agonists.

  20. Proof of radiation-induced tumour TNF-α expression in Ewing sarcoma cell line RM-82 following clinically relevant in vitro fractionated irradiation and in vivo one-time irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litzenberger, K.; Ruebe, C.E.; Erren, M.; Liu, L.; Valen, F. van; Palm, J.; Yang, K.; Ruebe, C.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of fractionated irradiation on TNF-α expression in Ewing sarcoma cell line RM-82 in vitro and following its establishment as a xenograft tumour in the nude mouse in vivo [de

  1. Histological examination of the oral mucosa after fractional diode laser irradiation with different power and pulse duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, Andrey V.; Ermolaeva, Ludmila A.; Korzhevsky, Dmitriy E.; Sergeeva, Elena S.; Semyashkina, Yulia V.; Antropova, Maria M.; Fedotov, Denis Y.; Zaitseva, Maria A.; Kashina, Tatiana V.

    2018-04-01

    Optical and histological methods were used to examination of influence the power and pulse duration of 980-nm diode laser to the dimensions and morphology of tissue around fractional micro injuries created by the radiation of that laser in the oral mucosa of rats in vivo. The power of laser radiation (P) varied in the range of 1÷21 W, and its pulse duration (tp) - in the range 50÷500 ms. Histological examination showed that in the mucosa of the oral cavity after the laser fractional irradiation, there following effects are found: a tissue defect, a transudate in the lumen of ablative micro injury, stretching and compacting effect of the nuclei of the basal epithelium, the disappearance of granules of the keratohialin, destroying the structure of the connective tissue, erythrocyte stasis in the vessels, the disappearance of transverse striation in the muscle fibers in muscle layer. It has been found that ablative micro injury begins to form up at P = 5 W, tp = 100 ms and affects only the epithelial layer of the mucosa. At P = 7 W, tp = 120 ms, the ratio of width to depth of ablative micro injury is 1 : 1, and at P = 10 W, tp = 100 ms, an ablative micro column with ratio of 1 : 1.5 is formed in the epithelial and submucosal layers of the mucosa. The laser effect with P = 15 W, tp = 200 ms leads to lengthening of the ablation micro-column to 1 : 2, with the bottom of the ablative micro column reaching the muscular layer. With a further growth of laser power or pulse duration, the width of the micro injury increases, and the growth of the micro injury depth is slowed down so that the micro column buildup is ceased.

  2. The effect of the overall treatment time of fractionated irradiation on the tumor control probability of a human soft tissue sarcoma xenograft in nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allam, Ayman; Perez, Luis A; Huang, Peigen; Taghian, Alphonse; Azinovic, Ignacio; Freeman, Jill; Duffy, Michael; Efird, Jimmy; Suit, Herman D

    1995-04-30

    Purpose: To study the impact of the overall treatment time of fractionated irradiation on the tumor control probability (TCP) of a human soft tissue sarcoma xenograft growing in nude mice, as well as to compare the pretreatment potential doubling time (T{sub pot}) of this tumor to the effective doubling time (T{sub eff}) derived from three different schedules of irradiation using the same total number of fractions with different overall treatment times. Methods and Materials: The TCP was assessed using the TCD{sub 50} value (the 50% tumor control dose) as an end point. A total of 240 male nude mice, 7-8 weeks old were used in three experimental groups that received the same total number of fractions (30 fractions) with different overall treatment times. In group 1, the animals received three equal fractions/day for 10 consecutive days, in group 2 they received two equal fractions/day for 15 consecutive days, and in group 3 one fraction/day for 30 consecutive days. All irradiations were given under normal blood flow conditions to air breathing animals. The mean tumor diameter at the start of irradiation was 7-8 mm. The mean interfraction intervals were from 8-24 h. The T{sub pot} was measured using Iododeoxyuridine (IudR) labeling and flow cytometry and was compared to T{sub eff}. Results: The TCD{sub 50} values of the three different treatment schedules were 58.8 Gy, 63.2 Gy, and 75.6 Gy for groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. This difference in TCD{sub 50} values was significant (p < 0.05) between groups 1 and 2 (30 fractions/10 days and 30 fractions/15 days) vs. group 3 (30 fractions/30 days). The loss in TCP due to the prolongation of the overall treatment time from 10 days to 30 days was found to be 1.35-1.4 Gy/day. The pretreatment T{sub pot} (2.4 days) was longer than the calculated T{sub eff} in groups 2 and 3 (1.35 days). Conclusion: Our data show a significant loss in TCP with prolongation of the overall treatment time. This is most probably due to an

  3. Molecular and genetic approach to understanding the mechanisms by which fractionated X-irradiation induces leukemia in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meruelo, D; Rossomando, A

    1986-01-01

    The authors laboratory's approach to try to shed light on the question of a viral etiology for radiation-induced leukemia has focused on defining, localizing and understanding the mode of action of genes involved in susceptibility to fractionated x-irradiation-(FXI) induced disease. These studies have indicated that multiple genes control the process of leukemogenesis. Not every mouse strain which shows some susceptibility to FXI-induced leukemia carries the susceptible gene at each of the multiple loci involved in the disease process. It is plausible to conclude that more than one mechanism of leukemogenesis can be triggered by FXI. Studies have focused on the mode of action of one such locus Ril-1. Several reagents have been developed to help clone and characterize this locus. Currently chromosomal ''walking'' and ''hopping'' techniques are being used in conjunction with an RFLP molecular probe which is adjacent to Ril-1. In addition a cDNA library has been prepared from a radiation-induced thymoma and substraction hybridization analysis is being used in the search for Ril-1.

  4. A molecular and genetic approach to understanding the mechanisms by which fractionated X-irradiation induces leukemia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meruelo, D.; Rossomando, A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors laboratory's approach to try to shed light on the question of a viral etiology for radiation-induced leukemia has focused on defining, localizing and understanding the mode of action of genes involved in susceptibility to fractionated x-irradiation-(FXI) induced disease. These studies have indicated that multiple genes control the process of leukemogenesis. Not every mouse strain which shows some susceptibility to FXI-induced leukemia carries the susceptible gene at each of the multiple loci involved in the disease process. It is plausible to conclude that more than one mechanism of leukemogenesis can be triggered by FXI. Studies have focused on the mode of action of one such locus Ril-1. Several reagents have been developed to help clone and characterize this locus. Currently chromosomal ''walking'' and ''hopping'' techniques are being used in conjunction with an RFLP molecular probe which is adjacent to Ril-1. In addition a cDNA library has been prepared from a radiation-induced thymoma and substraction hybridization analysis is being used in the search for Ril-1. (author)

  5. High-Dose, Single-Fraction Irradiation Rapidly Reduces Tumor Vasculature and Perfusion in a Xenograft Model of Neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jani, Ashish; Shaikh, Fauzia; Barton, Sunjay [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Willis, Callen [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Banerjee, Debarshi [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Mitchell, Jason [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Hernandez, Sonia L. [Department of Surgery, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Hei, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Kadenhe-Chiweshe, Angela [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamashiro, Darrell J. [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Connolly, Eileen P., E-mail: epc2116@cumc.columbia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize the effects of high-dose radiation therapy (HDRT) on neuroblastoma tumor vasculature, including the endothelial cell (EC)–pericyte interaction as a potential target for combined treatment with antiangiogenic agents. Methods and Materials: The vascular effects of radiation therapy were examined in a xenograft model of high-risk neuroblastoma. In vivo 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (3D-CEUS) imaging and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were performed. Results: HDRT significantly reduced tumor blood volume 6 hours after irradiation compared with the lower doses used in conventionally fractionated radiation. There was a 63% decrease in tumor blood volume after 12-Gy radiation compared with a 24% decrease after 2 Gy. Analysis of tumor vasculature by lectin angiography showed a significant loss of small vessel ends at 6 hours. IHC revealed a significant loss of ECs at 6 and 72 hours after HDRT, with an accompanying loss of immature and mature pericytes at 72 hours. Conclusions: HDRT affects tumor vasculature in a manner not observed at lower doses. The main observation was an early reduction in tumor perfusion resulting from a reduction of small vessel ends with a corresponding loss of endothelial cells and pericytes.

  6. Promotive effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabaya, Koji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kusaka, Masaru; Seki, Masatoshi (Kirin Brewery Co., Ltd., Gunma (Japan). Pharmaceutical Research Laboratory); Fushiki, Masato

    1994-08-01

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on the recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated whole-body irradiation was investigated in mice. Male 7-week old C3H/HeN mice received a total of ten exposures of 0.25 Gy/day from day 1 to 5 and from day 8 to 12. Peripheral neutropenia with a nadir on day 17 was caused by the fractionated irradiation. Daily subcutaneous injections of rhG-CSF at 0.25 and 2.5 [mu]g/body/day from day from day 1 to 21 promoted the recovery of neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. The kinetics of morphologically identifiable bone marrow cells were studied to clarify the mechanism behind the promotive effect of this factor. A slight decrease in mitotic immature granulocytes, such as myeloblasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes on day 5, and a drastic decrease in metamyelocytes and marrow neutrophils on days 5, 9, and 17 were seen in the femur of irradiated mice. Treatment using rhG-CSF caused an increase in immature granulocytes of all differential stages in the femur. Microscopic findings of the femurs and spleens also reveals an increase in immature granulocytes in these organs in mice injected with rhG-CSF. These results indicate that rhG-CSF accelerates granulopoiesis in the femur and spleen, thereby promoting recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation. (author).

  7. Promotive effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabaya, Koji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kusaka, Masaru; Seki, Masatoshi; Fushiki, Masato.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) on the recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated whole-body irradiation was investigated in mice. Male 7-week old C3H/HeN mice received a total of ten exposures of 0.25 Gy/day from day 1 to 5 and from day 8 to 12. Peripheral neutropenia with a nadir on day 17 was caused by the fractionated irradiation. Daily subcutaneous injections of rhG-CSF at 0.25 and 2.5 μg/body/day from day from day 1 to 21 promoted the recovery of neutrophils in a dose-dependent manner. The kinetics of morphologically identifiable bone marrow cells were studied to clarify the mechanism behind the promotive effect of this factor. A slight decrease in mitotic immature granulocytes, such as myeloblasts, promyelocytes and myelocytes on day 5, and a drastic decrease in metamyelocytes and marrow neutrophils on days 5, 9, and 17 were seen in the femur of irradiated mice. Treatment using rhG-CSF caused an increase in immature granulocytes of all differential stages in the femur. Microscopic findings of the femurs and spleens also reveals an increase in immature granulocytes in these organs in mice injected with rhG-CSF. These results indicate that rhG-CSF accelerates granulopoiesis in the femur and spleen, thereby promoting recovery from neutropenia induced by fractionated irradiation. (author)

  8. Weekly bi-fractionated 40 Gy three-dimensional conformational accelerated partial irradiation of breast: results of a phase II French pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgier, C.; Pichenot, C.; Verstraet, R.; Heymann, S.; Biron, B.; Delaloge, S.; Garbay, J.R.; Marsiglia, H.; Bourhis, J.; Taghian, A.; Marsiglia, H.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the first French experience of three-dimensional conformational and accelerated partial irradiation of breast. Twenty five patients have been concerned by this phase II trial. The prescribed total dose was 40 Gy, was delivered over 5 days in two daily fractions. Irradiation was performed with two 6 MV tangential mini-beams and a 6-22 MeV front electron beams. The planning target volume coverage was very good. Toxicity has been assessed. Healthy tissues (heart, lungs) are considerably protected. The acute and late toxicity is correct. Short communication

  9. Development of irradiation techniques and assessment of tumor response carbon ion radiotherapy in ultra-short fraction and time for a small lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Sugawara, Toshiyuki

    2005-01-01

    For planning safety carbon therapy for lung cancer, the minimum (threshold) dose to generate lung reaction on CT image was investigated at each fraction regimen. From 1995 January to 2003 December, 44 patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with carbon ion beams of various fractions (1-12 fractions a port) and total doses (28-90 GyE). The 78 irradiated fields for the early reaction (within 6 months) and 67 for the late (1 year after) were divided into the two groups: the positive (+) and the negative (-) after the reactions on CT image were graded according to Libshits's criteria. The α/βvalue of biological effective dose (BED) responsive curve was determined by assuming the biserial correlation coefficient between positive rate of lung reaction and BED dose. From the BED responsive curve, in turn, the dose responsive curve for lung reaction rate at each fraction regimen was obtained. Based on the curve, D10 (to generate the lung reaction at 10% of the patients) in single fraction regimen was determined to be 10.6 GyE for the late reaction and 9.96 GyE for the early reaction, respectively. These doses seem to be very useful to estimate lung injuries in singe-dose irradiation. (author)

  10. High-dose total-body irradiation and autologous marrow reconstitution in dogs: dose-rate-related acute toxicity and fractionation-dependent long-term survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.; Schumacher, D.; Shulman, H.; Graham, T.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    Beagle dogs treated by total-body irradiation (TBI) were given autologous marrow grafts in order to avoid death from marrow toxicity. Acute and delayed non-marrow toxicities of high single-dose (27 dogs) and fractionated TBI (20 dogs) delivered at 0.05 or 0.1 Gy/min were compared. Fractionated TBI was given in increments of 2 Gy every 6 hr for three increments per day. Acute toxicity and early mortality (<1 month) at identical total irradiation doses were comparable for dogs given fractionated or single-dose TBI. With single-dose TBI, 14, 16, and 18 Gy, respectively, given at 0.05 Gy/min, 0/5, 5/5, and 2/2 dogs died from acute toxicity; with 10, 12, and 14 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 5/5 dogs died acutely. With fractionated TBI, 14 and 16 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 2/2 dogs died auctely. Early deaths were due to radiation enteritis with or without associated septicemia (29 dogs; less than or equal to Day 10). Three dogs given 10 Gy of TBI at 0.1 Gy/min died from bacterial pneumonia; one (Day 18) had been given fractionated and two (Days 14, 22) single-dose TBI. Fifteen dogs survived beyond 1 month; eight of these had single-dose TBI (10-14 Gy) and all died within 7 months of irradiation from a syndrome consisting of hepatic damage, pancreatic fibrosis, malnutrition, wasting, and anemia. Seven of the 15 had fractionated TBI, and only one (14 Gy) died on Day 33 from hepatic failure, whereas 6 (10-14 Gy) are alive and well 250 to 500 days after irradiation. In conclusion, fractionated TBI did not offer advantages over single-dose TBI with regard to acute toxicity and early mortality; rather, these were dependent upon the total dose of TBI. The total acutely tolerated dose was dependent upon the exposure rate; however, only dogs given fractionated TBI became healthy long-term survivors

  11. In vivo assessment of the tolerance dose of small liver volumes after single-fraction HDR irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricke, Jens; Seidensticker, Max; Luedemann, Lutz; Pech, Maciej; Wieners, Gero; Hengst, Susanne; Mohnike, Konrad; Cho, Chie Hee; Lopez Haenninen, Enrique; Al-Abadi, Hussain; Felix, Roland; Wust, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess a dose-response relationship for small volumes of liver parenchyma after single-fraction irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five liver metastases were treated by computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial brachytherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed 1 day before and 3 days and 6, 12, and 24 weeks after therapy. MR sequences included T1-w gradient echo (GRE) enhanced by hepatocyte-targeted gadobenate dimeglumine. All MRI data sets were merged with 3D dosimetry data and evaluated by two radiologists. The reviewers indicated the border of hyperintensity on T2-w images (edema) or hypointensity on T1-w images (loss of hepatocyte function). Based on the total 3D data, a dose-volume histogram was calculated. We estimated the threshold dose for either edema or function loss as the D 90 , i.e., the dose achieved in at least 90% of the pseudolesion volume. Results: Between 3 days and 6 weeks, the extension of the edema increased significantly from the 12.9 Gy isosurface to 9.9 Gy (standard deviation [SD], 3.3 and 2.6). No significant change was detected between 6 and 12 weeks. After 24 weeks, the edematous tissue had shrunk significantly to 14.7 Gy (SD, 4.2). Three days postbrachytherapy, the D 90 for hepatocyte function loss reached the 14.9 Gy isosurface (SD, 3.9). At 6 weeks, the respective zone had increased significantly to 9.9 Gy (SD, 2.3). After 12 and 24 weeks, the dysfunction volume had decreased significantly to the 11.9 Gy and 15.2 Gy isosurface, respectively (SD, 3 and 4.1). Conclusions: The 95% interval from 7.6 to 12.2 Gy found as the minimal hepatocyte tolerance after 6 weeks accounts for the radiobiologic variations found in CT-guided brachytherapy, including heterogeneous dose rates by variable catheter arrays

  12. In vivo assessment of catheter positioning accuracy and prolonged irradiation time on liver tolerance dose after single-fraction 192Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kropf Siegfried

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess brachytherapy catheter positioning accuracy and to evaluate the effects of prolonged irradiation time on the tolerance dose of normal liver parenchyma following single-fraction irradiation with 192 Ir. Materials and methods Fifty patients with 76 malignant liver tumors treated by computed tomography (CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT were included in the study. The prescribed radiation dose was delivered by 1 - 11 catheters with exposure times in the range of 844 - 4432 seconds. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI datasets for assessing irradiation effects on normal liver tissue, edema, and hepatocyte dysfunction, obtained 6 and 12 weeks after HDR-BT, were merged with 3D dosimetry data. The isodose of the treatment plan covering the same volume as the irradiation effect was taken as a surrogate for the liver tissue tolerance dose. Catheter positioning accuracy was assessed by calculating the shift between the 3D center coordinates of the irradiation effect volume and the tolerance dose volume for 38 irradiation effects in 30 patients induced by catheters implanted in nearly parallel arrangement. Effects of prolonged irradiation were assessed in areas where the irradiation effect volume and tolerance dose volume did not overlap (mismatch areas by using a catheter contribution index. This index was calculated for 48 irradiation effects induced by at least two catheters in 44 patients. Results Positioning accuracy of the brachytherapy catheters was 5-6 mm. The orthogonal and axial shifts between the center coordinates of the irradiation effect volume and the tolerance dose volume in relation to the direction vector of catheter implantation were highly correlated and in first approximation identically in the T1-w and T2-w MRI sequences (p = 0.003 and p p = 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively. There was a significant shift of the irradiation effect towards the catheter entry site compared with the planned dose

  13. Administration of the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist pioglitazone during fractionated brain irradiation prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Weiling; Payne, Valerie; Tommasi, Ellen; Diz, Debra I.; Hsu, F.-C.; Robbins, Mike E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We hypothesized that administration of the anti-inflammatory peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist pioglitazone (Pio) to adult male rats would inhibit radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Methods and Materials: Young adult male F344 rats received one of the following: (1) fractionated whole brain irradiation (WBI); 40 or 45 Gy γ-rays in 4 or 4.5 weeks, respectively, two fractions per week and normal diet; (2) sham-irradiation and normal diet; (3) WBI plus Pio (120 ppm) before, during, and for 4 or 54 weeks postirradiation; (4) sham-irradiation plus Pio; or (5) WBI plus Pio starting 24h after completion of WBI. Results: Administration of Pio before, during, and for 4 or 54 weeks after WBI prevented Radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Administration of Pio for 54 weeks starting after completion of fractionated WBI substantially but not significantly reduced Radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Conclusions: These findings offer the promise of improving the quality of life and increasing the therapeutic window for brain tumor patients

  14. Mechanisms associated with the expression of cisplatin resistance in a human ovarian tumor cell line following exposure to fractionated x-irradiation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempke, W.C.M.; Shellard, S.A.; Hosking, L.K.; Hill, B.T.

    1992-01-01

    Interactions between cisplatin (CDDP) and irradiation are of potential significance for the combined modality treatment of cancer. To identify parameters associated with CDDP resistance, the human ovarian carcinoma cell line SK-OV-3/P was pre-exposed to fractionated X-irradiation in vitro. The resultant subline (SK-OV-3/DXR-10) proved 2-fold resistant to CDDP, but not to acute X-irradiation. Consistent with unaltered dihydrofolate reductase and thymidylate synthase activities, SK-OV-3/DXR-10 cells were neither cross-resistant to methotrexate nor to 5-fluorouracil. Verapamil significantly enhanced CDDP-induced cytotoxicity in the resistant DXR-10 subline, but not in the parental cells. Resistance in the SK-OV-3/DXR-10 cells was associated with significantly decreased cisplatin uptake. After an 18 h post-treatment incubation the parental cell line appeared proficient in the removal of the intrastrand adduct Pt-AG, but deficient in removing the major adduct Pt-GG and the difunctional Pt-(GMP) 2 lesion, whilst the DXR-10 resistant subline appeared proficient in removal of all four Pt-DNA adducts. DNA polymerases α and β activities, however, were comparable in both cell lines. These data implicate both enhanced repair and increased tolerance of DNA damage as mechanisms of resistance to CDDP resulting from in vitro exposure of a human ovarian carcinoma cell line to fractionated X-irradiation. (author)

  15. The AT1 Receptor Antagonist, L-158,809, Prevents or Ameliorates Fractionated Whole-Brain Irradiation-Induced Cognitive Impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, Mike E.; Payne, Valerie B.S.; Tommasi, Ellen B.S.; Diz, Debra I.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Brown, William R.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Olson, John; Zhao Weiling

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: We hypothesized that administration of the angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, L-158,809, to young adult male rats would prevent or ameliorate fractionated whole-brain irradiation (WBI)-induced cognitive impairment. Materials and Methods: Groups of 80 young adult male Fischer 344 x Brown Norway (F344xBN) rats, 12-14 weeks old, received either: (1) fractionated WBI; 40 Gy of γ rays in 4 weeks, 2 fractions/week, (2) sham-irradiation; (3) WBI plus L-158,809 (20 mg/L drinking water) starting 3 days prior, during, and for 14, 28, or 54 weeks postirradiation; and (4) sham-irradiation plus L-158,809 for 14, 28, or 54 weeks postirradiation. An additional group of rats (n = 20) received L-158,809 before, during, and for 5 weeks postirradiation, after which they received normal drinking water up to 28 weeks postirradiation. Results: Administration of L-158,809 before, during, and for 28 or 54 weeks after fractionated WBI prevented or ameliorated the radiation-induced cognitive impairment observed 26 and 52 weeks postirradiation. Moreover, giving L-158,809 before, during, and for only 5 weeks postirradiation ameliorated the significant cognitive impairment observed 26 weeks postirradiation. These radiation-induced cognitive impairments occurred without any changes in brain metabolites or gross histologic changes assessed at 28 and 54 weeks postirradiation, respectively. Conclusions: Administering L-158,809 before, during, and after fractionated WBI can prevent or ameliorate the chronic, progressive, cognitive impairment observed in rats at 26 and 52 weeks postirradiation. These findings offer the promise of improving the quality of life for brain tumor patients

  16. A comparison of anti-tumor effects of high dose rate fractionated and low dose rate continuous irradiation in multicellular spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Nobuo; Omura, Motoko; Matsubara, Sho.

    1997-01-01

    In a clinical experience, high dose rate (HDR) fractionated interstitial radiotherapy can be an alternative to traditional low dose rate (LDR) continuous interstitial radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. To investigate biological effect of HDR, compared to LDR, comparisons have been made using spheroids of human squamous carcinoma cells. Both LDR and HDR were delivered by 137 Cs at 37degC. Dose rate of LDR was 8 Gy/day and HDR irradiations of fraction size of 4, 5 or 6 Gy were applied twice a day with an interval time of more than 6 hr. We estimated HDR fractionated dose of 31 Gy with 4 Gy/fr to give the same biological effects of 38 Gy by continuous LDR for spheroids. The ratio of HDR/LDR doses to control 50% spheroids was 0.82. (author)

  17. Influence of radiation field and fractionation schedule of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on the induction of suppressor cells and stable chimerism after bone marrow transplantation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waer, M.; Ang, K.K.; van der Schueren, E.; Vandeputte, M.

    1984-01-01

    When BALB/c mice received 17 daily fractions of 2 Gy each of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI, total dose 34 Gy) and 30 x 10 6 C 57 B1 bone marrow cells (BM) on the day after the last fraction, stable bone marrow chimerism without signs of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) was obtained in 84% of the animals. On the contrary, in BALB/c mice receiving only seven fractions of TLI (total dose 14 Gy), all bone marrow grafts were rejected. When the last two fractions of a 14-Gy TLI course were given without shielding the extra lymphatic tissues (combined total lymphoid + total body irradiation, TLBI), chimerism could be induced in 53% of the animals. When this 14-Gy TLBI schedule was used, it was even possible to administer four fractions per day (multiple fractions per day schedule, MFD), thus reducing the overall treatment time to 2 consecutive days. After this concentrated form of TLBI, chimerism was detected in 35% of the animals. As in the 34-Gy TLI schedule, graft-vs-host reaction could not be prevented in the 14-Gy TLBI schedule when spleen lymphocytes (10 x 10 6 ) were added to the BM inocolum. Leucopenia or suppression of the phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced blastogenesis could not predict which schedule would result in a successful allogeneic bone marrow take. Suppressor cells of the mixed lymphocyte reaction, on the other hand, were only found in the spleen of BALB/c mice treated with the TLI or TLBI schedules, which also resulted in stable bone marrow chimerism

  18. Identification of radiation response genes and proteins from mouse pulmonary tissues after high-dose per fraction irradiation of limited lung volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hee; Jeon, Seulgi; Kang, Ga-Young; Lee, Hae-June; Cho, Jaeho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2017-02-01

    The molecular effects of focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose per fraction irradiation (HDFR) such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have not been fully characterized. In this study, we used such an irradiation system and identified the genes and proteins after HDFR to mouse lung, similar to those associated with human therapy. High focal radiation (90 Gy) was applied to a 3-mm volume of the left lung of C57BL6 mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. As well as histological examination for lungs, a cDNA micro array using irradiated lung tissues and a protein array of sera were performed until 4 weeks after irradiation, and radiation-responsive genes and proteins were identified. For comparison, the long-term effects (12 months) of 20 Gy radiation wide-field dose to the left lung were also investigated. The genes ermap, epb4.2, cd200r3 (up regulation) and krt15, hoxc4, gdf2, cst9, cidec, and bnc1 (down-regulation) and the proteins of AIF, laminin, bNOS, HSP27, β-amyloid (upregulation), and calponin (downregulation) were identified as being responsive to 90 Gy HDFR. The gdf2, cst9, and cidec genes also responded to 20 Gy, suggesting that they are universal responsive genes in irradiated lungs. No universal proteins were identified in both 90 Gy and 20 Gy. Calponin, which was downregulated in protein antibody array analysis, showed a similar pattern in microarray data, suggesting a possible HDFR responsive serum biomarker that reflects gene alteration of irradiated lung tissue. These genes and proteins also responded to the lower doses of 20 Gy and 50 Gy HDFR. These results suggest that identified candidate genes and proteins are HDFR-specifically expressed in lung damage induced by HDFR relevant to SBRT in humans.

  19. No effect of the hemoglobin solution HBOC-201 on the response of the rat R1H tumor to fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, A.

    2005-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Tumor hypoxia is regarded as one important underlying feature of radioresistance. The authors report on an experimental approach to improve tumor response to radiation by combining fractionated irradiation with HBOC-201, an ultrapurified polymerized hemoglobin solution, which is currently used in clinical phase II/III trials as alternative oxygen carrier and proved to be highly effective in tissue oxygenation (tpO 2 ). Material and Methods: Subcutaneously growing rhabdomyosarcoma R1H tumors of the rat were treated with either 40 Gy (2 Gy/fraction, 20 fractions in 2 weeks, ambient) followed by grade top-up doses (clamped) alone, or in combination with HBOC-201, or with HBOC-201 plus carbogen (95% O 2 +5% CO 2 ). Local tumor control (TCD50%) and growth delay were used as endpoints. In addition, the effect of HBOC-201 alone or in combination with carbogen on the tpO 2 of tumor and muscle was determined using a flexible stationary probe (Licox, GMS). Results: TCD50% values of 119 Gy (95% confidence interval 103; 135), 111 Gy (84; 138), and 102 Gy (83; 120) were determined for tumors irradiated alone, in combination with HBOC-201, and with HBOC-201 plus carbogen, respectively. Although the dose-response curves showed a slight shift to lower doses when HBOC-201 or HBOC-201 plus carbogen was added, the differences in TCD50% were not statistically significant. No effect was seen on the growth delay of recurrent tumors. HBOC-201 alone did not effect tumor or muscle tpO 2 . In combination with carbogen the mean tpO 2 muscle raised from 23.9 mmHg to 59.3 mmHg (p 2 by carbogen alone. Conclusion: Low-dose application of HBOC-201 does not improve the response of the rhabdomyosarcoma R1H of the rat to fractionated irradiation. (orig.)

  20. Ionizing radiation and autoimmunity: Induction of autoimmune disease in mice by high dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and its prevention by inoculating normal T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, N.; Sakaguchi, S.; Miyai, K.

    1992-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can functionally alter the immune system and break self-tolerance. High dose (42.5 Gy), fractionated (2.5 Gy 17 times) total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on mice caused various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as gastritis, thyroiditis, and orchitis, depending on the radiation dosages, the extent of lymphoid irradiation, and the genetic background of the mouse strains. Radiation-induced tissue damage is not the primary cause of the autoimmune disease because irradiation of the target organs alone failed to elicit the autoimmunity and shielding of the organs from irradiation was unable to prevent it. In contrast, irradiation of both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid organs/tissues was required for efficient induction of autoimmune disease by TLI. TLI eliminated the majority of mature thymocytes and the peripheral T cells for 1 mo, and inoculation of spleen cell, thymocyte, or bone marrow cell suspensions (prepared from syngeneic nonirradiated mice) within 2 wk after TLI effectively prevented the autoimmune development. Depletion of T cells from the inocula abrogated the preventive activity. CD4 + T cells mediated the autoimmune prevention but CD8 + T cells did not. CD4 + T cells also appeared to mediate the TLI-induced autoimmune disease because CD4 + T cells from disease-bearing TLI mice adoptively transferred the autoimmune disease to syngeneic naive mice. Taken together, these results indicate that high dose, fractionated ionizing radiation on the lymphoid organs/tissues can cause autoimmune disease by affecting the T cell immune system, rather than the target self-Ags, presumably by altering T cell-dependent control of self-reactive T cells. 62 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Usefulness of Daily Fractionated Administration of Wortmannin Combined With γ-Ray Irradiation in Terms of Local Tumor Response and Lung Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Tano, Keizo; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the usefulness of fractionated administration of wortmannin combined with γ-ray irradiation in terms of local tumor response and lung metastatic potential, referring to the response of intratumor quiescent (Q) cells. Methods B16-BL6 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were continuously given 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) cells. The tumor-bearing mice then received γ-ray irradiation after wortmannin treatment through a single or 4 consecutive daily intraperitoneal administrations up to a total dose of 4 mg/kg in combination with an acute hypoxia-releasing agent (nicotinamide) or mild temperature hyperthermia (MTH). Immediately after the irradiation, cells from some tumors were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker. The responses of the Q and total (= P + Q) cell populations were assessed based on the frequency of micronuclei using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. In other tumor-bearing mice, 17 days after irradiation, macroscopic lung metastases were enumerated. Results Wortmannin raised the sensitivity of Q cells more remarkably than the total cell population in both single and daily administrations. Daily administration of wortmannin elevated the sensitivity of both the total and Q cell populations, but especially the total cell population, compared with single administration. Daily administration, especially combined with MTH, decreased the number of lung metastases. Conclusion Daily fractionated administration of wortmannin in combination with γ-ray irradiation was thought to be more promising than single administration because of its potential to enhance local tumor response and repress lung metastatic potential. PMID:29147327

  2. Significance of Fractionated Administration of Thalidomide Combined With γ-Ray Irradiation in Terms of Local Tumor Response and Lung Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Sanada, Yu; Moriwaki, Takahiro; Tano, Keizo; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of fractionated administration of thalidomide combined with γ-ray irradiation in terms of local tumor response and lung metastatic potential, referring to the response of intratumor quiescent (Q) cells. Methods B16-BL6 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were continuously given 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) cells. The tumor-bearing mice then received γ-ray irradiation after thalidomide treatment through a single or two consecutive daily intraperitoneal administrations up to a total dose of 400 mg/kg in combination with an acute hypoxia-releasing agent (nicotinamide) or mild temperature hyperthermia (MTH). Immediately after the irradiation, cells from some tumors were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker. The responses of the Q and total (= P + Q) cell populations were assessed based on the frequency of micronuclei using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. In other tumor-bearing mice, 17 days after irradiation, macroscopic lung metastases were enumerated. Results Thalidomide raised the sensitivity of the total cell population more remarkably than Q cells in both single and daily administrations. Daily administration of thalidomide elevated the sensitivity of both the total and Q cell populations, but especially the total cell population, compared with single administration. Daily administration, especially combined with MTH, decreased the number of lung metastases. Conclusion Daily fractionated administration of thalidomide in combination with γ-ray irradiation was thought to be more promising than single administration because of its potential to enhance local tumor response and repress lung metastatic potential. PMID:29147396

  3. Splenic irradiation in the treatment of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia or myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia. Results of daily and intermittent fractionation with and without concomitant hydroxyurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, H. Jr.; McKeough, P.G.; Desforges, J.; Madoc-Jones, H.

