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Sample records for fractional dose tetravalent

  1. Immunogenicity of fractional doses of tetravalent a/c/y/w135 meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine: results from a randomized non-inferiority controlled trial in Uganda.

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    Philippe J Guerin

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A is the main causative pathogen of meningitis epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa. In recent years, serogroup W135 has also been the cause of epidemics. Mass vaccination campaigns with polysaccharide vaccines are key elements in controlling these epidemics. Facing global vaccine shortage, we explored the use of fractional doses of a licensed A/C/Y/W135 polysaccharide meningococcal vaccine.We conducted a randomized, non-inferiority trial in 750 healthy volunteers 2-19 years old in Mbarara, Uganda, to compare the immune response of the full dose of the vaccine versus fractional doses (1/5 or 1/10. Safety and tolerability data were collected for all subjects during the 4 weeks following the injection. Pre- and post-vaccination sera were analyzed by measuring serum bactericidal activity (SBA with baby rabbit complement. A responder was defined as a subject with a > or =4-fold increase in SBA against a target strain from each serogroup and SBA titer > or =128. For serogroup W135, 94% and 97% of the vaccinees in the 1/5- and 1/10-dose arms, respectively, were responders, versus 94% in the full-dose arm; for serogroup A, 92% and 88% were responders, respectively, versus 95%. Non-inferiority was demonstrated between the full dose and both fractional doses in SBA seroresponse against serogroups W135 and Y, in total population analysis. Non-inferiority was shown between the full and 1/5 doses for serogroup A in the population non-immune prior to vaccination. Non-inferiority was not shown for any of the fractionate doses for serogroup C. Safety and tolerability data were favourable, as observed in other studies.While the advent of conjugate A vaccine is anticipated to largely contribute to control serogroup A outbreaks in Africa, the scale-up of its production will not cover the entire "Meningitis Belt" target population for at least the next 3 to 5 years. In view of the current shortage of meningococcal vaccines for Africa

  2. Efficacy, immunogenicity, and safety of two doses of a tetravalent rotavirus vaccine RRV-TV in Ghana with the first dose administered during the neonatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armah, George E; Kapikian, Albert Z; Vesikari, Timo; Cunliffe, Nigel; Jacobson, Robert M; Burlington, D Bruce; Ruiz, Leonard P

    2013-08-01

    Oral rhesus/rhesus-human reassortant rotavirus tetravalent vaccine (RRV-TV) was licensed in 1998 but withdrawn in 1999 due to a rare association with intussusception, which occurred disproportionately in infants receiving their first dose at ≥90 days of age. This study examined RRV-TV for the prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RV-GE) in Ghana, West Africa, with infants receiving the first dose during the neonatal period and the second before 60 days of age. In a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in Navrongo, Ghana, we recruited neonates to receive 2 doses of RRV-TV or placebo and followed them to age 12 months. In the intention-to-treat population of 998 infants, we measured a vaccine efficacy of 63.1% against RV-GE of any severity associated with any of the 4 serotypes represented in the vaccine and 60.7% against RV-GE associated with any rotavirus serotype. RRV-TV in a 2-dose schedule with the first dose during the neonatal period is efficacious in preventing RV-GE in rural Ghana. Neonatal dosing results in early protection and may be the optimum schedule to avoid or significantly reduce intussusception, now reported to be associated in international settings with the 2 most widely marketed, licensed, live virus, oral rotavirus vaccines.

  3. Long-Term Safety and Immunogenicity of a Tetravalent Live-Attenuated Dengue Vaccine and Evaluation of a Booster Dose Administered to Healthy Thai Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanaveeradej, Veerachai; Simasathien, Sriluck; Mammen, Mammen P; Nisalak, Ananda; Tournay, Elodie; Kerdpanich, Phirangkul; Samakoses, Rudiwilai; Putnak, Robert J; Gibbons, Robert V; Yoon, In-Kyu; Jarman, Richard G; De La Barrera, Rafael; Moris, Philippe; Eckels, Kenneth H; Thomas, Stephen J; Innis, Bruce L

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of two doses of a live-attenuated, tetravalent dengue virus vaccine (F17/Pre formulation) and a booster dose in a dengue endemic setting in two studies. Seven children (7- to 8-year-olds) were followed for 1 year after dose 2 and then given a booster dose (F17/Pre formulation), and followed for four more years (Child study). In the Infant study, 49 2-year-olds, vaccinated as infants, were followed for approximately 3.5 years after dose 2 and then given a booster dose (F17) and followed for one additional year. Two clinically notable events were observed, both in dengue vaccine recipients in the Infant study: 1 case of dengue approximately 2.7 years after dose 2 and 1 case of suspected dengue after booster vaccinations. The booster vaccinations had a favorable safety profile in terms of reactogenicity and adverse events reported during the 1-month follow-up periods. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported during the studies. Neutralizing antibodies against dengue viruses 1-4 waned during the 1-3 years before boosting, which elicited a short-lived booster response but did not provide a long-lived, multivalent antibody response in most subjects. Overall, this candidate vaccine did not elicit a durable humoral immune response. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  4. Radiotherapy Dose Fractionation under Parameter Uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davison, Matt; Kim, Daero; Keller, Harald

    2011-01-01

    In radiotherapy, radiation is directed to damage a tumor while avoiding surrounding healthy tissue. Tradeoffs ensue because dose cannot be exactly shaped to the tumor. It is particularly important to ensure that sensitive biological structures near the tumor are not damaged more than a certain amount. Biological tissue is known to have a nonlinear response to incident radiation. The linear quadratic dose response model, which requires the specification of two clinically and experimentally observed response coefficients, is commonly used to model this effect. This model yields an optimization problem giving two different types of optimal dose sequences (fractionation schedules). Which fractionation schedule is preferred depends on the response coefficients. These coefficients are uncertainly known and may differ from patient to patient. Because of this not only the expected outcomes but also the uncertainty around these outcomes are important, and it might not be prudent to select the strategy with the best expected outcome.

  5. Acoustic neuromas: single dose vs fractionated therapy

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    Fuss, M; Debus, J; Lohr, F; Engenhart-Cabillic, R; Wannenmacher, M

    1997-07-01

    Purpose: Radiosurgical treatment (RS) of acoustic neuromas is a well established treatment. However, few data are available concerning conformal fractionated radiotherapy (FT) of this tumor entity. We evaluated treatment outcome and toxicity for both treatment modalities in 41 patients treated at our institution between 1984 and 1997. Material and Methods: All treatments were performed using a specially adapted linear accelerator and circular collimators for convergent beam RS or multi-leaf collimators (leaf thickness 1 or 3mm) for multi-field RS or fractionated treatment. 22 patients (7 male, 15 female, median age 60 years, range 20-83 years) were treated radiosurgically with single doses between 7 and 28 Gray (median 15 Gy) prescribed to the 80% isodose line. Tumor volumes ranged from 0.7 to 10.5 ccm with a median volume of 3.4 ccm. The median number of isocenters was 2 (1-4 isocenters). One patient was treated by a multi-field technique (14 isocentric irregularly shaped noncoplanar fields). 19 patients (5 male, 14 female, median age 55 years, range 20-81 years) were treated with stereotactic conformal radiotherapy. Median dose was 60 Gray with a median daily fraction size of 2 Gy and a median of 3 (1-4) irregularly shaped isocentric fields. Tumor volumes ranged from 0.7 to 32.4 ccm (median 15 ccm). Median follow-up was 30 months (7-149 months) for radiosurgical and 30 months (2-88 months) for fractionated treatment. Seven patients who underwent fractionated treatment had previously undergone neurosurgical resection on the contralateral side. One had undergone radiosurgery on the opposite side before. Results: All tumors were locally controlled. A volume reduction of more than 20% was seen in 16% after RS and 18% following FT. Typical posttherapeutic central reduction of contrast media enhancement was found in 73% following RS after a median of 8 (3-12) months and in 63% following FT after a median of 6 (1-12) months. Temporary brainstem edema was diagnosed in 4

  6. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  7. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J H; Sanzari, J; Avery, S; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G; Nuth, M; Wan, X S; Rusek, A; Kennedy, A R

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  8. Acoustic neuromas: single dose vs fractionated therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, M.; Debus, J.; Lohr, F.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Radiosurgical treatment (RS) of acoustic neuromas is a well established treatment. However, few data are available concerning conformal fractionated radiotherapy (FT) of this tumor entity. We evaluated treatment outcome and toxicity for both treatment modalities in 41 patients treated at our institution between 1984 and 1997. Material and Methods: All treatments were performed using a specially adapted linear accelerator and circular collimators for convergent beam RS or multi-leaf collimators (leaf thickness 1 or 3mm) for multi-field RS or fractionated treatment. 22 patients (7 male, 15 female, median age 60 years, range 20-83 years) were treated radiosurgically with single doses between 7 and 28 Gray (median 15 Gy) prescribed to the 80% isodose line. Tumor volumes ranged from 0.7 to 10.5 ccm with a median volume of 3.4 ccm. The median number of isocenters was 2 (1-4 isocenters). One patient was treated by a multi-field technique (14 isocentric irregularly shaped noncoplanar fields). 19 patients (5 male, 14 female, median age 55 years, range 20-81 years) were treated with stereotactic conformal radiotherapy. Median dose was 60 Gray with a median daily fraction size of 2 Gy and a median of 3 (1-4) irregularly shaped isocentric fields. Tumor volumes ranged from 0.7 to 32.4 ccm (median 15 ccm). Median follow-up was 30 months (7-149 months) for radiosurgical and 30 months (2-88 months) for fractionated treatment. Seven patients who underwent fractionated treatment had previously undergone neurosurgical resection on the contralateral side. One had undergone radiosurgery on the opposite side before. Results: All tumors were locally controlled. A volume reduction of more than 20% was seen in 16% after RS and 18% following FT. Typical posttherapeutic central reduction of contrast media enhancement was found in 73% following RS after a median of 8 (3-12) months and in 63% following FT after a median of 6 (1-12) months. Temporary brainstem edema was diagnosed in 4

  9. Effects of dose fractionation on the response of alanine dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundahl, Brad; Logar, John; Desrosiers, Marc; Puhl, James

    2014-01-01

    Alanine dosimetry is well established as a transfer standard and is becoming more prevalently used in routine dosimetry systems for radiation processing. Many routine measurement applications in radiation processing involve absorbed dose measurements resulting from fractioned exposures to ionizing radiation. Fractioning of absorbed dose is identified as an influence quantity (ISO/ASTM, 2013). This paper reports on study results of absorbed dose fractioning characteristics of alanine for gamma and high energy electron beam radiation sources. The results of this study indicate a radiation response difference due to absorbed dose fractioning in response can be observed after four fractionations for high-energy electron beams and no difference up to seven fractions for gamma rays using an ANOVA evaluation method. - Highlights: • Fractioning effects signaled in electron beam using an ANOVA at 6 equal increments. • Fractioning effects not signaled in gamma using an ANOVA up to 7 equal increments. • Insensitivity of alanine to dose fractioning indicates nominal impact on calibration

  10. The dependence of radiation response on the dose per fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joiner, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    The linear-quadratic (LQ) model explains the dependence of total dose in a fractionated course on the dose per fraction, in a very wide range of tumour and normal tissue studies, providing the dose per fraction remains above 2 Gy. In the range 2-1 Gy per fraction, some experimental studies show less increase in total dose than predicted by LQ; a probable explanation is incomplete repair between fractions given 2 seen between 1 and 0.1 Gy per fraction. This cannot be explained by incomplete repair; a modified LQ model where α decreases sharply with increasing dose per fraction in the range 0-1 Gy fits these data. The basic LQ model describes data from neutron fractionation studies, so the relationship between relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and X-ray dose per fraction can be expressed in terms of LQ parameters and fitted directly to RBE data. Results from different experiments, different assays and both top-up and full-course fractionation techniques, can all be included in one analysis. (author)

  11. Implication of fractionated dose exposures in therapeutic gain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Lee, Min-Ho; Kim, Eun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy pursues killing tumor cells while sparing normal cells from the radiation exposure. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a cancer treatment modality that delivers a high dose in a single operation. This high-dose single operation shortens the treatment course, but can increase the risk of normal cell damage. Normal cell damage can be reduced by employing multi-directional exposures for an increasing number of isocenters. In this study, we investigated whether therapeutic benefits would be expected by employing new dose fractionation patterns at a high-dose single operation. The conventional single-dose operation in brain tumor radiosurgery is performed by delivering fractionated uniform doses. According to Figs. 2 and 3, the conventional radiosurgery might have obtained some therapeutic benefit by employing the fractionated uniform-dose exposures instead of a single-dose exposure. We suggest that further therapeutic gain be expected by employing the fractionated radiation exposures in an increasing dose pattern. Until ensuring our suggestion, the significance in gain of cell surviving should be verified for all three dose patterns with both normal and tumor cells. The investigation whether normal and tumor cells show the same responses to the fractionated dose exposures at lower and higher than 15 Gy of total dose is also reserved for future work

  12. The influence of dose per fraction on repair kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, A.; Joiner, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    The use of multiple fractions per day (MFD) in radiotherapy requires information about the rate of repair of radiation injury. It is important to know the minimum interval between fractions necessary for maximum sparing of normal tissue damage, whether rate of repair is dependent on the size of dose per fraction and if it is different in early and late responding tissues and in tumours. To address these questions, the rate of repair between radiation dose fractions was measured in mouse skin (acute damage), mouse kidney (late damage) and a mouse tumour (carcinoma NT). Skin and kidney measurements were made using multiple split doses of X-rays, followed by a neutron top-up. For skin, faster recovery was obtained with 4.4 Gy fractions (t1/2 = 3.46 ± 0.88 h). In contrast kidney showed slower recovery at a low dose per fraction of 2 Gy (t1/2 = 1.69 ± 0.39 h) than at a higher dose of 7 Gy per fraction (t1/2 = 0.92 ± 0.1h). These data show that repair rate is dependent on the size of dose per fraction, but not in a simple way. T1/2 values now available for many different tissues generally lie in the range of 1-2h, and are not correlated with proliferation status or early versus late response to treatment. At the doses used currently in clinical MFD treatments, these data indicate that damage in almost all normal tissues would increase if interfraction intervals less than 6 h were used. The t1/2 for CaNT (0.31 ± 0.15 h) is less than for any normal tissue. This underlines that the excess morbidity resulting from interfraction intervals < 6 h will not be paralleled by an increased effect in tumours. (author). 25 refs.; 7 figs

  13. Late effects of various dose-fractionation regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turesson, I.; Notter, G.

    1983-01-01

    These clinical investigations of various dose-fractionation regimens on human skin show that: The late reactions cannot be predicted from the early reactions; The dose-response curves for late reactions are much steeper than for early reactions; Equivalent doses for various fractionation schedules concerning late effects can be calculated by means of a corrected CRE (NSD) formula; the correction must be considered preliminary because further follow-up is needed. A clinical fractionation study of this type requires: Extremely careful dosimetry; Study of the same anatomical region; Very long follow-up; Studies at different effect levels; Skin reaction is the only end point we have studied systematically for different fractionation regimens. Experience with the CRE formula as a model for calculating isoeffect doses for different fractionation schedules in routine clinical use can be summarized as follows: The CRE formula has been used prospectively since 1972 in all patients; CRE-equivalent weekly doses to 5 x 2.0 Gy per week has been used. (Although the fractionation schedule is changed, the overall treatment time is still the same); The CRE range was 18 to 21 for curative radiotherapy on carcinomas; No irradiation was applied during pronounced acute reactions. No unexpected complications have been observed under these conditions

  14. A dose-surviving fraction curve for mouse colonic mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, S.L.; Thames, H.D. Jr.; Withers, H.R.; Mason, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    A dose-surviving fraction curve representing the response of the mouse colonic mucosa to single doses of 137 Cs gamma radiation was obtained from the results of a multifraction in vivo colony assay. Construction of the curve required an estimated of the average number of clonogens initially present per colonic crypt. The estimated clonogen count (88) was determined by a statistical method based on the use of doses per fraction common to different fractionation protocols. Parameters for the LQ and TC models of cell survival were obtained by weighted least-squares fits to the data. A comparison of the survival characteristics of cells from the mouse colonic and jejunal crypts suggested that the epithelium of the colon is less radiosensitive than that of the jejunum. (author)

  15. Radiobiological aspects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turesson, I.

    1990-01-01

    The biological effects of continuous low dose-rate irradiation and fractionated high dose-rate irradiation in interstitial and intracavitary radiotherapy and total body irradiation are discussed in terms of dose-rate fractionation sensitivity for various tissues. A scaling between dose-rate and fraction size was established for acute and late normal-tissue effects which can serve as a guideline for local treatment in the range of dose rates between 0.02 and 0.005 Gy/min and fraction sizes between 8.5 and 2.5 Gy. This is valid provided cell-cycle progression and proliferation can be ignored. Assuming that the acute and late tissue responses are characterized by α/β values of about 10 and 3 Gy and a mono-exponential repair half-time of about 3 h, the same total doses given with either of the two methods are approximately equivalent. The equivalence for acute and late non-hemopoietic normal tissue damage is 0.02 Gy/min and 8.5 Gy per fraction; 0.01 Gy/min and 5.5 Gy per fraction; and 0.005 Gy/min and 2.5Gy per fraction. A very low dose rate, below 0.005 Gy/min, is thus necessary to simulate high dose-rate radiotherapy with fraction sizes of about 2Gy. The scaling factor is, however, dependent on the repair half-time of the tissue. A review of published data on dose-rate effects for normal tissue response showed a significantly stronger dose-rate dependence for late than for acute effects below 0.02 Gy/min. There was no significant difference in dose-rate dependence between various acute non-hemopoietic effects or between various late effects. The consistent dose-rate dependence, which justifies the use of a general scaling factor between fraction size and dose rate, contrasts with the wide range of values for repair half-time calculated for various normal-tissue effects. This indicates that the model currently used for repair kinetics is not satisfactory. There are also few experimental data in the clinical dose-rate range, below 0.02 Gy/min. It is therefore

  16. Vaccine vial stopper performance for fractional dose delivery of vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrahian, Courtney; Myers, Daniel; Creelman, Ben; Saxon, Eugene; Zehrung, Darin

    2017-07-03

    Shortages of vaccines such as inactivated poliovirus and yellow fever vaccines have been addressed by administering reduced-or fractional-doses, as recommended by the World Health Organization Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on Immunization, to expand population coverage in countries at risk. We evaluated 3 kinds of vaccine vial stoppers to assess their performance after increased piercing from repeated withdrawal of doses needed when using fractional doses (0.1 mL) from presentations intended for full-dose (0.5 mL) delivery. Self-sealing capacity and fragmentation of the stopper were assessed via modified versions of international standard protocols. All stoppers maintained self-sealing capacity after 100 punctures. The damage to stoppers measured as the fragmentation rate was within the target of ≤ 10% of punctures resulting in a fragment after as many as 50 punctures. We concluded that stopper failure is not likely to be a concern if existing vaccine vials containing up to 10 regular doses are used up to 50 times for fractional dose delivery.

  17. The influence of dose fractionation and dose rate on normal tissue responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barendsen, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of responses of a variety of normal tissues in animals to fractionated irradiations has been made with the aim of developing a formalism for the prediction of tolerance doses as a function of the dose per fraction and the overall treatment time. An important feature of the formalism is that it is directly based on radiological insights and therefore provides a logical concept to account for the diversity of tissue responses. (Auth.)

  18. Response of pig skin to fractionated radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiernik, G.; Hopewell, J.W.; Patterson, T.J.S.; Young, C.M.A.; Foster, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    The individual components of a fractionated course of irradiation treatment have been considered separately. Methods of accurate measurement of individual parameters has brought to light different interpretations of the observations. Reasons are given for the necessity of having a radiobiological model which has a direct relevance to the clinical situation. Results are reported for fractionated regimes of irradiation in which the dose has been varied above and below normal tissue tolerance which has been equated with clinical skin necrosis. The components of the acute skin reaction, erythema, pigmentation and desquamation have been analysed separately and their contribution as a method of measurement assessed. Initially, the range of numerical scores attributed to erythema did not reach the scores attributed to necrosis but we now believe that radiation damage expressed as erythema can move directly into necrosis without passing through desquamation. Desquamation, on the other hand, only became a useful parameter at higher dose levels; it has also been shown to be a component associated with skin breakdown. Pigmentation showed no dose response at the dose levels employed in our experiments and it is our belief that this is due to this system being fully saturated under these circumstances. Measurement of the late radiation reaction in the skin has been considered in detail and our results have been expressed by comparing the relative lengths of irradiated and control fields in the same pig. From these findings iso-effect graphs have been constructed and time and fractionation factors have been derived. (author)

  19. Dose rate and dose fractionation studies in total body irradiation of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, H.J.; Netzel, B.; Schaffer, E.; Kolb, H.

    1979-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) with 800-900 rads and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation according to the regimen designated by the Seattle group has induced remissions in patients with otherwise refractory acute leukemias. Relapse of leukemia after bone marrow transplantation remains the major problem, when the Seattle set up of two opposing 60 Co-sources and a low dose rate is used in TBI. Studies in dogs with TBI at various dose rates confirmed observations in mice that gastrointestinal toxicity is unlike toxicity against hemopoietic stem cells and possibly also leukemic stem cells depending on the dose rate. However, following very high single doses (2400 R) and marrow infusion acute gastrointestinal toxicity was not prevented by the lowest dose rate studied (0.5 R/min). Fractionated TBI with fractions of 600 R in addition to 1200 R (1000 rads) permitted the application of total doses up to 300 R followed by marrow infusion without irreversible toxicity. 26 dogs given 2400-3000 R have been observed for presently up to 2 years with regard to delayed radiation toxicity. This toxicity was mild in dogs given single doses at a low dose rate or fractionated TBI. Fractionated TBI is presently evaluated with allogeneic transplants in the dog before being applied to leukemic patients

  20. Decreased uptake after fractionated ablative doses of iodine-131

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    Wu, Hurng-Sheng [Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Department of Surgery, Changhua, Taiwan (Taiwan); Hseu, Huey-Herng [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Medical Education and Research, Taichung (Taiwan); Lin, Wan-Yu; Wang, Shyh-Jen [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taichung, Taiwan (Taiwan); Liu, Yao-Chi [Department of Surgery, General Surgery, National Defense Medical Center, Taipe (Taiwan)

    2005-02-01

    In an attempt to obviate the necessity for hospitalisation, the ablative dose of {sup 131}I in the treatment of thyroid cancer is divided into two or three fractions at weekly intervals in some hospitals with no special bed for {sup 131}I treatment. Thyroid stunning has been observed in patients receiving a {sup 131}I dose between 74 and 370 MBq (2-10 mCi). However, the influence of {sup 131}I uptake after administration of a higher dose, such as 1,110-1,850 MBq of {sup 131}I, has never been reported. In this study, we evaluated the degree of reduction in {sup 131}I uptake after patients received 1,480 MBq of {sup 131}I and evaluated the clinical value of fractionated ablative doses of {sup 131}I. Thirty-five patients with functional thyroid cancer received a total of 4,440 MBq (120 mCi) of {sup 131}I which was divided into three fractions administered at weekly intervals. In all patients two {sup 131}I whole-body scans were performed. The first scan was performed directly prior to the second dose of {sup 131}I (7 days after the first administration of {sup 131}I), and the second scan was performed 7 days after the second administration of {sup 131}I and directly prior to the third administration. Regions of interest including the neck and lungs were drawn to calculate the uptake of {sup 131}I in the thyroid remnant and possible cervical lymph node and lung metastases. The mean uptake of {sup 131}I was 2.73% 7 days after the first administration, and decreased significantly to 0.26% 7 days after the second administration. The mean decrease was as high as 80.7%. The decrease in {sup 131}I uptake was significant in all patients except the two with lung metastases. In the two patients with lung metastases, no definite evidence of decreased uptake was noted; the uptake of {sup 131}I in the lung metastases even increased on the second {sup 131}I image in one of these patients. After administration of 1,480 MBq of {sup 131}I, the decreased uptake was significant in all

  1. Advantage of dose fractionation in monoclonal antibody-targeted radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlom, J.; Molinolo, A.; Simpson, J.F.; Siler, K.; Roselli, M.; Hinkle, G.; Houchens, D.P.; Colcher, D.

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) B72.3 IgG was radiolabeled with 131I and administered to female athymic NCr-nu mice bearing the LS-174T human colon adenocarcinoma xenograft to determine if fractionation of MAb dose had any advantage in tumor therapy. In the LS-174T xenograft, only approximately 30%-60% of tumor cells express the B72.3-reactive TAG-72 antigen. The LS-174T xenograft was used to reflect the heterogeneity of the TAG-72 antigen often seen in biopsy specimens from patients. In contrast to a single 600-muCi dose of 131I-B72.3 IgG where 60% of the animals died from toxic effects, two 300-muCi doses of 131I-B72.3 IgG reduced or eliminated tumor growth in 90% of mice, with only 10% of the animals dying from toxic effects. Dose fractionation even permitted escalation of the dose to three doses of 300 muCi of 131I-B72.3 IgG, resulting in even more extensive tumor reduction or elimination and minimal toxic effects. The use of an isotype-matched control MAb revealed a nonspecific component to tumor growth retardation, but the use of the specific B72.3 IgG demonstrated a much greater therapeutic effect. Tumors that had escaped MAb therapy were analyzed for expression of the B72.3-reactive TAG-72 antigen with the use of the immunoperoxidase method; they were shown to have the same antigenic phenotype as the untreated tumors. We verified tumor elimination by killing the test animals after a 7-week observation period and performing histologic examination of tumor sites. We also monitored toxic effects by histologic examination of numerous organs. These studies thus demonstrate the advantage of dose fractionation of a radiolabeled MAb for tumor therapy. We anticipate that the concept of dose fractionation can be practically applied in radioimmunotherapeutic clinical trials with the development and use of recombinant-chimeric MAbs and modified constructs

  2. Method to account for dose fractionation in analysis of IMRT plans: Modified equivalent uniform dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Clinton S.; Kim, Yongbok; Lee, Nancy; Bucci, Kara M.; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Verhey, Lynn J.; Xia Ping

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To propose a modified equivalent uniform dose (mEUD) to account for dose fractionation using the biologically effective dose without losing the advantages of the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) and to report the calculated mEUD and gEUD in clinically used intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. Methods and Materials: The proposed mEUD replaces the dose to each voxel in the gEUD formulation by a biologically effective dose with a normalization factor. We propose to use the term mEUD D o /n o that includes the total dose (D o ) and number of fractions (n o ) and to use the term mEUD o that includes the same total dose but a standard fraction size of 2 Gy. A total of 41 IMRT plans for patients with nasopharyngeal cancer treated at our institution between October 1997 and March 2002 were selected for the study. The gEUD and mEUD were calculated for the planning gross tumor volume (pGTV), planning clinical tumor volume (pCTV), parotid glands, and spinal cord. The prescription dose for these patients was 70 Gy to >95% of the pGTV and 59.4 Gy to >95% of the pCTV in 33 fractions. Results: The calculated average gEUD was 72.2 ± 2.4 Gy for the pGTV, 54.2 ± 7.1 Gy for the pCTV, 26.7 ± 4.2 Gy for the parotid glands, and 34.1 ± 6.8 Gy for the spinal cord. The calculated average mEUD D o /n o using 33 fractions was 71.7 ± 3.5 Gy for mEUD 70/33 of the pGTV, 49.9 ± 7.9 Gy for mEUD 59.5/33 of the pCTV, 27.6 ± 4.8 Gy for mEUD 26/33 of the parotid glands, and 32.7 ± 7.8 Gy for mEUD 45/33 of the spinal cord. Conclusion: The proposed mEUD, combining the gEUD with the biologically effective dose, preserves all advantages of the gEUD while reflecting the fractionation effects and linear and quadratic survival characteristics

  3. Use of normalized total dose to represent the biological effect of fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, J.C.; Kalend, A.

    1990-01-01

    There are currently a number of radiobiological models to account for the effects of dose fractionation and time. Normalized total dose (NTD) is not another new model but is a previously reported, clinically useful form in which to represent the biological effect, determined by any specific radiobiological dose-fractionation model, of a course of radiation using a single set of standardized, easily understood terminology. The generalized form of NTD reviewed in this paper describes the effect of a course of radiotherapy administered with nonstandard fractionation as the total dose of radiation in Gy that could be administered with a given reference fractionation such as 2 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions per week that would produce an equivalent biological effect (probability of complications or tumor control) as predicted by a given dose-fractionation formula. The use of normalized total dose with several different exponential and linear-quadratic dose-fraction formulas is presented. (author). 51 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  4. Use of normalized total dose to represent the biological effect of fractionated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flickinger, J C; Kalend, A [Pittsburgh University School of Medicine (USA). Department of Radiation Oncology Pittsburg Cancer Institute (USA)

    1990-03-01

    There are currently a number of radiobiological models to account for the effects of dose fractionation and time. Normalized total dose (NTD) is not another new model but is a previously reported, clinically useful form in which to represent the biological effect, determined by any specific radiobiological dose-fractionation model, of a course of radiation using a single set of standardized, easily understood terminology. The generalized form of NTD reviewed in this paper describes the effect of a course of radiotherapy administered with nonstandard fractionation as the total dose of radiation in Gy that could be administered with a given reference fractionation such as 2 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions per week that would produce an equivalent biological effect (probability of complications or tumor control) as predicted by a given dose-fractionation formula. The use of normalized total dose with several different exponential and linear-quadratic dose-fraction formulas is presented. (author). 51 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab.

  5. Pulsed dose rate and fractionated high dose rate brachytherapy: choice of brachytherapy schedules to replace low dose rate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, Andries G.; Aardweg, Gerard J.M.J. van den; Levendag, Peter C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy is a new type of afterloading brachytherapy (BT) in which a continuous low dose rate (LDR) treatment is simulated by a series of 'pulses,' i.e., fractions of short duration (less than 0.5 h) with intervals between fractions of 1 to a few hours. At the Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, the term 'PDR brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with a large number of fractions (at least four per day), while the term 'fractionated high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy' is used for treatment schedules with just one or two brachytherapy fractions per day. Both treatments can be applied as alternatives for LDR BT. This article deals with the choice between PDR and fractionated HDR schedules and proposes possible fractionation schedules. Methods and Materials: To calculate HDR and PDR fractionation schedules with the intention of being equivalent to LDR BT, the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been used in an incomplete repair formulation as given by Brenner and Hall, and by Thames. In contrast to earlier applications of this model, both the total physical dose and the overall time were not kept identical for LDR and HDR/PDR schedules. A range of possible PDR treatment schedules is presented, both for booster applications (in combination with external radiotherapy (ERT) and for BT applications as a single treatment. Because the knowledge of both α/β values and the half time for repair of sublethal damage (T (1(2)) ), which are required for these calculations, is quite limited, calculations regarding the equivalence of LDR and PDR treatments have been performed for a wide range of values of α/β and T (1(2)) . The results are presented graphically as PDR/LDR dose ratios and as ratios of the PDR/LDR tumor control probabilities. Results: If the condition that total physical dose and overall time of a PDR treatment must be exactly identical to the values for the corresponding LDR treatment regimen is not applied, there appears

  6. Dose fractionation theorem in 3-D reconstruction (tomography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that the large number of projections for single-axis tomography precludes its application to most beam-labile specimens. However, Hegerl and Hoppe have pointed out that the total dose required to achieve statistical significance for each voxel of a computed 3-D reconstruction is the same as that required to obtain a single 2-D image of that isolated voxel, at the same level of statistical significance. Thus a statistically significant 3-D image can be computed from statistically insignificant projections, as along as the total dosage that is distributed among these projections is high enough that it would have resulted in a statistically significant projection, if applied to only one image. We have tested this critical theorem by simulating the tomographic reconstruction of a realistic 3-D model created from an electron micrograph. The simulations verify the basic conclusions of high absorption, signal-dependent noise, varying specimen contrast and missing angular range. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that individual projections in the series of fractionated-dose images can be aligned by cross-correlation because they contain significant information derived from the summation of features from different depths in the structure. This latter information is generally not useful for structural interpretation prior to 3-D reconstruction, owing to the complexity of most specimens investigated by single-axis tomography. These results, in combination with dose estimates for imaging single voxels and measurements of radiation damage in the electron microscope, demonstrate that it is feasible to use single-axis tomography with soft X-ray microscopy of frozen-hydrated specimens

  7. Dose fractionation theorem in 3-D reconstruction (tomography)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaeser, R.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    It is commonly assumed that the large number of projections for single-axis tomography precludes its application to most beam-labile specimens. However, Hegerl and Hoppe have pointed out that the total dose required to achieve statistical significance for each voxel of a computed 3-D reconstruction is the same as that required to obtain a single 2-D image of that isolated voxel, at the same level of statistical significance. Thus a statistically significant 3-D image can be computed from statistically insignificant projections, as along as the total dosage that is distributed among these projections is high enough that it would have resulted in a statistically significant projection, if applied to only one image. We have tested this critical theorem by simulating the tomographic reconstruction of a realistic 3-D model created from an electron micrograph. The simulations verify the basic conclusions of high absorption, signal-dependent noise, varying specimen contrast and missing angular range. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that individual projections in the series of fractionated-dose images can be aligned by cross-correlation because they contain significant information derived from the summation of features from different depths in the structure. This latter information is generally not useful for structural interpretation prior to 3-D reconstruction, owing to the complexity of most specimens investigated by single-axis tomography. These results, in combination with dose estimates for imaging single voxels and measurements of radiation damage in the electron microscope, demonstrate that it is feasible to use single-axis tomography with soft X-ray microscopy of frozen-hydrated specimens.

  8. Safety and immunogenicity of one versus two doses of Takeda's tetravalent dengue vaccine in children in Asia and Latin America: interim results from a phase 2, randomised, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Tricou, Vianney; Yu, Delia; Rivera, Luis; Tuboi, Suely; Garbes, Pedro; Borkowski, Astrid; Wallace, Derek

    2017-06-01

    Dengue is the most common mosquito-borne viral disease in human beings, and vector control has not halted its spread worldwide. A dengue vaccine for individuals aged 9 years and older has been licensed, but there remains urgent medical need for a vaccine that is safe and effective against all four dengue virus serotypes (DENV-1-4) in recipients of all ages. Here, we present the preplanned interim analyses at 6 months of a tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV), which is comprised of an attenuated DENV-2 virus strain (TDV-2) and three chimeric viruses containing the premembrane and envelope protein genes of DENV-1, DENV-3, and DENV-4 genetically engineered into the attenuated TDV-2 genome backbone (TDV-1, TDV-3, and TDV-4). An ongoing phase 2, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a TDV is being done at three sites in dengue-endemic countries (Dominican Republic, Panama, and the Philippines) to determine its safety and immunogenicity over 48 months in healthy participants aged 2-17 years who were randomly assigned (1:2:5:1) using an interactive web response system (stratified by age) to subcutaneous TDV injection (one 0·5 mL dose containing 2·5 × 10 4 plaque-forming units [PFU] of TDV-1; 6·3 × 10 3 PFU of TDV-2; 3·2 × 10 4 PFU of TDV-3; and 4·0 × 10 5 PFU of TDV-4) in different dose schedules (two-dose regimen at 0 and 3 months, one dose at 0 months, or one dose at 0 months and a booster at 12 months) or placebo. The primary endpoint of this 6 month interim analysis was geometric mean titres (GMTs) of neutralising antibodies against DENV-1-4 in the per-protocol immunogenicity subset at 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months after the first injection. Safety was assessed as a secondary outcome as percentage of participants with serious adverse events in all participants who were injected (safety set), and solicited and unsolicited adverse events (immunogenicity subset). This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT

  9. Dose rate and fractionation: Relative importance in radiation for bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarbell, N.J.; Rosenblatt, M.; Mauch, P.; Hellman, S.

    1987-01-01

    The optimal dose rate and fractionation schedules for total body irradiation (TBI) in bone marrow transplantation (BMT) are presently unknown. This study compares several fractionation and dose rate schedules that are currently in clinical use. C/sub 3/H/HeJ were given TBI and the bone marrow survival fraction was calculated using the CFU's assay. Irradiation was given as low dose rate (LDR) at 5 cGy/min or high dose rate (HDR) at 80 cGy/min, in single fraction (SF) and fractionated (FX) regimens. These results indicate no increase in survival for the normal bone marrow stem cells with fractionation either at high or low dose-rates. In fact, fractionation seemed to decrease the bone marrow survival over single fraction radiation

  10. Equilibrium method for estimating the first hydrolysis constant of tetravalent plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    A new method for estimating the numerical value of the first hydrolysis constant of tetravalent plutonium is illustrated by examples. It uses the pH and the equilibrium fractions of two of the Pu oxidation states. They are substituted into one or more of a choice of formulas that render explicit estimates of the hydrolysis constant. (author)

  11. Nonequilibrium method for estimating the first hydrolysis constant of tetravalent plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Six discrete formulas are used to estimate the equilibrium constant of the first hydrolysis reaction of tetravalent plutonium. They apply the pH, the oxidation number, one equilibrium constant, and fractions of two of the plutonium oxidation states. The new formulas are not restricted to the equilibrium condition. (author)

  12. Linear-quadratic model underestimates sparing effect of small doses per fraction in rat spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shun Wong, C.; Toronto University; Minkin, S.; Hill, R.P.; Toronto University

    1993-01-01

    The application of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model to describe iso-effective fractionation schedules for dose fraction sizes less than 2 Gy has been controversial. Experiments are described in which the effect of daily fractionated irradiation given with a wide range of fraction sizes was assessed in rat cervical spine cord. The first group of rats was given doses in 1, 2, 4, 8 and 40 fractions/day. The second group received 3 initial 'top-up'doses of 9 Gy given once daily, representing 3/4 tolerance, followed by doses in 1, 2, 10, 20, 30 and 40 fractions/day. The fractionated portion of the irradiation schedule therefore constituted only the final quarter of the tolerance dose. The endpoint of the experiments was paralysis of forelimbs secondary to white matter necrosis. Direct analysis of data from experiments with full course fractionation up to 40 fractions/day (25.0-1.98 Gy/fraction) indicated consistency with the LQ model yielding an α/β value of 2.41 Gy. Analysis of data from experiments in which the 3 'top-up' doses were followed by up to 10 fractions (10.0-1.64 Gy/fraction) gave an α/β value of 3.41 Gy. However, data from 'top-up' experiments with 20, 30 and 40 fractions (1.60-0.55 Gy/fraction) were inconsistent with LQ model and gave a very small α/β of 0.48 Gy. It is concluded that LQ model based on data from large doses/fraction underestimates the sparing effect of small doses/fraction, provided sufficient time is allowed between each fraction for repair of sublethal damage. (author). 28 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  13. Effects of dose, dose-rate and fraction on radiation-induced breast and lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    Recent results from a large Canadian epidemiologic cohort study of low-LET radiation and cancer will be described. This is a study of 64,172 tuberculosis patients first treated in Canada between 1930 and 1952, of whom many received substantial doses to breast and lung tissue from repeated chest fluoroscopies. The mortality of the cohort between 1950 and 1987 has been determined by computerized record linkage to the National Mortality Data Base. There is a strong positive association between radiation and breast cancer risk among the females in the cohort, but in contrast very little evidence of any increased risk in lung cancer. The results of this and other studies suggest that the effect of dose-rate and/or fractionation on cancer risk may will differ depending upon the particular cancer being considered. (author)

  14. Small dose multi-fractionation therapy, its radiobiological aspects and clinics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Hiroshi; Katagiri, Shiro; Furuhata, Akihiko; Fukusi, Itsuhisa

    1979-01-01

    Recent radiobiological data reveal that cell killings by small dose fractionation are almost due to nonrepairable damage with low oxygen enhancement ratio. Then, Small dose multi-fractionation method suggests a higher therapeutic-ratio than that in conventional high dose fractionated irradiation. Using these data of radiobiology, intermittent irradiations three times a day, four hours interval, with 60 - 80 rads for multi-fractionation, with high total doses of 7,200 - 7,500 rads/6.5 - 7 weeks mainly on bladder, laryngeal and esophageal tumour are applied. The results obtained are slightly improved. (author)

  15. IMRT dose fractionation for head and neck cancer: Variation in current approaches will make standardisation difficult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Kean F. (Academic Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)); Fowler, Jack F. (Dept. of Human Oncology and Medical Physics, Univ. of Wisconsin, Wisconsin (United States)); Sykes, Andrew J.; Yap, Beng K.; Lee, Lip W.; Slevin, Nick J. (Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom))

    2009-04-15

    Introduction. Altered fractionation has demonstrated clinical benefits compared to the conventional 2 Gy/day standard of 70 Gy. When using synchronous chemotherapy, there is uncertainty about optimum fractionation. IMRT with its potential for Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) adds further to this uncertainty. This survey will examine international practice of IMRT fractionation and suggest possible reasons for diversity in approach. Material and methods. Fourteen international cancer centres were surveyed for IMRT dose/fractionation practised in each centre. Results. Twelve different types of dose fractionation were reported. Conventional 70-72 Gy (daily 2 Gy/fraction) was used in 3/14 centres with concurrent chemotherapy while 11/14 centres used altered fractionation. Two centres used >1 schedule. Reported schedules and number of centres included 6 fractions/week DAHANCA regime (3), modest hypofractionation (=2.2 Gy/fraction) (3), dose-escalated hypofractionation (=2.3 Gy/fraction) (4), hyperfractionation (1), continuous acceleration (1) and concomitant boost (1). Reasons for dose fractionation variability include (i) dose escalation; (ii) total irradiated volume; (iii) number of target volumes; (iv) synchronous systemic treatment; (v) shorter overall treatment time; (vi) resources availability; (vii) longer time on treatment couch; (viii) variable GTV margins; (ix) confidence in treatment setup; (x) late tissue toxicity and (xi) use of lower neck anterior fields. Conclusions. This variability in IMRT fractionation makes any meaningful comparison of treatment results difficult. Some standardization is needed particularly for design of multi-centre randomized clinical trials.

  16. Changes in tumor cell response due to prolonged dose delivery times in fractionated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganetti, Harald

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic radiation therapy, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, delivers more complex treatment fields than conventional techniques. The increased complexity causes longer dose delivery times for each fraction. The cellular damage after a full treatment may depend on the dose rate, because sublethal radiation damage can be repaired more efficiently during prolonged dose delivery. The goal of this study was to investigate the significance of this effect in fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The lethal/potentially lethal model was used to calculate lesion induction rates for repairable and nonrepairable lesions. Dose rate effects were analyzed for 9 different cell lines (8 human tumor xenografts and a C3H10T1/2 cell line). The effects of single-fraction as well as fractionated irradiation for different dose rates were studied. Results: Significant differences can be seen for dose rates lower than about 0.1 Gy/min for all cell lines considered. For 60 Gy delivered in 30 fractions, the equivalent dose is reduced by between 1.3% and 12% comparing 2 Gy delivery over 30 min per fraction with 2 Gy delivery over 1 min per fraction. The effect is higher for higher doses per fraction. Furthermore, the results show that dose rate effects do not show a simple correlation with the α/β ratio for ratios between 3 Gy and 31 Gy. Conclusions: If the total dose delivery time for a treatment fraction in radiation therapy increases to about 20 min, a correction for dose rate effects may have to be considered in treatment planning. Adjustments in effective dose may be necessary when comparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy with conventional treatment plans

  17. Superfractionation as a potential hypoxic cell radiosensitizer: prediction of an optimum dose per fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasu, Alexandru; Denekamp, Juliana

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: A dose 'window of opportunity' has been identified in an earlier modeling study if the inducible repair variant of the LQ model is adopted instead of the pure LQ model, and if all survival curve parameters are equally modified by the presence or absence of oxygen. In this paper we have extended the calculations to consider survival curve parameters from 15 sets of data obtained for cells tested at low doses using clonogenic assays. Methods and Materials: A simple computer model has been used to simulate the response of each cell line to various doses per fraction in multifraction schedules, with oxic and hypoxic cells receiving the same fractional dose. We have then used pairs of simulated survival curves to estimate the effective hypoxic protection (OER') as a function of the dose per fraction. Results: The resistance of hypoxic cells is reduced by using smaller doses per fraction than 2 Gy in all these fractionated clinical simulations, whether using a simple LQ model, or the more complex LQ/IR model. If there is no inducible repair, the optimum dose is infinitely low. If there is inducible repair, there is an optimum dose per fraction at which hypoxic protection is minimized. This is usually around 0.5 Gy. It depends on the dose needed to induce repair being higher in hypoxia than in oxygen. The OER' may even go below unity, i.e. hypoxic cells may be more sensitive than oxic cells. Conclusions: If oxic and hypoxic cells are repeatedly exposed to doses of the same magnitude, as occurs in clinical radiotherapy, the observed hypoxic protection varies with the fractional dose. The OER' is predicted to diminish at lower doses in all cell lines. The loss of hypoxic resistance with superfractionation is predicted to be proportional to the capacity of the cells to induce repair, i.e. their intrinsic radioresistance at a dose of 2 Gy

  18. Single and 30 fraction tumor control doses correlate in xenografted tumor models: implications for predictive assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerweck, Leo E.; Dubois, Willum; Baumann, Michael; Suit, Herman D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: In a previous publication we reported that laboratory assays of tumor clonogen number, in combination with intrinsic radiosensitivity measured in-vitro, accurately predicted the rank-order of single fraction 50% tumor control doses, in six rodent and xenografted human tumors. In these studies, tumor hypoxia influenced the absolute value of the tumor control doses across tumor types, but not their rank-order. In the present study we hypothesize that determinants of the single fraction tumor control dose, may also strongly influence the fractionaled tumor control doses, and that knowledge of tumor clonogen number and their sensitivity to fractionated irradiation, may be useful for predicting the relative sensitivity of tumors treated by conventional fractionated irradiation. Methods/Materials: Five tumors of human origin were used for these studies. Special care was taken to ensure that all tumor control dose assays were performed over the same time frame, i.e., in-vitro cells of a similar passage were used to initiate tumor sources which were expanded and used in the 3rd or 4th generation. Thirty fraction tumor control doses were performed in air breathing mice, under normal blood flow conditions (two fractions/day). The results of these studies have been previously published. For studies under uniformly (clamp) hypoxic conditions, tumors arising from the same transplantation were randomized into single or fractionated dose protocols. For estimation of the fractionated TCD50 under hypoxic conditions, tumors were exposed to six 5.4 Gy fractions (∼ 2 Gy equivalent under air), followed by graded 'top-up' dose irradiation for determination of the TCD50; the time interval between doses was 6-9 hours. The single dose equivalent of the six 5.4 Gy doses was used to calculate an extrapolated 30 fraction hypoxic TCD50. Results: Fractionation substantially increased the dose required for tumor control in 4 of the 5 tumors investigated. For these 4 tumors

  19. A model to accumulate fractionated dose in a deforming organ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Di; Jaffray, D.A.; Wong, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Measurements of internal organ motion have demonstrated that daily organ deformation exists throughout the course of radiation treatment. However, a method of constructing the resultant dose delivered to the organ volume remains a difficult challenge. In this study, a model to quantify internal organ motion and a method to construct a cumulative dose in a deforming organ are introduced. Methods and Materials: A biomechanical model of an elastic body is used to quantify patient organ motion in the process of radiation therapy. Intertreatment displacements of volume elements in an organ of interest is calculated by applying an finite element method with boundary conditions, obtained from multiple daily computed tomography (CT) measurements. Therefore, by incorporating also the measurements of daily setup error, daily dose delivered to a deforming organ can be accumulated by tracking the position of volume elements in the organ. Furthermore, distribution of patient-specific organ motion is also predicted during the early phase of treatment delivery using the daily measurements, and the cumulative dose distribution in the organ can then be estimated. This dose distribution will be updated whenever a new measurement becomes available, and used to reoptimize the ongoing treatment. Results: An integrated process to accumulate dosage in a daily deforming organ was implemented. In this process, intertreatment organ motion and setup error were systematically quantified, and incorporated in the calculation of the cumulative dose. An example of the rectal wall motion in a prostate treatment was applied to test the model. The displacements of volume elements in the rectal wall, as well as the resultant doses, were calculated. Conclusion: This study is intended to provide a systematic framework to incorporate daily patient-specific organ motion and setup error in the reconstruction of the cumulative dose distribution in an organ of interest. The realistic dose

  20. High dose per fraction dosimetry of small fields with Gafchromic EBT2 film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Basavatia, Amar; Bayliss, Adam; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Small field dosimetry is prone to uncertainties due to the lack of electronic equilibrium and the use of the correct detector size relative to the field size measured. It also exhibits higher sensitivity to setup errors as well as large variation in output with field size and shape. Radiochromic film is an attractive method for reference dosimetry in small fields due to its ability to provide 2D dose measurements while having minimal impact on the dose distribution. Gafchromic EBT2 has a dose range of up to 40 Gy; therefore, it could potentially be useful for high dose reference dosimetry with high spatial resolution. This is a requirement in stereotactic radiosurgery deliveries, which deliver high doses per fraction to small targets. Methods: Targets of 4 mm and 12 mm diameters were treated to a minimum peripheral dose of 21 Gy prescribed to 80% of the maximum dose in one fraction. Target doses were measured with EBT2 film (both targets) and an ion chamber (12 mm target only). Measured doses were compared with planned dose distributions using profiles through the target and minimum peripheral dose coverage. Results: The measured target doses and isodose coverage agreed with the planned dose within ±1 standard deviation of three measurements, which were 2.13% and 2.5% for the 4 mm and 12 mm targets, respectively. Conclusions: EBT2 film is a feasible dosimeter for high dose per fraction reference 2D dosimetry.

  1. Immunogenicity to poliovirus type 2 following two doses of fractional intradermal inactivated poliovirus vaccine: A novel dose sparing immunization schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Abhijeet; Molodecky, Natalie A; Pallansch, Mark A; Sutter, Roland W

    2017-05-19

    The polio eradication endgame strategic plan calls for the sequential removal of Sabin poliovirus serotypes from the trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (tOPV), starting with type 2, and the introduction of ≥1 dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV), to maintain an immunity base against poliovirus type 2. The global removal of oral poliovirus type 2 was successfully implemented in May 2016. However, IPV supply constraints has prevented introduction in 21 countries and led to complete stock-out in >20 countries. We conducted a literature review and contacted corresponding authors of recent studies with fractional-dose IPV (fIPV), one-fifth of intramuscular dose administered intradermally, to conduct additional type 2 immunogenicity analyses of two fIPV doses compared with one full-dose IPV. Four studies were identified that assessed immunogenicity of two fIPV doses compared to one full-dose IPV. Two fractional doses are more immunogenic than 1 full-dose, with type 2 seroconversion rates improving between absolute 19-42% (median: 37%, pvaccine compared to one full-dose IPV. In response to the current IPV shortage, a schedule of two fIPV doses at ages 6 and 14weekshas been endorsed by technical oversight committees and has been introduced in some affected countries. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Low or High Fractionation Dose {beta}-Radiotherapy for Pterygium? A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viani, Gustavo Arruda, E-mail: gusviani@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Marilia Medicine School, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); De Fendi, Ligia Issa; Fonseca, Ellen Carrara [Department of Ophthalmology, Marilia Medicine School, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Stefano, Eduardo Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, Marilia Medicine School, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Postoperative adjuvant treatment using {beta}-radiotherapy (RT) is a proven technique for reducing the recurrence of pterygium. A randomized trial was conducted to determine whether a low fractionation dose of 2 Gy within 10 fractions would provide local control similar to that after a high fractionation dose of 5 Gy within 7 fractions for surgically resected pterygium. Methods: A randomized trial was conducted in 200 patients (216 pterygia) between February 2006 and July 2007. Only patients with fresh pterygium resected using a bare sclera method and given RT within 3 days were included. Postoperative RT was delivered using a strontium-90 eye applicator. The pterygia were randomly treated using either 5 Gy within 7 fractions (Group 1) or 2 Gy within 10 fractions (Group 2). The local control rate was calculated from the date of surgery. Results: Of the 216 pterygia included, 112 were allocated to Group 1 and 104 to Group 2. The 3-year local control rate for Groups 1 and 2 was 93.8% and 92.3%, respectively (p = .616). A statistically significant difference for cosmetic effect (p = .034), photophobia (p = .02), irritation (p = .001), and scleromalacia (p = .017) was noted in favor of Group 2. Conclusions: No better local control rate for postoperative pterygium was obtained using high-dose fractionation vs. low-dose fractionation. However, a low-dose fractionation schedule produced better cosmetic effects and resulted in fewer symptoms than high-dose fractionation. Moreover, pterygia can be safely treated in terms of local recurrence using RT schedules with a biologic effective dose of 24-52.5 Gy{sub 10.}.

  3. Response of rat spinal cord to very small doses per fraction: lack of enhanced radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shun, Wong C.; Yong, Hao; Hill, Richard P.

    1995-01-01

    Our previous work with rat spinal cord demonstrated that the linear quadratic (LQ) model based on data for large fraction sizes ((α(β)) of 2.4 Gy) failed to predict isoeffective doses between 1 and 2 Gy per fraction, and under-estimated the sparing effect of small doses per fraction given once daily. In contrast, data from mouse skin and kidney, and recent in vitro results revealed a paradoxical increase in radiosensitivity at below 1 Gy per fraction. To assess whether enhanced radiosensitivity is present in the spinal cord below 1 Gy per fraction, the rat spinal cord (C2-T2) was irradiated initially with three daily doses of 10.25 Gy (top-up doses representing 90% of tolerance), followed by graded single doses or fractionated doses in 1.5, 1.0, 0.8, 0.6 or 0.4 Gy fractions given once daily. To limit the overall treatment time to ≤ 8 weeks, a small number of the 0.6- and 0.4-Gy fractions were given twice daily with an interfraction interval of 16 h. The end-point was forelimb paralysis secondary to white matter necrosis, confirmed histologically. The ED 50 values, excluding the top-up doses, were 5.8, 10.6, 14.8, 15.2, 15.9 and 19.1 Gy for a single dose and doses in 1.5-, 1.0-, 0.8-, 0.6- and 0.4-Gy fractions, respectively. The data gave an (α(β)) of 2.1 Gy (95% CI, 1.4, 2.7 Gy). Pooling the data separately, the (α(β)) value was 2.3 Gy (95% CI, 0.82, 3.7 Gy) for fraction sizes ≥ 1 Gy, and 1.2 Gy (95% CI, 0.16, 2.3 Gy) for the 0.8-, 0.6- and 0.4-Gy experiments. These results in which top-up doses were given initially are consistent with a large sparing effect of very small fraction sizes in rat spinal cord provided sufficient time is allowed for repair of sublethal damage between fractions, and provide no evidence for a paradoxical increase in radiosensitivity in the rat spinal cord below 1 Gy down to 0.4 Gy per fraction

  4. Alternate day treatment and late effects: The concept of an effective dose per fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courdi, A.; Hery, M.; Gabillat, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Although most institutions treat all fields each day, some radiotherapists continue to adopt an alternate day schedule. The resulting daily variations of the dose per fraction in laterally located targets have been analyzed using the linear-quadratic model. Patients with breast carcinoma treated with definitive radiotherapy in 1974-1975 with one field a day were studied. An effective dose per fraction was derived, with a value higher than the average dose per fraction received by the reference point. The greater the fluctuations between the doses per fraction on successive days, the higher the effective dose per fraction. The corresponding cell survival due to alternate treatment as compared to survival with daily treatment depends on the alpha/beta ratio. For a late effect with low alpha/beta ratio, an alternate treatment may lead to almost 10-fold increase in cell kill in these lateral targets such as those responsible for subcutaneous sclerosis as compared to daily treatment of all fields with the same total dose. Taking the average effective dose per fraction in our series, the increase in cell kill was 4-fold. Acute effects would suffer less damage due to alternate treatment because of a high alpha/beta ratio. Treatment on an alternate schedule should be restricted to palliative radiotherapy

  5. Justification for inter-fraction correction of catheter movement in fractionated high dose-rate brachytherapy treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simnor, Tania; Li, Sonia; Lowe, Gerry; Ostler, Peter; Bryant, Linda; Chapman, Caroline; Inchley, Dave; Hoskin, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Fractionated high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer relies on reproducible catheter positions for each fraction to ensure adequate tumour coverage while minimising dose to normal tissues. Peri-prostatic oedema may cause caudal displacement of the catheters relative to the prostate gland between fractions. This can be corrected for by changing source dwell positions or by physical re-advancement of catheters before treatment. Materials and methods: Data for 20 consecutive monotherapy patients receiving three HDR fractions of 10.5 Gy per fraction over 2 days were analysed retrospectively. Pre-treatment CT scans were used to assess the effect of catheter movement between fractions on implant quality, with and without movement correction. Implant quality was evaluated using dosimetric parameters. Results: Compared to the first fraction (f1) the mean inter-fraction caudal movement relative to the prostate base was 7.9 mm (f2) (range 0-21 mm) and 3.9 mm (f3) (range 0-25.5 mm). PTV D90% was reduced without movement correction by a mean of 27.8% (f2) and 32.3% (f3), compared with 5.3% and 5.1%, respectively, with catheter movement correction. Dose to 2 cc of the rectum increased by a mean of 0.69 (f2) and 0.76 Gy (f3) compared with an increase of 0.03 and 0.04 Gy, respectively, with correction. The urethra V12 also increased by a mean of 0.36 (f2) and 0.39 Gy (f3) compared with 0.06 and 0.16 Gy, respectively, with correction. Conclusions: Inter-fraction correction for catheter movement using pre-treatment imaging is critical to maintain the quality of an implant. Without movement correction there is significant risk of tumour under-dosage and normal tissue over-dosage. The findings of this study justify additional imaging between fractions in order to carry out correction.

  6. Not traditional regimes of radiotherapeutic dose fractionation as modifier of radiotherapy for carcinoma of lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artemova, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    The efficiency of applying various of radiotherapeutic dose fractionation was analyzed. The results of the own studies performed at the Scientific and Research Institute of Oncology and Medical Radiology for elaborating not traditional regimes of radiotherapeutic dose fractionation (a dynamic fractionation applying enlarged regimes at the first stage and the classic ones at the second stage) were presented. Appliance of the modified radiotherapy for the epidermoid carcinoma of the lungs allowed to increase the objective response from 45,3+-3% to 80+-5% the tumor disappearing completely in 40+-6% of patients as compared with 10+-2%. Appliance of the intensive not traditional variant of the radiotherapy dynamic fractionation in case of a small cell carcinoma of the lungs resulted in the therapy duration reduction from 6 to 4 weeks. Thus the not traditional dose fractionation might become a mechanism for the improving the radiotherapy of persons suffering from the carcinoma of the lungs. (authors)

  7. System simulation on fractionation radiation doses and radioisotope handling in Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dytz, Aline Guerra; Dullius, Marcos Alexandre; Gomes, Camila e Silva

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the practical and theoretical learning of students from Medical Physics course at the Fundacao Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (FURG) on fractionation radiation doses, radioisotope handling and elution of molybdenum generators (Mo-99) / technetium (Tc -99m)

  8. ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DESPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANALYSIS OF RESPIRATORY DEPOSITION DOSE OF INHALED AMBIENT AEROSOLS FOR DIFFERENT SIZE FRACTIONS. Chong S. Kim, SC. Hu**, PA Jaques*, US EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711; **IIT Research Institute, Chicago, IL; *S...

  9. Responses of rat R-1 cells to low dose rate gamma radiation and multiple daily dose fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Bijman, J.Th.

    1981-01-01

    Multifraction irradiation may offer the same therapeutic gain as continuous irradiation. Therefore, a comparison of the efficacy of low dose rate irradiation and multifraction irradiation was the main objective of the experiments to be described. Both regimens were tested on rat rhabdomyosarcoma (R-1) cells in vitro and in vivo. Exponentially growing R-1 cells were treated in vitro by a multifraction irradiation procedure with dose fractions of 2 Gy gamma radiation and time intervals of 1 to 3 h. The dose rate was 1.3 Gy.min -1 . The results indicate that multifractionation of the total dose is more effective with respect to cell inactivation than continuous irradiation. (Auth.)

  10. Chromosome aberration yields in human lymphocytes induced by fractionated doses of x-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purrott, R.J.; Reeder, E.

    1976-01-01

    Unstimulated (G 0 ) human peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed at 37degC to doses of 200 or 500 rad of X-rays delivered in two equal fractions. The dose fractions were separated by intervals of up to 7 h in the 200 rad study and up to 48 h for 500 rad. In both studies the mean levels of dicentrics and total unstable aberrations began to decline when fractions were delivered with intervals of greater than 2 h. With 200 rad the yield had decreased to an additive baseline (i.e. equal to only twice the yield of a single 100-rad fraction) by an interval of 4 h. Following 500 rad the yield declined until 8 h and then remained 20% above the expected additive baseline even when 48 h separated the fractions. Possible explanations for this discrepancy are discussed. In a second experiment PHA stimulated lymphocyte cultures were exposed to 2 doses of 125 rad of X-rays up to 7 h apart in an attempt to demonstrate the late peak in aberration yield originally reported by Lane. Control cultures received unsplit doses of 250 rad at the time of the corresponding second 125-rad fraction. No evidence of a late peak in dicentric yield was observed. The yield remained approximately the same irrespective of the time interval between fractions but these split dose yields were significantly different from the accompanying unsplit controls

  11. Underprediction of human skin erythema at low doses per fraction by the linear quadratic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Christopher S.; Denham, James W.; O'Brien, Maree; Ostwald, Patricia; Kron, Tomas; Wright, Suzanne; Doerr, Wolfgang

    1996-01-01

    Background and purpose. The erythematous response of human skin to radiotherapy has proven useful for testing the predictions of the linear quadratic (LQ) model in terms of fractionation sensitivity and repair half time. No formal investigation of the response of human skin to doses less than 2 Gy per fraction has occurred. This study aims to test the validity of the LQ model for human skin at doses ranging from 0.4 to 5.2 Gy per fraction. Materials and methods. Complete erythema reaction profiles were obtained using reflectance spectrophotometry in two patient populations: 65 patients treated palliatively with 5, 10, 12 and 20 daily treatment fractions (varying thicknesses of bolus, various body sites) and 52 patients undergoing prostatic irradiation for localised carcinoma of the prostate (no bolus, 30-32 fractions). Results and conclusions. Gender, age, site and prior sun exposure influence pre- and post-treatment erythema values independently of dose administered. Out-of-field effects were also noted. The linear quadratic model significantly underpredicted peak erythema values at doses less than 1.5 Gy per fraction. This suggests that either the conventional linear quadratic model does not apply for low doses per fraction in human skin or that erythema is not exclusively initiated by radiation damage to the basal layer. The data are potentially explained by an induced repair model

  12. Marrow toxicity of fractionated vs. single dose total body irradiation is identical in a canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storb, R.; Raff, R.F.; Graham, T.; Appelbaum, F.R.; Deeg, H.J.; Schuening, F.G.; Shulman, H.; Pepe, M.

    1993-01-01

    The authors explored in dogs the marrow toxicity of single dose total body irradiation delivered from two opposing 60 Co sources at a rate of 10 cGy/min and compared results to those seen with total body irradiation administered in 100 cGy fractions with minimum interfraction intervals of 6 hr. Dogs were not given marrow transplants. They found that 200 cGy single dose total body irradiation was sublethal, with 12 of 13 dogs showing hematopoietic recovery and survival. Seven of 21 dogs given 300 cGy single dose total body irradiation survived compared to 6 of 10 dogs given 300 cGy fractionated total body irradiation. One of 28 dogs given 400 cGy single dose total body irradiation survived compared to none of six given fractionated radiation. With granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) administered from day 0-21 after 400 cGy total body irradiation, most dogs survived with hematological recovery. Because of the almost uniform success with GCSF after 400 cGy single dose total body irradiation, a study of GCSF after 400 cGy fractionated total body irradiation was deemed not to be informative and, thus, not carried out. Additional comparisons between single dose and fractionated total body irradiation were carried out with GCSF administered after 500 and 600 cGy of total body irradiation. As with lower doses of total body irradiation, no significant survival differences were seen between the two modes of total body irradiation, and only 3 of 26 dogs studied survived with complete hematological recovery. Overall, therefore, survival among dogs given single dose total body irradiation was not different from that of dogs given fractionated total body irradiation (p = .67). Similarly, the slopes of the postirradiation declines of granulocyte and platelet counts and the rates of their recovery in surviving dogs given equal total doses of single versus fractionated total body irradiation were indistinguishable. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Fractional dosing of yellow fever vaccine to extend supply: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Joseph T; Peak, Corey M; Leung, Gabriel M; Lipsitch, Marc

    2016-12-10

    The ongoing yellow fever epidemic in Angola strains the global vaccine supply, prompting WHO to adopt dose sparing for its vaccination campaign in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, in July-August, 2016. Although a 5-fold fractional-dose vaccine is similar to standard-dose vaccine in safety and immunogenicity, efficacy is untested. There is an urgent need to ensure the robustness of fractional-dose vaccination by elucidation of the conditions under which dose fractionation would reduce transmission. We estimate the effective reproductive number for yellow fever in Angola using disease natural history and case report data. With simple mathematical models of yellow fever transmission, we calculate the infection attack rate (the proportion of population infected over the course of an epidemic) with various levels of transmissibility and 5-fold fractional-dose vaccine efficacy for two vaccination scenarios, ie, random vaccination in a hypothetical population that is completely susceptible, and the Kinshasa vaccination campaign in July-August, 2016, with different age cutoff for fractional-dose vaccines. We estimate the effective reproductive number early in the Angola outbreak was between 5·2 and 7·1. If vaccine action is all-or-nothing (ie, a proportion of vaccine recipients receive complete protection [VE] and the remainder receive no protection), n-fold fractionation can greatly reduce infection attack rate as long as VE exceeds 1/n. This benefit threshold becomes more stringent if vaccine action is leaky (ie, the susceptibility of each vaccine recipient is reduced by a factor that is equal to the vaccine efficacy). The age cutoff for fractional-dose vaccines chosen by WHO for the Kinshasa vaccination campaign (2 years) provides the largest reduction in infection attack rate if the efficacy of 5-fold fractional-dose vaccines exceeds 20%. Dose fractionation is an effective strategy for reduction of the infection attack rate that would be robust with a

  14. Fractional Dosing of Yellow Fever Vaccine to Extend Supply: A Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peak, Corey M.; Leung, Gabriel M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The ongoing yellow fever (YF) epidemic in Angola strains the global vaccine supply, prompting WHO to adopt dose sparing for its vaccination campaign in Kinshasa in July–August 2016. Although a 5-fold fractional-dose vaccine is similar to standard-dose vaccine in safety and immunogenicity, efficacy is untested. There is an urgent need to ensure the robustness of fractional-dose vaccination by elucidating the conditions under which dose fractionation would reduce transmission. Methods We estimate the effective reproductive number for YF in Angola using disease natural history and case report data. With simple mathematical models of YF transmission, we calculate the infection attack rate (IAR, the proportion of population infected over the course of an epidemic) under varying levels of transmissibility and five-fold fractional-dose vaccine efficacy for two vaccination scenarios: (i) random vaccination in a hypothetical population that is completely susceptible; (ii) the Kinshasa vaccination campaign in July–August 2016 with different age cutoff for fractional-dose vaccines. Findings We estimate the effective reproductive number early in the Angola outbreak was between 5·2 and 7·1. If vaccine action is all-or-nothing (i.e. a proportion VE of vaccinees receives complete and the remainder receive no protection), n-fold fractionation can dramatically reduce IAR as long as efficacy VE exceeds 1/n. This benefit threshold becomes more stringent if vaccine action is leaky (i.e. the susceptibility of each vaccinee is reduced by a factor that is equal to the vaccine efficacy VE). The age cutoff for fractional-dose vaccines chosen by the WHO for the Kinshasa vaccination campaign (namely, 2 years) provides the largest reduction in IAR if the efficacy of five-fold fractional-dose vaccines exceeds 20%. Interpretation Dose fractionation is a very effective strategy for reducing infection attack rate that would be robust with a large margin for error in case

  15. Accelerated repopulation of mouse tongue epithelium during fractionated irradiations or following single doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, W.; Kummermehr, J.

    1990-01-01

    Mouse tongue mucosa was established as an animal model to study repopulation after large single doses or during continuous irradiation. A top-up irradiation technique was used employing priming doses or fractionated treatment to the whole snout (300 kV X-rays) followed by local test doses (25 kV X-rays) to elicit denudation in a confined field of the inferior tongue surface. Clearcut quantal dose-response curves of ulcer incidence were obtained to all protocols; animal morbidity, i.e. body weight loss was minimal. Repopulation following priming doses of 10 and 13 Gy started with a delay of at least 3 days and then progressed rapidly to nearly restore original tissue tolerance by day 11. During continuous fractionation over 1 to 3 weeks with 5 fractions/week and doses per fraction of 2.5, 3 and 3.5 Gy, repopulation was small in week one but subsequently increased to fully compensate the weekly dose at all dose levels. Additional measurements of cell density during a 4 weeks course of 5 x 3 Gy or 5 x 4 Gy per week showed only moderate depletion to 67% of the control figures. The fact that rapid repopulation is achieved at relatively moderate damage levels should be taken into account when the timing of a treatment split is considered. (author). 18 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  16. Prooxidate - antioxidate homeostasis in guinea pigs after fractional low-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baraboj, V.A.; Olyijnik, S.A.; Khmelevs'kij, Yi.V.

    1993-01-01

    We studied the influence of fractional total irradiation in the total dose of 1 Gy on the amount of lipids peroxide oxidation (LPO) products and ascorbic acid in the spleen, intestine and brain of guinea-pigs. The obtained date suggest that it is advisable to use ascorbic acid to correct postirradiation changes in the organism exposed to small doses of ionizing radiation

  17. The optimal fraction size in high-dose-rate brachytherapy: dependency on tissue repair kinetics and low-dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sminia, Peter; Schneider, Christoph J.; Fowler, Jack F.

