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Sample records for fractional ornstein-uhlenbeck process

  1. Some properties of the fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Litan; Lu Yunsheng; Xu Zhiqiang

    2008-01-01

    We consider the fractional analogue of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, i.e. the solution of the Langevin equation driven by a fractional Brownian motion in place of the usual Brownian motion. We establish some properties of these processes. We show that the process is local nondeterminism. For a two-dimensional process we show that its renormalized self-intersection local time exists in L 2 if and only if 0< H<3/4

  2. The Fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høg, Esben; Frederiksen, Per H.

    The paper revisits dynamic term structure models (DTSMs) and proposes a new way in dealing with the limitation of the classical affine models. In particular, this paper expands the flexibility of the DTSMs by applying a fractional Brownian motion as the governing force of the state variable inste...... of the bond is recovered by solving a fractional version of the fundamental bond pricing equation. Besides this theoretical contribution, the paper proposes an estimation methodology based on the Kalman filter approach, which is applied to the US term structure of interest rates....

  3. Ornstein-Uhlenbeck Processes Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzmina, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we give a brief introduction to Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes and their simulation methods. Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes were introduced by Barndorff-Nielsen and Shephard (2001) as a model to describe volatility in finance. Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes are based on Levy processes. Levy processes simulation may be found in [1, 2].

  4. Quasi Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Basse-O'Connor, Andreas

    The question of existence and properties of stationary solutions to Langevin equations driven by noise processes with stationary increments is discussed, with particular focus on noise processes of pseudo moving average type. On account of the Wold-Karhunen decomposition theorem such solutions...... of the associated autocorrelation functions, both for small and large lags. Applications to Gaussian and Lévy driven fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes are presented. As an element in the derivations a Fubini theorem for Lévy bases is established....

  5. Ergodicity and Parameter Estimates for Infinite-Dimensional Fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslowski, Bohdan; Pospisil, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Existence and ergodicity of a strictly stationary solution for linear stochastic evolution equations driven by cylindrical fractional Brownian motion are proved. Ergodic behavior of non-stationary infinite-dimensional fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes is also studied. Based on these results, strong consistency of suitably defined families of parameter estimators is shown. The general results are applied to linear parabolic and hyperbolic equations perturbed by a fractional noise

  6. Fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck for index prices of FTSE Bursa Malaysia KLCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kho Chia; Bahar, Arifah; Ting, Chee-Ming

    2014-07-01

    This paper studies the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model that incorporates long memory stochastic volatility which is known as fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model. The determination of the existence of long range dependence of the index prices of FTSE Bursa Malaysia KLCI is measured by the Hurst exponent. The empirical distribution of unobserved volatility is estimated using the particle filtering method. The performance between fractional Ornstein -Uhlenbeck and standard Ornstein -Uhlenbeck process had been compared. The mean square errors of the fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model indicated that the model describes index prices better than the standard Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process.

  7. Weyl and Riemann-Liouville multifractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S C; Teo, L P

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers two new multifractional stochastic processes, namely the Weyl multifractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and the Riemann-Liouville multifractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Basic properties of these processes such as locally self-similar property and Hausdorff dimension are studied. The relationship between the multifractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes and the corresponding multifractional Brownian motions is established

  8. Quasi Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Basse-O'Connor, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The question of existence and properties of stationary solutions to Langevin equations driven by noise processes with stationary increments is discussed, with particular focus on noise processes of pseudo-moving-average type. On account of the Wold–Karhunen decomposition theorem, such solutions are...... of the associated autocorrelation functions, both for small and large lags. Applications to Gaussian- and Lévy-driven fractional Ornstein–Uhlenbeck processes are presented. A Fubini theorem for Lévy bases is established as an element in the derivations....

  9. Generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes and associated self-similar processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S C; Muniandy, S V

    2003-01-01

    We consider three types of generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes: the stationary process obtained from the Lamperti transformation of fractional Brownian motion, the process with stretched exponential covariance and the process obtained from the solution of the fractional Langevin equation. These stationary Gaussian processes have many common properties, such as the fact that their local covariances share a similar structure and they exhibit identical spectral densities at large frequency limit. In addition, the generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes can be shown to be local stationary representations of fractional Brownian motion. Two new self-similar Gaussian processes, in addition to fractional Brownian motion, are obtained by applying the (inverse) Lamperti transformation to the generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes. We study some of the properties of these self-similar processes such as the long-range dependence. We give a simulation of their sample paths based on numerical Karhunan-Loeve expansion

  10. Generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes and associated self-similar processes

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, S C

    2003-01-01

    We consider three types of generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes: the stationary process obtained from the Lamperti transformation of fractional Brownian motion, the process with stretched exponential covariance and the process obtained from the solution of the fractional Langevin equation. These stationary Gaussian processes have many common properties, such as the fact that their local covariances share a similar structure and they exhibit identical spectral densities at large frequency limit. In addition, the generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes can be shown to be local stationary representations of fractional Brownian motion. Two new self-similar Gaussian processes, in addition to fractional Brownian motion, are obtained by applying the (inverse) Lamperti transformation to the generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes. We study some of the properties of these self-similar processes such as the long-range dependence. We give a simulation of their sample paths based on numerical Karhunan-Loeve expansi...

  11. Spectral properties of superpositions of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Leonenko, N.N.

    2005-01-01

    Stationary processes with prescribed one-dimensional marginal laws and long-range dependence are constructed. The asymptotic properties of the spectral densities are studied. The possibility of Mittag-Leffler decay in the autocorrelation function of superpositions of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type...... processes is proved....

  12. Representations of Urbanik's classes and multiparameter Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graversen, Svend-Erik; Pedersen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    A class of integrals with respect to homogeneous Lévy bases on Rk is considered. In the one-dimensional case k=1 this class corresponds to the selfdecomposable distributions. Necessary and sufficient conditions for existence as well as some representations of the integrals are given. Generalizing...... the one-dimensional case it is shown that the class of integrals corresponds to Urbanik's class Lk-1(R). Finally, multiparameter Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes are defined and studied....

  13. A note on a representation and calculation of the long-memory Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høg, Esben

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the covariance function for a long memory generalization of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type processes which are the analogues in continuous time of long memory autoregressions of order 1. A Fractional Brownian Motion with drift is a special case. We find the exact expression...

  14. Integrated stationary Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, and double integral processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abundo, Mario; Pirozzi, Enrica

    2018-03-01

    We find a representation of the integral of the stationary Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (ISOU) process in terms of Brownian motion Bt; moreover, we show that, under certain conditions on the functions f and g , the double integral process (DIP) D(t) = ∫βt g(s) (∫αs f(u) dBu) ds can be thought as the integral of a suitable Gauss-Markov process. Some theoretical and application details are given, among them we provide a simulation formula based on that representation by which sample paths, probability densities and first passage times of the ISOU process are obtained; the first-passage times of the DIP are also studied.

  15. On the time-homogeneous Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process in the foreign exchange rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Regina C. B.; Matsushita, Raul Y.; de Castro, Márcio T.; Figueiredo, Annibal

    2015-10-01

    Since Gaussianity and stationarity assumptions cannot be fulfilled by financial data, the time-homogeneous Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (THOU) process was introduced as a candidate model to describe time series of financial returns [1]. It is an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) process in which these assumptions are replaced by linearity and time-homogeneity. We employ the OU and THOU processes to analyze daily foreign exchange rates against the US dollar. We confirm that the OU process does not fit the data, while in most cases the first four cumulants patterns from data can be described by the THOU process. However, there are some exceptions in which the data do not follow linearity or time-homogeneity assumptions.

  16. KNO scaling functions given by Buras and Koba and by Barshay and Yamaguchi, and stochastic Rayleigh and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biyajima, M.

    1984-01-01

    Stochastic backgrounds of the KNO scaling functions given by Buras and Koba and by Barshay and Yamaguchi are investigated. It is found that they are connected with the stochastic Rayleigh process, and the (1+2)- and (1+4)-dimensional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Moreover those KNO scaling functions are transformed into the KNO scaling functions given by the Perina-McGill formula in terms of a nonlinear transformation. Analyses of data by means of them are made. Probability distributions of the former KNO scaling functions are also calculated by the Poisson transformation. (orig.)

  17. Construction of a Family of Quantum Ornstein-Uhlenbeck Semigroups

    CERN Document Server

    Ki Ko, C

    2003-01-01

    For a given quasi-free state on the CCR algebra over one dimensional Hilbert space, a family of Markovian semigroups which leave the quasi-free state invariant is constructed by means of noncommutative elliptic operators and Dirichlet forms on von Neumann algebras. The generators (Dirichlet operators) of the semigroups are analyzed and the spectrums together with eigenspaces are found. When restricted to a maximal abelian subalgebra, the semigroups are reduced to a unique Markovian semigroup of classical Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process.

  18. Parameter estimation from observations of first-passage times of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and the Feller process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Susanne Dalager; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2008-01-01

    a subjective graphical test of the applicability of the OU process or the Feller process when applied to a reasonably large sample of observed first-passage data. These non-stationary processes have several applications in biomedical research, for example as idealized models of the neuron membrane potential...... random time break through to the material surface and become observable. However, the OU process has as a model of physical phenomena the defect of not being bounded to the negative side. This defect is not present for the Feller process, which therefore may provide a useful modeling alternative...

  19. Tarificación de bonos sobre catástrofes (cat bonds con desencadenantes de índices de pérdidas. Modelación mediante un proceso de Ornstein-Uhlenbeck || Pricing Loss Index Triggered Cat Bonds. An Ornstein-Uhlenbeck Process-Based Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Fructuoso, María José

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo propone un modelo aleatorio en tiempo continuo para calcular el índice de pérdidas desencadenante de los bonos sobre catástrofes a partir de la cuantía declarada de siniestros hasta el momento de su vencimiento. Bajo la hipótesis de que la cuantía total de una catástrofe se define como la suma de la cuantía declarada de siniestros y la cuantía de siniestros pendiente de declarar, modelizamos la dinámica lineal decreciente de esta última cuantía mediante un proceso browniano aditivo o proceso de Ornstein-Uhlenbeck. La cuantía declarada de siniestros, entonces, se obtiene por diferencia entre la cuantía total de los siniestros y la cuantía de siniestros pendiente de declarar. Finalmente, se comprueba la validez del modelo propuesto estimando sus parámetros fundamentales y contrastando la bondad del ajuste realizado sobre una muestra de series de datos de seis inundaciones ocurridas en diferentes localidades españolas propensas a sufrir este tipo de catástrofes. || This paper develops a continuous-time random model of loss index triggers for cat bonds on the basis of the loss amount incurred until their maturity. Assuming that total loss amount due to a catastrophe is defined as the sum of the incurred loss amount plus the incurred-but-not-yet reported loss amount, we model the decreasing linear dynamics of the latter amount by means of an additive Brownian process (or Ornstein Uhlenbeck process; and get the former by the difference between the total loss amount and the incurred-but-not-yet-reported loss amount. Finally, we test the validity of the model by estimating its core parameters and by contrasting the goodness of fit through a data series of six floods occurred in several Spanish cities prone to suffer such kind of catastrophes.

  20. Conducting properties of classical transmission lines with Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, E.; Diez, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we study the behavior of bands of extended states and localized states which appear in classical disordered electrical transmission lines, when we use a ternary map and the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process to generate the long-range correlated disorder, instead of using the Fourier filtering method. By performing finite-size scaling we obtain the asymptotic value of the map parameter b in the thermodynamic limit in a selected range of values of the parameters γ and C of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. With these data we obtain the phase diagrams which separate the localized states from the extended states. These are the fundamental results of this article. - Highlights: → We study disordered classical transmission lines. → We use the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process to generate long-range correlated disorder. → We obtain the phase diagram of the transition in the thermodynamic limit.

  1. Stochastic Resonance in Neuronal Network Motifs with Ornstein-Uhlenbeck Colored Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuyang Lou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider here the effect of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck colored noise on the stochastic resonance of the feed-forward-loop (FFL network motif. The FFL motif is modeled through the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model as well as the chemical coupling. Our results show that the noise intensity and the correlation time of the noise process serve as the control parameters, which have great impacts on the stochastic dynamics of the FFL motif. We find that, with a proper choice of noise intensities and the correlation time of the noise process, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR can display more than one peak.

  2. On the stochastic pendulum with Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallick, Kirone; Marcq, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    We study a frictionless pendulum subject to multiplicative random noise. Because of destructive interference between the angular displacement of the system and the noise term, the energy fluctuations are reduced when the noise has a non-zero correlation time. We derive the long time behaviour of the pendulum in the case of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise by a recursive adiabatic elimination procedure. An analytical expression for the asymptotic probability distribution function of the energy is obtained and the results agree with numerical simulations. Lastly, we compare our method with other approximation schemes

  3. Memory effects on a resonate-and-fire neuron model subjected to Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paekivi, S.; Mankin, R.; Rekker, A.

    2017-10-01

    We consider a generalized Langevin equation with an exponentially decaying memory kernel as a model for the firing process of a resonate-and-fire neuron. The effect of temporally correlated random neuronal input is modeled as Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise. In the noise-induced spiking regime of the neuron, we derive exact analytical formulas for the dependence of some statistical characteristics of the output spike train, such as the probability distribution of the interspike intervals (ISIs) and the survival probability, on the parameters of the input stimulus. Particularly, on the basis of these exact expressions, we have established sufficient conditions for the occurrence of memory-time-induced transitions between unimodal and multimodal structures of the ISI density and a critical damping coefficient which marks a dynamical transition in the behavior of the system.

  4. Diffusion of Brownian particles in a tilted periodic potential under the influence of an external Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhan-Wu; Zhang, Wei

    2018-01-01

    The diffusion behaviors of Brownian particles in a tilted periodic potential under the influence of an internal white noise and an external Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise are investigated through numerical simulation. In contrast to the case when the bias force is smaller or absent, the diffusion coefficient exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence on the correlation time of the external noise when bias force is large. A mechanism different from locked-to-running transition theory is presented for the diffusion enhancement by a bias force in intermediate to large damping. In the underdamped regime and the presence of external noise, the diffusion coefficient is a monotonically decreasing function of low temperature rather than a nonmonotonic function when external noise is absent. The diffusive process undergoes four regimes when bias force approaches but is less than its critical value and noises intensities are small. These behaviors can be attributed to the locked-to-running transition of particles.

  5. Predicting animal home-range structure and transitions using a multistate Ornstein-Uhlenbeck biased random walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed, Greg A; Golson, Emily A; Tinker, M Tim

    2017-01-01

    The home-range concept is central in animal ecology and behavior, and numerous mechanistic models have been developed to understand home range formation and maintenance. These mechanistic models usually assume a single, contiguous home range. Here we describe and implement a simple home-range model that can accommodate multiple home-range centers, form complex shapes, allow discontinuities in use patterns, and infer how external and internal variables affect movement and use patterns. The model assumes individuals associate with two or more home-range centers and move among them with some estimable probability. Movement in and around home-range centers is governed by a two-dimensional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, while transitions between centers are modeled as a stochastic state-switching process. We augmented this base model by introducing environmental and demographic covariates that modify transition probabilities between home-range centers and can be estimated to provide insight into the movement process. We demonstrate the model using telemetry data from sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in California. The model was fit using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, which estimated transition probabilities, as well as unique Ornstein-Uhlenbeck diffusion and centralizing tendency parameters. Estimated parameters could then be used to simulate movement and space use that was virtually indistinguishable from real data. We used Deviance Information Criterion (DIC) scores to assess model fit and determined that both wind and reproductive status were predictive of transitions between home-range centers. Females were less likely to move between home-range centers on windy days, less likely to move between centers when tending pups, and much more likely to move between centers just after weaning a pup. These tendencies are predicted by theoretical movement rules but were not previously known and show that our model can extract meaningful behavioral insight from complex

  6. Estimation of stochastic volatility by using Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Maria C.; Bhuiyan, Md Al Masum; Tweneboah, Osei K.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we develop a technique for estimating the stochastic volatility (SV) of a financial time series by using Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type models. Using the daily closing prices from developed and emergent stock markets, we conclude that the incorporation of stochastic volatility into the time varying parameter estimation significantly improves the forecasting performance via Maximum Likelihood Estimation. Furthermore, our estimation algorithm is feasible with large data sets and have good convergence properties.

  7. Randomness and variability of the neuronal activity described by the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Košťál, Lubomír; Lánský, Petr; Zucca, Ch.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2007), s. 63-75 ISSN 0954-898X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1ET400110401; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB100110701 Grant - others:MIUR(IT) PRIN-Cofin 2005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Ornstein-Uhlenbeck * entropy * randomness Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.385, year: 2007

  8. A cautionary note on the use of Ornstein Uhlenbeck models in macroevolutionary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Natalie; Thomas, Gavin H; Venditti, Chris; Meade, Andrew; Freckleton, Rob P

    2016-05-01

    Phylogenetic comparative methods are increasingly used to give new insights into the dynamics of trait evolution in deep time. For continuous traits the core of these methods is a suite of models that attempt to capture evolutionary patterns by extending the Brownian constant variance model. However, the properties of these models are often poorly understood, which can lead to the misinterpretation of results. Here we focus on one of these models - the Ornstein Uhlenbeck (OU) model. We show that the OU model is frequently incorrectly favoured over simpler models when using Likelihood ratio tests, and that many studies fitting this model use datasets that are small and prone to this problem. We also show that very small amounts of error in datasets can have profound effects on the inferences derived from OU models. Our results suggest that simulating fitted models and comparing with empirical results is critical when fitting OU and other extensions of the Brownian model. We conclude by making recommendations for best practice in fitting OU models in phylogenetic comparative analyses, and for interpreting the parameters of the OU model.

  9. Stochastic rocket dynamics under random nozzle side loads: Ornstein-Uhlenbeck boundary layer separation and its coarse grained connection to side loading and rocket response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keanini, R.G.; Srivastava, N.; Tkacik, P.T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28078 (United States); Weggel, D.C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, 9201 University City Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28078 (United States); Knight, P.D. [Mitchell Aerospace and Engineering, Statesville, North Carolina 28677 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    A long-standing, though ill-understood problem in rocket dynamics, rocket response to random, altitude-dependent nozzle side-loads, is investigated. Side loads arise during low altitude flight due to random, asymmetric, shock-induced separation of in-nozzle boundary layers. In this paper, stochastic evolution of the in-nozzle boundary layer separation line, an essential feature underlying side load generation, is connected to random, altitude-dependent rotational and translational rocket response via a set of simple analytical models. Separation line motion, extant on a fast boundary layer time scale, is modeled as an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Pitch and yaw responses, taking place on a long, rocket dynamics time scale, are shown to likewise evolve as OU processes. Stochastic, altitude-dependent rocket translational motion follows from linear, asymptotic versions of the full nonlinear equations of motion; the model is valid in the practical limit where random pitch, yaw, and roll rates all remain small. Computed altitude-dependent rotational and translational velocity and displacement statistics are compared against those obtained using recently reported high fidelity simulations [Srivastava, Tkacik, and Keanini, J. Appl. Phys. 108, 044911 (2010)]; in every case, reasonable agreement is observed. As an important prelude, evidence indicating the physical consistency of the model introduced in the above article is first presented: it is shown that the study's separation line model allows direct derivation of experimentally observed side load amplitude and direction densities. Finally, it is found that the analytical models proposed in this paper allow straightforward identification of practical approaches for: (i) reducing pitch/yaw response to side loads, and (ii) enhancing pitch/yaw damping once side loads cease. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Fractional Number Operator and Associated Fractional Diffusion Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rguigui, Hafedh

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we study the fractional number operator as an analog of the finite-dimensional fractional Laplacian. An important relation with the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is given. Using a semigroup approach, the solution of the Cauchy problem associated to the fractional number operator is presented. By means of the Mittag-Leffler function and the Laplace transform, we give the solution of the Caputo time fractional diffusion equation and Riemann-Liouville time fractional diffusion equation in infinite dimensions associated to the fractional number operator.

  11. Predicting animal home-range structure and transitions using a multistate Ornstein-Uhlenbeck biased random walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed, Greg A.; Golson, Emily A.; Tinker, M. Tim

    2017-01-01

    The home‐range concept is central in animal ecology and behavior, and numerous mechanistic models have been developed to understand home range formation and maintenance. These mechanistic models usually assume a single, contiguous home range. Here we describe and implement a simple home‐range model that can accommodate multiple home‐range centers, form complex shapes, allow discontinuities in use patterns, and infer how external and internal variables affect movement and use patterns. The model assumes individuals associate with two or more home‐range centers and move among them with some estimable probability. Movement in and around home‐range centers is governed by a two‐dimensional Ornstein‐Uhlenbeck process, while transitions between centers are modeled as a stochastic state‐switching process. We augmented this base model by introducing environmental and demographic covariates that modify transition probabilities between home‐range centers and can be estimated to provide insight into the movement process. We demonstrate the model using telemetry data from sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in California. The model was fit using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, which estimated transition probabilities, as well as unique Ornstein‐Uhlenbeck diffusion and centralizing tendency parameters. Estimated parameters could then be used to simulate movement and space use that was virtually indistinguishable from real data. We used Deviance Information Criterion (DIC) scores to assess model fit and determined that both wind and reproductive status were predictive of transitions between home‐range centers. Females were less likely to move between home‐range centers on windy days, less likely to move between centers when tending pups, and much more likely to move between centers just after weaning a pup. These tendencies are predicted by theoretical movement rules but were not previously known and show that our model can extract meaningful

  12. Fractional Poincaré inequalities for general measures

    KAUST Repository

    Mouhot, Clé ment; Russ, Emmanuel; Sire, Yannick

    2011-01-01

    on the fractional derivative in terms of a weight growing at infinity. The proof goes through the introduction of the generator of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck semigroup and some careful estimates of its powers. To our knowledge this is the first proof of fractional

  13. Simple simulation schemes for CIR and Wishart processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pisani, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    We develop some simple simulation algorithms for CIR and Wishart processes. The main idea is the splitting of their generator into the sum of the square of an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck matrix process and a deterministic process. Joint work with Paolo Baldi, Tor Vergata University, Rome...

  14. Statistics of zero crossings in rough interfaces with fractional elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorategui, Arturo L.; Lecomte, Vivien; Kolton, Alejandro B.

    2018-04-01

    We study numerically the distribution of zero crossings in one-dimensional elastic interfaces described by an overdamped Langevin dynamics with periodic boundary conditions. We model the elastic forces with a Riesz-Feller fractional Laplacian of order z =1 +2 ζ , such that the interfaces spontaneously relax, with a dynamical exponent z , to a self-affine geometry with roughness exponent ζ . By continuously increasing from ζ =-1 /2 (macroscopically flat interface described by independent Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes [Phys. Rev. 36, 823 (1930), 10.1103/PhysRev.36.823]) to ζ =3 /2 (super-rough Mullins-Herring interface), three different regimes are identified: (I) -1 /2 value in the system size, or decays as a power-law towards (II) a subextensive or (III) an intensive value. In the steady state, the distribution of intervals between zeros changes from an exponential decay in (I) to a power-law decay P (ℓ ) ˜ℓ-γ in (II) and (III). While in (II) γ =1 -θ with θ =1 -ζ the steady-state persistence exponent, in (III) we obtain γ =3 -2 ζ , different from the exponent γ =1 expected from the prediction θ =0 for infinite super-rough interfaces with ζ >1 . The effect on P (ℓ ) of short-scale smoothening is also analyzed numerically and analytically. A tight relation between the mean interval, the mean width of the interface, and the density of zeros is also reported. The results drawn from our analysis of rough interfaces subject to particular boundary conditions or constraints, along with discretization effects, are relevant for the practical analysis of zeros in interface imaging experiments or in numerical analysis.

  15. Reduced equations of motion for quantum systems driven by diffusive Markov processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarovar, Mohan; Grace, Matthew D

    2012-09-28

    The expansion of a stochastic Liouville equation for the coupled evolution of a quantum system and an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process into a hierarchy of coupled differential equations is a useful technique that simplifies the simulation of stochastically driven quantum systems. We expand the applicability of this technique by completely characterizing the class of diffusive Markov processes for which a useful hierarchy of equations can be derived. The expansion of this technique enables the examination of quantum systems driven by non-Gaussian stochastic processes with bounded range. We present an application of this extended technique by simulating Stark-tuned Förster resonance transfer in Rydberg atoms with nonperturbative position fluctuations.

  16. Fractional Poincaré inequalities for general measures

    KAUST Repository

    Mouhot, Clément

    2011-01-01

    We prove a fractional version of Poincaré inequalities in the context of Rn endowed with a fairly general measure. Namely we prove a control of an L2 norm by a non-local quantity, which plays the role of the gradient in the standard Poincaré inequality. The assumption on the measure is the fact that it satisfies the classical Poincaré inequality, so that our result is an improvement of the latter inequality. Moreover we also quantify the tightness at infinity provided by the control on the fractional derivative in terms of a weight growing at infinity. The proof goes through the introduction of the generator of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck semigroup and some careful estimates of its powers. To our knowledge this is the first proof of fractional Poincaré inequality for measures more general than Lévy measures. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. The large deviation principle and steady-state fluctuation theorem for the entropy production rate of a stochastic process in magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yong; Ge, Hao; Xiong, Jie; Xu, Lihu

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuation theorem is one of the major achievements in the field of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics during the past two decades. There exist very few results for steady-state fluctuation theorem of sample entropy production rate in terms of large deviation principle for diffusion processes due to the technical difficulties. Here we give a proof for the steady-state fluctuation theorem of a diffusion process in magnetic fields, with explicit expressions of the free energy function and rate function. The proof is based on the Karhunen-Loève expansion of complex-valued Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process.

  18. On the dependence structure of Gaussian queues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es-Saghouani, A.; Mandjes, M.R.H.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we study Gaussian queues (that is, queues fed by Gaussian processes, such as fractional Brownian motion (fBm) and the integrated Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (iOU) process), with a focus on the dependence structure of the workload process. The main question is to what extent does the workload

  19. Fractional Poisson process (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaotian; Wen Zhixiong; Zhang Shiying

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a stochastic process W H (t)(H-bar (12,1)) which we call fractional Poisson process. The process W H (t) is self-similar in wide sense, displays long range dependence, and has more fatter tail than Gaussian process. In addition, it converges to fractional Brownian motion in distribution

  20. Multivariate supOU processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Stelzer, Robert

    Univariate superpositions of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) type processes, called supOU processes, provide a class of continuous time processes capable of exhibiting long memory behaviour. This paper introduces multivariate supOU processes and gives conditions for their existence and finiteness...... of moments. Moreover, the second order moment structure is explicitly calculated, and examples exhibit the possibility of long range dependence. Our supOU processes are defined via homogeneous and factorisable Lévy bases. We show that the behaviour of supOU processes is particularly nice when the mean...... reversion parameter is restricted to normal matrices and especially to strictly negative definite ones.For finite variation Lévy bases we are able to give conditions for supOU processes to have locally bounded càdlàg paths of finite variation and to show an analogue of the stochastic differential equation...

  1. Mixtures in nonstable Levy processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroni, N Cufaro

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the Levy processes produced by means of two interconnected classes of nonstable, infinitely divisible distribution: the variance gamma and the Student laws. While the variance gamma family is closed under convolution, the Student one is not: this makes its time evolution more complicated. We prove that-at least for one particular type of Student processes suggested by recent empirical results, and for integral times-the distribution of the process is a mixture of other types of Student distributions, randomized by means of a new probability distribution. The mixture is such that along the time the asymptotic behaviour of the probability density functions always coincide with that of the generating Student law. We put forward the conjecture that this can be a general feature of the Student processes. We finally analyse the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process driven by our Levy noises and show a few simulations of it

  2. Maximum likelihood estimation for integrated diffusion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baltazar-Larios, Fernando; Sørensen, Michael

    We propose a method for obtaining maximum likelihood estimates of parameters in diffusion models when the data is a discrete time sample of the integral of the process, while no direct observations of the process itself are available. The data are, moreover, assumed to be contaminated...... EM-algorithm to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters in the diffusion model. As part of the algorithm, we use a recent simple method for approximate simulation of diffusion bridges. In simulation studies for the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and the CIR process the proposed method works...... by measurement errors. Integrated volatility is an example of this type of observations. Another example is ice-core data on oxygen isotopes used to investigate paleo-temperatures. The data can be viewed as incomplete observations of a model with a tractable likelihood function. Therefore we propose a simulated...

  3. Nonhomogeneous fractional Poisson processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xiaotian [School of Management, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)]. E-mail: swa001@126.com; Zhang Shiying [School of Management, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Fan Shen [Computer and Information School, Zhejiang Wanli University, Ningbo 315100 (China)

    2007-01-15

    In this paper, we propose a class of non-Gaussian stationary increment processes, named nonhomogeneous fractional Poisson processes W{sub H}{sup (j)}(t), which permit the study of the effects of long-range dependance in a large number of fields including quantum physics and finance. The processes W{sub H}{sup (j)}(t) are self-similar in a wide sense, exhibit more fatter tail than Gaussian processes, and converge to the Gaussian processes in distribution in some cases. In addition, we also show that the intensity function {lambda}(t) strongly influences the existence of the highest finite moment of W{sub H}{sup (j)}(t) and the behaviour of the tail probability of W{sub H}{sup (j)}(t)

  4. Nonhomogeneous fractional Poisson processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaotian; Zhang Shiying; Fan Shen

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a class of non-Gaussian stationary increment processes, named nonhomogeneous fractional Poisson processes W H (j) (t), which permit the study of the effects of long-range dependance in a large number of fields including quantum physics and finance. The processes W H (j) (t) are self-similar in a wide sense, exhibit more fatter tail than Gaussian processes, and converge to the Gaussian processes in distribution in some cases. In addition, we also show that the intensity function λ(t) strongly influences the existence of the highest finite moment of W H (j) (t) and the behaviour of the tail probability of W H (j) (t)

  5. Neural network connectivity and response latency modelled by stochastic processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamborrino, Massimiliano

    is connected to thousands of other neurons. The rst question is: how to model neural networks through stochastic processes? A multivariate Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, obtained as a diffusion approximation of a jump process, is the proposed answer. Obviously, dependencies between neurons imply dependencies......Stochastic processes and their rst passage times have been widely used to describe the membrane potential dynamics of single neurons and to reproduce neuronal spikes, respectively.However, cerebral cortex in human brains is estimated to contain 10-20 billions of neurons and each of them...... between their spike times. Therefore, the second question is: how to detect neural network connectivity from simultaneously recorded spike trains? Answering this question corresponds to investigate the joint distribution of sequences of rst passage times. A non-parametric method based on copulas...

  6. On diffusion processes with variable drift rates as models for decision making during learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckhoff, P; Holmes, P; Law, C; Connolly, P M; Gold, J I

    2008-01-01

    We investigate Ornstein-Uhlenbeck and diffusion processes with variable drift rates as models of evidence accumulation in a visual discrimination task. We derive power-law and exponential drift-rate models and characterize how parameters of these models affect the psychometric function describing performance accuracy as a function of stimulus strength and viewing time. We fit the models to psychophysical data from monkeys learning the task to identify parameters that best capture performance as it improves with training. The most informative parameter was the overall drift rate describing the signal-to-noise ratio of the sensory evidence used to form the decision, which increased steadily with training. In contrast, secondary parameters describing the time course of the drift during motion viewing did not exhibit steady trends. The results indicate that relatively simple versions of the diffusion model can fit behavior over the course of training, thereby giving a quantitative account of learning effects on the underlying decision process

  7. A non-Gaussian Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model for pricing wind power futures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benth, Fred Espen; Pircalabu, Anca

    2018-01-01

    generated assuming a recent level of installed capacity. Also, based on one year of observed prices for wind power futures with different delivery periods, we study the market price of risk. Generally, we find a negative risk premium whose magnitude decreases as the length of the delivery period increases....

  8. On a Fractional Binomial Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahoy, Dexter O.; Polito, Federico

    2012-02-01

    The classical binomial process has been studied by Jakeman (J. Phys. A 23:2815-2825, 1990) (and the references therein) and has been used to characterize a series of radiation states in quantum optics. In particular, he studied a classical birth-death process where the chance of birth is proportional to the difference between a larger fixed number and the number of individuals present. It is shown that at large times, an equilibrium is reached which follows a binomial process. In this paper, the classical binomial process is generalized using the techniques of fractional calculus and is called the fractional binomial process. The fractional binomial process is shown to preserve the binomial limit at large times while expanding the class of models that include non-binomial fluctuations (non-Markovian) at regular and small times. As a direct consequence, the generality of the fractional binomial model makes the proposed model more desirable than its classical counterpart in describing real physical processes. More statistical properties are also derived.

  9. Fractional Processes and Fractional-Order Signal Processing Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sheng, Hu; Qiu, TianShuang

    2012-01-01

    Fractional processes are widely found in science, technology and engineering systems. In Fractional Processes and Fractional-order Signal Processing, some complex random signals, characterized by the presence of a heavy-tailed distribution or non-negligible dependence between distant observations (local and long memory), are introduced and examined from the ‘fractional’ perspective using simulation, fractional-order modeling and filtering and realization of fractional-order systems. These fractional-order signal processing (FOSP) techniques are based on fractional calculus, the fractional Fourier transform and fractional lower-order moments. Fractional Processes and Fractional-order Signal Processing: • presents fractional processes of fixed, variable and distributed order studied as the output of fractional-order differential systems; • introduces FOSP techniques and the fractional signals and fractional systems point of view; • details real-world-application examples of FOSP techniques to demonstr...

  10. Multivariate fractional Poisson processes and compound sums

    OpenAIRE

    Beghin, Luisa; Macci, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present multivariate space-time fractional Poisson processes by considering common random time-changes of a (finite-dimensional) vector of independent classical (non-fractional) Poisson processes. In some cases we also consider compound processes. We obtain some equations in terms of some suitable fractional derivatives and fractional difference operators, which provides the extension of known equations for the univariate processes.

  11. The fractional oscillator process with two indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S C; Teo, L P

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a new fractional oscillator process which can be obtained as a solution of a stochastic differential equation with two fractional orders. Basic properties such as fractal dimension and short-range dependence of the process are studied by considering the asymptotic properties of its covariance function. By considering the fractional oscillator process as the velocity of a diffusion process, we derive the corresponding diffusion constant, fluctuation-dissipation relation and mean-square displacement. The fractional oscillator process can also be regarded as a one-dimensional fractional Euclidean Klein-Gordon field, which can be obtained by applying the Parisi-Wu stochastic quantization method to a nonlocal Euclidean action. The Casimir energy associated with the fractional field at positive temperature is calculated by using the zeta function regularization technique

  12. Mass fractionation processes of transition metal isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X. K.; Guo, Y.; Williams, R. J. P.; O'Nions, R. K.; Matthews, A.; Belshaw, N. S.; Canters, G. W.; de Waal, E. C.; Weser, U.; Burgess, B. K.; Salvato, B.

    2002-06-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry make it possible to utilise isotope variations of transition metals to address some important issues in solar system and biological sciences. Realisation of the potential offered by these new isotope systems however requires an adequate understanding of the factors controlling their isotope fractionation. Here we show the results of a broadly based study on copper and iron isotope fractionation during various inorganic and biological processes. These results demonstrate that: (1) naturally occurring inorganic processes can fractionate Fe isotope to a detectable level even at temperature ˜1000°C, which challenges the previous view that Fe isotope variations in natural system are unique biosignatures; (2) multiple-step equilibrium processes at low temperatures may cause large mass fractionation of transition metal isotopes even when the fractionation per single step is small; (3) oxidation-reduction is an importation controlling factor of isotope fractionation of transition metal elements with multiple valences, which opens a wide range of applications of these new isotope systems, ranging from metal-silicate fractionation in the solar system to uptake pathways of these elements in biological systems; (4) organisms incorporate lighter isotopes of transition metals preferentially, and transition metal isotope fractionation occurs stepwise along their pathways within biological systems during their uptake.

  13. Alternative Forms of Compound Fractional Poisson Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Beghin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We study here different fractional versions of the compound Poisson process. The fractionality is introduced in the counting process representing the number of jumps as well as in the density of the jumps themselves. The corresponding distributions are obtained explicitly and proved to be solution of fractional equations of order less than one. Only in the final case treated in this paper, where the number of jumps is given by the fractional-difference Poisson process defined in Orsingher and Polito (2012, we have a fractional driving equation, with respect to the time argument, with order greater than one. Moreover, in this case, the compound Poisson process is Markovian and this is also true for the corresponding limiting process. All the processes considered here are proved to be compositions of continuous time random walks with stable processes (or inverse stable subordinators. These subordinating relationships hold, not only in the limit, but also in the finite domain. In some cases the densities satisfy master equations which are the fractional analogues of the well-known Kolmogorov one.

  14. Trait-specific processes of convergence and conservatism shape ecomorphological evolution in ground-dwelling squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Bryan S; Helgen, Kristofer M; Goodwin, H Thomas; Cook, Joseph A

    2018-03-01

    Our understanding of mechanisms operating over deep timescales to shape phenotypic diversity often hinges on linking variation in one or few trait(s) to specific evolutionary processes. When distinct processes are capable of similar phenotypic signatures, however, identifying these drivers is difficult. We explored ecomorphological evolution across a radiation of ground-dwelling squirrels whose history includes convergence and constraint, two processes that can yield similar signatures of standing phenotypic diversity. Using four ecologically relevant trait datasets (body size, cranial, mandibular, and molariform tooth shape), we compared and contrasted variation, covariation, and disparity patterns in a new phylogenetic framework. Strong correlations existed between body size and two skull traits (allometry) and among skull traits themselves (integration). Inferred evolutionary modes were also concordant across traits (Ornstein-Uhlenbeck with two adaptive regimes). However, despite these broad similarities, we found divergent dynamics on the macroevolutionary landscape, with phenotypic disparity being differentially shaped by convergence and conservatism. Such among-trait heterogeneity in process (but not always pattern) reiterates the mosaic nature of morphological evolution, and suggests ground squirrel evolution is poorly captured by single process descriptors. Our results also highlight how use of single traits can bias macroevolutionary inference, affirming the importance of broader trait-bases in understanding phenotypic evolutionary dynamics. © 2018 The Author(s). Evolution © 2018 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. Some probabilistic properties of fractional point processes

    KAUST Repository

    Garra, Roberto

    2017-05-16

    In this article, the first hitting times of generalized Poisson processes N-f (t), related to Bernstein functions f are studied. For the spacefractional Poisson processes, N alpha (t), t > 0 ( corresponding to f = x alpha), the hitting probabilities P{T-k(alpha) < infinity} are explicitly obtained and analyzed. The processes N-f (t) are time-changed Poisson processes N( H-f (t)) with subordinators H-f (t) and here we study N(Sigma H-n(j= 1)f j (t)) and obtain probabilistic features of these extended counting processes. A section of the paper is devoted to processes of the form N( G(H,v) (t)) where G(H,v) (t) are generalized grey Brownian motions. This involves the theory of time-dependent fractional operators of the McBride form. While the time-fractional Poisson process is a renewal process, we prove that the space-time Poisson process is no longer a renewal process.

  16. Simulation and optimization of fractional crystallization processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj; Rasmussen, Peter; Gani, Rafiqul

    1998-01-01

    A general method for the calculation of various types of phase diagrams for aqueous electrolyte mixtures is outlined. It is shown how the thermodynamic equilibrium precipitation process can be used to satisfy the operational needs of industrial crystallizer/centrifuge units. Examples of simulation...... and optimization of fractional crystallization processes are shown. In one of these examples, a process with multiple steady states is analyzed. The thermodynamic model applied for describing the highly non-ideal aqueous electrolyte systems is the Extended UNIQUAC model. (C) 1998 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd...

  17. Analyses of (0.5part>)-1dNch/dη distributions of PHOBOS and BRAHMS collaborations by means of a stochastic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biyajima, M.; Ide, M.; Mizoguchi, T.; Suzuki, N.

    2002-01-01

    Recently interesting data on dN ch /dη in Au-Au collisions (η=-ln tan(θ/2)) with the centrality cuts have been reported by PHOBOS and BRAHMS Collaborations. Their data are usually divided by the number of participants (nucleons) in collisions. Instead of this way, using the total multiplicity N ch =∫(dN ch /dη)dη, we find that there are scaling phenomena among (N ch ) -1 dN ch /dη=dn/dη with different centrality cuts at √s NN = 130 GeV and 200 GeV, respectively. To explain these scaling behaviors of dn/dη, we consider the stochastic approach named Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process with two sources. The Langevin equation is adopted for the present explanation. Among dn/dη at 130 GeV and 200 GeV, no significant difference has been found. Possible detection method of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) through dN ch /dη is presented. (author)

  18. Some continual integrals from gaussian forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazmanishvili, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    The result summary of continual integration of gaussian functional type is given. The summary contains 124 continual integrals which are the mathematical expectation of the corresponding gaussian form by the continuum of random trajectories of four types: real-valued Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, Wiener process, complex-valued Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and the stochastic harmonic one. The summary includes both the known continual integrals and the unpublished before integrals. Mathematical results of the continual integration carried in the work may be applied in the problem of the theory of stochastic process, approaching to the finding of mean from gaussian forms by measures generated by the pointed stochastic processes

  19. The Fractional Poisson Process and the Inverse Stable Subordinator

    OpenAIRE

    Meerschaert, Mark; Nane, Erkan; Vellaisamy, P.

    2011-01-01

    The fractional Poisson process is a renewal process with Mittag-Leffler waiting times. Its distributions solve a time-fractional analogue of the Kolmogorov forward equation for a Poisson process. This paper shows that a traditional Poisson process, with the time variable replaced by an independent inverse stable subordinator, is also a fractional Poisson process. This result unifies the two main approaches in the stochastic theory of time-fractional diffusion equations. The equivalence extend...

  20. The stochastic versus the Euclidean approach to quantum fields on a static space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Angelis, G.F.; de Falco, D.

    1986-01-01

    Equations are presented which modify the definition of the Gaussian field in the Rindler chart in order to make contact with the Wightman state, the Hartle-Hawking state, and the Euclidean field. By taking Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes the authors have chosen, in the sense of stochastic mechanics, to place precisely the Fulling modes in their harmonic oscillator ground state. In this respect, together with the periodicity of Minkowski space-time, the authors observe that the covariance of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process can be obtained by analytical continuation of the Wightman function of the harmonic oscillator at zero temperature

  1. Reduced Order Fractional Fourier Transform A New Variant to Fractional Signal Processing Definition and Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Sanjay

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a new variant to fractional signal processing is proposed known as the Reduced Order Fractional Fourier Transform. Various properties satisfied by its transformation kernel is derived. The properties associated with the proposed Reduced Order Fractional Fourier Transform like shift, modulation, time-frequency shift property are also derived and it is shown mathematically that when the rotation angle of Reduced Order Fractional Fourier Transform approaches 90 degrees, the propos...

  2. The Fractions SNARC Revisited: Processing Fractions on a Consistent Mental Number Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomarian, Elizabeth Y; Hubbard, Edward M

    2017-07-12

    The ability to understand fractions is key to establishing a solid foundation in mathematics, yet children and adults struggle to comprehend them. Previous studies have suggested that these struggles emerge because people fail to process fraction magnitude holistically on the mental number line (MNL), focusing instead on fraction components (Bonato et al. 2007). Subsequent studies have produced evidence for default holistic processing (Meert et al., 2009; 2010), but examined only magnitude processing, not spatial representations. We explored the spatial representations of fractions on the MNL in a series of three experiments: Experiment 1 replicated Bonato et al. (2007); 30 naïve undergraduates compared unit fractions (1/1-1/9) to 1/5, resulting in a reverse SNARC effect. Experiment 2 countered potential strategic biases induced by the limited set of fractions used by Bonato et al. by expanding the stimulus set to include all irreducible, single-digit proper fractions, and asked participants to compare them against 1/2. We observed a classic SNARC effect, completely reversing the pattern from Experiment 1. Together, Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that stimulus properties dramatically impact spatial representations of fractions. In Experiment 3, we demonstrated within-subjects reliability of the SNARC effect across both a fractions and whole number comparison task. Our results suggest that adults can indeed process fraction magnitudes holistically, and that their spatial representations occur on a consistent MNL for both whole numbers and fractions.

  3. Non-parametric Estimation of Diffusion-Paths Using Wavelet Scaling Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høg, Esben

    In continuous time, diffusion processes have been used for modelling financial dynamics for a long time. For example the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process (the simplest mean-reverting process) has been used to model non-speculative price processes. We discuss non--parametric estimation of these processes...

  4. Non-Parametric Estimation of Diffusion-Paths Using Wavelet Scaling Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høg, Esben

    2003-01-01

    In continuous time, diffusion processes have been used for modelling financial dynamics for a long time. For example the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process (the simplest mean--reverting process) has been used to model non-speculative price processes. We discuss non--parametric estimation of these processes...

  5. Evolutionary patterns and processes in the radiation of phyllostomid bats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteiro Leandro R

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phyllostomid bats present the most extensive ecological and phenotypic radiation known among mammal families. This group is an important model system for studies of cranial ecomorphology and functional optimisation because of the constraints imposed by the requirements of flight. A number of studies supporting phyllostomid adaptation have focused on qualitative descriptions or correlating functional variables and diet, but explicit tests of possible evolutionary mechanisms and scenarios for phenotypic diversification have not been performed. We used a combination of morphometric and comparative methods to test hypotheses regarding the evolutionary processes behind the diversification of phenotype (mandible shape and size and diet during the phyllostomid radiation. Results The different phyllostomid lineages radiate in mandible shape space, with each feeding specialisation evolving towards different axes. Size and shape evolve quite independently, as the main directions of shape variation are associated with mandible elongation (nectarivores or the relative size of tooth rows and mandibular processes (sanguivores and frugivores, which are not associated with size changes in the mandible. The early period of phyllostomid diversification is marked by a burst of shape, size, and diet disparity (before 20 Mya, larger than expected by neutral evolution models, settling later to a period of relative phenotypic and ecological stasis. The best fitting evolutionary model for both mandible shape and size divergence was an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process with five adaptive peaks (insectivory, carnivory, sanguivory, nectarivory and frugivory. Conclusions The radiation of phyllostomid bats presented adaptive and non-adaptive components nested together through the time frame of the family's evolution. The first 10 My of the radiation were marked by strong phenotypic and ecological divergence among ancestors of modern lineages, whereas the

  6. Evolutionary patterns and processes in the radiation of phyllostomid bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The phyllostomid bats present the most extensive ecological and phenotypic radiation known among mammal families. This group is an important model system for studies of cranial ecomorphology and functional optimisation because of the constraints imposed by the requirements of flight. A number of studies supporting phyllostomid adaptation have focused on qualitative descriptions or correlating functional variables and diet, but explicit tests of possible evolutionary mechanisms and scenarios for phenotypic diversification have not been performed. We used a combination of morphometric and comparative methods to test hypotheses regarding the evolutionary processes behind the diversification of phenotype (mandible shape and size) and diet during the phyllostomid radiation. Results The different phyllostomid lineages radiate in mandible shape space, with each feeding specialisation evolving towards different axes. Size and shape evolve quite independently, as the main directions of shape variation are associated with mandible elongation (nectarivores) or the relative size of tooth rows and mandibular processes (sanguivores and frugivores), which are not associated with size changes in the mandible. The early period of phyllostomid diversification is marked by a burst of shape, size, and diet disparity (before 20 Mya), larger than expected by neutral evolution models, settling later to a period of relative phenotypic and ecological stasis. The best fitting evolutionary model for both mandible shape and size divergence was an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process with five adaptive peaks (insectivory, carnivory, sanguivory, nectarivory and frugivory). Conclusions The radiation of phyllostomid bats presented adaptive and non-adaptive components nested together through the time frame of the family's evolution. The first 10 My of the radiation were marked by strong phenotypic and ecological divergence among ancestors of modern lineages, whereas the remaining 20 My were

  7. Laplace-Laplace analysis of the fractional Poisson process

    OpenAIRE

    Gorenflo, Rudolf; Mainardi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We generate the fractional Poisson process by subordinating the standard Poisson process to the inverse stable subordinator. Our analysis is based on application of the Laplace transform with respect to both arguments of the evolving probability densities.

  8. Some probabilistic properties of fractional point processes

    KAUST Repository

    Garra, Roberto; Orsingher, Enzo; Scavino, Marco

    2017-01-01

    P{T-k(alpha) < infinity} are explicitly obtained and analyzed. The processes N-f (t) are time-changed Poisson processes N( H-f (t)) with subordinators H-f (t) and here we study N(Sigma H-n(j= 1)f j (t)) and obtain probabilistic features

  9. Random attractors for stochastic lattice reversible Gray-Scott systems with additive noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we prove the existence of a random attractor of the stochastic three-component reversible Gray-Scott system on infinite lattice with additive noise. We use a transformation of addition involved with Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, for proving the pullback absorbing property and the pullback asymptotic compactness of the reaction diffusion system with cubic nonlinearity.

  10. Afrika Statistika ISSN 2316-090X On drift estimation for non-ergodic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Drift estimation; Discrete observations; Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process; Non- ergodicity. AMS 2010 Mathematics Subject Classification : 60G22; 62M05; 62F12. ∗Corresponding author Khalifa Es-Sebaiy: k.Essebaiy@uca.ma. Djibril Ndiaye : djibykhady@yahoo.fr. 1Supported by ”La commission de l'UEMOA dans le ...

  11. The Morris-Lecar neuron model embeds a leaky integrate-and-fire model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Susanne; Greenwood, Priscilla

    2013-01-01

    We showthat the stochastic Morris–Lecar neuron, in a neighborhood of its stable point, can be approximated by a two-dimensional Ornstein Uhlenbeck (OU) modulation of a constant circular motion. The associated radial OU process is an example of a leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model prior to firing...

  12. Time-dependent solutions for stochastic systems with delays: Perturbation theory and applications to financial physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, T.D.

    2006-01-01

    First-order approximations of time-dependent solutions are determined for stochastic systems perturbed by time-delayed feedback forces. To this end, the theory of delay Fokker-Planck equations is applied in combination with Bayes' theorem. Applications to a time-delayed Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and the geometric Brownian walk of financial physics are discussed

  13. On the inverse transform of Laplace transforms that contain (products of) the parabolic cylinder function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veestraeten, D.

    2015-01-01

    The Laplace transforms of the transition probability density and distribution functions for the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process contain the product of two parabolic cylinder functions, namely Dv(x)Dv(y) and Dv(x)Dv−1(y), respectively. The inverse transforms of these products have as yet not been

  14. Semi solid metal processing: The fraction solid dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nafisi, S.; Emadi, D.; Ghomashchi, R.

    2009-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects in semi solid metal (SSM) processing is to determine the actual volume fraction of the solid at the processing temperature. The fraction has great impact on the SSM slurry viscosity and the subsequent filling of the mold in the casting stage. Three methods, namely quantitative metallography, thermodynamic calculation, and thermal analysis are employed to investigate and clarify the contradictory open literature reports about the real value of the volume fraction of primary particles. It is reported that the discrepancies between the results obtained by different methods are caused mainly by variations in cooling rates and by coarsening of the primaries during the quenching process

  15. Semi solid metal processing: The fraction solid dilemma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nafisi, S. [EVRAZ Inc. NA 100 Armour Road, Regina, SK, S4P 3C7 (Canada)], E-mail: Shahrooz.Nafisi@evrazincna.com; Emadi, D. [CEPG, CanmetENERGY, Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON, K1A 1M1 (Canada); Ghomashchi, R. [Advanced Materials and Processing Research Institute, Suite 122, A7-1390 Major MacKenzie, ON, L4S 0A1 (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    One of the most challenging aspects in semi solid metal (SSM) processing is to determine the actual volume fraction of the solid at the processing temperature. The fraction has great impact on the SSM slurry viscosity and the subsequent filling of the mold in the casting stage. Three methods, namely quantitative metallography, thermodynamic calculation, and thermal analysis are employed to investigate and clarify the contradictory open literature reports about the real value of the volume fraction of primary particles. It is reported that the discrepancies between the results obtained by different methods are caused mainly by variations in cooling rates and by coarsening of the primaries during the quenching process.

  16. Statistical properties of several models of fractional random point processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendjaballah, C.

    2011-08-01

    Statistical properties of several models of fractional random point processes have been analyzed from the counting and time interval statistics points of view. Based on the criterion of the reduced variance, it is seen that such processes exhibit nonclassical properties. The conditions for these processes to be treated as conditional Poisson processes are examined. Numerical simulations illustrate part of the theoretical calculations.

  17. Stochastic calculus for fractional Brownian motion and related processes

    CERN Document Server

    Mishura, Yuliya S

    2008-01-01

    The theory of fractional Brownian motion and other long-memory processes are addressed in this volume. Interesting topics for PhD students and specialists in probability theory, stochastic analysis and financial mathematics demonstrate the modern level of this field. Among these are results about Levy characterization of fractional Brownian motion, maximal moment inequalities for Wiener integrals including the values 0fractional Brownian SDE. The author develops optimal filtering of mixed models including linear case, and studies financial applications and statistical inference with hypotheses testing and parameter estimation. She proves that the market with stock guided by the mixed model is arbitrage-free without any restriction on the dependence of the components and deduces different forms of the Black-Scholes equation for fractional mark...

  18. A fractional calculus approach to investigate the alpha decay processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calik, A.E.; Ertik, H.; Oder, B.; Sirin, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the nuclear decay equation is taken under consideration by making use of fractional calculus. In this context, the first-order time derivative is changed to a Caputo fractional derivative hence, the resulting equation is the time fractional nuclear decay equation. The solution of this equation is obtained in terms of Mittag–Leffler function which plays an important role to study the non-Markovian feature of physical processes. As an application of this time fractional formalism, alpha decay half-life values have been calculated for Pb, Po, Rn, Ra, Th and U isotopes. Consequently, the theoretical half-life values have been obtained in consistent with the experimental data. The dependence of the order of fractional derivative μ being a measure of fractality of time, on the nuclear structure has been established. In the investigations carried out, we have arrived to the conclusion that for the μ values which are closed to one, where time becomes homogenous and continuous, the shell closure effects are predominant and that the fractional derivative order μ (i.e., fractality of time) and nuclear structure are closely related to each other. (author)

  19. An extension of cointegration to fractional autoregressive processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren

    This paper contains an overview of some recent results on the statistical analysis of cofractional processes, see Johansen and Nielsen (2010). We first give an brief summary of the analysis of cointegration in the vector autoregressive model and then show how this can be extended to fractional pr...