    1986-01-01

    Seventeen patients with either chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia (MMM) received 24 courses of splenic irradiation at this institution from 1973 to 1982. Eleven of the 17 patients had received prior chemotherapy. Patients were treated with 60 Co gamma rays or 6 MV photons. The fraction size ranged from 15 to 100 rad and the total dose per treatment course from 15 to 650 rad, with the exception of one patient who received 1650 rad. Fourteen of 19 courses (71%) given for splenic pain yielded significant subjective relief while 17 of 26 courses given for splenomegaly obtained at least 50% regression of splenic size. Blood counts were carefully monitored before each treatment to limit hematologic toxicity. From this experience, the authors conclude that splenic irradiation effectively palliates splenic pain and reverses splenomegaly in the majority of patients with CML and MMM. Intermittent fractionation (twice or thrice weekly) is more convenient for the patient, appears to be as effective as daily treatment, and may be associated with less hematologic toxicity. Preliminary results of concurrent treatment with splenic irradiation and oral hydroxyurea show promise and warrant further study

  4. Autologous stem cell transplantation following high-dose whole-body irradiation of dogs - influence of cell number and fractionation regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenberger, U.

    1981-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome after a single dose of 1600 R (approx. 12-14 Gy in body midline) and after fractionated irradiation with 2400 R (approx. 18-20 Gy) was studied with regard to fractionation time and to the number of bone marrow cells infused. The acute radiation syndrome consisted of damage to the alimentary tract and of damage to the hemopoietic system. Damage of hemopoiesis was reversible in dogs which had been given a sufficient amount of hemopoietic cells. Furthermore changes in skin and in the mucous membranes occurred. Hemopoietic recovery following infusion of various amounts of bone marrow was investigated in dogs which were irradiated with 2400 R within 7 days. Repopulation of bone marrow as well as rise of leukocyte and platelet counts in the peripheral blood was taken as evidence of complete hemopoietic reconstitution. The results indicate that the acute radiation syndrom following 2400 R TBI and autologous BMT can be controlled by fractionation of this dose within 5 or 7 days. The acute gastrointestinal syndrome is aggravated by infusion of a lesser amount of hemopoietic cells. However, TBI with 2400 R does not require greater numbers of hemopoietic cells for restoration of hemopoiesis. Thus, the hemopoiesis supporting tissue can not be damage by this radiation dose to an essential degree. Longterm observations have not revealed serious late defects which could represent a contraindication to the treatment of malignent diseases with 2400 R of TBI. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Radiation cross-linked carboxymethyl sago pulp hydrogels loaded with ciprofloxacin: Influence of irradiation on gel fraction, entrapped drug and in vitro release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Yi Lyn; Muniyandy, Saravanan; Kamaruddin, Hashim; Mansor, Ahmad; Janarthanan, Pushpamalar

    2015-01-01

    Carboxymethyl sago pulp (CMSP) with 0.4 DS, viscosity 184 dl/g and molecular weight 76,000 g/mol was synthesized from sago waste. 10 and 20% w/v solutions of CMSP were irradiated at 10–30 kGy to form hydrogels and were characterized by % gel fraction (GF). Irradiation of 20% CMSP using 25 kGy has produced stable hydrogels with the highest % GF and hence loaded with ciprofloxacin HCl. Drug-loaded hydrogels were produced by irradiating the mixture of drug and 20% CMSP solution at 25 kGy. After irradiation, the hydrogels were cut into circular discs with a diameter of 6±1 mm and evaluated for physicochemical properties as well as drug release kinetics. The ciprofloxacin loading in the disc was 14.7%±1 w/w with an entrapment efficiency of 73.5% w/w. The low standard deviation of drug-loaded discs indicated uniform thickness (1.5±0.3 mm). The unloaded discs were thinner (1±0.4 mm) and more brittle than the drug-loaded discs. FESEM, FT-IR, XRD, DSC and TGA analysis revealed the absence of polymer–drug interaction and transformation of crystalline to amorphous form of ciprofloxacin in the discs. The disc sustained the drug release in phosphate buffer pH 7.4 over 36 h in a first-order manner. The mechanism of the drug release was found to be swelling controlled diffusion and matrix erosion. The anti-bacterial effect of ciprofloxacin was retained after irradiation and CMSP disc could be a promising device for ocular drug delivery. - Highlights: • Carboxymethyl sago pulp (CMSP) with ciprofloxacin is irradiated to form hydrogels. • 20% CMSP at 25 kGy has produced stable hydrogels with the highest gel fraction. • Crystalline ciprofloxacin converted as amorphous during hydrogel formation. • Hydrogel in disc form sustained the drug release drug up to 36 h. • Irradiation cross-linked polymeric chain of CMSP resulted in controlled swelling

  6. Microwave irradiation of lignocellulosic materials, 8: Microwave irradiation of the neutral fraction (C-I-M) of pine Björkman LCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, J.; Katayama, T.; Koshijima, T.

    1986-01-01

    Effect of microwave irradiation on the partially acetylated galactoglucomannan bearing a small amount of lignin (C-I-M) isolated from pine Bjorkman LCC was investigated. When the native C-I-M was heated above 180°C by microwave irradiation in the presence of water, its carbohydrate portion was hydrolyzed into oligosaccharides having d.p. of 2-5 and monosaccharides. The degree of depolymerization of carbohydrates strongly depended upon the heating temperature and did not reach a maximum below 237°C, at which the reducing sugar content attained to 45.7%. The lignin molecules precipitated during microwave irradiation and a substancial amount of their (β-0-4 linkages were splitted. The lignin-carbohydrate bondings were also splitted at the heating temperature above 230°C. The hydrolysis of the carbohydrate portion of C-I-M was found to be remarkably enhanced by addition of 0.5% acetic acid during microwave irradiation. In this case, the reducing sugar production showed a maximum (74.2%) at about 210°C. Acetic acid was an excellent reagent for enhancement of the extent of depolymerization of galactoglucomannan in C-I-M. (author)

  7. Impact of overall treatment time on local control of slow growing human GL squamous cell carcinoma in nude mice treated by fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, M.; Petersen, C.; Schulz, P.; Baisch, H.

    1999-01-01

    Background and purpose: The impact of overall treatment time of fractionated irradiation on local control of slow growing human GL squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was determined. Materials and methods: Moderately well differentiated and keratinizing human GL SCC with a volume doubling time of 8 days were transplanted subcutaneously into the right hindleg of NMRI (nu/nu) mice and irradiated with 30 fractions under ambient conditions over 2, 3, 4.5, 6 and 10 weeks. Endpoint of the experiments was local tumor control at day 180 after end of treatment.Results: The tumor control dose 50% (TCD 50) increased from 40 to 57 Gy when the treatment time was extended from 2 to 10 weeks. The data can be well described by a linear increase in TCD 50 with time. The recovered dose per day (D r ) was 0.28 Gy (95% confidence interval 0.06; 0.48). The fit to the data was not significantly improved by assuming a biphasic (dog-leg) time course with constant TCD 50 values in the initial part of treatment followed by a more rapid increase of TCD 50 thereafter.Conclusions: D r in GL SCC was significantly less than the value of 1.0 Gy (0.7; 1.3 ) previously reported for poorly differentiated, non-keratinizing and fast growing human FaDu SCC (Baumann M, Liertz C, Baisch H, Wiegel T, Lorenzen J, Arps H. Impact of overall treatment time of fractionated irradiation on local control of human FaDu squamous cell carcinoma in nude mice. Radiother. Oncol. 1994;32:137-143), indicating important heterogeneity of the time factor between different tumors of the same histological type. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  8. Mitigation of Radiation-Induced Epithelial Damage by the TLR5 Agonist Entolimod in a Mouse Model of Fractionated Head and Neck Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshkov, Ilia A; Gleiberman, Anatoli S; Mett, Vadim L; Hutson, Alan D; Singh, Anurag K; Gudkov, Andrei V; Burdelya, Lyudmila G

    2017-05-01

    Radiation treatment of head and neck cancer frequently causes severe collateral damage to normal tissues including mouth mucosa, salivary glands and skin. This toxicity limits the radiation dose that can be delivered and affects the patient's quality of life. Previous studies in mice and nonhuman primates showed that entolimod, a toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) agonist derived from bacterial flagellin, effectively reduced radiation damage to hematopoietic and gastrointestinal tissues in both total-body and local irradiation scenarios, with no protection of tumors. Here, using a mouse model, we analyzed the efficacy of entolimod administered before or after irradiation in reducing damage to normal tissues. Animals received local fractionated radiation to the head and neck area, thus modeling radiotherapy of head and neck cancer. Tissue damage was evaluated through histomorphological examination of samples collected at different time points up to four weeks, mice were exposed locally to five daily fractions of 5, 6 or 7 Gy. A semiquantitative scoring system was used to assess the severity of observed pathomorphological changes. In this model, radiation damage was most severe in the lips, tongue and skin, moderate in the upper esophagus and minor in salivary glands. The kinetics of injury appearance and recovery of normal morphology varied among tissues, with maximal damage to the tongue, esophagus and salivary glands developing at earlier times (days 8-11 postirradiation) relative to that of lip and skin mucosa (days 11-15 postirradiation). While both tested regimens of entolimod significantly reduced the extent of radiation damage and accelerated restoration of normal structure in all tissues analyzed, administration of entolimod 1 h after each irradiation was more effective than treatment 30 min before irradiation. These results support the potential clinical use of entolimod as an adjuvant for improving the therapeutic index of head and neck cancer radiotherapy by

  9. Fractionated stereotactic irradiation by Cyberknife of choroid melanomas: repositioning validation, closed eyelids; Irradiation stereotaxique fractionnee par Cyberknife des melanomes choroidiens: validation du repositionnement, paupieres fermees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, S.; Rezvoy, N.; Lacornerie, T.; Mirabel, X.; Labalette, P.; Lartigau, E. [Centre Oscar-Lambret, Service de Radiotherapie, 59 - Lille (France)

    2009-10-15

    The fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy by Cyberknife is an option in the treatment of eyes tumors. The advantages of the Cyberknife in the choroid melanomas are in its infra-millimetric precision, to the automated repositioning on the skull bones and to the conformity brought by the stereotaxy. The objective of this study was to validate the quality of repositioning and the immobility of the eyes with closed eyelids. Conclusion: the reproducibility of the eye positioning with closed eyelids seems enough to consider the conservative treatment of choroid melanomas by fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy by Cyberknife without implementation of fiducials nor retrobulbar anaesthesia. (N.C.)

  10. Effects of the nonsugar fraction of brown sugar on chronic ultraviolet B irradiation-induced photoaging in melanin-possessing hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiyoshi, Maho; Hayashi, Teruaki; Kimura, Yoshiyuki

    2009-04-01

    Brown sugar has been used traditionally for the treatment of skin trouble as a component of soaps or lotions. Symptoms of aging including wrinkles and pigmentation develop earlier in sun-exposed skin than unexposed skin, a phenomenon referred to as photoaging. Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation is one of the most important environmental factors influencing photoaging. The aim of this study was to clarify whether the nonsugar fraction of brown sugar prevents chronic UVB-induced aging of the skin using melanin-possessing hairless mice. The nonsugar fraction (1% or 3% solution, 50 mul/mouse) was applied topically to the dorsal region every day for 19 weeks. Both solutions prevented an increase in skin thickness and reduction in skin elasticity caused by the UVB. The 3% solution also prevented wrinkles and melanin pigmentation as well as increases in the diameter and length of skin blood vessels. Increases in the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in UVB-irradiated skin was inhibited by the nonsugar fraction. Prevention of UVB-induced aging of the skin by topical application of the nonsugar fraction of brown sugar may be due to inhibition of increases in MMP-2 and VEGF expression.

  11. Effect of the γ-IFN on radiation damage and radiation fibrosis of the rabbit rectum after cavitas pelvisrute fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yunyi; Zhang Li; Wang Juan; Zhao Hengfang; Dai Li; Liu Zi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of γ-IFN on the radiation-induced injury and fibrosis of the rabbit rectum after the fractionated irradiation to pelvic cavity. Methods: The animal model of radiation rectum injury was established. 52 New Zealand rabbits were divided into 3 groups as the normal control group, the conventional radiation group, and γ-IFN group. Except the normal control group, the pelvic cavity of the two other groups were irradiated with 6 MV X-rays. At 5 d post-irradiatio the γ-IFN group was administered with 250 000 U/kg of γ-IFN once a week, while the conventional radiation group with 5 ml of saline solution. The rabbits were executed after 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks, and the recta in the irradiated field were taken out. HE dyeing, in-situ hybridization and immuno-histochemical methods were used to analyze the radiation-induced rectrum injury and fibrosis. Results: At 4, 8, and 12 weeks post-irradiation, the radiation rectum injury and fibrosis were significantly different between the conventional radiation group and γ-IFN group(P 0.05) . At 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks post-irradiation, the expression of TGF-β1 mRNA in-situ hybridization in the γ-IFN group were significantly different compared to the conventional radiation group and the normal control group (P <0.05) . The immuno-histochemical results of Col III showed the significant difference among the γ-IFN group and both the normal control group and conventional radiation group ( P < 0.05). Conclusions: γ-IFN could reduce the radiation rectum injury, suppress the expression of TGF-β1 mRNA in the rectum mucosa, inhibit the expression of Col III, and delay the formation of radiation-induced fibrosis. (authors)

  12. Effect of chronic fractionated low-dose gamma irradiation on division potential of human embryonic cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masami; Suzuki, Masao; Suzuki, Keiji; Watanabe, Kimiko (Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Nakano, Kazushiro

    1991-12-01

    We investigated the in vitro phenotypic transformation of human embryo (HE) cells that were repeatedly irradiated (7.5 cGy once a week) throughout their life-span. Irradiation was repeated until the cells had accumulated 195 cGy (equivalent to the 26th passage). Samples of cells were assayed for survival by colony formation, as well as for mutation at the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus and for transformation by focus formation. The life-span (mean number of population doublings) of multiply irradiated cells with a total dose of 97.5 cGy was slightly but significantly prolonged over that of controls. After HE cells had accumulated 195 cGy, the maximum number of divisions increased to 130-160% of the number in non-irradiated control cells. Transformed foci were not observed until cells had accumulated 97.5 cGy, and then increased with the increasing accumulation of radiation. However, no cells showed immortality or expressed a malignant phenotype in vitro. (author).

  13. The value of setup portal films as an estimate of a patient's position throughout fractionated tangential breast irradiation: an on-line study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGee, Kiaran P.; Fein, Douglas A.; Hanlon, Alex L.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Fowble, Barbara L.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if portal setup films are an accurate representation of a patient's position throughout the course of fractionated tangential breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients undergoing external beam irradiation for T1-T2 infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast following excisional biopsy and axillary dissection were imaged using an on-line portal imaging device attached to a 6 MV linear accelerator. Medial and lateral tangential fields were imaged and a total of 139 fractions, 225 portal fields, and 4450 images were obtained. Interfractional and intrafractional variations for anatomical parameters including the central lung distance (CLD), central flash distance (CFD), and inferior central margin (ICM) were calculated from these images. A pooled estimate of the random error associated with a given treatment was determined by adding the interfractional and intrafractional standard deviations in quadrature. A 95% confidence level assigned a value of two standard deviations of the random error estimate. Central lung distance, CFD, and ICM distances were then measured for all portal setup films. Significant differences were defined as occurring when the simulation-setup difference was greater than the 95% confidence value. Results: Differences between setup portal and simulation films were less than their 95% confidence values in 70 instances indicating that in 90% of the time these differences are a result of random differences in daily treatment positioning. Conclusions: In 90% of cases tested, initial portal setup films are an accurate representation of a patients daily treatment setup

  14. Combined effect of carcinogenic n-nitrosodimethylamine precursors and fractioned {gamma}-irradiation on tumor development in rats.; Kombinirovannoe vliyanie predshestvennikov kantserogennogo N-nitrozodimetilamina i fraktsionirovannogo {gamma}-oblucheniya na vozniknovenie opukholej u krys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galenko, P M [Yinstitut Eksperimental` noyi Patologyiyi, Onkologyiyi yi Radyiobyiologyiyi, Natsyional` na Akademyiya Nauk Ukrayini, Kyiv (Ukraine); Nedopitanskaya, N N [Yinstitut Zdorov` ya, Myinyisterstvo Okhoroni Zdorov` ya, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    1996-12-01

    The influence of combined action of N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and fractioned {gamma}-irradiation on tumor development in rats was investigated. Both the tumor frequency and tumor plurality coefficient have been studied for two types of treatment: precursors of NDMA (amidopyrine and/or sodium nitrite (SN)) alone and the combination `precursors plus radiation`. Tumor frequency decreased by about 11% after combination of {gamma}-irradiation and precursors in comparison with precursors alone. Nevertheless, treatment with SN and {gamma}-irradiation did not change tumor frequency in comparison with SN alone. Irradiation of rats treated with precursors led to an increased tumor plurality coefficient.

  15. Biological alterations resulting from chronic lung irradiation. III. Effect of partial 60Co thoracic irradiation upon pulmonary collagen metabolism and fractionation in syrian hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickrell, J.A.; Harris, D.V.; Hahn, F.F.; Belasich, J.J.; Jones, R.K.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation-induced changes in pulmonary collagen metabolism were studied in Syrian hamsters given multiple thoracic doses of 60 Co radiation to achieve cumulative exposures of 6000, 4000, and 2000 R. At 13 to 14 wk after initial exposure, 6000- and 4000-R exposures had increased incorporation of injected [ 14 C]proline into pulmonary collagenous protein which suggested an increased collagen synthesis. By 21 to 22 wk after exposure, increased pulmonary soluble collagen was noted. Increased pulmonary scarring was indicated by a variable increase in native collagen at 13 to 36 wk. A collection of alveolar macrophages at 7 to 8 wk followed by inflammation at 13 to 14 wk and a beginning of pulmonary fibrosis at 13 to 19 wk were noted. At 21 to 22 wk after exposure a somewhat more marked pulmonary fibrosis and some epithelialization were observed. Hemosiderin deposits were also observed at 35 to 36 wk after exposure, but pathologic processes were lessened by this time. The early activation of collagen synthesis presumably caused the radiation-induced fibrosis. Later, when collagen tended to accumulate, the synthetic rate was normal. The activation of collagen synthesis caused by external thoracic irradiation resembles that caused by thoracic irradiation from the internal emitter, 144 Ce. Moreover, it demonstrates the usefulness of monitoring collagen biosynthesis by [ 14 C]proline incorporation into the lung. (U.S.)

  16. Three-year outcomes of a once daily fractionation scheme for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Sharad; Daroui, Parima; Khan, Atif J; Kearney, Thomas; Kirstein, Laurie; Haffty, Bruce G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report 3-year outcomes of toxicity, cosmesis, and local control using a once daily fractionation scheme (49.95 Gy in 3.33 Gy once daily fractions) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between July 2008 and August 2010, women aged ≥40 years with ductal carcinoma in situ or node-negative invasive breast cancer ≤3 cm in diameter, treated with breast-conserving surgery achieving negative margins, were accrued to a prospective study. Women were treated with APBI using 3–5 photon beams, delivering 49.95 Gy over 15 once daily fractions over 3 weeks. Patients were assessed for toxicities, cosmesis, and local control rates before APBI and at specified time points. Thirty-four patients (mean age 60 years) with Tis 0 (n = 9) and T1N0 (n = 25) breast cancer were treated and followed up for an average of 39 months. Only 3% (1/34) patients experienced a grade 3 subcutaneous fibrosis and breast edema and 97% of the patients had good/excellent cosmetic outcome at 3 years. The 3-year rate of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) was 0% while the rate of contralateral breast events was 6%. The 3-year disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) was 94%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Our novel accelerated partial breast fractionation scheme of 15 once daily fractions of 3.33 Gy (49.95 Gy total) is a remarkably well-tolerated regimen of 3D-CRT-based APBI. A larger cohort of patients is needed to further ascertain the toxicity of this accelerated partial breast regimen

  17. Increase in the fraction of necrotic, not apoptotic, cells in SiHa xenograft tumours shortly after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, P.L.; Vikse, C.M.; Vanderbyl, S.

    1999-01-01

    Background and purpose: Approximately 18% of the cells recovered by rapid mechanical dissociation of SiHa xenograft tumours contain large numbers of DNA strand breaks. The number of damaged cells increases to 30-40% 4-6 h after exposure to 5 or 15 Gy, returning to normal levels by 12 h. This observation is reminiscent of the rate of production of apoptotic cells in other murine and human xenograft tumours. The nature of this damage, rate of development and relation to cell proliferation rate were therefore examined in detail.Materials and methods: SiHa human cervical carcinoma cells were grown as xenograft tumours in SCID mice. Single-cell suspensions were prepared as a function of time after irradiation of the mouse and examined for DNA damage using the alkaline comet assay. Cell cycle progression was measured by flow cytometry evaluation of anti-bromodeoxyuridine-labelled tumour cells.Results: Significant numbers of apoptotic cells could not be detected in irradiated SiHa tumours using an end-labelling assay, electron microscopy, or histological examination of thin sections. Instead, xenograft cells exhibiting extensive DNA damage in the comet assay were predominantly necrotic cells. The increase in the proportion of heavily damaged cells 4-6 h after irradiation could be the result of an interplay between several factors including loss of viable cells and change in production or loss of necrotic cells. Analysis of the progression of BrdUrd-labelled cells confirmed that while 35% of cells from untreated SiHa tumours had divided and entered G 1 phase by 6 h after BrdUrd injection, none of the labelled cells from tumours exposed to 5 or 15 Gy had progressed to G 1 .Conclusions: The increase in the percentage of SiHa tumour cells with extensive DNA damage 4-6 h after irradiation is attributable to necrosis, not apoptosis. Cell cycle progression and cell loss are likely to influence the kinetics of appearance of both apoptotic and necrotic cells in irradiated tumours

  18. Unusual combination of Cis platinum and radiotherapy followed by a three fractions per day irradiation in splitcourse: a phase I-II study in brain glioma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hassel, M.; Lesimple, T.; Gedouin, D.; Chenal, C.; Guegan, Y.; Darcel, F.

    1992-01-01

    An unusual protocol based on a preliminary clinical study on cylindromas metastasized to the lung was proposed to brain glioma patients: Day 2 100 mg/m 2 i.v. Cis platinum (Cis P II) followed at days 3 and 5 by 6 Gy irradiation (RT) in two fractions and three days. Five cycles were scheduled at 21 days interval. On disease progression a three fractions per day radiotherapy regimen (3 FRT) in split-course (two series of 22.50 Gy in 15 fractions and five days separated by a two weeks period of rest) was then delivered to the patients. All patients had a measurable mass on the CT scan. 19 were entered into the study: 13 as first line therapy (group A) and six for salvage treatment (group B). Tolerance was globally good. Eight patients were considered responders at the end of five cycles of Cis II-RT. They were all group A patients. Median symptom-free interval was six months for the whole population. Survival was twelve months. The 3 FRT was well tolerated but does not seem to have improved the therapeutic gain of the chemoradiotherapy combination. The present study concerns patients whose prognosis was poor on inclusion: Surgery unadvisable or unsatisfactory and diagnosis mainly based on biopsy only. The number and the duration of responses justify further study into Cis P II as first line therapy as either an effective cytotoxic drug or a potential radio enhancer. (orig.) [de

  19. The efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen in modifying the response of tissue to irradiation in doses of 200-400 rad per fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, D.D.; Orsi, L.

    1975-01-01

    The efficacy of respiration of O 2 at 30 psi in modifying the response of normal and tumour tissue to irradiation administered at 200 to 400 rad per fraction to anaesthetized mice has been evaluated. End-points have been delay in growth and TCD 50 for an early generation iso-transplant of a C 3 H mouse mammary carcinoma, and the acute reaction of skin of the C 3 H/Sed mouse. Results showed that the ratios of dose (air)/dose (O 2 30 psi) to elicit these end points were in the range 1.2 to 1.4. In earlier work using the same end points but doses per fraction 430 to 2100 rad, the ratios were 1.6 to 1.8. That is, for these tissue responses, respiration of O 2 at 30 psi increases the response of both normal and tumour tissue to all radiation doses tested. It is of greater effectiveness when combined with large doses per fraction, eg. greater than 430 rad. (author)

  20. Induction of premature senescence by single and fractionated irradiation in human cancer cell line and xenografted mice model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Hee Jung; Kim, Bong Cho; Lee, Hyung Chul; Ji, Young Hoon; Park, Seung Woo; Lee, Jae Seon

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the best therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment. The cellular responses to ionizing radiation (IR) are varied ranging from cellular senescence to apoptotic cell death. To increase the efficacy of IR treatment is a major issue of radiation biology. From the point of view, the induction of premature senescence using the therapeutic dose of IR could be a promising treatment for tumors. The aim of this study is whether the premature senescence could contribute to cancer treatment by irradiation

  1. A phase I/II study to evaluate the effect of fractionated hemibody irradiation in the treatment of osseous metastases--RTOG 88-22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarantino, C.W.; Caplan, R.; Rotman, M.; Coughlin, C.; Demas, W.; Delrowe, J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was initiated to determine the maximum tolerated total dose that can be delivered by fractionated hemibody irradiation (HBI), as defined by the acute hematological and non hematological toxicity. Although it was designed as a dose searching trial, the influence of higher doses on occult and overt disease were considered equally important. The study was not designed to evaluate pain relief. The results were compared to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 82-06, which employed single high-dose HBI, to determine if either single or fractionated HBI is more effective in controlling occult or overt disease. Methods and Materials: A total of 144 patients were entered from September 1989 to April 1993. Only patients with a single symptomatic bone metastases from either prostate or breast cancer primaries and a KPS ≥ 60 were eligible. All patients initially received 30.0 Gy in 10 fractions to the symptomatic area followed by HBI in 2.50 Gy fractions to one of five arms: I--10.0 Gy (37 patients); II--12.5 Gy (23 patients); III--15.0 Gy (18 patients); IV--17.5 Gy (40 patients), and V--20.0 Gy (26 patients). A dose limiting toxicity was defined as an observed toxicity of ≥ Grade 3 lasting more than 30 days post completion of HBI. If three or more dose-limiting toxicities occurred at any dose level, the previous dose was considered as the maximum tolerable dose. Results: Thirty-six of 142 patients experienced ≥ Grade 3 hematological toxicity at some time following HBI. The distribution of dose-limiting hematological toxicity in each arm was: I--two patients; II--one patient; III--zero patients; IV--one patient; and V--three patients. The major non hematological toxicity was gastrointestinal and occurred in 10 patients. None were dose limiting. At 12 months from the initiation of treatment, the percent of patients with new disease were: Arms I--19%; II-9%; III-17%; IV--19%; V--13%; the percent of patients requiring additional treatment in

  2. Changes in the phospholipid fraction of intramuscular fat from pork loin (fresh and marinated) with different irradiation and packaging during storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Marquez, I.; Narvaez-Rivas, M.; Gallardo, E.; Cabeza, C. M.; Leon-Camacho, M.

    2013-05-01

    A study on the effect of E-beam (1 and 2 kGy) on the phospholipid classes of fresh and marinated pork loin stored at 4 degree centigrade and 8 degree centigrade under different atmospheres (air, vacuum and carbon dioxide enriched atmospheres) has been conducted. This is the first time that a study of this kind has been carried out on these types of samples. The combined statistical treatment of the distinct variables shows that minor changes (cardiol pin and sphingomyelin between both types of loin, cardiolipin vs storage temperatures and phosphatidylethanolamine vs the modified atmospheres) are produced in the individual phospholipids subjected to the different selected conditions. The more relevant result was that no effect of the irradiation doses on the phospholipids classes was found, so the E-beam can be considered a useful tool to extend the shelf-life of fresh meat without changes in the phospholipid fraction. (Author) 24 refs.

  3. On the surviving fraction in irradiated multicellular tumour spheroids: calculation of overall radiosensitivity parameters, influence of hypoxia and volume effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horas, Jorge A; Olguin, Osvaldo R; Rizzotto, Marcos G

    2005-01-01

    We model the heterogeneous response to radiation of multicellular tumour spheroids assuming position- and volume-dependent radiosensitivity. We propose a method to calculate the overall radiosensitivity parameters to obtain the surviving fraction of tumours. A mathematical model of a spherical tumour with a hypoxic core and a viable rim which is a caricature of a real tumour is constructed. The model is embedded in a two-compartment linear-quadratic (LQ) model, assuming a mixed bivariated Gaussian distribution to attain the radiosensitivity parameters. Ergodicity, i.e., the equivalence between ensemble and volumetric averages is used to obtain the overall radiosensitivities for the two compartments. We obtain expressions for the overall radiosensitivity parameters resulting from the use of both a linear and a nonlinear dependence of the local radiosensitivity with position. The model's results are compared with experimental data of surviving fraction (SF) for multicellular spheroids of different sizes. We make one fit using only the smallest spheroid data and we are able to predict the SF for the larger spheroids. These predictions are acceptable particularly using bounded sensitivities. We conclude with the importance of taking into account the contribution of clonogenic hypoxic cells to radiosensitivity and with the convenience of using bounded local sensitivities to predict overall radiosensitivity parameters

  4. Phase 2 Trial of Accelerated, Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation of 39 Gy in 13 Fractions Followed by a Tumor Bed Boost Sequentially Delivering 9 Gy in 3 Fractions in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ja Young; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Nam Kwon; Shin, Kyung Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report a phase 2 trial of accelerated, hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (AH-WBI) delivered as a daily dose of 3 Gy to the whole breast followed by a tumor bed boost. Methods and Materials: Two hundred seventy-six patients diagnosed with breast cancer (pT1-2 and pN0-1a) who had undergone breast-conserving surgery in which the operative margins were negative were treated with AH-WBI delivered as 39 Gy in 13 fractions of 3 Gy to the whole breast once daily over 5 consecutive working days, and 9 Gy in 3 sequential fractions of 3 Gy to a lumpectomy cavity, all within 3.2 weeks. Results: After a median follow-up period of 57 months (range: 27-75 months), the rate of 5-year locoregional recurrence was 1.4% (n=4), whereas that of disease-free survival was 97.4%. No grade 3 skin toxicity was reported during the follow-up period. Qualitative physician cosmetic assessments of good or excellent were noted in 82% of the patients at 2 months after the completion of AH-WBI. The global cosmetic outcome did not worsen over time, and a good or excellent cosmetic outcome was reported in 82% of the patients at 3 years. The mean pretreatment percentage breast retraction assessment was 12.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.14-12.86). The mean value of percentage breast retraction assessment increased to 13.99 (95% CI: 12.17-15.96) after 1 year and decreased to 13.54 (95% CI: 11.84-15.46) after 3 years but was not significant (P>.05). Conclusions: AH-WBI consisting of 39 Gy in 13 fractions followed by a tumor bed boost sequentially delivering 9 Gy in 3 fractions can be delivered with excellent disease control and tolerable skin toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery

  5. Radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses of repeated single-fraction hdr-irradiation of intersecting small liver volumes for recurrent hepatic metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wust Peter

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses as well as other toxic effects derived from repeated applications of single-fraction high dose rate irradiation of small liver volumes in clinical practice. Methods Twenty patients with liver metastases were treated repeatedly (2 - 4 times at identical or intersecting locations by CT-guided interstitial brachytherapy with varying time intervals. Magnetic resonance imaging using the hepatocyte selective contrast media Gd-BOPTA was performed before and after treatment to determine the volume of hepatocyte function loss (called pseudolesion, and the last acquired MRI data set was merged with the dose distributions of all administered brachytherapies. We calculated the BED (biologically equivalent dose for a single dose d = 2 Gy for different α/β values (2, 3, 10, 20, 100 based on the linear-quadratic model and estimated the tolerance dose for liver parenchyma D90 as the BED exposing 90% of the pseudolesion in MRI. Results The tolerance doses D90 after repeated brachytherapy sessions were found between 22 - 24 Gy and proved only slightly dependent on α/β in the clinically relevant range of α/β = 2 - 10 Gy. Variance analysis showed a significant dependency of D90 with respect to the intervals between the first irradiation and the MRI control (p 90 and the pseudolesion's volume. No symptoms of liver dysfunction or other toxic effects such as abscess formation occurred during the follow-up time, neither acute nor on the long-term. Conclusions Inactivation of liver parenchyma occurs at a BED of approx. 22 - 24 Gy corresponding to a single dose of ~10 Gy (α/β ~ 5 Gy. This tolerance dose is consistent with the large potential to treat oligotopic and/or recurrent liver metastases by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy without radiation-induced liver disease (RILD. Repeated small volume irradiation may be applied safely within the limits of this study.