    2002-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Indications of the existence of long repair half-times on the order of 2-4 h for late-responding human normal tissues have been obtained from continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART). Recently, these data were used to explain, on the basis of the biologically effective dose (BED), the potential superiority of fractionated high-dose rate (HDR) with large fraction sizes of 5-7 Gy over continuous low-dose rate (LDR) irradiation at 0.5 Gy/h in cervical carcinoma. We investigated the optimal fraction size in HDR brachytherapy and its dependency on treatment choices (overall treatment time, number of HDR fractions, and time interval between fractions) and treatment conditions (reference low-dose rate, tissue repair characteristics). Methods and Materials: Radiobiologic model calculations were performed using the linear-quadratic model for incomplete mono-exponential repair. An irradiation dose of 20 Gy was assumed to be applied either with HDR in 2-12 fractions or continuously with LDR for a range of dose rates. HDR and LDR treatment regimens were compared on the basis of the BED and BED ratio of normal tissue and tumor, assuming repair half-times between 1 h and 4 h. Results: With the assumption that the repair half-time of normal tissue was three times longer than that of the tumor, hypofractionation in HDR relative to LDR could result in relative normal tissue sparing if the optimum fraction size is selected. By dose reduction while keeping the tumor BED constant, absolute normal tissue sparing might therefore be achieved. This optimum HDR fraction size was found to be largely dependent on the LDR dose rate. On the basis of the BED NT/TUM ratio of HDR over LDR, 3 x 6.7 Gy would be the optimal HDR fractionation scheme for replacement of an LDR scheme of 20 Gy in 10-30 h (dose rate 2-0.67 Gy/h), while at a lower dose rate of 0.5 Gy/h, four fractions of 5 Gy would be preferential, still assuming large differences between tumor

  18. High-dose rate fractionated interstitial radiotherapy for oropharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, Takayuki; Inoue, Toshihiko; Inoue, Takehiro; Teshima, Teruki; Murayama, Shigeyuki [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-03-01

    The limitations of treating oropharyngeal cancer patients with definitive external radiotherapy are the complications of salivary glands, taste buds, mandible and temporomandibular joints. To avoid these complications we started interstitial radiotherapy as boost after 46 Gy of external radiotherapy. Ten cases (retromolar trigone; 1, soft palate; 1, base of tongue; 3, lateral wall; 5) were treated with this method and seven cases were controlled locally. With short follow-up period, xerostomia and dysgeusia are less than definitive external radiotherapy as clinical impression and no in-field recurrences have been experienced. With markedly increased tumor dose, the local control rate can be improved. This treatment method will be an alternative to definitive external radiotherapy to gain better QOL and higher control rate. (author).

  19. Improvements in dose calculation accuracy for small off-axis targets in high dose per fraction tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Bayliss, Adam; Wong, Jeannie Hsiu Ding; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Tome, Wolfgang A. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI, 53792 (United States); Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, VIC 3002 (Australia) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia) and Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Einstein Institute of Oncophysics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: A recent field safety notice from TomoTherapy detailed the underdosing of small, off-axis targets when receiving high doses per fraction. This is due to angular undersampling in the dose calculation gantry angles. This study evaluates a correction method to reduce the underdosing, to be implemented in the current version (v4.1) of the TomoTherapy treatment planning software. Methods: The correction method, termed 'Super Sampling' involved the tripling of the number of gantry angles from which the dose is calculated during optimization and dose calculation. Radiochromic film was used to measure the dose to small targets at various off-axis distances receiving a minimum of 21 Gy in one fraction. Measurements were also performed for single small targets at the center of the Lucy phantom, using radiochromic film and the dose magnifying glass (DMG). Results: Without super sampling, the peak dose deficit increased from 0% to 18% for a 10 mm target and 0% to 30% for a 5 mm target as off-axis target distances increased from 0 to 16.5 cm. When super sampling was turned on, the dose deficit trend was removed and all peak doses were within 5% of the planned dose. For measurements in the Lucy phantom at 9.7 cm off-axis, the positional and dose magnitude accuracy using super sampling was verified using radiochromic film and the DMG. Conclusions: A correction method implemented in the TomoTherapy treatment planning system which triples the angular sampling of the gantry angles used during optimization and dose calculation removes the underdosing for targets as small as 5 mm diameter, up to 16.5 cm off-axis receiving up to 21 Gy.

  20. Improvements in dose calculation accuracy for small off-axis targets in high dose per fraction tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Bayliss, Adam; Wong, Jeannie Hsiu Ding; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Tomé, Wolfgang A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A recent field safety notice from TomoTherapy detailed the underdosing of small, off-axis targets when receiving high doses per fraction. This is due to angular undersampling in the dose calculation gantry angles. This study evaluates a correction method to reduce the underdosing, to be implemented in the current version (v4.1) of the TomoTherapy treatment planning software. Methods: The correction method, termed “Super Sampling” involved the tripling of the number of gantry angles from which the dose is calculated during optimization and dose calculation. Radiochromic film was used to measure the dose to small targets at various off-axis distances receiving a minimum of 21 Gy in one fraction. Measurements were also performed for single small targets at the center of the Lucy phantom, using radiochromic film and the dose magnifying glass (DMG). Results: Without super sampling, the peak dose deficit increased from 0% to 18% for a 10 mm target and 0% to 30% for a 5 mm target as off-axis target distances increased from 0 to 16.5 cm. When super sampling was turned on, the dose deficit trend was removed and all peak doses were within 5% of the planned dose. For measurements in the Lucy phantom at 9.7 cm off-axis, the positional and dose magnitude accuracy using super sampling was verified using radiochromic film and the DMG. Conclusions: A correction method implemented in the TomoTherapy treatment planning system which triples the angular sampling of the gantry angles used during optimization and dose calculation removes the underdosing for targets as small as 5 mm diameter, up to 16.5 cm off-axis receiving up to 21 Gy.

  1. Response of rat spinal cord to single and fractionated doses of accelerated heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leith, J.L.; McDonald, M.; Powers-Risius, P.; Bliven, S.F.; Walton, R.E.; Woodruff, K.H.; Howard, J.

    1980-01-01

    The response of rat spinal cord to irradiation with accelerated heavy ions, in particular carbon and neon ions has been studied. Two different ionization regions in the modified Bragg curve for each ion have been studied for both single and fractionated exposures. We have defined the paralytic response as a function of dose and dose per fraction, and we have determined RBE and repair values. The response of rat spinal cord is both dose and LET dependent, which allows the derivation of RBE and repair values

  2. Colon mucosal cells after high-dose fractional irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorc-Pleskovic, R.; Vraspir-Porenta, O.; Petrovic, D.; Zorc, M.; Pleskovic, L.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate histological and stereological changes in cryptal enterocytes, mucosal lymphocytes and mast cells 10 days after irradiation. For experimental model, 24 Beagle dogs 1-2 years old were used. Twelve dogs were irradiated 20 days with 32 Gy over the whole pelvis and tail. Another 12 dogs represented a control group. For the detection of apoptosis, the TUNEL technique was used. Histological and stereological analyses were performed using a Wild sampling microscope M 1000. In the irradiated group, volume density (P < 0.01), numerical density (P < 0.05) and average volume of lymphocytes (P < 0.001) were significantly lower than in the nonirradiated group. Numerical areal density of mast cells in the irradiated group was also significantly lower (P < 0.05). Volume density (P < 0.001) and average volume of mast cells (P < 0.001) were significantly higher in the irradiated group. The results of our experiments show that irradiation causes injury and loss of lymphocytes and mast cells in the colon mucosa. Apoptosis was detected in enterocytes and lymphocytes in the irradiated group and in nonirradiated group in equal numbers (2.5 ± 0.3 vs. 2.3 ± 0.3; ns.), suggesting that 10 days after high-dose irradiation, the cell loss is not due to apoptosis. (author)

  3. Some thoughts on tolerance, dose, and fractionation in boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gahbauer, R.; Goodman, J.; Blue, T.

    1988-01-01

    Unique to boron neutron capture therapy, the tolerance very strongly depends on the boron concentration in normal brain, skin and blood. If one first considers the ideal situation of a 2 KeV beam and a compound clearing from normal tissues and blood, the tolerance dose to epithermal beams relates to the maximum tolerated capture gamma dose and capture high LET dose, H (n,gamma)D and N(n,p) 14 C. The authors can relate this gamma and high LET dose to known clinical experience. Assuming gamma and high LET dose ratios as given by Fairchild and Bond, one may first choose a clearly safe high LET whole brain dose and calculate the unavoidably resulting gamma dose. To a first approximation 500 cGy of high LET dose results in 3,000 cGy gamma dose. One can speculate that this approximates the tolerance of whole brain to the 2 KeV beam with no contributing boron dose if the radiation is fractionated. It would clearly be beyond tolerance in a single fraction where most therapists would be uncomfortable to deliver even one third of the above doses

  4. Impact of radiation technique, radiation fraction dose, and total cisplatin dose on hearing. Retrospective analysis of 29 medulloblastoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scobioala, Sergiu; Kittel, Christopher; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Wolters, Heidi; Eich, Hans Theodor; Parfitt, Ross; Matulat, Peter; Am Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, Antoinette

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the incidence and degree of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) resulting from different radiation techniques, fractionation dose, mean cochlear radiation dose (D mean ), and total cisplatin dose. In all, 29 children with medulloblastoma (58 ears) with subclinical pretreatment hearing thresholds participated. Radiotherapy (RT) and cisplatin had been applied sequentially according to the HIT MED Guidance. Audiological outcomes up to the latest follow-up (median 2.6 years) were compared. Bilateral high-frequency SNHL was observed in 26 patients (90%). No significant differences were found in mean hearing threshold between left and right ears at any frequency. A significantly better audiological outcome (p < 0.05) was found after tomotherapy at the 6 kHz bone-conduction threshold (BCT) and left-sided 8 kHz air-conduction threshold (ACT) than after a combined radiotherapy technique (CT). Fraction dose was not found to have any impact on the incidence, degree, and time-to-onset of SNHL. Patients treated with CT had a greater risk of SNHL at high frequencies than tomotherapy patients even though D mean was similar. Increase in severity of SNHL was seen when the total cisplatin dose reached above 210 mg/m 2 , with the highest abnormal level found 8-12 months after RT regardless of radiation technique or fraction dose. The cochlear radiation dose should be kept as low as possible in patients who receive simultaneous cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The risk of clinically relevant HL was shown when D mean exceeds 45 Gy independent of radiation technique or radiation regime. Cisplatin ototoxicity was shown to have a dose-dependent effect on bilateral SNHL, which was more pronounced in higher frequencies. (orig.) [de

  5. Radiation as an immunological adjuvant: current evidence on dose and fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaria, Sandra; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-01-01

    Ionizing radiation to a cancer site has the ability to convert the irradiated tumor in an immunogenic hub. However, radiation is a complex modifier of the tumor microenvironment and, by itself, is seldom sufficient to induce a therapeutically significant anti-tumor immune response, since it can also activate immune suppressive pathways. While several combinations of local radiation and immunotherapy have been shown in pre-clinical models to induce powerful anti-tumor immunity, the optimal strategy to achieve this effect remains to be defined. When used in vivo, radiation effects on tumors depend on the dose per fraction applied, the number of fractions used, and the total dose. Moreover, the interplay of these three variables is contingent upon the tumor setting studied, both in pre-clinical and clinical applications. To enable repair of the collateral damage to the normal tissue, radiation is usually given in multiple fractions, usually of 2 Gy. Generally, the use of larger fractions is limited to stereotactic applications, whereby optimal immobilization reduces inter- and intrafraction movement and permits a very conformal delivery of dose to the target, with optimal exclusion of normal tissue. Translation of the partnership of radiation and immunotherapy to the clinic requires a careful consideration of the radiation regimens used. To date, little is known on whether different dose/fractionation regimens have a specific impact on the anti-tumor immune response. Most experiments combining the two modalities were conducted with single fractions of radiotherapy. However, there is at least some evidencethat when combined with some specific immunotherapy approaches, the ability of radiation to promote anti-tumor immunity is dependent on the dose and fractionation employed. We critically review the available in vitro and in vivo data on this subject and discuss the potential impact of fractionation on the ability of radiation to synergize with immunotherapy.

  6. Recalculation of dose for each fraction of treatment on TomoTherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Simon J; Romanchikova, Marina; Harrison, Karl; Parker, Michael A; Bates, Amy M; Scaife, Jessica E; Sutcliffe, Michael P F; Burnet, Neil G

    2016-01-01

    The VoxTox study, linking delivered dose to toxicity requires recalculation of typically 20-37 fractions per patient, for nearly 2000 patients. This requires a non-interactive interface permitting batch calculation with multiple computers. Data are extracted from the TomoTherapy(®) archive and processed using the computational task-management system GANGA. Doses are calculated for each fraction of radiotherapy using the daily megavoltage (MV) CT images. The calculated dose cube is saved as a digital imaging and communications in medicine RTDOSE object, which can then be read by utilities that calculate dose-volume histograms or dose surface maps. The rectum is delineated on daily MV images using an implementation of the Chan-Vese algorithm. On a cluster of up to 117 central processing units, dose cubes for all fractions of 151 patients took 12 days to calculate. Outlining the rectum on all slices and fractions on 151 patients took 7 h. We also present results of the Hounsfield unit (HU) calibration of TomoTherapy MV images, measured over an 8-year period, showing that the HU calibration has become less variable over time, with no large changes observed after 2011. We have developed a system for automatic dose recalculation of TomoTherapy dose distributions. This does not tie up the clinically needed planning system but can be run on a cluster of independent machines, enabling recalculation of delivered dose without user intervention. The use of a task management system for automation of dose calculation and outlining enables work to be scaled up to the level required for large studies.

  7. Tumor and normal tissue responses to fractioned non-uniform dose delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaellman, P; Aegren, A; Brahme, A [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics

    1996-08-01

    The volume dependence of the radiation response of a tumor is straight forward to quantify because it depends primarily on the eradication of all its clonogenic cells. A tumor therefore has a parallel organization as any surviving clonogen in principle can repopulate the tumor. The difficulty with the response of the tumor is instead to know the density and sensitivity distribution of the most resistant clonogenic cells. The increase in the 50% tumor control dose and the decrease in the maximum normalized slope of the dose response relation, {gamma}, in presence of small compartments of resistant tumor cells have therefore been quantified to describe their influence on the dose response relation. Injury to normal tissue is a much more complex and gradual process. It depends on earlier effects induced long before depletion of the differentiated and clonogenic cells that in addition may have a complex structural and functional organization. The volume dependence of the dose response relation of normal tissues is therefore described here by the relative seriality, s, of the infrastructure of the organ. The model can also be generalized to describe the response of heterogeneous tissues to non uniform dose distributions. The new model is compared with clinical and experimental data on normal tissue response, and shows good agreement both with regard to the shape of dose response relation and the volume dependence of the isoeffect dose. The response of tumors and normal tissues are quantified for arbitrary dose fractionations using the linear quadratic cell survival parameters {alpha} and {beta}. The parameters of the dose response relation are derived both for a constant dose per fraction and a constant number of dose fractions, thus in the latter case accounting also for non uniform dose delivery. (author). 26 refs, 4 figs.

  8. Dose rate-dependent marrow toxicity of TBI in dogs and marrow sparing effect at high dose rate by dose fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storb, R; Raff, R F; Graham, T; Appelbaum, F R; Deeg, H J; Schuening, F G; Sale, G; Seidel, K

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated the marrow toxicity of 200 and 300 cGy total-body irradiation (TBI) delivered at 10 and 60 cGy/min, respectively, in dogs not rescued by marrow transplant. Additionally, we compared toxicities after 300 cGy fractionated TBI (100 cGy fractions) to that after single-dose TBI at 10 and 60 cGy/min. Marrow toxicities were assessed on the basis of peripheral blood cell count changes and mortality from radiation-induced pancytopenia. TBI doses studied were just below the dose at which all dogs die despite optimal support. Specifically, 18 dogs were given single doses of 200 cGy TBI, delivered at either 10 (n=13) or 60 (n=5) cGy/min. Thirty-one dogs received 300 cGy TBI at 10 cGy/min, delivered as either single doses (n=21) or three fractions of 100 cGy each (n=10). Seventeen dogs were given 300 cGy TBI at 60 cGy/min, administered either as single doses (n=5) or three fractions of 100 cGy each (n=10). Within the limitations of the experimental design, three conclusions were drawn: 1) with 200 and 300 cGy single-dose TBI, an increase of dose rate from 10 to 60 cGy/min, respectively, caused significant increases in marrow toxicity; 2) at 60 cGy/min, dose fractionation resulted in a significant decrease in marrow toxicities, whereas such a protective effect was not seen at 10 cGy/min; and 3) with fractionated TBI, no significant differences in marrow toxicity were seen between dogs irradiated at 60 and 10 cGy/min. The reduced effectiveness of TBI when a dose of 300 cGy was divided into three fractions of 100 cGy or when dose rate was reduced from 60 cGy/min to 10 cGy/min was consistent with models of radiation toxicity that allow for repair of sublethal injury in DNA.

  9. Preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer: comparison of three radiation dose and fractionation schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Shin Hyung; Kim, Jae Chul

    2016-01-01

    The standard radiation dose for patients with locally rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy is 45–50 Gy in 25–28 fractions. We aimed to assess whether a difference exists within this dose fractionation range. A retrospective analysis was performed to compare three dose fractionation schedules. Patients received 50 Gy in 25 fractions (group A), 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (group B), or 45 Gy in 25 fractions (group C) to the whole pelvis, as well as concurrent 5-fluorouracil. Radical resection was scheduled for 8 weeks after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Between September 2010 and August 2013, 175 patients were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy at our institution. Among those patients, 154 were eligible for analysis (55, 50, and 49 patients in groups A, B, and C, respectively). After the median follow-up period of 29 months (range, 5 to 48 months), no differences were found between the 3 groups regarding pathologic complete remission rate, tumor regression grade, treatment-related toxicity, 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, or overall survival. The circumferential resection margin width was a prognostic factor for 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, whereas ypN category was associated with distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. High tumor regression grading score was correlated with 2-year distant metastasis-free survival and disease-free survival in univariate analysis. Three different radiation dose fractionation schedules, within the dose range recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, had no impact on pathologic tumor regression and early clinical outcome for locally advanced rectal cancer

  10. Preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer: comparison of three radiation dose and fractionation schedules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Shin Hyung; Kim, Jae Chul [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The standard radiation dose for patients with locally rectal cancer treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy is 45–50 Gy in 25–28 fractions. We aimed to assess whether a difference exists within this dose fractionation range. A retrospective analysis was performed to compare three dose fractionation schedules. Patients received 50 Gy in 25 fractions (group A), 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (group B), or 45 Gy in 25 fractions (group C) to the whole pelvis, as well as concurrent 5-fluorouracil. Radical resection was scheduled for 8 weeks after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Between September 2010 and August 2013, 175 patients were treated with preoperative chemoradiotherapy at our institution. Among those patients, 154 were eligible for analysis (55, 50, and 49 patients in groups A, B, and C, respectively). After the median follow-up period of 29 months (range, 5 to 48 months), no differences were found between the 3 groups regarding pathologic complete remission rate, tumor regression grade, treatment-related toxicity, 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, or overall survival. The circumferential resection margin width was a prognostic factor for 2-year locoregional recurrence-free survival, whereas ypN category was associated with distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. High tumor regression grading score was correlated with 2-year distant metastasis-free survival and disease-free survival in univariate analysis. Three different radiation dose fractionation schedules, within the dose range recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, had no impact on pathologic tumor regression and early clinical outcome for locally advanced rectal cancer.

  11. First trial of spatial and temporal fractionations of the delivered dose using synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serduc, Raphael; Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Bouchet, Audrey; Brochard, Thierry; Bravin, Alberto; Le Duc, Geraldine; Renaud, Luc; Laissue, Jean Albert

    2009-01-01

    The technical feasibility of temporal and spatial fractionations of the radiation dose has been evaluated using synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy for brain tumors in rats. A significant increase in lifespan (216%, p<0.0001) resulted when three fractions of microbeam irradiation were applied to the tumor through three different ports, orthogonal to each other, at 24 h intervals. However, there were no long-term survivors, and immunohistological studies revealed that 9 L tumors were not entirely ablated. (orig.)

  12. First trial of spatial and temporal fractionations of the delivered dose using synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serduc, Raphael [Toulouse Univ. (France). UPS Centre de Recherche Cerveau et Cognition; CNRS, CerCo, Toulouse (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Bouchet, Audrey; Brochard, Thierry; Bravin, Alberto; Le Duc, Geraldine [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France); Renaud, Luc [Toulouse Univ. (France). UPS Centre de Recherche Cerveau et Cognition; CNRS, CerCo, Toulouse (France); Laissue, Jean Albert [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. of Pathology

    2009-07-15

    The technical feasibility of temporal and spatial fractionations of the radiation dose has been evaluated using synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy for brain tumors in rats. A significant increase in lifespan (216%, p<0.0001) resulted when three fractions of microbeam irradiation were applied to the tumor through three different ports, orthogonal to each other, at 24 h intervals. However, there were no long-term survivors, and immunohistological studies revealed that 9 L tumors were not entirely ablated. (orig.)

  13. Fractionation in medium dose rate brachytherapy of cancer of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leborgne, Felix; Fowler, Jack F.; Leborgne, Jose H.; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Chappell, Rick

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To establish an optimum fractionation for medium dose rate (MDR) brachytherapy from retrospective data of patients treated with different MDR schedules in comparison with a low dose rate (LDR) schedule. Methods and Materials: The study population consists of consecutive Stage IB-IIA-IIB patients who received radiotherapy alone with full dose brachytherapy plus external beam pelvic and parametrial irradiation from 1986-1993. Patients also receiving surgery or chemotherapy were excluded. The LDR group (n = 102, median follow-up: 80 months) received a median dose to Point A of two 32.5 Gy fractions at 0.44 Gy/h plus 18 Gy of external whole pelvic irradiation. The MDR1 group (n = 30, median follow-up: 45 months) received a mean dose of two 32 Gy fractions at 1.68 Gy/h. An individual dose reduction of 12.5% was planned for this group according to the Manchester experience, but only a 4.8% dose reduction was achieved. The MDR2 group (n = 10, median follow-up: 36 months) received a dose of two 24 Gy fractions at 1.65 Gy/h. The MDR3 group (n = 10, median follow-up 33 months) received a mean dose of three 15.3 Gy fractions at 1.64 Gy/h. And finally, the MDR4 group (n = 38, median follow-up: 24 months) received six 7.7 Gy fractions from two pulses 6 h apart in each of three insertions at 1.61 Gy/h. The median external pelvic dose to MDR schedules was between 12 and 20 Gy. The linear quadratic (LQ) formula was used to calculate the biologically effective dose (BED) to tumor (Gy 10 ) and rectum (Gy 3 ), assuming T(1(2)) for repair = 1.5 h. Results: The crude central recurrence rate was 6% for LDR (mean BED = 95.4 Gy 10 ) and 10% for MDR4 (mean BED = 77.0 Gy 10 ) (p = NS). The remaining MDR groups had no recurrences. Grade 2 and 3 rectal or bladder complications were 0% for LDR (rectal BED = 109 Gy 3 ), 83% for MDR1 (BED = 206 Gy 3 ), and 30% for MDR3 (BED = 127 Gy 3 ). The MDR2 and MDR4 groups presented no complications (BED, 123 Gy 3 , and 105 Gy 3 , respectively

  14. Implications of the quadratic cell survival curve and human skin radiation ''tolerance doses'' on fractionation and superfractionation dose selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, B.G.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis of early published multifraction orthovoltage human acute skin irradiation tolerance isoeffect doses is presented. It indicates that human acute skin radiation reactions may result from the repetition, with each dose fraction, of a cell survival curve of the form: S = e/sup -(αD + βD 2 )/). The analysis also shows no need for an independent proliferation related time factor for skin, for daily treatments of six weeks or less in duration. The value obtained for the constant β/α for orthovoltage irradiation from these data is 2.9 x 10 -3 rad -1 for the cell line determining acute skin tolerance. A radiation isoeffect relationship, based on the quadratic cell survival curve, is introduced for human skin. This relationship has some advantages over the nominal standard dose (NSD). First, its use is not restricted to tolerance level reactions. Second, a modification of the relationship, which is also introduced, may be employed in the selection of doses per treatment when irradiation dose fractions are administered at short intervals where repair of sublethal injury is incomplete

  15. Effect of the supply dose on the 15N enrichment level of cow's milk nitrogenous fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin, O.; Laurent, F.; Vignon, B.; Antoine, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Production of cow milk 15 N-labelled proteins is necessary for the study of their digestion by man. An adequate enrichment is required for compatibility with utilization constraints (application dose, studied fractions...). A test was conducted with five cows in order to optimize the utilization of labelled ammonium sulphate in the cow diet for 15 N enrichment of the milk nitrogenous matter. Doses and supply timing of labelled compounds are discussed. 3 figs., 3 refs

  16. Effect of time, dose and fractionation on local control of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Anne W.M.; Chan, David K.K.; Poon, Y.F.; Foo, William; Law, Stephen C.K.; O, S.K.; Tung, Stewart Y.; Fowler, Jack F.; Chappell, Rick

    1995-01-01

    To study the effect of radiation factors on local control of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, 1008 patients with similarly staged T1N0-3M0 disease (Ho's classification) were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were treated by megavoltage irradiation alone using the same technique. Four different fractionation schedules had been used sequentially during 1976-1985: with total dose ranging from 45.6 to 60 Gy and fractional dose from 2.5 to 4.2 Gy. The median overall time was 39 days (range = 38-75 days). Both for the whole series and 763 patients with nodal control, total dose was the most important radiation factor. The hazard of local failure decreased by 9% per additional Gy (p < 0.01). Biological equivalents expressed in terms of Biologically Effective Dose or Nominal Standard Dose also showed strong correlation. Fractional dose had no significant impact. The effect of overall treatment time was insignificant for the whole series, but almost reached statistical significance for those with nodal control (p = 0.06). Further study is required for elucidation, as 85% of patients completed treatment within a very narrow range (38-42 days), and the possible hazard is clinically too significant to be ignored

  17. Reemergence of apoptotic cells between fractionated doses in irradiated murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyn, R.E.; Hunter, N.R.; Milas, L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to follow up our previous studies on the development of apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors by testing whether an apoptotic subpopulation of cells reemerges between fractionated exposures. Mice bearing a murine ovarian carcinoma, OCa-I, were treated in vivo with two fractionation protocols: two doses of 12.5 Gy separated by various times out to 5 days and multiple daily fractions of 2.5 Gy. Animals were killed 4 h after the last dose in each protocol, and the percent apoptosis was scored from stained histological sections made from the irradiated tumors according to the specific features characteristic of this mode of cell death. The 12.5+12.5 Gy protocol yielded a net total percent apoptosis of about 45% when the two doses were separated by 5 days (total dose = 25 Gy), whereas the 2.5 Gy per day protocol yielded about 50% net apoptotic cells when given for 5 days (total dose = 12.5 Gy). These values are to be compared to the value of 36% apoptotic cells that is yielded by large single doses (> 25 Gy). Thus, these results indicate that an apoptotic subpopulation of cells reemerged between the fractions in both protocols, but the kinetics appeared to be delayed in the 12.5+12.5 Gy vs. the multiple 2.5 Gy protocol. This reemergence of cells with the propensity for radiation-induced apoptosis between fractionated exposures is consistent with a role for this mode of cell death in the response of tumors to radiotherapy and may represent the priming of a new subpopulation of tumor cells for apoptosis as part of normal tumor homeostasis to counterbalance cell division. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  18. Universal Survival Curve and Single Fraction Equivalent Dose: Useful Tools in Understanding Potency of Ablative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Clint; Papiez, Lech; Zhang Shichuan; Story, Michael; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Overprediction of the potency and toxicity of high-dose ablative radiotherapy such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) by the linear quadratic (LQ) model led to many clinicians' hesitating to adopt this efficacious and well-tolerated therapeutic option. The aim of this study was to offer an alternative method of analyzing the effect of SBRT by constructing a universal survival curve (USC) that provides superior approximation of the experimentally measured survival curves in the ablative, high-dose range without losing the strengths of the LQ model around the shoulder. Methods and Materials: The USC was constructed by hybridizing two classic radiobiologic models: the LQ model and the multitarget model. We have assumed that the LQ model gives a good description for conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CFRT) for the dose to the shoulder. For ablative doses beyond the shoulder, the survival curve is better described as a straight line as predicted by the multitarget model. The USC smoothly interpolates from a parabola predicted by the LQ model to the terminal asymptote of the multitarget model in the high-dose region. From the USC, we derived two equivalence functions, the biologically effective dose and the single fraction equivalent dose for both CFRT and SBRT. Results: The validity of the USC was tested by using previously published parameters of the LQ and multitarget models for non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines. A comparison of the goodness-of-fit of the LQ and USC models was made to a high-dose survival curve of the H460 non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. Conclusion: The USC can be used to compare the dose fractionation schemes of both CFRT and SBRT. The USC provides an empirically and a clinically well-justified rationale for SBRT while preserving the strengths of the LQ model for CFRT

  19. Short-term irradiation of the glioblastoma with high-dosed fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkelbein, W.; Bruggmoser, G.; Schmidt, M.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1984-01-01

    Compared to surgery alone, postoperative radiotherapy leads with glioblastomas (grade IV gliomas) to a significant improvement of the therapeutic results. The prolongation of survival time, however, is to a large extent compensated by the therapy itself (it normally implicates hospitalisation). Therefore, we tested the efficiency of rapid course irradiation with high fractions. 70 patients were treated daily with individual fractions of 3.5 Gy, 4 to 6 fractions per week. The entire dose amounted to 31.5 to 38.5 Gy. The average survival time was 33.5 weeks corresponding to the survival time known from the combined surgical and radiotherapeutical treatment of glioblastomas. An effective increase in therapy-free survival time seems possible, especially when the entire focal dose does not exceed 35 Gy. It is remarkable that the patients with the maximum exposure did not have the longest survival times and rates. Living conditions for the patients were similar to those with conventional fractioning, or even better. Rapid course irradiation with high fractions and a limited total dose (35 Gy) presently is - apart from the accelerated superfractioning - a successful measure to prolong the therapyfree survival time for patients with grade IV gliomas. (orig.) [de

  20. Effect of action of fractioned ionizing radiation in small dose on thyroid gland of rats

    OpenAIRE

    О. О. Prykhodko; V. V. Lizogubov; V. S. Usenko

    2005-01-01

    The effect of fractionated X-irradiation by 0.25 Gy dose to rat thyroid gland was studied . It was shown the decrease of thyrocyte proliferative activity that can induce the late effect of pathogenesis to thyroid land and biochemical pathways that control by thyroid hormones. Additional effect by any mutagenic factor may induce thyroid tumor development.

  1. Fractionated high dose rate intraluminal brachytherapy in palliation of advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sur, Ranjan K.; Donde, Bernard; Levin, Victor C.; Mannell, Aylwyn

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To optimize the dose of fractionated brachytherapy for palliation of advanced esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and seventy-two patients with advanced esophageal cancer were randomized to receive 12 Gy/2 fractions (group A); 16 Gy/2 fractions (group B), and 18 Gy/3 fractions (group C) by high dose rate intraluminal brachytherapy (HDRILBT). Treatment was given weekly and dose prescribed at 1 cm from the source axis. Patients were followed up monthly and assessed for dysphagia relief and development of complications. Results: Twenty-two patients died before completing treatment due to advanced disease and poor general condition. The overall survival was 19.4% at the end of 12 months for the whole group (A--9.8%, B--22.46%, C--35.32%; p > 0.05). The dysphagia-free survival was 28.9% at 12 months for the whole group (A--10.8%, B--25.43%, C--38.95%; p > 0.05). Forty-three patients developed fibrotic strictures needing dilatation (A--5 of 35, B--15 of 60, C--23 of 55; p = 0.032). Twenty-seven patients had persistent luminal disease (A--11, B--6, C--10), 15 of which progressed to fistulae (A--7, B--2, C--6; p = 0.032). There was no effect of age, sex, race, histology, performance status, previous dilation, presenting dysphagia score, presenting weight, grade, tumor length, and stage on overall survival, dysphagia-free, and complication-free survival (p > 0.05). On a multivariate analysis, brachytherapy dose (p = 0.002) and tumor length (p = 0.0209) were found to have a significant effect on overall survival; brachytherapy dose was the only factor that had an impact on local tumor control (p = 0.0005), while tumor length was the only factor that had an effect on dysphagia-free survival (p = 0.0475). When compared to other forms of palliation currently available (bypass surgery, laser, chemotherapy, intubation, external radiotherapy), fractionated brachytherapy gave the best results with a median survival of 6.2 months. Conclusions: Fractionated

  2. Effective dose as an irritating influence during fractionated γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, V.N.; Ushakov, I.B.; Davydov, B.I.

    1990-01-01

    The study of early neurological disturbances (END) in rats after fractionated γ-irradiation with doses of 37.5-225 Gy at dose rate of 30.11 Gy/min has demonstrated that the initial response of animals to pulse ionizing radiation is a function of the electric charge induced by ionizing radiation. A change in the probability of occurrence of each of the END symptoms, with the increased intervals between exposures, is merely an indirect indication of the eliminating mechanisms and is intricately connected with the irritating charge value. The proposed empiric relationships permit to correlate the probability of END symptom occurrence with the continuous quantitative parameter of fractionated irradiation, that is, with an effective dose as an analogue of the irritating effect

  3. Sterilization of boll weevil pupae with fractionated doses of gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haynes, J.W.; Mitlin, N.; Davich, T.B.; Dawson, J.R.; McGovern, W.L.; McKibben, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Fractionated doses of 6,250-8,000 rads of gamma irradiation administered to pupae of the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boh., sexually sterilized both sexes. Mortality of males thus treated with 6,250 and 8,000 rads via fractionation was 14% and 27% respectively, by 5 days posttreatment compared with 46% mortality when an equivalent acute dose was administered to newly emerged adults. Pheromone production of males irradiated at 6,250 rads was one-third that of the control for the first 4 days, but equal that of the control during 5-11 days posttreatment. This procedure lends itself to the large-scale sterilization of weevils needed in an eradication program. This technique is applicable to other insects that are highly susceptible to acute doses

  4. Fractionated dose cholecystography: a comparison between iopanoic acid and sodium ipodate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiner, R.G.; Lawson, M.J.; Davies, G.T.; Tucker, W.G.; Mileski, O.; Read, T.R.; Grant, A.K. (Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide (Australia))

    1980-11-01

    Two randomised groups of 100 subjects each, undergoing oral cholecystography, were given either a 6 g fractionated dose of iopanoic acid (Telepaque) or sodium ipodate (Biloptin) to determine the relative merits of this dose schedule. Exclusions to the study were pregnancy and iodine sensitivity. Calculi or abnormal gall-bladder opacification were present in 45% of subjects. Both agents were equally effective in demonstrating abnormalities, although bile duct visualisation was better using iopanoic acid (P<0.05). Of 46 subjects with abnormal cholecystograms subsequently undergoing surgery, all had the diagnosis confirmed. Side effects occurred in 63% of all subjects, being twice as common in those taking iopanoic acid (P<0.01). Sodium ipodate in a large fractionated dose is favoured because of the lower occurrence of side effects without loss of diagnostic accuracy.

  5. Fractionated dose cholecystography: a comparison between iopanoic acid and sodium ipodate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiner, R.G.; Lawson, M.J.; Davies, G.T.; Tucker, W.G.; Mileski, O.; Read, T.R.; Grant, A.K.

    1980-01-01

    Two randomised groups of 100 subjects each, undergoing oral cholecystography, were given either a 6 g fractionated dose of iopanoic acid (Telepaque) or sodium ipodate (Biloptin) to determine the relative merits of this dose schedule. Exclusions to the study were pregnancy and iodine sensitivity. Calculi or abnormal gall-bladder opacification were present in 45% of subjects. Both agents were equally effective in demonstrating abnormalities, although bile duct visualisation was better using iopanoic acid (P<0.05). Of 46 subjects with abnormal cholecystograms subsequently undergoing surgery, all had the diagnosis confirmed. Side effects occurred in 63% of all subjects, being twice as common in those taking iopanoic acid (P<0.01). Sodium ipodate in a large fractionated dose is favoured because of the lower occurrence of side effects without loss of diagnostic accuracy. (author)

  6. Induction by X-rays of chromosome aberrations in male guinea-pigs and golden hamsters. 4. Dose-response for spermatogonia treated with fractionated doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, M F; Cox, B D [Medical Research Council, Harwell (UK). Radiobiological Research Unit

    1975-10-01

    The effect of dose fractionation on the induction of translocations by 400 and 600 rad X-rays in spermatogonia of guinea-pigs and hamsters was investigated cytologically. Three types of fractionation were used, dividing the dose into (a) two equal fractions 24h apart, (b) two equal fractions 8 weeks apart, and (c) eight or twelve equal fractions of 50 rad, at intervals of one week. The two species responded similarly throughout, but gave lower translocation yields than the mouse. The effects of the first and third types of fractionation were similar to those described previously in the mouse, and suggested that a first radiation dose modifies the spermatogonial population so that its sensitivity to a dose 24h later is altered, and that repeated radiation doses result in development of resistance to translocation induction. After 8-week fractionation, the results suggested that in guinea-pigs and hamsters, the spermatogonial population had not returned to normal by 8 weeks after the first dose, whereas in the mouse, normal sensitivity had returned by this time. The results, reported previously, of single doses of X-rays suggest that the spermatogonial population consists of sub-populations differing in sensitivity to cell killing and genetic effects. The effects of fractionated doses in the mouse suggest that the sensitive and resistant types represent different phases of the samecell type rather than two distinct types of cell. In the guinea-pig and hamster, this question remains open.

  7. Fractional model for pharmacokinetics of high dose methotrexate in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Jovan K.; Spasić, Dragan T.; Tošić, Jela; Kolarović, Jovanka L.; Malti, Rachid; Mitić, Igor M.; Pilipović, Stevan; Atanacković, Teodor M.

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to promote a model based on the fractional differential calculus related to the pharmacokinetic individualization of high dose methotrexate treatment in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, especially in high risk patients. We applied two-compartment fractional model on 8 selected cases with the largest number (4-19) of measured concentrations, among 43 pediatric patients received 24-h methotrexate 2-5 g/m2 infusions. The plasma concentrations were determined by fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Our mathematical procedure, designed by combining Post's and Newton's method, was coded in Mathematica 8.0 and performed on Fujicu Celsius M470-2 PC. Experimental data show that most of the measured values of methotrexate were in decreasing order. However, in certain treatments local maximums were detected. On the other hand, integer order compartmental models do not give values which fit well with the observed data. By the use of our model, we obtained better results, since it gives more accurate behavior of the transmission, as well as the local maximums which were recognized in methotrexate monitoring. It follows from our method that an additional test with a small methotrexate dose can be suggested for the fractional system parameter identification and the prediction of a possible pattern with a full dose in the case of high risk patients. A special feature of the fractional model is that it can also recognize and better fit an observed non-monotonic behavior. A new parameter determination procedure can be successfully used.

  8. Fractional poisson--a simple dose-response model for human norovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messner, Michael J; Berger, Philip; Nappier, Sharon P

    2014-10-01

    This study utilizes old and new Norovirus (NoV) human challenge data to model the dose-response relationship for human NoV infection. The combined data set is used to update estimates from a previously published beta-Poisson dose-response model that includes parameters for virus aggregation and for a beta-distribution that describes variable susceptibility among hosts. The quality of the beta-Poisson model is examined and a simpler model is proposed. The new model (fractional Poisson) characterizes hosts as either perfectly susceptible or perfectly immune, requiring a single parameter (the fraction of perfectly susceptible hosts) in place of the two-parameter beta-distribution. A second parameter is included to account for virus aggregation in the same fashion as it is added to the beta-Poisson model. Infection probability is simply the product of the probability of nonzero exposure (at least one virus or aggregate is ingested) and the fraction of susceptible hosts. The model is computationally simple and appears to be well suited to the data from the NoV human challenge studies. The model's deviance is similar to that of the beta-Poisson, but with one parameter, rather than two. As a result, the Akaike information criterion favors the fractional Poisson over the beta-Poisson model. At low, environmentally relevant exposure levels (Poisson model; however, caution is advised because no subjects were challenged at such a low dose. New low-dose data would be of great value to further clarify the NoV dose-response relationship and to support improved risk assessment for environmentally relevant exposures. © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain for the U.S.A.

  9. Tetravalent one-regular graphs of order 4p2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Yan-Quan; Kutnar, Klavdija; Marusic, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    A graph is one-regular if its automorphism group acts regularly on the set of its arcs. In this paper tetravalent one-regular graphs of order 4p2, where p is a prime, are classified.......A graph is one-regular if its automorphism group acts regularly on the set of its arcs. In this paper tetravalent one-regular graphs of order 4p2, where p is a prime, are classified....

  10. Effects of intra-fraction motion on IMRT dose delivery: statistical analysis and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortfeld, Thomas; Jokivarsi, Kimmo; Goitein, Michael; Kung, Jong; Jiang, Steve B.

    2002-01-01

    There has been some concern that organ motion, especially intra-fraction organ motion due to breathing, can negate the potential merit of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). We wanted to find out whether this concern is justified. Specifically, we wanted to investigate whether IMRT delivery techniques with moving parts, e.g., with a multileaf collimator (MLC), are particularly sensitive to organ motion due to the interplay between organ motion and leaf motion. We also wanted to know if, and by how much, fractionation of the treatment can reduce the effects. We performed a statistical analysis and calculated the expected dose values and dose variances for volume elements of organs that move during the delivery of the IMRT. We looked at the overall influence of organ motion during the course of a fractionated treatment. A linear-quadratic model was used to consider fractionation effects. Furthermore, we developed software to simulate motion effects for IMRT delivery with an MLC, with compensators, and with a scanning beam. For the simulation we assumed a sinusoidal motion in an isocentric plane. We found that the expected dose value is independent of the treatment technique. It is just a weighted average over the path of motion of the dose distribution without motion. If the treatment is delivered in several fractions, the distribution of the dose around the expected value is close to a Gaussian. For a typical treatment with 30 fractions, the standard deviation is generally within 1% of the expected value for MLC delivery if one assumes a typical motion amplitude of 5 mm (1 cm peak to peak). The standard deviation is generally even smaller for the compensator but bigger for scanning beam delivery. For the latter it can be reduced through multiple deliveries ('paintings') of the same field. In conclusion, the main effect of organ motion in IMRT is an averaging of the dose distribution without motion over the path of the motion. This is the same as for treatments

  11. Effects of low-dose continuously fractionated X-ray irradiation on murine peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yi; Zhang Hong; Dang Bingrong; Hao Jifang; Guo Hongyun; Wang Xiaohu

    2007-01-01

    For estimating biological risks from low doses continual irradiation, we investigated the effects of exposure to continuously fractionated X-rays on murine immune system. The BALB/c mice were irradiated with 0.07Gy at the first day and 0.08 Gy/d in the following 12 days at a dose rate of 0.2 Gy/min. The peripheral blood lymphocyte cycle and death were determined by flow cytometry at the cumulative doses of 0, 0.07, 0.23, 0.39, 0.55, 0.71, 0.87 and 1.03 Gy respectively. The results showed that the cycle of peripheral blood lymphocyte was arrested in G 0 /G 1 at cumulative doses of 0.07, 0.23, 0.71 and 0.87 Gy, and in G 2 /M at cumulative doses of 0.39 and 1.03 Gy; the percentage of death of peripheral blood lymphocyte was ascended with dose increasing, and reached the death peak at cumulative doses of 0.71 Gy. The results suggested that low doses continual X-rays total-body irradiated could result in changes of cellular cycle and death, and some damages to immunocytes, which accorded to linear square model. (authors)

  12. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Boost for Prostate Cancer: Comparison of Two Different Fractionation Schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaprealian, Tania; Weinberg, Vivian; Speight, Joycelyn L.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Roach, Mack; Shinohara, Katsuto; Hsu, I.-Chow

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This is a retrospective study comparing our experience with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for prostate cancer, using two different fractionation schemes, 600 cGy × 3 fractions (patient group 1) and 950 cGy × 2 fractions (patient group 2). Methods and Materials: A total of 165 patients were treated for prostate cancer using external beam radiation therapy up to a dose of 45 Gy, followed by an HDR brachytherapy prostate radiation boost. Between July 1997 and Nov 1999, 64 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 600 cGy × 3 fractions; and between June 2000 and Nov 2005, 101 patients were treated with an HDR boost of 950 cGy × 2 fractions. All but 9 patients had at least one of the following risk features: pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level >10, a Gleason score ≥7, and/or clinical stage T3 disease. Results: Median follow-up was 105 months for group 1 and 43 months for group 2. Patients in group 2 had a greater number of high-risk features than group 1 (p = 0.02). Adjusted for comparable follow-up, there was no difference in biochemical no-evidence-of-disease (bNED) rate between the two fractionation scheme approaches, with 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of 93.5% in group 1 and 87.3% in group 2 (p = 0.19). The 5-year estimates of progression-free survival were 86% for group 1 and 83% for group 2 (p = 0.53). Among high-risk patients, there were no differences in bNED or PFS rate due to fractionation. Conclusions: Results were excellent for both groups. Adjusted for comparable follow-up, no differences were found between groups.

  13. Experience of micromultileaf collimator linear accelerator based single fraction stereotactic radiosurgery: Tumor dose inhomogeneity, conformity, and dose fall off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Linda X.; Garg, Madhur; Lasala, Patrick; Kim, Mimi; Mah, Dennis; Chen, Chin-Cheng; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Mynampati, Dinesh; Kuo, Hsiang-Chi; Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Sharp dose fall off outside a tumor is essential for high dose single fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) plans. This study explores the relationship among tumor dose inhomogeneity, conformity, and dose fall off in normal tissues for micromultileaf collimator (mMLC) linear accelerator (LINAC) based cranial SRS plans. Methods: Between January 2007 and July 2009, 65 patients with single cranial lesions were treated with LINAC-based SRS. Among them, tumors had maximum diameters {<=}20 mm: 31; between 20 and 30 mm: 21; and >30 mm: 13. All patients were treated with 6 MV photons on a Trilogy linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with a tertiary m3 high-resolution mMLC (Brainlab, Feldkirchen, Germany), using either noncoplanar conformal fixed fields or dynamic conformal arcs. The authors also created retrospective study plans with identical beam arrangement as the treated plan but with different tumor dose inhomogeneity by varying the beam margins around the planning target volume (PTV). All retrospective study plans were normalized so that the minimum PTV dose was the prescription dose (PD). Isocenter dose, mean PTV dose, RTOG conformity index (CI), RTOG homogeneity index (HI), dose gradient index R{sub 50}-R{sub 100} (defined as the difference between equivalent sphere radius of 50% isodose volume and prescription isodose volume), and normal tissue volume (as a ratio to PTV volume) receiving 50% prescription dose (NTV{sub 50}) were calculated. Results: HI was inversely related to the beam margins around the PTV. CI had a ''V'' shaped relationship with HI, reaching a minimum when HI was approximately 1.3. Isocenter dose and mean PTV dose (as percentage of PD) increased linearly with HI. R{sub 50}-R{sub 100} and NTV{sub 50} initially declined with HI and then reached a plateau when HI was approximately 1.3. These trends also held when tumors were grouped according to their maximum diameters. The smallest tumor group

  14. Dose mapping sensitivity to deformable registration uncertainties in fractionated radiotherapy – applied to prostate proton treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilly, David; Tilly, Nina; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Calculation of accumulated dose in fractionated radiotherapy based on spatial mapping of the dose points generally requires deformable image registration (DIR). The accuracy of the accumulated dose thus depends heavily on the DIR quality. This motivates investigations of how the registration uncertainty influences dose planning objectives and treatment outcome predictions. A framework was developed where the dose mapping can be associated with a variable known uncertainty to simulate the DIR uncertainties in a clinical workflow. The framework enabled us to study the dependence of dose planning metrics, and the predicted treatment outcome, on the DIR uncertainty. The additional planning margin needed to compensate for the dose mapping uncertainties can also be determined. We applied the simulation framework to a hypofractionated proton treatment of the prostate using two different scanning beam spot sizes to also study the dose mapping sensitivity to penumbra widths. The planning parameter most sensitive to the DIR uncertainty was found to be the target D 95 . We found that the registration mean absolute error needs to be ≤0.20 cm to obtain an uncertainty better than 3% of the calculated D 95 for intermediate sized penumbras. Use of larger margins in constructing PTV from CTV relaxed the registration uncertainty requirements to the cost of increased dose burdens to the surrounding organs at risk. The DIR uncertainty requirements should be considered in an adaptive radiotherapy workflow since this uncertainty can have significant impact on the accumulated dose. The simulation framework enabled quantification of the accuracy requirement for DIR algorithms to provide satisfactory clinical accuracy in the accumulated dose

  15. The NARLAL2 dose escalation trial: dosimetric implications of inter-fractional changes in organs at risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Lone; Knap, Marianne Marquard; Khalil, Azza Ahmed

    2018-01-01

    and an escalated treatment plan. In the escalated arm, mean doses up to 95 Gy/33 fractions (tumour) and 74 Gy/33 fractions (lymph nodes) are delivered to the most 18fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (18FDG PET) active regions. The dose distributions are limited by strict constraints to OARs...

  16. Daily fraction dose recalculation based on rigid registration using Cone Beam CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Bosse

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To calculate the daily fraction dose for CBCT recalculations based on rigid registration and compare it to the planned CT doses.Methods: For this study, 30 patients that were previously treated (10 SBRT lung, 10 prostate and 10 abdomen were considered. The daily CBCT images were imported into the Pinnacle treatment planning system from Mosaic. Pinnacle was used to re-contour the regions of interest (ROI for the specific CBCT by copying the contours from the original CT plan, planned by the prescribing physician, onto each daily CBCT and then manually reshaping contours to match the ROIs. A new plan is then created with the re-contoured CBCT as primary image in order to calculate the daily dose delivered to each ROI. The DVH values are then exported into Excel and overlaid onto the original CT DVH to produce a graph.Results: For the SBRT lung patients, we found that there were small daily volume changes in the lungs, trachea and esophagus. For almost all regions of interest we found that the dose received each day was less than the predicted dose of the planned CT while the PTV dose was relatively the same each day. The results for the prostate patients were similar, showing slight differences in the DVH values for different days in the rectum and bladder but similar PTV.Conclusion: By comparing daily fraction dose between the re-contoured CBCT images and the original planned CT show that PTV coverage for both prostate and SBRT, it has been shown that for PTV coverage, a planned CT is adequate. However, there are differences between the dose for the organs surrounding the PTV. The dose difference is less than the planned in most instances.-----------------------Cite this article as: Bosse C, Tuohy R, Mavroidis P, Shi Z, Crownover R, Gutierrez A, Papanikolaou N, Stathakis S. Daily fraction dose recalculation based on rigid registration using Cone Beam CT. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(2:020217. DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0202.17

  17. Response of rat spinal cord to single and fractionated doses of accelerated heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leith, J.T.; McDonald, M.; Powers-Risius, P.; Bliven, S.F.; Howard, J.

    1982-01-01

    The thoraco-lumbar (T12-L1) region of the spinal cord of rats was exposed to either single or fractionated (four daily exposures) doses of X rays (230 kVp) or heavy ions. The heavy ions used were carbon and neon, and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of both the plateau ionization region and the midpeak region of 4-cm spread-out Bragg peaks of each heavy ion were investigated. For single doses of carbon and neon ions in the plateau ionization region, RBE values of 1.45 +/- 0.25 (propagated 95% confidence limits) and 1.46 +/- 0.33, respectively, were obtained. In the spread peak regions for carbon and neon ions, the RBE values were 1.48 +/- 0.18 and 1.86 +/- 0.42, respectively. These values were obtained using the dose needed to produce 50% paralysis in a group of irradiated rats as the isoeffect comparison dose (ED 50 dose). Similarly, in groups of rats receiving four daily exposures, the RBE values for carbon and neon ions in the plateau ionization region were 1.31 +/- 0.27 and 1.80 +/- 0.24, respectively. In the spread peak regions of ionization for carbon and neon ions, the RBE values were 1.95 +/- 0.19 and 2.18 +/- 0.23, respectively. Similar values for RBE were obtained using changes in the activity of enzymes in spinal cord tissue (cyclic nucleotide phosphohydrolase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase). Also, it was estimated that, for X irradiation, the fractional amount of dose repaired (at the ED 50 dose) was 0.64 +/- 0.10 (95% confidence limits). For carbon and neon ions in the plateau ionization region, the values for the fractional amount of dose repaired were 0.70 +/- 0.27 and 0.48 +/- 0.20, and for carbon and neon ions in the spread peak region of ionization, the fractional repair values were 0.40 +/- 0.10 and 0.52 +/- 0.17. Spinal cord tissue therefore shows a high capacity for subeffective damage repair

  18. Acute hematological tolerance to multiple fraction, whole body, low dose irradiation in an experimental murine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melamed, J.S.; Chen, M.G.; Brown, J.W.; Katagiri, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    Using a dose fractionation scheme patterned after the current regimen for treatment of disseminated non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the authors studied the effects of irradation on progenitor and effector cells for hematopoiesis in five-month-old BC3F 1 mice. Fractions of 20 or 50 rad (0.2 or 0.5 Gy) total body irradation were given twice weekly to a final total dose of 200 or 500 rad (2 or 5 Gy), respectively. Weekly assays revealed a marked, sustained depression of stem cell activity, measured as numbers of spleen colony-forming units (CFU-S) and in vitro colony-forming cells (CFU-C), without corresponding depression of effector cells (red and white cells, and platelets). The lack of correlation between numbers of stem cells and peripheral elements is relevant to clinical assessment of marrow reserve

  19. Estimation of the effectivity of gamma teletherapy with fractionated daily doses in inoperable malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardynskij, Yu.S.; Leskov, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    131 patients with lung, esophagus, rectum and mandibulofacial tumors, most of them being inoperable, were treated with fractionated gamma teletherapy. The daily focus dose of 2-2.2 Gy was applied in 2 fractions with an interval of 4-6 h. The total focus dose of one course of treatment was 40-70 Gy. In 56 patients (42.7%) a complete regression of the tumors and of the increased regional lymph nodes was obtained. The irradiation by the mentioned technique showed the highest effectivity for tumors of the lung and the esophagus. The diminished frequency and an easier progress of the radiation reactions are important because they often prevent to carry out a radical therapy. (author)

  20. Intradermal Administration of Fractional Doses of Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine: A Dose-Sparing Option for Polio Immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okayasu, Hiromasa; Sein, Carolyn; Chang Blanc, Diana; Gonzalez, Alejandro Ramirez; Zehrung, Darin; Jarrahian, Courtney; Macklin, Grace; Sutter, Roland W

    2017-07-01

    A fractional dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (fIPV) administered by the intradermal route delivers one fifth of the full vaccine dose administered by the intramuscular route and offers a potential dose-sparing strategy to stretch the limited global IPV supply while further improving population immunity. Multiple studies have assessed immunogenicity of intradermal fIPV compared with the full intramuscular dose and demonstrated encouraging results. Novel intradermal devices, including intradermal adapters and disposable-syringe jet injectors, have also been developed and evaluated as alternatives to traditional Bacillus Calmette-Guérin needles and syringes for the administration of fIPV. Initial experience in India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka suggests that it is operationally feasible to implement fIPV vaccination on a large scale. Given the available scientific data and operational feasibility shown in early-adopter countries, countries are encouraged to consider introducing a fIPV strategy into their routine immunization and supplementary immunization activities. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  1. Single-dose and fractionated irradiation of four human lung cancer cell lines in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodin, O.; Lennartsson, L.; Nilsson, S.

    1991-01-01

    Four established human lung cancer cell lines were exposed to single-dose irradiation. The survival curves of 2 small cell lung carcinomas (SCLC) were characterized by a limited capacity for repair with small and moderate shoulders with extrapolation numbers (n) of 1.05 and 1.60 respectively. Two non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines, one squamous cell (SQCLC) and one large cell (LCLC) had large shoulders with n-values of 73 and 15 respectively. The radiosensitivity when measured as D 0 did not, however, differ as much from cell line to cell line, with values from 1.22 to 1.65. The surviving fraction after 2 Gy (SF2) was 0.24 and 0.42 respectively in the SCLC cell lines and 0.90 and 0.88 respectively in the NSCLC cell lines. Fractionated irradiation delivered according to 3 different schedules was also investigated. All the schedules delivered a total dose of 10 Gy in 5 days and were applied in 1, 2 and 5 Gy dose fractions respectively. Survival followed the pattern found after single-dose irradiation; it was lowest in the SCLC cell line with the lowest SF and highest in the two NSCLC cell lines. In the SCLC cell lines all schedules were approximately equally efficient. In the LCLC and in the SQCLC cell lines, the 5 Gy schedule killed more cells than the 1 and 2 Gy schedules. The results indicate that the size of the shoulder of the survival curve is essential when choosing the most tumoricidal fractionation schedule. (orig.)

  2. The influence of dose per fraction on the pathogenesis of radiation nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildiz, F.; Atahan, I.L.; Tuncel, M.; Konan, A. [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey). Departments of Radiation Oncology and Anatomy

    1998-11-01

    Both kidneys of male Wistar rats were irradiated with either a 1 0-Gy single dose or 26 Gy at a rate of 2 Gy per fraction per day. Serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine and blood haematocrit levels were assessed prior to radiotherapy and at intervals of 8 weeks thereafter. A subset of animals from each dose group were killed at 4, 8,16 and 24 weeks and both kidneys of each animal were examined by electron microscopy. In both dose groups a significant increase in BUN and creatinine levels, together with a decrease in haematocrit level, was observed at 16 weeks, and this was followed by an apparent improvement at 24 weeks. There was no statistical difference in these responses between the two groups. The morphological changes in both dose groups were essentially similar, but differed in severity. At 4 weeks after irradiation glomerular and proximal tubular injury were observed in both groups. A marked increase of glomerular and tubular injury in the 10-Gy dose group, without any apparent progression in the 26-Gy dose group, was detected at 8 weeks. By 16 weeks a noticeable improvement in both tubular and glomerular lesions (especially in the 10-Gy dose group) was observed. No apparent difference from the 16th week of evaluation was found at 24 weeks. These findings indicate that there is some recovery in kidney after irradiation, but the extent of the recovery process is somewhat limited. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 38 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  3. The HYP-RT Hypoxic Tumour Radiotherapy Algorithm and Accelerated Repopulation Dose per Fraction Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. Harriss-Phillips

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The HYP-RT model simulates hypoxic tumour growth for head and neck cancer as well as radiotherapy and the effects of accelerated repopulation and reoxygenation. This report outlines algorithm design, parameterisation and the impact of accelerated repopulation on the increase in dose/fraction needed to control the extra cell propagation during accelerated repopulation. Cell kill probabilities are based on Linear Quadratic theory, with oxygenation levels and proliferative capacity influencing cell death. Hypoxia is modelled through oxygen level allocation based on pO2 histograms. Accelerated repopulation is modelled by increasing the stem cell symmetrical division probability, while the process of reoxygenation utilises randomised pO2 increments to the cell population after each treatment fraction. Propagation of 108 tumour cells requires 5–30 minutes. Controlling the extra cell growth induced by accelerated repopulation requires a dose/fraction increase of 0.5–1.0 Gy, in agreement with published reports. The average reoxygenation pO2 increment of 3 mmHg per fraction results in full tumour reoxygenation after shrinkage to approximately 1 mm. HYP-RT is a computationally efficient model simulating tumour growth and radiotherapy, incorporating accelerated repopulation and reoxygenation. It may be used to explore cell kill outcomes during radiotherapy while varying key radiobiological and tumour specific parameters, such as the degree of hypoxia.

  4. Functional and morphological changes in pig skin after single or fractionated doses in x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, C.M.A.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The flank skin of pigs has been treated with either single or fractionated doses of x-irradiation. A single dose (2070 cGy) was compared with treatment given as 6 fractions in 18 days (6f/18 days; 3780 cGy) or 30 fractions in 39 days (30f/39 days; 8000 cGy). The doses were selected on the basis that similar levels of late tissue damage would result. Radiation induced changes in the skin were assessed by observing the skin reactions and by the measurement of isotope clearance (functional study), relative field contraction, dermal and epidermal thickness and dermal vascular density (morphological studies). In the three treatment groups the early radiation reaction varied considerably. In the first wave reaction (3 to 6 weeks after treatment) bright red erythema was recorded in many fields but moist desquamation developed only in the 30f/39 days treatment group. The second wave (10-16 weeks) was characterized by an ischemic mauve/dusky reaction. Dermal necrosis developed in 50% of the single dose fields. In the 30f/39 days regimen persistent moist desquamation progressed to dermal necrosis. Neither desquamation nor necrosis developed after 6f/18 days. Different levels of vascular damage in the dermis were assessed using an isotope clearance technique; for example in the early reaction significant changes were recorded in the papillary dermis (faster clearance) prior to the development of moist desquamation (30f/39 days) and in the reticular dermis (slower clearance) before necrosis (single dose). Changes in clearance rates have been correlated with changes in the vascular density and thickness of the dermis. Between 26 and 52 weeks (the late reaction) relative field contraction was slightly greater in the 30f/39 days group than in the other treatment groups

  5. Impact of radiation technique, radiation fraction dose, and total cisplatin dose on hearing. Retrospective analysis of 29 medulloblastoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scobioala, Sergiu; Kittel, Christopher; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Wolters, Heidi; Eich, Hans Theodor [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Muenster (Germany); Parfitt, Ross; Matulat, Peter; Am Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, Antoinette [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Phoniatrics and Pediatric Audiology, Muenster (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    To analyze the incidence and degree of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) resulting from different radiation techniques, fractionation dose, mean cochlear radiation dose (D{sub mean}), and total cisplatin dose. In all, 29 children with medulloblastoma (58 ears) with subclinical pretreatment hearing thresholds participated. Radiotherapy (RT) and cisplatin had been applied sequentially according to the HIT MED Guidance. Audiological outcomes up to the latest follow-up (median 2.6 years) were compared. Bilateral high-frequency SNHL was observed in 26 patients (90%). No significant differences were found in mean hearing threshold between left and right ears at any frequency. A significantly better audiological outcome (p < 0.05) was found after tomotherapy at the 6 kHz bone-conduction threshold (BCT) and left-sided 8 kHz air-conduction threshold (ACT) than after a combined radiotherapy technique (CT). Fraction dose was not found to have any impact on the incidence, degree, and time-to-onset of SNHL. Patients treated with CT had a greater risk of SNHL at high frequencies than tomotherapy patients even though D{sub mean} was similar. Increase in severity of SNHL was seen when the total cisplatin dose reached above 210 mg/m{sup 2}, with the highest abnormal level found 8-12 months after RT regardless of radiation technique or fraction dose. The cochlear radiation dose should be kept as low as possible in patients who receive simultaneous cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The risk of clinically relevant HL was shown when D{sub mean} exceeds 45 Gy independent of radiation technique or radiation regime. Cisplatin ototoxicity was shown to have a dose-dependent effect on bilateral SNHL, which was more pronounced in higher frequencies. (orig.) [German] Analyse von Inzidenz und Schweregrad einer sensorineuralen Schwerhoerigkeit (''sensorineural hearing loss'', SNHL) infolge der Wirkung unterschiedlicher Bestrahlungstechniken, Fraktionierungen, mittlerer

  6. Clinical applicability of biologically effective dose calculation for spinal cord in fractionated spine stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Heon; Lee, Kyu Chan; Choi, Jinho; Ahn, So Hyun; Lee, Seok Ho; Sung, Ki Hoon; Kil, Se Hee

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether biologically effective dose (BED) based on linear-quadratic model can be used to estimate spinal cord tolerance dose in spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) delivered in 4 or more fractions. Sixty-three metastatic spinal lesions in 47 patients were retrospectively evaluated. The most frequently prescribed dose was 36 Gy in 4 fractions. In planning, we tried to limit the maximum dose to the spinal cord or cauda equina less than 50% of prescription or 45 Gy 2/2 . BED was calculated using maximum point dose of spinal cord. Maximum spinal cord dose per fraction ranged from 2.6 to 6.0 Gy (median 4.3 Gy). Except 4 patients with 52.7, 56.4, 62.4, and 67.9 Gy 2/2 , equivalent total dose in 2-Gy fraction of the patients was not more than 50 Gy 2/2 (12.1–67.9, median 32.0). The ratio of maximum spinal cord dose to prescription dose increased up to 82.2% of prescription dose as epidural spinal cord compression grade increased. No patient developed grade 2 or higher radiation-induced spinal cord toxicity during follow-up period of 0.5 to 53.9 months. In fractionated spine SBRT, BED can be used to estimate spinal cord tolerance dose, provided that the dose per fraction to the spinal cord is moderate, e.g. < 6.0 Gy. It appears that a maximum dose of up to 45–50 Gy 2/2 to the spinal cord is tolerable in 4 or more fractionation regimen

  7. Crystalline insoluble acid salts of tetravalent metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberti, G.; Bernasconi, M.G.; Casciola, M.; Costantino, U.