  20. Kinetics and tissue repair process following fractional bipolar radiofrequency treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokolakis, G; von Eichel, L; Ulrich, M; Lademann, J; Zuberbier, T; Hofmann, M A

    2018-05-15

    Fractionated radiofrequency (RF) tissue tightening is an alternative method to fractionated laser treatment of skin wrinkling, laxity and acne scars, with reduced risk of scarring or persistent pigmentation. The aim of this study was to evaluate and quantify the wound healing process after RF treatment. 12 patients were treated with a 64-pin fractional bipolar RF device with 60 mJ/pin applied energy. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) examination was performed on day 1, day 2, day 7 and day 14 after treatment. Clinical wound healing process was measured and expressed as a percentage. All patients developed erythema, mild edema and crusts at the treated areas. Two weeks after treatment clinical symptoms resolved. During ablation patients reported moderate pain. Directly after ablation microscopic ablation zones could be detected in CLSM. Measurement of MAZ at epidermis, dermo-epidermal junction and papilary dermis showed a constant diameter until two weeks after treatment. Re-epithelization of the MAZ could be detected already 1 week after treatment. However, 2 weeks after ablation the honeycomb pattern of the epidermis was not yet completely restored. Bipolar fractionated RF treatment demonstrates clinically a rapid wound healing response. The subepidermal remodelling process still ongoing after 14 days, showing new granulation tissue. Therefore, treatment intervals of at least 14 days should be recommended to allow completion of the remodelling process.

  1. Calcium Isotope Geochemistry: Research Horizons and Nanoscale Fractionation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, J. M.; Depaolo, D. J.; Richter, F. M.; Fantle, M. S.; Simon, J. I.; Ryerson, F. J.; Ewing, S. A.; Turchyn, A. V.; Yang, W.; Owens, T. L.

    2008-12-01

    Interest in studies of calcium isotope variations in nature continues to increase. Investigations span human biology, plants and soils, oceanography and paleoclimate, early solar system processes, aqueous geochemistry, and silicate liquid structure. Variations in the 44Ca/40Ca ratio are generally small, about 5 ‰, but gradual small improvements in analytical capability now yield 0.05 to 0.1 ‰ resolution. The field is still plagued by a lack of universal standards for isotope ratios and data representation, but these are secondary issues. Traditional isotopic systems have been based in equilibrium thermodynamics, which can explain the magnitude and sign of observed mass-dependent fractionation behavior. For Ca isotopes this is not the case. There is still no reliable way to estimate the equilibrium free energy associated with isotopic exchange between most phases of interest. Experiments are difficult to interpret because it is almost impossible to precipitate minerals from aqueous solution at equilibrium at low temperature. Some studies suggest that, for example, there is no equilibrium isotopic fractionation between calcite and dissolved aqueous Ca. There is good evidence that most Ca isotopic fractionation is caused by kinetic effects. The details of the controlling processes are still missing, and without this mechanistic understanding it is difficult to fully understand the implications of natural isotopic variations. Recent work on dissolved Ca, calcite, and sulfates in both laboratory and natural settings is shedding light on where the fractionation may arise. There is emerging evidence for mass dependent fractionation associated with aqueous diffusion, but probably the primary source of the effects is in the details of precipitation of minerals from solution. This makes the fractionation potentially dependent on a number of factors, including solution composition and mineral growth rate. The next challenge is to develop appropriate experimental tests and

  2. Compositions, Random Sums and Continued Random Fractions of Poisson and Fractional Poisson Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsingher, Enzo; Polito, Federico

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we consider the relation between random sums and compositions of different processes. In particular, for independent Poisson processes N α ( t), N β ( t), t>0, we have that N_{α}(N_{β}(t)) stackrel{d}{=} sum_{j=1}^{N_{β}(t)} Xj, where the X j s are Poisson random variables. We present a series of similar cases, where the outer process is Poisson with different inner processes. We highlight generalisations of these results where the external process is infinitely divisible. A section of the paper concerns compositions of the form N_{α}(tauk^{ν}), ν∈(0,1], where tauk^{ν} is the inverse of the fractional Poisson process, and we show how these compositions can be represented as random sums. Furthermore we study compositions of the form Θ( N( t)), t>0, which can be represented as random products. The last section is devoted to studying continued fractions of Cauchy random variables with a Poisson number of levels. We evaluate the exact distribution and derive the scale parameter in terms of ratios of Fibonacci numbers.

  3. On the Fractional Poisson Process and the Discretized Stable Subordinator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Gorenflo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We consider the renewal counting number process N = N(t as a forward march over the non-negative integers with independent identically distributed waiting times. We embed the values of the counting numbers N in a “pseudo-spatial” non-negative half-line x ≥ 0 and observe that for physical time likewise we have t ≥ 0. Thus we apply the Laplace transform with respect to both variables x and t. Applying then a modification of the Montroll-Weiss-Cox formalism of continuous time random walk we obtain the essential characteristics of a renewal process in the transform domain and, if we are lucky, also in the physical domain. The process t = t(N of accumulation of waiting times is inverse to the counting number process, in honour of the Danish mathematician and telecommunication engineer A.K. Erlang we call it the Erlang process. It yields the probability of exactly n renewal events in the interval (0; t]. We apply our Laplace-Laplace formalism to the fractional Poisson process whose waiting times are of Mittag-Leffler type and to a renewal process whose waiting times are of Wright type. The process of Mittag-Leffler type includes as a limiting case the classical Poisson process, the process of Wright type represents the discretized stable subordinator and a re-scaled version of it was used in our method of parametric subordination of time-space fractional diffusion processes. Properly rescaling the counting number process N(t and the Erlang process t(N yields as diffusion limits the inverse stable and the stable subordinator, respectively.

  4. Cadmium isotope fractionation of materials derived from various industrial processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinková, Eva, E-mail: eva.cadkova@geology.cz [Czech Geological Survey, Geologická 6, 152 00 Prague 5 (Czech Republic); Chrastný, Vladislav, E-mail: chrastny@fzp.czu.cz [Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 21 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Francová, Michaela, E-mail: michaela.francova@fzp.czu.cz [Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 21 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Šípková, Adéla, E-mail: adela.sipkova@geology.cz [Czech Geological Survey, Geologická 6, 152 00 Prague 5 (Czech Republic); Čuřík, Jan, E-mail: jan.curik@geology.cz [Czech Geological Survey, Geologická 6, 152 00 Prague 5 (Czech Republic); Myška, Oldřich, E-mail: oldrich.myska@geology.cz [Czech Geological Survey, Geologická 6, 152 00 Prague 5 (Czech Republic); Mižič, Lukáš, E-mail: lukas.mizic@geology.cz [Czech Geological Survey, Geologická 6, 152 00 Prague 5 (Czech Republic)

    2016-01-25

    Highlights: • All studied industrial processes were accompanied by Cd isotope fractionation. • ϵ{sup 114/110} Cd values of the waste materials were discernible from primary sources. • Technology in use plays an important role in Cd isotope fractionation. - Abstract: Our study represents ϵ{sup 114/110} Cd {sub NIST3108} values of materials resulting from anthropogenic activities such as coal burning, smelting, refining, metal coating, and the glass industry. Additionally, primary sources (ore samples, pigment, coal) processed in the industrial premises were studied. Two sphalerites, galena, coal and pigment samples exhibited ϵ{sup 114/110} Cd{sub NIST3108} values of 1.0 ± 0.2, 0.2 ± 0.2, 1.3 ± 0.1, −2.3 ± 0.2 and −0.1 ± 0.3, respectively. In general, all studied industrial processes were accompanied by Cd isotope fractionation. Most of the industrial materials studied were clearly distinguishable from the samples used as a primary source based on ϵ{sup 114/110} Cd {sub NIST3108} values. The heaviest ϵ{sup 114/110} Cd{sub NIST3108} value of 58.6 ± 0.9 was found for slag resulting from coal combustion, and the lightest ϵ{sup 114/110} Cd{sub NIST3108} value of −23 ± 2.5 was observed for waste material after Pb refinement. It is evident that ϵ{sup 114/110} Cd {sub NIST3108} values depend on technological processes, and in case of incomplete Cd transfer from source to final waste material, every industrial activity creates differences in Cd isotope composition. Our results show that Cd isotope analysis is a promising tool to track the origins of industrial waste products.

  5. Maximum-entropy description of animal movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Chris H; Subaşı, Yiğit; Calabrese, Justin M

    2015-03-01

    We introduce a class of maximum-entropy states that naturally includes within it all of the major continuous-time stochastic processes that have been applied to animal movement, including Brownian motion, Ornstein-Uhlenbeck motion, integrated Ornstein-Uhlenbeck motion, a recently discovered hybrid of the previous models, and a new model that describes central-place foraging. We are also able to predict a further hierarchy of new models that will emerge as data quality improves to better resolve the underlying continuity of animal movement. Finally, we also show that Langevin equations must obey a fluctuation-dissipation theorem to generate processes that fall from this class of maximum-entropy distributions when the constraints are purely kinematic.

  6. Strontium isotope fractionation in soils and pedogenic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalev, Netta [Institute of Earth Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Geological Survey of Israel, 30 Malkhe Israel Street, 95501 Jerusalem (Israel); Lazar, Boaz [Institute of Earth Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Halicz, Ludwik; Stein, Mordechai; Gavrieli, Ittai; Sandler, Amir; Segal, Irena [Geological Survey of Israel, 30 Malkhe Israel Street, 95501 Jerusalem (Israel)

    2013-07-01

    The stable isotope composition of strontium (the ratio {sup 88}Sr/{sup 86}Sr expressed as δ{sup 88/86}Sr) showed significant fractionation in mountain soils of the Judea Highland. In order to understand this phenomenon, we studied the elemental composition and the stable and radiogenic Sr isotopic composition in soil transects conducted from semi-arid (desert fringe) to wetter (Mediterranean) climate zones. These transects were selected because the degree of soil leaching depends on the amount of precipitation and the permeability of the underlying bedrock. These soils are the pedogenic products of leaching of the accumulated desert dust and the underlying carbonate bed-rocks resulting in, among others, enrichment of the residual soils in Al-clays. A clear negative correlation was found between the δ{sup 88/86}Sr and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Al-clay content) values of the soils, the high δ{sup 88/86}Sr-low Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} being the dust end-member. This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility of using stable {sup 88}Sr-{sup 86}Sr isotopes as tracers of terrestrial weathering processes. (authors)

  7. The multivariate supOU stochastic volatility model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole; Stelzer, Robert

    Using positive semidefinite supOU (superposition of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type) processes to describe the volatility, we introduce a multivariate stochastic volatility model for financial data which is capable of modelling long range dependence effects. The finiteness of moments and the second order...... structure of the volatility, the log returns, as well as their "squares" are discussed in detail. Moreover, we give several examples in which long memory effects occur and study how the model as well as the simple Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type stochastic volatility model behave under linear transformations....... In particular, the models are shown to be preserved under invertible linear transformations. Finally, we discuss how (sup)OU stochastic volatility models can be combined with a factor modelling approach....

  8. Optimal consumption problem in the Vasicek model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Trybuła

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of an optimal consumption strategy on the infinite time horizon based on the hyperbolic absolute risk aversion utility when the interest rate is an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Using the method of subsolution and supersolution we obtain the existence of solutions of the dynamic programming equation. We illustrate the paper with a numerical example of the optimal consumption strategy and the value function.

  9. An ERP Study of the Processing of Common and Decimal Fractions: How Different They Are

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Qi; Lin, Chongde; Ding, Cody; Zhou, Xinlin

    2013-01-01

    This study explored event-related potential (ERP) correlates of common fractions (1/5) and decimal fractions (0.2). Thirteen subjects performed a numerical magnitude matching task under two conditions. In the common fraction condition, a nonsymbolic fraction was asked to be judged whether its magnitude matched the magnitude of a common fraction; in the decimal fraction condition, a nonsymbolic fraction was asked to be matched with a decimal fraction. Behavioral results showed significant main effects of condition and numerical distance, but no significant interaction of condition and numerical distance. Electrophysiological data showed that when nonsymbolic fractions were compared to common fractions, they displayed larger N1 and P3 amplitudes than when they were compared to decimal fractions. This finding suggested that the visual identification for nonsymbolic fractions was different under the two conditions, which was not due to perceptual differences but to task demands. For symbolic fractions, the condition effect was observed in the N1 and P3 components, revealing stimulus-specific visual identification processing. The effect of numerical distance as an index of numerical magnitude representation was observed in the P2, N3 and P3 components under the two conditions. However, the topography of the distance effect was different under the two conditions, suggesting stimulus specific semantic processing of common fractions and decimal fractions. PMID:23894491

  10. An ERP study of the processing of common and decimal fractions: how different they are.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available This study explored event-related potential (ERP correlates of common fractions (1/5 and decimal fractions (0.2. Thirteen subjects performed a numerical magnitude matching task under two conditions. In the common fraction condition, a nonsymbolic fraction was asked to be judged whether its magnitude matched the magnitude of a common fraction; in the decimal fraction condition, a nonsymbolic fraction was asked to be matched with a decimal fraction. Behavioral results showed significant main effects of condition and numerical distance, but no significant interaction of condition and numerical distance. Electrophysiological data showed that when nonsymbolic fractions were compared to common fractions, they displayed larger N1 and P3 amplitudes than when they were compared to decimal fractions. This finding suggested that the visual identification for nonsymbolic fractions was different under the two conditions, which was not due to perceptual differences but to task demands. For symbolic fractions, the condition effect was observed in the N1 and P3 components, revealing stimulus-specific visual identification processing. The effect of numerical distance as an index of numerical magnitude representation was observed in the P2, N3 and P3 components under the two conditions. However, the topography of the distance effect was different under the two conditions, suggesting stimulus specific semantic processing of common fractions and decimal fractions.

  11. The componential processing of fractions in adults and children: effects of stimuli variability and contextual interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Fang, Qiaochu; Gabriel, Florence C; Szücs, Dénes

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that people have a strong tendency to compare fractions based on constituent numerators or denominators. This is called componential processing. This study explored whether componential processing was preferred in tasks involving high stimuli variability and high contextual interference, when fractions could be compared based either on the holistic values of fractions or on their denominators. Here, stimuli variability referred to the fact that fractions were not monotonous but diversiform. Contextual interference referred to the fact that the processing of fractions was interfered by other stimuli. To our ends, three tasks were used. In Task 1, participants compared a standard fraction 1/5 to unit fractions. This task was used as a low stimuli variability and low contextual interference task. In Task 2 stimuli variability was increased by mixing unit and non-unit fractions. In Task 3, high contextual interference was created by incorporating decimals into fractions. The RT results showed that the processing patterns of fractions were very similar for adults and children. In task 1 and task 3, only componential processing was utilzied. In contrast, both holistic processing and componential processing were utilized in task 2. These results suggest that, if individuals are presented with the opportunity to perform componential processing, both adults and children will tend to do so, even if they are faced with high variability of fractions or high contextual interference.

  12. Signal Processing for Nondifferentiable Data Defined on Cantor Sets: A Local Fractional Fourier Series Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available From the signal processing point of view, the nondifferentiable data defined on the Cantor sets are investigated in this paper. The local fractional Fourier series is used to process the signals, which are the local fractional continuous functions. Our results can be observed as significant extensions of the previously known results for the Fourier series in the framework of the local fractional calculus. Some examples are given to illustrate the efficiency and implementation of the present method.

  13. Fractional calculus with applications in mechanics vibrations and diffusion processes

    CERN Document Server

    Atanackovic, T; Stankovic, Bogoljub; Zorica , Dusan

    2014-01-01

    This book contains mathematical preliminaries in which basic definitions of fractional derivatives and spaces are presented. The central part of the book contains various applications in classical mechanics including fields such as: viscoelasticity, heat conduction, wave propagation and variational Hamilton-type principles. Mathematical rigor will be observed in the applications. The authors provide some problems formulated in the classical setting and some in the distributional setting. The solutions to these problems are presented in analytical form and these solutions are then analyzed num

  14. A representation theory for a class of vector autoregressive models for fractional processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Based on an idea of Granger (1986), we analyze a new vector autoregressive model defined from the fractional lag operator 1-(1-L)^{d}. We first derive conditions in terms of the coefficients for the model to generate processes which are fractional of order zero. We then show that if there is a un...... root, the model generates a fractional process X(t) of order d, d>0, for which there are vectors ß so that ß'X(t) is fractional of order d-b, 0...

  15. Process and apparatus for fractionating close-boiling components of a multi-component system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsao, U.

    1983-01-01

    A process and apparatus are described for the fractionation of close-boiling components of a multi-component system comprising at least two fractionation columns A, B in series having a plurality of equilibrium stages in which the vapor stream from a downstream fractionation column B is compressed by a compressor and passed into a lower portion of a preceding fractionation column A and a liquid bottom stream from any one of said columns except the last is expanded by an orifice sufficiently to convey the resulting liquid-vapor mixture to the upper portion of the next fractionation column B. In a particularly preferred embodiment, the compressed overhead vapor stream is passed in heat transfer relationship to a liquid stream withdrawn from the preceding fractionation column A prior to introduction into the lower portion of such preceding fractionation column A. In one of the claims, the multi-component close-boiling system is a deuterium oxide-water solution. (author)

  16. Performance comparison of optimal fractional order hybrid fuzzy PID controllers for handling oscillatory fractional order processes with dead time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saptarshi; Pan, Indranil; Das, Shantanu

    2013-07-01

    Fuzzy logic based PID controllers have been studied in this paper, considering several combinations of hybrid controllers by grouping the proportional, integral and derivative actions with fuzzy inferencing in different forms. Fractional order (FO) rate of error signal and FO integral of control signal have been used in the design of a family of decomposed hybrid FO fuzzy PID controllers. The input and output scaling factors (SF) along with the integro-differential operators are tuned with real coded genetic algorithm (GA) to produce optimum closed loop performance by simultaneous consideration of the control loop error index and the control signal. Three different classes of fractional order oscillatory processes with various levels of relative dominance between time constant and time delay have been used to test the comparative merits of the proposed family of hybrid fractional order fuzzy PID controllers. Performance comparison of the different FO fuzzy PID controller structures has been done in terms of optimal set-point tracking, load disturbance rejection and minimal variation of manipulated variable or smaller actuator requirement etc. In addition, multi-objective Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II) has been used to study the Pareto optimal trade-offs between the set point tracking and control signal, and the set point tracking and load disturbance performance for each of the controller structure to handle the three different types of processes. Copyright © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Harvesting and processing of microalgae biomass fractions for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, M.; Sharif, N.; Naz, S.; Saleem, F.; Manzoor, F.

    2013-01-01

    There has been a recent resurgent interest in microalgae as an oil producer for biofuel applications. An adequate supply of nutrients and carbon dioxide enables algae to successfully transform light energy of the sun into energy - rich chemical compounds through photosynthesis. A strain with high lipids, successfully grown and harvested, could provide oil for most of our process by volume, which would then provide the most profitable output. Significant advances have also been made in upstream processing to generate cellular biomass and oil. However, the process of extracting and purifying of oil from algae continues to prove a significant challenge in producing both microalgae bioproducts and biofuel, as the oil extraction from algae is relatively energy-intensive and expensive. The aim of this review is to focus on different harvesting and extraction processes of algae for biodiesel production reported within the last decade. (author)

  18. Estimation of stochastic volatility with long memory for index prices of FTSE Bursa Malaysia KLCI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kho Chia; Kane, Ibrahim Lawal; Rahman, Haliza Abd [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Bahar, Arifah [UTM Centre for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (UTM-CIAM), Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, Johor Bahru and Department of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Ting, Chee-Ming [Center for Biomedical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310, Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

    2015-02-03

    In recent years, modeling in long memory properties or fractionally integrated processes in stochastic volatility has been applied in the financial time series. A time series with structural breaks can generate a strong persistence in the autocorrelation function, which is an observed behaviour of a long memory process. This paper considers the structural break of data in order to determine true long memory time series data. Unlike usual short memory models for log volatility, the fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is neither a Markovian process nor can it be easily transformed into a Markovian process. This makes the likelihood evaluation and parameter estimation for the long memory stochastic volatility (LMSV) model challenging tasks. The drift and volatility parameters of the fractional Ornstein-Unlenbeck model are estimated separately using the least square estimator (lse) and quadratic generalized variations (qgv) method respectively. Finally, the empirical distribution of unobserved volatility is estimated using the particle filtering with sequential important sampling-resampling (SIR) method. The mean square error (MSE) between the estimated and empirical volatility indicates that the performance of the model towards the index prices of FTSE Bursa Malaysia KLCI is fairly well.

  19. Estimation of stochastic volatility with long memory for index prices of FTSE Bursa Malaysia KLCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kho Chia; Bahar, Arifah; Kane, Ibrahim Lawal; Ting, Chee-Ming; Rahman, Haliza Abd

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, modeling in long memory properties or fractionally integrated processes in stochastic volatility has been applied in the financial time series. A time series with structural breaks can generate a strong persistence in the autocorrelation function, which is an observed behaviour of a long memory process. This paper considers the structural break of data in order to determine true long memory time series data. Unlike usual short memory models for log volatility, the fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is neither a Markovian process nor can it be easily transformed into a Markovian process. This makes the likelihood evaluation and parameter estimation for the long memory stochastic volatility (LMSV) model challenging tasks. The drift and volatility parameters of the fractional Ornstein-Unlenbeck model are estimated separately using the least square estimator (lse) and quadratic generalized variations (qgv) method respectively. Finally, the empirical distribution of unobserved volatility is estimated using the particle filtering with sequential important sampling-resampling (SIR) method. The mean square error (MSE) between the estimated and empirical volatility indicates that the performance of the model towards the index prices of FTSE Bursa Malaysia KLCI is fairly well.

  20. Estimation of stochastic volatility with long memory for index prices of FTSE Bursa Malaysia KLCI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Kho Chia; Kane, Ibrahim Lawal; Rahman, Haliza Abd; Bahar, Arifah; Ting, Chee-Ming

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, modeling in long memory properties or fractionally integrated processes in stochastic volatility has been applied in the financial time series. A time series with structural breaks can generate a strong persistence in the autocorrelation function, which is an observed behaviour of a long memory process. This paper considers the structural break of data in order to determine true long memory time series data. Unlike usual short memory models for log volatility, the fractional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is neither a Markovian process nor can it be easily transformed into a Markovian process. This makes the likelihood evaluation and parameter estimation for the long memory stochastic volatility (LMSV) model challenging tasks. The drift and volatility parameters of the fractional Ornstein-Unlenbeck model are estimated separately using the least square estimator (lse) and quadratic generalized variations (qgv) method respectively. Finally, the empirical distribution of unobserved volatility is estimated using the particle filtering with sequential important sampling-resampling (SIR) method. The mean square error (MSE) between the estimated and empirical volatility indicates that the performance of the model towards the index prices of FTSE Bursa Malaysia KLCI is fairly well

  1. Anaerobic Digestion of the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste With Recirculation of Process Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, H.; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2001-01-01

    A new concept of a wet anaerobic digestion treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is investigated. Once the waste is diluted with water, the entire liquid fraction of the effluent is recirculated and used as process water for dilution of the waste. This enables a well...

  2. Fractionation of whey protein isolate with supercritical carbon dioxide – process modeling and cost estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    An economical and environmentally friendly whey protein fractionation process was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) as an acid to produce enriched fractions of alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-La) and beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) from a commercial whey protein isolate (WPI) containing 55% ...

  3. The usage of Maxwell fractional equations for the investigation of the waveguide processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksyuta, M.V.; Slinchenko, Yu.A.; Grygoruk, V.I.

    2016-01-01

    By means of nabla operator written down with using both of some differential operators with integer orders and fractional differential Caputo operators, gradient, divergence and rotor operators are determined, it is checked up the fulfillment of vector relations in fractional vector analysis, fractional Green, Stocks and Ostrogradsky-Gauss formulas. For a specific expression of nabla operator (nabla components along x and y axes have a unit order and along z axis, correspondingly, a fractional value in the interval from zero till unit) Maxwell fractional equations are written down. Based on the following from them some fractional wave equations, dissipative and polarization processes at electromagnetic waves distribution both in rectangular (planar) and in cylindrical waveguide structures are analyzed.

  4. Heat-reactivatable adsorbent gas fractionator and process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verrando, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    A process and apparatus are provided for removing a first polar gas from a mixture thereof with a second gas. The gas mixture is passed through a sorbent bed having a preferential affinity for the first polar gas and the first polar gas is sorbed thereon so as to produce a gaseous effluent which has a concentration of first polar gas therein below a predetermined maximum. Then the polar gas sorbed on the sorbent bed is removed therefrom by application of microwave energy, at a temperature at which the sorbent is transparent to such energy, while passing a purge flow of gas in contact with the bed to flush out desorbed first polar gas from the bed. The bed is allowed to cool to a relatively efficient temperature for adsorption. The gas mixture is then again passed in contact with the bed. If two beds are used, one bed can be desorbed while the other is on-stream thereby maintaining a substantially continuous flow of effluent gas. The apparatus of the invention provides a sorbent bed assembly having a microwave energy generator positioned to direct such energy into the sorbent bed for desorption of first polar gas from the bed

  5. Testing for Level Shifts in Fractionally Integrated Processes: a State Space Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monache, Davide Delle; Grassi, Stefano; Santucci de Magistris, Paolo

    Short memory models contaminated by level shifts have similar long-memory features as fractionally integrated processes. This makes hard to verify whether the true data generating process is a pure fractionally integrated process when employing standard estimation methods based on the autocorrela......Short memory models contaminated by level shifts have similar long-memory features as fractionally integrated processes. This makes hard to verify whether the true data generating process is a pure fractionally integrated process when employing standard estimation methods based...... on the autocorrelation function or the periodogram. In this paper, we propose a robust testing procedure, based on an encompassing parametric specification that allows to disentangle the level shifts from the fractionally integrated component. The estimation is carried out on the basis of a state-space methodology...... and it leads to a robust estimate of the fractional integration parameter also in presence of level shifts. Once the memory parameter is correctly estimated, we use the KPSS test for presence of level shift. The Monte Carlo simulations show how this approach produces unbiased estimates of the memory parameter...

  6. A multiscale guide to Brownian motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebenkov, Denis S; Belyaev, Dmitry; Jones, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    We revise the Lévy construction of Brownian motion as a simple though rigorous approach to operate with various Gaussian processes. A Brownian path is explicitly constructed as a linear combination of wavelet-based ‘geometrical features’ at multiple length scales with random weights. Such a wavelet representation gives a closed formula mapping of the unit interval onto the functional space of Brownian paths. This formula elucidates many classical results about Brownian motion (e.g., non-differentiability of its path), providing an intuitive feeling for non-mathematicians. The illustrative character of the wavelet representation, along with the simple structure of the underlying probability space, is different from the usual presentation of most classical textbooks. Similar concepts are discussed for the Brownian bridge, fractional Brownian motion, the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, Gaussian free fields, and fractional Gaussian fields. Wavelet representations and dyadic decompositions form the basis of many highly efficient numerical methods to simulate Gaussian processes and fields, including Brownian motion and other diffusive processes in confining domains. (topical review)

  7. Fractional-Order Identification and Control of Heating Processes with Non-Continuous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Caponetto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a fractional order model of a heating process and a comparison of fractional and standard PI controllers in its closed loop system. Preliminarily, an enhanced fractional order model for the heating process on non-continuous materials has been identified through a fitting algorithm on experimental data. Experimentation has been carried out on a finite length beam filled with three non-continuous materials (air, styrofoam, metal buckshots in order to identify a model in the frequency domain and to obtain a relationship between the fractional order of the heating process and the different materials’ properties. A comparison between the experimental model and the theoretical one has been performed, proving a significant enhancement of the fitting performances. Moreover the obtained modelling results confirm the fractional nature of the heating processes when diffusion occurs in non-continuous composite materials, and they show how the model’s fractional order can be used as a characteristic parameter for non-continuous materials with different composition and structure. Finally, three different kinds of controllers have been applied and compared in order to keep constant the beam temperature constant at a fixed length.

  8. Two-degree-of-freedom fractional order-PID controllers design for fractional order processes with dead-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingjie; Zhou, Ping; Zhao, Zhicheng; Zhang, Jinggang

    2016-03-01

    Recently, fractional order (FO) processes with dead-time have attracted more and more attention of many researchers in control field, but FO-PID controllers design techniques available for the FO processes with dead-time suffer from lack of direct systematic approaches. In this paper, a simple design and parameters tuning approach of two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) FO-PID controller based on internal model control (IMC) is proposed for FO processes with dead-time, conventional one-degree-of-freedom control exhibited the shortcoming of coupling of robustness and dynamic response performance. 2-DOF control can overcome the above weakness which means it realizes decoupling of robustness and dynamic performance from each other. The adjustable parameter η2 of FO-PID controller is directly related to the robustness of closed-loop system, and the analytical expression is given between the maximum sensitivity specification Ms and parameters η2. In addition, according to the dynamic performance requirement of the practical system, the parameters η1 can also be selected easily. By approximating the dead-time term of the process model with the first-order Padé or Taylor series, the expressions for 2-DOF FO-PID controller parameters are derived for three classes of FO processes with dead-time. Moreover, compared with other methods, the proposed method is simple and easy to implement. Finally, the simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of this method. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Partial autocorrelation functions of the fractional ARIMA processes with negative degree of differencing

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Akihiko; Kasahara, Yukio

    2004-01-01

    Let {Xn : ∈Z} be a fractional ARIMA(p,d,q) process with partial autocorrelation function α(·). In this paper, we prove that if d∈(−1/2,0) then |α(n)|~|d|/n as n→∞. This extends the previous result for the case 0

  10. Fractional Flow Theory Applicable to Non-Newtonian Behavior in EOR Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, W.R.; Venkatraman, A.; Johns, R.T.; Kibodeaux, K.R.; Lai, H.; Moradi Tehrani, N.

    2011-01-01

    The method of characteristics, or fractional-flow theory, is extremely useful in understanding complex Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) processes and in calibrating simulators. One limitation has been its restriction to Newtonian rheology except in rectilinear flow. Its inability to deal with

  11. Micro-foundation using percolation theory of the finite time singular behavior of the crash hazard rate in a class of rational expectation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyrich, Maximilian; Sornette, Didier

    2016-04-01

    We present a plausible micro-founded model for the previously postulated power law finite time singular form of the crash hazard rate in the Johansen-Ledoit-Sornette (JLS) model of rational expectation bubbles. The model is based on a percolation picture of the network of traders and the concept that clusters of connected traders share the same opinion. The key ingredient is the notion that a shift of position from buyer to seller of a sufficiently large group of traders can trigger a crash. This provides a formula to estimate the crash hazard rate by summation over percolation clusters above a minimum size of a power sa (with a>1) of the cluster sizes s, similarly to a generalized percolation susceptibility. The power sa of cluster sizes emerges from the super-linear dependence of group activity as a function of group size, previously documented in the literature. The crash hazard rate exhibits explosive finite time singular behaviors when the control parameter (fraction of occupied sites, or density of traders in the network) approaches the percolation threshold pc. Realistic dynamics are generated by modeling the density of traders on the percolation network by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, whose memory controls the spontaneous excursion of the control parameter close to the critical region of bubble formation. Our numerical simulations recover the main stylized properties of the JLS model with intermittent explosive super-exponential bubbles interrupted by crashes.

  12. Deep desulfurization of middle distillates. Process adaptation to oil fractions' compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedernera, Esteban; Reimert, Rainer; Nguyen, Ngoc Luan; Van Buren, Vincent [Division of Fuel Technology, Universitat Karlsruhe TH, Engler-Bunte-Ring 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2003-04-30

    The influence of oil fractions' compositions on the conversion of sulfurous components was investigated in a trickle-bed reactor in laboratory scale. A commercially available NiMo/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was used throughout the investigations. Experimental results including sulfur conversion of different oil fractions and residence time distributions under reacting conditions are presented. The hydrogen consumption is ascribed to the conversion of sulfur and of nitrogen, to the hydrogenation of aromatics and to hydrocracking based on a simulation applying ASPEN Plus. Various configurations of the desulfurization process are evaluated but no advantage is found by separate treatment of individual oil fractions. In addition, experiments were carried out to determine liquid distribution and wetting efficiency in a catalyst bed by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique.

  13. Effect of low molecular fraction of thymus humoral factor on blood formation processes of irradiated mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolyarova, T.V.; Skobel'tsyna, E.S.; Grinberg, S.M.; Kruglikov, I.L.; Korotaev, G.K.; Tepelina, O.M.; Il'ina, T.I.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of low-molecular fraction of thymus humoral factor on blood formation in mice irradiated at 4 Gy was studied. It is shown that injection of low-molecular fraction of thymus hymoral factor to irradiated animals affects proliferative processes in spleen and bone marrow, however the degree of the effect depends on the injection scheme of the preparation. Application of mathematical planning methods of the experiment enables to analyze various injection schemes of low-molecular fraction of thymus humoral factor on the investigated indices. The optimal scheme of preparation injection is determined: 1st injection with the dose of 10 mkg/kg following 4 hour after irradiation, 2d injection - with the same dose in 7-21 days

  14. Valorisation of tuna processing waste biomass for recovery of functional and antioxidant peptides using enzymatic hydrolysis and membrane fractionation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Sami; Ben Amar, Raja

    2016-10-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis using Prolyve BS coupled to membrane process (Ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF)) is a means of biotransformation of tuna protein waste to Tuna protein hydrolysate (TPH) with higher added values. This method could be an effective solution for the production of bioactive compounds used in various biotechnological applications and minimizing the pollution problems generated by the seafood processing industries. The amino acid composition, functional and antioxidant properties of produced TPH were evaluated. The results show that the glutamic acid, aspartic acid, glycine, alaline, valine and leucine were the major amino acids detected in the TPH profile. After membrane fractionation process, those major amino acids were concentrated in the NF retentate (NFR). The NFR and NF permeate (NFP) have a higher protein solubility (>95 %) when compared to TPH (80 %). Higher oil and water binding capacity were observed in TPH and higher emulsifying and foam stability was found in UF retentate. The NFP showed the highest DPPH radical scavenging activity (65 %). The NFR contained antioxidant amino acid (30.3 %) showed the highest superoxide radical and reducing power activities. The TPH showed the highest iron chelating activity (75 %) compared to other peptide fractions. The effect of the membrane fractionation on the molecular weight distribution of the peptide and their bioactivities was underlined. We concluded that the TPH is a valuable source of bioactive peptides and their peptide fractions may serve as useful ingredients for application in food industry and formulation of nutritional products.

  15. Generalized Fractional Processes with Long Memory and Time Dependent Volatility Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shelton Peiris

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, fractionally-differenced processes have received a great deal of attention due to their flexibility in financial applications with long-memory. This paper revisits the class of generalized fractionally-differenced processes generated by Gegenbauer polynomials and the ARMA structure (GARMA with both the long-memory and time-dependent innovation variance. We establish the existence and uniqueness of second-order solutions. We also extend this family with innovations to follow GARCH and stochastic volatility (SV. Under certain regularity conditions, we give asymptotic results for the approximate maximum likelihood estimator for the GARMA-GARCH model. We discuss a Monte Carlo likelihood method for the GARMA-SV model and investigate finite sample properties via Monte Carlo experiments. Finally, we illustrate the usefulness of this approach using monthly inflation rates for France, Japan and the United States.

  16. Stochastic modeling for neural spiking events based on fractional superstatistical Poisson process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Konno

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In neural spike counting experiments, it is known that there are two main features: (i the counting number has a fractional power-law growth with time and (ii the waiting time (i.e., the inter-spike-interval distribution has a heavy tail. The method of superstatistical Poisson processes (SSPPs is examined whether these main features are properly modeled. Although various mixed/compound Poisson processes are generated with selecting a suitable distribution of the birth-rate of spiking neurons, only the second feature (ii can be modeled by the method of SSPPs. Namely, the first one (i associated with the effect of long-memory cannot be modeled properly. Then, it is shown that the two main features can be modeled successfully by a class of fractional SSPP (FSSPP.

  17. Stochastic modeling for neural spiking events based on fractional superstatistical Poisson process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Hidetoshi; Tamura, Yoshiyasu

    2018-01-01

    In neural spike counting experiments, it is known that there are two main features: (i) the counting number has a fractional power-law growth with time and (ii) the waiting time (i.e., the inter-spike-interval) distribution has a heavy tail. The method of superstatistical Poisson processes (SSPPs) is examined whether these main features are properly modeled. Although various mixed/compound Poisson processes are generated with selecting a suitable distribution of the birth-rate of spiking neurons, only the second feature (ii) can be modeled by the method of SSPPs. Namely, the first one (i) associated with the effect of long-memory cannot be modeled properly. Then, it is shown that the two main features can be modeled successfully by a class of fractional SSPP (FSSPP).

  18. Effect of Diabetes Condition on Topical Treatment of Binahong Leaf Fraction in Wound Healing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kintoko Kintoko

    2017-08-01

    binahong leaf fractions. FADB 10% has significant differences potention in wound healing process in diabetic rats macroscopically that accelerates wound contraction compared with negative and positive control groups (p<0,05.

  19. A new process for the fractionation of uranium; Un nuevo procedimiento para el fraccionamiento de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costas, E.; Baselga, B.; Tarin, F.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a new biological process for uranium isotopic fractionation based on Chlamydomonas cf. fonticola (microalgae) isolated from a pond extremely contaminated by uranium (. 25 ppm) from the ENUSA mine in Saelices (Salamanca, Spain) and genetically improved. The metabolic activity of this genetically improved ChlSPGI strain allows recover 115 mg of U per gram of micoralgal biomass in a short time (because this strain complete their cell cycle in . 24 hours). During this process ChlSPGI microalgae selectively captures {sup 2}35U conducting an isotopic enrichment of {sup 2}35U ({sup 2}35U δ = + 3,983%). (Author)

  20. Energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from an algae fractionation process for producing renewable diesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegallapati, Ambica K.; Frank, Edward D.

    2016-09-01

    In one approach to algal biofuel production, lipids are extracted and converted to renewable diesel and non-lipid remnants are converted to biogas, which is used for renewable heat and power to support the process. Since biofuel economics benefit from increased fuel yield, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory analyzed an alternative pathway that extracts lipids and also makes ethanol from carbohydrates in the biomass. In this paper, we examine the environmental sustainability of this "fractionation pathway" through life-cycle analysis (LCA) of greenhouse gas emissions and energy use. When the feedstock productivity was 30 (18) g/m(2)/d, this pathway emitted 31 (36) gCO(2)e/MJ of total fuel, which is less than the emissions associated with conventional low sulfur petroleum diesel (96 gCO(2)e/MJ). The fractionation pathway performed well in this model despite the diversion of carbon to the ethanol fuel.

  1. Relationship between processing score and kernel-fraction particle size in whole-plant corn silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias Junior, G S; Ferraretto, L F; Salvati, G G S; de Resende, L C; Hoffman, P C; Pereira, M N; Shaver, R D

    2016-04-01

    Kernel processing increases starch digestibility in whole-plant corn silage (WPCS). Corn silage processing score (CSPS), the percentage of starch passing through a 4.75-mm sieve, is widely used to assess degree of kernel breakage in WPCS. However, the geometric mean particle size (GMPS) of the kernel-fraction that passes through the 4.75-mm sieve has not been well described. Therefore, the objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate particle size distribution and digestibility of kernels cut in varied particle sizes; (2) to propose a method to measure GMPS in WPCS kernels; and (3) to evaluate the relationship between CSPS and GMPS of the kernel fraction in WPCS. Composite samples of unfermented, dried kernels from 110 corn hybrids commonly used for silage production were kept whole (WH) or manually cut in 2, 4, 8, 16, 32 or 64 pieces (2P, 4P, 8P, 16P, 32P, and 64P, respectively). Dry sieving to determine GMPS, surface area, and particle size distribution using 9 sieves with nominal square apertures of 9.50, 6.70, 4.75, 3.35, 2.36, 1.70, 1.18, and 0.59 mm and pan, as well as ruminal in situ dry matter (DM) digestibilities were performed for each kernel particle number treatment. Incubation times were 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h. The ruminal in situ DM disappearance of unfermented kernels increased with the reduction in particle size of corn kernels. Kernels kept whole had the lowest ruminal DM disappearance for all time points with maximum DM disappearance of 6.9% at 24 h and the greatest disappearance was observed for 64P, followed by 32P and 16P. Samples of WPCS (n=80) from 3 studies representing varied theoretical length of cut settings and processor types and settings were also evaluated. Each WPCS sample was divided in 2 and then dried at 60 °C for 48 h. The CSPS was determined in duplicate on 1 of the split samples, whereas on the other split sample the kernel and stover fractions were separated using a hydrodynamic separation procedure. After separation, the

  2. Amplitudes of solar p modes: Modelling of the eddy time-correlation function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkacem, K [Institut d' Astrophysique et de Geophysique, Universite de Liege, Allee du 6 Aout 17-B 4000 Liege (Belgium); Samadi, R; Goupil, M J, E-mail: Kevin.Belkacem@ulg.ac.BE [LESIA, UMR8109, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Universite Denis Diderot, Obs. de Paris, 92195 Meudon Cedex (France)

    2011-01-01

    Modelling amplitudes of stochastically excited oscillations in stars is a powerful tool for understanding the properties of the convective zones. For instance, it gives us information on the way turbulent eddies are temporally correlated in a very large Reynolds number regime. We discuss the way the time correlation between eddies is modelled and we present recent theoretical developments as well as observational results. Eventually, we discuss the physical underlying meaning of the results by introducing the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, which is a sub-class of a Gaussian Markov process.

  3. A feedback control strategy for the airfoil system under non-Gaussian colored noise excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yong, E-mail: hy@njust.edu.cn, E-mail: taogang@njust.edu.cn; Tao, Gang, E-mail: hy@njust.edu.cn, E-mail: taogang@njust.edu.cn [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, 200 XiaoLingwei Street, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2014-09-01

    The stability of a binary airfoil with feedback control under stochastic disturbances, a non-Gaussian colored noise, is studied in this paper. First, based on some approximated theories and methods the non-Gaussian colored noise is simplified to an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Furthermore, via the stochastic averaging method and the logarithmic polar transformation, one dimensional diffusion process can be obtained. At last by applying the boundary conditions, the largest Lyapunov exponent which can determine the almost-sure stability of the system and the effective region of control parameters is calculated.

  4. A feedback control strategy for the airfoil system under non-Gaussian colored noise excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Tao, Gang

    2014-09-01

    The stability of a binary airfoil with feedback control under stochastic disturbances, a non-Gaussian colored noise, is studied in this paper. First, based on some approximated theories and methods the non-Gaussian colored noise is simplified to an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Furthermore, via the stochastic averaging method and the logarithmic polar transformation, one dimensional diffusion process can be obtained. At last by applying the boundary conditions, the largest Lyapunov exponent which can determine the almost-sure stability of the system and the effective region of control parameters is calculated.

  5. On the fragility of fractional-order PID controllers for FOPDT processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Fabrizio; Visioli, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the fragility issue of fractional-order proportional-integral-derivative controllers applied to integer first-order plus-dead-time processes. In particular, the effects of the variations of the controller parameters on the achieved control system robustness and performance are investigated. Results show that this kind of controllers is more fragile with respect to the standard proportional-integral-derivative controllers and therefore a significant attention should be paid by the user in their tuning. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. THE VOLATILITY OF TEMPERATURE AND PRICING OF WEATHER DERIVATIVES

    OpenAIRE

    Benth, Fred Espen; Saltyte-Benth, Jurate

    2005-01-01

    We propose an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process with seasonal volatility to model the time dynamics of daily average temperatures. The model is fitted to almost 43 years of daily observations recorded in Stockholm, one of the European cities for which there is a trade in weather futures and options on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME). Explicit pricing dynamics for futures contracts written on the number of heating/cooling degree-days (so-called HDD/CDD-futures) and the cumulative average daily ...

  7. Only through perturbation can relaxation times be estimated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Susanne; Lansky, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of model parameters is as important as model building, but is often neglected in model studies. Here we show that despite the existence of well known results on parameter estimation in a simple homogenous Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, in most practical situations the methods suffer greatly...... on computer experiments based on applications in neuroscience and pharmacokinetics, which show a striking improvement of the quality of estimation. The results are important for judicious designs of experiments to obtain maximal information from each data point, especially when samples are expensive...

  8. Lyapunov exponent of the random frequency oscillator: cumulant expansion approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anteneodo, C; Vallejos, R O

    2010-01-01

    We consider a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator with a random frequency, focusing on both the standard and the generalized Lyapunov exponents, λ and λ* respectively. We discuss the numerical difficulties that arise in the numerical calculation of λ* in the case of strong intermittency. When the frequency corresponds to a Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, we compute analytically λ* by using a cumulant expansion including up to the fourth order. Connections with the problem of finding an analytical estimate for the largest Lyapunov exponent of a many-body system with smooth interactions are discussed.

  9. Mg isotope systematics during magmatic processes: Inter-mineral fractionation in mafic to ultramafic Hawaiian xenoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracke, A.; Tipper, E. T.; Klemme, S.; Bizimis, M.

    2018-04-01

    Observed differences in Mg isotope ratios between bulk magmatic rocks are small, often on a sub per mill level. Inter-mineral differences in the 26Mg/24Mg ratio (expressed as δ26Mg) in plutonic rocks are on a similar scale, and have mostly been attributed to equilibrium isotope fractionation at magmatic temperatures. Here we report Mg isotope data on minerals in spinel peridotite and garnet pyroxenite xenoliths from the rejuvenated stage of volcanism on Oahu and Kauai, Hawaii. The new data are compared to literature data and to theoretical predictions to investigate the processes responsible for inter-mineral Mg isotope fractionation at magmatic temperatures. Theory predicts up to per mill level differences in δ26Mg between olivine and spinel at magmatic temperatures and a general decrease in Δ26Mgolivine-spinel (=δ26Mgolivine - δ26Mgspinel) with increasing temperature, but also with increasing Cr# in spinel. For peridotites with a simple petrogenetic history by melt depletion, where increasing depletion relates to increasing melting temperatures, Δ26Mgolivine-spinel should thus systematically decrease with increasing Cr# in spinel. However, most natural peridotites, including the Hawaiian spinel peridotites investigated in this study, are overprinted by variable extents of melt-rock reaction, which disturb the systematic primary temperature and compositionally related olivine-spinel Mg isotope systematics. Diffusion, subsolidus re-equilibration, or surface alteration may further affect the observed olivine-spinel Mg isotope fractionation in peridotites, making Δ26Mgolivine-spinel in peridotites a difficult-to-apply geothermometer. The available Mg isotope data on clinopyroxene and garnet suggest that this mineral pair is a more promising geothermometer, but its application is restricted to garnet-bearing igneous (garnet pyroxenites) and metamorphic rocks (eclogites). Although the observed δ26Mg variation is on a sub per mill range in bulk magmatic rocks

  10. CHARACTERISTICS OF MUNICIPAL WASTE BIODEGRADABLE FRACTION AND EVALUATION OF ITS PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Meller

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A growing interest in Renewable Energy Sources initiated the use of biogas as an energy generating material. Biodegradable waste coming from different streams is an important resource for biogas production. The studies were conducted on 20–80 mm fraction of municipal waste separated by rotary screen in the technological process of The Waste Recovery and Storage Plant in Leśno Górne. Morphological composition of the examined waste and their parameters determining their usefulness for composting and fermentation were analysed. On the basis of organic carbon content, the amount of biogas that may be produced from 1 kg of waste was estimated. An approximate amount of biogas which can be obtained in the process of methane fermentation from energy piles, formed from 10 000 Mg of waste was also calculated. Depending on the temperature it was from. 2.8 to 3.8 mln m3.

  11. Stochastic processes crossing from ballistic to fractional diffusion with memory: exact results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ilyin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the now classical problem of a diffusion process that crosses over from a ballistic behavior at short times to a fractional diffusion (sub- or super-diffusion at longer times. Using the standard non-Markovian diffusion equation we demonstrate how to choose the memory kernel to exactly respect the two different asymptotics of the diffusion process. Having done so we solve for the probability distribution function as a continuous function which evolves inside a ballistically expanding domain. This general solution agrees for long times with the probability distribution function obtained within the continuous random walk approach but it is much superior to this solution at shorter times where the effect of the ballistic regime is crucial.

  12. Composting of the solid fraction of digestate derived from pig slurry: Biological processes and compost properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tambone, Fulvia, E-mail: fulvia.tambone@unimi.it; Terruzzi, Laura; Scaglia, Barbara; Adani, Fabrizio

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Anaerobic digestion leads to the production of a biologically stable digestate. • Solid–liquid separation produces a solid fraction having high fertilizer value. • Composting process shows low biological activity due to high biological stability of digestate. • Solid digestate fraction can be composted in a short time or used directly as organic fertilizer. - Abstract: The aim of this paper was to assess the characteristics of the solid fractions (SF) obtained by mechanical separation of digestate, their compostability and compost quality. To do so, the SF of digestates obtained from anaerobic digestion of pig slurry, energy crops and agro-industrial residues were sampled in five plants located in Northern Italy. Results obtained indicated that anaerobic digestion by itself promoted the high biological stability of biomasses with a Potential Dynamic Respiration Index (PDRI) close to 1000 mgO{sub 2} kg V S{sup −1} h{sup −1}. Subsequent composting of digestates, with an added bulking agent, did not give remarkably different results, and led only to a slight modification of the characteristics of the initial non-composted mixtures; the composts obtained fully respected the legal limits for high quality compost. Chemical studies of organic matter composition of the biomasses by using CP MAS {sup 13}C NMR, indicated that the compost was composed of a high relative content of O-alkyl-C (71.47% of total C) (cellulose and hemicelluloses) and a low alkyl-C (12.42%) (i.e. volatile fatty acids, steroid-like molecules, aliphatic biopolymers and proteins)

  13. Composting of the solid fraction of digestate derived from pig slurry: Biological processes and compost properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tambone, Fulvia; Terruzzi, Laura; Scaglia, Barbara; Adani, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Anaerobic digestion leads to the production of a biologically stable digestate. • Solid–liquid separation produces a solid fraction having high fertilizer value. • Composting process shows low biological activity due to high biological stability of digestate. • Solid digestate fraction can be composted in a short time or used directly as organic fertilizer. - Abstract: The aim of this paper was to assess the characteristics of the solid fractions (SF) obtained by mechanical separation of digestate, their compostability and compost quality. To do so, the SF of digestates obtained from anaerobic digestion of pig slurry, energy crops and agro-industrial residues were sampled in five plants located in Northern Italy. Results obtained indicated that anaerobic digestion by itself promoted the high biological stability of biomasses with a Potential Dynamic Respiration Index (PDRI) close to 1000 mgO 2 kg V S −1 h −1 . Subsequent composting of digestates, with an added bulking agent, did not give remarkably different results, and led only to a slight modification of the characteristics of the initial non-composted mixtures; the composts obtained fully respected the legal limits for high quality compost. Chemical studies of organic matter composition of the biomasses by using CP MAS 13 C NMR, indicated that the compost was composed of a high relative content of O-alkyl-C (71.47% of total C) (cellulose and hemicelluloses) and a low alkyl-C (12.42%) (i.e. volatile fatty acids, steroid-like molecules, aliphatic biopolymers and proteins)

  14. Purchasing power parity: Evidence of long memory processes and fractional integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadhem Selmi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Purchasing Power Parity (PPP theory, which serves as a key to the determination of several models of exchange rates, suggests a long-term relationship between exchange rates and relative prices. It states that the price levels in all the countries are the same when measured in terms of a single currency. The purpose of this study is to model the behavior of the exchange rates of five partner countries of Tunisia, namely, (Germany, the United States, France, Italy, the UK, Morocco and Libya relative to its fundamentals over the period 1990-1999. Beyond the traditional linear cointegration, we use the approaches based on fractional cointegration. We are trying to discriminate between the adjustment dynamics with long memory (but linear and a dynamics of a short memory (nonlinear. Given the important role of the exchange rates in the successful experience of open economies, we are interested, in this work, in analyzing the dynamics of the exchange rates in the long run. The econometric results obtained through the GPH tests, make us consider the PPP as an event in the long run if significant short-term deviations from the PPP cannot exist. Therefore, the analysis of the fractional cointegration makes the deviations, regarding equilibrium, follow a slightly integrated process and therefore capture a much wider group of research parity or mean-reverting behavior.

  15. Simulation and analysis of multi-stage centrifugal fractional extraction process of 4-nitrobenzene glycine enantiomers☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Wen; Kewen Tang; Jicheng Zhou; Panliang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Based on the interfacial ligand exchange model and the law of conservation of mass, the multi-stage enantioselective liquid–liquid extraction model has been established to analyze and discuss on multi-stage centrifugal fractional extraction process of 4-nitrobenzene glycine (PGL) enantiomers. The influence of phase ratio, extractant concentra-tion, and PF6−concentration on the concentrations of enantiomers in the extract and raffinate was investigated by experiment and simulation. A good agreement between model and experiment was obtained. On this basis, the influence of many parameters such as location of stage, concentration levels, extractant excess, and number of stages on the symmetric separation performance was simulated. The optimal location of feed stage is the middle of fractional extraction equipment. The feed flow must satisfy a restricted relationship on flow ratios and the liquid throughout of centrifugal device. For desired purity specification, the required flow ratios decrease with extractant concentration and increase with PF6−concentration. When the number of stages is 18 stages at extractant excess of 1.0 or 14 stages at extractant excess of 2.0, the eeeq (equal enantiomeric excess) can reach to 99%.