  6. Influence of overall treatment time in a fractionated total lymphoid irradiation as an immunosuppressive therapy in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waer, M.; Ang, K.K.; Vandeputte, M.; Van der Schueren, E.

    1982-01-01

    Three groups of C 57 /BL/Ka mice received total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) in a total dose of 34 Gy in three different fractionation schedules. The tolerance of all different schedules was excellent. No difference in the peripheral white blood cell and lymphocyte counts nor the degree of immunosuppression as measured by phytohaemaglutinin or concanavalin A induced blastogenesis and mixed lymphocyte reaction were observed at the end of the treatment and up to 200 days. When bone marrow transplantation was performed one day after the end of each schedule, chimerism without signs of graft versus host disease was induced in all the groups. However, from the results in a limited number of animals it seems that concentrated schedules were less effective for chimerism induction. It has been demonstrated that it is possible to reduce drastically the overall treatment time for TLI before bone marrow transplantation. Further investigations are necessary in order to determine the optimal time-dose-fractionation factors and the different perameters involved in the transplantation

  7. The use of biological isodoses ''IsobioGy 2'' for evaluation of tumour and normal tissues response for fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Skolyszewski, J.; Majewski, S.; Lobodziec, W.; Jedynak, T.; Slosarek, K.

    1988-01-01

    Divergences between physical and biological dose distributions were analysed using linear quadratic model. It was found that small variations in physical dose distribution and differences in normal tissue sensitivity for change in dose per fraction, expressed by a α/β value, can cause a high difference between physical and biological doses. This difference significantly increases when one field instead of two fields is daily treated. If there is no enough separation between treated fields, the biological dose may dramatically increase. The use of biological ''isobioGy 2'' isodoses, instead of physical isodoses, can provide an important information on biological effect in tumour or normal tissue and may diminish the risk of giving too high dose to normal tissue and too low dose to the tumour. 6 figs., 13 refs. (author)

  8. Different classes of EGFR inhibitors may have different potential to improve local tumour control after fractionated irradiation: a study on C225 in FaDu hSCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, M.; Schuetze, C.; Petersen, C.; Pimentel, N.; Hessel, F.; Harstrick, A.; Baumann, M.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Previous experiments reported from this laboratory have shown that simultaneous application of the selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) inhibitor BIBX1382BS during fractionated irradiation significantly prolonged growth delay of FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma but did not improve local tumour control. The present study investigates the effect of the EGFR monoclonal antibody (mAb) C225 on local tumour control of FaDu tumours after combined treatment with single dose and fractionated irradiation to address whether different classes of EGFR inhibitors have different potential to improve the outcome of radiotherapy in the same tumour model. Material and methods: In unirradiated tumours, C225 was given either once or 4 times i.p. to the nude mice. Irradiation experiments were performed with graded single doses under clamp hypoxic conditions or with 30 fractions in 6 weeks with graded total doses under ambient blood flow. C225 was given 6 h before or 6 h before and 2, 5 and 7 days after single dose irradiation. During fractionated irradiation C225 was given once per week. Experimental endpoints were tumour growth delay and local tumour control 120 after end of irradiation. Results: C225 treatment resulted in prolongation of tumour growth delay after drug treatment alone as well as after single dose and fractionated irradiation. TCD 50 values were reduced from 56.3 Gy [95% CI 50; 62 Gy] after single dose irradiation alone to 46.0 Gy [41;51] (enhancement ratio [ER]=1.22, P 50 ) was 73.0 Gy [64; 82] in control tumours and 63.1 Gy [57; 69] after simultaneous C225 treatment, corresponding to an ER of 1.2 (P=0.01). Conclusion: Treatment of FaDu hSCC with the anti-EGFR mAb C225 resulted in a significant prolongation of tumour growth delay after single dose and fractionated irradiation. In contrast to previous results on the EGFR-TK inhibitor BIBX1382BS, this prolongation of growth delay translated into a slight but

  9. Characterization and clonality of prelymphoma cells of B10 mice treated with fractionated X-irradiation (FX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, M.; Kubo, E.; Sado, T.; Shimizu, T.; Yamagishi, H.

    1992-01-01

    With a combined use of cell separation by cell sorter and intrathymic injection assay, it was shown that prelymphoma cells existed in the subpopulation of thymocytes expressing TL-2 antigen which is not expressed on normal thymocytes of B10. Thy 1.2 or B10. Thy 1.1 mice. We then addressed a question whether all TL-2 + cells undergo neoplastic initiation or pre-neoplastic cells develop infrequently from TL-2 + cells. To investigate this problem and to examine the clonality of prelymphoma cells, thymocytes from individual B10. Thy 1.1 mice at various times after FX were stained with anti TL-2 mAb and the content of TL-2 + cells was evaluated. A graded amount of TL-2 + thymocytes from individual mice was injected into the thymuses of B10. Thy 1.2 mice. Although various numbers of TL-2 + cells appeared in the thymus of individual mice 14 - 28 days after FX, the donor type T cell lymphomas developed when 10 2 - 10 5 of TL-2 + cells from 7 individuals out of 20 mice were injected into the recipient mice. On the other hand, injection of TL-2 + cells from other mice (13 out of 20) did not develop donor type T cell lymphoma in spite of TL-2 + cells appearing in the thymus. These results indicate that all TL-2 + cells did not always undergo neoplastic initiation, and prelymphoma cells might develop infrequently from TL-2 + cells. To evaluate the clonality of prelymphoma cells, high molecular weight DNAs were isolated from the donor-derived T cell lymphomas and the rearrangement of T cell receptors examined by Southern blot analysis. The nucleotide sequences of V-J junctions were also determined by polymerase chain reaction techniques. The results indicated that after irradiation neoplastic initiation might occur oligoclonally in some of the TL-2 + cells. (author)

  10. Protective Effect of the Ethyl Acetate Fraction of Sargassum muticum against Ultraviolet B–Irradiated Damage in Human Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Won Hyun

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the cytoprotective properties of the ethyl acetate fraction of Sargassum muticum (SME against ultraviolet B (UVB-induced cell damage in human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells. SME exhibited scavenging activity toward the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. SME also scavenged the hydroxyl radicals generated by the Fenton reaction (FeSO4 + H2O2, which was detected using electron spin resonance spectrometry. In addition, SME decreased the level of lipid peroxidation that was increased by UVB radiation, and restored the level of protein expression and the activities of antioxidant enzymes that were decreased by UVB radiation. Furthermore, SME reduced UVB-induced apoptosis as shown by decreased DNA fragmentation and numbers of apoptotic bodies. These results suggest that SME protects human keratinocytes against UVB-induced oxidative stress by enhancing antioxidant activity in cells, thereby inhibiting apoptosis.

  11. Comparison of the immunosuppressive effect of fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) vs conventional immunosuppression (CI) in renal cadaveric allotransplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waer, M.; Vanrenterghem, Y.; Ang, K.K.; van der Schueren, E.; Michielsen, P.; Vandeputte, M.

    1984-01-01

    Beginning in November 1981, eight patients with end stage diabetic nephropathy underwent renal cadaveric transplantation after TLI. Transplantation was done between 2 to 11 days after the end of a fractionated TLI to a total dose of 20 to 30 Gy. During the same observation period, 60 nondiabetic patients with end stage renal disease of different origin also received a cadaveric kidney graft, with a conventional regimen of immunosuppression that consists of anti-lymphocyte-globulin, tapering high doses of prednisone, and azathioprine. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-, concanavalin A (con A)-, and pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-induced blastogenesis, as well as the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and the cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) decreased progressively during the first months after conventional immunosuppression to 50% of the pretransplantation level, and remained there for the first year after transplantation. These tests were much more impaired after TLI and again no recovery occurred during the first year. In the clinic, the more profound immunosuppression in TLI patients was more frequently associated with viral infections (cytomegalovirus and herpes zoster). The incidence of rejections, however, was somewhat less frequent in the TLI-treated group and occurred significantly later. After TLI, the mean cumulative dose of steroids needed for kidney transplantation during the first year after transplantation could be substantially reduced

  12. Preliminary Results of a Phase 1 Dose-Escalation Trial for Early-Stage Breast Cancer Using 5-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Partial-Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi, Asal; Thomas, Kimberly; Spangler, Ann; Rao, Roshni; Leitch, Marilyn; Wooldridge, Rachel; Rivers, Aeisha; Seiler, Stephen; Albuquerque, Kevin; Stevenson, Stella; Goudreau, Sally; Garwood, Dan; Haley, Barbara; Euhus, David; Heinzerling, John; Ding, Chuxiong; Gao, Ang; Ahn, Chul; Timmerman, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability of a dose-escalated 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy for partial-breast irradiation (S-PBI) in treating early-stage breast cancer after partial mastectomy; the primary objective was to escalate dose utilizing a robotic stereotactic radiation system treating the lumpectomy cavity without exceeding the maximum tolerated dose. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive nonlobular epithelial histologies and stage 0, I, or II, with tumor size <3 cm. Patients and physicians completed baseline and subsequent cosmesis outcome questionnaires. Starting dose was 30 Gy in 5 fractions and was escalated by 2.5 Gy total for each cohort to 40 Gy. Results: In all, 75 patients were enrolled, with a median age of 62 years. Median follow-up for 5 cohorts was 49.9, 42.5, 25.7, 20.3, and 13.5 months, respectively. Only 3 grade 3 toxicities were experienced. There was 1 dose-limiting toxicity in the overall cohort. Ten patients experienced palpable fat necrosis (4 of which were symptomatic). Physicians scored cosmesis as excellent or good in 95.9%, 100%, 96.7%, and 100% at baseline and 6, 12, and 24 months after S-PBI, whereas patients scored the same periods as 86.5%, 97.1%, 95.1%, and 95.3%, respectively. The disagreement rates between MDs and patients during those periods were 9.4%, 2.9%, 1.6%, and 4.7%, respectively. There have been no recurrences or distant metastases. Conclusion: Dose was escalated to the target dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions, with the occurrence of only 1 dose-limiting toxicity. Patients felt cosmetic results improved within the first year after surgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy. Our results show minimal toxicity with excellent cosmesis; however, further follow-up is warranted in future studies. This study is the first to show the safety, tolerability, feasibility, and cosmesis results of a 5-fraction dose-escalated S-PBI treatment for

  13. Preliminary Results of a Phase 1 Dose-Escalation Trial for Early-Stage Breast Cancer Using 5-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Partial-Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Asal, E-mail: asal.rahimi@utsouthwestern.edu [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Thomas, Kimberly; Spangler, Ann [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Rao, Roshni; Leitch, Marilyn; Wooldridge, Rachel; Rivers, Aeisha [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Seiler, Stephen [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Albuquerque, Kevin; Stevenson, Stella [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Goudreau, Sally [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Garwood, Dan [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Haley, Barbara [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Euhus, David [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Heinzerling, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Levine Cancer Institute, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Ding, Chuxiong [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Gao, Ang; Ahn, Chul [Department of Statistics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Timmerman, Robert [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability of a dose-escalated 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy for partial-breast irradiation (S-PBI) in treating early-stage breast cancer after partial mastectomy; the primary objective was to escalate dose utilizing a robotic stereotactic radiation system treating the lumpectomy cavity without exceeding the maximum tolerated dose. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive nonlobular epithelial histologies and stage 0, I, or II, with tumor size <3 cm. Patients and physicians completed baseline and subsequent cosmesis outcome questionnaires. Starting dose was 30 Gy in 5 fractions and was escalated by 2.5 Gy total for each cohort to 40 Gy. Results: In all, 75 patients were enrolled, with a median age of 62 years. Median follow-up for 5 cohorts was 49.9, 42.5, 25.7, 20.3, and 13.5 months, respectively. Only 3 grade 3 toxicities were experienced. There was 1 dose-limiting toxicity in the overall cohort. Ten patients experienced palpable fat necrosis (4 of which were symptomatic). Physicians scored cosmesis as excellent or good in 95.9%, 100%, 96.7%, and 100% at baseline and 6, 12, and 24 months after S-PBI, whereas patients scored the same periods as 86.5%, 97.1%, 95.1%, and 95.3%, respectively. The disagreement rates between MDs and patients during those periods were 9.4%, 2.9%, 1.6%, and 4.7%, respectively. There have been no recurrences or distant metastases. Conclusion: Dose was escalated to the target dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions, with the occurrence of only 1 dose-limiting toxicity. Patients felt cosmetic results improved within the first year after surgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy. Our results show minimal toxicity with excellent cosmesis; however, further follow-up is warranted in future studies. This study is the first to show the safety, tolerability, feasibility, and cosmesis results of a 5-fraction dose-escalated S-PBI treatment for

  14. Estimation of dependence between mean of fractionation of photons and neutrons dose and intensity of post-irradiation reaction of mouse large intestine; Ocena zaleznosci pomiedzy sposobem frakcjonowania dawki fotonow i neutronow a nasileniem popromiennego odczynu jelita grubego myszy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasinska, A. [Oncology Center, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The aim of the work was verification of mouse large intestine tolerance on fractionated 250 kV X-rays and 2.3 MeV neutrons doses. Two cm of large intestine of mouse CBA/HT strain were irradiated with various fraction doses: from 0.25 to 35 Gy of X-rays and 0.05-12 Gy of neutrons. The measure of injury was handicap of intestine function. Early post-irradiation reaction was measured by loss of body weight (2-3 weeks after irradiation) and mouse mortality (till 2 months after irradiation, LD50/2). The late reaction was measured on the base of maximal body weight in 1 year period after irradiation, deformation of excrements (after 10 months) and death of animals (till 12. month after irradiation, LD50/12). Fractionation of X-ray dose influenced on decrease of intensification of late irradiation effects. After fractionation of neutrons this effect has not been observed. {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for X-rays was 19.9 Gy [15.2; 27.0] for body weight nadir, 13.4 Gy [9.3; 19.5] for early mortality (LD50/2), 6.4 Gy [3.6;11.0] for maximal body weight and 6.9 [4.2; 10.8] for late mortality (LD50/12). Analysis of influence of low doses of photons 90.25-4 Gy) and neutrons (0.05-0.8 Gy) showed trend to reduction {alpha}/{beta} for photons only (LD50/2=5.4 Gy; LD50/12=4.6 Gy). {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for neutrons was defined by LQ model only for maximal body weight and was 19.9 Gy [9.5; 61.0]. In application of graphic method {alpha}/{beta} for neutrons was 230 Gy for early and 48 Gy for late effects. Lower values of {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for late irradiation effects for photon radiation demonstrate the big influence of fractionation of photons dose on large intestine tolerance (decrease intensity in all biological effects). Author did not observe increase of intestine tolerance in fractionation of neutrons dose. Effect of irradiation damages repair in interfraction pauses, measured by percent of regenerated dose (F{sub r}) was much bigger for photons. For X-rays it was 50

  15. Direct biological effects of fractional ultrapulsed CO2 laser irradiation on keratinocytes and fibroblasts in human organotypic full-thickness 3D skin models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, L; Huth, S; Amann, P M; Marquardt, Y; Heise, R; Fietkau, K; Huth, L; Steiner, T; Hölzle, F; Baron, J M

    2018-05-01

    Molecular effects of various ablative and non-ablative laser treatments on human skin cells-especially primary effects on epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts-are not yet fully understood. We present the first study addressing molecular effects of fractional non-sequential ultrapulsed CO 2 laser treatment using a 3D skin model that allows standardized investigations of time-dependent molecular changes ex vivo. While histological examination was performed to assess morphological changes, we utilized gene expression profiling using microarray and qRT-PCR analyses to identify molecular effects of laser treatment. Irradiated models exhibited dose-dependent morphological changes resulting in an almost complete recovery of the epidermis 5 days after irradiation. On day 5 after laser injury with a laser fluence of 100 mJ/cm 2 , gene array analysis identified an upregulation of genes associated with tissue remodeling and wound healing (e.g., COL12A1 and FGF7), genes that are involved in the immune response (e.g., CXCL12 and CCL8) as well as members of the heat shock protein family (e.g., HSPB3). On the other hand, we detected a downregulation of matrix metalloproteinases (e.g., MMP3), differentiation markers (e.g., LOR and S100A7), and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1α.Overall, our findings substantiate the understanding of time-dependent molecular changes after CO 2 laser treatment. The utilized 3D skin model system proved to be a reliable, accurate, and reproducible tool to explore the effects of various laser settings both on skin morphology and gene expression during wound healing.

  16. In vivo assessment of the gastric mucosal tolerance dose after single fraction, small volume irradiation of liver malignancies by computed tomography-guided, high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streitparth, Florian; Pech, Maciej; Boehmig, Michael; Ruehl, Ricarda; Peters, Nils; Wieners, Gero; Steinberg, Johannes; Lopez-Haenninen, Enrique; Felix, Roland; Wust, Peter; Ricke, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the tolerance dose of gastric mucosa for single-fraction computed tomography (CT)-guided, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of liver malignancies. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 patients treated by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy of liver malignancies in segments II and/or III were included. Dose planning was performed upon a three-dimensional CT data set acquired after percutaneous applicator positioning. All patients received gastric protection post-treatment. For further analysis, the contours of the gastric wall were defined in every CT slice using Brachyvision Software. Dose-volume histograms were calculated for each treatment and correlated with clinical data derived from questionnaires assessing Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). All patients presenting symptoms of upper GI toxicity were examined endoscopically. Results: Summarizing all patients the minimum dose applied to 1 ml of the gastric wall (D 1ml ) ranged from 6.3 to 34.2 Gy; median, 14.3 Gy. Toxicity was present in 18 patients (55%). We found nausea in 16 (69%), emesis in 9 (27%), cramping in 13 (39%), weight loss in 12 (36%), gastritis in 4 (12%), and ulceration in 5 patients (15%). We found a threshold dose D 1ml of 11 Gy for general gastric toxicity and 15.5 Gy for gastric ulceration verified by an univariate analysis (p = 0.01). Conclusions: For a single fraction, small volume irradiation we found in the upper abdomen a threshold dose D 1ml of 15.5 Gy for the clinical endpoint ulceration of the gastric mucosa. This in vivo assessment is in accordance with previously published tolerance data

  17. Reproductive death and population kinetics in survival fractions of in vitro hamster cells during 48 hours after X-irradiation with doses up to 800 Rds. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, G.

    1976-01-01

    By means of a quantitative analysis, the time dependency of the number of dead cells and the resulting statement of cell numbers are compared with colony survival curves and with the distribution of colony sizes. The obtained periodical variation of reproductively killed cells is analyzed through population kinetics and is reduced to the number of those among the irradiated cells which show radiation-induced lethal reproductive damage. Therefrom, together with both sorts of interphase-dead cells, the dose dependency of the three lethal fractions results, taking into consideration the quantitative cellular statement. The formation of maxima of reproductively killed cells at the intervals of generation time until F 3 -generation is explained by an autosynchronization of partly lethally injured cell populations. From colony size distributions a linear dose dependency of the mean colony size group can be derived; this is discussed in connection with DNA double strand breaks regarded as a possible cause of reproductive lethal damages. The data obtained concerning the development of a cell population with radiation damages are evaluated by the construction of phylogenetic schedules for every 300 rd and 500 rd. By this means, the underlying population kinetics is being revised quantitatively. (orig.) [de

  18. Fractionated or single-dose total body irradiation in 171 acute myeloblastic leukemias in first complete remission: is there a best choice?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resbeut, Michel; Cowen, Didier; Blaise, Didier; Gluckman, Eliane; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Rio, Bernard; Pene, Francoise; Milpied, Nicolas; Cuillere, Jean-Claude; Reiffers, Josy; Richaud, Pierre

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the importance of fractionating total body irradiation (TBI) in patients receiving an allogenic bone marrow transplant (BMT) for an acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1). Methods and Materials: Between 1983 and 1990, 171 consecutive patients received either single dose TBI (STBI) (n = 65) or fractionated TBI (FTBI) (n = 106) after being conditioned with cyclophosphamide and before receiving a non-T-depleted Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA)-identical marrow. Both groups were comparable except for date of BMT and diagnosis-to-BMT interval (D-BMT). Results: After 63 months median follow-up, transplant-related mortality (TRM), probability of relapse, and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) were 0.38 and 0.27 (p = 0.04), 0.29 and 0.26 (p = 0.22), 0.43 and 0.56 (p = 0.06), respectively, for STBI and FTBI. The supposed influence of the schedule of TBI disappeared in the multivariate analysis: TRM was enhanced by severe acute graft vs. host disease (p = 0.0002), early years of transplant (before January 1, 1987) (p = 0.0003), and longer D-BMT intervals (p = 0.038). Relapse was linked to early years of transplant (p < 0.00001), and the absence of chronic GVHD (p = 0.007). Longer DFSs were observed for later years of transplant (after January 1, 1987 and later) (p = 0.001), milder acute GVHD (p = 0.005), and shorter D-BMT intervals (p = 0.045). Important improvements of the results were made during the 7-year observation period: TRM, probability of relapse, and DFS were, respectively, 0.36, 0.28, and 0.46 for patients transplanted before January 1, 1987 vs. 0.21, 0.15, and 0.67 after that date. Conclusion: Our data strongly suggest that allogenic BMT is the best postremission treatment for AML in CR1, and the results are better when BMT shortly follows the achievement of remission. The schedule of TBI was of little importance compared with the improvements made in the management of patients undergoing BMT during the 1980s, and

  19. External Beam Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation Using 32 Gy in 8 Twice-Daily Fractions: 5-Year Results of a Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashtan, Itai M.; Recht, Abram; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Brachtel, Elena; Abi-Raad, Rita F.; D'Alessandro, Helen A.; Levy, Antonin; Wo, Jennifer Y.; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Goldberg, Saveli; Specht, Michelle; Gadd, Michelle; Smith, Barbara L.; Powell, Simon N.; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: External beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an increasingly popular technique for treatment of patients with early stage breast cancer following breast-conserving surgery. Here we present 5-year results of a prospective trial. Methods and Materials: From October 2003 through November 2005, 98 evaluable patients with stage I breast cancer were enrolled in the first dose step (32 Gy delivered in 8 twice-daily fractions) of a prospective, multi-institutional, dose escalation clinical trial of 3-dimensional conformal external beam APBI (3D-APBI). Median age was 61 years; median tumor size was 0.8 cm; 89% of tumors were estrogen receptor positive; 10% had a triple-negative phenotype; and 1% had a HER-2-positive subtype. Median follow-up was 71 months (range, 2-88 months; interquartile range, 64-75 months). Results: Five patients developed ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), for a 5-year actuarial IBTR rate of 5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1%-10%). Three of these cases occurred in patients with triple-negative disease and 2 in non-triple-negative patients, for 5-year actuarial IBTR rates of 33% (95% CI, 0%-57%) and 2% (95% CI, 0%-6%; P<.0001), respectively. On multivariable analysis, triple-negative phenotype was the only predictor of IBTR, with borderline statistical significance after adjusting for tumor grade (P=.0537). Conclusions: Overall outcomes were excellent, particularly for patients with estrogen receptor-positive disease. Patients in this study with triple-negative breast cancer had a significantly higher IBTR rate than patients with other receptor phenotypes when treated with 3D-APBI. Larger, prospective 3D-APBI clinical trials should continue to evaluate the effect of hormone receptor phenotype on IBTR rates.

  20. External Beam Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation Using 32 Gy in 8 Twice-Daily Fractions: 5-Year Results of a Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashtan, Itai M. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Brachtel, Elena [Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Abi-Raad, Rita F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); D' Alessandro, Helen A. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Levy, Antonin; Wo, Jennifer Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hirsch, Ariel E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Goldberg, Saveli [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle; Gadd, Michelle; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: External beam accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is an increasingly popular technique for treatment of patients with early stage breast cancer following breast-conserving surgery. Here we present 5-year results of a prospective trial. Methods and Materials: From October 2003 through November 2005, 98 evaluable patients with stage I breast cancer were enrolled in the first dose step (32 Gy delivered in 8 twice-daily fractions) of a prospective, multi-institutional, dose escalation clinical trial of 3-dimensional conformal external beam APBI (3D-APBI). Median age was 61 years; median tumor size was 0.8 cm; 89% of tumors were estrogen receptor positive; 10% had a triple-negative phenotype; and 1% had a HER-2-positive subtype. Median follow-up was 71 months (range, 2-88 months; interquartile range, 64-75 months). Results: Five patients developed ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR), for a 5-year actuarial IBTR rate of 5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1%-10%). Three of these cases occurred in patients with triple-negative disease and 2 in non-triple-negative patients, for 5-year actuarial IBTR rates of 33% (95% CI, 0%-57%) and 2% (95% CI, 0%-6%; P<.0001), respectively. On multivariable analysis, triple-negative phenotype was the only predictor of IBTR, with borderline statistical significance after adjusting for tumor grade (P=.0537). Conclusions: Overall outcomes were excellent, particularly for patients with estrogen receptor-positive disease. Patients in this study with triple-negative breast cancer had a significantly higher IBTR rate than patients with other receptor phenotypes when treated with 3D-APBI. Larger, prospective 3D-APBI clinical trials should continue to evaluate the effect of hormone receptor phenotype on IBTR rates.

  1. Changes in the Lipid Fraction of Eel Gills after Ionizing Irradiation in Vivo and a Shift from Fresh to Sea Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heinz Johs. Max

    1975-01-01

    Sixteen eels were adapted to tap water for a week. Then eight of them were irradiated with 1000 R γ-radiation and four of the irradiated group and four of the nonirradiated control group were transferred to sea water. The rest remained in tap water. Three days later all were incubated with 14 C...... been irradiated and transferred to sea water. By measuring lipid biosynthesis in gill tissue it was thus possible to show an interaction between the effect of ionizing irradiation and the salinity of the environment, in agreement with previous biological findings....

  2. Optimization of the fractionated irradiation scheme considering physical doses to tumor and organ at risk based on dose–volume histograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugano, Yasutaka [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Mizuta, Masahiro [Laboratory of Advanced Data Science, Information Initiative Center, Hokkaido University, Kita-11, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0811 (Japan); Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Sutherland, Kenneth L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-15, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 (Japan); Date, Hiroyuki, E-mail: date@hs.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy of solid tumors has been performed with various fractionation regimens such as multi- and hypofractionations. However, the ability to optimize the fractionation regimen considering the physical dose distribution remains insufficient. This study aims to optimize the fractionation regimen, in which the authors propose a graphical method for selecting the optimal number of fractions (n) and dose per fraction (d) based on dose–volume histograms for tumor and normal tissues of organs around the tumor. Methods: Modified linear-quadratic models were employed to estimate the radiation effects on the tumor and an organ at risk (OAR), where the repopulation of the tumor cells and the linearity of the dose-response curve in the high dose range of the surviving fraction were considered. The minimization problem for the damage effect on the OAR was solved under the constraint that the radiation effect on the tumor is fixed by a graphical method. Here, the damage effect on the OAR was estimated based on the dose–volume histogram. Results: It was found that the optimization of fractionation scheme incorporating the dose–volume histogram is possible by employing appropriate cell surviving models. The graphical method considering the repopulation of tumor cells and a rectilinear response in the high dose range enables them to derive the optimal number of fractions and dose per fraction. For example, in the treatment of prostate cancer, the optimal fractionation was suggested to lie in the range of 8–32 fractions with a daily dose of 2.2–6.3 Gy. Conclusions: It is possible to optimize the number of fractions and dose per fraction based on the physical dose distribution (i.e., dose–volume histogram) by the graphical method considering the effects on tumor and OARs around the tumor. This method may stipulate a new guideline to optimize the fractionation regimen for physics-guided fractionation.

  3. Different mechanisms for the resistance of C3H and STS strain mice to the development of thymic lymphomas following fractionated whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Shiro; Kamisaku, Hitoko

    1999-01-01

    B10 strain mice are extremely susceptible for induction of thymic lymphomas by fractionated whole-body irradiation (FI), whereas C3H and STS mice are fairly resistant. In the present study, we constructed radiation bone marrow chimeras in the reciprocal donor-host combinations of susceptible and resistant mice with use of Thy1 markers that allow to determine genetic origins of donor- and host-type thymocytes, and then to analyze the influence of host/thymic environment on the strain-dependent susceptibility to thymic lymphomagenesis. B10.Thy1.1→C3H, B10.Thy1.1→STS as well as B10.Thy1.1→B10 bone marrow chimeras manifested a high incidence of thymic lymphomas after FI-treatment, whereas C3H. Thy1.1→B10 and STS→B10 as well as C3H→C3H and STS→STS chimeras manifested a low incidence of thymic lymphoma. Furthermore, FI-treatment of [B10.Thy1.1+C3H]→B10 mixed chimeras resulted in the generation of similar numbers of thymic lymphomas of B10 and C3H origins, whereas FI-treatment of [B10.Thy1.1+STS]→B10 mixed chimeras preferentially induced thymic lymphomas of B10 origin. These results indicated that host environments of C3H and STS resistant mice are not inhibitory for the development of thymic lymphomas, genetic factors responsible for the strain-dependent susceptibility and/or resistance to FI-induced lymphomagenesis exert their effects entirely on bone-marrow derived cells, and the resistance of STS mice to FI-induced thymic lymphomagenesis is an intrinsic property of thymocytes as the targets of thymic lymphoma induction, whereas bone marrow-derived thymic stroma cells seem to play a significant role in the resistance of C3H mice for the induction of thymic lymphomas. (author)

  4. Radiation-Free Weekend Rescued! Continuous Accelerated Irradiation of 7-Days per Week Is Equal to Accelerated Fractionation With Concomitant Boost of 7 Fractions in 5-Days per Week: Report on Phase 3 Clinical Trial in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skladowski, Krzysztof, E-mail: skladowski@io.gliwice.pl [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and the Institute of Oncology, Branch in Gliwice (Poland); Hutnik, Marcin; Wygoda, Andrzej; Golen, Maria; Pilecki, Boleslaw; Przeorek, Wieslawa; Rutkowski, Tomasz; Lukaszczyk-Widel, Beata; Heyda, Alicja; Suwinski, Rafal; Tarnawski, Rafal; Maciejewski, Boguslaw [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and the Institute of Oncology, Branch in Gliwice (Poland)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results of randomized trial comparing 2 accelerated fractionations of definitive radiation therapy assessing the need to irradiate during weekend in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 345 patients with SCC of the oral cavity, larynx, and oro- or hypo-pharynx, stage T2-4N0-1M0, were randomized to receive continuous accelerated irradiation (CAIR: once per day, 7 days per week) or concomitant accelerated boost (CB: once per day, 3 days per week, and twice per day, 2 days per week). Total dose ranged from 66.6-72 Gy, dose per fraction was 1.8 Gy, number of fractions ranged from 37-40 fractions, and overall treatment time ranged from 37-40 days. Results: No differences for all trial end-points were noted. At 5 and 10 years, the actuarial rates of local-regional control were 63% and 60% for CAIR vs 65% and 60% for CB, and the corresponding overall survival were 40% and 25% vs 44% and 25%, respectively. Confluent mucositis was the main acute toxicity, with an incidence of 89% in CAIR and 86% in CB patients. The 5-year rate of grade 3-4 late radiation morbidity was 6% for both regimens. Conclusions: Results of this trial indicate that the effects of accelerated fractionation can be achieve by delivering twice-per-day irradiation on weekday(s). This trial has also confirmed that an accelerated, 6-weeks schedule is a reasonable option for patients with intermediate-stage head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma because of the associated high cure rate and minimal severe late toxicity.