    1980-01-01

    Several titration curves of crystalline acid salts of tetravalent metals show an evident decrease in the pH of the supernatant solution with an increasing addition of metal hydroxide. This phenomenon, very unusual for common organic ion-exchangers, seems to be quite general for inorganic ion-exchangers with layered structure of α-type. In order to throw light on this phenomenon, a detailed investigation was carried out on the titration curves of α-Zr(HPO 4 ) 2 .H 2 O with various metal hydroxides, particularly KOH. To obtain the presence of a distinct minimum in the titration curve, three conditions seem to be necessary: (1) high activation energy for H + /Msup(Z+) exchange (which, in turn, depends on the relative size of Msup(Z+) and size of the windows connecting the cavities), (2) formation of solid solution having high M-content and (3) formation of a phase, with a large inter-layer distance, in the external parts of the crystals. This last point is particularly important since the enlargement of the external part of the crystals lowers the activation energy for the exchange of large cations. Thus, once started, the exchange can take place at lower pH' values. (author)

  8. Effect of single dose, fractionated, and hyperfractionated trunk irradiation on weight gain, respiration frequency, and survival in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimler, B.F.; Giri, P.G.S.; Giri, U.P.; Cox, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    It is concluded that, in this rat trunk irradiation model, fractionation of a single dose into two equal doses separated by 4-6 h produced a sparing effect of approx. 5Gy as measured by delay in weight gain; approx. 4Gy as measured by increased respiration frequency; and approx. 6Gy as measured by survival. Fractionation into daily doses or hyperfractionation into twice-daily doses permitted an approximate doubling of the dose required for the same suppression of weight gain. For the respiration rates and survival endpoints, fractionation or hyperfractionation produced an even greater sparing effect since there was no increase in the respiration frequency at twice the doses that would produce changes if delivered within a few hours; and since essentially no lethality was observed at twice the doses that would kill 70%-100% of animals if delivered in one day. (UK)

  9. Comparison of Different Fractionation Schedules Toward a Single Fraction in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Using 3-Dimensional Radiobiological Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis, E-mail: mavroidis@uthscsa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Milickovic, Natasa [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, Offenbach (Germany); Cruz, Wilbert F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Tselis, Nikolaos [Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, Offenbach (Germany); Karabis, Andreas [Pi-Medical Ltd., Athens (Greece); Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Zamboglou, Nikolaos [Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, Offenbach (Germany); Baltas, Dimos [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Strahlenklinik, Klinikum Offenbach GmbH, Offenbach (Germany); Nuclear and Particle Physics Section, Physics Department, University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was the investigation of different fractionation schemes to estimate their clinical impact. For this purpose, widely applied radiobiological models and dosimetric measures were used to associate their results with clinical findings. Methods and Materials: The dose distributions of 12 clinical high-dose-rate brachytherapy implants for prostate were evaluated in relation to different fractionation schemes. The fractionation schemes compared were: (1) 1 fraction of 20 Gy; (2) 2 fractions of 14 Gy; (3) 3 fractions of 11 Gy; and (4) 4 fractions of 9.5 Gy. The clinical effectiveness of the different fractionation schemes was estimated through the complication-free tumor control probability (P{sub +}), the biologically effective uniform dose, and the generalized equivalent uniform dose index. Results: For the different fractionation schemes, the tumor control probabilities were 98.5% in 1 × 20 Gy, 98.6% in 2 × 14 Gy, 97.5% in 3 × 11 Gy, and 97.8% in 4 × 9.5 Gy. The corresponding P{sub +} values were 88.8% in 1 × 20 Gy, 83.9% in 2 × 14 Gy, 86.0% in 3 × 11 Gy, and 82.3% in 4 × 9.5 Gy. With use of the fractionation scheme 4 × 9.5 Gy as reference, the isoeffective schemes regarding tumor control for 1, 2, and 3 fractions were 1 × 19.68 Gy, 2 × 13.75 Gy, and 3 × 11.05 Gy. The optimum fractionation schemes for 1, 2, 3, and 4 fractions were 1 × 19.16 Gy with a P{sub +} of 91.8%, 2 × 13.2 Gy with a P{sub +} of 89.6%, 3 × 10.6 Gy with a P{sub +} of 88.4%, and 4 × 9.02 Gy with a P{sub +} of 86.9%. Conclusions: Among the fractionation schemes 1 × 20 Gy, 2 × 14 Gy, 3 × 11 Gy, and 4 × 9.5 Gy, the first scheme was more effective in terms of P{sub +}. After performance of a radiobiological optimization, it was shown that a single fraction of 19.2 to 19.7 Gy (average 19.5 Gy) should produce at least the same benefit as that given by the 4 × 9.5 Gy scheme, and it should reduce the expected total complication probability by

  10. Dose fractionation in synchrotron radiation x-ray phase micro-tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frachon, Thibaut; Weber, Loriane; Hesse, Bernhard; Rit, Simon; Dong, Pei; Olivier, Cecile; Peyrin, Françoise; Langer, Max

    2015-01-01

    Phase sensitive x-ray imaging expands the applicability of standard attenuation based techniques by offering several orders of magnitude of increase in sensitivity. Due to the short wavelength, x-ray phase is not directly measurable, but has to be put in evidence by the use of phase contrast techniques. The phase can then be reconstructed from one or several phase contrast images. In this study, we consider synchrotron x-ray phase micro-computed tomography (μCT) based on free space propagation for heterogeneous and strongly absorbing objects. This technique generally relies on acquiring several scans of the sample at different detector distances. It is also generally believed that multi-distance phase μCT needs a higher dose input than single distance phase μCT. The purpose of this work is to study the impact of different means of dose fractionation on the reconstructed image quality. We define different acquistion schemes in multi-distance in-line phase μCT. Previously, the exposure time at each sample-to-detector distance was usually kept the same. Here, we let not only the number of distances vary but also the fraction of exposure time at each distance, the total exposure time being kept constant. Phase retrieval is performed with the mixed approach algorithm. The reconstructed μCT images are compared in terms of accuracy, precision and resolution. In addition, we also compare the result of dose fractionated multi distance phase μCT to single distance phase μCT using the same total radiation dose. In the multi-distance approach, we find that using different exposure times on each distance improves the image quality in the reconstructed image. Further, we show that, despite having the same total dose delivery, the multi distance imaging method gives better image quality than the single distance method, at the cost of an additional overhead from camera displacements and reference images. We show that by optimizing the acquistion parameters in terms of

  11. A framework to measure myocardial extracellular volume fraction using dual-phase low dose CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yixun; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua; Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T.; Bluemke, David A.; Nacif, Marcelo S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECVF) is a surrogate imaging biomarker of diffuse myocardial fibrosis, a hallmark of pathologic ventricular remodeling. Low dose cardiac CT is emerging as a promising modality to detect diffuse interstitial myocardial fibrosis due to its fast acquisition and low radiation; however, the insufficient contrast in the low dose CT images poses great challenge to measure ECVF from the image. Methods: To deal with this difficulty, the authors present a complete ECVF measurement framework including a point-guided myocardial modeling, a deformable model-based myocardium segmentation, nonrigid registration of pre- and post-CT, and ECVF calculation. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on 20 patients by two observers. Compared to the manually delineated reference segmentations, the accuracy of our segmentation in terms of true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), and average surface distance (ASD), were 92.18% ± 3.52%, 0.31% ± 0.10%, 0.69 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. The interobserver variability measured by concordance correlation coefficient regarding TPVF, FPVF, and ASD were 0.95, 0.90, 0.94, respectively, demonstrating excellent agreement. Bland-Altman method showed 95% limits of agreement between ECVF at CT and ECVF at MR. Conclusions: The proposed framework demonstrates its efficiency, accuracy, and noninvasiveness in ECVF measurement and dramatically advances the ECVF at cardiac CT toward its clinical use

  12. A framework to measure myocardial extracellular volume fraction using dual-phase low dose CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yixun; Summers, Ronald M.; Yao, Jianhua, E-mail: JYao@cc.nih.gov [Clinical Image Processing Service, Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T.; Bluemke, David A. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 and Molecular Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Nacif, Marcelo S. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, NIH Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1182 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Myocardial extracellular volume fraction (ECVF) is a surrogate imaging biomarker of diffuse myocardial fibrosis, a hallmark of pathologic ventricular remodeling. Low dose cardiac CT is emerging as a promising modality to detect diffuse interstitial myocardial fibrosis due to its fast acquisition and low radiation; however, the insufficient contrast in the low dose CT images poses great challenge to measure ECVF from the image. Methods: To deal with this difficulty, the authors present a complete ECVF measurement framework including a point-guided myocardial modeling, a deformable model-based myocardium segmentation, nonrigid registration of pre- and post-CT, and ECVF calculation. Results: The proposed method was evaluated on 20 patients by two observers. Compared to the manually delineated reference segmentations, the accuracy of our segmentation in terms of true positive volume fraction (TPVF), false positive volume fraction (FPVF), and average surface distance (ASD), were 92.18% ± 3.52%, 0.31% ± 0.10%, 0.69 ± 0.14 mm, respectively. The interobserver variability measured by concordance correlation coefficient regarding TPVF, FPVF, and ASD were 0.95, 0.90, 0.94, respectively, demonstrating excellent agreement. Bland-Altman method showed 95% limits of agreement between ECVF at CT and ECVF at MR. Conclusions: The proposed framework demonstrates its efficiency, accuracy, and noninvasiveness in ECVF measurement and dramatically advances the ECVF at cardiac CT toward its clinical use.

  13. Gamma radiation-induced Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis, comparison of single and fractionated dose regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoshbin khoshnazar, A. R; Jahanshahi, M; Azami, N. S

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy of the brain is associated with many consequences, including cognitive disorders. Pathogenesis of radiation induced cognitive disorder is not clear, but reduction of neurogenesis in hippocampus may be an underlying reason. 24 adult male rats entered to study. Radiation absorbed dose to midbrain was 10 Gy, delivered by routine cobalt radiotherapy machine which its output was measured 115.24 cGy/min. The rats were divided in four groups of sixes, including groups of control, single fraction 10 Gy, fractionated 10 Gy and finally anaesthesia sham group. Number of pyramidal nerve cells was counted in two regions of hippocampus formation (CA1 and CA3). The radiation could reduce the number of cells in two regions of hippocampus significantly (p=0.000). It seems fractionated 10 Gy irradiation to more efficient than single fraction, while role of anaesthesia drug should be cautiously assessed. Moreover the rate of neurogenesis reduction was determined the same in these regions of hippocampus meaning the same radiosensitivity of cells

  14. Esophageal Toxicity From High-Dose, Single-Fraction Paraspinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, Brett W.; Jackson, Andrew; Hunt, Margie; Bilsky, Mark; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the esophageal toxicity from single-fraction paraspinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and identify dosimetric and clinical risk factors for toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 204 spinal metastases abutting the esophagus (182 patients) were treated with high-dose single-fraction SRS during 2003-2010. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Dose-volume histograms were combined to generate a comprehensive atlas of complication incidence that identifies risk factors for toxicity. Correlation of dose-volume factors with esophageal toxicity was assessed using Fisher’s exact test and logistic regression. Clinical factors were correlated with toxicity. Results: The median dose to the planning treatment volume was 24 Gy. Median follow-up was 12 months (range, 3-81). There were 31 (15%) acute and 24 (12%) late esophageal toxicities. The rate of grade ≥3 acute or late toxicity was 6.8% (14 patients). Fisher’s exact test resulted in significant median splits for grade ≥3 toxicity at V12 = 3.78 cm 3 (relative risk [RR] 3.7, P=.05), V15 = 1.87 cm 3 (RR 13, P=.0013), V20 = 0.11 cm 3 (RR 6, P=0.01), and V22 = 0.0 cm 3 (RR 13, P=.0013). The median split for D2.5 cm 3 (14.02 Gy) was also a significant predictor of toxicity (RR 6; P=.01). A highly significant logistic regression model was generated on the basis of D2.5 cm 3 . One hundred percent (n = 7) of grade ≥4 toxicities were associated with radiation recall reactions after doxorubicin or gemcitabine chemotherapy or iatrogenic manipulation of the irradiated esophagus. Conclusions: High-dose, single-fraction paraspinal SRS has a low rate of grade ≥3 esophageal toxicity. Severe esophageal toxicity is minimized with careful attention to esophageal doses during treatment planning. Iatrogenic manipulation of the irradiated esophagus and systemic agents classically associated with radiation recall reactions are

  15. A comparison of anti-tumor effects of high dose rate fractionated and low dose rate continuous irradiation in multicellular spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Nobuo; Omura, Motoko; Matsubara, Sho.

    1997-01-01

    In a clinical experience, high dose rate (HDR) fractionated interstitial radiotherapy can be an alternative to traditional low dose rate (LDR) continuous interstitial radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. To investigate biological effect of HDR, compared to LDR, comparisons have been made using spheroids of human squamous carcinoma cells. Both LDR and HDR were delivered by 137 Cs at 37degC. Dose rate of LDR was 8 Gy/day and HDR irradiations of fraction size of 4, 5 or 6 Gy were applied twice a day with an interval time of more than 6 hr. We estimated HDR fractionated dose of 31 Gy with 4 Gy/fr to give the same biological effects of 38 Gy by continuous LDR for spheroids. The ratio of HDR/LDR doses to control 50% spheroids was 0.82. (author)

  16. Lack of evidence for increased tolerance of rat spinal cord with decreasing fraction doses below 2 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, K.K.; van der Kogel, A.J.; van der Schueren, E.

    1985-01-01

    The radiation tolerance of the spinal cord, both in man and in rats, has been shown to depend strongly on the size of the dose per fraction. With fraction doses down to about 2 Gy, the spinal cord tolerance can be predicted by a modified Ellis formula. More recently alternative isoeffect formulas were based on the linear-quadratic (LQ) model of cell survival where the effect of dose fractionation is characterized by the ratio α/β which varies from tissue to tissue. For the spinal cord, as well as for other late responding tissues, the ratio α/β is small, in contrast to most acutely responding tissues. Both the Ellis-type formula, and to a lesser extent the LQ-model, predict a continuously increasing tolerance dose with decreasing fraction size. From previous experiments on the rat cervical spinal cord with doses per fraction down to about 2 Gy, the ratio α/β was determined to be 1.7 Gy, and the LQ-model would predict a rise in tolerance with a reduction in fraction size to far below 2 Gy. Based on these predictions clinical studies have been initiated assuming a significantly increased tolerance by reduction of fraction size to about 1 Gy. However, in the present experiments no evidence was found for such an increase in tolerance with fraction sizes below 2 Gy

  17. Dose rate effect from the relationship between ICRU rectal dose and local control rate in intracavitary radiotherapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Six fraction HDR and three-fraction LDR in three weeks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jingu, Kenichi; Akita, Yuzou; Ohmagari, Jyunichi

    2001-01-01

    The dose rate effect, low dose rate radiotherapy (LDR)/high dose rate radiotherapy (HDR), was calculated using the isoeffect ICRU rectal dose by intracavitary radiotherapy (ICRT) for uterine cervix cancer. The subjects analyzed consisted of 78 LDR and 74 HDR patients whose ICRU rectal dose could be calculated and whose local control as stage II/III cases could be evaluated. The point A dose in ICRT was 45-55 Gy/3 fractions/3 weeks for LDR and 30 Gy/6 fractions/3 weeks for HDR. The dose effect relationships associated with local control at each whole pelvis external radiation dose were calculated using the double integration method and Probit analysis, and the 50% and 90% local control ICRU rectal doses were calculated from this relationship. Finally, the dose rate effect LDR/HDR was determined from 50% and 90% local control doses. The dose rate effect calculated from the 50% local control dose was 1.24 and that from the 90% local control dose was 1.14. (author)

  18. Extracranial doses during stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy measured with thermoluminescent dosimeter in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I.H.; Lim, D.H.; Kim, S.; Hong, S.; Kim, B.K.; Kang, W-S.; Wu, H.G.; Ha, S.W.; Park, C.I. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Therapeutic Radiology (Korea)

    2000-05-01

    Recently the usage of 3-dimensional non-coplanar radiotherapy technique is increasing. We measured the extracranial dose and its distribution g the above medical procedures to estimate effect of exit doses of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) of the intracranial target lesions using a linac system developed in our hospital. Among over hundred patients who were treated with SRS or FSRT from 1995 to 1998, radiation dosimetry data of 15 cases with SRS and 20 cases with FSRT were analyzed. All patients were adults. Of SRS cases, 11 were male and 4 were female. Vascular malformation cases were 9, benign tumors were 3, and malignant tumors were 3. Of FSRT cases, males were 12 and females were 8. Primary malignant brain tumors were 5, benign tumors were 6, and metastatic brain tumors were 10. Doses were measured with lithium fluoride TLD chips (7.5% Li-6 and 92.5% Li-7; TLD-100, Harshaw/Filtrol, USA). The chips were attached patient's skin at the various extracranial locations during SRS or FSRT. For SRS, 14-25 Gy were delivered with 1-2 isocenters using 12-38 mm circular tertiary collimators with reference to 50-80% isodose line conforming at the periphery of the target lesions. For FSRT, 5-28 fractions were used to deliver 9-56 Gy to periphery with dose maximum of 10-66 Gy. Both procedures used 6 MV X-ray generated from Clinac-18 (Varian, USA). For SRS procedures, extracranial surface doses (relative doses) were 8.07{+-}4.27 Gy (0.31{+-}0.16% Mean{+-}S.D.) at the upper eyelids, 6.13{+-}4.32 Gy (0.24{+-}0.16%) at the submental jaw, 7.80{+-}5.44 Gy (0.33{+-}0.26%) at thyroid, 1.78{+-}0.64 Gy (0.07{+-}0.02%) at breast, 0.75{+-}0.38 Gy (0.03{+-}0.02%) at umbilicus, 0.40{+-}0.07 Gy (0.02{+-}0.01%) at perineum, and 0.46{+-}0.39 Gy (0.02{+-}0.01%) at scrotum. Thus the farther the distance from the brain, the less the dose to the location. In overall the doses were less than 0.3% and thus less detrimental. For FSRT procedures

  19. Five-Year Outcomes of High-Dose Single-Fraction Spinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussazadeh, Nelson; Lis, Eric; Katsoulakis, Evangelia; Kahn, Sweena; Svoboda, Marek; DiStefano, Natalie M.; McLaughlin, Lily; Bilsky, Mark H.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Laufer, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize local tumor control and toxicity risk in very long-term survivors (>5 years) after high-dose spinal image guided, intensity modulated radiation therapy delivered as single-dose stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Previously published spinal SRS outcome analyses have included a heterogeneous population of cancer patients, mostly with short survival. This is the first study reporting the long-term tumor control and toxicity profiles after high-dose single-fraction spinal SRS. Methods and Materials: The study population included all patients treated from June 2004 to July 2009 with single-fraction spinal SRS (dose 24 Gy) who had survived at least 5 years after treatment. The endpoints examined included disease progression, surgical or radiation retreatment, in-field fracture development, and radiation-associated toxicity, scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria and the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Local control and fracture development were assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: Of 278 patients, 31 (11.1%), with 36 segments treated for spinal tumors, survived at least 5 years after treatment and were followed up radiographically and clinically for a median of 6.1 years (maximum 102 months). The histopathologic findings for the 5-year survivors included radiation-resistant metastases in 58%, radiation-sensitive metastases in 22%, and primary bone tumors in 19%. In this selected cohort, 3 treatment failures occurred at a median of 48.6 months, including 2 recurrences in the radiation field and 1 patient with demonstrated progression at the treatment margins. Ten lesions (27.8%) were associated with acute grade 1 cutaneous or gastrointestinal toxicity. Delayed toxicity ≥3 months after treatment included 8 cases (22.2%) of mild neuropathy, 2 (5.6%) of gastrointestinal discomfort, 8 (22.2%) of dermatitides, and 3 (8.3%) of myalgias/myositis. Thirteen

  20. Dose escalation by hypo fractionation in localized prostate cancer - a large single institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadevan, A.; Klein, E.; Kupelian, P.

    2003-01-01

    To report the outcomes of high dose radiation therapy using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) with hypo fractionation in localized prostate cancer at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. A total of 278 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with IMRT between 1998 and 2001. All cases had available pretreatment PSA (iPSA) and biopsy Gleason scores (bGS), no nodal metastasis, a minimum 2 year follow-up, and >5 follow-up PSA levels. The frequency by T-stage was: T1-T2A in 86%, T2B-T2C in 9%, and T3 in 5%. The median iPSA was 8.35. The frequency by bGS was: =7 in 45%. The age range for the patients was from 48 to 85 years (median 68 years). The median follow-up was 33 months (range: 24-49 months). The median doses delivered were 83Gy (delivered at 2.5Gy per fraction to 70 Gy; this being equivalent to 83 Gy at standard fractionation of 1.8 Gy using an alpha/beta of 2). The ASTRO definition for biochemical failure was used. Toxicity was assessed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. The 3-year biochemical relapse free survival (bRFS) for the entire cohort at three years was 91%. Any (grade 1 or higher) acute genito-urinary (GU) side effects were seen in 79% of patients. Grade 2 or higher acute GU toxicity was seen in 18% of patients. Any (grade 1 or higher) acute gastro-intestinal (GI) side effects were seen in 65% of patients. Grade 2 or higher acute GI toxicity was seen in 11% of patients. Any (grade 1 or higher) late GU side effects were seen in 3% of patients. Grade 2 or higher late GU toxicity was seen in 1.5% of patients. Any (grade 1 or higher) late GI side effects were seen in 13% of patients. Grade 2 or higher late GI toxicity was seen in 5% of patients. Higher doses of radiation delivered by IMRT resulted in excellent bRFS outcomes in patients with localized prostate cancer receiving external beam radiation therapy. IMRT can be effectively used to safely increase dose delivery without compromising on quality of life

  1. Five-Year Outcomes of High-Dose Single-Fraction Spinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussazadeh, Nelson [Division of Neurological Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States); Lis, Eric [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Katsoulakis, Evangelia [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Kahn, Sweena; Svoboda, Marek; DiStefano, Natalie M.; McLaughlin, Lily [Division of Neurological Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bilsky, Mark H. [Division of Neurological Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Laufer, Ilya, E-mail: lauferi@mskcc.org [Division of Neurological Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To characterize local tumor control and toxicity risk in very long-term survivors (>5 years) after high-dose spinal image guided, intensity modulated radiation therapy delivered as single-dose stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Previously published spinal SRS outcome analyses have included a heterogeneous population of cancer patients, mostly with short survival. This is the first study reporting the long-term tumor control and toxicity profiles after high-dose single-fraction spinal SRS. Methods and Materials: The study population included all patients treated from June 2004 to July 2009 with single-fraction spinal SRS (dose 24 Gy) who had survived at least 5 years after treatment. The endpoints examined included disease progression, surgical or radiation retreatment, in-field fracture development, and radiation-associated toxicity, scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiation morbidity scoring criteria and the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Local control and fracture development were assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: Of 278 patients, 31 (11.1%), with 36 segments treated for spinal tumors, survived at least 5 years after treatment and were followed up radiographically and clinically for a median of 6.1 years (maximum 102 months). The histopathologic findings for the 5-year survivors included radiation-resistant metastases in 58%, radiation-sensitive metastases in 22%, and primary bone tumors in 19%. In this selected cohort, 3 treatment failures occurred at a median of 48.6 months, including 2 recurrences in the radiation field and 1 patient with demonstrated progression at the treatment margins. Ten lesions (27.8%) were associated with acute grade 1 cutaneous or gastrointestinal toxicity. Delayed toxicity ≥3 months after treatment included 8 cases (22.2%) of mild neuropathy, 2 (5.6%) of gastrointestinal discomfort, 8 (22.2%) of dermatitides, and 3 (8.3%) of myalgias/myositis. Thirteen

  2. Scattered fractions of dose from 18 and 25 MV X-ray radiotherapy linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shobe, J.; Rodgers, J.E.; Taylor, P.L.; Jackson, J.; Popescu, G.

    1996-01-01

    Over the years, measurements have been made at a few energies to estimate the scattered fraction of dose from the patient in medical radiotherapy operations. This information has been a useful aid in the determination of shielding requirements for these facilities. With these measurements, known characteriztics of photons, and various other known parameters, Monte Carlo codes are being used to calculate the scattered fractions and hence the shielding requirements for the photons of other energies commonly used in radiotherapeutic applications. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) acquired a Sagittaire medical linear accelerator (linac) which was previously located at the Yale-New Haven Hospital. This linac provides an X-ray beam of 25 MV photons and electron beams with energies up to 32 MeV. The housing on the gantry was permanently removed from the accelerator during installation. A Varian Clinac 1800 linear accelerator was used to produce the 18 MV photons at the Frederick Memorial Hospital Regional Cancer Therapy Center in Frederick, MD. This paper represents a study of the photon dose scattered from a patient in typical radiation treatment situations as it relates to the dose delivered at the isocenter in water. The results of these measurements will be compared to Monte Carlo calculations. Photon spectral measurements were not made at this time. Neutron spectral measurements were made on this Sagittaire machine in its previous location and that work was not repeated here, although a brief study of the neutron component of the 18 and 25 MV linacs was performed utilizing thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) to determine the isotropy of the neutron dose. (author)

  3. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non–small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Scientific Institute of Tumours of Romagna I.R.S.T., Meldola (Italy); Caivano, Rocchina [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [U.O. of Radiotherapy, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Nappi, Antonio [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Storto, Giovanni [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new “toxicity index” (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  4. Radical radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer: What dose and fractionation schedule to choose?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pos, Floris J.; Hart, Guus; Schneider, Christoph; Sminia, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the α/β ratio of bladder cancer from different radiotherapy schedules reported in the literature and provide guidelines for the design of new treatment schemes. Methods and Materials: Ten external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and five brachytherapy schedules were selected. The biologically effective dose (BED) of each schedule was calculated. Logistic modeling was used to describe the relationship between 3-year local control (LC3y) and BED. Results: The estimated α/β ratio was 13 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.5-69 Gy) for EBRT and 24 Gy (95% CI, 1.3-460 Gy) for EBRT and brachytherapy combined. There is evidence for an overall dose-response relationship. After an increase in total dose of 10 Gy, the odds of LC3y increase by a factor of 1.44 (95% CI, 1.23-1.70) for EBRT and 1.47 (95% CI, 1.25-1.72) for the data sets of EBRT and brachytherapy combined. Conclusion: With the clinical data currently available, a reliable estimation of the α/β ratio for bladder cancer is not feasible. It seems reasonable to use a conventional α/β ratio of 10-15 Gy. Dose escalation could significantly increase local control. There is no evidence to support short overall treatment times or large fraction sizes in radiotherapy for bladder cancer

  5. Persistent DNA Damage in Spermatogonial Stem Cells After Fractionated Low-Dose Irradiation of Testicular Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grewenig, Angelika; Schuler, Nadine; Rübe, Claudia E., E-mail: claudia.ruebe@uks.eu

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Testicular spermatogenesis is extremely sensitive to radiation-induced damage, and even low scattered doses to testis from radiation therapy may pose reproductive risks with potential treatment-related infertility. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the greatest threat to the genomic integrity of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are essential to maintain spermatogenesis and prevent reproduction failure. Methods and Materials: During daily low-dose radiation with 100 mGy or 10 mGy, radiation-induced DSBs were monitored in mouse testis by quantifying 53 binding protein 1 (53BP-1) foci in SSCs within their stem cell niche. The accumulation of DSBs was correlated with proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of testicular germ cell populations. Results: Even very low doses of ionizing radiation arrested spermatogenesis, primarily by inducing apoptosis in spermatogonia. Eventual recovery of spermatogenesis depended on the survival of SSCs and their functional ability to proliferate and differentiate to provide adequate numbers of differentiating spermatogonia. Importantly, apoptosis-resistant SSCs resulted in increased 53BP-1 foci levels during, and even several months after, fractionated low-dose radiation, suggesting that surviving SSCs have accumulated an increased load of DNA damage. Conclusions: SSCs revealed elevated levels of DSBs for weeks after radiation, and if these DSBs persist through differentiation to spermatozoa, this may have severe consequences for the genomic integrity of the fertilizing sperm.

  6. Persistent DNA Damage in Spermatogonial Stem Cells After Fractionated Low-Dose Irradiation of Testicular Tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grewenig, Angelika; Schuler, Nadine; Rübe, Claudia E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Testicular spermatogenesis is extremely sensitive to radiation-induced damage, and even low scattered doses to testis from radiation therapy may pose reproductive risks with potential treatment-related infertility. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the greatest threat to the genomic integrity of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are essential to maintain spermatogenesis and prevent reproduction failure. Methods and Materials: During daily low-dose radiation with 100 mGy or 10 mGy, radiation-induced DSBs were monitored in mouse testis by quantifying 53 binding protein 1 (53BP-1) foci in SSCs within their stem cell niche. The accumulation of DSBs was correlated with proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of testicular germ cell populations. Results: Even very low doses of ionizing radiation arrested spermatogenesis, primarily by inducing apoptosis in spermatogonia. Eventual recovery of spermatogenesis depended on the survival of SSCs and their functional ability to proliferate and differentiate to provide adequate numbers of differentiating spermatogonia. Importantly, apoptosis-resistant SSCs resulted in increased 53BP-1 foci levels during, and even several months after, fractionated low-dose radiation, suggesting that surviving SSCs have accumulated an increased load of DNA damage. Conclusions: SSCs revealed elevated levels of DSBs for weeks after radiation, and if these DSBs persist through differentiation to spermatozoa, this may have severe consequences for the genomic integrity of the fertilizing sperm

  7. Fraction of a dose absorbed estimation for structurally diverse low solubility compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Kiyohiko

    2011-02-28

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prediction accuracy of the fully mechanistic gastrointestinal unified theoretical (GUT) framework for in vivo oral absorption of low solubility drugs. Solubility in biorelevant media, molecular weight, logP(oct), pK(a), Caco-2 permeability, dose and particle size were used as the input parameters. To neglect the effect of the low stomach pH on dissolution of a drug, the fraction of a dose absorbed (Fa%) of undissociable and free acids were used. In addition, Fa% of free base drugs with the high pH stomach was also included to increase the number of model drugs. In total twenty nine structurally diverse compounds were used as the model drugs. Fa% data at several doses and particle sizes in humans and dogs were collated from the literature (total 110 Fa% data). In approximately 80% cases, the prediction error was within 2 fold, suggesting that the GUT framework has practical predictability for drug discovery, but not for drug development. The GUT framework appropriately captured the dose and particle size dependency of Fa% as the particle drifting effect was taken into account. It should be noted that the present validation results cannot be applied for salt form cases and other special formulations such as solid dispersions and emulsion formulations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Single-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy: a dose-response analysis of arteriovenous malformation obliteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touboul, Emmanuel; Al Halabi, Assem; Buffat, Laurent; Merienne, Louis; Huart, Judith; Schlienger, Michel; Lefkopoulos, Dimitrios; Mammar, Hamid; Missir, Odile; Meder, Jean-Francois; Laurent, Alex; Housset, Martin

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiotherapy delivered in a high-dose single fraction is an effective technique to obliterate intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVM). To attempt to analyze the relationships between dose, volume, and obliteration rates, we studied a group of patients treated using single-isocenter treatment plans. Methods and Materials: From May 1986 to December 1989, 100 consecutive patients with angiographically proven AVM had stereotactic radiotherapy delivered as a high-dose single fraction using a single-isocenter technique. Distribution according to Spetzler-Martin grade was as follows: 79 grade 1-3, three grade 4, 0 grade 5, and 18 grade 6. The target volume was spheroid in 74 cases, ellipsoid in 11, and large and irregular in 15. The targeted volume of the nidus was estimated using two-dimensional stereotactic angiographic data and, calculated as an ovoid-shaped lesion, was 1900 ± 230 mm 3 (median 968 mm 3 ; range 62-11, 250 mm 3 ). The mean minimum target dose (D min ) was 19 ± 0.6 Gy (median 20 Gy; range: 3-31.5). The mean volume within the isodose which corresponded to the minimum target dose was 2500 ± 300 mm 3 (median 1200 mm 3 ; range 75-14 900 mm 3 ). The mean maximum dose (D max ) was 34.5 ± 0.5 Gy (median 35 Gy; range 15-45). The mean angiographic follow-up was 42 ± 2.3 months (median 37.5; range 7-117). Results: The absolute obliteration rate was 51%. The 5-year actuarial obliteration rate was 62.5 ± 7%. After univariate analysis, AVM obliteration was influenced by previous surgery (p = 0.0007), D min by steps of 5 Gy (p = 0.005), targeted volume of the nidus (≤968 mm 3 vs. >968 mm 3 ; p = 0.015), and grade according to Spetzler-Martin (grade 1-3 vs. grade 4-6; p = 0.011). After multivariate analysis, the independent factors influencing AVM obliteration were the D min [relative risk (RR) 1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-2.5; p min but does not seem to be influenced by D max and the targeted volume of the nidus

  9. Clinical results of definitive-dose (50 Gy/25 fractions) preoperative chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Kazuki; Nakamatsu, Kiyoshi; Shiraishi, Osamu; Yasuda, Takushi; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    The clinical results of definitive-dose preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks for unresectable esophageal cancer were analyzed. Inclusion criteria were unresectable esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with T4b or mediastinal lymph nodes invading to the trachea or aorta. Radiation therapy of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks was combined concurrently with two courses of FP therapy (CDDP 70 mg/m 2 + 5-FU 700 mg/m 2 /d x 5 days: day 1-5, day 29-33). Tumor response was evaluated 4 weeks after completion of RT. Subtotal esophagectomy was planned 6-8 weeks after RT. Thirty patients (26 male and 4 female) aged from 50-78 years (median 66) were enrolled between 2008 and 2011. The clinical stages according to the 7th edition of UICC were stages II/III/IV, 1/23/6; T1/2/3/4, 1/1/4/24; and N0/1/2/3, 3/25/1/1. All 30 patients completed RT of 50 Gy/ 25 fractions. Initial tumor responses were 21 patients with resectable disease, 7 with unresectable disease, and 2 with progressive disease. Subtotal esophagectomy was performed in 18 (60%) of the 30 patients. Pathological complete response was obtained in five (28%) patients. There were two patients with hospitalization death after surgery (11%). Six of the 7 patients who still had unresectable disease were treated with 1-3 courses of docetaxel, CDDP and 5-FU. Three patients treated without surgery showed long-term survival. The 3-year locoregional control rate and the 3-year overall survival rate for the 30 patients were 70 and 49%, respectively. Definitive-dose preoperative CRT was feasible, and is a promising treatment strategy for unresectable esophageal cancer. (author)

  10. Cell kinetic changes in the follicular epithelium of pig skin after irradiation with single and fractionated doses of X rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, G.M.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Changes in cell kinetics of the follicular epithelium of the pig were studied after x-irradiation with single and fractionated doses (30 fractions/39 days) and compared with previous epidermal data. In the follicular epithelium there was an initial degenerative phase, when the rate of cell depletion was independent of radiation dose and mode of administration. Repopulation was seen between the 14th and 18th days after single doses (15 or 20 Gy) and by the 28th day after the start of irradiation with fractionated doses (52.3-80.0 Gy). The degree of cell depletion and subsequent rate of repopulation were independent of dose. The regenerative phase was characterized by an increased cell proliferation. Islands of cells with appearance similar to cells in the normal follicular epithelium, were seen 18 days after a single dose of 20 Gy and 42 days after the start of fractionated irradiation. Compared with the epidermis, the follicular epithelium exhibited considerably less evidence of damage after both single and fractionated doses. There was a lower incidence of degenerate cells and reduced levels of cell depletion in the follicular epithelium. (author)

  11. Neuropsychological function in adults after high dose fractionated radiation therapy of skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glosser, Guila; McManus, Pat; Munzenrider, John; Austin-Seymour, Mary; Fullerton, Barbara; Adams, Judy; Urie, Marcia M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long term effects of high dose fractionated radiation therapy on brain functioning prospectively in adults without primary brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with histologically confirmed chordomas and low grade chondrosarcomas of the skull base were evaluated with neuropsychological measures of intelligence, language, memory, attention, motor function and mood following surgical resection/biopsy of the tumor prior to irradiation, and then at about 6 months, 2 years and 4 years following completion of treatment. None received chemotherapy. Results: In the patients without tumor recurrence or radiation necrosis, there were no indications of adverse effects on cognitive functioning in the post-acute through the late stages after brain irradiation. Even in patients who received doses of radiation up to 66 Cobalt Gy equivalent through nondiseased (temporal lobe) brain tissue, memory and cognitive functioning remained stable for up to 5 years after treatment. A mild decline in psycho-motor speed was seen in more than half of the patients, and motor slowing was related to higher radiation doses in midline and temporal lobe brain structures. Conclusion: Results suggest that in adults, tolerance for focused radiation is relatively high in cortical brain structures

  12. Inter fraction variations in rectum and bladder volumes and dose distributions during high dose rate brachytherapy treatment of the uterine cervix investigated by repetitive CT-examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Dale, Einar; Skjoensberg, Ane; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate variation of dose to organs at risk for patients receiving fractionated high dose rate gynaecological brachytherapy by using CT-based 3D treatment planning and dose-volume histograms (DVH). Materials and methods: Fourteen patients with cancer of the uterine cervix underwent three to six CT examinations (mean 4.9) during their course of high-dose-rate brachytherapy using radiographically compatible applicators. The rectal and bladder walls were delineated and DVHs were calculated. Results: Inter fraction variation of the bladder volume (CV mean =44.1%) was significantly larger than the inter fraction variation of the mean dose (CV mean =19.9%, P=0.005) and the maximum dose (CV mean =17.5%, P=0.003) of the bladder wall. The same trend was seen for rectum, although the figures were not significantly different. Performing CT examinations at four of seven brachytherapy fractions reduced the uncertainty to 4 and 7% for the bladder and rectal doses, respectively. A linear regression analysis showed a significant, negative relationship between time after treatment start and the whole bladder volume (P=0.018), whereas no correlation was found for the rectum. For both rectum and bladder a linear regression analysis revealed a significant, negative relationship between the whole volume and median dose (P<0.05). Conclusion: Preferably a CT examination should be provided at every fraction. However, this is logistically unfeasible in most institutions. To obtain reliable DVHs the patients will in the future undergo 3-4 CT examinations during the course of brachytherapy at our institution. Since this study showed an association between large bladder volumes and dose reductions, the patients will be treated with a standardized bladder volume

  13. Prescription dose and fractionation predict improved survival after stereotactic radiotherapy for brainstem metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeman Jonathan E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brainstem metastases represent an uncommon clinical presentation that is associated with a poor prognosis. Treatment options are limited given the unacceptable risks associated with surgical resection in this location. However, without local control, symptoms including progressive cranial nerve dysfunction are frequently observed. The objective of this study was to determine the outcomes associated with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiotherapy or radiosurgery (SRT/SRS of brainstem metastases. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 38 tumors in 36 patients treated with SRT/SRS between February 2003 and December 2011. Treatment was delivered with the Cyberknife™ or Trilogy™ radiosurgical systems. The median age of patients was 62 (range: 28–89. Primary pathologies included 14 lung, 7 breast, 4 colon and 11 others. Sixteen patients (44% had received whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT prior to SRT/SRS; ten had received prior SRT/SRS at a different site (28%. The median tumor volume was 0.94 cm3 (range: 0.01-4.2 with a median prescription dose of 17 Gy (range: 12–24 delivered in 1–5 fractions. Results Median follow-up for the cohort was 3.2 months (range: 0.4-20.6. Nineteen patients (52% had an MRI follow-up available for review. Of these, one patient experienced local failure corresponding to an actuarial 6-month local control of 93%. Fifteen of the patients with available follow-up imaging (79% experienced intracranial failure outside of the treatment volume. The median time to distant intracranial failure was 2.1 months. Six of the 15 patients with distant intracranial failure (40% had received previous WBRT. The actuarial overall survival rates at 6- and 12-months were 27% and 8%, respectively. Predictors of survival included Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA score, greater number of treatment fractions, and higher prescription dose. Three patients experienced acute treatment-related toxicity consisting of

  14. Molecular mechanisms involved in modulation of p-glycoprotein expression from squamous cell carcinoma by low dose fractionated radiation (LDFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shajahan; Shahin; Shareef, Mohammed M.; Sathishkumar, Sabapathi; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Ahmed, Mansoor M.; Brown, Brandee C.; Jones, Raleigh; Spring, Paul M.

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, two squamous cell carcinoma oral cavity cells (SCCOC), T-167 (p53 wild type) and T-409 (p53 mutant), were exposed to either clinically relevant dose (2 Gy), high dose (7Gy) or fractionated low dose (LDFR) (0.5 Gy x 4) and the expression of Mdr1 gene was assessed by real time RT-PCR, semiquantitative 32 P RT-PCR and luciferase reporter assay

  15. Impact of Fraction Size on Lung Radiation Toxicity: Hypofractionation may be Beneficial in Dose Escalation of Radiotherapy for Lung Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jinyue; Kong Fengming; Chetty, Indrin J.; Ajlouni, Munther; Ryu, Samuel; Ten Haken, Randall; Movsas, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess how fraction size impacts lung radiation toxicity and therapeutic ratio in treatment of lung cancers. Methods and Materials: The relative damaged volume (RDV) of lung was used as the endpoint in the comparison of various fractionation schemes with the same normalized total dose (NTD) to the tumor. The RDV was computed from the biologically corrected lung dose-volume histogram (DVH), with an α/β ratio of 3 and 10 for lung and tumor, respectively. Two different (linear and S-shaped) local dose-effect models that incorporated the concept of a threshold dose effect with a single parameter D L50 (dose at 50% local dose effect) were used to convert the DVH into the RDV. The comparison was conducted using four representative DVHs at different NTD and D L50 values. Results: The RDV decreased with increasing dose/fraction when the NTD was larger than a critical dose (D CR ) and increased when the NTD was less than D CR . The D CR was 32-50 Gy and 58-87 Gy for a small tumor (11 cm 3 ) for the linear and S-shaped local dose-effect models, respectively, when D L50 was 20-30 Gy. The D CR was 66-97 Gy and 66-99 Gy, respectively, for a large tumor (266 cm 3 ). Hypofractionation was preferred for small tumors and higher NTDs, and conventional fractionation was better for large tumors and lower NTDs. Hypofractionation might be beneficial for intermediate-sized tumors when NTD = 80-90 Gy, especially if the D L50 is small (20 Gy). Conclusion: This computational study demonstrated that hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy is a better regimen than conventional fractionation in lung cancer patients with small tumors and high doses, because it generates lower RDV when the tumor NTD is kept unchanged.

  16. Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy with a total dose of 54-56 Gy given in 9-7 fractions for patients with peripheral lung tumor: impact of maximum dose and fraction size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Sato, Mariko; Hirose, Katsumi; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2015-04-22

    Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer has been recently reported. However, incidence of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes with a long-term follow-up time are not clarified. We examined incidence and risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes for the patients with peripherally located lung tumor. During 2003-2008, 41 patients with 42 lung tumors were treated with SBRT to 54-56 Gy in 9-7 fractions. The endpoint in the study was radiation-induced rib fracture detected by CT scan after the treatment. All ribs where the irradiated doses were more than 80% of prescribed dose were selected and contoured to build the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Comparisons of the several factors obtained from the DVHs and the probabilities of rib fracture calculated by Kaplan-Meier method were performed in the study. Median follow-up time was 68 months. Among 75 contoured ribs, 23 rib fractures were observed in 34% of the patients during 16-48 months after SBRT, however, no patients complained of chest wall pain. The 4-year probabilities of rib fracture for maximum dose of ribs (Dmax) more than and less than 54 Gy were 47.7% and 12.9% (p = 0.0184), and for fraction size of 6, 7 and 8 Gy were 19.5%, 31.2% and 55.7% (p = 0.0458), respectively. Other factors, such as D2cc, mean dose of ribs, V10-55, age, sex, and planning target volume were not significantly different. The doses and fractionations used in this study resulted in no clinically significant rib fractures for this population, but that higher Dmax and dose per fraction treatments resulted in an increase in asymptomatic grade 1 rib fractures.

  17. Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy with a total dose of 54–56 Gy given in 9–7 fractions for patients with peripheral lung tumor: impact of maximum dose and fraction size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Sato, Mariko; Hirose, Katsumi; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer has been recently reported. However, incidence of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes with a long-term follow-up time are not clarified. We examined incidence and risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes for the patients with peripherally located lung tumor. During 2003–2008, 41 patients with 42 lung tumors were treated with SBRT to 54–56 Gy in 9–7 fractions. The endpoint in the study was radiation-induced rib fracture detected by CT scan after the treatment. All ribs where the irradiated doses were more than 80% of prescribed dose were selected and contoured to build the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Comparisons of the several factors obtained from the DVHs and the probabilities of rib fracture calculated by Kaplan-Meier method were performed in the study. Median follow-up time was 68 months. Among 75 contoured ribs, 23 rib fractures were observed in 34% of the patients during 16–48 months after SBRT, however, no patients complained of chest wall pain. The 4-year probabilities of rib fracture for maximum dose of ribs (Dmax) more than and less than 54 Gy were 47.7% and 12.9% (p = 0.0184), and for fraction size of 6, 7 and 8 Gy were 19.5%, 31.2% and 55.7% (p = 0.0458), respectively. Other factors, such as D2cc, mean dose of ribs, V10–55, age, sex, and planning target volume were not significantly different. The doses and fractionations used in this study resulted in no clinically significant rib fractures for this population, but that higher Dmax and dose per fraction treatments resulted in an increase in asymptomatic grade 1 rib fractures

  18. High-dose total-body irradiation and autologous marrow reconstitution in dogs: dose-rate-related acute toxicity and fractionation-dependent long-term survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.; Schumacher, D.; Shulman, H.; Graham, T.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    Beagle dogs treated by total-body irradiation (TBI) were given autologous marrow grafts in order to avoid death from marrow toxicity. Acute and delayed non-marrow toxicities of high single-dose (27 dogs) and fractionated TBI (20 dogs) delivered at 0.05 or 0.1 Gy/min were compared. Fractionated TBI was given in increments of 2 Gy every 6 hr for three increments per day. Acute toxicity and early mortality (<1 month) at identical total irradiation doses were comparable for dogs given fractionated or single-dose TBI. With single-dose TBI, 14, 16, and 18 Gy, respectively, given at 0.05 Gy/min, 0/5, 5/5, and 2/2 dogs died from acute toxicity; with 10, 12, and 14 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 5/5 dogs died acutely. With fractionated TBI, 14 and 16 Gy, respectively, given at 0.1 Gy/min, 1/5, 4/5, and 2/2 dogs died auctely. Early deaths were due to radiation enteritis with or without associated septicemia (29 dogs; less than or equal to Day 10). Three dogs given 10 Gy of TBI at 0.1 Gy/min died from bacterial pneumonia; one (Day 18) had been given fractionated and two (Days 14, 22) single-dose TBI. Fifteen dogs survived beyond 1 month; eight of these had single-dose TBI (10-14 Gy) and all died within 7 months of irradiation from a syndrome consisting of hepatic damage, pancreatic fibrosis, malnutrition, wasting, and anemia. Seven of the 15 had fractionated TBI, and only one (14 Gy) died on Day 33 from hepatic failure, whereas 6 (10-14 Gy) are alive and well 250 to 500 days after irradiation. In conclusion, fractionated TBI did not offer advantages over single-dose TBI with regard to acute toxicity and early mortality; rather, these were dependent upon the total dose of TBI. The total acutely tolerated dose was dependent upon the exposure rate; however, only dogs given fractionated TBI became healthy long-term survivors

  19. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in adults after fractionated body irradiation and high dose cyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinch, L.; Evensen, S.A.; Albrechtsen, D.; Egeland, T.; Solheim, B.G.; Rollag, H.; Naalsund, A.; Jacobsen, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present short and long-term results of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation after hyper-fractionated total body irradiation and high dose cyclophosphamide in ten patients treated for leukaemia during th period 1985-89. Three patients died from complications connected to the transplantation, while seven are living free from leukaemia 18 to 59 months after transplantation. Two patients need treatment for chronic graft versus host disease. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is expensive and risky. Close cooperation between clinicians and laboratory specialists is essential. The treatment increases long term survival and probably cures certain patients with leukaemia. Some of the patients will need treatment for chronic graft versus host disease and other late sequelae. 19 refs., 2 tabs

  20. The effects of high dose and highly fractionated radiation on distraction osteogenesis in the murine mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monson, Laura A; Cavaliere, Christi M; Deshpande, Sagar S; Ayzengart, Alexander L; Buchman, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    The ability of irradiated tissue to support bony growth remains poorly defined, although there are anecdotal cases reported showing mixed results for the use of mandibular distraction osteogenesis after radiation for head and neck cancer. Many of these reports lack objective measures that would allow adequate analysis of outcomes or efficacy. The purpose of this experiment was to utilize a rat model of mandibular distraction osteogenesis after high dose and highly fractionated radiation therapy and to evaluate and quantify distracted bone formation under these conditions. Male Sprague–Dawley rats underwent 12 fractions of external beam radiation (48 Gray) of the left mandible. Following a two week recovery period, an external frame distractor was applied and gradual distraction of the mandible was performed. Tissue was harvested after a twenty-eight day consolidation period. Gross, radiologic and histological evaluations were undertaken. Those animals subjected to pre-operative radiation showed severe attenuation of bone formation including bone atrophy, incomplete bridging of the distraction gap, and gross bony defects or non-union. Although physical lengthening was achieved, the irradiated bone consistently demonstrated marked damaging effects on the normal process of distraction osteogenesis. This murine model has provided reliable evidence of the injurious effects of high dose radiation on bone repair and regeneration in distraction osteogenesis utilizing accurate and reproducible metrics. These results can now be used to assist in the development of therapies directed at mitigating the adverse consequences of radiation on the regeneration of bone and to optimize distraction osteogenesis so it can be successfully applied to post-oncologic reconstruction

  1. Randomized trial of single dose versus fractionated palliative radiotherapy of bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, O.S.; Bentzen, S.M.; Sandberg, E.; Gadeberg, C.C.; Timothy, A.R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Data in the literature suggest that for painful bone metastases a single dose is as effective as fractionated radiotherapy. In the present multicentre prospective trial, the effects of 8 Gy x1 and 5 Gy x4 were compared. Patients and methods: A total of 241 patients were randomized to 8 Gy (122 patients) or 20 Gy (119 patients). The primary tumour was in the breast in 39% of patients, in the prostate in 34% of patients, in the lung in 13% of patients and in other locations in 14% of patients. Outcome measures were pain relief as measured by VAS and in half of the patients also by a five-point categorical pain scale, global quality of life (QoL) and analgesic consumption. Evaluation was performed before and 4, 8, 12 and 20 weeks after treatment. Results: A total of 239 patients were evaluable for response. The two groups did not differ with respect to age, sex, primary tumour, metastasis localization, analgesic consumption (type and dose), performance status, prior systemic treatment, degree of pain and QoL. The treatment was completed as planned in 98% of patients. The degree of pain relief did not differ between the two treatment groups. At 4 weeks the difference in pain relief was 6% (95% CI 7, 20%) and at 8 weeks the difference was 13% (95% CI 3, 28%). Neither was there any significant difference in the duration of pain relief, the number of new painful sites and the need for reirradiation and toxicity was minor. Conclusion: The present randomized study showed that a single fraction of 8 Gy was as effective as 5 Gy x4 in relieving pain from bone metastasis. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  2. The Effects of Radiation and Dose-Fractionation on Cancer and Non-Tumor Disease Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayle E. Woloschak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Janus series of radiation experiments, conducted from 1970 to 1992, explored the effects of gamma and neutron radiation on animal lifespan and disease development. Data from these experiments presents an opportunity to conduct a large scale analysis of both tumor and non-tumor disease development. This work was focused on a subset of animals from the Janus series of experiments, comparing acute or fractionated exposures of gamma or neutron radiation on the hazards associated with the development of tumor and non-tumor diseases of the liver, lung, kidney or vascular system. This study also examines how the co-occurrence of non-tumor diseases may affect tumor-associated hazards. While exposure to radiation increases the hazard of dying with tumor and non-tumor diseases, dose fractionation modulates these hazards, which varies across different organ systems. Finally, the effect that concurrent non-cancer diseases have on the hazard of dying with a tumor also differs by organ system. These results highlight the complexity in the effects of radiation on the liver, lung, kidney and vascular system.

  3. Fractionation in normal tissues: the (α/β)eff concept can account for dose heterogeneity and volume effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L; Nahum, Alan E

    2013-10-07

    The simple Linear-Quadratic (LQ)-based Withers iso-effect formula (WIF) is widely used in external-beam radiotherapy to derive a new tumour dose prescription such that there is normal-tissue (NT) iso-effect when changing the fraction size and/or number. However, as conventionally applied, the WIF is invalid unless the normal-tissue response is solely determined by the tumour dose. We propose a generalized WIF (gWIF) which retains the tumour prescription dose, but replaces the intrinsic fractionation sensitivity measure (α/β) by a new concept, the normal-tissue effective fractionation sensitivity, [Formula: see text], which takes into account both the dose heterogeneity in, and the volume effect of, the late-responding normal-tissue in question. Closed-form analytical expressions for [Formula: see text] ensuring exact normal-tissue iso-effect are derived for: (i) uniform dose, and (ii) arbitrary dose distributions with volume-effect parameter n = 1 from the normal-tissue dose-volume histogram. For arbitrary dose distributions and arbitrary n, a numerical solution for [Formula: see text] exhibits a weak dependence on the number of fractions. As n is increased, [Formula: see text] increases from its intrinsic value at n = 0 (100% serial normal-tissue) to values close to or even exceeding the tumour (α/β) at n = 1 (100% parallel normal-tissue), with the highest values of [Formula: see text] corresponding to the most conformal dose distributions. Applications of this new concept to inverse planning and to highly conformal modalities are discussed, as is the effect of possible deviations from LQ behaviour at large fraction sizes.

  4. Perioperative fractionated high-dose rate brachytherapy for malignant bone and soft tissue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Masahiko; Inoue, Takehiro; Yamazaki, Hideya; Teshima, Teruki; Tanaka, Eiichi; Yoshida, Ken; Imai, Atsushi; Shiomi, Hiroya; Kagawa, Kazufumi; Araki, Nobuto; Kuratsu, Shigeyuki; Uchida, Atsumasa; Inoue, Toshihiko

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the viability of perioperative fractionated HDR brachytherapy for malignant bone and soft tissue tumors, analyzing the influence of surgical margin. Methods and Materials: From July 1992 through May 1996, 16 lesions of 14 patients with malignant bone and soft tissue tumors (3 liposarcomas, 3 MFHs, 2 malignant schwannomas, 2 chordomas, 1 osteosarcoma, 1 leiomyosarcoma, 1 epithelioid sarcoma, and 1 synovial sarcoma) were treated at the Osaka University Hospital. The patients' ages ranged from 14 to 72 years (median: 39 years). Treatment sites were the pelvis in 6 lesions, the upper limbs in 5, the neck in 4, and a lower limb in 1. The resection margins were classified as intracapsular in 5 lesions, marginal in 5, and wide in 6. Postoperative fractionated HDR brachytherapy was started on the 4th-13th day after surgery (median: 6th day). The total dose was 40-50 Gy/7-10 fr/ 4-7 day (bid) at 5 or 10 mm from the source. Follow-up periods were between 19 and 46 months (median: 30 months). Results: Local control rates were 75% at 1 year and 48% in 2 years, and ultimate local control was achieved in 8 (50%) of 16 lesions. Of the 8 uncontrolled lesions, 5 (63%) had intracapsular (macroscopically positive) resection margins, and all the 8 controlled lesions (100%) had marginal (microscopically positive) or wide (negative) margins. Of the total, 3 patients died of both tumor and metastasis, 3 of metastasis alone, 1 of tumor alone, and 7 showed no evidence of disease. Peripheral nerve palsy was seen in one case after this procedure, but no infection or delayed wound healing caused by tubing or irradiation has occurred. Conclusion: Perioperative fractionated HDR brachytherapy is safe, well tolerated, and applicable to marginal or wide surgical margin cases

  5. Effects of low-dose fractionated external irradiation on metabolic and structural characteristics of rat thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadolnik, L.; Niatsetskaya, Z. [Institute of Biochemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Grodno (Belarus)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The problem of thyroid radiosensitivity to the effect of low dose external ionizing irradiation presently seems to be the least studied, and the experimental findings - the most contradictory. The aim of the work was to study the effects of long-term low-dose fractionated irradiation on the iodide metabolism and structure of the thyroid. Female Wistar rats weighing 140-160 g were irradiated 20 times (5 times a week, for 4 weeks) using a 60 Co installation. The single absorbed doses were 0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 Gy and the total ones - 2.0, 5.0 and 10.0 Gy, respectively. The animals were decapitated after 1 day, 4 and 24 weeks following the last irradiation. The thyroid tissue was used to assay for thyro-peroxidase (T.P.O.) activity as well as total, protein -bound and free iodide concentrations. Microscopic and morphometric examination of histologic thyroid preparations was carried out. Blood was assayed for thyroxin (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations. After a day following the irradiation, the thyroid showed a pronounced increase in the concentration of total iodide (30.0-54.4%) as well in that of free (32.1-60.8%) and protein-bound ones (24.4-37.4%). The most pronounced iodide concentration elevation was noted in the 0.1 -Gy animals, with thyroid T.P.O. activity being raised by 48.0%. Only the 0.5 Gy-group had 1.4-1.5-fold reduced thyroid hormone levels. Four weeks after the irradiation, studied parameters of irradiated rats were brought back to the control values, except for the 0.5 Gy-group. However, after 24-weeks, the 0.5-and 0.25- irradiated rats experienced a 12-20% thyroid weight elevation in comparison with the control. The thyroid of these animals demonstrated reduced contents of total and free iodide as well as T.P.O. activity by 24.5 and 34.8%. The 0.1 Gy-group had a 1.7-fold increased T.P.O. activity. The concentration of the thyroid hormones was maintained diminished only in the 0.5 Gy -irradiated group. However

  6. Modelling the variation in rectal dose due to inter-fraction rectal wall deformation in external beam prostate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, Jeremy; Zavgorodni, Sergei

    2005-01-01

    Prostate radiotherapy inevitably deposits radiation dose in the rectal wall, and the dose delivered to prostate is limited by the expected rectal complications. Accurate evaluation of the rectal dose is non-trivial due to a number of factors. One of these is variation of the shape and position of the rectal wall (with respect to the clinical target volume (CTV)), which may differ daily from that taken during planning CT acquisition. This study uses data currently available in the literature on rectal wall motion to provide estimates of mean population rectal wall dose. The rectal wall geometry is characterized by a population mean radius of the rectum as well as inter-patient and inter-fraction standard deviations in rectum radius. The model is used to evaluate the range of inter-fraction and inter-patient rectal dose variations. The simulation of individual patients with full and empty rectum in the planning CT scan showed that large variations in rectal dose (>15 Gy) are possible. Mean calculated dose accounting for treatment and planning uncertainties in the rectal wall surface was calculated as well as the map of planning dose over/underpredictions. It was found that accuracy of planning dose is dependent on the CTV-PTV margin size with larger margins producing more accurate estimates. Over a patient population, the variation in rectal dose is reduced by increasing the number of pre-treatment CT scans

  7. Fractionated total body irradiation and autologous bone marrow transplantation in dogs: Hemopoietic recovery after various marrow cell doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenburger, U.; Kolb, H.J.; Thierfelder, S.; Netzel, B.; Schaeffer, E.; Kolb, H.

    1980-01-01

    Hemopoietic recovery was studied in dogs given 2400 R fractionated total body irradiation within one week and graded doses of cryopreserved autologous bone marrow. Complete hemopoietic recovery including histology was observed after this dose and sufficient doses of marrow cells. Doses of more than 5.5 x 10 7 mononuclear marrow cells/kg body weight were sufficient for complete recovery in all dogs, 1.5 to 5.5 x 10 7 cells/kg were effective in some of the dogs and less than 1.5 x 10 7 cells/kg were insufficient for complete recovery. Similarly, more than 30000 CFUsub(c)/kg body weight were required for hemopoietic recovery. The optimal marrow cell dose which has been defined as the minimal dose required for the earliest possible recovery of leukocyte and platelet counts was 7-8 x 10 7 mononuclear marrow cells/kg body weight. It has been concluded that fractionated total body irradiation with 2400 R dose not require greater doses of marrow cells for hemopoietic reconstitution than lower single doses and that the hemopoietic microenvironment is not persistently disturbed after this dose. (author)

  8. Fractional-Dose Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine Campaign - Sindh Province, Pakistan, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervaiz, Aslam; Mbaeyi, Chukwuma; Baig, Mirza Amir; Burman, Ashley; Ahmed, Jamal A; Akter, Sharifa; Jatoi, Fayaz A; Mahamud, Abdirahman; Asghar, Rana Jawad; Azam, Naila; Shah, Muhammad Nadeem; Laghari, Mumtaz Ali; Soomro, Kamaluddin; Wadood, Mufti Zubair; Ehrhardt, Derek; Safdar, Rana M; Farag, Noha

    2017-12-01

    Following the declaration of eradication of wild poliovirus (WPV) type 2 in September 2015, trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (tOPV) was withdrawn globally to reduce the risk for type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV2) transmission; all countries implemented a synchronized switch to bivalent OPV (type 1 and 3) in April 2016 (1,2). Any isolation of VDPV2 after the switch is to be treated as a potential public health emergency and might indicate the need for supplementary immunization activities (3,4). On August 9, 2016, VDPV2 was isolated from a sewage sample taken from an environmental surveillance site in Hyderabad, Sindh province, Pakistan. Possible vaccination activities in response to VDPV2 isolation include the use of injectable inactivated polio vaccine (IPV), which poses no risk for vaccine-derived poliovirus transmission. Fractional-dose, intradermal IPV (fIPV), one fifth of the standard intramuscular dose, has been developed to more efficiently manage limited IPV supplies. fIPV has been shown in some studies to be noninferior to full-dose IPV (5,6) and was used successfully in response to a similar detection of a single VDPV2 isolate from sewage in India (7). Injectable fIPV was used for response activities in Hyderabad and three neighboring districts. This report describes the findings of an assessment of preparatory activities and subsequent implementation of the fIPV campaign. Despite achieving high coverage (>80%), several operational challenges were noted. The lessons learned from this campaign could help to guide the planning and implementation of future fIPV vaccination activities.

  9. Influence of fractionation of dose on 3 year results of X-ray therapy of skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymczyk, W.; Radziszewska, J.; Cyplik, I.; Glinska, H.

    1985-01-01

    Three-year results of X-ray therapy of skin cancer in 345 patients are presented. The dependence of results on the size of irradiated field and the method of dose fractionation is analysed. The clinical usefulness of a cumulative radiation effect (CRE) is evaluated. 96.5% of three-year cures were obtained. Recurrences amounted to 1.6% and necroses to 1.9% of treated lesions. It has been shown that treatment of small fields with 8-fractions gave equally positive results as with 15-fractions whereas in the treatment of large lesions the selection of CRE value, a number of fractions and dose should let the value of CRE minimally exceeds the level of tolerance of healthy tissues. The regard to CRE value in the treatment of large lesions or the introduction of additional dosimetric acts seems to be useful. 10 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs. (author)

  10. Fractionated dose studies with X-rays and various alkylating agents in P388 mouse lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The fractionated dose technique has been used in P388F cells to examine the effects of X-rays and four alkylating agents on survival and induction of 5-iodo-2-deoxyuridine (IudR) resistant variants. Fractionation intervals up to 5 1/2 h were used for X-rays and for the alkylating agents up to 192 h. Fractionation of the X-ray dose resulted in a sparing effect for survival and variant induction. A sparing effect was also observed for survival after treatment with alkylating agents. However, variant frequencies were observed as large as or greater than those produced by the full doses of alkylating agents. For such agents this would suggest that survival and variant induction are independent events. Differences in the effects of X-rays and alkylating agents cannot be explained by differences in growth rate or the recovery of viability after treatment

  11. Fractionated dose studies with X-rays and various alkylating agents in P388 mouse lymphoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The fractionated dose technique was used in P388F cells to examine the effects of X-rays and four alkylating agents on survival and induction of 5-iodo-2-deoxyuridine (IudR) resistant variants. Fractionation intervals up to 51/2 h were used for X-rays and for the alkylating agents up to 192 h. Fractionation of the X-ray dose resulted in a sparing effect for survival and variant induction. A sparing effect was also observed for survival after treatment with alkylating agents. However, variant frequencies were observed as large as or greater than those produced by the full doses of alkylating agents. For such agents this would suggest that survival and variant induction are independent events. Differences in the effects of X-rays and alkylating agents cannot be explained by differences in growth rate or the recovery of viability after treatment. (author)

  12. The relative biological effectiveness of fractionated doses of fast neutrons (42 MeVd→Be) for normal tissues. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezvani, M.; Hopewell, J.W.; Robbins, M.E.C.; Hamlet, R.; Barnes, D.W.H.; Sansom, J.M.; Adams, P.J.V.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of single and fractionated doses of fast neutrons (42 MeV d→Bc ) on the early and late radiation responses of the pig lung have been assessed by the measurement of changes in lung function using a 133 Xe washout technique. The results obtained for irradiation schedules with fast neutrons have been compared with those after photon irradiation. There was no statistically significant difference between the values for the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the early and late radiation response of the lung. The RBE of the neutron beam increased with decreasing size of dose/fraction with an upper limit value of 4.39 ± 0.94 for infinitely small X-ray doses per fraction. (author)

  13. Radiation-induced rectal complications are not influenced by age: a dose fractionation study in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Aardweg, Gerard J M J; Olofsen-van Acht, Manouk J J; van Hooije, Christel M C; Levendag, Peter C

    2003-05-01

    Radiation-induced complications of the rectum are an important dose-limiting factor in radiotherapy of pelvic malignancies. In general, animal studies demonstrated no differences in acute and late normal tissue toxicity with age, but little is known about rectal complications in relation to age. For this purpose, an extensive histological and dose fractionation study was carried out on the rectum of young (12 weeks) and older (77-80 weeks) rats. In this paper, the results of dose fractionation are presented in relation to age at the time of irradiation. Young and older animals were irradiated with single and fractionated doses. After irradiation, rectal complications could lead to occlusion and stenosis, eventually resulting in the clinical symptoms of a megacolon and a possible fistula. For each dose group, cumulative survival rates were obtained with Kaplan-Meier analysis, from which dose-effect curves and the associated LD(50) values for a megacolon/fistula were calculated. The majority of responders died between 8 and 24 weeks after irradiation, irrespective of age. For both age groups, only the fractionation data showed a reduction in the mean latency with increasing dose. In the older age group, 39% of the responders developed a fistula compared to 26% for the younger animals. The LD(50) values increased from around 30 Gy after single doses to nearly 65 Gy after 10 fractions. The increases in LD(50) values with the number of fractions were independent of the age of the rats. For each of the dose fractionation schedules, log-rank testing indicated no significant differences in cumulative survival rates between younger and older animals (P > 0.10). The high alpha/beta ratios obtained for both the young and older animals strongly suggested that the late rectal complications were a consequence of early epithelial injury. Associated histological findings indicated that blood vessel damage, which was already evident at a high incidence at 4 weeks after irradiation

  14. Limitations of a convolution method for modeling geometric uncertainties in radiation therapy: the radiobiological dose-per-fraction effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, William; Battista, Jerry; Van Dyk, Jake

    2004-01-01

    The convolution method can be used to model the effect of random geometric uncertainties into planned dose distributions used in radiation treatment planning. This is effectively done by linearly adding infinitesimally small doses, each with a particular geometric offset, over an assumed infinite number of fractions. However, this process inherently ignores the radiobiological dose-per-fraction effect since only the summed physical dose distribution is generated. The resultant potential error on predicted radiobiological outcome [quantified in this work with tumor control probability (TCP), equivalent uniform dose (EUD), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD)] has yet to be thoroughly quantified. In this work, the results of a Monte Carlo simulation of geometric displacements are compared to those of the convolution method for random geometric uncertainties of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mm (standard deviation). The α/β CTV ratios of 0.8, 1.5, 3, 5, and 10 Gy are used to represent the range of radiation responses for different tumors, whereas a single α/β OAR ratio of 3 Gy is used to represent all the organs at risk (OAR). The analysis is performed on a four-field prostate treatment plan of 18 MV x rays. The fraction numbers are varied from 1-50, with isoeffective adjustments of the corresponding dose-per-fractions to maintain a constant tumor control, using the linear-quadratic cell survival model. The average differences in TCP and EUD of the target, and in NTCP and gEUD of the OAR calculated from the convolution and Monte Carlo methods reduced asymptotically as the total fraction number increased, with the differences reaching negligible levels beyond the treatment fraction number of ≥20. The convolution method generally overestimates the radiobiological indices, as compared to the Monte Carlo method, for the target volume, and underestimates those for the OAR. These effects are interconnected and attributed

  15. Complex formation of transferrin with tetravalent plutonium and cerium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, M.S.; Oomen, I.K.

    1981-01-01

    Gel filtration experiments with 239 Pu labelled In Vitro bovine serum showed that the metal ion is bound to the transferrin of the serum proteins as in the case of iron labelled serum. This was confirmed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The ovotransferrin prepared from chicken egg white which was devoid of hemopexin contaminant was found to complex both tetravalent plutonium and cerium giving visible absorption peak at 365 and 435 nm respectively. The binding capacity of ovotransferrin with tetravalent plutonium and cerium, determined by spectrophotometric titration indicates that two metal ions are bound to each protein molecule as in the case of iron. The average molecular weight computed from this binding capacity measurements was found to be 71,000-75,000. The number of protons liberated for each metal ion bound was found to be three as in the case of iron. (author)

  16. Mutation induction in haploid yeast after split-dose radiation-exposure. I. Fractionated UV-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, K; Zölzer, F; Kiefer, J

    1989-01-01

    Mutation induction was investigated in wild-type haploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae after split-dose UV-irradiation. Cells were exposed to fractionated 254 nm-UV-doses separated by intervals from 0 to 6 h with incubation either on non-nutrient or nutrient agar between. The test parameter was resistance to canavanine. If modifications of sensitivity due to incubation are appropriately taken into account there is no change of mutation frequency.

  17. The unusual stability of homoleptic di- and tetravalent chromium alkyls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulzke, C.; Enright, D.; Sugiyama, H.; LeBlanc, G.; Gambarotta, S.; Yap, G.P.A.; Thompson, L.K.; Wilson, D.R.; Duchateau, R.

    2002-01-01

    Reaction of CrCl3(THF)3 with 3 equiv of R-M [R = Me3CCH2 (a), Me3SiCH2 (b)] afforded either the previously reported tetravalent homoleptic R4Cr (1a, b) [M = MgCl] or the unprecedented divalent and tetranuclear homoleptic [R2Cr]4 (2b) [M = Li]. Both types of compounds display a remarkable chemical

  18. Optimization of the fractionated irradiation scheme considering physical doses to tumor and organ at risk based on dose–volume histograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugano, Yasutaka [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Mizuta, Masahiro [Laboratory of Advanced Data Science, Information Initiative Center, Hokkaido University, Kita-11, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0811 (Japan); Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Sutherland, Kenneth L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-15, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8638 (Japan); Date, Hiroyuki, E-mail: date@hs.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-12, Nishi-5, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy of solid tumors has been performed with various fractionation regimens such as multi- and hypofractionations. However, the ability to optimize the fractionation regimen considering the physical dose distribution remains insufficient. This study aims to optimize the fractionation regimen, in which the authors propose a graphical method for selecting the optimal number of fractions (n) and dose per fraction (d) based on dose–volume histograms for tumor and normal tissues of organs around the tumor. Methods: Modified linear-quadratic models were employed to estimate the radiation effects on the tumor and an organ at risk (OAR), where the repopulation of the tumor cells and the linearity of the dose-response curve in the high dose range of the surviving fraction were considered. The minimization problem for the damage effect on the OAR was solved under the constraint that the radiation effect on the tumor is fixed by a graphical method. Here, the damage effect on the OAR was estimated based on the dose–volume histogram. Results: It was found that the optimization of fractionation scheme incorporating the dose–volume histogram is possible by employing appropriate cell surviving models. The graphical method considering the repopulation of tumor cells and a rectilinear response in the high dose range enables them to derive the optimal number of fractions and dose per fraction. For example, in the treatment of prostate cancer, the optimal fractionation was suggested to lie in the range of 8–32 fractions with a daily dose of 2.2–6.3 Gy. Conclusions: It is possible to optimize the number of fractions and dose per fraction based on the physical dose distribution (i.e., dose–volume histogram) by the graphical method considering the effects on tumor and OARs around the tumor. This method may stipulate a new guideline to optimize the fractionation regimen for physics-guided fractionation.

  19. A simple method to calculate the influence of dose inhomogeneity and fractionation in normal tissue complication probability evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begnozzi, L.; Gentile, F.P.; Di Nallo, A.M.; Chiatti, L.; Zicari, C.; Consorti, R.; Benassi, M.