  16. DETERMINATION OF DIETARY FIBRE – THE INFLUENCE OF MILLING FRACTION AND MIXING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaž FERJANČIČ

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary fibre is an important constituent of a healthy diet, composed of non-digestible carbohydrates and lignin. Over the last decades dietary fibre has gained importance for human nutrition, due to its beneficial effects on health. In addition to classical enzyme-gravimetric methods, new methods for the determination of total, insoluble and soluble dietary fibres in foods have recently been developed, but have not yet been fully implemented for use. For the purpose of creating food composition databases and for food labelling, the classical AOAC 985.29 and 991.43 methods are still widely used. The methods are enzyme-gravimetric and therefore sensitive to enzyme kinetics. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of milling fraction and mixing of the sample on dietary fibre content determined with the AOAC method 991.43. The results showed that milling fraction significantly influences the content of dietary fibre, especially in unprocessed or slightly processed cereals, the mixing acts synergistically with milling. According to the results it is proposed to mill the sample between 200 and 500 μm. For accurate determination of dietary fibre content, it is necessary to prepare the sample correctly, since the AOAC 991.43 method is, despite its robustness, sensitive during the sample preparation step.

  17. Bioactive Fraction of Geopropolis from Melipona scutellaris Decreases Neutrophils Migration in the Inflammatory Process: Involvement of Nitric Oxide Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Franchin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of the ethanolic extract of geopropolis (EEGP from Melipona scutellaris and its fractions on the modulation of neutrophil migration in the inflammatory process, and the participation of nitric oxide (NO pathway, as well as to check the chemical profile of the bioactive fraction. EEGP and its aqueous fraction decreased neutrophil migration in the peritoneal cavity and also the interaction of leukocytes (rolling and adhesion with endothelial cells. The levels of chemokines CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 were not altered after treatment with EEGP and the aqueous fraction. It was found that the injection of NO pathway antagonists abolished the EEGP and the aqueous fraction inhibitory activity on the neutrophil migration. The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (ICAM-1 was reduced, and nitrite levels increased after treatment with EEGP and aqueous fraction. In the carrageenan-induced paw edema model, EEGP and the aqueous fraction showed antiedema activity. No pattern of flavonoid and phenolic acid commonly found in propolis samples of Apis mellifera could be detected in the aqueous fraction samples. These data indicate that the aqueous fraction found has promising bioactive substances with anti-inflammatory activity.

  18. Bioactive Fraction of Geopropolis from Melipona scutellaris Decreases Neutrophils Migration in the Inflammatory Process: Involvement of Nitric Oxide Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchin, Marcelo; da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Denny, Carina; Napimoga, Marcelo Henrique; Cunha, Thiago Mattar; Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Matias de Alencar, Severino; Ikegaki, Masaharu; Luiz Rosalen, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of the ethanolic extract of geopropolis (EEGP) from Melipona scutellaris and its fractions on the modulation of neutrophil migration in the inflammatory process, and the participation of nitric oxide (NO) pathway, as well as to check the chemical profile of the bioactive fraction. EEGP and its aqueous fraction decreased neutrophil migration in the peritoneal cavity and also the interaction of leukocytes (rolling and adhesion) with endothelial cells. The levels of chemokines CXCL1/KC and CXCL2/MIP-2 were not altered after treatment with EEGP and the aqueous fraction. It was found that the injection of NO pathway antagonists abolished the EEGP and the aqueous fraction inhibitory activity on the neutrophil migration. The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (ICAM-1) was reduced, and nitrite levels increased after treatment with EEGP and aqueous fraction. In the carrageenan-induced paw edema model, EEGP and the aqueous fraction showed antiedema activity. No pattern of flavonoid and phenolic acid commonly found in propolis samples of Apis mellifera could be detected in the aqueous fraction samples. These data indicate that the aqueous fraction found has promising bioactive substances with anti-inflammatory activity.

  19. Comparison of various techniques for the extraction of umbelliferone and herniarin in Matricaria chamomilla processing fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Maja; Mendešević, Nikolina; Šubarić, Drago; Banjari, Ines; Jokić, Stela

    2017-08-05

    Chamomile, a well-known medicinal plant, is a rich source of bioactive compounds, among which two coumarin derivatives, umbelliferone and herniarin, are often found in its extracts. Chamomile extracts have found a different uses in cosmetic industry, as well as umbelliferone itself, which is, due to its strong absorption of UV light, usually added to sunscreens, while herniarin (7-methoxycoumarin) is also known for its biological activity. Therefore, chamomile extracts with certain herniarin and umbelliferone content could be of interest for application in pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. The aim of this study was to compare the extracts of different chamomile fractions (unprocessed chamomile flowers first class, processed chamomile flowers first class, pulvis and processing waste) and to identify the best material and method of extraction to obtain herniarin and umbelliferone. Various extraction techniques such as soxhlet, hydrodistillation, maceration and supercritical CO 2 extraction were used in this study. Umbelliferone and herniarin content was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The highest yield of umbelliferone (11.80 mg/100 g) and herniarin (82.79 mg/100 g) were obtained from chamomile processing waste using maceration technique with 50% aqueous ethanol solution and this extract has also proven to possess antioxidant activity (61.5% DPPH scavenging activity). This study shows a possibility of potential utilization of waste from chamomile processing applying different extraction techniques.

  20. Tracking transformation processes of organic micropollutants in aquatic environments using multi-element isotope fractionation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, Thomas B.; Bolotin, Jakov; Skarpeli-Liati, Marita; Wijker, Reto; Kurt, Zohre; Nishino, Shirley F.; Spain, Jim C.

    2011-01-01

    The quantitative description of enzymatic or abiotic transformations of man-made organic micropollutants in rivers, lakes, and groundwaters is one of the major challenges associated with the risk assessment of water resource contamination. Compound-specific isotope analysis enables one to identify (bio)degradation pathways based on changes in the contaminants' stable isotope ratios even if multiple reactive and non-reactive processes cause concentrations to decrease. Here, we investigated how the magnitude and variability of isotope fractionation in some priority pollutants is determined by the kinetics and mechanisms of important enzymatic and abiotic redox reactions. For nitroaromatic compounds and substituted anilines, we illustrate that competing transformation pathways can be assessed via trends of N and C isotope signatures.

  1. Modeling anomalous diffusion by a subordinated fractional Lévy-stable process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teuerle, Marek; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Sikora, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Two phenomena that can be discovered in systems with anomalous diffusion are long-range dependence and trapping events. The first effect concerns events that are arbitrarily distant but still influence each other exceptionally strongly, which is characteristic for anomalous regimes. The second corresponds to the presence of constant values of the underlying process. Motivated by the relatively poor class of models that can cover these two phenomena, we introduce subordinated fractional Lévy-stable motion with tempered stable waiting times. We present in detail its main properties, propose a simulation scheme and give an estimation procedure for its parameters. The last part of the paper is a presentation, via the Monte Carlo approach, of the effectiveness of the estimation of the parameters. (paper)

  2. Nonlinear processes in laser-produced dense plasma (observation of the fractional harmonics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyu, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    One of the main issues of laser plasma physics interactions is harmonic generation. The harmonic emission spectrum provides clues as to which non-linear processes take place in the plasma. Several effects contribute to a given line as judged from the complexity of the actual spectra. Unfolding of them has not been done satisfactorily yet. Harmonic lines with half integer or integer orders have been observed, but the physics are far from complete. In this dissertation research, we observed the usual second harmonic generation and a set of fractional harmonics which we believe have been observed for the first time in plasma physics. The plasma was produced by a high power laser and we have characterized its properties from the analysis of the radiation spectra, including the harmonic lines, as measured using the methods of transient spectroscopy. We produced the plasma with a Nd:glass laser which had a 65 nsec pulse width (FWHM) with a total energy of up to 6 Joules. The targets were steel alloys, copper, and aluminum. The harmonic generation from the plasma with a planar metal target was not strong. But, it became stronger when we made a dead hole (cavity) at the laser spot on the target surface. The second harmonic line appears first before the time of the peak of laser pulse. The fractional harmonics, which are related to the laser wavelength by rational number other than integers or half integers, appear near or after the time of the laser peak and weaker in UV wavelength range but stronger if some atomic emission line are near by. To understand the plasma evolution better, we developed computer simulation codes. The codes contain all relevant processes necessary to compute the plasma evolution

  3. Hydrodeoxygenation of pyrolysis oil fractions: process understanding and quality assessment through co-processing in refinery units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Miguel Mercader, F.; de Miguel Mercader, Ferran; Groeneveld, M.J.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; Geantet, Christophe; Toussaint, Guy; Way, Nico W.J.; Schaverien, Colin J.; Hogendoorn, Kees

    2011-01-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of pyrolysis oil fractions was studied to better understand the HDO of whole pyrolysis oil and to assess the possibility to use individual upgrading routes for these fractions. By mixing pyrolysis oil and water in a 2:1 weight ratio, two fractions were obtained: an oil

  4. Molybdenum isotope fractionation and speciation in a euxinic lake—Testing ways to discern isotope fractionation processes in a sulfidic setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, Tais W.; Wirth, Stefanie B.

    2017-06-01

    The molybdenum (Mo) isotope composition in euxinic shales has been used as a proxy for the global distribution of anoxic conditions in ancient oceans, and since more recently also as a proxy for sulfide concentrations in depositional environments. However, there is currently no way to distinguish isotope fractionation at low bottom water sulfide concentrations in ‘local’ basins from ‘global’ secular isotope variations associated with changing seawater composition. This uncertainty is challenging the use of Mo isotopes for paleoceanographic reconstructions. To explore this further, we present new data from sediments deposited over the past ~ 9800 years in one of the best studied euxinic localities in the world: Lake Cadagno in Switzerland. The sample set allows us to test ways to discern isotope fractionation processes at play in a highly restricted euxinic basin. Most of our drill core samples (n = 18) show high δ98Mo values similar to previously studied shallow sediments, indicative of quantitative Mo removal from the water column (Dahl et al. 2010a). However, a few samples (n = 3) deposited between about 1200 and 3400 years ago carry low δ98Mo values and have been isotopically fractionated in the lake. Sedimentological and geochemical characterizations show that these δ98Mo-fractionated sediments formed during times of frequent injection of O2- and sediment-rich river water into the deep sulfidic water column. A positive correlation between δ98Mo and sedimentary Mo contents suggests that isotope fractionation occurred during times of non-quantitative Mo removal, although Mn-oxide cycling at the chemocline might also contribute a subordinate proportion of (98Mo-depleted) molybdenum into the sulfidic zone. Sedimentary Mo/U enrichments relative to oxic lake water further supports the hypothesis that a particulate Mo shuttle was most efficient during times of quantitative Mo removal. Therefore, periods with inefficient Mo capture are ascribed to

  5. Influence of cooking process on protein fractions in cooked ham and mortadella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vonghia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The mortadella is a pork meat sausage (in natural or artificial bowel accurately triturated and mixed with little backfat cubes, salt, sodium nitrate and nitrite, spices and peppercorns, and then cooked in oven for many hours. The cooked ham is obtained from an anatomically completed piece of meat; the working process provides the addiction of salt and spices, the brine, the bones removal, the churning and the pressing, so the cured meat is first packed in a mould provided for this purpose, then cooked and after cooled and packed. The meat cooking is the last step in the cooked sausage production technology, and let us obtain a stable and eatable product. The effect of the heat and the lenght of processing are the main responsibles for modifications in water- and salt-soluble protein fractions. Indeed myofibrils denature themselves after cooking and consequently their solubility decreases; particularly the denaturation begins over 30°C in the myosin chain, instead the actin solubility begins to decrease over 60°C, being the actin more stable than myosin (Barbieri et al., 1997...

  6. Process for the production of protein enriched fractions from vegetable materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkink, B.H.; Willemsen, J.H.A.

    2006-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for the production of a protein enriched fraction and a fibre enriched fraction from a vegetable material, wherein the vegetable material comprises a total fat content of 0.1 to 22.0 % by dry weight of the total vegetable material and a total starch content of

  7. From stochastic processes to numerical methods: A new scheme for solving reaction subdiffusion fractional partial differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angstmann, C.N.; Donnelly, I.C. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, UNSW Australia, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia); Henry, B.I., E-mail: B.Henry@unsw.edu.au [School of Mathematics and Statistics, UNSW Australia, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia); Jacobs, B.A. [School of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Private Bag 3, Wits 2050 (South Africa); DST–NRF Centre of Excellence in Mathematical and Statistical Sciences (CoE-MaSS) (South Africa); Langlands, T.A.M. [Department of Mathematics and Computing, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba QLD 4350 (Australia); Nichols, J.A. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, UNSW Australia, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2016-02-15

    We have introduced a new explicit numerical method, based on a discrete stochastic process, for solving a class of fractional partial differential equations that model reaction subdiffusion. The scheme is derived from the master equations for the evolution of the probability density of a sum of discrete time random walks. We show that the diffusion limit of the master equations recovers the fractional partial differential equation of interest. This limiting procedure guarantees the consistency of the numerical scheme. The positivity of the solution and stability results are simply obtained, provided that the underlying process is well posed. We also show that the method can be applied to standard reaction–diffusion equations. This work highlights the broader applicability of using discrete stochastic processes to provide numerical schemes for partial differential equations, including fractional partial differential equations.

  8. Developing an objective function to characterize the tradeoffs in salting out and the foam and droplet fractionation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherry J.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many methods for separating and purifying proteins from dilute solutions, such as salting out/precipitation, adsorption/chromatography, foam fractionation, and droplet fractionation. In order to determine the optimal condition for a selected separation and purification process, an objective function is developed. The objective function consists of three parameters, which are the protein mass recovery, the separation ratio, and the enzymatic activity ratio. In this paper the objective function is determined as a function of the pH of the bulk solution for egg albumin, cellulase, and sporamin (for foam fractionation and invertase ( for droplet fractionation. It is found that the optimal pH for all the systems except for cellulase is near their isoelectric point.

  9. Thermal and mechanical stabilization process of the organic fraction of the municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giudicianni, Paola, E-mail: giudicianni@irc.cnr.it [DIC-MAPI – Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II (Italy); Bozza, Pio, E-mail: pi.bozza@studenti.unina.it [DIC-MAPI – Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II (Italy); Sorrentino, Giancarlo, E-mail: g.sorrentino@unina.it [DIC-MAPI – Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II (Italy); Ragucci, Raffaele, E-mail: ragucci@irc.cnr.it [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione – C.N.R. Napoli (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • A domestic scale prototype for the pre-treatment of OFMSW has been tested. • Two grinding techniques are compared and thermopress is used for the drying stage. • Increasing temperature up to 170 °C reduces energy consumption of the drying stage. • In the range 5–10 bar a reduction of 97% of the initial volume is obtained. • In most cases energy recovery from the dried waste matches energy consumption. - Abstract: In the present study a thermo-mechanical treatment for the disposal of the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW) at apartment or condominium scale is proposed. The process presents several advantages allowing to perform a significant volume and moisture reduction of the produced waste at domestic scale thus producing a material with an increased storability and improved characteristics (e.g. calorific value) that make it available for further alternative uses. The assessment of the applicability of the proposed waste pretreatment in a new scheme of waste management system requires several research steps involving different competences and application scales. In this context, a preliminary study is needed targeting to the evaluation and minimization of the energy consumption associated to the process. To this aim, in the present paper, two configurations of a domestic appliance prototype have been presented and the effect of some operating variables has been investigated in order to select the proper configuration and the best set of operating conditions capable to minimize the duration and the energy consumption of the process. The performances of the prototype have been also tested on three model mixtures representing a possible daily domestic waste and compared with an existing commercially available appliance. The results obtained show that a daily application of the process is feasible given the short treatment time required and the energy consumption comparable to the one of

  10. Hygienic quality of stem fractions of mechanically processed fibre hemp and linseed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H-R. KYMÄLÄINEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Bast fibre is the most important fraction of bast fibre plants for technical products, i.e. thermal insulations and packaging materials. The hygienic quality of the various fractions of bast fibre plants is of interest in thermal insulations, because it may affect the quality of indoor air. Packaging materials may be associated e.g. with foodstuffs, which highlights the importance of hygienic quality. The aim of this study was to screen the hygienic quality, determined as microbial content, of mechanically fractionated fibre hemp and linseed plants harvested in the autumn before frost, after early frost and in spring. In addition, the possible correlation between microbes and ash was investigated. Two plant species, fibre hemp and linseed were studied. The plants were cultivated in Siuntio in southern Finland during the years 2002 and 2003, harvested in autumn or in spring and mechanically fractionated. The microbial contents of the fractions were examined by measuring the total number of microbes using Hygicult® growing slides. The microbial content of fractions of fibre hemp and linseed varied between 103 and 109 cfu/gdw. The fibre of hemp harvested after early frost or in spring had the lowest amount of moulds, but during winter and spring the amounts of bacteria and yeasts increased in hemp. Mechanically separated fibre and shive contained less microbes than the stalk. Ash contents of all examined samples of stems and stem fractions varied between 1% and 14%. The fibre after fractionating had a lower ash content (2.3–3.3% than that of stems (4.4–6.9% harvested in the autumn. The ash content of stem and shive decreased to 1.6% during winter, the ash content of fibre being even somewhat lower (0.9%. No correlation was observed between the contents of microbes and ash.;

  11. Development of an integrated pretreatment fractionation process for fermentable sugars and lignin: Application to almond (Prunus dulcis) shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Dachun; Holtman, Kevin M.; Franqui-Espiet, Diana; Orts, William J.; Zhao, Ruming

    2011-01-01

    An environmentally friendly pretreatment process was developed to fractionate cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin from almond (Prunus dulcis) shells, consisting of hot water pretreatment (HWP) coupled with organic solvent (organosolv) pretreatment of water/ethanol (OWEP). This integrated pretreatment process proved more effective on the basis of yield of fermentable sugar and lignin separation compared with HWP alone, dilute acid pretreatment (DAP), ammonia pretreatment (AP), lime pretreatment LP, organosolv water/ethanol pretreatment (OWEP), and organosolv water/acetone pretreatment (OWAP). In the coupled hot water-organosolv process, hemicellulose sugars were recovered in the first residual liquid while varying amounts of cellulose was retained in the residual solid. The lignin fraction was obtained by simply adjusting the pH from the second liquid. The optimal two-stage process consisted of first HWP stage at 195 o C for 30 min, resulting in w glucose = 95.4% glucose recovery yield and w xylose = 92.2% xylose removal. The second organosolv OWEP stage was operated at 195 o C for 20 min, in ethanol in water mixtures of ethanol = 50% and resulted in nearly w glucose = 100% glucose recovery yield, w xylose = 90% xylose and w lignin = 61% lignin removal. After enzymatic hydrolysis, glucose yield was up to w glucose = 95%, compared to 61% yield from untreated almond. Images obtained via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) highlighted the differences in almond structure from the varying pretreatment methods during biomass fractionation. -- Highlights: → Almond shells are an under-utilized agriculture byproduct available in the world. → Almond shells are particularly attractive as bioenergy feedstock. → We have developed a new fractionation process for the almond shell. → The new process combined the HWP with OWEP. → The fractionation process has potential in the utilization of almond shell.

  12. Treatment of acidic mine water at uranium mine No. 711 by barium chloride-sludge recycle-fractional neutralization process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chaowen; Wang Benyi; Ding Tongsen; Zhong Pingru; Liao Yongbing; Li Xiaochu; Lu Guohua

    1994-01-01

    The barium chloride-sludge recycle-fractional neutralization process for disposal of acidic mine water at Uranium Mine No. 711 was checked through laboratory and enlarged tests and one-year industrial trial-run. The results showed that the presented technology can meet the requirements of production and environmental protection

  13. Sobre uma nova teoria de precificação de opções e outros derivativos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailton Cassettari

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo desenvolve uma nova teoria de precificação de títulos derivativos, implementando-a para a situação particular de opções de compra européias de ações sem dividendos a partir da premissa básica de que o drift do ativo subjacente desempenha papel relevante no processo de precificação, no contexto dos fenômenos de transporte. É feita uma confrontação sistemática com os bem-conhecidos modelos Black-Scholes e Ornstein-Uhlenbeck bivariado que mostra a plausibilidade e efetividade desta abordagem.This paper develops a new theory of derivative securities pricing and implementes it for the specific case of European call options on a hypothetical non-dividend-paying stock. The basic premise is that the drift of the underlying asset plays a very important role in the pricing process, in the context of transport phenomena. A systematic confrontation to well-known Black-Scholes and bivariate trending Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models is also carried out, providing plausibility and effectiveness for this approach.

  14. Void fraction measurement in two-phase flow processes via symbolic dynamic filtering of ultrasonic signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Subhadeep; Keller, Eric; Talley, Justin; Srivastav, Abhishek; Ray, Asok; Kim, Seungjin

    2009-01-01

    This communication introduces a non-intrusive method for void fraction measurement and identification of two-phase flow regimes, based on ultrasonic sensing. The underlying algorithm is built upon the recently reported theory of a statistical pattern recognition method called symbolic dynamic filtering (SDF). The results of experimental validation, generated on a laboratory test apparatus, show a one-to-one correspondence between the flow measure derived from SDF and the void fraction measured by a conductivity probe. A sharp change in the slope of flow measure is found to be in agreement with a transition from fully bubbly flow to cap-bubbly flow. (rapid communication)

  15. Oxygen isotopic fractionation of O₂ during adsorption and desorption processes using molecular sieve at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Insu; Kusakabe, Minoru; Lee, Jong Ik

    2014-06-15

    Cryogenic trapping using molecular sieves is commonly used to collect O2 extracted from silicates for (17)O/(16)O and (18)O/(16)O analyses. However, gases which interfere with (17)O/(16)O analysis, notably NF3, are also trapped and their removal is essential for accurate direct measurement of the (17)O/(16)O ratio. It is also necessary to identify and quantify any isotopic fractionation associated with the use of cryogenic trapping using molecular sieves. The oxygen isotopic compositions of O2 before and after desorption from, and adsorption onto, 13X and 5A molecular sieves (MS13X and MS5A) at 0°C, -78°C, -114°C, and -130°C were measured in order to determine the oxygen isotopic fractionation at these temperatures. We also investigated whether isotopic fractionation occurred when O2 gas was transferred sequentially into a second cold finger, also containing molecular sieve. It was confirmed that significant oxygen isotopic fractionation occurs between the gaseous O2 and that adsorbed onto molecular sieve, if desorption and adsorption are incomplete. As the fraction of released or untrapped O2 becomes smaller with decreasing trapping temperature (from 0 to -130°C), the isotopic fractionation becomes larger. Approximately half of the total adsorbed O2 is released from the molecular sieve during desorption at -114°C, which is the temperature recommended for separation from NF3 (retained on the molecular sieve), and this will interfere with (17)O/(16)O measurements. The use of a single cold finger should be avoided, because partial desorption is accompanied by oxygen isotopic fractionation, thereby resulting in inaccurate isotopic data. The use of a dual cold finger arrangement is recommended because, as we have confirmed, the transfer of O2 from the first trap to the second is almost 100%. However, even under these conditions, a small isotopic fractionation (0.18 ± 0.05‰ in δ(17)O values and 0.26 ± 0.06‰ in δ(18)O values) occurred, with O2 in

  16. Development and evaluation of a multiple-plate fraction collector for sample processing: application to radioprofiling in drug metabolism studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Anthony; Ly, Van T; Chando, Theodore J; Ruan, Qian; Donenfeld, Scott L; Holub, David P; Christopher, Lisa J

    2011-04-05

    Microplate scintillation counters are utilized routinely in drug metabolism laboratories for the off-line radioanalysis of fractions collected during HPLC radioprofiling. In this process, the current fraction collection technology is limited by the number of plates that can be used per injection as well as the potential for sample loss due to dripping or spraying as the fraction collector head moves from well to well or between plates. More importantly, sample throughput is limited in the conventional process, since the collection plates must be manually exchanged after each injection. The Collect PAL, an innovative multiple-plate fraction collector, was developed to address these deficiencies and improve overall sample throughput. It employs a zero-loss design and has sub-ambient temperature control. Operation of the system is completely controlled with software and up to 24 (96- or 384-well) fraction collection plates can be loaded in a completely automated run. The system may also be configured for collection into various-sized tubes or vials. At flow rates of 0.5 or 1.0 mL/min and at collection times of 10 or 15s, the system precisely delivered 83-μL fractions (within 4.1% CV) and 250-μL fractions (within 1.4% CV), respectively, of three different mobile phases into 12 mm × 32 mm vials. Similarly, at a flow rate of 1 mL/min and 10s collection times, the system precisely dispensed mobile phase containing a [(14)C]-radiolabeled compound across an entire 96-well plate (% CV was within 5.3%). Triplicate analyses of metabolism test samples containing [(14)C]buspirone and its metabolites, derived from three different matrices (plasma, urine and bile), indicated that the Collect PAL produced radioprofiles that were reproducible and comparable to the current technology; the % CV for 9 selected peaks in the radioprofiles generated with the Collect PAL were within 9.3%. Radioprofiles generated by collecting into 96- and 384-well plates were qualitatively comparable

  17. Hydrolyzable Tannins from Sweet Chestnut Fractions Obtained by a Sustainable and Eco-friendly Industrial Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Margherita; Pinelli, Patrizia; Romani, Annalisa

    2016-03-01

    Sweet Chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.) wood extracts, rich in Hydrolyzable Tannins (HTs), are traditionally used in the tanning and textile industries, but recent studies suggest additional uses. The aim of this work is the HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS characterization of Sweet Chestnut aqueous extracts and fractions obtained through a membrane separation technology system without using other solvents, and the evaluation of their antioxidant and antiradical activities. Total tannins range between 2.7 and 138.4 mM; gallic acid ranges between 6% and 100%; castalagin and vescalagin range between 0% and 40%. Gallic Acid Equivalents, measured with the Folin-Ciocalteu test, range between 0.067 and 56.99 g/100 g extract weight; ORAC test results for the marketed fractions are 450.4 and 3050 µmol/g Trolox Equivalents/extract weight. EC₅₀ values, measured with the DPPH test, range between 0.444 and 2.399 µM. These results suggest a new ecofriendly and economically sustainable method for obtaining chestnut fractions with differentiated, stable and reproducible chemical compositions. Such fractions can be marketed for innovative uses in several sectors.

  18. Fraction transfer process in on-line comprehensive two-dimensional liquid phase separations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Česla, P.; Křenková, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 1 (2017), s. 109-123 ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06319S Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : capillary electrophoresis * comprehensive liquid chromatography * fraction transfer * two-dimensional separations * liquid chromatography Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 2.557, year: 2016

  19. Permanganate oxidizable carbon reflects a processed soil fraction that is sensitive to management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permanganate oxidizable C (POXC; i.e., active C) is a relatively new method that can quantify labile soil C rapidly and inexpensively. Despite limited reports of positive correlations with particulate organic carbon (POC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and other soil carbon (C) fractions, little i...

  20. Volume fraction dependence and reorganization in cluster-cluster aggregation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garderen, van H.F.; Dokter, W.H.; Beelen, T.P.M.; Santen, van R.A.; Pantos, E.; Michels, M.A.J.; Hilbers, P.A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Off-lattice diffusion limited cluster aggregation simulations in two dimensions have been performed in a wide volume fraction range between 0.001 and 0.60. Starting from a system of 10 000 monomers with radius 0.5, that follow Brownian trajectories, larger aggregates are generated by bond formation

  1. Hair regrowth through wound healing process after ablative fractional laser treatment in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jung Min; Jung, Han Mi; Goo, Boncheol; Park, Young Min

    2015-07-01

    Alopecia is one of the most common dermatological problems in the elderly; however, current therapies for it are limited by low efficacy and undesirable side effects. Although clinical reports on fractional laser treatment for various alopecia types are increasing, the exact mechanism remains to be clarified. The purposes of this study were to demonstrate the effect of ablative fractional laser treatment on hair follicle regrowth in vivo and investigate the molecular mechanism after laser treatment. Ablative CO2 fractional laser was applied to the shaved dorsal skin of 7-week-old C57BL/6 mice whose hair was in the telogen stage. After 12 mice were treated at various energy (10-40 mJ/spot) and density (100-400 spots/cm(2) ) settings to determine the proper dosage for maximal effect. Six mice were then treated at the decided dosage and skin specimens were sequentially obtained by excision biopsy from the dorsal aspect of each mouse. Tissue samples were used for the immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays to examine hair follicle status and their related molecules. The most effective dosage was the 10 mJ/spot and 300 spots/cm(2) setting. The anagen conversion of hair was observed in the histopathological examination, while Wnt/β-catenin expression was associated with hair regrowth in the immunohistochemistry and molecular studies. Ablative fractional lasers appear to be effective for inducing hair regrowth via activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in vivo. Our findings indicate that fractional laser treatment can potentially be developed as new treatment options for stimulating hair regrowth. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Application of fractional control techniques in petrochemical process; Aplicacao de tecnicas de controle fracionario para processos petroquimicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isfer, Luis A.D.; Lenzi, Marcelo K. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Lenzi, Ervin K. [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This work deals with the study of petrochemical process modeling and control using fractional differential equations. This kind of equation has been successfully used in modeling/identification, due to its powerful phenomenological description capability, generalizing conventional/classical models commonly used. Experimental data from literature were used for process identification and the mathematical model obtained, based on fractional differential equations, was the study of servo closed-loop control. Owing to its simplicity, the proportional type controller was used for this task, being able to control the process, keeping its stability, despite off-set. Different controller gains were used for simulation purposes, indicating that the higher the value of K{sub c}, the lower the off-set. (author)

  3. Bioavailability of iron to rats from processed soybean fractions determined by intrinsic and extrinsic labeling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, C.M.; Nelson, N.; Elliott, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Intrinsic and extrinsic labeling techniques were used to measure iron bioavailability from soybean fractions (isolated soy protein, defatted flour, soy hulls, insoluble material and whey) by iron-depleted and non-iron-depleted rats. As expected, absorption of iron was higher in the iron-depleted than in the non-iron-depleted rats. In the iron-depleted group, significantly more iron was absorbed from soy whey than from other fractions. No other significant difference in iron absorption associated with iron source was observed. The higher absorption rate of iron from whey by the iron-depleted rats probably was related to a lower quantity of food consumed during the test meal by this group. Intrinsic and extrinsic labeling techniques produced similar assessments of bioavailability of iron

  4. Cereal bran fractionation: processing techniques for the recovery of functional components and their applications to the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukoulis, Christos; Aprea, Eugenio

    2012-04-01

    Bran is the outer part of cereal grains that is separated during the cereals de-hulling and milling processes. It was considered in the past a by-product of cereal industry employed mainly as animal feed. Cereal bran, being particularly rich in different functional biopolymers, bio-active compounds and essential fatty acids, attracted the interest of pharmaceutical and food industry. Furthermore, the peculiar techno-functional properties of brans together with their particular physiological and nutritional aspects have led to a great interest in their incorporation as main or secondary components in different groups of food products including bakery and confectionery products, breakfast cereals and extruded foodstuffs, emulsions and functional dairy products and pasta products. In the first part of the present work the main fractionation processes, bran fractions properties and their physicochemical and technological properties are briefly reviewed. In the second part, relevant applications, with emphasis on patents, in food industry are reviewed as well.

  5. Separation of Radioiodine Fraction in the Processing Line of 235U Fission Produced 99Mo and Its Utilization For Preparation of Hippuran131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soenarjo Sunarhadijoso; HG Adang; W Kadarismanto; Purwadi B; Sukmana A; Sriyono; Rukman

    1998-01-01

    Production process of 99Mo from fission of 235U in RPC- BATAN produces non-moly radioactive fractions, which are classifiable into 3 fraction, i.e.; radioiodine fraction, radioxenon (noble gas) fraction and post-irradiated uranium fraction. The radioiodine fraction is expectable to be used as a source for providing radioisotope of 131I, and, therefore, an effort for separation of the radioiodine fraction was carried out. The separation was performed by trapping the radioiodine in a copper-wool column followed by purification using charcoal column. The bulk solution of Na131I bulk solution was relatively low, presumable due to the escape of the radioiodine from the copper-wool column into the cold finger originally used for trapping the noble gas fraction

  6. From correlation to causation: Estimating effective connectivity from zero-lag covariances of brain signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, Jonathan; Niederbühl, Alexander; Pernice, Volker; Lennartz, Carolin; Hennig, Jürgen; LeVan, Pierre; Rotter, Stefan

    2018-03-01

    Knowing brain connectivity is of great importance both in basic research and for clinical applications. We are proposing a method to infer directed connectivity from zero-lag covariances of neuronal activity recorded at multiple sites. This allows us to identify causal relations that are reflected in neuronal population activity. To derive our strategy, we assume a generic linear model of interacting continuous variables, the components of which represent the activity of local neuronal populations. The suggested method for inferring connectivity from recorded signals exploits the fact that the covariance matrix derived from the observed activity contains information about the existence, the direction and the sign of connections. Assuming a sparsely coupled network, we disambiguate the underlying causal structure via L1-minimization, which is known to prefer sparse solutions. In general, this method is suited to infer effective connectivity from resting state data of various types. We show that our method is applicable over a broad range of structural parameters regarding network size and connection probability of the network. We also explored parameters affecting its activity dynamics, like the eigenvalue spectrum. Also, based on the simulation of suitable Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes to model BOLD dynamics, we show that with our method it is possible to estimate directed connectivity from zero-lag covariances derived from such signals. In this study, we consider measurement noise and unobserved nodes as additional confounding factors. Furthermore, we investigate the amount of data required for a reliable estimate. Additionally, we apply the proposed method on full-brain resting-state fast fMRI datasets. The resulting network exhibits a tendency for close-by areas being connected as well as inter-hemispheric connections between corresponding areas. In addition, we found that a surprisingly large fraction of more than one third of all identified connections were of

  7. Oligarchy as a phase transition: The effect of wealth-attained advantage in a Fokker-Planck description of asset exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghosian, Bruce M.; Devitt-Lee, Adrian; Johnson, Merek; Li, Jie; Marcq, Jeremy A.; Wang, Hongyan

    2017-06-01

    The ;Yard-Sale Model; of asset exchange is known to result in complete inequality-all of the wealth in the hands of a single agent. It is also known that, when this model is modified by introducing a simple model of redistribution based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, it admits a steady state exhibiting some features similar to the celebrated Pareto Law of wealth distribution. In the present work, we analyze the form of this steady-state distribution in much greater detail, using a combination of analytic and numerical techniques. We find that, while Pareto's Law is approximately valid for low redistribution, it gives way to something more similar to Gibrat's Law when redistribution is higher. Additionally, we prove in this work that, while this Pareto or Gibrat behavior may persist over many orders of magnitude, it ultimately gives way to gaussian decay at extremely large wealth. Also in this work, we introduce a bias in favor of the wealthier agent-what we call Wealth-Attained Advantage (WAA)-and show that this leads to the phenomenon of ;wealth condensation; when the bias exceeds a certain critical value. In the wealth-condensed state, a finite fraction of the total wealth of the population ;condenses; to the wealthiest agent. We examine this phenomenon in some detail, and derive the corresponding modification to the Fokker-Planck equation. We observe a second-order phase transition to a state of coexistence between an oligarch and a distribution of non-oligarchs. Finally, by studying the asymptotic behavior of the distribution in some detail, we show that the onset of wealth condensation has an abrupt reciprocal effect on the character of the non-oligarchical part of the distribution. Specifically, we show that the above-mentioned gaussian decay at extremely large wealth is valid both above and below criticality, but degenerates to exponential decay precisely at criticality.

  8. Enhancing the hydrolysis process of a two-stage biogas technology for the organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasir, Zeeshan; Uellendahl, Hinrich

    2015-01-01

    The Danish company Solum A/S has developed a two-stage dry anaerobic digestion process labelled AIKAN® for the biological conversion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) into biogas and compost. In the AIKAN® process design the methanogenic (2nd) stage is separated from...... the hydrolytic (1st) stage, which enables pump-free feeding of the waste into the 1st stage (processing module), and eliminates the risk for blocking of pumps and pipes by pumping only the percolate from the 1st stage into the 2nd stage (biogas reactor tank). The biogas yield of the AIKAN® two-stage process......, however, has shown to be only about 60% of the theoretical maximum. Previous monitoring of the hydrolytic and methanogenic activity in the two stages of the process revealed that the bottleneck of the whole degradation process is rather found in the hydrolytic first stage while the methanogenic second...

  9. Synthesis, fractionation, and thin film processing of nanoparticles using the tunable solvent properties of carbon dioxide gas expanded liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Madhu

    Nanoparticles have received significant attention because of their unusual characteristics including high surface area to volume ratios. Materials built from nanoparticles possess unique chemical, physical, mechanical and optical properties. Due to these properties, they hold potential in application areas such as catalysts, sensors, semiconductors and optics. At the same time, CO 2 in the form of supercritical fluid or CO2 gas-expanded liquid mixtures has gained significant attention in the area of processing nanostructures. This dissertation focuses on the synthesis and processing of nanoparticles using CO2 tunable solvent systems. Nanoparticle properties depend heavily on their size and, as such, the ability to finely control the size and uniformity of nanoparticles is of utmost importance. Solution based nanoparticle formation techniques are attractive due to their simplicity, but they often result in the synthesis of particles with a wide size range. To address this limitation, a post-synthesis technique has been developed in this dissertation to fractionate polydisperse nanoparticles ( s . = 30%) into monodisperse fractions ( s . = 8%) using tunable physicochemical properties of CO 2 expanded liquids, where CO2 is employed as an antisolvent. This work demonstrates that by controlling the addition of CO2 (pressurization) to an organic dispersion of nanoparticles, the ligand stabilized nanoparticles can be size selectively precipitated within a novel high pressure apparatus that confines the particle precipitation to a specified location on a surface. Unlike current techniques, this CO2 expanded liquid approach provides faster and more efficient particle size separation, reduction in organic solvent usage, and pressure tunable size selection in a single process. To improve our fundamental understanding and to further refine the size separation process, a detailed study has been performed to identify the key parameters enabling size separation of various

  10. DO DYNAMIC NEURAL NETWORKS STAND A BETTER CHANCE IN FRACTIONALLY INTEGRATED PROCESS FORECASTING?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Delavari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the capabilities of two generations of models such as those based on dynamic neural network (e.g., Nonlinear Neural network Auto Regressive or NNAR model and a regressive (Auto Regressive Fractionally Integrated Moving Average model which is based on Fractional Integration Approach in forecasting daily data related to the return index of Tehran Stock Exchange (TSE. In order to compare these models under similar conditions, Mean Square Error (MSE and also Root Mean Square Error (RMSE were selected as criteria for the models’ simulated out-of-sample forecasting performance. Besides, fractal markets hypothesis was examined and according to the findings, fractal structure was confirmed to exist in the time series under investigation. Another finding of the study was that dynamic artificial neural network model had the best performance in out-of-sample forecasting based on the criteria introduced for calculating forecasting error in comparison with the ARFIMA model.

  11. Pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) seed proteins: sequential extraction processing and fraction characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezig, Leila; Chibani, Farhat; Chouaibi, Moncef; Dalgalarrondo, Michèle; Hessini, Kamel; Guéguen, Jacques; Hamdi, Salem

    2013-08-14

    Seed proteins extracted from Tunisian pumpkin seeds ( Cucurbita maxima ) were investigated for their solubility properties and sequentially extracted according to the Osborne procedure. The solubility of pumpkin proteins from seed flour was greatly influenced by pH changes and ionic strength, with higher values in the alkaline pH regions. It also depends on the seed defatting solvent. Protein solubility was decreased by using chloroform/methanol (CM) for lipid extraction instead of pentane (P). On the basis of differential solubility fractionation and depending on the defatting method, the alkali extract (AE) was the major fraction (42.1 (P), 22.3% (CM)) compared to the salt extract (8.6 (P), 7.5% (CM)). In salt, alkali, and isopropanol extracts, all essential amino acids with the exceptions of threonine and lysine met the minimum requirements for preschool children (FAO/WHO/UNU). The denaturation temperatures were 96.6 and 93.4 °C for salt and alkali extracts, respectively. Pumpkin protein extracts with unique protein profiles and higher denaturation temperatures could impart novel characteristics when used as food ingredients.

  12. Scaling characteristics of one-dimensional fractional diffusion processes in the presence of power-law distributed random noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhadhaghighi, Mohsen Ghasemi

    2017-08-01

    Here, we present results of numerical simulations and the scaling characteristics of one-dimensional random fluctuations with heavy-tailed probability distribution functions. Assuming that the distribution function of the random fluctuations obeys Lévy statistics with a power-law scaling exponent, we investigate the fractional diffusion equation in the presence of μ-stable Lévy noise. We study the scaling properties of the global width and two-point correlation functions and then compare the analytical and numerical results for the growth exponent β and the roughness exponent α. We also investigate the fractional Fokker-Planck equation for heavy-tailed random fluctuations. We show that the fractional diffusion processes in the presence of μ-stable Lévy noise display special scaling properties in the probability distribution function (PDF). Finally, we numerically study the scaling properties of the heavy-tailed random fluctuations by using the diffusion entropy analysis. This method is based on the evaluation of the Shannon entropy of the PDF generated by the random fluctuations, rather than on the measurement of the global width of the process. We apply the diffusion entropy analysis to extract the growth exponent β and to confirm the validity of our numerical analysis.

  13. Scaling characteristics of one-dimensional fractional diffusion processes in the presence of power-law distributed random noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhadhaghighi, Mohsen Ghasemi

    2017-08-01

    Here, we present results of numerical simulations and the scaling characteristics of one-dimensional random fluctuations with heavy-tailed probability distribution functions. Assuming that the distribution function of the random fluctuations obeys Lévy statistics with a power-law scaling exponent, we investigate the fractional diffusion equation in the presence of μ -stable Lévy noise. We study the scaling properties of the global width and two-point correlation functions and then compare the analytical and numerical results for the growth exponent β and the roughness exponent α . We also investigate the fractional Fokker-Planck equation for heavy-tailed random fluctuations. We show that the fractional diffusion processes in the presence of μ -stable Lévy noise display special scaling properties in the probability distribution function (PDF). Finally, we numerically study the scaling properties of the heavy-tailed random fluctuations by using the diffusion entropy analysis. This method is based on the evaluation of the Shannon entropy of the PDF generated by the random fluctuations, rather than on the measurement of the global width of the process. We apply the diffusion entropy analysis to extract the growth exponent β and to confirm the validity of our numerical analysis.

  14. Metallurgical behavior of fine fractions of copper sulfide minerals in a combined process of modified flotation and agitated bio leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibanez, J. P.; Ipinza, J.; Collao, N.; Ahlborn, G.

    2007-01-01

    The metallurgical behaviour of fine fraction of copper sulfide minerals of Compania Minera Quebrada Blanca S. A. was studied by concentration through flotation in aqueous media modified by alcohol followed by bio leaching of the concentrates. By using a 1% v/v of methanol, the metallurgical recovery of copper reaches 88%, while the iron recovery was 43%, the weight recovery was 18%, which indicates a high selectivity. these concentrates were then bio leached with and without nutrient medium, reaching 80% of copper recovery after 10 and 17 days, respectively. then, it is possible to conclude that this concentration-bio leaching metallurgical process is a promising route for copper recovery from the fine fraction of sulfide minerals. (Author) 24 refs

  15. Binder fraction reduction in non-ferrous metals concentrates briquetting process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jodkowski

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The research results on a method of reducing the amount of binder applied during formation of metal concentrates are presented. Research was done on a model copper concentrate, which was mixed in assumed mass fraction with binder, as well as binder with addition of waste polyols. Such mixtures were formed and tested using static compressive strength, both immediately after forming and after the assumed seasoning times: 24, 96, 192 and 336 hours. The results confirm the possibility of binder dose lowering using high-efficiency system of binder dispersing with small addition of waste polyols and by homogeneous mixing of the binder with the material. In all examined cases increase in seasoning time influenced mechanical strength of the formed shapes advantageously.

  16. Integer, fractional, and anomalous quantum Hall effects explained with Eyring's rate process theory and free volume concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Tian

    2017-02-22

    The Hall effects, especially the integer, fractional and anomalous quantum Hall effects, have been addressed using Eyring's rate process theory and free volume concept. The basic assumptions are that the conduction process is a common rate controlled "reaction" process that can be described with Eyring's absolute rate process theory; the mobility of electrons should be dependent on the free volume available for conduction electrons. The obtained Hall conductivity is clearly quantized as with prefactors related to both the magnetic flux quantum number and the magnetic quantum number via the azimuthal quantum number, with and without an externally applied magnetic field. This article focuses on two dimensional (2D) systems, but the approaches developed in this article can be extended to 3D systems.

  17. Radiation processing studies on residual fractions of Olowi petroleum crude oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarfo, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Residual fuel oil is an inexpensive boiler fuel that can replace diesel in some industrial boilers. The viscous waxy nature of residual fuel oil makes it very difficult to use in industries where fuel storage tanks have no heating elements to keep the fuel at temperatures at which it would easily flow. Irradiation is currently being studied as a cost effective means of cracking heavy petroleum crude oil into lighter and more valuable products. Research has shown that irradiation can replace the conventional methods of cracking petroleum with economical benefits. Gamma radiation from a cobalt-60 source was applied to the residue obtained after refining crude oil in this research study, with the intention of causing a similar cracking phenomenon. The main objective of the study was to evaluate the possibility of using gamma radiation to reduce the viscosity of residual fractions of crude oil used as residual fuel oil. This was done by exposing samples of residual fuel oil in glass jars to 9 different doses of gamma radiation, at room temperature and an elevated temperature of 60 degrees Celsius to determine and quantify the effect of radiation on residual fuel oil obtained from the Tema Oil Refinery. The pour points of the irradiated samples were not affected by radiation doses up to 200 kGy while the changes in viscosity for irradiation at room temperature were not significant. Irradiation at 60 degrees Celsius induced a small but significant increase in viscosity at 1 kGy and 200 kGy absorbed doses of irradiation. Irradiation fuels were stable in relation to viscosity, density and pour point over a period of 20 days after exposure. The flash point of irradiated samples, however, decreased by 5.26, 10.53 and 11.34% for 30, 50 and 80 kGy absorbed doses of radiation respectively. Cumulative and continuous doses gave similar results for pour point, density, viscosity and flash point measurements up to 50 kGy. Comparative cost analysis of methods used in maintaining low

  18. Separation process of isobutene and 1-butene from spent C4 fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, M.; Okamura, M.; Deguchi, T.; Higashio, H.

    1987-01-01

    The following is the summary of characteristics of Sumitomo's MTBE process for C 4 separation: 1) High purity isobutylene and 1-butene are economically separated from spent C 4 . 2) No solvents or chemicals are used and little by-product is generated. Therefore, the process is simple and results in relatively low plant capital investment and running cost. 3) No special acid-resistant materials are required for the equipment and facilities of the process. 4) Since reactions in the process are made under mild conditions, no special high temperature or pressure is required. 5) Operation and maintenance work are easy. The process can be operated by a relatively small number of operators

  19. Bio-based fractions by hydrothermal treatment of olive pomace: Process optimization and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazan, Aslihan; Celiktas, Melih Soner; Sargin, Sayit; Yesil-Celiktas, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Olive pomace was utilized based on biorefinery concept. • Protein extraction in the high pressure reactor yielded 231 mg protein/L. • LHW treatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis yielded 93.7% of the fermentable sugars. • At the end of the consecutive steps, 94.4% of the lignin present in the biomass were recovered. • Obtained hydrolysate was further converted to bioethanol. - Abstract: Olive pomace is an important lignocellulosic biomass for Mediterranean countries which is released in large quantities during industrial olive oil production and used for heating purposes for many years. In this study, the aim was to investigate the use of olive pomace to obtain value added fractions namely, proteins, fermentable sugars and lignin by sustainable biorefinery approach applying a sequence of high pressure extraction and hydrolysis. After pretreatment steps, 93.7% of the fermentable sugars and 94.4% of the lignin that present in the biomass were recovered. Liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment was shown to enhance the yield of enzymatic hydrolysis by an increase of 95.23%. The obtained sugars were used to produce bioethanol and based on the consumed sugar the yield and productivity were determined as 15.25% and 0.086 kg/m 3 h respectively

  20. Composting of the solid fraction of digestate derived from pig slurry: Biological processes and compost properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambone, Fulvia; Terruzzi, Laura; Scaglia, Barbara; Adani, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to assess the characteristics of the solid fractions (SF) obtained by mechanical separation of digestate, their compostability and compost quality. To do so, the SF of digestates obtained from anaerobic digestion of pig slurry, energy crops and agro-industrial residues were sampled in five plants located in Northern Italy. Results obtained indicated that anaerobic digestion by itself promoted the high biological stability of biomasses with a Potential Dynamic Respiration Index (PDRI) close to 1000 mgO2 kg V S(-1)h(-1). Subsequent composting of digestates, with an added bulking agent, did not give remarkably different results, and led only to a slight modification of the characteristics of the initial non-composted mixtures; the composts obtained fully respected the legal limits for high quality compost. Chemical studies of organic matter composition of the biomasses by using CP MAS (13)C NMR, indicated that the compost was composed of a high relative content of O-alkyl-C (71.47% of total C) (cellulose and hemicelluloses) and a low alkyl-C (12.42%) (i.e. volatile fatty acids, steroid-like molecules, aliphatic biopolymers and proteins). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  2. PRETREATMENT AND FRACTIONATION OF CORN STOVER BY AMMONIA RECYCLE PERCOLATION PROCESS. (R831645)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn stover was pretreated with aqueous ammonia in a flow-through column reactor,a process termed as Ammonia Recycle Percolation (ARP). The aqueous ammonia causesswelling and efficient delignification of biomass at high temperatures. The ARPprocess solubilizes abou...

  3. Fractionation of visuo-spatial memory processes in bipolar depression: a cognitive scaffolding account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallagher, P.; Gray, J.M.; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies of neurocognitive performance in bipolar disorder (BD) have demonstrated impairments in visuo-spatial memory. The aim of the present study was to use an object-location memory (OLM) paradigm to assess specific, dissociable processes in visuo-spatial memory and examine

  4. Fractionation of visuo-spatial memory processes in bipolar depression: a cognitive scaffolding account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallagher, P.; Gray, J.M.; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies of neurocognitive performance in bipolar disorder (BD) have demonstrated impairments in visuo-spatial memory. The aim of the present study was to use an object-location memory (OLM) paradigm to assess specific, dissociable processes in visuo-spatial memory and examine

  5. Fractional quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Laskin, Nick

    2018-01-01

    Fractional quantum mechanics is a recently emerged and rapidly developing field of quantum physics. This is the first monograph on fundamentals and physical applications of fractional quantum mechanics, written by its founder. The fractional Schrödinger equation and the fractional path integral are new fundamental physical concepts introduced and elaborated in the book. The fractional Schrödinger equation is a manifestation of fractional quantum mechanics. The fractional path integral is a new mathematical tool based on integration over Lévy flights. The fractional path integral method enhances the well-known Feynman path integral framework. Related topics covered in the text include time fractional quantum mechanics, fractional statistical mechanics, fractional classical mechanics and the α-stable Lévy random process. The book is well-suited for theorists, pure and applied mathematicians, solid-state physicists, chemists, and others working with the Schrödinger equation, the path integral technique...

  6. Fractionation of yeast extract by nanofiltration process to assess key compounds involved in CHO cell culture improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosser, Mathilde; Kapel, Romain; Chevalot, Isabelle; Olmos, Eric; Marc, Ivan; Marc, Annie; Oriol, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Yeast extract (YE) is known to greatly enhance mammalian cell culture performances, but its undefined composition decreases process reliability. Accordingly, in the present study, the nature of YE compounds involved in the improvement of recombinant CHO cell growth and IgG production was investigated. First, the benefits of YE were verified, revealing that it increased maximal concentrations of viable cells and IgG up to 73 and 60%, respectively compared to a reference culture. Then, the analyses of YE composition highlighted the presence of molecules such as amino acids, vitamins, salts, nucleobase, and glucose that were contained in reference medium, while others including peptides, trehalose, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids were not. Consequently, YE was fractionated by a nanofiltration process to deeper evaluate its effects on CHO cell cultures. The YE molecules already contained in reference medium were mainly isolated in the permeate fraction together with trehalose and short peptides, while other molecules were concentrated in the retentate. Permeate, which was free of macromolecules, exhibited a similar positive effect than raw YE on maximal concentrations. Additional studies on cell energetic metabolism underlined that dipeptides and tripeptides in permeate were used as an efficient source of nitrogenous substrates. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  7. Multi-objective LQR with optimum weight selection to design FOPID controllers for delayed fractional order processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saptarshi; Pan, Indranil; Das, Shantanu

    2015-09-01

    An optimal trade-off design for fractional order (FO)-PID controller is proposed with a Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) based technique using two conflicting time domain objectives. A class of delayed FO systems with single non-integer order element, exhibiting both sluggish and oscillatory open loop responses, have been controlled here. The FO time delay processes are handled within a multi-objective optimization (MOO) formalism of LQR based FOPID design. A comparison is made between two contemporary approaches of stabilizing time-delay systems withinLQR. The MOO control design methodology yields the Pareto optimal trade-off solutions between the tracking performance and total variation (TV) of the control signal. Tuning rules are formed for the optimal LQR-FOPID controller parameters, using median of the non-dominated Pareto solutions to handle delayed FO processes. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Production of gasoline fraction from bio-oil under atmospheric conditions by an integrated catalytic transformation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhaoxia; Bi, Peiyan; Jiang, Peiwen; Fan, Minghui; Deng, Shumei; Zhai, Qi; Li, Quanxin

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to develop an integrated process for production of gasoline fraction bio-fuels from bio-oil under atmospheric conditions. This novel transformation process included the catalytic cracking of bio-oil to light olefins and the subsequent synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon bio-fuels from light olefins with two reactors in series. The yield of bio-fuel was up to 193.8 g/(kg bio-oil) along with a very low oxygen content, high RONs (research octane numbers), high LHVs (lower heating values) and low benzene content under the optimizing reaction conditions. Coke deposition seems to be the main cause of catalyst deactivation in view of the fact that the deactivated catalysts was almost recovered by on-line treating the used catalyst with oxygen. The integrated transformation potentially provides a useful way for the development of gasoline range hydrocarbon fuels using renewable lignocellulose biomass. - Graphical abstract: An integrated process for production of gasoline fraction bio-fuels from bio-oil through the catalytic cracking of bio-oil to light olefins followed by the synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon bio-fuels from light olefins in series. - Highlights: • A new route for production of gasoline-range bio-fuels from bio-oil was achieved. • The process was an integrated catalytic transformation at atmospheric pressure. • Bio-oil is converted into light olefins and then converted to biofuel in series. • C_6–C_1_0 bio-fuels derived from bio-oil had high RONs and LHVs.