  5. Impact of adjuvant inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases on tumor growth delay and local tumor control after fractionated irradiation in human squamous cell carcinomas in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zips, Daniel; Hessel, Franziska; Krause, Mechthild; Schiefer, Yvonne; Hoinkis, Cordelia; Thames, Howard D.; Haberey, Martin; Baumann, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Previous experiments have shown that adjuvant inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor after fractionated irradiation prolonged tumor growth delay and may also improve local tumor control. To test the latter hypothesis, local tumor control experiments were performed. Methods and materials: Human FaDu and UT-SCC-14 squamous cell carcinomas were studied in nude mice. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 (50 mg/kg body weight b.i.d.) was administered for 75 days after irradiation with 30 fractions within 6 weeks. Tumor growth time and tumor control dose 50% (TCD 50 ) were determined and compared to controls (carrier without PTK787/ZK222584). Results: Adjuvant administration of PTK787/ZK222584 significantly prolonged tumor growth time to reach 5 times the volume at start of drug treatment by an average of 11 days (95% confidence interval 0.06;22) in FaDu tumors and 29 days (0.6;58) in UT-SCC-14 tumors. In both tumor models, TCD 50 values were not statistically significantly different between the groups treated with PTK787/ZK222584 compared to controls. Conclusions: Long-term inhibition of angiogenesis after radiotherapy significantly reduced the growth rate of local recurrences but did not improve local tumor control. This indicates that recurrences after irradiation depend on vascular endothelial growth factor-driven angiogenesis, but surviving tumor cells retain their clonogenic potential during adjuvant antiangiogenic treatment with PTK787/ZK222584

  6. Comparison of hypo-fractional irradiation protocols used in the treatment of prostate cancer by external radiotherapy; Porovnanie hypofrakcionacnych ozarovacich protokolov pouzivanych v liecbe karcinomu prostaty pomocou externej radioterapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petruskova, B. [Univerzita Pavla Jozefa Safarika, Ustav fyzikalnych vied, Katedra jadrovej a subjadrovej fyziky, 04001 Kosice (Slovakia); Matula, P.; Koncik, J.; Jasencak, M. [Vychodoslovensky onkologicky ustav, a.s., 04001 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2013-04-16

    The main aim of this study is to compare two hypo-fractionated protocols used in the radiotherapy of prostate cancer in terms of late complications in normal tissue. 50 patients in first protocol were irradiated with the dose of 52,8 Gy in 16 fractions. 52 patients included in the second protocol were irradiated with the dose of 62 Gy in 20 fractions. Protocols were compared through dose-volume histograms (DVH) of rectum and bladder and radiobiological calculations with the use of Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model for Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP). Results of NTCP were compared with real incidence of late toxicity for normal tissue. DVH of rectum and bladder for patients from second protocol have a better behavior then DVHs for patients from first protocol. NTCPs for first protocol are (12,5{+-}3,3)% and (1,6{+-}1,3)% for rectum and bladder, respectively. NTCPs for second protocol are (6,8{+-}3,0)% and (0,53{+-}0,9)% for rectum and bladder, respectively. From comparison of results of radiobiological calculations and real incidence had arisen a need of refinement of parameters of LKB model. (authors)

  7. Changes in the lipid fraction of eel gills after ionizing irradiation in vivo and a shift from fresh to sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, H.J.M.

    1975-01-01

    Sixteen eels were adapted to tap water for a week. Then eight of them were irradiated with 1000 R γ radiation and four of the irradiated group and four of the nonirradiated control group were transferred to seawater. The rest remained in tap water. Three days later all were incubated with 14 C-labeled acetate and 32 P-labeled phosphate added to the water in the aquariums. Lipids from the gills were separated by tlc and the individual fatty acids were assayed by paper chromatography. Results showed an enhanced incorporation of 14 C activity into sterol esters in seawater. This was further intensified by γ irradiation. Similarly, γ irradiation intensified a relatively enhanced incorporation in seawater of 32 P activity into lecithin, and there was a relatively increased synthesis of certain 14 C-labeled unsaturated fatty acids (mainly C 16 : 1 ) in the gills of animals that had both been irradiated and transferred to seawater. By measuring lipid biosynthesis in gill tissue it was thus possible to show an interaction between the effect of ionizing irradiation and the salinity of the environment, in agreement with previous biological findings. (U.S.)

  8. Results of high intensity afterloading irradiation with 192 iridium in the therapy of genital tumors in women under different dose rates, fractionations and total doses in comparison with conventional radium contact irradiation. Ergebnisse der High-Intensity-Afterloadingbestrahlung mit 192 Iridium in der Therapie von Genitaltumoren der Frau unter verschiedenen Dosisleistungen, Fraktionierungen und Gesamtdosen im Vergleich mit konventioneller Radiumkontaktbestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giers, G

    1986-05-07

    In comparison to conventional radium therapy are to be evaluated the results of the high intensity afterloading technique with the help of the parameters survial rate and complication rate. Thereby were included in the examination 4 documentations of results (collum, cervix stump, corpus and vaginal carcinoma) with altogether 742 patients with 2806 single irradiations and an evaluation of the therapy after several modifications of the therapy schemes. The 5-year survival rate was in the case of collum carcinoma: 68.4%, cervix stump: 50%, corpus carcinoma: 76%, and vaginal carcinoma: 66.6%. The corresponding 3-year survival rates were: 74.2%, 80%, 84% and 70% with primary irradiation. Only with cervix stump carcinoma were the values for post-operative irradiation. The description of the irradiation results showed, that with the changing of the fractionation mode and the dose level in collum and corpus carcinoma the irreversible complications as an expression of the success of a new therapy were reduced. The for now best suited therapy schema (fractionation and dosing) are described. (TRV).

  9. Dose-rate effects in synchronous mammalian cells in culture. II. A comparison of the life cycle of HeLa cells during continuous irradiation or multiple-dose fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.B.; Bedford, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    The life cycle of synchronized S3 HeLa cells was examined during continuous irradiation at a dose rate of approximately 37 rad/hr and during multiple dose fractionation schedules of the same average dose rate (total dose / overall time = average dose rate). For all regimes given at this dose rate the effects on the life cyclee were similar. Cells progressed through G1 and S without appreciable delay and experienced a minimum G2 delay of about 10 hr. Cells eventually entered mitosis but virtually none were able to complete a successful division

  10. Pimonidazole labelling and response to fractionated irradiation of five human squamous cell carcinoma (hSCC) lines in nude mice: The need for a multivariate approach in biomarker studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaromina, Ala; Zips, Daniel; Thames, Howard D.; Eicheler, Wolfgang; Krause, Mechthild; Rosner, Andrea; Haase, Michael; Petersen, Cordula; Raleigh, James A.; Quennet, Verena; Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang; Baumann, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence on local control after fractionated radiotherapy of hypoxia measured in unirradiated tumours using the hypoxic marker Pimonidazole, using multivariate approaches. Material and methods: Five human squamous cell carcinoma lines (FaDu, UT-SCC-15, UT-SCC-14, XF354, and UT-SCC-5) were transplanted subcutaneously into the right hind-leg of NMRI nude mice. Histological material was collected from 60 unirradiated tumours after injection of Pimonidazole. The relative hypoxic area within the viable tumour area (Pimonidazole hypoxic fraction, pHF) was determined in seven serial 10 μm cross-sections per tumour by fluorescence microscopy and computerized image analysis. Local tumour control was evaluated in a total of 399 irradiated tumours at 120 days after 30 fractions given within 6 weeks with total doses between 30 and 115 Gy. Results: Tumour lines showed pronounced heterogeneity in both pHF and TCD 5 . Mean pHF values varied between 5% and 37%, TCD 5 values between 47 and 130 Gy. A Cox Proportional Hazards model of time to recurrence with two covariates, dose and pHF, yielded significant contributions of both parameters on local control (p < 0.005) but violated the proportional hazards assumption, suggesting that other factors also influence tumour control. Introduction of histological grade as an example of a confounding factor into the model improved the fit significantly. Local control rates decreased with increasing pHF and this effect was more pronounced at higher doses. Conclusions: This study confirms that tumour hypoxia measured using Pimonidazole in untreated tumours is a significant determinant of local control after fractionated irradiation. The data support the use of multivariate approaches for the evaluation of a single prognostic biomarker such as Pimonidazole, and more generally, suggest that they are required to establish accurate prognostic factors for tumour response

  11. Evaluation of the efficacy of palliative irradiation with high fractionated doses and planned intervals of patients with advanced cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx. Ocena skutecznosci paliatywnego napromieniania wysokimi dawkami frakcyjnymi z planowanymi przerwami chorych na zaawansowanego raka jamy ustnej i gardla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skolyszewski, J; Reinfuss, M [Instytut Onkologii, Cracow (Poland)

    1988-01-01

    200 patients, previously not treated, with advanced highly differentiated cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx have been palliatively irradiated in the Oncology Center in Cracow in the years 1976-1985. Megavoltage irradiation with fractionated doses 4-5 Gy up to the dose of 20 Gy to the tumor with 4-5 fractions during 4-7 days has been applied. 64 patients received 20 Gy as simple dose, in 65 cases such dose has been repeated after month. 71 patients have been irradiated for the third time with similar dose after another 1 month interval. Partial regression of 25-50% of the tumor volume has been obtained after the first series of irradiation in 19% of patients and more than 50% in 28% of patients, complete regression in 4% of patients. 15,5% of the total number of patients survived 1 year since the initiation of the irradiation, 5% without symptoms of the neoplasm. Worse prognosis is connected with major advancement of the tumor (T{sub 4}, N{sub 2}), poor general condition, cachexia and alcohol addition. Absence of improvement after the first series of irradiations indicates the non-effectiveness of the treatment. Palliative treatment by irradiation with high fractionated doses and planned interval is a safe and efficacious method. 1 fig., 6 tabs., 14 refs. (author).

  12. Action of fractionated X-irradiation, continuous and a combination of continuous and acute (Co60) γ-irradiation on the catechol-amine content of the cardiac muscle of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpovich, N.V.

    1976-01-01

    Changes in the catechol amine content of the cardiac muscle of white rats have been studied in the course and after the exposure to low-dose X- and gamma radiation. The data obtained show that the changes in the catechol amine content depend not merely on the cumulative dose of the ionizing radiation but also on its type and the time that has passed after irradiation

  13. Resistance to mycobacteria in mice treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and in mice reconstituted with allogeneic bone marrow cells following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mor, N.; Lutsky, I.; Weiss, L.; Morecki, S.; Slavin, S.

    1985-01-01

    The increased clinical use of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) as an immunosuppressive adjunct in transplantation suggested the need for determining the effects of TLI on the in vivo susceptibility of animals to infections controlled by cell-mediated immunity. TLI-treated, TLI-treated and splenectomized, and chimeric mice prepared with TLI were inoculated in the hind foot pad with Mycobacterium marinum or Mycobacterium leprae. Although M. marinum organisms multiplied in greater numbers in the TLI mice, ultimately they were destroyed as effectively in TLI mice as in the non-irradiated control mice. M. leprae multiplied at the same rate and to the same maximum in TLI mice as in controls. Mice previously challenged with M. marinum in one hind foot pad, and challenged subsequently with the same organism in the opposite hind foot pad, showed a solid immunity against this reinfection. It appears that upon recovery from the immediate effects of radiotherapy TLI-treated mice are able to mount an effective immune response to experimental infection with M. marinum and M. leprae

  14. Resistance to mycobacteria in mice treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and in mice reconstituted with allogeneic bone marrow cells following radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mor, N.; Lutsky, I.; Weiss, L.; Morecki, S.; Slavin, S.

    1985-01-01

    The increased clinical use of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) as an immunosuppressive adjunct in transplantation suggested the need for determining the effects of TLI on the in vivo susceptibility of animals to infections controlled by cell-mediated immunity. TLI-treated, TLI-treated and splenectomized, and chimeric mice prepared with TLI were inoculated in the hind foot pad with Mycobacterium marinum or Mycobacterium leprae. Although M. marinum organisms multiplied in greater numbers in the TLI mice, ultimately they were destroyed as effectively in TLI mice as in the non-irradiated control mice. M. leprae multiplied at the same rate and to the same maximum in TLI mice as in controls. Mice previously challenged with M. marinum in one hind foot pad, and challenged subsequently with the same organism in the opposite hind foot pad, showed a solid immunity against this reinfection. It appears that upon recovery from the immediate effects of radiotherapy TLI-treated mice are able to mount an effective immune response to experimental infection with M. marinum and M. leprae.

  15. Analysis of the dose-response relationships of chromosomal aberrations after irradiation and bleomycin exposure of different human lymphocyte fractions in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresp, J.

    1979-01-01

    Cytogenetic analyses could be carried out on whole blood and pure T-cell cultures and also on cells of the 'buffy-coat'. In pure B-cell cultures even after 96 hours no mitogenic stimulation could be achieved. Parameters of radiosensitivity and bleomycin sensitivity were dicentric chromosomes, for which the dose-response relationships were calculated. Chromosomal investigations on the 'buffy-coat' cells did not provide indications referring to a varying radiosensitivity compared to whole blood cultures. In pure T-cell cultures T-lymphocytes, which had been separated after whole blood irradiation exposure, showed lower aberration rates than lymphocytes, which had been cultured after whole blood irradiation without previous separation. In the case of bleomycin exposure the treatment of previously separated leucocytes and T-lymphocytes respectively, led to lower aberration rates than the treatment before separation. Therefore it is apparently not necessary for a cytogenetic dosimetry or mutagenicity to depart from the whole blood culture method. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Optimal timing and frequency of bone marrow soup therapy for functional restoration of salivary glands injured by single-dose or fractionated irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Dongdong; Shang, Sixia; Liu, Younan; Bakkar, Mohammed; Sumita, Yoshinori; Seuntjens, Jan; Tran, Simon D

    2018-02-01

    Injections of bone marrow (BM) cell extract, known as 'BM soup', were previously reported to mitigate ionizing radiation (IR) injury to salivary glands (SGs). However, the optimal starting time and frequency to maintain BM soup therapeutic efficacy remains unknown. This study tested the optimal starting time and frequency of BM soup injections in mice radiated with either a single dose or a fractionated dose. First, BM soup treatment was started at 1, 3 or 7 weeks post-IR; positive (non-IR) and negative (IR) control mice received injections of saline (vehicle control). Second, BM soup-treated mice received injections at different frequencies (1, 2, 3 and 5 weekly injections). Third, a 'fractionated-dose radiation' model to injure mouse SGs was developed (5 Gy × 5 days) and compared with the single high dose radiation model. All mice (n = 65) were followed for 16 weeks post-IR. The results showed that starting injections of BM soup between 1 and 3 weeks mitigated the effect of IR-induced injury to SGs and improved the restoration of salivary function. Although the therapeutic effect of BM soup lessens after 8 weeks, it can be sustained by increasing the frequency of weekly injections. Moreover, both single-dose and fractionated-dose radiation models are efficient and comparable in inducing SG injury and BM soup treatments are effective in restoring salivary function in both radiation models. In conclusion, starting injections of BM soup within 3 weeks post-radiation, with 5 weekly injections, maintains 90-100% of saliva flow in radiated mice. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Fractionated irradiation of H69 small-cell lung cancer cells causes stable radiation and drug resistance with increased MRP1, MRP2, and topoisomerase IIα expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henness, Sheridan; Davey, Mary W.; Harvie, Rozelle M.; Davey, Ross A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: After standard treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) often develops resistance to both treatments. Our aims were to establish if fractionated radiation treatment alone would induce radiation and drug resistance in the H69 SCLC cell line, and to determine the mechanisms of resistance. Methods and Materials: H69 SCLC cells were treated with fractionated X-rays to an accumulated dose of 37.5 Gy over 8 months to produce the H69/R38 subline. Drug and radiation resistance was determined using the MTT (3,-4,5 dimethylthiazol-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide) cell viability assay. Protein expression was analyzed by Western blot. Results: The H69/R38 subline was resistant to radiation (2.0 ± 0.2-fold, p<0.0001), cisplatin (14 ± 7-fold, p < 0.001), daunorubicin (6 ± 3-fold, p<0.05), and navelbine (1.7 ± 0.15-fold, p<0.02). This was associated with increased expression of the multidrug resistance-associated proteins, MRP1 and MRP2, and topoisomerase IIα and decreased expression of glutathione-S-transferase π (GSTπ) and bcl-2 and decreased cisplatin accumulation. Treatment with 4 Gy of X-rays produced a 66% decrease in MRP2 in the H69 cells with no change in the H69/R38 cells. This treatment also caused a 5-fold increase in topoisomerase IIα in the H69/R38 cells compared with a 1.5-fold increase in the H69 cells. Conclusions: Fractionated radiation alone can lead to the development of stable radiation and drug resistance and an altered response to radiation in SCLC cells

  18. FRACTIONAL BANKING

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Klimikova

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the reasons of the present financial problems lies In understanding the substance of fractional reserve banking. The substance of fractional banking is in lending more money than the bankers have. Banking of partial reserves is an alternative form which links deposit banking and credit banking. Fractional banking is causing many unfavorable economic impacts in the worldwide system, specifically an inflation.

  19. Fractional thermoelasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Povstenko, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to fractional thermoelasticity, i.e. thermoelasticity based on the heat conduction equation with differential operators of fractional order. Readers will discover how time-fractional differential operators describe memory effects and space-fractional differential operators deal with the long-range interaction. Fractional calculus, generalized Fourier law, axisymmetric and central symmetric problems and many relevant equations are featured in the book. The latest developments in the field are included and the reader is brought up to date with current research.  The book contains a large number of figures, to show the characteristic features of temperature and stress distributions and to represent the whole spectrum of order of fractional operators.  This work presents a picture of the state-of-the-art of fractional thermoelasticity and is suitable for specialists in applied mathematics, physics, geophysics, elasticity, thermoelasticity and engineering sciences. Corresponding sections of ...

  20. Identification of irradiated chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelberg, A.; Heide, L.; Boegl, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    Frozen chicken and chicken parts were irradiated at a dose of 5 kGy with Co-60. The irradiated chicken and chicken parts were identified by determination of three radiation-induced hydrocarbons from the lipid fraction. Isolation was carried out by high-vacuum distillation with a cold-finger apparatus. The detection of the hydrocarbons was possible in all irradiated samples by gaschromatography/mass spectrometry. (orig.) [de

  1. Topical or systemic 16,16 dm prostaglandin E2 or WR-2721 (WR-1065) protects mice from alopecia after fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, L.; Malkinson, F.D.; Hanson, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies in mice demonstrated that systemic or topical 16,16 dm PGE 2 protected against single dose radiation-induced hair loss. The authors have now investigated prostaglandin, or WR-2721, protection against murine alopecia produced by varying doses and schedules of fractionated radiation. In some studies with the radioprotectors given systematically, WR-2721 afforded slightly greater radioprotection than 16,16 dm PGE 2 . The two compounds were essentially equally radioprotective in the topical application studies. Since both systemic and topical applications of the agents tested enhanced hair regrowth following radiation, the authors conclude that clinical use of these compounds may provide some protection of hair follicles, and perhaps other tissues, lying within a radiation therapy field. (author)

  2. Topical or systemic 16,16 dm prostaglandin E sub 2 or WR-2721 (WR-1065) protects mice from alopecia after fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, L.; Malkinson, F.D. (Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke' s Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)); Hanson, W.R. (Hines VA Medical Center, IL (United States))

    1992-04-01

    Previous studies in mice demonstrated that systemic or topical 16,16 dm PGE{sub 2} protected against single dose radiation-induced hair loss. The authors have now investigated prostaglandin, or WR-2721, protection against murine alopecia produced by varying doses and schedules of fractionated radiation. In some studies with the radioprotectors given systematically, WR-2721 afforded slightly greater radioprotection than 16,16 dm PGE{sub 2}. The two compounds were essentially equally radioprotective in the topical application studies. Since both systemic and topical applications of the agents tested enhanced hair regrowth following radiation, the authors conclude that clinical use of these compounds may provide some protection of hair follicles, and perhaps other tissues, lying within a radiation therapy field. (author).

  3. Experimental radiotherapy of the R1H rhabdomyosarcoma of the rat: combined use of interstitial iodine-125-brachytherapy and fractionated X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, D.

    1995-01-01

    The study described here investigated into the therapeutic effects that split-dose x-radiation combined with interstitial iodine-125 brachytherapy would have on two different lines of the R1H rhabdomyosarcoma of the rat. The following parameters were examined: local tumour control rate; growth delay; net growth delay; position, movement and loss of seeds; tumour shape. The following results were obtained: The local tumour control rate for tumours externally treated with two seeds was by 42 Gy higher than that determined for the group treated with external irradiation alone. A procedure was developed to calculate the most appropriate distance for the seeds on the basis of tumour axes and volumes. The relationship between growth delay and mean maximum distance of the seed from the tumour margin could be ascertained on a quantitative basis. The influence of the tumour shape on the result of treatment was confirmed. Although the seeds were still active at the time of recidivation and treatment was not yet terminated, it was possible to show that the tumour bed effect, which tends to distort the growth delay calculations and may even occur in externally treated seed animals, could largely be avoided in the evaluation of this study. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Radioprotective effect against gamma-irradiation of methylene blue in the rat with reference to serum enzymes and pancreatic protein fractions examined by isoelectric focussing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, S O; Nam, S Y [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea). Dept. of Biology

    1975-12-01

    The Sprague-Dawley male rats were given 360 rads of single whole-body gamma-irradiation following an intraperitoneal injection of methylene blue (40 mg/kg). Serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), serum amylase, serum lipase, and serum lecithinase A activities, and isoelectric focussing pattern of pancreatic juice proteins were determined at various time intervals after exposure. Methylene blue reduced generally the rise of SGOT, sGPT, amylase, and lipase activities. Methylene blue delayed also the serum lecithinase A fall after exposure. Mean number of protein bands as revealed by isoelectric focussing of pancreatic juice were significantly altered in both the control and the methylene blue-treated group after exposure. Especially methylene blue-treated group showed a marked delay in the decrease in number of protein bands after exposure. The possibility of using the SGOT, the SGPT, the serum amylase, the serum lipase, and the serum lecithinase A levels, and the number of protein bands in isoelectric focussing pattern of pancreatic juice as an early index of radiation injury is suggested.

  5. Busulfan, cyclophosphamide and fractionated total body irradiation as a conditioning regimen for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in patients with non-lymphocytic hematopoietic malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with the conditioning regimen of 8 mg/kg of busulfan (BUS), 120 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide (CPM) and 10 Gy of total body irradiation (TBI) was evaluated in the patients with non-lymphocytic hematopoietic malignancies. The disease distribution of the 22 patients was as follows; 14 in the standard risk group (SRG), 8 in the high risk group (HRG). SRG included the patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the first complete remission, chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in chronic phase and myelodysplastic syndrome with refractory anemia, while HRG included the patients with refractory AML and CML in blastic phase. The median age of patients was 33 years old (y.o.), and the median observation period was 34.5 months No relapse occurred, but 8 patients (36%) died of various complications. Ail the patients who died of interstitial pneumonitis (4 cases) were 40 y.o. and more. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and chronic GvHD were clinically controllable. The probability of disease-free survival rate at 5 years (5y-DFS) was 50.0% in overall patients. The 5y-DFS was 57.1% in HRG (7 cases), while 54.3% in SRG (13 cases) donated from the HLA identical siblings (20 cases). In these 13 patients in SRG, the 5y-DFS was 100% in patients under 40 y.o. (6 cases), while the probability of disease-free survival rate at 3 years was 68.6% and the 5y-DFS was 0% in patients over 40 y.o. (7 cases). Our data indicate that the conditioning regimen combining BUS, CPM and TBI for allogeneic BMT is promising for the treatment of the patients of HRG and the patients under 40 y.o. in SRG. (author)

  6. Busulfan, cyclophosphamide and fractionated total body irradiation as a conditioning regimen for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in patients with non-lymphocytic hematopoietic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with the conditioning regimen of 8 mg/kg of busulfan (BUS), 120 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide (CPM) and 10 Gy of total body irradiation (TBI) was evaluated in the patients with non-lymphocytic hematopoietic malignancies. The disease distribution of the 22 patients was as follows; 14 in the standard risk group (SRG), 8 in the high risk group (HRG). SRG included the patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the first complete remission, chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in chronic phase and myelodysplastic syndrome with refractory anemia, while HRG included the patients with refractory AML and CML in blastic phase. The median age of patients was 33 years old (y.o.), and the median observation period was 34.5 months No relapse occurred, but 8 patients (36%) died of various complications. Ail the patients who died of interstitial pneumonitis (4 cases) were 40 y.o. and more. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and chronic GvHD were clinically controllable. The probability of disease-free survival rate at 5 years (5y-DFS) was 50.0% in overall patients. The 5y-DFS was 57.1% in HRG (7 cases), while 54.3% in SRG (13 cases) donated from the HLA identical siblings (20 cases). In these 13 patients in SRG, the 5y-DFS was 100% in patients under 40 y.o. (6 cases), while the probability of disease-free survival rate at 3 years was 68.6% and the 5y-DFS was 0% in patients over 40 y.o. (7 cases). Our data indicate that the conditioning regimen combining BUS, CPM and TBI for allogeneic BMT is promising for the treatment of the patients of HRG and the patients under 40 y.o. in SRG. (author)

  7. Effect of treatment in fractionated schedules with the combination of x-irradiation and six cytotoxic drugs on the RIF-1 tumor and normal mouse skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelieveld, P.; Scoles, M.A.; Brown, J.M.; Phil, D.; Kallman, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    RIF-1 tumors, implanted syngeneically in the gastrocnemius muscles of the right hind legs of C3H/Km mice, were treated either with X ray alone, drug alone, or drug and X ray combined. The drugs tested were bleomycin, BCNU, cis-diamminedichloro platinum, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, and actinomycin-D. All drugs were administered either in the maximum tolerated dose or a dose that causes minimal tumor growth delay. Both drugs and X rays were administered either as a single dose or in five daily fractions. In addition to the single modality controls, seven different schedules of combined modalities were tested. Tumors were measured periodically after treatment in order that the day at which each tumor reached 4 times its initial cross-sectional area, i.e., its size at the time of treatment, could be determined. The effect of treatment on tumors was based upon excess growth delay (GD), i.e., T400% (treated)-T400% (untreated control). Treatment effects for the same combined modality schedules were also determined for normal skin, using the early skin reaction as an endpoint. Dose effect factors (DEF) were computed for all combined modality schedules and were based upon calculated radiation dose equivalents. We also calculated supra-additivity ratios, SR/sub I/ and SR/sub II/, therapeutic gain factors and adjusted therapeutic gain factors. The only drugs to produce significant supra-additivity with X rays were cis-Pt and cyclo

  8. Quality of Life in Women Undergoing Breast Irradiation in a Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Evaluating Different Tumor Bed Boost Fractionations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finkel, Morgan A.; Cooper, Benjamin T.; Li, Xiaochun; Fenton-Kerimian, Maria; Goldberg, Judith D.; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To identify differences in breast cancer patient-reported quality of life (QOL) between 2 radiation tumor bed boost dose regimens. Methods and Materials: Four hundred patients with stage 0, I, or II breast cancer who underwent segmental mastectomy with sentinel node biopsy and/or axillary node dissection were treated with either a daily or weekly boost. Patients were treated prone to 40.5 Gy/15 fractions to the whole breast, 5 days per week. Patients were randomized to a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy, or a weekly boost of 2 Gy on Friday. Patients completed 6 validated QOL survey instruments at baseline, last week of treatment (3 weeks), 45-60 days from the completion of radiation treatment, and at 2-year follow-up. Results: There were no statistically significance differences in responses to the 6 QOL instruments between the daily and weekly radiation boost regimens, even after adjustment for important covariates. However, several changes in responses over time occurred in both arms, including worsening functional status, cosmetic status, and breast-specific pain at the end of treatment as compared with before and 45 to 60 days after the conclusion of treatment. Conclusions: Whole-breast, prone intensity modulated radiation has similar outcomes in QOL measures whether given with a daily or weekly boost. This trial has generated the foundation for a current study of weekly versus daily radiation boost in women with early breast cancer in which 3-dimensional conformal radiation is allowed as a prospective stratification factor.

  9. Quality of Life in Women Undergoing Breast Irradiation in a Randomized, Controlled Clinical Trial Evaluating Different Tumor Bed Boost Fractionations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkel, Morgan A.; Cooper, Benjamin T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Li, Xiaochun [Division of Biostatistics, Departments of Population Health and Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Fenton-Kerimian, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Division of Biostatistics, Departments of Population Health and Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: formenti@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To identify differences in breast cancer patient-reported quality of life (QOL) between 2 radiation tumor bed boost dose regimens. Methods and Materials: Four hundred patients with stage 0, I, or II breast cancer who underwent segmental mastectomy with sentinel node biopsy and/or axillary node dissection were treated with either a daily or weekly boost. Patients were treated prone to 40.5 Gy/15 fractions to the whole breast, 5 days per week. Patients were randomized to a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy, or a weekly boost of 2 Gy on Friday. Patients completed 6 validated QOL survey instruments at baseline, last week of treatment (3 weeks), 45-60 days from the completion of radiation treatment, and at 2-year follow-up. Results: There were no statistically significance differences in responses to the 6 QOL instruments between the daily and weekly radiation boost regimens, even after adjustment for important covariates. However, several changes in responses over time occurred in both arms, including worsening functional status, cosmetic status, and breast-specific pain at the end of treatment as compared with before and 45 to 60 days after the conclusion of treatment. Conclusions: Whole-breast, prone intensity modulated radiation has similar outcomes in QOL measures whether given with a daily or weekly boost. This trial has generated the foundation for a current study of weekly versus daily radiation boost in women with early breast cancer in which 3-dimensional conformal radiation is allowed as a prospective stratification factor.

  10. Acceptance Test Data for the AGR-5/6/7 Irradiation Test Fuel Composite Defective IPyC Fraction and Pyrocarbon Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmreich, Grant W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skitt, Darren J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dyer, John A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Schumacher, Austin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Coated particle composite J52R-16-98005 was produced by Babcock and Wilcox Technologies (BWXT) as fuel for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) Program’s AGR-5/6/7 irradiation test in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This composite was comprised of four coated particle fuel batches J52O-16-93165B (26%), 93168B (26%), 93169B (24%), and 93170B (24%), chosen based on the Quality Control (QC) data acquired for each individual candidate AGR-5/6/7 batch. Each batch was coated in a 150-mm-diameter production-scale fluidized-bed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace. Tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coatings were deposited on 425-μm-nominal-diameter spherical kernels from BWXT Lot J52R-16-69317 containing a mixture of 15.5%-enriched uranium carbide and uranium oxide (UCO). The TRISO coatings consisted of four consecutive CVD layers: a ~50% dense carbon buffer layer with 100-μm-nominal thickness, a dense inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layer with 40-μm-nominal thickness, a silicon carbide (SiC) layer with 35-μm-nominal thickness, and a dense outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer with 40-μm-nominal thickness. The TRISO-coated particle batches were sieved to upgrade the particles by removing over-sized and under-sized material, and the upgraded batches were designated by appending the letter A to the end of the batch number (e.g., 93165A). Secondary upgrading by sieving was performed on the A-designated batches to remove particles with missing or very-thin buffer layers that were identified during previous analysis of the individual batches for defective IPyC, as reported in the acceptance test data report for the AGR-5/6/7 production batches [Hunn et al. 2017]. The additionally-upgraded batches were designated by appending the letter B to the end of the batch number (e.g., 93165B).