    1994-01-01

    Since volumetric dose distributions are available with 3-dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning they can be used in statistical evaluation of response to radiation. This report presents a method to calculate the influence of dose inhomogeneity and fractionation in normal tissue complication probability evaluation. The mathematical expression for the calculation of normal tissue complication probability has been derived combining the Lyman model with the histogram reduction method of Kutcher et al. and using the normalized total dose (NTD) instead of the total dose. The fitting of published tolerance data, in case of homogeneous or partial brain irradiation, has been considered. For the same total or partial volume homogeneous irradiation of the brain, curves of normal tissue complication probability have been calculated with fraction size of 1.5 Gy and of 3 Gy instead of 2 Gy, to show the influence of fraction size. The influence of dose distribution inhomogeneity and α/β value has also been simulated: Considering α/β=1.6 Gy or α/β=4.1 Gy for kidney clinical nephritis, the calculated curves of normal tissue complication probability are shown. Combining NTD calculations and histogram reduction techniques, normal tissue complication probability can be estimated taking into account the most relevant contributing factors, including the volume effect. (orig.) [de

  20. In vivo dosimetry of high-dose fractionated irradiation in an experimental set-up with rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortan, L; Van Hecke, H; Van Duyse, B; De Neve, W; De Meerleer, B [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde; Pattyn, P; Van Renthergem, K [Ghent University (Belgium). Dept. of Surgery

    1995-12-01

    The feasibility to irradiate a limited section of a rat abdomen with well-defined edges was assessed. Because of the relative small volume involved, in vivo dosimetry with TLDs was necessary in providing us information about the accuracy of the irradiation method. Three to five days prior to the start of the radiotherapy treatment, two plastic strips - each containing a TLD-dosimeter (Harshaw TLD10 LiF rods, 1 mm dia x 6 mm) sealed in polyethylene tubing, and a lead bean - were implanted in the rat abdomen. The plastic strips made a closed loop around the bowel, through the mesenterium, and were fixed with a single stitch on the inner abdominal wall. One loop was made in the hepatic area; another was made in the lower abdomen, around the rectosigmoid. Conscious animals were irradiated using a purpose-build plexi-holder, with rear legs immobilised to avoid longitudinal movements. The implanted lead beans enabled us to simulate the rat prior to each radiation session. This way, the radiation field could be set up individually for each rat, in such way that the rectosigmoid area received full dose and the hepatic area received no irradiation dose at all. Irradiation was carried out, using 5 MV photons of a linear accelerator. Fifteen animals per group were irradiated according a conventional (2.0 Gy / fraction; 5 fractions / week) or a hyperfractionated (1.6 Gy / fraction; 2 daily fractions; 5 days / week) schedule, with different total doses. Prior to implantation, TLDs were individually calibrated and checked for stability. After removal from the abdomen . TLDs were tested again for accuracy. TLDs with an unacceptable read-out curve were rejected (about 2 to 4 TLDs per group of 15). The obtained accumulated doses - as determined by TLD read-outs-were comparable to the theoretical doses, indicating that fractionated radiation of small fields, with well defined mark off, in rats is feasible.

  1. In vivo dosimetry of high-dose fractionated irradiation in an experimental set-up with rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortan, L.; Van Hecke, H.; Van Duyse, B.; De Neve, W.; De Meerleer, B.; Pattyn, P.; Van Renthergem, K.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility to irradiate a limited section of a rat abdomen with well-defined edges was assessed. Because of the relative small volume involved, in vivo dosimetry with TLDs was necessary in providing us information about the accuracy of the irradiation method. Three to five days prior to the start of the radiotherapy treatment, two plastic strips - each containing a TLD-dosimeter (Harshaw TLD10 LiF rods, 1 mm dia x 6 mm) sealed in polyethylene tubing, and a lead bean - were implanted in the rat abdomen. The plastic strips made a closed loop around the bowel, through the mesenterium, and were fixed with a single stitch on the inner abdominal wall. One loop was made in the hepatic area; another was made in the lower abdomen, around the rectosigmoid. Conscious animals were irradiated using a purpose-build plexi-holder, with rear legs immobilised to avoid longitudinal movements. The implanted lead beans enabled us to simulate the rat prior to each radiation session. This way, the radiation field could be set up individually for each rat, in such way that the rectosigmoid area received full dose and the hepatic area received no irradiation dose at all. Irradiation was carried out, using 5 MV photons of a linear accelerator. Fifteen animals per group were irradiated according a conventional (2.0 Gy / fraction; 5 fractions / week) or a hyperfractionated (1.6 Gy / fraction; 2 daily fractions; 5 days / week) schedule, with different total doses. Prior to implantation, TLDs were individually calibrated and checked for stability. After removal from the abdomen . TLDs were tested again for accuracy. TLDs with an unacceptable read-out curve were rejected (about 2 to 4 TLDs per group of 15). The obtained accumulated doses - as determined by TLD read-outs-were comparable to the theoretical doses, indicating that fractionated radiation of small fields, with well defined mark off, in rats is feasible

  2. Radiobiological basis of total body irradiation with different dose rate and fractionation: repair capacity of hemopoietic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C.W.; Kim, T.H.; Khan, F.M.; Kersey, J.H.; Levitt, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) followed by bone marrow transplantation is being used in the treatment of malignant or non-malignant hemopoietic disorders. It has been believed that the ability of hemopoietic cells to repair sublethal radiation damage is negligible. Therefore, several schools of investigators suggested that TBI in a single exposure at extremely low dose rate (5 rad/min) over several hours, or in several fractions in 2-3 days, should yield a higher therapeutic gain, as compared with a single exposure at a high dose rate (26 rad/min). We reviewed the existing data in the literature, in particular, the response of hemopoietic cells to fractionated doses of irradiation and found that the repair capacity of both malignant and non-malignant hemopoietic cells might be greater than has been thought. It is concluded that we should not underestimate the ability of hemopoietic cells to repair sublethal radiation damage in using TBI

  3. Role of Immunomodulators in Tumor Regression in Mice Exposed to Fractionated Low Dose of Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rokaya Elsayed Maaroaf Elsayed

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most promising approaches of cancer treatment. The present study was designed to examine the role of irradiated tumor cell lysate vaccine, IFNα-2b and low dose of gamma irradiation as immunomodulators either alone or combined in tumor regression. Ehrlich ascite carcinoma (EAC) cells and 9 groups of female mice were used. Mice were immunized intramuscularly by tumor cell lysate vaccine one time/week for 3 weeks in the right thigh of mice. After two weeks from last immunization, all mice were challenged with normal viable EAC cells at count of 2.5 ×10 6 /mouse in the opposite left thigh for Ehrlich carcinoma (EC) production. Mice were subcutaneously injected with 10.000 units of IFNα-2b 3 times/week for 4 weeks and others were exposed to fractionated dose of γ- radiation (0.5 Gy/day x 4, day after day). Tumor size, serum tumor markers (TNF-α and CEA), tumor DNA fragmentation and Caspase-3 were evaluated. Oxidative stress (MDA and NO) markers and antioxidants (GSH, GPX and SOD) were determined in spleen and tumor tissues. Histopathological examinations, apoptosis and necrosis in spleen and tumor tissues were also examined. The results revealed significant inhibition in tumor size throughout the observation period either for treatments with vaccine or IFNα-2b either alone or combined with γ-irradiation. DNA fragmentation and Caspase-3 enzyme activities were significantly elevated in immunized mice as compared with EC group along with diminished tumor size while, tumor markers were significantly decreased. MDA and NO were significantly increased in tumor tissue.while, tumor GSH content, GPX and SOD activities were significantly decreased. Combined treatments of female mice bearing EC with IFN-α-2b, tumor cell lysate vaccine and low dose of γ-radiation cause a highly significant decrease in serum TNF-α and CEA levels, increase in Cas-3 activity, no DNA fragmentation, significant increase in MDA, decrease in SOD activity and decreased

  4. Effect of e-beam dose on the fractional density of Au-catalyzed GaAs nanowire growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeung Hun, E-mail: jeunghunpark@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Gambin, Vincent [Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Kodambaka, Suneel, E-mail: kodambaka@ucla.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Using Au/GaAs as a model system, the effect of initial catalyst patterning conditions on the growth of nanowire was studied. Resulting morphologies and fractional surface densities are determined as a function of e-beam dose, dot size, and inter-dot spacing using scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The majority of resulting nanowires grow randomly oriented with respect to the substrate. The nanowires are tapered with narrow tops, wider bases, and catalysts at the wire tips — characteristics of vapor–liquid–solid process. The base diameters of the wires are larger than the dot size, which is likely due to the non-catalyzed vapor–solid deposition along the sidewalls. The higher dose rate used in pattering leads to the formation of higher aspect ratio nanowires with narrower bases. The fractional surface density is found to increase linearly with the clearing dose and the critical dose for nanowire growth increases with decreasing catalyst pattern size and spacing. At a given dose, the fractional density increases with increasing Au dot size and with decreasing inter-dot spacing. Our results may provide new insights into the role of catalyst preparing conditions on the high density, wafer-scale growth of nanowires. - Highlights: • Initial Au catalyst layers are prepared using electron beam lithography. • GaAs nanowires are grown on GaAs(111)B using molecular beam epitaxy. • Effect of dose, size and spacing of Au dots on morphology and density is studied. • Density of nanowires is controlled by changing exposed dose on Au catalyst.

  5. Analyzed immunogenicity of fractional doses of Sabin-inactivated poliovirus vaccine (sIPV) with intradermal delivery in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lei; Cai, Wei; Sun, Mingbo; Cun, Yina; Zhou, Jian; Liu, Jing; Hu, Wenzhu; Zhang, Xinwen; Song, Shaohui; Jiang, Shude; Liao, Guoyang

    2016-12-01

    The live-attenuated oral polio vaccine (OPV) will be no longer used when wild poliovirus (WPV) eliminating in worldwide, according to GPEI (the Global Polio Eradication Initiative) Reports. It is planning to replace OPV by Sabin-based inactivated poliovirus vaccine (sIPV) in developing countries, with purpose of reducing of the economic burden and maintaining of the appropriate antibody levels in population. It studied serial fractional doses immunized by intradermal injection (ID) in rats, to reduce consume of antigen and financial burden, maintaining sufficient immunogenicity; Methods: Study groups were divided in 4 groups of dose gradient, which were one-tenth (1/10), one-fifth (1/5), one-third (1/3) and one-full dose (1/1), according to the volume of distribution taken from the same batch of vaccine (sIPV). Wistar rats were injected intradermally with the needle and syringe sing the mantoux technique taken once month for 3 times. It was used as positive control that intramuscular inoculation (IM) was injected with one-full dose (1/1) with same batch of sIPV. PBS was used as negative control. Blood samples were collected via tail vein. After 30 d with 3 round of immunization, it analyzed the changes of neutralization antibody titers in the each group by each immunization program end; Results: The results of seroconversion had positive correlation with different doses in ID groups. The higher concentration of D-antigen (D-Ag) could conduct higher seroconversion. Furthermore, different types of viruses had different seroconversion trend. It showed that the geometric mean titers (GMTs) of each fractional-dose ID groups increased by higher concentration of D-Ag, and it got significant lower than the full-dose IM group. At 90 th days of immunization, the GMTs for each poliovirus subtypes of fractional doses were almost higher than 1:8, implied that it could be meaning positive seroprotection titer for polio vaccine types, according to WHO suggestion; Conclusions

  6. Increasing Fractional Doses Increases the Probability of Benign PSA Bounce in Patients Undergoing Definitive HDR Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauck, Carlin R.; Ye, Hong; Chen, Peter Y.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Limbacher, Amy; Krauss, Daniel J., E-mail: Daniel.krauss@beaumont.edu

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce is a temporary elevation of the PSA level above a prior nadir. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the frequency of a PSA bounce following high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer is associated with individual treatment fraction size. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2014, 554 patients underwent treatment of low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer with definitive HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy and had ≥3 subsequent PSA measurements. Four different fraction sizes were used: 950 cGy × 4 fractions, 1200 cGy × 2 fractions, 1350 cGy × 2 fractions, 1900 cGy × 1 fraction. Four definitions of PSA bounce were applied: ≥0.2, ≥0.5, ≥1.0, and ≥2.0 ng/mL above the prior nadir with a subsequent return to the nadir. Results: The median follow-up period was 3.7 years. The actuarial 3-year rate of PSA bounce for the entire cohort was 41.3%, 28.4%, 17.4%, and 6.8% for nadir +0.2, +0.5, +1.0, and +2.0 ng/mL, respectively. The 3-year rate of PSA bounce >0.2 ng/mL was 42.2%, 32.1%, 41.0%, and 59.1% for the 950-, 1200-, 1350-, and 1900-cGy/fraction levels, respectively (P=.002). The hazard ratio for bounce >0.2 ng/mL for patients receiving a single fraction of 1900 cGy compared with those receiving treatment in multiple fractions was 1.786 (P=.024). For patients treated with a single 1900-cGy fraction, the 1-, 2-, and 3-year rates of PSA bounce exceeding the Phoenix biochemical failure definition (nadir +2 ng/mL) were 4.5%, 18.7%, and 18.7%, respectively, higher than the rates for all other administered dose levels (P=.025). Conclusions: The incidence of PSA bounce increases with single-fraction HDR treatment. Knowledge of posttreatment PSA kinetics may aid in decision making regarding management of potential biochemical failures.

  7. Increasing Fractional Doses Increases the Probability of Benign PSA Bounce in Patients Undergoing Definitive HDR Brachytherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauck, Carlin R.; Ye, Hong; Chen, Peter Y.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Limbacher, Amy; Krauss, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce is a temporary elevation of the PSA level above a prior nadir. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the frequency of a PSA bounce following high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer is associated with individual treatment fraction size. Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2014, 554 patients underwent treatment of low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer with definitive HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy and had ≥3 subsequent PSA measurements. Four different fraction sizes were used: 950 cGy × 4 fractions, 1200 cGy × 2 fractions, 1350 cGy × 2 fractions, 1900 cGy × 1 fraction. Four definitions of PSA bounce were applied: ≥0.2, ≥0.5, ≥1.0, and ≥2.0 ng/mL above the prior nadir with a subsequent return to the nadir. Results: The median follow-up period was 3.7 years. The actuarial 3-year rate of PSA bounce for the entire cohort was 41.3%, 28.4%, 17.4%, and 6.8% for nadir +0.2, +0.5, +1.0, and +2.0 ng/mL, respectively. The 3-year rate of PSA bounce >0.2 ng/mL was 42.2%, 32.1%, 41.0%, and 59.1% for the 950-, 1200-, 1350-, and 1900-cGy/fraction levels, respectively (P=.002). The hazard ratio for bounce >0.2 ng/mL for patients receiving a single fraction of 1900 cGy compared with those receiving treatment in multiple fractions was 1.786 (P=.024). For patients treated with a single 1900-cGy fraction, the 1-, 2-, and 3-year rates of PSA bounce exceeding the Phoenix biochemical failure definition (nadir +2 ng/mL) were 4.5%, 18.7%, and 18.7%, respectively, higher than the rates for all other administered dose levels (P=.025). Conclusions: The incidence of PSA bounce increases with single-fraction HDR treatment. Knowledge of posttreatment PSA kinetics may aid in decision making regarding management of potential biochemical failures.

  8. In vivo assessment of the gastric mucosal tolerance dose after single fraction, small volume irradiation of liver malignancies by computed tomography-guided, high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streitparth, Florian; Pech, Maciej; Boehmig, Michael; Ruehl, Ricarda; Peters, Nils; Wieners, Gero; Steinberg, Johannes; Lopez-Haenninen, Enrique; Felix, Roland; Wust, Peter; Ricke, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the tolerance dose of gastric mucosa for single-fraction computed tomography (CT)-guided, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of liver malignancies. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 patients treated by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy of liver malignancies in segments II and/or III were included. Dose planning was performed upon a three-dimensional CT data set acquired after percutaneous applicator positioning. All patients received gastric protection post-treatment. For further analysis, the contours of the gastric wall were defined in every CT slice using Brachyvision Software. Dose-volume histograms were calculated for each treatment and correlated with clinical data derived from questionnaires assessing Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). All patients presenting symptoms of upper GI toxicity were examined endoscopically. Results: Summarizing all patients the minimum dose applied to 1 ml of the gastric wall (D 1ml ) ranged from 6.3 to 34.2 Gy; median, 14.3 Gy. Toxicity was present in 18 patients (55%). We found nausea in 16 (69%), emesis in 9 (27%), cramping in 13 (39%), weight loss in 12 (36%), gastritis in 4 (12%), and ulceration in 5 patients (15%). We found a threshold dose D 1ml of 11 Gy for general gastric toxicity and 15.5 Gy for gastric ulceration verified by an univariate analysis (p = 0.01). Conclusions: For a single fraction, small volume irradiation we found in the upper abdomen a threshold dose D 1ml of 15.5 Gy for the clinical endpoint ulceration of the gastric mucosa. This in vivo assessment is in accordance with previously published tolerance data

  9. Tetravalent anti-CD20/CD3 bispecific antibody for the treatment of B cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chia-Yen; Chen, Gregory J.; Tai, Pei-Han; Yang, Yu-Chen [Institute of Biologics, Development Center for Biotechnology, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Yu-Shen, E-mail: yshsu@advagene.com.tw [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, Advagene Biopharma, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Mingi, E-mail: mingi.chang@advagene.com.tw [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, Advagene Biopharma, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chuan-Lung, E-mail: fabio@dcb.org.tw [Institute of Biologics, Development Center for Biotechnology, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China)

    2016-05-13

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) are second generation antibodies for therapeutic application in immunotherapy. One of the major strategies of the bsAb platform is the recruitment of immune effector T cells by incorporating an anti-CD3 domain. A bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE), with one end having an affinity for CD3 and the other end with affinity for CD19, has been approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, due to their small size and lack of Fc region, these single-chain variable fragment (scFv) bsAbs have short half-lives in vivo. Additionally, poor solubility, structural instability, and low production yields have also become major challenges in the bulk production process. To overcome these challenges, we have engineered a tetravalent bsAb with bivalent binding specificity for the CD20 and CD3 antigen in an immunoglobulin G (IgG) format. The fusion of the anti-CD3 scFvs to the CD20 antibody via a linker-hinge domain (LHD) results in improved antibody stabilization and properties. Here we demonstrate this antibody's highly efficient cancer cell elimination in a dose-dependent manner in a CD20-expressing B lymphoblastoid cell line in vitro. Our data suggest the potential clinical application of this bsAb for the treatment of CD20-expressing B cell malignancies. - Highlights: • A bispecific antibody (bsAb) can increase immunotherapeutic efficacy. • A tetravalent bsAb with binding specificity for the CD20 and CD3 antigens is proposed. • A linker-hinge domain (LHD) within the bsAb results in improved antibody properties.

  10. Insect radiosensitivity: dose curves and dose-fractionation studies of dominant lethal mutations in the mature sperm of 4 insect species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaChance, L.E.; Graham, C.K.

    1984-01-01

    Males of 4 species of insects: Musca domestica L. (housefly) (Diptera), Oncopeltus fasciatus (Dallas) (milkweed bug) (Hemiptera), Anagasta kuhniella (Zeller) (mealmoth) (Lepidoptera) and Heliothis virescens (Fab.) (tobacco budworm) (Lepidoptera) were irradiated as adults. Dose-response curves for the induction of dominant lethal mutations in the mature sperm were constructed. The curves were analyzed mathematically and compared with theoretical computer simulated curves requiring 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 'hits' for the induction of a dominant lethal mutation. The 4 species belonging to 3 different orders of insects showed a wide range in radiation sensitivity and vastly different dose-response curves. When the data were analyzed by several mathematical models the authors found that a logistic response curve gave reasonably good fit with vastly different parameters for the 4 species. Dose-fractionation experiments showed no reduction in the frequency of lethal mutations induced in any species when an acute dose was fractionated into 2 equal exposures separated by an 8-h period. (Auth.)

  11. Optimization of the temporal pattern of applied dose for a single fraction of radiation: Implications for radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Michael B.

    The increasing prevalence of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as a treatment modality has led to a renewed interest in the potential for interaction between prolonged treatment time, as frequently associated with IMRT, and the underlying radiobiology of the irradiated tissue. A particularly relevant aspect of radiobiology is cell repair capacity, which influences cell survival, and thus directly relates to the ability to control tumors and spare normal tissues. For a single fraction of radiation, the linear quadratic (LQ) model is commonly used to relate the radiation dose to the fraction of cells surviving. The LQ model implies a dependence on two time-related factors which correlate to radiobiological effects: the duration of radiation application, and the functional form of how the dose is applied over that time (the "temporal pattern of applied dose"). Although the former has been well studied, the latter has not. Thus, the goal of this research is to investigate the impact of the temporal pattern of applied dose on the survival of human cells and to explore how the manipulation of this temporal dose pattern may be incorporated into an IMRT-based radiation therapy treatment planning scheme. The hypothesis is that the temporal pattern of applied dose in a single fraction of radiation can be optimized to maximize or minimize cell kill. Furthermore, techniques which utilize this effect could have clinical ramifications. In situations where increased cell kill is desirable, such as tumor control, or limiting the degree of cell kill is important, such as the sparing of normal tissue, temporal sequences of dose which maximize or minimize cell kill (temporally "optimized" sequences) may provide greater benefit than current clinically used radiation patterns. In the first part of this work, an LQ-based modeling analysis of effects of the temporal pattern of dose on cell kill is performed. Through this, patterns are identified for maximizing cell kill for a

  12. A unified dose response relationship to predict high dose fractionation response in the lung cancer stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Than S Kehwar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study is designed to investigate the superiority and applicability of the model among the linear-quadratic (LQ, linear-quadratic-linear (LQ-L and universal-survival-curve (USC models by fitting published radiation cell survival data of lung cancer cell lines. Materials and Method: The radiation cell survival data for small cell (SC and non-small cell (NSC lung cancer cell lines were obtained from published reports, and were used to determine the LQ and cell survival curve parameters, which ultimately were used in the curve fitting of the LQ, LQ-L and USC models. Results: The results of this study demonstrate that the LQ-L(Dt-mt model, compared with the LQ and USC models, provides best fit with smooth and gradual transition to the linear portion of the curve at transition dose Dt-mt, where the LQ model loses its validity, and the LQ-L(Dt-2α/β and USC(Dt-mt models do not transition smoothly to the linear portion of the survival curve. Conclusion: The LQ-L(Dt-mt model is able to fit wide variety of cell survival data over a very wide dose range, and retains the strength of the LQ model in the low-dose range.

  13. SU-E-J-176: Characterization of Inter-Fraction Breast Variability and the Implications On Delivered Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudhoff, M; Lamba, M; Kumar, N; Ward, A; Elson, H [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To systematically characterize inter-fraction breast variability and determine implications on delivered dose. Methods: Weekly port films were used to characterize breast setup variability. Five evenly spaced representative positions across the contour of each breast were chosen on the electronic port film in reference to graticule, and window and level was set such that the skin surface of the breast was visible. Measurements from the skin surface to treatment field edge were taken on each port film at each position and compared to the planning DRR, quantifying the variability. The systematic measurement technique was repeated for all port films for 20 recently treated breast cancer patients. Measured setup variability for each patient was modeled as a normal distribution. The distribution was randomly sampled from the model and applied as isocentric shifts in the treatment planning computer, representing setup variability for each fraction. Dose was calculated for each shifted fraction and summed to obtain DVHs and BEDs that modeled the dose with daily setup variability. Patients were categorized in to relevant groupings that were chosen to investigate the rigorousness of immobilization types, treatment techniques, and inherent anatomical difficulties. Mean position differences and dosimetric differences were evaluated between planned and delivered doses. Results: The setup variability was found to follow a normal distribution with mean position differences between the DRR and port film between − 8.6–3.5 mm with sigma range of 5.3–9.8 mm. Setup position was not found to be significantly different than zero. The mean seroma or whole breast PTV dosimetric difference, calculated as BED, ranged from a −0.23 to +1.13Gy. Conclusion: A systematic technique to quantify and model setup variability was used to calculate the dose in 20 breast cancer patients including variable setup. No statistically significant PTV or OAR BED differences were found between

  14. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: The feasibility and cosmetic outcome of a fractionated outpatient delivery scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, Matthew A.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.; Arnfield, Mark R.; Amir, Cyrus; Zwicker, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, potential toxicity, and cosmetic outcome of fractionated interstitial high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for the management of patients with breast cancer at increased risk for local recurrence. Methods and Materials: From 1994 to 1996, 18 women with early stage breast cancer underwent conventionally fractionated whole breast radiotherapy (50-50.4 Gy) followed by interstitial HDR brachytherapy boost. All were considered to be at high risk for local failure. Seventeen had pathologically confirmed final surgical margins of less than 2 mm or focally positive. Brachytherapy catheter placement and treatment delivery were conducted on an outpatient basis. Preplanning was used to determine optimal catheter positions to enhance dose homogeneity of dose delivery. The total HDR boost dose was 15 Gy delivered in 6 fractions of 2.5 Gy over 3 days. Local control, survival, late toxicities (LENT-SOMA), and cosmetic outcome were recorded in follow-up. In addition, factors potentially influencing cosmesis were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. Results: The minimum follow-up is 40 months with a median 50 months. Sixteen patients were alive without disease at last follow-up. There have been no in-breast failures observed. One patient died with brain metastases, and another died of unrelated causes without evidence of disease. Grade 1-2 late toxicities included 39% with hyperpigmentation, 56% with detectable fibrosis, 28% with occasional discomfort, and 11% with visible telangiectasias. Grade 3 toxicity was reported in one patient as persistent discomfort. Sixty-seven percent of patients were considered to have experienced good/excellent cosmetic outcomes. Factors with a direct relationship to adverse cosmetic outcome were extent of surgical defect (p = 0.00001), primary excision volume (p = 0.017), and total excision volume (p = 0.015). Conclusions: For high risk patients who may benefit from increased doses, interstitial HDR

  15. Low-dose X-irradiation of adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Efficacy of different fractionation schedules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebmann, A.; Hindemith, M.; Jahns, J.; Kamprad, F.; Hildebrandt, G.; Madaj-Sterba, P.; Weisheit, S.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: low-dose radiotherapy is widely accepted as a very effective treatment option for inflammatory symptoms associated with painful degenerative joint disorders. Radiation doses and fractionation schedules in practical use are empirical and mainly based on clinical observations. Experimental data are rare. The efficacy of low-dose X-irradiation on adjuvant induced arthritis in rats using different fractionation schemes was investigated in vivo, in order to explore whether there is a dose and fractionation dependence. Material and methods: adjuvant arthritis in female lewis rats (n = 128) was induced by intradermal injection of heat-inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis on day 0. Both arthritic hind paws were sham-irradiated (group 1: days 10-14; group 2: days 15-19; group 3: days 22-26) or X-irradiated with either 5 x 1.0 Gy (group 4: days 10-14; group 6: days 15-19; group 8: days 22-26; group 10: days 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18) or 5 x 0.5 Gy (group 5: days 10-14; group 7: days 15-19; group 9: days 22-26; group 11: days 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18; group 12: days 10-14 and 22-26). The clinical parameters arthritis score (AS), hind paw volume (HPV), and body weight were determined. Results: a significant decrease of the clinical arthritis parameters was observed following 5 x 0.5 Gy or 5 x 1.0 Gy during the acute maximum of the inflammatory response (days 15-19). The most pronounced treatment effect was reached after two daily fractionated series of 5 x 0.5 Gy with an early treatment onset (days 10-14) and repetition in interval (days 22-26). After the application of 5 x 1.0 Gy on days 10-14 or in a protracted scheme (days 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18), only a nonsignificant positive trend could be detected. Daily fractionated X-irradiation in the chronic phase of adjuvant arthritis (days 22-26) did not show any positive clinical effect. Conclusion: low-dose radiotherapy is able to prevent a full-blown arthritic reaction if given during the florid phase of

  16. Radiosensitivity of Nicotiana protoplasts. Action on cell; cycle effects of low dose and fractionated irradiations; biological repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnien, E.

    1981-10-01

    Leaf protoplasts of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and Nicotiana sylvestris demonstrate five main qualities: they can be maintained as haploid lines; they constitute starting populations with a remarkable cytological homogeneity; they show a transient initial lag-phase; they yield very high plating efficiencies and retain permanently a complete differentiation capacity; being derived of a cell wall, they appear well adapted for fusion experiments or enzymatic dosages. The resumption of mitotic activity was followed by cytophotometric measurements, labelling experiments, nuclear sizing and enzymatic assays. The action of 5 Gy gamma-ray irradiations delayed entrance in the S-phase, provoked an otherwise not verified dependency between transcription, translation and protein synthesis, increased nuclear volumes in the G2-phase, and slightly stimulated the activity of a repair enzyme. The plating efficiency was a sensitive end-point which allowed the evaluation of the biological effectiveness of low to medium radiation-doses after gamma-ray and fast neutron irradiations. The neutron dose-RBE relationship increased from 3 to 25 when the dose decreased from 5 Gy to 5 mGy. When fractionated into low single doses only, a neutron dose of 300 mGy markedly increased its biological effectiveness: this phenomenon could not be explained by cell progression, and necessitated additional hypotheses involving other mechanisms in the specific action of low radiation doses. Radiation-induced UDS was measured in presence of aphidicolin. A beta-like DNA-polymerase was shown to be definitely involved in nuclear repair synthesis [fr

  17. In vivo assessment of catheter positioning accuracy and prolonged irradiation time on liver tolerance dose after single-fraction 192Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kropf Siegfried

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess brachytherapy catheter positioning accuracy and to evaluate the effects of prolonged irradiation time on the tolerance dose of normal liver parenchyma following single-fraction irradiation with 192 Ir. Materials and methods Fifty patients with 76 malignant liver tumors treated by computed tomography (CT-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT were included in the study. The prescribed radiation dose was delivered by 1 - 11 catheters with exposure times in the range of 844 - 4432 seconds. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI datasets for assessing irradiation effects on normal liver tissue, edema, and hepatocyte dysfunction, obtained 6 and 12 weeks after HDR-BT, were merged with 3D dosimetry data. The isodose of the treatment plan covering the same volume as the irradiation effect was taken as a surrogate for the liver tissue tolerance dose. Catheter positioning accuracy was assessed by calculating the shift between the 3D center coordinates of the irradiation effect volume and the tolerance dose volume for 38 irradiation effects in 30 patients induced by catheters implanted in nearly parallel arrangement. Effects of prolonged irradiation were assessed in areas where the irradiation effect volume and tolerance dose volume did not overlap (mismatch areas by using a catheter contribution index. This index was calculated for 48 irradiation effects induced by at least two catheters in 44 patients. Results Positioning accuracy of the brachytherapy catheters was 5-6 mm. The orthogonal and axial shifts between the center coordinates of the irradiation effect volume and the tolerance dose volume in relation to the direction vector of catheter implantation were highly correlated and in first approximation identically in the T1-w and T2-w MRI sequences (p = 0.003 and p p = 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively. There was a significant shift of the irradiation effect towards the catheter entry site compared with the planned dose

  18. Effect of dose fractionation of 60Co gamma radiation on longevity and reproduction of Sitophilus granarius (L., 1785) (Col., Curculionidae) in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, V.; Walder, J.M.M.; Wiendl, F.M.; Domarco, R.E.; Haddad, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of fractionated doses of gamma radiation in different interval of time on longevity and reproductivity of Sitophilus granarius (L., 1785) are studied. Gamma radiation was provided at dose rate of 1.56 kGy/hour by a Cobalt 60 source (Gammabeam-650). The insects were divided in two sets: one was irradiated at acute doses and the other in fractionated doses, with interval of 48 hours. Both sets received doses of 0,40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100Gy. Mortality and and emergency were determined weekly. (M.A.C.) [pt

  19. Optimum radiotherapy schedule for uterine cervical cancer based-on the detailed information of dose fractionation and radiotherapy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyun Chang; Suh, Chang Ok

    2005-01-01

    The best dose-fractionation regimen of the definitive radiotherapy for cervix cancer remains to be clearly determined. It seems to be partially attributed to the complexity of the affecting factors and the lack of detailed information on external and intra-cavitary fractionation. To find optimal practice guidelines, our experiences of the combination of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) were reviewed with detailed information of the various treatment parameters obtained from a large cohort of women treated homogeneously at a single institute. The subjects were 743 cervical cancer patients (Stage IB 198, IIA 77, IIB 364, IIIA 7, IIIB 89 and IVA 8) treated by radiotherapy alone, between 1990 and 1996. A total external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) dose of 23.4 ∼ 59.4 Gy (Median 45.0) was delivered to the whole pelvis. High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) was also performed using various fractionation schemes. A Midline block (MLB) was initiated after the delivery of 14.4∼ 43.2 Gy (Median 36.0) of EBRT in 495 patients, while in the other 248 patients EBRT could not be used due to slow tumor regression or the huge initial bulk of tumor. The point A, actual bladder and rectal doses were individually assessed in all patients. The biologically effective dose (BED) to the tumor (α / β = 10) and late-responding tissues (α /β = 3) for both EBRT and HDR-ICBT were calculated. The total BED values to point A, the actual bladder and rectal reference points were the summation of the EBRT and HDR-ICBT. In addition to all the details on dose-fractionation, the other factors (i.e. the overall treatment time, physicians preference) that can affect the schedule of the definitive radiotherapy were also thoroughly analyzed. The association between MD-BED Gy 3 and the risk of complication was assessed using serial multiple logistic regressions models. The associations between R-BED Gy 3 and rectal complications

  20. Effects of high doses of intracoronary adenosine on the assessment of fractional flow reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Khashaba

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: Intracoronary adenosine, at doses higher than currently suggested, lows obtaining FFR values similar to IV adenosine. Intravenous adenosine, which remains the gold standard, might thus be reserved for those lesions with equivocal FFR values.

  1. SU-E-T-480: Radiobiological Dose Comparison of Single Fraction SRS, Multi-Fraction SRT and Multi-Stage SRS of Large Target Volumes Using the Linear-Quadratic Formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, C; Hrycushko, B; Jiang, S; Meyer, J; Timmerman, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the radiobiological effect on large tumors and surrounding normal tissues from single fraction SRS, multi-fractionated SRT, and multi-staged SRS treatment. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom with a centrally located large volume target (18.2 cm 3 ) was scanned using a 16 slice large bore CT simulator. Scans were imported to the Multiplan treatment planning system where a total prescription dose of 20Gy was used for a single, three staged and three fractionated treatment. Cyber Knife treatment plans were inversely optimized for the target volume to achieve at least 95% coverage of the prescription dose. For the multistage plan, the target was segmented into three subtargets having similar volume and shape. Staged plans for individual subtargets were generated based on a planning technique where the beam MUs of the original plan on the total target volume are changed by weighting the MUs based on projected beam lengths within each subtarget. Dose matrices for each plan were export in DICOM format and used to calculate equivalent dose distributions in 2Gy fractions using an alpha beta ratio of 10 for the target and 3 for normal tissue. Results: Singe fraction SRS, multi-stage plan and multi-fractionated SRT plans had an average 2Gy dose equivalent to the target of 62.89Gy, 37.91Gy and 33.68Gy, respectively. The normal tissue within 12Gy physical dose region had an average 2Gy dose equivalent of 29.55Gy, 16.08Gy and 13.93Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The single fraction SRS plan had the largest predicted biological effect for the target and the surrounding normal tissue. The multi-stage treatment provided for a more potent biologically effect on target compared to the multi-fraction SRT treatments with less biological normal tissue than single-fraction SRS treatment

  2. Positron emission tomography for the dose monitoring of intra-fractionally moving targets in ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuetzer, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Ion beam therapy (IBT) is a promising treatment option in radiotherapy. The characteristic physical and biological properties of light ion beams allow for the delivery of highly tumor conformal dose distributions. Related to the sparing of surrounding healthy tissue and nearby organs at risk, it is feasible to escalate the dose in the tumor volume to reach higher tumor control and survival rates. Remarkable clinical outcome was achieved with IBT for radio-resistant, deep-seated, static and well fixated tumor entities. Presumably, more patients could benefit from the advantages of IBT if it would be available for more frequent tumor sites. Those located in the thorax and upper abdominal region are commonly subjected to intra-fractional, respiration related motion. Different motion-compensated dose delivery techniques have been developed for active field shaping with scanned pencil beams and are at least available under experimental conditions at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) in Darmstadt, Germany. Since minor unexpected anatomical changes e.g. related to patient mispositioning, tumour shrinkage or tissue swelling could already lead to remarkable deviations between planned and delivered dose distribution, a valuable dose monitoring system is desired for IBT. So far, positron emission tomography (PET) is the only in vivo, in situ and non-invasive qualitative dose monitoring method applied under clinical conditions. Conclusions about the delivered dose distribution can be drawn indirectly from a comparison between two β + -activity distributions: the measured one and an expected one generated by a Monte-Carlo simulation. Dedicated phantoms mainly made up of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and a motion table for regular one-dimensional (1D) motion patterns have been designed and manufactured for the experiments. Furthermore, the general applicability of the 4D MLEM algorithm for more complex motion patterns has been demonstrated by the

  3. High Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Two 9 Gy Fractions in the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer - a South Indian Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Saptarshi; Rao, Pamidimukkala Bramhananda; Kotne, Sivasankar

    2015-01-01

    Although 3D image based brachytherapy is currently the standard of treatment in cervical cancer, most of the centres in developing countries still practice orthogonal intracavitary brachytherapy due to financial constraints. The quest for optimum dose and fractionation schedule in high dose rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) is still ongoing. While the American Brachytherapy Society recommends four to eight fractions of each less than 7.5 Gy, there are some studies demonstrating similar efficacy and comparable toxicity with higher doses per fraction. To assess the treatment efficacy and late complications of HDR ICBT with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions. This is a prospective institutional study in Southern India carried on from 1st June 2012 to 31st July 2014. In this period, 76 patients of cervical cancer satisfying our inclusion criteria were treated with concurrent chemo-radiation following ICBT with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions, five to seven days apart. The median follow-up period in the study was 24 months (range 10.6 - 31.2 months). The 2 year actuarial local control rate, disease-free survival and overall survival were 88.1%, 84.2% and 81.8% respectively. Although 38.2% patients suffered from late toxicity, only 3 patients had grade III late toxicity. In our experience, HDR brachytherapy with 9 Gy per fraction in two fractions is an effective dose fractionation for the treatment of cervical cancer with acceptable toxicity.

  4. Influence of Exposure to Fractionated Dose of Gamma Radiation and Antioxidants Supplementation to Mice on program cell death induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanafi, A.

    2010-01-01

    The previous studies reported that the tumor suppressor protein (P53) is not functioning correctly in most human cancers, and that it plays a crucial role in the prevention of tumor development. This study was designed to evaluate if exposure to fractionated dose of gamma radiation impair function of P53 by the administration of antioxidants. Group of control mice was used. Another groups treated with 3 mg/mouse/day of Antox drug which contains the three main antioxidant vitamins (A, C, and E) together with trace element selenium for 15 days. Another group subjected to 1 Gy of gamma radiation 5 times every other day either alone or combined with the Antox drug supplementation. Hepatic and renal functions were evaluated. Antioxidant markers (MDA and GSH) levels, histopathological changes and P53 expression were recorded in liver and kidney tissues. Animals treated with Antox showed some increase in liver transaminases, non significant changes in total protein and albumin levels, a non significant change in kidney function profiles, a non significant increase in MDA and a significant increase in GSH levels in liver and kidney tissues. However, the exposure of mice to fractionated dose of gamma radiation led to a significant increase in kidney function profiles, AST and ALT activity, a significant decrease in total protein and albumin level, a significant increase in MDA levels and a significant decrease in GSH levels in liver and kidney were observed. Exposure of experimental animals post treatment with Antox drug to fractionated dose of gamma radiation revealed a significant amelioration in liver and kidney function profiles, a highly significant decrease in MDA levels and a significant increase in GSH level in comparison with irradiated group. Histopathological changes in liver and kidney recorded the same alterations observed with the biochemical parameters. P53 expression negatively expressed in normal liver and kidney tissues. However, the exposure of mice to

  5. The hemodynamic effects of spinal block with low dose of bupivacaine and sufentanil in patients with low myocardial ejection fraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Sanatkar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effect of spinal block with low dose of bupivacaine and sufentanil on patients with low cardiac output who underwent lower limb surgery. Fifteen patients who had ejection fraction less than 40% (group 1 were compared with 65 cases with ejection fraction more than 40% (group 2 in our study. Our subjects underwent spinal block with 7.5 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% and 5 µg sufentanil. We recorded early events such as hypotension, bradycardia, vasopressor need and ST segment change in our cases. The average mean arterial pressure decreased 13% (110 mmHg to 95.7 mmHg in group 1 and 20% (160 mmHg to 128 mmHg in group 2 (P<0.001. Hypotension due to spinal anesthesia was observed in none of our subjects in both groups and none of our cases need to vasopressor support. All patients remained alert, and no ST segment changes were observed in two groups. In our study none of subjects complained of pain intraoperatively. The subjects were without complaints during the spinal anesthetic in both groups. Spinal block with low dose local anesthetic and sufentanil was a safe and effective method for lower limb surgery in patients with low ejection fraction.

  6. What minimum number of fractions is required with high dose-rate remote afterloading; and reply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orton, C.G.

    1987-01-01

    The author presents 'a more rigorous application of the linear quadratic model for protracted radiotherapy than Dale (1985)' and demonstrates that considerably fewer than 17 fractions are needed, a conclusion particularly relevant to treatment of cancer of the cervix. Dale's reply is based on the tenet that Orton has misquoted the use of the damage repair constants. (UK)

  7. Integrated immunogenicity analysis of a tetravalent dengue vaccine up to 4 y after vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigne, Claire; Dupuy, Martin; Richetin, Aline; Guy, Bruno; Jackson, Nicholas; Bonaparte, Matthew; Hu, Branda; Saville, Melanie; Chansinghakul, Danaya; Noriega, Fernando; Plennevaux, Eric

    2017-09-02

    Two large pivotal phase III studies demonstrated the efficacy of the tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV; Dengvaxia®, Sanofi Pasteur) against all dengue serotypes. Here we present an unprecedented integrated summary of the immunogenicity of CYD-TDV to identify the parameters driving the neutralizing humoral immune response and evolution over time. We summarized the immunogenicity profiles of a 3-dose schedule of CYD-TDV administered 6 months apart across 10 phase II and 6 phase III trials undertaken in dengue endemic and non-endemic countries. Dengue neutralizing antibody titers in sera were determined at centralized laboratories using the 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT 50 ) at baseline, 28 d after the third dose, and annually thereafter for up to 4 y after the third dose in some studies. CYD-TDV elicits neutralizing antibody responses against all 4 dengue serotypes; geometric mean titers (GMTs) increased from baseline to post-dose 3. GMTs were influenced by several parameters including age, baseline dengue seropositivity and region. In the 2 pivotal studies, GMTs decreased initially during the first 2 y post-dose 3 but appear to stabilize or slightly increase again in the third year. GMTs persisted 1.2-3.2-fold higher than baseline levels for up to 4 y post-dose 3 in other studies undertaken in dengue endemic countries. Our integrated analysis captures the fullness of the CYD-TDV immunogenicity profile across studies, age groups and regions; by presenting the available data in this way general trends and substantial outliers within each grouping can be easily identified. CYD-TDV elicits neutralizing antibody responses against all dengue serotypes, with differences by age and endemicity, which persist above baseline levels in endemic countries.

  8. Effect of Fractionated Low Doses of Gamma Radiation on Some Haematological and Immunological Parameters in Albino Rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahgat, M.M.; Abdel-Khalek, L.G.

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed on 30 mature male albino rats to evaluate the direct effect of fractionated low doses (0.5 Gy twice weekly) gamma radiation and delayed effect (one month post-irradiation) on some haematological and immunological parameters. The rats were divided into three equal groups, Control and two whole body gamma-irradiated groups the irradiated groups were subjected to total doses of 4 and 8 Grays over a period of one and two months, respectively. The blood samples and peritoneal macrophages were taken twice from each irradiated rats at the end of their irradiation period and after one month post irradiation. Activated peritoneal macrophages in all groups showed significant decrease as compared to control group denoting that irradiation may cause receptor alteration and/or decrease in the phagocytic power of macrophages lasting for a longer time. Throughout the whole experiment there was wide variation in platelet count with no significant or minimal changes in other blood elements. Moreover, in the post irradiation group after two months irradiation, all the haematological parameters tested, except the Hct, were increased as compared to the control group. These results pointed to that the bone marrow and lymphoid organs of the animals can tolerate fractionated low dose irradiation through rapid recovery and/or compensatory stimulation. The presence of many target cells in the post irradiated group increases the red blood cell fragility

  9. Atomistic Simulation of Intrinsic Defects and Trivalent and Tetravalent Ion Doping in Hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo D. S. Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomistic simulation techniques have been employed in order to investigate key issues related to intrinsic defects and a variety of dopants from trivalent and tetravalent ions. The most favorable intrinsic defect is determined to be a scheme involving calcium and hydroxyl vacancies. It is found that trivalent ions have an energetic preference for the Ca site, while tetravalent ions can enter P sites. Charge compensation is predicted to occur basically via three schemes. In general, the charge compensation via the formation of calcium vacancies is more favorable. Trivalent dopant ions are more stable than tetravalent dopants.

  10. Low-dose fractionated whole-body irradiation in the treatment of advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, N.C.; Timothy, A.R.; Kaufman, S.D.; Carey, R.W.; Aisenberg, A.C.

    1979-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients with advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (38 patients with lymphocytic lymphoma and 1 patient with mixed lymphocytic and histiocytic lymphoma) were treated by fractionated low dose whole body irradiation (WBI) with a minimum follow-up of 8 months. Twenty-eight patients had no previous treatment and the other 11 patients were in relapse after previous chemotherapy or regional radiotherapy. There were 20 and 19 patients in stages III and IV groups, respectively. The majority of patients (31) had nodular histology; diffuse lymphocytic lymphoma was present in 8 patients (Rappaport criteria) (9). Constitutional symptoms were present in 10 patients. Thirty-three (85%) attained complete remission (CR) with median duration of remission 24 months. Actuarial survival was 78% and 74% at 3 and 4 years. However, relapse free survival was 26% at 3 and 4 years. A prospective randomized trial to compare 10 vs. 15 rad per fraction of fractionated WBI schedules (the same total dose 150 rad) demonstrated no difference in response rate, response duration, and median nadir platelet or WBC counts between the two schedules. Supplement radiotherapy to bulky tumor site prevented local recurrence, but did not influence survival or duration or remission. Major toxicity was thrombocytopenia with median nadir platelet counts 77,000/mm 3 (11,000 to 170,000/mm 3 ). Five of 6 patients with diffuse lymphocytic poorly differentiated lymphoma attained CR. However, their median survival was 30 months which is much shorter than that of nodular lymphoma. Constitutional symptoms and advanced stage (stage IV) were associated with shorter duration of remission. Response of patients in relapse after WBI to subsequent chemotherapy +- local radiotherapy was CR in 50% and PR in 40%. Fractionated whole body irradiation is an excellent systemic induction agent for advanced lymphocytic and mixed lymphoma

  11. Biodistribution and safety of a live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine in the cynomolgus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, Guillaume; Mantel, Nathalie; Silvano, Jeremy; Rogue, Alexandra; Guy, Bruno; Jackson, Nicholas; Burdin, Nicolas

    2017-10-13

    The first licensed dengue vaccine is a recombinant, live, attenuated, tetravalent dengue virus vaccine (CYD-TDV; Sanofi Pasteur). This study assessed the biodistribution, shedding, and toxicity of CYD-TDV in a non-human primate model as part of the nonclinical safety assessment program for the vaccine. Cynomolgus monkeys were given one subcutaneous injection of either one human dose (5log 10 CCID 50 /serotype) of CYD-TDV or saline control. Study endpoints included clinical observations, body temperature, body weight, food consumption, clinical pathology, immunogenicity, and post-mortem examinations including histopathology. Viral load, distribution, persistence, and shedding in tissues and body fluids were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The subcutaneous administration of CYD-TDV was well tolerated. There were no toxicological findings other than expected minor local reactions at the injection site. A transient low level of CYD-TDV viral RNA was detected in blood and the viral genome was identified primarily at the injection site and in the draining lymph nodes following immunization. These results, together with other data from repeat-dose toxicity and neurovirulence studies, confirm the absence of toxicological concern with CYD-TDV and corroborate clinical study observations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Geochemical modelling of the sorption of tetravalent radioelements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, K.A.; Tweed, C.J.

    1991-05-01

    The results of an experimental study of the sorption of a range of tetravalent radioelements, plutonium (IV), tin (IV), thorium(IV) and uranium(IV), onto clay at pH8 and pH11 have been successfully simulated using a triple layer sorption model. The model has been incorporated into HARPHRQ, a geochemical program based on PHREEQE. The model has been parameterised using data for sorption onto ferric oxyhydroxide and goethite. The effects of hydroxycarboxylic acids on the sorption process have also been investigated experimentally. It was generally observed that in the presence of 2x10 -3 M gluconate, sorption was reduced by up two orders of magnitude. The model has satisfactorily simulated these lower sorptivities, through assuming competing sorption and complexation reactions. This work, therefore, further confirms the need to take account of such organic materials in safety assessment modelling. (author)

  13. Relative effect of dose-rate values and fractionation on late responding tissues and tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malgieri, F.

    1995-01-01

    There are currently available different facilities for radiotherapy also with regard to the dose-rate values (in the ranges LDR - MDR - HDR), sometimes used alternatively or subsequently for the same tumour. We have set up a 'unitary' L-Q model, based on Liversage's and Dale's works, that explicitly include also the dose-rate value and a correction factor of the β parameter depending on the sublethal damage repair time constant, on the length of time of each irradiation and on the time interval between following irradiation for to realize the effect of the incomplete repair when the time interval is short as, for example, in the PLDR. This 'unitary' L-Q model is, of course, usable in the same way both for external beam therapy and for curietherapy and make possible to compute and compare, for each kind of tumour and normal tissue, the relative effect of the different available modality of radiotherapy also with regard to the dose-rate. We show and discuss the resulting relationships of the ratio BED 'late'/BED tumour changing the time-dose parameters and the values of the biological characteristic parameters T p , α/β and μ, for defined size of tumour control and different value of the doserate

  14. Radiation therapy in cancer patients with psoriasis. The fractionated daily dose and the Koebner phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Yosef, Rami; Soyfer, Vyacheslav; Vexler, Akiva

    2005-01-01

    Skin side effects following XRT take place more often in patients with skin disorders. In this study six patients with psoriatic lesions were evaluated. The total/daily XRT dose to the tumor site was 50-70/1.8-2.0 Gy. No debilitating effect of XRT was observed in both the psoriatic lesions and in the surrounding normal skin

  15. Fractionated dose skews differentiation of Glial progenitor cells into immature oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, with lower mature oligodendrocytes formation, as compared to singe low dose of low and high LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Zina; Pena, Louis; Naidu, Mamta

    2010-01-01

    In the proposed study, the effect of fractionated, low dose versus single low dose of low LET X-rays and charged particles on induction of base excision repair enzyme Apurinic Endonuclease-1 (Ape1) are determined, which is known to inhibit cell differentiation, and found that at lower doses of 10,25 and 50 cGy there was a very significant induction of Apel which correlated to number of fractions, whereas at 100 cGy this induction was significantly lower. Also, there was a clear correlation between increase in fractions and higher immature OL and astrocyte formation

  16. A generalised formulation of the 'incomplete-repair' model for cell survival and tissue response to fractionated low dose-rate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, P.; Joiner, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    A generalized equation for cell survival or tissue effects after fractionated low dose-rate irradiations, when there is incomplete repair between fractions and significant repair during fractions, is derived in terms of the h- and g-functions of the 'incomplete-repair' (IR) model. The model is critically dependent on α/β, repair half-time, treatment time and interfraction interval, and should therefore be regarded primarily as a tool for the analysis of fractionation and dose-rate effects in carefully designed radiobiological experiments, although it should also be useful in exploring, in a general way, the feasibility of clinical treatment protocols using fractionated low dose-rate treatments. (author)

  17. Low-dose fractionated percutaneous teletherapy in age-related macular degeneration with subfoveolar neovascularization - 3 year results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schittkowski, M.; Schneider, H.; Guthoff, R.; Grueschow, K.; Ziegler, P.G.; Fietkau, R.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of low dose fractionated percutaneous teletherapy to visual acuity and the changes in subfoveolar neovascular membranes in age-related macular degeneration were investigated. Patients and Method: 126 eyes of 118 patients (age 55-89 years; mean 74 ys.) were treated. Best distal and near visual acuity was assessed prior to (= initial visual acuity [IVA]) and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months after teletherapy. Fluorescein angiography was performed prior to and 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after radiation therapy. For analysis patients were divided into different groups by IVA and membrane size. Maximal duration of observation was 36 months. Teletherapy was done by a 9-MeV photon linear accelerator through a lateral port in half-beam technique with a single dose of 2 Gy up to a total dose of 20 Gy within 12 days. Results: No severe negative side effects have been observed. Eight patients reported of epiphora and four patients complained of transient sicca syndrome. Visual acuity decreased more than one line in the group IVA 0.05-0.2. The group IVA 0.3-0.5 remained unchanged for 1 year. We found a tendency for increased visual acuity in group IVA ≥ 0.6 for 18 months. After that time both groups showed decreased visual acuity, but all these patients reported of reduced metamorphopsia and increased color and contrast perception. Conclusions: There is an influence of low dose fractionated percutaneous teletherapy on visual acuity, subfoveal neovascular membranes and metamorphopsia. IVA and duration of anamnesis play an important role. There seems to be no persistent effect; possibly increased dosage will bring a benefit. (orig.) [de

  18. Attached, unattached fraction of progeny concentrations and equilibrium factor for dose assessments from {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Parminder; Saini, Komal; Bajwa, Bikramjit Singh [Guru Nanak Dev University, Department of Physics, Amritsar, Punjab (India); Mishra, Rosaline; Sahoo, Bijay Kumar [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Mumbai (India)

    2016-08-15

    In this study, measurements of indoor radon ({sup 222}Rn), thoron ({sup 220}Rn) and their equilibrium equivalent concentration (EEC) were carried out in 96 dwellings from 22 different villages situated in Hamirpur district, Himachal Pradesh, India, by using LR-115 type II-based pinhole twin cup dosimeters and deposition-based progeny sensors (DRPS/DTPS). The annual average indoor {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn concentrations observed in these dwellings were 63.82 and 89.59 Bq/m{sup 3}, respectively, while the average EEC (attached + unattached) for {sup 222}Rn and {sup 220}Rn was 29.28 and 2.74 Bq/m{sup 3}. For {sup 222}Rn (f{sub Rn}) and {sup 220}Rn (f{sub Tn}), the average values of unattached fraction were 0.11 and 0.09, respectively. The equilibrium factors for radon (F{sub Rn}) and thoron (F{sub Tn}) varied from 0.12 to 0.77 with an average of 0.50, and from 0.01 to 0.34 with an average of 0.05, respectively. The annual inhalation dose due to mouth and nasal breathing was calculated using dose conversion factors and unattached fractions. The indoor annual effective doses for {sup 222}Rn (AEDR) and {sup 220}Rn (AEDT) were found to be 1.92 and 0.83 mSv a{sup -1}, respectively. The values of {sup 222}Rn/{sup 220}Rn concentrations and annual effective doses obtained in the present study are within the safe limits as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for indoor dwelling exposure conditions. (orig.)

  19. Effects of local single and fractionated X-ray doses on rat bone marrow blood flow and red blood cell volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, M.A.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Time and dose dependent changes in blood flow and red blood cell volume were studied in the locally irradiated bone marrow of the rat femur after single and fractionated doses of X-rays. With the single dose of 10 Gy the bone marrow blood flow although initially reduced returned to the control levels by seven months after irradiation. With doses >=15 Gy the blood flow was still significantly reduced at seven months. The total dose levels predicted by the nominal standard dose equation for treatments in three, six or nine fractions produced approximately the same degree of reduction in the bone marrow blood flow seven months after the irradiation. However, the fall in the red blood cell volume was from 23 to 37% greater in the three fractions groups compared with that in the nine fractions groups. Using the red blood cell volume as a parameter the nominal standard dose formula underestimated the severity of radiation damage in rat bone marrow at seven months for irradiation with small numbers of large dose fractions. (orig.) [de

  20. Expression profiling of murine lung 70 days following exposure to fractionated or acute dose of 1.0 Gy 56Fe- particle irradiation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Irradiation of the K-rasLA1 mouse model with a fractionated dose of 1.0Gy 56Fe- particles increases the incidence of invasive carcinoma compared to unirradiated...

  1. A model of cardiovascular disease giving a plausible mechanism for the effect of fractionated low-dose ionizing radiation exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark P Little

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the main cause of coronary heart disease and stroke, the two major causes of death in developed society. There is emerging evidence of excess risk of cardiovascular disease at low radiation doses in various occupationally exposed groups receiving small daily radiation doses. Assuming that they are causal, the mechanisms for effects of chronic fractionated radiation exposures on cardiovascular disease are unclear. We outline a spatial reaction-diffusion model for atherosclerosis and perform stability analysis, based wherever possible on human data. We show that a predicted consequence of multiple small radiation doses is to cause mean chemo-attractant (MCP-1 concentration to increase linearly with cumulative dose. The main driver for the increase in MCP-1 is monocyte death, and consequent reduction in MCP-1 degradation. The radiation-induced risks predicted by the model are quantitatively consistent with those observed in a number of occupationally-exposed groups. The changes in equilibrium MCP-1 concentrations with low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration are also consistent with experimental and epidemiologic data. This proposed mechanism would be experimentally testable. If true, it also has substantive implications for radiological protection, which at present does not take cardiovascular disease into account. The Japanese A-bomb survivor data implies that cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality contribute similarly to radiogenic risk. The major uncertainty in assessing the low-dose risk of cardiovascular disease is the shape of the dose response relationship, which is unclear in the Japanese data. The analysis of the present paper suggests that linear extrapolation would be appropriate for this endpoint.

  2. Doses and fractionation schemes to be employed in clinical trials of high-LET radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    An improvement in local tumour control of 20% would require 2 x 130 cases in order that nine trials out of ten should show the difference at a significant level. If the improvement is 30% only 2 x 55 patients are required. However, the detection of increased normal tissue complications requires larger number of patients than this, e.g. 2 x 150 if the increase is from 5% to 15%. The use of two dose levels on the neutron side in a clinical trial would enable definitive data to be obtained in, say, 6 years with 300 patients, instead of 10 years with 400 patients if only one dose level were used. (author)

  3. Plant-expressed Fc-fusion protein tetravalent dengue vaccine with inherent adjuvant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Young; Copland, Alastair; Nayak, Kaustuv; Chandele, Anmol; Ahmed, Muhammad S; Zhang, Qibo; Diogo, Gil R; Paul, Matthew J; Hofmann, Sven; Yang, Moon-Sik; Jang, Yong-Suk; Ma, Julian K-C; Reljic, Rajko

    2017-12-09

    Dengue is a major global disease requiring improved treatment and prevention strategies. The recently licensed Sanofi Pasteur Dengvaxia vaccine does not protect children under the age of nine, and additional vaccine strategies are thus needed to halt this expanding global epidemic. Here, we employed a molecular engineering approach and plant expression to produce a humanized and highly immunogenic poly-immunoglobulin G scaffold (PIGS) fused to the consensus dengue envelope protein III domain (cEDIII). The immunogenicity of this IgG Fc receptor-targeted vaccine candidate was demonstrated in transgenic mice expressing human FcγRI/CD64, by induction of neutralizing antibodies and evidence of cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, these molecules were able to prime immune cells from human adenoid/tonsillar tissue ex vivo as evidenced by antigen-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T-cell proliferation, IFN-γ and antibody production. The purified polymeric fraction of dengue PIGS (D-PIGS) induced stronger immune activation than the monomeric form, suggesting a more efficient interaction with the low-affinity Fcγ receptors on antigen-presenting cells. These results show that the plant-expressed D-PIGS have the potential for translation towards a safe and easily scalable single antigen-based tetravalent dengue vaccine. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy and single high-dose radiosurgery for acoustic neuroma: early results of a prospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, O.W.M.; Wolbers, J.G.; Baayen, J.C.; Slotman, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess the local control and toxicity rate in acoustic neuroma patients treated with linear accelerator-based radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 37 consecutive patients treated with stereotactic radiation therapy for acoustic neuroma. All patients had progressive tumors, progressive symptoms, or both. Mean tumor diameter was 2.3 cm (range 0.8-3.3) on magnetic resonance (MR) scan. Dentate patients were given a dose of 5 x 4 Gy or 5 x 5 Gy and edentate patients were given a dose of 1 x 10 Gy or 1 x 12.50 Gy prescribed to the 80% isodose. All patients were treated with a single isocenter. Results: With a mean follow-up period of 25 months (range 12-61), the actuarial local control rate at 5 years was 91% (only 1 patient failed). The actuarial rate of hearing preservation at 5 years was 66% in previously-hearing patients. The actuarial rate of freedom from trigeminal nerve toxicity was 97% at 5 years. No patient developed facial nerve toxicity or other complications. Conclusion: In this unselected series, fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy and linear accelerator-based radiosurgery give excellent local control in acoustic neuroma. It combines a high rate of preservation of hearing with a very low rate of other toxicity, although follow-up is relatively short

  5. Modification of UV-induced mutation frequencies in Chinese hamster- cells by dose fractionation, cycloheximide and caffeine treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.-C.; Schultz, R.; Trosko, J.E.; D'Ambrosio, S.M.; Setlow, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Chinese hamster (V79) cells were irradiated with a fractionated regime of ultraviolet light (UV 1 +UV 2 ). The fractionation of a UV dose always increased the colony-forming ability but reduced (or it did not change) the mutation frequencies. Treatment with cycloheximide between the two UV irradiations resulted in two types of effects, depending on the protocols used. Long exposures to cycloheximide (i.e., >6h) for the entire period between UV 1 and UV 2 or partial treatment of cycloheximide (i.e., 3h) long before UV 2 always resulted in reduced colony-forming ability and enhanced or unchanged mutation frequencies. Exposure to cycloheximide for the entire period in the short fractionated regime (i.e., 4h) between UV 1 and UV 2 or partial treatment of cycloheximide just prior to UV 2 tended to give the opposite effects. Caffeine treatment before UV 2 , with or without UV 1 , significantly increased the mutation frequencies. These results suggest that an error-free postreplication repair system exists in Chinese hamster cells which is inhibitable by particular cycloheximide or caffeine treatments. (Auth.)

  6. Dose fractionation effects in plateau-phase cultures of C3H 10T1/2 cells and their transformed counterparts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, E.M.; Bedford, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    A comparison of γ-ray dose fractionation effects was made using plateau-phase cultures of C3H 10T1/2 cells and their transformed counterparts in an attempt to simulate basically similar populations of cells that differ primarily in their turnover rates. The status of cell populations with respect to their turnover rates may be an important factor influencing dose fractionation effects in early- and late-responding tissues. In this cell culture system, the rate of cell turnover was approximately three times higher for the plateau-phase transformed cultures. While the single acute dose survival curves for log-phase cells were indistinguishable, there were significant differences between the survival curves for plateau-phase cultures of the two cell types. Both cell lines had a similar capacity for repair of sublethal damage, but untransformed cells had a much greater capacity to repair potentially lethal damage in plateau phase. Multifraction survival curves were determined for both cell lines for doses per fraction ranging from 9.0 to 0.8 Gy, and from these isoeffect curves of log total dose versus dose per fraction were derived. The isoeffect curve for the slowly cycling, untransformed cells was found to be appreciably steeper than that for the more rapidly cycling transformed cells, a finding consistent with previously reported differences in dose fractionation isoeffect curves for early- and late-responding tissues in vivo

  7. nduced hyperlipidemic rats. Methods: Column chromatographic fractionation of butanol fraction of total methanol extract of leaves of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. yields four sub-fractions (sub-fraction A-D. All sub-fractions tested for their anti-hyperlipidemic activity. Sub-fractions administered at a dose of 65 mg/kg (oral to the Triton WR-1339 induced hyperlipidemic rats and total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL and VLDL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Kumar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect and evaluation of Anti-hyperlipidemic activity guided subfraction isolated from total methanolic extract of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. leaves on Triton WR-1339 induced hyperlipidemic rats. Methods: Column chromatographic fractionation of butanol fraction of total methanol extract of leaves of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. yields four subfractions (sub-fraction A-D. All sub-fractions tested for their anti-hyperlipidemic activity. Subfractions administered at a dose of 65 mg/kg (oral to the Triton WR-1339 induced hyperlipidemic rats and total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL and VLDL level in the blood were checked. Results: Sub-fraction D showed significant reduction (P<0.05 among four sub-fraction in comparison with standard drug fenofibrate. Conclusions: From the above study it could be concluded that butanol sub-fraction D of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. not only have resulted in significant reduction in cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, VLDL level but also increases the HDL level at a reduced dose level.

  8. SU-F-T-01: Optimization of the Accelerated Partial Breast Brachytherapy Fractionation with Consideration of Physical Doses to Tumor and Organ at Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, W; Huq, M [University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with brachytherapy prescribes 34Gy to be delivered in 10 fractions over 5 consecutive working days without considering the physical dose to the target and organs at risk (OARs) for an individual patient. The purpose of this study is to optimize the fractionation scheme by evaluating the radiation effect on tumor and OARs with a modified linear-quadratic (LQ) model based on dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Methods: Five breast patients treated with multilumen balloon brachytherapy were selected. The minimum skin and rib spacing were ranged from 2.5mm to 14.3mm and from 1.0mm to 25.0mm, respectively. The LQ model parameters were set as: (1) breast: α=0.08, β=0.028, doubling time Tpot=14.4 days, and starting time Tk=21days; (2) skin: acute reaction α=0.101, β=0.009; late reaction α=0.064, β=0.029; (3) rib: α=0.3, β=0.12. Boundary dose Dt was 6 Gy for both target and OARs. The relation between radiation effects on the tumor (ET) and OARs (EOAR) were plotted for fraction number from 1 to 20. Results: The value of radiation effect from routine 3.4Gyx10 fractions was used as reference, ETref and EOARref. If set ET=ETref, the fractionation that results in minimum EOAR values correspond to the optimal fractionation. For these patients, the optimal numbers are 10 fractions for skin acute reaction, 18 fractions for skin and rib late reaction while the doses per fraction are 3.4Gy and 2.05–2.10Gy, respectively. If set EOAR=EOARref, the fractionation that results in a maximum ET value corresponds to the optimal fractionation. The optimal fractionation is 3.4Gyx10 fractions for skin acute reaction, and 2.10–2.25Gyx18 fractions for skin late reaction and rib. Conclusion: For APBI brachytherapy, the routine 3.4Gyx10 fractions is optimal fractionation for skin acute reaction, while 2.05–2.25Gyx18 fractions is optimal fractionation for late reaction of skin and rib.

  9. Modification of the biologic dose to normal tissue by daily fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollin, M; Kagan, A R [Southern California Permanente Medical Group, Los Angeles Calif. (USA). Dep. of Radiation Therapy

    1976-12-01

    A method to predict normal tissue injury is proposed that includes high daily doses and unusual times successfully by calculating a new value called BIR (Biologic Index of Reaction). BIR and NSD were calculated for various normal tissue reactions. With the aid of statistical correlation techniques it is found that the BIR model is better than the NSD model in predicting radiation myelopathy and vocal edema and as good as NSD IN PREDICTING RIB FRACTURE/ Neither model predicts pericardial effusion. In no case were the results of BIR inferior to those of NSD.

  10. Dose-rate effects in synchronous mammalian cells in culture. II. A comparison of the life cycle of HeLa cells during continuous irradiation or multiple-dose fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.B.; Bedford, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    The life cycle of synchronized S3 HeLa cells was examined during continuous irradiation at a dose rate of approximately 37 rad/hr and during multiple dose fractionation schedules of the same average dose rate (total dose / overall time = average dose rate). For all regimes given at this dose rate the effects on the life cyclee were similar. Cells progressed through G1 and S without appreciable delay and experienced a minimum G2 delay of about 10 hr. Cells eventually entered mitosis but virtually none were able to complete a successful division

  11. In vivo assessment of the tolerance dose of small liver volumes after single-fraction HDR irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricke, Jens; Seidensticker, Max; Luedemann, Lutz; Pech, Maciej; Wieners, Gero; Hengst, Susanne; Mohnike, Konrad; Cho, Chie Hee; Lopez Haenninen, Enrique; Al-Abadi, Hussain; Felix, Roland; Wust, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively assess a dose-response relationship for small volumes of liver parenchyma after single-fraction irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five liver metastases were treated by computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial brachytherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed 1 day before and 3 days and 6, 12, and 24 weeks after therapy. MR sequences included T1-w gradient echo (GRE) enhanced by hepatocyte-targeted gadobenate dimeglumine. All MRI data sets were merged with 3D dosimetry data and evaluated by two radiologists. The reviewers indicated the border of hyperintensity on T2-w images (edema) or hypointensity on T1-w images (loss of hepatocyte function). Based on the total 3D data, a dose-volume histogram was calculated. We estimated the threshold dose for either edema or function loss as the D 90 , i.e., the dose achieved in at least 90% of the pseudolesion volume. Results: Between 3 days and 6 weeks, the extension of the edema increased significantly from the 12.9 Gy isosurface to 9.9 Gy (standard deviation [SD], 3.3 and 2.6). No significant change was detected between 6 and 12 weeks. After 24 weeks, the edematous tissue had shrunk significantly to 14.7 Gy (SD, 4.2). Three days postbrachytherapy, the D 90 for hepatocyte function loss reached the 14.9 Gy isosurface (SD, 3.9). At 6 weeks, the respective zone had increased significantly to 9.9 Gy (SD, 2.3). After 12 and 24 weeks, the dysfunction volume had decreased significantly to the 11.9 Gy and 15.2 Gy isosurface, respectively (SD, 3 and 4.1). Conclusions: The 95% interval from 7.6 to 12.2 Gy found as the minimal hepatocyte tolerance after 6 weeks accounts for the radiobiologic variations found in CT-guided brachytherapy, including heterogeneous dose rates by variable catheter arrays

  12. Concurrent cisplatin, infusional fluorouracil, and conventionally fractionated radiation therapy in head and neck cancer: Dose-limiting mucosal toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denham, J.W.; Abbott, R.L. (Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia))

    1991-03-01

    After a preliminary dose-finding study involving 12 patients with advanced or locally recurrent head and neck cancer, 27 patients were treated on a phase II protocol, using fluorouracil 350 mg/m2/d by continuous intravenous (IV) infusion over 5 days, followed on the sixth day by a 2-hour IV infusion of cisplatin 50 mg/m2, administered during the first and fourth weeks of radiation therapy to total doses between 60 and 64 Gy, using 2 Gy daily fractions. Eight of these 27 patients had American Joint Committee on Cancer Staging (AJCC) stage III disease, and 12 had stage IV disease. Four had recurrent disease after surgery. Three-year follow-up is now available. Twenty-one (77.8%) remitted completely following treatment, and 11 remain free of local and regional relapse at 3 years. Four have developed systemic metastases. Following successful salvage treatment in two cases, estimated determinate survival at 3 years is 64%. Acute toxicity was manageable with this regime. Eleven instances of grade 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) mucositis were observed, which caused interruptions to radiotherapy in only four cases. No late sequelae have so far been recorded. It is concluded that the protocol described is tolerable but probably did not cause a greater number of locoregional cures than would have been expected following conventional radiotherapy alone in this group of patients. The use of infusional fluorouracil with concurrent conventionally fractionated radiation therapy and cisplatin infusion results in mucositis that limits the dose of fluorouracil to levels that are probably subtherapeutic.