  9. The distribution of environmental contaminants and pharmaceuticals among skim milk, milk fat, curd, whey, and milk protein fractions through milk processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty-seven environmental contaminants and pharmaceuticals encompassing a wide range of physicochemical properties were utilized to determine the effects of milk processing on xenobiotic distribution among milk fractions. Target compounds included radiolabeled antibiotics [ciprofloxacin (CIPR), cl...

  10. Tin isotope fractionation during magmatic processes and the isotope composition of the bulk silicate Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueying; Amet, Quentin; Fitoussi, Caroline; Bourdon, Bernard

    2018-05-01

    Tin is a moderately volatile element whose isotope composition can be used to investigate Earth and planet differentiation and the early history of the Solar System. Although the Sn stable isotope composition of several geological and archaeological samples has been reported, there is currently scarce information about the effect of igneous processes on Sn isotopes. In this study, high-precision Sn isotope measurements of peridotites and basalts were obtained by MC-ICP-MS with a double-spike technique. The basalt samples display small variations in δ124/116Sn ranging from -0.01 ± 0.11 to 0.27 ± 0.11‰ (2 s.d.) relative to NIST SRM 3161a standard solution, while peridotites have more dispersed and more negative δ124Sn values ranging from -1.04 ± 0.11 to -0.07 ± 0.11‰ (2 s.d.). Overall, basalts are enriched in heavy Sn isotopes relative to peridotites. In addition, δ124Sn in peridotites become more negative with increasing degrees of melt depletion. These results can be explained by different partitioning behavior of Sn4+ and Sn2+ during partial melting. Sn4+ is overall more incompatible than Sn2+ during partial melting, resulting in Sn4+-rich silicate melt and Sn2+-rich residue. As Sn4+ has been shown experimentally to be enriched in heavy isotopes relative to Sn2+, the effect of melting is to enrich residual peridotites in relatively more compatible Sn2+, which results in isotopically lighter peridotites and isotopically heavier mantle-derived melts. This picture can be disturbed partly by the effect of refertilization. Similarly, the presence of enriched components such as recycled oceanic crust or sediments could explain part of the variations in Sn isotopes in oceanic basalts. The most primitive peridotite analyzed in this study was used for estimating the Sn isotope composition of the BSE, with δ124Sn = -0.08 ± 0.11‰ (2 s.d.) relative to the Sn NIST SRM 3161a standard solution. Altogether, this suggests that Sn isotopes may be a powerful probe of

  11. Steam Explosion and Vibrating Membrane Filtration to Improve the Processing Cost of Microalgae Cell Disruption and Fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Lorente

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore an innovative downstream route for microalgae processing to reduce cost production. Experiments have been carried out on cell disruption and fractionation stages to recover lipids, sugars, and proteins. Steam explosion and dynamic membrane filtration were used as unit operations. The species tested were Nannochloropsis gaditana, Chlorella sorokiniana, and Dunaliella tertiolecta with different cell wall characteristics. Acid-catalysed steam explosion permitted cell disruption, as well as the hydrolysis of carbohydrates and partial hydrolysis of proteins. This permitted a better access to non-polar solvents for lipid extraction. Dynamic filtration was used to moderate the impact of fouling. Filtration enabled two streams: A permeate containing water and monosaccharides and a low-volume retentate containing the lipids and proteins. The necessary volume of solvent to extract the lipids is thus much lower. An estimation of operational costs of both steam explosion and membrane filtration was performed. The results show that the steam explosion operation cost varies between 0.005 $/kg and 0.014 $/kg of microalgae dry sample, depending on the cost of fuel. Membrane filtration cost in fractionation was estimated at 0.12 $/kg of microalgae dry sample.

  12. Mass Dependency of Isotope Fractionation of Gases Under Thermal Gradient and Its Possible Implications for Planetary Atmosphere Escaping Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Niles, Paul; Bao, Huiming; Socki, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Physical processes that unmix elements/isotopes of gas molecules involve phase changes, diffusion (chemical or thermal), effusion and gravitational settling. Some of those play significant roles for the evolution of chemical and isotopic compositions of gases in planetary bodies which lead to better understanding of surface paleoclimatic conditions, e.g. gas bubbles in Antarctic ice, and planetary evolution, e.g. the solar-wind erosion induced gas escaping from exosphere on terrestrial planets.. A mass dependent relationship is always expected for the kinetic isotope fractionations during these simple physical processes, according to the kinetic theory of gases by Chapman, Enskog and others [3-5]. For O-bearing (O16, -O17, -O18) molecules the alpha O-17/ alpha O-18 is expected at 0.5 to 0.515, and for S-bearing (S32,-S33. -S34, -S36) molecules, the alpha S-33/ alpha S-34 is expected at 0.5 to 0.508, where alpha is the isotope fractionation factor associated with unmixing processes. Thus, one isotope pair is generally proxied to yield all the information for the physical history of the gases. However, we recently] reported the violation of mass law for isotope fractionation among isotope pairs of multiple isotope system during gas diffusion or convection under thermal gradient (Thermal Gradient Induced Non-Mass Dependent effect, TGI-NMD). The mechanism(s) that is responsible to such striking observation remains unanswered. In our past studies, we investigated polyatomic molecules, O2 and SF6, and we suggested that nuclear spin effect could be responsible to the observed NMD effect in a way of changing diffusion coefficients of certain molecules, owing to the fact of negligible delta S-36 anomaly for SF6.. On the other hand, our results also showed that for both diffusion and convection under thermal gradient, this NMD effect is increased by lower gas pressure, bigger temperature gradient and lower average temperature, which indicate that the nuclear spin effect may

  13. Tempered fractional calculus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabzikar, Farzad, E-mail: sabzika2@stt.msu.edu [Department of Statistics and Probability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States); Meerschaert, Mark M., E-mail: mcubed@stt.msu.edu [Department of Statistics and Probability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States); Chen, Jinghua, E-mail: cjhdzdz@163.com [School of Sciences, Jimei University, Xiamen, Fujian, 361021 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  14. Tempered fractional calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  15. Tempered fractional calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series

  16. Automated determination of the right ventricular ejection fraction by digital processing of sup(81m)Kr scintigrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfner, R.; Vaknine, R.; Knapp, W.H.; Tillmanns, H.; Lorenz, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    A method is presented for the automated determination of the right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) by digital image processing of scintigrams obtained by intravenous infusion of Krypton 81m (sup(81m)Kr) dissolved in a glucose solution. End-diastolic and end-systolic sum pictures were computed by the addition of approximately 30-40 frames selected from the time-activity curve of a preliminary, manually drawn, right ventricular region of interest. After processing these two images with an adaptive Wiener filter, the right ventricular contour was determined by a recently developed algorithm using morphological and functional criteria. The RVEF was calculated for a series of 51 patients from the counts in the detected right ventricular regions in the end-diastolic and end-systolic sum images. In 16 patients without evidence of cardiopulmonary disease, the mean RVEF was 50+-6.1%. RVEF was significantly reduced in 18 patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (42+-6.5%) and in 17 patients with congestive cardiomyopathy (36+-7.1%). The correlation coefficient between two determinations of the RVEF was r=0.94. Through digital image processing, the determination of the RVEF by radioventriculography with sup(81m)Kr showed high reliability and reproducibility. (orig.)

  17. Distribution of complemented 15N - (NH4)2SO4 in an ethanolic fermentation process on insolube-N and solube-N fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara Cabejas, W.A.R.; Trivelin, P.C.O.

    1990-01-01

    Looking for stillage labeling with 15 N for further utilization in studies of mineral fertilization of sugar-cane, 15 N-(NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 (43.5ppm, 45.401 atoms% 15 N) was supplemented in a single fermentative cycle, in a laboratory scale. A nitrogen fractionation was made between insoluble-N and soluble-N in several componentes of the fermentative process (yeast, sugar-cane juice, centrifugate wine, centrifugate yeast and stillage) with the objective of studying the added nitrogen distribution and its isotopic abundance composition. The nitrogen fractionation, and the isotopic analysis by mass spectrometry of 15 N, in the fractions of the several components of the fermentative process, showed 81.1% of N recovery, being 3.2% in stillage and mainly in a soluble-N fraction (71.4%), and the rest found in centrifugate yeast (77.9%), distributed mainly in a insoluble-N fraction (92.0%). Desuniform isotopic label was found in stillage, between soluble-N (1.333 atoms% 15 N) and insoluble-N fractions (0.744 atoms% 15 N). Means to improve the isotopic uniformity in these fractions is discussed. (autor) [pt

  18. Dependence of isospin fractionation process on the neutron-proton ratio of a colliding system in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yongzhong; Liu Jianye; Fang Yutian; Guo Wenjun

    2004-01-01

    The degree of isospin fractionation is measured by the ratio of saturated neutron-proton: i.e. the ratio of gas phase (nucleon emission) to that of liquid phase (fragment emission) in heavy ion collisions. The authors have studied the dependence of the degree of isospin fractionation on the neutron-proton ratio in the colliding system by using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamical model. The calculated results show that the degree of isospin fractionation depends sensitively on the symmetry potential and weakly on the isospin effect of nucleon-nucleon cross section. In particular, the degree of isospin fractionation increases with increasing neutron-proton ratio in the colliding system for the neutron-rich system, in this process the neutron-rich gas phase and neutron-poor liquid phase are produced. The degree of isospin fractionation is very sensitive to the degree of symmetry potential. On the contrary, for the neutron-poor system the neutron-poor gas phase and neutron-rich liquid phase are produced. In this case, the degree of isospin fractionation is not sensitive to the symmetry potential. The authors also find that the role of momentum dependent interaction in the isospin fractionation process is not obvious. The authors propose that our calculated results can compared directly with the experimental data to get the information about the symmetry potential in the intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions

  19. Simulation of processes of water aerosol coagulation-condensation growth using a combination of methods of groups and fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander G Godizov; Alexander D Efanov; Alexander A Lukianov; Olga V Supotnitskaya

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: To describe the phenomena involving aerosol, the model in lumped parameters is used, which is based on the kinetic integral-differential equation for the function of particle distribution of size and content of soluble and insoluble impurities with sources and collision integrals. By the function of particle size distribution, the integral parameters of aerosol can be determined: water content (mass of condensed moisture in a unit of volume), dust content (mass of insoluble condensation nuclei in a unit of volume), calculational concentration and the mean radius of particles. In the aerosol transfer problem being considered, the thermodynamic fields are the external data obtained with a thermal-hydraulic computer code. For numerical simulation of the kinetic equation describing aerosol behavior in coagulation-condensation processes, a hybrid method is used, which combines the method of groups and the method of fractions. To solve the complete equation of aerosol transfer, the method of fractions is used. The integral equation describing aerosol coagulation is solved by means of the group method. The group method based on the representation of particle size distribution in terms of a linear combination of δ-functions with time-dependent arguments makes it possible to calculate the integral parameters of spectrum: the moments of distribution function at a small number of groups. The test calculations were performed by giving the particle spectrum as a lognormal distribution and Γ- function. The hybrid method combined with the thermal-hydraulic computer code enables one to simulate volume condensation of steam at varying thermal-hydraulic conditions. (authors)

  20. The valuation of equity warrants under the fractional Vasicek process of the short-term interest rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Weilin; Zhang, Weiguo; Zhang, Xili; Chen, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the empirical evidence of long range dependence in short-term interest rates and considering the long maturities of equity warrants, we propose the fractional Vasicek model to describe the dynamics of the short rate in the pricing environment of equity warrants. Using the partial differential equation approach, we present a valuation model for equity warrants under the assumption that the short rate follows the fractional Vasicek process. After identifying the pricing model for equity warrants, we provide the parameter estimation procedure for the proposed pricing model. Since obtaining the values of equity warrants from the proposed model needs to solve a nonlinear equation, we employ a hybrid intelligent algorithm to get around this optimization problem. Furthermore, to illustrate the practicality of our proposed model, we conduct an empirical study to ascertain the performance of our proposed model using the data from China’s warrant market and the China Foreign Exchange Trade System. The comparison of traditional models (such as the Black-Scholes model, the Noreen-Wolfson model, the Lauterbach-Schultz model, and the Ukhov model) with our proposed model is also presented. The empirical results show that the mean absolute percentage error of our pricing model is 10.30%. By contrast, the Black-Scholes model, the Noreen-Wolfson model, the Lauterbach-Schultz model, and the Ukhov model applied to the same warrant produce mean absolute errors of 35.26%, 37.67%, 33.40%, 32.81%, respectively. Thus the long memory property in stochastic interest rates cannot be ignored in determining the valuation of equity warrants.

  1. THE CHANGE OF TOTAL PROTEIN FRACTION OF MUSCLE TISSUE OF PORK WITH BIO- AND PHYSICO-CHEMICAL SPECIFIC IN THE PROCESS OF COOKING AT DIFFERENT TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Shalimova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The character of changes in total protein fraction of muscle tissue of pork with PSE defects in the process of cooking at temperatures ranging from 40 to 72 g.C in steps of 2 g.C is investigated. Our studies have revealed differences in the change of state the total fraction of muscle proteins with defects PSE pork during cooking.

  2. A Novel Method for Control Performance Assessment with Fractional Order Signal Processing and Its Application to Semiconductor Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Liu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The significant task for control performance assessment (CPA is to review and evaluate the performance of the control system. The control system in the semiconductor industry exhibits a complex dynamic behavior, which is hard to analyze. This paper investigates the interesting crossover properties of Hurst exponent estimations and proposes a novel method for feature extraction of the nonlinear multi-input multi-output (MIMO systems. At first, coupled data from real industry are analyzed by multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA and the resultant multifractal spectrum is obtained. Secondly, the crossover points with spline fit in the scale-law curve are located and then employed to segment the entire scale-law curve into several different scaling regions, in which a single Hurst exponent can be estimated. Thirdly, to further ascertain the origin of the multifractality of control signals, the generalized Hurst exponents of the original series are compared with shuffled data. At last, non-Gaussian statistical properties, multifractal properties and Hurst exponents of the process control variables are derived and compared with different sets of tuning parameters. The results have shown that CPA of the MIMO system can be better employed with the help of fractional order signal processing (FOSP.

  3. The effect of varying the acquisition angle on processing and ejection fractions in gated blood pool studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, K.; Schults, C.G.; Trinh, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Suboptimal ventricular definition has been blamed for difficulties in processing and variations in Ejection Fraction (EF). Clinical patients had Gated Blood Pool Studies (GBPS) performed by one of two operators, ensuring good left ventricular separation and definition. With patient consent, another study was acquired with the camera angle altered in the caudal or septal plane. Using GE Entegra GBPS Software, which allows some operator involvement in modifying the automated systolic and diastolic regions, the studies were analysed by eight 'blinded' technologists. Analyses of optimal and suboptimal acquisitions were compared. The mean, standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation (CV%) were determined for each patient's set of EFs. There was no significant difference in the means of the optimal and suboptimal groups (61.2% and 61.7%). One third of the suboptimal studies acquired gave a mean EF that differed by more than 5% from the Optimal' mean. The average CV of all analyses was 4.5%. The optima] group CV 4.7% (septal 4.6%/caudal 4.8%) and the suboptimal group CV 4.3% (septal 4.5%/caudal 4.2%). The analysis demonstrates that precision of processing GBPS is not affected when the study is acquired at a suboptimal angle. Although most EF results are reliable when acquired at a suboptimal angle, approximately one third will produce an EF that varies from the optimal result by more than 5%. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  4. Stromal vascular fraction isolated from lipo-aspirates using an automated processing system: bench and bed analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Kentaro; Tanaka, Shinsuke; Iida, Hideo; Eto, Hitomi; Kato, Harunosuke; Aoi, Noriyuki; Kuno, Shinichiro; Hirohi, Toshitsugu; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2013-11-01

    The heterogeneous stromal vascular fraction (SVF), containing adipose-derived stem/progenitor cells (ASCs), can be easily isolated through enzymatic digestion of aspirated adipose tissue. In clinical settings, however, strict control of technical procedures according to standard operating procedures and validation of cell-processing conditions are required. Therefore, we evaluated the efficiency and reliability of an automated system for SVF isolation from adipose tissue. SVF cells, freshly isolated using the automated procedure, showed comparable number and viability to those from manual isolation. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed an SVF cell composition profile similar to that after manual isolation. In addition, the ASC yield after 1 week in culture was also not significantly different between the two groups. Our clinical study, in which SVF cells isolated with the automated system were transplanted with aspirated fat tissue for soft tissue augmentation/reconstruction in 42 patients, showed satisfactory outcomes with no serious side-effects. Taken together, our results suggested that the automated isolation system is as reliable a method as manual isolation and may also be useful in clinical settings. Automated isolation is expected to enable cell-based clinical trials in small facilities with an aseptic room, without the necessity of a good manufacturing practice-level cell processing area. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Fractional Factorial Design Study on the Performance of GAC-Enhanced Electrocoagulation Process Involved in Color Removal from Dye Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliana Gabriela Breaban

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effects of main factors and interactions on the color removal performance from dye solutions using the electrocoagulation process enhanced by adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon (GAC. In this study, a mathematical approach was conducted using a two-level fractional factorial design (FFD for a given dye solution. Three textile dyes: Acid Blue 74, Basic Red 1, and Reactive Black 5 were used. Experimental factors used and their respective levels were: current density (2.73 or 27.32 A/m2, initial pH of aqueous dye solution (3 or 9, electrocoagulation time (20 or 180 min, GAC dose (0.1 or 0.5 g/L, support electrolyte (2 or 50 mM, initial dye concentration (0.05 or 0.25 g/L and current type (Direct Current—DC or Alternative Pulsed Current—APC. GAC-enhanced electrocoagulation performance was analyzed statistically in terms of removal efficiency, electrical energy, and electrode material consumptions, using modeling polynomial equations. The statistical significance of GAC dose level on the performance of GAC enhanced electrocoagulation and the experimental conditions that favor the process operation of electrocoagulation in APC regime were determined. The local optimal experimental conditions were established using a multi-objective desirability function method.

  6. Fractional Factorial Design Study on the Performance of GAC-Enhanced Electrocoagulation Process Involved in Color Removal from Dye Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secula, Marius Sebastian; Cretescu, Igor; Cagnon, Benoit; Manea, Liliana Rozemarie; Stan, Corneliu Sergiu; Breaban, Iuliana Gabriela

    2013-07-10

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of main factors and interactions on the color removal performance from dye solutions using the electrocoagulation process enhanced by adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon (GAC). In this study, a mathematical approach was conducted using a two-level fractional factorial design ( FFD ) for a given dye solution. Three textile dyes: Acid Blue 74, Basic Red 1, and Reactive Black 5 were used. Experimental factors used and their respective levels were: current density (2.73 or 27.32 A/m²), initial pH of aqueous dye solution (3 or 9), electrocoagulation time (20 or 180 min), GAC dose (0.1 or 0.5 g/L), support electrolyte (2 or 50 mM), initial dye concentration (0.05 or 0.25 g/L) and current type (Direct Current- DC or Alternative Pulsed Current- APC ). GAC-enhanced electrocoagulation performance was analyzed statistically in terms of removal efficiency, electrical energy, and electrode material consumptions, using modeling polynomial equations. The statistical significance of GAC dose level on the performance of GAC enhanced electrocoagulation and the experimental conditions that favor the process operation of electrocoagulation in APC regime were determined. The local optimal experimental conditions were established using a multi-objective desirability function method.

  7. White Matter Fractional Anisotropy Correlates With Speed of Processing and Motor Speed in Young Childhood Cancer Survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aukema, Eline J.; Caan, Matthan W.A.; Oudhuis, Nienke; Majoie, Charles; Vos, Frans M.; Reneman, Liesbeth; Last, Bob F.; Grootenhuis, Martha A.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y.N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether childhood medulloblastoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors have decreased white matter fractional anisotropy (WMFA) and whether WMFA is related to the speed of processing and motor speed. Methods and Materials: For this study, 17 patients (6 medulloblastoma, 5 ALL treated with high-dose methotrexate (MTX) (4 x 5 g/m 2 ) and 6 with low-dose MTX (3 x 2 g/m 2 )) and 17 age-matched controls participated. On a 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed, and WMFA values were calculated, including specific regions of interest (ROIs), and correlated with the speed of processing and motor speed. Results: Mean WMFA in the patient group, mean age 14 years (range 8.9 - 16.9), was decreased compared with the control group (p = 0.01), as well as WMFA in the right inferior fronto-occipital fasciliculus (IFO) (p = 0.03) and in the genu of the corpus callosum (gCC) (p = 0.01). Based on neurocognitive results, significant positive correlations were present between processing speed and WMFA in the splenium (sCC) (r = 0.53, p = 0.03) and the body of the corpus callosum (bCC) (r = 0.52, p = 0.03), whereas the right IFO WMFA was related to motor speed (r = 0.49, p < 0.05). Conclusions: White matter tracts, using a 3.0-T MRI scanner, show impairment in childhood cancer survivors, medulloblastoma survivors, and also those treated with high doses of MTX. In particular, white matter tracts in the sCC, bCC and right IFO are positively correlated with speed of processing and motor speed.

  8. Biomass ash reutilisation as an additive in the composting process of organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asquer, Carla; Cappai, Giovanna; De Gioannis, Giorgia; Muntoni, Aldo; Piredda, Martina; Spiga, Daniela

    2017-11-01

    In this work the effects of selected types of biomass ash on the composting process and final product quality were studied by conducting a 96-day long experiment where the source separated organic fraction of municipal waste, mixed with wood prunings that served as bulking agent, was added with 0%, 2%, 4% and 8% wt/wt of biomass ash. The evolution over time of the main process parameters was observed, and the final composts were characterised. On the basis of the results, both the composting process and the quality of the final product were improved by ash addition. Enhanced volatile solids reduction and biological stability (up to 32% and 52%, respectively, as compared to the unamended product) were attained when ash was added, since ash favored the aerobic degradation by acting asa physical conditioner. In the final products, higher humification of organic matter (expressed in terms of the humification index, that was 2.25 times higher in the most-enriched compost than in the unamended one) and total Ca, K, Mg and P content were observed when ash was used. The latter aspect may influence the composts marketability positively, particularly with regards to potassium and phosphorus. The heavy metals content, that is regarded as the main environmental disadvantage when using ash asa composting additive, did not negatively affect the final composts quality. However, some other controversial effects of ash, related to the moisture and temperature values attained during the process, pH (8.8-9.2 as compared to 8.2 of the unamended compost) and electrical conductivity levels (up to 53% higher as compared to the unamended compost) in the final composts, were also observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Processes controlling silicon isotopic fractionation in a forested tropical watershed: Mule Hole Critical Zone Observatory (Southern India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riotte, Jean; Meunier, Jean-Dominique; Zambardi, Thomas; Audry, Stéphane; Barboni, Doris; Anupama, Krishnamurthy; Prasad, Srinivasan; Chmeleff, Jérôme; Poitrasson, Franck; Sekhar, Muddu; Braun, Jean-Jacques

    2018-05-01

    Assessing the dynamics of the silica cycle in the critical zone remains challenging, particularly within the soil, where multiple processes are involved. To improve our understanding of this cycle in the Tropics, and more specifically the role played by vegetation, we combined elemental Si mass balance with the δ30Si signatures of the compartments involved in the water-plant-rock interactions of a tropical forested watershed, Mule Hole (Southern India). To accomplish this, we analysed (1) the δ30Si values of present-day litter phytoliths from tree leaves and grass, as well as soil amorphous silica (ASi); (2) the Si isotope fractionation induced by phytolith dissolution; (3) the silicon mass balance inferred from isotopes at the soil-plant scale; and (4) the consistency between water sources and the δ30Si signatures in the ephemeral stream. The δ30Si values of present-day litter phytoliths and soil ASi vary within a narrow range of 1.10-1.40‰ for all samples, but two deep vertisol samples which likely trapped phytoliths from different vegetation growing under more humid conditions, as indicated by pollen analysis. A homogeneous signature of litter is a minimum condition for using δ30Si as a proxy for the litter/phytolith source of Si. However, litter-ash dissolution experiments demonstrate that the incipient dissolution of phytoliths fractionates Si isotopes, with the preferential dissolution of 28Si over 30Si yielding δ30Si values as low as -1.41‰. Values close to the whole-sample signatures, i.e., above 1‰, were recovered in the solution after a few hours of water-ash interaction. At the soil-plant scale, the average δ30Si value of soil-infiltrating solutions is slightly lighter than the average phytolith signature, which suggests phytoliths as the source of soil dissolved Si. The isotopic budget of dissolved Si within the soil layer, which was obtained based on previous elemental fluxes, is imbalanced. Equilibrating the isotopic budget would imply

  10. Influence of physicochemical characteristics and high pressure processing on the volatile fraction of Iberian dry-cured ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Onandi, Nerea; Rivas-Cañedo, Ana; Ávila, Marta; Garde, Sonia; Nuñez, Manuel; Picon, Antonia

    2017-09-01

    The volatile fraction of 30 Iberian dry-cured hams of different physicochemical characteristics and the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) at 600MPa on volatile compounds were investigated. According to the analysis of variance carried out on the levels of 122 volatile compounds, intramuscular fat content influenced the levels of 8 benzene compounds, 5 carboxylic acids, 2 ketones, 2 furanones, 1 alcohol, 1 aldehyde and 1 sulfur compound, salt concentration influenced the levels of 1 aldehyde and 1 ketone, salt-in-lean ratio had no effect on volatile compounds, and water activity influenced the levels of 3 sulfur compounds, 1 alcohol and 1 aldehyde. HPP-treated samples of Iberian ham had higher levels of 4 compounds and lower levels of 31 compounds than untreated samples. A higher influence of HPP treatment on volatile compounds than physicochemical characteristics was observed for Iberian ham. Therefore, HPP treatment conditions should be optimized in order to diminish its possible effect on Iberian ham odor and aroma characteristics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Directed transport of confined Brownian particles with torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Paul K.; Schimansky-Geier, Lutz

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the influence of an additional torque on the motion of Brownian particles confined in a channel geometry with varying width. The particles are driven by random fluctuations modeled by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process with given correlation time τc. The latter causes persistent motion and is implemented as (i) thermal noise in equilibrium and (ii) noisy propulsion in nonequilibrium. In the nonthermal process a directed transport emerges; its properties are studied in detail with respect to the correlation time, the torque, and the channel geometry. Eventually, the transport mechanism is traced back to a persistent sliding of particles along the even boundaries in contrast to scattered motion at uneven or rough ones.

  12. Estimation of mean-reverting oil prices: a laboratory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerksund, P.; Stensland, G.

    1993-12-01

    Many economic decision support tools developed for the oil industry are based on the future oil price dynamics being represented by some specified stochastic process. To meet the demand for necessary data, much effort is allocated to parameter estimation based on historical oil price time series. The approach in this paper is to implement a complex future oil market model, and to condense the information from the model to parameter estimates for the future oil price. In particular, we use the Lensberg and Rasmussen stochastic dynamic oil market model to generate a large set of possible future oil price paths. Given the hypothesis that the future oil price is generated by a mean-reverting Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, we obtain parameter estimates by a maximum likelihood procedure. We find a substantial degree of mean-reversion in the future oil price, which in some of our decision examples leads to an almost negligible value of flexibility. 12 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Low-molecular-weight color pI markers to monitor on-line the peptide focusing process in OFFGEL fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelland, Sylvie; Bourgoin-Voillard, Sandrine; Cunin, Valérie; Tollance, Axel; Bertolino, Pascal; Slais, Karel; Seve, Michel

    2017-08-01

    High-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis requires peptide fractionation to simplify complex biological samples and increase proteome coverage. OFFGEL fractionation technology became a common method to separate peptides or proteins using isoelectric focusing in an immobilized pH gradient. However, the OFFGEL focusing process may be further optimized and controlled in terms of separation time and pI resolution. Here we evaluated OFFGEL technology to separate peptides from different samples in the presence of low-molecular-weight (LMW) color pI markers to visualize the focusing process. LMW color pI markers covering a large pH range were added to the peptide mixture before OFFGEL fractionation using a 24-wells device encompassing the pH range 3-10. We also explored the impact of LMW color pI markers on peptide fractionation labeled previously for iTRAQ. Then, fractionated peptides were separated by RP_HPLC prior to MS analysis using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry in MS and MS/MS modes. Here we report the performance of the peptide focusing process in the presence of LMW color pI markers as on-line trackers during the OFFGEL process and the possibility to use them as pI controls for peptide focusing. This method improves the workflow for peptide fractionation in a bottom-up proteomic approach with or without iTRAQ labeling. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. FRACTIONAL BANKING

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Klimikova

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the reasons of the present financial problems lies In understanding the substance of fractional reserve banking. The substance of fractional banking is in lending more money than the bankers have. Banking of partial reserves is an alternative form which links deposit banking and credit banking. Fractional banking is causing many unfavorable economic impacts in the worldwide system, specifically an inflation.

  15. Modeling sheep pox disease from the 1994-1998 epidemic in Evros Prefecture, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malesios, C; Demiris, N; Abas, Z; Dadousis, K; Koutroumanidis, T

    2014-10-01

    Sheep pox is a highly transmissible disease which can cause serious loss of livestock and can therefore have major economic impact. We present data from sheep pox epidemics which occurred between 1994 and 1998. The data include weekly records of infected farms as well as a number of covariates. We implement Bayesian stochastic regression models which, in addition to various explanatory variables like seasonal and environmental/meteorological factors, also contain serial correlation structure based on variants of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. We take a predictive view in model selection by utilizing deviance-based measures. The results indicate that seasonality and the number of infected farms are important predictors for sheep pox incidence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling and Forecasting Average Temperature for Weather Derivative Pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiliang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to present a feasible model for the daily average temperature on the area of Zhengzhou and apply it to weather derivatives pricing. We start by exploring the background of weather derivatives market and then use the 62 years of daily historical data to apply the mean-reverting Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process to describe the evolution of the temperature. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations are used to price heating degree day (HDD call option for this city, and the slow convergence of the price of the HDD call can be found through taking 100,000 simulations. The methods of the research will provide a frame work for modeling temperature and pricing weather derivatives in other similar places in China.

  17. Value of the future: Discounting in random environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, J. Doyne; Geanakoplos, John; Masoliver, Jaume; Montero, Miquel; Perelló, Josep

    2015-05-01

    We analyze how to value future costs and benefits when they must be discounted relative to the present. We introduce the subject for the nonspecialist and take into account the randomness of the economic evolution by studying the discount function of three widely used processes for the dynamics of interest rates: Ornstein-Uhlenbeck, Feller, and log-normal. Besides obtaining exact expressions for the discount function and simple asymptotic approximations, we show that historical average interest rates overestimate long-run discount rates and that this effect can be large. In other words, long-run discount rates should be substantially less than the average rate observed in the past, otherwise any cost-benefit calculation would be biased in favor of the present and against interventions that may protect the future.

  18. Fast shuttling of a particle under weak spring-constant noise of the moving trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Jing; Ruschhaupt, A.; Muga, J. G.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the excitation of a quantum particle shuttled in a harmonic trap with weak spring-constant colored noise. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model for the noise correlation function describes a wide range of possible noises, in particular for short correlation times the white-noise limit examined by Lu et al. [Phys. Rev. A 89, 063414 (2014)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.89.063414 and, by averaging over correlation times, "1 /f flicker noise." We find expressions for the excitation energy in terms of static (independent of trap motion) and dynamical sensitivities, with opposite behavior with respect to shuttling time, and demonstrate that the excitation can be reduced by proper process timing and design of the trap trajectory.

  19. Relaxometry imaging of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles at ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkler, Amit; Schmid-Lorch, Dominik; Häberle, Thomas; Reinhard, Friedemann; Zappe, Andrea; Slota, Michael; Bogani, Lapo; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    We present a novel technique to image superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles via their fluctuating magnetic fields. The detection is based on the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center in diamond, which allows optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) measurements on its electron spin structure. In combination with an atomic-force-microscope, this atomic-sized color center maps ambient magnetic fields in a wide frequency range from DC up to several GHz, while retaining a high spatial resolution in the sub-nanometer range. We demonstrate imaging of single 10 nm sized magnetite nanoparticles using this spin noise detection technique. By fitting simulations (Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process) to the data, we are able to infer additional information on such a particle and its dynamics, like the attempt frequency and the anisotropy constant. This is of high interest to the proposed application of magnetite nanoparticles as an alternative MRI contrast agent or to the field of particle-aided tumor hyperthermia.

  20. Digital hardware implementation of a stochastic two-dimensional neuron model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassia, F; Kohno, T; Levi, T

    2016-11-01

    This study explores the feasibility of stochastic neuron simulation in digital systems (FPGA), which realizes an implementation of a two-dimensional neuron model. The stochasticity is added by a source of current noise in the silicon neuron using an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. This approach uses digital computation to emulate individual neuron behavior using fixed point arithmetic operation. The neuron model's computations are performed in arithmetic pipelines. It was designed in VHDL language and simulated prior to mapping in the FPGA. The experimental results confirmed the validity of the developed stochastic FPGA implementation, which makes the implementation of the silicon neuron more biologically plausible for future hybrid experiments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Moment Lyapunov Exponent and Stochastic Stability of Binary Airfoil under Combined Harmonic and Non-Gaussian Colored Noise Excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, D. L.; Liu, X. B.

    Both periodic loading and random forces commonly co-exist in real engineering applications. However, the dynamic behavior, especially dynamic stability of systems under parametric periodic and random excitations has been reported little in the literature. In this study, the moment Lyapunov exponent and stochastic stability of binary airfoil under combined harmonic and non-Gaussian colored noise excitations are investigated. The noise is simplified to an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process by applying the path-integral method. Via the singular perturbation method, the second-order expansions of the moment Lyapunov exponent are obtained, which agree well with the results obtained by the Monte Carlo simulation. Finally, the effects of the noise and parametric resonance (such as subharmonic resonance and combination additive resonance) on the stochastic stability of the binary airfoil system are discussed.

  2. Equations involving Malliavin calculus operators applications and numerical approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Levajković, Tijana

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive and unified introduction to stochastic differential equations and related optimal control problems. The material is new and the presentation is reader-friendly. A major contribution of the book is the development of generalized Malliavin calculus in the framework of white noise analysis, based on chaos expansion representation of stochastic processes and its application for solving several classes of stochastic differential equations with singular data involving the main operators of Malliavin calculus. In addition, applications in optimal control and numerical approximations are discussed.  The book is divided into four chapters. The first, entitled White Noise Analysis and Chaos Expansions, includes notation and provides the reader with the theoretical background needed to understand the subsequent chapters.  In Chapter 2, Generalized Operators of Malliavin Calculus, the Malliavin derivative operator, the Skorokhod integral and the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck operator are introdu...

  3. Fractional thermoelasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Povstenko, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to fractional thermoelasticity, i.e. thermoelasticity based on the heat conduction equation with differential operators of fractional order. Readers will discover how time-fractional differential operators describe memory effects and space-fractional differential operators deal with the long-range interaction. Fractional calculus, generalized Fourier law, axisymmetric and central symmetric problems and many relevant equations are featured in the book. The latest developments in the field are included and the reader is brought up to date with current research.  The book contains a large number of figures, to show the characteristic features of temperature and stress distributions and to represent the whole spectrum of order of fractional operators.  This work presents a picture of the state-of-the-art of fractional thermoelasticity and is suitable for specialists in applied mathematics, physics, geophysics, elasticity, thermoelasticity and engineering sciences. Corresponding sections of ...

  4. Fractional gradient and its application to the fractional advection equation

    OpenAIRE

    D'Ovidio, M.; Garra, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we provide a definition of fractional gradient operators, related to directional derivatives. We develop a fractional vector calculus, providing a probabilistic interpretation and mathematical tools to treat multidimensional fractional differential equations. A first application is discussed in relation to the d-dimensional fractional advection-dispersion equation. We also study the connection with multidimensional L\\'evy processes.

  5. Pretreatment and processing of field biomasses for production of precious, bulk and energy fiber fractions; Peltobiomassojen esikaesittely ja prosessointi arvo-, bulkki- ja energiakuitujakeiden tuottamiseksi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilppunen, P; Sohlo, J [Oulu Univ., Oulu (Finland). Dept. of Process Engineering

    1996-12-31

    The objective of the research was to make a preliminary study on pretreatment and processing possibilities of different field biomasses for production of specific product fractions with dry and wet separation methods. Pretreatment processes and possible combinations, before pulping and energy production, were studied in the dry-fraction part of the research. Sieving technology, air-classifier and a collision separator were tested. Additionally, the fuel processing systems of present power/thermal plants were studied in practice. A new type of separation system, based on removal of fines with collision-separator, was designed in the sub-project. The results of the sub-project are now utilized in other researches of the Bioenergy Research Programme. Separation processes for energy and fiber fractions, predominantly those for seed flax, using traditional pulp classifiers and the new pressure classifier process were studied in the wet-separation part of the project. A combined plant fiber further-refining process, based on mechanical and biotechnical separation, operating on the basis of fiber length, was developed on the basis of dry and wet frection tests

  6. Pretreatment and processing of field biomasses for production of precious, bulk and energy fiber fractions; Peltobiomassojen esikaesittely ja prosessointi arvo-, bulkki- ja energiakuitujakeiden tuottamiseksi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilppunen, P.; Sohlo, J. [Oulu Univ., Oulu (Finland). Dept. of Process Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The objective of the research was to make a preliminary study on pretreatment and processing possibilities of different field biomasses for production of specific product fractions with dry and wet separation methods. Pretreatment processes and possible combinations, before pulping and energy production, were studied in the dry-fraction part of the research. Sieving technology, air-classifier and a collision separator were tested. Additionally, the fuel processing systems of present power/thermal plants were studied in practice. A new type of separation system, based on removal of fines with collision-separator, was designed in the sub-project. The results of the sub-project are now utilized in other researches of the Bioenergy Research Programme. Separation processes for energy and fiber fractions, predominantly those for seed flax, using traditional pulp classifiers and the new pressure classifier process were studied in the wet-separation part of the project. A combined plant fiber further-refining process, based on mechanical and biotechnical separation, operating on the basis of fiber length, was developed on the basis of dry and wet frection tests

  7. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by ferrous iron: A process of chromium isotope fractionation and its relevance to natural environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Lasse Nørbye; Dideriksen, Knud; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2011-01-01

    Stable chromium (Cr) isotopes can be used as a tracer for changing redox conditions in modern marine systems and in the geological record. We have investigated isotope fractionation during reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq. Reduction of Cr(VI)aq by Fe(II)aq in batch experiments leads to significant...

  8. Influence of soil mercury concentration and fraction on bioaccumulation process of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Liu, Hongyan; Du, Buyun; Shang, Lihai; Yang, Junbo; Wang, Yusheng

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies showed that rice is the major pathway for methylmercury (MeHg) exposure to inhabitants in mercury (Hg) mining areas in China. There is, therefore, a concern regarding accumulation of Hg in rice grown in soils with high Hg concentrations. A soil pot experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of Hg-contaminated soil on the growth of rice and uptake and speciation of Hg in the rice. Our results imply that the growth of rice promotes residual fraction of Hg transforming to organic-bound fraction in soil and increased the potential risks of MeHg production. Bioaccumulation factors deceased for IHg but relatively stabilized for MeHg with soil total mercury (THg) increasing. IHg in soil was the major source of Hg in the root and stalk, but leaf was contributed by Hg from both atmosphere and soil. Soluble and exchangeable Hg fraction can predict the bioavailability of IHg and MeHg in soils, and that can provide quantitative description of the rate of uptake of the bioavailable Hg. Soluble and exchangeable Hg fraction in paddy soil exceeding 0.0087 mg kg(-1) may cause THg concentration in rice grain above the permissible limit standard, and MeHg concentration in paddy soil more than 0.0091 mg kg(-1) may have the health risks to humans.

  9. Enzymic and structural studies on processed proteins from the vacuolar (lutoid-body) fraction of latex of Hevea brasiliensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subroto, T; de Vries, H; Schuringa, JJ; Soedjanaatmadja, UMS; Hofsteenge, J; Jekel, PA; Beintema, JJ

    2001-01-01

    The lutoid-body (bottom) fraction of latex from the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) contains a limited number of major proteins. These are the chitin-binding protein hevein, its precursor and C-terminal fragment of the precursor, a basic chitinase/lysozyme, and a beta-1,3-glucanase. The content and

  10. Generalized Langevin dynamics of a nanoparticle using a finite element approach: Thermostating with correlated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uma, B.; Swaminathan, T. N.; Ayyaswamy, P. S.; Eckmann, D. M.; Radhakrishnan, R.

    2011-09-01

    A direct numerical simulation (DNS) procedure is employed to study the thermal motion of a nanoparticle in an incompressible Newtonian stationary fluid medium with the generalized Langevin approach. We consider both the Markovian (white noise) and non-Markovian (Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise and Mittag-Leffler noise) processes. Initial locations of the particle are at various distances from the bounding wall to delineate wall effects. At thermal equilibrium, the numerical results are validated by comparing the calculated translational and rotational temperatures of the particle with those obtained from the equipartition theorem. The nature of the hydrodynamic interactions is verified by comparing the velocity autocorrelation functions and mean square displacements with analytical results. Numerical predictions of wall interactions with the particle in terms of mean square displacements are compared with analytical results. In the non-Markovian Langevin approach, an appropriate choice of colored noise is required to satisfy the power-law decay in the velocity autocorrelation function at long times. The results obtained by using non-Markovian Mittag-Leffler noise simultaneously satisfy the equipartition theorem and the long-time behavior of the hydrodynamic correlations for a range of memory correlation times. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process does not provide the appropriate hydrodynamic correlations. Comparing our DNS results to the solution of an one-dimensional generalized Langevin equation, it is observed that where the thermostat adheres to the equipartition theorem, the characteristic memory time in the noise is consistent with the inherent time scale of the memory kernel. The performance of the thermostat with respect to equilibrium and dynamic properties for various noise schemes is discussed.

  11. Measurement of Soot Volume Fraction and Temperature for Oxygen-Enriched Ethylene Combustion Based on Flame Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijie Yan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A method for simultaneously visualizing the two-dimensional distributions of temperature and soot volume fraction in an ethylene flame was presented. A single-color charge-coupled device (CCD camera was used to capture the flame image in the visible spectrum considering the broad-response spectrum of the R and G bands of the camera. The directional emissive power of the R and G bands were calibrated and used for measurement. Slightly increased temperatures and reduced soot concentration were predicted in the central flame without self-absorption effects considered, an iterative algorithm was used for eliminating the effect of self-absorption. Nine different cases were presented in the experiment to demonstrate the effects of fuel mass flow rate and oxygen concentration on temperature and soot concentration in three different atmospheres. For ethylene combustion in pure-air atmosphere, as the fuel mass flow rate increased, the maximum temperature slightly decreased, and the maximum soot volume fraction slightly increased. For oxygen fractions of 30%, 40%, and 50% combustion in O2/N2 oxygen-enhanced atmospheres, the maximum flame temperatures were 2276, 2451, and 2678 K, whereas combustion in O2/CO2 atmospheres were 1916, 2322, and 2535 K. The maximum soot volume fractions were 4.5, 7.0, and 9.5 ppm in oxygen-enriched O2/N2 atmosphere and 13.6, 15.3, and 14.8 ppm in oxygen-enriched O2/CO2 atmosphere. Compared with the O2/CO2 atmosphere, combustion in the oxygen-enriched O2/N2 atmosphere produced higher flame temperature and larger soot volume fraction. Preliminary results indicated that this technique is reliable and can be used for combustion diagnosis.

  12. Peptide Fractions Obtained from Rice By-Products by Means of an Environment-Friendly Process Show In Vitro Health-Related Bioactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Maura; Graen-Heedfeld, Jürgen; Bretz, Karlheinz; Guillon, Fabien; Michelini, Elisa; Calabretta, Maria Maddalena; Lamborghini, Matteo; Gruarin, Nicolò; Roda, Aldo; Kraft, Axel; Tassoni, Annalisa

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the isolation of new health-related bioactive molecules derived from agro-food industrial by-products by means of environment-friendly extraction processes has become of particular interest. In the present study, a protein by-product from the rice starch industry was hydrolysed with five commercial proteolytic enzymes, avoiding the use of solvents or chemicals. The digestion processes were optimised, and the digestates were separated in fractions with four different molecular weight ranges by using a cross-flow membrane filtration technique. Total hydrolysates and fractions were tested in vitro for a wide range of biological activities. For the first time rice-derived peptides were assayed for anti-tyrosinase, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxicity and irritation capacities. Antioxidant and anti-hypertensive activities were also evaluated. Protamex, Alcalase and Neutrase treatments produced peptide fractions with valuable bioactivities without resulting cytotoxic or irritant. Highest levels of bioactivity were detected in Protamex-derived samples, followed by samples treated with Alcalase. Based on the present results, a future direct exploitation of isolated peptide fractions in the nutraceutical, functional food and cosmetic industrial fields may be foreseen.

  13. Peptide Fractions Obtained from Rice By-Products by Means of an Environment-Friendly Process Show In Vitro Health-Related Bioactivities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Ferri

    Full Text Available Recently, the isolation of new health-related bioactive molecules derived from agro-food industrial by-products by means of environment-friendly extraction processes has become of particular interest. In the present study, a protein by-product from the rice starch industry was hydrolysed with five commercial proteolytic enzymes, avoiding the use of solvents or chemicals. The digestion processes were optimised, and the digestates were separated in fractions with four different molecular weight ranges by using a cross-flow membrane filtration technique. Total hydrolysates and fractions were tested in vitro for a wide range of biological activities. For the first time rice-derived peptides were assayed for anti-tyrosinase, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxicity and irritation capacities. Antioxidant and anti-hypertensive activities were also evaluated. Protamex, Alcalase and Neutrase treatments produced peptide fractions with valuable bioactivities without resulting cytotoxic or irritant. Highest levels of bioactivity were detected in Protamex-derived samples, followed by samples treated with Alcalase. Based on the present results, a future direct exploitation of isolated peptide fractions in the nutraceutical, functional food and cosmetic industrial fields may be foreseen.

  14. Energy optimization and comparative study of pre- and post-fractionator extractive dividing wall column for the CO2–ethane azeotropic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavan, Yadollah; Riazi, Seiied Hadi; Nozohouri, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two arrangements is proposed for extractive DWC based on pre- and post- fractionator. • Operating parameters are optimized to minimize energy demand. • The pre-fractionator design showed the best performance in comparison to others. - Abstract: Two possible extractive dividing-wall column (DWC) arrangements are explored to find the potential benefits derived from thermally coupled distillations in separation of a mixture including the CO 2 –ethane azeotrope with a low boiling point. It is shown that the process including pre-fractionator in the DWC design in its optimized state leads to 51.6% reduction in total duties in comparison with the conventional process. Furthermore, a comparison between conventional extractive distillation columns and the new DWC process is made in terms of cost estimation, CO 2 removal efficiency and CO 2 emission reduction. Remarkable, the results clearly show that DWC process is interesting/feasible and the novel proposed DWC alternative reduces the steam requirements by 41% and the equipment costs by 31%

  15. Optimizing removal of arsenic, chromium, copper, pentachlorophenol and polychlorodibenzo-dioxins/furans from the 1-4 mm fraction of polluted soil using an attrition process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guemiza, Karima; Coudert, Lucie; Tran, Lan Huong; Metahni, Sabrine; Blais, Jean-François; Besner, Simon; Mercier, Guy

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate, at a pilot scale, the performance of an attrition process for removing As, Cr, Cu, pentachlorophenol (PCP) and polychlorodibenzodioxins and furans (PCDDF) from a 1-4 mm soil fraction. A Box-Behnken experimental design was utilized to evaluate the influence of several parameters (temperature, surfactant concentration and pulp density) and to optimize the main operating parameters of this attrition process. According to the results, the concentration of surfactant (cocamidopropylbetaine-BW) was the main parameter influencing both PCP and PCDDF removal from the 1-4 mm soil fraction by attrition. The behavior of each 2,3,7,8-PCDD/F congener during the attrition process was studied. The results indicated that the concentration of surfactant had a significant and positive effect on the removal of almost all of the dioxin and furan. The removal of 56%, 55%, 50%, 67% and 62% of the contaminants were obtained for As, Cr, Cu, PCP and PCDDF, respectively, using the optimized conditions ([BW]= 2% (w.w-1), T = 25°C and PD = 40% (w.w-1)). These results showed that attrition in the presence of a surfactant can be efficiently used to remediate the coarse fractions of soil contaminated by As, Cr, Cu, PCP and PCDDF.

  16. Influence of ore processing activity on Hg, As and Sb contamination and fractionation in soils in a former mining site of Monte Amiata ore district (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protano, Giuseppe; Nannoni, Francesco

    2018-05-01

    A geochemical study was carried out at the former Abbadia San Salvatore (ASS) mining site of the Monte Amiata ore district (Italy). Hg, As and Sb total contents and fractionation using a sequential extraction procedure were determined in soil and mining waste samples. Ore processing activities provided a different contribution to Hg contamination and concentration in soil fractions, influencing its behaviour as volatility and availability. Soils of roasting zone showed the highest Hg contamination levels mainly due to the deposition of Hg released as Hg 0 by furnaces during cinnabar roasting. High Hg contents were also measured in waste from the lower part of mining dump due to the presence of cinnabar. The fractionation pattern suggested that Hg was largely as volatile species in both uncontaminated and contaminated soils and mining waste, and concentrations of these Hg species increased as contamination increased. These findings were in agreement with the fact that the ASS mining site is characterized by high Hg concentrations in the air and the presence of Hg 0 liquid droplets in soil. Volatile Hg species were also prevalent in uncontaminated soils likely because the Monte Amiata region is an area characterized by anomalous fluxes of gaseous Hg from natural and anthropogenic inputs. At the ASS mining site soils were also contaminated by Sb, while As contents were comparable with its local background in soil. In all soil and waste samples Sb and As were preferentially in residual fraction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Burgers' turbulence problem with linear or quadratic external potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Leonenko, N.N.

    2005-01-01

    We consider solutions of Burgers' equation with linear or quadratic external potential and stationary random initial conditions of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type. We study a class of limit laws that correspond to a scale renormalization of the solutions.......We consider solutions of Burgers' equation with linear or quadratic external potential and stationary random initial conditions of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type. We study a class of limit laws that correspond to a scale renormalization of the solutions....

  18. Random Young diagrams in a Rectangular Box

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Dan; Boutillier, Cédric; Enriquez, Nathanaël

    We exhibit the limit shape of random Young diagrams having a distribution proportional to the exponential of their area, and confined in a rectangular box. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck bridge arises from the fluctuations around the limit shape.......We exhibit the limit shape of random Young diagrams having a distribution proportional to the exponential of their area, and confined in a rectangular box. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck bridge arises from the fluctuations around the limit shape....

  19. Fractional charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saminadayar, L.

    2001-01-01

    20 years ago fractional charges were imagined to explain values of conductivity in some materials. Recent experiments have proved the existence of charges whose value is the third of the electron charge. This article presents the experimental facts that have led theorists to predict the existence of fractional charges from the motion of quasi-particles in a linear chain of poly-acetylene to the quantum Hall effect. According to the latest theories, fractional charges are neither bosons nor fermions but anyons, they are submitted to an exclusive principle that is less stringent than that for fermions. (A.C.)

  20. Thermochemical transformations of anthracite fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkina, T.V.; Privalov, V.E.; Stepanenko, atM.A.