  11. Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging Finding of Discrepant Fractional Anisotropy Between the Frontal and Parietal Lobes After Whole-Brain Irradiation in Childhood Medulloblastoma Survivors: Reflection of Regional White Matter Radiosensitivity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Deqiang; Kwong, Dora; Chan, Godfrey; Leung, Lucullus; Khong, P.-L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that fractional anisotropy (FA) is more severely reduced in white matter of the frontal lobe compared with the parietal lobe after receiving the same whole-brain irradiation dose in a cohort of childhood medulloblastoma survivors. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two medulloblastoma survivors (15 male, mean [± SD] age = 12.1 ± 4.6 years) and the same number of control subjects (15 male, aged 12.0 ± 4.2 years) were recruited for diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging scans. Using an automated tissue classification method and the Talairach Daemon atlas, FA values of frontal and parietal lobes receiving the same radiation dose, and the ratio between them were quantified and denoted as FFA, PFA, and FA f/p , respectively. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to test for significant differences of FFA, PFA, and FA f/p between medulloblastoma survivors and control subjects. Results: Frontal lobe and parietal lobe white matter FA were found to be significantly less in medulloblastoma survivors compared with control subjects (frontal p = 0.001, parietal p = 0.026). Moreover, these differences were found to be discrepant, with the frontal lobe having a significantly larger difference in FA compared with the parietal lobe. The FA f/p of control and medulloblastoma survivors was 1.110 and 1.082, respectively (p = 0.029). Conclusion: Discrepant FA changes after the same irradiation dose suggest radiosensitivity of the frontal lobe white matter compared with the parietal lobe. Special efforts to address the potentially vulnerable frontal lobe after treatment with whole-brain radiation may be needed so as to balance disease control and treatment-related morbidity

  12. Fractional charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saminadayar, L.

    2001-01-01

    20 years ago fractional charges were imagined to explain values of conductivity in some materials. Recent experiments have proved the existence of charges whose value is the third of the electron charge. This article presents the experimental facts that have led theorists to predict the existence of fractional charges from the motion of quasi-particles in a linear chain of poly-acetylene to the quantum Hall effect. According to the latest theories, fractional charges are neither bosons nor fermions but anyons, they are submitted to an exclusive principle that is less stringent than that for fermions. (A.C.)

  13. Fractional fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackiw, R.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1984-01-01

    The theory of fermion fractionization due to topologically generated fermion ground states is presented. Applications to one-dimensional conductors, to the MIT bag, and to the Hall effect are reviewed. (author)

  14. On the effect of small radiation doses: Desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis and DNA repair of thymus, spleen, and bone marrow cells in the rat after fractionated total body X-ray irradiation. Zur Wirkung kleiner Strahlendosen: Desoxyribonukleinsaeure-(DNA-)Synthese und DNA-Reparatur von Thymus-, Milz- und Knochenmarkszellen der Ratte nach fraktionierter Ganzkoerperroentgenbestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tempel, K.; Ehling, G. (Muenchen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Pharmakologie, Toxikologie und Pharmazie)

    1989-09-01

    After three to seven days following to fractionated total body X-ray irradiation (TBI) (four expositions with doses of 0.3 to 5.0 cGy per fraction at intervals of 24 hours), a maximum 50 percent stimulation of the semiconservative DNA synthesis (SDS) of spleen cells was measured in vitro. This was not dependent of the fact if an acute high-dose (400 and/or 800 cGy) unique irradiation was applied after the fractionated TBI at the moment of stimulation. A significant increase of {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation into the DNA of bone marrow and thymus cells was only found when doses of 1.25 cGy per fraction had been used. After fractionated TBI with doses of {ge}5 cGy per fraction, an increase of DNA synthesis resistant to hydroxyurea ('unprogrammed' DNA synthesis, UDS) was demonstrated in spleen cells. The UV-simulated UDS decreased proportionately. The sedimentation of thymus, spleen, and bone marrow nucleoids in a neutral saccharose gradient gave no evidence of an increased DNA repair capacity after fractionated TBI. Whereas the SDS stimulation by fractionated TBI with small doses can be explained by a modified proliferation behavior of exposed cells, the UDS behavior of spleen cells after considerably higher radiation doses suggests regenerative processes correlated with an increased number of cells resistant to hydroxyurea and cells presenting an UV repair deficiency. These findings can be considered to be a further proof of the assumed immune-stimulating effect of small radiation doses. (orig.).

  15. Mystery Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  16. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  17. Total body irradiation: current indications; L`irradiation corporelle totale: les indications actuelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraud, P.; Danhier, S.; Dubray, B.; Cosset, J.M. [Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France)

    1998-05-01

    The choice of dose and fractionation for total body irradiation is made difficult by the large number of considerations to be taken into account. The outcome of bone marrow transplantation after total body irradiation can be understood in terms of tumor cell killing, engraftment, and normal tissue damage, each of these endpoints being influenced by irradiation-, disease-, transplant-, and patient- related factors. Interpretation of clinical data is further hampered by the overwhelming influence of logistic constraints, the small numbers of randomized studies, and the concomitant variations in total dose and fraction size or dose rate. So far, three cautious conclusions can be drawn in order to tentatively adapt the total body irradiation schedule to clinically-relevant situations. Firstly, the organs at risk for normal tissue damage (lung, liver, lens, kidney) are protected by delivering small doses per fraction at low dose rate. This suggests that, when toxicity is at stake (e.g. in children), fractionated irradiation should be preferred, provided that inter-fraction intervals are long enough. Secondly, fractionated irradiation should be avoided in case of T-cell depleted transplant, given the high risk of graft rejection in this setting. An alternative would be to increase total (or fractional) dose of fractionated total body irradiation, but this approach is likely to induce more normal tissue toxicity. Thirdly, clinical data have shown higher relapse rates in chronic myeloid leukemia after fractionated or low dose rate total body irradiation, suggesting that fractionated irradiation should not be recommended, unless total (or fractional) dose is increased. Total body irradiation-containing regimens, primarily cyclophosphamide / total body irradiation, are either equivalent to or better than the chemotherapy-only regimens, primarily busulfan / cyclophosphamide. Busulfan / cyclophosphamide certainly represents a reasonable alternative, especially in patients who

  18. Influence of the time interval between two daily fractions during fractionated radiotherapy of the R1H-tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck-Bornholdt, H.P.; Kleineidam, M.; Pieconka, A.

    1994-01-01

    Tumors were exposed to irradiation five days per week over six weeks. A standard treatment of 30 fractions, i.e. one fraction per day (200 kVp X-rays) was compared with a hyperfractionated schedule of 60 fractions, i.e. two fractions per day, with time invervals of either one, two, three, five or six hours between the two daily fractions. Compared with standard treatment a significant reduction (p [de

  19. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soothill, R.

    1987-01-01

    The issue of food irradiation has become important in Australia and overseas. This article discusses the results of the Australian Consumers' Association's (ACA) Inquiry into food irradiation, commissioned by the Federal Government. Issues discussed include: what is food irradiation; why irradiate food; how much food is consumer rights; and national regulations

  20. Fractional vector calculus for fractional advection dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Mortensen, Jeff; Wheatcraft, Stephen W.

    2006-07-01

    We develop the basic tools of fractional vector calculus including a fractional derivative version of the gradient, divergence, and curl, and a fractional divergence theorem and Stokes theorem. These basic tools are then applied to provide a physical explanation for the fractional advection-dispersion equation for flow in heterogeneous porous media.

  1. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindqvist, H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is a review of food irradiation and lists plants for food irradiation in the world. Possible applications for irradiation are discussed, and changes induced in food from radiation, nutritional as well as organoleptic, are reviewed. Possible toxicological risks with irradiated food and risks from alternative methods for treatment are also brought up. Ways to analyze weather food has been irradiated or not are presented. 8 refs

  2. Fractional Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskin, Nick

    2002-01-01

    Some properties of the fractional Schroedinger equation are studied. We prove the Hermiticity of the fractional Hamilton operator and establish the parity conservation law for fractional quantum mechanics. As physical applications of the fractional Schroedinger equation we find the energy spectra of a hydrogenlike atom (fractional 'Bohr atom') and of a fractional oscillator in the semiclassical approximation. An equation for the fractional probability current density is developed and discussed. We also discuss the relationships between the fractional and standard Schroedinger equations

  3. Meadow based Fraction Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Bergstra, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of an involutive meadow a precise definition of fractions is formulated and on that basis formal definitions of various classes of fractions are given. The definitions follow the fractions as terms paradigm. That paradigm is compared with two competing paradigms for storytelling on fractions: fractions as values and fractions as pairs.

  4. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenewald, T

    1985-01-01

    Food irradiation has become a matter of topical interest also in the Federal Republic of Germany following applications for exemptions concerning irradiation tests of spices. After risks to human health by irradiation doses up to a level sufficient for product pasteurization were excluded, irradiation now offers a method suitable primarily for the disinfestation of fruit and decontamination of frozen and dried food. Codex Alimentarius standards which refer also to supervision and dosimetry have been established; they should be adopted as national law. However, in the majority of cases where individual countries including EC member-countries so far permitted food irradiation, these standards were not yet used. Approved irradiation technique for industrial use is available. Several industrial food irradiation plants, partly working also on a contractual basis, are already in operation in various countries. Consumer response still is largely unknown; since irradiated food is labelled, consumption of irradiated food will be decided upon by consumers.

  5. Irradiation sequels of retinoblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benk, V.; Habrand, J.L.; Bloch Michel, E.; Soussaline, M.; Sarrazin, D.

    1993-01-01

    From 1975 to 1985, 34 children with a non-metastatic retinoblastoma were irradiated at the Institut Gustave-Roussy. After enucleation, 19 bilateral tumors were irradiated by two lateral opposed fields and 15 unilateral tumors by one lateral and anterior field, in the case of optic nerve being histologically positive. Dose was 45 Gy, 1.8 Gy per fraction. The 10-year-survival rate for unilateral and bilateral retinoblastomas was 79%. Long term sequels were available for 25 patients: 88% retained one functional eye. Three children with bilateral retinoblastomas developed a cataract in the residual eye between 2 and 5 years after irradiation, none with unilateral tumor. Nine patients (36%), seven with unilateral and two with bilateral tumor developed a cosmetical problem that required multiple surgical rehabilitation between 3 and 14 years after irradiation. Nine children (36%), five with unilateral and four with bilateral tumors developed growth hormone deficit between 2 and 8 years after irradiation that required hormone replacement. Their pituitary gland received 22 to 40 Gy. No osteosarcoma occurred in this population. Among long-term sequels, following irradiation for retinoblastoma, cosmetical deformities represent disabling sequels that could justify new approaches in radiotherapy, as protontherapy combined with 3-D-treatment planning

  6. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomotaro; Aoki, Shohei

    1976-01-01

    Definition and significance of food irradiation were described. The details of its development and present state were also described. The effect of the irradiation on Irish potatoes, onions, wiener sausages, kamaboko (boiled fish-paste), and mandarin oranges was evaluated; and healthiness of food irradiation was discussed. Studies of the irradiation equipment for Irish potatoes in a large-sized container, and the silo-typed irradiation equipment for rice and wheat were mentioned. Shihoro RI center in Hokkaido which was put to practical use for the irradiation of Irish potatoes was introduced. The state of permission of food irradiation in foreign countries in 1975 was introduced. As a view of the food irradiation in the future, its utilization for the prevention of epidemics due to imported foods was mentioned. (Serizawa, K.)

  7. Fractional Vector Calculus and Fractional Special Function

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ming-Fan; Ren, Ji-Rong; Zhu, Tao

    2010-01-01

    Fractional vector calculus is discussed in the spherical coordinate framework. A variation of the Legendre equation and fractional Bessel equation are solved by series expansion and numerically. Finally, we generalize the hypergeometric functions.

  8. Gamma irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, G.

    1986-09-01

    Fiability of devices set around reactors depends on material resistance under irradiation noticeably joints, insulators, which belongs to composition of technical, safety or physical incasurement devices. The irradiated fuel elements, during their desactivation in a pool, are an interesting gamma irradiation device to simulate damages created in a nuclear environment. The existing facility at Osiris allows to generate an homogeneous rate dose in an important volume. The control of the element distances to irradiation box allows to control this dose rate [fr

  9. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The article explains what radiation does to food to preserve it. Food irradiation is of economic importance to Canada because Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is the leading world supplier of industrial irradiators. Progress is being made towards changing regulations which have restricted the irradiation of food in the United States and Canada. Examples are given of applications in other countries. Opposition to food irradiation by antinuclear groups is addressed

  10. Energy and food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynjolfsson, A.

    1978-01-01

    The energy used in food systems in the US amounts to about 16.5% of total US energy. An analysis has been made of the energy used in the many steps of the food-irradiation process. It is found that irradiation pasteurization uses only 21kJ/kg and radappertization 157kJ/kg, which is much less than the energy used in the other food processes. A comparison has also been made with other methods of preserving, distributing and preparing the meat for servings. It is found that the food irradiation can save significant amounts of energy. In the case of heat-sterilized and radiation-sterilized meats the largest fraction of the energy is used in the packaging, while in the frozen meats the largest energy consumption is by refrigeration in the distribution channels and in the home. (author)

  11. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, M.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of food irradiation are outlined. The interaction of irradiation with matter is then discussed with special reference to the major constituents of foods. The application of chemical analysis in the evaluation of the wholesomeness of irradiated foods is summarized [af

  12. Effects of irradiation on the vascularity of lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, K; Takegawa, Y; Nagase, M; Akiyama, H [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-06-01

    Effects of irradiation on the intravascular volume of the lung were studied with respect to changes in intravascular volume over a period of time after irradiation, the effect of fractionation of the dose and the influence of the irradiation dose rate. After a single irradiation with 1000 rad or 3000 rad, applied locally to the lung, the intravascular volume decreased significantly in 1 to 3 months after irradiation. The changes in the intravascular volumes of lungs could be lessened by fractionation of the dose or by low dose rate irradiation.

  13. The come-back of hypo fractionation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosset, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Hypo-fractionation (i.e. the use of fewer higher fractional doses than usual) is not a new concept. It had actually been proposed in the early year of Radiotherapy by the German and Austrian specialists. In the seventy's, supported by the - wrong - hypotheses which gave birth to the NSD (Nominal Standard Dose), hypo-fractionation reappears. The consequential increase of late complications which was observed led the radiation oncologists to give up again using large doses per fraction, except for a few specific situations, such as palliative treatments. We are recently facing a new 'come-back' of hypo-fractionation, in particular for breast and prostate cancers. In the case of breast cancer, the aim is clearly to look for more 'convenience' for both the patients and the physicians, proposing shorter irradiation schedules including a lesser number of fractions. Some 'modestly' hypo-fractionated schemes have been proposed and used, without apparently altering the efficacy/toxicity ratio, but these results have been seriously questioned. As for prostate cancer, the situation is different, since in that case new radiobiological data are at the origin of the newly proposed hypo-fractionation schedules. A number of papers actually strongly suggested that the fractionation sensitivity of prostate cancer could be higher than the one of the tissues responsible for late toxicity (i.e the exact opposite of the classical dogma). Based on those data, several hypo-fractionated schemes have been proposed, with a few preliminary results looking similar to the ones obtained by the classical schedules. However, no randomized study is available so far, and a few recent radiobiological data are now questioning the new dogma of the high fractionation sensitivity of prostate cancer. For those two - frequent - cancers, it seems therefore that prudence should prevail before altering classical irradiation schedules which have proven their efficacy, while staying open to new concepts and

  14. Skin and lung reaction to fractionated x iradiation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, S.B.; Hornsey, S.; Hammersmith Hospital, London

    1980-01-01

    The dependence between the summary dose and the number of fractions for lung and skin injuries of mice, are studied. Single irradiation and irradiation consisting of a different number of fractions are applied. Results are estimated in two directions. Fractionated irradiation is compared with single irradiation. In the case of such an approach the assumption that the observed lung and skin injury results from cell death, the correlation between the initial slope of the survival curve and the final slope is about 7:1. The additional dose necessary when doubling the number of fractions is measured. In the first approximation, these results agree with the model of a single-shock multi-target curve and the 3:1 slope ratio. The conclusion is made that the double-component model gives an inadequate description of cell survival curves of both skin and lungs [ru

  15. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macklin, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Queensland Government has given its support the establishment of a food irradiation plant in Queensland. The decision to press ahead with a food irradiation plant is astonishing given that there are two independent inquiries being carried out into food irradiation - a Parliamentary Committee inquiry and an inquiry by the Australian Consumers Association, both of which have still to table their Reports. It is fair to assume from the Queensland Government's response to date, therefore, that the Government will proceed with its food irradiation proposals regardless of the outcomes of the various federal inquiries. The reasons for the Australian Democrats' opposition to food irradiation which are also those of concerned citizens are outlined

  16. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchacek, V.

    1989-01-01

    The ranges of doses used for food irradiation and their effect on the processed foods are outlined. The wholesomeness of irradiated foods is discussed. The present food irradiation technology development in the world is described. A review of the irradiated foods permitted for public consumption, the purposes of food irradiaton, the doses used and a review of the commercial-scale food irradiators are tabulated. The history and the present state of food processing in Czechoslovakia are described. (author). 1 fig., 3 tabs., 13 refs

  17. Irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darrington, Hugh

    1988-06-01

    This special edition of 'Food Manufacture' presents papers on the following aspects of the use of irradiation in the food industry:- 1) an outline view of current technology and its potential. 2) Safety and wholesomeness of irradiated and non-irradiated foods. 3) A review of the known effects of irradiation on packaging. 4) The problems of regulating the use of irradiation and consumer protection against abuse. 5) The detection problem - current procedures. 6) Description of the Gammaster BV plant in Holland. 7) World outline review. 8) Current and future commercial activities in Europe. (U.K.)

  18. Radiobiological arguments for and clinical possibilities of unconventional fractionating rhythms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, T.; Voigtmann, L.

    1986-01-01

    Radiobiological considerations are presented using unconventional fractionating rhythms. The aim of this method is to enlarge the therapeutic dimensions between maximum tumor destruction and most careful treatment of late responding cell systems. These late responding tissues show a very similar dose-time reaction, probably by reason of a causal injury on cells of the capillary endothelium. In linear-quadratic models for the estimation of the parameters of the number of fractions and total treatment period it becomes evident that a careful treatment of late responding tissue can be attained by reduction of the single dose per fraction. Because with partition of a total dose in several fractions at daily irradiation a longer repopulation period is available also for the tumor irradiations are presented, done repeatedly during the day. Accelerated fractionation (same fractionating number in reduced treatment period) are contrasted to hyperfractionation (increased fractionating number within the same total treatment period) and possibilities in application are suggested. (author)

  19. Therapeutic irradiation and brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheline, G.E.; Wara, W.M.; Smith, V.

    1980-01-01

    This is a review and reanalysis of the literature on adverse effects of therapeutic irradiation on the brain. Reactions have been grouped and considered according to time of appearance. The emphasis of the analysis is on delayed reactions, especially those that occur from a few months to several years after irradiation. All dose specifications were converted into equivalent megavoltage rads. The data were analyzed in terms of total dose, overall treatment time and number of treatment fractions. Also discussed were acute radiation reactions, early delayed radiation reactions, somnolence and leukoencephalopathy post-irradiation/chemotherapy and combined effects of radiation and chemotherapy

  20. What next in fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Trends in models for predicting the total dose required to produce tolerable normal-tissue injury can be seen by the progression from the ''cube root law'', through Strandqvist's slope of 0.22, to NSD, TDF and CRE which have separate time and fraction number exponents, to even better approximations now available. The dose-response formulae that can be used to define the effect of fraction size (and number) include (1) the linear quadratic (LQ) model (2) the two-component (TC) multi-target model and (3) repair-misrepair models. The LQ model offers considerable convenience, requires only two parameters to be determined, and emphasizes the difference between late and early normal-tissue dependence on dose per fraction first shown by exponents greater than the NSD slope of 0.24. Exponents of overall time, e.g. Tsup(0.11), yield the wrong shape of time curve, suggesting that most proliferating occurs early, although it really occurs after a delay depending on the turnover time of the tissue. Improved clinical results are being sought by hyperfractionation, accelerated fractionation, or continuous low dose rate irradiation as in interstitial implants. (U.K.)

  1. Fractional quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Laskin, Nick

    2018-01-01

    Fractional quantum mechanics is a recently emerged and rapidly developing field of quantum physics. This is the first monograph on fundamentals and physical applications of fractional quantum mechanics, written by its founder. The fractional Schrödinger equation and the fractional path integral are new fundamental physical concepts introduced and elaborated in the book. The fractional Schrödinger equation is a manifestation of fractional quantum mechanics. The fractional path integral is a new mathematical tool based on integration over Lévy flights. The fractional path integral method enhances the well-known Feynman path integral framework. Related topics covered in the text include time fractional quantum mechanics, fractional statistical mechanics, fractional classical mechanics and the α-stable Lévy random process. The book is well-suited for theorists, pure and applied mathematicians, solid-state physicists, chemists, and others working with the Schrödinger equation, the path integral technique...

  2. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered

  3. Fractional statistics and fractional quantized Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, R.; Wu, Y.S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors suggest that the origin of the odd-denominator rule observed in the fractional quantized Hall effect (FQHE) may lie in fractional statistics which govern quasiparticles in FQHE. A theorem concerning statistics of clusters of quasiparticles implies that fractional statistics do not allow coexistence of a large number of quasiparticles at fillings with an even denominator. Thus, no Hall plateau can be formed at these fillings, regardless of the presence of an energy gap. 15 references

  4. Foodstuff irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Report written on behalf of the Danish Food Institute summarizes national and international rules and developments within food irradiation technology, chemical changes in irradiated foodstuffs, microbiological and health-related aspects of irradiation and finally technological prospects of this conservation form. Food irradiatin has not been hitherto applied in Denmark. Radiation sources and secondary radiation doses in processed food are characterized. Chemical changes due to irradiation are compared to those due to p.ex. food heating. Toxicological and microbiological tests and their results give no unequivocal answer to the problem whether a foodstuff has been irradiated. The most likely application fields in Denmark are for low radiation dosis inhibition of germination, riping delay and insecticide. Medium dosis (1-10 kGy) can reduce bacteria number while high dosis (10-50 kGy) will enable total elimination of microorganisms and viruses. Food irradiation can be acceptable as technological possibility with reservation, that further studies follow. (EG)

  5. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  6. Hemibody irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schen, B.C.; Mella, O.; Dahl, O.

    1992-01-01

    In a large number of cancer patients, extensive skeletal metastases or myelomatosis induce vast suffering, such as intolerable pain and local complications of neoplastic bone destruction. Analgetic drugs frequently do not yield sufficient palliation. Irradiation of local fields often has to be repeated, because of tumour growth outside previously irradiated volumes. Wide field irradiation of the lower or upper half of the body causes significant relief of pain in most patients. Adequate pretreatment handling of patients, method of irradiation, and follow-up are of importance to reduce side effects, and are described as they are carried out at the Department of Oncology, Haukeland Hospital, Norway. 16 refs., 2 figs

  7. Tempered fractional calculus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabzikar, Farzad, E-mail: sabzika2@stt.msu.edu [Department of Statistics and Probability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States); Meerschaert, Mark M., E-mail: mcubed@stt.msu.edu [Department of Statistics and Probability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States); Chen, Jinghua, E-mail: cjhdzdz@163.com [School of Sciences, Jimei University, Xiamen, Fujian, 361021 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  8. Tempered fractional calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  9. Tempered fractional calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series

  10. Higher fractions theory of fractional hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, I.Z.; Popov, V.N.

    1985-07-01

    A theory of fractional quantum Hall effect is generalized to higher fractions. N-particle model interaction is used and the gap is expressed through n-particles wave function. The excitation spectrum in general and the mean field critical behaviour are determined. The Hall conductivity is calculated from first principles. (author)

  11. Treating locally advanced lung cancer with a 1.5T MR-Linac - Effects of the magnetic field and irradiation geometry on conventionally fractionated and isotoxic dose-escalated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Hannah E; Menten, Martin J; Fast, Martin F; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe; McDonald, Fiona

    2017-11-01

    This study investigates the feasibility and potential benefits of radiotherapy with a 1.5T MR-Linac for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA NSCLC) patients. Ten patients with LA NSCLC were retrospectively re-planned six times: three treatment plans were created according to a protocol for conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and three treatment plans following guidelines for isotoxic target dose escalation. In each case, two plans were designed for the MR-Linac, either with standard (∼7mm) or reduced (∼3mm) planning target volume (PTV) margins, while one conventional linac plan was created with standard margins. Treatment plan quality was evaluated using dose-volume metrics or by quantifying dose escalation potential. All generated treatment plans fulfilled their respective planning constraints. For conventionally fractionated treatments, MR-Linac plans with standard margins had slightly increased skin dose when compared to conventional linac plans. Using reduced margins alleviated this issue and decreased exposure of several other organs-at-risk (OAR). Reduced margins also enabled increased isotoxic target dose escalation. It is feasible to generate treatment plans for LA NSCLC patients on a 1.5T MR-Linac. Margin reduction, facilitated by an envisioned MRI-guided workflow, enables increased OAR sparing and isotoxic target dose escalation for the respective treatment approaches. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercader, J.P.; Emily Leong

    1985-01-01

    The paper discusses the need for effective and efficient technologies in improving the food handling system. It defines the basic premises for the development of food handling. The application of food irradiation technology is briefly discussed. The paper points out key considerations for the adoption of food irradiation technology in the ASEAN region (author)

  13. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Akira

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews researches, commentaries, and conference and public records of food irradiation, published mainly during the period 1987-1989, focusing on the current conditions of food irradiation that may pose not only scientific or technologic problems but also political issues or consumerism. Approximately 50 kinds of food, although not enough to fill economic benefit, are now permitted for food irradiation in the world. Consumerism is pointed out as the major factor that precludes the feasibility of food irradiation in the world. In the United States, irradiation is feasible only for spices. Food irradiation has already been feasible in France, Hollands, Belgium, and the Soviet Union; has under consideration in the Great Britain, and has been rejected in the West Germany. Although the feasibility of food irradiation is projected to increase gradually in the future, commercial success or failure depends on the final selection of consumers. In this respect, the role of education and public information are stressed. Meat radicidation and recent progress in the method for detecting irradiated food are referred to. (N.K.) 128 refs

  14. Irradiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Akira

    1977-01-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures. (Kanao, N.)

  15. Irradiation proctitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, A [Osaka Kita Tsishin Hospital (Japan)

    1977-06-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures.

  16. Use of infrared spectroscopy to study the γ-irradiated dextran structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komar, V.P.; Bondarenko, N.T.; Zhbankov, R.G.; Markevich, S.V.

    1977-01-01

    Infrared spectra of the fractions of γ-irradiated dextran aqueous solutions have been investigated in the range 3800 -1 -400 cm -1 . Infrared spectra of the irradiated non-fractionated dextran do not differ from those of non-irradiated dextran whereas the spectra of the fractions beginning with the molecular weight 50x1O 3 dalton and lower differ considerably. With decreasing molecular weight of the fractions, more significant changes in the spectra are observed. A polymer obtained as a result of γ-irradiation of dextran differs in structure from the initial product. It is assumed that similar transformations can take place upon irradiation of other polysaccharides

  17. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Kikuchi, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    Food irradiation can have a number of beneficial effects, including prevention of sprouting; control of insects, parasites, pathogenic and spoilage bacteria, moulds and yeasts; and sterilization, which enables commodities to be stored for long periods. It is most unlikely that all these potential applications will prove commercially acceptable; the extend to which such acceptance is eventually achieved will be determined by practical and economic considerations. A review of the available scientific literature indicates that food irradiation is a thoroughly tested food technology. Safety studies have so far shown no deleterious effects. Irradiation will help to ensure a safer and more plentiful food supply by extending shelf-life and by inactivating pests and pathogens. As long as requirement for good manufacturing practice are implemented, food irradiation is safe and effective. Possible risks of food irradiation are not basically different from those resulting from misuse of other processing methods, such as canning, freezing and pasteurization. (author)

  18. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  19. Irradiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization

  20. Time dependence of the yield of chromosome mutations and free radicals in. gamma. -irradiated dry seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuzhdin, N I; Samokhvalova, N S; Dozortseva, R L; Petrova, L E; Sheksheev, E M [AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Ehvolyutsionnoj Morfologii i Ehkologii Zhivotnykh

    1976-07-01

    It has been revealed in dry barley seeds that the yield of induced ESR signals and the number of cells having chromosome aberrations depend on the irradiation conditions (single or fractionated exposures, and varying dose rates) and the duration of the post-irradiation storage. Radiobiological effects caused in dry seeds by fractionated irradiation and varying dose rates are of different nature.

  1. Modification of cell growth rate by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hisao; Takemasa, Kazuhiko; Nishiguchi, Iku; Ka, Wei-Jei; Kutsuki, Shoji; Hashimoto, Shozo

    1993-01-01

    The effect of irradiation on the proliferation kinetics of the monolayer cells has been studied. Two human cell lines with different doubling times (HeLa-P and RMUG) and two clones that have the same radiosensitivity but different doubling times (HeLa-R and HeLa-S) were irradiated with a daily dose of 2 Gy for 6 days. The number of the clonogenic cells/dish was calculated by multiplying the number of total cell/dish by the survival fraction. In the rapidly growing cells (HeLa-P, HeLa-R), the number of the clonogenic cells was not decreased by the first two fractionated irradiations, but decreased thereafter at a similar rate as by single-dose fractionation, whereas the clonogenic cell number decreased from the first fractionated irradiation in the slowly growing cells (RMUG, HeLa-S). When the proliferation of clonogenic cell number increased along with a similar growth rates that was seen in all other types of cells. Further, no correlation was seen between the growth rates of cells without irradiation and cells that received irradiation. This latter result suggests that the slow growth rate of non-irradiated cells may not be the predictive factor of the tumor cure and the interruption of radiotherapy may reduce the beneficial effect of this treatment even in slow growing tumors. (author)

  2. Asphalt chemical fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obando P, Klever N.

    1998-01-01

    Asphalt fractionation were carried out in the Esmeraldas Oil Refinery using n-pentane, SiO 2 and different mixture of benzene- methane. The fractions obtained were analyzed by Fourier's Transformed Infrared Spectrophotometry (FTIR)

  3. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetherington, M.

    1989-01-01

    This popular-level article emphasizes that the ultimate health effects of irradiated food products are unknown. They may include vitamin loss, contamination of food by botulism bacteria, mutations in bacteria, increased production of aflatoxins, changes in food, carcinogenesis from unknown causes, presence of miscellaneous harmful chemicals, and the lack of a way of for a consumer to detect irradiated food. It is claimed that the nuclear industry is applying pressure on the Canadian government to relax labeling requirements on packages of irradiated food in order to find a market for its otherwise unnecessary products

  4. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luecher, O.

    1979-01-01

    Limitations of existing preserving methods and possibilities of improved food preservation by application of nuclear energy are explained. The latest state-of-the-art in irradiation technology in individual countries is described and corresponding recommendations of FAO, WHO and IAEA specialists are presented. The Sulzer irradiation equipment for potato sprout blocking is described, the same equipment being suitable also for the treatment of onions, garlic, rice, maize and other cereals. Systems with a higher power degree are needed for fodder preserving irradiation. (author)

  5. Postoperative irradiation of glaucoma filtering surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mano, Tomiya; Manabe, Reizo; Masaki, Norie; Ohashi, Yuichi; Umemoto, Masayo; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Ryo; Hirose, Naomi.

    1986-01-01

    To inhibit the subcojunctival scarring after glaucoma filtering surgery, Sr-90 beta-irradiation of 10 Gy in 1 fraction or 20 Gy in 2 fractions has been tried in 12 eyes. Usual trabeculectomy followed by beta-irradiation was performed on 6 eyes. Of these, 3/6 eyes were meintained in normal range of IOP after irradiation. Furthermore, combined surgery of trabeculectomy, tenectomy and episcleral resection followed by beta-irradiation were performed on 6 eyes. Of these, 5/6 eyes were maintained in normal range of IOP. No complications was observed during 3 to 8 months of followup periods after treatment. Filtering surgery combined with postoperative beta-irradiation seems to inhibit the proliferation of subcon-junctival fibroblast and to control IOP. (1 Gy = 100 rad). (author)

  6. Smarandache Continued Fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Ibstedt, H.

    2001-01-01

    The theory of general continued fractions is developed to the extent required in order to calculate Smarandache continued fractions to a given number of decimal places. Proof is given for the fact that Smarandache general continued fractions built with positive integer Smarandache sequences baving only a finite number of terms equal to 1 is convergent. A few numerical results are given.