  13. Dose fractionated gamma knife radiosurgery for large arteriovenous malformations on daily or alternate day schedule outside the linear quadratic model: Proof of concept and early results. A substitute to volume fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Kanchan Kumar; Kumar, Narendra; Tripathi, Manjul; Oinam, Arun S; Ahuja, Chirag K; Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Kapoor, Rakesh; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Kaur, Rupinder; Bhatt, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of dose fractionated gamma knife radiosurgery (DFGKRS) on a daily schedule beyond the linear quadratic (LQ) model, for large volume arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Between 2012-16, 14 patients of large AVMs (median volume 26.5 cc) unsuitable for surgery or embolization were treated in 2-3 of DFGKRS sessions. The Leksell G frame was kept in situ during the whole procedure. 86% (n = 12) patients had radiologic evidence of bleed, and 43% (n = 6) had presented with a history of seizures. 57% (n = 8) patients received a daily treatment for 3 days and 43% (n = 6) were on an alternate day (2 fractions) regimen. The marginal dose was split into 2 or 3 fractions of the ideal prescription dose of a single fraction of 23-25 Gy. The median follow up period was 35.6 months (8-57 months). In the three-fraction scheme, the marginal dose ranged from 8.9-11.5 Gy, while in the two-fraction scheme, the marginal dose ranged from 11.3-15 Gy at 50% per fraction. Headache (43%, n = 6) was the most common early postoperative complication, which was controlled with short course steroids. Follow up evaluation of at least three years was achieved in seven patients, who have shown complete nidus obliteration in 43% patients while the obliteration has been in the range of 50-99% in rest of the patients. Overall, there was a 67.8% reduction in the AVM volume at 3 years. Nidus obliteration at 3 years showed a significant rank order correlation with the cumulative prescription dose (p 0.95, P value 0.01), with attainment of near-total (more than 95%) obliteration rates beyond 29 Gy of the cumulative prescription dose. No patient receiving a cumulative prescription dose of less than 31 Gy had any severe adverse reaction. In co-variate adjusted ordinal regression, only the cumulative prescription dose had a significant correlation with common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) severity (P value 0.04), independent of age, AVM volume

  14. The influence of single and fractionated dose external beam irradiation on injury-induced arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, U.; Micke, O.; Dorszewski, A.; Breithardt, G.; Willich, N.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Restenosis after catheter-based revascularization has been demonstrated to be primarily caused by smooth muscle cell proliferation. This study examined the effects of external beam irradiation on neointimal proliferation after external injury to the central artery of the rabbit ear. Materials and Methods: 40 male New Zealand White rabbits were used in this study. Crush lesions were performed on each ear under general anesthesia and bilateral auricular nerve blockade. A single dose of 12 Gy (n=10), 16 Gy (n=10), or 20 Gy (n=10) and a fractionated dose of 4 x 5 Gy (n=10) gamma radiation was delivered to the left or right central artery of the ear 24 hours after injury; the contralateral central artery served as control. All rabbits were sacrificed after twenty-one days and the central arteries of the ear were fixed for morphometric measurements. Results: Mean (± SD) neointimal area was 0.062 ± 0.005 mm 2 (12 Gy), 0.022 ± 0,005 mm 2 (16 Gy), 0,028 ± 0,006 mm 2 and 0.038 mm 2 ± 0,02 mm 2 (4 x 5 Gy) in irradiated arteries compared with 0,081 ± 0,009 mm 2 in the control group. Mean (±SD) luminal area was 0.049 ± 0.004 mm 2 (12 Gy), 0.059 ± 0.002 mm 2 (16 Gy), 0.072 ± 0,006 mm 2 (20 Gy) and 0.048 mm 2 ± 0,018 mm 2 (4 x 5 Gy) in irradiated arteries compared with 0,043 ± 0,008 mm 2 in the control group. The difference in neointimal and luminal area between control and irradiated arteries was significant (p<0.05) only for the 16 and 20 Gy group compared to control. Conclusion: We conclude that in this model, external beam X-ray irradiation was successful in reducing neointimal proliferation after injury of the central artery of the rabbit ear. The optimal dose seems to be a single dose of 16 Gy - 20 Gy. Only a less prominent effect was noted for a fractionated dose of 4 x 5 Gy. Whether this approach can be used successfully to inhibit restenosis in the clinical setting requires further investigation

  15. High-Dose, Single-Fraction Irradiation Rapidly Reduces Tumor Vasculature and Perfusion in a Xenograft Model of Neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jani, Ashish; Shaikh, Fauzia; Barton, Sunjay [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Willis, Callen [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Banerjee, Debarshi [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Mitchell, Jason [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Hernandez, Sonia L. [Department of Surgery, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Hei, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Kadenhe-Chiweshe, Angela [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamashiro, Darrell J. [Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Connolly, Eileen P., E-mail: epc2116@cumc.columbia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To characterize the effects of high-dose radiation therapy (HDRT) on neuroblastoma tumor vasculature, including the endothelial cell (EC)–pericyte interaction as a potential target for combined treatment with antiangiogenic agents. Methods and Materials: The vascular effects of radiation therapy were examined in a xenograft model of high-risk neuroblastoma. In vivo 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (3D-CEUS) imaging and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were performed. Results: HDRT significantly reduced tumor blood volume 6 hours after irradiation compared with the lower doses used in conventionally fractionated radiation. There was a 63% decrease in tumor blood volume after 12-Gy radiation compared with a 24% decrease after 2 Gy. Analysis of tumor vasculature by lectin angiography showed a significant loss of small vessel ends at 6 hours. IHC revealed a significant loss of ECs at 6 and 72 hours after HDRT, with an accompanying loss of immature and mature pericytes at 72 hours. Conclusions: HDRT affects tumor vasculature in a manner not observed at lower doses. The main observation was an early reduction in tumor perfusion resulting from a reduction of small vessel ends with a corresponding loss of endothelial cells and pericytes.

  16. Clinical evaluation of the hypoxic cytotoxin tirapazamine (SR-4233): phase I experience with repeated dose administration during fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, Steven L.; Spencer, Sharon; Mariscal, Carol; Wooten, Ann; Wheeler, Richard; Brown, J. Martin; Fisher, Cheryl; Roemeling, Reinhard von

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Regions of chronic or transient hypoxia are common in many human tumors and are thought to limit tumor cell killing and tumor control with conventional irradiation and some chemotherapeutic agents. Tirapazamine (3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine-1,4-di-N-oxide) forms a cytotoxic free radical during reductive metabolism in regions of hypoxia. In well oxygenated regions, the tirapazamine radical reacts with molecular oxygen to form the inactive parent drug. This results in markedly greater toxicity for hypoxic cells than for the well oxygenated cells that comprise most normal tissues. Tirapazamine increased the anti-tumor effects of single dose or fractionated irradiation or cis-platin chemotherapy in murine tumors,in vivo . This study evaluated the ability to repeat the administration of Tirapazamine during courses of fractionated irradiation in humans after an earlier phase I trial established a maximum tolerated dose of 390 mg per square meter of body surface area (mg/m 2 ) when given as a single dose with radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Between December 1993 and August 1995 22 patients with locally advanced or metastatic tumors of varying histology, normal renal, hepatic, and hematologic functions, and Karnofsky performance status ≥ 60 received repeated doses of Tirapazamine during a planned, 6 weeks course of standardly fractionated radiotherapy. After anti-emetic treatment with ondansetron (32 mg) and dexamethasone (16 mg), Tirapazamine was administered during a 2 hour intravenous infusion that ended from 30 to 90 minutes before a radiation treatment. Patients were monitored for acute toxicity during the course of treatment and for a minimum of one month after radiotherapy. Results: The study was initiated with three, biweekly doses of Tirapazamine at 330 mg/m 2 . Four of 7 patients who initiated treatment at this dose refused the second (1 patient) or third dose of Tirapazamine (3 patients). Two of the three patients who received three doses

  17. Reduction of Tetravalent Plutonium in the Presence of Acetohydroxamic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkac, Peter [Radiation Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Precek, Martin [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Paulenova, Alena [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) has been proposed as a salt-free stripping reagent in the modified PUREX process for the spent nuclear fuel re-processing. AHA is a capable reductant of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) and a strong complexant for tetravalent neptunium and plutonium; hence, its behavior must be studied in detail. For better characterization of the all relevant chemical processes and successful design of the future separation flowsheets it is important to predict the speciation and partitioning of Pu between the organic and aqueous phases in the proposed extraction systems containing acetohydroxamic acid. The hydrolytic instability of hydroxamic group under acidic conditions causes a slow degradation of AHA followed by formation of acetic acid and hydroxylamine which also acts as a reductant of Pu(IV). The complexes of Pu(IV) with AHA are very strong; however, under acidic conditions, the chelate ring prevents the acidic hydrolysis only temporarily. The decomposition of Pu-aceto-hydroxamate complex and reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) observed for these systems was investigated in the present paper. Reduction of Pu(IV) in the presence of AHA was monitored by Vis-NIR spectroscopy in the range of 400-700 nm. All complexes between Pu(IV) and AHA have a very intense absorption in this region; therefore, for a better resolution of spectra, all experiments were performed under low AHA:Pu ratios, where only two species, non-complexed Pu(IV) and Pu(IV)-mono-aceto-hydroxamate complex, are initially present in relevant concentrations. To characterize the rate and the reaction mechanism, spectra were collected as a function of time for different initial concentrations of reactants and analyzed at several wavelengths using the data on extinction coefficients for all absorbing species. The extinction coefficient for Pu(IV)-AHA complex was resolved by fitting the absorption spectra with the chemical equilibrium modeling software FITEQL 4.0. The analysis of the experimental data obtained

  18. Chemical interaction of tetravalent actinides simulators and the engineering barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chain, Pablo; Alba, Maria D.; Castro, Miguel A.; Pavon, Esperanza; Mar Orta, M.

    2010-01-01

    simulator with the engineering barrier at conditions close to those of the repository. The methodology used consists in the hydrothermal treatment of different natural bentonites, including FEBEX and MX-80 bentonites, with aqueous solutions of the mentioned tetravalent lanthanide elements at subcritical conditions. The reaction products have been analysed with the help of X-ray diffraction, MAS-NMR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that after the hydrothermal reaction two new phases containing zirconium have been formed, ZrSiO 4 and ZrO 2 , and their ratio depend on the nature of the bentonite. It demonstrates that the already explored chemical interaction between trivalent radionuclides and bentonite barrier is also possible with the tetravalent radionuclides. (authors)

  19. Comparison of patient-reported acute urinary and sexual toxicity scores in a 6- versus 2-fraction course of high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy monotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragab, Omar; Park, Sang-June; Zhang, Mingle; Wang, Jason; Velez, Maria; Demanes, David J.; Banerjee, Robyn; Patel, Shyamal; Kamrave, Mitchell

    2018-01-01

    To identify differences in acute urinary and sexual toxicity between a 6-fraction and 2-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy monotherapy regimen and correlate dosimetric constraints to short-term toxicity. A single institution retrospective study of 116 men with prostate cancer treated with HDR monotherapy from 2010 to 2015 was conducted. Eighty-one men had 7.25 Gy × 6-fractions and 35 men had 13.5 Gy × 2-fractions. Patients had two CT-planned implants spaced 1–2 weeks apart. Patient baseline characteristics, International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) and Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) scores were collected pre-treatment and 3, 6 and 12 months post-implantation. Mixed effect modelling was undertaken to compare baseline, 1–6 month and 7–12 month scores between groups. Poisson regression analysis was performed to correlate dosimetric constraints with acute toxicity. There was no difference between baseline and post-implantation IPSS scores between 6-fraction and 2-fraction groups. SHIM scores for men treated with 6-fractions had a steeper decline at 1–6 months, but resolved at 7–12 months. Pre-treatment alpha-blocker use correlated with worse short-term acute urinary toxicity. Worsened SHIM score correlated with increasing age, diabetes mellitus and androgen-deprivation therapy. In a dosimetric analysis of outcomes, prostate V150 dose and bladder wall (D01.cc, D1cc, D2cc) dose correlated with increased IPSS score. No increased acute genitourinary or sexual dysfunction has been observed in men when transitioning from 6-fraction to 2-fraction HDR monotherapy. A dosimetric correlation was found between the V150 and bladder wall doses for acute urinary toxicity. Future research should continue to standardize and validate dose constraints for prostate HDR monotherapy patients.

  20. Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine: A Review in the Prevention of Dengue Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lesley J

    2016-09-01

    Tetravalent, live-attenuated, dengue vaccine (Dengvaxia(®); CYD-TDV) is the first vaccine approved for the prevention of dengue disease caused by dengue virus (DENV) serotypes 1-4 in individuals aged 9-45 or 9-60 years living in high dengue endemic areas. This narrative review discusses the immunogenicity, protective efficacy, reactogenicity and safety of CYD-TDV in the prevention of dengue disease. In Latin American and Asian phase 3 trials in children and adolescents (n > 30,000), the recommended three-dose CYD-TDV regimen was efficacious in preventing virologically-confirmed dengue (VCD) during the period from 28 days after the last dose (month 13) to month 25, meeting the primary endpoint criteria. Protective efficacy against VCD in the respective individual trials was 60.8 and 56.5 % (primary analysis). During the 25-month active surveillance phase, CYD-TDV also provided protective efficacy against VCD, severe dengue, any grade of dengue haemorrhagic fever and VCD-related hospitalization in children aged 9 years and older. CYD-TDV was generally well tolerated, with no safety concerns identified after up to 4 years' follow-up (i.e. from post dose 1) in ongoing long-term studies. Based on evidence from the dengue clinical trial program, the WHO SAGE recommended that countries with high dengue endemicity consider introducing CYD-TDV as part of an integrated disease prevention strategy to lower disease burden. Pharmacoeconomic considerations will be pivotal to implementing dengue vaccination prevention strategies in these countries. The availability of a dengue vaccine is considered essential if the 2012 WHO global strategy targets for reducing the burden of dengue disease by 2020 are to be attained. Hence, CYD-TDV represents a major advance for the prevention of dengue disease in high dengue endemic regions.

  1. Radioimmunotherapy with Y-90-epratuzumab in patients with previously treated B-cell lymphoma. A fractionated dose-escalation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, O.; Cavallin-Stahl, E.; Tennvall, J.; Hindorf, C.; Olsson, T.; Strand, S.E.; Stenberg, L.; Wingardh, K.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Fractionated RIT may improve outcome by decreasing heterogeneity in absorbed dose and by increasing therapeutic window. The humanised anti-CD22 antibody, Epratuzumab, (Immunomedics, Inc., Morris Plains, NJ) can be given repeatedly with minimal risk of neutralising Ab (HAHA), making fractionated treatment with 90 Y-labelled epratuzumab possible. Materials and Methods: Patients with previously treated B-cell lymphoma received increasing number (2-4) of weekly infusions of 90 Y-epratuzumab. Patients received either 185 MBq/m 2 per infusion (group A), or, if they had a history of high-dose chemotherapy with stem-cell rescue, 92.5 MBq/m 2 per infusion (group B). The first infusion included 150 MBq of 111 Indium for scintigraphic verification of tumour targeting and dosimetry. 1.5 mg/kg epratuzumab was administered with each infusion. The treatment could be repeated once after 3 m. Results: Of 23 patients, 16 in group A and 6 in group B were evaluable for response. The RR in group A was 62% objective response (OR) and 25% CR/CRu. One patient in group B showed OR. OR was seen in aggressive and indolent lymphoma. Response was also long-lasting and event-free survival of patients showing CR/CRu was 14 to 25+ months. In group A all seven patient, receiving three infusions, showed less than grade 3 platelet and neutrophil toxicity, except for two patients suffering grade 3 neutropenia. Of five patients with 4 weekly infusions there were two patients with dose-limiting haematological toxicity (DLT), both recently treated with high dose cytosar before RIT. With criteria used the maximal tolerated dose was three infusions 185 MBq/m 2 . In group B no patient suffered DLT and one patient exhibited OR. Seven patients were retreated after 3 months with minor toxicity, but improvement in OR in two cases. No patient has developed HAHA. CD22 expression on tumour cells, as assessed by flow cytometry, is available in 18 of 22 patients. In group A, seven of eight patients with

  2. Ag29(BDT)12(TPP)4: A Tetravalent Nanocluster

    KAUST Repository

    AbdulHalim, Lina G.

    2015-06-24

    The bottom-up assembly of nanoparticles into diverse ordered solids is a challenge because it requires nanoparticles, which are often quasi-spherical, to have interaction anisotropy akin to atoms and molecules. Typically, anisotropy has been introduced by changing the shape of the inorganic nanoparticle core. Here, we present the design, self-assembly, optical properties and total structural determination of Ag29(BDT)12(TPP)4, an atomically precise tetravalent nanocluster (NC) (BDT: 1,3-benzenedithiols; TPP: triphenylphosphine). It features four unique tetrahedrally symmetrical binding surface sites facilitated by the supramolecular assembly of 12 BDT—wide footprint bidentate thiols—in the ligand shell. When each of these sites was selectively functionalized by a single phosphine ligand, particle stability, synthetic yield and the propensity to self-assemble into macroscopic crystals increased. The solid crystallized NCs have a substantially narrowed optical bandgap compared to that of the solution state, suggesting strong inter-particle electronic coupling occurs in the solid state.

  3. Ag29(BDT)12(TPP)4: A Tetravalent Nanocluster

    KAUST Repository

    AbdulHalim, Lina G.; Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa; Tang, Qing; Del Gobbo, Silvano; AbdulHalim, Rasha; Eddaoudi, Mohamed; Jiang, De-en; Bakr, Osman

    2015-01-01

    The bottom-up assembly of nanoparticles into diverse ordered solids is a challenge because it requires nanoparticles, which are often quasi-spherical, to have interaction anisotropy akin to atoms and molecules. Typically, anisotropy has been introduced by changing the shape of the inorganic nanoparticle core. Here, we present the design, self-assembly, optical properties and total structural determination of Ag29(BDT)12(TPP)4, an atomically precise tetravalent nanocluster (NC) (BDT: 1,3-benzenedithiols; TPP: triphenylphosphine). It features four unique tetrahedrally symmetrical binding surface sites facilitated by the supramolecular assembly of 12 BDT—wide footprint bidentate thiols—in the ligand shell. When each of these sites was selectively functionalized by a single phosphine ligand, particle stability, synthetic yield and the propensity to self-assemble into macroscopic crystals increased. The solid crystallized NCs have a substantially narrowed optical bandgap compared to that of the solution state, suggesting strong inter-particle electronic coupling occurs in the solid state.

  4. In a randomized trial, the live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine TV003 is well-tolerated and highly immunogenic in subjects with flavivirus exposure prior to vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen S Whitehead

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Infection caused by the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV-1-4 is a leading cause of mosquito-borne disease. Clinically-severe dengue disease is more common when secondary dengue infection occurs following prior infection with a heterologous dengue serotype. Other flaviviruses such as yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and Zika virus, can also elicit antibodies which are cross-reactive to DENV. As candidate dengue vaccines become available in endemic settings and for individuals who have received other flavivirus vaccines, it is important to examine vaccine safety and immunogenicity in these flavivirus-experienced populations. We performed a randomized, controlled trial of the National Institutes of Health live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TV003 in fifty-eight individuals with prior exposure to flavivirus infection or vaccine. As in prior studies of this vaccine in flavivirus-naive volunteers, flavivirus-experienced subjects received two doses of vaccine six months apart and were followed closely for clinical events, laboratory changes, viremia, and neutralizing antibody titers. TV003 was well tolerated with few adverse events other than rash, which was predominately mild. Following one dose, 87% of vaccinees had an antibody response to all four serotypes (tetravalent response, suggesting a robust immune response. In addition, 76% of vaccinees were viremic; mean peak titers ranged from 0.68–1.1 log10 PFU/mL and did not differ by serotype. The second dose of TV003 was not associated with viremia, rash, or a sustained boost in antibody titers indicating that a single dose of the vaccine is likely sufficient to prevent viral replication and thus protect against disease. In comparison to the viremia and neutralizing antibody response elicited by TV003 in flavivirus-naïve subjects from prior studies, we found that subjects who were flavivirus-exposed prior to vaccination exhibited slightly higher DENV-3 viremia

  5. Dose Evaluation of Fractionated Schema and Distance From Tumor to Spinal Cord for Spinal SBRT with Simultaneous Integrated Boost: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Cai, Bo-ning; Wang, Xiao-shen; Cong, Xiao-hu; Xu, Wei; Wang, Jin-yuan; Yang, Jun; Xu, Shou-ping; Ju, Zhong-jian; Ma, Lin

    2016-02-23

    BACKGROUND This study investigated and quantified the dosimetric impact of the distance from the tumor to the spinal cord and fractionation schemes for patients who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost (HF-SIB). MATERIAL AND METHODS Six modified planning target volumes (PTVs) for 5 patients with spinal metastases were created by artificial uniform extension in the region of PTV adjacent spinal cord with a specified minimum tumor to cord distance (0-5 mm). The prescription dose (biologic equivalent dose, BED) was 70 Gy in different fractionation schemes (1, 3, 5, and 10 fractions). For PTV V100, Dmin, D98, D95, and D1, spinal cord dose, conformity index (CI), V30 were measured and compared. RESULTS PTV-to-cord distance influenced PTV V100, Dmin, D98, and D95, and fractionation schemes influenced Dmin and D98, with a significant difference. Distances of ≥2 mm, ≥1 mm, ≥1 mm, and ≥0 mm from PTV to spinal cord meet dose requirements in 1, 3, 5, and 10 fractionations, respectively. Spinal cord dose, CI, and V30 were not impacted by PTV-to-cord distance and fractionation schemes. CONCLUSIONS Target volume coverage, Dmin, D98, and D95 were directly correlated with distance from the spinal cord for spine SBRT and HF-SIB. Based on our study, ≥2 mm, ≥1 mm, ≥1 mm, and ≥0 mm distance from PTV to spinal cord meets dose requirements in 1, 3, 5 and 10 fractionations, respectively.

  6. Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33 secreted from impaired vessels in the skin compared to fractionated irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun-Jung, E-mail: forejs2@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Won, E-mail: JUNWON@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Hyun, E-mail: gochunghee@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Woori, E-mail: asleo02@snu.ac.kr [Interdisciplinary Program in Bioinformatics, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Hoon, E-mail: wonhoon@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seoae, E-mail: seoae@cnkgenomics.com [C& K Genomics, Seoul National University Mt.4-2, Main Bldg. #514, SNU Research Park, NakSeoungDae, Gwanakgu, Seoul 151-919 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yu Jeong, E-mail: yunk9275@daum.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoon-Jin, E-mail: yjlee8@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Effects, Research Center for Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-760 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jaeho, E-mail: jjhmd@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-14

    We have revealed in a porcine skin injury model that eosinophil recruitment was dose-dependently enhanced by a single high-dose irradiation. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of eosinophil-associated skin fibrosis and the effect of high-dose-per-fraction radiation. The dorsal skin of a mini-pig was divided into two sections containing 4-cm{sup 2} fields that were irradiated with 30 Gy in a single fraction or 5 fractions and biopsied regularly over 14 weeks. Eosinophil-related Th2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and C–C motif chemokine-11 (CCL11/eotaxin) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. RNA-sequencing using 30 Gy-irradiated mouse skin and functional assays in a co-culture system of THP-1 and irradiated-human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed to investigate the mechanism of eosinophil-mediated radiation fibrosis. Single high-dose-per-fraction irradiation caused pronounced eosinophil accumulation, increased profibrotic factors collagen and transforming growth factor-β, enhanced production of eosinophil-related cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, CCL11, IL-13, and IL-33, and reduced vessels compared with 5-fraction irradiation. IL-33 notably increased in pig and mouse skin vessels after single high-dose irradiation of 30 Gy, as well as in irradiated HUVECs following 12 Gy. Blocking IL-33 suppressed the migration ability of THP-1 cells and cytokine secretion in a co-culture system of THP-1 cells and irradiated HUVECs. Hence, high-dose-per-fraction irradiation appears to enhance eosinophil-mediated fibrotic responses, and IL-33 may be a key molecule operating in eosinophil-mediated fibrosis in high-dose-per fraction irradiated skin. - Highlights: • Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33. • Vascular endothelial cells damaged by high-dose radiation secrete IL-33. • Blocking IL-33 suppressed migration of inflammatory cells and cytokine secretion. • IL

  7. Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33 secreted from impaired vessels in the skin compared to fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Yoo, Hyun; Kwak, Woori; Choi, Won Hoon; Cho, Seoae; Choi, Yu Jeong; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-01-01

    We have revealed in a porcine skin injury model that eosinophil recruitment was dose-dependently enhanced by a single high-dose irradiation. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of eosinophil-associated skin fibrosis and the effect of high-dose-per-fraction radiation. The dorsal skin of a mini-pig was divided into two sections containing 4-cm 2 fields that were irradiated with 30 Gy in a single fraction or 5 fractions and biopsied regularly over 14 weeks. Eosinophil-related Th2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and C–C motif chemokine-11 (CCL11/eotaxin) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. RNA-sequencing using 30 Gy-irradiated mouse skin and functional assays in a co-culture system of THP-1 and irradiated-human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed to investigate the mechanism of eosinophil-mediated radiation fibrosis. Single high-dose-per-fraction irradiation caused pronounced eosinophil accumulation, increased profibrotic factors collagen and transforming growth factor-β, enhanced production of eosinophil-related cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, CCL11, IL-13, and IL-33, and reduced vessels compared with 5-fraction irradiation. IL-33 notably increased in pig and mouse skin vessels after single high-dose irradiation of 30 Gy, as well as in irradiated HUVECs following 12 Gy. Blocking IL-33 suppressed the migration ability of THP-1 cells and cytokine secretion in a co-culture system of THP-1 cells and irradiated HUVECs. Hence, high-dose-per-fraction irradiation appears to enhance eosinophil-mediated fibrotic responses, and IL-33 may be a key molecule operating in eosinophil-mediated fibrosis in high-dose-per fraction irradiated skin. - Highlights: • Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33. • Vascular endothelial cells damaged by high-dose radiation secrete IL-33. • Blocking IL-33 suppressed migration of inflammatory cells and cytokine secretion. • IL-33

  8. Correlation between radiological, scintigraphic and histological changes in bone in rabbits following irradiation with single and fractionated doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgener, F.A.; King, M.A.; Weber, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    In the left hind legs of eight rabbits were irradiated with 1,750 rad in a single dose or with 4,650 rad divided over a period of three weeks. These animals, as well as four who had not been irradiated, were examined periodically radiologically and with 99 mTechnetium pyrophosphate scintigrams during one year. No difference could be detected between the results of the single and fractionated doses. Scintigraphically there was a biphasic increase in uptake, the first peak co-inciding with the irradiation and of vascular origin, whereas the second peak occured at four months and was due to a change in bone metabolism. At the end of a year uptake in the irradiated limb was slightly reduced. The earliest radiological changes were found after six months, at the end of the second scintigraphic peak; they consisted of coarsening and blurring of the trabeculae, non-homogeneous spotty mineralisation and endosteal scalloping. Six animals developed a radiation-induced bone sarcoma, first demonstrated either by scintigraphy or radiology depending on its histology. The value of combining radiological and scintigraphic examinations for the early detection of post-radiation abnormalities is stressed. (orig.) [de

  9. Effects of Minimum and Maximum Doses of Furosemide on Fractional Shortening Parameter in Echocardiography of the New Zealand White Rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roham Vali, Mohammad Nasrollahzadeh Masouleh* and Siamak Mashhady Rafie1

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available There is no data on the effect of maximum and minimum doses of furosemide on heart's work performance and amount of fractional shortening (FS in echocardiography of rabbit. This study was designed to validate probability of the mentionable effect. Twenty-four healthy female New Zealand white rabbits were divided into four equal groups. Maximum and minimum doses of furosemide were used for the first and second groups and the injection solution for the third and fourth groups was sodium chloride 0.9% which had the same calculated volumes of furosemide for the first two groups, respectively. The left ventricle FS in statutory times (0, 2, 5, 15, 30 minutes was determined by echocardiography. Measurements of Mean±SD, maximum and minimum amounts for FS values in all groups before injection and in statutory times were calculated. Statistical analysis revealed non-significant correlation between the means of FS. The results of this study showed that furosemide can be used as a diuretic agent for preparing a window approach in abdominal ultrasonography examination with no harmful effect on cardiac function.

  10. Effect of intra-fraction motion on the accumulated dose for free-breathing MR-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy of renal-cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Glitzner, Markus; Kontaxis, Charis; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Prins, Fieke M.; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Kerkmeijer, Linda G. W.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Tijssen, Rob H. N.

    2017-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has shown great promise in increasing local control rates for renal-cell carcinoma (RCC). Characterized by steep dose gradients and high fraction doses, these hypo-fractionated treatments are, however, prone to dosimetric errors as a result of variations in intra-fraction respiratory-induced motion, such as drifts and amplitude alterations. This may lead to significant variations in the deposited dose. This study aims to develop a method for calculating the accumulated dose for MRI-guided SBRT of RCC in the presence of intra-fraction respiratory variations and determine the effect of such variations on the deposited dose. For this, RCC SBRT treatments were simulated while the underlying anatomy was moving, based on motion information from three motion models with increasing complexity: (1) STATIC, in which static anatomy was assumed, (2) AVG-RESP, in which 4D-MRI phase-volumes were time-weighted, and (3) PCA, a method that generates 3D volumes with sufficient spatio-temporal resolution to capture respiration and intra-fraction variations. Five RCC patients and two volunteers were included and treatments delivery was simulated, using motion derived from subject-specific MR imaging. Motion was most accurately estimated using the PCA method with root-mean-squared errors of 2.7, 2.4, 1.0 mm for STATIC, AVG-RESP and PCA, respectively. The heterogeneous patient group demonstrated relatively large dosimetric differences between the STATIC and AVG-RESP, and the PCA reconstructed dose maps, with hotspots up to 40% of the D99 and an underdosed GTV in three out of the five patients. This shows the potential importance of including intra-fraction motion variations in dose calculations.

  11. The relative biological effectiveness of fractionated doses of fast neutrons (42 MeV sub d yields Be ) for normal tissues. Pt. 3; Effects on lung function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezvani, M.; Hopewell, J.W.; Robbins, M.E.C.; Hamlet, R. (Churchill Hospital, Oxford (UK)); Barnes, D.W.H.; Sansom, J.M.; Adams, P.J.V. (Medical Research Council, Harwell (UK). Radiobiological Research Unit)

    1990-11-01

    The effect of single and fractionated doses of fast neutrons (42 MeV{sub d{yields}Bc}) on the early and late radiation responses of the pig lung have been assessed by the measurement of changes in lung function using a {sup 133}Xe washout technique. The results obtained for irradiation schedules with fast neutrons have been compared with those after photon irradiation. There was no statistically significant difference between the values for the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the early and late radiation response of the lung. The RBE of the neutron beam increased with decreasing size of dose/fraction with an upper limit value of 4.39 {plus minus} 0.94 for infinitely small X-ray doses per fraction. (author).

  12. Hydrolysis constants of tetravalent neptunium by using solvent extraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, K.; Kohara, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The hydrolysis constants of tetravalent neptunium (Np(IV)) were determined by solvent extraction method using thenoyltrifluoroacetone(TTA). In order to avoid colloid formation, a stock solution of carrier-free 239 Np(V) was from 243 Am milked. The valence of Np in the solution was then reduced to Np(IV) by using zinc amalgam. The hydrolysis constants (β m ) of the reactions, Np 4+ + mOH - = Np(OH) m (4-m)+ was evaluated by using distribution ratios at ionic strengths (I) = 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0. All experiments were performed in oxygen-free 0.5% H 2 -N 2 atmosphere (below 1.0 ppm of O 2 ) in a glove-box at room temperature (23 ± 2 C) to avoid oxidation of Np(IV). The β m values were extrapolated to the standard state (I = 0) by using the specific ion interaction theory (SIT), and the formation constants at I = 0 were determined to be log β 1 = 13.91 ± 0.23, log β 2 = 27.13 ± 0.15, log β 3 = 37.70 ± 0.30 and log β 4 = 46.16 ± 0.30. The ion interaction coefficients were also evaluated to be ε(NpOH 3+ , ClO 4 - ) = 0.49 ± 0.15, ε(Np(OH) 2 2+ , ClO 4 - ) = 0.35 ± 0.11, and ε(Np(OH) 3 + , ClO 4 - ) = 0.29 ± 0.15. (orig.)

  13. Hydrolysis constants of tetravalent neptunium by using solvent extraction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kohara, Y. [Inspection and Development Co., Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    The hydrolysis constants of tetravalent neptunium (Np(IV)) were determined by solvent extraction method using thenoyltrifluoroacetone(TTA). In order to avoid colloid formation, a stock solution of carrier-free {sup 239}Np(V) was from {sup 243}Am milked. The valence of Np in the solution was then reduced to Np(IV) by using zinc amalgam. The hydrolysis constants ({beta}{sub m}) of the reactions, Np{sup 4+} + mOH{sup -} = Np(OH){sub m}{sup (4-m)+} was evaluated by using distribution ratios at ionic strengths (I) = 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0. All experiments were performed in oxygen-free 0.5% H{sub 2}-N{sub 2} atmosphere (below 1.0 ppm of O{sub 2}) in a glove-box at room temperature (23 {+-} 2 C) to avoid oxidation of Np(IV). The {beta}{sub m} values were extrapolated to the standard state (I = 0) by using the specific ion interaction theory (SIT), and the formation constants at I = 0 were determined to be log {beta}{sub 1} = 13.91 {+-} 0.23, log {beta}{sub 2} = 27.13 {+-} 0.15, log {beta}{sub 3} = 37.70 {+-} 0.30 and log {beta}{sub 4} = 46.16 {+-} 0.30. The ion interaction coefficients were also evaluated to be {epsilon}(NpOH{sup 3+}, ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) = 0.49 {+-} 0.15, {epsilon}(Np(OH){sub 2}{sup 2+}, ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) = 0.35 {+-} 0.11, and {epsilon}(Np(OH){sub 3}{sup +}, ClO{sub 4}{sup -}) = 0.29 {+-} 0.15. (orig.)

  14. Solvothermal synthesis of tetravalent uranium with isophthalate or pyromellitate ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falaise, Clement; Delille, Jason; Volkringer, Christophe; Loiseau, Thierry [Contribution from Unite de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide (UCCS) - UMR CNRS 8181, Universite de Lille, USTL-ENSCL, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2015-06-15

    Three new coordination polymers bearing tetravalent uranium have been isolated with the O-donor ligands such as isophthalate (1,3-bdc) or pyromellitate (btec). The compounds 1 and 3 have been solvothermally synthesized in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). The crystal structure of U(1,3-bdc){sub 2}(DMF) (1) is built up from discrete tricapped trigonal-primastic UO{sub 9} units, for which one carbonyl oxygen atom from DMF is bound to uranium. The connection of the UO{sub 9} units with the isophthalate linkers occurs in a chelating and bidentate fashion and gives rise to the formation of a 3D framework, delimiting narrow channels running along the [101] direction. Upon heating, the DMF molecules are removed, generating the second phase U(1,3-bdc){sub 2} (2) compound, closely related to 1. Indeed, the coordination environment of uranium is reduced to eight with a distorted square-antiprismatic geometry. This transition induces the relative shrinkage of the network (ΔV = 23 %). The structure of the compound U(btec)(DMF){sub 2} (3) also exhibits a 3D framework composed of an isolated bicapped square-antiprismatic UO{sub 10} unit, for which two carbonyl oxygen atoms from DMF are bonded to uranium. Pyromellitate ensures the connection of the UO{sub 10} units through the carboxylate arms in a chelating mode. This results in the formation of a network with diamond-shaped channels, developed along the c axis and encapsulating the DMF molecules. In contrast to 1, no stable phase is observed upon removing the DMF species by heating. (Copyright copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Artificial neural network based gynaecological image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatment planning correction of intra-fractional organs at risk dose variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Jaberi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Intra-fractional organs at risk (OARs deformations can lead to dose variation during image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT. The aim of this study was to modify the final accepted brachytherapy treatment plan to dosimetrically compensate for these intra-fractional organs-applicators position variations and, at the same time, fulfilling the dosimetric criteria. Material and methods : Thirty patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT of 45-50 Gy over five to six weeks with concomitant weekly chemotherapy, and qualified for intracavitary high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy with tandem-ovoid applicators were selected for this study. Second computed tomography scan was done for each patient after finishing brachytherapy treatment with applicators in situ. Artificial neural networks (ANNs based models were used to predict intra-fractional OARs dose-volume histogram parameters variations and propose a new final plan. Results : A model was developed to estimate the intra-fractional organs dose variations during gynaecological intracavitary brachytherapy. Also, ANNs were used to modify the final brachytherapy treatment plan to compensate dosimetrically for changes in ‘organs-applicators’, while maintaining target dose at the original level. Conclusions : There are semi-automatic and fast responding models that can be used in the routine clinical workflow to reduce individually IGABT uncertainties. These models can be more validated by more patients’ plans to be able to serve as a clinical tool.

  16. Artificial neural network based gynaecological image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatment planning correction of intra-fractional organs at risk dose variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaberi, Ramin; Siavashpour, Zahra; Aghamiri, Mahmoud Reza; Kirisits, Christian; Ghaderi, Reza

    2017-12-01

    Intra-fractional organs at risk (OARs) deformations can lead to dose variation during image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT). The aim of this study was to modify the final accepted brachytherapy treatment plan to dosimetrically compensate for these intra-fractional organs-applicators position variations and, at the same time, fulfilling the dosimetric criteria. Thirty patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) of 45-50 Gy over five to six weeks with concomitant weekly chemotherapy, and qualified for intracavitary high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with tandem-ovoid applicators were selected for this study. Second computed tomography scan was done for each patient after finishing brachytherapy treatment with applicators in situ. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) based models were used to predict intra-fractional OARs dose-volume histogram parameters variations and propose a new final plan. A model was developed to estimate the intra-fractional organs dose variations during gynaecological intracavitary brachytherapy. Also, ANNs were used to modify the final brachytherapy treatment plan to compensate dosimetrically for changes in 'organs-applicators', while maintaining target dose at the original level. There are semi-automatic and fast responding models that can be used in the routine clinical workflow to reduce individually IGABT uncertainties. These models can be more validated by more patients' plans to be able to serve as a clinical tool.

  17. High-Dose Spatially Fractionated GRID Radiation Therapy (SFGRT): A Comparison of Treatment Outcomes With Cerrobend vs. MLC SFGRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuner, Geoffrey; Mohiuddin, Majid M.; Vander Walde, Noam; Goloubeva, Olga; Ha, Jonathan; Yu, Cedric X.; Regine, William F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Spatially fractionated GRID radiotherapy (SFGRT) using a customized Cerrobend block has been used to improve response rates in patients with bulky tumors. The clinical efficacy of our own multileaf collimator (MLC) technique is unknown. We undertook a retrospective analysis to compare clinical response rates attained using these two techniques. Methods and Materials: Seventy-nine patients with bulky tumors (median diameter, 7.6 cm; range, 4–30 cm) treated with SFGRT were reviewed. Between 2003 and late 2005, the Cerrobend block technique (n = 39) was used. Between late 2005 and 2008, SFGRT was delivered using MLC-shaped fields (n = 40). Dose was prescribed to dmax (depth of maximum dose) and was typically 15 Gy. Eighty percent of patients in both groups received external beam radiotherapy in addition to SFGRT. The two-sided Fisher-Freeman-Halton test was used to compare pain and mass effect response rates between the two groups. Results: Sixty-one patients (77%) were treated for palliative intent and 18 (23%) for curative intent. The majority of patients had either lung or head-and-neck primaries in both groups; the most frequent site of SFGRT application was the neck. The majority of patients complained of either pain (65%) or mass effect (58%) at intake. Overall response rates for pain and mass response were no different between the Cerrobend and MLC groups: pain, 75% and 74%, respectively (p = 0.50), and mass effect, 67% and 73%, respectively (p = 0.85). The majority of toxicities were Grade 1 or 2, and only 3 patients had late Grade 3-4 toxicities. Conclusions: MLC-based and Cerrobend-based SFGRT have comparable and encouraging response rates when used either in the palliative or curative setting. MLC-based SGFRT should allow clinics to more easily adopt this novel treatment approach for the treatment of bulky tumors.

  18. Validation of contour-driven thin-plate splines for tracking fraction-to-fraction changes in anatomy and radiation therapy dose mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaly, B; Bauman, G S; Battista, J J; Dyk, J Van

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study is to validate a deformable model using contour-driven thin-plate splines for application to radiation therapy dose mapping. Our testing includes a virtual spherical phantom as well as real computed tomography (CT) data from ten prostate cancer patients with radio-opaque markers surgically implanted into the prostate and seminal vesicles. In the spherical mathematical phantom, homologous control points generated automatically given input contour data in CT slice geometry were compared to homologous control point placement using analytical geometry as the ground truth. The dose delivered to specific voxels driven by both sets of homologous control points were compared to determine the accuracy of dose tracking via the deformable model. A 3D analytical spherically symmetric dose distribution with a dose gradient of ∼10% per mm was used for this phantom. This test showed that the uncertainty in calculating the delivered dose to a tissue element depends on slice thickness and the variation in defining homologous landmarks, where dose agreement of 3-4% in high dose gradient regions was achieved. In the patient data, radio-opaque marker positions driven by the thin-plate spline algorithm were compared to the actual marker positions as identified in the CT scans. It is demonstrated that the deformable model is accurate (∼2.5 mm) to within the intra-observer contouring variability. This work shows that the algorithm is appropriate for describing changes in pelvic anatomy and for the dose mapping application with dose gradients characteristic of conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy

  19. Validation of contour-driven thin-plate splines for tracking fraction-to-fraction changes in anatomy and radiation therapy dose mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaly, B; Bauman, G S; Battista, J J; Van Dyk, J

    2005-02-07

    The goal of this study is to validate a deformable model using contour-driven thin-plate splines for application to radiation therapy dose mapping. Our testing includes a virtual spherical phantom as well as real computed tomography (CT) data from ten prostate cancer patients with radio-opaque markers surgically implanted into the prostate and seminal vesicles. In the spherical mathematical phantom, homologous control points generated automatically given input contour data in CT slice geometry were compared to homologous control point placement using analytical geometry as the ground truth. The dose delivered to specific voxels driven by both sets of homologous control points were compared to determine the accuracy of dose tracking via the deformable model. A 3D analytical spherically symmetric dose distribution with a dose gradient of approximately 10% per mm was used for this phantom. This test showed that the uncertainty in calculating the delivered dose to a tissue element depends on slice thickness and the variation in defining homologous landmarks, where dose agreement of 3-4% in high dose gradient regions was achieved. In the patient data, radio-opaque marker positions driven by the thin-plate spline algorithm were compared to the actual marker positions as identified in the CT scans. It is demonstrated that the deformable model is accurate (approximately 2.5 mm) to within the intra-observer contouring variability. This work shows that the algorithm is appropriate for describing changes in pelvic anatomy and for the dose mapping application with dose gradients characteristic of conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy.

  20. Evaluation of the efficacy of palliative irradiation with high fractionated doses and planned intervals of patients with advanced cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skolyszewski, J.; Reinfuss, M.

    1988-01-01

    200 patients, previously not treated, with advanced highly differentiated cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx have been palliatively irradiated in the Oncology Center in Cracow in the years 1976-1985. Megavoltage irradiation with fractionated doses 4-5 Gy up to the dose of 20 Gy to the tumor with 4-5 fractions during 4-7 days has been applied. 64 patients received 20 Gy as simple dose, in 65 cases such dose has been repeated after month. 71 patients have been irradiated for the third time with similar dose after another 1 month interval. Partial regression of 25-50% of the tumor volume has been obtained after the first series of irradiation in 19% of patients and more than 50% in 28% of patients, complete regression in 4% of patients. 15,5% of the total number of patients survived 1 year since the initiation of the irradiation, 5% without symptoms of the neoplasm. Worse prognosis is connected with major advancement of the tumor (T 4 , N 2 ), poor general condition, cachexia and alcohol addition. Absence of improvement after the first series of irradiations indicates the non-effectiveness of the treatment. Palliative treatment by irradiation with high fractionated doses and planned interval is a safe and efficacious method. 1 fig., 6 tabs., 14 refs. (author)

  1. Inter fractional dose variation during intensity-modulated radiation therapy for cervical cancer assessed by weekly CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Youngyih; Shin, Eun Hyuk; Huh, Seung Jae; Lee, Jung Eun; Park, Won

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the inter fractional dose variation of a small-bowel displacement system (SBDS)-assisted intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of cervical cancer. Methods: Four computed tomography (CT) scans were carried out in 10 patients who received radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer. The initial CT was taken by use of the SBDS, before the beginning of radiotherapy, and 3 additional CT scans with the SBDS were done in subsequent weeks. IMRT was planned by use of the initial CT, and the subsequent images were fused with the initial CT set. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) changes of the targets (planning target volume [PTV] = clinical target volume [CTV] + 1.5 cm) and of the critical organs were evaluated after obtaining the volumes of each organ on 4 CT sets. Results: No significant differences were found in PTV volumes. Changes on the DVH of the CTVs were not significant, whereas DVH changes of the PTVs at 40% to 100% of the prescription dose level were significant (V 90% ; 2nd week: p = 0.0091, 3rd week: p = 0.0029, 4th week: p = 0.0050). The changes in the small-bowel volume included in the treatment field were significant. These were 119.5 cm 3 (range, 26.9-251.0 cm 3 ), 126 cm 3 (range, 38.3-336 cm 3 ), 161.9 cm 3 (range, 37.7-294.6 cm 3 ), and 149.1 cm 3 (range, 38.6-277.8 cm 3 ) at the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th weeks, respectively, and were significantly correlated with the DVH change in the small bowel, which were significant at the 3rd (V 80% ; p = 0.0230) and 4th (V 80% ; p = 0.0263) weeks. The bladder-volume change correlated to the large volume change (>20%) of the small-bowel volume. Conclusions: Significant DVH differences for the small bowel can result because of interfractional position variations, whereas the DVH differences of the CTV were not significant. Strict bladder-filling control and an accurate margin for the PTV, as well as image-guided position verification, are important to achieve the goal of IMRT

  2. The effect of fractionating 100 R hard X-ray doses on the hemogram and proteinogram of the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alix, D.

    1965-01-01

    Eighty one rabbits 'Fauve de Bourgogne' received total exposure of 100 R X-rays, by fractional doses of 5 - 10 - 25 - 50 and 100 R per irradiation. Blood count and protein dosage were practised before, during and after the irradiation session. Seventeen controls were subjected to the same investigations with the same periodicity. Statistical analysis of experimental data permitted to infer from the exposures of X-rays, that irradiation induces drop in leucocytes count, resulting from a drop in mononuclear cells. On the other hand, it is more difficult to clear up its action on the protein profiles, because the observed changes were likewise observed on the controls, although at a lesser degree. Nevertheless, the authors think that it may be concluded to an increase of albumin concentration and to some instability of the gamma-globulins concentration. Then they discuss the possible mechanisms of X-rays effects: either perturbations of protean metabolism following loss of mitotic activity or histolysis. (author) [fr

  3. Evaluation of several novel diamide based ligands for selective extraction of tetravalent plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaramakrishna, Mallampalli; Nayak, Shashikant K. [Heavy Water Board, V.S. Bhavan, Mumbai (India); Raut, Dhaval R.; Mohapatra, Prasanta K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry Division; Nayak, Sandip K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai (India). Bioorganic Division

    2017-06-01

    The present paper describes the selective extraction of tetravalent plutonium employing several diamide ligands containing aromatic spacer groups. The ligands containing two amide functional groups attached to a 2,4,6-tri-phenyl pyridine moiety with different substituents viz.; L{sub I} (iso-butyl), L{sub II}(n-butyl), L{sub III}(n-octyl), L{sub IV} (2-ethylhexyl) at the amidic nitrogen atom were evaluated for the extraction of Pu(IV) using their nitrobenzene solutions. The distribution ratio values of Pu(IV) with the diamide ligands followed the order: L{sub II}>L{sub I}>L{sub III}>L{sub IV} and were significantly higher than those of metal ions such as Cs(I), Sr(II), Am(III) and Eu(III). The distribution ratio values of U(VI) were about 2-3 orders magnitude lower than those of Pu(IV). The extraction and stripping kinetics were found to be moderately fast and it took less than 30 min (less than 5 min for L{sub I} and L{sub IV}) to obtain equilibrium D values. The extraction was found to be increasing with the aqueous phase nitric acid concentration conforming to a solvation mechanism of extraction. The extracted species contained two ligand molecules for L{sub I} and L{sub II} while monosolvates were observed for the other two extractants. The ligands showed good radiation stability up to an absorbed dose of 630 kGy.

  4. Gamma dose rates to body organs from immersion in a semi-infinite radioactive cloud; an alternate approach using absorbed fraction data for internal radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, F.C.

    1982-01-01

    This note shows that reasonable estimates of absorbed γ-dose rates for specific organs arising from whole body immersion in semi-infinite radioactive clouds may be obtained very simply from well known data on absorbed fractions for mono-energetic γ-sources uniformly distributed in the whole body. (author)

  5. Intensification of antitumor radiation effect by metronidazole and short-term hyperglycemia and dependence of therapeutic effect on schedules of fractionation and value of single dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkhvadze, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    Combined application of metronidazole and short-term hyperglycemia under fractionated irradiation of sarcoma-45, 340 in white rats-males is studied. Tumors were γ-irradiated with 60 Co threefold in 48 hours at 15 Gy single dose or irradiated threefold in a week at 20, 25 and 30 Gy doses. Efficiency of experimental therapy is cheked by dynamics of tumor regression, a number of animals with tumors reabsorbed temporarily, a number of animals recovered and time of tumor grouth up to the initial volume. It is established that combined application of metronidazole and short-term hyperglycemia under fractionated irradiation increases essentially the efficiency of radiotherapy carried out by large fractions with great time intervals. 7 refs.; 1 fig.; 2 tabs

  6. Treatment results by uneven fractionated irradiation, low-dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost, and intraoperative irradiation for malignant glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Shogo; Takai, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Kenji; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Kakuto, Yoshihisa; Hoshi, Akihiko; Sakamoto, Kiyohiko; Kayama, Takamasa; Yoshimoto, Takashi (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-08-01

    The prognosis of malignant glioma is extremely poor. We applied conventionally fractionated irradiation combined with 1-(4-aminio-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl)methyl-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosourea (ACNU), uneven fractionated irradiation with ACNU, low dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost, and intraoperative irradiation against 110 malignant gliomas to investigate the efficacy of these methods as alternative treatments for malignant glioma. Although local tumor control by uneven fractionated irradiation was better than that by the other methods, no significant improvement was obtained in survival rates. As a result of multiple regression analysis, age and histology were major factors for survival rates, and the difference of treatment methods was not important. Both low-dose rate telecobalt therapy as a boost and intraoperative irradiation showed little advantage because of the high risk of brain necrosis associated with them. (author).

  7. Safety issues from a Phase 3 clinical trial of a live-attenuated chimeric yellow fever tetravalent dengue vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Scott B

    2018-02-26

    A tetravalent live-attenuated 3-dose vaccine composed of chimeras of yellow fever 17D and the four dengue viruses (CYD, also called Dengvaxia) completed phase 3 clinical testing in over 35,000 children leading to a recommendation that vaccine be administered to >/ = 9 year-olds residing in highly dengue- endemic countries. When clinical trial results were assessed 2 years after the first dose, vaccine efficacy among seropositives was high, but among seronegatives efficacy was marginal. Breakthrough dengue hospitalizations of vaccinated children occurred continuously over a period of 4-5 years post 3rd dose in an age distribution suggesting these children had been vaccinated when seronegative. This surmise was validated recently when the manufacturer reported that dengue NS1 IgG antibodies were absent in sera from hospitalized vaccinated children, an observation consistent with their having received Dengvaxia when seronegative. Based upon published efficacy data and in compliance with initial published recommendations by the manufacturer and WHO the Philippine government undertook to vaccinate 800,000-plus 9 year-olds starting in April 2016. Eighteen months later, dengue hospitalizations and a deaths were reported among vaccinated children. The benefits of administering Dengvaxia predicted by the manufacturer, WHO and others derive from scoring dengue hospitalizations of vaccinated children as vaccine failures rather than as vaccine enhanced dengue disease. Recommended regimens for administration of Dengvaxia should have been structured to warn of and avoid serious adverse events.

  8. The efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen in modifying the response of tissue to irradiation in doses of 200-400 rad per fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, D.D.; Orsi, L.

    1975-01-01

    The efficacy of respiration of O 2 at 30 psi in modifying the response of normal and tumour tissue to irradiation administered at 200 to 400 rad per fraction to anaesthetized mice has been evaluated. End-points have been delay in growth and TCD 50 for an early generation iso-transplant of a C 3 H mouse mammary carcinoma, and the acute reaction of skin of the C 3 H/Sed mouse. Results showed that the ratios of dose (air)/dose (O 2 30 psi) to elicit these end points were in the range 1.2 to 1.4. In earlier work using the same end points but doses per fraction 430 to 2100 rad, the ratios were 1.6 to 1.8. That is, for these tissue responses, respiration of O 2 at 30 psi increases the response of both normal and tumour tissue to all radiation doses tested. It is of greater effectiveness when combined with large doses per fraction, eg. greater than 430 rad. (author)

  9. Estimation of dependence between mean of fractionation of photons and neutrons dose and intensity of post-irradiation reaction of mouse large intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasinska, A.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the work was verification of mouse large intestine tolerance on fractionated 250 kV X-rays and 2.3 MeV neutrons doses. Two cm of large intestine of mouse CBA/HT strain were irradiated with various fraction doses: from 0.25 to 35 Gy of X-rays and 0.05-12 Gy of neutrons. The measure of injury was handicap of intestine function. Early post-irradiation reaction was measured by loss of body weight (2-3 weeks after irradiation) and mouse mortality (till 2 months after irradiation, LD50/2). The late reaction was measured on the base of maximal body weight in 1 year period after irradiation, deformation of excrements (after 10 months) and death of animals (till 12. month after irradiation, LD50/12). Fractionation of X-ray dose influenced on decrease of intensification of late irradiation effects. After fractionation of neutrons this effect has not been observed. α/β coefficient for X-rays was 19.9 Gy [15.2; 27.0] for body weight nadir, 13.4 Gy [9.3; 19.5] for early mortality (LD50/2), 6.4 Gy [3.6;11.0] for maximal body weight and 6.9 [4.2; 10.8] for late mortality (LD50/12). Analysis of influence of low doses of photons 90.25-4 Gy) and neutrons (0.05-0.8 Gy) showed trend to reduction α/β for photons only (LD50/2=5.4 Gy; LD50/12=4.6 Gy). α/β coefficient for neutrons was defined by LQ model only for maximal body weight and was 19.9 Gy [9.5; 61.0]. In application of graphic method α/β for neutrons was 230 Gy for early and 48 Gy for late effects. Lower values of α/β coefficient for late irradiation effects for photon radiation demonstrate the big influence of fractionation of photons dose on large intestine tolerance (decrease intensity in all biological effects). Author did not observe increase of intestine tolerance in fractionation of neutrons dose. Effect of irradiation damages repair in interfraction pauses, measured by percent of regenerated dose (F r ) was much bigger for photons. For X-rays it was 50% for early and 63% for late effects. In case of

  10. Low-dose fractionated radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy for recurrent or progressive glioblastoma. Final report of a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balducci, M.; Diletto, B.; Chiesa, S.; D' Agostino, G.R.; Gambacorta, M.A.; Ferro, M.; Valentini, V. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rome (Italy); Colosimo, C. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Maira, G.; Anile, C. [Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Department of Neurosurgery, Rome (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    Evaluated in this study were the feasibility and the efficacy of concurrent low dose fractionated radiotherapy (LD-FRT) and chemotherapy as palliative treatment for recurrent/progressive glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Eligible patients had recurrent or progressive GBM, Karnofsky performance status ≥70, prior surgery, and standard radiochemotherapy treatment. Recurrence/progression disease during temozolomide (TMZ) received cisplatin (CDDP; 30 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1, 8, 15), fotemustine (FTM; 40 mg/m{sup 2} on days 2, 9, 16), and concurrent LD-FRT (0.3 Gy twice daily); recurrence/progression after 4 months from the end of adjuvant TMZ were treated by TMZ (150/200 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5) concomitant with LD-FRT (0.4 Gy twice daily). Primary endpoints were safety and toxicity. A total of 32 patients were enrolled. Hematologic toxicity G1-2 was observed in 18.7% of patients and G3-4 in 9.4%. One patient (3.1%) had complete response, 3 (9.4%) had partial response, 8 (25%) had stable disease for at least 8 weeks, while 20 patients (62.5%) experienced progressive disease. The clinical benefit was 37.5%. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 5 and 8 months, respectively. Survival rate at 12 months was of 27.8%. LD-FRT and chemotherapy for recurrent/progressive GBM have a good toxicity profile and clinical outcomes, even though further investigation of this novel palliative treatment approach is warranted. (orig.)

  11. 75 FR 6211 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Purified Inactivated Dengue Tetravalent Vaccine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ... Exclusive License: Purified Inactivated Dengue Tetravalent Vaccine Containing a Common 30 Nucleotide Deletion in the 3'-UTR of Dengue Types 1,2,3, and 4 AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health...., ``Development of Mutations Useful for Attenuating Dengue Viruses and Chimeric Dengue Viruses''-- European Patent...

  12. WHO position on the use of fractional doses - June 2017, addendum to vaccines and vaccination against yellow fever WHO: Position paper - June 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization

    2017-10-13

    This article presents the World Health Organization's (WHO) recommendations on the use of fractional doses of yellow fever vaccines excerpted from the "Yellow fever vaccine: WHO position on the use of fractional doses - June 2017, Addendum to Vaccines and vaccination against yellow fever WHO: Position Paper - June 2013″, published in the Weekly Epidemiological Record [1,2]. This addendum to the 2013 position paper pertains specifically to use of fractional dose YF (fYF) vaccination (fractional dose yellow fever vaccination refers to administration of a reduced volume of vaccine dose, which has been reconstituted as usual per manufacturer recommendations) in the context of YF vaccine supply shortages beyond the capacity of the global stockpile. The current WHO position on the use of yellow fever (YF) vaccine is set out in the 2013 WHO position paper on vaccines and vaccination against YF and those recommendations are unchanged. Footnotes to this paper provide a number of core references including references to grading tables that assess the quality of the scientific evidence, and to the evidence-to-recommendation table. In accordance with its mandate to provide guidance to Member States on health policy matters, WHO issues a series of regularly updated position papers on vaccines and combinations of vaccines against diseases that have an international public health impact. These papers are concerned primarily with the use of vaccines in large-scale immunization programmes; they summarize essential background information on diseases and vaccines, and conclude with WHO's current position on the use of vaccines in the global context. Recommendations on the use of Yellow Fever vaccines were discussed by SAGE in October 2016; evidence presented at these meetings can be accessed at: www.who.int/immunization/sage/meetings/2016/October/presentations_background_docs/en/. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Phase I/II trial of single-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy-boosted hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiation therapy for localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Michael A; Hagan, Michael P; Todor, Dorin; Gilbert, Lynn; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Randolf, Jessica; Heimiller, Jeffrey; Anscher, Mitchell S

    2012-01-01

    A Phase I/II protocol was conducted to examine the toxicity and efficacy of the combination of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a single-fraction high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy implant. From 2001 through 2006, 26 consecutive patients were treated on the trial. The primary objective was to demonstrate a high rate of completion without experiencing a treatment-limiting toxicity. Eligibility was limited to patients with T stage ≤2b, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤20, and Gleason score ≤7. Treatment began with a single HDR fraction of 6Gy to the entire prostate and 9Gy to the peripheral zone, followed by IMRT optimized to deliver in 28 fractions with a normalized total dose of 70Gy. Patients received 50.4Gy to the pelvic lymph node. The prostate dose (IMRT and HDR) resulted in an average biologic equivalent dose >128Gy (α/β=3). Patients whose pretreatment PSA was ≥10ng/mL, Gleason score 7, or stage ≥T2b received short-term androgen ablation. Median followup was 53 months (9-68 months). There were no biochemical failures by either the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology or the Phoenix definitions. The median nadir PSA was 0.32ng/mL. All the 26 patients completed the treatment as prescribed. The rate of Grade 3 late genitourinary toxicity was 3.8% consisting of a urethral stricture. There was no other Grade 3 or 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicities. Single-fraction HDR-boosted IMRT is a safe effective method of dose escalation for localized prostate cancer. Copyright © 2012 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Preliminary Results of a Phase 1 Dose-Escalation Trial for Early-Stage Breast Cancer Using 5-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Partial-Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi, Asal; Thomas, Kimberly; Spangler, Ann; Rao, Roshni; Leitch, Marilyn; Wooldridge, Rachel; Rivers, Aeisha; Seiler, Stephen; Albuquerque, Kevin; Stevenson, Stella; Goudreau, Sally; Garwood, Dan; Haley, Barbara; Euhus, David; Heinzerling, John; Ding, Chuxiong; Gao, Ang; Ahn, Chul; Timmerman, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability of a dose-escalated 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy for partial-breast irradiation (S-PBI) in treating early-stage breast cancer after partial mastectomy; the primary objective was to escalate dose utilizing a robotic stereotactic radiation system treating the lumpectomy cavity without exceeding the maximum tolerated dose. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive nonlobular epithelial histologies and stage 0, I, or II, with tumor size <3 cm. Patients and physicians completed baseline and subsequent cosmesis outcome questionnaires. Starting dose was 30 Gy in 5 fractions and was escalated by 2.5 Gy total for each cohort to 40 Gy. Results: In all, 75 patients were enrolled, with a median age of 62 years. Median follow-up for 5 cohorts was 49.9, 42.5, 25.7, 20.3, and 13.5 months, respectively. Only 3 grade 3 toxicities were experienced. There was 1 dose-limiting toxicity in the overall cohort. Ten patients experienced palpable fat necrosis (4 of which were symptomatic). Physicians scored cosmesis as excellent or good in 95.9%, 100%, 96.7%, and 100% at baseline and 6, 12, and 24 months after S-PBI, whereas patients scored the same periods as 86.5%, 97.1%, 95.1%, and 95.3%, respectively. The disagreement rates between MDs and patients during those periods were 9.4%, 2.9%, 1.6%, and 4.7%, respectively. There have been no recurrences or distant metastases. Conclusion: Dose was escalated to the target dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions, with the occurrence of only 1 dose-limiting toxicity. Patients felt cosmetic results improved within the first year after surgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy. Our results show minimal toxicity with excellent cosmesis; however, further follow-up is warranted in future studies. This study is the first to show the safety, tolerability, feasibility, and cosmesis results of a 5-fraction dose-escalated S-PBI treatment for

  15. Preliminary Results of a Phase 1 Dose-Escalation Trial for Early-Stage Breast Cancer Using 5-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Partial-Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Asal, E-mail: asal.rahimi@utsouthwestern.edu [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Thomas, Kimberly; Spangler, Ann [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Rao, Roshni; Leitch, Marilyn; Wooldridge, Rachel; Rivers, Aeisha [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Seiler, Stephen [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Albuquerque, Kevin; Stevenson, Stella [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Goudreau, Sally [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Garwood, Dan [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Haley, Barbara [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Euhus, David [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Heinzerling, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Levine Cancer Institute, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Ding, Chuxiong [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Gao, Ang; Ahn, Chul [Department of Statistics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Timmerman, Robert [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability of a dose-escalated 5-fraction stereotactic body radiation therapy for partial-breast irradiation (S-PBI) in treating early-stage breast cancer after partial mastectomy; the primary objective was to escalate dose utilizing a robotic stereotactic radiation system treating the lumpectomy cavity without exceeding the maximum tolerated dose. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive nonlobular epithelial histologies and stage 0, I, or II, with tumor size <3 cm. Patients and physicians completed baseline and subsequent cosmesis outcome questionnaires. Starting dose was 30 Gy in 5 fractions and was escalated by 2.5 Gy total for each cohort to 40 Gy. Results: In all, 75 patients were enrolled, with a median age of 62 years. Median follow-up for 5 cohorts was 49.9, 42.5, 25.7, 20.3, and 13.5 months, respectively. Only 3 grade 3 toxicities were experienced. There was 1 dose-limiting toxicity in the overall cohort. Ten patients experienced palpable fat necrosis (4 of which were symptomatic). Physicians scored cosmesis as excellent or good in 95.9%, 100%, 96.7%, and 100% at baseline and 6, 12, and 24 months after S-PBI, whereas patients scored the same periods as 86.5%, 97.1%, 95.1%, and 95.3%, respectively. The disagreement rates between MDs and patients during those periods were 9.4%, 2.9%, 1.6%, and 4.7%, respectively. There have been no recurrences or distant metastases. Conclusion: Dose was escalated to the target dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions, with the occurrence of only 1 dose-limiting toxicity. Patients felt cosmetic results improved within the first year after surgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy. Our results show minimal toxicity with excellent cosmesis; however, further follow-up is warranted in future studies. This study is the first to show the safety, tolerability, feasibility, and cosmesis results of a 5-fraction dose-escalated S-PBI treatment for

  16. SU-D-BRB-06: Treating Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) as a Chronic Disease: Implication of Temporal-Spatial Dose Fractionation Optimization Including Cancer Stem Cell Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, V; Nguyen, D; Pajonk, F; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Steinberg, M; Low, D; Sheng, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of improving GBM treatment outcome with temporal-spatial dose optimization of an ordinary differential equation (ODE) that models the differentiation and distinct radiosensitivity between cancer stem cells (CSC) and differentiated cancer cells (DCC). Methods: The ODE was formulated into a non-convex optimization problem with the objective to minimize remaining total cancer cells 500 days from the onset of radiotherapy when the total cancer cell number was 3.5×10{sup 7}, while maintaining normal tissue biological effective dose (BED) of 100Gy resulted from standard prescription of 2Gyx30. Assuming spatially separated CSC and DCC, optimization was also performed to explore the potential benefit from dose-painting the two compartments. Dose escalation to a sub-cell-population in the GTV was also examined assuming that a 2 cm margin around the GTV allows sufficient dose drop-off to 100Gy BED. The recurrence time was determined as the time at which the total cancer cell number regrows to 10{sup 9} cells. Results: The recurrence time with variable fractional doses administered once per week, bi-week and month for one year were found to be 615, 593 and 570 days, superior to the standard-prescription recurrence time of 418 days. The optimal dose-fraction size progression for both uniform and dose-painting to the tumor is low and relatively constant in the beginning and gradually increases to more aggressive fractions at end of the treatment course. Dose escalation to BED of 200Gy to the whole tumor alongside with protracted weekly treatment was found to further delay recurrence to 733 days. Dose-painting of 200 and 500Gy BED to CSC on a year-long weekly schedule further extended recurrence to 736 and 1076 days, respectively. Conclusion: GBM treatment outcome can possibly be improved with a chronic treatment approach. Further dose escalation to the entire tumor or CSC targeted killing is needed to achieve total tumor control. This work

  17. Optimal timing and frequency of bone marrow soup therapy for functional restoration of salivary glands injured by single-dose or fractionated irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Dongdong; Shang, Sixia; Liu, Younan; Bakkar, Mohammed; Sumita, Yoshinori; Seuntjens, Jan; Tran, Simon D

    2018-02-01

    Injections of bone marrow (BM) cell extract, known as 'BM soup', were previously reported to mitigate ionizing radiation (IR) injury to salivary glands (SGs). However, the optimal starting time and frequency to maintain BM soup therapeutic efficacy remains unknown. This study tested the optimal starting time and frequency of BM soup injections in mice radiated with either a single dose or a fractionated dose. First, BM soup treatment was started at 1, 3 or 7 weeks post-IR; positive (non-IR) and negative (IR) control mice received injections of saline (vehicle control). Second, BM soup-treated mice received injections at different frequencies (1, 2, 3 and 5 weekly injections). Third, a 'fractionated-dose radiation' model to injure mouse SGs was developed (5 Gy × 5 days) and compared with the single high dose radiation model. All mice (n = 65) were followed for 16 weeks post-IR. The results showed that starting injections of BM soup between 1 and 3 weeks mitigated the effect of IR-induced injury to SGs and improved the restoration of salivary function. Although the therapeutic effect of BM soup lessens after 8 weeks, it can be sustained by increasing the frequency of weekly injections. Moreover, both single-dose and fractionated-dose radiation models are efficient and comparable in inducing SG injury and BM soup treatments are effective in restoring salivary function in both radiation models. In conclusion, starting injections of BM soup within 3 weeks post-radiation, with 5 weekly injections, maintains 90-100% of saliva flow in radiated mice. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Dengue envelope-based 'four-in-one' virus-like particles produced using Pichia pastoris induce enhancement-lacking, domain III-directed tetravalent neutralising antibodies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpoot, Ravi Kant; Shukla, Rahul; Arora, Upasana; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam; Khanna, Navin

    2018-06-05

    Dengue is a significant public health problem worldwide, caused by four antigenically distinct mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV) serotypes. Antibodies to any given DENV serotype which can afford protection against that serotype tend to enhance infection by other DENV serotypes, by a phenomenon termed antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). Antibodies to the viral pre-membrane (prM) protein have been implicated in ADE. We show that co-expression of the envelope protein of all four DENV serotypes, in the yeast Pichia pastoris, leads to their co-assembly, in the absence of prM, into tetravalent mosaic VLPs (T-mVLPs), which retain the serotype-specific antigenic integrity and immunogenicity of all four types of their monomeric precursors. Following a three-dose immunisation schedule, the T-mVLPs elicited EDIII-directed antibodies in mice which could neutralise all four DENV serotypes. Importantly, anti-T-mVLP antibodies did not augment sub-lethal DENV-2 infection of dengue-sensitive AG129 mice, based on multiple parameters. The 'four-in-one' tetravalent T-mVLPs possess multiple desirable features which may potentially contribute to safety (non-viral, prM-lacking and ADE potential-lacking), immunogenicity (induction of virus-neutralising antibodies), and low cost (single tetravalent immunogen produced using P. pastoris, an expression system known for its high productivity using simple inexpensive media). These results strongly warrant further exploration of this vaccine candidate.