    1979-08-01

    Research on the nature of thermochemical transformations of anthracite fractions and the possibility of increasing their activity and identifying conditions for their use in the electrode pitch process is described. From research done on different anthracite fractions processed at varying temperatures it was concluded that accumulations of condensates from heating anthracite fractions occur significantly slower in comparison with pitch. As a result the electrode pitch process is prolonged. Thermal treatment of an anthracite fraction causes the formation and accumulation of condensates and promotes thermochemical transformations. Lastly, the use of thermally treated anthracite fractions apparently intensifies the electrode pitch process and improves its quality. (16 refs.) (In Russian)

  1. Mutual information identifies spurious Hurst phenomena in resting state EEG and fMRI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wegner, Frederic; Laufs, Helmut; Tagliazucchi, Enzo

    2018-02-01

    Long-range memory in time series is often quantified by the Hurst exponent H , a measure of the signal's variance across several time scales. We analyze neurophysiological time series from electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) resting state experiments with two standard Hurst exponent estimators and with the time-lagged mutual information function applied to discretized versions of the signals. A confidence interval for the mutual information function is obtained from surrogate Markov processes with equilibrium distribution and transition matrix identical to the underlying signal. For EEG signals, we construct an additional mutual information confidence interval from a short-range correlated, tenth-order autoregressive model. We reproduce the previously described Hurst phenomenon (H >0.5 ) in the analytical amplitude of alpha frequency band oscillations, in EEG microstate sequences, and in fMRI signals, but we show that the Hurst phenomenon occurs without long-range memory in the information-theoretical sense. We find that the mutual information function of neurophysiological data behaves differently from fractional Gaussian noise (fGn), for which the Hurst phenomenon is a sufficient condition to prove long-range memory. Two other well-characterized, short-range correlated stochastic processes (Ornstein-Uhlenbeck, Cox-Ingersoll-Ross) also yield H >0.5 , whereas their mutual information functions lie within the Markovian confidence intervals, similar to neural signals. In these processes, which do not have long-range memory by construction, a spurious Hurst phenomenon occurs due to slow relaxation times and heteroscedasticity (time-varying conditional variance). In summary, we find that mutual information correctly distinguishes long-range from short-range dependence in the theoretical and experimental cases discussed. Our results also suggest that the stationary fGn process is not sufficient to describe neural data, which

  2. Fractional fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackiw, R.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1984-01-01

    The theory of fermion fractionization due to topologically generated fermion ground states is presented. Applications to one-dimensional conductors, to the MIT bag, and to the Hall effect are reviewed. (author)

  3. Fractionation of acid lime essential oil using ethanol/water mixtures: Effect of the process on the aroma profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonçalves, Daniel; Costa, Patrícia; Rodrigues, Christianne E.C.; Rodrigues, Alírio E.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Fractionation of crude acid lime essential oil using ethanol/water mixtures. • Extract phases were enriched in aroma-active components. • Predicted compositions of liquid phases fitted well with the experimental data. • Aroma-active components were separated from terpenes, keeping the original acid lime essential oil odour. • The water content in the solvent did not affect the aroma profile of the phases from the liquid–liquid equilibrium. - Abstract: This study aims to separate aroma-active components of the crude Citrus latifolia essential oil (EO) from the unstable terpene hydrocarbons using ethanol/water mixtures through liquid–liquid equilibrium (LLE) and to evaluate the aroma profiles of the crude EO and the LLE phases. For this purpose, the liquid compositions of the crude EOs and the LLE phases were found by gas chromatography analysis. The compositions of the liquid phases were predicted using the NRTL model and compared to the experimental data. Afterwards, the concentrations of the components in the vapour phases above the liquid mixtures were obtained by headspace analysis and the odour intensity of each component was estimated using the Stevens’ power law concept. Finally, the classification into olfactory families was evaluated through the Perfumery Radar methodology. The solvent extraction technique made it possible to obtain extract phases enriched in citral and poor in monoterpenes, with aromas profiles similar to that of the crude EO and classified as herbaceous and citrus scent, with floral, woody, and oriental nuances. The extract phase obtained from ethanol with 50% water was found to be a promising fraction for industrial applications. Furthermore, the results proved that the NRTL parameters can be efficiently used to predict the compositions of the phases from the LLE.

  4. Fractionation of bamboo culms by autohydrolysis, organosolv delignification and extended delignification: understanding the fundamental chemistry of the lignin during the integrated process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jia-Long; Sun, Shao-Ni; Yuan, Tong-Qi; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-12-01

    Bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) was successfully fractionated using a three-step integrated process: (1) autohydrolysis pretreatment facilitating xylooligosaccharide (XOS) production (2) organosolv delignification with organic acids to obtain high-purity lignin, and (3) extended delignification with alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) to produce purified pulp. The integrated process was comprehensively evaluated by component analysis, SEM, XRD, and CP-MAS NMR techniques. Emphatically, the fundamental chemistry of the lignin fragments obtained from the integrated process was thoroughly investigated by gel permeation chromatography and solution-state NMR techniques (quantitative (13)C, 2D-HSQC, and (31)P-NMR spectroscopies). It is believed that the integrated process facilitate the production of XOS, high-purity lignin, and purified pulp. Moreover, the enhanced understanding of structural features and chemical reactivity of lignin polymers will maximize their utilizations in a future biorefinery industry. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Co-processing of lignite-plastic mixtures into liquid distillate fractions in the presence of iron catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, B.N.; Sharypov, V.I.; Beregovtsova, N.G.; Baryshnikov, S.V.; Doroginskaya, A.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Chemistry of Natural Organic Materials Sibirian Branch

    1997-12-31

    Some features of co-processing of Kansk-Achinsk lignite with plastics into hydrocarbon mixtures in the presence of activated iron-containing minerals (hematite, magnetite, pyrrhotite) were investigated under various operating parameters. The following catalytic processes were studied: pyrolysis in an inert atmosphere, hydropyrolysis and water-steam cracking. (orig.)

  6. Fractional Stochastic Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkonen, Juha

    2018-02-01

    Models describing evolution of physical, chemical, biological, social and financial processes are often formulated as differential equations with the understanding that they are large-scale equations for averages of quantities describing intrinsically random processes. Explicit account of randomness may lead to significant changes in the asymptotic behaviour (anomalous scaling) in such models especially in low spatial dimensions, which in many cases may be captured with the use of the renormalization group. Anomalous scaling and memory effects may also be introduced with the use of fractional derivatives and fractional noise. Construction of renormalized stochastic field theory with fractional derivatives and fractional noise in the underlying stochastic differential equations and master equations and the interplay between fluctuation-induced and built-in anomalous scaling behaviour is reviewed and discussed.

  7. Mystery Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  8. Storage method, drying processes and extraction procedures strongly affect the phenolic fraction of rosemary leaves: an HPLC/DAD/MS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulinacci, N; Innocenti, M; Bellumori, M; Giaccherini, C; Martini, V; Michelozzi, M

    2011-07-15

    The Rosmarinus officinalis L. is widely known for its numerous applications in the food field but also for the increasing interest in its pharmaceutical properties. Two groups of compounds are mainly responsible for the biological activities of the plant: the volatile fraction and the phenolic constituents. The latter group is mainly constituted by rosmarinic acid, by a flavonoidic fraction and by some diterpenoid compounds structurally derived from the carnosic acid. The aim of our work was to optimize the extractive and analytical procedure for the determination of all the phenolic constituents. Moreover the chemical stability of the main phenols, depending on the storage condition, the different drying procedures and the extraction solvent, have been evaluated. This method allowed to detect up to 29 different constituents at the same time in a relatively short time. The described procedure has the advantage to being able to detect and quantify several classes of compounds, among them numerous minor flavonoids, thus contributing to improving knowledge of the plant. The findings from this study have demonstrated that storing the raw fresh material in the freezer is not appropriate for rosemary, mainly due to the rapid disappearing of the rosmarinic acid during the freezing/thawing process. Regarding the flavonoidic fraction, consistent decrements, were highlighted in the dried samples at room temperature if compared with the fresh leaf. Rosmarinic acid, appeared very sensitive also to mild drying processes. The total diterpenoidic content undergoes to little changes when the leaves are freeze dried or frozen and limited losses are observed working on dried leaves at room temperature. Nevertheless it can be taken in account that this fraction is very sensitive to the water presence during the extraction that favors the conversion of carnosic acid toward it oxidized form carnosol. From our findings, it appear evident that when evaluating the phenolic content in

  9. CALCULATION OF EFFICIENCY OF PROCESS OF FRACTIONATION OF LOOSE MIX IN THE WORKING VOLUME OF A PNEUMATIC SEPARATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Semenov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The process of separation bulk mixtures in the air stream is widespread in production associated with the cleaning of grain from impurity. In doing so, in order to effectively use the force of gravity appropriate cleaning grain in vertical air stream. Quantitative analysis of the separation process considering based on the model of the motion of an isolated particles in the stream. We used law of conservation of impulse in the form of the second law of Newton. Movement of particles in the air stream develops in conditions of large of number Reynolds. Therefore, the resistance force particles chosen by quadratic depending on its relative speed. Based on the quantitative analysis of the equations of motion of a particle moving on a specific trajectory, determine the critical diameter of the particles. As a process control setting chosen by the speed of the airflow. Based on the dispersion factor mixture of granular calculated coefficient of lightening. A specific example of equipment based on geometrical and physical-mechanical parameters of the process graphically presents the results of a qualitative and meaningful analysis on trajectories and velocities of the particles, the critical diameter of particle, coefficient of lightening.

  10. Nuclear criticality safety bounding analysis for the in-tank-precipitation (ITP) process, impacted by fissile isotopic weight fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, C.E.

    1994-04-22

    The In-Tank Precipitation process (ITP) receives High Level Waste (HLW) supernatant liquid containing radionuclides in waste processing tank 48H. Sodium tetraphenylborate, NaTPB, and monosodium titanate (MST), NaTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}H, are added for removal of radioactive Cs and Sr, respectively. In addition to removal of radio-strontium, MST will also remove plutonium and uranium. The majority of the feed solutions to ITP will come from the dissolution of supernate that had been concentrated by evaporation to a crystallized salt form, commonly referred to as saltcake. The concern for criticality safety arises from the adsorption of U and Pt onto MST. If sufficient mass and optimum conditions are achieved then criticality is credible. The concentration of u and Pt from solution into the smaller volume of precipitate represents a concern for criticality. This report supplements WSRC-TR-93-171, Nuclear Criticality Safety Bounding Analysis For The In-Tank-Precipitation (ITP) Process. Criticality safety in ITP can be analyzed by two bounding conditions: (1) the minimum safe ratio of MST to fissionable material and (2) the maximum fissionable material adsorption capacity of the MST. Calculations have provided the first bounding condition and experimental analysis has established the second. This report combines these conditions with canyon facility data to evaluate the potential for criticality in the ITP process due to the adsorption of the fissionable material from solution. In addition, this report analyzes the potential impact of increased U loading onto MST. Results of this analysis demonstrate a greater safety margin for ITP operations than the previous analysis. This report further demonstrates that the potential for criticality in the ITP process due to adsorption of fissionable material by MST is not credible.

  11. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  12. Advances in robust fractional control

    CERN Document Server

    Padula, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    This monograph presents design methodologies for (robust) fractional control systems. It shows the reader how to take advantage of the superior flexibility of fractional control systems compared with integer-order systems in achieving more challenging control requirements. There is a high degree of current interest in fractional systems and fractional control arising from both academia and industry and readers from both milieux are catered to in the text. Different design approaches having in common a trade-off between robustness and performance of the control system are considered explicitly. The text generalizes methodologies, techniques and theoretical results that have been successfully applied in classical (integer) control to the fractional case. The first part of Advances in Robust Fractional Control is the more industrially-oriented. It focuses on the design of fractional controllers for integer processes. In particular, it considers fractional-order proportional-integral-derivative controllers, becau...

  13. Selectivity of an Active Natural Zeolite in Catalytic Conversion Process of Bangkirai, Kruing and Kamper Woods Biofuel to Gasoline Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wega Trisunaryanti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The selectivity of an active natural zeolite (ZAAH in catalytic conversion process of Bangkirai, Kruing and Kamper woods biofuels has been studied. The ZAAH catalyst was prepared from a natural zeolite (ZA treated with acids solution (1% HF and 6M HCI and hydrothermal then calcined at 500 °C and oxidized at 400 °C under nitrogen and oxygen gas stream, respectively. Characterizations of the catalysts including Si/Al ratio and acidity were determined by atomic adsorption spectroscopy (AAS and ammonia gas adsorption method, respectively. The conversion process was carried out in a flow reactor system at 400 °C, under N2 stream (20 mL/min. The biofuel was vaporized from the pyrolysis zone to the catalytic reactor. A liquid product was covered and analyzed by gas chromatograph (GC and that connected with mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. The characterization results showed that the Si/AI ratio and acidity of the ZAAH were higher than that of the ZA catalyst. The GC-MS data showed that the highest product selectivity was 2,4-dimethyl heptane and 1,2-dimethyl benzene. The total product selectivity using the ZAAH catalyst (bangkirai = 68.10%; kruing = 54.76%; kamper = 50.72% was higher than that of the ZA catalyst (bangkirai = 39.24%; kruing = 44.38%; kamper = 46.11%.

  14. Influence of the type of fat and air humidity on chosen properties of the lipid fraction in the process of baking shortbread pastries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miśkiewicz, K.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The results from his study reveal that the type of fat used during the baking of shortbreads had a noticeable influence on the properties of lipid fractions as well as the correlation among these properties (acid value, peroxide value, conjugated dienes and trienes contents. For low-trans fats, the correlation between acid value and peroxide value was inversely proportional; for transcontaining fats this correlation was directly proportional. An increase in air humidity during baking caused a decrease in the melting temperature of the fractions of fats used in the process, compared to fats from pastries baked in dry air. This may be indicative of a product with a high degree of unsaturation in the lipid fraction.

    Los resultados de este estudio demuestran que el tipo de grasa utilizada en el horneado de mantecadas tienen una influencia evidente en las propiedades de la fracción lipídica y una correlación entre estas propiedades (acidez, peróxidos, dienos y trienos conjugados. Para grasas bajas en trans la correlación entre la acidez y el índice de peróxido es inversamente proporcional, para grasas conteniendo trans esta correlación fue directamente proporcional. Un aumento de la humedad del aire durante el horneado causa una disminución de la temperatura de fusión de las fracciones de grasas utilizadas en el proceso, en comparación con las grasas de repostería horneadas en aire seco. Esto puede indicar la presencia de productos con alto grado de insaturación en las fracciones lipídicas.

  15. Isotopic fractionation of soil water during the evaporation process in the presence of a phreatic water table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leopoldo, P.R.; Stolf, R.

    1979-01-01

    This experiment was conducted with columns of soil, constitued by alluvion sediment keeping a phreatic watertable at a depth of 40 cm and constant water supply, and its objective was to check the water behaviour as to its deuterium and oxigen content when moving from the lower layers to the upper layers, and consequent loss to the atmosphere through evaporation. It was noted that the existing D and 18 O content in the water forming the phreativ watertable practivally does not vary with this process. In addition to the observations on soil columns, soil water from the Brasilian northeastern region was collected and analysed. The phreatic watertable at the collecting site lay at a depth of about 40-50 cm. Preliminarily, it was noted that these results apparently indicate an excess evaporation, and are also consistent with those obtained by other investigators, who proposed the use of stable isotopes to study problems related to salinization of water in this region. (Author) [pt

  16. A fractional-N frequency divider for multi-standard wireless transceiver fabricated in 0.18 μm CMOS process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiafeng; Fan, Xiangning; Shi, Xiaoyang; Wang, Zhigong

    2017-12-01

    With the rapid evolution of wireless communication technology, integrating various communication modes in a mobile terminal has become the popular trend. Because of this, multi-standard wireless technology is one of the hot spots in current research. This paper presents a wideband fractional-N frequency divider of the multi-standard wireless transceiver for many applications. High-speed divider-by-2 with traditional source-coupled-logic is designed for very wide band usage. Phase switching technique and a chain of divider-by-2/3 are applied to the programmable frequency divider with 0.5 step. The phase noise of the whole frequency synthesizer will be decreased by the narrower step of programmable frequency divider. Δ-Σ modulator is achieved by an improved MASH 1-1-1 structure. This structure has excellent performance in many ways, such as noise, spur and input dynamic range. Fabricated in TSMC 0.18μm CMOS process, the fractional-N frequency divider occupies a chip area of 1130 × 510 μm2 and it can correctly divide within the frequency range of 0.8-9 GHz. With 1.8 V supply voltage, its division ratio ranges from 62.5 to 254 and the total current consumption is 29 mA.

  17. Fractionation of the component processes underlying successful episodic encoding: a combined fMRI and divided-attention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncapher, Melina R; Rugg, Michael D

    2008-02-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that attentional resources are necessary for the encoding of episodic memories, but the nature of the relationship between attention and neural correlates of encoding is unclear. Here we address this question using functional magnetic resonance imaging and a divided-attention paradigm in which competition for different types of attentional resources was manipulated. Fifteen volunteers were scanned while making animacy judgments to visually presented words and concurrently performing one of three tasks on auditorily presented words: male/female voice discrimination (control task), 1-back voice comparison (1-back task), or indoor/outdoor judgment (semantic task). The 1-back and semantic tasks were designed to compete for task-generic and task-specific attentional resources, respectively. Using the "remember/know" procedure, memory for the study words was assessed after 15 min. In the control condition, subsequent memory effects associated with later recollection were identified in the left dorsal inferior frontal gyrus and in the left hippocampus. These effects were differentially attenuated in the two more difficult divided-attention conditions. The effects of divided attention seem, therefore, to reflect impairments due to limitations at both task-generic and task-specific levels. Additionally, each of the two more difficult divided-attention conditions was associated with subsequent memory effects in regions distinct from those showing effects in the control condition. These findings suggest the engagement of alternative encoding processes to those engaged in the control task. The overall pattern of findings suggests that divided attention can impact later memory in different ways, and accordingly, that different attentional resources, including task-generic and task-specific resources, make distinct contributions to successful episodic encoding.

  18. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  19. Gravity driven and in situ fractional crystallization processes in the Centre Hill complex, Abitibi Subprovince, Canada: Evidence from bilaterally-paired cyclic units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thériault, R. D.; Fowler, A. D.

    1996-12-01

    The formation of layers in mafic intrusions has been explained by various processes, making it the subject of much controversy. The concept that layering originates from gravitational settling of crystals has been superseded in recent years by models involving in situ fractional crystallization. Here we present evidence from the Centre Hill complex that both processes may be operative simultaneously within the same intrusion. The Centre Hill complex is part of the Munro Lake sill, an Archean layered mafic intrusion emplaced in volcanic rocks of the Abitibi Subprovince. The Centre Hill complex comprises the following lithostratigraphic units: six lower cyclic units of peridotite and clinopyroxenite; a middle unit of leucogabbro; six upper cyclic units of branching-textured gabbro (BTG) and clotted-textured gabbro (CTG), the uppermost of these units being overlain by a marginal zone of fine-grained gabbro. The cyclic units of peridotite/clinopyroxenite and BTG/CTG are interpreted to have formed concurrently through fractional crystallization, associated with periodic replenishment of magma to the chamber. The units of peridotite and clinopyroxenite formed by gravitational accumulation of crystals that grew under the roof. The cyclic units of BTG and CTG formed along the upper margin of the sill by two different mechanisms: (1) layers of BTG crystallized in situ along an inward-growing roof and (2) layers of CTG formed by accumulation of buoyant plagioclase crystals. The layers of BTG are characterized by branching pseudomorphs after fayalite up to 50 cm in length that extend away from the upper margin. The original branching crystals are interpreted to have grown from stagnant intercumulus melt in a high thermal gradient resulting from the injection of new magma to the chamber.

  20. Brewing with fractionated barley

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donkelaar, van L.H.G.

    2016-01-01

    Brewing with fractionated barley

    Beer is a globally consumed beverage, which is produced from malted barley, water, hops and yeast. In recent years, the use of unmalted barley and exogenous enzymes have become more popular because they enable simpler processing and reduced environmental

  1. Influence of dissolution processing of PVA blends on the characteristics of their hydrogels synthesized by radiation—Part I: Gel fraction, swelling, and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcântara, M.T.S.; Brant, A.J.C.; Giannini, D.R.; Pessoa, J.O.C.P.; Andrade, A.B.; Riella, H.G.; Lugão, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this work several hydrogels were obtained with two different poly(vinyl alcohol)s/PVAs as the main polymer in aqueous solutions containing 10% of PVA, 0.6% of agar, and 0.6% of κ-carrageenan (KC), cross-linked by gamma-rays from a 60 Co irradiation source. The PVAs tested have different degrees of hydrolysis and viscosities at 4% with values closed to 30 mPa s. The aqueous polymeric solutions were prepared using two distinct processes: the simple process of heating–stirring and that of making use of an autoclave. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of the dissolution process by means of both methods on the hydrogels’ properties obtained. These were investigated by means of degree of cross-linking/gel fraction, degree of swelling in water, and some mechanical properties. The results that are obtained for hydrogels synthesized from solutions of PVA, agar, KC, and blends thereof prepared by both dissolution processes showed higher degrees of swelling for hydrogels from the autoclaved polymer solutions than those from the solutions prepared by simple heating–stirring process. Furthermore, their hydrogels containing totally hydrolyzed PVA displayed higher tensile strength and lower elongation properties. - Highlights: ► Hydrogels from γ-irradiated PVA and PVA-polysaccharide blends were obtained. ► PVA molar mass and degree of hydrolysis play an important role in their hydrogels. ► Dissolution processes of PVAs have influenced on their hydrogel characteristics. ► Degrees of swelling of hydrogels were lower when prepared from autoclaved solutions.

  2. Energy-constrained open-system magmatic processes IV: Geochemical, thermal and mass consequences of energy-constrained recharge, assimilation and fractional crystallization (EC-RAFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendy A. Bohrson Department of Geological Sciences, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, Washington, 98926, USA; Frank J. Spera Institute for Crustal Studies and Department of Geological Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, 93106, USA

    2003-01-01

    A wealth of geochemical and petrological data provide evidence that the processes of fractional crystallization, assimilation, and magma recharge (replenishment) dominate the chemical signatures of many terrestrial igneous rocks. Previous work [Spera and Bohrson, 2001 ; Bohrson and Spera, 2001] has established the importance of integrating energy, species and mass conservation into simulations of complex magma chamber processes. An extended version of the energy-constrained formulation, Energy-Constrained Recharge, Assimilation, Fractional Crystallization (EC-RAFC), tracks mass and compositional variations of melt, cumulates, and enclaves in a magma body undergoing simultaneous recharge, assimilation, and fractional crystallization [Spera and Bohrson, 2002]. Because many EC-RAFC results are distinct from those predicted by extant RAFC formulations, the primary goal of this paper is to present a range of geochemical and mass relationships for selected cases that highlight issues relevant to modern petrology. Among the plethora of petrologic problems that have important, well-documented analogues in nature are the geochemical distinctions that arise when a magma body undergoes continuous versus episodic recharge, the connection between erupted magmas and associated cumulate bodies, the behavior of recharge-fractionation dominated systems (RFC), thermodynamic conditions that promote the formation of enclaves versus cumulates, and the conditions under which magma bodies may be described as chemically homogeneous. Investigation of the effects of continuous versus episodic recharge for mafic magma undergoing RAFC in the lower crust indicates that the resulting geochemical trends for melt and solids are sensitive to the intensity and composition of recharge, suggesting that EC-RAFC may be used as a tool to distinguish the nature of the recharge events. Compared to the record preserved in melts, the geochemical and mass characteristics of solids associated with particular

  3. Parameters affecting the stability of the digestate from a two-stage anaerobic process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trzcinski, Antoine P.; Stuckey, David C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focused on the factors affecting the respiration rate of the digestate taken from a continuous anaerobic two-stage process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). The process involved a hydrolytic reactor (HR) that produced a leachate fed to a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). It was found that a volatile solids (VS) removal in the range 40-75% and an operating temperature in the HR between 21 and 35 o C resulted in digestates with similar respiration rates, with all digestates requiring 17 days of aeration before satisfying the British Standard Institution stability threshold of 16 mg CO 2 g VS -1 day -1 . Sanitization of the digestate at 65 o C for 7 days allowed a mature digestate to be obtained. At 4 g VS L -1 d -1 and Solid Retention Times (SRT) greater than 70 days, all the digestates emitted CO 2 at a rate lower than 25 mg CO 2 g VS -1 d -1 after 3 days of aeration, while at SRT lower than 20 days all the digestates displayed a respiration rate greater than 25 mg CO 2 g VS -1 d -1 . The compliance criteria for Class I digestate set by the European Commission (EC) and British Standard Institution (BSI) could not be met because of nickel and chromium contamination, which was probably due to attrition of the stainless steel stirrer in the HR.

  4. Ethanol production from residual wood chips of cellulose industry: acid pretreatment investigation, hemicellulosic hydrolysate fermentation, and remaining solid fraction fermentation by SSF process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Neumara Luci Conceição; Betancur, Gabriel Jaime Vargas; Vasquez, Mariana Peñuela; Gomes, Edelvio de Barros; Pereira, Nei

    2011-04-01

    Current research indicates the ethanol fuel production from lignocellulosic materials, such as residual wood chips from the cellulose industry, as new emerging technology. This work aimed at evaluating the ethanol production from hemicellulose of eucalyptus chips by diluted acid pretreatment and the subsequent fermentation of the generated hydrolysate by a flocculating strain of Pichia stipitis. The remaining solid fraction generated after pretreatment was subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis, which was carried out simultaneously with glucose fermentation [saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process] using a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The acid pretreatment was evaluated using a central composite design for sulfuric acid concentration (1.0-4.0 v/v) and solid to liquid ratio (1:2-1:4, grams to milliliter) as independent variables. A maximum xylose concentration of 50 g/L was obtained in the hemicellulosic hydrolysate. The fermentation of hemicellulosic hydrolysate and the SSF process were performed in bioreactors and the final ethanol concentrations of 15.3 g/L and 28.7 g/L were obtained, respectively.

  5. Near infrared spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis for monitoring the ethanol precipitation process of fraction I + II + III supernatant in human albumin separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Can; Wang, Fei; Zang, Lixuan; Zang, Hengchang; Alcalà, Manel; Nie, Lei; Wang, Mingyu; Li, Lian

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, as a powerful process analytical tool, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been widely applied in process monitoring. In present work, NIRS combined with multivariate analysis was used to monitor the ethanol precipitation process of fraction I + II + III (FI + II + III) supernatant in human albumin (HA) separation to achieve qualitative and quantitative monitoring at the same time and assure the product's quality. First, a qualitative model was established by using principal component analysis (PCA) with 6 of 8 normal batches samples, and evaluated by the remaining 2 normal batches and 3 abnormal batches. The results showed that the first principal component (PC1) score chart could be successfully used for fault detection and diagnosis. Then, two quantitative models were built with 6 of 8 normal batches to determine the content of the total protein (TP) and HA separately by using partial least squares regression (PLS-R) strategy, and the models were validated by 2 remaining normal batches. The determination coefficient of validation (Rp2), root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV), root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and ratio of performance deviation (RPD) were 0.975, 0.501 g/L, 0.465 g/L and 5.57 for TP, and 0.969, 0.530 g/L, 0.341 g/L and 5.47 for HA, respectively. The results showed that the established models could give a rapid and accurate measurement of the content of TP and HA. The results of this study indicated that NIRS is an effective tool and could be successfully used for qualitative and quantitative monitoring the ethanol precipitation process of FI + II + III supernatant simultaneously. This research has significant reference value for assuring the quality and improving the recovery ratio of HA in industrialization scale by using NIRS.

  6. Near infrared spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis for monitoring the ethanol precipitation process of fraction I+II+III supernatant in human albumin separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Can; Wang, Fei; Zang, Lixuan; Zang, Hengchang; Alcalà, Manel; Nie, Lei; Wang, Mingyu; Li, Lian

    2017-03-15

    Nowadays, as a powerful process analytical tool, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been widely applied in process monitoring. In present work, NIRS combined with multivariate analysis was used to monitor the ethanol precipitation process of fraction I+II+III (FI+II+III) supernatant in human albumin (HA) separation to achieve qualitative and quantitative monitoring at the same time and assure the product's quality. First, a qualitative model was established by using principal component analysis (PCA) with 6 of 8 normal batches samples, and evaluated by the remaining 2 normal batches and 3 abnormal batches. The results showed that the first principal component (PC1) score chart could be successfully used for fault detection and diagnosis. Then, two quantitative models were built with 6 of 8 normal batches to determine the content of the total protein (TP) and HA separately by using partial least squares regression (PLS-R) strategy, and the models were validated by 2 remaining normal batches. The determination coefficient of validation (R p 2 ), root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV), root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and ratio of performance deviation (RPD) were 0.975, 0.501g/L, 0.465g/L and 5.57 for TP, and 0.969, 0.530g/L, 0.341g/L and 5.47 for HA, respectively. The results showed that the established models could give a rapid and accurate measurement of the content of TP and HA. The results of this study indicated that NIRS is an effective tool and could be successfully used for qualitative and quantitative monitoring the ethanol precipitation process of FI+II+III supernatant simultaneously. This research has significant reference value for assuring the quality and improving the recovery ratio of HA in industrialization scale by using NIRS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Local Fractional Bootstrap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Mikkel; Hounyo, Ulrich; Lunde, Asger

    We introduce a bootstrap procedure for high-frequency statistics of Brownian semistationary processes. More specifically, we focus on a hypothesis test on the roughness of sample paths of Brownian semistationary processes, which uses an estimator based on a ratio of realized power variations. Our...... new resampling method, the local fractional bootstrap, relies on simulating an auxiliary fractional Brownian motion that mimics the fine properties of high frequency differences of the Brownian semistationary process under the null hypothesis. We prove the first order validity of the bootstrap method...... and in simulations we observe that the bootstrap-based hypothesis test provides considerable finite-sample improvements over an existing test that is based on a central limit theorem. This is important when studying the roughness properties of time series data; we illustrate this by applying the bootstrap method...

  8. Fractional vector calculus for fractional advection dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Mortensen, Jeff; Wheatcraft, Stephen W.

    2006-07-01

    We develop the basic tools of fractional vector calculus including a fractional derivative version of the gradient, divergence, and curl, and a fractional divergence theorem and Stokes theorem. These basic tools are then applied to provide a physical explanation for the fractional advection-dispersion equation for flow in heterogeneous porous media.

  9. Fractional Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskin, Nick

    2002-01-01

    Some properties of the fractional Schroedinger equation are studied. We prove the Hermiticity of the fractional Hamilton operator and establish the parity conservation law for fractional quantum mechanics. As physical applications of the fractional Schroedinger equation we find the energy spectra of a hydrogenlike atom (fractional 'Bohr atom') and of a fractional oscillator in the semiclassical approximation. An equation for the fractional probability current density is developed and discussed. We also discuss the relationships between the fractional and standard Schroedinger equations

  10. Meadow based Fraction Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Bergstra, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of an involutive meadow a precise definition of fractions is formulated and on that basis formal definitions of various classes of fractions are given. The definitions follow the fractions as terms paradigm. That paradigm is compared with two competing paradigms for storytelling on fractions: fractions as values and fractions as pairs.

  11. Fractional hydrodynamic equations for fractal media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2005-01-01

    We use the fractional integrals in order to describe dynamical processes in the fractal medium. We consider the 'fractional' continuous medium model for the fractal media and derive the fractional generalization of the equations of balance of mass density, momentum density, and internal energy. The fractional generalization of Navier-Stokes and Euler equations are considered. We derive the equilibrium equation for fractal media. The sound waves in the continuous medium model for fractional media are considered

  12. Contrasting isotopic signatures between anthropogenic and geogenic Zn and evidence for post-depositional fractionation processes in smelter-impacted soils from Northern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillot, Farid; Maréchal, Chloe; Morin, Guillaume; Jouvin, Delphine; Cacaly, Sylvain; Telouk, Philipe; Benedetti, Marc F.; Ildefonse, Philippe; Sutton, Steve; Guyot, François; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.

    2011-05-01

    Zinc isotopes have been studied along two smelter-impacted soil profiles sampled near one of the largest Pb and Zn processing plants in Europe located in northern France, about 50 km south of Lille. Mean δ 66Zn values along these two soil profiles range from +0.22 ± 0.17‰ (2 σ) to +0.34 ± 0.17‰ (2 σ) at the lowest horizons and from +0.38 ± 0.45‰ (2 σ) to +0.76 ± 0.14‰ (2 σ) near the surface. The δ 66Zn values in the lowest horizons of the soils are interpreted as being representative of the local geochemical background (mean value +0.31 ± 0.38‰), whereas heavier δ 66Zn values near the surface of the two soils are related to anthropogenic Zn. This anthropogenic Zn occurs in the form of franklinite (ZnFe 2O 4)-bearing slag grains originating from processing wastes at the smelter site and exhibiting δ 66Zn values of +0.81 ± 0.20‰ (2 σ). The presence of franklinite is indicated by EXAFS analysis of the topsoil samples from both soil profiles as well as by micro-XANES analysis of the surface horizon of a third smelter-impacted soil from a distant site. These results indicate that naturally occurring Zn and smelter-derived Zn exhibit significantly different δ 66Zn values, which suggests that zinc isotopes can be used to distinguish between geogenic and anthropogenic sources of Zn in smelter-impacted soils. In addition to a possible influence of additional past sources of light Zn (likely Zn-sulfides and Zn-sulfates directly emitted by the smelter), the light δ 66Zn values in the surface horizons compared to smelter-derived slag materials are interpreted as resulting mainly from fractionation processes associated with biotic and/or abiotic pedological processes (Zn-bearing mineral precipitation, Zn complexation by organic matter, and plant uptake of Zn). This conclusion emphasizes the need for additional Zn isotopic studies before being able to use Zn isotopes to trace sources and pathways of this element in surface environments.

  13. A fractional model for dye removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Huan He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption process has a fractional property, and a fractional model is suggested to study a transport model of direct textile industry wastewater. An approximate solution of the concentration is obtained by the variational iteration method.

  14. Use of a post-production fractionation process improves the nutritional value of wheat distillers grains with solubles for young broiler chicks

    OpenAIRE

    Thacker, Philip; Deep, Aman; Beltranena, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Background Post-production fractionation of wheat distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) increases their crude protein content and reduces their fiber content. This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of fractionation of wheat DDGS on apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) and performance when fed to broiler chicks (0?21 d). Methods A total of 150, day-old, male broiler chicks (Ross-308 line; Lilydale Hatchery, Wynyard, Saskatchewan) weighing an average of 49.6 ? 0.8 g were a...

  15. FRACTIONATION AND CHARACTERISATION OF TECHNICAL AMMONIUM LIGNOSULPHONATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Ann Leger

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to use lignin in any analytical methodology without reducing its considerable polydispersity by fractionation. An ammonium lignosulphonate sample was fractionated using a method of partial solubility in solutions of isopropanol increasingly diluted with distilled water, effectively fractionating by polarity. Selected fractions were characterised by gravimetric determination of the fractions, and determination of acid insoluble lignin, soluble lignin, and carbohydrate contents. Acid-insoluble lignin content was very low, and soluble lignin provided the majority of the lignin content, as should be expected from sulphonated lignin. Carbohydrate contents were also fairly low, the highest percentage at 14.5 being in Fraction 2, with the bulk lignin and Fraction 3 having 6.5% and 3.2%, respectively. Differences in the composition of each fraction support the efficacy of the fractionation process and permitted selection of fractions for use in subsequent studies.

  16. Plasma fractionation issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Albert; Evers, Theo; Falcou, Pierre-Francois; Burnouf, Thierry; Amorim, Luiz; Thomas, Sylvia

    2009-04-01

    Procurement and processing of human plasma for fractionation of therapeutic proteins or biological medicines used in clinical practice is a multi-billion dollar international trade. Together the private sector and public sector (non-profit) provide large amounts of safe and effective therapeutic plasma proteins needed worldwide. The principal therapeutic proteins produced by the dichotomous industry include gamma globulins or immunoglobulins (including pathogen-specific hyperimmune globulins, such as hepatitis B immune globulins) albumin, factor VIII and Factor IX concentrates. Viral inactivation, principally by solvent detergent and other processes, has proven highly effective in preventing transmission of enveloped viruses, viz. HBV, HIV, and HCV.

  17. Fractional Vector Calculus and Fractional Special Function

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ming-Fan; Ren, Ji-Rong; Zhu, Tao

    2010-01-01

    Fractional vector calculus is discussed in the spherical coordinate framework. A variation of the Legendre equation and fractional Bessel equation are solved by series expansion and numerically. Finally, we generalize the hypergeometric functions.

  18. Anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure in a single continuously stirred tank reactor process: Limits in co-substrate ratios and organic loading rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Carlos; Muñoz, Noelia; Rico, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of cheese whey and the screened liquid fraction of dairy manure was investigated with the aim of determining the treatment limits in terms of the cheese whey fraction in feed and the organic loading rate. The results of a continuous stirred tank reactor that was operated with a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 days showed that the co-digestion process was possible with a cheese whey fraction as high as 85% in the feed. The efficiency of the process was similar within the range of the 15-85% cheese whey fraction. To study the effect of the increasing loading rate, the HRT was progressively shortened with the 65% cheese whey fraction in the feed. The reactor efficiency dropped as the HRT decreased but enabled a stable operation over 8.7 days of HRT. At these operating conditions, a volumetric methane production rate of 1.37 m(3) CH4 m(-3) d(-1) was achieved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Permutation entropy of fractional Brownian motion and fractional Gaussian noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zunino, L.; Perez, D.G.; Martin, M.T.; Garavaglia, M.; Plastino, A.; Rosso, O.A.

    2008-01-01

    We have worked out theoretical curves for the permutation entropy of the fractional Brownian motion and fractional Gaussian noise by using the Bandt and Shiha [C. Bandt, F. Shiha, J. Time Ser. Anal. 28 (2007) 646] theoretical predictions for their corresponding relative frequencies. Comparisons with numerical simulations show an excellent agreement. Furthermore, the entropy-gap in the transition between these processes, observed previously via numerical results, has been here theoretically validated. Also, we have analyzed the behaviour of the permutation entropy of the fractional Gaussian noise for different time delays

  20. A counter-intuitive approach to calculating non-exchangeable 2H isotopic composition of hair: treating the molar exchange fraction fE as a process-related rather than compound-specific variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landwehr, J.M.; Meier-Augenstein, W.; Kemp, H.F.

    2011-01-01

    Hair is a keratinous tissue that incorporates hydrogen from material that an animal consumes but it is metabolically inert following synthesis. The stable hydrogen isotope composition of hair has been used in ecological studies to track migrations of mammals as well as for forensic and archaeological purposes to determine the provenance of human remains or the recent geographic life trajectory of living people. Measurement of the total hydrogen isotopic composition of a hair sample yields a composite value comprised of both metabolically informative, non-exchangeable hydrogen and exchangeable hydrogen, with the latter reflecting ambient or sample preparation conditions. Neither of these attributes is directly measurable, and the non-exchangeable hydrogen composition is obtained by estimation using a commonly applied mathematical expression incorporating sample measurements obtained from two distinct equilibration procedures. This commonly used approach treats the fraction of exchangeable hydrogen as a mixing ratio, with a minimal procedural fractionation factor assumed to be close or equal to 1. Instead, we propose to use full molar ratios to derive an expression for the non-exchangeable hydrogen composition explicitly as a function of both the procedural fractionation factor α and the molar hydrogen exchange fraction fE. We apply these derivations in a longitudinal study of a hair sample and demonstrate that the molar hydrogen exchange fraction fE should, like the procedural fractionation factor α, be treated as a process-dependent parameter, i.e. a reaction-specific constant. This is a counter-intuitive notion given that maximum theoretical values for the molar hydrogen exchange fraction fE can be calculated that are arguably protein-type specific and, as such, fE could be regarded as a compound-specific constant. We also make some additional suggestions for future approaches to determine the non-exchangeable hydrogen composition of hair and the use of

  1. On varitional iteration method for fractional calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Hai-Gen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Modification of the Das’ variational iteration method for fractional differential equations is discussed, and its main shortcoming involved in the solution process is pointed out and overcome by using fractional power series. The suggested computational procedure is simple and reliable for fractional calculus.

  2. Evidence for Cyclical Fractional Crystallization, Recharge, and Assimilation in Basalts of the Kimama Core, Central Snake River Plain, Idaho: A 5.5-million-year Highlight Reel of Petrogenetic processes in a Mid-Crustal Sill Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Katherine E.; Shervais, John W.; Christiansen, Eric H.; Vetter, Scott K.

    2018-02-01

    Basalts erupted in the Snake River Plain of central Idaho and sampled in the Kimama drill core link eruptive processes to the construction of mafic intrusions over 5.5 Ma. Cyclic variations in basalt composition reveal temporal chemical heterogeneity related to fractional crystallization and the assimilation of previously-intruded mafic sills. A range of compositional types are identified within 1912 m of continuous drill core: Snake River olivine tholeiite (SROT), low K SROT, high Fe-Ti, and evolved and high K-Fe lavas similar to those erupted at Craters of the Moon National Monument. Detailed lithologic and geophysical logs document 432 flow units comprising 183 distinct lava flows and 78 flow groups. Each lava flow represents a single eruptive episode, while flow groups document chemically and temporally related flows that formed over extended periods of time. Temporal chemical variation demonstrates the importance of source heterogeneity and magma processing in basalt petrogenesis. Low-K SROT and high Fe-Ti basalts are genetically related to SROT as, respectively, hydrothermally-altered and fractionated daughters. Cyclic variations in the chemical composition of Kimama flow groups are apparent as 21 upward fractionation cycles, six recharge cycles, eight recharge-fractionation cycles, and five fractionation-recharge cycles. We propose that most Kimama basalt flows represent typical fractionation and recharge patterns, consistent with the repeated influx of primitive SROT parental magmas and extensive fractional crystallization coupled with varying degrees of assimilation of gabbroic to ferrodioritic sills at shallow to intermediate depths over short durations. Trace element models show that parental SROT basalts were generated by 5-10% partial melting of enriched mantle at shallow depths above the garnet-spinel lherzolite transition. The distinctive evolved and high K-Fe lavas are rare. Found at four depths, 319 m, 1045 m, 1078 m, and 1189 m, evolved and high K

  3. Low-molecular-weight color pI markers to monitor on-line the peptide focusing process in OFFGEL fractionation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michelland, S.; Bourgoin-Voillard, S.; Cunin, V.; Tollance, A.; Bertolino, P.; Šlais, Karel; Seve, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 16 (2017), s. 2034-2041 ISSN 0173-0835 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : iTRAQ labeling * low- molecular -weight color pI markers * peptides OFFGEL fractionation Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 2.744, year: 2016

  4. Low-molecular-weight color pI markers to monitor on-line the peptide focusing process in OFFGEL fractionation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michelland, S.; Bourgoin-Voillard, S.; Cunin, V.; Tollance, A.; Bertolino, P.; Šlais, Karel; Seve, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 16 (2017), s. 2034-2041 ISSN 0173-0835 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : iTRAQ labeling * low-molecular-weight color pI markers * peptides OFFGEL fractionation Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 2.744, year: 2016

  5. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered

  6. Fractional statistics and fractional quantized Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, R.; Wu, Y.S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors suggest that the origin of the odd-denominator rule observed in the fractional quantized Hall effect (FQHE) may lie in fractional statistics which govern quasiparticles in FQHE. A theorem concerning statistics of clusters of quasiparticles implies that fractional statistics do not allow coexistence of a large number of quasiparticles at fillings with an even denominator. Thus, no Hall plateau can be formed at these fillings, regardless of the presence of an energy gap. 15 references

  7. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  8. What defines an adaptive radiation? Macroevolutionary diversification dynamics of an exceptionally species-rich continental lizard radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincheira-Donoso, Daniel; Harvey, Lilly P; Ruta, Marcello

    2015-08-07

    Adaptive radiation theory posits that ecological opportunity promotes rapid proliferation of phylogenetic and ecological diversity. Given that adaptive radiation proceeds via occupation of available niche space in newly accessed ecological zones, theory predicts that: (i) evolutionary diversification follows an 'early-burst' process, i.e., it accelerates early in the history of a clade (when available niche space facilitates speciation), and subsequently slows down as niche space becomes saturated by new species; and (ii) phylogenetic branching is accompanied by diversification of ecologically relevant phenotypic traits among newly evolving species. Here, we employ macroevolutionary phylogenetic model-selection analyses to address these two predictions about evolutionary diversification using one of the most exceptionally species-rich and ecologically diverse lineages of living vertebrates, the South American lizard genus Liolaemus. Our phylogenetic analyses lend support to a density-dependent lineage diversification model. However, the lineage through-time diversification curve does not provide strong support for an early burst. In contrast, the evolution of phenotypic (body size) relative disparity is high, significantly different from a Brownian model during approximately the last 5 million years of Liolaemus evolution. Model-fitting analyses also reject the 'early-burst' model of phenotypic evolution, and instead favour stabilizing selection (Ornstein-Uhlenbeck, with three peaks identified) as the best model for body size diversification. Finally, diversification rates tend to increase with smaller body size. Liolaemus have diversified under a density-dependent process with slightly pronounced apparent episodic pulses of lineage accumulation, which are compatible with the expected episodic ecological opportunity created by gradual uplifts of the Andes over the last ~25My. We argue that ecological opportunity can be strong and a crucial driver of adaptive

  9. Predictive performance for population models using stochastic differential equations applied on data from an oral glucose tolerance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Jonas B; Overgaard, Rune V; Madsen, Henrik; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Ingwersen, Steen H

    2010-02-01

    Several articles have investigated stochastic differential equations (SDEs) in PK/PD models, but few have quantitatively investigated the benefits to predictive performance of models based on real data. Estimation of first phase insulin secretion which reflects beta-cell function using models of the OGTT is a difficult problem in need of further investigation. The present work aimed at investigating the power of SDEs to predict the first phase insulin secretion (AIR (0-8)) in the IVGTT based on parameters obtained from the minimal model of the OGTT, published by Breda et al. (Diabetes 50(1):150-158, 2001). In total 174 subjects underwent both an OGTT and a tolbutamide modified IVGTT. Estimation of parameters in the oral minimal model (OMM) was performed using the FOCE-method in NONMEM VI on insulin and C-peptide measurements. The suggested SDE models were based on a continuous AR(1) process, i.e. the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, and the extended Kalman filter was implemented in order to estimate the parameters of the models. Inclusion of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) process caused improved description of the variation in the data as measured by the autocorrelation function (ACF) of one-step prediction errors. A main result was that application of SDE models improved the correlation between the individual first phase indexes obtained from OGTT and AIR (0-8) (r = 0.36 to r = 0.49 and r = 0.32 to r = 0.47 with C-peptide and insulin measurements, respectively). In addition to the increased correlation also the properties of the indexes obtained using the SDE models more correctly assessed the properties of the first phase indexes obtained from the IVGTT. In general it is concluded that the presented SDE approach not only caused autocorrelation of errors to decrease but also improved estimation of clinical measures obtained from the glucose tolerance tests. Since, the estimation time of extended models was not heavily increased compared to basic models, the applied method

  10. Green's function-stochastic methods framework for probing nonlinear evolution problems: Burger's equation, the nonlinear Schroedinger's equation, and hydrodynamic organization of near-molecular-scale vorticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keanini, R.G.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Systematic approach for physically probing nonlinear and random evolution problems. → Evolution of vortex sheets corresponds to evolution of an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. → Organization of near-molecular scale vorticity mediated by hydrodynamic modes. → Framework allows calculation of vorticity evolution within random strain fields. - Abstract: A framework which combines Green's function (GF) methods and techniques from the theory of stochastic processes is proposed for tackling nonlinear evolution problems. The framework, established by a series of easy-to-derive equivalences between Green's function and stochastic representative solutions of linear drift-diffusion problems, provides a flexible structure within which nonlinear evolution problems can be analyzed and physically probed. As a preliminary test bed, two canonical, nonlinear evolution problems - Burgers' equation and the nonlinear Schroedinger's equation - are first treated. In the first case, the framework provides a rigorous, probabilistic derivation of the well known Cole-Hopf ansatz. Likewise, in the second, the machinery allows systematic recovery of a known soliton solution. The framework is then applied to a fairly extensive exploration of physical features underlying evolution of randomly stretched and advected Burger's vortex sheets. Here, the governing vorticity equation corresponds to the Fokker-Planck equation of an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, a correspondence that motivates an investigation of sub-sheet vorticity evolution and organization. Under the assumption that weak hydrodynamic fluctuations organize disordered, near-molecular-scale, sub-sheet vorticity, it is shown that these modes consist of two weakly damped counter-propagating cross-sheet acoustic modes, a diffusive cross-sheet shear mode, and a diffusive cross-sheet entropy mode. Once a consistent picture of in-sheet vorticity evolution is established, a number of analytical results, describing the

  11. Higher fractions theory of fractional hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, I.Z.; Popov, V.N.

    1985-07-01

    A theory of fractional quantum Hall effect is generalized to higher fractions. N-particle model interaction is used and the gap is expressed through n-particles wave function. The excitation spectrum in general and the mean field critical behaviour are determined. The Hall conductivity is calculated from first principles. (author)

  12. Stochastic IMT (Insulator-Metal-Transition Neurons: An Interplay of Thermal and Threshold Noise at Bifurcation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Parihar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural networks can harness stochasticity in multiple ways to enable a vast class of computationally powerful models. Boltzmann machines and other stochastic neural networks have been shown to outperform their deterministic counterparts by allowing dynamical systems to escape local energy minima. Electronic implementation of such stochastic networks is currently limited to addition of algorithmic noise to digital machines which is inherently inefficient; albeit recent efforts to harness physical noise in devices for stochasticity have shown promise. To succeed in fabricating electronic neuromorphic networks we need experimental evidence of devices with measurable and controllable stochasticity which is complemented with the development of reliable statistical models of such observed stochasticity. Current research literature has sparse evidence of the former and a complete lack of the latter. This motivates the current article where we demonstrate a stochastic neuron using an insulator-metal-transition (IMT device, based on electrically induced phase-transition, in series with a tunable resistance. We show that an IMT neuron has dynamics similar to a piecewise linear FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN neuron and incorporates all characteristics of a spiking neuron in the device phenomena. We experimentally demonstrate spontaneous stochastic spiking along with electrically controllable firing probabilities using Vanadium Dioxide (VO2 based IMT neurons which show a sigmoid-like transfer function. The stochastic spiking is explained by two noise sources - thermal noise and threshold fluctuations, which act as precursors of bifurcation. As such, the IMT neuron is modeled as an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU process with a fluctuating boundary resulting in transfer curves that closely match experiments. The moments of interspike intervals are calculated analytically by extending the first-passage-time (FPT models for Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU process to include a

  13. Stochastic Models for Laser Propagation in Atmospheric Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leland, Robert Patton

    In this dissertation, stochastic models for laser propagation in atmospheric turbulence are considered. A review of the existing literature on laser propagation in the atmosphere and white noise theory is presented, with a view toward relating the white noise integral and Ito integral approaches. The laser beam intensity is considered as the solution to a random Schroedinger equation, or forward scattering equation. This model is formulated in a Hilbert space context as an abstract bilinear system with a multiplicative white noise input, as in the literature. The model is also modeled in the Banach space of Fresnel class functions to allow the plane wave case and the application of path integrals. Approximate solutions to the Schroedinger equation of the Trotter-Kato product form are shown to converge for each white noise sample path. The product forms are shown to be physical random variables, allowing an Ito integral representation. The corresponding Ito integrals are shown to converge in mean square, providing a white noise basis for the Stratonovich correction term associated with this equation. Product form solutions for Ornstein -Uhlenbeck process inputs were shown to converge in mean square as the input bandwidth was expanded. A digital simulation of laser propagation in strong turbulence was used to study properties of the beam. Empirical distributions for the irradiance function were estimated from simulated data, and the log-normal and Rice-Nakagami distributions predicted by the classical perturbation methods were seen to be inadequate. A gamma distribution fit the simulated irradiance distribution well in the vicinity of the boresight. Statistics of the beam were seen to converge rapidly as the bandwidth of an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process was expanded to its white noise limit. Individual trajectories of the beam were presented to illustrate the distortion and bending of the beam due to turbulence. Feynman path integrals were used to calculate an

  14. Distinct 238U/235U ratios and REE patterns in plutonic and volcanic angrites: Geochronologic implications and evidence for U isotope fractionation during magmatic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, François L. H.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Grove, Timothy L.

    2017-09-01

    Angrites are differentiated meteorites that formed between 4 and 11 Myr after Solar System formation, when several short-lived nuclides (e.g., 26Al-26Mg, 53Mn-53Cr, 182Hf-182W) were still alive. As such, angrites are prime anchors to tie the relative chronology inferred from these short-lived radionuclides to the absolute Pb-Pb clock. The discovery of variable U isotopic composition (at the sub-permil level) calls for a revision of Pb-Pb ages calculated using an ;assumed; constant 238U/235U ratio (i.e., Pb-Pb ages published before 2009-2010). In this paper, we report high-precision U isotope measurement for six angrite samples (NWA 4590, NWA 4801, NWA 6291, Angra dos Reis, D'Orbigny, and Sahara 99555) using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry and the IRMM-3636 U double-spike. The age corrections range from -0.17 to -1.20 Myr depending on the samples. After correction, concordance between the revised Pb-Pb and Hf-W and Mn-Cr ages of plutonic and quenched angrites is good, and the initial (53Mn/55Mn)0 ratio in the Early Solar System (ESS) is recalculated as being (7 ± 1) × 10-6 at the formation of the Solar System (the error bar incorporates uncertainty in the absolute age of Calcium, Aluminum-rich inclusions - CAIs). An uncertainty remains as to whether the Al-Mg and Pb-Pb systems agree in large part due to uncertainties in the Pb-Pb age of CAIs. A systematic difference is found in the U isotopic compositions of quenched and plutonic angrites of +0.17‰. A difference is also found between the rare earth element (REE) patterns of these two angrite subgroups. The δ238U values are consistent with fractionation during magmatic evolution of the angrite parent melt. Stable U isotope fractionation due to a change in the coordination environment of U during incorporation into pyroxene could be responsible for such a fractionation. In this context, Pb-Pb ages derived from pyroxenes fraction should be corrected using the U isotope composition

  15. Effect of processing on phenolic composition of dough and bread fractions made from refined and whole wheat flour of three wheat varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yingjian; Luthria, Devanand; Fuerst, E Patrick; Kiszonas, Alecia M; Yu, Liangli; Morris, Craig F

    2014-10-29

    This study investigated the effect of breadmaking on the assay of phenolic acids from flour, dough, and bread fractions of three whole and refined wheat varieties. Comparison of the efficacy of two commonly used methods for hydrolysis and extraction of phenoilc acids showed that yields of total phenolic acids (TPA) were 5-17% higher among all varieties and flour types when samples were directly hydrolyzed in the presence of ascorbate and EDTA as compared to the method separating free, soluble conjugates and bound, insoluble phenolic acids. Ferulic acid (FA) was the predominant phenolic acid, accounting for means of 59 and 81% of TPA among all refined and whole wheat fractions, respectively. All phenolic acids measured were more abundant in whole wheat than in refined samples. Results indicated that the total quantified phenolic acids did not change significantly when breads were prepared from refined and whole wheat flour. Thus, the potential phytochemical health benefits of total phenolic acids appear to be preserved during bread baking.