  7. Calculation simulation of equivalent irradiation swelling for dispersion nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Wei; Zhao Yunmei; Gong Xin; Ding Shurong; Huo Yongzhong

    2015-01-01

    The dispersion nuclear fuel was regarded as a kind of special particle composites. Assuming that the fuel particles are periodically distributed in the dispersion nuclear fuel meat, the finite element model to calculate its equivalent irradiation swelling was developed with the method of computational micro-mechanics. Considering irradiation swelling in the fuel particles and the irradiation hardening effect in the metal matrix, the stress update algorithms were established respectively for the fuel particles and metal matrix. The corresponding user subroutines were programmed, and the finite element simulation of equivalent irradiation swelling for the fuel meat was performed in Abaqus. The effects of the particle size and volume fraction on the equivalent irradiation swelling were investigated, and the fitting formula of equivalent irradiation swelling was obtained. The results indicate that the main factors to influence equivalent irradiation swelling of the fuel meat are the irradiation swelling and volume fraction of fuel particles. (authors)

  8. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganini, M.C.

    1991-06-01

    Food treatment by means of ionizing energy, or irradiation, is an innovative method for its preservation. In order to treat important volumes of food, it is necessary to have industrial irradiation installations. The effect of radiations on food is analyzed in the present special work and a calculus scheme for an Irradiation Plant is proposed, discussing different aspects related to its project and design: ionizing radiation sources, adequate civil work, security and auxiliary systems to the installations, dosimetric methods and financing evaluation methods of the project. Finally, the conceptual design and calculus of an irradiation industrial plant of tubercles is made, based on the actual needs of a specific agricultural zone of our country. (Author) [es

  9. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Food preservation by irradiation is one part of Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace program that is enjoying renewed interest. Classified as a food additive by the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1958 instead of a processing technique, irradiation lost public acceptance. Experiments have not been done to prove that there are no health hazards from gamma radiation, but there are new pressures to get Food and Drug Administration approval for testing in order to make commercial use of some radioactive wastes. Irradiation causes chemical reactions and nutritional changes, including the destruction of several vitamins, as well as the production of radiolytic products not normally found in food that could have adverse effects. The author concludes that, lacking epidemiological evidence, willing buyers should be able to purchase irradiated food as long as it is properly labeled

  10. Fruit irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Food spoilage is a common problem when marketing agricultural products. Promising results have already been obtained on a number of food irradiating applications. A process is described in this paper where irradiation of sub-tropical fruits, especially mangoes and papayas, combined with conventional heat treatment results in effective insect and fungal control, delays ripening and greatly improves the quality of fruit at both export and internal markets

  11. Fractional smith chart theory

    KAUST Repository

    Shamim, Atif

    2011-03-01

    For the first time, a generalized Smith chart is introduced here to represent fractional order circuit elements. It is shown that the standard Smith chart is a special case of the generalized fractional order Smith chart. With illustrations drawn for both the conventional integer based lumped elements and the fractional elements, a graphical technique supported by the analytical method is presented to plot impedances on the fractional Smith chart. The concept is then applied towards impedance matching networks, where the fractional approach proves to be much more versatile and results in a single element matching network for a complex load as compared to the two elements in the conventional approach. © 2010 IEEE.

  12. Tissue irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-01-01

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in-vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood-carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170

  13. Blood irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandy, Mammen

    1998-01-01

    Viable lymphocytes are present in blood and cellular blood components used for transfusion. If the patient who receives a blood transfusion is immunocompetent these lymphocytes are destroyed immediately. However if the patient is immunodefficient or immunosuppressed the transfused lymphocytes survive, recognize the recipient as foreign and react producing a devastating and most often fatal syndrome of transfusion graft versus host disease [T-GVHD]. Even immunocompetent individuals can develop T-GVHD if the donor is a first degree relative since like the Trojan horse the transfused lymphocytes escape detection by the recipient's immune system, multiply and attack recipient tissues. T-GVHD can be prevented by irradiating the blood and different centers use doses ranging from 1.5 to 4.5 Gy. All transfusions where the donor is a first degree relative and transfusions to neonates, immunosuppressed patients and bone marrow transplant recipients need to be irradiated. Commercial irradiators specifically designed for irradiation of blood and cellular blood components are available: however they are expensive. India needs to have blood irradiation facilities available in all large tertiary institutions where immunosuppressed patients are treated. The Atomic Energy Commission of India needs to develop a blood irradiator which meets international standards for use in tertiary medical institutions in the country. (author)

  14. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdal, W.

    1995-01-01

    A worldwide standard on food irradiation was adopted in 1983 by codex Alimentarius Commission of the Joint Food Standard Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and The World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, 41 countries have approved the use of irradiation for treating one or more food items and the number is increasing. Generally, irradiation is used to: food loses, food spoilage, disinfestation, safety and hygiene. The number of countries which use irradiation for processing food for commercial purposes has been increasing steadily from 19 in 1987 to 33 today. In the frames of the national programme on the application of irradiation for food preservation and hygienization an experimental plant for electron beam processing has been established in Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The plant is equipped with a small research accelerator Pilot (19 MeV, 1 kW) and industrial unit Electronika (10 MeV, 10 kW). On the basis of the research there were performed at different scientific institutions in Poland, health authorities have issued permissions for irradiation for; spices, garlic, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, dry mushrooms and vegetables. (author)

  15. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Processing of food with low levels of radiation has the potential to contribute to reducing both spoilage of food during storage - a particular problem in developing countries - and the high incidence of food-borne disease currently seen in all countries. Approval has been granted for the treatment of more than 30 products with radiation in over 30 countries but, in general, governments have been slow to authorize the use of this new technique. One reason for this slowness is a lack of understanding of what food irradiation entails. This book aims to increase understanding by providing information on the process of food irradiation in simple, non-technical language. It describes the effects that irradiation has on food, and the plant and equipment that are necessary to carry it out safely. The legislation and control mechanisms required to ensure the safety of food irradiation facilities are also discussed. Education is seen as the key to gaining the confidence of the consumers in the safety of irradiated food, and to promoting understanding of the benefits that irradiation can provide. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab [de

  16. Fractional factorial plans

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Aloke

    2009-01-01

    A one-stop reference to fractional factorials and related orthogonal arrays.Presenting one of the most dynamic areas of statistical research, this book offers a systematic, rigorous, and up-to-date treatment of fractional factorial designs and related combinatorial mathematics. Leading statisticians Aloke Dey and Rahul Mukerjee consolidate vast amounts of material from the professional literature--expertly weaving fractional replication, orthogonal arrays, and optimality aspects. They develop the basic theory of fractional factorials using the calculus of factorial arrangements, thereby providing a unified approach to the study of fractional factorial plans. An indispensable guide for statisticians in research and industry as well as for graduate students, Fractional Factorial Plans features: * Construction procedures of symmetric and asymmetric orthogonal arrays. * Many up-to-date research results on nonexistence. * A chapter on optimal fractional factorials not based on orthogonal arrays. * Trend-free plans...

  17. Fractional Dynamics and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, José; Luo, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Fractional Dynamics and Control provides a comprehensive overview of recent advances in the areas of nonlinear dynamics, vibration and control with analytical, numerical, and experimental results. This book provides an overview of recent discoveries in fractional control, delves into fractional variational principles and differential equations, and applies advanced techniques in fractional calculus to solving complicated mathematical and physical problems.Finally, this book also discusses the role that fractional order modeling can play in complex systems for engineering and science. Discusses how fractional dynamics and control can be used to solve nonlinear science and complexity issues Shows how fractional differential equations and models can be used to solve turbulence and wave equations in mechanics and gravity theories and Schrodinger’s equation  Presents factional relaxation modeling of dielectric materials and wave equations for dielectrics  Develops new methods for control and synchronization of...

  18. Effect of fractionated radiation on multidrug resistance in human ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Dejuan; Liu Xiaodong; Liang Bing; Jia Lili; Ma Shumei

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of different subtypes of fractionated doses on multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer cells. Methods: The human ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and its drug-resistant subtype SKVCR were divided into four groups i.e., sham-irradiated, single dose (10 Gy), fractionated dose (2 Gy × 5) and multi-fractionated dose (1 Gy × 2 × 5). Cell sensitivity to vincristine (VCR), etoposide (VP-16), pirarubicin (THP) and cisplatin (DDP) was measured by MTT assay. Western blot was applied to detect the expression of P-gp after irradiation. Results: The doubling time of SKVCR was about 1.8-fold of that of SKOV3 cells. P-gp was expressed in SKVCR but not in SKOV3. IC 50 values of SKVCR were higher than those of SKOV3. To SKOV3 cells, single dose irradiation decreased cell sensitivity to THP and DDP and fractionated irradiation decreased cell sensitivity to VCR, THP and VP-16. Multi-fractionated irradiation decreased cell sensitivity to VP-16. In SKVCR cells, all these irradiation treatments increased cell sensitivity to VCR and VP-16 but not to DDP. In addition, single and fractionated irradiation decreased P-gp expression in SKVCR cells. Conclusions: Single, fractionated and multi-fractionated radiation induced chemotherapy resistance in SKOV3 cells, while reversed drug resistance to VCR and VP-16 in SKVCR cells. (authors)

  19. Dividing Fractions: A Pedagogical Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robert

    2016-01-01

    When dividing one fraction by a second fraction, invert, that is, flip the second fraction, then multiply it by the first fraction. To multiply fractions, simply multiply across the denominators, and multiply across the numerators to get the resultant fraction. So by inverting the division of fractions it is turned into an easy multiplication of…

  20. SAFARI 2000 AERONET-derived Diffuse Spectral Irradiance for Eight Core Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains monthly mean values of diffuse irradiance fraction [f(Ediff), or ratio of diffuse-to-total irradiance] at ground level for a 30-degree solar...

  1. Enhancement of antimicrobial activity of chitosan by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuhashi, S.; Kume, T.

    1997-01-01

    Antimicrobial activity of irradiated chitosan was studied against Escherichia coli B/r. Irradiation of chitosan at 100 kGy under dry conditions was effective in increasing the activity, and inhibited the growth of E. coli completely. The molecular weight of chitosan significantly decreased with the increase in irradiation dose, whereas the relative surface charge of chitosan was decreased only 3% by 100 kGy irradiation. Antimicrobial activity assay of chitosan fractionated according to molecular weight showed that 1 x 10 5 -3 x 10 5 fraction was most effective in suppressing the growth of E coli. This fraction comprised only 8% of the 100 kGy irradiated chitosan. On the other hand, chitosan whose molecular weight was less than 1 x 10 5 had no activity. The results show that low dose irradiation, specifically 100 kGy, of chitosan gives enough degradation to increase its antimicrobial activity as a result of a change in molecular weight. (Author)

  2. First-in-man intraglandular implantation of stromal vascular fraction and adipose-derived stem cells plus platelet-rich plasma in irradiation-induced gland damage: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comella K

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Kristin Comella,1 Walter Bell2 1US Stem Cell, Inc, Sunrise, FL, USA; 2South African Stem Cell Institute, Parys, South Africa Background: Stromal vascular fraction (SVF is a mixture of cells which can be isolated from a mini-lipoaspirate of fat tissue. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is a mixture of growth factors and other nutrients which can be obtained from peripheral blood. Adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ADSCs can be isolated from fat tissue and expanded in culture. The SVF includes a variety of different cells such as ADSCs, pericytes, endothelial/progenitor cells, and a mix of different growth factors. The adipocytes (fat cells can be removed via centrifugation. Here, we describe the rationale and, to our knowledge, the first clinical implementation of SVF and PRP followed by repeat dosing of culture-expanded ADSCs into a patient with severe xerostomia postirradiation. Methods: Approximately 120 mLs of adipose tissue was removed via mini-lipoaspirate procedure under local anesthetic. The SVF was prepared from half of the fat and resuspended in PRP. The mixture was delivered via ultrasound directly into the submandibular and parotid glands on both the right and left sides. The remaining 60 mLs of fat was processed to culture-expand ADSCs. The patient received seven follow-up injections of the ADSCs plus PRP at 5, 8, 16, 18, 23, 28, and 31 months postliposuction. The subject was monitored over a period of 31 months for safety (adverse events, glandular size via ultrasound and saliva production. Results: Throughout the 31-month monitoring period, no safety events such as infection or severe adverse events were reported. The patient demonstrated an increase in gland size as measured by ultrasound which corresponded to increased saliva production. Conclusion: Overall, the patient reported improved quality of life and willingness to continue treatments. The strong safety profile and preliminary efficacy results warrant larger studies to determine

  3. Irradiation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Toshimitsu.

    1989-01-01

    In an irradiation device for irradiating radiation rays such as electron beams to pharmaceuticals, etc., since the distribution of scanned electron rays was not monitored, the electron beam intensity could be determined only indirectly and irradiation reliability was not satisfactory. In view of the above, a plurality of monitor wires emitting secondary electrons are disposed in the scanning direction near a beam take-out window of a scanning duct, signals from the monitor wires are inputted into a display device such as a cathode ray tube, as well as signals from the monitor wires at the central portion are inputted into counting rate meters to measure the radiation dose as well. Since secondary electrons are emitted when electron beams pass through the monitor wires and the intensity thereof is in proportion with the intensity of incident electron beams, the distribution of the radiation dose can be monitored by measuring the intensity of the emitted secondary electrons. Further, uneven irradiation, etc. can also be monitored to make the radiation of irradiation rays reliable. (N.H.)

  4. Study of irradiation effect on curcuma polyphenols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rejeb, Imen

    2008-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of gamma irradiation on curcumin (Curcuma Longa rhizome) component, particularly the polyphenolic fraction. Powdered rhizome was irradiated at 0, 5, 10 and 15 KGy (dose rate of 6 KGy / H). Polyphenolics were extracted and total polyphenols conent (TPC) was quantified using the Folin-Ciocalteau method. The irradiation effect was also evaluated by the HPLC technique. The chromatographic analysis showed that the irradiated and non-irradiated curcumin spectrum gave similar data. The antioxidant and antibacterial activities of the phenolic extracts were also assessed. the anti oxidative potential of the sample was evaluated using two radical scavenging methods with DPPH and ABTS. The antimicrobial analysis showed that the phenolic extracts of curcumin inhibited the growth of the studied microorganisms. Our results showed that irradiated samples were not affected in terms of polyphenols content and characteristics. (Author)

  5. Hemostimulating efficiency of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs under modified irradiation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhvoronkov, L.P.; Sklobovskaya, I.Eh.

    1988-01-01

    Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) were found to have hemostimulating effect in mice after irradiation. This effect was rather definite under irradiation conditions modified by dose fractioning or radioprotective chemicals. NSAID application during fractionated irradiation with midlethal integral dose leads to almost complete recovery of bone marrow hemopoiesis by the 9th day of radiation illness. NSAID usage combined with chemical radioprotectors provides effective hemopoiesis stimulation leading to survival increase in animals, irradiated with absolutely lethal doses. (author)

  6. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beishon, J.

    1991-01-01

    Food irradiation has been the subject of concern and controversy for many years. The advantages of food irradiation include the reduction or elimination of dangerous bacterial organisms, the control of pests and insects which destroy certain foods, the extension of the shelf-life of many products, for example fruit, and its ability to treat products such as seafood which may be eaten raw. It can also replace existing methods of treatment which are believed to have hazardous side-effects. However, after examining the evidence produced by the proponents of food irradiation, the author questions whether it has any major contribution to make to the problems of foodborne diseases or world food shortages. More acceptable solutions, he suggests, may be found in educating food handlers to ensure that hygienic conditions prevail in the production, storage and serving of food. (author)

  7. Vinca irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eymery, R.

    1976-10-01

    The development programme of the VINCA radiosterilisation centre involves plans for an irradiator capable of working in several ways. Discontinuous operation. The irradiator is loaded for a certain period then runs automatically until the moment of unloading. This method is suitable as long as the treatment capacity is relatively small. Continuous operation with permanent batch loading and unloading carried out either manually or automatically (by means of equipment to be installed later). Otherwise the design of the apparatus is highly conventional. The source is a vertical panel submersible in a pool. The conveyor is of the 'bucket' type, with 4 tiers to each bucket. The batches pass successively through all possible irradiation positions. Transfert into and out of the cell take place through a maze, which also provides access to the cell when the sources are in storage at the bottom of the pool [fr

  8. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for craniopharyngiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Frank, Claudia; Herfarth, Klaus K.; Rhein, Bernhard; Wannenmacher, Michael; Debus, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate outcome and toxicity after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) in patients with craniopharyngiomas. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with craniopharyngiomas were treated with FSRT between May 1989 and February 2001. Median age was 33.5 years (range: 5-57 years). Nine patients received FSRT after surgery as primary treatment, and 17 patients were irradiated for recurrent tumor or progressive growth after initial surgery. Median target dose was 52.2 Gy (range: 50.0-57.6 Gy) with conventional fractionation. Follow-up included MRI and neurologic, ophthalmologic, and endocrinologic examinations. Results: The median follow-up was 43 months (range: 7-143 months). The actuarial local control rate and actuarial overall survival rates were 100% and 100%, respectively, at 5 years and 100% and 83%, respectively, at 10 years. Four patients showed complete response, 14 patients showed partial response, and 8 patients remained stable. In 5 patients, vision improved after radiation therapy. Acute toxicity was mild. One patient required cyst drainage 3 months after radiotherapy. Late toxicity after radiotherapy included impairment of hormone function in 3 out of 18 patients at risk. We did not observe any vision impairment, radionecrosis, or secondary malignancies. Conclusions: FSRT is effective and safe in the treatment of cystic craniopharyngiomas. Toxicity is extremely low using this conformal technique

  9. Fractional distillation of oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, L D

    1931-10-31

    A method of dividing oil into lubricating oil fractions without substantial cracking by introducing the oil in a heated state into a fractionating column from which oil fractions having different boiling points are withdrawn at different levels, while reflux liquid is supplied to the top of the column, and additional heat is introduced into the column by contacting with the oil therein a heated fluid of higher monlecular weight than water and less susceptible to thermal decomposition than is the highest boiling oil fraction resulting from the distillation, or of which any products produced by thermal decomposition will not occur in the highest boiling distillate withdrawn from the column.

  10. Irradiance gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, G.J.; Heckbert, P.S.; Technische Hogeschool Delft

    1992-04-01

    A new method for improving the accuracy of a diffuse interreflection calculation is introduced in a ray tracing context. The information from a hemispherical sampling of the luminous environment is interpreted in a new way to predict the change in irradiance as a function of position and surface orientation. The additional computation involved is modest and the benefit is substantial. An improved interpolation of irradiance resulting from the gradient calculation produces smoother, more accurate renderings. This result is achieved through better utilization of ray samples rather than additional samples or alternate sampling strategies. Thus, the technique is applicable to a variety of global illumination algorithms that use hemicubes or Monte Carlo sampling techniques

  11. Red light photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis using 37 J/cm2 : Fractionated irradiation with 12.3 mW/cm2 after 30 minutes incubation time compared to standard continuous irradiation with 75 mW/cm2 after 3 hours incubation time using a mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignion-Dewalle, Anne-Sophie; Baert, Gregory; Devos, Laura; Thecua, Elise; Vicentini, Claire; Mortier, Laurent; Mordon, Serge

    2017-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging treatment modality for various diseases, especially for dermatological conditions. Although, the standard PDT protocol for the treatment of actinic keratoses in Europe has shown to be effective, treatment-associated pain is often observed in patients. Different modifications to this protocol attempted to decrease pain have been investigated. The decrease in fluence rate seems to be a promising solution. Moreover, it has been suggested that light fractionation significantly increases the efficacy of PDT. Based on a flexible light-emitting textile, the FLEXITHERALIGHT device specifically provides a fractionated illumination at a fluence rate more than six times lower than that of the standard protocol. In a recently completed clinical trial of PDT for the treatment of actinic keratosis, the non-inferiority of a protocol involving illumination with the FLEXITHERALIGHT device after a short incubation time and referred to as the FLEXITHERALIGHT protocol has been assessed compared to the standard protocol. In this paper, we propose a comparison of the two above mentioned 635 nm red light protocols with 37 J/cm 2 in the PDT treatment of actinic keratosis: the standard protocol and the FLEXITHERALIGHT one through a mathematical modeling. This mathematical modeling, which slightly differs from the one we have already published, enables the local damage induced by the therapy to be estimated. The comparison performed in terms of the local damage induced by the therapy demonstrates that the FLEXITHERALIGHT protocol with lower fluence rate, light fractionation and shorter incubation time is somewhat less efficient than the standard protocol. Nevertheless, from the clinical trial results, the FLEXITHERALIGHT protocol results in non-inferior response rates compared to the standard protocol. This finding raises the question of whether the PDT local damage achieved by the FLEXITHERALIGHT protocol (respectively, the standard protocol

  12. Irradiation in adulthood as a new model of schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhide Iwata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies suggest that radiation exposure may be a potential risk factor for schizophrenia in adult humans. Here, we investigated whether adult irradiation in rats caused behavioral abnormalities relevant to schizophrenia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total dose of 15-Gy irradiation in six fractionations during 3 weeks was exposed to the forebrain including the subventricular zone (SVZ and subgranular zone (SGZ with male rats in the prone position. Behavioral, immunohistochemical, and neurochemical studies were performed three months after fractionated ionizing irradiation. Three months after fractionated ionizing irradiation, the total numbers of BrdU-positive cells in both the SVZ and SGZ zones of irradiated rats were significantly lower than those of control (sham-irradiated rats. Hyperactivity after administration of the dopaminergic agonist methamphetamine, but not the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine, was significantly enhanced in the irradiated rats although spontaneous locomotion in the irradiated rats was significantly lower than that of controls. Behavioral abnormalities including auditory sensory gating deficits, social interaction deficits, and working memory deficits were observed in the irradiated rats. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study suggests that irradiation in adulthood caused behavioral abnormalities relevant to schizophrenia, and that reduction of adult neurogenesis by irradiation may be associated with schizophrenia-like behaviors in rats.

  13. Fractionation study: survival of mouse intestinal crypts to exposure of 60Co and 11 MeV electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    The study was conducted to determine a statistical procedure for the quantification of time, dose, fraction relations for mouse intestinal crypt survival after fractionated Co-60 and 11-MeV electron irradiation. In the initial phase of the investigation CDF/1 male mice were exposed to fractionated Co-60 irradiation. A completely randomized experimental design with three factors, total time from initiation to completion of fractionation schedule, number of fractions, and total dose was utilized. The experimental animals were irradiated with a Co-60 panoramic irradiator unit at an absorbed dose rate of approximately 51 rads per minute. Two days after completion of the fractionation schedule, the experimental animals were sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Sections of intestinal jejunum were resected and routine histological preparations performed. The surviving crypts were scored with a compound microscope using a quantitative counting technique. The resulting crypt survival was observed to increase for increasing total times and fraction numbers

  14. Fractional Poisson process (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaotian; Wen Zhixiong; Zhang Shiying

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a stochastic process W H (t)(H-bar (12,1)) which we call fractional Poisson process. The process W H (t) is self-similar in wide sense, displays long range dependence, and has more fatter tail than Gaussian process. In addition, it converges to fractional Brownian motion in distribution

  15. An Appetite for Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Trena L.; Bryan, Tommy; Curry, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how using candy bars as models gives sixth-grade students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve. Using paper models of the candy bars, students explored and compared fractions. They noticed fewer different representations for one-third than for one-half. The authors conclude…

  16. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems (Empson…

  17. ion irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swift heavy ions interact predominantly through inelastic scattering while traversing any polymer medium and produce excited/ionized atoms. Here samples of the polycarbonate Makrofol of approximate thickness 20 m, spin coated on GaAs substrate were irradiated with 50 MeV Li ion (+3 charge state). Build-in ...

  18. Fractional bosonic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Victor Alfonzo; Giusti, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a simple generalization of bosonic string theory in the framework of the theory of fractional variational problems. Specifically, we present a fractional extension of the Polyakov action, for which we compute the general form of the equations of motion and discuss the connection between the new fractional action and a generalization the Nambu-Goto action. Consequently, we analyze the symmetries of the modified Polyakov action and try to fix the gauge, following the classical procedures. Then we solve the equations of motion in a simplified setting. Finally, we present a Hamiltonian description of the classical fractional bosonic string and introduce the fractional light-cone gauge. It is important to remark that, throughout the whole paper, we thoroughly discuss how to recover the known results as an "integer" limit of the presented model.

  19. Fish irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, J.; Tengumnuay, C.; Juangbhanich, C.

    1970-01-01

    Chub-mackerel was chosen for the study because they are the most common fish in Thailand. Preliminary investigations were conducted to determine the maximum radiation dose of gamma-rays by organoleptic tests. The samples were subjected to radiation at various doses up to 4 Mrad. Many experiments were conducted using other kinds of fish. The results showed that 1 Mrad would be the maximum acceptable dose for fish. Later, the influence of the radiation dose from 0.1-1 Mrad was studied in order to find the optimum acceptable dose for preservation of fish without off-flavour. For this purpose, the Hedonic scale was used. It was found that 0.2 and 0.5 Mrad gave the best result on Chub mackerel. The determinations of optimum dose, organoleptic, microbiological and trimethylamine content changes were done. The results showed that Chub mackerel irradiated at 0.2, 0.5 and 1 Mrad stored at 3 0 C for 71 days were still acceptable, on the contrary the untreated samples were found unacceptable at 14 days. The trimethylamine increment was significantly higher in the untreated samples. At 15 days storage, trimethylamine in the non-irradiated Chub-mackerel was about 10 times higher than the irradiated ones. At 51 and 79 days storage, about 13 times higher in the control samples than the irradiated samples except 0.1 Mrad. Only 2 times higher was found for the 0.1 Mrad. The microbiological results showed that the irradiation above 0.2 Mrad gave favorable extension of shelf-life of fish

  20. Chapter 2: Irradiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2018-04-01

    The chapter 2 presents the subjects: 1) gamma irradiators which includes: Category-I gamma irradiators (self-contained); Category-II gamma irradiators (panoramic and dry storage); Category-III gamma irradiators (self-contained in water); Category-IV gamma irradiators (panoramic and wet storage); source rack for Category-IV gamma irradiators; product transport system for Category-IV gamma irradiators; radiation shield for gamma irradiators; 2) accelerators which includes: Category-I Accelerators (shielded irradiator); Category-II Accelerators (irradiator inside a shielded room); Irradiation application examples.

  1. The indication and the point at issue in total body irradiation (TBI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Yuzo; Nishino, Shigeo.

    1992-01-01

    The role of radiation in the cause of interstitial pneumonitis (IP) was analysed here. Also optimal dose fractionation was discussed about total absorbed lung dose, dose rate and fractionation in spect of IP. After all optimal time schedule was recommended 3, 4 and 6 fraction of ≤ 4 Gy of fraction size using conventional and hyperfractionated irradiation. In the end the present condition and the point at issue in the irradiation of blood for prevention GVHD were discussed. (author)

  2. Dose rate and fractionation: Relative importance in radiation for bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarbell, N.J.; Rosenblatt, M.; Mauch, P.; Hellman, S.

    1987-01-01

    The optimal dose rate and fractionation schedules for total body irradiation (TBI) in bone marrow transplantation (BMT) are presently unknown. This study compares several fractionation and dose rate schedules that are currently in clinical use. C/sub 3/H/HeJ were given TBI and the bone marrow survival fraction was calculated using the CFU's assay. Irradiation was given as low dose rate (LDR) at 5 cGy/min or high dose rate (HDR) at 80 cGy/min, in single fraction (SF) and fractionated (FX) regimens. These results indicate no increase in survival for the normal bone marrow stem cells with fractionation either at high or low dose-rates. In fact, fractionation seemed to decrease the bone marrow survival over single fraction radiation

  3. Food irradiation: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Rosanna M.

    1984-01-01

    Recent regulatory and commercial activity regarding food irradiation is highlighted. The effects of irradiation, used to kill insects and microorganisms which cause food spoilage, are discussed. Special attention is given to the current regulatory status of food irradiation in the USA; proposed FDA regulation regarding the use of irradiation; pending irradiation legislation in the US Congress; and industrial applications of irradiation

  4. Industrial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    Production lines for rubber gloves would not appear to have much in common with particle physics laboratories, but they both use accelerators. Electron beam irradiation is often used in industry to improve the quality of manufactured goods or to reduce production cost. Products range from computer disks, shrink packaging, tyres, cables, and plastics to hot water pipes. Some products, such as medical goods, cosmetics and certain foodstuffs, are sterilized in this way. In electron beam irradiation, electrons penetrate materials creating showers of low energy electrons. After many collisions these electrons have the correct energy to create chemically active sites. They may either break molecular bonds or activate a site which promotes a new chemical linkage. This industrial irradiation can be exploited in three ways: breaking down a biological molecule usually renders it useless and kills the organism; breaking an organic molecule can change its toxicity or function; and crosslinking a polymer can strengthen it. In addition to traditional gamma irradiation using isotopes, industrial irradiation uses three accelerator configurations, each type defining an energy range, and consequently the electron penetration depth. For energies up to 750 kV, the accelerator consists of a DC potential applied to a simple wire anode and the electrons extracted through a slot in a coaxially mounted cylindrical cathode. In the 1-5 MeV range, the Cockcroft-Walton or Dynamitron( R ) accelerators are normally used. To achieve the high potentials in these DC accelerators, insulating SF6 gas and large dimension vessels separate the anode and cathode; proprietary techniques distinguish the various commercial models available. Above 5 MeV, the size of DC accelerators render them impractical, and more compact radiofrequency-driven linear accelerators are used. Irradiation electron beams are actually 'sprayed' over the product using a magnetic deflection system. Lower energy beams of

  5. Equivalence of hyperfractionated and continuous brachytherapy in a rat tumor model and remarkable effectiveness when preceded by external irradiation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veninga, T.; Visser, A.G.; Berg, A.P. van den; Hooije, C.M. van; Geel, C.A. van; Levendag, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: In clinical brachytherapy, there is a tendency to replace continuous low-dose-rate (LDR) irradiation by either single-dose or fractionated high-dose-rate (HDR) irradiation. In this study, the equivalence of LDR treatments and fractionated HDR (2 fractions/day) or pulsed-dose-rate (PDR, 4

  6. Fractional Order Generalized Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tenreiro Machado

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper formulates a novel expression for entropy inspired in the properties of Fractional Calculus. The characteristics of the generalized fractional entropy are tested both in standard probability distributions and real world data series. The results reveal that tuning the fractional order allow an high sensitivity to the signal evolution, which is useful in describing the dynamics of complex systems. The concepts are also extended to relative distances and tested with several sets of data, confirming the goodness of the generalization.

  7. Fractional finite Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Kedar; George, Nicholas

    2004-07-01

    We show that a fractional version of the finite Fourier transform may be defined by using prolate spheroidal wave functions of order zero. The transform is linear and additive in its index and asymptotically goes over to Namias's definition of the fractional Fourier transform. As a special case of this definition, it is shown that the finite Fourier transform may be inverted by using information over a finite range of frequencies in Fourier space, the inversion being sensitive to noise. Numerical illustrations for both forward (fractional) and inverse finite transforms are provided.

  8. Social Trust and Fractionalization:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This paper takes a closer look at the importance of fractionalization for the creation of social trust. It first argues that the determinants of trust can be divided into two categories: those affecting individuals' trust radii and those affecting social polarization. A series of estimates using...... a much larger country sample than in previous literature confirms that fractionalization in the form of income inequality and political diversity adversely affects social trust while ethnic diversity does not. However, these effects differ systematically across countries, questioning standard...... interpretations of the influence of fractionalization on trust....

  9. Radiation-induced lung damage in rats: The influence of fraction spacing on effect per fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haston, C.K.; Hill, R.P.; Newcomb, C.H.; Van Dyk, J.