  19. The determination of the inhalable fraction of 40K activity in marijuana (Cannabis sativa L. buds by instrumental neutron activation analysis and the effective dose to the body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann M.R. Antoine

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Total potassium in marijuana (Cannabis sativa L. buds was determined using instrumental neutron activation analysis. The mass fraction of 40K and its activity were derived using the natural isotopic ratios of potassium. The total potassium in the marijuana buds ranged from 0.84% to 3.15% with a mean mass fraction of 1.93%. The activity concentrations of 40K in the samples of marijuana ranged from 253 to 946 Bq kg−1 with a mean activity concentration of 581 Bq kg−1. The effective dose to the body from smoking marijuana is lower than that for comparable tobacco smoking. Simulated smoking experiments show that over 90% of 40K is retained in the cigarette ash. Accepted methods of determining effective dose to the body from 40K inhalation are likely overestimations for both marijuana and tobacco cigarette smoke.

  20. SU-G-BRC-15: The Potential Clinical Significance of Dose Mapping Error for Intra- Fraction Dose Mapping for Lung Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayah, N [Thomas Cancer Center, Richmond, VA (United States); Weiss, E [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Watkins, W [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Siebers, J [University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dose-mapping error (DME) inherent to conventional dose-mapping algorithms as a function of dose-matrix resolution. Methods: As DME has been reported to be greatest where dose-gradients overlap tissue-density gradients, non-clinical 66 Gy IMRT plans were generated for 11 lung patients with the target edge defined as the maximum 3D density gradient on the 0% (end of inhale) breathing phase. Post-optimization, Beams were copied to 9 breathing phases. Monte Carlo dose computed (with 2*2*2 mm{sup 3} resolution) on all 10 breathing phases was deformably mapped to phase 0% using the Monte Carlo energy-transfer method with congruent mass-mapping (EMCM); an externally implemented tri-linear interpolation method with voxel sub-division; Pinnacle’s internal (tri-linear) method; and a post-processing energy-mass voxel-warping method (dTransform). All methods used the same base displacement-vector-field (or it’s pseudo-inverse as appropriate) for the dose mapping. Mapping was also performed at 4*4*4 mm{sup 3} by merging adjacent dose voxels. Results: Using EMCM as the reference standard, no clinically significant (>1 Gy) DMEs were found for the mean lung dose (MLD), lung V20Gy, or esophagus dose-volume indices, although MLD and V20Gy were statistically different (2*2*2 mm{sup 3}). Pinnacle-to-EMCM target D98% DMEs of 4.4 and 1.2 Gy were observed ( 2*2*2 mm{sup 3}). However dTransform, which like EMCM conserves integral dose, had DME >1 Gy for one case. The root mean square RMS of the DME for the tri-linear-to- EMCM methods was lower for the smaller voxel volume for the tumor 4D-D98%, lung V20Gy, and cord D1%. Conclusion: When tissue gradients overlap with dose gradients, organs-at-risk DME was statistically significant but not clinically significant. Target-D98%-DME was deemed clinically significant for 2/11 patients (2*2*2 mm{sup 3}). Since tri-linear RMS-DME between EMCM and tri-linear was reduced at 2*2*2 mm{sup 3}, use of this resolution is

  1. Six fractions per week of external beam radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix: A phase I/II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Min; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Lee, Jeung Eun; Park, Young Je; Nam, Hee Rim; Lim, Do Hoon; Ahn, Yong Chan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the treatment results of external beam radiotherapy administered in six fractions per week and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From July 2000 to July 2003, 43 patients were enrolled in this study. The patients received 45 Gy from a 10-MV photon beam using four-field box or anterior-posterior beams. Parametrial regions and the pelvic side walls were boosted with up to 50.4 Gy using a midline block. The daily fraction dose was 1.8 Gy administered in six-weekly fractions, from Monday to Saturday. HDR brachytherapy was also delivered at doses of 24 Gy to point A in six fractions twice a week. The median follow-up time was 37 months (range, 9-60 months). Results: The median overall treatment time was 51 days for all patients (range, 44-62 days). Thirty-four patients (79.1%) achieved complete remission and 8 (18.6%) achieved partial remission after radiotherapy. Locoregional recurrence occurred in 5 patients (11.6%), and a distant metastasis was encountered in 6 patients (13.9%). The 3-year overall survival, locoregional, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 74.7%, 87.8%, and 84.7%, respectively. Grade 2 and 3 late rectal complications were encountered in 3 (6.5%) and 1 (2.2%), respectively. There were no Grade 3 late bladder complications. Conclusions: Six fractions per week of external beam radiotherapy and HDR brachytherapy is an effective treatment for patients with a carcinoma of the uterine cervix and can be used as a possible alternative to concomitant chemoradiotherapy in elderly patients or in patients with co-morbidity

  2. Compliance to the prescribed dose and overall treatment time in five randomized clinical trials of altered fractionation in radiotherapy for head-and-neck carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, Azza A.; Bentzen, Soeren M.; Bernier, Jacques; Saunders, Michele I.; Horiot, Jean-Claude; Bogaert, Walter van den; Cummings, Bernard J.; Dische, Stanley

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate compliance to the prescribed dose-fractionation schedule in five randomized controlled trials of altered fractionation in radiotherapy for head-and-neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Individual patient data from 2566 patients participating in the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 22791, EORTC 22811, EORTC 22851, Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH), and continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (CHART) head-and-neck trials were merged in the fractionation IMPACT (Intergroup Merger of Patient data from Altered or Conventional Treatment schedules) study database. The ideal treatment time was defined as the minimum time required to deliver a prescribed schedule. Compliance to the prescribed overall treatment time was quantified as the difference between the actual and the ideal overall time. An overall measure of compliance in an individual patient, the total dose lost (TDL), was calculated as the dose lost due to prolongation of therapy (assuming a D prolif of 0.64 Gy/day) plus the difference between the prescribed and the actual dose given. Results: The time in excess of the ideal ranged up to 97 days (average 3.9 days), and 25% of the patients had delays of 6 days or more. World Health Organization (WHO) performance status and nodal stage had a significant effect on TDL. TDL was significantly higher in the conventional than in the altered arm of the EORTC 22851 and CHART trials. In the PMH trial, TDL was significantly higher in the hyperfractionation than in the conventional arm. Centers participating in the three EORTC trials varied significantly in their compliance. There was a significant improvement in compliance in patients treated more recently. Conclusions: Even in randomized controlled trials, compliance to the prescribed radiation therapy schedule may be relatively poor, especially after conventional fractionation. This affects the interpretation of the outcome of these trials

  3. The relationship between sol fraction and radiation dose in radiation crosslinking of low-density polyethylene (LDPE)/ethylenevinylacetate copolymer (EVA) blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.X.; Liu, Y.T.; Sun, J.Z.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, two different methods were used to prepare the blend of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA). One of them was mechanical blending, and the other was solution blending. The relationship between sol fraction and radiation dose of different weight ratio polymer blends has been studied. The method to calculate the β b value of polymer blend system (LDPE/EVA) has been established. (author)

  4. Effect of fractionated X-ray doses on the hemogram and the protein formula of the mouse; Action de doses fractionnees de rayons X sur l'hemogramme et la formule proteique de la souris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alix, D; Pierotti, Th [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The authors have studied the action of small doses of radiation on the system of mice. Irradiations was performed at doses of 50, 100, 150 or 200 R according to groups, either, as single dose or as fractionated doses. It was established that changes begin to become evident only after total exposure of 100 R. It occurs a decrease of cellular constituents and more often than not an increase of total proteins and {gamma}-globulins. (authors) [French] Les auteurs ont etudie l'action des faibles doses de radiation sur la souris. Des irradiations furent pratiquees a des doses totales de 50, 100, 150 ou 200 R suivant les lots, soit en dose unique, soit en doses fractionnees. Ils ont constate que les modifications ne commencent a apparaitre nettement qu'apres une exposition de 100 R au total. Elles se font dans le sens de la diminution pour les elements cellulaires, le plus souvent dans le sens de l'augmentation pour les proteines totales et les {gamma}-globulines. (auteurs)

  5. Autologous stem cell transplantation following high-dose whole-body irradiation of dogs - influence of cell number and fractionation regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenberger, U.

    1981-01-01

    The acute radiation syndrome after a single dose of 1600 R (approx. 12-14 Gy in body midline) and after fractionated irradiation with 2400 R (approx. 18-20 Gy) was studied with regard to fractionation time and to the number of bone marrow cells infused. The acute radiation syndrome consisted of damage to the alimentary tract and of damage to the hemopoietic system. Damage of hemopoiesis was reversible in dogs which had been given a sufficient amount of hemopoietic cells. Furthermore changes in skin and in the mucous membranes occurred. Hemopoietic recovery following infusion of various amounts of bone marrow was investigated in dogs which were irradiated with 2400 R within 7 days. Repopulation of bone marrow as well as rise of leukocyte and platelet counts in the peripheral blood was taken as evidence of complete hemopoietic reconstitution. The results indicate that the acute radiation syndrom following 2400 R TBI and autologous BMT can be controlled by fractionation of this dose within 5 or 7 days. The acute gastrointestinal syndrome is aggravated by infusion of a lesser amount of hemopoietic cells. However, TBI with 2400 R does not require greater numbers of hemopoietic cells for restoration of hemopoiesis. Thus, the hemopoiesis supporting tissue can not be damage by this radiation dose to an essential degree. Longterm observations have not revealed serious late defects which could represent a contraindication to the treatment of malignent diseases with 2400 R of TBI. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Risk assessment of excess drug and sunscreen absorption via skin with ablative fractional laser resurfacing : optimization of the applied dose for postoperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Fang, Chia-Lang; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Yang, Hung-Hsu; Li, Yi-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2013-09-01

    The ablative fractional laser is a new modality used for surgical resurfacing. It is expected that laser treatment can generally deliver drugs into and across the skin, which is toxicologically relevant. The aim of this study was to establish skin absorption characteristics of antibiotics, sunscreens, and macromolecules via laser-treated skin and during postoperative periods. Nude mice were employed as the animal model. The skin received a single irradiation of a fractional CO2 laser, using fluences of 4-10 mJ with spot densities of 100-400 spots/cm(2). In vitro skin permeation using Franz cells was performed. Levels of skin water loss and erythema were evaluated, and histological examinations with staining by hematoxylin and eosin, cyclooxygenase-2, and claudin-1 were carried out. Significant signs of erythema, edema, and scaling of the skin treated with the fractional laser were evident. Inflammatory infiltration and a reduction in tight junctions were also observed. Laser treatment at 6 mJ increased tetracycline and tretinoin fluxes by 70- and 9-fold, respectively. A higher fluence resulted in a greater tetracycline flux, but lower skin deposition. On the other hand, tretinoin skin deposition increased following an increase in the laser fluence. The fractional laser exhibited a negligible effect on modulating oxybenzone absorption. Dextrans with molecular weights of 4 and 10 kDa showed increased fluxes from 0.05 to 11.05 and 38.54 μg/cm(2)/h, respectively. The optimized drug dose for skin treated with the fractional laser was 1/70-1/60 of the regular dose. The skin histology and drug absorption had recovered to a normal status within 2-3 days. Our findings provide the first report on risk assessment of excessive skin absorption after fractional laser resurfacing.

  7. Fractional carbon dioxide laser versus low-dose UVA-1 phototherapy for treatment of localized scleroderma: a clinical and immunohistochemical randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaby, S M; Bosseila, M; Fawzy, M M; Abdel Halim, D M; Sayed, S S; Allam, R S H M

    2016-11-01

    Morphea is a rare fibrosing skin disorder that occurs as a result of abnormal homogenized collagen synthesis. Fractional ablative laser resurfacing has been used effectively in scar treatment via abnormal collagen degradation and induction of healthy collagen synthesis. Therefore, fractional ablative laser can provide an effective modality in treatment of morphea. The study aimed at evaluating the efficacy of fractional carbon dioxide laser as a new modality for the treatment of localized scleroderma and to compare its results with the well-established method of UVA-1 phototherapy. Seventeen patients with plaque and linear morphea were included in this parallel intra-individual comparative randomized controlled clinical trial. Each with two comparable morphea lesions that were randomly assigned to either 30 sessions of low-dose (30 J/cm 2 ) UVA-1 phototherapy (340-400 nm) or 3 sessions of fractional CO 2 laser (10,600 nm-power 25 W). The response to therapy was then evaluated clinically and histopathologically via validated scoring systems. Immunohistochemical analysis of TGF-ß1 and MMP1 was done. Patient satisfaction was also assessed. Wilcoxon signed rank test for paired (matched) samples and Spearman rank correlation equation were used as indicated. Comparing the two groups, there was an obvious improvement with fractional CO 2 laser that was superior to that of low-dose UVA-1 phototherapy. Statistically, there was a significant difference in the clinical scores (p = 0.001), collagen homogenization scores (p = 0.012), and patient satisfaction scores (p = 0.001). In conclusion, fractional carbon dioxide laser is a promising treatment modality for cases of localized morphea, with proved efficacy of this treatment on clinical and histopathological levels.

  8. Synthetic Smectite Colloids: Characterization of Nanoparticles after Co-Precipitation in the Presence of Lanthanides and Tetravalent Elements (Zr, Th

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Bouby

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The magnesian smectite hectorite is a corrosion product frequently detected in nuclear waste glass alteration experiments. The structural incorporation of a single trivalent lanthanide was previously demonstrated. Hectorite was presently synthesized, for the first time, in the presence of several lanthanides (La, Eu, Yb following a multi-step synthesis protocol. The smallest-sized particles (nanoparticles, NPs were isolated by centrifugation and analyzed by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF coupled to ICP-MS, in order to obtain information on the elemental composition and distribution as a function of the size. Nanoparticles can be separated from the bulk smectite phase. The particles are able to accommodate even the larger-sized lanthanides such as La, however, with lower efficiency. We, therefore, assume that the incorporation proceeds by substitution for octahedral Mg accompanied by a concomitant lattice strain that increases with the size of the lanthanides. The presence of a mixture does not seem to affect the incorporation extent of any specific element. Furthermore, syntheses were performed where in addition the tetravalent zirconium or thorium elements were admixed, as this oxidation state may prevail for many actinide ions in a nuclear waste repository. The results show that they can be incorporated as well.

  9. Patterns of Local Recurrence and Dose Fractionation of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in 462 Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity and Trunk Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jebsen, Nina L., E-mail: nina.louise.jebsen@helse-bergen.no [Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Engellau, Jacob [Department of Oncology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund (Sweden); Engström, Katarina [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Bauer, Henrik C. [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section for Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Monge, Odd R. [Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Muren, Ludvig P. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Eide, Geir E. [Centre for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Trovik, Clement S. [Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Bruland, Øyvind S. [Department of Oncology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of dose fractionation of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) on local recurrence (LR) and the relation of LR to radiation fields. Methods and Materials: LR rates were analyzed in 462 adult patients with soft tissue sarcoma who underwent surgical excision and adjuvant RT at five Scandinavian sarcoma centers from 1998 to 2009. Medical records were reviewed for dose fractionation parameters and to determine the location of the LR relative to the radiation portals. Results: Fifty-five of 462 patients developed a LR (11.9%). Negative prognostic factors included intralesional surgical margin (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.83, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.08-20.0), high malignancy grade (HR: 5.82, 95% CI: 1.31-25.8), age at diagnosis (HR per 10 years: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.03-1.56), and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor histological subtype (HR: 6.66, 95% CI: 2.56-17.3). RT dose was tailored to margin status. No correlation between RT dose and LR rate was found in multiple Cox regression analysis. The majority (65%) of LRs occurred within the primary RT volume. Conclusions: No significant dose–response effect of adjuvant RT was demonstrated. Interestingly, patients given 45-Gy accelerated RT (1.8 Gy twice daily/2.5 weeks) had the best local outcome. A total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions seemed adequate following wide margin surgery. The risk of LR was associated with histopathologic subtype, which should be included in the treatment algorithm of adjuvant RT in soft tissue sarcoma.

  10. Patterns of Local Recurrence and Dose Fractionation of Adjuvant Radiation Therapy in 462 Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity and Trunk Wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jebsen, Nina L.; Engellau, Jacob; Engström, Katarina; Bauer, Henrik C.; Monge, Odd R.; Muren, Ludvig P.; Eide, Geir E.; Trovik, Clement S.; Bruland, Øyvind S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of dose fractionation of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) on local recurrence (LR) and the relation of LR to radiation fields. Methods and Materials: LR rates were analyzed in 462 adult patients with soft tissue sarcoma who underwent surgical excision and adjuvant RT at five Scandinavian sarcoma centers from 1998 to 2009. Medical records were reviewed for dose fractionation parameters and to determine the location of the LR relative to the radiation portals. Results: Fifty-five of 462 patients developed a LR (11.9%). Negative prognostic factors included intralesional surgical margin (hazard ratio [HR]: 7.83, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.08-20.0), high malignancy grade (HR: 5.82, 95% CI: 1.31-25.8), age at diagnosis (HR per 10 years: 1.27, 95% CI: 1.03-1.56), and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor histological subtype (HR: 6.66, 95% CI: 2.56-17.3). RT dose was tailored to margin status. No correlation between RT dose and LR rate was found in multiple Cox regression analysis. The majority (65%) of LRs occurred within the primary RT volume. Conclusions: No significant dose–response effect of adjuvant RT was demonstrated. Interestingly, patients given 45-Gy accelerated RT (1.8 Gy twice daily/2.5 weeks) had the best local outcome. A total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions seemed adequate following wide margin surgery. The risk of LR was associated with histopathologic subtype, which should be included in the treatment algorithm of adjuvant RT in soft tissue sarcoma

  11. Preparation of hexavalent plutonium and its determination in the presence of tetravalent plutonium; Preparation de plutonium hexavalent et dosage en presence de plutonium tetravalent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corpel, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Corpel, J [Institut du Radium, 75 - Paris (France)

    1958-07-01

    In order to study the eventual reduction of plutonium from the VI-valent state to the IV-valent state, in sulphuric medium, under the influence of its own {alpha} radiation or of the {gamma}-rays from a cobalt-60 source, we have developed a method for preparing pure hexavalent plutonium and two methods for determining solutions containing tetravalent and hexavalent plutonium simultaneously. Hexavalent plutonium was prepared by anodic oxidation at a platinum electrode. Study of the oxidation yield as a function of various factors has made it possible to define experimental conditions giving complete oxidation. For concentrations in total plutonium greater than 1.5 x 10{sup -3} M, determination of the two valencies IV and VI was carried out by spectrophotometry at two wavelengths. For lower concentrations, the determination was done by counting, after separation of the tetravalent plutonium in the form of fluoride in the presence of a carrier. (author) [French] Afin d'etudier l'eventuelle reduction du plutonium de l'etat de valence VI a l'etat de valence IV, en milieu sulfurique sous l'influence de son propre rayonnement {alpha} ou des rayons {gamma} d'une source de cobalt-60, nous avons mis au point une methode de preparation de plutonium hexavalent pur et deux methodes de dosage des solutions contenant simultanement du plutonium tetravalent et du plutonium hexavalent. Nous avons prepare le plutonium hexavalent par oxydation anodique au contact d'une electrode de platine. L'etude de rendement de l'oxydation en fonction des divers facteurs nous a permis de definir des conditions experimentales donnant une oxydation complete. Pour des concentrations en plutonium total superieures a 1,5.10{sup -3} M, le dosage des deux valences IV et VI a ete realise par spectrophotometrie a deux longueurs d'onde. Pour des concentrations inferieures, le dosage a ete effectue par comptage apres separation du plutonium tetravalent sous la forme du fluorure en presence d'un entraineur

  12. Radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses of repeated single-fraction hdr-irradiation of intersecting small liver volumes for recurrent hepatic metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wust Peter

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess radiobiological restrictions and tolerance doses as well as other toxic effects derived from repeated applications of single-fraction high dose rate irradiation of small liver volumes in clinical practice. Methods Twenty patients with liver metastases were treated repeatedly (2 - 4 times at identical or intersecting locations by CT-guided interstitial brachytherapy with varying time intervals. Magnetic resonance imaging using the hepatocyte selective contrast media Gd-BOPTA was performed before and after treatment to determine the volume of hepatocyte function loss (called pseudolesion, and the last acquired MRI data set was merged with the dose distributions of all administered brachytherapies. We calculated the BED (biologically equivalent dose for a single dose d = 2 Gy for different α/β values (2, 3, 10, 20, 100 based on the linear-quadratic model and estimated the tolerance dose for liver parenchyma D90 as the BED exposing 90% of the pseudolesion in MRI. Results The tolerance doses D90 after repeated brachytherapy sessions were found between 22 - 24 Gy and proved only slightly dependent on α/β in the clinically relevant range of α/β = 2 - 10 Gy. Variance analysis showed a significant dependency of D90 with respect to the intervals between the first irradiation and the MRI control (p 90 and the pseudolesion's volume. No symptoms of liver dysfunction or other toxic effects such as abscess formation occurred during the follow-up time, neither acute nor on the long-term. Conclusions Inactivation of liver parenchyma occurs at a BED of approx. 22 - 24 Gy corresponding to a single dose of ~10 Gy (α/β ~ 5 Gy. This tolerance dose is consistent with the large potential to treat oligotopic and/or recurrent liver metastases by CT-guided HDR brachytherapy without radiation-induced liver disease (RILD. Repeated small volume irradiation may be applied safely within the limits of this study.

  13. Differences in Clinical Results After LINAC-Based Single-Dose Radiosurgery Versus Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Patients With Vestibular Schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, Stephanie E.; Welzel, Thomas; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Huber, Peter E.; Debus, Juergen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) vs. those treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: This study is based on an analysis of 200 patients with 202 VSs treated with FSRT (n = 172) or SRS (n = 30). Patients with tumor progression and/or progression of clinical symptoms were selected for treatment. In 165 out of 202 VSs (82%), RT was performed as the primary treatment for VS, and for 37 VSs (18%), RT was conducted for tumor progression after neurosurgical intervention. For patients receiving FSRT, a median total dose of 57.6 Gy was prescribed, with a median fractionation of 5 x 1.8 Gy per week. For patients who underwent SRS, a median single dose of 13 Gy was prescribed to the 80% isodose. Results: FSRT and SRS were well tolerated. Median follow-up time was 75 months. Local control was not statistically different for both groups. The probability of maintaining the pretreatment hearing level after SRS with doses of ≤13 Gy was comparable to that of FSRT. The radiation dose for the SRS group (≤13 Gy vs. >13 Gy) significantly influenced hearing preservation rates (p = 0.03). In the group of patients treated with SRS doses of ≤13 Gy, cranial nerve toxicity was comparable to that of the FSRT group. Conclusions: FSRT and SRS are both safe and effective alternatives for the treatment of VS. Local control rates are comparable in both groups. SRS with doses of ≤13 Gy is a safe alternative to FSRT. While FSRT can be applied safely for the treatment of VSs of all sizes, SRS should be reserved for smaller lesions.

  14. Development of a Novel Tetravalent Synthetic Peptide That Binds to Phosphatidic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Ogawa

    Full Text Available We employed a multivalent peptide-library screening technique to identify a peptide motif that binds to phosphatidic acid (PA, but not to other phospholipids such as phosphatidylcholine (PC, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE, and phosphatidylserine (PS. A tetravalent peptide with the sequence motif of MARWHRHHH, designated as PAB-TP (phosphatidic acid-binding tetravalent peptide, was shown to bind as low as 1 mol% of PA in the bilayer membrane composed of PC and cholesterol. Kinetic analysis of the interaction between PAB-TP and the membranes containing 10 mol% of PA showed that PAB-TP associated with PA with a low dissociation constant of KD = 38 ± 5 nM. Coexistence of cholesterol or PE with PA in the membrane enhanced the PAB-TP binding to PA by increasing the ionization of the phosphomonoester head group as well as by changing the microenvironment of PA molecules in the membrane. Amino acid replacement analysis demonstrated that the tryptophan residue at position 4 of PAB-TP was involved in the interaction with PA. Furthermore, a series of amino acid substitutions at positions 5 to 9 of PAB-TP revealed the involvement of consecutive histidine and arginine residues in recognition of the phosphomonoester head group of PA. Our results demonstrate that the recognition of PA by PAB-TP is achieved by a combination of hydrophobic, electrostatic and hydrogen-bond interactions, and that the tetravalent structure of PAB-TP contributes to the high affinity binding to PA in the membrane. The novel PA-binding tetravalent peptide PAB-TP will provide insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the recognition of PA by PA-binding proteins that are involved in various cellular events.

  15. Preparation and use of crystalline bis-monoorganic phosphonate and phosphate salts of tetravalent metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, L.

    1980-06-26

    A method of preparing and using the crystalline organic derivatives of the tetravalent metal phosphates and phosphonates provides for the contacting of an aqueous solution of a metal nitrate, with a solution of an organophosphorus acid for a period of time at room temperature that is sufficient for the formation of a metal phosphate product, and thereafter recovering said product. According to the invention, the product of the disclosed process is used in effecting analytical separations, such as ion exchange and chromatography.

  16. SU-F-T-02: Estimation of Radiobiological Doses (BED and EQD2) of Single Fraction Electronic Brachytherapy That Equivalent to I-125 Eye Plaque: By Using Linear-Quadratic and Universal Survival Curve Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y; Waldron, T; Pennington, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test the radiobiological impact of hypofractionated choroidal melanoma brachytherapy, we calculated single fraction equivalent doses (SFED) of the tumor that equivalent to 85 Gy of I125-BT for 20 patients. Corresponding organs-at-risks (OARs) doses were estimated. Methods: Twenty patients treated with I125-BT were retrospectively examined. The tumor SFED values were calculated from tumor BED using a conventional linear-quadratic (L-Q) model and an universal survival curve (USC). The opposite retina (α/β = 2.58), macula (2.58), optic disc (1.75), and lens (1.2) were examined. The % doses of OARs over tumor doses were assumed to be the same as for a single fraction delivery. The OAR SFED values were converted into BED and equivalent dose in 2 Gy fraction (EQD2) by using both L-Q and USC models, then compared to I125-BT. Results: The USC-based BED and EQD2 doses of the macula, optic disc, and the lens were on average 118 ± 46% (p 14 Gy). Conclusion: The estimated single fraction doses were feasible to be delivered within 1 hour using a high dose rate source such as electronic brachytherapy (eBT). However, the estimated OAR doses using eBT were 112 ∼ 118% higher than when using the I125-BT technique. Continued exploration of alternative dose rate or fractionation schedules should be followed.

  17. Outcome of Patients Treated With a Single-Fraction Dose of Palliative Radiation for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Tarita O.; Agrawal, Priya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Guitart, Joan [Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Rosen, Steven T. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Rademaker, Alfred W. [Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Querfeld, Christiane [Department of Medicine/Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Hayes, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Kuzel, Timothy M. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Mittal, Bharat B., E-mail: bmittal@nmh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a radiosensitive tumor. Presently, treatment with radiation is given in multiple fractions. The current literature lacks data that support single-fraction treatment for CTCL. This retrospective review assesses the clinical response in patients treated with a single fraction of radiation. Methods and Materials: This study reviewed the records of 58 patients with CTCL, primarily mycosis fungoides, treated with a single fraction of palliative radiation therapy (RT) between October 1991 and January 2011. Patient and tumor characteristics were reviewed. Response rates were compared using Fisher's exact test and multiple logistic regressions. Survival rates were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to assess the cost of a single vs a multifractionated treatment regimen. Results: Two hundred seventy individual lesions were treated, with the majority (97%) treated with ≥700 cGy; mean follow-up was 41.3 months (range, 3-180 months). Response rate by lesion was assessed, with a complete response (CR) in 255 (94.4%) lesions, a partial response in 10 (3.7%) lesions, a partial response converted to a CR after a second treatment in 4 (1.5%) lesions, and no response in 1 (0.4%) lesion. The CR in lower extremity lesions was lower than in other sites (P=.0016). Lesions treated with photons had lower CR than those treated with electrons (P=.017). Patients with lesions exhibiting large cell transformation and tumor morphology had lower CR (P=.04 and P=.035, respectively). Immunophenotype did not impact response rate (P=.23). Overall survival was significantly lower for patients with Sézary syndrome (P=.0003) and erythroderma (P<.0001). The cost of multifractionated radiation was >200% higher than that for single-fraction radiation. Conclusions: A single fraction of 700 cGy-800 cGy provides excellent palliation for CTCL lesions and is cost effective and convenient for the patient.

  18. Outcome of Patients Treated With a Single-Fraction Dose of Palliative Radiation for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Tarita O.; Agrawal, Priya; Guitart, Joan; Rosen, Steven T.; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Querfeld, Christiane; Hayes, John P.; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Mittal, Bharat B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a radiosensitive tumor. Presently, treatment with radiation is given in multiple fractions. The current literature lacks data that support single-fraction treatment for CTCL. This retrospective review assesses the clinical response in patients treated with a single fraction of radiation. Methods and Materials: This study reviewed the records of 58 patients with CTCL, primarily mycosis fungoides, treated with a single fraction of palliative radiation therapy (RT) between October 1991 and January 2011. Patient and tumor characteristics were reviewed. Response rates were compared using Fisher's exact test and multiple logistic regressions. Survival rates were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to assess the cost of a single vs a multifractionated treatment regimen. Results: Two hundred seventy individual lesions were treated, with the majority (97%) treated with ≥700 cGy; mean follow-up was 41.3 months (range, 3-180 months). Response rate by lesion was assessed, with a complete response (CR) in 255 (94.4%) lesions, a partial response in 10 (3.7%) lesions, a partial response converted to a CR after a second treatment in 4 (1.5%) lesions, and no response in 1 (0.4%) lesion. The CR in lower extremity lesions was lower than in other sites (P=.0016). Lesions treated with photons had lower CR than those treated with electrons (P=.017). Patients with lesions exhibiting large cell transformation and tumor morphology had lower CR (P=.04 and P=.035, respectively). Immunophenotype did not impact response rate (P=.23). Overall survival was significantly lower for patients with Sézary syndrome (P=.0003) and erythroderma (P 200% higher than that for single-fraction radiation. Conclusions: A single fraction of 700 cGy-800 cGy provides excellent palliation for CTCL lesions and is cost effective and convenient for the patient

  19. In silico prediction of monovalent and chimeric tetravalent vaccines for prevention and treatment of dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Subramaniyan; Ramesh, Venkatachalam; Prabhu, Srinivasan; Manogar, Palani

    2017-11-01

    Reverse vaccinology method was used to predict the monovalent peptide vaccine candidate to produce antibodies for therapeutic purpose and to predict tetravalent vaccine candidate to act as a common vaccine to cover all the fever dengue virus serotypes. Envelope (E)-proteins of DENV-1-4 serotypes were used for vaccine prediction using NCBI, Uniprot/Swissprot, Swiss-prot viewer, VaxiJen V2.0, TMHMM, BCPREDS, Propred-1, Propred and MHC Pred,. E-proteins of DENV-1-4 serotypes were identified as antigen from which T cell epitopes, through B cell epitopes, were predicted to act as peptide vaccine candidates. Each selected T cell epitope of E-protein was confirmed to act as vaccine and to induce complementary antibody against particular serotype of dengue virus. Chimeric tetravalent vaccine was formed by the conjugation of four vaccines, each from four dengue serotypes to act as a common vaccine candidate for all the four dengue serotypes. It can be justifiably concluded that the monovalent 9-mer T cell epitope for each DENV serotypes can be used to produce specific antibody agaomst dengue virus and a chimeric common tetravalent vaccine candidate to yield a comparative vaccine to cover any of the four dengue virus serotype. This vaccine is expected to act as highly immunogenic against preventing dengue fever.

  20. Immune responses after fractional doses of inactivated poliovirus vaccine using newly developed intradermal jet injectors: a randomized controlled trial in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resik, Sonia; Tejeda, Alina; Mach, Ondrej; Fonseca, Magile; Diaz, Manuel; Alemany, Nilda; Garcia, Gloria; Hung, Lai Heng; Martinez, Yenisleydis; Sutter, Roland

    2015-01-03

    The World Health Organization recommends that, as part of the new polio endgame, a dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) be introduced by the end of 2015 in all countries using only oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV). Administration of fractional dose (1/5th of full dose) IPV (fIPV) intradermally may reduce costs, but its administration is cumbersome with BCG needle and syringe. We evaluated performance of two newly developed intradermal-only jet injectors and compared the immune response induced by fIPV with that induced by full-dose IPV. Children between 12 and 20 months of age, who had previously received two doses of OPV, were enrolled in Camaguey, Cuba. Subjects received a single dose of IPV (either full-dose IPV intramuscularly with needle and syringe or fIPV intradermally administered with one of two new injectors or with BCG needle or a conventional needle-free injector). Serum was tested for presence of poliovirus neutralizing antibodies on day 0 (pre-IPV) and on days 3, 7 and 21 (post-vaccination). Complete data were available from 74.2% (728/981) subjects. Baseline median antibody titers were 713, 284, and 113 for poliovirus types 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Seroprevalence at study end were similar across the intervention groups (≥ 94.8%). The immune response induced with one new injector was similar to BCG needle and to the conventional injector; and superior to the other new injector. fIPV induced significantly lower boosting response compared to full-dose IPV. No safety concerns were identified. One of the two new injectors demonstrated its ability to streamline intradermal fIPV administration, however, further investigations are needed to assess the potential contribution of fIPV in the polio endgame plan. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dose and Fractionation in Radiation Therapy of Curative Intent for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramroth, Johanna; Cutter, David J.; Darby, Sarah C. [Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Higgins, Geoff S. [Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); McGale, Paul [Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Partridge, Mike [CRUK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Taylor, Carolyn W., E-mail: carolyn.taylor@ndph.ox.ac.uk [Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: The optimum dose and fractionation in radiation therapy of curative intent for non-small cell lung cancer remains uncertain. We undertook a published data meta-analysis of randomized trials to examine whether radiation therapy regimens with higher time-corrected biologically equivalent doses resulted in longer survival, either when given alone or when given with chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eligible studies were randomized comparisons of 2 or more radiation therapy regimens, with other treatments identical. Median survival ratios were calculated for each comparison and pooled. Results: 3795 patients in 25 randomized comparisons of radiation therapy dose were studied. The median survival ratio, higher versus lower corrected dose, was 1.13 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.22) when radiation therapy was given alone and 0.83 (95% CI 0.71-0.97) when it was given with concurrent chemotherapy (P for difference=.001). In comparisons of radiation therapy given alone, the survival benefit increased with increasing dose difference between randomized treatment arms (P for trend=.004). The benefit increased with increasing dose in the lower-dose arm (P for trend=.01) without reaching a level beyond which no further survival benefit was achieved. The survival benefit did not differ significantly between randomized comparisons where the higher-dose arm was hyperfractionated and those where it was not. There was heterogeneity in the median survival ratio by geographic region (P<.001), average age at randomization (P<.001), and year trial started (P for trend=.004), but not for proportion of patients with squamous cell carcinoma (P=.2). Conclusions: In trials with concurrent chemotherapy, higher radiation therapy doses resulted in poorer survival, possibly caused, at least in part, by high levels of toxicity. Where radiation therapy was given without chemotherapy, progressively higher radiation therapy doses resulted in progressively longer survival, and no

  2. Dose and Fractionation in Radiation Therapy of Curative Intent for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramroth, Johanna; Cutter, David J.; Darby, Sarah C.; Higgins, Geoff S.; McGale, Paul; Partridge, Mike; Taylor, Carolyn W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The optimum dose and fractionation in radiation therapy of curative intent for non-small cell lung cancer remains uncertain. We undertook a published data meta-analysis of randomized trials to examine whether radiation therapy regimens with higher time-corrected biologically equivalent doses resulted in longer survival, either when given alone or when given with chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eligible studies were randomized comparisons of 2 or more radiation therapy regimens, with other treatments identical. Median survival ratios were calculated for each comparison and pooled. Results: 3795 patients in 25 randomized comparisons of radiation therapy dose were studied. The median survival ratio, higher versus lower corrected dose, was 1.13 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-1.22) when radiation therapy was given alone and 0.83 (95% CI 0.71-0.97) when it was given with concurrent chemotherapy (P for difference=.001). In comparisons of radiation therapy given alone, the survival benefit increased with increasing dose difference between randomized treatment arms (P for trend=.004). The benefit increased with increasing dose in the lower-dose arm (P for trend=.01) without reaching a level beyond which no further survival benefit was achieved. The survival benefit did not differ significantly between randomized comparisons where the higher-dose arm was hyperfractionated and those where it was not. There was heterogeneity in the median survival ratio by geographic region (P<.001), average age at randomization (P<.001), and year trial started (P for trend=.004), but not for proportion of patients with squamous cell carcinoma (P=.2). Conclusions: In trials with concurrent chemotherapy, higher radiation therapy doses resulted in poorer survival, possibly caused, at least in part, by high levels of toxicity. Where radiation therapy was given without chemotherapy, progressively higher radiation therapy doses resulted in progressively longer survival, and no

  3. Stage, tumor growth rate and optimal dose fractionation schedules in the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Tadashi; Morita, Mamoru; Aihara, Toshinori; Tanaka, Osamu

    1983-01-01

    In 77 patients with cancer of the head and neck, 45 patients received radiotherapy alone, while 32 patients with T 1 or T 2 glottic cancer received combined therapy with laryngomicrosurgery performed prior to or during the course of irradiation. These T 1 and T 2 groups were separately analyzed from other T 1 and T 2 groups as T sub(LMS). Local recurrence rates were compared concerning overall time and fraction size in following three subgroups, i.e., T sub(LMS), Tsub(1+2), and Tsub(3+4). No significant correlation was detected between total dose converted to partial tolerance (PT) and local control in all subgroups except for Tsub(3+4), in which local recurrence rate was rather higher in high PT range. Local control was significantly dependent on overall treatment time and fraction size, differently by tumor stage. Favorable fractionation schedules considered as optimal for T sub(LMS) were those in which treatment was given 5 times weekly with a daily dose rate more than 196 rad in a shorter overall time of less than 42 days. In contrast to T sub(LMS), effective schedules for Tsub(3+4) consisted of longer overall time of more than 60 days and a lower daily dose rate of less than 153 rad. In Tsub(1+2), the optimal schedule was needed to be altered according to rapidness of progression of disease characterised by duration of the complaints, which was statistically proved to be significantly shorter in Tsub(1+2) than Tsub(3+4). Rapidity-adjusted schedule consisted of a shorter over-all time of less than 49 days with a daily dose rate of more than 175 rad 5 fractions a week for a case having a duration of complaints of less than 2.9 months, and a longer overall time of more than 50 days with a daily dose rate of less than 174 rad for a case having a duration of more than 3 months. (J.P.N.)

  4. Secondary malignancies in patients with stage IA-IIIA Hodgkin's lymphoma after radiation (chemoradiation) therapy using accelerated dose fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinajko, V.V.; Minajlo, I.I.; Veyakin, I.V.

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of secondary malignancies was investigated in 367 patients with stage IA-IIIA Hodgkin's lymphoma after radiation therapy using accelerated fractionation. For 20 years of the observation 24 of them developed 27(7.4%) tumors, besides their frequency did not depend on the disease stage and method of treatment.

  5. Experimentally induced, synergistic late effects of a single dose of radiation and aging: significance in LKS fraction as compared with mature blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Yoko; Tsuboi, Isao; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Inoue, Tohru

    2015-03-01

    The number of murine mature blood cells recovered within 6 weeks after 2-Gy whole-body irradiation at 6 weeks of age, whereas in the case of the undifferentiated hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSC/HPC) compartment [cells in the lineage-negative, c-kit-positive and stem-cell-antigen-1-positive (LKS) fraction], the numerical differences between mice with and without irradiation remained more than a year, but conclusively the cells showed numerical recovery. When mice were exposed to radiation at 6 months of age, acute damages of mature blood cells were rather milder probably because of their maturation with age; but again, cells in the LKS fraction were specifically damaged, and their numerical recovery was significantly delayed probably as a result of LKS-specific cellular damages. Interestingly, in contrast to the recovery of the number of cells in the LKS fraction, their quality was not recovered, which was quantitatively assessed on the basis of oxidative-stress-related fluorescence intensity. To investigate why the recovery in the number of cells in the LKS fraction was delayed, expression levels of genes related to cellular proliferation and apoptosis of cells in the bone marrow and LKS fraction were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In the case of 21-month-old mice after radiation exposure, Ccnd1, PiK3r1 and Fyn were overexpressed solely in cells in the LKS fraction. Because Ccnd1and PiK3r1 upregulated by aging were further upregulated by radiation, single-dose radiation seemed to induce the acceleration of aging, which is related to the essential biological responses during aging based on a lifetime-dependent relationship between a living creature and xenobiotic materials. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Dosimetric evaluation of multi-pattern spatially fractionated radiation therapy using a multi-leaf collimator and collapsed cone convolution superposition dose calculation algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stathakis, Sotirios [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, 7979 Wurzbach Rd, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)], E-mail: stathakis@uthscsa.edu; Esquivel, Carlos; Gutierrez, Alonso N.; Shi, ChengYu; Papanikolaou, Niko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, 7979 Wurzbach Rd, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: In this paper, we present an alternative to the originally proposed technique for the delivery of spatially fractionated radiation therapy (GRID) using multi-leaf collimator (MLC) shaped fields. We employ the MLC to deliver various pattern GRID treatments to large solid tumors and dosimetrically characterize the GRID fields. Methods and materials: The GRID fields were created with different open to blocked area ratios and with variable separation between the openings using a MLC. GRID designs were introduced into the Pinnacle{sup 3} treatment planning system, and the dose was calculated in a water phantom. Ionization chamber and film measurements using both Kodak EDR2 and Gafchromic EBT film were performed in a SolidWater phantom to determine the relative output of each GRID design as well as its spatial dosimetric characteristics. Results: Agreement within 5.0% was observed between the Pinnacle{sup 3} predicted dose distributions and the measurements for the majority of experiments performed. A higher magnitude of discrepancy (15%) was observed using a high photon beam energy (18 MV) and small GRID opening. Skin dose at the GRID openings was higher than the corresponding open field by a factor as high as three for both photon energies and was found to be independent of the open-to-blocked area ratio. Conclusion: In summary, we reaffirm that the MLC can be used to deliver spatially fractionated GRID therapy and show that various GRID patterns may be generated. The Pinnacle{sup 3} TPS can accurately calculate the dose of the different GRID patterns in our study to within 5% for the majority of the cases based on film and ion chamber measurements. Disadvantages of MLC-based GRID therapy are longer treatment times and higher surface doses.

  7. Effect of. gamma. radiation in relatively low dose on the activity of glutaminase in subcellular fraction of brain and liver cells. [Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkach, V M

    1973-01-01

    The effect of ..gamma..-irradiation at a dose of 40 rads was studied on the exchange of glutamine in rats. It has been shown that the irradiation leads to a significant lowering of the activity of glutaminamidohydrolase (I) in brain mitochondria and in the liver after 1, 3, 7, 15, and 30 days post exposure. In the fractions containing nuclei, fraction of myofibrillae and connective tissue, a slow down of the deamidation of glutamine also takes place, and only after 7 days the ammonium separation from glutamine increases and returns to normal. At the 15 and 30 days a second wave of the lower rate of the activity of I takes place. The type of the changes of I is the same in both organs, but in the liver it is expressed to a lesser degree. (JPRS)

  8. Favorable Preliminary Outcomes for Men With Low- and Intermediate-risk Prostate Cancer Treated With 19-Gy Single-fraction High-dose-rate Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Daniel J., E-mail: dkrauss@beaumont.edu [Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Ye, Hong [Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro A. [21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); Mitchell, Beth; Sebastian, Evelyn; Limbacher, Amy; Gustafson, Gary S. [Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity and preliminary clinical outcomes of a prospective trial evaluating 19-Gy, single-fraction high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for men with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 63 patients were treated according to an institutional review board-approved prospective study of single-fraction HDR brachytherapy. Eligible patients had tumor stage ≤T2a, prostate-specific antigen level ≤15 ng/mL, and Gleason score ≤7. Patients with a prostate gland volume >50 cm{sup 3} and baseline American Urologic Association symptom score >12 were ineligible. Patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided transperineal implantation of the prostate, followed by single-fraction HDR brachytherapy. Treatment was delivered using {sup 192}Ir to a dose of 19 Gy prescribed to the prostate, with no additional margin applied. Results: Of the 63 patients, 58 had data available for analysis. Five patients had withdrawn consent during the follow-up period. The median follow-up period was 2.9 years (range 0.3-5.2). The median age was 61.4 years. The median gland volume at treatment was 34.8 cm{sup 3}. Of the 58 patients, 91% had T1 disease, 71% had Gleason score ≤6 (29% with Gleason score 7), and the median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level was 5.1 ng/mL. The acute and chronic grade 2 genitourinary toxicity incidence was 12.1% and 10.3%, respectively. No grade 3 urinary toxicity occurred. No patients experienced acute rectal toxicity grade ≥2, and 2 experienced grade ≥2 chronic gastrointestinal toxicity. Three patients experienced biochemical failure, yielding a 3-year cumulative incidence estimate of 6.8%. Conclusions: Single-fraction HDR brachytherapy is well-tolerated, with favorable preliminary biochemical and clinical disease control rates.

  9. A secretome analysis reveals that PPARα is upregulated by fractionated-dose γ-irradiation in three-dimensional keratinocyte cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jee Yong; Kim, Hyun Ji; Yi, Jae Youn

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) environment composed of properly interconnected and differentiated cells that allows communication and cooperation among cells via secreted molecules would be expected to more accurately reflect cellular responses. Here, we investigated γ-irradiation-induced changes in the secretome of 3D-cultured keratinocytes. An analysis of keratinocyte secretome profiles following fractionated-dose γ-irradiation revealed changes in genes involved in cell adhesion, angiogenesis, and the immune system. Notably, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-(PPARα) was upregulated in response to fractionated-dose γ-irradiation. This upregulation was associated with an increase in the transcription of known PPARα target genes, including angiopoietin-like protein 4, dermokine and kallikrein-related peptide 12, which were differentially regulated by fractionated-dose γ-irradiation. Collectively, our data imply a mechanism linking γ-irradiation and secretome changes, and suggest that these changes could play a significant role in the coordinated cellular responses to harmful ionizing radiation, such as those associated with radiation therapy. This extension of our understanding of γ-irradiation-induced secretome changes has the potential to improve radiation therapy strategies. Control of inflammatory waves, improved wound healing, and stabilization of the skin barrier are imperative for minimizing such injuries. Therefore, PPARα agonists and antagonists have the potential to become important therapeutic agents for the treatment of γ-irradiation induced skin damage. Specifically, our analysis suggests that the undesirable consequences of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation could be alleviated by PPARα agonists

  10. A secretome analysis reveals that PPARα is upregulated by fractionated-dose γ-irradiation in three-dimensional keratinocyte cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jee Yong; Kim, Hyun Ji; Yi, Jae Youn [Korea Institute of Radiation and Medical Sciences, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    A three-dimensional (3D) environment composed of properly interconnected and differentiated cells that allows communication and cooperation among cells via secreted molecules would be expected to more accurately reflect cellular responses. Here, we investigated γ-irradiation-induced changes in the secretome of 3D-cultured keratinocytes. An analysis of keratinocyte secretome profiles following fractionated-dose γ-irradiation revealed changes in genes involved in cell adhesion, angiogenesis, and the immune system. Notably, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-(PPARα) was upregulated in response to fractionated-dose γ-irradiation. This upregulation was associated with an increase in the transcription of known PPARα target genes, including angiopoietin-like protein 4, dermokine and kallikrein-related peptide 12, which were differentially regulated by fractionated-dose γ-irradiation. Collectively, our data imply a mechanism linking γ-irradiation and secretome changes, and suggest that these changes could play a significant role in the coordinated cellular responses to harmful ionizing radiation, such as those associated with radiation therapy. This extension of our understanding of γ-irradiation-induced secretome changes has the potential to improve radiation therapy strategies. Control of inflammatory waves, improved wound healing, and stabilization of the skin barrier are imperative for minimizing such injuries. Therefore, PPARα agonists and antagonists have the potential to become important therapeutic agents for the treatment of γ-irradiation induced skin damage. Specifically, our analysis suggests that the undesirable consequences of long-term exposure to ionizing radiation could be alleviated by PPARα agonists.

  11. Effect of inoculation dosing on the composting of source-selected organic fraction of municipal solid wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Barrena Gómez, Raquel

    2006-01-01

    The effects of a commercial inoculum (MicroGest 10X, Brookside Agra L.C.) on the field-scale composting of the source-selected organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (OFMSW) have been studied by following routine parameters of the composting process (temperature, oxygen content and moisture) and biologically-related tests such as the respirometric index and the maturity grade. The inoculum was added to composting piles of OFMSW at different levels: control (no added inoculum), treatment A...

  12. The impact of radiation dose and fractionation on the risk factor of radiation pneumonitis on four radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG) lung cancer trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, Mack; Pajak, Thomas F; Byhardt, Roger; Graham, Mary L; Asbell, Sucha O; Russell, Anthony H; Fu, Karen K; Urtasun, Raul C; Herskovic, Arnold M; Cox, James D

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To assess the relationship between total dose of radiation delivered, the fractionation scheme used, age, and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) on the risk of moderate to severe (≥ Grade 2) radiation pneumonitis in patients treated with radiotherapy alone for lung cancer on four RTOG Trials. Materials and Methods: Between February of 1984 and April of 1989, 1701 patients with clinically localized (I-IIIb) lung cancer were entered on clinical trials employing radiotherapy alone. Twelve hundred and forty-seven patients were entered on RTOG 8311 or 8407 (phase I/II trials) and 454 patients were entered on RTOG 8321 or 8403 (phase III trials). RTOG 8403 and 8321 patients received once-a-day irradiation to 60 Gy. Patients treated on RTOG 8407 were treated with a concomitant boost technique in a non-randomized fashion to 64.8, 69.6, 74.4 or 79.2 Gy. Patients treated on RTOG 8407 were treated with a concomitant boost technique in a non-randomized fashion to 63 Gy or 70.2 Gy. All patients were assessed for the incidence of Grade 2-5, radiation pneumonitis. One hundred and seven (6%) of patients were either ineligible or canceled (n=60), or were excluded because of incomplete data (n=47). The factors evaluated included total dose of radiation, the fractionation scheme, age and pre-treatment KPS. Patients treated to doses ≥ 72 Gy were considered to have received high doses (72.0 - 81.6 Gy), while the remaining patients treated to doses < 72 Gy (57.6 - 71.9 Gy) were considered to have received standard dose radiation. For the this analysis, information regarding field size and baseline pulmonary function was not available. Results: Age, sex, stage distribution, and the percentage of patients with a KPS ≥90 were similar among the patients treated on these four studies. Patients receiving hyperfractionated radiotherapy to doses ≥ 72 Gy experienced a higher incidence of radiation pneumonitis ≥ Grade 2, than patients treated with standard doses < 72

  13. Acute personalized habitual caffeine doses improve attention and have selective effects when considering the fractionation of executive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanini, Juliana; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandes; Pompéia, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is widely used, often consumed with food, and improves simple and complex/executive attention under fasting conditions. We investigated whether these cognitive effects are observed when personalized habitual doses of caffeine are ingested by caffeine consumers, whether they are influenced by nutriments and if various executive domains are susceptible to improvement. This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled study including 60 young, healthy, rested males randomly assigned to one of four treatments: placebo fasting, caffeine fasting, placebo meal and caffeine meal. Caffeine doses were individualized for each participant based on their self-reported caffeine consumption at the time of testing (morning). The test battery included measures of simple and sustained attention, executive domains (inhibiting, updating, shifting, dual tasking, planning and accessing long-term memory), control measures of subjective alterations, glucose and insulin levels, skin conductance, heart rate and pupil dilation. Regardless of meal intake, acute habitual doses of caffeine decreased fatigue, and improved simple and sustained attention and executive updating. This executive effect was not secondary to the habitual weekly dose consumed, changes in simple and sustained attention, mood, meal ingestion and increases in cognitive effort. We conclude that the morning caffeine "fix" has positive attentional effects and selectively improved executive updating whether or not caffeine is consumed with food. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Damage to the surface of the small intestinal villus: an objective scale of assessment of the effects of single and fractionated radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, K.E.; Watt, C. (Glasgow Univ. (UK). Dept. of Anatomy); Hamlet, R.; Nias, A.H.W. (Glasgow Inst. of Radiotherapeutics and Oncology (UK))

    1983-07-01

    Scanning electron microscopy has been used to compare damage to mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation with different doses of photons and neutrons. Various stages of the collapse of villous structure seen after radiation include the production of conical and rudimentary villi and a flattened mucosa. A scale is proposed to relate radiation to villous damage. Points from this scale are taken to produce comparative ratios for equivalent damage produced by different radiation conditions. RBE values are quoted for neutron, X and gamma radiation given as single or fractionated irradiation doses and as whole or partial body irradiation. The relationship between the stroma in intravillous pegs and that of the pericryptal compartment is explored.

  15. Damage to the surface of the small intestinal villus: an objective scale of assessment of the effects of single and fractionated radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, K.E.; Watt, C.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy has been used to compare damage to mouse small intestinal mucosa after irradiation with different doses of photons and neutrons. Various stages of the collapse of villous structure seen after radiation include the production of conical and rudimentary villi and a flattened mucosa. A scale is proposed to relate radiation to villous damage. Points from this scale are taken to produce comparative ratios for equivalent damage produced by different radiation conditions. RBE values are quoted for neutron, X and gamma radiation given as single or fractionated irradiation doses and as whole or partial body irradiation. The relationship between the stroma in intravillous pegs and that of the pericryptal compartment is explored. (author)

  16. Randomized multicenter follow-up trial on the effect of radiotherapy for plantar fasciitis (painful heels spur) depending on dose and fractionation – a study protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtmann, Henrik; Niewald, Marcus; Prokein, Benjamin; Graeber, Stefan; Ruebe, Christian

    2015-01-01

    An actual clinical trial showed the effect of low dose radiotherapy in painful heel spur (plantar fasciitis) with single doses of 1.0 Gy and total doses of 6.0 Gy applied twice weekly. Furthermore, a lot of animal experimental and in vitro data reveals the effect of lower single doses of 0.5 Gy which may be superior in order to ease pain and reduce inflammation in patients with painful heel spur. Our goal is therefore to transfer this experimentally found effect into a randomized multicenter trial. This was a controlled, prospective, two-arm phase III-multicenter trial. The standard arm consisted of single fractions of 1.0 Gy applied two times a week, for a total dose of 6.0 Gy (total therapy time: 3 weeks). The experimental arm consisted of single fractions of 0.5 Gy applied 3 times a week, for a total dose of 6.0 Gy (total therapy time: 4 weeks). Following a statistical power calculation, there were 120 patients for each investigation arm. The main inclusion criteria were: age > = 40 years, clinical and radiologically diagnosed painful heel spur (plantar fasciitis), and current symptoms for at least 6 months. The main exclusion criteria were: former local trauma, surgery or radiotherapy of the heel; pregnant or breastfeeding women; and a pre-existing severe psychiatric or psychosomatic disorder. After approving a written informed consent the patients are randomized by a statistician into one of the trial arms. After radiotherapy, the patients are seen after six weeks, after twelve weeks and then every twelve weeks up to 48 weeks. Additionally, they receive a questionnaire every six weeks after the follow-up examinations up to 48 weeks. The effect is measured using the visual analogue scale of pain (VAS), the calcaneodynia score according to Rowe and the SF-12 score. The primary endpoint is the pain relief three months after therapy. Patients of both therapy arms with an insufficient result are offered a second radiotherapy series applying the standard dose

  17. Fractional sunburn threshold UVR doses generate equivalent vitamin D and DNA damage in skin types I-VI, but with epidermal DNA damage gradient correlated to skin darkness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Barbara B; Farrar, Mark D; Cooke, Marcus S; Osman, Joanne; Langton, Abigail K; Kift, Richard; Webb, Ann R; Berry, Jacqueline L; Watson, Rachel E B; Vail, Andy; de Gruijl, Frank R; Rhodes, Lesley E

    2018-05-03

    Public health guidance recommends limiting sun-exposure to sub-sunburn levels, but it's unknown whether these can gain vitamin D (for musculoskeletal health) whilst avoiding epidermal DNA damage (initiates skin cancer). Well-characterised healthy humans of all skin types (I-VI; lightest to darkest skin) were exposed to a low dose-series of solar simulated UVR of 20-80% their individual sunburn threshold dose (minimal erythemal dose, MED). Significant UVR dose-responses were seen for serum 25(OH)D and whole epidermal CPD, with as little as 0.2 MED concurrently producing 25(OH)D and CPD. Notably, fractional MEDs generated equivalent levels of whole epidermal CPD and 25(OH)D across all skin types. Crucially, we demonstrated an epidermal gradient of CPD formation strongly correlated with skin darkness (r=0.74; Pskin types, ranging from darkest skin, where high CPD levels occurred superficially with none in the germinative basal layer, through to lightest skin where CPD were induced evenly across the epidermal depth. Darker skin people can be encouraged to utilise sub-sunburn UVR-exposure to enhance their vitamin D. In lighter skin people, basal cell damage occurs concurrent with vitamin D synthesis at exquisitely low UVR levels, providing an explanation for their high skin cancer incidence; greater caution is required. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Diagnostic Performance of a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography System With Low-Dose Technetium-99m as Assessed by Fractional Flow Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikamori, Taishiro; Hida, Satoshi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Igarashi, Yuko; Yamashita, Jun; Shiba, Chie; Murata, Naotaka; Hoshino, Kou; Hokama, Yohei; Yamashina, Akira

    2016-04-25

    Although stress single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using a cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) camera facilitates radiation dose reduction, only a few studies have evaluated its diagnostic accuracy in Japanese patients by applying fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurements. We prospectively evaluated 102 consecutive patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease with a low-dose stress/rest protocol ((99m)Tc radiotracer 185/370 MBq) using CZT SPECT. Within 3 months, coronary angiography was performed and a significant stenosis was defined as ≥90% diameter narrowing on visual estimation, or as a lesion of <90% and ≥ 50% stenosis with FFR ≤0.80. To detect individual coronary stenosis, the respective sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 86%, 75%, and 82% for left anterior descending artery stenosis, 76%, 81%, and 79% for left circumflex artery stenosis, and 87%, 92%, and 90% for right coronary artery stenosis. When limited to 92 intermediate stenotic lesions in which FFR was measured, stress SPECT showed 77% sensitivity, 91% specificity, and 84% accuracy, whereas the diagnostic value decreased to 52% sensitivity, 68% specificity, and 58% accuracy based only on visual estimation of ≥75% diameter narrowing. CZT SPECT demonstrated a good diagnostic yield in detecting hemodynamically significant coronary stenoses as assessed by FFR, even when using a low-dose (99m)Tc protocol with an effective dose ≤5 mSv. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1217-1224).

  19. Measuring gluconeogenesis using a low dose of 2H2O: advantage of isotope fractionation during gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katanik, Jill; McCabe, Brendan J; Brunengraber, Daniel Z; Chandramouli, Visvanathan; Nishiyama, Fumie J; Anderson, Vernon E; Previs, Stephen F

    2003-05-01

    The contribution of gluconeogenesis to glucose production can be measured by enriching body water with (2)H(2)O to approximately 0.5% (2)H and determining the ratio of (2)H that is bound to carbon-5 vs. carbon-2 of blood glucose. This labeling ratio can be measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after the corresponding glucose carbons are converted to formaldehyde and then to hexamethylenetetramine (HMT). We present a technique for integrating ion chromatograms that allows one to use only 0.05% (2)H in body water (i.e., 10 times less than the current dose). This technique takes advantage of the difference in gas chromatographic retention times of naturally labeled HMT and [(2)H]HMT. We discuss the advantage(s) of using a low dose of (2)H(2)O to quantify the contribution of gluconeogenesis.

  20. Mouse spermatogonia exposed to a high, multiply fractionated dose of a cancer chemotherapeutic drug: mutation analysis by electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, F M; Lewis, S E

    1981-04-01

    Male mice of the DBA/2J strain were injected with procarbazine at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight twice weekly until an accumulated dose of 2400 mg/kg was reached. A concurrent control group, injected only with the vehicle (saline) was also established. Most of the treated animals died as a result of exposure and all survivors became temporarily sterile. After regaining fertility the few survivors were repeatedly mated with C57BL/6J females over several weeks time to generate a population of F1 animals. The parental animals and the F1 were subsequently analyzed by electrophoresis for the occurrence of newly arisen mutations of spermatogonial origin. A mutation in the gene Pep-3 was found.

  1. SU-G-JeP3-06: Lower KV Image Dose Are Expected From a Limited-Angle Intra-Fractional Verification (LIVE) System for SBRT Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, G [Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN (United States); Yin, F; Ren, L [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In order to track the tumor movement for patient positioning verification during arc treatment delivery or in between 3D/IMRT beams for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), the limited-angle kV projections acquisition simultaneously during arc treatment delivery or in-between static treatment beams as the gantry moves to the next beam angle was proposed. The purpose of this study is to estimate additional imaging dose resulting from multiple tomosynthesis acquisitions in-between static treatment beams and to compare with that of a conventional kV-CBCT acquisition. Methods: kV imaging system integrated into Varian TrueBeam accelerators was modeled using EGSnrc Monte Carlo user code, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc code was used in dose calculations. The simulated realistic kV beams from the Varian TrueBeam OBI 1.5 system were used to calculate dose to patient based on CT images. Organ doses were analyzed using DVHs. The imaging dose to patient resulting from realistic multiple tomosynthesis acquisitions with each 25–30 degree kV source rotation between 6 treatment beam gantry angles was studied. Results: For a typical lung SBRT treatment delivery much lower (20–50%) kV imaging doses from the sum of realistic six tomosynthesis acquisitions with each 25–30 degree x-ray source rotation between six treatment beam gantry angles were observed compared to that from a single CBCT image acquisition. Conclusion: This work indicates that the kV imaging in this proposed Limited-angle Intra-fractional Verification (LIVE) System for SBRT Treatments has a negligible imaging dose increase. It is worth to note that the MV imaging dose caused by MV projection acquisition in-between static beams in LIVE can be minimized by restricting the imaging to the target region and reducing the number of projections acquired. For arc treatments, MV imaging acquisition in LIVE does not add additional imaging dose as the MV images are acquired from treatment beams directly during the

  2. Mature results of a randomized trial comparing two fractionation schedules of high dose rate endoluminal brachytherapy for the treatment of endobronchial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemoeller, Olivier M; Pöllinger, Barbara; Niyazi, Maximilian; Corradini, Stefanie; Manapov, Farkhad; Belka, Claus; Huber, Rudolf M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of high dose rate endobronchial brachytherapy (HDR-BT) for the treatment of centrally located lung tumors, two different fractionation schedules were compared regarding local tumor response, side effects and survival. Mature retrospective results with longer follow-up and more patients were analyzed. Initial results were published by Huber et al. in 1995. 142 patients with advanced, centrally located malignant tumors with preferential endoluminal growth were randomized to receive 4 fractions of 3.8 Gy (time interval: 1 week, n = 60, group I) or 2 fractions of 7.2 Gy (time interval: 3 weeks, n = 82, group II) endobronchial HDR-BT. Age, gender, tumor stage, Karnofsky Performance Score and histology were equally distributed between both groups. Local tumor response with 2 fractions of 7.2 Gy was significantly higher as compared to 4 fractions of 3.8 Gy (median 12 vs. 6 weeks; p ≤ 0.015). Median survival was similar in both groups (19 weeks in the 4 fractions group vs. 18 weeks in the 2 fractions group). Fatal hemoptysis was less frequent following irradiation with 2 × 7.2 Gy than with 4 × 3.8 Gy, although the difference did not achieve statistical significance (12.2% vs. 18.3%, respectively. p = 0,345). Patients presenting with squamous cell carcinoma were at higher risk of bleeding compared to other histology (21.9% vs. 9%, p = 0,035). Multivariate analysis with regard to overall survival, revealed histology (p = 0.02), Karnofsky Performance Score (p < 0.0001) and response to therapy (p < 0.0001) as significant prognostic factors. For patients showing complete response the median survival was 57 weeks, while for patients with progressive disease median survival time was 8 weeks, p < 0.0001. The KPS at the start of the treatment was significantly correlated with survival. Patients presenting with a KPS ≤ 60 at the start had a significantly (p = 0,032) shorter survival time (10 weeks) than patients with a KPS > 60 (29 weeks). Moreover

  3. Semisterility of the first male progeny of female rats given a fractionated x ray dose of 800 R with administration of cysteamine and cystamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baev, I; Bairakova, A

    1975-01-01

    A total of 107 male Wistar rats were obtained six months after the fractional irradiation of females at a total x ray dose of 800 R (40 R per day for 20 days). Part of the females were irradiated without protection, and the rest received 5 mg cysteamine and 20 mg cystamine per rat each day before irradiation. The irradiated females were crossed with intact males. Fifteen males obtained from unirradiated parents served as controls. Males obtained from irradiated mothers and the control males were each housed with 7 intact females on attaining reproductive age. The females were killed on the 18th day after fertilization, and the living and dead embryos and the yellow bodies in each female were determined. The embryonic lethality in the male progeny whose mothers were irradiated with a fractionated dose of 800 R was 11 percent preimplantation with 9 percent postimplantation for a total of 19 percent for irradiated mothers given no radioprotective agent compared with 7 percent preimplantation with 5.5 percent postimplantation for a total of 12.5 percent in the control rats. For the cystamine-protected mothers the corresponding embryonic lethalities were 16.1 percent preimplantation with 10.5 percent postimplantation for a total of 26.6 percent, and for the cysteamine protected mothers, 14.3 percent preimplantation with 14.2 percent postimplantation for a total of 28.5 percent. Abouthalf of the males from the first generation of irradiated females showed a lowered fertility. 10 refs.