  16. Water binding of proteins in the processing frankfurter-type sausages. Part. 1. Water-binding ability of freeze-dried meat fractions containing myofibrillar and stromal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinevetter, L; Gassmann, B; Kroll, J

    1987-01-01

    As soon as possible and 48 h after slaughter respectively, from both blade-bone muscle groups of cattle and pig carcasses the "thick pieces" were excised, extracted, and fractionated. Residues and precipitates from water and salt extracts resulted were freeze-dried, and an improved Baumann capillary suction apparatus was used to measure their water binding capacity (WBC) with and without addition of 2% sodium chloride and/or heating to 80 degrees C. With one exception the WBC results followed a relative pattern demonstrating the final residues (stromal proteins and leavings of myofibrillar proteins) binding the highest amount of added water, precipitates of dialysis (mainly containing myofibrillar proteins) a remarkable amount and powdered meats the least. As scanning electron micrographs confirmed, there were no fibrous structures in the precipitates resulted from dialysis of salt solutions (1.0 mol/1). Heating decreased the spontaneous water uptake of all fractions. Addition of sodium chloride had only a noticeable capillary-suction and swelling effect on unheated samples. Hence swelling of undissolved protein structures (extraction of myosin and possibly of actomyosin) is therefore not the only way for water binding in frankfurter-type sausages.

  17. Study of the conditions of activation and stabilization of Shigella sonnei 47 DNA methylases in the process of fractionation, purification, and during storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchkov, S.V.; Lopatina, N.G.; Arutyunyan, E.E.; Nikol'skaya, I.I.; Debov, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    A comparative investigation was made of the factors of activation and conditions of stabilization of partially purified and individual fractions of DNA methylases of the strain Shigella sonnei 47. The influence of the temperature system, glycerin, albumin, protease inhibitors, divalent metal ions, as well as the conditions of storage at the value of the isoelectric point of the protein on the activity of the enzymes of methylation was studied. It was shown that the effects of activating factors and levels of stabilization differ appreciably, depending on the degree of purification and the composition of the enzyme preparations. It was established that glycerin is ineffective as a stabilizing agent. It was shown that of all the divalent cations studied the only activator universal for the methylases of Shigella sonnei 47 is Ca 2+ ions. A pronounced stabilizing effect of albumin on the activity of these DNA methylases was demonstrated. With the exception of one enzymatic fraction, the protease inhibitors have virtually no effect on the level of methylating activity of the preparations. The phenomenon of spontaneous fluctuations of the methylating activity of Shigella sonnei 47 enzyme preparations during storage is described

  18. Asphalt chemical fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obando P, Klever N.

    1998-01-01

    Asphalt fractionation were carried out in the Esmeraldas Oil Refinery using n-pentane, SiO 2 and different mixture of benzene- methane. The fractions obtained were analyzed by Fourier's Transformed Infrared Spectrophotometry (FTIR)

  19. Research on deeply purifying effluent from uranium mining and metallurgy to remove uranium by ion exchange. Pt.2: Elution uranium from lower loaded uranium resin by the intense fractionation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianguo; Chen Shaoqiang; Qi Jing

    2002-01-01

    Developing macroporous resin for purifying uranium effluent from uranium mining and metallurgy is presented. The Intense Fractionation Process is employed to elute uranium from lower loaded uranium resin by the eluent of sulfuric acid and ammonium sulfate. The result is indicated that the uranium concentration in the rich elutriant is greatly increased, and the rich liquor is only one bed column volume, uranium concentration in the elutriant is increased two times which concentration is 10.1 g/L. The eluent is saved about 50% compared with the conventional fixed bed elution operation. And also the acidity in the rich elutriant is of benefit to the later precipitation process in uranium recovery

  20. Smarandache Continued Fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Ibstedt, H.

    2001-01-01

    The theory of general continued fractions is developed to the extent required in order to calculate Smarandache continued fractions to a given number of decimal places. Proof is given for the fact that Smarandache general continued fractions built with positive integer Smarandache sequences baving only a finite number of terms equal to 1 is convergent. A few numerical results are given.

  1. Evidence for mass-independent and mass-dependent fractionation of the stable isotopes of mercury by natural processes in aquatic ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Togwell A.; Whittle, D. Michael; Evans, Marlene S.; Muir, Derek C.G.

    2008-01-01

    Isotopic and chemical analyses were performed on crustaceans, forage fish, top predator fish, and sediment cores from Lake Ontario and two boreal forest lakes to investigate fractionation of the stable isotopes of Hg in aquatic ecosystems. Multicollector inductively coupled mass spectrometry was used to determine Hg isotope abundances. The Hg isotope data for all three lakes showed mass-independent variation in the organisms but only mass-dependent variation in the sediments. The mass-independent isotope effect was characterised by (1) selective enrichment in isotopes of odd mass number ( 199 Hg and 201 Hg), (2) enrichment in 201 Hg relative to 199 Hg, (3) an inverse relationship between isotopes of odd and even mass number in fish, and (4) a positive correlation with methylHg (CH 3 Hg + ) concentration, and hence with trophic level (although lake whitefish were consistently anomalous, possibly owing to biochemical demethylation). Isotope signatures of species at the same trophic level varied with habitat and diet, differentiating between planktonic and benthic crustaceans and their predators, and between fish that frequent deep, cold water and fish of similar diet that prefer warmer, shallower water, because of corresponding differences in CH 3 Hg + and inorganic Hg content. Isotopic analysis of CH 3 Hg + and inorganic Hg extracted from lake trout proved that the mass-independent isotope effect was due to anomalously high abundances of 199 Hg and 201 Hg in CH 3 Hg + , as implied by the data for whole organisms, suggesting mass-independent fractionation during microbial methylation of Hg. The purely mass-dependent variation in the sediments is attributable to the fact that Hg in sediments is mostly inorganic. The mass-independent fractionation of Hg isotopes can be explained by effects of nuclear spin or nuclear field shift, or both, and penetration of the inner electron shells of Hg by valence electrons of Hg-binding ligands. The results of the research

  2. Effect of Feed Composition Changing at Naphtha Catalytic Reforming Unit Due to Involvement of Gasoline Fraction Obtained by Diesel Fuels Hydrodewaxing into the Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Belinskaya, Natalia Sergeevna; Ivanchina, Emilia Dmitrievna; Ivashkina, Elena Nikolaevna; Frantsina, Evgeniya Vladimirovna; Silko, Galina Yurievna

    2014-01-01

    One of the primary products of hydrodewaxing process is stable gasoline, which is characterized by low octane number on the one hand. On the other hand, it contains a significant amount of iso-paraffins (on average 45% wt.) and naphthenes (on average 25% wt.), which are reagents in the naphtha catalytic reforming process primary reactions. Feasibility of stable gasoline obtained by means of diesel fuel catalytic hydrodewaxing process involving into the processing at the naphtha catalytic refo...

  3. Metallurgical behavior of fine fractions of copper sulfide minerals in a combined process of modified flotation and agitated bio leaching; Respuesta metalurgica de fracciones finas de minerales sulfurados de cobre en un proceso combinado de flotacion modificada y biolixiviacion agitada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez, J. P.; Ipinza, J.; Collao, N.; Ahlborn, G.

    2007-07-01

    The metallurgical behaviour of fine fraction of copper sulfide minerals of Compania Minera Quebrada Blanca S. A. was studied by concentration through flotation in aqueous media modified by alcohol followed by bio leaching of the concentrates. By using a 1% v/v of methanol, the metallurgical recovery of copper reaches 88%, while the iron recovery was 43%, the weight recovery was 18%, which indicates a high selectivity. these concentrates were then bio leached with and without nutrient medium, reaching 80% of copper recovery after 10 and 17 days, respectively. then, it is possible to conclude that this concentration-bio leaching metallurgical process is a promising route for copper recovery from the fine fraction of sulfide minerals. (Author) 24 refs.

  4. Fractional smith chart theory

    KAUST Repository

    Shamim, Atif

    2011-03-01

    For the first time, a generalized Smith chart is introduced here to represent fractional order circuit elements. It is shown that the standard Smith chart is a special case of the generalized fractional order Smith chart. With illustrations drawn for both the conventional integer based lumped elements and the fractional elements, a graphical technique supported by the analytical method is presented to plot impedances on the fractional Smith chart. The concept is then applied towards impedance matching networks, where the fractional approach proves to be much more versatile and results in a single element matching network for a complex load as compared to the two elements in the conventional approach. © 2010 IEEE.

  5. Fractional factorial plans

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Aloke

    2009-01-01

    A one-stop reference to fractional factorials and related orthogonal arrays.Presenting one of the most dynamic areas of statistical research, this book offers a systematic, rigorous, and up-to-date treatment of fractional factorial designs and related combinatorial mathematics. Leading statisticians Aloke Dey and Rahul Mukerjee consolidate vast amounts of material from the professional literature--expertly weaving fractional replication, orthogonal arrays, and optimality aspects. They develop the basic theory of fractional factorials using the calculus of factorial arrangements, thereby providing a unified approach to the study of fractional factorial plans. An indispensable guide for statisticians in research and industry as well as for graduate students, Fractional Factorial Plans features: * Construction procedures of symmetric and asymmetric orthogonal arrays. * Many up-to-date research results on nonexistence. * A chapter on optimal fractional factorials not based on orthogonal arrays. * Trend-free plans...

  6. Fractional Dynamics and Control

    CERN Document Server

    Machado, José; Luo, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Fractional Dynamics and Control provides a comprehensive overview of recent advances in the areas of nonlinear dynamics, vibration and control with analytical, numerical, and experimental results. This book provides an overview of recent discoveries in fractional control, delves into fractional variational principles and differential equations, and applies advanced techniques in fractional calculus to solving complicated mathematical and physical problems.Finally, this book also discusses the role that fractional order modeling can play in complex systems for engineering and science. Discusses how fractional dynamics and control can be used to solve nonlinear science and complexity issues Shows how fractional differential equations and models can be used to solve turbulence and wave equations in mechanics and gravity theories and Schrodinger’s equation  Presents factional relaxation modeling of dielectric materials and wave equations for dielectrics  Develops new methods for control and synchronization of...

  7. The fractional dynamics of quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Longzhao; Yu, Xiangyang

    2018-05-01

    The fractional dynamic process of a quantum system is a novel and complicated problem. The establishment of a fractional dynamic model is a significant attempt that is expected to reveal the mechanism of fractional quantum system. In this paper, a generalized time fractional Schrödinger equation is proposed. To study the fractional dynamics of quantum systems, we take the two-level system as an example and derive the time fractional equations of motion. The basic properties of the system are investigated by solving this set of equations in the absence of light field analytically. Then, when the system is subject to the light field, the equations are solved numerically. It shows that the two-level system described by the time fractional Schrödinger equation we proposed is a confirmable system.

  8. Dividing Fractions: A Pedagogical Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robert

    2016-01-01

    When dividing one fraction by a second fraction, invert, that is, flip the second fraction, then multiply it by the first fraction. To multiply fractions, simply multiply across the denominators, and multiply across the numerators to get the resultant fraction. So by inverting the division of fractions it is turned into an easy multiplication of…

  9. Fractional Order Models of Industrial Pneumatic Controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolhassan Razminia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a new approach for modeling of versatile controllers in industrial automation and process control systems such as pneumatic controllers. Some fractional order dynamical models are developed for pressure and pneumatic systems with bellows-nozzle-flapper configuration. In the light of fractional calculus, a fractional order derivative-derivative (FrDD controller and integral-derivative (FrID are remodeled. Numerical simulations illustrate the application of the obtained theoretical results in simple examples.

  10. Distribution of return point memory states for systems with stochastic inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amann, A; Brokate, M; Rachinskii, D; Temnov, G

    2011-01-01

    We consider the long term effect of stochastic inputs on the state of an open loop system which exhibits the so-called return point memory. An example of such a system is the Preisach model; more generally, systems with the Preisach type input-state relationship, such as in spin-interaction models, are considered. We focus on the characterisation of the expected memory configuration after the system has been effected by the input for sufficiently long period of time. In the case where the input is given by a discrete time random walk process, or the Wiener process, simple closed form expressions for the probability density of the vector of the main input extrema recorded by the memory state, and scaling laws for the dimension of this vector, are derived. If the input is given by a general continuous Markov process, we show that the distribution of previous memory elements can be obtained from a Markov chain scheme which is derived from the solution of an associated one-dimensional escape type problem. Formulas for transition probabilities defining this Markov chain scheme are presented. Moreover, explicit formulas for the conditional probability densities of previous main extrema are obtained for the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck input process. The analytical results are confirmed by numerical experiments.

  11. [Effectiveness of a micronized purified flavonoid fraction (MPFF) in the healing process of lower limb ulcers. An open multicentre study, controlled and randomized].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinski, W; Chodynicka, B; Roszkiewicz, J; Bogdanowski, T; Lecewicz-Torun, B; Kaszuba, A; Bowszyc, J; Nowak, A; Wnorowski, J; Wasik, F; Glinska-Ferenz, M; Blaszczyk, M; Strzyga, P; Pachocki, R

    2001-04-01

    To determine the increase in healing rate of venous ulcer in patients receiving a micronised purified flavonoid fraction (MPFF) as supplementation to standard local care. A randomised, open, controlled, multicentre study. Departments of Dermatology and University Outpatients Clinics. One hundred and forty patients with chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers. PATIENTS received standard compressive therapy plus external treatment alone or 2 tablets of MPFF daily in addition to the above treatment for 24 weeks. Healing of ulcers and their reduction in size after 24 weeks of treatment. The percentage of patients whose ulcers healed completely was found to be markedly higher in those receiving MPFF in addition to standard external and compressive treatment than in those treated with conventional therapy alone (46.5% vs 27.5%; p<0.05. OR=2.3, 95% CI 1.1-4.6). Ulcers with diameters <3 cm were cured in 71% of patients in the MPFF group and in 50% of patients in the control group, whereas ulcers between 3 and 6 cm in diameter were cured in 60% and 32% of patients (p<0.05), respectively. The mean reduction in ulcer size was also found to be greater in patients treated with MPFF (80%) than in the control group (65%) (p<0.05). The cost-effectiveness ratio (cost per healed ulcer) in the MPFF group was 1026.2 compared with 1871.8 in the control group. These results indicate that MPFF significantly improves the cure rate in patients with chronic venous insufficiency.

  12. Determination of mercury and its fractionation products in samples from legacy use of mercury amalgam in gold processing in Randfontein, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshia Malehase

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at determining the levels of total mercury (THg in tailings dams, soil, sediments and water samples collected in the vicinity of legacy mercury amalgam gold mines. Acid digestion was employed in sample digestion followed by analysis using CVAAS. Tailings dams, community and garden soil, and stream sediments were further investigated for mercury fractions using a five step sequential extraction procedure. The concentrations of THg in tailings dams, community and gardens soil were 0.890–6.755 μg/g, 0.431–0.968 μg/g and 0.471–1.019 μg/g, respectively and the concentrations of THg in the sediments obtained from tailings dams, streams and wetlands were 0.649–1.998 μg/g, 0.604–1.356 μg/g and 0.681–1.356 μg/g, respectively. The concentrations of THg, in aqueous samples obtained from tailings, streams and wetlands were 0.032–0.070 μg/l, 0.004–0.068 μg/l and 0.007–0.012 μg/l, respectively. The sequential extraction procedure showed that most Hg in the tailings dams was largely elemental Hg and Hg bound to sulphur. Soil and sediments were largely dominated by organic bound Hg. Moderate seasonal correlation was observed in tailings dams soil, but weak seasonal correlation in soils collected in the vicinity of tailings. However, a strong seasonal correlation was observed in sediments and water samples. The concentrations of Hg obtained largely existed in organic and sulphate bound Hg and there is elevated potential to methylate Hg.

  13. Environmental impact of rejected materials generated in organic fraction of municipal solid waste anaerobic digestion plants: Comparison of wet and dry process layout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colazo, Ana-Belén; Sánchez, Antoni; Font, Xavier; Colón, Joan

    2015-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion of source separated organic fraction of municipal solid waste is an increasing waste valorization alternative instead of incineration or landfilling of untreated biodegradable wastes. Nevertheless, a significant portion of biodegradable wastes entering the plant is lost in pre-treatments and post-treatments of anaerobic digestion facilities together with other improper materials such as plastics, paper, textile materials and metals. The rejected materials lost in these stages have two main implications: (i) less organic material enters to digesters and, as a consequence, there is a loss of biogas production and (ii) the rejected materials end up in landfills or incinerators contributing to environmental impacts such as global warming or eutrophication. The main goals of this study are (i) to estimate potential losses of biogas in the rejected solid materials generated during the pre- and post-treatments of two full-scale anaerobic digestion facilities and (ii) to evaluate the environmental burdens associated to the final disposal (landfill or incineration) of these rejected materials by means of Life Cycle Assessment. This study shows that there is a lost of potential biogas production, ranging from 8% to 15%, due to the loss of organic matter during pre-treatment stages in anaerobic digestion facilities. From an environmental point of view, the Life Cycle Assessment shows that the incineration scenario is the most favorable alternative for eight out of nine impact categories compared with the landfill scenario. The studied impact categories are Climate Change, Fossil depletion, Freshwater eutrophication, Marine eutrophication, Ozone depletion, Particulate matter formation, Photochemical oxidant formation, Terrestrial acidification and Water depletion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fractional distillation of oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, L D

    1931-10-31

    A method of dividing oil into lubricating oil fractions without substantial cracking by introducing the oil in a heated state into a fractionating column from which oil fractions having different boiling points are withdrawn at different levels, while reflux liquid is supplied to the top of the column, and additional heat is introduced into the column by contacting with the oil therein a heated fluid of higher monlecular weight than water and less susceptible to thermal decomposition than is the highest boiling oil fraction resulting from the distillation, or of which any products produced by thermal decomposition will not occur in the highest boiling distillate withdrawn from the column.

  15. The Beta Cell in Its Cluster: Stochastic Graphs of Beta Cell Connectivity in the Islets of Langerhans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A Striegel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic islets of Langerhans consist of endocrine cells, primarily α, β and δ cells, which secrete glucagon, insulin, and somatostatin, respectively, to regulate plasma glucose. β cells form irregular locally connected clusters within islets that act in concert to secrete insulin upon glucose stimulation. Due to the central functional significance of this local connectivity in the placement of β cells in an islet, it is important to characterize it quantitatively. However, quantification of the seemingly stochastic cytoarchitecture of β cells in an islet requires mathematical methods that can capture topological connectivity in the entire β-cell population in an islet. Graph theory provides such a framework. Using large-scale imaging data for thousands of islets containing hundreds of thousands of cells in human organ donor pancreata, we show that quantitative graph characteristics differ between control and type 2 diabetic islets. Further insight into the processes that shape and maintain this architecture is obtained by formulating a stochastic theory of β-cell rearrangement in whole islets, just as the normal equilibrium distribution of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process can be viewed as the result of the interplay between a random walk and a linear restoring force. Requiring that rearrangements maintain the observed quantitative topological graph characteristics strongly constrained possible processes. Our results suggest that β-cell rearrangement is dependent on its connectivity in order to maintain an optimal cluster size in both normal and T2D islets.

  16. The Beta Cell in Its Cluster: Stochastic Graphs of Beta Cell Connectivity in the Islets of Langerhans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegel, Deborah A; Hara, Manami; Periwal, Vipul

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic islets of Langerhans consist of endocrine cells, primarily α, β and δ cells, which secrete glucagon, insulin, and somatostatin, respectively, to regulate plasma glucose. β cells form irregular locally connected clusters within islets that act in concert to secrete insulin upon glucose stimulation. Due to the central functional significance of this local connectivity in the placement of β cells in an islet, it is important to characterize it quantitatively. However, quantification of the seemingly stochastic cytoarchitecture of β cells in an islet requires mathematical methods that can capture topological connectivity in the entire β-cell population in an islet. Graph theory provides such a framework. Using large-scale imaging data for thousands of islets containing hundreds of thousands of cells in human organ donor pancreata, we show that quantitative graph characteristics differ between control and type 2 diabetic islets. Further insight into the processes that shape and maintain this architecture is obtained by formulating a stochastic theory of β-cell rearrangement in whole islets, just as the normal equilibrium distribution of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process can be viewed as the result of the interplay between a random walk and a linear restoring force. Requiring that rearrangements maintain the observed quantitative topological graph characteristics strongly constrained possible processes. Our results suggest that β-cell rearrangement is dependent on its connectivity in order to maintain an optimal cluster size in both normal and T2D islets.

  17. HMM filtering and parameter estimation of an electricity spot price model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlwein, Christina; Benth, Fred Espen; Mamon, Rogemar

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we develop a model for electricity spot price dynamics. The spot price is assumed to follow an exponential Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) process with an added compound Poisson process. In this way, the model allows for mean-reversion and possible jumps. All parameters are modulated by a hidden Markov chain in discrete time. They are able to switch between different economic regimes representing the interaction of various factors. Through the application of reference probability technique, adaptive filters are derived, which in turn, provide optimal estimates for the state of the Markov chain and related quantities of the observation process. The EM algorithm is applied to find optimal estimates of the model parameters in terms of the recursive filters. We implement this self-calibrating model on a deseasonalised series of daily spot electricity prices from the Nordic exchange Nord Pool. On the basis of one-step ahead forecasts, we found that the model is able to capture the empirical characteristics of Nord Pool spot prices. (author)

  18. Level crossings and excess times due to a superposition of uncorrelated exponential pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorsen, A.; Garcia, O. E.

    2018-01-01

    A well-known stochastic model for intermittent fluctuations in physical systems is investigated. The model is given by a superposition of uncorrelated exponential pulses, and the degree of pulse overlap is interpreted as an intermittency parameter. Expressions for excess time statistics, that is, the rate of level crossings above a given threshold and the average time spent above the threshold, are derived from the joint distribution of the process and its derivative. Limits of both high and low intermittency are investigated and compared to previously known results. In the case of a strongly intermittent process, the distribution of times spent above threshold is obtained analytically. This expression is verified numerically, and the distribution of times above threshold is explored for other intermittency regimes. The numerical simulations compare favorably to known results for the distribution of times above the mean threshold for an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. This contribution generalizes the excess time statistics for the stochastic model, which find applications in a wide diversity of natural and technological systems.

  19. Some classes of multivariate infinitely divisible distributions admitting stochastic integral representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Maejima, M.; Sato, K.

    2006-01-01

    The class of distributions on R generated by convolutions of Γ-distributions and the class generated by convolutions of mixtures of exponential distributions are generalized to higher dimensions and denoted by T(Rd) and B(Rd) . From the Lévy process {Xt(μ)} on Rd with distribution μ at t=1, Υ...... divisible distributions and of self-decomposable distributions on Rd , respectively. The relations with the mapping Φ from μ to the distribution at each time of the stationary process of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck type with background driving Lévy process {Xt(μ)} are studied. Developments of these results......(μ) is defined as the distribution of the stochastic integral ∫01log(1/t)dXt(μ) . This mapping is a generalization of the mapping Υ introduced by Barndorff-Nielsen and Thorbjørnsen in one dimension. It is proved that ϒ(ID(Rd))=B(Rd) and ϒ(L(Rd))=T(Rd) , where ID(Rd) and L(Rd) are the classes of infinitely...

  20. Coupling regularizes individual units in noisy populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ly Cheng; Ermentrout, G. Bard

    2010-01-01

    The regularity of a noisy system can modulate in various ways. It is well known that coupling in a population can lower the variability of the entire network; the collective activity is more regular. Here, we show that diffusive (reciprocal) coupling of two simple Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) processes can regularize the individual, even when it is coupled to a noisier process. In cellular networks, the regularity of individual cells is important when a select few play a significant role. The regularizing effect of coupling surprisingly applies also to general nonlinear noisy oscillators. However, unlike with the O-U process, coupling-induced regularity is robust to different kinds of coupling. With two coupled noisy oscillators, we derive an asymptotic formula assuming weak noise and coupling for the variance of the period (i.e., spike times) that accurately captures this effect. Moreover, we find that reciprocal coupling can regularize the individual period of higher dimensional oscillators such as the Morris-Lecar and Brusselator models, even when coupled to noisier oscillators. Coupling can have a counterintuitive and beneficial effect on noisy systems. These results have implications for the role of connectivity with noisy oscillators and the modulation of variability of individual oscillators.

  1. An Appetite for Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Trena L.; Bryan, Tommy; Curry, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how using candy bars as models gives sixth-grade students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve. Using paper models of the candy bars, students explored and compared fractions. They noticed fewer different representations for one-third than for one-half. The authors conclude…

  2. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems (Empson…

  3. Equivalence of interest rate models and lattice gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjol, Dan

    2012-04-01

    We consider the class of short rate interest rate models for which the short rate is proportional to the exponential of a Gaussian Markov process x(t) in the terminal measure r(t)=a(t)exp[x(t)]. These models include the Black-Derman-Toy and Black-Karasinski models in the terminal measure. We show that such interest rate models are equivalent to lattice gases with attractive two-body interaction, V(t(1),t(2))=-Cov[x(t(1)),x(t(2))]. We consider in some detail the Black-Karasinski model with x(t) as an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, and show that it is similar to a lattice gas model considered by Kac and Helfand, with attractive long-range two-body interactions, V(x,y)=-α(e(-γ|x-y|)-e(-γ(x+y))). An explicit solution for the model is given as a sum over the states of the lattice gas, which is used to show that the model has a phase transition similar to that found previously in the Black-Derman-Toy model in the terminal measure.

  4. Bilayer graphene lattice-layer entanglement in the presence of non-Markovian phase noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Victor A. S. V.; Blasone, Massimo; Bernardini, Alex E.

    2018-03-01

    The evolution of single particle excitations of bilayer graphene under effects of non-Markovian noise is described with focus on the decoherence process of lattice-layer (LL) maximally entangled states. Once the noiseless dynamics of an arbitrary initial state is identified by the correspondence between the tight-binding Hamiltonian for the AB-stacked bilayer graphene and the Dirac equation—which includes pseudovectorlike and tensorlike field interactions—the noisy environment is described as random fluctuations on bias voltage and mass terms. The inclusion of noisy dynamics reproduces the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes: A non-Markovian noise model with a well-defined Markovian limit. Considering that an initial amount of entanglement shall be dissipated by the noise, two profiles of dissipation are identified. On one hand, for eigenstates of the noiseless Hamiltonian, deaths and revivals of entanglement are identified along the oscillation pattern for long interaction periods. On the other hand, for departing LL Werner and Cat states, the entanglement is suppressed although, for both cases, some identified memory effects compete with the pure noise-induced decoherence in order to preserve the the overall profile of a given initial state.

  5. On the distribution of interspecies correlation for Markov models of character evolution on Yule trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Willem H; Crawford, Forrest W

    2015-01-07

    Efforts to reconstruct phylogenetic trees and understand evolutionary processes depend fundamentally on stochastic models of speciation and mutation. The simplest continuous-time model for speciation in phylogenetic trees is the Yule process, in which new species are "born" from existing lineages at a constant rate. Recent work has illuminated some of the structural properties of Yule trees, but it remains mostly unknown how these properties affect sequence and trait patterns observed at the tips of the phylogenetic tree. Understanding the interplay between speciation and mutation under simple models of evolution is essential for deriving valid phylogenetic inference methods and gives insight into the optimal design of phylogenetic studies. In this work, we derive the probability distribution of interspecies covariance under Brownian motion and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models of phenotypic change on a Yule tree. We compute the probability distribution of the number of mutations shared between two randomly chosen taxa in a Yule tree under discrete Markov mutation models. Our results suggest summary measures of phylogenetic information content, illuminate the correlation between site patterns in sequences or traits of related organisms, and provide heuristics for experimental design and reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Framework based on communicability and flow to analyze complex network dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, M.; Kouvaris, N. E.; Deco, G.; Zamora-López, G.

    2018-05-01

    Graph theory constitutes a widely used and established field providing powerful tools for the characterization of complex networks. The intricate topology of networks can also be investigated by means of the collective dynamics observed in the interactions of self-sustained oscillations (synchronization patterns) or propagationlike processes such as random walks. However, networks are often inferred from real-data-forming dynamic systems, which are different from those employed to reveal their topological characteristics. This stresses the necessity for a theoretical framework dedicated to the mutual relationship between the structure and dynamics in complex networks, as the two sides of the same coin. Here we propose a rigorous framework based on the network response over time (i.e., Green function) to study interactions between nodes across time. For this purpose we define the flow that describes the interplay between the network connectivity and external inputs. This multivariate measure relates to the concepts of graph communicability and the map equation. We illustrate our theory using the multivariate Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, which describes stable and non-conservative dynamics, but the formalism can be adapted to other local dynamics for which the Green function is known. We provide applications to classical network examples, such as small-world ring and hierarchical networks. Our theory defines a comprehensive framework that is canonically related to directed and weighted networks, thus paving a way to revise the standards for network analysis, from the pairwise interactions between nodes to the global properties of networks including community detection.

  7. Front Propagation in Stochastic Neural Fields

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the effects of extrinsic multiplicative noise on front propagation in a scalar neural field with excitatory connections. Using a separation of time scales, we represent the fluctuating front in terms of a diffusive-like displacement (wandering) of the front from its uniformly translating position at long time scales, and fluctuations in the front profile around its instantaneous position at short time scales. One major result of our analysis is a comparison between freely propagating fronts and fronts locked to an externally moving stimulus. We show that the latter are much more robust to noise, since the stochastic wandering of the mean front profile is described by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process rather than a Wiener process, so that the variance in front position saturates in the long time limit rather than increasing linearly with time. Finally, we consider a stochastic neural field that supports a pulled front in the deterministic limit, and show that the wandering of such a front is now subdiffusive. © 2012 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  8. Fractional bosonic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Victor Alfonzo; Giusti, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a simple generalization of bosonic string theory in the framework of the theory of fractional variational problems. Specifically, we present a fractional extension of the Polyakov action, for which we compute the general form of the equations of motion and discuss the connection between the new fractional action and a generalization the Nambu-Goto action. Consequently, we analyze the symmetries of the modified Polyakov action and try to fix the gauge, following the classical procedures. Then we solve the equations of motion in a simplified setting. Finally, we present a Hamiltonian description of the classical fractional bosonic string and introduce the fractional light-cone gauge. It is important to remark that, throughout the whole paper, we thoroughly discuss how to recover the known results as an "integer" limit of the presented model.

  9. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Biofuels: Algal Biomass Fractionation to Lipid- and Carbohydrate-Derived Fuel Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.; Kinchin, C.; Markham, J.; Tan, E.; Laurens, L.; Sexton, D.; Knorr, D.; Schoen, P.; Lukas, J.

    2014-09-01

    Beginning in 2013, NREL began transitioning from the singular focus on ethanol to a broad slate of products and conversion pathways, ultimately to establish similar benchmarking and targeting efforts. One of these pathways is the conversion of algal biomass to fuels via extraction of lipids (and potentially other components), termed the 'algal lipid upgrading' or ALU pathway. This report describes in detail one potential ALU approach based on a biochemical processing strategy to selectively recover and convert select algal biomass components to fuels, namely carbohydrates to ethanol and lipids to a renewable diesel blendstock (RDB) product. The overarching process design converts algal biomass delivered from upstream cultivation and dewatering (outside the present scope) to ethanol, RDB, and minor coproducts, using dilute-acid pretreatment, fermentation, lipid extraction, and hydrotreating.

  10. Mechanical-biological waste treatment with thermal processing of partial fractions; Mechanisch-biologische Restabfallbehandlung unter Einbindung thermischer Verfahren fuer Teilfraktionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Technologies for mechanical-biological treatment of waste in the Land of Hessen were compared including thermal processes like combustion and gasification. The new and more rigid limiting values specified in the Technical Guide for Municipal Waste Treatment (Technische Anleitung Siedlungsabfall - TASI) get a special mention. [Deutsch] Verschiedene Technologien der mechanisch-biologischen Restabfallbehandlung im Raum Hessen wurden unter Einbezug thermischer Verfahren (Verbrennung, Vergasung) miteinander verglichen. Dabei wurden besonders auf die verschaerften Grenzwerte der Technischen Anleitung Siedlungsabfall (TASI) eingegangen. (ABI)

  11. On fractal space-time and fractional calculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Yue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives an explanation of fractional calculus in fractal space-time. On observable scales, continuum models can be used, however, when the scale tends to a smaller threshold, a fractional model has to be adopted to describe phenomena in micro/nano structure. A time-fractional Fornberg-Whitham equation is used as an example to elucidate the physical meaning of the fractional order, and its solution process is given by the fractional complex transform.

  12. Distributed-order fractional diffusions on bounded domains

    OpenAIRE

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Nane, Erkan; Vellaisamy, P.

    2011-01-01

    In a fractional Cauchy problem, the usual first order time derivative is replaced by a fractional derivative. The fractional derivative models time delays in a diffusion process. The order of the fractional derivative can be distributed over the unit interval, to model a mixture of delay sources. In this paper, we provide explicit strong solutions and stochastic analogues for distributed-order fractional Cauchy problems on bounded domains with Dirichlet boundary conditions. Stochastic solutio...

  13. Empirical validation of the triple-code model of numerical processing for complex math operations using functional MRI and group Independent Component Analysis of the mental addition and subtraction of fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmithorst, Vincent J; Brown, Rhonda Douglas

    2004-07-01

    The suitability of a previously hypothesized triple-code model of numerical processing, involving analog magnitude, auditory verbal, and visual Arabic codes of representation, was investigated for the complex mathematical task of the mental addition and subtraction of fractions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from 15 normal adult subjects were processed using exploratory group Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Separate task-related components were found with activation in bilateral inferior parietal, left perisylvian, and ventral occipitotemporal areas. These results support the hypothesized triple-code model corresponding to the activated regions found in the individual components and indicate that the triple-code model may be a suitable framework for analyzing the neuropsychological bases of the performance of complex mathematical tasks. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  14. Iteration of Aitken's Δ2 Process as an alternative to Pade approximants and the problem of using rational fractions to parameterize experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRae, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that iterating Aitken's Δ 2 process, or equivalently Shanks' ε algorithm on the partial sums of a Taylor series can lead to a dramatic convergence of the series. This method is compared to the standard technique of accelerating the convergence of series by constructing Pade Approximants. Also, the problem of determining Taylor expansion coefficients from experimental data fitted to Pade Approximants is reviewed, and it is suggested that a method based on this iteration scheme may be better. (author). 6 refs., 1 fig

  15. Microfluidic Devices for Blood Fractionation

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Han Wei; Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Lee, Wong Cheng J.; Huang, Sha; Han, Jongyoon; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2011-01-01

    Blood, a complex biological fluid, comprises 45% cellular components suspended in protein rich plasma. These different hematologic components perform distinct functions in vivo and thus the ability to efficiently fractionate blood into its individual components has innumerable applications in both clinical diagnosis and biological research. Yet, processing blood is not trivial. In the past decade, a flurry of new microfluidic based technologies has emerged to address this compelling problem. ...

  16. Dynamic analysis of trapping and escaping in dual beam optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenqiang; Hu, Huizhu; Su, Heming; Li, Zhenggang; Shen, Yu

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we simulate the dynamic movement of a dielectric sphere in optical trap. This dynamic analysis can be used to calibrate optical forces, increase trapping efficiency and measure viscous coefficient of surrounding medium. Since an accurate dynamic analysis is based on a detailed force calculation, we calculate all forces a sphere receives. We get the forces of dual-beam gradient radiation pressure on a micron-sized dielectric sphere in the ray optics regime and utilize Einstein-Ornstein-Uhlenbeck to deal with its Brownian motion forces. Hydrodynamic viscous force also exists when the sphere moves in liquid. Forces from buoyance and gravity are also taken into consideration. Then we simulate trajectory of a sphere when it is subject to all these forces in a dual optical trap. From our dynamic analysis, the sphere can be trapped at an equilibrium point in static water, although it permanently fluctuates around the equilibrium point due to thermal effects. We go a step further to analyze the effects of misalignment of two optical traps. Trapping and escaping phenomena of the sphere in flowing water are also simulated. In flowing water, the sphere is dragged away from the equilibrium point. This dragging distance increases with the decrease of optical power, which results in escaping of the sphere with optical power below a threshold. In both trapping and escaping process we calculate the forces and position of the sphere. Finally, we analyze a trapping region in dual optical tweezers.

  17. Effective equilibrium states in the colored-noise model for active matter I. Pairwise forces in the Fox and unified colored noise approximations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, René; Maggi, C.; Sharma, A.; Scacchi, A.; Brader, J. M.; Marini Bettolo Marconi, U.

    2017-11-01

    The equations of motion of active systems can be modeled in terms of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes (OUPs) with appropriate correlators. For further theoretical studies, these should be approximated to yield a Markovian picture for the dynamics and a simplified steady-state condition. We perform a comparative study of the unified colored noise approximation (UCNA) and the approximation scheme by Fox recently employed within this context. We review the approximations necessary to define effective interaction potentials in the low-density limit and study the conditions for which these represent the behavior observed in two-body simulations for the OUPs model and active Brownian particles. The demonstrated limitations of the theory for potentials with a negative slope or curvature can be qualitatively corrected by a new empirical modification. In general, we find that in the presence of translational white noise the Fox approach is more accurate. Finally, we examine an alternative way to define a force-balance condition in the limit of small activity.

  18. Potential and flux field landscape theory. II. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics of spatially inhomogeneous stochastic dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    We have established a general non-equilibrium thermodynamic formalism consistently applicable to both spatially homogeneous and, more importantly, spatially inhomogeneous systems, governed by the Langevin and Fokker-Planck stochastic dynamics with multiple state transition mechanisms, using the potential-flux landscape framework as a bridge connecting stochastic dynamics with non-equilibrium thermodynamics. A set of non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations, quantifying the relations of the non-equilibrium entropy, entropy flow, entropy production, and other thermodynamic quantities, together with their specific expressions, is constructed from a set of dynamical decomposition equations associated with the potential-flux landscape framework. The flux velocity plays a pivotal role on both the dynamic and thermodynamic levels. On the dynamic level, it represents a dynamic force breaking detailed balance, entailing the dynamical decomposition equations. On the thermodynamic level, it represents a thermodynamic force generating entropy production, manifested in the non-equilibrium thermodynamic equations. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process and more specific examples, the spatial stochastic neuronal model, in particular, are studied to test and illustrate the general theory. This theoretical framework is particularly suitable to study the non-equilibrium (thermo)dynamics of spatially inhomogeneous systems abundant in nature. This paper is the second of a series

  19. Adaptive evolution in locomotor performance: How selective pressures and functional relationships produce diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Jeffrey A; Butler, Marguerite A

    2016-01-01

    Despite the complexity of nature, most comparative studies of phenotypic evolution consider selective pressures in isolation. When competing pressures operate on the same system, it is commonly expected that trade-offs will occur that will limit the evolution of phenotypic diversity, however, it is possible that interactions among selective pressures may promote diversity instead. We explored the evolution of locomotor performance in lizards in relation to possible selective pressures using the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Here, we show that a combination of selection based on foraging mode and predator escape is required to explain variation in performance phenotypes. Surprisingly, habitat use contributed little explanatory power. We find that it is possible to evolve very different abilities in performance which were previously thought to be tightly correlated, supporting a growing literature that explores the many-to-one mapping of morphological design. Although we generally find the expected trade-off between maximal exertion and speed, this relationship surprisingly disappears when species experience selection for both performance types. We conclude that functional integration need not limit adaptive potential, and that an integrative approach considering multiple major influences on a phenotype allows a more complete understanding of adaptation and the evolution of diversity. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  20. The best of both worlds: Phylogenetic eigenvector regression and mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alexandre Felizola Diniz Filho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Eigenfunction analyses have been widely used to model patterns of autocorrelation in time, space and phylogeny. In a phylogenetic context, Diniz-Filho et al. (1998 proposed what they called Phylogenetic Eigenvector Regression (PVR, in which pairwise phylogenetic distances among species are submitted to a Principal Coordinate Analysis, and eigenvectors are then used as explanatory variables in regression, correlation or ANOVAs. More recently, a new approach called Phylogenetic Eigenvector Mapping (PEM was proposed, with the main advantage of explicitly incorporating a model-based warping in phylogenetic distance in which an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U process is fitted to data before eigenvector extraction. Here we compared PVR and PEM in respect to estimated phylogenetic signal, correlated evolution under alternative evolutionary models and phylogenetic imputation, using simulated data. Despite similarity between the two approaches, PEM has a slightly higher prediction ability and is more general than the original PVR. Even so, in a conceptual sense, PEM may provide a technique in the best of both worlds, combining the flexibility of data-driven and empirical eigenfunction analyses and the sounding insights provided by evolutionary models well known in comparative analyses.

  1. Geometric capture and escape of a microswimmer colliding with an obstacle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolie, Saverio E; Moreno-Flores, Gregorio R; Bartolo, Denis; Lauga, Eric

    2015-05-07

    Motivated by recent experiments, we consider the hydrodynamic capture of a microswimmer near a stationary spherical obstacle. Simulations of model equations show that a swimmer approaching a small spherical colloid is simply scattered. In contrast, when the colloid is larger than a critical size it acts as a passive trap: the swimmer is hydrodynamically captured along closed trajectories and endlessly orbits around the colloidal sphere. In order to gain physical insight into this hydrodynamic scattering problem, we address it analytically. We provide expressions for the critical trapping radius, the depth of the "basin of attraction," and the scattering angle, which show excellent agreement with our numerical findings. We also demonstrate and rationalize the strong impact of swimming-flow symmetries on the trapping efficiency. Finally, we give the swimmer an opportunity to escape the colloidal traps by considering the effects of Brownian, or active, diffusion. We show that in some cases the trapping time is governed by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, which results in a trapping time distribution that is well-approximated as inverse-Gaussian. The predictions again compare very favorably with the numerical simulations. We envision applications of the theory to bioremediation, microorganism sorting techniques, and the study of bacterial populations in heterogeneous or porous environments.

  2. Dynamic Looping of a Free-Draining Polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Felix X. -F.; Stinis, Panos; Qian, Hong

    2018-01-11

    Here, we revisit the celebrated Wilemski--Fixman (WF) treatment for the looping time of a free-draining polymer. The WF theory introduces a sink term into the Fokker--Planck equation for the $3(N+1)$-dimensional Ornstein--Uhlenbeck process of polymer dynamics, which accounts for the appropriate boundary condition due to the formation of a loop. The assumption for WF theory is considerably relaxed. A perturbation method approach is developed that justifies and generalizes the previous results using either a delta sink or a Heaviside sink. For both types of sinks, we show that under the condition of a small dimensionless $\\epsilon$, the ratio of capture radius to the Kuhn length, we are able to systematically produce all known analytical and asymptotic results obtained by other methods. This includes most notably the transition regime between the $N^2$ scaling of Doi, and $N\\sqrt{N}/\\epsilon$ scaling of Szabo, Schulten, and Schulten. The mathematical issue at play is the nonuniform convergence of $\\epsilon\\to 0$ and $N\\to\\infty$, the latter being an inherent part of the theory of a Gaussian polymer. Our analysis yields a novel term in the analytical expression for the looping time with small $\\epsilon$, which was previously unknown. Monte Carlo numerical simulations corroborate the analytical findings. The systematic method developed here can be applied to other systems modeled by multidimensional Smoluchowski equations.

  3. LNG as a strategy to establish developing countries' gas markets: The Brazilian case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberto Rechelo Neto, Carlos; Sauer, Ildo Luis

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to evaluate, from a Brazilian case study, if the natural gas trade can be viewed as a good opportunity for developing countries located geographically close to Western Europe and North America gas markets. Initially, the paper presents an overview of the Brazilian natural gas industry and evaluates the balance between supply and demand in each main region of Brazil. Then, it analyzes the evolution of the international gas trade, which is expected to increase rapidly (LNG particularly). Finally, the paper analyses the financial viability of the Brazilian LNG project in a context of high volatility of natural gas prices in the international market. To take this uncertainty into account, North-American natural gas prices are modelled according to the ORNSTEIN-UHLENBECK process (with EIA data over the period 1985-2003). By using an approach based on Monte-Carlo simulations and under the assumption that imports are guaranteed since the North American gas price would be higher than the breakeven of the Brazilian project, the model aims to test the hypothesis that export can promote the development of the Brazilian Northeastern gas market. LNG project is here compared to the Petrobras pipelines project, which is considered as the immediate solution for the Northeastern gas shortage. As a conclusion, this study shows that the LNG export will be vulnerable to the risks associated to the natural gas prices volatility observed on the international market

  4. Simplified rotor load models and fatigue damage estimates for offshore wind turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskulus, M

    2015-02-28

    The aim of rotor load models is to characterize and generate the thrust loads acting on an offshore wind turbine. Ideally, the rotor simulation can be replaced by time series from a model with a few parameters and state variables only. Such models are used extensively in control system design and, as a potentially new application area, structural optimization of support structures. Different rotor load models are here evaluated for a jacket support structure in terms of fatigue lifetimes of relevant structural variables. All models were found to be lacking in accuracy, with differences of more than 20% in fatigue load estimates. The most accurate models were the use of an effective thrust coefficient determined from a regression analysis of dynamic thrust loads, and a novel stochastic model in state-space form. The stochastic model explicitly models the quasi-periodic components obtained from rotational sampling of turbulent fluctuations. Its state variables follow a mean-reverting Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Although promising, more work is needed on how to determine the parameters of the stochastic model and before accurate lifetime predictions can be obtained without comprehensive rotor simulations. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Stochastic particle acceleration and statistical closures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimits, A.M.; Krommes, J.A.

    1985-10-01

    In a recent paper, Maasjost and Elsasser (ME) concluded, from the results of numerical experiments and heuristic arguments, that the Bourret and the direct-interaction approximation (DIA) are ''of no use in connection with the stochastic acceleration problem'' because (1) their predictions were equivalent to that of the simpler Fokker-Planck (FP) theory, and (2) either all or none of the closures were in good agreement with the data. Here some analytically tractable cases are studied and used to test the accuracy of these closures. The cause of the discrepancy (2) is found to be the highly non-Gaussian nature of the force used by ME, a point not stressed by them. For the case where the force is a position-independent Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (i.e., Gaussian) process, an effective Kubo number K can be defined. For K << 1 an FP description is adequate, and conclusion (1) of ME follows; however, for K greater than or equal to 1 the DIA behaves much better qualitatively than the other two closures. For the non-Gaussian stochastic force used by ME, all common approximations fail, in agreement with (2)

  6. Linear response and correlation of a self-propelled particle in the presence of external fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprini, Lorenzo; Marini Bettolo Marconi, Umberto; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2018-03-01

    We study the non-equilibrium properties of non interacting active Ornstein-Uhlenbeck particles (AOUP) subject to an external nonuniform field using a Fokker-Planck approach with a focus on the linear response and time-correlation functions. In particular, we compare different methods to compute these functions including the unified colored noise approximation (UCNA). The AOUP model, described by the position of the particle and the active force acting on it, is usually mapped into a Markovian process, describing the motion of a fictitious passive particle in terms of its position and velocity, where the effect of the activity is transferred into a position-dependent friction. We show that the form of the response function of the AOUP depends on whether we put the perturbation on the position and keep unperturbed the active force in the original variables or perturb the position and maintain unperturbed the velocity in the transformed variables. Indeed, as a result of the change of variables the perturbation on the position becomes a perturbation both on the position and on the fictitious velocity. We test these predictions by considering the response for three types of convex potentials: quadratic, quartic and double-well potential. Moreover, by comparing the response of the AOUP model with the corresponding response of the UCNA model we conclude that although the stationary properties are fairly well approximated by the UCNA, the non equilibrium properties are not, an effect which is not negligible when the persistence time is large.

  7. A Fractionally Integrated Wishart Stochastic Volatility Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Asai (Manabu); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThere has recently been growing interest in modeling and estimating alternative continuous time multivariate stochastic volatility models. We propose a continuous time fractionally integrated Wishart stochastic volatility (FIWSV) process. We derive the conditional Laplace transform of

  8. Regularized Fractional Power Parameters for Image Denoising Based on Convex Solution of Fractional Heat Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid A. Jalab

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interest in using fractional mask operators based on fractional calculus operators has grown for image denoising. Denoising is one of the most fundamental image restoration problems in computer vision and image processing. This paper proposes an image denoising algorithm based on convex solution of fractional heat equation with regularized fractional power parameters. The performances of the proposed algorithms were evaluated by computing the PSNR, using different types of images. Experiments according to visual perception and the peak signal to noise ratio values show that the improvements in the denoising process are competent with the standard Gaussian filter and Wiener filter.

  9. Fractional Order Generalized Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tenreiro Machado

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper formulates a novel expression for entropy inspired in the properties of Fractional Calculus. The characteristics of the generalized fractional entropy are tested both in standard probability distributions and real world data series. The results reveal that tuning the fractional order allow an high sensitivity to the signal evolution, which is useful in describing the dynamics of complex systems. The concepts are also extended to relative distances and tested with several sets of data, confirming the goodness of the generalization.

  10. Fractional finite Fourier transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Kedar; George, Nicholas

    2004-07-01

    We show that a fractional version of the finite Fourier transform may be defined by using prolate spheroidal wave functions of order zero. The transform is linear and additive in its index and asymptotically goes over to Namias's definition of the fractional Fourier transform. As a special case of this definition, it is shown that the finite Fourier transform may be inverted by using information over a finite range of frequencies in Fourier space, the inversion being sensitive to noise. Numerical illustrations for both forward (fractional) and inverse finite transforms are provided.

  11. Social Trust and Fractionalization:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This paper takes a closer look at the importance of fractionalization for the creation of social trust. It first argues that the determinants of trust can be divided into two categories: those affecting individuals' trust radii and those affecting social polarization. A series of estimates using...... a much larger country sample than in previous literature confirms that fractionalization in the form of income inequality and political diversity adversely affects social trust while ethnic diversity does not. However, these effects differ systematically across countries, questioning standard...... interpretations of the influence of fractionalization on trust....

  12. Design and simulation of an automation system of a production process and fractionation of 131I, using strategies of advanced control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paez, Jose; Arias, Pablo; Miranda, Jesus

    2013-01-01

    In this report, the results are obtained in the design and simulation of a control system using advanced strategies in a production cell in the Plant Production of Radioisotopes of IPEN. The results demonstrate that the temperature of the coalition oven is stabilized after 30 minutes, being constituted in an advantage to obtain the maximum yield of the cell production of 131 I; also, an integral good controller has been designed that allows to obtain a mathematical model that reproduces with enough accuracy the behavior of the process. With the final simulation it has been to demonstrate that the System Control of Temperature of the Cell Production of 131 I is a controllable system and allows to carry out the respective sequence with other variables of control of the production cell. (author)

  13. FRACTIONS: CONCEPTUAL AND DIDACTIC ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sead Rešić

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fractions represent the manner of writing parts of whole numbers (integers. Rules for operations with fractions differ from rules for operations with integers. Students face difficulties in understanding fractions, especially operations with fractions. These difficulties are well known in didactics of Mathematics throughout the world and there is a lot of research regarding problems in learning about fractions. Methods for facilitating understanding fractions have been discovered, which are essentially related to visualizing operations with fractions.

  14. Discrete fractional calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Goodrich, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This text provides the first comprehensive treatment of the discrete fractional calculus. Experienced researchers will find the text useful as a reference for discrete fractional calculus and topics of current interest. Students who are interested in learning about discrete fractional calculus will find this text to provide a useful starting point. Several exercises are offered at the end of each chapter and select answers have been provided at the end of the book. The presentation of the content is designed to give ample flexibility for potential use in a myriad of courses and for independent study. The novel approach taken by the authors includes a simultaneous treatment of the fractional- and integer-order difference calculus (on a variety of time scales, including both the usual forward and backwards difference operators). The reader will acquire a solid foundation in the classical topics of the discrete calculus while being introduced to exciting recent developments, bringing them to the frontiers of the...

  15. Fractional smith chart theory

    KAUST Repository

    Shamim, Atif; Radwan, Ahmed Gomaa; Salama, Khaled N.

    2011-01-01

    matching networks, where the fractional approach proves to be much more versatile and results in a single element matching network for a complex load as compared to the two elements in the conventional approach. © 2010 IEEE.