    1994-01-01

    When the linear-quadratic model is used to predict fractionated treatments which are isoeffective, it is usually assumed that each (equal size) treatment fraction has an equal effect, independent of the time at which it was delivered during a course of treatment. Previous work has indicated that this assumption may not be valid in the context of radiation-induced lung damage in rats. Consequently the authors tested directly the validity of the assumption that each fraction has an equal effect, independent of the time it is delivered. An experiment was completed in which fractionated irradiation was given to whole thoraces of Sprague-Dawley rats. All treatment schedules consisted of eleven equal dose fractions in 36 days given as a split course, with some groups receiving the bulk of the doses early in the treatment schedule, before a 27-day gap, and others receiving most of the dose toward the end of the treatment schedule, after the time gap. To monitor the incidence of radiation-induced damage, breathing rate and lethality assays were used. The maximum differences in the LD 50 s and breathing rate ED 50 s for the different fractionation schedules were 4.0% and 7.7% respectively. The lethality data and breathing rate data were consistent with results expected from modelling using the linear-quadratic model with the inclusion of an overall time factor, but not the generalized linear-quadratic model which accounted for fraction spacing. For conventional daily fractionation, and within the range of experimental uncertainties, the results indicate that the effect of a treatment fraction does not depend on the time at which it is given (its position) in the treatment. The results indicate no need to extend isoeffect formulae to consider the effect of each fraction separately for radiation-induced lung damage. 21 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerens, H [Lille-1 Univ., 59 - Villeneuve-d' Ascq (France); Saint-Lebe, L

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of food treatment by cobalt 60 or caesium 137 gamma radiation are reviewed. One of the main applications of irradiation on foodstuffs lies in its ability to kill micro-organisms, lethal doses being all the lower as the organism concerned is more complex. The effect on parasites is also spectacular. Doses of 200 to 300 krad are recommended to destroy all parasites with no survival period and no resistance phenomenon has ever been observed. The action of gamma radiation on macromolecules was also investigated, the bactericide treatment giving rise to side effects by transformation of food components. Three examples were studied: starch, nucleic acids and a whole food, the egg. The organoleptic aspect of irradiation was examined for different treated foods, then the physical transformations of unpasteurized, heat-pasteurized and radio-pasteurized eggs were compared. The report ends with a brief analysis of the toxicity and conditions of application of the treatment.

  11. Irradiation device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ransohoff, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Carriers, after being loaded with product to be irradiated, are transported by an input-output conveyor system into an irradiation chamber where they are received in a horizontal arrangement on racks which may support different sizes and numbers of carriers. The racks are moved by a chamber conveyor system in an endless rectangular path about a radiation source. Packers shift the carriers on the racks to maintain nearest proximity to the radiation source. The carriers are shifted in position on each rack during successive rack cycles to produce even radiation exposure. The carriers may be loaded singly onto successive racks during a first cycle of movement thereof about the source, with loading of additional carriers, and/or unloading of carriers, onto each rack occurring on subsequent rack cycles of movement

  12. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    Food can be provided with extra beneficial properties by physical processing. These benefits include a reduced possibility of food poisoning, or an increased life of the food. We are familiar with pasteurisation of milk, drying of vegetables, and canning of fruit. These physical processes work because the food absorbs energy during treatment which brings about the changes needed. The energy absorbed in these examples is heat energy. Food irradiation is a less familiar process. It produces similar benefits to other processes and it can sometimes be applied with additional advantages over conventional processing. For example, because irradiation causes little heating, foods may look and taste more natural. Also, treatment can take place with the food in its final plastic wrappers, reducing the risk of re-contamination. (author). 1 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab

  13. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beerens, H.; Saint-Lebe, L.

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of food treatment by cobalt 60 or caesium 137 gamma radiation are reviewed. One of the main applications of irradiation on foodstuffs lies in its ability to kill micro-organisms, lethal doses being all the lower as the organism concerned is more complex. The effect on parasites is also spectacular. Doses of 200 to 300 krad are recommended to destroy all parasites with no survival period and no resistance phenomenon has ever been observed. The action of gamma radiation on macromolecules was also investigated, the bactericide treatment giving rise to side effects by transformation of food components. Three examples were studied: starch, nucleic acids and a whole food, the egg. The organoleptic aspect of irradiation was examined for different treated foods, then the physical transformations of unpasteurized, heat-pasteurized and radio-pasteurized eggs were compared. The report ends with a brief analysis of the toxicity and conditions of application of the treatment [fr

  14. Endolymphatic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvao, M.M.; Ianhez, L.E.; Sabbaga, E.

    1982-01-01

    The authors analysed the clinical evolution and the result of renal transplantation some years after irradiation in 24 patients (group I) who received endolymphatic 131 I as a pre-transplantation immunesuppresive measure. The control group (group II) consisted of 24 non-irradiated patients comparable to group I in age, sex, primary disease, type of donor and immunesuppressive therapy. Significant differences were observed between the two groups regarding such factors a incidence and reversibility of rejection crises in the first 60 post-transplantation days, loss of kidney due to rejection, and dosage of azathioprine. The authors conclude that this method, besides being harmless, has prolonged immunesuppressive action, its administration being advised for receptores of cadaver kidneys, mainly those who show positive cross-match against HLA antigens for painel. (Author) [pt

  15. FRACTIONS: CONCEPTUAL AND DIDACTIC ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sead Rešić

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fractions represent the manner of writing parts of whole numbers (integers. Rules for operations with fractions differ from rules for operations with integers. Students face difficulties in understanding fractions, especially operations with fractions. These difficulties are well known in didactics of Mathematics throughout the world and there is a lot of research regarding problems in learning about fractions. Methods for facilitating understanding fractions have been discovered, which are essentially related to visualizing operations with fractions.

  16. Food irradiation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauli, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Since 1963, some irradiated foods have been permitted for sale in the United States. Yet, at this time, commercial application has been limited to irradiation of a relatively small fraction of the spices and seasonings used as ingredients in other foods. The current situation regarding irradiated foods in the United States and how it developed is discussed. The author writes from experience gained as a Government regulator concerned primarily with ensuring safety of food and therefore this is stressed together with the crucial role played by consumers and industry. (author)

  17. Fractional Stochastic Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkonen, Juha

    2018-02-01

    Models describing evolution of physical, chemical, biological, social and financial processes are often formulated as differential equations with the understanding that they are large-scale equations for averages of quantities describing intrinsically random processes. Explicit account of randomness may lead to significant changes in the asymptotic behaviour (anomalous scaling) in such models especially in low spatial dimensions, which in many cases may be captured with the use of the renormalization group. Anomalous scaling and memory effects may also be introduced with the use of fractional derivatives and fractional noise. Construction of renormalized stochastic field theory with fractional derivatives and fractional noise in the underlying stochastic differential equations and master equations and the interplay between fluctuation-induced and built-in anomalous scaling behaviour is reviewed and discussed.

  18. Discrete fractional calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Goodrich, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This text provides the first comprehensive treatment of the discrete fractional calculus. Experienced researchers will find the text useful as a reference for discrete fractional calculus and topics of current interest. Students who are interested in learning about discrete fractional calculus will find this text to provide a useful starting point. Several exercises are offered at the end of each chapter and select answers have been provided at the end of the book. The presentation of the content is designed to give ample flexibility for potential use in a myriad of courses and for independent study. The novel approach taken by the authors includes a simultaneous treatment of the fractional- and integer-order difference calculus (on a variety of time scales, including both the usual forward and backwards difference operators). The reader will acquire a solid foundation in the classical topics of the discrete calculus while being introduced to exciting recent developments, bringing them to the frontiers of the...

  19. Fractional smith chart theory

    KAUST Repository

    Shamim, Atif; Radwan, Ahmed Gomaa; Salama, Khaled N.

    2011-01-01

    matching networks, where the fractional approach proves to be much more versatile and results in a single element matching network for a complex load as compared to the two elements in the conventional approach. © 2010 IEEE.

  20. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  1. Fractional laser skin resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2012-11-01

    Laser skin resurfacing (LSR) has evolved over the past 2 decades from traditional ablative to fractional nonablative and fractional ablative resurfacing. Traditional ablative LSR was highly effective in reducing rhytides, photoaging, and acne scarring but was associated with significant side effects and complications. In contrast, nonablative LSR was very safe but failed to deliver consistent clinical improvement. Fractional LSR has achieved the middle ground; it combined the efficacy of traditional LSR with the safety of nonablative modalities. The first fractional laser was a nonablative erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser that produced microscopic columns of thermal injury in the epidermis and upper dermis. Heralding an entirely new concept of laser energy delivery, it delivered the laser beam in microarrays. It resulted in microscopic columns of treated tissue and intervening areas of untreated skin, which yielded rapid reepithelialization. Fractional delivery was quickly applied to ablative wavelengths such as carbon dioxide, Er:YAG, and yttrium scandium gallium garnet (2,790 nm), providing more significant clinical outcomes. Adjustable laser parameters, including power, pitch, dwell time, and spot density, allowed for precise determination of percent surface area, affected penetration depth, and clinical recovery time and efficacy. Fractional LSR has been a significant advance to the laser field, striking the balance between safety and efficacy.

  2. Hemibody irradiation in multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobias, J.S.; Richards, J.D.M.; Blackman, G.M.; Joannides, T.; Trask, C.W.L.; Nathan, J.I.

    1985-01-01

    Eighteen patients with multiple myeloma were treated by hemibody irradiation using large single fractions, usually to a dose of 10 Gy (lower half) and 7.5 GY (upper half). All except one patient had previously been treated by multiple courses of conventional chemotherapy with melphalan and prednisone, and were considered to be resistant to further chemotherapy. In most cases, local field irradiation had also been given for symptomatic bone pain. Of the 13 patients who had symptoms at the start of hemibody irradiation, 11 improved sufficiently for their analgesia requirement to be reduced. In eight patients, there was a significant fall in circulating immunoglobulin but no patient with Bence-Jones proteinuria had complete resolution of this biochemical abnormality. Although thrombocytopenia and neutropenia were common, only two patients required platelet transfusion and the treatment was in general extremely well tolerated. Survival following hemibody irradiation was similar to the survival reported from the use of 'second-line' chemotherapy and we feel that hemibody irradiation is a more acceptable alternative for most patients. (orig.)

  3. Small dose multi-fractionation therapy, its radiobiological aspects and clinics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Hiroshi; Katagiri, Shiro; Furuhata, Akihiko; Fukusi, Itsuhisa

    1979-01-01

    Recent radiobiological data reveal that cell killings by small dose fractionation are almost due to nonrepairable damage with low oxygen enhancement ratio. Then, Small dose multi-fractionation method suggests a higher therapeutic-ratio than that in conventional high dose fractionated irradiation. Using these data of radiobiology, intermittent irradiations three times a day, four hours interval, with 60 - 80 rads for multi-fractionation, with high total doses of 7,200 - 7,500 rads/6.5 - 7 weeks mainly on bladder, laryngeal and esophageal tumour are applied. The results obtained are slightly improved. (author)

  4. Accumulation of DNA damage and cell death after fractionated irradiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáčová, M.; Rudolfová, G.; Tichý, Adam; Bačíková, Alena; Mutná, D.; Havelek, R.; Vávrová, J.; Odrážka, K.; Lukášová, Emilie; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 175, č. 6 (2011), s. 708-718 ISSN 0033-7587 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/1022; GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : DNA DSB * apoptosis * cellular senescence Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.684, year: 2011

  5. Series expansion in fractional calculus and fractional differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ming-Fan; Ren, Ji-Rong; Zhu, Tao

    2009-01-01

    Fractional calculus is the calculus of differentiation and integration of non-integer orders. In a recently paper (Annals of Physics 323 (2008) 2756-2778), the Fundamental Theorem of Fractional Calculus is highlighted. Based on this theorem, in this paper we introduce fractional series expansion method to fractional calculus. We define a kind of fractional Taylor series of an infinitely fractionally-differentiable function. Further, based on our definition we generalize hypergeometric functio...

  6. The RBE of Fractionated Fast Neutron on Walker 256 Carcinosarcoma with KCCH-Cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seong Yul; Koh, Kyoung Hwan; Cho, Chul Koo; Park, Charn Il; Kang, Wee Saing

    1987-01-01

    For evaluation of biological effect of p+(50.5 MeV) Be neutron beam produced by Korea Cancer Center Hospital(KCCH) cyclotron the RBE had been measured in experimental tumor Walker 256 carcinosarcoma as well as normal tissue, mouse intestine and bone marrow, in single and fractionated irradiation. As pilot study, the RBE had been measured for the mouse jejunal crypt cells in single whole body irradiation of which the result was 2.8. The obtained RBE values of TCD 50 of Walker 256 tumor, bone marrow and intestine in single irradiation were 1.9, 1.9 and 1.5 respectively. In fractionated irradiation, the RBE value of tumor Walker 256 was decreased as increasing of fraction number and increased as increasing of fraction size

  7. FRACTIONS: CONCEPTUAL AND DIDACTIC ASPECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Sead Rešić; Ismet Botonjić; Maid Omerović

    2016-01-01

    Fractions represent the manner of writing parts of whole numbers (integers). Rules for operations with fractions differ from rules for operations with integers. Students face difficulties in understanding fractions, especially operations with fractions. These difficulties are well known in didactics of Mathematics throughout the world and there is a lot of research regarding problems in learning about fractions. Methods for facilitating understanding fractions have been discovered...

  8. The design of cermet fuel phase fraction and fuel particle diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Sheng.

    1986-01-01

    UO 2 -Zr-2 is an ideal cermet fuel. As an exemplification with this fuel, this paper emphatically elucidates the irradiation theory of cermet fuel and its application in the design of cermet fuel phase fraction and of fuel particle diameter. From the point of view of the irradiation theory and the consideration for sandwich rolling, the suitable volume fraction of UO 2 phase of 25% and diameter of UO 2 particle of 100 +- 15 μm are selected

  9. Boll weevils: field and laboratory assessment of mating ability and sperm content after irradiation with or without diflubenzuron treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villavaso, E.J.; Earle, N.W.; Hollier, D.D.

    1977-01-01

    Sperm depletion did not occur within the 1st week after irradiated males and females of Anthonomus grandis Boheman were released together into isolated field plots. Also, survival and mating ability did not differ as a result of treatment. The treatments were: irradiation of 4-day-old adults plus diflubenzuron (N-(4-chlorophenyl). N 1 -(2,6-difluorobenzoyl) urea)), fractionated irradiation of pupae, and fractionated irradiation of adults plus diflubenzuron

  10. Fractional-order devices

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Karabi; Caponetto, Riccardo; Mendes Lopes, António; Tenreiro Machado, José António

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on two specific areas related to fractional order systems – the realization of physical devices characterized by non-integer order impedance, usually called fractional-order elements (FOEs); and the characterization of vegetable tissues via electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) – and provides readers with new tools for designing new types of integrated circuits. The majority of the book addresses FOEs. The interest in these topics is related to the need to produce “analogue” electronic devices characterized by non-integer order impedance, and to the characterization of natural phenomena, which are systems with memory or aftereffects and for which the fractional-order calculus tool is the ideal choice for analysis. FOEs represent the building blocks for designing and realizing analogue integrated electronic circuits, which the authors believe hold the potential for a wealth of mass-market applications. The freedom to choose either an integer- or non-integer-order analogue integrator...

  11. Studies on the storage of irradiated potatoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharabash, M; Orabi, I O [National Center for research and radiation Technology, Nasr City, Cairo (Egypt); Eloksh, I I; Abd-Alia, M A [Faculty of Agric. Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    Tubers of alpha and king edward potato cultivars were exposed to O, 10 or 50 krad and stored under room temperature and good ventilation in perforated standard carton boxes. 10 Krad was the promising dosage for sprouting inhibition for both the two cultivars. Total losses in weight were partially dependent on the volume of the dosage, the time elapsed after irradiation and cultivar used. Ascorbic acid slightly decreased, whilst sugar fractions were increased during storage in irradiated tubers. Sugar fractions were sharply decreased in boiled or fried potatoes. Also, chlorogenic acid was increased by prolonging the storage time and/or increasing the exposure dose. After-cooking discoloration (darkening) was reduced by gamma irradiation and/or extending the storage period. Using 0.5% citric acid or 0.5% sodium citrate solution inhibited the after-cooking discoloration. 8 tabs.

  12. Studies on the storage of irradiated potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharabash, M.; Orabi, I.O.; Eloksh, I.I.; Abd-Alia, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Tubers of alpha and king edward potato cultivars were exposed to O, 10 or 50 krad and stored under room temperature and good ventilation in perforated standard carton boxes. 10 Krad was the promising dosage for sprouting inhibition for both the two cultivars. Total losses in weight were partially dependent on the volume of the dosage, the time elapsed after irradiation and cultivar used. Ascorbic acid slightly decreased, whilst sugar fractions were increased during storage in irradiated tubers. Sugar fractions were sharply decreased in boiled or fried potatoes. Also, chlorogenic acid was increased by prolonging the storage time and/or increasing the exposure dose. After-cooking discoloration (darkening) was reduced by gamma irradiation and/or extending the storage period. Using 0.5% citric acid or 0.5% sodium citrate solution inhibited the after-cooking discoloration. 8 tabs

  13. Effect of irradiation on glycosaminoglycans connect in rat tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdz, M; Kucharz, E; Glowacki, A; Zylka, J

    1981-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycan (GAGs) fractions were determined in tissues (skin, liver, lungs, aortic wall) and blood serum of rats irradiated with a single dose of 500 R. An increase of total GAGs as well as changes in the fractions were found in the tissues and urine of exposed rats.

  14. Accelerated irradiation growth of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, M.; Gilbert, R.W.; Fidleris, V.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses how sponge zirconium and Zr-2.5 wt% Nb, Zircaloy, or Excel alloys all exhibit accelerated irradiation growth compared with high-purity crystal-bar zirconium for irradiation temperatures between 550 to 710 K and fluences between 0.1 to 10 x 10 25 n · m -2 (E > 1 MeV). There is generally an incubation period or fluence before the onset of accelerated or breakaway growth, which is dependent on the particular material being irradiated, its metallurgical condition before irradiation, and the irradiation temperature. Transmission electron microscopy has shown that there is a correlation between accelerated irradiation growth and the appearance of c-component vacancy loops on basal planes. Measurements in some specimens indicate that a significant fraction of the strain can be directly attributed to the loops themselves. There is considerable evidence to show that their formation is dependent both on the specimen purity and on the irradiation temperature. Materials that have a high interstitial-solute content contain c-component loops and exhibit high growth rates even at low fluences ( 2 :5 n · m -2 , E > 1 MeV). For sponge zirconium and the Zircaloys, c-component loop formation and the associated acceleration of growth (breakaway) during irradiation occurs because the intrinsic interstitial solute (mainly, oxygen, carbon and nitrogen) in the zirconium matrix is supplemented by interstitial iron, chromium, and nickel from the radiation-induced dissolution of precipitates. (author)

  15. Detection of irradiated spices by thermoluminescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerton, K.M.; Banos, C.

    1996-01-01

    Spices are used extensively in prepared foods. The high levels of contamination of many spices with microorganisms poses a problem for the food industry. Irradiation treatment is the most effective means of reducing the microbial load to safe levels. Although the process is currently subject to a moratorium in Australia, it is used in several countries for the decontamination of spices. Methods for detecting irradiation treatment of spices are necessary to enforce compliance with labelling requirements or with a prohibition on the sale of irradiated foods. Thermoluminescence (TL) analysis of spice samples has been shown to be an applicable method for the detection of all irradiated spices. It was established that the TL response originates from the adhering mineral dust in the sample. Definitive identification of many irradiated spices requires the separation of a mineral extract from the organic fraction of the spice sample. This separation can be achieved by using density centrifugation with a heavy liquid, sodium polytungstate. Clear discrimination between untreated and irradiated spice samples has been obtained by re-irradiation of the mineral extract after the first TL analysis with an absorbed dose of about 1 kGy (normalisation). The ratio of the first to second TL response was about one for irradiated samples and well below one for untreated samples. These methods have been investigated with a range of spices to establish the most suitable method for routine control purposes. (author)

  16. Irradiation behaviors of coated fuel particles, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Kousaku; Kashimura, Satoru; Ogawa, Toru; Ikawa, Katsuichi; Iwamoto, Kazumi; Ishimoto, Kiyoshi

    1981-09-01

    Loose coated fuel particles prepared in confirmity to a preliminary design for the multi-purpose VHTR in fiscal 1972 - 1974 were irradiated by 73F - 12A capsule in JMTR. Main purpose for this irradiation experiment was to examine irradiation stability of the candidate TRISO coated fuel particles for the VHTR. Also the coated particles possessing low-density kernel (90%TD), highly anisotropic OLTI-PyC and ZrC coating layer were loaded with the candidate particles in this capsule. The coated particles were irradiated up to 1.5 x 10 21 n/cm 2 of fast neutron fluence (E > 0.18 MeV) and 3.2% FIMA of burnup. In the post irradiation examination it was observed that among three kinds of TRISO particles exposed to irradiation corresponding to the normal operating condition of the VHTR ones possessing poor characteristics of the coating layers did not show a good stability. The particles irradiated under abnormally high temperature condition (> 1800 0 C) revealed 6.7% of max. EOL failure fraction (95% confidence limit). Most of these particles were failed by the ameoba effect. Furthermore, among four kinds of the TRISO particles exposed to irradiation corresponding to the transient condition of the VHTR (--1500 0 C) the two showed a good stability, while the particles possessing highly anisotropic OLTI-PyC or poorly characteristic coating layers were not so good. (author)

  17. Fractional gradient and its application to the fractional advection equation

    OpenAIRE

    D'Ovidio, M.; Garra, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we provide a definition of fractional gradient operators, related to directional derivatives. We develop a fractional vector calculus, providing a probabilistic interpretation and mathematical tools to treat multidimensional fractional differential equations. A first application is discussed in relation to the d-dimensional fractional advection-dispersion equation. We also study the connection with multidimensional L\\'evy processes.

  18. Phospholipid metabolism in lymphoid cells at delayed periods following sublethal γ-irradiation of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novoselova, E.G.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamics of phospholipid metabolism in rat thymocytes and bone marrow cells was studied 1-6 months after fractionated irradiation. The rate of total and individual lipid synthesis was shown to increase in the exposed cells. The rate of lipid synthesis increased 1 and 2 months after irradiation and was normalized 3 and 6 months after irradiation

  19. Accumulation and recovery of defects in ion-irradiated nanocrystalline gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimi, Y. E-mail: chimi@popsvr.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Iwase, A.; Ishikawa, N.; Kobiyama, M.; Inami, T.; Okuda, S

    2001-09-01

    Effects of 60 MeV {sup 12}C ion irradiation on nanocrystalline gold (nano-Au) are studied. The experimental results show that the irradiation-produced defects in nano-Au are thermally unstable because of the existence of a large volume fraction of grain boundaries. This suggests a possibility of the use of nanocrystalline materials as irradiation-resistant materials.

  20. Sweet Work with Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Natalya; Blaine, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Almost everyone loves chocolate. However, the same cannot be said about fractions, which are loved by markedly fewer. Middle school students tend to view them with wary respect, but little affection. The authors attempt to sweeten the subject by describing a type of game involving division of chocolate bars. The activity they describe provides a…

  1. Fermion Number Fractionization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    1 . In tro d u ctio n. T he N obel P rize in C hem istry for the year 2000 w as aw arded to A lan J H ... soliton, the ground state of the ferm ion-soliton system can have ..... probability density,in a heuristic w ay that a fractional ferm ion num ber m ay ...

  2. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-01-01

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in high-degree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifold singularities. Upon taking the AdS_3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.

  3. Fractional Differential Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa El-Shahed

    2007-01-01

    where 2<α<3 is a real number and D0+α is the standard Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative. Our analysis relies on Krasnoselskiis fixed point theorem of cone preserving operators. An example is also given to illustrate the main results.

  4. Vapor liquid fraction determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This invention describes a method of measuring liquid and vapor fractions in a non-homogeneous fluid flowing through an elongate conduit, such as may be required with boiling water, non-boiling turbulent flows, fluidized bed experiments, water-gas mixing analysis, and nuclear plant cooling. (UK)

  5. Brewing with fractionated barley

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkelaar, van L.H.G.

    2016-01-01

    Brewing with fractionated barley

    Beer is a globally consumed beverage, which is produced from malted barley, water, hops and yeast. In recent years, the use of unmalted barley and exogenous enzymes have become more popular because they enable simpler processing and reduced environmental

  6. Fractionation and rectification apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauerwald, A

    1932-05-25

    Fractionation and rectifying apparatus with a distillation vessel and a stirring tube, drainage tubes leading from its coils to a central collecting tube, the drainage tubes being somewhat parallel and attached to the outer half of the stirring tube and partly on the inner half of the central collecting tube, whereby distillation and rectification can be effected in a single apparatus.

  7. Fractional charge search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innes, W.; Klein, S.; Perl, M.; Price, J.C.

    1982-06-01

    A device to search for fractional charge in matter is described. The sample is coupled to a low-noise amplifier by a periodically varying capacitor and the resulting signal is synchronously detected. The varying capacitor is constructed as a rapidly spinning wheel. Samples of any material in volumes of up to 0.05 ml may be searched in less than an hour

  8. Biological basis of total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubray, B.; Helfre, S.; Dendale, R.; Cosset, J.M.; Giraud, P.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the radiobiological bases of total body irradiation (TBI) is made difficult by the large number of normal and malignant tissues that must be taken into account. In addition, tissue responses to irradiation are also sensitive to associated treatments, type of graft and a number of patient characteristics. Experimental studies have yielded a large body of data, the clinical relevance of which still requires definite validation through randomized trials. Fractionated TBI schemes are able to reduce late normal tissue toxicity, but the ultimate consequences of the fractional dose reduction do not appear to be equivocal. Thus, leukemia and lymphoma cells are probably more radio-biologically heterogeneous than previously thought, with several cell lines displaying relatively high radioresistance and repair capability patterns. The most primitive host-type hematopoietic stem cells are likely to be at least partly protected by TBI fractionation and may hamper late engraftment. Similarly, but with possibly conflicting consequences on the probability of engraftment, the persistence of a functional marrow stroma may also be fractionation-sensitive, while higher rejection rates have been reported after T-depletion grafts and fractionated TBI. in clinical practice (as for performance of relevant clinical trials), the influence of these results are rather limited by the heavy logistic constraints created by a sophisticated and time-consuming procedure. Lastly, clinicians are now facing an increasing incidence of second cancers, at least partly induced by irradiation, which jeopardize the long-term prospects of otherwise cured patients. (authors)

  9. Biology of food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    The author presents his arguments for food scientists and biologists that the hazards of food irradiation outweigh the benefits. The subject is discussed in the following sections: introduction (units, mutagenesis, seed viability), history of food irradiation, effects of irradiation on organoleptic qualities of staple foods, radiolytic products and selective destruction of nutrients, production of microbial toxins in stored irradiated foods and loss of quality in wheat, deleterious consequences of eating irradiated foods, misrepresentation of the facts about food irradiation. (author)

  10. Responses of rat R-1 cells to low dose rate gamma radiation and multiple daily dose fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Bijman, J.Th.

    1981-01-01

    Multifraction irradiation may offer the same therapeutic gain as continuous irradiation. Therefore, a comparison of the efficacy of low dose rate irradiation and multifraction irradiation was the main objective of the experiments to be described. Both regimens were tested on rat rhabdomyosarcoma (R-1) cells in vitro and in vivo. Exponentially growing R-1 cells were treated in vitro by a multifraction irradiation procedure with dose fractions of 2 Gy gamma radiation and time intervals of 1 to 3 h. The dose rate was 1.3 Gy.min -1 . The results indicate that multifractionation of the total dose is more effective with respect to cell inactivation than continuous irradiation. (Auth.)

  11. A Practical Irradiance Model for Bifacial PV Modules: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, Bill; MacAlpine, Sara; Deline, Chris; Asgharzadeh, Amir; Toor, Fatima; Riley, Daniel; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford

    2017-06-15

    A model, suitable for a row or multiple rows of photovoltaic (PV) modules, is presented for estimating the backside irradiance for bifacial PV modules. The model, which includes the effects of shading by the PV rows, is based on the use of configuration factors (CFs) to determine the fraction of a source of irradiance that is received by the backside of the PV module. Backside irradiances are modeled along the sloped height of the PV module, but assumed not to vary along the length of the PV row. The backside irradiances are corrected for angle-of-incidence losses and may be added to the front side irradiance to determine the total irradiance resource for the PV cell. Model results are compared with the measured backside irradiances for NREL and Sandia PV systems, and with results when using the RADIANCE ray tracing program.

  12. A Practical Irradiance Model for Bifacial PV Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, Bill; MacAlpine, Sara; Deline, Chris; Asgharzadeh, Amir; Toor, Fatima; Riley, Daniel; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford

    2017-06-21

    A model, suitable for a row or multiple rows of photovoltaic (PV) modules, is presented for estimating the backside irradiance for bifacial PV modules. The model, which includes the effects of shading by the PV rows, is based on the use of configuration factors to determine the fraction of a source of irradiance that is received by the backside of the PV module. Backside irradiances are modeled along the sloped height of the PV module, but assumed not to vary along the length of the PV row. The backside irradiances are corrected for angle-of-incidence losses and may be added to the front side irradiance to determine the total irradiance resource for the PV cell. Model results are compared with the measured backside irradiances for NREL and Sandia PV systems, and with results when using ray tracing software.

  13. Irradiation mucositis and oral flora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spijkervet, F.K.L.

    1989-01-01

    This study, which is motivated by the substantial morbidity of local signs of mucositis and generalized symptoms that result from mucositis induced by therapeutic irradiation, has the following objectives: To investigate if it is possible to prevent irradiation mucositis via oral flora elimination, and, if it is true that flora plays a role in irradiation mucositis, what fraction of the oral flora may be involved; to evaluate oral Gram-negative bacillary carriage; to investigate the possibility to eradicate Gram-negative bacilli from the oral cavity; to evaluate oral yeast carriage; to investigate the possibility to eradicate yeasts stomatitis and the 'selectivity' of elimination of flora. Two methods are described for monitoring alterations of mucositis of the oral cavity and changes in oral flora. Chlorhexidine has been tested as the commonly used prophylaxis. The effect of chlorhexidine 0.1% rinses on oral flora and mucositis has been studied in a prospective placebo controlled double blind randomized programme. The results of the influence of saliva on the antimicrobial activity of chlorhexidine and the results of selective elimination of oral flora in irradiated patients who have head and neck cancer are reported. Salivary inactivation of the topical antimicrobials used for selective elimination of oral flora has been studied and the results are reported. Finally, the objectives that have been achieved (or not) are delineated. The significance of the results of the study are discussed in terms of published information and further lines of research are suggested. (author). 559 refs.; 29 figs.; 20 tabs

  14. Transcutaneous drug delivery by liposomes using fractional laser technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Wang, Jian; Baba, Kazuki; Oki, Yuka; Hiruta, Yuki; Ito, Masayuki; Ito, Shinobu; Kanazawa, Hideko

    2017-07-01

    Transdermal delivery of hydrophilic peptides remains a challenge due to their poor cellular uptake and transdermal penetration. We hypothesize that combination of a CO 2 fractional laser to enhance percutaneous absorption and liposomes as transdermal carriers would improve skin penetration of hydrophilic drugs. NA. Liposomes were prepared using membrane fusion lipid dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine, and used to deliver 5-carboxyfluorescein (CF) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated ovalbumin (OVA-FITC) as model hydrophilic peptide drugs. Liposome size was estimated by dynamic light scattering. Liposome uptake into murine macrophage cells and penetration or permeation into Yucatan micropig skin after irradiation by CO 2 fractional laser at varying energy levels (laser power and exposure duration) were investigated using Franz cell and fluorescence microscopy. Oxidative damage to the irradiated mouse skin was assessed by electron spin resonance. Size of CF and OVA-FITC encapsulated liposomes was 324 ± 75 nm. Cellular uptake of OVA-FITC delivered by liposomes was 10-fold higher (1,370 relative fluorescence units, RFU) than delivered in solution form (130 RFU). Fractional laser irradiation increased skin permeation rate of CF liposomes (0-10%) and OVA-FITC liposomes (4-40%) in a dose-dependent manner. Although peeling off the stratum corneum facilitated CF liposome penetration at low energy levels (2.69-3.29 J/cm 2 ; 10-20 W for 500 μs), drug permeation was similar (7-8%) in peeled or untreated skin at higher laser energy levels (6.06 J/cm 2 ; 20 W for 1,500 μs). FITC penetrated deeper in the skin after laser irradiation. However, OH, O2-, and VC reactive oxygen species were generated upon irradiation of the skin with a fractional CO 2 laser. Increasing laser power and irradiation, time increased liposome uptake by cells and penetration of peptide drugs across the skin in a dose-dependent manner. High-energy CO 2 fractional laser overcomes the

  15. -Dimensional Fractional Lagrange's Inversion Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Abd El-Salam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Riemann-Liouville fractional differential operator, a fractional extension of the Lagrange inversion theorem and related formulas are developed. The required basic definitions, lemmas, and theorems in the fractional calculus are presented. A fractional form of Lagrange's expansion for one implicitly defined independent variable is obtained. Then, a fractional version of Lagrange's expansion in more than one unknown function is generalized. For extending the treatment in higher dimensions, some relevant vectors and tensors definitions and notations are presented. A fractional Taylor expansion of a function of -dimensional polyadics is derived. A fractional -dimensional Lagrange inversion theorem is proved.