  4. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy of a Single Implant With Two Fractions Combined With External Beam Radiotherapy for Hormone-Naive Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Morio; Mori, Takashi; Shirai, Shintaro; Kishi, Kazushi; Inagaki, Takeshi; Hara, Isao

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the preliminary outcomes of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of a single implant with two fractions and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for hormone-naive prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between March 2000 and Sept 2003, a total of 53 patients with tumor Stage T1c-T3b N0 M0 prostate cancer were treated with HDR brachytherapy boost doses (7.5 Gy/fraction) and 50-Gy EBRT during a 5.5-week period. Median follow-up was 61 months. Patients were divided into groups with localized (T1c-T2b) and advanced disease (T3a-T3b). We used the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition for biochemical failure. According to recommendations of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-ASTRO Phoenix Consensus Conference, biochemical failure-free control rates (BF-FCRs) at 3 years were investigated as 2 years short of the median follow-up. Results: Between April 2000 and Sept 2007, Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 2.0 late Grade 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity rates were 0% and 3.8%, respectively. Erectile preservation was 25% at 5 years. Overall survival was 88.1% and cause-specific survival was 100%. At 3 years, ASTRO BF-FCRs of the localized and advanced groups were 100% and 42%, respectively (p = 0.001). Conclusions: The HDR brachytherapy of a single implant with two fractions plus EBRT is effective in treating patients with localized hormone-naive prostate cancer, with the least genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities; however, longer median BF-FCR follow-up is required to assess these findings

  5. Health-Related Quality of Life After Single-Fraction High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Hypofractionated External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, Gerard C.; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Chung, Hans; Tsang, Gail; Sankreacha, Raxa; Deabreu, Andrea; Zhang Liying; Mamedov, Alexandre; Cheung, Patrick; Batchelar, Deidre; Danjoux, Cyril; Szumacher, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the change in health-related quality of life for men after high-dose-rate brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer and the factors associated with this change. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had clinically localized intermediate-risk prostate cancer. The patients received high-dose-rate brachytherapy as a single 15-Gy implant, followed by external beam radiotherapy to 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions. The patients were monitored prospectively for toxicity (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and health-related quality of life (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite [EPIC]). The proportion of patients developing a clinically significant difference in the EPIC domain score (minimally important difference of >0.5 standard deviation) was determined and correlated with the baseline clinical and dosimetric factors. The study accrued 125 patients, with a median follow-up of 24 months. Results: By 24 months, 23% had Grade 2 urinary toxicity and only 5% had Grade 2 bowel toxicity, with no Grade 3 toxicity. The proportion of patients reporting a significant decrease in EPIC urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal domain scores was 53%, 51%, 45%, and 40% at 12 months and 57%, 65%, 51%, and 30% at 24 months, respectively. The proportion with a >1 standard deviation decrease in the EPIC urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal domain scores was 38%, 36%, 24%, and 20% at 12 months and 46%, 48%, 19%, and 8% at 24 months, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the dose to 10% of the urethra was associated with a decreasing EPIC urinary domain score (p = .0089) and, less strongly (p = .0312) with a decreasing hormonal domain score. No association was found between the prostate volume, bladder dose, or high-dose volume and urinary health-related quality of life. A high baseline International Index of Erectile Function score was associated (p = .0019) with a decreasing sexual domain score. The optimal maximal dose

  6. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Candidate in Healthy Children and Adults in Dengue-Endemic Regions: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Phase 2 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirivichayakul, Chukiat; Barranco-Santana, Elizabeth A; Esquilin-Rivera, Inés; Oh, Helen M L; Raanan, Marsha; Sariol, Carlos A; Shek, Lynette P; Simasathien, Sriluck; Smith, Mary Kathryn; Velez, Ivan Dario; Wallace, Derek; Gordon, Gilad S; Stinchcomb, Dan T

    2016-05-15

    A safe, effective tetravalent dengue vaccine is a global health priority. The safety and immunogenicity of a live attenuated, recombinant tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (TDV) were evaluated in healthy volunteers from dengue-endemic countries. This multicenter, double-blind, phase 2 study was conducted in Puerto Rico, Colombia, Singapore, and Thailand. During stage I, 148 volunteers aged 1.5-45 years were sequentially enrolled into 4 age-descending groups and randomized at a ratio of 2:1 to receive TDV or placebo. In stage II (group 5), 212 children aged 1.5-11 years were randomized at a ratio of 3:1 to receive TDV or placebo. Participants received a subcutaneous injection of TDV or placebo on days 0 and 90 and were followed for analysis of safety, seropositivity, and neutralizing antibodies to DENV-1-4. Injection site pain, itching, and erythema (mostly mild) were the only solicited adverse events more frequently reported with TDV than with placebo in all age groups. After 2 TDV doses, seropositivity was >95% in all 5 groups for DENV-1-3 and 72.7%-100% for DENV-4; geometric mean titers ranged from 582 to 1187 for DENV-1, from 582 to 1187 for DENV-2, from 196 to 630 for DENV-3, and from 41 to 210 for DENV-4 among the 5 groups. TDV was well tolerated and immunogenic in volunteers aged 1.5-45 years, irrespective of prevaccination dengue exposure. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mailjournals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Mixed insoluble acidic salts of tetravalent metals Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakshooki, S.K.; Dehair, A.; Elmismary, Y.; Haraga, S.; Benfaid, N.; Benhamed, A.; Maiof, A.; Szirtes, L.

    1988-01-01

    Solid ZrOCl 2 x8H 2 O was added in a slow stream to a solution of phosphoric acid or to a solution of TiCl 4 in phosphoric acid to obtain granules of amorphous Zr(HPO 4 ) 2 xnH 2 O or Zr x Ti (1-x) (HPO 4 ) 2 xnH-2O (where x=0.95-0.80). It was found that the particle size of the resulting materials is very similar to that of ZrOCl 2 x8H 2 O, in such a way that it may be controlled indirectly. These materials are suitable for ion-exchange column operations. The relatively high gamma radiation doses of 60 Co source did not alter its exchange properties. pH-titrations were performed by an automatic titrimeter and the exchange capacities of alkali metal ions were determined by isotopic tracer technique. Other characterizations were made by usual chemical analysis and thermography. (author) 20 refs.; 4 figs

  8. Standard-Fractionated Radiotherapy for Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma: Visual Outcome Is Predicted by Mean Eye Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abouaf, Lucie [Neuro-Ophthalmology Unit, Pierre-Wertheimer Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Girard, Nicolas [Radiotherapy-Oncology Department, Lyon Sud Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Claude Bernard University, Lyon (France); Lefort, Thibaud [Neuro-Radiology Department, Pierre-Wertheimer Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); D' hombres, Anne [Claude Bernard University, Lyon (France); Tilikete, Caroline; Vighetto, Alain [Neuro-Ophthalmology Unit, Pierre-Wertheimer Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Claude Bernard University, Lyon (France); Mornex, Francoise, E-mail: francoise.mornex@chu-lyon.fr [Claude Bernard University, Lyon (France)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has shown its efficacy in controlling optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) tumor growth while allowing visual acuity to improve or stabilize. However, radiation-induced toxicity may ultimately jeopardize the functional benefit. The purpose of this study was to identify predictive factors of poor visual outcome in patients receiving radiotherapy for ONSM. Methods and Materials: We conducted an extensive analysis of 10 patients with ONSM with regard to clinical, radiologic, and dosimetric aspects. All patients were treated with conformal radiotherapy and subsequently underwent biannual neuroophthalmologic and imaging assessments. Pretreatment and posttreatment values of visual acuity and visual field were compared with Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Results: Visual acuity values significantly improved after radiotherapy. After a median follow-up time of 51 months, 6 patients had improved visual acuity, 4 patients had improved visual field, 1 patient was in stable condition, and 1 patient had deteriorated visual acuity and visual field. Tumor control rate was 100% at magnetic resonance imaging assessment. Visual acuity deterioration after radiotherapy was related to radiation-induced retinopathy in 2 patients and radiation-induced mature cataract in 1 patient. Study of radiotherapy parameters showed that the mean eye dose was significantly higher in those 3 patients who had deteriorated vision. Conclusions: Our study confirms that radiotherapy is efficient in treating ONSM. Long-term visual outcome may be compromised by radiation-induced side effects. Mean eye dose has to be considered as a limiting constraint in treatment planning.

  9. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.kirchheiner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth [Department of Psychology, Sigmund Freud Private University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Scharbert, Gisela; Wetzel, Léonore [Department of Anaesthesia, General Intensive Care and Pain Management, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Nout, Remi A. [Department of Clinical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Sturdza, Alina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dimopoulos, Johannes C. [Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful

  10. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka; Ponocny-Seliger, Elisabeth; Scharbert, Gisela; Wetzel, Léonore; Nout, Remi A.; Sturdza, Alina; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful

  11. Polymerization of a divalent/tetravalent metal-storing atom-mimicking dendrimer

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht, Ken; Hirabayashi, Yuki; Otake, Masaya; Mendori, Shin; Tobari, Yuta; Azuma, Yasuo; Majima, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Kimihisa

    2016-01-01

    The phenylazomethine dendrimer (DPA) has a layer-by-layer electron density gradient that is an analog of the Bohr atom (atom mimicry). In combination with electron pair mimicry, the polymerization of this atom-mimicking dendrimer was achieved. The valency of the mimicked atom was controlled by changing the chemical structure of the dendrimer. By mimicking a divalent atom, a one-dimensional (1D) polymer was obtained, and by using a planar tetravalent atom mimic, a 2D polymer was obtained. Thes...

  12. High-dose-rate brachytherapy as monotherapy delivered in two fractions within one day for favorable/intermediate-risk prostate cancer: preliminary toxicity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghilezan, Michel; Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye, Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy

    2012-07-01

    To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy × 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy × 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of ≤12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Favorable-risk prostate cancer patients treated with a single implant HDR-BT to 24-27 Gy in two fractions

  13. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy Delivered in Two Fractions Within One Day for Favorable/Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghilezan, Michel, E-mail: mghilezan@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J. Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital and Rose Cancer Institute, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of {<=}12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6-40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Conclusions: Favorable

  14. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as Monotherapy Delivered in Two Fractions Within One Day for Favorable/Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Toxicity Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghilezan, Michel; Martinez, Alvaro; Gustason, Gary; Krauss, Daniel; Antonucci, J. Vito; Chen, Peter; Fontanesi, James; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong; Casey, Alyse; Sebastian, Evelyn; Kim, Leonard; Limbacher, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the toxicity profile of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy (BT) as monotherapy in a Human Investigation Committee-approved study consisting of a single implant and two fractions (12 Gy × 2) for a total dose of 24 Gy, delivered within 1 day. The dose was subsequently increased to 27 Gy (13.5 Gy × 2) delivered in 1 day. We report the acute and early chronic genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 173 patients were treated between December 2005 and July 2010. However, only the first 100 were part of the IRB-approved study and out of these, only 94 had a minimal follow-up of 6 months, representing the study population for this preliminary report. All patients had clinical Stage T2b or less (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 5th edition), Gleason score 6-7 (3+4), and prostate-specific antigen level of ≤12 ng/mL. Ultrasound-guided HDR-BT with real-time dosimetry was used. The prescription dose was 24 Gy for the first 50 patients and 27 Gy thereafter. The dosimetric goals and constraints were the same for the two dose groups. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3. The highest toxicity scores encountered at any point during follow-up are reported. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months (range, 6–40.5). Most patients had Grade 0-1 acute toxicity. The Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was mainly frequency/urgency (13%), dysuria (5%), hematuria, and dribbling/hesitancy (2%). None of the patients required a Foley catheter at any time; however, 8% of the patients experienced transient Grade 1 diarrhea. No other acute gastrointestinal toxicities were found. The most common chronic toxicity was Grade 2 urinary frequency/urgency in 16% of patients followed by dysuria in 4% of patients; 2 patients had Grade 2 rectal bleeding and 1 had Grade 4, requiring laser treatment. Conclusions: Favorable-risk prostate cancer patients treated with

  15. Effect of simultaneous, single oral doses of beta-carotene with lutein or lycopene on the beta-carotene and retinyl ester responses in the triacylglycerol-rich lipoprotein fraction of men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, H. van den; Vliet, T. van

    1998-01-01

    The effects of lutein and lycopene on β-carotene absorption and cleavage were investigated in 12 male subjects. Responses of carotenoids and retinyl palmitate in the triacylglycerol-rich lipoprotein (TRL) fraction after a separate 15-mg β-carotene dose were compared with those after a dose of 15 mg

  16. Preoperative Single-Fraction Partial Breast Radiation Therapy: A Novel Phase 1, Dose-Escalation Protocol With Radiation Response Biomarkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, Janet K.; Blitzblau, Rachel C.; Yoo, Sua; Geradts, Joseph; Chang, Zheng; Baker, Jay A.; Georgiade, Gregory S.; Chen, Wei; Siamakpour-Reihani, Sharareh; Wang, Chunhao; Broadwater, Gloria; Groth, Jeff; Palta, Manisha; Dewhirst, Mark; Barry, William T.; Duffy, Eileen A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Women with biologically favorable early-stage breast cancer are increasingly treated with accelerated partial breast radiation (PBI). However, treatment-related morbidities have been linked to the large postoperative treatment volumes required for external beam PBI. Relative to external beam delivery, alternative PBI techniques require equipment that is not universally available. To address these issues, we designed a phase 1 trial utilizing widely available technology to 1) evaluate the safety of a single radiation treatment delivered preoperatively to the small-volume, intact breast tumor and 2) identify imaging and genomic markers of radiation response. Methods and Materials: Women aged ≥55 years with clinically node-negative, estrogen receptor–positive, and/or progesterone receptor–positive HER2−, T1 invasive carcinomas, or low- to intermediate-grade in situ disease ≤2 cm were enrolled (n=32). Intensity modulated radiation therapy was used to deliver 15 Gy (n=8), 18 Gy (n=8), or 21 Gy (n=16) to the tumor with a 1.5-cm margin. Lumpectomy was performed within 10 days. Paired pre- and postradiation magnetic resonance images and patient tumor samples were analyzed. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. At a median follow-up of 23 months, there have been no recurrences. Physician-rated cosmetic outcomes were good/excellent, and chronic toxicities were grade 1 to 2 (fibrosis, hyperpigmentation) in patients receiving preoperative radiation only. Evidence of dose-dependent changes in vascular permeability, cell density, and expression of genes regulating immunity and cell death were seen in response to radiation. Conclusions: Preoperative single-dose radiation therapy to intact breast tumors is well tolerated. Radiation response is marked by early indicators of cell death in this biologically favorable patient cohort. This study represents a first step toward a novel partial breast radiation approach. Preoperative radiation should

  17. Preoperative Single-Fraction Partial Breast Radiation Therapy: A Novel Phase 1, Dose-Escalation Protocol With Radiation Response Biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, Janet K., E-mail: janet.horton@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Blitzblau, Rachel C.; Yoo, Sua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Geradts, Joseph [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chang, Zheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Baker, Jay A. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Georgiade, Gregory S. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Wei [Department of Bioinformatics: Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Siamakpour-Reihani, Sharareh; Wang, Chunhao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Broadwater, Gloria [Department of Biostatistics: Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Groth, Jeff [Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Palta, Manisha; Dewhirst, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Barry, William T. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Duffy, Eileen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Women with biologically favorable early-stage breast cancer are increasingly treated with accelerated partial breast radiation (PBI). However, treatment-related morbidities have been linked to the large postoperative treatment volumes required for external beam PBI. Relative to external beam delivery, alternative PBI techniques require equipment that is not universally available. To address these issues, we designed a phase 1 trial utilizing widely available technology to 1) evaluate the safety of a single radiation treatment delivered preoperatively to the small-volume, intact breast tumor and 2) identify imaging and genomic markers of radiation response. Methods and Materials: Women aged ≥55 years with clinically node-negative, estrogen receptor–positive, and/or progesterone receptor–positive HER2−, T1 invasive carcinomas, or low- to intermediate-grade in situ disease ≤2 cm were enrolled (n=32). Intensity modulated radiation therapy was used to deliver 15 Gy (n=8), 18 Gy (n=8), or 21 Gy (n=16) to the tumor with a 1.5-cm margin. Lumpectomy was performed within 10 days. Paired pre- and postradiation magnetic resonance images and patient tumor samples were analyzed. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. At a median follow-up of 23 months, there have been no recurrences. Physician-rated cosmetic outcomes were good/excellent, and chronic toxicities were grade 1 to 2 (fibrosis, hyperpigmentation) in patients receiving preoperative radiation only. Evidence of dose-dependent changes in vascular permeability, cell density, and expression of genes regulating immunity and cell death were seen in response to radiation. Conclusions: Preoperative single-dose radiation therapy to intact breast tumors is well tolerated. Radiation response is marked by early indicators of cell death in this biologically favorable patient cohort. This study represents a first step toward a novel partial breast radiation approach. Preoperative radiation should

  18. Safety Overview of a Recombinant Live-Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine: Pooled Analysis of Data from 18 Clinical Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Gailhardou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A recombinant live attenuated tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV has been shown to be efficacious in preventing virologically-confirmed dengue disease, severe dengue disease and dengue hospitalization in children aged 2-16 years in Asia and Latin America. We analyzed pooled safety data from 18 phase I, II and III clinical trials in which the dengue vaccine was administered to participants aged 2-60 years, including long-term safety follow-up in three efficacy trials. The participants were analyzed according to their age at enrollment. The percentage of participants aged 2-60 years reporting ≥1 solicited injection-site or systemic reactions was slightly higher in the CYD-TDV group than in the placebo group. The most common solicited injection-site reactions were pain. Headache and malaise were the most common solicited systemic reactions. In both groups 0.3% of participants discontinued for safety reasons. The most common unsolicited adverse events were injection-site reactions, gastrointestinal disorders, and infections. Reactogenicity did not increase with successive doses of CYD-TDV. The frequency and nature of SAEs occurring within 28 days of any dose were similar in the CYD-TDV and placebo groups and were common medical conditions that could be expected as a function of age. Baseline dengue virus serostatus did not appear to influence the safety profile. No vaccine-related anaphylactic reactions, neurotropic events or viscerotropic events were reported. In year 3 after dose 1, an imbalance for dengue hospitalization, including for severe dengue, observed in participants aged <9 years in the CYD-TDV group compared with the placebo group was not observed for participants aged ≥9 years. In Year 4, this imbalance in participants aged <9 years was less marked, giving an overall lower risk of dengue hospitalization or severe dengue from dose 1 to Year 4 in the CYD-TDV group. These results have contributed to the definition of the target

  19. High-dose-rate brachytherapy with two or three fractions as monotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskin, Peter; Rojas, Ana; Ostler, Peter; Hughes, Robert; Alonzi, Roberto; Lowe, Gerry; Bryant, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Background: To evaluate late urinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events (AEs) and biochemical control of disease after high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in locally advanced prostate cancer. Patients and methods: 227 consecutive patients were treated with 3 × 10.5 Gy (n = 109) or 2 × 13 Gy (n = 118) HDR-BT alone. Biochemical failure was assessed using the Phoenix definition of PSA nadir + 2 μg/l and late AEs using the RTOG scoring system and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). Results: Kaplan–Meier estimates and prevalence of late events indicate that urinary, bowel and IPSS symptoms are higher after 31.5 Gy than after 26 Gy, however differences are significant only for Grade 1 and 2 urinary toxicity. Kaplan–Meier estimates of morbidity are consistently and considerably higher than time-point estimates of prevalence; which reflects the transient nature of most symptoms. At 3 years 93% and 97% of patients treated with 26 and 31.5 Gy, respectively, were free from biochemical relapse (p = 0.5) and 91% for the latter regimen at 5 years. In univariate and multivariate analysis risk-category was the only significant predictor of relapse (p < 0.03). Conclusion: These HDR-BT schedules achieved high levels of biochemical control of disease in patients with advanced prostate cancer with few severe complications seen throughout the first 3 years

  20. Functional and histological findings of the islets of Langerhans in mice after fractioned telecobalt irradiations with tumor doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konermann, G.; Petersen, K.G.; Slanina, J.; Blachnitzky, E.O.; Kraft, C.; Freiburg Univ.

    1979-01-01

    After a local radiation exposure of the pancreas of mice to a total dose of 5000 rd ( 60 Co gamma radiation over five weeks with 5 x 200 rd per week), there is no demonstrable alteration, even at long term, of the glucose tolerance and the insulin secretion of isolated islets of Langerhans in vitro and of the density of a histochemically prepared islet secretion. However, the proinsuline synthesis under glucose loading is reduced by about 40%. A radiogenic reduction of the total insulin content in the islet tissue of 27,6% is accompanied by a diminution of the body weight of 10% and a reduction of the organ weight of pancreas, liver and spleen of 20%, 13% and 47%. In view of these findings and taking into account a cellular death rate in the islet tissue of 21% immediately after the radiotherapy and of 5,8% eight weeks post irradiationem, the authors suppose a compensating secretion by the remaining islet cells which is sufficient under normal conditions. Signs of a tissue degeneration near the vessels are clearer in the exocrine pancreas than in the islet tissue. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 RKD [de

  1. Effect of chronic fractionated low-dose gamma irradiation on division potential of human embryonic cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masami; Suzuki, Masao; Suzuki, Keiji; Watanabe, Kimiko (Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Nakano, Kazushiro

    1991-12-01

    We investigated the in vitro phenotypic transformation of human embryo (HE) cells that were repeatedly irradiated (7.5 cGy once a week) throughout their life-span. Irradiation was repeated until the cells had accumulated 195 cGy (equivalent to the 26th passage). Samples of cells were assayed for survival by colony formation, as well as for mutation at the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus and for transformation by focus formation. The life-span (mean number of population doublings) of multiply irradiated cells with a total dose of 97.5 cGy was slightly but significantly prolonged over that of controls. After HE cells had accumulated 195 cGy, the maximum number of divisions increased to 130-160% of the number in non-irradiated control cells. Transformed foci were not observed until cells had accumulated 97.5 cGy, and then increased with the increasing accumulation of radiation. However, no cells showed immortality or expressed a malignant phenotype in vitro. (author).

  2. Coordination polymers: trapping of radionuclides and chemistry of tetravalent actinides (Th, U) carboxylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falaise, Clement

    2014-01-01

    The use of nuclear energy obviously raises the question of the presence of radionuclides in the environment. Currently, their mitigation is a major issue associated with nuclear chemistry. This thesis focuses on both the trapping of radionuclides by porous solids called Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOF) and the crystal chemistry of the carboxylate of tetravalent actinides (AnIV). The academic knowledge of the reactivity of carboxylate of AnIV could help the understanding of actinides speciation in environment. We focused on the sequestration of iodine by aluminum based MOF. The functionalization (electron-donor group) of the MOF drastically enhances the iodine capture capacity. The removal of light actinides (Th and U) from aqueous solution was also investigated as well as the stability of (Al)-MOF under γ radiation. More than twenty coordination polymers based on tetravalent actinides have been synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The use of controlled hydrolysis promotes the formation of coordination polymers exhibiting polynuclear cluster ([U 4 ], [Th 6 ], [U 6 ] and [U 38 ]). In order to understand the formation of the largest cluster, the ex-situ study of the solvo-thermal synthesis of compound {U 38 } has also been investigated. (author)

  3. SU-F-T-516: Effects of Inter-Fraction Organ Displacement/deformation On the Delivered Doses to the Heart, Esophagus, and Lungs in Patients Receiving Thoracic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammers, J; Matney, J; Kaidar-Person, O; Zagar, T; Marks, L; Das, S; Mavroidis, P [University North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively assess the effects of inter-fraction changes in organ shape and location on the delivered dose distribution to the organs at risk (OAR) in lung cancer patients. Methods: This study analyzes treatment data of 10 patients, who were treated to 60Gy in 30 fractions. In each fraction a cone beam CT (CBCT) was acquired. Each CBCT was registered with the planning CT using deformable registration tools within MIM Software. The daily setup shifts were used to translate the planned dose distribution on the deformed planning CT. The structures of lungs, esophagus and heart were re-delineated by a physician on each CBCT. The doses delivered to each OAR, reflecting changes in the position and shape variations, were recomputed. Resultant daily dose volume histograms (DVHs) for OARs were computed and compared to those from the planning CT. Results: Based on the findings of two patients and 24 CBCTs analyzed so far, higher doses are delivered to the lungs and esophagus compared to the treatment plan. The dose differences per fraction between the delivered doses and those in the treatment plan are: for patient 1, lung mean dose = 5.3±1.3cGy and esophagus mean dose = 3.4±3.5cGy. For patient 2, lung mean dose = 12.0±3.9cGy and esophagus mean dose = 34.2±7.5cGy. Regarding the maximum dose to heart, the results varied (−18.9±22.0cGy for patient1 and 53.0±62.2cGy for patient2). Conclusion: The dosimetric effects of inter-fractional anatomical variations could be estimated using deformable image registration and manual organ segmentation for each CBCT. A considerable dose distribution variation between fractions was observed for the OARs. These changes are currently not taken into account while treating the patients and these may explain cases with severe side effects even when the treatment plan looks satisfactory. These results suggest the need for automated daily dose tracking and accumulation.

  4. Ionizing radiation and autoimmunity: Induction of autoimmune disease in mice by high dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and its prevention by inoculating normal T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, N.; Sakaguchi, S.; Miyai, K.

    1992-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can functionally alter the immune system and break self-tolerance. High dose (42.5 Gy), fractionated (2.5 Gy 17 times) total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on mice caused various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as gastritis, thyroiditis, and orchitis, depending on the radiation dosages, the extent of lymphoid irradiation, and the genetic background of the mouse strains. Radiation-induced tissue damage is not the primary cause of the autoimmune disease because irradiation of the target organs alone failed to elicit the autoimmunity and shielding of the organs from irradiation was unable to prevent it. In contrast, irradiation of both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid organs/tissues was required for efficient induction of autoimmune disease by TLI. TLI eliminated the majority of mature thymocytes and the peripheral T cells for 1 mo, and inoculation of spleen cell, thymocyte, or bone marrow cell suspensions (prepared from syngeneic nonirradiated mice) within 2 wk after TLI effectively prevented the autoimmune development. Depletion of T cells from the inocula abrogated the preventive activity. CD4 + T cells mediated the autoimmune prevention but CD8 + T cells did not. CD4 + T cells also appeared to mediate the TLI-induced autoimmune disease because CD4 + T cells from disease-bearing TLI mice adoptively transferred the autoimmune disease to syngeneic naive mice. Taken together, these results indicate that high dose, fractionated ionizing radiation on the lymphoid organs/tissues can cause autoimmune disease by affecting the T cell immune system, rather than the target self-Ags, presumably by altering T cell-dependent control of self-reactive T cells. 62 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Single-Fraction High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Hypofractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer - Long Term Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cury, Fabio L., E-mail: fabio.cury@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Duclos, Marie [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Aprikian, Armen [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Patrocinio, Horacio [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Kassouf, Wassim [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Shenouda, George; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc; Souhami, Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We present the long-term results of a cohort of patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PC) treated with single-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (HypoRT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated exclusively with HDRB and HypoRT. HDRB delivered a dose of 10 Gy to the prostate surface and HypoRT consisted of 50 Gy delivered in 20 daily fractions. The first 121 consecutive patients with a minimum of 2 years posttreatment follow-up were assessed for toxicity and disease control. Results: The median follow-up was 65.2 months. No acute Grade III or higher toxicity was seen. Late Grade II gastrointestinal toxicity was seen in 9 patients (7.4%) and Grade III in 2 (1.6%). Late Grade III genitourinary toxicity was seen in 2 patients (1.6%). After a 24-month follow-up, a rebiopsy was offered to the first 58 consecutively treated patients, and 44 patients agreed with the procedure. Negative biopsies were found in 40 patients (91%). The 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival rate was 90.7% (95% CI, 84.5-96.9%), with 13 patients presenting biochemical failure. Among them, 9 were diagnosed with distant metastasis. Prostate cancer-specific and overall survival rates at 5 years were 100% and 98.8% (95% CI, 96.4-100%), respectively. Conclusion: The combination of HDRB and HypoRT is well tolerated, with acceptable toxicity rates. Furthermore, results from rebiopsies revealed an encouraging rate of local control. These results confirm that the use of conformal RT techniques, adapted to specific biological tumor characteristics, have the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio in intermediate-risk PC patients.

  6. Reproductive death and population kinetics in survival fractions of in vitro hamster cells during 48 hours after X-irradiation with doses up to 800 Rds. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, G.

    1976-01-01

    By means of a quantitative analysis, the time dependency of the number of dead cells and the resulting statement of cell numbers are compared with colony survival curves and with the distribution of colony sizes. The obtained periodical variation of reproductively killed cells is analyzed through population kinetics and is reduced to the number of those among the irradiated cells which show radiation-induced lethal reproductive damage. Therefrom, together with both sorts of interphase-dead cells, the dose dependency of the three lethal fractions results, taking into consideration the quantitative cellular statement. The formation of maxima of reproductively killed cells at the intervals of generation time until F 3 -generation is explained by an autosynchronization of partly lethally injured cell populations. From colony size distributions a linear dose dependency of the mean colony size group can be derived; this is discussed in connection with DNA double strand breaks regarded as a possible cause of reproductive lethal damages. The data obtained concerning the development of a cell population with radiation damages are evaluated by the construction of phylogenetic schedules for every 300 rd and 500 rd. By this means, the underlying population kinetics is being revised quantitatively. (orig.) [de

  7. Identification of radiation response genes and proteins from mouse pulmonary tissues after high-dose per fraction irradiation of limited lung volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hee; Jeon, Seulgi; Kang, Ga-Young; Lee, Hae-June; Cho, Jaeho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2017-02-01

    The molecular effects of focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose per fraction irradiation (HDFR) such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have not been fully characterized. In this study, we used such an irradiation system and identified the genes and proteins after HDFR to mouse lung, similar to those associated with human therapy. High focal radiation (90 Gy) was applied to a 3-mm volume of the left lung of C57BL6 mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. As well as histological examination for lungs, a cDNA micro array using irradiated lung tissues and a protein array of sera were performed until 4 weeks after irradiation, and radiation-responsive genes and proteins were identified. For comparison, the long-term effects (12 months) of 20 Gy radiation wide-field dose to the left lung were also investigated. The genes ermap, epb4.2, cd200r3 (up regulation) and krt15, hoxc4, gdf2, cst9, cidec, and bnc1 (down-regulation) and the proteins of AIF, laminin, bNOS, HSP27, β-amyloid (upregulation), and calponin (downregulation) were identified as being responsive to 90 Gy HDFR. The gdf2, cst9, and cidec genes also responded to 20 Gy, suggesting that they are universal responsive genes in irradiated lungs. No universal proteins were identified in both 90 Gy and 20 Gy. Calponin, which was downregulated in protein antibody array analysis, showed a similar pattern in microarray data, suggesting a possible HDFR responsive serum biomarker that reflects gene alteration of irradiated lung tissue. These genes and proteins also responded to the lower doses of 20 Gy and 50 Gy HDFR. These results suggest that identified candidate genes and proteins are HDFR-specifically expressed in lung damage induced by HDFR relevant to SBRT in humans.

  8. Tetravalent thulium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiselev, Yu.M.; Goryachenkov, S.A.; Martynenko, L.I.; Spitsyn, V.I. (Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    It is shown by the DTA method that the CsTmCl/sub 6/ and Cs/sub 3/TmF/sub 6/ interaction with XeF/sub 2/ reagents ratio (1:6) proceeds exothermally respectively below 100 deg C and at 380 deg C. The results of IR-spectroscopic investigation and magnetic moment measurement have shown that in the first case in fluorination products there are about 50% of Tm(4) in the TmF/sub 7//sup 3 -/ form, in the second 20-30%. Lesser percent of Tm(4) in Tm(3) fluorocomplex fluorination products as compared with the Tm(3) chlorocomplex fluorination products is caused by kinetic reasons. Radiographically the Cs/sub 3/TmF/sub 6/ and Cs/sub 3/TmF/sub 7/ cubic structures similarity is shown which can be a reason of additional stabilization of the system containing Tm(4) for account of formation of solid solutions.

  9. SU-F-T-02: Estimation of Radiobiological Doses (BED and EQD2) of Single Fraction Electronic Brachytherapy That Equivalent to I-125 Eye Plaque: By Using Linear-Quadratic and Universal Survival Curve Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Y; Waldron, T; Pennington, E [University Of Iowa, College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To test the radiobiological impact of hypofractionated choroidal melanoma brachytherapy, we calculated single fraction equivalent doses (SFED) of the tumor that equivalent to 85 Gy of I125-BT for 20 patients. Corresponding organs-at-risks (OARs) doses were estimated. Methods: Twenty patients treated with I125-BT were retrospectively examined. The tumor SFED values were calculated from tumor BED using a conventional linear-quadratic (L-Q) model and an universal survival curve (USC). The opposite retina (α/β = 2.58), macula (2.58), optic disc (1.75), and lens (1.2) were examined. The % doses of OARs over tumor doses were assumed to be the same as for a single fraction delivery. The OAR SFED values were converted into BED and equivalent dose in 2 Gy fraction (EQD2) by using both L-Q and USC models, then compared to I125-BT. Results: The USC-based BED and EQD2 doses of the macula, optic disc, and the lens were on average 118 ± 46% (p < 0.0527), 126 ± 43% (p < 0.0354), and 112 ± 32% (p < 0.0265) higher than those of I125-BT, respectively. The BED and EQD2 doses of the opposite retina were 52 ± 9% lower than I125-BT. The tumor SFED values were 25.2 ± 3.3 Gy and 29.1 ± 2.5 Gy when using USC and LQ models which can be delivered within 1 hour. All BED and EQD2 values using L-Q model were significantly larger when compared to the USC model (p < 0.0274) due to its large single fraction size (> 14 Gy). Conclusion: The estimated single fraction doses were feasible to be delivered within 1 hour using a high dose rate source such as electronic brachytherapy (eBT). However, the estimated OAR doses using eBT were 112 ∼ 118% higher than when using the I125-BT technique. Continued exploration of alternative dose rate or fractionation schedules should be followed.

  10. Identification of early-stage usual interstitial pneumonia from low-dose chest CT scans using fractional high-density lung distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yiting; Salvatore, Mary; Liu, Shuang; Jirapatnakul, Artit; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2017-03-01

    A fully-automated computer algorithm has been developed to identify early-stage Usual Interstitial Pneumonia (UIP) using features computed from low-dose CT scans. In each scan, the pre-segmented lung region is divided into N subsections (N = 1, 8, 27, 64) by separating the lung from anterior/posterior, left/right and superior/inferior in 3D space. Each subsection has approximately the same volume. In each subsection, a classic density measurement (fractional high-density volume h) is evaluated to characterize the disease severity in that subsection, resulting in a feature vector of length N for each lung. Features are then combined in two different ways: concatenation (2*N features) and taking the maximum in each of the two corresponding subsections in the two lungs (N features). The algorithm was evaluated on a dataset consisting of 51 UIP and 56 normal cases, a combined feature vector was computed for each case and an SVM classifier (RBF kernel) was used to classify them into UIP or normal using ten-fold cross validation. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) was used for evaluation. The highest AUC of 0.95 was achieved by using concatenated features and an N of 27. Using lung partition (N = 27, 64) with concatenated features had significantly better result over not using partitions (N = 1) (p-value < 0.05). Therefore this equal-volume partition fractional high-density volume method is useful in distinguishing early-stage UIP from normal cases.

  11. Chemistry of tetravalent actinides phosphates. The thorium phosphate-diphosphate as immobilisation matrix of actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dacheux, N.

    2002-01-01

    The author presents in this document its scientific works from 1992 to 2001, in order to obtain the enabling to manage scientific and chemical researches at the university Paris Sud Orsay. The first part gives an abstract of the thesis on the characterizations, lixiviation and synthesis of uranium and thorium based phosphate matrix in the framework of the search for a ceramic material usable in the radioactive waste storage. The second part presents briefly the researches realized at the CEA, devoted to a reliable, independent and accurate measure of some isotopes activity. The last part presents the abstracts of researches activities from 1996 to 2001 on the tetravalent actinides phosphates chemistry, the sintering of PDT and solid solutions of PDTU and the kinetic and thermodynamical studies of the PDT dissolution. Many references and some publication in full text are provided. (A.L.B.)

  12. Contribution to the physicochemical investigation of monovalent thallium and tetravalent uranium fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsini, M.S.

    1983-07-01

    Ionic transport properties are studied in monovalent elements and tetravalent uranium fluorides and oxyfluorides. Crystal structure of the oxyfluoride: TlUsub(2.75)OF 10 was determined by X-ray diffraction on a monocrystal. The particular role played by oxygen is evidenced in the stabilization of the crystal structure based on an original arrangement of Archimedes antiprisms: UOF 7 corresponding to a long distance order oxygen-fluorine in the anionic network. Electric conductivity measurements in AC by the complex impedance method or in DC by the Van der Pauw method allowed performance estimation of these materials which are solid electrolytes. Correlations between electrical properties and structure give information in basic diffusion mechanism in these materials [fr

  13. The in vivo characteristics of genetically engineered divalent and tetravalent single-chain antibody constructs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittel, Uwe A.; Jain, Maneesh; Goel, Apollina; Chauhan, Subhash C.; Colcher, David; Batra, Surinder K.

    2005-01-01

    Engineered multivalent single-chain Fv (scFv) constructs have been demonstrated to exhibit rapid blood clearance and better tumor penetration. To understand the short plasma half-life of multivalent single-chain antibody fragments, the pharmacokinetic properties of covalent dimeric scFv [sc(Fv) 2 ], noncovalent tetrameric scFv {[sc(Fv) 2 ] 2 } and IgG of MAb CC49 were examined. The scFvs displayed an ability to form higher molecular aggregates in vivo. A specific proteolytic cleavage of the linker sequence of the covalent dimeric or a deterioration of the noncovalent association of the dimeric scFv into tetravalent scFv constructs was not observed. In conclusion, sc(Fv) 2 and [sc(Fv) 2 ] 2 are stable in vivo and have significant potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications

  14. Use of Tetravalent Galabiose for Inhibition of Streptococcus Suis Serotype 2 Infection in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Krogfelt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is an important swine pathogen associated with a variety of infections such as meningitis, arthritis and septicemia. The bacterium is zoonotic and has been found to cause meningitis especially in humans occupationally exposed to infected pigs. Since adhesion is a prerequisite for colonization and subsequent infection, anti-adhesion treatment seems a natural alternative to traditional treatment with antibiotics. In order to optimize the inhibitory potency a multivalency approach was taken in the inhibitor design. A synthetic tetravalent galabiose compound was chosen which had previously shown promising anti-adhesion effects with S. suis in vitro. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effects of the compound using an infection peritonitis mouse model. As such S. suis serotype 2 infection and treatment were tested in vivo and the effects were compared to the effect of treatment with penicillin.

  15. Binuclear trivalent and tetravalent uranium halides and cyanides supported by cyclooctatetraene ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Cong-Zhi; Wu, Qun-Yan; Lan, Jian-Hui; Shi, Wei-Qun; Gibson, John K.

    2017-01-01

    Although the first organoactinide chloride Cp_3UCl (Cp = η"5-C_5H_5) was synthesized more than 50 years ago, binuclear uranium halides remain very rare in organoactinide chemistry. Herein, a series of binuclear trivalent and tetravalent uranium halides and cyanides with cyclooctatetraene ligands, (COT)_2U_2X_n (COT = η"8-C_8H_8; X=F, Cl, CN; n=2, 4), have been systematically studied using scalar-relativistic density functional theory (DFT). The structures with bridging halide or cyanide ligands were predicted to be the most stable complexes of (COT)_2U_2X_n, and all the complexes show weak antiferromagnetic interactions between the uranium centers. However, for each species, there is no significant uranium-uranium bonding interaction. The bonding between the metal and the ligands shows some degree of covalent character, especially between the metal and terminal halide or cyanide ligands. The U-5f and 6d orbitals are predominantly involved in the metal-ligand bonding. All the (COT)_2U_2X_n species were predicted to be more stable compared to the mononuclear half-sandwich complexes at room temperature in the gas phase such that (COT)_2U_2X_4 might be accessible through the known (COT)_2U complex. The tetravalent derivatives (COT)_2U_2X_4 are more energetically favorable than the trivalent (COT)_2U_2X_2 analogs, which may be attributed to the greater number of strong metal-ligand bonds in the former complexes.

  16. Binuclear trivalent and tetravalent uranium halides and cyanides supported by cyclooctatetraene ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cong-Zhi; Wu, Qun-Yan; Lan, Jian-Hui; Shi, Wei-Qun [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Chemistry and Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety; Chai, Zhi-Fang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Chemistry and Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety; Soochow Univ., Suzhou (China). School of Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X); Gibson, John K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Division

    2017-03-01

    Although the first organoactinide chloride Cp{sub 3}UCl (Cp = η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}) was synthesized more than 50 years ago, binuclear uranium halides remain very rare in organoactinide chemistry. Herein, a series of binuclear trivalent and tetravalent uranium halides and cyanides with cyclooctatetraene ligands, (COT){sub 2}U{sub 2}X{sub n} (COT = η{sup 8}-C{sub 8}H{sub 8}; X=F, Cl, CN; n=2, 4), have been systematically studied using scalar-relativistic density functional theory (DFT). The structures with bridging halide or cyanide ligands were predicted to be the most stable complexes of (COT){sub 2}U{sub 2}X{sub n}, and all the complexes show weak antiferromagnetic interactions between the uranium centers. However, for each species, there is no significant uranium-uranium bonding interaction. The bonding between the metal and the ligands shows some degree of covalent character, especially between the metal and terminal halide or cyanide ligands. The U-5f and 6d orbitals are predominantly involved in the metal-ligand bonding. All the (COT){sub 2}U{sub 2}X{sub n} species were predicted to be more stable compared to the mononuclear half-sandwich complexes at room temperature in the gas phase such that (COT){sub 2}U{sub 2}X{sub 4} might be accessible through the known (COT){sub 2}U complex. The tetravalent derivatives (COT){sub 2}U{sub 2}X{sub 4} are more energetically favorable than the trivalent (COT){sub 2}U{sub 2}X{sub 2} analogs, which may be attributed to the greater number of strong metal-ligand bonds in the former complexes.

  17. Multi-institutional phase I study of low-dose ultra-fractionated radiotherapy as a chemosensitizer for gemcitabine and erlotinib in patients with locally advanced or limited metastatic pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konski, Andre; Meyer, Joshua E.; Joiner, Michael; Hall, Michael J.; Philip, Philip; Shields, Anthony; McSpadden, Erin; Choi, Minsig; Adaire, Beth; Duncan, Gail; Meropol, Neal J.; Cescon, Terrence P.; Cohen, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Gemcitabine (G) has been shown to sensitize pancreatic cancer to radiotherapy but requires lower doses of G and thus delays aggressive systemic treatment, potentially leading to distant failure. We initiated a phase I trial combining ultra-fractionated low-dose radiotherapy with full dose G and erlotinib in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods: Patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer confined to the abdomen and an ECOG performance status (PS) of 0–1 who had received 0–1 prior regimens (without G or E) and no prior radiotherapy were eligible. Patients were treated in 21 day cycles with G IV days 1 and 8, E once PO QD, and twice daily RT fractions separated by at least 4 h on days 1, 2, 8, and 9. Whole abdominal RT fields were used. Primary endpoint was to define dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Results: 27 patients (median age 64 years and 15 male) were enrolled between 11/24/08 and 4/12/12. 1 patient withdrew consent prior to receiving any protocol therapy. 17 patients had a PS of 1. The majority of patients were stage IV. One DLT was noted out of 7 patients at dose level (DL) 1. Subsequently no DLTs were noted in 3 patients each enrolled at DL2-4 or 11 patients in the expansion cohort. The majority of grade 3 toxicities were hematologic with 1 grade 5 bowel perforation in dose level 1 in cycle 4. Best response in 24 evaluable patients: PR (8), stable (15), PD 1. Median survival for the entire group was 9.1 months. Conclusion: This phase I study combining low-dose ultra-fractionated RT as a sensitizer to full dose G plus E was well tolerated with encouraging efficacy. This represents a novel strategy worthy of further investigation in advanced pancreatic cancer patients

  18. Skull base chordomas: treatment outcome and prognostic factors in adult patients following conformal treatment with 3D planning and high dose fractionated combined proton and photon radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munzenrider, J E; Hug, E; McManus, P; Adams, J; Efird, J; Liebsch, N J

    1995-07-01

    Purpose: To report treatment outcome and prognostic factors for local recurrence-free survival and overall survival in adult patients with skull base chordomas treated with 3D planning and high dose fractionated combined proton and photon radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: From 1975 through 1993, 132 adult patients with skull base chordomas were treated with fractionated combined proton and photon radiation therapy. Seventy five patients (57%) were male and 57 (43%) female. Age ranged from 19 to 80 years (median 45.5 years). All pathology was verified at MGH by a single pathologist. Ninety six had non-chondroid (NCC) and 36 chondroid chordomas (CC), respectively. Median prescribed dose was 68.7 CGE (CGE, Cobalt Gray-equivalent: proton Gy X RBE 1.1 + photon Gy), ranging from 36 to 79.2 CGE; 95% received {>=} 66.6 CGE. Between 70 and 100% of the dose was given with the 160 MeV proton beam at the Harvard Cyclotron. 3D CT-based treatment planning has been employed in all patients treated since 1980. Median follow-up was 46 months (range 2-158 months). Results: Treatment outcome was evaluated in terms of local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) and disease specific survival (DSS), as well as treatment-related morbidity. Local failure (LF), defined as progressive neurological deficit with definite increase in tumor volume on CT or MRI scan, occurred in 39 patients (29.5%). LF was more common among women than among men:(26(57)) (46%) vs (13(75)) (17%), respectively. Thirty three of the 39 LF were seen in non-chondroid chordoma patients, with 6 occurring in patients with the chondroid variant (34% of NCC and 17% of CC), respectively. Distant metastasis was documented in 8 patients. LRFS was 81 {+-} 5.8%, 59 {+-} 8.3%, and 43 {+-} 10.4%, and DSS was 94 {+-} 3.6%, 80 {+-} 6.7%, and 50 {+-} 10.7% at 36, 60, and 96 months, respectively, for the total group. LRFS and DSS were not significantly different for patients with NCC than those with CC (p > .05). Gender was

  19. Fractionated or single-dose total body irradiation in 171 acute myeloblastic leukemias in first complete remission: is there a best choice?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resbeut, Michel; Cowen, Didier; Blaise, Didier; Gluckman, Eliane; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Rio, Bernard; Pene, Francoise; Milpied, Nicolas; Cuillere, Jean-Claude; Reiffers, Josy; Richaud, Pierre

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the importance of fractionating total body irradiation (TBI) in patients receiving an allogenic bone marrow transplant (BMT) for an acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1). Methods and Materials: Between 1983 and 1990, 171 consecutive patients received either single dose TBI (STBI) (n = 65) or fractionated TBI (FTBI) (n = 106) after being conditioned with cyclophosphamide and before receiving a non-T-depleted Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA)-identical marrow. Both groups were comparable except for date of BMT and diagnosis-to-BMT interval (D-BMT). Results: After 63 months median follow-up, transplant-related mortality (TRM), probability of relapse, and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) were 0.38 and 0.27 (p = 0.04), 0.29 and 0.26 (p = 0.22), 0.43 and 0.56 (p = 0.06), respectively, for STBI and FTBI. The supposed influence of the schedule of TBI disappeared in the multivariate analysis: TRM was enhanced by severe acute graft vs. host disease (p = 0.0002), early years of transplant (before January 1, 1987) (p = 0.0003), and longer D-BMT intervals (p = 0.038). Relapse was linked to early years of transplant (p < 0.00001), and the absence of chronic GVHD (p = 0.007). Longer DFSs were observed for later years of transplant (after January 1, 1987 and later) (p = 0.001), milder acute GVHD (p = 0.005), and shorter D-BMT intervals (p = 0.045). Important improvements of the results were made during the 7-year observation period: TRM, probability of relapse, and DFS were, respectively, 0.36, 0.28, and 0.46 for patients transplanted before January 1, 1987 vs. 0.21, 0.15, and 0.67 after that date. Conclusion: Our data strongly suggest that allogenic BMT is the best postremission treatment for AML in CR1, and the results are better when BMT shortly follows the achievement of remission. The schedule of TBI was of little importance compared with the improvements made in the management of patients undergoing BMT during the 1980s, and

  20. Estimation of dependence between mean of fractionation of photons and neutrons dose and intensity of post-irradiation reaction of mouse large intestine; Ocena zaleznosci pomiedzy sposobem frakcjonowania dawki fotonow i neutronow a nasileniem popromiennego odczynu jelita grubego myszy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasinska, A. [Oncology Center, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The aim of the work was verification of mouse large intestine tolerance on fractionated 250 kV X-rays and 2.3 MeV neutrons doses. Two cm of large intestine of mouse CBA/HT strain were irradiated with various fraction doses: from 0.25 to 35 Gy of X-rays and 0.05-12 Gy of neutrons. The measure of injury was handicap of intestine function. Early post-irradiation reaction was measured by loss of body weight (2-3 weeks after irradiation) and mouse mortality (till 2 months after irradiation, LD50/2). The late reaction was measured on the base of maximal body weight in 1 year period after irradiation, deformation of excrements (after 10 months) and death of animals (till 12. month after irradiation, LD50/12). Fractionation of X-ray dose influenced on decrease of intensification of late irradiation effects. After fractionation of neutrons this effect has not been observed. {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for X-rays was 19.9 Gy [15.2; 27.0] for body weight nadir, 13.4 Gy [9.3; 19.5] for early mortality (LD50/2), 6.4 Gy [3.6;11.0] for maximal body weight and 6.9 [4.2; 10.8] for late mortality (LD50/12). Analysis of influence of low doses of photons 90.25-4 Gy) and neutrons (0.05-0.8 Gy) showed trend to reduction {alpha}/{beta} for photons only (LD50/2=5.4 Gy; LD50/12=4.6 Gy). {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for neutrons was defined by LQ model only for maximal body weight and was 19.9 Gy [9.5; 61.0]. In application of graphic method {alpha}/{beta} for neutrons was 230 Gy for early and 48 Gy for late effects. Lower values of {alpha}/{beta} coefficient for late irradiation effects for photon radiation demonstrate the big influence of fractionation of photons dose on large intestine tolerance (decrease intensity in all biological effects). Author did not observe increase of intestine tolerance in fractionation of neutrons dose. Effect of irradiation damages repair in interfraction pauses, measured by percent of regenerated dose (F{sub r}) was much bigger for photons. For X-rays it was 50

  1. Early observed transient prostate-specific antigen elevations on a pilot study of external beam radiation therapy and fractionated MRI guided High Dose Rate brachytherapy boost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anurag K; Godette, Denise J; Stall, Bronwyn R; Coleman, C Norman; Camphausen, Kevin; Ménard, Cynthia; Guion, Peter; Susil, Robert C; Citrin, Deborah E; Ning, Holly; Miller, Robert W; Ullman, Karen; Smith, Sharon; Crouse, Nancy Sears

    2006-01-01

    To report early observation of transient PSA elevations on this pilot study of external beam radiation therapy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost. Eleven patients with intermediate-risk and high-risk localized prostate cancer received MRI guided HDR brachytherapy (10.5 Gy each fraction) before and after a course of external beam radiotherapy (46 Gy). Two patients continued on hormones during follow-up and were censored for this analysis. Four patients discontinued hormone therapy after RT. Five patients did not receive hormones. PSA bounce is defined as a rise in PSA values with a subsequent fall below the nadir value or to below 20% of the maximum PSA level. Six previously published definitions of biochemical failure to distinguish true failure from were tested: definition 1, rise >0.2 ng/mL; definition 2, rise >0.4 ng/mL; definition 3, rise >35% of previous value; definition 4, ASTRO defined guidelines, definition 5 nadir + 2 ng/ml, and definition 6, nadir + 3 ng/ml. Median follow-up was 24 months (range 18–36 mo). During follow-up, the incidence of transient PSA elevation was: 55% for definition 1, 44% for definition 2, 55% for definition 3, 33% for definition 4, 11% for definition 5, and 11% for definition 6. We observed a substantial incidence of transient elevations in PSA following combined external beam radiation and HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Such elevations seem to be self-limited and should not trigger initiation of salvage therapies. No definition of failure was completely predictive

  2. Efficacy of a tetravalent dengue vaccine in children in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Luis; Dayan, Gustavo Horacio; Arredondo-García, José Luis; Rivera, Doris Maribel; Cunha, Rivaldo; Deseda, Carmen; Reynales, Humberto; Costa, Maria Selma; Morales-Ramírez, Javier Osvaldo; Carrasquilla, Gabriel; Rey, Luis Carlos; Dietze, Reynaldo; Luz, Kleber; Rivas, Enrique; Miranda Montoya, Maria Consuelo; Cortés Supelano, Margarita; Zambrano, Betzana; Langevin, Edith; Boaz, Mark; Tornieporth, Nadia; Saville, Melanie; Noriega, Fernando

    2015-01-08

    In light of the increasing rate of dengue infections throughout the world despite vector-control measures, several dengue vaccine candidates are in development. In a phase 3 efficacy trial of a tetravalent dengue vaccine in five Latin American countries where dengue is endemic, we randomly assigned healthy children between the ages of 9 and 16 years in a 2:1 ratio to receive three injections of recombinant, live, attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) or placebo at months 0, 6, and 12 under blinded conditions. The children were then followed for 25 months. The primary outcome was vaccine efficacy against symptomatic, virologically confirmed dengue (VCD), regardless of disease severity or serotype, occurring more than 28 days after the third injection. A total of 20,869 healthy children received either vaccine or placebo. At baseline, 79.4% of an immunogenicity subgroup of 1944 children had seropositive status for one or more dengue serotypes. In the per-protocol population, there were 176 VCD cases (with 11,793 person-years at risk) in the vaccine group and 221 VCD cases (with 5809 person-years at risk) in the control group, for a vaccine efficacy of 60.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 52.0 to 68.0). In the intention-to-treat population (those who received at least one injection), vaccine efficacy was 64.7% (95% CI, 58.7 to 69.8). Serotype-specific vaccine efficacy was 50.3% for serotype 1, 42.3% for serotype 2, 74.0% for serotype 3, and 77.7% for serotype 4. Among the severe VCD cases, 1 of 12 was in the vaccine group, for an intention-to-treat vaccine efficacy of 95.5%. Vaccine efficacy against hospitalization for dengue was 80.3%. The safety profile for the CYD-TDV vaccine was similar to that for placebo, with no marked difference in rates of adverse events. The CYD-TDV dengue vaccine was efficacious against VCD and severe VCD and led to fewer hospitalizations for VCD in five Latin American countries where dengue is endemic. (Funded by Sanofi Pasteur

  3. Treating locally advanced lung cancer with a 1.5T MR-Linac - Effects of the magnetic field and irradiation geometry on conventionally fractionated and isotoxic dose-escalated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Hannah E; Menten, Martin J; Fast, Martin F; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe; McDonald, Fiona

    2017-11-01

    This study investigates the feasibility and potential benefits of radiotherapy with a 1.5T MR-Linac for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA NSCLC) patients. Ten patients with LA NSCLC were retrospectively re-planned six times: three treatment plans were created according to a protocol for conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and three treatment plans following guidelines for isotoxic target dose escalation. In each case, two plans were designed for the MR-Linac, either with standard (∼7mm) or reduced (∼3mm) planning target volume (PTV) margins, while one conventional linac plan was created with standard margins. Treatment plan quality was evaluated using dose-volume metrics or by quantifying dose escalation potential. All generated treatment plans fulfilled their respective planning constraints. For conventionally fractionated treatments, MR-Linac plans with standard margins had slightly increased skin dose when compared to conventional linac plans. Using reduced margins alleviated this issue and decreased exposure of several other organs-at-risk (OAR). Reduced margins also enabled increased isotoxic target dose escalation. It is feasible to generate treatment plans for LA NSCLC patients on a 1.5T MR-Linac. Margin reduction, facilitated by an envisioned MRI-guided workflow, enables increased OAR sparing and isotoxic target dose escalation for the respective treatment approaches. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The inverse-trans-influence in tetravalent lanthanide and actinide bis(carbene) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregson, Matthew; Lu, Erli; Mills, David P.; Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J. L.; Hennig, Christoph; Scheinost, Andreas C.; McMaster, Jonathan; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J.; Kerridge, Andrew; Liddle, Stephen T.

    2017-02-01

    Across the periodic table the trans-influence operates, whereby tightly bonded ligands selectively lengthen mutually trans metal-ligand bonds. Conversely, in high oxidation state actinide complexes the inverse-trans-influence operates, where normally cis strongly donating ligands instead reside trans and actually reinforce each other. However, because the inverse-trans-influence is restricted to high-valent actinyls and a few uranium(V/VI) complexes, it has had limited scope in an area with few unifying rules. Here we report tetravalent cerium, uranium and thorium bis(carbene) complexes with trans C=M=C cores where experimental and theoretical data suggest the presence of an inverse-trans-influence. Studies of hypothetical praseodymium(IV) and terbium(IV) analogues suggest the inverse-trans-influence may extend to these ions but it also diminishes significantly as the 4f orbitals are populated. This work suggests that the inverse-trans-influence may occur beyond high oxidation state 5f metals and hence could encompass mid-range oxidation state actinides and lanthanides. Thus, the inverse-trans-influence might be a more general f-block principle.

  5. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of manufacturing seeds for a tetravalent dengue vaccine (DENVax.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Y-H Huang

    Full Text Available We have developed a manufacturing strategy that can improve the safety and genetic stability of recombinant live-attenuated chimeric dengue vaccine (DENVax viruses. These viruses, containing the pre-membrane (prM and envelope (E genes of dengue serotypes 1-4 in the replicative background of the attenuated dengue-2 PDK-53 vaccine virus candidate, were manufactured under cGMP.After deriving vaccine viruses from RNA-transfected Vero cells, six plaque-purified viruses for each serotype were produced. The plaque-purified strains were then analyzed to select one stock for generation of the master seed. Full genetic and phenotypic characterizations of the master virus seeds were conducted to ensure these viruses retained the previously identified attenuating determinants and phenotypes of the vaccine viruses. We also assessed vector competence of the vaccine viruses in sympatric (Thai Aedes aegypti mosquito vectors.All four serotypes of master vaccine seeds retained the previously defined safety features, including all three major genetic loci of attenuation, small plaques, temperature sensitivity in mammalian cells, reduced replication in mosquito cell cultures, and reduced neurovirulence in new-born mice. In addition, the candidate vaccine viruses demonstrated greatly reduced infection and dissemination in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, and are not likely to be transmissible by these mosquitoes. This manufacturing strategy has successfully been used to produce the candidate tetravalent vaccine, which is currently being tested in human clinical trials in the United States, Central and South America, and Asia.

  6. Static electric dipole polarizabilities of tri- and tetravalent U, Np, and Pu ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Payal; Peterson, Kirk A; Clark, Aurora E

    2013-11-21

    High-quality static electric dipole polarizabilities have been determined for the ground states of the hard-sphere cations of U, Np, and Pu in the III and IV oxidation states. The polarizabilities have been calculated using the numerical finite field technique in a four-component relativistic framework. Methods including Fock-space coupled cluster (FSCC) and Kramers-restricted configuration interaction (KRCI) have been performed in order to account for electron correlation effects. Comparisons between polarizabilities calculated using Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF), FSCC, and KRCI methods have been made using both triple- and quadruple-ζ basis sets for U(4+). In addition to the ground state, this study also reports the polarizability data for the first two excited states of U(3+/4+), Np(3+/4+), and Pu(3+/4+) ions at different levels of theory. The values reported in this work are the most accurate to date calculations for the dipole polarizabilities of the hard-sphere tri- and tetravalent actinide ions and may serve as reference values, aiding in the calculation of various electronic and response properties (for example, intermolecular forces, optical properties, etc.) relevant to the nuclear fuel cycle and material science applications.

  7. Dose escalation by image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy leads to an increase in pain relief for spinal metastases: a comparison study with a regimen of 30 Gy in 10 fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinlan; Xiao, Jianghong; Peng, Xingchen; Duan, Baofeng; Li, Yan; Ai, Ping; Yao, Min; Chen, Nianyong

    2017-12-22

    Under the existing condition that the optimum radiotherapy regimen for spinal metastases is controversial, this study investigates the benefits of dose escalation by image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) with 60-66 Gy in 20-30 fractions for spinal metastases. In the dose-escalation group, each D50 of planning gross tumor volume (PGTV) was above 60 Gy and each Dmax of spinal cord planning organ at risk volume (PRV) was below 48 Gy. The median biological effective dose (BED) of Dmax of spinal cord was lower in the dose-escalation group compared with that in the 30-Gy group (69.70 Gy vs. 83.16 Gy, p pain responses were better in the dose-escalation group than those in the 30-Gy group ( p = 0.005 and p = 0.024), and the complete pain relief rates were respectively 73.69% and 34.29% ( p = 0.006), 73.69% and 41.38% ( p = 0.028) in two compared groups. In the dose-escalation group, there is a trend of a longer duration of pain relief, a longer overall survival and a lower incidence of acute radiation toxicities. No late radiation toxicities were observed in both groups. Dosimetric parameters and clinical outcomes, including pain response, duration of pain relief, radiation toxicities and overall survival, were compared among twenty-five metastatic spinal lesions irradiated with the dose-escalation regimen and among forty-four lesions treated with the 30-Gy regimen. Conventionally-fractionated IG-IMRT for spinal metastases could escalate dose to the vertebral lesions while sparing the spinal cord, achieving a better pain relief without increasing radiation complications.

  8. Lung cancer mortality between 1950 and 1987 after exposure to fractionated moderate-dose-rate ionizing radiation in the Canadian fluoroscopy cohort study and a comparison with lung cancer mortality in the atomic bomb survivors study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Current lung cancer risk estimates after exposure to low-linear energy transfer radiation such as X rays are based on studies of people exposed to such radiation at high dose rates, for example the atomic bomb survivors. Radiobiology and animal experiments suggest that risks from exposure at low to moderate dose rates, for example medical diagnostic procedures, may be overestimated by such risk models, but data for humans to examine this issue are limited. In this paper we report on lung cancer mortality between 1950 and 1987 in a cohort of 64,172 Canadian tuberculosis patients, of whom 39% were exposed to highly fractionated multiple chest fluoroscopies leading to a mean lung radiation dose of 1.02 Sv received at moderate dose rates. These data have been used to estimate the excess relative risk per sievert of lung cancer mortality, and this is compared directly to estimates derived from 75,991 atomic bomb survivors. Based on 1,178 lung cancer deaths in the fluoroscopy study, there was no evidence of any positive association between risk and dose, with the relative risk at 1 Sv being 1.00 (95% confidence interval 0.94, 1.07), which contrasts with that based on the atomic bomb survivors, 1.60 (1.27, 1.99). The difference in effect between the two studies almost certainly did not arise by chance (P = 0.0001). This study provides strong support from data for humans for a substantial fractionation/dose-rate effect for low-linear energy transfer radiation and lung cancer risk. This implies that lung cancer risk from exposures to such radiation at present-day dose rates is likely to be lower than would be predicted by current radiation risk models based on studies of high-dose-rate exposures. 25 refs., 8 tabs

  9. Immunogenicity and safety of tetravalent dengue vaccine in 2-11 year-olds previously vaccinated against yellow fever: randomized, controlled, phase II study in Piura, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanata, Claudio F; Andrade, Teresa; Gil, Ana I; Terrones, Cynthia; Valladolid, Omar; Zambrano, Betzana; Saville, Melanie; Crevat, Denis

    2012-09-07

    In a randomized, placebo-controlled, monocenter, observer blinded study conducted in an area where dengue is endemic, we assessed the safety and immunogenicity of a recombinant, live, attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine candidate (CYD-TDV) in 2-11 year-olds with varying levels of pre-existing yellow-fever immunity due to vaccination 1-7 years previously. 199 children received 3 injections of CYD-TDV (months 0, 6 and 12) and 99 received placebo (months 0 and 6) or pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (month 12). One month after the third dengue vaccination, serotype specific neutralizing antibody GMTs were in the range of 178-190 (1/dil) (versus 16.7-38.1 in the control group), a 10-20 fold-increase from baseline, and 94% of vaccines were seropositive to all four serotypes (versus 39% in the control group). There were no vaccine-related SAEs. The observed reactogenicity profile was consistent with phase I studies, with severity grade 1-2 injection site pain, headache, malaise and fever most frequently reported and no increase after subsequent vaccinations. Virologically confirmed dengue cases were seen after completion of the 3 doses: 1 in the CYD-TDV group (N=199), and 3 in the control group (N=99). A 3-dose regimen of CYD-TDV had a good safety profile in 2-11 year olds with a history of YF vaccination and elicited robust antibody responses that were balanced against the four serotypes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficacy of sacubitril/valsartan vs. enalapril at lower than target doses in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: the PARADIGM-HF trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardeny, Orly; Claggett, Brian; Packer, Milton; Zile, Michael R; Rouleau, Jean; Swedberg, Karl; Teerlink, John R; Desai, Akshay S; Lefkowitz, Martin; Shi, Victor; McMurray, John J V; Solomon, Scott D

    2016-10-01

    In this analysis, we utilized data from PARADIGM-HF to test the hypothesis that participants who exhibited any dose reduction during the trial would have similar benefits from lower doses of sacubitril/valsartan relative to lower doses of enalapril. In a post-hoc analysis from PARADIGM-HF, we characterized patients by whether they received the maximal dose (200 mg sacubitril/valsartan or 10 mg enalapril twice daily) throughout the trial or had any dose reduction to lower doses (100/50/0 mg sacubitril/valsartan or 5/2.5/0 mg enalapril twice daily). The treatment effect for the primary outcome was estimated, stratified by dose level using time-updated Cox regression models. In the two treatment arms, participants with a dose reduction (43% of those randomized to enalapril and 42% of those randomized to sacubitril/valsartan) had similar baseline characteristics and similar baseline predictors of the need for dose reduction. In a time-updated analysis, any dose reduction was associated with a higher subsequent risk of the primary event [hazard ratio (HR) 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.2-2.7]. However, the treatment benefit of sacubitril/valsartan over enalapril following a dose reduction was similar (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.70-0.93, P sacubitril/valsartan relative to those on lower doses of enalapril was similar to that of patients who remained on target doses of both drugs. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.

  11. Dynamic profiles of neutralizing antibody responses elicited in rhesus monkeys immunized with a combined tetravalent DTaP-Sabin IPV candidate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingbo; Ma, Yan; Xu, Yinhua; Yang, Huijuan; Shi, Li; Che, Yanchun; Liao, Guoyang; Jiang, Shude; Zhang, Shumin; Li, Qihan

    2014-02-19

    The World Health Organization has recommended that a Sabin inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) should gradually and synchronously replace oral polio vaccines for routine immunizations because its benefits in eliminating vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis have been reported in different phases of clinical trials. It is also considered important to explore new tetravalent diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis-Sabin IPV (DTaP-sIPV) candidate vaccines for possible use in developing countries. In this study, the immunogenicity of a combined tetravalent DTaP-sIPV candidate vaccine was investigated in primates by evaluating the neutralizing antibody responses it induced. The dynamic profiles of the antibody responses to each of the separate antigenic components and serotypes of Sabin IPV were determined and their corresponding geometric mean titers were similar to those generated by the tetravalent diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis-conventional IPV (DTaP-cIPV), the tetravalent diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (DTaP), and Sabin IPV vaccines in the control groups. This implies that protective immunogenic effects are conferred by this combined tetravalent formulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. SU-G-BRA-12: Development of An Intra-Fractional Motion Tracking and Dose Reconstruction System for Adaptive Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaeian, N Hassan; Chi, Y; Tian, Z; Jiang, S; Hannan, R; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A clinical trial on stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for high-risk prostate cancer is undergoing at our institution. In addition to escalating dose to the prostate, we have increased dose to intra-prostatic lesions. Intra-fractional prostate motion deteriorates well planned radiation dose, especially for the small intra-prostatic lesions. To solve this problem, we have developed a motion tracking and 4D dose-reconstruction system to facilitate adaptive re-planning. Methods: Patients in the clinical trial were treated with VMAT using four arcs and 10 FFF beam. KV triggered x-ray projections were taken every 3 sec during delivery to acquire 2D projections of 3D anatomy at the direction orthogonal to the therapeutic beam. Each patient had three implanted prostate markers. Our developed system first determined 2D projection locations of these markers and then 3D prostate translation and rotation via 2D/3D registration of the markers. Using delivery log files, our GPU-based Monte Carlo tool (goMC) reconstructed dose corresponding to each triggered image. The calculated 4D dose distributions were further aggregated to yield the delivered dose. Results: We first tested each module in our system. MC dose engine were commissioned to our treatment planning system with dose difference of <0.5%. For motion tracking, 1789 kV projections from 7 patients were acquired. The 2D marker location error was <1 mm. For 3D motion tracking, root mean square (RMS) errors along LR, AP, and CC directions were 0.26mm, 0.36mm, and 0.01mm respectively in simulation studies and 1.99mm, 1.37mm, and 0.22mm in phantom studies. We also tested the entire system workflow. Our system was able to reconstruct delivered dose. Conclusion: We have developed a functional intra-fractional motion tracking and 4D dose re-construction system to support our clinical trial on adaptive high-risk prostate cancer SBRT. Comprehensive evaluations have shown the capability and accuracy of our system.

  13. Immobilization of tetravalent actinides in three phosphate based ceramics: britholites, TPD and monazites/brabantites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra, O.; Audubert, F.; Dacheux, N.; Guy, C.; Podor, R.

    2004-01-01

    Three phosphate based ceramics were studied for the immobilization of tri- and tetravalent actinides: britholites Ca 9 Nd 1-x An x IV (PO 4 ) 5-x (SiO 4 ) 1+x F 2 , monazites/brabantites Ln 1-2x III Ca x An x IV PO 4 and Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (TPD) Th 4-x An x IV (PO 4 ) 4 P 2 O 7 . For each material, the incorporation of Th, U(IV), or Ce(IV) in the structure was examined. This work was the early beginning of the incorporation of 239 Pu and/or 238 Pu in order to evaluate the effects of α -decay on these three crystallographic structures. The syntheses were carried out using dry chemistry methods, involving mechanical grinding then heating treatment (1100 deg C ≤ θ ≤ 1400 deg C). For britholites, we showed that the incorporation of thorium was complete for weight loading lower than 20 wt.% through the (Nd 3+ , PO 4 3- ) ↔ (Th 4+ , SiO 4 4- ) coupled substitution, leading to the preparation of solid solutions. Due to redox problems, the incorporation of uranium was limited to 5 to 8 wt.% and always led to a two-phase mixture of U-britholite and CaU 2 O 5+y . For solid solutions based on TPD and for brabantites, the syntheses dealing with the incorporation of Th and/or U(IV) were improved by dry chemistry method using three mechanical grinding-calcination cycles. For both solids, homogeneous and single phase samples of the corresponding solid solutions were obtained. Finally, dense pellets of britholites, monazites/brabantites and TAn IV PD solid solutions were prepared in order to study their chemical durability during leaching tests. (authors)

  14. Investigation into formation of nanoparticles of tetravalent neptunium in slightly alkaline aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husar, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Considering the worldwide growing discharge of minor actinides and the current need for geological disposal facilities for radioactive waste, this work provides a contribution to the safety case concerning Np transport if it would be released from deep repository sites and moving from alkaline cement conditions (near-field) to more neutral environmental conditions (far-field). The reducing conditions in a nuclear waste repository render neptunium tetravalent, which is assumed to be immobile in aqueous environment due to the low solubility solution of Np(IV). For tetravalent actinide nuclides, the most significant transport should occur via colloidal particles. This work demonstrates the formation of intrinsic neptunium dioxide nanocrystals and amorphous Np(IV) silica colloids under environmentally relevant conditions. The dissociation of the initial soluble Np(IV) complex (i.e. [Np(IV)(CO 3 ) 5 ] 6- ) induces the intrinsic formation of nanocrystalline NpO 2 in the solution phase. The resulting irregularly shaped nanocrystals with an average size of 4 nm exhibit a face-centered cubic (fcc), fluorite-type structure (space group Fm anti 3m). The NCs tend to agglomerate under ambient conditions due to the weakly charged hydrodynamic surface at neutral pH (zetapotential ζ ∝0 mV). The formation of micron-sized agglomerates, composed of nanocrystals of 2-5 nm in size, and the subsequent precipitation cause immobilization of the major amount of Np(IV) in the Np carbonate system. Agglomeration of NpO 2 nanocrystals in dependence on time was indicated by PCS and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy with the changes of baseline characteristics and absorption maximum at 742 nm. Hitherto, unknown polynuclear species as intermediate species of NpO 2 nanocrystal formation were isolated from solution and observed by HR-TEM. These polynuclear Np species appear as dimers, trimers and hexanuclear compounds in analogy with those reported for other actinides. Intrinsic formation of NpO 2

  15. Dependence of early therapy results and complications on radiation dose values and their fractionation in pre-operative ''afterloading'' technique brachyradiotherapy applied to cervix uteri carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminska, G.; Kawczynska, M.