  16. Effects of dose fractionation on the response of alanine dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundahl, Brad; Logar, John; Desrosiers, Marc; Puhl, James

    2014-01-01

    Alanine dosimetry is well established as a transfer standard and is becoming more prevalently used in routine dosimetry systems for radiation processing. Many routine measurement applications in radiation processing involve absorbed dose measurements resulting from fractioned exposures to ionizing radiation. Fractioning of absorbed dose is identified as an influence quantity (ISO/ASTM, 2013). This paper reports on study results of absorbed dose fractioning characteristics of alanine for gamma and high energy electron beam radiation sources. The results of this study indicate a radiation response difference due to absorbed dose fractioning in response can be observed after four fractionations for high-energy electron beams and no difference up to seven fractions for gamma rays using an ANOVA evaluation method. - Highlights: • Fractioning effects signaled in electron beam using an ANOVA at 6 equal increments. • Fractioning effects not signaled in gamma using an ANOVA up to 7 equal increments. • Insensitivity of alanine to dose fractioning indicates nominal impact on calibration

  17. Fractional laser skin resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2012-11-01

    Laser skin resurfacing (LSR) has evolved over the past 2 decades from traditional ablative to fractional nonablative and fractional ablative resurfacing. Traditional ablative LSR was highly effective in reducing rhytides, photoaging, and acne scarring but was associated with significant side effects and complications. In contrast, nonablative LSR was very safe but failed to deliver consistent clinical improvement. Fractional LSR has achieved the middle ground; it combined the efficacy of traditional LSR with the safety of nonablative modalities. The first fractional laser was a nonablative erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser that produced microscopic columns of thermal injury in the epidermis and upper dermis. Heralding an entirely new concept of laser energy delivery, it delivered the laser beam in microarrays. It resulted in microscopic columns of treated tissue and intervening areas of untreated skin, which yielded rapid reepithelialization. Fractional delivery was quickly applied to ablative wavelengths such as carbon dioxide, Er:YAG, and yttrium scandium gallium garnet (2,790 nm), providing more significant clinical outcomes. Adjustable laser parameters, including power, pitch, dwell time, and spot density, allowed for precise determination of percent surface area, affected penetration depth, and clinical recovery time and efficacy. Fractional LSR has been a significant advance to the laser field, striking the balance between safety and efficacy.

  18. Viabilidade celular da fração mononuclear da medula óssea e fração vascular estromal do tecido adiposo de equinos após o processo de congelamento e descongelamento Viability of equine bone marrow mononuclear fraction and adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction after freezing and thawing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesiane Ribeiro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cinco cavalos adultos foram submetidos à coleta de medula óssea do esterno e de tecido adiposo da região glútea. As amostras foram processadas para obtenção da fração mononuclear da medula óssea e fração vascular estromal do tecido adiposo, o número de células obtidas e a viabilidade celular foram determinados. Em seguida, realizou-se o congelamento das amostras em solução contendo 20% de soro fetal bovino e 10% de dimetilsulfóxido. Depois de um mês, realizou-se o descongelamento das amostras e a viabilidade celular foi novamente mensurada. Os resultados revelaram que as técnicas utilizadas tanto para coleta de medula óssea quanto de tecido adiposo em equinos são simples, rápidas e seguras. As metodologias adotadas para o processamento das amostras foram eficientes, obtendo-se aproximadamente 95% de viabilidade celular. Após o descongelamento, a viabilidade média das amostras de células mononucleares da medula óssea foi de 86% e da fração vascular estromal do tecido adiposo de 64%. Frente à importância da terapia celular na clínica médica de equinos, concluiu-se que é necessária a realização de mais estudos, visando padronizar uma técnica de criopreservação que mantenha a integridade das células da fração mononuclear da medula óssea e da fração vascular estromal do tecido adiposo de equinos.In five adult horses, bone marrow was aspirated from the sternum and adipose tissue extracted from the gluteal region. The samples were processed to obtain the mononuclear fraction of bone marrow and stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue, and the number of cells obtained and cell viability were determined. Next, the cell samples were frozen in medium containing 20% fetal bovine serum and 10% dimethylsulfoxide. After one month, the cells were thawed and cell viability was again determined. The results revealed that the techniques for collecting both bone marrow and adipose tissue in horses are simple, rapid and

  19. Geochemical processes assessed by Rare Earth Elements fractionation at “Laguna Verde” acidic-sulphate crater lake (Azufral volcano, Colombia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inguaggiato, Claudio; Burbano, Viviana; Rouwet, Dmitri; Garzón, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    The geochemical behaviour of major elements, Fe, Al, Mn, and Rare Earth Elements (REE) was investigated in the “Laguna Verde” acidic crater lake of Azufral volcano (Colombia). The cold lake water (T close to 10 °C) is sulphate-dominated, due to absorption and oxidation of H_2S (pH 2.1–2.7, Eh 196–260 mV), and Na-enriched (Total Dissolved Solids 0.79 g L"−"1). The total amount of REE dissolved in the lake ranges from 3.3 to 9.1 ppb. The REE patterns normalized to the local rocks show a Light Rare Earth Elements (LREE) depletion quite constant in the 15 samples. Similar patterns were already found in the acidic sulphate springs of Nevado del Ruiz volcano-hydrothermal system, caused by the precipitation of alunite and jarosite, absorbing LREE and hence removing them from solution. Alunite and jarosite minerals are not oversaturated at chemical-physical conditions within the lake itself, but alunite becomes oversaturated for temperatures above ≈100 °C, reigning in the underlying hydrothermal system. Water temperatures close to 75 °C were found in the northern part of the lake. Coupling the distribution of REE in lake water (LREE depleted) and the saturation indexes, we suggest that the distribution of REE in the lake water is the result of the alunite precipitation in the northern part of the lake and/or in the deeper hydrothermal system. The acidic hydrothermal fluids mobilize the REE with contents up to ≈5 orders of magnitude higher than seawater; acidic-hydrothermal systems, such as acidic crater lakes, can hence be considered potential REE “reservoirs”. - Highlights: • Acidic crater lakes can be considered potential Rare Earth Elements reservoirs. • Alunite precipitation removes Light Rare Earth Elements. • Rare Earth Elements identify geochemical processes in volcano-hydrothermal systems.

  20. Electrochemically controlled iron isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jay R.; Young, Edward D.; Kavner, Abby

    2010-02-01

    Variations in the stable isotope abundances of transition metals have been observed in the geologic record and trying to understand and reconstruct the physical/environmental conditions that produced these signatures is an area of active research. It is clear that changes in oxidation state lead to large fractionations of the stable isotopes of many transition metals such as iron, suggesting that transition metal stable isotope signatures could be used as a paleo-redox proxy. However, the factors contributing to these observed stable isotope variations are poorly understood. Here we investigate how the kinetics of iron redox electrochemistry generates isotope fractionation. Through a combination of electrodeposition experiments and modeling of electrochemical processes including mass-transport, we show that electron transfer reactions are the cause of a large isotope separation, while mass transport-limited supply of reactant to the electrode attenuates the observed isotopic fractionation. Furthermore, the stable isotope composition of electroplated transition metals can be tuned in the laboratory by controlling parameters such as solution chemistry, reaction overpotential, and solution convection. These methods are potentially useful for generating isotopically-marked metal surfaces for tracking and forensic purposes. In addition, our studies will help interpret stable isotope data in terms of identifying underlying electron transfer processes in laboratory and natural samples.

  1. Continuous fractional distillation of petroleum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1921-11-05

    This invention has for its object a process of distillation, fractional, and continuous, of shale oil, tar, etc., characterized by the vapors leaving the evaporation chamber being forced, before condensation, to go over a continuous circuit. The vapors traverse first a preheater then return to the vaporization chamber in which they are passed along large surfaces and by application of the counter-current principle in contact with the liquid to be distilled. They stream through the chamber in a continuous manner (the quantity of vapor emitted in the circuit being determined in a manner to advance the distillation just to completion); the excess of vapor formed being removed from the circuit and sent to a condensing apparatus for fractionation.

  2. Series expansion in fractional calculus and fractional differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ming-Fan; Ren, Ji-Rong; Zhu, Tao

    2009-01-01

    Fractional calculus is the calculus of differentiation and integration of non-integer orders. In a recently paper (Annals of Physics 323 (2008) 2756-2778), the Fundamental Theorem of Fractional Calculus is highlighted. Based on this theorem, in this paper we introduce fractional series expansion method to fractional calculus. We define a kind of fractional Taylor series of an infinitely fractionally-differentiable function. Further, based on our definition we generalize hypergeometric functio...

  3. FRACTIONS: CONCEPTUAL AND DIDACTIC ASPECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Sead Rešić; Ismet Botonjić; Maid Omerović

    2016-01-01

    Fractions represent the manner of writing parts of whole numbers (integers). Rules for operations with fractions differ from rules for operations with integers. Students face difficulties in understanding fractions, especially operations with fractions. These difficulties are well known in didactics of Mathematics throughout the world and there is a lot of research regarding problems in learning about fractions. Methods for facilitating understanding fractions have been discovered...

  4. Fractional-order devices

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, Karabi; Caponetto, Riccardo; Mendes Lopes, António; Tenreiro Machado, José António

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on two specific areas related to fractional order systems – the realization of physical devices characterized by non-integer order impedance, usually called fractional-order elements (FOEs); and the characterization of vegetable tissues via electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) – and provides readers with new tools for designing new types of integrated circuits. The majority of the book addresses FOEs. The interest in these topics is related to the need to produce “analogue” electronic devices characterized by non-integer order impedance, and to the characterization of natural phenomena, which are systems with memory or aftereffects and for which the fractional-order calculus tool is the ideal choice for analysis. FOEs represent the building blocks for designing and realizing analogue integrated electronic circuits, which the authors believe hold the potential for a wealth of mass-market applications. The freedom to choose either an integer- or non-integer-order analogue integrator...

  5. A generalized fractional sub-equation method for fractional differential equations with variable coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Bo; He, Yinnian; Wei, Leilei; Zhang, Xindong

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter, a generalized fractional sub-equation method is proposed for solving fractional differential equations with variable coefficients. Being concise and straightforward, this method is applied to the space–time fractional Gardner equation with variable coefficients. As a result, many exact solutions are obtained including hyperbolic function solutions, trigonometric function solutions and rational solutions. It is shown that the considered method provides a very effective, convenient and powerful mathematical tool for solving many other fractional differential equations in mathematical physics. -- Highlights: ► Study of fractional differential equations with variable coefficients plays a role in applied physical sciences. ► It is shown that the proposed algorithm is effective for solving fractional differential equations with variable coefficients. ► The obtained solutions may give insight into many considerable physical processes.

  6. Fractional diffusion equations and anomalous diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Evangelista, Luiz Roberto

    2018-01-01

    Anomalous diffusion has been detected in a wide variety of scenarios, from fractal media, systems with memory, transport processes in porous media, to fluctuations of financial markets, tumour growth, and complex fluids. Providing a contemporary treatment of this process, this book examines the recent literature on anomalous diffusion and covers a rich class of problems in which surface effects are important, offering detailed mathematical tools of usual and fractional calculus for a wide audience of scientists and graduate students in physics, mathematics, chemistry and engineering. Including the basic mathematical tools needed to understand the rules for operating with the fractional derivatives and fractional differential equations, this self-contained text presents the possibility of using fractional diffusion equations with anomalous diffusion phenomena to propose powerful mathematical models for a large variety of fundamental and practical problems in a fast-growing field of research.

  7. Foam Fractionation of Lycopene: An Undergraduate Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Mingjie; Hu, Yongliang

    2010-01-01

    A novel experiment for the extraction of lycopene from tomato paste by foam fractionation is described. Foam fractionation is a process for separating and concentrating chemicals by utilizing differences in their surface activities. Extraction of lycopene by foam fractionation is a new method that has not been previously reported in the…

  8. Sweet Work with Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Natalya; Blaine, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Almost everyone loves chocolate. However, the same cannot be said about fractions, which are loved by markedly fewer. Middle school students tend to view them with wary respect, but little affection. The authors attempt to sweeten the subject by describing a type of game involving division of chocolate bars. The activity they describe provides a…

  9. Fermion Number Fractionization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    1 . In tro d u ctio n. T he N obel P rize in C hem istry for the year 2000 w as aw arded to A lan J H ... soliton, the ground state of the ferm ion-soliton system can have ..... probability density,in a heuristic w ay that a fractional ferm ion num ber m ay ...

  10. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-01-01

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in high-degree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifold singularities. Upon taking the AdS_3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.

  11. Fractional Differential Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa El-Shahed

    2007-01-01

    where 2<α<3 is a real number and D0+α is the standard Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative. Our analysis relies on Krasnoselskiis fixed point theorem of cone preserving operators. An example is also given to illustrate the main results.

  12. Vapor liquid fraction determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This invention describes a method of measuring liquid and vapor fractions in a non-homogeneous fluid flowing through an elongate conduit, such as may be required with boiling water, non-boiling turbulent flows, fluidized bed experiments, water-gas mixing analysis, and nuclear plant cooling. (UK)

  13. Fractionation and rectification apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauerwald, A

    1932-05-25

    Fractionation and rectifying apparatus with a distillation vessel and a stirring tube, drainage tubes leading from its coils to a central collecting tube, the drainage tubes being somewhat parallel and attached to the outer half of the stirring tube and partly on the inner half of the central collecting tube, whereby distillation and rectification can be effected in a single apparatus.

  14. Fractional charge search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innes, W.; Klein, S.; Perl, M.; Price, J.C.

    1982-06-01

    A device to search for fractional charge in matter is described. The sample is coupled to a low-noise amplifier by a periodically varying capacitor and the resulting signal is synchronously detected. The varying capacitor is constructed as a rapidly spinning wheel. Samples of any material in volumes of up to 0.05 ml may be searched in less than an hour

  15. Influence of size and volume fraction of SiC particulates on properties of ex situ reinforced Al-4.5Cu-3Mg metal matrix composite prepared by direct metal laser sintering process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Subrata Kumar [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Midnapore (West), Kharagpur 721302, West Bengal (India); Saha, Partha, E-mail: psaha@mech.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Midnapore (West), Kharagpur 721302, West Bengal (India); Kishore, Shyam [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Midnapore (West), Kharagpur 721302, West Bengal (India)

    2010-07-15

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) process has a great potential to prepare metal matrix composites (MMCs) in fabrication of arbitrary shaped jobs through rapid manufacturing. In the present work, silicon carbide particulates reinforced aluminium based metal matrix composite was developed by direct metal laser sintering process. Influences of SiC particulate (SiCp) on density, porosity and microhardness of the composite were investigated. It shows that SiCp having 300 mesh size provides higher density and lower porosity because of lower clustering effect. Higher microhardness was achieved at 1200 mesh of reinforcement because of lower grain size. Microhardness increases with increase of volume fraction of SiCp and higher value was achieved at high reinforcement content of 30 vol.%. Microstructure was studied through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray elemental mapping. Interfacial microstructure was also investigated and cracks were found in number of cases due to difference between co-efficient of thermal expansion of matrix alloy and SiCp.

  16. Influence of size and volume fraction of SiC particulates on properties of ex situ reinforced Al-4.5Cu-3Mg metal matrix composite prepared by direct metal laser sintering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Saha, Partha; Kishore, Shyam

    2010-01-01

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) process has a great potential to prepare metal matrix composites (MMCs) in fabrication of arbitrary shaped jobs through rapid manufacturing. In the present work, silicon carbide particulates reinforced aluminium based metal matrix composite was developed by direct metal laser sintering process. Influences of SiC particulate (SiCp) on density, porosity and microhardness of the composite were investigated. It shows that SiCp having 300 mesh size provides higher density and lower porosity because of lower clustering effect. Higher microhardness was achieved at 1200 mesh of reinforcement because of lower grain size. Microhardness increases with increase of volume fraction of SiCp and higher value was achieved at high reinforcement content of 30 vol.%. Microstructure was studied through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray elemental mapping. Interfacial microstructure was also investigated and cracks were found in number of cases due to difference between co-efficient of thermal expansion of matrix alloy and SiCp.

  17. Fractional separation of hydrocarbon vapours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1937-07-10

    A process is described for converting higher boiling hydrocarbons to lower boiling hydrocarbons by subjecting them at elevated temperatures to a conversion operation, then separating the higher and lower boiling fractions. The separation takes place while the reaction products are maintained in the vapor phase by contact with a mass of solid porous material which has little or no catalytic activity but does have a preferential absorption property for higher boiling hydrocarbons so that the lower boiling part of the reaction products pass through the separation zone while the heavier hydrocarbons are retained. The separation is accomplished without substantial loss of heat of these reaction products.

  18. Shot-noise evidence of fractional quasiparticle creation in a local fractional quantum Hall state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashisaka, Masayuki; Ota, Tomoaki; Muraki, Koji; Fujisawa, Toshimasa

    2015-02-06

    We experimentally identify fractional quasiparticle creation in a tunneling process through a local fractional quantum Hall (FQH) state. The local FQH state is prepared in a low-density region near a quantum point contact in an integer quantum Hall (IQH) system. Shot-noise measurements reveal a clear transition from elementary-charge tunneling at low bias to fractional-charge tunneling at high bias. The fractional shot noise is proportional to T(1)(1-T(1)) over a wide range of T(1), where T(1) is the transmission probability of the IQH edge channel. This binomial distribution indicates that fractional quasiparticles emerge from the IQH state to be transmitted through the local FQH state. The study of this tunneling process enables us to elucidate the dynamics of Laughlin quasiparticles in FQH systems.

  19. -Dimensional Fractional Lagrange's Inversion Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Abd El-Salam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Riemann-Liouville fractional differential operator, a fractional extension of the Lagrange inversion theorem and related formulas are developed. The required basic definitions, lemmas, and theorems in the fractional calculus are presented. A fractional form of Lagrange's expansion for one implicitly defined independent variable is obtained. Then, a fractional version of Lagrange's expansion in more than one unknown function is generalized. For extending the treatment in higher dimensions, some relevant vectors and tensors definitions and notations are presented. A fractional Taylor expansion of a function of -dimensional polyadics is derived. A fractional -dimensional Lagrange inversion theorem is proved.

  20. Relaxation property of the fractional Brownian particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Litan; Lung, C.W.

    1988-08-01

    Dynamic susceptibility of a diffusion system associated with the fractional Brownian motion (fBm) was examined for the fractal property of the Non-Debye relaxation process. The comparisons between fBm and other approaches were made. Anomalous diffusion and the Non-Debye relaxation processes were discussed with this approach. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig

  1. Gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, Matheus Jatkoske

    2011-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrations of non-integers orders was introduced more than three centuries ago but only recently gained more attention due to its application on nonlocal phenomenas. In this context, several formulations of fractional electromagnetic fields was proposed, but all these theories suffer from the absence of an effective fractional vector calculus, and in general are non-causal or spatially asymmetric. In order to deal with these difficulties, we propose a spatially symmetric and causal gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic field from a Lagrangian formulation. From our fractional Maxwell's fields arose a definition for the fractional gradient, divergent and curl operators. -- Highlights: → We propose a fractional Lagrangian formulation for fractional Maxwell's fields. → We obtain gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields. → Our generalized fractional Maxwell's field is spatially symmetrical. → We discuss the non-causality of the theory.

  2. Gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazo, Matheus Jatkoske, E-mail: matheuslazo@furg.br [Instituto de Matematica, Estatistica e Fisica - FURG, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil)

    2011-09-26

    Fractional derivatives and integrations of non-integers orders was introduced more than three centuries ago but only recently gained more attention due to its application on nonlocal phenomenas. In this context, several formulations of fractional electromagnetic fields was proposed, but all these theories suffer from the absence of an effective fractional vector calculus, and in general are non-causal or spatially asymmetric. In order to deal with these difficulties, we propose a spatially symmetric and causal gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic field from a Lagrangian formulation. From our fractional Maxwell's fields arose a definition for the fractional gradient, divergent and curl operators. -- Highlights: → We propose a fractional Lagrangian formulation for fractional Maxwell's fields. → We obtain gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields. → Our generalized fractional Maxwell's field is spatially symmetrical. → We discuss the non-causality of the theory.

  3. On matrix fractional differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Kılıçman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to study the matrix fractional differential equations and to find the exact solution for system of matrix fractional differential equations in terms of Riemann–Liouville using Laplace transform method and convolution product to the Riemann–Liouville fractional of matrices. Also, we show the theorem of non-homogeneous matrix fractional partial differential equation with some illustrative examples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new methodology. The main objective of this article is to discuss the Laplace transform method based on operational matrices of fractional derivatives for solving several kinds of linear fractional differential equations. Moreover, we present the operational matrices of fractional derivatives with Laplace transform in many applications of various engineering systems as control system. We present the analytical technique for solving fractional-order, multi-term fractional differential equation. In other words, we propose an efficient algorithm for solving fractional matrix equation.

  4. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part I. The fluorination-fractionation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, M.B.; Blanco, R.E.; Finney, B.C.; Hill, G.S.; Moore, R.E.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1977-07-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) production plant using the fluorination-fractionation (dry hydrofluor) process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. This study is designed to assist in defining the term as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) in relation to limiting the release of radioactive materials from nuclear facilities. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose commitment are calculated for each case. In the final analysis, radiological dose is plotted vs the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992.

  5. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part I. The fluorination-fractionation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, M.B.; Blanco, R.E.; Finney, B.C.; Hill, G.S.; Moore, R.E.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1977-07-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) production plant using the fluorination-fractionation (dry hydrofluor) process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. This study is designed to assist in defining the term as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) in relation to limiting the release of radioactive materials from nuclear facilities. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose commitment are calculated for each case. In the final analysis, radiological dose is plotted vs the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992

  6. Microfluidic Devices for Blood Fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwee Teck Lim

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood, a complex biological fluid, comprises 45% cellular components suspended in protein rich plasma. These different hematologic components perform distinct functions in vivo and thus the ability to efficiently fractionate blood into its individual components has innumerable applications in both clinical diagnosis and biological research. Yet, processing blood is not trivial. In the past decade, a flurry of new microfluidic based technologies has emerged to address this compelling problem. Microfluidics is an attractive solution for this application leveraging its numerous advantages to process clinical blood samples. This paper reviews the various microfluidic approaches realized to successfully fractionate one or more blood components. Techniques to separate plasma from hematologic cellular components as well as isolating blood cells of interest including certain rare cells are discussed. Comparisons based on common separation metrics including efficiency (sensitivity, purity (selectivity, and throughput will be presented. Finally, we will provide insights into the challenges associated with blood-based separation systems towards realizing true point-of-care (POC devices and provide future perspectives.

  7. Fractionalization and Entrepreneurial Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of the literature on ethnicity and entrepreneurship focuses on the construct of ethnic entrepreneurship. However, very little is known about how ethnic heterogeneity affects entrepreneurship. This study attempts to fill the gap, and thus examines the effect of ethnic heterogeneity on entrepreneurial activities in a cross-section of 90 countries. Using indices of ethnic and linguistic fractionalization, we show that ethnic heterogeneity negatively influences entrepreneurship....

  8. Designing an automated blood fractionation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, Adrian C; Sales, Sean D

    2008-04-01

    UK Biobank will be collecting blood samples from a cohort of 500 000 volunteers and it is expected that the rate of collection will peak at approximately 3000 blood collection tubes per day. These samples need to be prepared for long-term storage. It is not considered practical to manually process this quantity of samples so an automated blood fractionation system is required. Principles of industrial automation were applied to the blood fractionation process leading to the requirement of developing a vision system to identify the blood fractions within the blood collection tube so that the fractions can be accurately aspirated and dispensed into micro-tubes. A prototype was manufactured and tested on a range of human blood samples collected in different tube types. A specially designed vision system was capable of accurately measuring the position of the plasma meniscus, plasma/buffy coat interface and the red cells/buffy coat interface within a vacutainer. A rack of 24 vacutainers could be processed in blood fractionation system offers a solution to the problem of processing human blood samples collected in vacutainers in a consistent manner and provides a means of ensuring data and sample integrity.

  9. Geochemical importance of isotopic fractionation during respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleser, G.; Foerstel, H.

    1975-01-01

    In 1935 it was found that atmospheric oxygen contained a relatively greater abundance of the 18 O isotope than did the oxygen bound in water (Dole effect). A major contribution to the fractionation of the stable oxygen isotopes should result from the respiration of microorganisms. In this respect our interest centers on the soil because nearly all organic material produced on land is decomposed within the soil. The oceans are less important because the primary productivity on land is twice the value for the oceans. In a first approach we measured the oxygen isotope fractionation during the respiration of E. coli K12 for different respiration rates. These results, accomplished with a chemostat, indicate that the fractionation factor α of the oxygen isotopes increases with the increasing respiratory activity, measured as Q/sub O 2 /. At low dilution rates or growth rates respectively of about 0.05 h -1 , the fractionation factor amounts to 1.006 increasing to 1.017 at dilution rates of about 1.0 h -1 . The results are interpreted as a kinetic mass fractionation due to the slightly different diffusion coefficients of 16 O 2 and 18 O 16 O. The respiration rates in conjunction with the corresponding fractionation data are compared with the respiration rates of typical soil microorganisms such as Azotobacter, in order to deduce fractionation data for these organisms. This is necessary to calculate a mean global fractionation factor. Understanding the Dole effect with these fractionation processes should finally give us the opportunity to calculate gas-exchange rates between the atmosphere and the oceans, on the basis of the behavior of the stable oxygen isotopes

  10. Eigenfunction expansion for fractional Brownian motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maccone, C.

    1981-01-01

    The fractional Brownian motions, a class of nonstationary stochastic processes defined as the Riemann-Liouville fractional integral/derivative of the Brownian motion, are studied. It is shown that these processes can be regarded as the output of a suitable linear system of which the input is the white noise. Their autocorrelation is then derived with a study of their standard-deviation curves. Their power spectra are found by resorting to the nonstationary spectral theory. And finally their eigenfunction expansion (Karhunen-Loeve expansion) is obtained: the eigenfunctions are proved to be suitable Bessel functions and the eigenvalues zeros of the Bessel functions. (author)

  11. Image Retrieval Algorithm Based on Discrete Fractional Transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Neeru; Singh, Kulbir

    2013-06-01

    The discrete fractional transforms is a signal processing tool which suggests computational algorithms and solutions to various sophisticated applications. In this paper, a new technique to retrieve the encrypted and scrambled image based on discrete fractional transforms has been proposed. Two-dimensional image was encrypted using discrete fractional transforms with three fractional orders and two random phase masks placed in the two intermediate planes. The significant feature of discrete fractional transforms benefits from its extra degree of freedom that is provided by its fractional orders. Security strength was enhanced (1024!)4 times by scrambling the encrypted image. In decryption process, image retrieval is sensitive for both correct fractional order keys and scrambling algorithm. The proposed approach make the brute force attack infeasible. Mean square error and relative error are the recital parameters to verify validity of proposed method.

  12. Gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, Matheus Jatkoske

    2011-09-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrations of non-integers orders was introduced more than three centuries ago but only recently gained more attention due to its application on nonlocal phenomenas. In this context, several formulations of fractional electromagnetic fields was proposed, but all these theories suffer from the absence of an effective fractional vector calculus, and in general are non-causal or spatially asymmetric. In order to deal with these difficulties, we propose a spatially symmetric and causal gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic field from a Lagrangian formulation. From our fractional Maxwell's fields arose a definition for the fractional gradient, divergent and curl operators.

  13. The Extended Fractional Subequation Method for Nonlinear Fractional Differential Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jianping; Tang, Bo; Kumar, Sunil; Hou, Yanren

    2012-01-01

    An extended fractional subequation method is proposed for solving fractional differential equations by introducing a new general ansätz and Bäcklund transformation of the fractional Riccati equation with known solutions. Being concise and straightforward, this method is applied to the space-time fractional coupled Burgers’ equations and coupled MKdV equations. As a result, many exact solutions are obtained. It is shown that the considered method provides a very effective, convenient, and powe...

  14. Void fraction prediction in saturated flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francisco J Collado

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: An essential element in thermal-hydraulics is the accurate prediction of the vapor void fraction, or fraction of the flow cross-sectional area occupied by steam. Recently, the author has suggested to calculate void fraction working exclusively with thermodynamic properties. It is well known that the usual 'flow' quality, merely a mass flow rate ratio, is not at all a thermodynamic property because its expression in function of thermodynamic properties includes the slip ratio, which is a parameter of the process not a function of state. By the other hand, in the classic and well known expression of the void fraction - in function of the true mass fraction of vapor (also called 'static' quality), and the vapor and liquid densities - does not appear the slip ratio. Of course, this would suggest a direct procedure for calculating the void fraction, provided we had an accurate value of the true mass fraction of vapor, clearly from the heat balance. However the classic heat balance is usually stated in function of the 'flow' quality, what sounds really contradictory because this parameter, as we have noted above, is not at all a thermodynamic property. Then we should check against real data the actual relationship between the thermodynamic properties and the applied heat. For saturated flow boiling just from the inlet of the heated tube, and not having into account the kinetic and potential terms, the uniform applied heat per unit mass of inlet water and per unit length (in short, specific linear heat) should be closely related to a (constant) slope of the mixture enthalpy. In this work, we have checked the relation between the specific linear heat and the thermodynamic enthalpy of the liquid-vapor mixture using the actual mass fraction. This true mass fraction is calculated using the accurate measurements of the outlet void fraction taken during the Cambridge project by Knights and Thom in the sixties for vertical and horizontal

  15. Fractional calculus in bioengineering, part 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  16. Functional Fractional Calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Shantanu

    2011-01-01

    When a new extraordinary and outstanding theory is stated, it has to face criticism and skeptism, because it is beyond the usual concept. The fractional calculus though not new, was not discussed or developed for a long time, particularly for lack of its application to real life problems. It is extraordinary because it does not deal with 'ordinary' differential calculus. It is outstanding because it can now be applied to situations where existing theories fail to give satisfactory results. In this book not only mathematical abstractions are discussed in a lucid manner, with physical mathematic

  17. Fractional Reserve Banking

    OpenAIRE

    Andreasen, Niels; Bjerregaard, Mads; Lund, Jonas; Olsen, Ove Bitsch; Rasmussen, Andreas Dalgas

    2012-01-01

    Projektet er bygget op omkring kritisk realisme, som er det gennemgående videnskabelige fundament til undersøgelsen af hvilke strukturelle grunde der er til finansiel ustabilitet i Danmark. Projektet går i dybden med Fractional Reserve Banking og incitamentsstrukturen i banksystemet. Vi bevæger os både på det makro- og mikroøkonomiske niveau i analysen. På makro niveau bruger vi den østrigske skole om konjunktur teori (The Positive Theory of the Cycle). På mikro niveau arbejder vi med princip...

  18. Search for fractional charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    A search was made for fractional charges of the form Z plus two-thirds e, where Z is an integer. It was assumed that the charges exist in natural form bound with other fractional charges in neutral molecules. It was further assumed that these neutral molecules are present in air. Two concentration schemes were employed. One sample was derived from the waste gases from a xenon distillation plant. This assumes that high mass, low vapor pressure components of air are concentrated along with the xenon. The second sample involved ionizing air, allowing a brief recombination period, and then collecting residual ions on the surface of titanium discs. Both samples were analyzed at the University of Rochester in a system using a tandem Van de Graff to accelerate particles through an essentially electrostatic beam handling system. The detector system employed both a Time of Flight and an energy-sensitive gas ionization detector. In the most sensitive mode of analysis, a gas absorber was inserted in the beam path to block the intense background. The presence of an absorber limited the search to highly penetrating particles. Effectively, this limited the search to particles with low Z and masses greater than roughly fifty GeV. The final sensitivities attained were on the order of 1 x 10 -20 for the ionized air sample and 1 x 10 -21 for the gas sample. A discussion of the caveats that could reduce the actual level of sensitivity is included

  19. Fractional Fick's law: the direct way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, M C; Abdennadher, A; Joelson, M

    2007-01-01

    Levy flights, which are Markovian continuous time random walks possibly accounting for extreme events, serve frequently as small-scale models for the spreading of matter in heterogeneous media. Among them, Brownian motion is a particular case where Fick's law holds: for a cloud of walkers, the flux is proportional to the gradient of the probability density of finding a particle at some place. Levy flights resemble Brownian motion, except that jump lengths are distributed according to an α-stable Levy law, possibly showing heavy tails and skewness. For α between 1 and 2, a fractional form of Fick's law is known to hold in infinite media: that the flux is proportional to a combination of fractional derivatives or the order of α - 1 of the density of walkers was obtained as a consequence of a fractional dispersion equation. We present a direct and natural proof of this result, based upon a novel definition of usual fractional derivatives, involving a convolution and a limiting process. Taking account of the thus obtained fractional Fick's law yields fractional dispersion equation for smooth densities. The method adapts to domains, limited by boundaries possibly implying non-trivial modifications to this equation

  20. Fractional Reserve in Banking System

    OpenAIRE

    Valkonen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is aimed to provide understanding of the role of the fractional reserve in the mod-ern banking system worldwide and particularly in Finland. The fractional reserve banking is used worldwide, but the benefits of this system are very disputable. On the one hand, experts say that the fractional reserve is a necessary instrument for the normal business and profit making. On the other hand, sceptics openly criticize the fractional reserve system and blame it for fiat money (money n...

  1. On matrix fractional differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Adem Kılıçman; Wasan Ajeel Ahmood

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study the matrix fractional differential equations and to find the exact solution for system of matrix fractional differential equations in terms of Riemann–Liouville using Laplace transform method and convolution product to the Riemann–Liouville fractional of matrices. Also, we show the theorem of non-homogeneous matrix fractional partial differential equation with some illustrative examples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new methodology. The main objec...

  2. Fractional Hopfield Neural Networks: Fractional Dynamic Associative Recurrent Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yi-Fei; Yi, Zhang; Zhou, Ji-Liu

    2017-10-01

    This paper mainly discusses a novel conceptual framework: fractional Hopfield neural networks (FHNN). As is commonly known, fractional calculus has been incorporated into artificial neural networks, mainly because of its long-term memory and nonlocality. Some researchers have made interesting attempts at fractional neural networks and gained competitive advantages over integer-order neural networks. Therefore, it is naturally makes one ponder how to generalize the first-order Hopfield neural networks to the fractional-order ones, and how to implement FHNN by means of fractional calculus. We propose to introduce a novel mathematical method: fractional calculus to implement FHNN. First, we implement fractor in the form of an analog circuit. Second, we implement FHNN by utilizing fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, and further analyze its attractors. Third, we perform experiments to analyze the stability and convergence of FHNN, and further discuss its applications to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. The main contribution of our work is to propose FHNN in the form of an analog circuit by utilizing a fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, prove its Lyapunov stability, analyze its attractors, and apply FHNN to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. A significant advantage of FHNN is that its attractors essentially relate to the neuron's fractional order. FHNN possesses the fractional-order-stability and fractional-order-sensitivity characteristics.

  3. Potential use of the non-random distribution of N2 and N2O mole masses in the atmosphere as a tool for tracing atmospheric mixing and isotope fractionation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Well, R.; Langel, R.; Reineking, A.

    2002-01-01

    The variation in the natural abundance of 15 N in atmospheric gas species is often used to determine the mixing of trace gases from different sources. With conventional budget calculations one unknown quantity can be determined if the remaining quantities are known. From 15 N tracer studies in soils with highly enriched 15 N-nitrate a procedure is known to calculate the mixing of atmospheric and soil derived N 2 based on the measurement of the 30/28 and 29/28 ratios in gas samples collected from soil covers. Because of the non-random distribution of the mole masses 30 N 2 , 29 N 2 and 28 N 2 in the mixing gas it is possible to calculate two quantities simultaneously, i.e. the mixing ratio of atmospheric and soil derived N 2 , and the isotopic signature of the soil derived N 2 . Routine standard measurements of laboratory air had suggested a non-random distribution of N 2 -mole masses. The objective of this study was to investigate and explain the existence of non-random distributions of 15 N 15 N, 14 N 15 N and 14 N 14 N in N 2 and N 2 O in environmental samples. The calculation of theoretical isotope data resulting from hypothetical mixing of two sources differing in 15 N natural abundance demonstrated, that the deviation from an ideal random distribution of mole masses is not detectable with the current precision of mass spectrometry. 15 N-analysis of N 2 or N 2 O was conducted with randomised and non-randomised replicate samples of different origin. 15 N abundance as calculated from 29/28 ratios were generally higher in randomised samples. The differences between the treatments ranged between 0.05 and 0.17 δper mille 15 N. It was concluded that the observed randomisation effect is probably caused by 15 N 15 N fractionation during environmental processes. (author)

  4. The random continued fraction transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalle, Charlene; Kempton, Tom; Verbitskiy, Evgeny

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a random dynamical system related to continued fraction expansions. It uses random combinations of the Gauss map and the Rényi (or backwards) continued fraction map. We explore the continued fraction expansions that this system produces, as well as the dynamical properties of the system.

  5. How Weird Are Weird Fractions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuffelbeam, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    A positive rational is a weird fraction if its value is unchanged by an illegitimate, digit-based reduction. In this article, we prove that each weird fraction is uniquely weird and initiate a discussion of the prevalence of weird fractions.

  6. Do Children Understand Fraction Addition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, David W.; Tian, Jing; Siegler, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Many children fail to master fraction arithmetic even after years of instruction. A recent theory of fraction arithmetic (Braithwaite, Pyke, & Siegler, in press) hypothesized that this poor learning of fraction arithmetic procedures reflects poor conceptual understanding of them. To test this hypothesis, we performed three experiments…

  7. On fractional Fourier transform moments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alieva, T.; Bastiaans, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Based on the relation between the ambiguity function represented in a quasi-polar coordinate system and the fractional power spectra, the fractional Fourier transform moments are introduced. Important equalities for the global second-order fractional Fourier transform moments are derived and their

  8. Fractional dynamic calculus and fractional dynamic equations on time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, Svetlin G

    2018-01-01

    Pedagogically organized, this monograph introduces fractional calculus and fractional dynamic equations on time scales in relation to mathematical physics applications and problems. Beginning with the definitions of forward and backward jump operators, the book builds from Stefan Hilger’s basic theories on time scales and examines recent developments within the field of fractional calculus and fractional equations. Useful tools are provided for solving differential and integral equations as well as various problems involving special functions of mathematical physics and their extensions and generalizations in one and more variables. Much discussion is devoted to Riemann-Liouville fractional dynamic equations and Caputo fractional dynamic equations.  Intended for use in the field and designed for students without an extensive mathematical background, this book is suitable for graduate courses and researchers looking for an introduction to fractional dynamic calculus and equations on time scales. .

  9. Efeito do arejamento no processo de compostagem da fracção sólida do chorume de pecuária leiteira Influence of aeration on the process of composting dairy cattle slurry solid fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Brito

    2009-01-01

    muito elevado (8-9 durante o processo de compostagem.Manure surpluses in dairy farms can be reduced by separation of the solid fraction from slurry whereas composting allows the stabilization of the organic matter of the solid fraction. The solid fraction can be exported to other farms with a high demand for organic amendments after composting because this turns cattle slurry solids into a uniform, easily handled, organically stable, without pathogens or viable weed seeds that can be land applied and marketed as a soil amendment. However, when 60% moisture content of solids is exceeded, and this is the situation for most separated slurry solids, oxygen movement is somewhat restricted. Therefore, the effect of turning the compost pile must be researched since it provides oxygen for the decomposition process. Dairy cattle slurry solids from two different farms located at the NW Portugal (Vila do Conde, with 70% and 78% moisture contents, were removed from the tank using an auger encased in a perforated stainless steel screen, allowing removal of excess water. Twelve pile treatments of 15 m³ of freshly separated solids were placed in bare soil. The effects of using straw as a framework and of turning with a tractor-mounted front-end loader were evaluated through chemical analysis on pile samples collected over a 15 week period. Thermophilic temperatures were achieved soon after separation for 70% moisture solids, but these temperatures were attained for 78% moisture solids only once mixed with straw, indicating that differences in bedding material affects the temperature and oxygen concentration during composting. Moreover, solids with initial 70% moisture had a faster rate of composting and took shorter time to reach maturity than solids with 78% moisture. Although chemical evolution based on parameters such as pH, electrical conductivity and C/N ratio provided substantial evidence that agronomical suitable compost can be obtained, future challenges include optimizing

  10. Oscillation results for certain fractional difference equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyun WANG

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Fractional calculus is a theory that studies the properties and application of arbitrary order differentiation and integration. It can describe the physical properties of some systems more accurately, and better adapt to changes in the system, playing an important role in many fields. For example, it can describe the process of tumor growth (growth stimulation and growth inhibition in biomedical science. The oscillation of solutions of two kinds of fractional difference equations is studied, mainly using the proof by contradiction, that is, assuming the equation has a nonstationary solution. For the first kind of equation, the function symbol is firstly determined, and by constructing the Riccati function, the difference is calculated. Then the condition of the function is used to satisfy the contradiction, that is, the assumption is false, which verifies the oscillation of the solution. For the second kind of equation with initial condition, the equivalent fractional sum form of the fractional difference equation are firstly proved. With considering 0<α≤1 and α>1, respectively, by using the properties of Stirling formula and factorial function, the contradictory is got through enhanced processing, namely the assuming is not established, and the sufficient condition for the bounded solutions of the fractional difference equation is obtained. The above results will optimize the relevant conclusions and enrich the relevant results. The results are applied to the specific equations, and the oscillation of the solutions of equations is proved.

  11. The mental representations of fractions: adults' same–different judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Florence; Szucs, Denes; Content, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether the processing of the magnitude of fractions is global or componential. Previously, some authors concluded that adults process the numerators and denominators of fractions separately and do not access the global magnitude of fractions. Conversely, others reported evidence suggesting that the global magnitude of fractions is accessed. We hypothesized that in a fraction matching task, participants automatically extract the magnitude of the components but that the activation of the global magnitude of the whole fraction is only optional or strategic. Participants carried out same/different judgment tasks. Two different tasks were used: a physical matching task and a numerical matching task. Pairs of fractions were presented either simultaneously or sequentially. Results showed that participants only accessed the representation of the global magnitude of fractions in the numerical matching task. The mode of stimulus presentation did not affect the processing of fractions. The present study allows a deeper understanding of the conditions in which the magnitude of fractions is mentally represented by using matching tasks and two different modes of presentation. PMID:23847562

  12. Membrane Assisted Enzyme Fractionation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Linfeng

    to the variation in size of the proteins and a reasonable separation factor can be observed only when the size difference is in the order of 10 or more. This is partly caused by concentration polarization and membrane fouling which hinders an effective separation of the proteins. Application of an electric field...... across the porous membrane has been demonstrated to be an effective way to reduce concentration polarization and membrane fouling. In addition, this technique can also be used to separate the proteins based on difference in charge, which to some extent overcome the limitations of size difference...... of proteins on the basis of their charge, degree of hydrophobicity, affinity or size. Adequate purity is often not achieved unless several purification steps are combined thereby increasing cost and reducing product yield. Conventional fractionation of proteins using ultrafiltration membranes is limited...

  13. Fraction Reduction in Membrane Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fraction reduction is a basic computation for rational numbers. P system is a new computing model, while the current methods for fraction reductions are not available in these systems. In this paper, we propose a method of fraction reduction and discuss how to carry it out in cell-like P systems with the membrane structure and the rules with priority designed. During the application of fraction reduction rules, synchronization is guaranteed by arranging some special objects in these rules. Our work contributes to performing the rational computation in P systems since the rational operands can be given in the form of fraction.

  14. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2014-09-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity.

  15. The Fractionation and Enrichment of La Content by Precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyanti; Purwani, MV

    2007-01-01

    The fractionation and enrichment of La content by precipitation have been done. The feed was La hydroxide by product of monazite sand. La hydroxide was diluted in HNO 3 and was precipitated with ammonia. For to obtain La, diluent was precipitated at pH 8 and the filtrate was precipitated with oxalic acid. The precipitant of La concentrated was more rich than the feed. This process was done continue and fractionally. The best yield of enrichment of La was obtained at dilution of 25 gram La Hydroxide in 20 ml HNO 3 . The efficient degree of fractionation was XV. The average weight of La concentrate was obtained at every fraction was 1 gram. The total sum weight from fraction I until fraction XV 13.5 grams. The average of La content was 48%, average fractionation efficiency of La for every step of fractionation was 48 %. Total efficiency all process was 100%. The average ratio of La/Nd was 2 and the ratio of La/Ce almost infinite. Before processed La/Ce was 7.86, and after process increase to 26.92 - to approach ∞. Before processed ratio of La/Nd was 2.79, after processed increased to 4.4 - to approach ∞. (author)

  16. Misonidazole in fractionated radiotherapy: are many small fractions best

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denekamp, J.; McNally, N.J.; Fowler, J.F.; Joiner, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    The largest sensitizing effect is always demonstrated with six fractions, each given with 2 g/m 2 of misonidazole. In the absence of reoxygenation a sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.7 is predicted, but this falls to 1.1-1.2 if extensive reoxygenation occurs. Less sensitization is observed with 30 fractions, each with 0.4 g/m 2 of drug. However, for clinical use, the important question is which treatment kills the maximum number of tumour cells. Many of the simulations predict a marked disadvantage of reducing the fraction number for X rays alone. The circumstances in which this disadvantage is offset by the large Sensitizer enhancement ratio values with a six-fraction schedule are few. The model calculations suggest that many small fractions, each with a low drug dose, are safest unless the clinician has some prior knowledge that a change in fraction number is not disadvantageous. (author)

  17. Fractional statistics and fractional quantized Hall effect. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, R.; Wu, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    We suggest that the origin of the odd denominator rule observed in the fractional quantized Hall effect (FQHE) may lie in fractional statistics which governs quasiparticles in FQHE. A theorem concerning statistics of clusters of quasiparticles implies that fractional statistics does not allow coexistence of a large number of quasiparticles at fillings with an even denominator. Thus no Hall plateau can be formed at these fillings, regardless of the presence of an energy gap. 15 references

  18. Fractionation of Pb and Cu in the fine fraction (landfill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczala, Fabio; Orupõld, Kaja; Augustsson, Anna; Burlakovs, Juris; Hogland, Marika; Bhatnagar, Amit; Hogland, William

    2017-11-01

    The fractionation of metals in the fine fraction (landfill was carried out to evaluate the metal (Pb and Cu) contents and their potential towards not only mobility but also possibilities of recovery/extraction. The fractionation followed the BCR (Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction, and the exchangeable (F1), reducible (F2), oxidizable (F3) and residual fractions were determined. The results showed that Pb was highly associated with the reducible (F2) and oxidizable (F3) fractions, suggesting the potential mobility of this metal mainly when in contact with oxygen, despite the low association with the exchangeable fraction (F1). Cu has also shown the potential for mobility when in contact with oxygen, since high associations with the oxidizable fraction (F3) were observed. On the other hand, the mobility of metals in excavated waste can be seen as beneficial considering the circular economy and recovery of such valuables back into the economy. To conclude, not only the total concentration of metals but also a better understanding of fractionation and in which form metals are bound is very important to bring information on how to manage the fine fraction from excavated waste both in terms of environmental impacts and also recovery of such valuables in the economy.

  19. Fractional variational calculus in terms of Riesz fractional derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, O P

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents extensions of traditional calculus of variations for systems containing Riesz fractional derivatives (RFDs). Specifically, we present generalized Euler-Lagrange equations and the transversality conditions for fractional variational problems (FVPs) defined in terms of RFDs. We consider two problems, a simple FVP and an FVP of Lagrange. Results of the first problem are extended to problems containing multiple fractional derivatives, functions and parameters, and to unspecified boundary conditions. For the second problem, we present Lagrange-type multiplier rules. For both problems, we develop the Euler-Lagrange-type necessary conditions which must be satisfied for the given functional to be extremum. Problems are considered to demonstrate applications of the formulations. Explicitly, we introduce fractional momenta, fractional Hamiltonian, fractional Hamilton equations of motion, fractional field theory and fractional optimal control. The formulations presented and the resulting equations are similar to the formulations for FVPs given in Agrawal (2002 J. Math. Anal. Appl. 272 368, 2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 10375) and to those that appear in the field of classical calculus of variations. These formulations are simple and can be extended to other problems in the field of fractional calculus of variations

  20. Boron-isotope fractionation in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marentes, E [Univ. of Guelph, Dept. of Horticultural Science, Guelph, Ontario (Canada); Vanderpool, R A [USDA/ARS Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, Grand Forks, North Dakota (United States); Shelp, B J [Univ. of Guelph, Dept. of Horticultural Science, Guelph, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-10-15

    Naturally-occurring variations in the abundance of stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and other elements in plants have been reported and are now used to understand various physiological processes in plants. Boron (B) isotopic variation in several plant species have been documented, but no determination as to whether plants fractionate the stable isotopes of boron, {sup 11}B and {sup 10}B, has been made. Here, we report that plants with differing B requirements (wheat, corn and broccoli) fractionated boron. The whole plant was enriched in {sup 11}B relative to the nutrient solution, and the leaves were enriched in {sup 10}B and the stem in {sup 11}B relative to the xylem sap. Although at present, a mechanistic role for boron in plants is uncertain, potential fractionating mechanisms are discussed. (author)

  1. Boron-isotope fractionation in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marentes, E.; Vanderpool, R.A.; Shelp, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    Naturally-occurring variations in the abundance of stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and other elements in plants have been reported and are now used to understand various physiological processes in plants. Boron (B) isotopic variation in several plant species have been documented, but no determination as to whether plants fractionate the stable isotopes of boron, 11 B and 10 B, has been made. Here, we report that plants with differing B requirements (wheat, corn and broccoli) fractionated boron. The whole plant was enriched in 11 B relative to the nutrient solution, and the leaves were enriched in 10 B and the stem in 11 B relative to the xylem sap. Although at present, a mechanistic role for boron in plants is uncertain, potential fractionating mechanisms are discussed. (author)

  2. Fractional model for heat conduction in polar bear hairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qing-Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-fractional differential equations can accurately describe heat conduction in fractal media, such as wool fibers, goose down and polar bear hair. The fractional complex transform is used to convert time-fractional heat conduction equations with the modified Riemann-Liouville derivative into ordinary differential equations, and exact solutions can be easily obtained. The solution process is straightforward and concise.

  3. Time rescaling and Gaussian properties of the fractional Brownian motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maccone, C.

    1981-01-01

    The fractional Brownian motions are proved to be a class of Gaussian (normal) stochastic processes suitably rescaled in time. Some consequences affecting their eigenfunction expansion (Karhunen-Loeve expansion) are inferred. A known formula of Cameron and Martin is generalized. The first-passage time probability density is found. The partial differential equation of the fractional Brownian diffusion is obtained. And finally the increments of the fractional Brownian motions are proved to be independent for nonoverlapping time intervals. (author)

  4. Modelling altered fractionation schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    The author discusses the conflicting requirements of hyperfractionation and accelerated fractionation used in radiotherapy, and the development of computer modelling to predict how to obtain an optimum of tumour cell kill without exceeding normal-tissue tolerance. The present trend is to shorten hyperfractionated schedules from 6 or 7 weeks to give overall times of 4 or 5 weeks as in new schedules by Herskovic et al (1992) and Harari (1992). Very high doses are given, much higher than can be given when ultrashort schedules such as CHART (12 days) are used. Computer modelling has suggested that optimum overall times, to yield maximum cell kill in tumours ((α/β = 10 Gy) for a constant level of late complications (α/β = 3 Gy) would be X or X-1 weeks, where X is the doubling time of the tumour cells in days (Fowler 1990). For median doubling times of about 5 days, overall times of 4 or 5 weeks should be ideal. (U.K.)

  5. Fractional Brownian motion and motion governed by the fractional Langevin equation in confined geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae-Hyung; Metzler, Ralf

    2010-02-01

    Motivated by subdiffusive motion of biomolecules observed in living cells, we study the stochastic properties of a non-Brownian particle whose motion is governed by either fractional Brownian motion or the fractional Langevin equation and restricted to a finite domain. We investigate by analytic calculations and simulations how time-averaged observables (e.g., the time-averaged mean-squared displacement and displacement correlation) are affected by spatial confinement and dimensionality. In particular, we study the degree of weak ergodicity breaking and scatter between different single trajectories for this confined motion in the subdiffusive domain. The general trend is that deviations from ergodicity are decreased with decreasing size of the movement volume and with increasing dimensionality. We define the displacement correlation function and find that this quantity shows distinct features for fractional Brownian motion, fractional Langevin equation, and continuous time subdiffusion, such that it appears an efficient measure to distinguish these different processes based on single-particle trajectory data.

  6. Accessible solitons of fractional dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Wei-Ping, E-mail: zhongwp6@126.com [Department of Electronic and Information Engineering, Shunde Polytechnic, Guangdong Province, Shunde 528300 (China); Texas A& M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Belić, Milivoj [Texas A& M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Zhang, Yiqi [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education & Shaanxi Key Lab of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrate that accessible solitons described by an extended Schrödinger equation with the Laplacian of fractional dimension can exist in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media. The soliton solutions of the model are constructed by two special functions, the associated Legendre polynomials and the Laguerre polynomials in the fraction-dimensional space. Our results show that these fractional accessible solitons form a soliton family which includes crescent solitons, and asymmetric single-layer and multi-layer necklace solitons. -- Highlights: •Analytic solutions of a fractional Schrödinger equation are obtained. •The solutions are produced by means of self-similar method applied to the fractional Schrödinger equation with parabolic potential. •The fractional accessible solitons form crescent, asymmetric single-layer and multilayer necklace profiles. •The model applies to the propagation of optical pulses in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media.

  7. Fractional Calculus and Shannon Wavelet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Cattani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An explicit analytical formula for the any order fractional derivative of Shannon wavelet is given as wavelet series based on connection coefficients. So that for any 2(ℝ function, reconstructed by Shannon wavelets, we can easily define its fractional derivative. The approximation error is explicitly computed, and the wavelet series is compared with Grünwald fractional derivative by focusing on the many advantages of the wavelet method, in terms of rate of convergence.

  8. Fractional variational principles in action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baleanu, Dumitru [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Faculty of Art and Sciences, Cankaya University, 06530 Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Space Sciences, PO Box MG-23, R 76900, Magurele-Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: dumitru@cankaya.edu.tr

    2009-10-15

    The fractional calculus has gained considerable importance in various fields of science and engineering, especially during the last few decades. An open issue in this emerging field is represented by the fractional variational principles area. Therefore, the fractional Euler-Lagrange and Hamilton equations started to be examined intensely during the last decade. In this paper, we review some new trends in this field and we discuss some of their potential applications.