  16. Gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, Matheus Jatkoske

    2011-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrations of non-integers orders was introduced more than three centuries ago but only recently gained more attention due to its application on nonlocal phenomenas. In this context, several formulations of fractional electromagnetic fields was proposed, but all these theories suffer from the absence of an effective fractional vector calculus, and in general are non-causal or spatially asymmetric. In order to deal with these difficulties, we propose a spatially symmetric and causal gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic field from a Lagrangian formulation. From our fractional Maxwell's fields arose a definition for the fractional gradient, divergent and curl operators. -- Highlights: → We propose a fractional Lagrangian formulation for fractional Maxwell's fields. → We obtain gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields. → Our generalized fractional Maxwell's field is spatially symmetrical. → We discuss the non-causality of the theory.

  17. Gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazo, Matheus Jatkoske, E-mail: matheuslazo@furg.br [Instituto de Matematica, Estatistica e Fisica - FURG, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil)

    2011-09-26

    Fractional derivatives and integrations of non-integers orders was introduced more than three centuries ago but only recently gained more attention due to its application on nonlocal phenomenas. In this context, several formulations of fractional electromagnetic fields was proposed, but all these theories suffer from the absence of an effective fractional vector calculus, and in general are non-causal or spatially asymmetric. In order to deal with these difficulties, we propose a spatially symmetric and causal gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic field from a Lagrangian formulation. From our fractional Maxwell's fields arose a definition for the fractional gradient, divergent and curl operators. -- Highlights: → We propose a fractional Lagrangian formulation for fractional Maxwell's fields. → We obtain gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields. → Our generalized fractional Maxwell's field is spatially symmetrical. → We discuss the non-causality of the theory.

  18. On matrix fractional differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Kılıçman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to study the matrix fractional differential equations and to find the exact solution for system of matrix fractional differential equations in terms of Riemann–Liouville using Laplace transform method and convolution product to the Riemann–Liouville fractional of matrices. Also, we show the theorem of non-homogeneous matrix fractional partial differential equation with some illustrative examples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new methodology. The main objective of this article is to discuss the Laplace transform method based on operational matrices of fractional derivatives for solving several kinds of linear fractional differential equations. Moreover, we present the operational matrices of fractional derivatives with Laplace transform in many applications of various engineering systems as control system. We present the analytical technique for solving fractional-order, multi-term fractional differential equation. In other words, we propose an efficient algorithm for solving fractional matrix equation.

  19. Chromatogram Profiles and Cytotoxic Activity of Irradiated Mahkota Dewa (Phaleria Macrocarpa Scheff. Boerl Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Katrin1

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Gamma irradiation has been used by the industries for preservation of herbal medicine, but it has not been studied the effect of gamma irradiation on their efficacy, especially their bioactivity as anticancer substances. The purpose of this research was to study the effect of gamma irradiation on the mahkota dewa leaves which has been claimed to contain potent anticancer substances. Maceration of dried mahkota dewa leaves successively with n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and ethanol gave crude extracts which the ethyl acetate was the most cytotoxic extract against leukemia L1210 cells with an inhibition concentration fifty (IC50 value of 10.3 µg/ml. Further separation of ethyl acetate extract by column chromatograph gave 7 fractions, and fraction 2 showed the most cytotoxic fraction exhibited the most cytotoxic extract against leukemia L1210 cells with an IC50 value of 1.9 µg/ml. Since, the fraction 2 of ethyl acetate extract was the most potent fraction, the irradiated samples were treated with the same procedure as treatment of fraction 2 from control sample. Cytotoxic activity test of fractions 2 from irradiated samples showed that the cytotoxic activity decreased depending on increasing of irradiation dose. Gamma irradiation dose up to 7.5 kGy on mahkota dewa leaves could decreased the cytotoxic activity of fraction 2 as the most cytotoxic-potential fraction against leukemia L1210 cells, but decreasing the cytotoxic activity has not exceeded the limit of the fraction declared inactive. So that the irradiation dose up to 7.5 kGy can be used for decontamination of bacteria and fungus/yeast without eliminating the cytotoxic activity. Gamma irradiation also caused changes in the thin layer chromatograph (TLC spots and HPLC chromatograms profiles of fraction 2 which was the most cytotoxic fraction in ethyl acetate extract of mahkota dewa leaves against leukemia L1210 cells. One of the main peaks (peak 1 on HPLC chromatograms decreased with increasing

  20. Chromatogram Profiles and Cytotoxic Activity of Irradiated Mahkota Dewa (Phaleria Macrocarpa (Scheff.) Boerl) Leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katrin, E.; Winarno, H.; Selvie

    2011-01-01

    Gamma irradiation has been used by the industries for preservation of herbal medicine, but it has not been studied the effect of gamma irradiation on their efficacy, especially their bioactivity as anticancer substances. The purpose of this research was to study the effect of gamma irradiation on the mahkota dewa leaves which has been claimed to contain potent anticancer substances. Maceration of dried mahkota dewa leaves successively with n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and ethanol gave crude extracts which the ethyl acetate was the most cytotoxic extract against leukemia L1210 cells with an inhibition concentration fifty (IC 50 ) value of 10.3 μg/ml. Further separation of ethyl acetate extract by column chromatograph gave 7 fractions, and fraction 2 showed the most cytotoxic fraction exhibited the most cytotoxic extract against leukemia L1210 cells with an IC 50 value of 1.9 μg/ml. Since, the fraction 2 of ethyl acetate extract was the most potent fraction, the irradiated samples were treated with the same procedure as treatment of fraction 2 from control sample. Cytotoxic activity test of fractions 2 from irradiated samples showed that the cytotoxic activity decreased depending on increasing of irradiation dose. Gamma irradiation dose up to 7.5 kGy on mahkota dewa leaves could decreased the cytotoxic activity of fraction 2 as the most cytotoxic-potential fraction against leukemia L1210 cells, but decreasing the cytotoxic activity has not exceeded the limit of the fraction declared inactive. So that the irradiation dose up to 7.5 kGy can be used for decontamination of bacteria and fungus/yeast without eliminating the cytotoxic activity. Gamma irradiation also caused changes in the thin layer chromatograph (TLC) spots and HPLC chromatograms profiles of fraction 2 which was the most cytotoxic fraction in ethyl acetate extract of mahkota dewa leaves against leukemia L1210 cells. One of the main peaks (peak 1) on HPLC chromatograms decreased with increasing the

  1. A method for total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasukochi, Hiroshi; Higashi, Shizuka; Okuhata, Yoshitaka; Lee, Keiichi; Ishioka, Kuniaki; Murakami, Koji; Nagai, Jun; Kuniyasu, Yoshio

    1988-01-01

    In these two years, we have treated four infant patients of acute leukemia by Cobalt-60 total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation. During total body irradiation, thermoluminescence dosimeters were attached to the skin of patients. For four patients, nine dosimetries were performed. Reliability of this method was examined by phantom experiment. Every irradiation for the patient per fraction was 2.4 Gy, that is, 60 cGy for each four positions, right decubitus A-P and PA directions and left decubitus A-P and PA directions under aseptic circumstances. Radiation dose was uniform by this technique for each patient, and average determined dose for surface of the patients was between 87 % and 106 % compared with the air dose of the center of aseptic space (wagon). As the result, we suggest that this method is suitable for the total body irradiation of acute leukemia of infant. (author)

  2. The Local Fractional Bootstrap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Mikkel; Hounyo, Ulrich; Lunde, Asger

    We introduce a bootstrap procedure for high-frequency statistics of Brownian semistationary processes. More specifically, we focus on a hypothesis test on the roughness of sample paths of Brownian semistationary processes, which uses an estimator based on a ratio of realized power variations. Our...... new resampling method, the local fractional bootstrap, relies on simulating an auxiliary fractional Brownian motion that mimics the fine properties of high frequency differences of the Brownian semistationary process under the null hypothesis. We prove the first order validity of the bootstrap method...... and in simulations we observe that the bootstrap-based hypothesis test provides considerable finite-sample improvements over an existing test that is based on a central limit theorem. This is important when studying the roughness properties of time series data; we illustrate this by applying the bootstrap method...

  3. Gamma Irradiation for the Inhibition of Shrimp (Penaeus aztecus) Allergy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Jae-Hun; Lee Ju-Woon

    2000-01-01

    Food irradiation technology was conducted to reduce shrimp allergy. The experiment was designated in 3 portions as follows; A, the irradiation of raw shrimp; B the irradiation of shrimp and then cooking; and C, cooking the shrimp and then irradiation. Gamma irradiation was done with doses of 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 kGy. A shrimp sarcoplasmic protein solution (SSPS) and a myofibrillar protein solution (SMPS) were prepared from A portion. Cooked shrimp protein solutions were also prepared from B and C portions. The binding abilities of the shrimp allergic patients' IgE and mouse monoclonal Ab 4.9.5 (mAb 4.9.5), produced to the shrimp heat-stable protein, to each sample solution were determined by ELISA. Binding abilities of patients' IgE and mAb 4.9.5 to irradiated shrimp fractions were dose-dependently reduced. The cooking treatment after irradiation was more effective than the irradiation treatment after cooking in the reduction of the binding abilities of IgE and IgG. SDS-PAGE was performed to compare irradiated shrimp proteins with non-irradiated shrimp proteins. SDS-PAGE showed that no bands were changed by gamma irradiation. The results indicated that food irradiation with an adequate dose can be reduce allergenicity of shrimp

  4. Fractionalization and Entrepreneurial Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of the literature on ethnicity and entrepreneurship focuses on the construct of ethnic entrepreneurship. However, very little is known about how ethnic heterogeneity affects entrepreneurship. This study attempts to fill the gap, and thus examines the effect of ethnic heterogeneity on entrepreneurial activities in a cross-section of 90 countries. Using indices of ethnic and linguistic fractionalization, we show that ethnic heterogeneity negatively influences entrepreneurship....

  5. Fractional Number Operator and Associated Fractional Diffusion Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rguigui, Hafedh

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we study the fractional number operator as an analog of the finite-dimensional fractional Laplacian. An important relation with the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is given. Using a semigroup approach, the solution of the Cauchy problem associated to the fractional number operator is presented. By means of the Mittag-Leffler function and the Laplace transform, we give the solution of the Caputo time fractional diffusion equation and Riemann-Liouville time fractional diffusion equation in infinite dimensions associated to the fractional number operator.

  6. Brain fibronectin expression in prenatally irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meznarich, H.K.; McCoy, L.S.; Bale, T.L.; Stiegler, G.L.; Sikov, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Activation of gene transcription by radiation has been recently demonstrated in vivo. However, little is known on the specificity of these alterations on gene transcription. Prenatal irradiation is a known teratogen that affects the developing mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Altered neuronal migration has been suggested as a mechanism for abnormal development of prenatally irradiated brains. Fibronectin (FN), an extracellular glycoprotein, is essential for neural crest cell migration and neural cell growth. In addition, elevated levels of FN have been found in the extracellular matrix of irradiated lung. To test whether brain FN is affected by radiation, either FN level in insoluble matrix fraction or expression of FN mRNA was examined pre- and postnatally after irradiation. Mice (CD1), at 13 d of gestation (DG), served either as controls or were irradiated with 14 DG, 17 DG, or 5,6, or 14 d postnatal. Brain and liver were collected from offspring and analyzed for either total FN protein levels or relative mRNAs for FN and tubulin. Results of prenatal irradiation on reduction of postnatal brain weight relative to whole are comparable to that reported by others. Insoluble matrix fraction (IMF) per gram of brain, liver, lung, and heart weight was not significantly different either between control and irradiated groups or between postnatal stages, suggesting that radiation did not affect the IMF. However, total amounts of FN in brain IMF at 17 DG were significantly different (p < .02) between normal (1.66 ± 0.80 μg) and irradiated brains (0.58 ± 0.22 μg). FN mRNA was detectable at 13, 14, and 17 DG, but was not detectable at 6 and 14 d postnatal, indicating that FN mRNA is developmentally regulated. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Irradiation Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, Blerina; Carbonez, Pierre; Danzeca, Salvatore; Fabich, Adrian; Garcia, Alia, Ruben; Glaser, Maurice; Gorine, Georgi; Jaekel, Martin, Richard; Mateu,Suau, Isidre; Pezzullo, Giuseppe; Pozzi, Fabio; Ravotti, Federico; Silari, Marco; Tali, Maris

    2017-01-01

    CERN provides unique irradiation facilities for applications in many scientific fields. This paper summarizes the facilities currently operating for proton, gamma, mixed-field and electron irradiations, including their main usage, characteristics and information about their operation. The new CERN irradiation facilities database is also presented. This includes not only CERN facilities but also irradiation facilities available worldwide.

  8. LPV model for PV cell and fractional control of DC/DC converter for photovoltaic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez González, Rubén; Bolea Monte, Yolanda; Grau Saldes, Antoni; Martínez García, Herminio

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the fractional modelling of a DC-DC converter, suitable in solar-powered electrical generation systems, and the design of a fractional controller for the aforementioned switching converter. A new model for PV cells is proposed in order to obtain a linear equation for V-I characteristic via scheduling dependence of temperature and irradiance. Due to the fractional nature of the ultracapacitors this kind of controller gives a suitable and good performance. Peer Reviewed

  9. LPV model for PV cells and fractional control of DC/DC converter for photovoltaic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez González, Rubén; Bolea Monte, Yolanda; Grau Saldes, Antoni; Martínez García, Herminio

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the fractional modelling of a DC-DC converter, suitable in solar-powered electrical generation systems, and the design of a fractional controller for the aforementioned switching converter. A new model for PV cells is proposed in order to obtain a linear equation for VI characteristic via scheduling dependence of temperature and irradiance. Due to the fractional nature of the ultracapacitors this kind of controller gives a suitable and good performance. Peer Rev...

  10. Perspective on food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newsome, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    A brief review summarizes current scientific information on the safety and efficacy of irradiation processing of foods. Attention is focused on: specifics of the irradiation process and its effectiveness in food preservation; the historical development of food irradiation technology in the US; the response of the Institute of Food Technologists to proposed FDA guidelines for food irradiation; the potential uses of irradiation in the US food industry; and the findings of the absence of toxins and of unaltered nutrient density (except possibly for fats) in irradiated foods. The misconceptions of consumers concerning perceived hazards associated with food irradiation, as related to consumer acceptance, also are addressed

  11. Linear-quadratic model underestimates sparing effect of small doses per fraction in rat spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shun Wong, C.; Toronto University; Minkin, S.; Hill, R.P.; Toronto University

    1993-01-01

    The application of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model to describe iso-effective fractionation schedules for dose fraction sizes less than 2 Gy has been controversial. Experiments are described in which the effect of daily fractionated irradiation given with a wide range of fraction sizes was assessed in rat cervical spine cord. The first group of rats was given doses in 1, 2, 4, 8 and 40 fractions/day. The second group received 3 initial 'top-up'doses of 9 Gy given once daily, representing 3/4 tolerance, followed by doses in 1, 2, 10, 20, 30 and 40 fractions/day. The fractionated portion of the irradiation schedule therefore constituted only the final quarter of the tolerance dose. The endpoint of the experiments was paralysis of forelimbs secondary to white matter necrosis. Direct analysis of data from experiments with full course fractionation up to 40 fractions/day (25.0-1.98 Gy/fraction) indicated consistency with the LQ model yielding an α/β value of 2.41 Gy. Analysis of data from experiments in which the 3 'top-up' doses were followed by up to 10 fractions (10.0-1.64 Gy/fraction) gave an α/β value of 3.41 Gy. However, data from 'top-up' experiments with 20, 30 and 40 fractions (1.60-0.55 Gy/fraction) were inconsistent with LQ model and gave a very small α/β of 0.48 Gy. It is concluded that LQ model based on data from large doses/fraction underestimates the sparing effect of small doses/fraction, provided sufficient time is allowed between each fraction for repair of sublethal damage. (author). 28 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  12. Modulation of haemopoietic radiation response of mice by diclofenac in fractionated treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, M.; Pospisil, M.; Pipalova, I.; Hola, J.

    1996-01-01

    The effects were studied of diclofenac, an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis, on the acute radiation syndrome elicited in mice by fractionated irradiation. Several hematological parameters were evaluated in mice irradiated with 5x 2 Gy and 3x, 4x, or 5x 3 Gy (intervals between fractions 24 h) from a 60 Co gamma source. The animals were treated with diclofenac either before each fraction or only once before the last fraction. The survival of mice was recorded after the irradiation regimen of 5x 3 Gy followed by a ''top-up'' dose of 3.5 Gy given 24 h after the last radiation fraction. Statistically significant enhancement of the endogenous spleen colony and of leukopoiesis was found in mice treated with diclofenac repeatedly, as compared with both saline-treated irradiated controls and animals administered a single diclofenac dose, if a sublethal total radiation dose had been accumulated. However, following accumulation of a lethal radiation dose, slightly impaired survival was observed in mice given diclofenac. It follows from the results that diclofenac is a suitable drug for enhancing leukopoisesis impaired by sublethal fractionated irradiation. Nevertheless, the undesirable side effects of this drug affect adversely the survival of the experimental animals following a lethal accumulated radiation dose. 3 tabs., 3 figs.,32 refs

  13. Gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, Matheus Jatkoske

    2011-09-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrations of non-integers orders was introduced more than three centuries ago but only recently gained more attention due to its application on nonlocal phenomenas. In this context, several formulations of fractional electromagnetic fields was proposed, but all these theories suffer from the absence of an effective fractional vector calculus, and in general are non-causal or spatially asymmetric. In order to deal with these difficulties, we propose a spatially symmetric and causal gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic field from a Lagrangian formulation. From our fractional Maxwell's fields arose a definition for the fractional gradient, divergent and curl operators.

  14. The Extended Fractional Subequation Method for Nonlinear Fractional Differential Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jianping; Tang, Bo; Kumar, Sunil; Hou, Yanren

    2012-01-01

    An extended fractional subequation method is proposed for solving fractional differential equations by introducing a new general ansätz and Bäcklund transformation of the fractional Riccati equation with known solutions. Being concise and straightforward, this method is applied to the space-time fractional coupled Burgers’ equations and coupled MKdV equations. As a result, many exact solutions are obtained. It is shown that the considered method provides a very effective, convenient, and powe...

  15. Cellular localization of peptide hydrolases in chicken embryo tissues and influence of gamma irradiation on their activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khristov, D; Marinopolski, G

    1975-01-01

    Studied was the influence of chicken embryo irradiation at 600 R and 1000 R gamma rays on the activity of tissue peptide hydrolases in mitochondrial-lysosomal, microsomal and supernatant (cell hyaloplasm) cell fractions. The investigation was performed 50 to 168 hours post irradiation. The wole tissue (of the whole embryo) was examined following irradiation of 4-day-old embryos whose liver, muscle and brain tissues were post irradiation examined on day 12 and 16 of incubation. Prior to treatment, the tissues were threfold rinsed with sucrose solution to eliminate proeinase inhibitors. Lysosome membranes were destroyed by adding 0.5 % desoxycholate. It was found that: Peptide hydrolase activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal cell fractions of tissues of whole 6-day chicken embryos is 4-5 times as high as that of cell hyaloplasm. Peptide hydrolase activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal fractions of liver tissues decreases on day 18 and 19 post incubation, while the same fraction of muscle and brain tissues shows high activity. Peptide hydrolase activity of microsomal fraction and of cell hyaloplasm rises during embryonal development and exceeds the activity of liver tissue mitochondrial fraction. Peptide hydrolase activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction of tissue of whole 6-day-old embryos 50 hours post irradiation is higher than the activity of non-irradiated embryos. Later the activity of this fraction diminishes and on the 168 hr post irradiation it drops below the normal. Microsomal fraction and cell hyaloplasm activity likewise show deviation from the norm. Peptide hydrolase activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction of liver, muscle and brain tissue of 14 and 18-day-old embryos is higher than the control 50 hours post irradiation and then declines. The activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction of embryo brain tissue changes most strikingly on irradiation, while other brain cell fractions change less compared with liver and muscle fractions.

  16. Cellular localization of peptide hydrolases in chicken embryo tissues and influence of gamma irradiation on their activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khristov, D.; Marinopolski, G.

    1975-01-01

    Studied was the influence of chicken embryo irradiation at 600 R and 1000 R gamma rays on the activity of tissue peptide hydrolases in mitochondrial-lysosomal, microsomal and supernatant (cell hyaloplasm) cell fractions. The investigation was performed 50 to 168 hours post irradiation. The wole tissue (of the whole embryo) was examined following irradiation of 4-day-old embryos whose liver, muscle and brain tissues were post irradiation examined on day 12 and 16 of incubation. Prior to treatment, the tissues were threfold rinsed with sucrose solution to eliminate proeinase inhibitors. Lysosome membranes were destroyed by adding 0.5 % desoxycholate. It was found that: Peptide hydrolase activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal cell fractions of tissues of whole 6-day chicken embryos is 4-5 times as high as that of cell hyaloplasm. Peptide hydrolase activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal fractions of liver tissues decreases on day 18 and 19 post incubation, while the same fraction of muscle and brain tissues shows high activity. Peptide hydrolase activity of microsomal fraction and of cell hyaloplasm rises during embryonal development and exceeds the activity of liver tissue mitochondrial fraction. Peptide hydrolase activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction of tissue of whole 6-day-old embryos 50 hours post irradiation is higher than the activity of non-irradiated embryos. Later the activity of this fraction diminishes and on the 168 hr post irradiation it drops below the normal. Microsomal fraction and cell hyaloplasm activity likewise show deviation from the norm. Peptide hydrolase activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction of liver, muscle and brain tissue of 14 and 18-day-old embryos is higher than the control 50 hours post irradiation and then declines. The activity of mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction of embryo brain tissue changes most strikingly on irradiation, while other brain cell fractions change less compared with liver and muscle fractions

  17. Functional Fractional Calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Shantanu

    2011-01-01

    When a new extraordinary and outstanding theory is stated, it has to face criticism and skeptism, because it is beyond the usual concept. The fractional calculus though not new, was not discussed or developed for a long time, particularly for lack of its application to real life problems. It is extraordinary because it does not deal with 'ordinary' differential calculus. It is outstanding because it can now be applied to situations where existing theories fail to give satisfactory results. In this book not only mathematical abstractions are discussed in a lucid manner, with physical mathematic

  18. Fractional Reserve Banking

    OpenAIRE

    Andreasen, Niels; Bjerregaard, Mads; Lund, Jonas; Olsen, Ove Bitsch; Rasmussen, Andreas Dalgas

    2012-01-01

    Projektet er bygget op omkring kritisk realisme, som er det gennemgående videnskabelige fundament til undersøgelsen af hvilke strukturelle grunde der er til finansiel ustabilitet i Danmark. Projektet går i dybden med Fractional Reserve Banking og incitamentsstrukturen i banksystemet. Vi bevæger os både på det makro- og mikroøkonomiske niveau i analysen. På makro niveau bruger vi den østrigske skole om konjunktur teori (The Positive Theory of the Cycle). På mikro niveau arbejder vi med princip...

  19. Plasma fractionation issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Albert; Evers, Theo; Falcou, Pierre-Francois; Burnouf, Thierry; Amorim, Luiz; Thomas, Sylvia

    2009-04-01

    Procurement and processing of human plasma for fractionation of therapeutic proteins or biological medicines used in clinical practice is a multi-billion dollar international trade. Together the private sector and public sector (non-profit) provide large amounts of safe and effective therapeutic plasma proteins needed worldwide. The principal therapeutic proteins produced by the dichotomous industry include gamma globulins or immunoglobulins (including pathogen-specific hyperimmune globulins, such as hepatitis B immune globulins) albumin, factor VIII and Factor IX concentrates. Viral inactivation, principally by solvent detergent and other processes, has proven highly effective in preventing transmission of enveloped viruses, viz. HBV, HIV, and HCV.

  20. Advances in robust fractional control

    CERN Document Server

    Padula, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    This monograph presents design methodologies for (robust) fractional control systems. It shows the reader how to take advantage of the superior flexibility of fractional control systems compared with integer-order systems in achieving more challenging control requirements. There is a high degree of current interest in fractional systems and fractional control arising from both academia and industry and readers from both milieux are catered to in the text. Different design approaches having in common a trade-off between robustness and performance of the control system are considered explicitly. The text generalizes methodologies, techniques and theoretical results that have been successfully applied in classical (integer) control to the fractional case. The first part of Advances in Robust Fractional Control is the more industrially-oriented. It focuses on the design of fractional controllers for integer processes. In particular, it considers fractional-order proportional-integral-derivative controllers, becau...

  1. Repair in mouse lung of multifraction X rays and neutrons: extension to 40 fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkins, C.S.; Fowler, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    Repair parameters were calculated from measurements of breathing rate and lethality at monthly intervals up to 17 months after irradiation with 1, 10, 20 or 40 equal fractions, down to 1.1 Gy of x-rays and 0.18 Gy of 3 MeV neutrons per fraction. Sparing of neutron damage was negligible when the neutron dose was divided into multiple fractions; progressively greater repair of lung damage was seen after increasing x-ray fractions. Significant increase in the iso-effect dose for 40 x-ray fractions was found compared with 20, even at two fractions per day at six hour intervals, as was the case in the 40 fraction experiment. Data were well fitted by the linear quadratic formula for response vs. dose per fraction and the ratio γ/β yielded values of approx. 3 Gy after x-rays and 30 to 40 Gy after neutron irradiation, not different from γ/β ratios found for up to 20 fractions. Single dose RBE was less than 2, increasing to about six at the lowest dose per fraction measured, agreeing with previous results. The ratio of the γ component for neutrons to that for x-rays was approx. 8, which is therefore the limiting RBE predicted for infinitely small fractional doses. (U.K.)

  2. Search for fractional charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    A search was made for fractional charges of the form Z plus two-thirds e, where Z is an integer. It was assumed that the charges exist in natural form bound with other fractional charges in neutral molecules. It was further assumed that these neutral molecules are present in air. Two concentration schemes were employed. One sample was derived from the waste gases from a xenon distillation plant. This assumes that high mass, low vapor pressure components of air are concentrated along with the xenon. The second sample involved ionizing air, allowing a brief recombination period, and then collecting residual ions on the surface of titanium discs. Both samples were analyzed at the University of Rochester in a system using a tandem Van de Graff to accelerate particles through an essentially electrostatic beam handling system. The detector system employed both a Time of Flight and an energy-sensitive gas ionization detector. In the most sensitive mode of analysis, a gas absorber was inserted in the beam path to block the intense background. The presence of an absorber limited the search to highly penetrating particles. Effectively, this limited the search to particles with low Z and masses greater than roughly fifty GeV. The final sensitivities attained were on the order of 1 x 10 -20 for the ionized air sample and 1 x 10 -21 for the gas sample. A discussion of the caveats that could reduce the actual level of sensitivity is included

  3. Fractional Reserve in Banking System

    OpenAIRE

    Valkonen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is aimed to provide understanding of the role of the fractional reserve in the mod-ern banking system worldwide and particularly in Finland. The fractional reserve banking is used worldwide, but the benefits of this system are very disputable. On the one hand, experts say that the fractional reserve is a necessary instrument for the normal business and profit making. On the other hand, sceptics openly criticize the fractional reserve system and blame it for fiat money (money n...

  4. On matrix fractional differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Adem Kılıçman; Wasan Ajeel Ahmood

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study the matrix fractional differential equations and to find the exact solution for system of matrix fractional differential equations in terms of Riemann–Liouville using Laplace transform method and convolution product to the Riemann–Liouville fractional of matrices. Also, we show the theorem of non-homogeneous matrix fractional partial differential equation with some illustrative examples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new methodology. The main objec...

  5. Fractional Hopfield Neural Networks: Fractional Dynamic Associative Recurrent Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yi-Fei; Yi, Zhang; Zhou, Ji-Liu

    2017-10-01

    This paper mainly discusses a novel conceptual framework: fractional Hopfield neural networks (FHNN). As is commonly known, fractional calculus has been incorporated into artificial neural networks, mainly because of its long-term memory and nonlocality. Some researchers have made interesting attempts at fractional neural networks and gained competitive advantages over integer-order neural networks. Therefore, it is naturally makes one ponder how to generalize the first-order Hopfield neural networks to the fractional-order ones, and how to implement FHNN by means of fractional calculus. We propose to introduce a novel mathematical method: fractional calculus to implement FHNN. First, we implement fractor in the form of an analog circuit. Second, we implement FHNN by utilizing fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, and further analyze its attractors. Third, we perform experiments to analyze the stability and convergence of FHNN, and further discuss its applications to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. The main contribution of our work is to propose FHNN in the form of an analog circuit by utilizing a fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, prove its Lyapunov stability, analyze its attractors, and apply FHNN to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. A significant advantage of FHNN is that its attractors essentially relate to the neuron's fractional order. FHNN possesses the fractional-order-stability and fractional-order-sensitivity characteristics.

  6. The random continued fraction transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalle, Charlene; Kempton, Tom; Verbitskiy, Evgeny

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a random dynamical system related to continued fraction expansions. It uses random combinations of the Gauss map and the Rényi (or backwards) continued fraction map. We explore the continued fraction expansions that this system produces, as well as the dynamical properties of the system.

  7. How Weird Are Weird Fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuffelbeam, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    A positive rational is a weird fraction if its value is unchanged by an illegitimate, digit-based reduction. In this article, we prove that each weird fraction is uniquely weird and initiate a discussion of the prevalence of weird fractions.

  8. Do Children Understand Fraction Addition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, David W.; Tian, Jing; Siegler, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Many children fail to master fraction arithmetic even after years of instruction. A recent theory of fraction arithmetic (Braithwaite, Pyke, & Siegler, in press) hypothesized that this poor learning of fraction arithmetic procedures reflects poor conceptual understanding of them. To test this hypothesis, we performed three experiments…

  9. On fractional Fourier transform moments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alieva, T.; Bastiaans, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Based on the relation between the ambiguity function represented in a quasi-polar coordinate system and the fractional power spectra, the fractional Fourier transform moments are introduced. Important equalities for the global second-order fractional Fourier transform moments are derived and their

  10. Electron beam irradiating device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, K

    1969-12-20

    The efficiency of an electron beam irradiating device is heightened by improving the irradiation atmosphere and the method of cooling the irradiation window. An irradiation chamber one side of which incorporates the irradiation windows provided at the lower end of the scanner is surrounded by a suitable cooling system such as a coolant piping network so as to cool the interior of the chamber which is provided with circulating means at each corner to circulate and thus cool an inert gas charged therewithin. The inert gas, chosen from a group of such gases which will not deleteriously react with the irradiating equipment, forms a flowing stream across the irradiation window to effect its cooling and does not contaminate the vacuum exhaust system or oxidize the filament when penetrating the equipment through any holes which the foil at the irradiation window may incur during the irradiating procedure.

  11. Fractional dynamic calculus and fractional dynamic equations on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, Svetlin G

    2018-01-01

    Pedagogically organized, this monograph introduces fractional calculus and fractional dynamic equations on time scales in relation to mathematical physics applications and problems. Beginning with the definitions of forward and backward jump operators, the book builds from Stefan Hilger’s basic theories on time scales and examines recent developments within the field of fractional calculus and fractional equations. Useful tools are provided for solvi