    1984-01-01

    The ''afterloading'' technique with use of Curietron (41 cases) or Selectron (43 cases) apparatus was applied in 83 cervix uteri carcinoma patients in phase 1b (79 cases) and 2a (4 cases). The Wertheim-Magis operation was performed after several weeks. Post-operative histologic investigation showed complete destruction of the tumour in 72% cases; persistent cancer cells in cervix uteri were stated in 11 patients (13%), while lymphatic node metastasis was seen in 14 patients (17%). Supplementary teleradiotherapy was performed in those cases. 39 patients (95%) of the 41 observed during 3 years survived without any cancer symptoms. No explicit relationship between dose administered to vaginal disc and cancer persistence frequency in the cervix uteri was stated. However, such relationship was stated for the dose in point A. In the group of 19 patients who received point A dose of the least 6000 rads, with average TDF value of 135, presence of cancer cells in cervix uteri was not stated in any of the cases. In 7 patients (17%) observed for over 3 years light and medium heavy postradiation complications were stated; in that 5 rectum side complications were stated in patients additionally irradiated from external fields, where the dose absorbed by rectum wall exceeded 8000 rads, with TDF - 150. No complications were observed when the dose was less than 5000 rads and TDF below 100. 16 refs., 1 fig. (author)

  16. Solid-state syntheses and single-crystal characterizations of three tetravalent thorium and uranium silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Geng Bang; Soderholm, L.

    2015-01-01

    Colorless crystals of ThSiO 4 (huttonite) (1) and (Ca 0.5 Na 0.5 ) 2 NaThSi 8 O 20 (2) have been synthesized by the solid-state reactions of ThO 2 , CaSiO 3 , and Na 2 WO 4 at 1073 K. Green crystals of (Ca 0.5 Na 0.5 ) 2 NaUSi 8 O 20 (3) have been synthesized by the solid-state reactions of UO 2 , CaSiO 3 , and Na 2 WO 4 at 1003 K. All three compounds have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 adopts a monazite-type three-dimensional condensed structure, which is built from edge- and corner-shared ThO 9 polyhedra and SiO 4 tetrahedra. Compounds 2 and 3 are isostructural and they crystallize in a steacyite-type structure. The structure consists of discrete pseudocubic [Si 8 O 20 ] 8− polyanions, which are connected by An 4+ cations into a three-dimensional framework. Each An atom coordinates to eight monodentate [Si 8 O 20 ] 8− moieties in a square antiprismatic geometry. Na + and Ca 2+ ions reside in the void within the framework. Raman spectra of 1, 2, and 3 were collected on single crystal samples. 1 displays more complex vibrational bands than thorite. Raman spectra of 2 and 3 are analogous with most of vibrational bands located at almost the same regions. - Graphical abstract: A Raman spectrum and crystal structures of (Ca 0.5 Na 0.5 ) 2 NaAnSi 8 O 20 (An=Th, U), which contain pseudocubic [Si 8 O 20 ] 8− polyanions and eight-coordinate An 4+ cations. - Highlights: • Single crystal growth of three tetravalent actinide silicates from melts. • Single-crystal structures and Raman spectra of (Ca 0.5 Na 0.5 ) 2 NaAnSi 8 O 20 (An=Th, U). • First report of Raman spectrum of huttonite on single crystal samples

  17. Solubility product of tetravalent neptunium hydrous oxide and its ionic strength dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, K.; Mori, T. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), 4-33, Muramatsu, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1194 (Japan); Kohara, Y. [Inspection and Development Company, 4-33, Muramatsu, Tokaimura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1112 (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Solubility products (K{sub sp}) are key parameters in the context of reliable assessment of actinides migration in the repository conditions of high level radioactive waste. Neptunium (Np(IV)) is one of the most important actinide elements in the assessment, because of its inventory and the long half-life. A few previous data for Np(IV) solubility are varied widely due to experimental difficulties related to the extremely low solubility. We carried out batch-type experiments under nitrogen atmosphere using a glovebox. Np(V) was reduced to Np(III) by bubbling 0.5 ppm H{sub 2} / N{sub 2} gas through the solution for 30 days in the presence of platinum black as catalyst. After reducing treatment, the Np(III) converted to Np(IV) by auto-oxidation within approximately three days. The solubilities of the Np(IV) were measured in the pHc ranging from 2 to 4, at room temperature (23 {+-} 2 deg. C), in ionic strength(I) = 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 M NaClO{sub 4}. The equilibrium condition was confirmed by over-saturation and under-saturation method. After the equilibrium, the pH{sub c} and the E{sub h} value of the suspension were measured. The suspension was then filtered using a filter with a NMWL of 3000 (less than 2 nm{phi}). The Np radio activity in the filtrate was determined by alpha spectrometry and absorption spectra of Np(IV). The solubility decreased with increasing pHc and the hydrolysis species are predominantly formed. From the obtained results, the solubility products (K{sub sp}) of Np hydroxide, for the reaction, NpO{sub 2} . xH{sub 2}O {r_reversible} Np{sup 4+} + 4OH{sup -} + (x-2)H{sub 2}O, at I = 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 were determined by using formation constants ({beta}{sub n}(I)), which were determined for the reaction, Np{sup 4+} + nOH{sup -} {r_reversible} Np(OH){sub n}{sup (4-n)+}. By using the specific interaction theory (SIT), the solubility product of tetravalent Np hydrous oxide is calculated to be log K{sub sp}{sup 0

  18. FRACTIONAL BANKING

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Klimikova

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the reasons of the present financial problems lies In understanding the substance of fractional reserve banking. The substance of fractional banking is in lending more money than the bankers have. Banking of partial reserves is an alternative form which links deposit banking and credit banking. Fractional banking is causing many unfavorable economic impacts in the worldwide system, specifically an inflation.

  19. Differential uptake and oxidative stress response in zebrafish fed a single dose of the principal copper and zinc enriched sub-cellular fractions of Gammarus pulex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Farhan R.; Bury, Nicolas R.; Hogstrand, Christer

    2010-01-01

    The sub-cellular compartmentalisation of trace metals and its effect on trophic transfer and toxicity in the aquatic food chain has been a subject of growing interest. In the present study, the crustacean Gammarus pulex was exposed to either 11 μg Cu l -1 , added solely as the enriched stable isotope 65 Cu, or 660 μg Zn l -1 , radiolabeled with 2MBq 65 Zn, for 16 days. Post-exposure the heat stable cytosol containing metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP) and a combined granular and exoskeletal (MRG + exo) fractions were isolated by differential centrifugation, incorporated into gelatin and fed to zebrafish as a single meal. Assimilation efficiency (AE) and intestinal lipid peroxidation, as malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured. There was a significant difference (p 65 Cu, although the results pointed towards greater bioavailability of the MTLP fraction compared to MRG + exo during the slow elimination phase (24-72 h) these results were not significant (p = 0.155). Neither zinc feed provoked a lipid peroxidation response in the intestinal tissue of zebrafish compared to control fish (gelatin fed), but both 65 Cu labeled feeds did. The greater effect was exerted by the MRG + exo (2.96 ± 0.29 nmol MDA mg protein -1 ) feed which three-fold greater than control (p -1 , p 109 Cd labeled G. pulex fractions were fed to zebrafish. Thus it appears that when a metal (Cu or Cd) has the potential to cause cytotoxicity via lipid peroxidation, a feed consisting of a largely unavailable fraction (MRG + exo) causes a greater intestinal stress response than the more bioavailable (MTLP) feed.

  20. High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-IC) in treatment of cervical carcinoma: 5-year results and implication of increased low-grade rectal complication on initiation of an HDR-IC fractionation scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chongjong; Wan Leung, Stephen; Chen Huichun; Sun Limin; Fang Fumin; Changchien Chanchao; Huang Engyen; Wu Jiaming; Chen Chuhnchih

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To report the treatment results and rectal/bladder complications of cervical carcinoma radically treated with high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-IC). The current policy of using three-fraction scheme was examined. Methods and Materials: Between November 1987 and August 1990, 173 patients with cervical carcinoma were treated with curative-intent radiation therapy. Whole pelvic irradiation was administered with 10-MV X ray. Dose to the central cervix was 40-44 Gy in 20-22 fractions, following by pelvic wall boost 6-14 Gy in three to seven fractions with central shielding. 60 Co sources were used for HDR-IC, and 7.2 Gy was given to Point A for three applications, 1-2 weeks apart. Duration of follow-up was 5-7.8 years. Results: Twenty-eight patients (16%) developed central-regional recurrences. Overall 5-year actuarial pelvic control rate was 83%. By stage, 5-year actuarial pelvic control rates were 94%, 87%, and 72% for Stages IB + IIA, IIB + IIIA, and IIIB + IVA, respectively. Thirty-one patients (18%) developed distant metastasis. Overall 5-year actuarial survival rate was 58%. By stage, 5-year actuarial survival rates were 79%, 59%, and 41% for Stages IB + IIA, IIB + IIIA, and IIIB + IVA, respectively. Sixty-six (38%) and 19 patients (11%) developed rectal and bladder complications, respectively. For rectal complication, the overall actuarial rate was 38% at 5 years. By grade, 5-year actuarial rectal complication rates were 24%, 15%, 4%, and 3% for Grades 1-4, respectively. Overall prevalence of rectal complications was 37% and 14% at 2 and 5 years, respectively. Prevalence of low-grade rectal complication (Grades 1 and 2) was dominant at 2 years (30%), but declined to 8% at 5 years. Prevalence of high-grade, severe rectal complication (Grades 3 and 4) remained steady at 2 and 5 years (7% and 6%, respectively). Five-year actuarial bladder complication was 9%. Five-year prevalence of bladder complication was 2%. Conclusion: Using a three-fraction

  1. Fractional thermoelasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Povstenko, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to fractional thermoelasticity, i.e. thermoelasticity based on the heat conduction equation with differential operators of fractional order. Readers will discover how time-fractional differential operators describe memory effects and space-fractional differential operators deal with the long-range interaction. Fractional calculus, generalized Fourier law, axisymmetric and central symmetric problems and many relevant equations are featured in the book. The latest developments in the field are included and the reader is brought up to date with current research.  The book contains a large number of figures, to show the characteristic features of temperature and stress distributions and to represent the whole spectrum of order of fractional operators.  This work presents a picture of the state-of-the-art of fractional thermoelasticity and is suitable for specialists in applied mathematics, physics, geophysics, elasticity, thermoelasticity and engineering sciences. Corresponding sections of ...

  2. Second Study of Hyper-Fractionated Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jacob

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Method. Hyper-fractionated radiotherapy for treatment of soft tissue sarcomas is designed to deliver a higher total dose of radiation without an increase in late normal tissue damage. In a previous study at the Royal Marsden Hospital, a total dose of 75 Gy using twice daily 1.25 Gy fractions resulted in a higher incidence of late damage than conventional radiotherapy using 2 Gy daily fractions treating to a total of 60 Gy. The current trial therefore used a lower dose per fraction of 1.2 Gy and lower total dose of 72 Gy, with 60 fractions given over a period of 6 weeks.

  3. Computed tomography-based treatment planning for high-dose-rate brachytherapy using the tandem and ring applicator: influence of applicator choice on organ dose and inter-fraction adaptive planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishruta A. Dumane

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Three dimensional planning for high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy in cervical cancer has been highly recommended by consensus guidelines such as the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS and the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie – European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO. In this document, we describe our experience with computed tomography (CT-based planning using the tandem/ring applicator. We discuss the influence of applicator geometry on doses to organs at risk (OARs, namely the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid. Through example cases with dose prescribed to point A, we demonstrate how adaptive planning can help achieve constraints to the OARs as per guidelines.

  4. Chemistry of tetravalent actinides phosphates. The thorium phosphate-diphosphate as immobilisation matrix of actinides; Chimie des phosphates d'actinides tetravalents. Le phosphate-diphosphate de thorium en tant que matrice d'imobilisation des actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacheux, N

    2002-07-01

    The author presents in this document its scientific works from 1992 to 2001, in order to obtain the enabling to manage scientific and chemical researches at the university Paris Sud Orsay. The first part gives an abstract of the thesis on the characterizations, lixiviation and synthesis of uranium and thorium based phosphate matrix in the framework of the search for a ceramic material usable in the radioactive waste storage. The second part presents briefly the researches realized at the CEA, devoted to a reliable, independent and accurate measure of some isotopes activity. The last part presents the abstracts of researches activities from 1996 to 2001 on the tetravalent actinides phosphates chemistry, the sintering of PDT and solid solutions of PDTU and the kinetic and thermodynamical studies of the PDT dissolution. Many references and some publication in full text are provided. (A.L.B.)

  5. Electrochemical investigation of tetravalent uranium β-diketones for active materials of all-uranium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Tomoo; Shiokawa, Yoshinobu; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2002-01-01

    For active materials of the all-uranium redox flow battery for the power storage, tetravalent uranium β-diketones were investigated. The electrode reactions of U(ba) 4 and U(btfa) 4 were examined in comparison with that of U(acac) 4 , where ba denotes benzoylacetone, btfa benzoyltrifluoroacetone and acac acetylacetone. The cyclic voltammograms of U(ba) 4 and U(btfa) 4 solutions indicate that there are two series of redox reactions corresponding to the complexes with different coordination numbers of four and three. The electrode kinetics of the U(IV)/U(III) redox reactions for btfa complexes is examined. The obtained result supports that the uranium β-diketone complexes examined in the present study will serve as excellent active materials for negative electrolyte in the redox flow battery. (author)

  6. On the effect of small radiation doses: Desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis and DNA repair of thymus, spleen, and bone marrow cells in the rat after fractionated total body X-ray irradiation. Zur Wirkung kleiner Strahlendosen: Desoxyribonukleinsaeure-(DNA-)Synthese und DNA-Reparatur von Thymus-, Milz- und Knochenmarkszellen der Ratte nach fraktionierter Ganzkoerperroentgenbestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tempel, K.; Ehling, G. (Muenchen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Pharmakologie, Toxikologie und Pharmazie)

    1989-09-01

    After three to seven days following to fractionated total body X-ray irradiation (TBI) (four expositions with doses of 0.3 to 5.0 cGy per fraction at intervals of 24 hours), a maximum 50 percent stimulation of the semiconservative DNA synthesis (SDS) of spleen cells was measured in vitro. This was not dependent of the fact if an acute high-dose (400 and/or 800 cGy) unique irradiation was applied after the fractionated TBI at the moment of stimulation. A significant increase of {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation into the DNA of bone marrow and thymus cells was only found when doses of 1.25 cGy per fraction had been used. After fractionated TBI with doses of {ge}5 cGy per fraction, an increase of DNA synthesis resistant to hydroxyurea ('unprogrammed' DNA synthesis, UDS) was demonstrated in spleen cells. The UV-simulated UDS decreased proportionately. The sedimentation of thymus, spleen, and bone marrow nucleoids in a neutral saccharose gradient gave no evidence of an increased DNA repair capacity after fractionated TBI. Whereas the SDS stimulation by fractionated TBI with small doses can be explained by a modified proliferation behavior of exposed cells, the UDS behavior of spleen cells after considerably higher radiation doses suggests regenerative processes correlated with an increased number of cells resistant to hydroxyurea and cells presenting an UV repair deficiency. These findings can be considered to be a further proof of the assumed immune-stimulating effect of small radiation doses. (orig.).

  7. Incorporation of tetravalent actinides in three phosphated matrices: britholite, monazite/brabandite and thorium phosphate diphosphate (β-TPD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra, O.

    2005-03-01

    Three phosphate based ceramics were studied for the immobilization of tri- and tetravalent actinides: britholite Ca 9 Nd 1-x An x IV (PO 4 ) 5-x (SiO 4 ) 1+x F 2 , monazite/brabantite solid solutions Ln 1-2x III Ca x An x IP O 4 and Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (β-TPD) Th 4- xAn x IV (PO 4 ) 4 P 2 O 7 . For each material, the incorporation of thorium and uranium (IV) was studied as a surrogate of plutonium. This work was the early beginning of the incorporation of 239 Pu and/or 238 Pu in order to evaluate the effects of α-decay on the three crystallographic structures. The incorporation of tetravalent cations was carried out by dry chemistry methods, using mechanical grinding to improve the reactivity of the initial mixture then the homogeneity of final solid prepared after calcination at high temperature (1200-1400 deg C). For britholites, the thorium incorporation was complete for weight loading up to 20 wt.%, leading to the preparation of homogeneous and single phase solid solutions when using the coupled substitution (Nd 3+ , PO 4 3- ) ↔ (Th 4+ , SiO 4 4- ). Due to redox problems, the incorporation of uranium was limited to 5 to 8 wt.% and always led to a two-phase mixture of U-britholite and CaU 2 O 5+y . The preparation of homogeneous solid solutions of β-TUPD and of brabantites containing thorium and uranium samples was successfully obtained using three steps of mechanical grinding/calcination. For each matrix, dense pellets were prepared prior to the study of their chemical behaviour during leaching tests. The chemical durability of brabantites and β-TUPD were found to be close to that reported in literature. The formation of neo-formed phases was also evidenced onto the surface of Th-britholite samples. (author)

  8. Phase I Randomized Study of a Tetravalent Dengue Purified Inactivated Vaccine in Healthy Adults from Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Clemente; Lin, Leyi; Martinez, Luis J; Eckels, Kenneth H; Campos, Maribel; Jarman, Richard G; De La Barrera, Rafael; Lepine, Edith; Toussaint, Jean-François; Febo, Irma; Innis, Bruce L; Thomas, Stephen J; Schmidt, Alexander C

    2018-05-01

    The safety and immunogenicity of four adjuvanted formulations of an investigational tetravalent dengue purified inactivated vaccine (DPIV) were evaluated in a predominantly dengue-primed population in Puerto Rico. In this placebo-controlled, randomized, observer-blind, phase I trial, 100 healthy adults were randomized 1:1:1:1:1 to receive DPIV at Day (D)0 and D28 (1 μg per dengue virus [DENV] type 1-4 adjuvanted with either alum, AS01 E or AS03 B , or 4 μg per DENV type adjuvanted with alum) or saline placebo. Functional antibody responses were assessed using a microneutralization assay at D56, Month (M)7, and M13. All DPIV formulations were well tolerated and no safety signals were identified through M13. The M13 according-to-protocol (ATP) immunogenicity cohort included 83 participants. The ATP analysis of immunogenicity was performed only on the 78 subjects seropositive for ≥ 1 DENV type at baseline: 69 tetravalent, three trivalent, two bivalent, and four monovalent. In all DPIV groups, geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) increased from D0 to D56 and waned modestly through M13, while remaining well above prevaccination levels. The 4 μg + alum and the AS01 E - and AS03 B -adjuvanted formulations were highly immunogenic, with M13-neutralizing antibody GMTs against all four DENV types above 1,000. M13/D0 GMT ratios were highest in the 1 μg + AS03 B group (ranging 3.2-3.7 depending on the DENV type). These results encourage continued clinical development of DPIV (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01702857).

  9. Fractional charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saminadayar, L.

    2001-01-01

    20 years ago fractional charges were imagined to explain values of conductivity in some materials. Recent experiments have proved the existence of charges whose value is the third of the electron charge. This article presents the experimental facts that have led theorists to predict the existence of fractional charges from the motion of quasi-particles in a linear chain of poly-acetylene to the quantum Hall effect. According to the latest theories, fractional charges are neither bosons nor fermions but anyons, they are submitted to an exclusive principle that is less stringent than that for fermions. (A.C.)

  10. Analysis of the dose-response relationships of chromosomal aberrations after irradiation and bleomycin exposure of different human lymphocyte fractions in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresp, J.

    1979-01-01

    Cytogenetic analyses could be carried out on whole blood and pure T-cell cultures and also on cells of the 'buffy-coat'. In pure B-cell cultures even after 96 hours no mitogenic stimulation could be achieved. Parameters of radiosensitivity and bleomycin sensitivity were dicentric chromosomes, for which the dose-response relationships were calculated. Chromosomal investigations on the 'buffy-coat' cells did not provide indications referring to a varying radiosensitivity compared to whole blood cultures. In pure T-cell cultures T-lymphocytes, which had been separated after whole blood irradiation exposure, showed lower aberration rates than lymphocytes, which had been cultured after whole blood irradiation without previous separation. In the case of bleomycin exposure the treatment of previously separated leucocytes and T-lymphocytes respectively, led to lower aberration rates than the treatment before separation. Therefore it is apparently not necessary for a cytogenetic dosimetry or mutagenicity to depart from the whole blood culture method. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Chemistry of tetravalent plutonium and zirconium. Hydrolysis, solubility, colloid formation and redox reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hye-Ryun

    2006-01-01

    The chemical properties of plutonium and zirconium are important in order to assess nuclear waste disposals with respect to isolation and immobilization of radionuclides. In this study, the hydrolysis, solubility and colloid formation of tetravalent plutonium and zirconium are investigated in 0.5 M HCl/NaCl solution using several complementary methods and the redox behavior of plutonium is investigated in acidic conditions as well. The solubilities of Pu(IV) and Zr(IV) are determined from the onset of colloid formation as a function of pH and metal concentration using LIBD (laser-induced breakdown detection). The investigation of the solubility of Zr(IV) is carried out at different concentrations (log [Zr] = -3 ∝ -7.6) and in a wide pH range (pH = 3 - 9) yielding log K sp (Zr(IV)) = -53.1 ± 0.5 based on the assumption that only mononuclear hydrolysis species exist in solution. Comparing the present results with literature data, the solubilities of Zr can be split in two groups, a crystalline phase with lower solubility and an amorphous phase (Zr(OH) 4 (am)) with higher solubility. The data obtained in the present work set an upper limit for the solubility of freshly formed Zr(OH) 4 (am). To understand this difference of solubilities, the geometrical structure of the dominant solution species is investigated as a function of pH using XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure). The samples at pH >2, still below the solubility limit determined by LIBD, contain the polynuclear Zr(IV) species probably due to the high concentration ([Zr] = 1 mM) and their structure do not resemble any reported simple ZrO 2 structure. The Zr(IV) colloid species in oversaturated solution under this experimental condition resembles amorphous Zr(IV) hydroxide rather than crystalline ZrO 2 . The solubility of Pu(IV) is investigated in acidic solution below pH 2. Considering only mononuclear hydrolysis species, log K sp (Pu(IV)) = -58.3 ± 0.4 is obtained. Since Pu(IV) is not redox stable even

  12. Fractional fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackiw, R.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1984-01-01

    The theory of fermion fractionization due to topologically generated fermion ground states is presented. Applications to one-dimensional conductors, to the MIT bag, and to the Hall effect are reviewed. (author)

  13. Immunogenicity and Safety of a Booster Injection of DTap-IPV//Hib (Pentaxim) Administered Concomitantly With Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine in Healthy Toddlers 15-18 Months of Age in Mexico: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Flor Irene Rodriguez; Morales, José Juan Renteria; De Los Santos, Abiel Homero Mascareñas; Rivas, Enrique; Vigne, Claire; Noriega, Fernando

    2017-06-01

    The live, attenuated, tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) is licensed in a number of dengue endemic countries for individuals ≥9 years of age. Before the integration of any vaccine into childhood vaccination schedules, a lack of immune interference and acceptable safety when coadministered with other recommended vaccines should be demonstrated. This randomized, multi-center phase III trial was conducted in Mexico. Healthy toddlers (n = 732) received a booster dose of a licensed pentavalent combination vaccine [diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis, inactivated polio vaccine and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTaP-IPV//Hib)] either concomitantly or sequentially, with the second dose of CYD-TDV administered as a 3-dose schedule. Antibody titers against diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid and pertussis antigens were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibodies against poliovirus and dengue serotypes were measured using a plaque reduction neutralization test. Noninferiority was demonstrated for each of the DTaP-IPV//Hib antigens if the lower limit of the 2-sided 95% confidence interval of the difference in seroconversion rates between the 2 groups (CYD-TDV and placebo) was ≥10%. Safety of both vaccines was assessed. Noninferiority in immune response was demonstrated for all DTaP-IPV//Hib antigens. After 3 doses of CYD-TDV, no difference was observed in the immune response for CYD-TDV between groups. There were no safety concerns during the study. Coadministration of the DTaP-IPV//Hib booster vaccine with CYD-TDV has no observed impact on the immunogenicity or safety profile of the DTaP-IPV//Hib booster vaccine. No difference was observed on the CYD-TDV profile when administered concomitantly or sequentially with the DTaP-IPV//Hib booster vaccine.

  14. Fractionated irradiation and haematopoiesis. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkov, V.; Karanovic, D.; Savovski, K.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of total single fractionated irradiation with short time interval on heamatopoietic regeneration of the bone marrow and spleen was investigated. Also, the importance of first dose, when dose of 600 R was divided in two unequal fractions with time interval of 300 s was studied. The investigation was performed on 25 day old rats. The dose of 600 R (X-rays) was divided on: 500 + 100, 400 + 200, 300 + 300, 200 + 400 or 100 + 500 R with time interval of 150, 300 or 600 s. Ten days after irradiation the changes in blood, bone marrow and spleen were observed. After unequal fractionated dose with interval of 600 s slight effect was found. The results after intervals of 600 s and 300 s were significant, when the total dose was divided in two equal doses. The first dose has no promoting role in haematopoietic regeneration when total dose was unequally fractionated. (orig.) [de

  15. Energy level schemes of f{sup N} electronic configurations for the di-, tri-, and tetravalent lanthanides and actinides in a free state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C.-G. [College of Sciences, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Brik, M.G., E-mail: mikhail.brik@ut.ee [College of Sciences, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14C, Tartu 50411 (Estonia); Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Armii Krajowej 13/15, PL-42200 Czestochowa (Poland); Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Liu, D.-X.; Feng, B.; Tian, Ya [College of Sciences, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China); Suchocki, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-02-15

    The energy level diagrams are theoretically constructed for the di-, tri-, tetravalent lanthanide and actinide ions, using the Hartree–Fock calculated parameters of the Coulomb and spin–orbit interactions within f{sup N} (N=1…13) electron configurations. These diagrams are analogous to Dieke's diagram, which was obtained experimentally. They can be used for an analysis of the optical spectra of all considered groups of ions in various environments. Systematic variation of some prominent energy levels (especially those ones with a potential for emission transitions) along the isoelectronic 4f/5f ions is considered. - Highlights: • Energy level schemes for di-, tri, tetravalent lanthanides/actinides are calculated. • Systematic variation of the characteristic energy levels across the series is considered. • Potentially interesting emission transitions are identified.

  16. Feasibility and early outcome of high-dose-rate Ir-192 brachytherapy as monotherapy in two fractions within 1 day for high-/very high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Shingo; Yamasaki, Ichiro; Tamura, Kenji; Shimamoto, Tsutomu; Inoue, Keiji; Kariya, Shinji; Kobayashi, Kana; Yamagami, Takuji; Shuin, Taro

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and preliminary outcomes of high-dose-rate (HDR)-brachytherapy as a monotherapy in two fractions within 1 day for localized prostate cancer, including high-/very high-risk cases. Among the 68 patients treated with HDR monotherapy between July 2011 and December 2014, 65 had a minimal follow-up of 12 months without adjuvant androgen deprivation therapy and were enrolled in the present study [42/65 (64.6%) exhibited high-/very high-risk diseases]. HDR monotherapy was performed in two fractions with a minimal interval of 6 h and the prescribed dose was 13.5 Gy (×2). Adverse events (AEs) were assessed using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4; http://ctep.cancer.gov/protocolDevelopment/electronic_applications/ctc.htm#ctc_40), and biochemical failure was assessed by the Phoenix definition. The median follow-up time was 30.1 months. The majority of patients had Grade 0-1 acute AEs. Four patients (6.2%) exhibited urinary retention, requiring a Foley catheter. Grade 3 acute AEs occurred at a frequency of 3.1% and hematuria at 1.5%. The majority of patients also exhibited Grade 0-1 chronic AEs. Grade 3 chronic AEs occurred at a frequency of 1.5% and urethral stricture at 1.5%, for which endoscopic treatment was indicated. Acute and chronic gastrointestinal AEs were uncommon, and no Grade 3 or above AEs developed. Biochemical failure occurred in 4 patients who all exhibited high-/very high-risk diseases. Kaplan-Meier estimated that 3 year biochemical failure-free survival was 91.6% overall and 88.0% in high-/very high-risk cases. The present two-fraction 1 day HDR monotherapy is feasible with minimal AEs and achieved acceptable biochemical control of localized prostate cancer, including high-/very high-risk cases, although long-term follow-up is required.

  17. SU-D-207A-07: The Effects of Inter-Cycle Respiratory Motion Variation On Dose Accumulation in Single Fraction MR-Guided SBRT Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stemkens, B; Glitzner, M; Kontaxis, C; Prins, F; Crijns, SPM; Kerkmeijer, L; Lagendijk, J; Berg, CAT van den; Tijssen, RHN [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Denis de Senneville, B [Imaging Division, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); IMB, UMR 5251 CNRS/University of Bordeaux (France)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the dose deposition in simulated single-fraction MR-Linac treatments of renal cell carcinoma, when inter-cycle respiratory motion variation is taken into account using online MRI. Methods: Three motion characterization methods, with increasing complexity, were compared to evaluate the effect of inter-cycle motion variation and drifts on the accumulated dose for an SBRT kidney MR-Linac treatment: 1) STATIC, in which static anatomy was assumed, 2) AVG-RESP, in which 4D-MRI phase-volumes were time-weighted, based on the respiratory phase and 3) PCA, in which 3D volumes were generated using a PCA-model, enabling the detection of inter-cycle variations and drifts. An experimental ITV-based kidney treatment was simulated in a 1.5T magnetic field on three volunteer datasets. For each volunteer a retrospectively sorted 4D-MRI (ten respiratory phases) and fast 2D cine-MR images (temporal resolution = 476ms) were acquired to simulate MR-imaging during radiation. For each method, the high spatio-temporal resolution 3D volumes were non-rigidly registered to obtain deformation vector fields (DVFs). Using the DVFs, pseudo-CTs (generated from the 4D-MRI) were deformed and the dose was accumulated for the entire treatment. The accuracies of all methods were independently determined using an additional, orthogonal 2D-MRI slice. Results: Motion was most accurately estimated using the PCA method, which correctly estimated drifts and inter-cycle variations (RMSE=3.2, 2.2, 1.1mm on average for STATIC, AVG-RESP and PCA, compared to the 2DMRI slice). Dose-volume parameters on the ITV showed moderate changes (D99=35.2, 32.5, 33.8Gy for STATIC, AVG-RESP and PCA). AVG-RESP showed distinct hot/cold spots outside the ITV margin, which were more distributed for the PCA scenario, since inter-cycle variations were not modeled by the AVG-RESP method. Conclusion: Dose differences were observed when inter-cycle variations were taken into account. The increased inter

  18. Clinical, serological and echocardiographic examination of healthy field dogs before and after vaccination with a commercial tetravalent leptospirosis vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiri, Andrea M; Rodriguez-Campos, Sabrina; Matos, José M; Glaus, Tony M; Riond, Barbara; Reusch, Claudia E; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Willi, Barbara

    2017-05-25

    Leptospirosis is a re-emerging bacterial zoonosis caused by spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Severe disease has been reported in dogs in Europe despite vaccination with bivalent Leptospira vaccines. Recently, a tetravalent canine Leptospira vaccine (Nobivac® L4) was licenced in Europe. The goal of this study was to investigate clinical signs, microscopic agglutination test (MAT) titres, haematology, blood biochemistry, cardiac (c) Troponin I levels and echocardiography before and after vaccination with this tetravalent vaccine. Forty-eight healthy dogs were prospectively enrolled and vaccinated twice, 3-4 weeks apart (T0 and T1). Before vaccination (T0) and 16-31 days after the second vaccination (T2), MAT (n = 48), haematology (n = 48), blood biochemistry (n = 36) and cTroponin I measurements (n = 29) were performed, and MAT was repeated 347-413 days after the second vaccination (T3, n = 44). Echocardiography was performed before the first and second vaccination (T0 and T1, n = 24). Mild and transient clinical signs within 5 days following the first and second vaccination occurred in 23% and 10% of the dogs, respectively. Before the first vaccination (T0), all dogs showed negative MAT titres for the tested serovars except for Canicola (50% with titres 100-400). At T2, positive MAT titres to the serovars Canicola (100%), Australis (89%), Grippotyphosa (86%), Bratislava (60%), Autumnalis (58%), Copenhageni (42%), Pomona (12%), Pyrogenes (8%) and Icterohaemorrhagiae (2%) were found. Median to high titres (≥ 400) were most common to the serovar Canicola (92%) and less common to the serovars Australis (41%), Grippotyphosa (21%), Bratislava (12%), Autumnalis (4%), Pyrogenes (4%) and Pomona (2%). At T3, positive MAT titres (titre range: 100-400) were found in 2-18% of the dogs to serovars of the vaccine serogroups and in 2-18% of the dogs to the non-vaccine serovars Pomona, Autumnalis, Pyrogenes and Ballum. Haematology, blood biochemistry, c

  19. Results of high intensity afterloading irradiation with 192 iridium in the therapy of genital tumors in women under different dose rates, fractionations and total doses in comparison with conventional radium contact irradiation. Ergebnisse der High-Intensity-Afterloadingbestrahlung mit 192 Iridium in der Therapie von Genitaltumoren der Frau unter verschiedenen Dosisleistungen, Fraktionierungen und Gesamtdosen im Vergleich mit konventioneller Radiumkontaktbestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giers, G

    1986-05-07

    In comparison to conventional radium therapy are to be evaluated the results of the high intensity afterloading technique with the help of the parameters survial rate and complication rate. Thereby were included in the examination 4 documentations of results (collum, cervix stump, corpus and vaginal carcinoma) with altogether 742 patients with 2806 single irradiations and an evaluation of the therapy after several modifications of the therapy schemes. The 5-year survival rate was in the case of collum carcinoma: 68.4%, cervix stump: 50%, corpus carcinoma: 76%, and vaginal carcinoma: 66.6%. The corresponding 3-year survival rates were: 74.2%, 80%, 84% and 70% with primary irradiation. Only with cervix stump carcinoma were the values for post-operative irradiation. The description of the irradiation results showed, that with the changing of the fractionation mode and the dose level in collum and corpus carcinoma the irreversible complications as an expression of the success of a new therapy were reduced. The for now best suited therapy schema (fractionation and dosing) are described. (TRV).

  20. Misonidazole in fractionated radiotherapy: are many small fractions best

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denekamp, J.; McNally, N.J.; Fowler, J.F.; Joiner, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    The largest sensitizing effect is always demonstrated with six fractions, each given with 2 g/m 2 of misonidazole. In the absence of reoxygenation a sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.7 is predicted, but this falls to 1.1-1.2 if extensive reoxygenation occurs. Less sensitization is observed with 30 fractions, each with 0.4 g/m 2 of drug. However, for clinical use, the important question is which treatment kills the maximum number of tumour cells. Many of the simulations predict a marked disadvantage of reducing the fraction number for X rays alone. The circumstances in which this disadvantage is offset by the large Sensitizer enhancement ratio values with a six-fraction schedule are few. The model calculations suggest that many small fractions, each with a low drug dose, are safest unless the clinician has some prior knowledge that a change in fraction number is not disadvantageous. (author)

  1. Mystery Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of trivalent and tetravalent actinides in solution at varying pH values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendebach, B.; Banik, N.L.; Marquardt, C.M.; Rothe, J.; Denecke, M.A.; Geckeis, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Nukleare Entsorgung

    2009-07-01

    We perform X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) investigations to monitor the stabilization of redox sensitive trivalent and tetravalent actinide ions in solution at acidic conditions in a pH range from 0 to 3 after treatment with holding reductants, hydroxylamine hydrochloride (NH{sub 2}OHHCl) and Rongalite (sodium hydroxymethanesulfinate, CH{sub 3}NaO{sub 3}S). X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) measurements clearly demonstrate the stability of the actinide species for several hours under the given experimental conditions. Hence, structural parameters can be accurately derived by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) investigations. The coordination structure of oxygen atoms belonging to water ligands surrounding the actinide ions does not change with increasing pH value (approximately 11 O atoms at 2.42 A in the case of U(IV) at pH 1, 9 0 atoms at 2.52 A for Np(III) at pH 1.5, and 10 O atoms at 2.49 A for Pu(III) up to pH 3), indicating that hydrolysis reactions are suppressed under the given chemical conditions. (orig.)

  3. The Immunogenicity and Safety of CYD-Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine (CYD-TDV) in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Raksheeth; Wahid, Mardiastuti H; Yausep, Oliver E; Angel, Sharon H; Lokeswara, Angga W

    2017-01-01

    to assess the immunogenicity and safety of CYD-tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) in children. comprehensive literature searches were conducted on various databases. Randomized-controlled trials on children with CYD-TDV as intervention were selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data extracted from selected trials included safety of vaccine and immunogenicity in terms of Geometric Mean Titres (GMT) of antibodies.   six clinical trials were selected based on preset criteria. GMT values were obtained using 50% Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test (PRNT) and safety was semi-quantitatively assessed based on adverse effects. Additional data processing was done to obtain a better understanding on the trends among the studies. The results showed that the groups vaccinated with CYD-TDV showed higher immunogenicity against dengue virus antigens than the control groups. Safety results were satisfactory in all trials, and most severe side effects were unrelated to the vaccine. CYD-TDV is both effective and safe for patients in endemic regions. This gives promise for further development and large-scale research on this vaccine to assess its efficacy in decreasing dengue prevalence, and its pervasive implementation in endemic countries, such as Indonesia.

  4. Study of lifetimes of fluorescence levels of tetravalent uranium in the incommensurate phase of thorium tetrabromide and tetrachloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milicic, A.

    1989-01-01

    The lifetimes of radiative levels of tetravalent uranium in the incommensurate phase of thorium tetrahalides have been measured as a function of different parameters: site symmetry, temperature and concentration. The incommensurate phase of thorium tetrabromide and tetrachloride is characterized by a continuous distribution of site symmetries induced by a continuous and weak displacement of the halides around the thorium (uranium) ions. At low temperature, 4.2 K, the lifetime variation as a function of excited classes of symmetry is governed by the radiative process probability as well as the energy transfer between uranium ions in different sites. At higher temperature, a model based on a Boltzmann equilibrium between closed energy levels is able to reproduce the experimental lifetime variation as a function of the temperature, for a given class of symmetry. For the variation of lifetime as a function of uranium ion concentrations, at high dilution and in the case of U 4+ : ThBr 4 , there is a competition between the energy transfer and thermal population of excited states [fr

  5. Clinical Study of New Tetravalent (Type A, B, E, and F) Botulinum Toxoid Vaccine Derived from M Toxin in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Yasushi; Sugimoto, Nakaba; Kohda, Tomoko; Kozaki, Shunji; Morokuma, Kazunori; Horikawa, Yoshikane; Ginnaga, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Takahashi, Motohide

    2017-07-24

    Botulinum toxin is the most poisonous substance known, and is believed to be a highly lethal as a biological weapon; researchers of the toxin are exposed to this hazard. Botulinum toxoid vaccines have been produced and used in Japan. However, since clinical studies involving these vaccines were conducted before establishment of the Ethical Guidelines for Clinical Research in Japan, their immunogenicity and safety were not systematically assessed. In this study, we produced a new tetravalent (type A, B, E, and F) botulinum toxoid vaccine, the first ever to be derived from M toxin, and conducted quality control tests with reference to the Minimum Requirements in Japan for adsorbed tetanus toxoid vaccine. Subsequently, a clinical study using the new vaccine in 48 healthy adult volunteers was conducted according to the guidelines in Japan. No clinically serious adverse event was noted. Neutralizing antibody titers for each type of toxin in the participants' sera, 1 month after the 4th injection were more than 0.25 IU/mL, indicating sufficient protection. This study demonstrated that the vaccine has marked immunogenicity and is safe for use in humans.

  6. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  7. Development of ProCaRS Clinical Nomograms for Biochemical Failure-free Survival Following Either Low-Dose Rate Brachytherapy or Conventionally Fractionated External Beam Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Andrew; Pickles, Tom; Crook, Juanita; Martin, Andre-Guy; Souhami, Luis; Catton, Charles; Lukka, Himu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although several clinical nomograms predictive of biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS) for localized prostate cancer exist in the medical literature, making valid comparisons can be challenging due to variable definitions of biochemical failure, the disparate distribution of prognostic factors, and received treatments in patient populations. The aim of this investigation was to develop and validate clinically-based nomograms for 5-year BFFS using the ASTRO II “Phoenix” definition for two patient cohorts receiving low-dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy or conventionally fractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) from a large Canadian multi-institutional database. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected from the GUROC (Genitourinary Radiation Oncologists of Canada) Prostate Cancer Risk Stratification (ProCaRS) database if they received (1) LDR brachytherapy ≥ 144 Gy (n=4208) or (2) EBRT ≥ 70 Gy  (n=822). Multivariable Cox regression analysis for BFFS was performed separately for each cohort and used to generate clinical nomograms predictive of 5-year BFFS. Nomograms were validated using calibration plots of nomogram predicted probability versus observed probability via Kaplan-Meier estimates. Results: Patients receiving LDR brachytherapy had a mean age of 64 ± 7 years, a mean baseline PSA of 6.3 ± 3.0 ng/mL, 75% had a Gleason 6, and 15% had a Gleason 7, whereas patients receiving EBRT had a mean age of 70 ± 6 years, a mean baseline PSA of 11.6 ± 10.7 ng/mL, 30% had a Gleason 6, 55% had a Gleason 7, and 14% had a Gleason 8-10. Nomograms for 5-year BFFS included age, use and duration of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), baseline PSA, T stage, and Gleason score for LDR brachytherapy and an ADT (months), baseline PSA, Gleason score, and biological effective dose (Gy) for EBRT. Conclusions: Clinical nomograms examining 5-year BFFS were developed for patients receiving either LDR brachytherapy or conventionally fractionated EBRT and

  8. Low-dose fractionated percutaneous teletherapy in age-related macular degeneration with subfoveolar neovascularization - 3 year results; 3 Jahre Erfahrung mit der niedrig dosierten fraktionierten perkutanen Teletherapie bei subfoveolaeren Neovaskularisationen. Klinische Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schittkowski, M.; Schneider, H.; Guthoff, R. [Universitaetsaugenklinik Rostock (Germany); Grueschow, K.; Ziegler, P.G.; Fietkau, R. [Zentrum fuer Radiologie, Univ. Rostock (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    The effect of low dose fractionated percutaneous teletherapy to visual acuity and the changes in subfoveolar neovascular membranes in age-related macular degeneration were investigated. Patients and Method: 126 eyes of 118 patients (age 55-89 years; mean 74 ys.) were treated. Best distal and near visual acuity was assessed prior to (= initial visual acuity [IVA]) and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months after teletherapy. Fluorescein angiography was performed prior to and 6, 12, 24 and 36 months after radiation therapy. For analysis patients were divided into different groups by IVA and membrane size. Maximal duration of observation was 36 months. Teletherapy was done by a 9-MeV photon linear accelerator through a lateral port in half-beam technique with a single dose of 2 Gy up to a total dose of 20 Gy within 12 days. Results: No severe negative side effects have been observed. Eight patients reported of epiphora and four patients complained of transient sicca syndrome. Visual acuity decreased more than one line in the group IVA 0.05-0.2. The group IVA 0.3-0.5 remained unchanged for 1 year. We found a tendency for increased visual acuity in group IVA {>=} 0.6 for 18 months. After that time both groups showed decreased visual acuity, but all these patients reported of reduced metamorphopsia and increased color and contrast perception. Conclusions: There is an influence of low dose fractionated percutaneous teletherapy on visual acuity, subfoveal neovascular membranes and metamorphopsia. IVA and duration of anamnesis play an important role. There seems to be no persistent effect; possibly increased dosage will bring a benefit. (orig.) [German] Es wurde die Wirkung der Bestrahlung auf die Sehschaerfe bei altersabhaengiger Makuladegeneration mit chorioidalen Neovaskularisationen, die nach den MPS-Kriterien einer Laserkoagulation nicht zugaenglich sind, untersucht. Patienten und Methode: 126 Augen von 118 Patienten im Alter von 55-89 Jahren (Mittel 74) wurden behandelt. Ein

  9. The effect of fractionating 100 R hard X-ray doses on the hemogram and proteinogram of the rabbit; Action du fractionnement de 100 R de rayons X sur l'hemogramme et le proteinogramme du lapin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alix, D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    Eighty one rabbits 'Fauve de Bourgogne' received total exposure of 100 R X-rays, by fractional doses of 5 - 10 - 25 - 50 and 100 R per irradiation. Blood count and protein dosage were practised before, during and after the irradiation session. Seventeen controls were subjected to the same investigations with the same periodicity. Statistical analysis of experimental data permitted to infer from the exposures of X-rays, that irradiation induces drop in leucocytes count, resulting from a drop in mononuclear cells. On the other hand, it is more difficult to clear up its action on the protein profiles, because the observed changes were likewise observed on the controls, although at a lesser degree. Nevertheless, the authors think that it may be concluded to an increase of albumin concentration and to some instability of the gamma-globulins concentration. Then they discuss the possible mechanisms of X-rays effects: either perturbations of protean metabolism following loss of mitotic activity or histolysis. (author) [French] 81 lapins de race fauve de Bourgogne ont ete irradies in toto aux rayons X a la dose totale de 100 R aux fractionnements suivants: 5 - 10 - 25 - 50 et 100 R par seance. Des examens hematologiques et des dosages de proteines ont ete pratiques avant et apres irradiation et au cours de la periode d'irradiation; 17 temoins non irradies ont ete soumis aux memes examens avec la meme frequence. L'irradiation provoque une chute des leucocytes totaux, due surtout a la chute des elements mononuclees. Par contre, on ne peut pas mettre en evidenre une action propre a l'irradiation sur la formule proteique car les variations rencontrees s'observent egalement dans le lot temoin non irradie. (auteur)

  10. Evaluation of the efficacy of palliative irradiation with high fractionated doses and planned intervals of patients with advanced cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx. Ocena skutecznosci paliatywnego napromieniania wysokimi dawkami frakcyjnymi z planowanymi przerwami chorych na zaawansowanego raka jamy ustnej i gardla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skolyszewski, J; Reinfuss, M [Instytut Onkologii, Cracow (Poland)

    1988-01-01

    200 patients, previously not treated, with advanced highly differentiated cancer of the oral cavity and pharynx have been palliatively irradiated in the Oncology Center in Cracow in the years 1976-1985. Megavoltage irradiation with fractionated doses 4-5 Gy up to the dose of 20 Gy to the tumor with 4-5 fractions during 4-7 days has been applied. 64 patients received 20 Gy as simple dose, in 65 cases such dose has been repeated after month. 71 patients have been irradiated for the third time with similar dose after another 1 month interval. Partial regression of 25-50% of the tumor volume has been obtained after the first series of irradiation in 19% of patients and more than 50% in 28% of patients, complete regression in 4% of patients. 15,5% of the total number of patients survived 1 year since the initiation of the irradiation, 5% without symptoms of the neoplasm. Worse prognosis is connected with major advancement of the tumor (T{sub 4}, N{sub 2}), poor general condition, cachexia and alcohol addition. Absence of improvement after the first series of irradiations indicates the non-effectiveness of the treatment. Palliative treatment by irradiation with high fractionated doses and planned interval is a safe and efficacious method. 1 fig., 6 tabs., 14 refs. (author).

  11. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  12. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  13. Immunogenicity and safety of a tetravalent E. coli O-antigen bioconjugate vaccine in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Dobbelsteen, Germie P J M; Faé, Kellen C; Serroyen, Jan; van den Nieuwenhof, Ingrid M; Braun, Martin; Haeuptle, Micha A; Sirena, Dominique; Schneider, Joerg; Alaimo, Cristina; Lipowsky, Gerd; Gambillara-Fonck, Veronica; Wacker, Michael; Poolman, Jan T

    2016-07-29

    Extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) are major human pathogens; however, no protective vaccine is currently available. We assessed in animal models the immunogenicity and safety of a 4-valent E. coli conjugate vaccine (ExPEC-4V, serotypes O1, O2, O6 and O25 conjugated to Exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (EPA)) produced using a novel in vivo bioconjugation method. Three doses of ExPEC-4V (with or without aluminum hydroxide) were administered to rabbits (2μg or 20μg per O-antigen, subcutaneously), mice (0.2μg or 2μg per O-antigen, subcutaneously) and rats (0.4μg or 4μg per O-antigen, intramuscularly). Antibody persistence and boostability were evaluated in rats using O6-EPA monovalent conjugate (0.4μg O-antigen/dose, intramuscularly). Toxicity was assessed in rats (16μg total polysaccharide, intramuscularly). Serum IgG and IgM antibodies were measured by ELISA. Robust antigen-specific IgG responses were observed in all animal models, with increased responses in rabbits when administered with adjuvant. O antigen-specific antibody responses persisted up to 168days post-priming. Booster immunization induced a rapid recall response. Toxicity of ExPEC-4V when administered to rats was considered to be at the no observed adverse effect level. ExPEC-4V conjugate vaccine showed good immunogenicity and tolerability in animal models supporting progression to clinical evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Spatiotemporal Fractionation Schemes for Irradiating Large Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkelbach, Jan, E-mail: junkelbach@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bussière, Marc R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chapman, Paul H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To optimally exploit fractionation effects in the context of radiosurgery treatments of large cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). In current practice, fractionated treatments divide the dose evenly into several fractions, which generally leads to low obliteration rates. In this work, we investigate the potential benefit of delivering distinct dose distributions in different fractions. Methods and Materials: Five patients with large cerebral AVMs were reviewed and replanned for intensity modulated arc therapy delivered with conventional photon beams. Treatment plans allowing for different dose distributions in all fractions were obtained by performing treatment plan optimization based on the cumulative biologically effective dose delivered at the end of treatment. Results: We show that distinct treatment plans can be designed for different fractions, such that high single-fraction doses are delivered to complementary parts of the AVM. All plans create a similar dose bath in the surrounding normal brain and thereby exploit the fractionation effect. This partial hypofractionation in the AVM along with fractionation in normal brain achieves a net improvement of the therapeutic ratio. We show that a biological dose reduction of approximately 10% in the healthy brain can be achieved compared with reference treatment schedules that deliver the same dose distribution in all fractions. Conclusions: Boosting complementary parts of the target volume in different fractions may provide a therapeutic advantage in fractionated radiosurgery treatments of large cerebral AVMs. The strategy allows for a mean dose reduction in normal brain that may be valuable for a patient population with an otherwise normal life expectancy.

  15. Neutralizing Antibody Response and Efficacy of Novel Recombinant Tetravalent Dengue DNA Vaccine Comprising Envelope Domain III in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Kulkarni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dengue is a global arboviral threat to humans; causing 390 million infections per year. The availability of safe and effective tetravalent dengue vaccine is a global requirement to prevent epidemics, morbidity, and mortality associated with it. Methods: Five experimental groups (6 mice per group each of 5-week-old BALB/c mice were immunized with vaccine and placebo (empty plasmid (100 µg, i.m. on days 0, 14 and 28. Among these, four groups (one group per serotype of each were subsequently challenged 3 weeks after the last boost with dengue virus (DENV serotypes 1-4 (100 LD50, 20 µl intracerebrally to determine vaccine efficacy. The fifth group of each was used as a control. The PBS immunized group was used as mock control. Serum samples were collected before and after subsequent immunizations. EDIII fusion protein expression was determined by Western blot. Total protein concentration was measured by Bradford assay. Neutralizing antibodies were assessed by TCID50-CPE inhibition assay. Statistical analysis was performed using Stata/IC 10.1 software for Windows. One-way repeated measures ANOVA and Mann-Whitney test were used for neutralizing antibody analysis and vaccine efficacy, respectively. Results: The recombinant EDIII fusion protein was expressed adequately in transfected 293T cells. Total protein concentration was almost 3 times more than the control. Vaccine candidate induced neutralizing antibodies against all four DENV serotypes with a notable increase after subsequent boosters. Vaccine efficacy was 83.3% (DENV-1, -3, -4 and 50% (DENV-2. Conclusion: Our results suggest that vaccine is immunogenic and protective; however, further studies are required to improve the immunogenicity particularly against DENV-2.

  16. Resource Use and Costs of Dengue: Analysis of Data from Phase III Efficacy Studies of a Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fezzazi, Hanna; Branchu, Marie; Carrasquilla, Gabriel; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Perroud, Ana Paula; Frago, Carina; Coudeville, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    A tetravalent dengue vaccine (CYD-TDV) has recently been approved in 12 countries in southeast Asia and Latin America for individuals aged 9-45 years or 9-60 years (age indication approvals vary by country) living in endemic areas. Data on utilization of medical and nonmedical resources as well as time lost from school and work were collected during the active phase of two phase III efficacy studies performed in 10 countries in the Asia-Pacific region and Latin America (NCT01373281; NCT01374516). We compared dengue-related resource utilization and costs among vaccinated and nonvaccinated participants. Country-specific unit costs were derived from available literature. There were 901 virologically confirmed dengue episodes among participants aged ≥ 9 years ( N = 25,826): corresponding to 373 episodes in the CYD-TDV group ( N = 17,230) and 528 episodes in the control group ( N = 8,596). Fewer episodes in the CYD-TDV group resulted in hospitalization than in the control group (7.0% versus 13.3%; P = 0.002), but both had a similar average length of stay of 4 days. Overall, a two-thirds reduction in resource consumption and missed school/work days was observed in the CYD-TDV group relative to the control group. The estimated direct and indirect cost (2014 I$) associated with dengue episodes per participant in the CYD-TDV group was 73% lower than in the control group (I$6.72 versus I$25.08); representing a saving of I$I8.36 (95% confidence interval [CI]:17.05-19.78) per participant with vaccination. This is the first study providing information on dengue costs among vaccinated individuals and direct confirmation that vaccination has the potential to reduce dengue illness costs.

  17. The Immunodominance Change and Protection of CD4+ T-Cell Responses Elicited by an Envelope Protein Domain III-Based Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Wei Chen

    Full Text Available Dengue is the leading cause of mosquito-borne viral infections and no vaccine is available now. Envelope protein domain III (ED3 is the major target for the binding of dengue virus neutralizing antibodies; however, the ED3-specifc T-cell response is less well understood. To investigate the T-cell responses to four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV-1 to 4, we immunized mice using either a tetravalent ED3-based DNA or protein vaccine, or combined both as a DNA prime-protein boost strategy (prime-boost. A significant serotype-dependent IFN-γ or IL-4 response was observed in mice immunized with either the DNA or protein vaccine. The IFN-γ response was dominant to DENV-1 to 3, whereas the IL-4 response was dominant to DENV-4. Although the similar IgG titers for the four serotypes were observed in mice immunized with the tetravalent vaccines, the neutralizing antibody titers varied and followed the order of 2 = 3>1>4. Interestingly, the lower IFN-γ response to DENV-4 is attributable to the immunodominance change between two CD4+ T-cell epitopes; one T-cell epitope located at E349-363 of DENV-1 to 3 was more immunogenic than the DENV-4 epitope E313-327. Despite DENV-4 specific IFN-γ responses were suppressed by immunodominance change, either DENV-4-specific IFN-γ or neutralizing antibody responses were still recalled after DENV-4 challenge and contributed to virus clearance. Immunization with the prime-boost elicited both IFN-γ and neutralizing antibody responses and provided better protection than either DNA or protein immunization. Our findings shed light on how ED3-based tetravalent dengue vaccines sharpen host CD4 T-cell responses and contribute to protection against dengue virus.

  18. Synergistic extraction of tetravalent actinides by mixtures of a β-diketone and a neutral donor : a review [Paper No. : IIIA-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.K.; Ramakrishna, V.V.

    1979-01-01

    Synergistic extraction of metal ions by mixtures of a β-diketone and a neutral donor has been studied extensively. Due to large synergistic enhancement of extraction both the formulas of the extractable species and the adduct formation constants with various neutral donors have been ascertained. Relatively few such studies have been devoted to the extraction of tetravalent actinides and these are reviewed critically in the present paper. In addition the work on synergistic extraction of tetravelent actinides by HTTA in admixture with several neutral donors carried out at Radiochemistry Division, BARC, is included. Attempts are made to explain the observed trends in the adduct formation constants. (author)

  19. Oxide perovskites with tetravalent dysprosium and compounds of the type Ba/sub 3/RE/sub 4/O/sub 9/ (RE = Rare Earth Element)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauer, G; Kristen, H [Freiburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.)

    1980-03-01

    In analogy to our investigations concerning tetravalent Nd in oxide perovskites, we also tried to stabilize dysprosium(IV) by incorporation in host-lattices with the perovskite structure. As host-lattices we used BaCeO/sub 3/, BaTbO/sub 3/, and SrTbO/sub 3/. Only in Ba(Ce, Dy)O/sub 3/ we could trace Dy(IV) with certainty. Among the prepared mixed oxides, also the phase Ba/sub 3/Dy/sub 4/O/sub 9/ occured. The lattice parameters of several phases of this latter type were redetermined.

  20. Contribution to the study of the behavior of tetravalent technetium at tracer amounts in aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guennec, J.Y.

    The behavior of /sup 99m/Tc was studied first in perchloric media. Reduction of TcO 4 - by BH 4 - at pH 7 in perchloric medium leads to Tc(IV) as a radiocolloid (20 percent) and soluble TcO 2 (50 percent). Acidification of the medium oxidizes the soluble Tc(IV) fraction. Acid solutions containing only the IV species and free of radiocolloids can be studied using back extraction. Tc(IV) is extracted by the organic phases, containing or not containing TTA or HDEHP from solutions of Tc(VII) reduced by BH 4 - at pH 7. These organic phases are then contacted with aqueous phases 5 x 10 -2 to 3 M HClO 4 , and the variation of the distribution coefficient was studied as a function of the chelating agent content and of the pH. In the absence of a chelating agent, the extracted species is TcO 2 . In the presence of chelating agents, the cation TcO(OH) + is extracted in the forms TcO(OH)A and TcO(OH)A 2 H respectively with TTA and HDEHP. Hydrolysis of this cation leads to TcO 2 . Study of the reduction of Tc(VII) in hydrochloric medium is complicated by the oxychlorinated forms of Tc(IV). The hexachlorotechnetate ion, TcCl 6 , exists in HCl 12 M down to 1 M and is very inert. Addition of chloride ions to solutions containing only TcO 2 and TcO(OH) + , when [Cl - ] is less than 1 M, leads to a neutral extractable species, which could be TcOCl 2 . When the Cl - concentration is greater than 1 M, there is formation of a species with one more chlorine atoms; this could be TcOCl 3 . The behavior of technetium during the formation of the complex ''Tc-Iron-Ascorbic Acid'' used in medical scintigraphy was also studied. Ascorbic acid alone or divalent iron alone slightly reduce the pertechnetate. Addition of Fe 2+ (or BH 4 - ) to Tc(VII) and ascorbic acid produces a high percentage of Tc(IV). So it is the ascorbate of iron which reduces the Tc(VII) and the excess ascorbic acid maintains the technetium in its reduced state by formation of a weak complex

  1. Maximizing Tumor Immunity With Fractionated Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaue, Doerthe, E-mail: dschaue@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ratikan, Josephine A.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; McBride, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Technologic advances have led to increased clinical use of higher-sized fractions of radiation dose and higher total doses. How these modify the pathways involved in tumor cell death, normal tissue response, and signaling to the immune system has been inadequately explored. Here we ask how radiation dose and fraction size affect antitumor immunity, the suppression thereof, and how this might relate to tumor control. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing B16-OVA murine melanoma were treated with up to 15 Gy radiation given in various-size fractions, and tumor growth followed. The tumor-specific immune response in the spleen was assessed by interferon-{gamma} enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay with ovalbumin (OVA) as the surrogate tumor antigen and the contribution of regulatory T cells (Tregs) determined by the proportion of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} T cells. Results: After single doses, tumor control increased with the size of radiation dose, as did the number of tumor-reactive T cells. This was offset at the highest dose by an increase in Treg representation. Fractionated treatment with medium-size radiation doses of 7.5 Gy/fraction gave the best tumor control and tumor immunity while maintaining low Treg numbers. Conclusions: Radiation can be an immune adjuvant, but the response varies with the size of dose per fraction. The ultimate challenge is to optimally integrate cancer immunotherapy into radiation therapy.

  2. Maximizing Tumor Immunity With Fractionated Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaue, Dörthe; Ratikan, Josephine A.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; McBride, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Technologic advances have led to increased clinical use of higher-sized fractions of radiation dose and higher total doses. How these modify the pathways involved in tumor cell death, normal tissue response, and signaling to the immune system has been inadequately explored. Here we ask how radiation dose and fraction size affect antitumor immunity, the suppression thereof, and how this might relate to tumor control. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing B16-OVA murine melanoma were treated with up to 15 Gy radiation given in various-size fractions, and tumor growth followed. The tumor-specific immune response in the spleen was assessed by interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay with ovalbumin (OVA) as the surrogate tumor antigen and the contribution of regulatory T cells (Tregs) determined by the proportion of CD4 + CD25 hi Foxp3 + T cells. Results: After single doses, tumor control increased with the size of radiation dose, as did the number of tumor-reactive T cells. This was offset at the highest dose by an increase in Treg representation. Fractionated treatment with medium-size radiation doses of 7.5 Gy/fraction gave the best tumor control and tumor immunity while maintaining low Treg numbers. Conclusions: Radiation can be an immune adjuvant, but the response varies with the size of dose per fraction. The ultimate challenge is to optimally integrate cancer immunotherapy into radiation therapy.

  3. Hidratación oral continua o a dosis fraccionadas en niños deshidratados por diarrea aguda Oral rehydration in continuous administration or in fractionated doses in dehydrated children with acute diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Mota-Hernández

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Evaluar la seguridad y efectividad de dos técnicas de hidratación oral. Material y métodos. Ensayo clínico aleatorio, hecho en el Servicio de Hidratación Oral del Hospital Infantil de México, Federico Gómez, entre septiembre de 1998 y junio de 1999. Cuarenta pacientes deshidratados por diarrea aguda, menores de cinco años, recibieron suero oral ad libitum (grupo AL y otros cuarenta lo recibieron en dosis fraccionada (grupo DF. Las características clínicas fueron similares en ambos grupos. Los resultados se presentan como promedio y desviación estándar o mediana, según la distribución de frecuencias simples y relativas. Resultados. El promedio de gasto fecal en el grupo AL fue 11.0±7.5 g/kg/h y en el grupo DF 7.1±7.4 (p=0.03. La ingesta de suero, el tiempo de hidratación y la diuresis promedio, fueron similares entre ambos grupos (p>0.05. Seis pacientes del grupo AL y cinco del DF tuvieron gasto fecal alto (>10 g/kg/hora, mejorando con la administración de atole de arroz. Un paciente del grupo AL y dos pacientes del DF tuvieron vómitos persistentes, mejorando con gastroclisis. Ningún paciente requirió rehidratación intravenosa. Conclusiones. Estos resultados sugieren que la administración de suero oral ad libitum, bajo supervisión, es tan segura y efectiva como la técnica de dosis fraccionada para el tratamiento de niños deshidratados por diarrea aguda.Objective. To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of two oral rehydration techniques. Material and Methods. A randomized clinical trial was conducted at the oral rehydration unit of Hospital Infantil de Mexico "Federico Gomez", between September 1998 and June 1999. Forty patients five-year old and younger children, dehydrated due to acute diarrhea, were given oral rehydration solution (ORS ad libitum (AL group; another forty patients received ORS in fractionated doses (FD group. Clinical characteristics were similar in both groups. Results are presented as

  4. What next in fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Trends in models for predicting the total dose required to produce tolerable normal-tissue injury can be seen by the progression from the ''cube root law'', through Strandqvist's slope of 0.22, to NSD, TDF and CRE which have separate time and fraction number exponents, to even better approximations now available. The dose-response formulae that can be used to define the effect of fraction size (and number) include (1) the linear quadratic (LQ) model (2) the two-component (TC) multi-target model and (3) repair-misrepair models. The LQ model offers considerable convenience, requires only two parameters to be determined, and emphasizes the difference between late and early normal-tissue dependence on dose per fraction first shown by exponents greater than the NSD slope of 0.24. Exponents of overall time, e.g. Tsup(0.11), yield the wrong shape of time curve, suggesting that most proliferating occurs early, although it really occurs after a delay depending on the turnover time of the tissue. Improved clinical results are being sought by hyperfractionation, accelerated fractionation, or continuous low dose rate irradiation as in interstitial implants. (U.K.)

  5. Test of equal effect per fraction and estimation of initial clonogen number in microcolony assays of survival after fractionated irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thames, H.D.; Withers, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    In the use of multifraction microcolony assays to infer the low-dose response of in situ renewal systems such as intestinal crypts, the assumption of equal effect per dose fraction is required. Moreover, the construction of a cell-survival curve requires knowledge of the initial count of cells capable of repopulating each renewal structure. We describe a method of designing fractionation protocols which provides a regression estimate of the initial number of clonogens per renewal structure and a test of the hypothesis of equal effect per fraction. The essential factor in the experimental design is the use of common dose fractions (use of the same dose per fraction in series with different numbers of fractions). Applications of the method to data for which the assumption of equal effect per fraction holds (four-hour fractionation interval murine testis study) and does not hold (one-hour fractionation interval murine jejunal crypt study) are presented. (author)

  6. Time-dose modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kian Ang, K.

    1987-01-01

    Changes in fractionation schedule can be made by various approaches. However, from the first principle, it is anticipated that strategies of hyperfractionation and/or accelerated fractionation offer the most promised in improving the therapeutic ratio. Hyperfractionation is defined as a treatment schedule in which a large number of significantly reduced dose fractions (--1.2 Gy/fraction) is used to give a greater total dose in a conventional overall time period. The results of the pilot studies testing the efficacy of hyperfractionation have been encouraging. The most valid clinical trial of pure hyperfractionation, however, is that conducted by the EORTC. This study compared 70 Gy in 35 fractions or 80.5 Gy in 70 fractions over 7 weeks in the treatment of patients with oropharyngeal carcinomas. The local tumor control was significantly improved in the hyperfractionated arm without increasing the morbidity. Accelerated fractionation is defined as a schedule in which the overall time of treatment is reduced without significant changes in the total dose and fraction size. The strategy has been used to treat patients with malignant gliomas, melanomas and Head and Neck cancers. The data in Head and Neck Cancers seem to be promising

  7. New Data on Joint Extraction of Nitric Acid, Uranium(VI) and Tetravalent Elements by Diluted TBP and New Approach to Modeling of their Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilberman, B.Ya.; Fedorov, Yu.S.; Puzikov, E.A.; Blazheva, I.V.

    2008-01-01

    HNO 3 and U(IV) extraction by diluted TBP (tributyl phosphate) appeared significantly higher than believed earlier, requiring correction of mathematical model for extraction of all the species. The proposed model of HNO 3 extraction includes its dissolving in the extracted water, as well as its abduction to UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 (TBP) 2 . Extraction of U(VI) and tetravalent elements is considered as reaction of their hydrated or partially hydrolyzed forms, the latter could be extracted themselves or as neutral forms with water liberation. The equation of element chemical reaction for modeling is determined by the slope of the linear part of the S-shaped curve representing D/S 2 function as a plot of HNO 3 concentration, where D is a distribution coefficient of the micro-component and S is a TBP concentration free of HNO 3 . The description of tetravalent element extraction in U(VI) presence needs the assumption of cation-cation interaction of element hydrolyzed forms with U(VI) in aqueous phase. Zr distribution is affected by micellar effects. (authors)

  8. Symmetry transition via tetravalent impurity and investigations on magnetic properties of Li0.5Fe2.5O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounsalye, Jitendra S.; Kharat, Prashant B.; Chavan, Apparao R.; Humbe, Ashok V.; Borade, R. M.; Jadhav, K. M.

    2018-04-01

    The present study, deals with the phase symmetry transformation of lithium ferrite after introducing tetravalent (Ti4+) impurity. The sol-gel auto combustion technique was adopted for the synthesis of nanoparticle samples with generic chemical formula Li0.5Fe2.5O4 and Li0.55Ti0.10Fe2.35O4. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique for structural analysis. The XRD patterns show the single phase cubic structure without any impurity phase but the P4332 to Fd-3m transformation was observed after introducing Ti4+ impurity. The Nano size of the synthesized particles was confirmed by crystallite size ( 20nm) calculated using Debye-Scherrer's formula. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) studies shows shifting of band frequencies which reflect the structural changes after tetravalent substitutional impurities. The magnetic properties were studied through pulse field hysteresis loop (M-H loop) technique at room temperature, the M-H loops showdecrease in magnetic properties afternonmagnetic Ti4+ ion substitution. This is attributed to transition of inverse spinel structure of lithium ferrite to random spinel structure.

  9. Fractional vector calculus for fractional advection dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Mortensen, Jeff; Wheatcraft, Stephen W.

    2006-07-01

    We