  9. Fractional quiver W-algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Taro; Pestun, Vasily

    2018-04-01

    We introduce quiver gauge theory associated with the non-simply laced type fractional quiver and define fractional quiver W-algebras by using construction of Kimura and Pestun (Lett Math Phys, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11005-018-1072-1; Lett Math Phys, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11005-018-1073-0) with representation of fractional quivers.

  10. On the Fractional Mean Value

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseinabadi, Abdolali Neamaty; Nategh, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    This work, dealt with the classical mean value theorem and took advantage of it in the fractional calculus. The concept of a fractional critical point is introduced. Some sufficient conditions for the existence of a critical point is studied and an illustrative example rele- vant to the concept of the time dilation effect is given. The present paper also includes, some connections between convexity (and monotonicity) with fractional derivative in the Riemann-Liouville sense.

  11. Fractionated Spacecraft Architectures Seeding Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mathieu, Charlotte; Weigel, Annalisa

    2006-01-01

    .... Models were developed from a customer-centric perspective to assess different fractionated spacecraft architectures relative to traditional spacecraft architectures using multi-attribute analysis...

  12. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  13. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  14. Electronically Tunable Fully Integrated Fractional-Order Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Tsirimokou, Georgia

    2017-03-20

    A fully integrated implementation of a parallel fractional-order resonator which employs together a fractional order capacitor and a fractional-order inductor is proposed in this paper. The design utilizes current-controlled Operational Transconductance Amplifiers as building blocks, designed and fabricated in AMS 0:35m CMOS process, and based on a second-order approximation of a fractional-order differentiator/ integrator magnitude optimized in the range 10Hz–700Hz. An attractive benefit of the proposed scheme is its electronic tuning capability.

  15. Electronically Tunable Fully Integrated Fractional-Order Resonator

    KAUST Repository

    Tsirimokou, Georgia; Psychalinos, Costas; Elwakil, Ahmed S.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2017-01-01

    A fully integrated implementation of a parallel fractional-order resonator which employs together a fractional order capacitor and a fractional-order inductor is proposed in this paper. The design utilizes current-controlled Operational Transconductance Amplifiers as building blocks, designed and fabricated in AMS 0:35m CMOS process, and based on a second-order approximation of a fractional-order differentiator/ integrator magnitude optimized in the range 10Hz–700Hz. An attractive benefit of the proposed scheme is its electronic tuning capability.

  16. Mechanical and biotechnical fractionating of field biomasses into different fibre fractions; Peltobiomassojen mekaaninen ja biotekninen fraktiointi eri kuitujakeisiin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilppunen, P.; Aaltonen, H.; Sohlo, J. [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Process Engineering

    1997-12-01

    Separation processes for energy and fibre fractions, predominantly those for seed flax, using traditional pulp classifiers and the new pressure classifier process were studied in the wet-separation part of the project. A combined plant fibre further-refining process, based on mechanical and biotechnical separation, operating on the basis of fibre length, was developed on the basis of dry and wet fraction tests. (orig.)

  17. EVOLUTION OF THE BINARY FRACTION IN DENSE STELLAR SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fregeau, John M.; Ivanova, Natalia; Rasio, Frederic A.

    2009-01-01

    Using our recently improved Monte Carlo evolution code, we study the evolution of the binary fraction in globular clusters. In agreement with previous N-body simulations, we find generally that the hard binary fraction in the core tends to increase with time over a range of initial cluster central densities for initial binary fractions ∼<90%. The dominant processes driving the evolution of the core binary fraction are mass segregation of binaries into the cluster core and preferential destruction of binaries there. On a global scale, these effects and the preferential tidal stripping of single stars tend to roughly balance, leading to overall cluster binary fractions that are roughly constant with time. Our findings suggest that the current hard binary fraction near the half-mass radius is a good indicator of the hard primordial binary fraction. However, the relationship between the true binary fraction and the fraction of main-sequence stars in binaries (which is typically what observers measure) is nonlinear and rather complicated. We also consider the importance of soft binaries, which not only modify the evolution of the binary fraction, but can also drastically change the evolution of the cluster as a whole. Finally, we briefly describe the recent addition of single and binary stellar evolution to our cluster evolution code.

  18. Fractions, Number Lines, Third Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Kathleen; Ahrendt, Sue; Monson, Debra; Wyberg, Terry; Colum, Karen

    2017-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) (CCSSI 2010) outlines ambitious goals for fraction learning, starting in third grade, that include the use of the number line model. Understanding and constructing fractions on a number line are particularly complex tasks. The current work of the authors centers on ways to successfully…

  19. Unwrapping Students' Ideas about Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Rebecca M.; Gibbons, Lynsey K.; Kazemi, Elham; Lind, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Supporting students to develop an understanding of the meaning of fractions is an important goal of elementary school mathematics. This involves developing partitioning strategies, creating representations, naming fractional quantities, and using symbolic notation. This article describes how teachers can use a formative assessment problem to…

  20. Understanding Magnitudes to Understand Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Fractions are known to be difficult to learn and difficult to teach, yet they are vital for students to have access to further mathematical concepts. This article uses evidence to support teachers employing teaching methods that focus on the conceptual understanding of the magnitude of fractions.

  1. Financial Planning with Fractional Goals

    OpenAIRE

    Goedhart, Marc; Spronk, Jaap

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWhen solving financial planning problems with multiple goals by means of multiple objective programming, the presence of fractional goals leads to technical difficulties. In this paper we present a straightforward interactive approach for solving such linear fractional programs with multiple goal variables. The approach is illustrated by means of an example in financial planning.

  2. Deterministic ratchets for suspension fractionation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulrattanarak, T.

    2010-01-01

    Driven by the current insights in sustainability and technological development in
    biorefining natural renewable resources, the food industry has taken an interest in
    fractionation of agrofood materials, like milk and cereal crops. The purpose of fractionation
    is to split the raw

  3. Fermion fractionization and index theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Minoru; Torii, Tatsuo

    1982-01-01

    The relation between the fermion fractionization and the Callias-Bott-Seeley index theorem for the Dirac operator in the open space of odd dimension is clarified. Only the case of one spatial dimension is discussed in detail. Sum rules for the expectation values of various quantities in fermion-fractionized configurations are derived. (author)

  4. Iron isotopic fractionation during continental weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantle, Matthew S.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2003-10-01

    The biological activity on continents and the oxygen content of the atmosphere determine the chemical pathways through which Fe is processed at the Earth's surface. Experiments have shown that the relevant chemical pathways fractionate Fe isotopes. Measurements of soils, streams, and deep-sea clay indicate that the {sup 56}Fe/{sup 54}Fe ratio ({delta}{sup 56}Fe relative to igneous rocks) varies from +1{per_thousand} for weathering residues like soils and clays, to -3{per_thousand} for dissolved Fe in streams. These measurements confirm that weathering processes produce substantial fractionation of Fe isotopes in the modern oxidizing Earth surface environment. The results imply that biologically-mediated processes, which preferentially mobilize light Fe isotopes, are critical to Fe chemistry in weathering environments, and that the {delta}{sup 56}Fe of marine dissolved Fe should be variable and negative. Diagenetic reduction of Fe in marine sediments may also be a significant component of the global Fe isotope cycle. Iron isotopes provide a tracer for the influence of biological activity and oxygen in weathering processes through Earth history. Iron isotopic fractionation during weathering may have been smaller or absent in an oxygen-poor environment such as that of the early Precambrian Earth.

  5. A new fractional wavelet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hongzhe; Zheng, Zhibao; Wang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) is a potent tool to analyze the time-varying signal. However, it fails in locating the fractional Fourier domain (FRFD)-frequency contents which is required in some applications. A novel fractional wavelet transform (FRWT) is proposed to solve this problem. It displays the time and FRFD-frequency information jointly in the time-FRFD-frequency plane. The definition, basic properties, inverse transform and reproducing kernel of the proposed FRWT are considered. It has been shown that an FRWT with proper order corresponds to the classical wavelet transform (WT). The multiresolution analysis (MRA) associated with the developed FRWT, together with the construction of the orthogonal fractional wavelets are also presented. Three applications are discussed: the analysis of signal with time-varying frequency content, the FRFD spectrum estimation of signals that involving noise, and the construction of fractional Harr wavelet. Simulations verify the validity of the proposed FRWT.

  6. Stochastic modeling of the Fermi/LAT γ-ray blazar variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolewska, M. A.; Siemiginowska, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kelly, B. C. [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93107 (United States); Nalewajko, K., E-mail: malgosia@camk.edu.pl [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2014-05-10

    We study the γ-ray variability of 13 blazars observed with the Fermi/Large Area Telescope (LAT). These blazars have the most complete light curves collected during the first four years of the Fermi sky survey. We model them with the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) process or a mixture of the OU processes. The OU process has power spectral density (PSD) proportional to 1/f {sup α} with α changing at a characteristic timescale, τ{sub 0}, from 0 (τ >> τ{sub 0}) to 2 (τ << τ{sub 0}). The PSD of the mixed OU process has two characteristic timescales and an additional intermediate region with 0 < α < 2. We show that the OU model provides a good description of the Fermi/LAT light curves of three blazars in our sample. For the first time, we constrain a characteristic γ-ray timescale of variability in two BL Lac sources, 3C 66A and PKS 2155-304 (τ{sub 0} ≅ 25 days and τ{sub 0} ≅ 43 days, respectively, in the observer's frame), which are longer than the soft X-ray timescales detected in blazars and Seyfert galaxies. We find that the mixed OU process approximates the light curves of the remaining 10 blazars better than the OU process. We derive limits on their long and short characteristic timescales, and infer that their Fermi/LAT PSD resemble power-law functions. We constrain the PSD slopes for all but one source in the sample. We find hints for sub-hour Fermi/LAT variability in four flat spectrum radio quasars. We discuss the implications of our results for theoretical models of blazar variability.

  7. Density fractions versus size separates: does physical fractionation isolate functional soil compartments?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Moni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical fractionation is a widely used methodology to study soil organic matter (SOM dynamics, but concerns have been raised that the available fractionation methods do not well describe functional SOM pools. In this study we explore whether physical fractionation techniques isolate soil compartments in a meaningful and functionally relevant way for the investigation of litter-derived nitrogen dynamics at the decadal timescale. We do so by performing aggregate density fractionation (ADF and particle size-density fractionation (PSDF on mineral soil samples from two European beech forests a decade after application of 15N labelled litter.

    Both density and size-based fractionation methods suggested that litter-derived nitrogen became increasingly associated with the mineral phase as decomposition progressed, within aggregates and onto mineral surfaces. However, scientists investigating specific aspects of litter-derived nitrogen dynamics are pointed towards ADF when adsorption and aggregation processes are of interest, whereas PSDF is the superior tool to research the fate of particulate organic matter (POM.

    Some methodological caveats were observed mainly for the PSDF procedure, the most important one being that fine fractions isolated after sonication can not be linked to any defined decomposition pathway or protective mechanism. This also implies that historical assumptions about the "adsorbed" state of carbon associated with fine fractions need to be re-evaluated. Finally, this work demonstrates that establishing a comprehensive picture of whole soil OM dynamics requires a combination of both methodologies and we offer a suggestion for an efficient combination of the density and size-based approaches.

  8. Generalized fractional Schroedinger equation with space-time fractional derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shaowei; Xu Mingyu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the generalized fractional Schroedinger equation with space and time fractional derivatives is constructed. The equation is solved for free particle and for a square potential well by the method of integral transforms, Fourier transform and Laplace transform, and the solution can be expressed in terms of Mittag-Leffler function. The Green function for free particle is also presented in this paper. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the cases of the generalized fractional Schroedinger equation and the ones in standard quantum

  9. Flowthrough Reductive Catalytic Fractionation of Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Eric M.; Stone, Michael L.; Katahira, Rui; Reed, Michelle; Beckham, Gregg T.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2017-11-01

    Reductive catalytic fractionation (RCF) has emerged as a leading biomass fractionation and lignin valorization strategy. Here, flowthrough reactors were used to investigate RCF of poplar. Most RCF studies to date have been conducted in batch, but a flow-based process enables the acquisition of intrinsic kinetic and mechanistic data essential to accelerate the design, optimization, and scale-up of RCF processes. Time-resolved product distributions and yields obtained from experiments with different catalyst loadings were used to identify and deconvolute events during solvolysis and hydrogenolysis. Multi-bed RCF experiments provided unique insights into catalyst deactivation, showing that leaching, sintering, and surface poisoning are causes for decreased catalyst performance. The onset of catalyst deactivation resulted in higher concentrations of unsaturated lignin intermediates and increased occurrence of repolymerization reactions, producing high-molecular-weight species. Overall, this study demonstrates the concept of flowthrough RCF, which will be vital for realistic scale-up of this promising approach.

  10. On some generalization of fractional Brownian motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaotian; Liang Xiangqian; Ren Fuyao; Zhang Shiying

    2006-01-01

    The multifractional Brownian motion (mBm) is a continuous Gaussian process that extends the classical fractional Brownian motion (fBm) defined by Barton and Vincent Poor [Barton RJ, Vincent Poor H. IEEE Trans Inform 1988;34(5):943] and Decreusefond and Ustuenel [Decreusefond L, Ustuenel AS. Potential Anal 1999;10:177]. In addition, an innovational representation of fBm is given

  11. Modeling single-file diffusion with step fractional Brownian motion and a generalized fractional Langevin equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, S C; Teo, L P

    2009-01-01

    Single-file diffusion behaves as normal diffusion at small time and as subdiffusion at large time. These properties can be described in terms of fractional Brownian motion with variable Hurst exponent or multifractional Brownian motion. We introduce a new stochastic process called Riemann–Liouville step fractional Brownian motion which can be regarded as a special case of multifractional Brownian motion with a step function type of Hurst exponent tailored for single-file diffusion. Such a step fractional Brownian motion can be obtained as a solution of the fractional Langevin equation with zero damping. Various kinds of fractional Langevin equations and their generalizations are then considered in order to decide whether their solutions provide the correct description of the long and short time behaviors of single-file diffusion. The cases where the dissipative memory kernel is a Dirac delta function, a power-law function and a combination of these functions are studied in detail. In addition to the case where the short time behavior of single-file diffusion behaves as normal diffusion, we also consider the possibility of a process that begins as ballistic motion

  12. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E

    2014-01-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity. (papers)

  13. Phylogenetic correlograms and the evolution of body size in South American owls (Strigiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alexandre Felizola Diniz-Filho

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years, many models have been proposed to link microevolutionary processes to macroevolutionary patterns, defined by comparative data analysis. Among these, Brownian motion and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U processes have been used to model, respectively, genetic drift or directional selection and stabilizing selection. These models produce different curves of pairwise variance between species against time since divergence, in such a way that different profiles appear in phylogenetic correlograms. We analyzed variation in body length among 19 species of South American owls, by means of phylogenetic correlograms constructed using Moran's I coefficient in four distance classes. Phylogeny among species was based on DNA hybridization. The observed correlogram was then compared with 500 correlograms obtained by simulations of Brownian motion and O-U over the same phylogeny, using discriminant analysis. The observed correlogram indicates a phylogenetic gradient up to 45 mya, when coefficients tend to stabilize, and it is similar to the correlograms produced by the O-U process. This is expected when we consider that body size of organisms is correlated with many ecological and life-history traits and subjected to many constraints that can be modeled by the O-U process, which has been used to describe evolution under stabilizing selection.Nos últimos anos diversos modelos têm sido propostos a fim de realizar inferências sobre processos microevolutivos com base em padrões macroevolutivos obtidos a partir de dados comparativos. Dentre esses, o movimento Browniano e o processo Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U têm sido utilizados para modelar principalmente deriva genética e seleção estabilizadora, respectivamente. Esses modelos produzem curvas diferentes de relação entre variância interespecífica e distância no tempo, de modo que eles podem ser distingüidos com base em correlogramas filogenéticos. Neste trabalho, nós analisamos a varia

  14. Essential oil composition of different fractions of Piper guineense ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mme ESTHER

    Essential oil fractions from dried seed powder of Piper guineense were analyzed by gas .... high frequency in an ultrasonic cell disruptor (Microson™). This process was to .... present on the control (Nc) and treated (Nt) areas of the discs was.

  15. The functional variable method for solving the fractional Korteweg ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The physical and engineering processes have been modelled by means of fractional ... very important role in various fields such as economics, chemistry, notably control the- .... In §3, the functional variable method is applied for finding exact.

  16. Ferroelectric Fractional-Order Capacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Agambayev, Agamyrat

    2017-07-25

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride)-based polymers and their blends are used to fabricate electrostatic fractional-order capacitors. This simple but effective method allows us to precisely tune the constant phase angle of the resulting fractional-order capacitor by changing the blend composition. Additionally, we have derived an empirical relation between the ratio of the blend constituents and the constant phase angle to facilitate the design of a fractional order capacitor with a desired constant phase angle. The structural composition of the fabricated blends is investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques.

  17. Ferroelectric Fractional-Order Capacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Agambayev, Agamyrat; Patole, Shashikant P.; Farhat, Mohamed; Elwakil, Ahmed; Bagci, Hakan; Salama, Khaled N.

    2017-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride)-based polymers and their blends are used to fabricate electrostatic fractional-order capacitors. This simple but effective method allows us to precisely tune the constant phase angle of the resulting fractional-order capacitor by changing the blend composition. Additionally, we have derived an empirical relation between the ratio of the blend constituents and the constant phase angle to facilitate the design of a fractional order capacitor with a desired constant phase angle. The structural composition of the fabricated blends is investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques.

  18. On Generalized Fractional Differentiator Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid A. Jalab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available By employing the generalized fractional differential operator, we introduce a system of fractional order derivative for a uniformly sampled polynomial signal. The calculation of the bring in signal depends on the additive combination of the weighted bring-in of N cascaded digital differentiators. The weights are imposed in a closed formula containing the Stirling numbers of the first kind. The approach taken in this work is to consider that signal function in terms of Newton series. The convergence of the system to a fractional time differentiator is discussed.

  19. Methods and Algorithms for Solving Inverse Problems for Fractional Advection-Dispersion Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Aldoghaither, Abeer

    2015-01-01

    Fractional calculus has been introduced as an e cient tool for modeling physical phenomena, thanks to its memory and hereditary properties. For example, fractional models have been successfully used to describe anomalous di↵usion processes

  20. An Efficient Implicit FEM Scheme for Fractional-in-Space Reaction-Diffusion Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Burrage, Kevin; Hale, Nicholas; Kay, David

    2012-01-01

    Fractional differential equations are becoming increasingly used as a modelling tool for processes associated with anomalous diffusion or spatial heterogeneity. However, the presence of a fractional differential operator causes memory (time

  1. Analysis on one type of swing option in the energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mistry, Hetal A.

    2005-01-01

    In the Nordic electricity market most of the trading takes place in derivates and options. To describe these products theoretically one needs to have knowledge from stochastic analysis. This thesis will derive a price model for one type of swing option in energy market. The main aim of writing this thesis is to introduce coal power plant and how to approach the problem if such power plant is built in Norway. This thesis uses the approach where I start out with a model for the spot price of electricity and coal, and then derive theoretical option prices. I use a Schwartz process for model and Ornstein Uhlenbeck processes to model the spot prices for electricity and coal. This model also incorporates mean-reversion, which is an important aspect of energy prices. Historical data for the spot prices is used to estimate my variables in the Schwartz model. The main objectives of this thesis were to find the price for a tolling contract in energy market and production volume that is producers control function. The first chapters gives an over view about the agreement and the formula used to derive the price. The second chapter provided me with the material I needed to derive these price and production volume such as dynamics for the spot prices for electricity and coal and their solution. Third chapter gives a statistical look on these stochastic processes. In the last chapter I tested the price model for stochastic control problem and found that the swing option can be bound in two ways: 1. Swing option limited as Margrabes solution. 2. Swing option limited as spread option. The use of the model is discussed. (Author)

  2. A unified view on weakly correlated recurrent networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro eGrytskyy

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of neuron models used in contemporary theoretical neuroscience to investigate specific properties of covariances in the spiking activity raises the question how these models relate to each other. In particular it is hard to distinguish between generic properties of covariances and peculiarities due to the abstracted model. Here we present a unified view on pairwise covariances in recurrent networks in the irregular regime. We consider the binary neuron model, the leaky integrate-and-fire model, and the Hawkes process. We show that linear approximation maps each of these models to either of two classes of linear rate models, including the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process as a special case. The distinction between both classes is the location of additive noise in the rate dynamics, which is located on the output side for spiking models and on the input side for the binary model. Both classes allow closed form solutions for the covariance. For output noise it separates into an echo term and a term due to correlated input. The unified framework enables us to transfer results between models. For example, we generalize the binary model and the Hawkes process to the situation with synaptic conduction delays and simplify derivations for established results. Our approach is applicable to general network structures and suitable for the calculation of population averages. The derived averages are exact for fixed out-degree network architectures and approximate for fixed in-degree. We demonstrate how taking into account fluctuations in the linearization procedure increases the accuracy of the effective theory and we explain the class dependent differences between covariances in the time and the frequency domain. Finally we show that the oscillatory instability emerging in networks of integrate-and-fire models with delayed inhibitory feedback is a model-invariant feature: the same structure of poles in the complex frequency plane determines the

  3. Adaptive fractionation therapy: I. Basic concept and strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Weiguo; Chen Mingli; Chen Quan; Ruchala, Kenneth; Olivera, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is fractionized to increase the therapeutic ratio. Fractionation in conventional treatment is determined as part of the prescription, and a fixed fraction size is used for the whole course of treatment. Due to patients' day-to-day variations on the relative distance between the tumor and the organs at risk (OAR), a better therapeutic ratio may be attained by using an adaptive fraction size. Intuitively, we want to use a larger fraction size when OAR and the tumor are far apart and a smaller fraction size when OAR and the tumor are close to each other. The concept and strategies of adaptive fractionation therapy (AFT) are introduced in this paper. AFT is an on-line adaptive technique that utilizes the variations of internal structures to get optimal OAR sparing. Changes of internal structures are classified as different configurations according to their feasibility to the radiation delivery. A priori knowledge is used to describe the probability distribution of these configurations. On-line processes include identifying the configuration via daily image guidance and optimizing the current fraction size. The optimization is modeled as a dynamic linear programming problem so that at the end of the treatment course, the tumor receives the same planned dose while OAR receives less dose than the regular fractionation delivery. Extensive simulations, which include thousands of treatment courses with each course consisting of 40 fractions, are used to test the efficiency and robustness of the presented technique. The gains of OAR sparing depend on the variations on configurations and the bounds of the fraction size. The larger the variations and the looser the bounds are, the larger the gains will be. Compared to the conventional fractionation technique with 2 Gy/fraction in 40 fractions, for a 20% variation on tumor-OAR configurations and [1 Gy, 3 Gy] fraction size bounds, the cumulative OAR dose with adaptive fractionation is 3-8 Gy, or 7-20% less than that

  4. Taylor–Fourier spectra to study fractional order systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbé, Kurt; Lauwers, Lieve; Fuentes, Lee Gonzales

    2016-01-01

    In measurement science mathematical models are often used as an indirect measurement of physical properties which are mapped to measurands through the mathematical model. Dynamical systems describing a physical process with a dominant diffusion or dispersion phenomenon requires a large dimensional model due to its long memory. Ignoring a dominant difussion or dispersion component acts as a confounder which may introduce a bias in the estimated quantities of interest. For linear systems it has been observed that fractional order models outperform classical rational forms in terms of the number of parameters for the same fitting error. However it is not straightforward to deal with a fractional order system or long memory effects without prior knowledge. Since the parametric modeling of a fractional system is very involved, we put forward the question whether fractional insight can be gathered in a non-parametric way. In this paper we show that classical Fourier basis leading to the frequency response function lacks fractional insight. To circumvent this problem, we introduce a fractional Taylor–Fourier basis to obtain non-parametric insight in the fractional system. This analysis proposes a novel type of spectrum to visualize the spectral content of a fractional system: Taylor–Fourier spectrum. This spectrum is fully measurement driven which can be used as a first to explore the fractional dynamics of a measured diffusion or dispersion system. (paper)

  5. On generalized fractional vibration equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Hongzhe; Zheng, Zhibao; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The paper presents a generalized fractional vibration equation for arbitrary viscoelastically damped system. • Some classical vibration equations can be derived from the developed equation. • The analytic solution of developed equation is derived under some special cases. • The generalized equation is particularly useful for developing new fractional equivalent linearization method. - Abstract: In this paper, a generalized fractional vibration equation with multi-terms of fractional dissipation is developed to describe the dynamical response of an arbitrary viscoelastically damped system. It is shown that many classical equations of motion, e.g., the Bagley–Torvik equation, can be derived from the developed equation. The Laplace transform is utilized to solve the generalized equation and the analytic solution under some special cases is derived. Example demonstrates the generalized transfer function of an arbitrary viscoelastic system.

  6. Physcicists rewarded for 'fractional electrons'

    CERN Multimedia

    Ball, P

    1998-01-01

    The 1998 Nobel prize for physics has been awarded to Horst Stormer, Daniel Tsui and Robert Laughlin.Stormer and Tsui were the first to observe the fractional quantum Hall effect and Laughlin provided the theory shortly afterwards (1 page).

  7. Ultracentrifugation for ultrafine nanodiamond fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koniakhin, S. V.; Besedina, N. A.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Shvidchenko, A. V.; Eidelman, E. D.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method for ultrafine fractionation of nanodiamonds using the differential centrifugation in the fields up to 215000g. The developed protocols yield 4-6 nm fraction giving main contribution to the light scattering intensity. The desired 4-6 nm fraction can be obtained from various types of initial nanodiamonds: three types of detonation nanodiamonds differing in purifying methods, laser synthesis nanodiamonds and nanodiamonds made by milling. The characterization of the obtained hydrosols was conducted with Dynamic Light Scattering, Zeta potential measurements, powder XRD and TEM. According to powder XRD and TEM data ultracentrifugation also leads to a further fractionation of the primary diamond nanocrystallites in the hydrosols from 4 to 2 nm.

  8. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  9. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M andO 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  10. Fractional Reserve Banking: Some Quibbles

    OpenAIRE

    Bagus, Philipp; Howden, David

    2010-01-01

    We explore several unaddressed issues in George Selgin’s (1988) claim that the best monetary system to maintain monetary equilibrium is a fractional reserve free banking one. The claim that adverse clearing balances would limit credit expansion in a fractional reserve free banking system is more troublesome than previously reckoned. Both lengthened clearing periods and interbank agreements render credit expansion unrestrained. “The theory of free banking” confuses increases in money held with...

  11. Intelligent fractions learning system: implementation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, Andrew C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Conference Proceedings Paul Cunningham and Miriam Cunningham (Eds) IIMC International Information Management Corporation, 2011 ISBN: 978-1-905824-24-3 An Intelligent Fractions Learning System: Implementation Andrew Cyrus SMITH1, Teemu H. LAINE2 1CSIR... to fractions. Our aim with the current research project is to extend the existing UFractions learning system to incorporate automatic data capturing. ?Intelligent UFractions? allows a teacher to remotely monitor the children?s progress during...

  12. Studying the evolutionary significance of thermal adaptation in ectotherms: The diversification of amphibians' energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nespolo, Roberto F; Figueroa, Julio; Solano-Iguaran, Jaiber J

    2017-08-01

    A fundamental problem in evolutionary biology is the understanding of the factors that promote or constrain adaptive evolution, and assessing the role of natural selection in this process. Here, comparative phylogenetics, that is, using phylogenetic information and traits to infer evolutionary processes has been a major paradigm . In this study, we discuss Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models (OU) in the context of thermal adaptation in ectotherms. We specifically applied this approach to study amphibians's evolution and energy metabolism. It has been hypothesized that amphibians exploit adaptive zones characterized by low energy expenditure, which generate specific predictions in terms of the patterns of diversification in standard metabolic rate (SMR). We complied whole-animal metabolic rates for 122 species of amphibians, and adjusted several models of diversification. According to the adaptive zone hypothesis, we expected: (1) to find "accelerated evolution" in SMR (i.e., diversification above Brownian Motion expectations, BM), (2) that a model assuming evolutionary optima (i.e., an OU model) fits better than a white-noise model and (3) that a model assuming multiple optima (according to the three amphibians's orders) fits better than a model assuming a single optimum. As predicted, we found that the diversification of SMR occurred most of the time, above BM expectations. Also, we found that a model assuming an optimum explained the data in a better way than a white-noise model. However, we did not find evidence that an OU model with multiple optima fits the data better, suggesting a single optimum in SMR for Anura, Caudata and Gymnophiona. These results show how comparative phylogenetics could be applied for testing adaptive hypotheses regarding history and physiological performance in ectotherms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Xenon fractionation in porous planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Pollack, James B.; Kasting, James F.

    1990-01-01

    The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. Beginning with Ozima and Nakazawa's (1980) hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large porous planetesimals, it is pointed out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. It is shown that enough fractionated Xe to supply the earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and Martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, the present hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula.

  14. Fractional Charge Definitions and Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldhaber, A.S.

    2004-06-04

    Fractional charge is known through theoretical and experimental discoveries of isolable objects carrying fractions of familiar charge units--electric charge Q, spin S, and the difference of baryon and lepton numbers B-L. With a few simple assumptions all these effects may be described using a generalized version of charge renormalization for locally conserved charges, in which medium correlations yield familiar adiabatic, continuous renormalization, or sometimes nonadiabatic, discrete renormalization. Fractional charges may be carried by fundamental particles or fundamental solitons. Either picture works for the simplest fractional-quantum-Hall-effect quasiholes, though the particle description is far more general. The only known fundamental solitons in three or fewer space dimensions d are the kink (d = 1), the vortex (d = 2), and the magnetic monopole (d = 3). Further, for a charge not intrinsically coupled to the topological charge of a soliton, only the kink and the monopole may carry fractional values. The same reasoning enforces fractional values of B-L for electrically charged elementary particles.

  15. Fractional Charge Definitions and Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhaber, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Fractional charge is known through theoretical and experimental discoveries of isolable objects carrying fractions of familiar charge units--electric charge Q, spin S, and the difference of baryon and lepton numbers B-L. With a few simple assumptions all these effects may be described using a generalized version of charge renormalization for locally conserved charges, in which medium correlations yield familiar adiabatic, continuous renormalization, or sometimes nonadiabatic, discrete renormalization. Fractional charges may be carried by fundamental particles or fundamental solitons. Either picture works for the simplest fractional-quantum-Hall-effect quasiholes, though the particle description is far more general. The only known fundamental solitons in three or fewer space dimensions d are the kink (d = 1), the vortex (d = 2), and the magnetic monopole (d = 3). Further, for a charge not intrinsically coupled to the topological charge of a soliton, only the kink and the monopole may carry fractional values. The same reasoning enforces fractional values of B-L for electrically charged elementary particles

  16. Xenon fractionation in porous planetesimals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahnle, K.; Pollack, J.B.; Kasting, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and Earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. We begin with Ozima and Nakazawa's hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large porous planetesimals. We point out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. We show that enough fractionated Xe to supply the Earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, our hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula. The required planetesimals are large, representing a class of object now extinct in the solar system

  17. Revised models of interstellar nitrogen isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirström, E. S.; Charnley, S. B.

    2018-03-01

    Nitrogen-bearing molecules in cold molecular clouds exhibit a range of isotopic fractionation ratios and these molecules may be the precursors of 15N enrichments found in comets and meteorites. Chemical model calculations indicate that atom-molecular ion and ion-molecule reactions could account for most of the fractionation patterns observed. However, recent quantum-chemical computations demonstrate that several of the key processes are unlikely to occur in dense clouds. Related model calculations of dense cloud chemistry show that the revised 15N enrichments fail to match observed values. We have investigated the effects of these reaction rate modifications on the chemical model of Wirström et al. (2012) for which there are significant physical and chemical differences with respect to other models. We have included 15N fractionation of CN in neutral-neutral reactions and also updated rate coefficients for key reactions in the nitrogen chemistry. We find that the revised fractionation rates have the effect of suppressing 15N enrichment in ammonia at all times, while the depletion is even more pronounced, reaching 14N/15N ratios of >2000. Taking the updated nitrogen chemistry into account, no significant enrichment occurs in HCN or HNC, contrary to observational evidence in dark clouds and comets, although the 14N/15N ratio can still be below 100 in CN itself. However, such low CN abundances are predicted that the updated model falls short of explaining the bulk 15N enhancements observed in primitive materials. It is clear that alternative fractionating reactions are necessary to reproduce observations, so further laboratory and theoretical studies are urgently needed.

  18. Oxygen isotopic fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, N.; Turchyn, A. V.; Lyons, T.; Bruchert, V.; Schrag, D. P.; Wall, J.

    2006-12-01

    Sulfur isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) is understood to depend on a variety of environmental parameters, such as sulfate concentration, temperature, cell specific sulfate reduction rates, and the carbon substrate. What controls oxygen isotope fractionation during BSR is less well understood. Some studies have suggested that carbon substrate is important, whereas others concluded that there is a stoichiometric relationship between the fractionations of sulfur and oxygen during BSR. Studies of oxygen fractionation are complicated by isotopic equilibration between sulfur intermediates, particularly sulfite, and water. This process can modify the isotopic composition of the extracellular sulfate pool (δ18OSO4 ). Given this, the challenge is to distinguish between this isotopic equilibration and fractionations linked to the kinetic effects of the intercellular enzymes and the incorporation of sulfate into the bacterial cell. The δ18OSO4 , in concert with the sulfur isotope composition of sulfate (δ34SSO4), could be a powerful tool for understanding the pathways and environmental controls of BSR in natural systems. We will present δ18OSO4 data measured from batch culture growth of 14 different species of sulfate reducing bacteria for which sulfur isotope data were previously published. A general observation is that δ18OSO4 shows little isotopic change (kinetic effect during BSR and/or equilibration between sulfur intermediates and the isotopically light water (~-5‰) of the growth medium. Our present batch culture data do not allow us to convincingly isolate the magnitude and the controlling parameters of the kinetic isotope effect for oxygen. However, ongoing growth of mutant bacteria missing enzymes critical in the different steps of BSR may assist in this mission.

  19. Fractionation of Stable Isotopes in Atmospheric Aerosol Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meusinger, Carl

    -independent) fractionation processes of stable isotopes of C, N, O and S in order to investigate three different systems related to aerosols: 1. Post-depositional processes of nitrate in snow that obscure nitrate ice core records 2. Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol generated by ozonolysis of X...... reactions and undergo complex chemical and physical changes during their lifetimes. In order to assess processes that form and alter aerosols, information provided by stable isotopes can be used to help constrain estimates on the strength of aerosol sources and sinks. This thesis studies (mass...... as required. The kndings provide important results for the studies' respective felds, including a description of the isotopic fractionation and quantum yield of nitrate photolysis in snow, equilibrium fractionation in secondary organic aerosol and fractionation constants of different oxidation pathways of SO2....

  20. Fractional Diffusion Equations and Anomalous Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Luiz Roberto; Kaminski Lenzi, Ervin

    2018-01-01

    Preface; 1. Mathematical preliminaries; 2. A survey of the fractional calculus; 3. From normal to anomalous diffusion; 4. Fractional diffusion equations: elementary applications; 5. Fractional diffusion equations: surface effects; 6. Fractional nonlinear diffusion equation; 7. Anomalous diffusion: anisotropic case; 8. Fractional Schrödinger equations; 9. Anomalous diffusion and impedance spectroscopy; 10. The Poisson–Nernst–Planck anomalous (PNPA) models; References; Index.

  1. Conformable Fractional Bessel Equation and Bessel Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Gökdoğan, Ahmet; Ünal, Emrah; Çelik, Ercan

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we study the fractional power series solutions around regular singular point x=0 of conformable fractional Bessel differential equation and fractional Bessel functions. Then, we compare fractional solutions with ordinary solutions. In addition, we present certain property of fractional Bessel functions.

  2. Discrete fractional solutions of a Legendre equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmazer, Resat

    2018-01-01

    One of the most popular research interests of science and engineering is the fractional calculus theory in recent times. Discrete fractional calculus has also an important position in fractional calculus. In this work, we acquire new discrete fractional solutions of the homogeneous and non homogeneous Legendre differential equation by using discrete fractional nabla operator.

  3. Methods And Apparatus For Acoustic Fiber Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodeur, Pierre

    1999-11-09

    Methods and apparatus for acoustic fiber fractionation using a plane ultrasonic wave field interacting with water suspended fibers circulating in a channel flow using acoustic radiation forces to separate fibers into two or more fractions based on fiber radius, with applications of the separation concept in the pulp and paper industry. The continuous process relies on the use of a wall-mounted, rectangular cross-section piezoelectric ceramic transducer to selectively deflect flowing fibers as they penetrate the ultrasonic field. The described embodiment uses a transducer frequency of approximately 150 kHz. Depending upon the amount of dissolved gas in water, separation is obtained using a standing or a traveling wave field.

  4. Fractional calculus and morphogen gradient formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuste, Santos Bravo; Abad, Enrique; Lindenberg, Katja

    2012-12-01

    Some microscopic models for reactive systems where the reaction kinetics is limited by subdiffusion are described by means of reaction-subdiffusion equations where fractional derivatives play a key role. In particular, we consider subdiffusive particles described by means of a Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) model subject to a linear (first-order) death process. The resulting fractional equation is employed to study the developmental biology key problem of morphogen gradient formation for the case in which the morphogens are subdiffusive. If the morphogen degradation rate (reactivity) is constant, we find exponentially decreasing stationary concentration profiles, which are similar to the profiles found when the morphogens diffuse normally. However, for the case in which the degradation rate decays exponentially with the distance to the morphogen source, we find that the morphogen profiles are qualitatively different from the profiles obtained when the morphogens diffuse normally.

  5. Fractional Brownian motion with a reflecting wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Alexander H. O.; Vojta, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Fractional Brownian motion, a stochastic process with long-time correlations between its increments, is a prototypical model for anomalous diffusion. We analyze fractional Brownian motion in the presence of a reflecting wall by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Whereas the mean-square displacement of the particle shows the expected anomalous diffusion behavior ˜tα , the interplay between the geometric confinement and the long-time memory leads to a highly non-Gaussian probability density function with a power-law singularity at the barrier. In the superdiffusive case α >1 , the particles accumulate at the barrier leading to a divergence of the probability density. For subdiffusion α implications of these findings, in particular, for applications that are dominated by rare events.

  6. Complex network approach to fractional time series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manshour, Pouya [Physics Department, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr 75169 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In order to extract correlation information inherited in stochastic time series, the visibility graph algorithm has been recently proposed, by which a time series can be mapped onto a complex network. We demonstrate that the visibility algorithm is not an appropriate one to study the correlation aspects of a time series. We then employ the horizontal visibility algorithm, as a much simpler one, to map fractional processes onto complex networks. The degree distributions are shown to have parabolic exponential forms with Hurst dependent fitting parameter. Further, we take into account other topological properties such as maximum eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix and the degree assortativity, and show that such topological quantities can also be used to predict the Hurst exponent, with an exception for anti-persistent fractional Gaussian noises. To solve this problem, we take into account the Spearman correlation coefficient between nodes' degrees and their corresponding data values in the original time series.

  7. Boundary value problemfor multidimensional fractional advection-dispersion equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khasambiev Mokhammad Vakhaevich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent time there is a very great interest in the study of differential equations of fractional order, in which the unknown function is under the symbol of fractional derivative. It is due to the development of the theory of fractional integro-differential theory and application of it in different fields.The fractional integrals and derivatives of fractional integro-differential equations are widely used in modern investigations of theoretical physics, mechanics, and applied mathematics. The fractional calculus is a very powerful tool for describing physical systems, which have a memory and are non-local. Many processes in complex systems have nonlocality and long-time memory. Fractional integral operators and fractional differential operators allow describing some of these properties. The use of the fractional calculus will be helpful for obtaining the dynamical models, in which integro-differential operators describe power long-time memory by time and coordinates, and three-dimensional nonlocality for complex medium and processes.Differential equations of fractional order appear when we use fractal conception in physics of the condensed medium. The transfer, described by the operator with fractional derivatives at a long distance from the sources, leads to other behavior of relatively small concentrations as compared with classic diffusion. This fact redefines the existing ideas about safety, based on the ideas on exponential velocity of damping. Fractional calculus in the fractal theory and the systems with memory have the same importance as the classic analysis in mechanics of continuous medium.In recent years, the application of fractional derivatives for describing and studying the physical processes of stochastic transfer is very popular too. Many problems of filtration of liquids in fractal (high porous medium lead to the need to study boundary value problems for partial differential equations in fractional order.In this paper the

  8. Quantifying the value of investing in distributed natural gas and renewable electricity systems as complements: Applications of discounted cash flow and real options analysis with stochastic inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pless, Jacquelyn; Arent, Douglas J.; Logan, Jeffrey; Cochran, Jaquelin; Zinaman, Owen

    2016-01-01

    One energy policy objective in the United States is to promote the adoption of technologies that provide consumers with stable, secure, and clean energy. Recent work provides anecdotal evidence of natural gas (NG) and renewable electricity (RE) synergies in the power sector, however few studies quantify the value of investing in NG and RE systems together as complements. This paper uses discounted cash flow analysis and real options analysis to value hybrid NG-RE systems in distributed applications, focusing on residential and commercial projects assumed to be located in the states of New York and Texas. Technology performance and operational risk profiles are modeled at the hourly level to capture variable RE output and NG prices are modeled stochastically as geometric Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) stochastic processes to capture NG price uncertainty. The findings consistently suggest that NG-RE hybrid distributed systems are more favorable investments in the applications studied relative to their single-technology alternatives when incentives for renewables are available. In some cases, NG-only systems are the favorable investments. Understanding the value of investing in NG-RE hybrid systems provides insights into one avenue towards reducing greenhouse gas emissions, given the important role of NG and RE in the power sector. - Highlights: • Natural gas and renewable electricity can be viewed as complements. • We model hybrid natural gas and renewable electricity systems at the hourly level. • We incorporate variable renewable power output and uncertain natural gas prices. • Hybrid natural gas and renewable electricity systems can be valuable investments.

  9. Ecological and phylogenetic variability in the spinalis muscle of snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingle, J L; Gartner, G E A; Jayne, B C; Garland, T

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the origin and maintenance of functionally important subordinate traits is a major goal of evolutionary physiologists and ecomorphologists. Within the confines of a limbless body plan, snakes are diverse in terms of body size and ecology, but we know little about the functional traits that underlie this diversity. We used a phylogenetically diverse group of 131 snake species to examine associations between habitat use, sidewinding locomotion and constriction behaviour with the number of body vertebrae spanned by a single segment of the spinalis muscle, with total numbers of body vertebrae used as a covariate in statistical analyses. We compared models with combinations of these predictors to determine which best fit the data among all species and for the advanced snakes only (N = 114). We used both ordinary least-squares models and phylogenetic models in which the residuals were modelled as evolving by the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Snakes with greater numbers of vertebrae tended to have spinalis muscles that spanned more vertebrae. Habitat effects dominated models for analyses of all species and advanced snakes only, with the spinalis length spanning more vertebrae in arboreal species and fewer vertebrae in aquatic and burrowing species. Sidewinding specialists had shorter muscle lengths than nonspecialists. The relationship between prey constriction and spinalis length was less clear. Differences among clades were also strong when considering all species, but not for advanced snakes alone. Overall, these results suggest that muscle morphology may have played a key role in the adaptive radiation of snakes. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  10. Noise in strong laser-atom interactions: Phase telegraph noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberly, J.H.; Wodkiewicz, K.; Shore, B.W.

    1984-01-01

    We discuss strong laser-atom interactions that are subjected to jump-type (random telegraph) random-phase noise. Physically, the jumps may arise from laser fluctuations, from collisions of various kinds, or from other external forces. Our discussion is carried out in two stages. First, direct and partially heuristic calculations determine the laser spectrum and also give a third-order differential equation for the average inversion of a two-level atom on resonance. At this stage a number of general features of the interaction are able to be studied easily. The optical analog of motional narrowing, for example, is clearly predicted. Second, we show that the theory of generalized Poisson processes allows laser-atom interactions in the presence of random telegraph noise of all kinds (not only phase noise) to be treated systematically, by means of a master equation first used in the context of quantum optics by Burshtein. We use the Burshtein equation to obtain an exact expression for the two-level atom's steady-state resonance fluorescence spectrum, when the exciting laser exhibits phase telegraph noise. Some comparisons are made with results obtained from other noise models. Detailed treatments of the effects ofmly jumps, or as a model of finite laser bandwidth effects, in which the laser frequency exhibits random jumps. We show that these two types of frequency noise can be distinguished in light-scattering spectra. We also discuss examples which demonstrate both temporal and spectral motional narrowing, nonexponential correlations, and non-Lorentzian spectra. Its exact solubility in finite terms makes the frequency-telegraph noise model an attractive alternative to the white-noise Ornstein-Uhlenbeck frequency noise model which has been previously applied to laser-atom interactions

  11. A General Model for Estimating Macroevolutionary Landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Florian C; Démery, Vincent; Conti, Elena; Harmon, Luke J; Uyeda, Josef

    2018-03-01

    The evolution of quantitative characters over long timescales is often studied using stochastic diffusion models. The current toolbox available to students of macroevolution is however limited to two main models: Brownian motion and the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, plus some of their extensions. Here, we present a very general model for inferring the dynamics of quantitative characters evolving under both random diffusion and deterministic forces of any possible shape and strength, which can accommodate interesting evolutionary scenarios like directional trends, disruptive selection, or macroevolutionary landscapes with multiple peaks. This model is based on a general partial differential equation widely used in statistical mechanics: the Fokker-Planck equation, also known in population genetics as the Kolmogorov forward equation. We thus call the model FPK, for Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov. We first explain how this model can be used to describe macroevolutionary landscapes over which quantitative traits evolve and, more importantly, we detail how it can be fitted to empirical data. Using simulations, we show that the model has good behavior both in terms of discrimination from alternative models and in terms of parameter inference. We provide R code to fit the model to empirical data using either maximum-likelihood or Bayesian estimation, and illustrate the use of this code with two empirical examples of body mass evolution in mammals. FPK should greatly expand the set of macroevolutionary scenarios that can be studied since it opens the way to estimating macroevolutionary landscapes of any conceivable shape. [Adaptation; bounds; diffusion; FPK model; macroevolution; maximum-likelihood estimation; MCMC methods; phylogenetic comparative data; selection.].

  12. Is the number and size of scales in Liolaemus lizards driven by climate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Tulli, María; Cruz, Félix B

    2018-05-03

    Ectothermic vertebrates are sensitive to thermal fluctuations in the environments where they occur. To buffer these fluctuations, ectotherms use different strategies, including the integument, which is a barrier that minimizes temperature exchange between the inner body and the surrounding air. In lizards, this barrier is constituted by keratinized scales of variable size, shape and texture, and its main function is protection, water loss avoidance and thermoregulation. The size of scales in lizards has been proposed to vary in relation to climatic gradients; however, it has also been observed that in some groups of Iguanian lizards could be related to phylogeny. Thus, here, we studied the area and number of scales (dorsal and ventral) of 61 species of Liolaemus lizards distributed in a broad latitudinal and altitudinal gradient to determine the nature of the variation of the scales with climate, and found that the number and size of scales are related to climatic variables, such as temperature and geographical variables as altitude. The evolutionary process that better explained how these morphological variables evolved was the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model. The number of scales seemed to be related to common ancestry, whereas dorsal and ventral scale areas seemed to vary as a consequence of ecological traits. In fact, the ventral area is less exposed to climate conditions such as ultraviolet radiation or wind and is thus under less pressure to change in response to alterations in external conditions. It is possible that scale ornamentation such as keels and granulosity may bring some more information in this regard. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Fractional governing equations of transient groundwater flow in confined aquifers with multi-fractional dimensions in fractional time

    OpenAIRE

    M. L. Kavvas; T. Tu; A. Ercan; J. Polsinelli

    2017-01-01

    Using fractional calculus, a dimensionally consistent governing equation of transient, saturated groundwater flow in fractional time in a multi-fractional confined aquifer is developed. First, a dimensionally consistent continuity equation for transient saturated groundwater flow in fractional time and in a multi-fractional, multidimensional confined aquifer is developed. For the equation of water flux within a multi-fractional multidimensional confined aquifer, a dimensionally...

  14. Robust fractional order differentiators using generalized modulating functions method

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Dayan; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at designing a fractional order differentiator for a class of signals satisfying a linear differential equation with unknown parameters. A generalized modulating functions method is proposed first to estimate the unknown parameters, then to derive accurate integral formulae for the left-sided Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives of the studied signal. Unlike the improper integral in the definition of the left-sided Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative, the integrals in the proposed formulae can be proper and be considered as a low-pass filter by choosing appropriate modulating functions. Hence, digital fractional order differentiators applicable for on-line applications are deduced using a numerical integration method in discrete noisy case. Moreover, some error analysis are given for noise error contributions due to a class of stochastic processes. Finally, numerical examples are given to show the accuracy and robustness of the proposed fractional order differentiators.

  15. Linear fractional diffusion-wave equation for scientists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Povstenko, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    This book systematically presents solutions to the linear time-fractional diffusion-wave equation. It introduces the integral transform technique and discusses the properties of the Mittag-Leffler, Wright, and Mainardi functions that appear in the solutions. The time-nonlocal dependence between the flux and the gradient of the transported quantity with the “long-tail” power kernel results in the time-fractional diffusion-wave equation with the Caputo fractional derivative. Time-nonlocal generalizations of classical Fourier’s, Fick’s and Darcy’s laws are considered and different kinds of boundary conditions for this equation are discussed (Dirichlet, Neumann, Robin, perfect contact). The book provides solutions to the fractional diffusion-wave equation with one, two and three space variables in Cartesian, cylindrical and spherical coordinates. The respective sections of the book can be used for university courses on fractional calculus, heat and mass transfer, transport processes in porous media and ...

  16. Bovine plasma protein fractionation by ion exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moure, F; Rendueles, M; Díaz, M

    2004-12-01

    An ion exchange chromatography process was developed to separate the main protein fractions of bovine blood plasma using a composite material, Q-HyperD resin, and a gel material, DEAE-Sepharose. The experiments were carried out at semipreparative scale. It was necessary to establish analytical methods of electrophoresis and HPLC to identify the fractionated proteins. Results show that these materials are able to adequately fractionate different protein groups from the raw blood plasma. This method may be used to avoid chemical fractionation using agents such as ethanol or PEG and, thus, decrease protein denaturation of the different fractions to be used for research or pharmaceutical purposes. The Q-HyperD resin presents a better retention capacity for plasma protein than DEAE-Sepharose under the experimental conditions employed.

  17. Robust fractional order differentiators using generalized modulating functions method

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Dayan

    2015-02-01

    This paper aims at designing a fractional order differentiator for a class of signals satisfying a linear differential equation with unknown parameters. A generalized modulating functions method is proposed first to estimate the unknown parameters, then to derive accurate integral formulae for the left-sided Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives of the studied signal. Unlike the improper integral in the definition of the left-sided Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative, the integrals in the proposed formulae can be proper and be considered as a low-pass filter by choosing appropriate modulating functions. Hence, digital fractional order differentiators applicable for on-line applications are deduced using a numerical integration method in discrete noisy case. Moreover, some error analysis are given for noise error contributions due to a class of stochastic processes. Finally, numerical examples are given to show the accuracy and robustness of the proposed fractional order differentiators.

  18. Measuring memory with the order of fractional derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Maolin; Wang, Zaihua; Hu, Haiyan

    2013-12-01

    Fractional derivative has a history as long as that of classical calculus, but it is much less popular than it should be. What is the physical meaning of fractional derivative? This is still an open problem. In modeling various memory phenomena, we observe that a memory process usually consists of two stages. One is short with permanent retention, and the other is governed by a simple model of fractional derivative. With the numerical least square method, we show that the fractional model perfectly fits the test data of memory phenomena in different disciplines, not only in mechanics, but also in biology and psychology. Based on this model, we find that a physical meaning of the fractional order is an index of memory.

  19. A Tutorial Review on Fractal Spacetime and Fractional Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ji-Huan

    2014-11-01

    This tutorial review of fractal-Cantorian spacetime and fractional calculus begins with Leibniz's notation for derivative without limits which can be generalized to discontinuous media like fractal derivative and q-derivative of quantum calculus. Fractal spacetime is used to elucidate some basic properties of fractal which is the foundation of fractional calculus, and El Naschie's mass-energy equation for the dark energy. The variational iteration method is used to introduce the definition of fractional derivatives. Fractal derivative is explained geometrically and q-derivative is motivated by quantum mechanics. Some effective analytical approaches to fractional differential equations, e.g., the variational iteration method, the homotopy perturbation method, the exp-function method, the fractional complex transform, and Yang-Laplace transform, are outlined and the main solution processes are given.

  20. Fractional charge definitions and conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldhaber, Alfred Scharff

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of fractional charge has come to prominence in recent decades through theoretical and experimental discoveries of isolable objects which carry fractions of familiar charge units--electric charge Q, spin S, baryon number B and lepton number L. It is shown here on the basis of a few simple assumptions that all these effects may be described using a generalized version of charge renormalization for locally conserved charges, in which many-body correlations can produce familiar adiabatic, continuous renormalization, and in some circumstances nonadiabatic, discrete renormalization. The fractional charges may be carried either by fundamental particles or by fundamental solitons. This excludes nontopological solitons and also skyrmions: The only known fundamental solitons in three or fewer space dimensions d are the kink (d=1), the vortex (d=2), and the magnetic monopole (d=3). Further, for a charge which is not intrinsically coupled to the topological charge of a soliton, only the kink and the monopole may carry fractional values. The same reasoning enforces fractional local values of B-L for electrically charged elementary particles